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Sample records for activator tpa remains

  1. Impacts of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) on neuronal survival

    PubMed Central

    Chevilley, Arnaud; Lesept, Flavie; Lenoir, Sophie; Ali, Carine; Parcq, Jérôme; Vivien, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) a serine protease is constituted of five functional domains through which it interacts with different substrates, binding proteins, and receptors. In the last years, great interest has been given to the clinical relevance of targeting tPA in different diseases of the central nervous system, in particular stroke. Among its reported functions in the central nervous system, tPA displays both neurotrophic and neurotoxic effects. How can the protease mediate such opposite functions remain unclear but several hypotheses have been proposed. These include an influence of the degree of maturity and/or the type of neurons, of the level of tPA, of its origin (endogenous or exogenous) or of its form (single chain tPA versus two chain tPA). In this review, we will provide a synthetic snapshot of our current knowledge regarding the natural history of tPA and discuss how it sustains its pleiotropic functions with focus on excitotoxic/ischemic neuronal death and neuronal survival. PMID:26528141

  2. Current perspectives on the use of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for treatment of acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Sherita N; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Johansen, Michelle C; McMurry, Timothy L; Johnston, Karen C; Southerland, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    In 1995, the NINDS (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) tPA (tissue plasminogen activator) Stroke Study Group published the results of a large multicenter clinical trial demonstrating efficacy of intravenous tPA by revealing a 30% relative risk reduction (absolute risk reduction 11%–15%) compared with placebo at 90 days in the likelihood of having minimal or no disability. Since approval in 1996, tPA remains the only drug treatment for acute ischemic stroke approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Over the years, an abundance of research and clinical data has supported the safe and efficacious use of intravenous tPA in all eligible patients. Despite such supporting data, it remains substantially underutilized. Challenges to the utilization of tPA include narrow eligibility and treatment windows, risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, perceived lack of efficacy in certain high-risk subgroups, and a limited pool of neurological and stroke expertise in the community. With recent US census data suggesting annual stroke incidence will more than double by 2050, better education and consensus among both the medical and lay public are necessary to optimize the use of tPA for all eligible stroke patients. Ongoing and future research should continue to improve upon the efficacy of tPA through more rapid stroke diagnosis and treatment, refinement of advanced neuroimaging and stroke biomarkers, and successful demonstration of alternative means of reperfusion. PMID:24591838

  3. Microglial tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) triggers neuronal apoptosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Flavin, M P; Zhao, G; Ho, L T

    2000-02-15

    Several CNS disorders feature microglial activation. Microglia are known to have both restorative and cytotoxic capabilities. Neuronal apoptosis has been noted after an acute insult such as ischemia. Microglia may participate in this event. We previously showed that conditioned medium (CM) harvested from peritoneal macrophages or from activated microglia triggered apoptosis in rat hippocampal neurons in culture. We wished to characterize the factor responsible for triggering neuronal death. Quiescent microglia produced CM that did not disrupt hippocampal neurons. Lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia produced CM which resulted in neuronal death. This effect was blocked by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, by tPA STOP, and by co-incubation with tPA antibody. Recombinant human tPA exaggerated the neurotoxic effects of microglial CM, while tPA alone was toxic only at very high concentrations. This in vitro system, which probably excludes any significant impact of microglial free radicals, suggests that microglial tPA may contribute significantly to hippocampal neuronal death.

  4. Involvement of tissue plasminogen activator "tPA" in ethanol-induced locomotor sensitization and conditioned-place preference.

    PubMed

    Bahi, Amine; Dreyer, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol is one of the most abused drugs in the western societies. It is well established that mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons mediate the rewarding properties of ethanol. In our previous studies we have shown that the serine protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is involved in the rewarding properties of morphine and amphetamine. In the current study, we investigated the role of tPA in ethanol-induced behavioral sensitization and conditioned-place preference (CPP). Ethanol treatment dose-dependently induced tPA enzymatic activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). In addition, ethanol-induced increase in tPA activity was completely inhibited by pre-treatment with the dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists SCH23390 and raclopride respectively. Furthermore, ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation, behavioral sensitization and conditioned-place preference were enhanced following tPA over-expression in the NAc using a lentiviral vector. In contrast, tPA knock down in the NAc with specific shRNA blocked the rewarding properties of ethanol. The defect of locomotor stimulation in shRNA-injected mice was reversed by microinjections of exogenous recombinant tPA into the nucleus accumbens. Collectively, these results indicate, for the first time, that activation of tPA is effective in enhancing the rewarding effects of ethanol. Targeting the tissue plasminogen activator system would provide new therapeutic approaches to the treatment of alcoholism.

  5. Reciprocal actions of NCAM and tPA via a Ras-dependent MAPK activation in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyeon; Seuk Kim, Jin; Mogg Kim, Jung; Lee, Sang-Hun; Lee, Yong-Sung

    2002-10-25

    In an attempt to identify the functions of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, we investigated the relationship between the two molecules by focusing on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), an essential enzyme in this process. NCAM clustering in cultured hippocampal neurons transiently induced MAPK within 10min. Moreover, soluble NCAM also induced a Ras-dependent MAPK activation. Conversely, MAPK activation led to an increase in the expressions of all three isoforms of NCAM. Treatment of neurons with tPA and plasminogen induced a Ras-dependent MAPK activation and tPA-plasmin degradation of NCAM was mediated in a MAPK-dependent manner. Soluble NCAM transiently inhibited tPA mRNA expression levels in a MAPK-dependent manner, while stimulation of MAPK alone induced tPA reduction in cells. These results collectively indicate that NCAM and tPA reciprocally act as important regulators in the modulation of synaptic plasticity via a Ras-MAPK-involved signaling pathway. In turn, MAPK activation may cause tPA degradation or a decrease in expression to promote synaptic plasticity.

  6. Specific interaction of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) with annexin II on the membrane of pancreatic cancer cells activates plasminogen and promotes invasion in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, V M; Hurtado, M; Thomson, T M; Reventós, J; Paciucci, R

    2004-01-01

    Background: Overexpression of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) in pancreatic cancer cells promotes invasion and proliferation in vitro and tumour growth and angiogenesis in vivo. Aims: To understand the mechanisms by which t-PA favours cancer progression, we analysed the surface membrane proteins responsible for binding specifically t-PA and studied the contribution of this interaction to the t-PA promoted invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. Methods: The ability of t-PA to activate plasmin and a fluorogenic plasmin substrate was used to analyse the nature of the binding of active t-PA to cell surfaces. Specific binding was determined in two pancreatic cancer cell lines (SK-PC-1 and PANC-1), and complex formation analysed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments and co-immunolocalisation in tumours. The functional role of the interaction was studied in Matrigel invasion assays. Results: t-PA bound to PANC-1 and SK-PC-1 cells in a specific and saturable manner while maintaining its activity. This binding was competitively inhibited by specific peptides interfering with the interaction of t-PA with annexin II. The t-PA/annexin II interaction on pancreatic cancer cells was also supported by co-immunoprecipitation assays using anti-t-PA antibodies and, reciprocally, with antiannexin II antibodies. In addition, confocal microscopy showed t-PA and annexin II colocalisation in tumour tissues. Finally, disruption of the t-PA/annexin II interaction by a specific hexapeptide significantly decreased the invasive capacity of SK-PC-1 cells in vitro. Conclusion: t-PA specifically binds to annexin II on the extracellular membrane of pancreatic cancer cells where it activates local plasmin production and tumour cell invasion. These findings may be clinically relevant for future therapeutic strategies based on specific drugs that counteract the activity of t-PA or its receptor annexin II, or their interaction at the surface level. PMID:15194650

  7. Conformations of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) orchestrate neuronal survival by a crosstalk between EGFR and NMDAR

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, T; Lesept, F; Chevilley, A; Lenoir, S; Aimable, M; Briens, A; Hommet, Y; Bardou, I; Parcq, J; Vivien, D

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a pleiotropic serine protease of the central nervous system (CNS) with reported neurotrophic and neurotoxic functions. Produced and released under its single chain form (sc), the sc-tPA can be cleaved by plasmin or kallikrein in a two chain form, tc-tPA. Although both sc-tPA and tc-tPA display a similar fibrinolytic activity, we postulated here that these two conformations of tPA (sc-tPA and tc-tPA) could differentially control the effects of tPA on neuronal survival. Using primary cultures of mouse cortical neurons, our present study reveals that sc-tPA is the only one capable to promote N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-induced calcium influx and subsequent excitotoxicity. In contrast, both sc-tPA and tc-tPA are capable to activate epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs), a mechanism mediating the antiapoptotic effects of tPA. Interestingly, we revealed a tPA dependent crosstalk between EGFR and NMDAR in which a tPA-dependent activation of EGFRs leads to downregulation of NMDAR signaling and to subsequent neurotrophic effects. PMID:26469972

  8. Human T cell activation. III. Induction of an early activation antigen, EA 1 by TPA, mitogens and antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, T.; Jung, L.K.L.; FU, S.M.

    1986-03-01

    With human T cells activated for 12 hours by 12-o-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as immunogen, an IgG/sub 2a/ monoclonal antibody, mAb Ea 1, has been generated to a 60KD phosphorylated protein with 32KD and 28KD subunits. The antigen, Ea 1, is readily detected on 60% of isolated thymocytes by indirect immunofluorescence. A low level of Ea 1 expression is detectable on 2-6% of blood lymphocytes. Isolated T cells have been induced to express Ea 1 by TPA, mitogens and anitgens. TPA activated T cells express Ea 1 as early as 1 hour after activation. By 4 hours, greater than 95% of the T cells stain with mAb Ea 1. About 50% of the PHA or Con A activated T cells express Ea 1 with a similar kinetics. Ea 1 expression proceeds that of IL-2 receptor in these activation processes. T cells activated by soluble antigens (tetanus toxoid and PPD) and alloantigens in MLR also express Ea 1 after a long incubation. About 20% of the T cells stain for Ea 1 at day 6. Ea 1 expression is not limited to activated T cells. B cells activated by TPA or anti-IgM Ab plus B cell growth factor express Ea 1. The kinetics of Ea 1 expression is slower and the staining is less intense. Repeated attempts to detect Ea 1 on resting and activated monocytes and granulocytes have not been successful. Ea 1 expression is due to de novo synthesis for its induction is blocked by cycloheximide and actinomycin D. Ea 1 is the earliest activation antigen detectable to-date.

  9. Dopamine D3 receptor deletion increases tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) activity in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Castorina, A; D'Amico, A G; Scuderi, S; Leggio, G M; Drago, F; D'Agata, V

    2013-10-10

    Considerable evidence indicates that dopamine (DA) influences tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-mediated proteolytic processing of the precursor of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (proBDNF) into mature BDNF (mBDNF). However, specific roles in this process for the dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) and the underlying molecular mechanisms are yet to be fully characterized. In the present study, we hypothesized that D3R deletion could influence tPA activity in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Using D3R knockout (D3(-/-)) mice, we show that receptor inactivation is associated with increased tPA expression/activity both in the prefrontal cortex and, to a greater extent, in the hippocampus. Augmented tPA expression in D3(-/-) mice correlated with increased BDNF mRNA levels, plasmin/plasminogen protein ratio and the conversion of proBDNF into mBDNF, as well as enhanced tPA and mBDNF immunoreactivity, as determined by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. In addition, when compared to wild-type controls, D3(-/-) mice exhibited increased basal activation of the canonical cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)-driven Akt/cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) signaling cascade, as determined by the increased Akt phosphorylation both at Thr304 and Ser473 residues, of DA and cAMP-regulated protein of 32kDa (DARPP-32) at Thr34 and a phosphorylation state-dependent inhibition of glycogen synthetase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) at Ser9, a substrate of Akt whose constitutive function impairs normal CREB transcriptional activity through phosphorylation at its Ser129 residue. Accordingly, CREB phosphorylation at Ser133 was significantly increased in D3(-/-) mice, whereas the GSK-3β-dependent phosphorylation at Ser129 was diminished. Altogether, our finding reveals that mice lacking D3Rs show enhanced tPA proteolytic activity on BDNF which may involve, at least in part, a potentiated Akt/CREB signaling

  10. Participation of mitogen-activated protein kinase in thapsigargin- and TPA-induced histamine production in murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Muneshige; Hirasawa, Noriyasu; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Oikawa, Shinji; Murakami, Akira; Ohuchi, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    Stimulation of the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 with thapsigargin, an endomembrane Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor, induced histamine production in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The protein kinase C activator, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), also enhanced histamine production. α-Fluoromethylhistidine, a suicide substrate of L-histidine decarboxylase (HDC), suppressed the thapsigargin (30 nM)- and TPA (30 nM)-induced histamine production. Both thapsigargin (30 nM) and TPA (30 nM) induced phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase and p38 MAP kinase. PD98059, a specific inhibitor of MEK-1 which phosphorylates p44/p42 MAP kinase, strongly suppressed both the thapsigargin (30 nM)- and TPA (30 nM)-induced histamine production, whereas SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase, inhibited them only partially. The other MEK-1 inhibitor, U-0126, also inhibited both the thapsigargin- and TPA-induced histamine production in a concentration-dependent manner. Thapsigargin (30 nM) and TPA (30 nM) increased the levels of HDC mRNA at 4 h, but PD98059 suppressed both the thapsigargin- and TPA-induced increases in the HDC mRNA level. These findings indicate that thapsigargin and TPA induce histamine production in RAW 264.7 cells by increasing the level of HDC mRNA, and that both the thapsigargin- and TPA-induced histamine production are regulated largely by p44/p42 MAP kinase and partially by p38 MAP kinase.. PMID:10711350

  11. Fisetin regulates TPA-induced breast cell invasion by suppressing matrix metalloproteinase-9 activation via the PKC/ROS/MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Noh, Eun-Mi; Park, Yeon-Ju; Kim, Jeong-Mi; Kim, Mi-Seong; Kim, Ha-Rim; Song, Hyun-Kyung; Hong, On-Yu; So, Hong-Seob; Yang, Sei-Hoon; Kim, Jong-Suk; Park, Samg Hyun; Youn, Hyun-Jo; You, Yong-Ouk; Choi, Ki-Bang; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Lee, Young-Rae

    2015-10-01

    Invasion and metastasis are among the main causes of death in patients with malignant tumors. Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid found in the smoke tree (Cotinus coggygria), is known to have antimetastatic effects on prostate and lung cancers; however, the effect of fisetin on breast cancer metastasis is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the anti-invasive activity of fisetin in human breast cancer cells. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 is a major component facilitating the invasion of many cancer tumor cell types, and thus the inhibitory effect of fisetin on MMP-9 expression in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-stimulated human breast cancer cells was investigated in this study. Fisetin significantly attenuated TPA-induced cell invasion in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, and was found to inhibit the activation of the PKCα/ROS/ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. This effect was furthermore associated with reduced NF-κB activation, suggesting that the anti-invasive effect of fisetin on MCF-7 cells may result from inhibited TPA activation of NF-κB and reduced TPA activation of PKCα/ROS/ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK signals, ultimately leading to the downregulation of MMP-9 expression. Our findings indicate the role of fisetin in MCF-7 cell invasion, and clarify the underlying molecular mechanisms of this role, suggesting fisetin as a potential chemopreventive agent for breast cancer metastasis.

  12. Effects of TPA on short-circuit current across frog skin

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, T.; O'Brien, T.G.; Civan, M.M.

    1987-02-01

    TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate) is an effective tumor promoter that affects a variety of ion transport processes. To examine the relationship between effects on transport and growth and differentiation, the authors have been studying the actions of TPA on frog skin, a particularly well-characterized epithelium. They have reported that high concentrations of TPA stimulate base-line short-circuit current (I/sub SC/) and inhibit the subsequent natriferic action of vasopressin. The current study of 89 preparations extends those findings. The K/sub m/ of the stimulatory effect of TPA is approx. 3 nM; this high affinity indicates that the transport phenomenon does not simply reflect a nonspecific interaction of phorbol ester with the plasma membranes. TPA acts largely or entirely at the mucosal surface of both split and whole skins; thus the sidedness of the effect does not arise from adsorption onto the underlying connective tissue when TPA is applied to the serosal surface of whole skin. Amiloride, an inhibitor of apical Na entry, abolishes I/sub SC/ across frog skins pretreated with TPA. The phorbol ester also increases I/sub SC/ across split skins, preparations which do not produce net Cl transport. The present results indicate that frog skin is highly responsive to TPA at concentrations known to activate protein kinase C in broken-cell preparations. The actions on I/sub SC/ appear to reflect changes in transepithelial Na transport modulated at the apical membranes. The full biochemical events triggered by TPA remain to be clarified; in part, TPA's actions may be mediated by leukotrienes produced by activation of the lipoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism.

  13. Prognostic value of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and its complex with the type-1 inhibitor (PAI-1) in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Witte, J H de; Sweep, C G J; Klijn, J G M; Grebenschikov, N; Peters, H A; Look, M P; Tienoven, ThH van; Heuvel, J J T M; Vries, J Bolt-De; Benraad, ThJ; Foekens, J A

    1999-01-01

    The prognostic value of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) measured in samples derived from 865 patients with primary breast cancer using a recently developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was evaluated. Since the assay could easily be adapted to the assessment of the complex of tPA with its type-1 inhibitor (PAI-1), it was investigated whether the tPA:PAI-1 complex also provides prognostic information. To this end, cytosolic extracts and corresponding detergent extracts of 100 000 g pellets obtained after ultracentrifugation when preparing the cytosolic fractions for routine steroid hormone receptor determination were assayed. Statistically significant correlations were found between the cytosolic levels and those determined in the pellet extracts (Spearman correlation coefficient rs = 0.75, P < 0.001 for tPA and r = 0.50, P < 0.001 for tPA:PAI-1 complex). In both Cox univariate and multivariate analysis elevated levels of (total) tPA determined in the pellet extracts, but not in cytosols, were associated with prolonged relapse-free (RFS) and overall survival (OS). In contrast, high levels of the tPA:PAI-1 complex measured in cytosols, but not in the pellet extracts, were associated with a poor RFS and OS. The prognostic information provided by the cytosolic tPA:PAI-1 complex was comparable to that provided by cytosolic (total) PAI-1. Furthermore, the estimated levels of free, uncomplexed tPA and PAI-1, in cytosols and in pellet extracts, were related to patient prognosis in a similar way as the (total) levels of tPA and PAI-1 respectively. Determination of specific forms of components of the plasminogen activation system, i.e. tPA:PAI-1 complex and free, uncomplexed tPA and/or PAI-1, may be considered a useful adjunct to the analyses of the separate components (tPA and/or PAI-1) and provide valuable additional prognostic information with respect to survival of breast cancer patients. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10390010

  14. Allelic imbalance of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) gene expression in human brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Tjarnlund-Wolf, A; Hultman, K; Curtis, M A; Faull, R L M; Medcalf, R L; Jern, C

    2011-06-01

    We have identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the t-PA enhancer (-7351C>T), which is associated with endothelial t-PA release in vivo. In vitro studies demonstrated that this SNP is functional at the level of transcription. In the brain, t-PA has been implicated in both physiologic and pathophysiologic processes. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of the t-PA -7351C>T SNP on t-PA gene expression in human brain tissue. Allelic mRNA expression was measured in heterozygous post-mortem brain tissues using quantitative TaqMan genotyping assay. Protein-DNA interactions were assessed using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Significantly higher levels of t-PA mRNA were generated from chromosomes that harboured the wild-type -7351C allele, as compared to those generated from the mutant T allele (for the hippocampus, C to T allelic ratio of ~1.3, p=0.010, n=12; and for the cortex, C to T allelic ratio of ~1.2, p=0.017, n=12). EMSA showed reduced neuronal and astrocytic nuclear protein binding affinity to the T allele, and identified Sp1 and Sp3 as the major transcription factors that bound to the -7351 site. ChIP analyses confirmed that Sp1 recognises this site in intact cells. In conclusion, the t-PA -7351C>T SNP affects t-PA gene expression in human brain tissue. This finding might have clinical implications for neurological conditions associated with enhanced t-PA levels, such as in the acute phase of cerebral ischaemia, and also for stroke recovery.

  15. Interaction of human tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) with pregnancy zone protein: a comparative study with t-PA-alpha2-macroglobulin interaction.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, M C; Chiabrando, G A; Guglielmone, H A; Bonacci, G R; Rabinovich, G A; Vides, M A

    1998-08-01

    Human pregnancy zone protein (PZP) is a major pregnancy-associated plasma protein strongly related to alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2-M). Interactions of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) with PZP and alpha2-M were both investigated in vitro and the complexes were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The results demonstrated that PZP-t-PA complex formation was evident within 1 h of incubation, whereas alpha2-M-t-PA complexes were formed after 18 h. Conclusions were supported by the following evidence: (i) PZP and alpha2-M complexes revealed changes of the mobility rate in non-denaturing PAGE, similar to those observed with alpha-Ms-chymotrypsin; (ii) both PZP and alpha2-M formed complexes of molecular size >360 kDa by SDS-PAGE, in accordance with the covalent binding of t-PA, which was previously reported for other proteinases; and (iii) PZP underwent a specific cleavage of the bait region with appearence of fragments of 85-90 kDa as judged by reducing SDS-PAGE. In contrast, the proteolytic attack on alpha2-M was found to occur more slowly, requiring several hours of incubation with t-PA for generation of an appreciable amount of fragments of 85-90 kDa. The appearance of free SH-groups of alpha-Ms was further investigated by titration with 5, 5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid). The maximal level of SH-groups raised was 3.9 mol/mol of PZP and 3.5 mol/mol of alpha2-M, indicating approximately one SH-group for each 180-kDa subunit. Finally, t-PA activity in PZP-t-PA complex was evaluated by measuring the hydrolysis of the chromogenic substrate Flavigen t-PA. Our results revealed that prolongation of the incubation period of this complex increased t-PA-mediated hydrolysis of Flavigen t-PA until a plateau was reached, approximately between 60 and 120 min. The present study suggests that PZP, by binding to t-PA, may contribute to the control of the activity of proteinases derived from fibrinolytic systems.

  16. Attenuation of BPDE-induced p53 accumulation by TPA is associated with a decrease in stability and phosphorylation of p53 and down-regulation of NF-κB activation: Role of p38 MAP kinase

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Jagat J.; Sikka, Harish C.

    2005-01-01

    DNA damage caused by benzo[a]pyrene (BP) or other PAHs induce p53 protein as a protective measure to eliminate the possibility of mutagenic fixation of the DNA damage. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) inhibits p53 response induced by BP and other DNA-damaging agents and may cause tumor promotion. The molecular mechanism of attenuation of BP-induced p53 response by TPA is not known. We investigated the effect of TPA on p53 response in BPDE-treated mouse epidermal JB6(P+) Cl 41 cells. BPDE treatment induced p53 accumulation which was attenuated significantly by TPA. Cells treated with BPDE and TPA showed increased ratio of Mdm2 to p53 proteins in p53 immunoprecipitate and decreased p53 life span compared to BPDE-treated cells indicating p53 destabilization by TPA. TPA also inhibited BPDE-induced p53 phosphorylation at serine15. Activation of both ERKs and p38 MAPK by BPDE and attenuation of BPDE-induced p53 accumulation by U0126 or SB202190, specific inhibitor of MEK1/2 or p38 MAPK, indicate the role of ERKs and p38 MAPK in p53 accumulation. Interestingly, TPA potentiated BPDE-induced activation of ERKs whereas p38 MAPK activation was significantly inhibited by TPA, suggesting that inhibition of p38 MAPK is involved in p53 attenuation by TPA. Furthermore SB202190 treatment caused decreased p53 stability and inhibition of phosphorylation of p53 at serine 15 in BPDE-treated cells. We also observed that TPA or SB202190 attenuated BPDE-induced NF-κB activation in JB6 (Cl 41) cells harboring NF-κB reporter plasmid. To our knowledge this is the first report that TPA inhibits chemical carcinogen-induced NF-κB activation. Interference of TPA with BPDE-induced NF-κB activation implicates abrogation of p53 function which has been discussed. Overall our data suggest that abrogation of BPDE-induced p53 response and of NF-κB activation by TPA is mediated by impairment of signaling pathway involving p38 MAPK. PMID:16244358

  17. Aromatic-turmerone attenuates invasion and expression of MMP-9 and COX-2 through inhibition of NF-κB activation in TPA-induced breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Young; Kim, Young Hun; Kim, YoungHee; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2012-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that breast cancer is one of the most common forms of malignancy in females, and metastasis from the primary cancer site is the main cause of death. Aromatic (ar)-turmerone is present in Curcuma longa and is a common remedy and food. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of ar-turmerone on expression and enzymatic activity levels of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and cyclooxygenaase-2 (COX-2) in breast cancer cells. Our data indicated that ar-turmerone treatment significantly inhibited enzymatic activity and expression of MMP-9 and COX-2 at non-cytotoxic concentrations. However, the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, TIMP-2, MMP-2, and COX-1 did not change upon ar-turmerone treatment. We found that ar-turmerone inhibited the activation of NF-κB, whereas it did not affect AP-1 activation. Moreover, The ChIP assay revealed that in vivo binding activities of NF-κB to the MMP-9 and COX-2 promoter were significantly inhibited by ar-turmerone. Our data showed that ar-turmerone reduced the phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 signaling, whereas it did not affect phosphorylation of JNK or p38 MAPK. Thus, transfection of breast cancer cells with PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 siRNAs significantly decreased TPA-induced MMP-9 and COX-2 expression. These results suggest that ar-turmerone suppressed the TPA-induced up-regulation of MMP-9 and COX-2 expression by blocking NF-κB, PI3K/Akt, and ERK1/2 signaling in human breast cancer cells. Furthermore, ar-turmerone significantly inhibited TPA-induced invasion, migration, and colony formation in human breast cancer cells.

  18. Ascorbic acid inhibits TPA-induced HL-60 cell differentiation by decreasing cellular H₂O₂ and ERK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Yiang, Giou-Teng; Chen, Jen-Ni; Wu, Tsai-Kun; Wang, Hsueh-Fang; Hung, Yu-Ting; Chang, Wei-Jung; Chen, Chinshuh; Wei, Chyou-Wei; Yu, Yung-Luen

    2015-10-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), vitamin D and 12-O‑tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) can induce HL-60 cells to differentiate into granulocytes, monocytes and macrophages, respectively. Similar to RA and vitamin D, ascorbic acid also belongs to the vitamin family. High‑dose ascorbic acid (>100 µM) induces HL‑60 cell apoptosis and induces a small fraction of HL‑60 cells to express the granulocyte marker, CD66b. In addition, ascorbic acid exerts an anti‑oxidative stress function. Oxidative stress is required for HL‑60 cell differentiation following treatment with TPA, however, the effect of ascorbic acid on HL‑60 cell differentiation in combination with TPA treatment remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the cellular effects of ascorbic acid treatment on TPA-differentiated HL-60 cells. TPA-differentiated HL-60 cells were used for this investigation, this study and the levels of cellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), caspase activity and ERK phosphorylation were determined following combined treatment with TPA and ascorbic acid. The results demonstrated that low‑dose ascorbic acid (5 µM) reduced the cellular levels of H2O2 and inhibited the differentiation of HL‑60 cells into macrophages following treatment with TPA. In addition, the results of the present study further demonstrated that low‑dose ascorbic acid inactivates the ERK phosphorylation pathway, which inhibited HL‑60 cell differentiation following treatment with TPA.

  19. Evidence for impairment of behavioural inhibition in performance of operant tasks in tPA-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Ripley, T L; Horwood, J M; Stephens, D N

    2001-11-01

    We have previously shown that mice that lack the serine protease, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), show over-responding on the active lever during time-out periods in an I.V. cocaine self-administration task. To investigate this effect further, tPA knockout mice (tPA-/-) were tested in a number of operant paradigms for a liquid food reinforcer. tPA-/- and wild-type (WT) control mice acquired a fixed ratio (FR) and a fixed interval (FI) task equally. However, extinction from the FR schedule resulted in a significant decrease in responses on the active and inactive levers in the WT mice whilst responding on the inactive lever remained high in the tPA-/- animals. In a differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL) task, tPA-/- mice acquired the task at a slower rate than WT animals. This was characterised by high levels of responding on the active lever during the first 15 sessions in the tPA-/- mice. Burst responding on the active lever (lever press rate with an inter-response time of less than 3 s) was especially high in these animals. This behaviour pattern resulted in the animals obtaining less reinforcers than the WT controls. Acute cocaine dose-dependently shifted the pattern of behaviour on the active lever towards shorter inter-response times. However, there was no difference between the tPA-/- and WT mice in their sensitivity to cocaine on this task. Repeated administration of a low dose of cocaine did not alter performance on this task in either set of animals. When the DRL task was modified to allow the tPA-/- and WT mice an equal number of reinforced trials per session there was no difference in the ability of the animals to perform the task. This would suggest that the tPA-/- mice have a tendency to over-respond but that this can be overcome when the task is modified to allow equal opportunity to learn.

  20. Anti-tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) as an effective therapy of neonatal hypoxia-ischemia with and without inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dianer; Kuan, Chia-Yi

    2015-04-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury is an important cause of neurodevelopmental deficits in neonates. Intrauterine infection and the ensuing fetal inflammatory responses augment hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and attenuate the efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia. Here, we review evidences from preclinical studies suggesting that the induction of brain parenchymal tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) plays an important pathogenic role in these conditions. Moreover, administration of a stable-mutant form of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 called CPAI confers potent protection against hypoxic-ischemic injury with and without inflammation via different mechanisms. Besides intracerebroventricular injection, CPAI can also be administered into the brain using a noninvasive intranasal delivery strategy, adding to its applicability in clinical use. In sum, the therapeutic potential of CPAI in neonatal care merits further investigation with large-animal models of hypoxia-ischemia and cerebral palsy. PMID:25475942

  1. Activated chemoreceptor arrays remain intact and hexagonally packed

    PubMed Central

    Briegel, Ariane; Beeby, Morgan; Thanbichler, Martin; Jensen, Grant J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Bacterial chemoreceptors cluster into exquisitively sensitive, tunable, highly ordered, polar arrays. While these arrays serve as paradigms of cell signalling in general, it remains unclear what conformational changes transduce signals from the periplasmic tips, where attractants and repellents bind, to the cytoplasmic signalling domains. Conflicting reports support and contest the hypothesis that activation causes large changes in the packing arrangement of the arrays, up to and including their complete disassembly. Using electron cryotomography, here we show that in Caulobacter crescentus, chemoreceptor arrays in cells grown in different media and immediately after exposure to the attractant galactose all exhibit the same 12 nm hexagonal packing arrangement, array size and other structural parameters. ΔcheB and ΔcheR mutants mimicking attractant- or repellent-bound states prior to adaptation also show the same lattice structure. We conclude that signal transduction and amplification must be accomplished through only small, nanoscale conformational changes. PMID:21992450

  2. A role for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tpa1 protein in direct alkylation repair.

    PubMed

    Shivange, Gururaj; Kodipelli, Naveena; Monisha, Mohan; Anindya, Roy

    2014-12-26

    Alkylating agents induce cytotoxic DNA base adducts. In this work, we provide evidence to suggest, for the first time, that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tpa1 protein is involved in DNA alkylation repair. Little is known about Tpa1 as a repair protein beyond the initial observation from a high-throughput analysis indicating that deletion of TPA1 causes methyl methane sulfonate sensitivity in S. cerevisiae. Using purified Tpa1, we demonstrate that Tpa1 repairs both single- and double-stranded methylated DNA. Tpa1 is a member of the Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family, and we show that mutation of the amino acid residues involved in cofactor binding abolishes the Tpa1 DNA repair activity. Deletion of TPA1 along with the base excision repair pathway DNA glycosylase MAG1 renders the tpa1Δmag1Δ double mutant highly susceptible to methylation-induced toxicity. We further demonstrate that the trans-lesion synthesis DNA polymerase Polζ (REV3) plays a key role in tolerating DNA methyl-base lesions and that tpa1Δmag1revΔ3 triple mutant is extremely susceptible to methylation-induced toxicity. Our results indicate a synergism between the base excision repair pathway and direct alkylation repair by Tpa1 in S. cerevisiae. We conclude that Tpa1 is a hitherto unidentified DNA repair protein in yeast and that it plays a crucial role in reverting alkylated DNA base lesions and cytotoxicity.

  3. Tat-CBR1 inhibits inflammatory responses through the suppressions of NF-κB and MAPK activation in macrophages and TPA-induced ear edema in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young Nam; Kim, Dae Won; Jo, Hyo Sang; Shin, Min Jea; Ahn, Eun Hee; Ryu, Eun Ji; Yong, Ji In; Cha, Hyun Ju; Kim, Sang Jin; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Youn, Jong Kyu; Hwang, Jae Hyeok; Jeong, Ji-Heon; Kim, Duk-Soo; Cho, Sung-Woo; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2015-07-15

    Human carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1) plays a crucial role in cell survival and protects against oxidative stress response. However, its anti-inflammatory effects are not yet clearly understood. In this study, we examined whether CBR1 protects against inflammatory responses in macrophages and mice using a Tat-CBR1 protein which is able to penetrate into cells. The results revealed that purified Tat-CBR1 protein efficiently transduced into Raw 264.7 cells and inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) expression levels. In addition, Tat-CBR1 protein leads to decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine expression through suppression of nuclear transcription factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. Furthermore, Tat-CBR1 protein inhibited inflammatory responses in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced skin inflammation when applied topically. These findings indicate that Tat-CBR1 protein has anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in vivo through inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK activation, suggesting that Tat-CBR1 protein may have potential as a therapeutic agent against inflammatory diseases. - Highlights: • Transduced Tat-CBR1 reduces LPS-induced inflammatory mediators and cytokines. • Tat-CBR1 inhibits MAPK and NF-κB activation. • Tat-CBR1 ameliorates inflammation response in vitro and in vivo. • Tat-CBR1 may be useful as potential therapeutic agent for inflammation.

  4. Melatonin inhibits TPA-induced oral cancer cell migration by suppressing matrix metalloproteinase-9 activation through the histone acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chia-Ming; Lin, Chiao-Wen; Yang, Jia-Sin; Yang, Wei-En; Su, Shih-Chi; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin exerts antimetastatic effects on liver and breast cancer and also inhibits matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. However, the detailed impacts and underlying mechanisms of melatonin on oral cancer cell metastasis are still unclear. This study showed that melatonin attenuated the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced migration of oral cancer cell lines, HSC-3 and OECM-1. Zymography, quantitative real-time PCR, and Western blotting analyses revealed that melatonin lessened MMP-9 enzyme activity as well as the expression of MMP-9 mRNA and protein. Furthermore, melatonin suppressed the phosphorylation of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway, which dampened MMP-9 gene transcription by affecting the expression of transcriptional coactivators, such as CREB-binding protein (CREBBP) and E1A binding protein p300 (EP300), and decreasing histone acetylation in HSC-3 and OECM-1 cells. Examinations on clinical samples exhibited that MMP-9, CREBBP, and EP300 were significantly increased in oral cancer tissues. Moreover, the relative level of CREBBP was positively correlated with the expression of MMP-9 and EP300. In conclusion, we demonstrated that melatonin inhibits the motility of HSC-3 and OECM-1 cells in vitro through a molecular mechanism that involves attenuation of MMP-9 expression and activity mediated by decreased histone acetylation. PMID:26980735

  5. Melatonin inhibits TPA-induced oral cancer cell migration by suppressing matrix metalloproteinase-9 activation through the histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chia-Ming; Lin, Chiao-Wen; Yang, Jia-Sin; Yang, Wei-En; Su, Shih-Chi; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2016-04-19

    Melatonin exerts antimetastatic effects on liver and breast cancer and also inhibits matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. However, the detailed impacts and underlying mechanisms of melatonin on oral cancer cell metastasis are still unclear. This study showed that melatonin attenuated the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced migration of oral cancer cell lines, HSC-3 and OECM-1. Zymography, quantitative real-time PCR, and Western blotting analyses revealed that melatonin lessened MMP-9 enzyme activity as well as the expression of MMP-9 mRNA and protein. Furthermore, melatonin suppressed the phosphorylation of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway, which dampened MMP-9 gene transcription by affecting the expression of transcriptional coactivators, such as CREB-binding protein (CREBBP) and E1A binding protein p300 (EP300), and decreasing histone acetylation in HSC-3 and OECM-1 cells. Examinations on clinical samples exhibited that MMP-9, CREBBP, and EP300 were significantly increased in oral cancer tissues. Moreover, the relative level of CREBBP was positively correlated with the expression of MMP-9 and EP300. In conclusion, we demonstrated that melatonin inhibits the motility of HSC-3 and OECM-1 cells in vitro through a molecular mechanism that involves attenuation of MMP-9 expression and activity mediated by decreased histone acetylation. PMID:26980735

  6. [The antioxidative mechanisms of tea polyphenols in inhibiting tumor promotion by TPA].

    PubMed

    Qi, L; Han, C

    1998-01-01

    In the mouse study, topical application of green tea polyphenols (GTP) significantly inhibited TPA-induced increasing of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and increased the activities of several antioxidant enzymes (CAT, GR and GST). In another in vitro study, when GTP was incubated with TPA and mice polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), TPA induced hydrogen peroxide formation was markedly suppressed with a dose-dependent relationship. The results suggest that the antioxidative effect of GTP may play an important role in inhibiting tumor promotion.

  7. Vascular Risk Factors in Patients with Different Subtypes of Ischemic Stroke May Affect Their Outcome after Intravenous tPA

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jinma; Nair, Deepak S.; Parker, Sarah; Jahnel, Jan L.; Swanson-Devlin, Teresa G.; Beck, Judith M.; Mathews, Maureen; McNeil, Clayton J.; Upadhyaya, Manas; Gao, Yuan; Dong, Qiang; Wang, David Z.

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous (IV) tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only approved noninvasive therapy for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). However, after tPA treatment, the outcome of patients with different subtypes of stroke according to their vascular risk factors remains to be elucidated. We aim to explore the relationship between the outcome and different risk factors in patients with different subtype of acute strokes treated with IV tPA. Records of patients in this cohort were reviewed. Data collected and analysed included the demographics, vascular risk factors, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores, 90-day modified Rankin Scores (mRS), and subtypes of stroke. By using the 90-day mRS, patients were dichotomized into favorable versus unfavorable outcome in each subtype of stroke. We identified the vascular risk factors that are likely associated with the poor outcome in each subtype. Among 570 AIS patients received IV tPA, 217 were in the large artery atherosclerosis (LAA) group, 146 in the small vessel occlusion(SVO) group, and 140 in the cardioaortic embolism(CE) group. Lower NIHSS score on admission was related to favorable outcome in patients in all subtypes. Patients with history of dyslipidemia were likely on statin treatment before their admission and hence less likely to have elevated cholesterol level on admission. Therefore, there was a possible paradoxical effect on the outcome in patients with LAA and SVO subtypes of strokes. SVO patients with history of diabetes had higher risk of unfavorable outcome. SVO patients had favorable outcome if their time from onset to treatment was short. In conclusion, the outcome of patients treated with IV tPA may be related to different vascular risk factors associated with different subtypes of stroke. PMID:26247772

  8. Mild hypothermia markedly reduces ischemia related coronary t-PA release.

    PubMed

    van der Pals, Jesper; Götberg, Matthias; Olivecrona, Göran K; Brogren, Helen; Jern, Sverker; Erlinge, David

    2010-04-01

    In experimentally induced myocardial ischemia, mild hypothermia (33-35 degrees C) has a robust cardioprotective effect. Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) is a profibrinolytic enzyme that is released from the vascular endothelial cells in response to ischemia and other injurious stimuli. t-PA has also been found to have proinflammatory properties that could contribute to reperfusion injury. We postulated that hypothermia could attenuate t-PA release in the setting of myocardial ischemia. Sixteen 25-30 kg pigs were anesthetized and a temperature of 37 degrees C was established using an intravascular cooling/warming catheter. The pigs were then randomized to hypothermia (34 degrees C) or control (37 degrees C). A doppler flow wire was placed distal to a percutaneous coronary intervention balloon positioned immediately distal to the first diagonal branch of the left anterior descending artery (LAD). The LAD was then occluded for 10 min in all pigs. Coronary blood flow and t-PA was measured before, during and after ischemia/reperfusion. t-PA was measured in peripheral arterial blood and locally in the venous blood from the coronary sinus. Net t-PA release over the coronary bed was calculated by subtraction of arterial values from coronary sinus values. An estimate of differences in total t-PA release was calculated by multiplying net t-PA release with the relative increase in flow compared to baseline, measured in relative units consisting of ((ng/ml - ng/ml) x (cm/s/cm/s)). There was no observed difference in t-PA levels in peripheral arterial samples. As shown previously, net t-PA release increased during reperfusion. Hypothermia significantly inhibited the increase in t-PA release during reperfusion (peak value 9.44 +/- 4.34 ng/ml vs. 0.79 +/- 0.45 ng/ml, P = 0.02). The effect was even more prominent when an estimation of total t-PA release was performed with mean peak value in the control group 26-fold higher than in the hypothermia group (69.74 +/- 33.86 units vs

  9. Pathological VWF fibers resist tPA and ADAMTS13 while promoting the contact pathway and shear-induced platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Herbig, Bradley A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Under severe stenotic conditions, von Willebrand Factor (VWF) multimerizes into large insoluble fibers at pathological shear rates. Objective Evaluate the mechanics and biology of VWF fibers without the confounding effects of endothelium or collagen. Methods Within a micropost-impingement microfluidic device, >100 µm long VWF fibers multimerized on the post within 10 min using EDTA-treated PFP perfused at wall shear rates >5000 s−1. Results VWF fiber thickness increased to >10 µm by increasing shear rate to 10,000 s−1. In a stress-strain test, fibrous VWF had an elastic modulus of ~50 MPa. The insoluble VWF fibers were non-amyloid since they rapidly dissolved in trypsin, plasmin, or 2% SDS, but were resistant to 50 nM ADAMTS13 or 100 nM tPA in plasma. Following fiber formation, perfusion of low corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI)-treated (4 µg/ml), recalcified citrated plasma at 1500 s−1 caused fibrin formation on the VWF fibers, a result not observed with purified type 1 collagen or a naked micropost. During VWF fiber formation, contact pathway factors accumulated on VWF since the use of EDTA/PPACK/apixaban/high CTI-treated PFP during VWF fiber formation prevented subsequent fibrin production from low CTI, recalcified citrated PFP. VWF fibers displayed FXIIa-immunostaining. When PPACK-inhibited whole blood was perfused over VWF fibers, platelets rolled and arrested on the surface of VWF, but only displayed P-selectin if prevailing shear rates were pathological. Platelet arrest on VWF fibers was blocked with αIIbβ3 antagonist GR144053. Conclusions We report VWF fiber-contact pathway crosstalk and mechanisms of thrombolytic resistance in hemodynamic settings of myocardial infarction. PMID:26178390

  10. Field Documentation of Unusual Post-Mortem Arthropod Activity on Human Remains.

    PubMed

    Pechal, Jennifer L; Benbow, M Eric; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Crippen, Tawni L; Tarone, Aaron M; Singh, Baneshwar; Lenhart, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    During a forensic investigation, the presence of physical marks on human remains can influence the interpretation of events related to the death of an individual. Some tissue injury on human remains can be misinterpreted as ante- or peri-mortem wounds by an investigator when in reality the markings resulted from post-mortem arthropod activity. Unusual entomological data were collected during a study examining the decomposition of a set of human remains in San Marcos, Texas. An adult female Pediodectes haldemani (Girard) (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) and an Armadillidium cf. vulgare (Isopoda: Armadilidiidae) were documented feeding on the remains. Both arthropods produced physical marks or artifacts on the remains that could be misinterpreted as attack, abuse, neglect, or torture. Additionally, red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), were observed constructing structures in the mark produced by the P. haldemani feeding. These observations provide insight into the potential of post-mortem arthropod damage to human remains, which previously had not been described for these taxa, and therefore, physical artifacts on any remains found in similar circumstances may result from arthropod activity and not ante- or peri-mortem wounds. PMID:26336287

  11. Field Documentation of Unusual Post-Mortem Arthropod Activity on Human Remains.

    PubMed

    Pechal, Jennifer L; Benbow, M Eric; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Crippen, Tawni L; Tarone, Aaron M; Singh, Baneshwar; Lenhart, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    During a forensic investigation, the presence of physical marks on human remains can influence the interpretation of events related to the death of an individual. Some tissue injury on human remains can be misinterpreted as ante- or peri-mortem wounds by an investigator when in reality the markings resulted from post-mortem arthropod activity. Unusual entomological data were collected during a study examining the decomposition of a set of human remains in San Marcos, Texas. An adult female Pediodectes haldemani (Girard) (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) and an Armadillidium cf. vulgare (Isopoda: Armadilidiidae) were documented feeding on the remains. Both arthropods produced physical marks or artifacts on the remains that could be misinterpreted as attack, abuse, neglect, or torture. Additionally, red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), were observed constructing structures in the mark produced by the P. haldemani feeding. These observations provide insight into the potential of post-mortem arthropod damage to human remains, which previously had not been described for these taxa, and therefore, physical artifacts on any remains found in similar circumstances may result from arthropod activity and not ante- or peri-mortem wounds.

  12. Hispolon inhibits TPA-induced invasion by reducing MMP-9 expression through the NF-κB signaling pathway in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    SUN, YI-SHENG; ZHAO, ZHAO; ZHU, HAN-PING

    2015-01-01

    Hispolon has been demonstrated to possess analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. However, whether hispolon prevents the invasion of breast carcinoma cells and the underlying mechanisms of its action remain unknown. In the present study, various assays, including a matrigel-based Transwell invasion assay and electrophoretic mobility shift assay, were used to investigate the anti-invasion effect of hispolon and explore its mechanism of action. The results revealed that hispolon inhibited the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells at non-toxic concentrations. Hispolon also prevented the TPA-induced secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and reduced its expression at the transcriptional and translational levels. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of IκBα was reduced by hispolon, which resulted in the suppression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and p65 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that NF-κB DNA-binding activity was induced by TPA and inhibited by hispolon. In addition, Bay 11–7082, which is a specific inhibitor of NF-κB, functioned in a similar manner as hispolon and blocked the secretion and expression of MMP-9. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that hispolon inhibited TPA-induced migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells by reducing the secretion and expression of MMP-9 through the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26171065

  13. Does treatment with t-PA increase the risk of developing epilepsy after stroke?

    PubMed

    Keller, Lena; Hobohm, Carsten; Zeynalova, Samira; Classen, Joseph; Baum, Petra

    2015-10-01

    Patients suffering from ischemic stroke carry an enhanced risk of developing secondary epilepsy. We sought to clarify whether thrombolytic treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) is independently associated with post-stroke epilepsy (PSE). In this observational study, data from 302 stroke patients treated at a single academic neurological department were analyzed retrospectively. Median follow-up was 42 months (maximum 80). Variables included presence of comorbidity, stroke severity, neurological presentation, complications, infarct characteristics, and treatment with t-PA. After univariate analyses, a multivariate analysis was performed to create a model of factors that were significantly associated with PSE, including treatment with t-PA. 13.9 % of patients developed PSE during follow-up. Multivariate analysis identified 5 independent factors for PSE: low Barthel Index at discharge; hemianopia; infection acquired during the hospital stay; involvement of the temporal lobe; involvement of the perirolandic cortex. While the incidence of PSE was higher in patients treated with t-PA (20.6 vs. 10.7 %, univariate analysis; p = 0.020), the effect was lost after adjusting for several factors associated with t-PA treatment [odds ratio for PSE after treatment with t-PA 1.3 (95 % CI 0.6-2.9), p = 0.489]. This study failed to identify treatment with t-PA as an independent risk factor for PSE.

  14. The antimicrobial activity of embalming chemicals and topical disinfectants on the microbial flora of human remains.

    PubMed

    Burke, P A; Sheffner, A L

    1976-10-01

    The antimicrobial activity of embalming chemicals an topical disinfectants was evaluated to determine the degree of disinfection achieved during the embalming of human remains. The administration of arterial and cavity embalming chemicals resulted in a 99% reduction of the postmortem microbial population after 2 hours of contact. This level of disinfection was maintained for the 24 hours test period. Topical disinfection of the body orifices was also observed. Therefore, it is probable that present embalming practices reduce the hazard from transmission of potentially infectious microbial agents within the immediate environment of embalmed human remains.

  15. Antimicrobial Activity of the Manganese Photoactivated Carbon Monoxide-Releasing Molecule [Mn(CO)3(tpa-κ3N)]+ Against a Pathogenic Escherichia coli that Causes Urinary Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Rana, Namrata; Nagel, Christoph; Jesse, Helen E.; Smith, Thomas W.; Wareham, Lauren K.; Hippler, Michael; Schatzschneider, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: We set out to investigate the antibacterial activity of a new Mn-based photoactivated carbon monoxide-releasing molecule (PhotoCORM, [Mn(CO)3(tpa-κ3N)]+) against an antibiotic-resistant uropathogenic strain (EC958) of Escherichia coli. Results: Activated PhotoCORM inhibits growth and decreases viability of E. coli EC958, but non-illuminated carbon monoxide-releasing molecule (CORM) is without effect. NADH-supported respiration rates are significantly decreased by activated PhotoCORM, mimicking the effect of dissolved CO gas. CO from the PhotoCORM binds to intracellular targets, namely respiratory oxidases in strain EC958 and a bacterial globin heterologously expressed in strain K-12. However, unlike previously characterized CORMs, the PhotoCORM is not significantly accumulated in cells, as deduced from the cellular manganese content. Activated PhotoCORM reacts avidly with hydrogen peroxide producing hydroxyl radicals; the observed peroxide-enhanced toxicity of the PhotoCORM is ameliorated by thiourea. The PhotoCORM also potentiates the effect of the antibiotic, doxycycline. Innovation: The present work investigates for the first time the antimicrobial activity of a light-activated PhotoCORM against an antibiotic-resistant pathogen. A comprehensive study of the effects of the PhotoCORM and its derivative molecules upon illumination is performed and mechanisms of toxicity of the activated PhotoCORM are investigated. Conclusion: The PhotoCORM allows a site-specific and time-controlled release of CO in bacterial cultures and has the potential to provide much needed information on the generality of CORM activities in biology. Understanding the mechanism(s) of activated PhotoCORM toxicity will be key in exploring the potential of this and similar compounds as antimicrobial agents, perhaps in combinatorial therapies with other agents. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 765–780. PMID:26842766

  16. Effect of Fagonia arabica on thrombin induced release of t-PA and complex of PAI-1 tPA in cultured HUVE cells.

    PubMed

    Aloni, Prutha D; Nayak, Amit R; Chaurasia, Sweta R; Deopujari, Jayant Y; Chourasia, Chhaya; Purohit, Hemant J; Taori, Girdhar M; Daginawala, Hatim F; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2016-07-01

    Fagonia arabica (FA) possesses a thrombolytic property which has been earlier reported in our laboratory. Current study was undertaken to investigate the effect of aqueous extract of FA on thrombin-induced tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) release from cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cell line (HUVE) for studying its clot lytic activity. For this, establishment of cell line model has been done by isolating the cells from human umbilical cord. Cell toxicity was evaluated using XTT assay. Estimation of t-PA and PAI-1 t-PA complex were done using ELISA technique. Thrombin treatment induces the t-PA and PAI-1 release from HUVE cell line, and FA treatment was found to antagonize the thrombin induced t-PA and PAI-1 release. Our preliminary results suggest that FA may be used as an alternative to thrombolytic drug. However, study demands further experiments using animal model of thrombosis to establish the role of FA as a novel thrombolytic drug. PMID:27419084

  17. Plasma Is the Physiologic Buffer of tPA Mediated Fibrinolysis: Rationale for Plasma First Resuscitation after Life-Threatening Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Hunter B; Moore, Ernest E; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Wiener, Gregory; Chapman, Michael P; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Sauaia, Angela; Banerjee, Anirban; Hansen, Kirk C; Silliman, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Background Pre-hospital resuscitation with crystalloid exacerbates fibrinolysis, which is associated with high mortality. We hypothesize that plasma compared to crystalloid resuscitation prevents hyperfibrinolysis in a tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) rich environment via preservation of proteins essential for regulation of fibrinolysis. Study Design Healthy individuals donated blood, which was assayed using a native (non activated) thrombelastography (TEG). Whole-blood (WB) was mixed with normal saline (NS) or platelet poor plasma (PPP) at progressive dilutions. TPA was added to promote a fibrinolytic environment. In a separate experiment PPP was run through 100 KD filter and liquid remaining on top of the filter (TFP) and below the filter (BFP) was obtained. Whole blood was diluted by 50% with TFP, BPF and NS and assayed with tPA TEG challenge. TFP and BFP were assayed for protein concentration and protein composition. Results NS and PPP dilution of WB with out tPA did not affect clot lysis at 30 minutes (LY30) (NS Spearman’s Rho 0.300 p=0.186 and PPP 0.294 p=0.288). When tPA was added NS dilution of whole blood increased LY30 in a percentage dependent manner (0.844 p<0.001) but did not significantly increase with PPP dilution (0.270 p=0.202). The difference in LY30 from WB to diluted WB with PPP (mean change −1.05 95% CI −9.42 to 7.33) was similar with TFP (1.23 95%CI −5.20 to 7.66 p=0.992). However, both BPF (37.65 95%CI 24.47 to 50.82 p=0.001) and NS (47.36 95%CI 34.3–60.45 p<0.001) showed large increases in fibrinolysis compared to PPP. Conclusions Crystalloid and plasma dilution of whole blood does not increase fibrinolysis. However NS dilution of WB, increases susceptibility to tPA mediated fibrinolysis. Plasma resuscitation, simulated by plasma dilution of whole blood, attenuates increased susceptibility to tPA mediate fibrinolysis. The benefits of plasma resuscitation are mediated through preservation of plasma proteins. PMID:25840538

  18. The Consequences of edTPA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenblatt, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    States and teacher preparation programs across the country are increasingly using a teacher candidate assessment called edTPA. The purpose? To make sure that teacher candidates are ready and able to teach before they begin their careers. The teacher performance assessment requires candidates to compile a portfolio that consists of lesson plans,…

  19. Changing contraindications for t-PA in acute stroke: review of 20 years since NINDS.

    PubMed

    Parker, Sarah; Ali, Yasmin

    2015-10-01

    When intravenous (IV) tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) was originally approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) in 1996, there was a lengthy list of contraindications. In the 19 years since the approval of t-PA for AIS, it has been used off label and in patients with those contraindications. In February 2015, the list of contraindications for IV t-PA in AIS was revised and several of the previous contraindications were removed. As only 4 % of patients with ischemic stroke receive treatment with IV t-PA, these changes increase the number of patients eligible for treatment. Anytime there is a significant change in the indications and treatment paradigm with a medication, there can be some resistance to the adaptation of the change into physician's treating habits. We seek to review what the changes to t-PA contraindications are, how they came about, as well as the literature on the previously off-label and currently off-label use of IV t-PA for patients with AIS. PMID:26277361

  20. Clinical implications of the involvement of tPA in neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Tsirka, S E

    1997-05-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), the serine protease that converts inactive plasminogen to the protease plasmin, was recently shown to mediate neurodegeneration in the mouse hippocampus. Mice deficient in tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) display a dramatic resistance to a paradigm of excitotoxic neuronal death that involves intrahippocampal injection of the excitotoxin. This model is thought to reproduce the mechanism of neuronal death observed during acute (such as ischemic stroke) and degenerative (such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) diseases of the nervous system. The requirement for the proteolytic activity of tPA to mediate neuronal death is acute in the adult mouse. Serine protease inhibitors, specific for tPA or the tPA/plasmin proteolytic cascade, are effective in conferring extensive neuroprotection following the excitotoxic injection. These findings suggest possible new ways for interfering with the neuronal death observed in the hippocampus as a result of excitotoxicity. In addition, tPA is produced in the hippocampus primarily by microglial cells, which become activated in response to the neuronal injury. Blocking microglial activation has been shown in other injury paradigms to protect against neuronal death, therefore suggesting another way to retard neurodegeneration in the CNS. Furthermore, after the insult has been inflicted and in the presence of a compromised blood-brain barrier macrophages (cells deriving from the same lineage as microglia) migrate into the brain, where they are thought to contribute to the neuronal cell loss by secreting neurotoxic molecules. If these macrophages/microglia expressed, however, a tPA inhibitor, rather than the possibly neurotoxic tPA, they might be able to protect the neurons from dying.

  1. Male-female differences in the genetic regulation of t-PA and PAI-1 levels in a Ghanaian population.

    PubMed

    Schoenhard, J A; Asselbergs, F W; Poku, K A; Stocki, S A; Gordon, S; Vaughan, D E; Brown, N J; Moore, J H; Williams, Scott M

    2008-12-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) directly influence thrombus formation and degradation, and have been identified as risk factors for thromboembolic disease. Prior studies investigated determinants of t-PA and PAI-1 expression, but mainly in Caucasian subjects. The aim of this study was to identify the contributions of genetic and other factors to inter-individual variation in plasma levels of t-PA and PAI-1 in a large-scale population-based sample from urban West Africa. t-PA, PAI-1 and several demographic, anthropometric, and metabolic parameters were measured in 992 residents of Sunyani, the capital of the Brong-Ahafo region of Ghana. In addition, nine gene polymorphisms associated with components of the renin-angiotensin and fibrinolytic systems were determined. We found that BMI, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, glucose, and triglycerides were all significant predictors of t-PA and PAI-1 in both females and males. In addition, a significant relationship was found between the PAI-1 4G/5G (rs1799768) polymorphism on PAI-1 levels in females, the TPA I/D (rs4646972) polymorphism on t-PA and PAI-1 in males, the renin (rs3730103) polymorphism on t-PA and PAI-1 in males, the ethanolamine kinase 2 (rs1917542) polymorphism on PAI-1 in males, and the renin (rs1464816) polymorphism on t-PA in females and on PAI-1 in males. This study of urban West Africans shows that t-PA and PAI-1 levels are determined by both genetic loci of the fibrinolytic and renin-angiotensin systems and other factors often associated with cardiovascular disease, and that genetic factors differ between males and females.

  2. Effect of the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) upon membrane ionic exchanges in sea urchin eggs

    SciTech Connect

    Ciapa, B.; Payan, P. ); Allemand, D. )

    1989-12-01

    The effect of TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate) upon ionic exchanges was investigated in eggs of the sea urchin Arbacia lixula. Ouabain-sensitive {sup 86}Rb uptake and amiloride-sensitive {sup 24}Na influx were dramatically stimulated after TPA addition, indicating an enhancement of total ionic permeabilities. Stimulation by TPA of both Na{sup +}/H{sup +} and Na{sup +}/K{sup +} exchanges was canceled by amiloride, suggesting that activation of protein kinase C elicits, via Na{sup +}/H{sup +} activity, stimulation of the sodium pump. However, TPA did not stimulate sodium pump activity and Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchange at the same rate as fertilization, probably because of an absence of calcium-dependent events. Further fertilization of TPA pretreated eggs triggered an enhancement of sodium pump activity when the TPA treatment duration did not exceed 10 minutes. It is suggested that TPA activates preexisting transporting mechanisms in plasma membranes of unfertilized eggs (Na{sup +} stat, pH stat).

  3. The hippocampus remains activated over the long term for the retrieval of truly episodic memories.

    PubMed

    Harand, Caroline; Bertran, Françoise; La Joie, Renaud; Landeau, Brigitte; Mézenge, Florence; Desgranges, Béatrice; Peigneux, Philippe; Eustache, Francis; Rauchs, Géraldine

    2012-01-01

    The role of the hippocampus in declarative memory consolidation is a matter of intense debate. We investigated the neural substrates of memory retrieval for recent and remote information using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). 18 young, healthy participants learned a series of pictures. Then, during two fMRI recognition sessions, 3 days and 3 months later, they had to determine whether they recognized or not each picture using the "Remember/Know" procedure. Presentation of the same learned images at both delays allowed us to track the evolution of memories and distinguish consistently episodic memories from those that were initially episodic and then became familiar or semantic over time and were retrieved without any contextual detail. Hippocampal activation decreased over time for initially episodic, later semantic memories, but remained stable for consistently episodic ones, at least in its posterior part. For both types of memories, neocortical activations were observed at both delays, notably in the ventromedial prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices. These activations may reflect a gradual reorganization of memory traces within neural networks. Our data indicate maintenance and strengthening of hippocampal and cortico-cortical connections in the consolidation and retrieval of episodic memories over time, in line with the Multiple Trace theory (Nadel and Moscovitch, 1997). At variance, memories becoming semantic over time consolidate through strengthening of cortico-cortical connections and progressive disengagement of the hippocampus. PMID:22937055

  4. tPA Deficiency in Mice Leads to Rearrangement in the Cerebrovascular Tree and Cerebroventricular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Stefanitsch, Christina; Lawrence, Anna-Lisa E.; Olverling, Anna; Nilsson, Ingrid; Fredriksson, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The serine protease tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is used as a thrombolytic agent in the management of ischemic stroke, but concerns for hemorrhagic conversion greatly limits the number of patients that receive this treatment. It has been suggested that the bleeding complications associated with thrombolytic tPA may be due to unanticipated roles of tPA in the brain. Recent work has suggested tPA regulation of neurovascular barrier integrity, mediated via platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)-C/PDGF receptor-α (PDGFRα) signaling, as a possible molecular mechanism affecting the outcome of stroke. To better understand the role of tPA in neurovascular regulation we conducted a detailed analysis of the cerebrovasculature in brains from adult tPA deficient (tPA−/−) mice. Our analysis demonstrates that life-long deficiency of tPA is associated with rearrangements in the cerebrovascular tree, including a reduction in the number of vascular smooth-muscle cell covered, large diameter, vessels and a decrease in vessel-associated PDGFRα expression as compared to wild-type (WT) littermate controls. In addition, we found that ablation of tPA results in an increased number of ERG-positive endothelial cells and increased junctional localization of the tight junction protein ZO1. This is intriguing since ERG is an endothelial transcription factor implicated in regulation of vascular integrity. Based on these results, we propose that the protection of barrier properties seen utilizing these tPA−/− mice might be due, at least in part, to these cerebrovascular rearrangements. In addition, we found that tPA−/− mice displayed mild cerebral ventricular malformations, a feature previously associated with ablation of PDGF-C, thereby providing an in vivo link between tPA and PDGF signaling in central nervous system (CNS) development. Taken together, the data presented here will advance our understanding of the role of tPA within the CNS and in regulation of

  5. X-ray diffraction of molybdenum under ramp compression to 1 TPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jue; Coppari, Federica; Smith, Raymond F.; Eggert, Jon H.; Lazicki, Amy E.; Fratanduono, Dayne E.; Rygg, J. Ryan; Boehly, Thomas R.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Duffy, Thomas S.

    2016-09-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a transition metal with a wide range of technical applications. There has long been strong interest in its high-pressure behavior, and it is often used as standard for high-pressure experiments. Combining powder x-ray diffraction and dynamic ramp compression, structural and equation of state data were collected for solid Mo to 1 TPa (10 Mbar). Diffraction results are consistent with Mo remaining in the body-centered-cubic structure into the TPa regime. Stress-density data show that Mo under ramp loading is less compressible than the room-temperature isotherm but more compressible than the single-shock Hugoniot.

  6. Toxicological review and oral risk assessment of terephthalic acid (TPA) and its esters: A category approach.

    PubMed

    Ball, Gwendolyn L; McLellan, Clifton J; Bhat, Virunya S

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate, a copolymer of terephthalic acid (TPA) or dimethyl terephthalate (DMT) with ethylene glycol, has food, beverage, and drinking water contact applications. Di-2-ethylhexyl terephthalate (DEHT) is a plasticizer in food and drinking water contact materials. Oral reference doses (RfDs) and total allowable concentrations (TACs) in drinking water were derived for TPA, DMT, and DEHT. Category RfD and TAC levels were also established for nine C(1)-C(8) terephthalate esters. The mode of action of TPA, and of DMT, which is metabolized to TPA, involves urinary acidosis, altered electrolyte elimination and hypercalciuria, urinary supersaturation with calcium terephthalate or calcium hydrogen terephthalate, and crystallization into bladder calculi. Weanling rats were more sensitive to calculus formation than dams. Calculi-induced irritation led to bladder hyperplasia and tumors in rats fed 1000 mg/kg-day TPA. The lack of effects at 142 mg/kg-day supports a threshold for urine saturation with calcium terephthalate, a key event for calculus formation. Chronic dietary DMT exposure in rodents caused kidney inflammation, but not calculi. Chronic dietary DEHT exposure caused general toxicity unrelated to calculi, although urine pH was reduced suggesting the TPA metabolite was biologically-active, but of insufficient concentration to induce calculi. Respective oral reference doses of 0.5, 0.5, and 0.2 mg/kg-day and total allowable drinking water concentrations of 3, 3, and 1 mg/L were derived for TPA, DMT, and DEHT. An oral RfD of 0.2 mg/kg-day for the terephthalate category chemicals corresponded to a drinking water TAC of 1 mg/L.

  7. Suppression of endothelial t-PA expression by prolonged high laminar shear stress

    SciTech Connect

    Ulfhammer, Erik; Carlstroem, Maria; Bergh, Niklas; Larsson, Pia; Karlsson, Lena; Jern, Sverker

    2009-02-06

    Primary hypertension is associated with an impaired capacity for acute release of endothelial tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), which is an important local protective response to prevent thrombus extension. As hypertensive vascular remodeling potentially results in increased vascular wall shear stress, we investigated the impact of shear on regulation of t-PA. Cultured human endothelial cells were exposed to low ({<=}1.5 dyn/cm{sup 2}) or high (25 dyn/cm{sup 2}) laminar shear stress for up to 48 h in two different experimental models. Using real-time RT-PCR and ELISA, shear stress was observed to time and magnitude-dependently suppress t-PA transcript and protein secretion to approximately 30% of basal levels. Mechanistic experiments revealed reduced nuclear protein binding to the t-PA specific CRE element (EMSA) and an almost completely abrogated shear response with pharmacologic JNK inhibition. We conclude that prolonged high laminar shear stress suppresses endothelial t-PA expression and may therefore contribute to the enhanced risk of arterial thrombosis in hypertensive disease.

  8. t-PA reduces ischemic impairment of blood-brain barrier by strengthening endothelium junction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongling; Chen, Xuhui; Li, Le; Zhang, Keling; Tian, Shuqing; Gao, Hongmei; Li, Hulun

    2013-09-01

    Cerebral ischemic stroke is one of the most prevalent diseases in senior individuals. Its therapeutical strategies include anticoagulation, thrombolysis and cell protection. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) that interacts with thrombin for the lysis of thrombosis is widely used to treat stroke patients in early stage. The mechanism of action of t-PA is not clear. Here, we report a novel role of t-PA in protecting blood-brain barrier and its potential mechanisms. In a model of the blood-brain barrier with human umbilical vascular epithelium cells, we found that t-PA in low concentrations prevented the impairment of the blood-brain barrier as a result of oxygen and glucose deprivation. This protection was fulfilled by strengthening the junctions among vascular endothelia and by upregulating the productions of vascular endothelium growth factor and of zonula occludens-1. Therefore, t-PA may strengthen the junctions of vascular endothelia in the blood-brain barrier to improve the microenvironment of brain cells and, in turn, the outcome of stroke patients.

  9. Enhancement of TPA-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in myeloid leukemia cells by BAY 11-7082, an NF-kappaB inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Annette; Marín, Yarí E; Suh, Junghan; Rabson, Arnold B; Chen, Suzie; Huberman, Eliezer; Chang, Richard L; Conney, Allan H; Zheng, Xi

    2005-10-01

    The phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is a potent stimulator of differentiation and apoptosis in myeloid leukemia cells. In the present study, we investigated the role of the transcription factor NF-kappaB in TPA-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in the myeloid leukemia HL-60 cell line and its TPA-resistant cell variant HL-525. Unlike the parental cell line, HL-525 cells are protein kinase C (PKC)-beta deficient and resistant to TPA-induced differentiation and apoptosis. We found that treatment of HL-60 cells with TPA resulted in a concentration-dependent growth inhibition and an increase in apoptotic cells. TPA only had a small effect on growth and apoptosis in HL-525 cells. Treatment of HL-60 cells with TPA (0.64-3.2 nM) caused a rapid activation of NF-kappaB as determined by electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) and immunocytochemistry. Although the basal level of NF-kappaB activity was low in HL-60 cells, TPA-resistant HL-525 cells had a high basal level of NF-kappaB activity. Treatment of HL-525 cells with higher concentrations of TPA (16-80 nM) resulted in a further increase in NF-kappaB activity. (E)3-[(4-methylphenyl)-sulfonyl]-2-propenenitrile (BAY 11-7082; BAY), which inhibits IkappaB alpha phosphorylation and thus decreases NF-kappaB activation, was found to decrease TPA-induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB. Furthermore, BAY enhanced TPA-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in both HL-60 and HL-525 cells. Results from the present study indicate that inhibition of NF-kappaB by BAY was associated with enhanced TPA-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia cells. TPA in combination with pharmacological inhibitors of NF-kappaB may improve the therapeutic efficacy of TPA and overcome the resistance to TPA in some myeloid leukemia patients.

  10. Neuronal degeneration and a decrease in laminin-like immunoreactivity is associated with elevated tissue-type plasminogen activator in the rat hippocampus after kainic acid injection.

    PubMed

    Nagai, N; Urano, T; Endo, A; Takahashi, H; Takada, Y; Takada, A

    1999-02-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that converts the inactive precursor plasminogen to the active protease plasmin. In the central nervous system, tPA has been suggested to participate in plasticity, memory and the neuronal degeneration caused by excitotoxins, but its precise functions during these processes are still unclear. We show in this report that tPA antigen level and extracellular tPA activity increased in the hippocampus during the early stages of neuronal degeneration in the CA3 region following the injection of kainic acid (KA) into the lateral cerebral ventricles. The increase in tPA antigen level was transient and its peak was at 4 h after the injection. tPA activity was also increased 4 h after the injection, but it remained at a high level for more than 8 h. Histological zymography showed that the increase in tPA activity was mainly localized in the CA3 region. In the same region, the disappearance of interneuronal laminin-like immunoreactivity and atrophic changes in pyramidal neurons were observed 4 h after the injection of KA. These results suggested that such focal and transient increases in tPA synthesis and release, which result in the proteolysis of laminin through plasminogen activation, could be involved in the neuronal degeneration in the CA3 region after the injection of KA.

  11. [Effects of no-tillage and stubble-remaining on soil enzyme activities in broadcasting rice seedlings paddy field].

    PubMed

    Ren, Wan-Jun; Huang, Yun; Wu, Jin-Xiu; Liu, Dai-Yin; Yang, Wen-Yu

    2011-11-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of four cultivation modes (conventional tillage, no-tillage, conventional tillage + stubble-remaining, and no-tillage + stubble-remaining) on the activities of urease, acid phosphatase, protease, and cellulose in different soil layers in a broadcasting rice seedlings paddy field. Under the four cultivation modes, the activities of test enzymes were higher in upper than in deeper soil layers, and had a greater difference between the soil layers under no-tillage + stubble-remaining. In upper soil layers, the activities of test enzymes were higher in the treatments of no-tillage than in the treatments of conventional tillage, being the highest under no-tillage + stubble-remaining and the lowest under conventional tillage. In deeper soil layers, the test enzyme activities were the highest under conventional tillage + stubble-remaining, followed by no-tillage + stubble-remaining, no-tillage, and conventional tillage. During the growth period of rice, soil urease and cellulose activities were lower at tillering stage, increased to the maximum at booting stage, and decreased then, soil acid phosphatase activity was higher at tillering stage but lower at elongating stage, whereas soil protease activity peaked at tillering and heading stages.

  12. Epistatic interactions in genetic regulation of t-PA and PAI-1 levels in a Ghanaian population.

    PubMed

    Penrod, Nadia M; Poku, Kwabena A; Vaughan, Douglas E; Vaughn, Douglas E; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Brown, Nancy J; Moore, Jason H; Williams, Scott M

    2011-01-31

    The proteins, tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), act in concert to balance thrombus formation and degradation, thereby modulating the development of arterial thrombosis and excessive bleeding. PAI-1 is upregulated by the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), specifically by angiotensin II, the product of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) cleavage of angiotensin I, which is produced by the cleavage of angiotensinogen (AGT) by renin (REN). ACE indirectly stimulates the release of t-PA which, in turn, activates the corresponding fibrinolytic system. Single polymorphisms in these pathways have been shown to significantly impact plasma levels of t-PA and PAI-1 differently in Ghanaian males and females. Here we explore the involvement of epistatic interactions between the same polymorphisms in central genes of the RAS and fibrinolytic systems on plasma t-PA and PAI-1 levels within the same population (n = 992). Statistical modeling of pairwise interactions was done using two-way ANOVA between polymorphisms in the ETNK2, RENIN, ACE, PAI-1, t-PA, and AGT genes. The most significant interactions that associated with t-PA levels were between the ETNK2 A6135G and the REN T9435C polymorphisms in females (p = 0.006) and the REN T9435C and the TPA I/D polymorphisms (p = 0.005) in males. The most significant interactions for PAI-1 levels were with REN T9435C and the TPA I/D polymorphisms (p = 0.001) in females, and the association of REN G6567T with the TPA I/D polymorphisms (p = 0.032) in males. Our results provide evidence for multiple genetic effects that may not be detected using single SNP analysis. Because t-PA and PAI-1 have been implicated in cardiovascular disease these results support the idea that the genetic architecture of cardiovascular disease is complex. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the relationship between interacting polymorphisms of pathway specific genes that predict t-PA and PAI-1 levels.

  13. RACIAL DISPARITIES IN TPA TREATMENT RATE FOR STROKE: A POPULATION-BASED STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Amie W.; Edwards, Dorothy F.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Wing, Jeffrey J.; Brown, Nina C.; Coles, Regina; Loftin, Sarah; Wein, Andrea; Koslosky, Sara S.; Fatima, Sabiha; Fokar, Ali; Gibbons, M. Chris; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni; Kidwell, Chelsea S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Some prior studies have shown that racial disparities exist in intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) utilization for acute ischemic stroke. We sought to determine whether race was associated with tPA treatment for stroke in a predominantly black urban population. Methods Systematic chart abstraction was performed on consecutive hospitalized ischemic stroke patients from all seven acute care hospitals in the District of Columbia from Feb 1, 2008 to Jan 31, 2009. Results Of 1044 ischemic stroke patients, 74%% were black, 19% non-Hispanic white, 5% received IV tPA. Blacks were one third less likely than whites to receive IV tPA (3% vs. 10%, p<0.001). However, blacks were also less likely than whites to present within 3 hours of symptom onset (13% vs. 21%, p=0.004) and also less likely to be tPA-eligible (5% vs. 13%, p<0.001). Of those who presented within 3 hours, blacks were almost half as likely to be treated with IV tPA than whites (27% vs. 46%, p=0.023). The treatment rate for tPA-eligible patients was similar for blacks and whites (70% vs. 76%, p=0.62). Conclusions In this predominantly black urban population hospitalized for acute ischemic stroke, blacks were significantly less likely to be treated with IV tPA due to contraindications to treatment, delayed presentation, and stroke severity. Effective interventions designed to increase treatment in this population need to focus on culturally relevant education programs designed to address barriers specific to this population. PMID:21719765

  14. Evolution of intracerebral hemorrhage after intravenous tPA: reversal of harmful effects with mast cell stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Marinkovic, Ivan; Mattila, Olli S; Strbian, Daniel; Meretoja, Atte; Shekhar, Shashank; Saksi, Jani; Abo-Ramadan, Usama; Rantanen, Ville; Lindsberg, Perttu J; Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2014-01-01

    Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) traditionally demands baseline imaging to rule out intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), which causes delays in treatment. Preventing possible adverse effects of tPA on ICH would allow rapid on-site thrombolysis in patients with presumed acute ischemic stroke, reducing onset-to-treatment times. We examined how intravenous tPA alters ICH evolution during an extended follow-up, and how mast cell stabilization affects this process. Intracerebral hemorrhage was induced in rats by collagenase injection. Rats received either saline (n=10), tPA (n=13), tPA+low-dose cromoglycate (n=10), or tPA+high-dose cromoglycate (n=10). Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 24, 48, and 72 hours after ICH induction, together with neurologic evaluations. During 72 hours of follow-up, tPA administration did not significantly increase hematoma volume (mean±s.d. 83.5±14.3 versus 66.7±14.7 μL; P=0.256) or hemispheric expansion (14.5±5.0 versus 11.5±5.0% P=0.457) compared with saline. However, tPA-treated animals had worse neurologic outcomes (P<0.05), and mortality (8/13 versus 3/10). Combining tPA with high-dose cromoglycate mitigated hemispheric expansion (7.4±1.7 versus 14.5±5.0% P=0.01), improved neurologic outcome (P<0.001) and decreased mortality (1/10; P<0.05) compared with tPA alone. Our results suggest tPA increases neurologic deficit in ICH, an effect that was abolished by concomitant mast cell stabilization. Further studies are needed to establish the clinical relevance of these findings. PMID:24169849

  15. Pro-Oxidant Role of Silibinin in DMBA/TPA Induced Skin Cancer: 1H NMR Metabolomic and Biochemical Study.

    PubMed

    Sati, Jasmine; Mohanty, Biraja Prasad; Garg, Mohan Lal; Koul, Ashwani

    2016-01-01

    Silibinin, a major bioactive flavonolignan in Silybum marianum, has received considerable attention in view of its anticarcinogenic activity. The present study examines its anticancer potential against 7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced skin cancer. Male LACA mice were randomly segregated into 4 groups: Control, DMBA/TPA, Silibinin and Silibinin+DMBA/TPA. Tumors in DMBA/TPA and Silibinin+DMBA/TPA groups were histologically graded as squamous cell carcinoma. In the Silibinin+DMBA/TPA group, significant reduction in tumor incidence (23%), tumor volume (64.4%), and tumor burden (84.8%) was observed when compared to the DMBA/TPA group. The underlying protective mechanism of Silibinin action was studied at pre-initiation (2 weeks), post-initiation (10 weeks) and promotion (22 weeks) stages of the skin carcinogenesis. The antioxidant nature of Silibinin was evident at the end of 2 weeks of its treatment. However, towards the end of 10 and 22 weeks, elevated lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels indicate the pro-oxidative nature of Silibinin in the cancerous tissue. TUNEL assay revealed enhanced apoptosis in the Silibinin+DMBA/TPA group with respect to the DMBA/TPA group. Therefore, it may be suggested that raised LPO could be responsible for triggering apoptosis in the Silibinin+DMBA/TPA group. 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to determine the metabolic profile of the skin /skin tumors. Dimethylamine (DMA), glycerophosphocholine (GPC), glucose, lactic acid, taurine and guanine were identified as the major contributors for separation between the groups from the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the metabolite data. Enhanced DMA levels with no alteration in GPC, glucose and lactate levels reflect altered choline metabolism with no marked Warburg effect in skin tumors. However, elevated guanine levels with potent suppression of taurine and glucose levels in the Silibinin+DMBA/TPA group are

  16. Pro-Oxidant Role of Silibinin in DMBA/TPA Induced Skin Cancer: 1H NMR Metabolomic and Biochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Sati, Jasmine; Mohanty, Biraja Prasad; Garg, Mohan Lal; Koul, Ashwani

    2016-01-01

    Silibinin, a major bioactive flavonolignan in Silybum marianum, has received considerable attention in view of its anticarcinogenic activity. The present study examines its anticancer potential against 7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced skin cancer. Male LACA mice were randomly segregated into 4 groups: Control, DMBA/TPA, Silibinin and Silibinin+DMBA/TPA. Tumors in DMBA/TPA and Silibinin+DMBA/TPA groups were histologically graded as squamous cell carcinoma. In the Silibinin+DMBA/TPA group, significant reduction in tumor incidence (23%), tumor volume (64.4%), and tumor burden (84.8%) was observed when compared to the DMBA/TPA group. The underlying protective mechanism of Silibinin action was studied at pre-initiation (2 weeks), post-initiation (10 weeks) and promotion (22 weeks) stages of the skin carcinogenesis. The antioxidant nature of Silibinin was evident at the end of 2 weeks of its treatment. However, towards the end of 10 and 22 weeks, elevated lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels indicate the pro-oxidative nature of Silibinin in the cancerous tissue. TUNEL assay revealed enhanced apoptosis in the Silibinin+DMBA/TPA group with respect to the DMBA/TPA group. Therefore, it may be suggested that raised LPO could be responsible for triggering apoptosis in the Silibinin+DMBA/TPA group. 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to determine the metabolic profile of the skin /skin tumors. Dimethylamine (DMA), glycerophosphocholine (GPC), glucose, lactic acid, taurine and guanine were identified as the major contributors for separation between the groups from the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the metabolite data. Enhanced DMA levels with no alteration in GPC, glucose and lactate levels reflect altered choline metabolism with no marked Warburg effect in skin tumors. However, elevated guanine levels with potent suppression of taurine and glucose levels in the Silibinin+DMBA/TPA group are

  17. Remaining Uncertainties in the Causes of Past and Future Atlantic Hurricane Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossin, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    There is no debate that hurricane activity in the North Atlantic has increased substantially since the relatively quiescent period of the 1970s and 1980s, but there is still uncertainty in the dominant cause of the increase. Increases in anthropogenic greenhouse gases (aGHG) have contributed to the observed increase in tropical sea surface temperatures (SST) over the past century, while shorter-term decadal variability in regions where hurricanes form and track is generally dominated by 1) internal variability, 2) natural factors such as volcanic eruptions and mineral aerosol variability, and 3) changes in anthropogenic aerosols. Direct SST warming from globally well-mixed aGHG is understood to have a much smaller effect on hurricane formation and intensification compared to the effect of regional warming due to changes in the three factors noted above. While most recent papers implicate both internal and external anthropogenic causes for the presently heightened Atlantic hurricane activity, some show that internal variability dominates and others show that anthropogenic factors dominate. In the Atlantic, model projection-based consensus indicates no change in storm frequency over the next century but the uncertainty is large and spans -50% to +50%. Mean storm intensity and rainfall rates are projected to increase with continued warming, and the models tend to agree better when projecting these measures of activity. Models that are capable of producing very strong hurricanes usually project increases in the frequency of the most intense hurricanes. This measure is highly relevant to physical and societal impacts. In the Atlantic, model-based consensus indicates substantial increases in the strongest hurricanes, but the uncertainty is large and spans -100% to +200% change over the next century.

  18. Dependence of Proximal GC Boxes and Binding Transcription Factors in the Regulation of Basal and Valproic Acid-Induced Expression of t-PA.

    PubMed

    Ulfhammer, Erik; Larsson, Pia; Magnusson, Mia; Karlsson, Lena; Bergh, Niklas; Jern, Sverker

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Endothelial tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) release is a pivotal response to protect the circulation from occluding thrombosis. We have shown that the t-PA gene is epigenetically regulated and greatly induced by the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA). We now investigated involvement of known t-PA promoter regulatory elements and evaluated dependence of potential interacting transcription factors/cofactors. Methods. A reporter vector with an insert, separately mutated at either the t-PA promoter CRE or GC box II or GC box III elements, was transfected into HT-1080 and HUVECs and challenged with VPA. HUVECs were targeted with siRNA against histone acetyl transferases (HAT) and selected transcription factors from the Sp/KLF family. Results. An intact VPA-response was observed with CRE mutated constructs, whereas mutation of GC boxes II and III reduced the magnitude of the induction by 54 and 79% in HT-1080 and 49 and 50% in HUVECs, respectively. An attenuated induction of t-PA mRNA was observed after Sp2, Sp4, and KLF5 depletion. KLF2 and p300 (HAT) were identified as positive regulators of basal t-PA expression and Sp4 and KLF9 as repressors. Conclusion. VPA-induced t-PA expression is dependent on the proximal GC boxes in the t-PA promoter and may involve interactions with Sp2, Sp4, and KLF5.

  19. Calcium regulation of tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 release from cultured human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, C; Kaji, T; Sakamoto, M; Kozuka, H; Koizumi, F

    1994-04-15

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) produced by vascular endothelial cells converts plasminogen to plasmin which degrades fibrin. Since t-PA activity is greatly potentiated in the presence of fibrin (1,2), the activator is implicated in intravascular fibrinolysis. On the other hand, endothelial cells also produce plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) (3). The inhibitor associated with vascular endothelium rapidly inhibits t-PA, while that released into the liquid phase has a little anti-activator activity (4). However, clinical studies have shown that elevation of plasma PAI-1 level is a risk factor of thrombosis (5,6). It is thus suggested that the balance between t-PA and PAI-1 is important for the regulation of fibrinolysis. The release of t-PA and PAI-1 from vascular endothelial cells is regulated by physiological factors including thrombin (3,7), histamine (8), vasoconstrictor peptide endothelins (9,10) and cytokines (11). In addition, the regulation of the t-PA release and that of the PAI-1 release are not necessarily coupled. It has been shown that activated protein kinase C and cyclic AMP are involved in the stimulation and suppression, respectively, of the endothelial t-PA and PAI-1 production (12,13). However, the role of intracellular calcium in the regulation of endothelial t-PA and PAI-1 release has remained to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of calcium ionophore A23187 on the release of t-PA antigen (t-PA:Ag) and PAI-1 antigen (PAI-1:Ag) from cultured vascular endothelial cells derived from human umbilical vein.

  20. The active outer shell of Earth: What remains to be explored in carbon and life interactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boetius, Antje

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in methods and technologies have allowed us to explore the interaction between life and abiotic resources from nano to megascales in space and time, and this has set new challenges to the geosciences. This lecture aims at discussing key biological factors in the question of the dynamics of carbon reservoirs and fluxes on Earth, and the challenges to the geosciences to incorporate and further this knowledge. Humans themselves as one such biological factor have considerably changed the dynamics of carbon and other elements, with repercussions to most other life forms on Earth. Which other life forms shape carbon fluxes and reservoirs, and what do we know about their key traits in catalyzing geochemical reactions, their past and their future? I will use case studies from my own research field - geobiology of the oceans and the cryosphere - and from other geoscience areas to highlight the considerable non-linearity introduced by life to element fluxes and the environment; and discuss advances but also gaps in knowledge and research approaches concerning assessing and predicting carbon transformations in the active outer shell of Earth.

  1. cVEMP morphology changes with recording electrode position, but single motor unit activity remains constant.

    PubMed

    Rosengren, Sally M; Colebatch, James G; Borire, Adeniyi; Straumann, Dominik; Weber, Konrad P

    2016-04-15

    Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs) recorded over the lower quarter of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle in normal subjects may have opposite polarity to those recorded over the midpoint. It has thus been suggested that vestibular projections to the lower part of SCM might be excitatory rather than inhibitory. We tested the hypothesis that the SCM muscle receives both inhibitory and excitatory vestibular inputs. We recorded cVEMPs in 10 normal subjects with surface electrodes placed at multiple sites along the anterior (sternal) component of the SCM muscle. We compared several reference sites: sternum, ipsilateral and contralateral earlobes, and contralateral wrist. In five subjects, single motor unit responses were recorded at the upper, middle, and lower parts of the SCM muscle using concentric needle electrodes. The surface cVEMP had the typical positive-negative polarity at the midpoint of the SCM muscle. In all subjects, as the recording electrode was moved toward each insertion point, p13 amplitude became smaller and p13 latency increased, then the polarity inverted to a negative-positive waveform (n1-p1). Changing the reference site did not affect reflex polarity. There was a significant short-latency change in activity in 61/63 single motor units, and in each case this was a decrease or gap in firing, indicating an inhibitory reflex. Single motor unit recordings showed that the reflex was inhibitory along the entire SCM muscle. The cVEMP surface waveform inversion near the mastoid and sternal insertion points likely reflects volume conduction of the potential occurring with increasing distance from the motor point. PMID:26796756

  2. High t-PA release by neonate brain microvascular endothelial cells under glutamate exposure affects neuronal fate.

    PubMed

    Henry, Vincent Jean; Lecointre, Maryline; Laudenbach, Vincent; Ali, Carine; Macrez, Richard; Jullienne, Amandine; Berezowski, Vincent; Carmeliet, Peter; Vivien, Denis; Marret, Stéphane; Gonzalez, Bruno José; Leroux, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity is a consolidated hypothesis in neonatal brain injuries and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) participates in the processes through proteolytic and receptor mediated effects. In brain microvascular endothelial cell (nBMEC) cultures from neonates, t-PA content and release upon glutamate are higher than in adult (aBMECs) cultures. Owing to the variety of t-PA substrates and receptor targets, the study was aimed at determining the putative roles of endothelial t-PA in the neonatal brain parenchyma under glutamate challenge. Basal t-PA release was 4.4 fold higher in nBMECs vs aBMECs and glutamate was 20 fold more potent to allow Evans blue vascular permeability in neonate microvessels indicating that, under noxious glutamate (50 μM) exposure, high amounts of endothelial t-PA stores may be mobilized and may access the nervous parenchyma. Culture media from nBMECS or aBMECs challenged by excitotoxic glutamate were applied to neuron cultures at DIV 11. While media from adult cells did not evoke more LDH release in neuronal cultures that under glutamate alone, media from nBMECs enhanced 2.2 fold LDH release. This effect was not observed with media from t-PA(-/-) nBMECs and was inhibited by hr-PAI-1. In Cortical slices from 10 day-old mice, hrt-PA associated with glutamate evoked neuronal necrosis in deeper (more mature) layers, an effect reversed by NMDA receptor GluN1 amino-terminal domain antibody capable of inhibiting t-PA potentiation of the receptor. In superficial layers (less mature), hrt-PA alone inhibited apoptosis, an effect reversed by the EGF receptor antagonist AG1478. Applied to immature neurons in culture (DIV5), media from nBMEC rescued 85.1% of neurons from cell death induced by serum deprivation. In cortical slices, the anti-apoptotic effect of t-PA fitted with age dependent localization of less mature neurons. These data suggest that in the immature brain, propensity of vessels to release high amounts of t-PA may not only

  3. The medical malpractice TPA: Taking it to the next level.

    PubMed

    Sicard, Lauren E; Ruzzo, Loreto

    2016-04-01

    Risk managers whose organizations self-insure their medical professional liabilities often find themselves dealing with their institution's third-party administrator (TPA), the independent entity that manages claims against the organization and its employees. By understanding better the purpose and operations of a TPA, risk managers can enhance their organizations' litigation outcomes while adding new tools to improve patient safety and quality of care. Viewing the TPA simply as an expense item to be reduced to its lowest possible level deprives the organization of a valuable resource in the form of high-quality data on the drivers of professional liability losses. This article identifies the qualities found in an exceptional medical malpractice TPA and suggests ways to create an effective partnership that will reduce the total cost of claims while supporting the risk manager's mission. PMID:27088774

  4. TPA decreases 1,25(OH)2D3 binding and calbindin D-28K in renal (MDBK) cells.

    PubMed

    Simboli-Campbell, M; Gagnon, A M; Franks, D J; Welsh, J

    1992-02-01

    The effect of the phorbol ester TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate) on vitamin D receptors (VDRs) was studied in MDBK cells, a normal bovine renal epithelial cell line. 24 h treatment of MDBK cells with TPA resulted in down-regulation of VDR number, with no change in the binding affinity for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) or approximate molecular weight determined by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). TPA treatment also reduced the level of calbindin D-28K, a vitamin D-dependent renal protein. 4 alpha-Phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4 alpha-PDD), an inactive phorbol ester, did not affect either 1,25(OH)2D3 binding or calbindin D-28K levels. TPA elicited a significant decrease in membrane-associated protein kinase C (PKC) activity which coincided with the reduction in VDR number and calbindin D-28K. These data support a link between TPA, PKC activity and vitamin D actions in kidney.

  5. The gender-specific role of polymorphisms from the fibrinolytic, renin-angiotensin, and bradykinin systems in determining plasma t-PA and PAI-1 levels.

    PubMed

    Asselbergs, Folkert W; Williams, Scott M; Hebert, Patricia R; Coffey, Christopher S; Hillege, Hans L; Navis, Gerjan; Vaughan, Douglas E; van Gilst, Wiek H; Moore, Jason H

    2006-10-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) directly influence thrombus formation and degradation and thus risk for arterial thrombosis. We report here results from a genetic analysis of plasma t-PA and PAI-1 levels in a large population-based sample from the PREVEND study in Groningen, the Netherlands (n = 2,527). We measured polymorphisms from genes of the fibrinolytic system, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), and the bradykinin system. We found that males had higher levels of natural-log transformed t-PA, and PAI-1 (P < 0.01) compared to females. When stratifying females by menopausal status, PAI-1 levels were only significantly different between pre-menopausal females and males (p < 0.001). Furthermore, we found that age, body mass index, and waist-to-hip ratio were significant predictors of t-PA and PAI-1 in both females and males, and that the regression relationships between these factors and plasma t-PA and PAI-1 were dependent on gender. In addition, we found that the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism was a significant predictor of PAI-1 levels in both females and males, that the angiotensin II type I receptor A1166C was a significant predictor of t-PA and PAI-1 levels in females, and that the bradykinin receptor B2 58CT polymorphism was a significant predictor of t-PA levels in females. In conclusion, this large population-based study showed that t-PA and PAI-1 levels are determined by several demographic and genetic factors involved in the fibrinolytic, RAS and bradykinin system. In addition, the results support the idea that the biology of t-PA and PAI-1 is different between females and males.

  6. Catheter-directed Thrombolysis with Argatroban and tPA for Massive Iliac and Femoropopliteal Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sharifi, Mohsen; Bay, Curt; Nowroozi, Sasan; Bentz, Suzanne; Valeros, Gayle; Memari, Sara

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) is a highly effective approach in the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT). There are no data on the primary use of CDT with argatroban and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in patients without heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the combined administration of argatroban and tPA during CDT for massive DVT in patients without HIT. Methods: Thirty-three patients with massive symptomatic iliac and femoropopliteal DVT underwent CDT with tPA and argatroban within 28 {+-} 6 h of presentation. The dose of tPA was 0.75-1 mg/h through the infusion port and that of argatroban at 0.3-1 {mu}g/kg/min through the side port of the sheath. The patients were evaluated for the efficacy and safety of CDT and recurrent symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) at a mean follow-up of 22 months. Results: There was no bleeding or iatrogenic pulmonary embolism with the CDT regimen we used. Grade III lysis (complete resolution of thrombus on venography) was achieved in 30 patients (91 %). In 3 patients with additional inferior vena cava filter thrombosis, further thrombectomy of the filter was required. No patient developed recurrent VTE. Conclusion: Concomitant administration of argatroban and tPA is a highly safe and effective regimen for CDT for massive DVT.

  7. Redox-regulation of Erk1/2-directed phosphatase by reactive oxygen species: role in signaling TPA-induced growth arrest in ML-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Traore, Kassim; Sharma, Rajni; Thimmulappa, Rajesh K; Watson, Walter H; Biswal, Shyam; Trush, Michael A

    2008-07-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk)1/2 activity signals myeloid cell differentiation induced by 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Previously, we reported that Erk1/2 activation (phosphorylation) induced by TPA required reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a second messenger. Here, we hypothesized that ROS generated in response to TPA inhibit Erk1/2-directed phosphatase activity, which leads to an increase phosphorylation of Erk1/2 to signal p21(WAF1/Cip1)-mediated growth arrest in ML-1 cells. Incubation of ML-1 cells with TPA resulted in a marked accumulation of phosphorylated Erk1/2, and is subsequent to H2O2 generation. Interestingly, post-TPA-treatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) stimulated a marked and a rapid dephosphorylation of Erk1/2, suggesting a regeneration of Erk1/2-directed phospahatase activity by NAC. ROS generation in ML-1 cells induced by TPA was suggested to occur in the mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) based on the following observations: (i) undifferentiated ML-1 cells not only lack p67-phox and but also express a low level of p47-phox key components required for NADPH oxidase enzymatic activity, (ii) pretreatment with DPI, an inhibitor of NADH- and NADPH-dependent enzymes, or rhein, an inhibitor of complex I, blocked the ROS generation, and (iii) examination of the microarray analysis data and Western blot analysis data revealed an induction of MnSOD expression at both mRNA and protein levels in response to TPA. MnSOD is a key member of the mitochondrial defense system against mitochondrial-derived superoxide. Together, this study suggested that TPA stimulated ROS generation as a second messenger to activate Erk1/2 via a redox-mediated inhibition of Erk1/2-directed phosphatase in ML-1 cells.

  8. Sulforaphane controls TPA-induced MMP-9 expression through the NF-κB signaling pathway, but not AP-1, in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Rae; Noh, Eun-Mi; Han, Ji-Hey; Kim, Jeong-Mi; Hwang, Bo-Mi; Kim, Byeong-Soo; Lee, Sung-Ho; Jung, Sung Hoo; Youn, Hyun Jo; Chung, Eun Yong; Kim, Jong-Suk

    2013-01-01

    Sulforaphane [1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylsulfinyl)-butane] is an isothiocyanate found in some cruciferous vegetables, especially broccoli. Sulforaphane has been shown to display anti-cancer properties against various cancer cell lines. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which degrades the extracellular matrix (ECM), plays an important role in cancer cell invasion. In this study, we investigated the effect of sulforaphane on 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced MMP-9 expression and cell invasion in MCF-7 cells. TPA-induced MMP-9 expression and cell invasion were decreased by sulforaphane treatment. TPA substantially increased NF-κB and AP-1 DNA binding activity. Pre-treatment with sulforaphane inhibited TPA-stimulated NF-κB binding activity, but not AP-1 binding activity. In addition, we found that sulforaphane suppressed NF-κB activation, by inhibiting phosphorylation of IκB in TPA-treated MCF-7 cells. In this study, we demonstrated that the inhibition of TPA-induced MMP-9 expression and cell invasion by sulforaphane was mediated by the suppression of the NF-κB pathway in MCF-7 cells. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(4): 201-206] PMID:23615261

  9. Model of complex chiral drug metabolic systems and numerical simulation of the remaining chirality toward analysis of dynamical pharmacological activity.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Yoshiyuki; Asahi, Toru

    2015-05-21

    In this study, systems of complicated pathways involved in chiral drug metabolism were investigated. The development of chiral drugs resulted in significant improvement in the remedies available for the treatment of various severe sicknesses. Enantiopure drugs undergo various biological transformations that involve chiral inversion and thus result in the generation of multiple enantiomeric metabolites. Identification of the specific active substances determining a given drug׳s efficacy among such a mixture of different metabolites remains a challenge. To comprehend this complexity, we constructed a mathematical model representing the complicated metabolic pathways simultaneously involving chiral inversion. Moreover, this model is applied to the metabolism of thalidomide, which has recently been revived as a potentially effective prescription drug for a number of intractable diseases. The numerical simulation results indicate that retained chirality in the metabolites reflects the original chirality of the unmetabolized drug, and a higher level of enantiomeric purity is preserved during spontaneous degradation. In addition, chirality remaining after equilibration is directly related to the rate constant not only for chiral inversion but also for generation and degradation. Furthermore, the retention of chirality is quantitatively predictable using this combination of kinetic parameters. Our simulation results well explain the behavior of thalidomide in the practical biological experimental data. Therefore, this model promises a comprehensive understanding of dynamic metabolic systems involving chiral drugs that express multiple enantiospecific drug efficacies.

  10. Model of complex chiral drug metabolic systems and numerical simulation of the remaining chirality toward analysis of dynamical pharmacological activity.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Yoshiyuki; Asahi, Toru

    2015-05-21

    In this study, systems of complicated pathways involved in chiral drug metabolism were investigated. The development of chiral drugs resulted in significant improvement in the remedies available for the treatment of various severe sicknesses. Enantiopure drugs undergo various biological transformations that involve chiral inversion and thus result in the generation of multiple enantiomeric metabolites. Identification of the specific active substances determining a given drug׳s efficacy among such a mixture of different metabolites remains a challenge. To comprehend this complexity, we constructed a mathematical model representing the complicated metabolic pathways simultaneously involving chiral inversion. Moreover, this model is applied to the metabolism of thalidomide, which has recently been revived as a potentially effective prescription drug for a number of intractable diseases. The numerical simulation results indicate that retained chirality in the metabolites reflects the original chirality of the unmetabolized drug, and a higher level of enantiomeric purity is preserved during spontaneous degradation. In addition, chirality remaining after equilibration is directly related to the rate constant not only for chiral inversion but also for generation and degradation. Furthermore, the retention of chirality is quantitatively predictable using this combination of kinetic parameters. Our simulation results well explain the behavior of thalidomide in the practical biological experimental data. Therefore, this model promises a comprehensive understanding of dynamic metabolic systems involving chiral drugs that express multiple enantiospecific drug efficacies. PMID:25791284

  11. RBC-coupled tPA prevents cerebrovasodilatory impairment and tissue injury in pediatric cerebral hypoxia/ischemia through inhibition of ERK MAPK unregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, Kumkum; Armstead, William M; Kiessling, J W; Chen, Xiao - Han; Smith, Douglas H; Higazi, Abd Ar; Cines, Douglas B; Bdeir, Khalil; Zaitsev, Sergei; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2008-01-01

    Babies experience hypoxia (H) and ischemia (I) from stroke. The only approved treatment for stroke is fibrinolytic therapy with tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA). However, tPA potentiates H/I-induced impairment of responses to cerebrovasodilators such as hypercapnia and hypotension, and blockade of tPA-mediated vasoactivity prevents this deleterious effect. Coupling tPA to RBCs reduces its CNS toxicity through spatially confining the drug to the vasculature. Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), a family of at least 3 kinases, is upregulated after H/I. In this study we determined if RBC-tPA given before or after cerebral H/I would preserve responses to cerebrovasodilators and prevent neuronal injury mediated through the ERK MAPK pathway. Animals given RBC-tPA maintained responses to cerebrovasodilators at levels equivalent to pre-H/I values. CSF and brain parenchymal ERK MAPK was elevated by H/I and this upregulation was potentiated by tPA, but blunted by RBC-tPA. U 0126, an ERK MAPK antagonist, also maintained cerebrovasodilation post H/I. Neuronal degeneration in CA1 hippocampus and parietal cortex after H/I was exacerbated by tPA, but ameliorated by RBC-tPA and U 0126. These data suggest that coupling tPA to RBCs may offer a novel approach towards increasing the benefit/risk ratio of thrombolytic therapy for CNS disorders associated with H/I.

  12. Displacement of submacular hemorrhage associated with age-related macular degeneration using vitrectomy and submacular tPA injection followed by intravitreal ranibizumab

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Sukhpal Singh; Manvikar, Sridhar; Steel, David Henry William

    2010-01-01

    Background/aims: To evaluate retrospectively the clinical outcomes of patients presenting with submacular hemorrhage (SMH) secondary to neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD), treated by vitrectomy, submacular tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) injection and pneumatic displacement of SMH with air followed by postoperative intravitreal ranibizumab (RZB). Methods: Patients with SMH and nAMD had 25-guage vitrectomy and subretinal tPA (12.5 micrograms/0.1 mL) with fluid/air exchange. Intravitreal RZB was administered postoperatively to patients eligible for National Health Service (NHS) funded treatment. Results: Of the total of 16 patients, 11 (68.7%) had complete displacement of SMH. The remaining five had residual SMH, mainly subretinal pigment epithelium in location. Three of the four patients who previously had a failed expansile gas pneumatic displacement were successfully displaced with vitrectomy surgery. At presentation 5/16 (31.3%) patients were eligible for NHS funded intravitreal RZB. This increased to 12 patients after the vitrectomy procedure (75.0%). At 6 months postoperatively all improved by ≥1 line. Ten of the 16 patients (63%) improved by ≥2 lines, with 10 of the 12 patients (83%) treated with RZB improving by ≥2 lines. Conclusion: Vitrectomy/subretinal tPA/air to displace SMH followed by intravitreal RZB injection can stabilize/improve vision in patients with nAMD. This technique displaces hemorrhage not displaced by attempted expansile gas techniques. PMID:20668667

  13. Fatty acid synthesis and pyruvate metabolism pathways remain active in dihydroartemisinin-induced dormant ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nanhua; LaCrue, Alexis N; Teuscher, Franka; Waters, Norman C; Gatton, Michelle L; Kyle, Dennis E; Cheng, Qin

    2014-08-01

    Artemisinin (ART)-based combination therapy (ACT) is used as the first-line treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria worldwide. However, despite high potency and rapid action, there is a high rate of recrudescence associated with ART monotherapy or ACT long before the recent emergence of ART resistance. ART-induced ring-stage dormancy and recovery have been implicated as possible causes of recrudescence; however, little is known about the characteristics of dormant parasites, including whether dormant parasites are metabolically active. We investigated the transcription of 12 genes encoding key enzymes in various metabolic pathways in P. falciparum during dihydroartemisinin (DHA)-induced dormancy and recovery. Transcription analysis showed an immediate downregulation for 10 genes following exposure to DHA but continued transcription of 2 genes encoding apicoplast and mitochondrial proteins. Transcription of several additional genes encoding apicoplast and mitochondrial proteins, particularly of genes encoding enzymes in pyruvate metabolism and fatty acid synthesis pathways, was also maintained. Additions of inhibitors for biotin acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase and enoyl-acyl carrier reductase of the fatty acid synthesis pathways delayed the recovery of dormant parasites by 6 and 4 days, respectively, following DHA treatment. Our results demonstrate that most metabolic pathways are downregulated in DHA-induced dormant parasites. In contrast, fatty acid and pyruvate metabolic pathways remain active. These findings highlight new targets to interrupt recovery of parasites from ART-induced dormancy and to reduce the rate of recrudescence following ART treatment.

  14. Three Ways edTPA Prepared Me for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    edTPA, a capstone assessment designed to assess whether new teachers are ready for the job by evaluating their teaching and their analysis of their teaching, helped prepare the author for the classroom in three ways. First, he became accountable to his students. Second, he learned to analyze his teaching. Third, he discovered how to relate…

  15. Candidate Success and edTPA: Looking at the Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Lesley A.; Kelly, Mary K.; Baldwin, Joni L.; Arnold, Jackie M.

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive study looks at the correlations between Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA) data and numerous program data points, including GPA, major GPA, and benchmark assignment scores, gathered in an Early Childhood Education (ECE) program. Previous studies have looked to correlate grade point average (GPA) with pre-service teacher…

  16. Teaching Elementary School Social Studies Methods under edTPA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Sohyun

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a self-study that analyzes my experience as a teacher educator navigating a turbulent educational landscape with the advent of edTPA. The data consist of my journal entries, the syllabi, handouts, work submitted by my students, and course evaluations. Data were analyzed by using an inductive process to describe how the edTPA…

  17. Neuroendocrinal, Neurodevelopmental, and Embryotoxic Effects of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Treatment for Pregnant Women with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Anna; Moreira, Tiago P.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) was the first evidence-based treatment approved for acute stroke. Ischemic stroke is relatively uncommon in fertile women but treatment is often delayed or not given. In randomized trials, pregnancy has been an exclusion criterion for thrombolysis. Physiologic TPA has been shown to have neuroendocrine effects namely in vasopressin secretion. Important TPA effects in brain function and development include neurite outgrowth, migration of cerebellar granular neurons and promotion of long-term potentiation, among others. Until now, no neuroendocrine side-effects have been reported in pregnant women treated with rTPA. The effects of rTPA exposure in the fetus following intravenous thrombolysis in pregnant women are still poorly understood. This depends on low case frequency, short-duration of exposure and the fact that rTPA molecule is too large to pass the placenta. rTPA has a short half-life of 4–5 min, with only 10% of its concentration remaining in circulation after 20 min, which may explain its safety at therapeutically doses. Ischemic stroke during pregnancy occurs most often in the third trimester. Complication rates of rTPA in pregnant women treated for thromboembolic conditions and ischemic stroke were found to be similar when compared to non-pregnant women (7–9% mortality). In embryos of animal models so far, no indications of a teratogenic or mutagenic potential were found. Pregnancy is still considered a relative contraindication when treating acute ischemic stroke with rTPA, however, treatment risk must be balanced against the potential of maternal disability and/or death. PMID:26941596

  18. Repurposing an old drug to improve the safety and use of tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke: Minocycline

    PubMed Central

    Hess, David C; Fagan, Susan

    2014-01-01

    There is only 1 US Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for acute ischemic stroke: tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Due to a short time window and fear of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), tPA remains underutilized. There is great interest in developing combination drugs to use with tPA to improve the odds of a favorable recovery and to reduce the risk of ICH. Minocycline is a broad spectrum antibiotic that has been found to be a neuroprotective agent in preclinical ischemic stroke models. Minocycline inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-9, a biomarker for ICH associated with tPA use. Minocycline is also an anti-inflammatory agent and inhibits poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase- 1. Minocycline has been safe and well tolerated in the clinical trials conducted to date. PMID:20575623

  19. Epistatic effects of polymorphisms in genes from the renin-angiotensin, bradykinin, and fibrinolytic systems on plasma t-PA and PAI-1 levels.

    PubMed

    Asselbergs, Folkert W; Williams, Scott M; Hebert, Patricia R; Coffey, Christopher S; Hillege, Hans L; Navis, Gerjan; Vaughan, Douglas E; van Gilst, Wiek H; Moore, Jason H

    2007-03-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) directly influence thrombus formation and degradation and thereby risk for arterial thrombosis. Activation of the renin-angiotensin system has been linked to the production of PAI-1 expression via the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). In addition, bradykinin can induce the release of t-PA through a B2 receptor mechanism. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the epistatic effects of polymorphisms in genes from the renin-angiotensin, bradykinin, and fibrinolytic systems on plasma t-PA and PAI-1 levels in a large population-based sample (n=2527). We demonstrated a strong significant interaction within genetic variations of the bradykinin B2 gene (P=0.002) and between ACE and bradykinin B2 (p=0.003) polymorphisms on t-PA levels in females. In males, polymorphisms in the bradykinin B2 and AT1R gene showed the most strong effect on t-PA levels (P=0.006). In both females and males, the bradykinin B2 gene interacted with AT1R gene on plasma PAI-1 levels (P=0.026 and P=0.039, respectively). In addition, the current study found a borderline significant interaction between PAI 4G5G and ACE I/D on plasma t-PA and PAI-1 levels. These results support the idea that the interplay between the renin-angiotensin, bradykinin, and fibrinolytic systems might play an important role in t-PA and PAI-1 biology.

  20. TPA - A COMPUTER PROGRAM TO BALANCE MAPPED TURBOPUMP ASSEMBLIES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    Accurate simulation of nuclear thermal propulsion systems using computational methods will permit reductions in testing and, thus, the time and cost of achieving a flight ready status for systems utilizing this advanced technology. An accurate simulation must maintain a "balance-of-plant" where the required pump work equals the supplied turbine work. This turbopump assembly balancing must be integrated into the overall system analysis models. TPA was developed to balance turbine and pump work using performance maps. It requires the inlet properties, performance maps, and shaft speed. TPA then computes the exit conditions and work terms. The work terms can then be balanced by varying the input shaft speed. The objective of the pump analysis is to determine the propellant state properties at the pump exit and the pump work. The pump analysis algorithm for liquid flow assumes that the shaft speed, the propellant state properties at the pump entrance, the propellant flow rate, the pump entrance and exit areas, as well as performance curves, are all known. The analysis of both the pump pressure rise and pump efficiency curves is required. The objective of the turbine analysis is to determine the propellant state properties at the turbine exit and the turbine work. The turbine analysis algorithm assumes that the shaft speed, the propellant state properties at the turbine entrance, the propellant flow rate, the turbine root mean square blade diameter, the turbine entrance and exit areas, as well as performance curves, are all known. The analysis also requires the turbine flow parameter curve and the turbine total efficiency curve. TPA is written in FORTRAN 77 to be machine independent. The TPA package includes the NBS+_PH2 code, which is also available separately (LEW-15505). TPA has been successfully implemented on a DEC VAX series computer running VMS, a Sun4 series computer running SunOS, and an IBM PC compatible computer running MS-DOS. Lahey F77L3 EM/32 v. 5.01 or

  1. The reaction of [FeII(tpa)] with H2O2 in acetonitrile and acetone--distinct intermediates and yet similar catalysis.

    PubMed

    Mairata i Payeras, Antoni; Ho, Raymond Y N; Fujita, Megumi; Que, Lawrence

    2004-10-11

    The reaction of [FeII(tpa)(OTf)2] (tpa=tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine) and its related 5-Me3-tpa complex with hydrogen peroxide affords spectroscopically distinct iron(III)-peroxo intermediates in CH3CN and acetone. The reaction in acetonitrile at -40 degrees C results in the formation of the previously reported Fe(III)-OOH intermediate, the end-on hydroperoxo coordination mode of which is established in this paper by detailed resonance Raman isotope-labeling experiments. On the other hand, the reaction in acetone below -40 degrees C leads to the observation of a different peroxo intermediate identified by resonance Raman spectroscopy to be an FeIII-OOC (CH3)2OH species; this represents the first example of an intermediate derived from the adduct of H2O2 and acetone. The peroxoacetone intermediate decays more rapidly than the corresponding FeIII-OOH species and converts to an FeIV=O species by O-O bond homolysis. This decay process is analogous to that observed for [FeIII(tpa)(OOtBu)]2+ and in fact exhibits a comparable enthalpy of activation of 54(3) kJ mol(-1). Thus, with respect to their physical properties at low temperature, the peroxoacetone intermediate resembles [FeIII(tpa)(OOtBu)]2+ more than the corresponding FeIII-OOH species. At room temperature, however, the behavior of the Fe(tpa)/H2O2 combination in acetone in catalytic hydrocarbon oxidations differs significantly from that of the Fe(tpa)/tBuOOH combination and more closely matches that of the Fe(tpa)/H2O2 combination in CH3CN. Like the latter, the Fe(tpa)/H2O2 combination in acetone catalyzes the hydroxylation of cis-1,2-dimethylcyclohexane to its tertiary alcohol with high stereoselectivity and carries out the epoxidation and cis-dihydroxylation of olefins. These results demonstrate the subtle complexity of the Fe(tpa)/H2O2 reaction surface.

  2. Inhibitory effect of the flowers of artichoke (Cynara cardunculus) on TPA-induced inflammation and tumor promotion in two-stage carcinogenesis in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Ken; Matsubara, Hideki; Sano, Yuri

    2010-07-01

    The methanol extract of the flowers of artichoke (Cynara cardunculus) exhibited remarkable antitumor activity in an in vivo two-stage carcinogenesis test in mice, using 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene as an initiator and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as a promoter. From the active fraction of the methanol extract, four triterpene alcohols and their corresponding acetates were isolated and identified. These compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on TPA-induced inflammation (1 microg/ear) in mice and showed marked anti-inflammatory effects, with a 50% inhibitory dose of 0.50-0.91 micromol/ear.

  3. Cardiac activation heat remains inversely dependent on temperature over the range 27-37°C.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Callum M; Han, June-Chiew; Loiselle, Denis S; Nielsen, Poul M F; Taberner, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    The relation between heat output and stress production (force per cross-sectional area) of isolated cardiac tissue is a key metric that provides insight into muscle energetic performance. The heat intercept of the relation, termed "activation heat," reflects the metabolic cost of restoring transmembrane gradients of Na(+) and K(+) following electrical excitation, and myoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration following its release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. At subphysiological temperatures, activation heat is inversely dependent on temperature. Thus one may presume that activation heat would decrease even further at body temperature. However, this assumption is prima facie inconsistent with a study, using intact hearts, which revealed no apparent change in the combination of activation and basal metabolism between 27 and 37°C. It is thus desired to directly determine the change in activation heat between 27 and 37°C. In this study, we use our recently constructed high-thermal resolution muscle calorimeter to determine the first heat-stress relation of isolated cardiac muscle at 37°C. We compare the relation at 37°C to that at 27°C to examine whether the inverse temperature dependence of activation heat, observed under hypothermic conditions, prevails at body temperature. Our results show that activation heat was reduced (from 3.5 ± 0.3 to 2.3 ± 0.3 kJ/m(3)) at the higher temperature. This leads us to conclude that activation metabolism continues to decline as temperature is increased from hypothermia to normothermia and allows us to comment on results obtained from the intact heart by previous investigators.

  4. Cardiac activation heat remains inversely dependent on temperature over the range 27-37°C.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Callum M; Han, June-Chiew; Loiselle, Denis S; Nielsen, Poul M F; Taberner, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    The relation between heat output and stress production (force per cross-sectional area) of isolated cardiac tissue is a key metric that provides insight into muscle energetic performance. The heat intercept of the relation, termed "activation heat," reflects the metabolic cost of restoring transmembrane gradients of Na(+) and K(+) following electrical excitation, and myoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration following its release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. At subphysiological temperatures, activation heat is inversely dependent on temperature. Thus one may presume that activation heat would decrease even further at body temperature. However, this assumption is prima facie inconsistent with a study, using intact hearts, which revealed no apparent change in the combination of activation and basal metabolism between 27 and 37°C. It is thus desired to directly determine the change in activation heat between 27 and 37°C. In this study, we use our recently constructed high-thermal resolution muscle calorimeter to determine the first heat-stress relation of isolated cardiac muscle at 37°C. We compare the relation at 37°C to that at 27°C to examine whether the inverse temperature dependence of activation heat, observed under hypothermic conditions, prevails at body temperature. Our results show that activation heat was reduced (from 3.5 ± 0.3 to 2.3 ± 0.3 kJ/m(3)) at the higher temperature. This leads us to conclude that activation metabolism continues to decline as temperature is increased from hypothermia to normothermia and allows us to comment on results obtained from the intact heart by previous investigators. PMID:27016583

  5. Adjunctive treatment with ticagrelor, but not clopidogrel, added to tPA enables sustained coronary artery recanalisation with recovery of myocardium perfusion in a canine coronary thrombosis model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Zhou, Xiaorong; Huang, Yanming; Khalil, Mazen; Wiktor, Dominik; van Giezen, J J J; Penn, Marc S

    2010-09-01

    Reperfusion therapy for myocardial infarction is limited by significant re-occlusion rates and less-than-optimal myocardial tissue perfusion. It was the objective of this study to assess and compare the effect of ticagrelor, the first reversibly binding oral P2Y12 receptor antagonist, with that of clopidogrel, in conjunction with thrombolytic therapy, on platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, and myocardial perfusion in a canine model. Thrombus formation was induced by electrolytic injury and blood flow was measured with a Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter. All animals received tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) (1 mg/kg over 20 min); 10 animals received clopidogrel (10 mg/kg IV bolus over 5 min), 10 animals received ticagrelor initiated with a 1-min bolus (75 microg/kg/min), followed by continuous infusion (10 microg/kg/min) for 2 h, and 10 animals received IV saline. Re-occlusion rate and cyclic flow variation decreased with ticagrelor compared to saline groups (p<0.05). Adenosine phosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation decreased with ticagrelor (1.9% +/- 2.67) and clopidogrel (1.11% +/- 2.0) vs. saline (26.3% +/- 23.5, p<0.05) at the end of adjunctive therapy. Bleeding time increased in the clopidogrel compared to the ticagrelor group (p=0.01). Infarct size was reduced with ticagrelor compared to the clopidogrel and saline groups (p<0.05). Blood flow remained significantly below baseline values at 20 min after tPA administration in the saline and clopidogrel groups but not in the ticagrelor group. In conclusion, in a dog coronary thrombosis model, ticagrelor blocks ADP-induced platelet activation and aggregation; prevents platelet-mediated thrombosis; prolongs reperfusion time and reduces re-occlusion and cyclic flow variation; and significantly decreases infarct size and rapidly restores myocardial tissue perfusion. PMID:20694285

  6. Intravitreal tPA Injection and Pneumatic Displacement for Submacular Hemorrhage in a 10-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Hiroshi; Hattori, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    Background. Submacular hemorrhage can occur after blunt trauma to the eye. Intravitreal tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and gas injection are often used for treatment and are effective for submacular hemorrhage caused by age-related macular degeneration. This report describes the clinical outcome in a child with submacular hemorrhage caused by traumatic choroidal rupture who underwent successful intravitreal tPA injection and pneumatic displacement. Case Presentation. A 10-year-old boy developed sudden decrease of vision and a central scotoma in his right eye after trauma. Submacular hemorrhage was found in the eye. Visual acuity was 20/70 OD. Tissue plasminogen activator (12.5 μg in 0.05 mL) and 0.3 mL of pure sulfur hexafluoride were injected into the vitreous cavity under general anesthesia. After surgery, the patient was instructed to maintain a prone position. Displacement of the submacular hemorrhage from the fovea revealed a choroidal rupture, presumed to be the cause of the hemorrhage. After 4 months of follow-up, visual acuity was restored and final visual acuity is 20/16. Conclusion. Intravitreal tPA and gas injection can be an effective treatment for children with submacular hemorrhage. PMID:27722001

  7. Aerobic exercise capacity remains normal despite impaired endothelial function in the micro- and macrocirculation of physically active IDDM patients.

    PubMed

    Veves, A; Saouaf, R; Donaghue, V M; Mullooly, C A; Kistler, J A; Giurini, J M; Horton, E S; Fielding, R A

    1997-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine if diabetes in the absence of neuropathy affects the exercising capacity of IDDM patients, and whether regular, intense training has a beneficial effect on endothelial function. Five groups of subjects were studied: 23 healthy control subjects who exercised regularly (age 33 +/- 6 years), 23 nonneuropathic type 1 diabetic patients who exercised regularly (age 33 +/- 6 years, IDDM duration 11 +/- 8 years), 7 neuropathic type 1 diabetic patients who exercised regularly (age 36 +/- 7 years, IDDM duration 22 +/- 8 years), 18 healthy subjects who did not exercise regularly (age 34 +/- 7 years), and 5 nonneuropathic type 1 diabetic patients who did not exercise regularly (age 31 +/- 4 years, IDDM duration 20 +/- 3 years). All groups were matched for age, sex, and body weight. No differences existed in the energy expenditure per week in physical activity among the three exercising groups or between the two nonexercising groups. The maximal oxygen uptake was similar between control and diabetic nonneuropathic exercisers, and among diabetic neuropathic exercisers, control nonexercisers, and diabetic nonexercisers; however, a significant difference existed between the first two and the last three groups (P < 0.0001). A stepwise increase was found in the resting heart rate among the groups, ranging from the lowest in control exercisers to the highest in diabetic nonexercisers, but the maximal heart rate was lower only in diabetic neuropathic exercisers compared with all other groups (P < 0.05). Assessments of endothelial function in both macro- and microcirculation were performed in 12 control exercisers, 10 diabetic nonneuropathic exercisers, 5 diabetic neuropathic exercisers, 17 control nonexercisers, and 4 diabetic nonexercisers. When all diabetic patients were considered as one group and all control subjects as another, the microcirculation endothelial function in the diabetic group was reduced compared with the control subjects

  8. Toxins vapC and pasB from prokaryotic TA modules remain active in mammalian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wieteska, Łukasz; Skulimowski, Aleksander; Cybula, Magdalena; Szemraj, Janusz

    2014-10-01

    Among the great number of addictive modules which have been discovered, only a few have been characterized. However, research concerning the adoption of toxins from these systems shows their great potential as a tool for molecular biology and medicine. In our study, we tested two different toxins derived from class II addictive modules, pasAB from plasmid pTF-FC2 (Thiobacillus ferrooxidans) and vapBC 2829Rv (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), in terms of their usefulness as growth inhibitors of human cancer cell lines, namely KYSE 30, MCF-7 and HCT 116. Transfection of the pasB and vapC genes into the cells was conducted with the use of two different expression systems. Cellular effects, such as apoptosis, necrosis and changes in the cell cycle, were tested by applying flow cytometry with immunofluorescence staining. Our findings demonstrated that toxins VapC and PasB demonstrate proapoptotic activity in the human cancer cells, regardless of the expression system used. As for the toxin PasB, observed changes were more subtle than for the VapC. The level of expression for both the genes was monitored by QPCR and did not reveal statistically significant differences within the same cell line.

  9. Single or multicellular origin of human T lymphocyte colonies in vitro: modification by 12-o-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA).

    PubMed

    Singer, J W; Ernst, C; Whalen, C K; Steinmann, L; Fialkow, P J

    1981-04-01

    The assumption that human T lymphocyte colonies have a unicellular origin has been directly tested with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 2 women heterozygous for the common X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) gene (GdB) and the variant GdA. T cells were cultured in semisolid medium in the presence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and T lymphocyte growth factor with or without preincubation in suspension culture with PHA (2-stage and 1-stage assays, respectively). The enzyme type of individual T cell colonies was then determined electrophoretically at the lowest colony density with adequate growth (usually less than 100 colonies/dish). In the 2-stage system, 90 of 97 tested colonies had equal amounts of A and B enzyme activities suggesting multicellular origin of the colonies. Similarly, in the single-stage system, 21 of 31 colonies had both A and B enzymes. Increasing the density of the soft agar did not influence the frequency of A/B colonies. However, when 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), a promoter of T cell colony growth shown in other systems to inhibit metabolic cooperation, was added, a striking decrease in frequency of colonies with both G-6-PD types was found. In the 2-stage culture, 0 of 9 colonies had a double-enzyme type and in the single-stage system, the frequency of A/B colonies declined to 9 of 34 (p less than 0.025). The data suggest that despite the apparent multicellular origin of T cell colonies in cultures with TPA, most colonies do originate from single cells when cultured with TPA at low colony densities. Stimulation of cell growth or inhibition of metabolic cooperation between cells by TPA are possible explanations for these differences. PMID:6970773

  10. Cancer-promoting effect of capsaicin on DMBA/TPA-induced skin tumorigenesis by modulating inflammation, Erk and p38 in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoguo; Zhu, Pingting; Tao, Yu; Shen, Cunsi; Wang, Siliang; Zhao, Lingang; Wu, Hongyan; Fan, Fangtian; Lin, Chao; Chen, Chen; Zhu, Zhijie; Wei, Zhonghong; Sun, Lihua; Liu, Yuping; Wang, Aiyun; Lu, Yin

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiologic and animal studies revealed that capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-noneamide) can act as a carcinogen or cocarcinogen. However, the influence of consumption of capsaicin-containing foods or vegetables on skin cancer patients remains largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that capsaicin has a cocarcinogenic effect on 9, 10-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced skin tumorigenesis. Our results showed that topical application of capsaicin on the dorsal skin of DMBA-initiated and TPA-promoted mice could significantly accelerate tumor formation and growth and induce more and larger skin tumors than the model group (DMBA + TPA). Moreover, capsaicin could promote TPA-induced skin hyperplasia and tumor proliferation. Mechanistic study found that inflammation-related factors cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were highly elevated by pretreatment with capsaicin, suggesting an inflammation-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, mice that were administered capsaicin exhibited significant up-regulation of phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB), Erk and p38 but had no effect on JNK. Thus, our results indicated that inflammation, Erk and P38 collectively played a crucial role in cancer-promoting effect of capsaicin on carcinogen-induced skin cancer in mice.

  11. Anti-diphtheria antibody seroprotection rates are similar 10 years after vaccination with dTpa or DTPa using a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Cheuvart, Brigitte; Burgess, Margaret; Zepp, Fred; Mertsola, Jussi; Wolter, Joanne; Schuerman, Lode

    2004-12-01

    The reduced antigen content diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (dTpa) vaccine (Boostrixtrade mark) has been shown to induce a strong booster response to all the vaccine components in 4-6 year olds. However, anti-diphtheria antibody levels were observed to be lower when compared to the "full strength" paediatric DTPa vaccine. To assess the impact of this difference on long-term protection, a mathematical model was developed to predict diphtheria antibody decay over time. The model was based on a linear decrease in log-transformed antibody concentrations after the first year post-vaccination. When applied to data collected 3.5 years after vaccination of 4-6 year olds with either DTPa or dTpa, the model predicted that 10 years post-vaccination, 98.6% of subjects vaccinated with dTpa were likely to remain seroprotected against diphtheria, compared to 99.6% vaccinated with DTPa. Therefore, the difference observed in diphtheria antibody geometric mean concentrations 1 month after booster vaccination at 4-6 years with dTpa or DTPa is unlikely to be of clinical relevance 10 years later at the time of the adolescent booster.

  12. Unstandardized Responses to a "Standardized" Test: The edTPA as Gatekeeper and Curriculum Change Agent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledwell, Katherine; Oyler, Celia

    2016-01-01

    We examine edTPA (a teacher performance assessment) implementation at one private university during the first year that our state required this exam for initial teaching certification. Using data from semi-structured interviews with 19 teacher educators from 12 programs as well as public information on edTPA pass rates, we explore whether the…

  13. "What about Bilingualism?" A Critical Reflection on the edTPA with Teachers of Emergent Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleyn, Tatyana; López, Dina; Makar, Carmina

    2015-01-01

    Amidst the debates surrounding teacher quality and preparation programs, the edTPA (education Teaching Performance Assessment) has emerged to assess future teachers through a portfolio-based certification process. This study offers the perspective of three faculty members who participated in an experimental configuration of edTPA implementation…

  14. Cellulose derivatives carrying triphenylamine (TPA) moieties: synthesis and electro-optical properties.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jinqing; Liao, Wenbo; Chen, Huanqin; Masuda, Toshio

    2009-06-11

    A novel ethyl cellulose derivative [poly(1)] that carries triphenylamine moieties is synthesized with a moderate number-average molecular weight up to 78,200 in 85% yield by the reaction of 4-(diphenylamino)benzoic acid with the residual hydroxy group of ethyl cellulose. Poly(1) is soluble in common organic solvents including toluene, CHCl3, CH2Cl2, and tetrahydrofuran while insoluble in hexane, diethyl ether, and methanol. The polymer emits blue-green fluorescence with quantum yields up to 65% in CHCl3 and displays unique solvatochromism. The cyclic voltammograms of poly(1) indicate that the polymer carrying TPA moieties is electrochemically redox active. The onset temperature of weight loss of the poly(1) is about 177 degrees C according to thermogravimetric analysis in air.

  15. Highly effective fibrinolysis by a sequential synergistic combination of mini-dose tPA plus low-dose mutant proUK.

    PubMed

    Pannell, Ralph; Li, Shelley; Gurewich, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Results of thrombolysis by monotherapy with either tPA or proUK have not lived up to expectations. Since these natural activators are inherently complementary, this property can be utilized to a synergistic advantage; and yet, this has undergone little evaluation. ProUK is no longer available because at pharmacological concentrations it converts to UK in plasma. Therefore, a single site proUK mutant, M5, was developed to address this problem and was used in this study. Fibrinolysis was measured using preformed fluoresceinated 24 h old clots in a plasma milieu rather than by the standard automated method, because proUK/M5 is sensitive to inactivation by thrombin and activation by plasmin. The shortest 50% clot lysis time that could be achieved by tPA or M5 alone was determined: mean times were 55 and 48 minutes respectively. These bench marks were matched by 6% of the tPA monotherapy dose combined with 40% that of M5: mean lysis time 47 minutes with less associated fibrinogenolysis. Results showed that the tPA effect was limited to initiating fibrinolysis which was completed by M5 and then tcM5. Plasma C1-inhibitor inhibited fibrinogenolysis by M5, providing protection from side effects not available for proUK. In conclusion, by utilizing the complementary properties and sequential modes of action of each activator, more efficient fibrinolysis with less non-specific effects can be achieved than with traditional monotherapy. In vivo validation is needed, but in a previous clinical trial using a similar combination of tPA and proUK (5% and 50% monotherapy doses) very promising results have already been obtained. PMID:25811605

  16. Role of catalase in monocytic differentiation of U937 cells by TPA: hydrogen peroxide as a second messenger.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Sakaguchi, N; Hachiya, M; Nakayama, F; Yamakawa, M; Akashi, M

    2009-04-01

    Human promonocytic cell line U937 cells can be induced to differentiate into macrophages by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). TPA treatment induced the expression of the monocytic differentiation markers CD11b and CD36, with concomitant morphological changes. Moreover, TPA enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in these cells, and phagocytic ability was also stimulated during differentiation. The antioxidant agent N-acetyl-L-cysteine inhibited the TPA-induced differentiation of U937 cells. TPA treatment decreased the expression level of catalase, which catalyzes the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) to H(2)O and O(2). In contrast, TPA increased the level of manganese superoxide dismutase, which catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide into H(2)O(2) and O(2) without affecting the levels of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase or glutathione peroxidase 1, which removes H(2)O(2) using glutathione as substrate. Treatment of U937 cells with catalase inhibited the enhancement of ROS generation induced by TPA, and blocked the TPA-induced differentiation of U937 cells. Human promyelocytic cell line HL60 cells were also induced to differentiate into macrophages by TPA. However, HP100-1 cells, its variant cell line overexpressing catalase, were resistant to TPA-induced differentiation. Our results suggest that catalase inhibits monocytic differentiation by TPA; the decrease in catalase level and the accumulation of H(2)O(2) are significant events for monocyte/macrophage differentiation by TPA.

  17. Optimization of chemical induction conditions for human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) reactivation with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) from latently-infected BC-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenbin; Galvin, Teresa A; Ma, Hailun; Ma, Yunkun; Muller, Jacqueline; Khan, Arifa S

    2011-05-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) persists as episomal DNA in latently-infected cells and can establish two alternative life cycles, latent or lytic. 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is a known inducer of HHV-8 in several human primary effusion lymphoma cell lines and has been widely used for HHV-8 reactivation; however, induction conditions have differed, resulting in varying levels of virus expression. We have used HHV-8 latently-infected BC-3 cells as a model to determine critical parameters for optimizing virus reactivation by TPA. We found that cell growth properties and drug treatment conditions were important for maximum reactivation of HHV-8. Addition of TPA to cells in the early log phase of a sigmoidal growth curve, which was tightly associated with high percentage of the cells in early S phase and with lower histone deacetylase activity in the cells, provided the optimum cell conditions for latent virus to switch to lytic replication. Furthermore, increasing TPA concentration (up to 320 ng per ml) at 48 h exposure time resulted in increased virus production. The results demonstrate the use of a step-wise strategy with chemical induction that may facilitate broad detection of latent DNA viruses and novel virus discovery. PMID:21470875

  18. Ulinastatin decreases permeability of blood--brain barrier by inhibiting expression of MMP-9 and t-PA in postoperative aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yong-zhe; Yin, Yan-ling; Ma, Ya-qun; Zhang, Sheng-suo

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) have been reported to play important roles in increased permeability of blood-brain barrier (BBB) under many pathological circumstances. We have showed that Ulinastatin, a broad-spectrum serine protease inhibitor, could alleviate inflammation in the hippocampus of aged rats following partial hepatectomy. In this study, we investigate the expression and potential roles of t-PA and MMP-9 in the protective effect of Ulinastatin. We found that partial hepatectomy increased Evans blue leakage in hippocampus at day 1 and 3 postoperatively. Furthermore, surgery decreased the protein levels of claudin-5, ZO-1, and NF-kB p65 while upregulating the mRNA and protein levels of t-PA and MMP-9 in brain capillaries. All these effects caused by surgery were partially reversed by administering Ulinastatin. Our study sheds light on the roles of t-PA and MMP-9 of BBB in post-surgical neuroinflammation and postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Besides, it could also help to understand the mechanism of Ulinastatin alleviating neuroinflammation.

  19. Growth-dependent AIB and meAIB uptake in LLC-PK/sub 1/ cells: effects of differentiation inducers and of TPA

    SciTech Connect

    Amsler, K.; Shaffer, C.; Cook, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Cultured pig kidney cells designated LLC-PK/sub 1/, previously shown to acquire Na/sup +/-dependent concentrative transport of hexoses as the cells become growth arrested, also show Na/sup +/-dependent concentrative uptake of the amino acid analogs /sup 2/-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and (methyl) meAIB. This A system-like transport is most active in sparse, growing cultures and becomes stepped down at confluence. The cell/medium equilibrium distribution ratio of the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium ion (TPP/sup +/) decreases in parallel fashion, suggesting that a decrease in membrane potential may be a major factor in the stepdown. Differentiation inducers (hexamethylene bisacetamide) and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (theophylline, methylisobutyl xanthine) accelerate the stepdown, but even in the presence of these compounds addition of the tumor promoter 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) results in the maintenance of a high level of AIB and meAIB uptake. In all these respects the changes in A system like amino acid transport are the reciprocal of those seen for concentrative hexose transport, although the driving force appears to be the same for both systems. The TPA analogs phorbol and 4-0-methyl TPA which are inactive in tumor promotion are inactive in this system as well. In confluent, already stepped-down cultures, addition of TPA leads to a rapid (2-6 hour) stimulation of AIB and meAIB uptake. The enhancement is sensitive to cycloheximide and actinomycin D. 30 references, 6 figures.

  20. Polypyrrole layered SPEES/TPA proton exchange membrane for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelakandan, S.; Kanagaraj, P.; Sabarathinam, R. M.; Nagendran, A.

    2015-12-01

    Hybrid membranes based on sulfonated poly(1,4-phenylene ether ether sulfone) (SPEES)/tungstophosphoric acid (TPA) were prepared. SPEES/TPA membrane surfaces were modified with polypyrrole (Ppy) by in situ polymerization method to reduce the TPA leaching. The morphology and electrochemical property of the surface coated membranes were studied by SEM, AFM, water uptake, ion exchange capacity, proton conductivity, methanol permeability and tensile strength. The water uptake and the swelling ratio of the surface coated membranes decreased with increasing the Ppy layer. The surface roughness of the hybrid membrane was decreased with an increase in Ppy layer on the membrane surface. The methanol permeability of SPEES/TPA-Ppy4 hybrid membrane was significantly suppressed and found to be 2.1 × 10-7 cm2 s-1, which is 1.9 times lower than pristine SPEES membrane. The SPEES/TPA-Ppy4 membrane exhibits highest relative selectivity (2.86 × 104 S cm-3 s) than the other membrane with low TPA leaching. The tensile strength of hybrid membranes was improved with the introduction of Ppy layer. Combining their lower swelling ratio, high thermal stability and selectivity, SPEES/TPA-Ppy4 membranes could be a promising material as PEM for DMFC applications.

  1. X-ray diffraction of solid tin to 1.2 TPa

    SciTech Connect

    Lazicki, A.; Rygg, J. R.; Coppari, F.; Smith, R.; Fratanduono, D.; Kraus, R. G.; Collins, G. W.; Briggs, R.; Braun, D. G.; Swift, D. C.; Eggert, J. H.

    2015-08-12

    In this study, we report direct in situ measurements of the crystal structure of tin between 0.12 and 1.2 TPa, the highest stress at which a crystal structure has ever been observed. Using angle-dispersive powder x-ray diffraction, we find that dynamically compressed Sn transforms to the body-centered-cubic (bcc) structure previously identified by ambient-temperature quasistatic-compression studies and by zero-kelvin density-functional theory predictions between 0.06 and 0.16 TPa. However, we observe no evidence for the hexagonal close-packed (hcp) phase found by those studies to be stable above 0.16 TPa. Instead, our results are consistent with bcc up to 1.2 TPa. We conjecture that at high temperature bcc is stabilized relative to hcp due to differences in vibrational free energy.

  2. X-ray diffraction of solid tin to 1.2 TPa

    DOE PAGES

    Lazicki, A.; Rygg, J. R.; Coppari, F.; Smith, R.; Fratanduono, D.; Kraus, R. G.; Collins, G. W.; Briggs, R.; Braun, D. G.; Swift, D. C.; et al

    2015-08-12

    In this study, we report direct in situ measurements of the crystal structure of tin between 0.12 and 1.2 TPa, the highest stress at which a crystal structure has ever been observed. Using angle-dispersive powder x-ray diffraction, we find that dynamically compressed Sn transforms to the body-centered-cubic (bcc) structure previously identified by ambient-temperature quasistatic-compression studies and by zero-kelvin density-functional theory predictions between 0.06 and 0.16 TPa. However, we observe no evidence for the hexagonal close-packed (hcp) phase found by those studies to be stable above 0.16 TPa. Instead, our results are consistent with bcc up to 1.2 TPa. We conjecturemore » that at high temperature bcc is stabilized relative to hcp due to differences in vibrational free energy.« less

  3. Propellant-remaining modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgovitsky, S.

    1991-01-01

    A successful satellite mission is predicted upon the proper maintenance of the spacecraft's orbit and attitude. One requirement for planning and predicting the orbit and attitude is the accurate estimation of the propellant remaining onboard the spacecraft. Focuss is on the three methods that were developed for calculating the propellant budget: the errors associated with each method and the uncertainties in the variables required to determine the propellant remaining that contribute to these errors. Based on these findings, a strategy is developed for improved propellant-remaining estimation. The first method is based on Boyle's law, which related the values of pressure, volume, and temperature (PVT) of an ideal gas. The PVT method is used for the monopropellant and the bipropellant engines. The second method is based on the engine performance tests, which provide data that relate thrust and specific impulse associated with a propellant tank to that tank's pressure. Two curves representing thrust and specific impulse as functions of pressure are then generated using a polynomial fit on the engine performance data. The third method involves a computer simulation of the propellant system. The propellant flow is modeled by creating a conceptual model of the propulsion system configuration, taking into account such factors as the propellant and pressurant tank characteristics, thruster functionality, and piping layout. Finally, a thrust calibration technique is presented that uses differential correction with the computer simulation method of propellant-remaining modeling. Thrust calibration provides a better assessment of thruster performance and therefore enables a more accurate estimation of propellant consumed during a given maneuver.

  4. Fractionation of a tumor-initiating UV dose introduces DNA damage-retaining cells in hairless mouse skin and renders subsequent TPA-promoted tumors non-regressing.

    PubMed

    van de Glind, Gerline; Rebel, Heggert; van Kempen, Marika; Tensen, Kees; de Gruijl, Frank

    2016-02-16

    Sunburns and especially sub-sunburn chronic UV exposure are associated with increased risk of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Here we focus on a possible difference in tumor initiation from a single severe-sunburn dose (on day 1, 21 hairless mice) and from an equal dose fractionated into very low sub-sunburn doses not causing any (growth-promoting) epidermal hyperplasia (40 days daily exposure, n=20). From day 47 all mice received 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) applications (2x/wk) for 20 weeks to promote tumor development within the lifetime of the animals. After the sub-sunburn regimen sparse DNA damage-retaining basal cells (quiescent stem cells, QSCs) remained in the non-hyperplastic epidermis. These cells were forced to divide by TPA. After discontinuation of TPA tumors regressed and disappeared in the 'sunburn group' but persisted and grew in the 'sub-sunburn group' (0.06 vs 2.50 SCCs and precursors ≥4 mm/mouse after 280 days, p=0.03). As the tumors carried no mutations in p53, H/K/N-Ras and Notch1/2, these 'usual suspects' were not involved in the UV-driven tumor initiation. Although we could not selectively eliminate QSCs (unknown phenotype) to establish causality, our data suggest that forcing specifically DNA damage-retaining QSCs to divide--with high mutagenic risk--gives rise to persisting (mainly 'in situ') skin carcinomas. PMID:26797757

  5. Enhancing mitochondrial respiration suppresses tumor promoter TPA-induced PKM2 expression and cell transformation in skin epidermal JB6 cells.

    PubMed

    Wittwer, Jennifer A; Robbins, Delira; Wang, Fei; Codarin, Sarah; Shen, Xinggui; Kevil, Christopher G; Huang, Ting-Ting; Van Remmen, Holly; Richardson, Arlan; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2011-09-01

    Differentiated cells primarily metabolize glucose for energy via the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation, but cancer cells thrive on a different mechanism to produce energy, characterized as the Warburg effect, which describes the increased dependence on aerobic glycolysis. The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2), which is responsible for catalyzing the final step of aerobic glycolysis, is highly expressed in cancer cells and may contribute to the Warburg effect. However, whether PKM2 plays a contributing role during early cancer development is unclear. In our studies, we have made an attempt to elucidate the effects of varying mitochondrial respiration substrates on skin cell transformation and expression of PKM2. Tumorigenicity in murine skin epidermal JB6 P+ (promotable) cells was measured in a soft agar assay using 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as a tumor promoter. We observed a significant reduction in cell transformation upon pretreatment with the mitochondrial respiration substrate succinate or malate/pyruvate. We observed that increased expression and activity of PKM2 in TPA-treated JB6 P+ cells and pretreatment with succinate or malate/pyruvate suppressed the effects. In addition, TPA treatment also induced PKM2 whereas PKM1 expression was suppressed in mouse skin epidermal tissues in vivo. In comparison with JB6 P+ cells, the nonpromotable JB6 P- cells showed no increase in PKM2 expression or activity upon TPA treatment. Knockdown of PKM2 using a siRNA approach significantly reduced skin cell transformation. Thus, our results suggest that PKM2 activation could be an early event and play a contributing role in skin tumorigenesis.

  6. Protective Effect of Fermented Soybean Dried Extracts against TPA-Induced Oxidative Stress in Hairless Mice Skin

    PubMed Central

    Georgetti, Sandra R.; Casagrande, Rúbia; Vicentini, Fabiana T. M. C.; Baracat, Marcela M.; Verri, Waldiceu A.; Fonseca, Maria J. V.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the chemical properties (polyphenol and genistein contents) of soybean extracts obtained by biotransformation and dried by spray dryer at different conditions and their in vivo ability to inhibit 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate- (TPA-) induced biochemical alterations in the skin of hairless mice. By comparing the obtained data with that of the well-known active soybean extract Isoflavin beta, we evaluated the influence of the fermentation and drying process in the extracts efficacy. The results demonstrated that inlet gas temperature and adjuvant concentration for the extract drying process have significantly affected the total polyphenol contents and, to a minor degree, the genistein contents. However, the effect of topical stimulus with TPA, an oxidative stress inducer, which caused significant depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) and catalase, with increased levels of H2O2 and lipid peroxidation (MDA) in the skin of hairless mice, was significantly prevented by the soybean extracts treatment. These results indicate that the spray drying processing resulted in a product capable of limiting the oxidative stress with possible therapeutic applicability as an antioxidant in pharmaceutical forms. PMID:24073399

  7. Protective effect of fermented soybean dried extracts against TPA-induced oxidative stress in hairless mice skin.

    PubMed

    Georgetti, Sandra R; Casagrande, Rúbia; Vicentini, Fabiana T M C; Baracat, Marcela M; Verri, Waldiceu A; Fonseca, Maria J V

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the chemical properties (polyphenol and genistein contents) of soybean extracts obtained by biotransformation and dried by spray dryer at different conditions and their in vivo ability to inhibit 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate- (TPA-) induced biochemical alterations in the skin of hairless mice. By comparing the obtained data with that of the well-known active soybean extract Isoflavin beta, we evaluated the influence of the fermentation and drying process in the extracts efficacy. The results demonstrated that inlet gas temperature and adjuvant concentration for the extract drying process have significantly affected the total polyphenol contents and, to a minor degree, the genistein contents. However, the effect of topical stimulus with TPA, an oxidative stress inducer, which caused significant depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) and catalase, with increased levels of H2O2 and lipid peroxidation (MDA) in the skin of hairless mice, was significantly prevented by the soybean extracts treatment. These results indicate that the spray drying processing resulted in a product capable of limiting the oxidative stress with possible therapeutic applicability as an antioxidant in pharmaceutical forms. PMID:24073399

  8. Ultraviolet stimulated melanogenesis by human melanocytes is augmented by di-acyl glycerol but not TPA

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, P.S.; Wren, F.E.; Matthews, J.N. )

    1990-02-01

    Epidermal melanocytes (MC) synthesize melanin in response to ultraviolet radiation (UVR). The mechanisms mediating the UV-induced activation of melanogenesis are unknown but since UVR induces turnover of membrane phospholipids generating prostaglandins (PGs) and other products, it is possible that one of these might provide the activating signal. We have examined the effects of prostaglandins (PGs) E1, E2, D2, F2 alpha, and di-acyl glycerol upon the UV-induced responses of cultured human MC and the Cloudman S91 melanoma cell line. The PGs had little effect on unirradiated cells and did not alter the response to UVR in either human MC or S91 melanoma cells. However, a synthetic analogue of di-acyl glycerol, 1-oleyl 2-acetyl glycerol (OAG), caused a significant (P less than 0.0001), dose-related augmentation of melanin content both in human MC (seven-fold) and S91 cells (three-fold). UVR caused a significant augmentation of the OAG-induced melanogenesis of both human MC and S91 cells. Since OAG is known to activate protein kinase C, it was possible that the observed modulation of the UVR signal could be via that pathway. Di-octanoyl glycerol, another di-acyl glycerol, which activates kinase C, caused a small (70%) increase in melanogenesis in MC which was not altered by UVR. However, 12-0 tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA), a potent activator of protein kinase C, had no significant effect on either basal or UV-induced melanin synthesis in either cell type. These data suggest that the UV-induced signal activating melanogenesis could be mediated by di-acyl glycerol. Furthermore, they imply that the signal is transduced via an alternative, pathway that might be independent of protein kinase C.

  9. Exogenous t-PA Administration Increases Hippocampal Mature BDNF Levels. Plasmin- or NMDA-Dependent Mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Rodier, Marion; Prigent-Tessier, Anne; Béjot, Yannick; Jacquin, Agnès; Mossiat, Claude; Marie, Christine; Garnier, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) through TrkB activation is central for brain functioning. Since the demonstration that plasmin is able to process pro-BDNF to mature BDNF and that these two forms have opposite effects on neuronal survival and plasticity, a particular attention has been paid to the link between tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasmin system and BDNF metabolism. However, t-PA via its action on different N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits is also considered as a neuromodulator of glutamatergic transmission. In this context, the aim of our study was to investigate the effect of recombinant (r)t-PA administration on brain BDNF metabolism in rats. In the hippocampus, we found that rt-PA (10 mg/kg) administration induced a progressive increase in mature BDNF levels associated with TrkB activation. In order to delineate the mechanistic involved, plasmin activity was assessed and its inhibition was attempted using tranexamic acid (30 or 300 mg/kg, i.v.) while NMDA receptors were antagonized with MK801 (0.3 or 3 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with rt-PA treatment. Our results showed that despite a rise in rt-PA activity, rt-PA administration failed to increase hippocampal plasmin activity suggesting that the plasminogen/plasmin system is not involved whereas MK801 abrogated the augmentation in mature BDNF levels observed after rt-PA administration. All together, our results show that rt-PA administration induces increase in hippocampal mature BDNF expression and suggests that rt-PA contributes to the control of brain BDNF synthesis through a plasmin-independent potentiation of NMDA receptors signaling. PMID:24670989

  10. Exogenous t-PA administration increases hippocampal mature BDNF levels. plasmin- or NMDA-dependent mechanism?

    PubMed

    Rodier, Marion; Prigent-Tessier, Anne; Béjot, Yannick; Jacquin, Agnès; Mossiat, Claude; Marie, Christine; Garnier, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) through TrkB activation is central for brain functioning. Since the demonstration that plasmin is able to process pro-BDNF to mature BDNF and that these two forms have opposite effects on neuronal survival and plasticity, a particular attention has been paid to the link between tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasmin system and BDNF metabolism. However, t-PA via its action on different N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits is also considered as a neuromodulator of glutamatergic transmission. In this context, the aim of our study was to investigate the effect of recombinant (r)t-PA administration on brain BDNF metabolism in rats. In the hippocampus, we found that rt-PA (10 mg/kg) administration induced a progressive increase in mature BDNF levels associated with TrkB activation. In order to delineate the mechanistic involved, plasmin activity was assessed and its inhibition was attempted using tranexamic acid (30 or 300 mg/kg, i.v.) while NMDA receptors were antagonized with MK801 (0.3 or 3 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with rt-PA treatment. Our results showed that despite a rise in rt-PA activity, rt-PA administration failed to increase hippocampal plasmin activity suggesting that the plasminogen/plasmin system is not involved whereas MK801 abrogated the augmentation in mature BDNF levels observed after rt-PA administration. All together, our results show that rt-PA administration induces increase in hippocampal mature BDNF expression and suggests that rt-PA contributes to the control of brain BDNF synthesis through a plasmin-independent potentiation of NMDA receptors signaling.

  11. Loss of endogenous Nfatc1 reduces the rate of DMBA/TPA-induced skin tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Jill; Roth, Eve; Roberts, Natalie; Zwick, Rachel; Lin, Samantha; Fletcher, Sean; Tadeu, Ana; Wu, Christine; Beck, Amanda; Zeiss, Caroline; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Horsley, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive therapies using calcineurin inhibitors, such as cyclosporine A, are associated with a higher incidence of squamous cell carcinoma formation in mice and humans. Calcineurin is believed to suppress tumorigenesis in part through Nfatc1, a transcription factor expressed primarily in hair follicle bulge stem cells in mice. However, mice overexpressing a constitutively active Nfatc1 isoform in the skin epithelium developed increased spontaneous skin squamous cell carcinomas. Because follicular stem cells can contribute to skin tumorigenesis, whether the endogenous expression of Nfatc1 inhibits or enhances skin tumorigenesis is unclear. Here we show that loss of the endogenous expression of Nfatc1 suppresses the rate of DMBA/TPA-induced skin tumorigenesis. Inducible deletion of Nfatc1 in follicular stem cells before tumor initiation significantly reduces the rate of tumorigenesis and the contribution of follicular stem cells to skin tumors. We find that skin tumors from mice lacking Nfatc1 display reduced Hras codon 61 mutations. Furthermore, Nfatc1 enhances the expression of genes involved in DMBA metabolism and increases DMBA-induced DNA damage in keratinocytes. Together these data implicate Nfatc1 in the regulation of skin stem cell–initiated tumorigenesis via the regulation of DMBA metabolism. PMID:26310443

  12. The effects of polymorphisms in genes from the renin-angiotensin, bradykinin, and fibrinolytic systems on plasma t-PA and PAI-1 levels are dependent on environmental context.

    PubMed

    Asselbergs, Folkert W; Williams, Scott M; Hebert, Patricia R; Coffey, Christopher S; Hillege, Hans L; Snieder, Harold; Navis, Gerjan; Vaughan, Douglas E; van Gilst, Wiek H; Moore, Jason H

    2007-11-01

    Thrombosis is a key factor in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. Important biochemical constituents of the fibrinolytic system, affecting thrombosis, include tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Both t-PA and PAI-1 are determined by multiple genetic and environmental factors. We aimed to investigate whether the effects of polymorphism in genes from the renin-angiotensin, bradykinin, and fibrinolytic systems on t-PA or PAI-1 levels are dependent on environmental factors in a large population-based sample from the PREVEND study in Groningen, The Netherlands (n = 2,527). We found strong evidence (P t-PA in females and males and on PAI-1 in males. Only suggestive evidence (P t-PA and PAI-1 there was at least one BDKRB2-body size combination that exhibited suggestive (P t-PA and PAI-1 is dependent on the environmental context such as body size and alcohol use. The present study emphasizes the importance of including environmental factors in genetic analyses to fully comprehend the genetic architecture of a specific trait.

  13. Cerebroprotective effects of TAK-937, a novel cannabinoid receptor agonist, in permanent and thrombotic focal cerebral ischemia in rats: therapeutic time window, combination with t-PA and efficacy in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Koji; Suzuki, Motohisa; Suzuki, Noriko; Hamajo, Kazuhiro; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Shimojo, Masato

    2013-08-14

    Some occluded arteries of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients are not recanalized, even if thrombolytic therapy is performed. Considering such clinical settings, we examined the potential cerebroprotective efficacy of TAK-937, a novel cannabinoid receptor agonist, in young adult and aged rats with a permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model and conducted a combination study with TAK-937 and tissue type plasminogen activator (t-PA) in a rat thrombotic MCAO model. TAK-937 significantly reduced infarct volume when it was administered 3 and 5h after permanent MCAO in young adult rats. A thrombotic MCAO was induced by photo-irradiation of the middle cerebral artery with Rose Bengal administration and a permanent MCAO was produced by thermoelectric coagulation of occluded arteries. TAK-937 (10, 30 and 100μg/kg/h) was intravenously infused 1, 3, 5, or 8-24h after MCAO. t-PA (3 or 10mg/kg) was intravenously administered 1, 1.5 or 2h after MCAO. Infarct volume was determined using a 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining method 24 or 48h after MCAO. The combined treatment of TAK-937 with t-PA significantly reduced the cerebral infarction compared with t-PA treatment alone in a rat thrombotic MCAO model. TAK-937 reduced infarct volume of aged rats as well, when it was administered 1h after permanent MCAO. These results suggest that TAK-937 exerts protective effects regardless of age and has a wide therapeutic time window in permanent occlusion. Furthermore, combined treatment of TAK-937 with t-PA would provide more therapeutic efficacy compared to t-PA treatment alone. PMID:23791950

  14. Saussurea lappa extract suppresses TPA-induced cell invasion via inhibition of NF-κB-dependent MMP-9 expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Saussurea lappa (SL) has been used as a traditional herbal medicine to treat abdominal pain and tenesmus, and has been suggested to possess various biological activities, including anti-tumor, anti-ulcer, anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, and cardiotonic activities. The effect of SL on breast cancer metastasis, however, is unknown. Cell migration and invasion are crucial in neoplastic metastasis. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which degrades the extracellular matrix, is a major component in cancer cell invasion. Methods Cell viability was examined by MTT assay, whereas cell motility was measured by invasion assay. Western blot, Real-time PCR, and Zymography assays were used to investigate the inhibitory effects of ESL on matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression level in MCF-7 cells. EMSA confirmed the inhibitory effects of ESL on DNA binding of NF- κB in MCF-7 cells. Results Cells threated with various concentrations of Saussurea lappa (ESL) for 24 h. Concentrations of 2 or 4 μM did not lead to a significant change in cell viability or morphology. Therefore, subsequent experiments utilized the optimal non-toxic concentration (2 or 4 μM) of ESL. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of ethanol extract of ESL on MMP-9 expression and cell invasion in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced MCF-7 cells. ESL inhibited the TPA-induced transcriptional activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). However, this result obtained that ESL did not block the TPA-induced phosphorylation of the kinases: p38, ERK, and JNK. Therefore, ELS-mediated inhibition of TPA-induced MMP-9 expression and cell invasion involves the suppression of NF-kB pathway in MCF-7 cells. Conclusions These results indicate that ELS-mediated inhibition of TPA-induced MMP-9 expression and cell invasion involves the suppression of NF-kB pathway in MCF-7 cells. Thus, ESL has potential for controlling breast cancer invasiveness in vitro. PMID:24885456

  15. Rat oocyte tissue plasminogen activator is a catalytically efficient enzyme in the absence of fibrin. Endogenous potentiation of enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Bicsak, T A; Hsueh, A J

    1989-01-01

    Rat oocytes synthesize tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in response to stimuli which initiate meiotic maturation. Purified tPA exhibits optimal activity only in the presence of fibrin or fibrin substitutes. Because oocytes are not exposed to fibrin in situ, we investigated the possible stimulation of rat oocyte tPA activity by other endogenous factor(s). Oocytes were obtained from immature female rats which were induced to ovulate with gonadotropins. tPA activity was measured by the plasminogen-dependent cleavage of a chromogenic substrate. Measurements of kinetic parameters with Glu- or Lys-plasminogen revealed a Km for the rat oocyte enzyme of 1.3-2.1 microM compared with 23-24 microM for purified human tPA. Inclusion of the soluble fibrin substitute polylysine lowered the Km of human tPA by 30-fold (0.8 microM) but had no effect on the oocyte tPA Km. Polylysine had no significant effect on the Vmax values. The rate of plasminogen activation catalyzed by oocyte tPA was increased only 4.3-fold by fibrin while fibrin stimulated purified human tPA activity by 15.2-fold. After fractionation of oocyte extract by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, polylysine enhanced oocyte tPA activity as seen by casein zymography. tPA activity in the conditioned medium of a rat insulinoma cell line was also not stimulated with polylysine prior to fractionation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These data suggest that extravascular cells which elaborate tPA may produce stimulatory factor(s) which allow for full tPA activity at physiological concentrations of plasminogen in the absence of fibrin. PMID:2491854

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. TP-A0874, a Catechoserine Producer

    PubMed Central

    Hosoyama, Akira; Ichikawa, Natsuko; Igarashi, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. TP-A0874 isolated from compost. This strain produces catechoserine, a new catecholate-type inhibitor of tumor cell invasion. The genome harbors at least six gene clusters for polyketide and nonribosomal peptide biosyntheses. The biosynthetic gene cluster for catechoserines was identified by bioinformatic analysis. PMID:27795278

  17. Breakers, Benders, and Obeyers: Inquiring into Teacher Educators' Mediation of edTPA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratner, Andrew R.; Kolman, Joni S.

    2016-01-01

    This article reflects a qualitative exploratory inquiry into the lived experiences of faculty members working within a system of urban schools of education as they supported diverse teacher candidates in completing the Educative Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA) during its first semesters of high-stakes implementation. Drawing upon…

  18. Racist Ordering, Settler Colonialism, and EdTPA: A Participatory Policy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuck, Eve; Gorlewski, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This article tells the story of an intervention by a collective of teacher educators on New York State's adoption of edTPA. Too often in education policy analysis, issues of race are discussed briefly, if at all. This article argues that attending to constructions of race specific to settler colonialism is an important approach to education policy…

  19. Buyer Beware: Lessons Learned from EdTPA Implementation in New York State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenblatt, Deborah; O'Hara, Kate E.

    2015-01-01

    As states across the country continue their implementation of the Teacher Performance Assessment Portfolio (edTPA), a complex and high-stakes certification requirement for teacher certification, there are important lessons for educators and education advocates to learn from New York State's implementation. As Linda Darling-Hammond, developer and…

  20. Is the EdTPA the Right Choice for Evaluating Teacher Readiness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkes, Kelly A.; Powell, Sean R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and analyze the edTPA, a performance assessment created by the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity (SCALE) and administered by Pearson, Inc., to assess the professional readiness of student teachers. We challenge claims made in support of using this assessment, specifically within the…

  1. Perception Versus Actual Performance in Timely Tissue Plasminogen Activation Administration in the Management of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheryl B; Cox, Margueritte; Olson, DaiWai M; Britz, Gavin W; Constable, Mark; Fonarow, Gregg C; Schwamm, Lee; Peterson, Eric D; Shah, Bimal R

    2015-01-01

    Background Timely thrombolytic therapy can improve stroke outcomes. Nevertheless, the ability of US hospitals to meet guidelines for intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains suboptimal. What is unclear is whether hospitals accurately perceive their rate of tPA “door-to-needle” (DTN) time within 60 minutes and how DTN rates compare across different hospitals. Methods and Results DTN performance was defined by the percentage of treated patients who received tPA within 60 minutes of arrival. Telephone surveys were obtained from staff at 141 Get With The Guidelines hospitals, representing top, middle, and lowDTN performance. Less than one-third (29.1%) of staff accurately identified their DTN performance. Among middle- and low-performing hospitals (n=92), 56 sites (60.9%) overestimated their performance; 42% of middle performers and 85% of low performers overestimated their performance. Sites that overestimated tended to have lower annual volumes of tPA administration (median 8.4 patients [25th to 75th percentile 5.9 to 11.8] versus 10.2 patients [25th to 75th percentile 8.2 to 17.3], P=0.047), smaller percentages of eligible patients receiving tPA (84.7% versus 89.8%, P=0.008), and smaller percentages of DTN ≤60 minutes among treated patients (10.6% versus 16.6%, P=0.002). Conclusions Hospitals often overestimate their ability to deliver timely tPA to treated patients. Our findings indicate the need to routinely provide comparative provider performance rates as a key step to improving the quality of acute stroke care. PMID:26201547

  2. GRAPHIC REANALYSIS OF THE TWO NINDS-TPA TRIALS CONFIRMS SUBSTANTIAL TREATMENT BENEFIT

    PubMed Central

    Saver, Jeffrey L.; Gornbein, Jeffrey; Starkman, Sidney

    2010-01-01

    Background of Comment/Review Multiple statistical analyses of the two NINDS-TPA Trials have confirmed study findings of benefit of fibrinolytic therapy. A recent graphic analysis departed from best practices in the visual display of quantitative information by failing to take into account the skewed functional importance NIH Stroke Scale raw scores and by scaling change axes at up to twenty times the range achievable by individual patients. Methods Using the publicly available datasets of the 2 NINDS-TPA Trials, we generated a variety of figures appropriate to the characteristics of acute stroke trial data. Results A diverse array of figures all visually delineated substantial benefits of fibrinolytic therapy, including: bar charts of normalized gain and loss; stacked bar, bar, and matrix plots of clinically relevant ordinal ranks; a time series stacked line plot of continuous scale disability weights; and line plot, bubble chart, and person icon array graphs of joint outcome table analysis. The achievable change figure showed substantially greater improvement among TPA than placebo patients, median 66.7% (IQR 0–92.0) vs 50.0% (IQR −7.1 – 80.0), p=0.003. Conclusions On average, under 3 hour patients treated with TPA recovered two-thirds while placebo patients improved only half of the way towards fully normal. Graphical analyses of the two NINDS-TPA trials, when performed according to best practices, is a useful means of conveying details about patient response to therapy not fully delineated by summary statistics, and confirms a valuable treatment benefit of under 3 hour fibrinolytic therapy in acute stroke. PMID:20829518

  3. The Jasper Ridge elevated CO{sub 2} experiment: Root acid phosphatase activity in Bromus hordeaceus and Avena barbata remains unchanged under elevated [CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Cardon, Z.G.; Jackson, R.

    1995-06-01

    Root acid phosphatase activity increases phosphate available to plants by cleaving phosphate esters in soil organic matter. Because of increased plant growth potential under elevated [CO{sub 2}], we hypothesized that high [CO{sub 2}]-grown plants might exhibit higher phosphatase activity than low [CO{sub 2}]-grown plants. We assayed phosphatase activity in two species grown on two substrates (Bromus on serpentine soil and Bromus and Avena on sandstone soil) under high and low [CO{sub 2}] and under several nutrient treatments. Phosphatase activity was expressed per gram fresh weight of roots. Phosphatase activity of Bromus roots (on sandstone) was first assayed in treatments where only P and K, or only N, were added to soil. Bromus roots in this case showed strong induction of phosphatase activity when N only had been added to soil, indicating that Bromus regulated its phosphatase activity in response to phosphate availability. Both Bromus and Avena growing in sandstone, and Bromus growing in serpentine, showed enhanced phosphatase activity at high nutrient (N, P, and K) levels over that at low nutrient levels, but no differences between phosphatase activity were apparent between [CO{sub 2}] treatments. The increased phosphatase activity at high N, P, and K may indicate enhanced {open_quotes}growth demand{close_quotes} (reflected in higher biomass) in both Avena and Bromus. In contrast, though Bromus {open_quotes}growth demand{close_quotes} (biomass) increased under high [CO{sub 2}] on sandstone, phosphatase activity did not increase.

  4. Preservice Teachers' Adaptations to Tensions Associated with the edTPA during Its Early Implementation in New York and Washington States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuwissen, Kevin W.; Choppin, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    The edTPA is a teaching performance assessment (TPA) that the states of New York and Washington implemented as a licensure requirement in 2013. While TPAs are not new modes of assessment, New York and Washington are the first states to use the edTPA specifically as a compulsory, high-stakes policy lever in an effort to strengthen the quality and…

  5. Potential O-acyl-substituted (-)-Epicatechin gallate prodrugs as inhibitors of DMBA/TPA-induced squamous cell carcinoma of skin in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Sandeep; Manon, Benu; Vir Singh, Tej; Dev Sharma, Pritam; Sharma, Manu

    2011-04-01

    (-)-Epicatechin-3-gallate (1) is one of the principal catechins of green tea and exhibits cancer-preventive activities in various animal models. However, this compound is unstable in neutral or alkaline medium and, therefore, has a poor bioavailability. To improve its stability, O-acyl derivatives of 1 were prepared by isolating the partially purified tea catechin fraction from green tea extract and treating it with a variety of acylating agents. The resulting derivatives, compounds 2-6, were screened for their antitumor potential against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced squamous cell carcinogenesis of skin in mice. The results showed that the antitumor activity decreased with the increase in size of the chain length of the acyl groups, i.e., from compound 2, derivative with an Ac group, to compound 6, possessing a valeryl group. Moreover, the C(4) derivative with a branched acyl chain, 5, had a lower activity than the linear C(4) derivative 4. This reduction in the inhibitory activity may be due to the steric hindrance by the two Me groups. Moreover, significant increases in the protein levels analyzed by ELISA of c-Jun, p65, and p53 were observed in the skin of DMBA/TPA treated mice, whereas mice treated with 2 and DMBA/TPA had a similar expression of these transcription factors than the control mice. The prodrug potential of the O-acyl derivatives 2-6 showed that they were adequately stable to be absorbed intact from the intestine, more stable at gastric pH, and suitable for oral administration. PMID:21480506

  6. Unique secretory dynamics of tissue plasminogen activator and its modulation by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuko; Mogami, Hideo; Ihara, Hayato; Urano, Tetsumei

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed the secretory dynamics of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in EA.hy926 cells, an established vascular endothelial cell (VEC) line producing GFP-tagged tPA, using total internal reflection-fluorescence (TIR-F) microscopy. tPA-GFP was detected in small granules in EA.hy926 cells, the distribution of which was indistinguishable from intrinsically expressed tPA. Its secretory dynamics were unique, with prolonged (> 5 minutes) retention of the tPA-GFP on the cell surface, appearing as fluorescent spots in two-thirds of the exocytosis events. The rapid disappearance (mostly by 250 ms) of a domain-deletion mutant of tPA-GFP possessing only the signal peptide and catalytic domain indicates that the amino-terminal heavy chain of tPA-GFP is essential for binding to the membrane surface. The addition of PAI-1 dose-dependently facilitated the dissociation of membrane-retained tPA and increased the amounts of tPA-PAI-1 high-molecular-weight complexes in the medium. Accordingly, suppression of PAI-1 synthesis in EA.hy926 cells by siRNA prolonged the dissociation of tPA-GFP, whereas a catalytically inactive mutant of tPA-GFP not forming complexes with PAI-1 remained on the membrane even after PAI-1 treatment. Our results provide new insights into the relationship between exocytosed, membrane-retained tPA and PAI-1, which would modulate cell surface-associated fibrinolytic potential.

  7. Tissue plasminogen activator contributes to the late phase of LTP and to synaptic growth in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway.

    PubMed

    Baranes, D; Lederfein, D; Huang, Y Y; Chen, M; Bailey, C H; Kandel, E R

    1998-10-01

    The expression of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is increased during activity-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity. We have found that inhibitors of tPA inhibit the late phase of long-term potentiation (L-LTP) induced by either forskolin or tetanic stimulation in the hippocampal mossy fiber and Schaffer collateral pathways. Moreover, application of tPA enhances L-LTP induced by a single tetanus. Exposure of granule cells in culture to forskolin results in secretion of tPA, elongation of mossy fiber axons, and formation of new, active presynaptic varicosities contiguous to dendritic clusters of the glutamate receptor R1. These structural changes are blocked by tPA inhibitors and induced by application of tPA. Thus, tPA may be critically involved in the production of L-LTP and specifically in synaptic growth.

  8. Polymorphism in the spin-crossover ferric complexes [(TPA)Fe(III)(TCC)]PF6.

    PubMed

    Collet, Eric; Boillot, Marie Laure; Hebert, Johan; Moisan, Nicolas; Servol, Marina; Lorenc, Maciej; Toupet, Loïc; Buron-Le Cointe, Marylise; Tissot, Antoine; Sainton, Joelle

    2009-08-01

    We have identified two polymorphs of the molecular complex [(TPA)Fe((III))(TCC)]PF(6) [TPA = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine and TCC = 3,4,5,6-tetrachlorocatecholate dianion]: one is monoclinic and the other is orthorhombic. By lowering the temperature both undergo a thermal spin-crossover between a high-spin (S = 5/2) and a low-spin (S = 1/2) state, which we detected by magnetic, optical and X-ray diffraction measurements. The thermal crossover is only slightly shifted between the polymorphs. Their crystalline structures consist of similar cation layers alternating with PF(6) anion layers, packed differently in the two polymorphs. The magnetic and optical properties of the polymorphs are presented.

  9. Shock wave equation of state experiments at multi-TPa pressures on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celliers, P. M.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Peterson, J. L.; Meezan, N. B.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Braun, D. G.; Millot, M.; Fry, J.; Boehm, K. J.; Collins, G. W.; Nikroo, A.; Fitzsimmons, P.

    2015-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility provides an unprecedented capability to generate steady, planar, ultra-high pressure shock waves (around 10 TPa) in solid samples. Building on successful laser shock equation of state experiments performed on a variety of other laser facilities, we have designed and fielded experiments to perform impedance match experiments on samples of C, Be, quartz and CH, in the range of 3 to 7 TPa. The experiments use a line-imaging VISAR as the primary diagnostic to measure the shock velocity in an Al reference standard and in an array of the four samples. Initial tests with the line-imaging VISAR show that the NIF is capable of driving shocks that are steady for several ns, with smooth planar breakout patterns over a 2 mm diameter spot. Initial results will be discussed. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Tissue plasminogen activator prevents white matter damage following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Fernando; Gauberti, Maxime; Parcq, Jérôme; Macrez, Richard; Hommet, Yannick; Obiang, Pauline; Hernangómez, Miriam; Montagne, Axel; Liot, Géraldine; Guaza, Carmen; Maubert, Eric; Ali, Carine; Vivien, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only available treatment for acute stroke. In addition to its vascular fibrinolytic action, tPA exerts various effects within the brain, ranging from synaptic plasticity to control of cell fate. To date, the influence of tPA in the ischemic brain has only been investigated on neuronal, microglial, and endothelial fate. We addressed the mechanism of action of tPA on oligodendrocyte (OL) survival and on the extent of white matter lesions in stroke. We also investigated the impact of aging on these processes. We observed that, in parallel to reduced levels of tPA in OLs, white matter gets more susceptible to ischemia in old mice. Interestingly, tPA protects murine and human OLs from apoptosis through an unexpected cytokine-like effect by the virtue of its epidermal growth factor–like domain. When injected into aged animals, tPA, although toxic to the gray matter, rescues white matter from ischemia independently of its proteolytic activity. These studies reveal a novel mechanism of action of tPA and unveil OL as a target cell for cytokine effects of tPA in brain diseases. They show overall that tPA protects white matter from stroke-induced lesions, an effect which may contribute to the global benefit of tPA-based stroke treatment. PMID:21576385

  11. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Neurotoxicity is Neutralized by Recombinant ADAMTS 13

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Mengchen; Xu, Haochen; Wang, Lixiang; Luo, Haiyu; Zhu, Ximin; Cai, Ping; Wei, Lixiang; Lu, Lu; Cao, Yongliang; Ye, Rong; Fan, Wenying; Zhao, Bing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke, but its neurotoxicity is a significant problem. Here we tested the hypothesis that recombinant ADAMTS 13 (rADAMTS 13) would reduce tPA neurotoxicity in a mouse model of stroke. We show that treatment with rADAMTS 13 in combination with tPA significantly reduced infarct volume compared with mice treated with tPA alone 48 hours after stroke. The combination treatment significantly improved neurological deficits compared with mice treated with tPA or vehicle alone. These neuroprotective effects were associated with significant reductions in fibrin deposits in ischemic vessels and less severe cell death in ischemic brain. The effect of rADAMTS13 on tPA neurotoxicity was mimicked by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist M-801, and was abolished by injection of NMDA. Moreover, rADAMTS 13 prevents the neurotoxicity effect of tPA, by blocking its interaction with the NMDA receptor NR2B and the attendant phosphorylation of NR2B and activation of ERK1/2. Finally, the NR2B-specific NMDA receptor antagonist ifenprodil abolished tPA neurotoxicity and rADAMTS 13 treatment had no further beneficial effect. Our data suggest that the combination of rADAMTS 13 and tPA may provide a novel treatment of ischemic stroke by diminishing the neurotoxic effects of exogenous tPA. PMID:27181025

  12. Human monocytes can produce tissue-type plasminogen activator

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Evidence has previously been presented that monocytes and macrophages produce urokinase-type plasminogen activator. We have shown for the first time that human monocytes, when stimulated appropriately in vitro, can produce tissue type-plasminogen activator (t-PA) of 70 kD. Detection of t-PA mRNA was consistent with the biochemical and immunological characterization of t-PA produced by human monocytes. PMID:2494295

  13. Localization and regulation of the tissue plasminogen activator-plasmin system in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Salles, Fernando J; Strickland, Sidney

    2002-03-15

    The extracellular protease cascade of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasminogen has been implicated in neuronal plasticity and degeneration. We show here that unstimulated expression of tPA in the mouse hippocampus is concentrated in the mossy fiber pathway, with little or no expression within the perforant path, the Schaffer collaterals, or neuronal cell bodies. tPA protein is also expressed in vascular endothelial cells throughout the brain parenchyma. Four hours after excitotoxic injury, tPA protein is transiently induced within CA1 pyramidal neurons. The induced CA1 tPA is localized to neurons that survive the injury and is enzymatically active. Within the mossy fiber pathway, injury resulted in decreased tPA protein. In contrast, mossy fiber tPA activity displayed a biphasic character: transient increase at 8 hr, then a decrease by 24 hr after injury. Analysis of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression showed that PAI-1 antigen is upregulated by 24 hr and could account for the tPA activity downregulation seen at this time point. Plasminogen immunohistochemistry suggested an increase within the mossy fiber pathway after injury. Finally, hippocampal tPA expression among various mammalian species was strikingly different. These results indicate a complex control of tPA protein and enzymatic activity in the hippocampus that may help regulate neuronal plasticity.

  14. t-PA acts as a cytokine to regulate lymphocyte-endothelium adhesion in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinghua; Zhang, Xin; Mu, Lili; Zhang, Mingqing; Gao, Zhongming; Zhang, Jia; Yao, Xiuhua; Liu, Chuanliang; Wang, Guangyou; Wang, Dandan; Kong, Qingfei; Liu, Yumei; Li, Na; Sun, Bo; Li, Hulun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the capacity for t-PA to affect T cell-brain microvascular endothelial cell adhesion by acting as a cytokine was investigated. Following the treatment of a brain-derived endothelial cell line, bEnd.3, with various concentrations of t-PA, adhesion and transwell migration assays were performed. In the presence of t-PA, enhanced adhesion of T cells to bEnd.3 cells was observed. Using western blot analysis, an increase in ICAM-1 expression was detected for both t-PA-treated bEnd.3 cells and bEnd.3 cells treated with a non-enzymatic form of t-PA. In contrast, when LRP1 was blocked using a specific antibody, upregulation of ICAM-1 was inhibited and cAMP-PKA signaling was affected. Furthermore, using an EAE mouse model, administration of t-PA was associated with an increase in ICAM-1 expression by brain endothelial cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that t-PA can induce ICAM-1 expression in brain microvascular endothelial cells, and this may promote the development of EAE.

  15. Effects of trifluoperazine on platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Ardlie, N G; Boatwright, C; Garrett, J; McGuiness, J A

    1985-06-15

    Previous reports of the inhibitory effects of trifluoperazine on platelet responses to different aggregating agents have been conflicting, and the mechanism of action remains unclear. We have found that aggregation by minimum concentrations of collagen and arachidonic acid, and second phase aggregation by minimum concentrations of ADP, thrombin, epinephrine and the calcium ionophore A23187 were inhibited by 40-60 microM trifluoperazine. The first phase of aggregation by a minimum concentration of epinephrine was completely inhibited by 100 microM trifluoperazine, and the first phase of aggregation induced by ADP, thrombin or A23187 was decreased by 300 microM trifluoperazine. The platelet shape change caused by collagen, but by no other aggregating agent examined, was inhibited by 300 microM trifluoperazine. Secretion of 3H-5 hydroxytryptamine by minimum concentrations of ADP, collagen, epinephrine and arachidonic acid was completely suppressed by 50 microM trifluoperazine. Secretion by thrombin and A23187 was incompletely inhibited by 300 microM trifluoperazine. Thromboxane B2 formation caused by all aggregating agents, except epinephrine, was incompletely suppressed by 50 microM trifluoperazine, and 300 microM trifluoperazine only caused complete inhibition of thromboxane B2 formation by ADP, collagen and epinephrine. The phorbol ester, TPA, which mimics diacylglycerol by activating protein kinase C, caused aggregation and secretion. Aggregation, but not secretion, by low concentrations of TPA was inhibited by concentrations of trifluoperazine as low as 50 microM. However, aggregation by a combination of TPA and A23187 was only inhibited by concentrations of trifluoperazine in excess of 100 microM. Secretion by TPA was inhibited by concentrations of trifluoperazine in excess of 200 microM. Our findings suggest that low concentrations of trifluoperazine inhibit platelet activation by inhibiting phospholipase A2, and that higher concentrations inhibit platelet

  16. Where do those remains come from?

    PubMed

    Nociarová, Dominika; Adserias, M Jose; Malgosa, Assumpció; Galtés, Ignasi

    2014-12-01

    Part of the study of skeletal remains or corpses in advance decay located in the field involves determining their origin. They may be the result of criminal activity, accident, unearthed because of erosion, or they may also have originated from a cemetery. The discovery site, condition of the remains, and the associated artifacts, are factors that could be helpful for the forensic anthropologist to identify the origin of the remains. In order to contribute to this recognition, an analysis was made of the exhumations of 168 unclaimed human remains from the cemetery of Terrassa (Catalonia, Spain). This investigation presents a description of artifacts and conditions of remains that could indicate that the human remains may have originated from a cemetery. PMID:25459276

  17. Membrane depolarization induces calcium-dependent secretion of tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Gualandris, A; Jones, T E; Strickland, S; Tsirka, S E

    1996-04-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease that converts inactive plasminogen to active plasmin, is produced in the rat and mouse hippocampus and participates in neuronal plasticity. To help define the role of tPA in the nervous system, we have analyzed the regulation of its expression in the neuronal cell line PC12. In control cultures, tPA activity is exclusively cell-associated, and no activity is measurable in the culture medium. When the cells are treated with depolarizing agents, such as KCI, tPA activity becomes detectable in the medium. The increased secreted tPA activity is not accompanied by an increase in tPA mRNA levels, and it is not blocked by protein synthesis inhibitors. In contrast, tPA release is abolished by Ca2+ channel blockers, suggesting that chemically induced membrane depolarization stimulates the secretion of preformed enzyme. Moreover, KCI has a similar effect in vivo when administered to the murine brain via an osmotic pump: tPA activity increases along the CA2-CA3 regions and dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation. These results demonstrate a neuronal activity-dependent secretory mechanism that can rapidly increase the amount of tPA in neuronal tissue.

  18. Nonproteolytic neuroprotection by human recombinant tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y H; Park, J H; Hong, S H; Koh, J Y

    1999-04-23

    Human recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) may benefit ischemic stroke patients by dissolving clots. However, independent of thrombolysis, tPA may also have deleterious effects on neurons by promoting excitotoxicity. Zinc neurotoxicity has been shown to be an additional key mechanism in brain injuries. Hence, if tPA affects zinc neurotoxicity, this may provide additional insights into its effect on neuronal death. Independent of its proteolytic action, tPA markedly attenuated zinc-induced cell death in cortical culture, and, when injected into cerebrospinal fluid, also reduced kainate seizure-induced hippocampal neuronal death in adult rats.

  19. Atrazine represses S100A4 gene expression and TPA-induced motility in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Peyre, Ludovic; Zucchini-Pascal, Nathalie; Rahmani, Roger

    2014-03-01

    Atrazine (ATZ) is probably the most widely used herbicide in the world. However there are still many controversies regarding its impacts on human health. Our investigations on the role of pesticides in liver dysfunctions have led us to detect an inhibition of FSP1 expression of 70% at 50μm and around 95% at 500μM of ATZ (p<0.01). This gene encodes the protein S100a4 and is a clinical biomarker of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key step in the metastatic process. Here we investigated the possible effect of ATZ on cell migration and noticed that it prevents the EMT and motility of the HepG2 cells induced by the phorbol ester TPA. ATZ decreases Fak pathway activation but has no effect on the Erk1/2 pathway known to be involved in metastasis in this cell line. These results suggest that ATZ could be involved in cell homeostasis perturbation, potentially through a S100a4-dependant mechanism. PMID:24211529

  20. Suppression of TPA-induced cancer cell invasion by Peucedanum japonicum Thunb. extract through the inhibition of PKCα/NF-κB-dependent MMP-9 expression in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Mi; Noh, Eun-Mi; Kim, Ha-Rim; Kim, Mi-Seong; Song, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Minok; Yang, Sei-Hoon; Lee, Guem-San; Moon, Hyoung-Chul; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Lee, Young-Rae

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic cancers spread from their site of origin (the primary site) to other parts of the body. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which degrades the extracellular matrix, is important in metastatic cancers as it plays a major role in cancer cell invasion. The present study examined the inhibitory effect of an ethanol extract of Peucedanum japonicum Thunb. (PJT) on MMP-9 expression and the invasion of MCF-7 breast cancer cells induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Western blot analysis, gelatin zymography, and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR revealed that PJT significantly suppressed MMP-9 expression and activation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, PJT attenuated TPA-induced nuclear translocation and the transcriptional activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. The results indicated that the PJT-mediated inhibition of TPA-induced MMP-9 expression and cell invasion involved the suppression of the PKCα/NF-κB pathway in MCF-7 cells. Thus, the inhibition of MMP-9 expression by PJT may have potential value as a therapy for restricting the invasiveness of breast cancer.

  1. Suppression of TPA-induced cancer cell invasion by Peucedanum japonicum Thunb. extract through the inhibition of PKCα/NF-κB-dependent MMP-9 expression in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Mi; Noh, Eun-Mi; Kim, Ha-Rim; Kim, Mi-Seong; Song, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Minok; Yang, Sei-Hoon; Lee, Guem-San; Moon, Hyoung-Chul; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Lee, Young-Rae

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic cancers spread from their site of origin (the primary site) to other parts of the body. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which degrades the extracellular matrix, is important in metastatic cancers as it plays a major role in cancer cell invasion. The present study examined the inhibitory effect of an ethanol extract of Peucedanum japonicum Thunb. (PJT) on MMP-9 expression and the invasion of MCF-7 breast cancer cells induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Western blot analysis, gelatin zymography, and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR revealed that PJT significantly suppressed MMP-9 expression and activation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, PJT attenuated TPA-induced nuclear translocation and the transcriptional activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. The results indicated that the PJT-mediated inhibition of TPA-induced MMP-9 expression and cell invasion involved the suppression of the PKCα/NF-κB pathway in MCF-7 cells. Thus, the inhibition of MMP-9 expression by PJT may have potential value as a therapy for restricting the invasiveness of breast cancer. PMID:26717978

  2. Shock wave equation of state experiments at multi-TPa pressures on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celliers, P. M.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Peterson, J. L.; Meezan, N. B.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Braun, D. G.; Millot, M.; Fry, J.; Boehm, K. J.; Sterne, P. A.; Collins, G. W.; Nikroo, A.; Fitzsimmons, P.

    2015-11-01

    The National Ignition Facility provides an unprecedented capability to generate steady, planar, ultra-high pressure shock waves (up to 10 TPa or more) in solid samples. Building on successful laser shock equation of state experiments performed on a variety of other laser facilities, we have designed and fielded experiments to perform impedance match experiments on samples of C, Be, SiO2 and CH, in the range of 3 to 7 TPa. The experiments use a line-imaging VISAR as the primary diagnostic to measure the shock velocity in an Al reference standard and in an array of the four samples. Initial tests with the line-imaging VISAR show that the NIF is capable of driving shocks that are steady to better than 2% in velocity for several ns, with smooth planar breakout patterns over a 2 mm diameter spot. Hugoniot data points will be compared to current equation-of-state models for the various materials under study. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Cooperative TPA enhancement via through-space interactions in organic nanodots built from dipolar chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Anne-Claire; Parthasarathy, Venkatakrishnan; Pla-Quintana, Anna; Mongin, Olivier; Terenziani, Francesca; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille

    2010-08-01

    Whereas structure-properties relationships have been widely investigated at the molecular level, supramolecular structure-property relationships have been somewhat overlooked. In many cases, interchromophoric interactions are found to be detrimental (in particular in second-order NLO) and a lot of efforts have been devoted to circumvent and control these effects to achieve efficient NLO materials for electrooptics. At opposite, we have implemented a countermainstream route based on the confinement of push-pull chromophores in close proximity within organic nanodots where both their number and relative position/distance are controlled by covalent attachment onto appropriate organic scaffolds. In such multichromophoric organic superstructures (namely covalent nanoclusters), dipole-dipole interactions can be tuned by playing on the internal architecture (topology, number of chromophoric subunits, length of the covalent linkers) and on the nature and properties (polarity, polarizability) of the chromophoric subunits. Following this strategy, we present the investigation of two series of such organic nanoclusters built from push-pull chromophores where through-space interactions are shown to modify both one-photon (OPA) and two-photon absorption (TPA) of each chromophoric subunits leading to cooperative enhancement of TPA properties and improved transparency.

  4. Binding of tissue plasminogen activator to cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hajjar, K A; Hamel, N M; Harpel, P C; Nachman, R L

    1987-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and urokinase (u-PA), the major activators of plasminogen, are synthesized and released from endothelial cells. We previously demonstrated specific and functional binding of plasminogen to cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). In the present study we found that t-PA could bind to HUVEC. Binding of t-PA to HUVEC was specific, saturable, plasminogen-independent, and did not require lysine binding sites. The t-PA bound in a rapid and reversible manner, involving binding sites of both high (Kd, 28.7 +/- 10.8 pM; Bmax, 3,700 +/- 300) and low (Kd, 18.1 +/- 3.8 nM; Bmax 815,000 +/- 146,000) affinity. t-PA binding was 70% inhibited by a 100-fold molar excess of u-PA. When t-PA was bound to HUVEC, its apparent catalytic efficiency increased by three- or fourfold as measured by plasminogen activation. HUVEC-bound t-PA was active site-protected from its rapidly acting inhibitor: plasminogen activator inhibitor. These results demonstrate that t-PA specifically binds to HUVEC and that such binding preserves catalytic efficiency with respect to plasminogen activation. Therefore, endothelial cells can modulate hemostatic and thrombotic events at the cell surface by providing specific binding sites for activation of plasminogen. PMID:3119664

  5. Content and Access Remain Key

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Linda B.

    2007-01-01

    It is impossible to review the year's outstanding government publication landscape without acknowledging that change remains paramount. Just as striking, however, is that these changes go hand in hand with some familiar constants. Within this shifting environment, there are the consistency and dependability of government information itself,…

  6. Effects of garlic on cellular doubling time and DNA strand breaks caused by UV light and BPL, enhanced with catechol and TPA

    SciTech Connect

    Baturay, N.Z.; Gayle, F.; Liu, S.; Kreidinger, C.

    1995-11-01

    3T3 cell cultures were exposed to UV light and Beta-Propiolactone. Neoplastic cell transformation (TF) was demonstrated after concurrent addition of catechol, or repeated addition of TPA. Addition of garlic to all fluences/concentrations of the carcinogen/cocarcinogen/promoter groups reduced the number of transformed foci/dish by at least 40%. Since the cell cycle is prolonged following exposure to carcinogens, it is likely the cell requires a longer time to repair this damage. The doubling time (DT) was extended from 12 to 36 hrs. when cells were exposed to BPL and from 12 o 28 hrs. when cells were exposed to 3.0J/M2/sec. If an anticarcinogenic compound is also added, it is reasonable to assume that the cell cycle may be further elongated. The cell cycle, denoted by DT was lengthened from 12 to 47 hrs and from 12 to 86 hrs for BPL and UVC, respectively. The extensions occurred in a dope dependent manner. The concentrations of the cocarcinogen and promoter remained constant throughout the experiment. When strand breaks were determined at the same dose sequences, by alkaline elution, more repair was seen with garlic where the lowest and middle doses of BPL were used and almost no decrease in % DNA eluted was seen with UVC exposed cells. With catechol, there was a two-fold decrease in % DNA eluted at the lowest and middle fluences. When TPA was added, all three fluences of UVC showed more than a threefold decrease in % DNA eluted. BPS with both TPA and catechol, again showed a reduction in strand breaks only low and middle doses. Both a direct-acting alkylating agent, BPL, and a physical carcinogen, UVC, were homogeneously affected, in terms of doubling time, but not when strand break repair was examined. A separate mechanism may be responsible for repair, and the mechanism associated with combinations of physical carcinogen enhancing agents combined with some non-carcinogens may be more profoundly affected by some natural products.

  7. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is a neuroprotectant in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Echeverry, Ramiro; Wu, Jialing; Haile, Woldeab B; Guzman, Johanna; Yepes, Manuel

    2010-06-01

    The best-known function of the serine protease tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is as a thrombolytic enzyme. However, it is also found in structures of the brain that are highly vulnerable to hypoxia-induced cell death, where its association with neuronal survival is poorly understood. Here, we have demonstrated that hippocampal areas of the mouse brain lacking tPA activity are more vulnerable to neuronal death following an ischemic insult. We found that sublethal hypoxia, which elicits tolerance to subsequent lethal hypoxic/ischemic injury in a natural process known as ischemic preconditioning (IPC), induced a rapid release of neuronal tPA. Treatment of hippocampal neurons with tPA induced tolerance against a lethal hypoxic insult applied either immediately following insult (early IPC) or 24 hours later (delayed IPC). tPA-induced early IPC was independent of the proteolytic activity of tPA and required the engagement of a member of the LDL receptor family. In contrast, tPA-induced delayed IPC required the proteolytic activity of tPA and was mediated by plasmin, the NMDA receptor, and PKB phosphorylation. We also found that IPC in vivo increased tPA activity in the cornu ammonis area 1 (CA1) layer and Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus, as well as ischemic tolerance in wild-type but not tPA- or plasminogen-deficient mice. These data show that tPA can act as an endogenous neuroprotectant in the murine hippocampus.

  8. Luteolin 8-C-β-fucopyranoside inhibits invasion and suppresses TPA-induced MMP-9 and IL-8 via ERK/AP-1 and ERK/NF-κB signaling in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Ho; Kim, Jung-Hee; Lee, Dong-Hun; Kang, Jeong-Woo; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Yoon, Do-Young

    2013-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) play major roles in tumor progression and invasion of breast cancer cells. The present study was undertaken to investigate the inhibitory mechanism of cell invasion by luteolin 8-C-β-fucopyranoside (named as LU8C-FP), a C-glycosylflavone, in human breast cancer cells. We investigated whether LU8C-FP would inhibit MMP-9 activation and IL-8 expression in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-treated MCF-7 breast cancer cells. LU8C-FP suppressed TPA-induced MMP-9 and IL-8 secretion and mRNA expression via inhibition of the MAPK signaling pathway and down-regulation of nuclear AP-1 and NF-κB. TPA-induced phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 was suppressed by LU8C-FP, whereas JNK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation were unaffected. In addition, LU8C-FP blocked the ERK 1/2 pathways following expression of MMP-9 and IL-8. These results suggest LU8C-FP may function to suppress invasion of breast cancer cells through the ERK/AP-1 and ERK/NF-κB signaling cascades.

  9. Equation-of-state measurements for polystyrene at multi-TPa pressures in laser direct-drive experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, N.; Ono, T.; Takamatsu, K.; Tanaka, K.A.; Nakano, M.; Kataoka, T.; Yoshida, M.; Wakabayashi, K.; Nakai, M.; Nagai, K.; Shigemori, K.; Yamanaka, T.; Kondo, K.

    2005-12-15

    Equation-of-state (EOS) measurements for polystyrene in TPa (10 Mbar) pressure regions are presented. Polystyrene Hugoniot data were obtained up to 2.7 TPa using impedance matching techniques with laser direct drive at the GEKKO/HIPER laser facility [N. Miyanaga et al., in Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Fusion Energy (IAEA, Sorrento, Italy, 2001), IAEA-CN-77] The results were compared with theoretical models and previous experimental data and found to be in good agreement with the previous data obtained by different drive and diagnostic techniques.

  10. Improvement of photovoltaic performance by substituent effect of donor and acceptor structure of TPA-based dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Inostroza, Natalia; Mendizabal, Fernando; Arratia-Pérez, Ramiro; Orellana, Carlos; Linares-Flores, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    We report a computational study of a series of organic dyes built with triphenylamine (TPA) as an electron donor group. We designed a set of six dyes called (TPA-n, where n = 0-5). In order to enhance the electron-injection process, the electron-donor effect of some specific substituent was studied. Thus, we gave insights into the rational design of organic TPA-based chromophores for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). In addition, we report the HOMO, LUMO, the calculated excited state oxidized potential E(dye*)(eV) and the free energy change for electron-injection ΔGinject(eV), and the UV-visible absorption bands for TPA-n dyes by a time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) procedure at the B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP levels with solvent effect. The results demonstrate that the introduction of the electron-acceptor groups produces an intramolecular charge transfer showing a shift of the absorption wavelengths of TPA-n under studies. Graphical Abstract Several organic dyes TPA-n with different donors and acceptors are modeled. A strong conjugation acrros the donor and anchoring groips (TPA-n) bas been studied. Candidate TPA-3 shows a promising results.

  11. The quest for TPa Hugoniot data: using the DEMG in high velocity pulsed power experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Jeff H; Rousculp, Christopher L; Holtkamp, David B; Oro, David M; Griego, Jeffrey R; Atchison, Walter L; Reinovsky, Robert E

    2010-12-20

    ALT-3 is an experiment being designed in collaboration between Russian VNIIEF scientists and LANL that aims to conduct high velocity material experiments to measure shock velocities at pressures near 1 TPa. The DEMG (Disk Explosive Magnetic Generator) is used to drive >60MA currents to accelerate an aluminum liner to speeds in excess of 20 km/s. The 1-D model of the DEMG has been refined from a given current profile to a time-varying inductance. Various techniques are used to model the FOS (Foil Opening Switch) on the DEMG and a refined DEMG model is then used to drive a liner into various targets to determine the optimum design for the experiment and analyze the possible conditions and complications.

  12. Neuroserpin Differentiates Between Forms of Tissue Type Plasminogen Activator via pH Dependent Deacylation

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Karen-Sue B.; Nguyen, Lan; Schwartz, Kat; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Schwartz, Bradford S.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), initially characterized for its critical role in fibrinolysis, also has key functions in both physiologic and pathologic processes in the CNS. Neuroserpin (NSP) is a t-PA specific serine protease inhibitor (serpin) found almost exclusively in the CNS that regulates t-PA’s proteolytic activity and protects against t-PA mediated seizure propagation and blood–brain barrier disruption. This report demonstrates that NSP inhibition of t-PA varies profoundly as a function of pH within the biologically relevant pH range for the CNS, and reflects the stability, rather than the formation of NSP: t-PA acyl-enzyme complexes. Moreover, NSP differentiates between the zymogen-like single chain form (single chain t-PA, sct-PA) and the mature protease form (two chain t-PA, tct-PA) of t-PA, demonstrating different pH profiles for protease inhibition, different pH ranges over which catalytic deacylation occurs, and different pH dependent profiles of deacylation rates for each form of t-PA. NSP’s pH dependent inhibition of t-PA is not accounted for by differential acylation, and is specific for the NSP-t-PA serpin-protease pair. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism for the differential regulation of the two forms of t-PA in the CNS, and suggest a potential specific regulatory role for CNS pH in controlling t-PA proteolytic activity. PMID:27378851

  13. The examination of skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Knight, B

    1985-01-01

    In summary, unless the more sophisticated methods listed in the references are repeated and more success obtained with a series of bone samples of known date, no physico-chemical or morphological techniques have yet been devised that will determine date independently of environmental deterioration. The only exception is the radiocarbon estimation in bones of greater antiquity than those of medico-legal interest. The best mentor in the examination of skeletal remains is experience. Unfortunately, the majority of samples brought to the medical examiner remain of unknown provenance, and this prevents the doctor from checking his expertise against the true facts of identity and dating. The main point to bear in mind is that the tendency toward overinterpretation and dogmatic opinion should be avoided where the available data do not merit such a degree of certainty. There is no advantage in offering unfounded opinions to the investigators, since this might merely mislead them and perhaps cause them to exclude a class of possible identities because the doctor has unwisely told them to look only within a certain bracket of date and identifiable factors. As in any branch of forensic medicine, it is dangerous to speculate where the facts cannot firmly support the opinion.

  14. What Does It Mean to Be Student Centered? An Institutional Case Study of edTPA Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayne, Harriet; Qian, Gaoyin

    2016-01-01

    This longitudinal case study investigated how one School of Education (SOE), situated in an urban, commuter, public university, responded to the New York State mandate to require the edTPA for initial teacher certification. In order to engage faculty in the work of program redesign, SOE administrators employed a covert leadership approach. Based…

  15. Tissue-type plasminogen activator suppresses activated stellate cells through low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1.

    PubMed

    Kang, Liang-I; Isse, Kumiko; Koral, Kelly; Bowen, William C; Muratoglu, Selen; Strickland, Dudley K; Michalopoulos, George K; Mars, Wendy M

    2015-10-01

    Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and trans-differentiation into myofibroblast (MFB)-like cells is key for fibrogenesis after liver injury and a potential therapeutic target. Recent studies demonstrated that low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1)-dependent signaling by tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is a pro-fibrotic regulator of the MFB phenotype in kidney. This study investigated whether LRP1 signaling by t-PA is also relevant to HSC activation following injury. Primary and immortalized rat HSCs were treated with t-PA and assayed by western blot, MTT, and TUNEL. In vitro results were then verified using an in vivo, acute carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) injury model that examined the phenotype and recovery kinetics of MFBs from wild-type animals vs mice with a global (t-PA) or HSC-targeted (LRP1) deletion. In vitro, in contrast to kidney MFBs, exogenous, proteolytically inactive t-PA suppressed, rather than induced, activation markers in HSCs following phosphorylation of LRP1. This process was mediated by LRP1 as inhibition of t-PA binding to LRP1 blocked the effects of t-PA. In vivo, following acute injury, phosphorylation of LRP1 on activated HSCs occurred immediately prior to their disappearance. Mice lacking t-PA or LRP1 retained higher densities of activated HSCs for a longer time period compared with control mice after injury cessation. Hence, t-PA, an FDA-approved drug, contributes to the suppression of activated HSCs following injury repair via signaling through LRP1. This renders t-PA a potential target for exploitation in treating patients with fibrosis.

  16. Exogenous tissue plasminogen activator enhances peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery after injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zou, Tie; Ling, Changchun; Xiao, Yao; Tao, Xianmei; Ma, Duan; Chen, Zu-Lin; Strickland, Sidney; Song, Houyan

    2006-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is an essential component of the proteolytic cascade that lyses blood clots. Various studies also suggest that tPA plays important roles in the nervous system. We show that exogenous tPA or tPA/plasminogen (plg) promotes axonal regeneration, remyelination, and functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury in the mouse. Local application of tPA or tPA/plg 7 days after sciatic nerve crush significantly increased the total number of axons and myelinated axons, which is accompanied by enhanced expression of neurofilament. Treatment with tPA or tPA/plg reduced the deposition of fibrin(ogen) after nerve injury. Moreover, tPA or tPA/plg increased the number of macrophages and induced MMP-9 expression at the injury site, coincident with reduced collagen scar formation and accelerated clearance of myelin and lipid debris after treatment. Consequently, tPA or tPA/plg treatment protected muscles from atrophy after nerve injury, indicating better functional recovery. These results suggest that administration of exogenous tPA or tPA/plg promotes axonal regeneration and remyelination through removal of fibrin deposition and activation of MMP-9-positive macrophages, which may be responsible for myelin debris clearance and preventing collagen scar formation. Therefore, tPA may be useful for treatment of peripheral nerve injury.

  17. Silicon photonics: some remaining challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, G. T.; Topley, R.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Thompson, D. J.; Stanković, S.; Reynolds, S.; Chen, X.; Soper, N.; Mitchell, C. J.; Hu, Y.; Shen, L.; Martinez-Jimenez, G.; Healy, N.; Mailis, S.; Peacock, A. C.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Gardes, F. Y.; Soler Penades, J.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Ortega-Monux, A.; Wanguemert-Perez, G.; Molina-Fernandez, I.; Cheben, P.; Mashanovich, G. Z.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses some of the remaining challenges for silicon photonics, and how we at Southampton University have approached some of them. Despite phenomenal advances in the field of Silicon Photonics, there are a number of areas that still require development. For short to medium reach applications, there is a need to improve the power consumption of photonic circuits such that inter-chip, and perhaps intra-chip applications are viable. This means that yet smaller devices are required as well as thermally stable devices, and multiple wavelength channels. In turn this demands smaller, more efficient modulators, athermal circuits, and improved wavelength division multiplexers. The debate continues as to whether on-chip lasers are necessary for all applications, but an efficient low cost laser would benefit many applications. Multi-layer photonics offers the possibility of increasing the complexity and effectiveness of a given area of chip real estate, but it is a demanding challenge. Low cost packaging (in particular, passive alignment of fibre to waveguide), and effective wafer scale testing strategies, are also essential for mass market applications. Whilst solutions to these challenges would enhance most applications, a derivative technology is emerging, that of Mid Infra-Red (MIR) silicon photonics. This field will build on existing developments, but will require key enhancements to facilitate functionality at longer wavelengths. In common with mainstream silicon photonics, significant developments have been made, but there is still much left to do. Here we summarise some of our recent work towards wafer scale testing, passive alignment, multiplexing, and MIR silicon photonics technology.

  18. Modulation of zinc toxicity by tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Siddiq, Mustafa M; Tsirka, Stella E

    2004-01-01

    The tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-plasmin proteolytic system mediates excitotoxin-induced neurodegeneration in vivo and in cell culture. tPA also confers neuroprotection from zinc toxicity in cell culture through a proteolysis-independent mechanism. This raises two questions: what is this non-enzymatic mechanism, and why tPA does not synergize with zinc to promote neuronal cell death? We show here that zinc binds to tPA and inhibits its activity in a dose-dependent fashion, thus terminating its protease-dependent neurotoxic capacity. We extend the previously reported culture findings to demonstrate that elevated zinc is neurotoxic in vivo, and even more so when tPA is absent. Thus, physiological levels of tPA confer protection from elevated free zinc. Mechanistically, tPA promotes movement of zinc into hippocampal neuron cells through voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channels and Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA/KA channels. Therefore, zinc and tPA each appear to be able to limit the potential of the other to facilitate neurodegeneration, a reciprocal set of actions that may be critical in the hippocampus where tPA is secreted during the nonpathological conditions of learning and memory at sites known to be repositories of free and sequestered zinc.

  19. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is not required for kainate-induced motoneuron death in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, W; Van Den Bosch, L; Robberecht, W

    1998-08-24

    Spinal motoneurons are highly vulnerable to kainate both in vivo and in vitro. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasmin have recently been shown to mediate kainate-induced neuronal death in the mouse hippocampus in vivo. The aim of the present study was to determine whether tPA also mediates the kainate-induced death of motoneurons in vitro. A motoneuron-enriched neuronal population was isolated from the ventral spinal cord of wild-type (WT) and tPA-deficient (tPA-/-) mouse embryos. WT and tPA-/- neurons were cultured on WT and tPA-/- spinal glial feeder layers, respectively. WT and tPA-/- co-cultures were morphologically indistinguishable. Expression of tPA in WT co-cultures was demonstrated using RT-PCR. WT and tPA-/- co-cultures were exposed to kainate for 24 h. The neurotoxic effect of kainate did not differ significantly between WT and tPA-/- cultures. The plasmin inhibitor alpha2-antiplasmin did not protect WT neurons against kainate-induced injury. These results indicate that the plasmin system is not a universal mediator of kainate-induced excitotoxicity.

  20. Pancreatic stem cells remain unresolved.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fang-Xu; Morahan, Grant

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is caused by absolute (type 1) or relative (type 2) deficiency of insulin-secreting islet β cells. An ideal treatment of diabetes would, therefore, be to replace the lost or deficient β cells, by transplantation of donated islets or differentiated endocrine cells or by regeneration of endogenous islet cells. Due to their ability of unlimited proliferation and differentiation into all functional lineages in our body, including β cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are ideally placed as cell sources for a diabetic transplantation therapy. Unfortunately, the inability to generate functional differentiated islet cells from pluripotent stem cells and the poor availability of donor islets have severely restricted the broad clinical use of the replacement therapy. Therefore, endogenous sources that can be directed to becoming insulin-secreting cells are actively sought after. In particular, any cell types in the developing or adult pancreas that may act as pancreatic stem cells (PSC) would provide an alternative renewable source for endogenous regeneration. In this review, we will summarize the latest progress and knowledge of such PSC, and discuss ways that facilitate the future development of this often controversial, but crucial research.

  1. Epidermal growth factor stimulates the disruption of gap junctional communication and connexin43 phosphorylation independent of 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-sensitive protein kinase C: the possible involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kanemitsu, M Y; Lau, A F

    1993-08-01

    We previously reported that epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced the disruption of gap junctional communication (gjc) and serine phosphorylation of connexin43 (Cx43) in T51B rat liver epithelial cells. However, the cascade of events linking EGF receptor activation to these particular responses have not been fully characterized. Furthermore, the serine kinase(s) acting directly on Cx43 remain unidentified. In the current study, we demonstrate that downmodulation of 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-sensitive protein kinase C (PKC) activity does not affect EGF's ability to reduce junctional permeability or phosphorylate Cx43 in T51B cells. EGF in the presence or absence of chronic TPA treatment stimulated marked increases in Cx43 phosphorylation on numerous sites as determined by two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide mapping. Computer-assisted sequence analysis of Cx43 identified several protein kinase phosphorylation consensus sites including two sites for mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. EGF stimulated activation of MAP kinase in a time- and dose-dependent manner where the kinetics of kinase activity corroborated its possible involvement in mediating EGF's effects. Moreover, purified MAP kinase directly phosphorylated Cx43 on serine residues in vitro. Two-dimensional tryptic and chymotryptic phosphopeptide mapping demonstrated that the in vitro phosphopeptides represented a specific subset of the in vivo phosphopeptides produced in response to EGF after chronic TPA treatment. Therefore, EGF-induced disruption of gjc and phosphorylation of Cx43 may be mediated in part by MAP kinase in vivo.

  2. Calnexin and calreticulin bind to enzymically active tissue-type plasminogen activator during biosynthesis and are not required for folding to the native conformation.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, S; Bulleid, N J

    1997-01-01

    The roles of the endoplasmic-reticulum lectins calnexin and calreticulin in the folding of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) have been investigated using an in vitro translation system that reconstitutes these processes as they would occur in the intact cell. Using co-immunoprecipitation of newly synthesized tPA with antibodies to calnexin and calreticulin, it was demonstrated that the interaction of tPA with both lectins was dependent upon tPA glycosylation and glucosidase trimming. When tPA was synthesized in the presence of semi-permeabilized cells under conditions preventing complex formation with calnexin and calreticulin, the translation product had a specific plasminogenolytic activity identical with that when synthesized under conditions permitting interactions with both lectins. Furthermore, complexes of tPA bound to calnexin and calreticulin were shown to be enzymically active. These results demonstrate that calnexin and calreticulin can form a stable interaction with correctly folded tPA; however, such interactions are not required for the synthesis of enzymically active tPA. PMID:9359841

  3. Characterization of the interaction in vivo of tissue-type plasminogen activator with liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, J.; Otter, M.; Rijken, D.C.; van Berkel, T.J.

    1988-12-05

    The interaction in vivo of 125I-labeled tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) with the rat liver and the various liver cell types was characterized. Intravenously injected 125I-t-PA was rapidly cleared from the plasma (t1/2 = 1 min), and 80% of the injected dose associated with the liver. After uptake, t-PA was rapidly degraded in the lysosomes. The interaction of 125I-t-PA with the liver could be inhibited by preinjection of the rats with ovalbumin or unlabeled t-PA. The intrahepatic recognition site(s) for t-PA were determined by subfractionation of the liver in parenchymal, endothelial, and Kupffer cells. It can be calculated that parenchymal cells are responsible for 54.5% of the interaction of t-PA with the liver, endothelial cells for 39.5%, and Kupffer cells for only 6%. The association of t-PA with parenchymal cells was not mediated by a carbohydrate-specific receptor and could only be inhibited by an excess of unlabeled t-PA, indicating involvement of a specific t-PA recognition site. The association of t-PA with endothelial cells could be inhibited 80% by the mannose-terminated glycoprotein ovalbumin, suggesting that the mannose receptor plays a major role in the recognition of t-PA by endothelial liver cells. An excess of unlabeled t-PA inhibited the association of 125I-t-PA to endothelial liver cells 95%, indicating that an additional specific t-PA recognition site may be responsible for 15% of the high affinity interaction of t-PA with this liver cell type. It is concluded that the uptake of t-PA by the liver is mainly mediated by two recognition systems: a specific t-PA site on parenchymal cells and the mannose receptor on endothelial liver cells. It is suggested that for the development of strategies to prolong the half-life of t-PA in the blood, the presence of both types of recognition systems has to be taken into account.

  4. Russian Nesting Doll Complexes of Molecular Baskets and Zinc Containing TPA Ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhiquan, Lei; Polen, Shane; Hadad, Christopher M; RajanBabu, T V; Badjić, Jovica D

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we examined the structural and electronic complementarities of convex 1-Zn(II), comprising functionalized tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (TPA) ligand, and concave baskets 2 and 3, having glycine and (S)-alanine amino acids at the rim. With the assistance of (1)H NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, we found that basket 2 would entrap 1-Zn(II) in water to give equimolar 1-Zn⊂2in complex (K = (2.0 ± 0.2) × 10(3) M(-1)) resembling Russian nesting dolls. Moreover, C3 symmetric and enantiopure basket 3, containing (S)-alanine groups at the rim, was found to transfer its static chirality to entrapped 1-Zn(II) and, via intermolecular ionic contacts, twist the ligand's pyridine rings into a left-handed (M) propeller (circular dichroism spectroscopy). With molecular baskets embodying the second coordination sphere about metal-containing TPAs, the here described findings should be useful for extending the catalytic function and chiral discrimination capability of TPAs. PMID:27305044

  5. Cloning and characterization of the goadsporin biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces sp. TP-A0584.

    PubMed

    Onaka, Hiroyasu; Nakaho, Mizuho; Hayashi, Keiko; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Furumai, Tamotsu

    2005-12-01

    The biosynthetic gene cluster of goadsporin, a polypeptide antibiotic containing thiazole and oxazole rings, was cloned from Streptomyces sp. TP-A0584. The cluster contains a structural gene, godA, and nine god (goadsporin) genes involved in post-translational modification, immunity and transcriptional regulation. Although the gene organization is similar to typical bacteriocin biosynthetic gene clusters, each goadsporin biosynthetic gene shows low homology to these genes. Goadsporin biosynthesis is initiated by the translation of godA, and the subsequent cyclization, dehydration and acetylation are probably catalysed by godD, godE, godF, godG and godH gene products. godI shows high similarity to the 54 kDa subunit of the signal recognition particle and plays an important role in goadsporin immunity. Furthermore, four goadsporin analogues were produced by site-directed mutagenesis of godA, suggesting that this biosynthesis machinery is used for the heterocyclization of peptides. PMID:16339937

  6. [Promotion of physical activity for secondary prevention in patients with chronic diseases: the situation in the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg].

    PubMed

    Lion, A; Urhausen, A; Delagardelle, C; Seil, R; Theisen, D

    2014-01-01

    The regular practice of physical activities has health benefits in healthy subjects (primary prevention) and in patients with non-communicable diseases (secondary prevention). This study aimed to perform a stocktaking of the physical activities programs for patients or individuals at risk in the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg. The organizations offering therapeutic physical activities (TPA) have been investigated. Eleven groups offering TPA adapted to different non-communicable diseases were characterized by their costs, instructors, participants and potential participants. These groups were divided into five main categories: cardiology, neurology, obesity, oncology, and orthopedics. During on-site meetings, 41 professionals, 192 participants and 34 potential participants have been interviewed during the period September 2013 to April 2014. The results show that about 40 hours of TPA, 17 hours of which in cardiology, are currently proposed every week, except during school holidays. The main TPA are gymnastics, aerobics, swimming, Nordic walking, cycling, and resistance training. The national coverage is quite low, especially for obesity, neurology and orthopedics. The costs is mainly related to the human resources, the gym being often borrowed but rarely available during school holidays. Between 200 and 400 individuals participate in the TPA. The average number of participants per hour is 8.9 (± 5.1), which represents only 50% of the maximal capacity estimated by the instructors (18.0 ± 8.2 participants per hour). The recruitment process is different according to the groups but the medical doctors and the physiotherapists are mainly involved in this process. However, the majority of the potential participants were not aware of the existence of the groups. The existence of these groups is a positive point, since it contributes to compensate for the current lack of concrete action of the public and private authorities. However, the current TPA offer is clearly

  7. Design, synthesis, and characterization of TPA-thiophene-based amide or imine functionalized molecule for potential optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarswat, Prashant K.; Sathyapalan, Amarchand; Zhu, Yakun; Free, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    New sets of molecules containing tri-phenyl-amine (TPA) core and thiophene unit with amide and imine functional groups are designed, synthesized, characterized, and compared. These are solution processable small molecules with high mobility. The newly designed molecules have better solubility due to the C=N (imine) and CONH2 (amide) moiety as compared to the established molecules with CH=CH (methine) for optoelectronic applications. They have an optimal energy band gap, which indicates their potential utility in a variety of optoelectronic applications. These molecules also show efficient intermolecular charge transfer mechanisms similar to conventional organic semiconducting molecules as evidenced by optical measurements. Density functional theory simulation results show that the localization of the frontier highest occupied molecular orbital is around the TPA core for molecules coupled with imine and amide, and is reasonably stable.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. TP-A0890, a Producer of FR-900452 and A-74863a

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Natsuko; Hosoyama, Akira; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Igarashi, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. TP-A0890, a producer of FR-900452 and A-74863a. The genome was found to contain at least eight polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene clusters. A prediction of gene functions based on the sequence similarity allowed us to assign the biosynthetic gene clusters for FR-900452 and A-74863a. PMID:26472848

  9. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is a neuroprotectant in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Yepes, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine proteinase found not only in the intravascular space but also in a well-defined sub-set of neurons in the brain. tPA is rapidly released from neurons after either exposure to hypoxia or hypoglycemia in vitro, or the induction of cerebral ischemia in vivo. It has been proposed that tPA has a neurotoxic effect in the ischemic brain. However, recent evidence indicate that once released into the synaptic cleft tPA activates specific cell signaling pathways that promote the detection and adaptation to metabolic stress. More specifically, the non-proteolytic interaction of tPA with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family in dendritic spines activates the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway that adapts cellular processes to the availability of energy and metabolic resources. TPA-induced mTOR activation in neurons leads to hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) accumulation, HIF-1α-induced expression and membrane recruitment of the neuronal transporter of glucose GLUT3, and GLUT3-mediated uptake of glucose. These and other data discussed in this Review suggest that the postulated neurotoxic effect of tPA needs to be reconsidered and instead indicate the emergence of a new paradigm: that tPA is an endogenous neuroprotectant in the central nervous system (CNS). PMID:26347605

  10. Modulation by the noble gas argon of the catalytic and thrombolytic efficiency of tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    David, Hélène N; Haelewyn, Benoît; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Abraini, Jacques H

    2013-01-01

    Argon has been shown to provide cortical as well as, under certain conditions, subcortical neuroprotection in all models so far (middle cerebral artery occlusion, trauma, neonatal asphyxia, etc.). This has led to the suggestion that argon could be a cost-efficient alternative to xenon, a metabolically inert gas thought to be gold standard in gas pharmacology but whose clinical development suffers its little availability and excessive cost of production. However, whether argon interacts with the thrombolytic agent tissue plasminogen activator, which is the only approved therapy of acute ischemic stroke to date, still remains unknown. This latter point is not trivial since previous data have clearly demonstrated the inhibiting effect of xenon on tPA enzymatic and thrombolytic efficiency and the critical importance of the time at which xenon is administered, during or after ischemia, in order not to block thrombolysis and to obtain neuroprotection. Here, we investigated the effect of argon on tPA enzymatic and thrombolytic efficiency using in vitro methods shown to provide reliable prediction of the in vivo effects of both oxygen and the noble inert gases on tPA-induced thrombolysis. We found that argon has a concentration-dependent dual effect on tPA enzymatic and thrombolytic efficiency. Low and high concentrations of argon of 25 and 75 vol% respectively block and increase tPA enzymatic and thrombolytic efficiency. The possible use of argon at low and high concentrations in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke if given during ischemia or after tPA-induced reperfusion is discussed as regards to its neuroprotectant action and its inhibiting and facilitating effects on tPA-induced thrombolysis. The mechanisms of argon-tPA interactions are also discussed.

  11. Physiological and pathological roles of tissue plasminogen activator and its inhibitor neuroserpin in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tet Woo; Tsang, Vicky W. K.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    Although its roles in the vascular space are most well-known, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is widely expressed in the developing and adult nervous system, where its activity is believed to be regulated by neuroserpin, a predominantly brain-specific member of the serpin family of protease inhibitors. In the normal physiological state, tPA has been shown to play roles in the development and plasticity of the nervous system. Ischemic damage, however, may lead to excess tPA activity in the brain and this is believed to contribute to neurodegeneration. In this article, we briefly review the physiological and pathological roles of tPA in the nervous system, which includes neuronal migration, axonal growth, synaptic plasticity, neuroprotection and neurodegeneration, as well as a contribution to neurological disease. We summarize tPA's multiple mechanisms of action and also highlight the contributions of the inhibitor neuroserpin to these processes. PMID:26528129

  12. Interleukin 12 induces activation of fibrinolysis and coagulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Portielje, J E; Kruit, W H; Eerenberg, A J; Schuler, M; Sparreboom, A; Lamers, C H; Bolhuis, R L; Stoter, G; Huber, C; Hack, C

    2001-02-01

    Interleukin 12 (IL-12) has potential efficacy in malignant, infectious and allergic diseases. Its side-effects include activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis, as documented in chimpanzees. We assessed the coagulative and fibrinolytic response in 18 patients with renal cell carcinoma after subcutaneous injection of 0.5 microg/kg recombinant human IL-12. IL-12 induced a fibrinolytic response in 17 patients (94%): plasmin-alpha2-anti-plasmin complexes (PAPc) increased from 11.8 +/- 6.6 nmol/l (mean +/- SD) to a maximum of 18.8 +/- 7.4 nmol/l at 72 h. Baseline levels of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasminogen-activator inhibitor-I (PAI) were elevated in eight and 14 patients respectively. tPA increased from 12.6 +/- 5.2 ng/ml to a maximum of 19.0 +/- 6.7 ng/ml at 72 h. PAI decreased from 111 +/- 69 ng/ml to a minimum of 65 +/- 53 ng/ml at 8 h, thereafter remaining below baseline. Elevation of PAPc correlated with elevation of tPA and reduction of PAI. A coagulative response occurred in nine patients (50%): thrombin-anti-thrombin III complexes increased from 29 +/- 53 ng/ml to a maximum of 460 +/- 322 ng/ml at 12 h. Patients with and without a coagulative response had similar levels of recombinant human IL-12, interferon-gamma or tumour necrosis factor-alpha. We conclude that IL-12 can activate both fibrinolysis and coagulation in a significant proportion of patients with cancer. The time-frame and sequence of these activation processes differ from those known for other cytokines.

  13. Vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator exhibits a strict and fastidious requirement for polymeric fibrin as its cofactor, unlike human tissue-type plasminogen activator. A kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergum, P W; Gardell, S J

    1992-09-01

    The vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator (BatPA) is virtually inactive toward Glu-plasminogen in the absence of a fibrin-like cofactor, unlike human tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) (the kcat/Km values were 4 and 470 M-1 s-1, respectively). In the presence of fibrin II, tPA and BatPA activated Glu-plasminogen with comparable catalytic efficiencies (158,000 and 174,000 M-1 s-1, respectively). BatPA's cofactor requirement was partially satisfied by polymeric fibrin I (54,000 M-1 s-1), but monomeric fibrin I was virtually ineffective (970 M-1 s-1). By comparison, a variety of monomeric and polymeric fibrin-like species markedly enhanced tPA-mediated activation of Glu-plasminogen. Fragment X polymer was 2-fold better but 9-fold worse as cofactor for tPA and BatPA, respectively, relative to fibrin II. Fibrinogen, devoid of plasminogen, was a 10-fold better cofactor for tPA than fibrinogen rigorously depleted of plasminogen, Factor XIII, and fibronectin; the enhanced stimulatory effect of the less-purified fibrinogen was apparently due to the presence of Factor XIII. By contrast, the two fibrinogen preparations were equally poor cofactors of BatPA-mediated activation of Glu-plasminogen. BatPA possessed only 23 and 4% of the catalytic efficiencies of tPA and two-chain tPA, respectively, in hydrolyzing the chromogenic substrate Spectrozyme tPA. However in the presence of fibrin II, BatPA and tPA exhibited similar kcat/Km values for the hydrolysis of Spectrozyme tPA. Our data revealed that BatPA, unlike tPA, displayed a strict and fastidious requirement for polymeric fibrin I or II. Consequently, BatPA may preferentially promote plasmin generation during a narrow temporal window of fibrin formation and dissolution. PMID:1387641

  14. Design of a novel chimeric tissue plasminogen activator with favorable Vampire bat plasminogen activator properties.

    PubMed

    Kazemali, MohammadReza; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Sardari, Soroush; Saadatirad, Amir Hossein; Khalaj, Vahid; Zarei, Najmeh; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Adeli, Ahmad; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2014-12-01

    Fibrinolytic agents are widely used in treatment of the thromboembolic disorders. The new generations like recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA, alteplase) are not showing promising results in clinical practice in spite of displaying specific binding to fibrin in vitro. Vampire bat plasminogen activator (b-PA) is a plasminogen activator with higher fibrin affinity and specificity in comparison to t-PA resulting in reduced probability of hemorrhage. b-PA is also resistant to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) showing higher half-life compared to other variants of t-PA. However, its non-human origin was a driving force to design a human t-PA with favorable properties of b-PA. In the present study, we designed a chimeric t-PA with desirable b-PA properties and this new molecule was called as CT-b. The construct was prepared through kringle 2 domain removal and replacement of t-PA finger domain with b-PA one. In addition, the KHRR sequence at the initial part of protease domain was replaced by four alanine residues. The novel construct was integrated in Pichia pastoris genome by electroporation. Catalytic activity was investigated in the presence and absence of fibrin. The purified protein was analyzed by western blot. Fibrin binding and PAI resistance assays were also conducted. The activity of the recombinant protein in the presence of fibrin was 1560 times more than its activity in the absence of fibrin, showing its higher specificity to fibrin. The fibrin binding of CT-b was 1.2 fold more than t-PA. In addition, it was inhibited by PAI enzyme 44% less than t-PA. Although the presented data demonstrate a promising in vitro activity, more in vivo studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic advantage of this novel plasminogen activator.

  15. Design of a novel chimeric tissue plasminogen activator with favorable Vampire bat plasminogen activator properties.

    PubMed

    Kazemali, MohammadReza; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Sardari, Soroush; Saadatirad, Amir Hossein; Khalaj, Vahid; Zarei, Najmeh; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Adeli, Ahmad; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2014-12-01

    Fibrinolytic agents are widely used in treatment of the thromboembolic disorders. The new generations like recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA, alteplase) are not showing promising results in clinical practice in spite of displaying specific binding to fibrin in vitro. Vampire bat plasminogen activator (b-PA) is a plasminogen activator with higher fibrin affinity and specificity in comparison to t-PA resulting in reduced probability of hemorrhage. b-PA is also resistant to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) showing higher half-life compared to other variants of t-PA. However, its non-human origin was a driving force to design a human t-PA with favorable properties of b-PA. In the present study, we designed a chimeric t-PA with desirable b-PA properties and this new molecule was called as CT-b. The construct was prepared through kringle 2 domain removal and replacement of t-PA finger domain with b-PA one. In addition, the KHRR sequence at the initial part of protease domain was replaced by four alanine residues. The novel construct was integrated in Pichia pastoris genome by electroporation. Catalytic activity was investigated in the presence and absence of fibrin. The purified protein was analyzed by western blot. Fibrin binding and PAI resistance assays were also conducted. The activity of the recombinant protein in the presence of fibrin was 1560 times more than its activity in the absence of fibrin, showing its higher specificity to fibrin. The fibrin binding of CT-b was 1.2 fold more than t-PA. In addition, it was inhibited by PAI enzyme 44% less than t-PA. Although the presented data demonstrate a promising in vitro activity, more in vivo studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic advantage of this novel plasminogen activator. PMID:25442953

  16. Bioassay-guided chemical study of the anti-inflammatory effect of Senna villosa (Miller) H.S. Irwin & Barneby (Leguminosae) in TPA-induced ear edema.

    PubMed

    Susunaga-Notario, Ana del Carmen; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Salud; Zavala-Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Almanza-Pérez, Julio Cesar; Gutiérrez-Carrillo, Atilano; Arrieta-Báez, Daniel; López-López, Ana Laura; Román-Ramos, Rubén; Flores-Sáenz, José Luis Eduardo; Alarcón-Aguilar, Francisco Javier

    2014-07-15

    Senna villosa (Miller) is a plant that grows in México. In traditional Mexican medicine, it is used topically to treat skin infections, pustules and eruptions and to heal wounds by scar formation. However, studies of its potential anti-inflammatory effects have not been performed. The aim of the present study was to determine the anti-inflammatory effect of extracts from the leaves of Senna villosa and to perform a bioassay-guided chemical study of the extract with major activity in a model of ear edema induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). The results reveal that the chloroform extract from Senna villosa leaves has anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties. Nine fractions were obtained from the bioassay-guided chemical study, including a white precipitate from fractions 2 and 3. Although none of the nine fractions presented anti-inflammatory activity, the white precipitate exhibited pharmacological activity. It was chemically characterized using mass spectrometry and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, resulting in a mixture of three aliphatic esters, which were identified as the principal constituents: hexyl tetradecanoate (C20H40O2), heptyl tetradecanoate (C21H42O2) and octyl tetradecanoate (C22H44O2). This research provides, for the first time, evidence of the anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties of compounds isolated from Senna villosa.

  17. Bioassay-guided chemical study of the anti-inflammatory effect of Senna villosa (Miller) H.S. Irwin & Barneby (Leguminosae) in TPA-induced ear edema.

    PubMed

    Susunaga-Notario, Ana del Carmen; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Salud; Zavala-Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Almanza-Pérez, Julio Cesar; Gutiérrez-Carrillo, Atilano; Arrieta-Báez, Daniel; López-López, Ana Laura; Román-Ramos, Rubén; Flores-Sáenz, José Luis Eduardo; Alarcón-Aguilar, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Senna villosa (Miller) is a plant that grows in México. In traditional Mexican medicine, it is used topically to treat skin infections, pustules and eruptions and to heal wounds by scar formation. However, studies of its potential anti-inflammatory effects have not been performed. The aim of the present study was to determine the anti-inflammatory effect of extracts from the leaves of Senna villosa and to perform a bioassay-guided chemical study of the extract with major activity in a model of ear edema induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). The results reveal that the chloroform extract from Senna villosa leaves has anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties. Nine fractions were obtained from the bioassay-guided chemical study, including a white precipitate from fractions 2 and 3. Although none of the nine fractions presented anti-inflammatory activity, the white precipitate exhibited pharmacological activity. It was chemically characterized using mass spectrometry and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, resulting in a mixture of three aliphatic esters, which were identified as the principal constituents: hexyl tetradecanoate (C20H40O2), heptyl tetradecanoate (C21H42O2) and octyl tetradecanoate (C22H44O2). This research provides, for the first time, evidence of the anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties of compounds isolated from Senna villosa. PMID:25029073

  18. Tissue plasminogen activator is required for the development of fetal alcohol syndrome in mice.

    PubMed

    Noel, Melissa; Norris, Erin H; Strickland, Sidney

    2011-03-22

    Ethanol exposure during developmental synaptogenesis can lead to brain defects referred to as fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), which can include mental health problems such as cognitive deficits and mental retardation. In FAS, widespread neuronal death and brain mass loss precedes behavioral and cognitive impairments in adulthood. Because tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been implicated in neurodegeneration, we examined whether it mediates FAS. Neonatal WT and tPA-/- mice were injected with ethanol to mimic FAS in humans. In WT mice, ethanol elicited caspase-3 activation, significant forebrain neurodegeneration, and decreased contextual fear conditioning in adults. However, tPA-deficient mice were protected from these neurotoxicities, and this protection could be abrogated by exogenous tPA. Selective pharmacological modulators of NMDA and GABAA receptor pathways revealed that the effects of tPA were mediated by the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor. This study identifies tPA as a critical signaling component in FAS.

  19. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Induction in Purkinje Neurons After Cerebellar Motor Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeds, Nicholas W.; Williams, Brian L.; Bickford, Paula C.

    1995-12-01

    The cerebellar cortex is implicated in the learning of complex motor skills. This learning may require synaptic remodeling of Purkinje cell inputs. An extracellular serine protease, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), is involved in remodeling various nonneural tissues and is associated with developing and regenerating neurons. In situ hybridization showed that expression of tPA messenger RNA was increased in the Purkinje neurons of rats within an hour of their being trained for a complex motor task. Antibody to tPA also showed the induction of tPA protein associated with cerebellar Purkinje cells. Thus, the induction of tPA during motor learning may play a role in activity-dependent synaptic plasticity.

  20. Characterization of tissue plasminogen activator binding proteins isolated from endothelial cells and other cell types

    SciTech Connect

    Beebe, D.P.; Wood, L.L.; Moos, M. )

    1990-07-15

    Human tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) was shown to bind specifically to human osteosarcoma cells (HOS), and human epidermoid carcinoma cells (A-431 cells). Crosslinking studies with DTSSP demonstrated high molecular weight complexes (130,000) between {sup 125}I-t-PA and cell membrane protein on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), HOS, and A-431 cells. A 48-65,000 molecular weight complex was demonstrated after crosslinking t-PA peptide (res. 7-20) to cells. Ligand blotting of cell lysates which had been passed over a t-PA affinity column revealed binding of t-PA to 54,000 and 95,000 molecular weight proteins. Several t-PA binding proteins were identified in immunopurified cell lysates, including tubulin beta chain, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and single chain urokinase.

  1. Proteolysis of neuronal cell adhesion molecule by the tissue plasminogen activator-plasmin system after kainate injection in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Endo, A; Nagai, N; Urano, T; Takada, Y; Hashimoto, K; Takada, A

    1999-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that converts inactive plasminogen to the active protease plasmin and mediates extracellular metabolism. tPA is transcriptionally induced in the mouse hippocampus by pharmacological or electrical stimulation of neuronal activity and mediates excitotoxin-induced neuronal degeneration. Therefore, we hypothesized that tPA would be induced in the hippocampus after kainic acid (KA) injection into the lateral cerebral ventricle (LCV) and that the activated tPA-plasmin system would degrade the neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), which is a component of the extracellular matrix. In order to investigate this possibility, we first examined whether NCAM is a substrate for the tPA plasmin system by incubating mouse brain homogenates with tPA and plasminogen at 37 degrees C. Next, we examined the degradation of NCAM and the changes of tPA activity in the mouse hippocampus with immunohistochemical procedures and histological zymography after KA injection into both LCVs. As a result, we observed neuronal atrophy and a decrease of NCAM immunoreactivity along with an increase of tPA activity in the CA3 area of the hippocampus. These results suggest that activation of the tPA plasmin system after KA injection into the LCVs results in the degradation of NCAM in the CA3 area.

  2. Ionic, electrical, and secretory effects of protein kinase C activation in mouse pancreatic B-cells: studies with a phorbol ester

    SciTech Connect

    Bozem, M.; Nenquin, M.; Henquin, J.C.

    1987-09-01

    The phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was used to study the effects of protein kinase C activation on stimulus-secretion coupling in mouse pancreatic B-cells. At a nonstimulatory concentration of glucose (3 mM), 100 nM TPA, but not 10 nM TPA, slightly and slowly increased insulin release and /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux and decreased /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux, but did not affect the membrane potential of B-cells. At a threshold concentration of glucose (7 mM), 100 nM TPA markedly increased insulin release without triggering electrical activity in B-cells. At a stimulatory concentration of glucose (10 mM), TPA caused a dose-dependent irreversible increase in insulin release, /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, and /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux and slightly augmented islet cAMP levels. Omission of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ abolished the effects of 10 nM TPA and partially inhibited those of 100 nM TPA on insulin release and /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux. In contrast, their effect on /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux was paradoxically augmented. Glucose-induced electrical activity in B-cells was only marginally affected by TPA; the duration of the slow waves with spikes was not modified, but a small shortening of the polarized intervals raised their frequency and slightly increased the overall activity. This increase was significant only with 10 nM TPA, whereas only 100 nM TPA brought about a minute increase in /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ influx. These results thus show that TPA induces insulin release or potentiates glucose-induced insulin release without mimicking or amplifying the initial ionic and electrical signals triggered by glucose. They suggest that protein kinase C activation affects stimulus-secretion coupling by modulating intracellular and/or nonelectrogenic membrane events.

  3. t-PA-specific modulation of a human blood-brain barrier model involves plasmin-mediated activation of the Rho kinase pathway in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Niego, Be'eri; Freeman, Roxann; Puschmann, Till B; Turnley, Ann M; Medcalf, Robert L

    2012-05-17

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) can modulate permeability of the neurovascular unit and exacerbate injury in ischemic stroke. We examined the effects of t-PA using in vitro models of the blood-brain barrier. t-PA caused a concentration-dependent increase in permeability. This effect was dependent on plasmin formation and potentiated in the presence of plasminogen. An inactive t-PA variant inhibited the t-PA-mediated increase in permeability, whereas blockade of low-density lipoprotein receptors or exposed lysine residues resulted in similar inhibition, implying a role for both a t-PA receptor, most likely a low-density lipoprotein receptor, and a plasminogen receptor. This effect was selective to t-PA and its close derivative tenecteplase. The truncated t-PA variant reteplase had a minor effect on permeability, whereas urokinase and desmoteplase were ineffective. t-PA also induced marked shape changes in both brain endothelial cells and astrocytes. Changes in astrocyte morphology coincided with increased F-actin staining intensity, larger focal adhesion size, and elevated levels of phosphorylated myosin. Inhibition of Rho kinase blocked these changes and reduced t-PA/plasminogen-mediated increase in permeability. Hence plasmin, generated on the cell surface selectively by t-PA, modulates the astrocytic cytoskeleton, leading to an increase in blood-brain barrier permeability. Blockade of the Rho/Rho kinase pathway may have beneficial consequences during thrombolytic therapy.

  4. Involvement of tissue plasminogen activator in stress responsivity during acute cocaine withdrawal in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Maiya, Rajani; Norris, Erin H.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Strickland, Sidney

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence that increased release of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) contributes to stress responsivity during cocaine withdrawal (WD). Recent studies suggest that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in the CeA is a downstream effector protein for CRF after acute “binge” cocaine administration. The purpose of this study was to determine if tPA modulates cocaine WD-induced stress responsivity. Wild-type (WT) and tPA-deficient (tPA −/−) mice were subjected to chronic (14 days) “binge” cocaine (45 mg/kg per day) or its acute (1 day) WD. Extracellular tPA activity, CRF mRNA levels, and plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels were measured in tPA −/− and WT mice. Extracellular tPA activity was reduced by 50% in the CeA and medial amygdala of WT mice after chronic cocaine and returned to basal levels after acute WD. Unlike WT mice, tPA −/− mice did not display elevated amygdalar CRF mRNA levels during cocaine WD. In comparison to WT mice, tPA −/− mice showed a blunted plasma CORT response during acute WD. These results demonstrate that tPA activity in the amygdala (Amy) is altered by chronic cocaine exposure, and further suggest an involvement of tPA in modulating amygdalar CRF stress responsive system and hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis in response to acute cocaine WD. PMID:20666641

  5. Topical (+)-catechin emulsified gel prevents DMBA/TPA-induced squamous cell carcinoma of the skin by modulating antioxidants and inflammatory biomarkers in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Monga, Jitender; Aggarwal, Vaibhav; Suthar, Sharad Kumar; Monika; Nongalleima, Khumukcham; Sharma, Manu

    2014-12-01

    An emulsified gel of (+)-catechin was developed and evaluated topically against 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-promoted (DMBA-induced and TPA-promoted) squamous cell carcinoma of the skin in BALB/c mice. The biological evaluation outcome indicated that the (+)-catechin emulsified gel increased the activity of oxidative stress biomarkers glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), whereas it decreased the level of malondialdehyde (MDA). The mechanistic study showed that genes implicated in the inflammation and cancer, such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS), were down-regulated by (+)-catechin emulsified gel while inhibiting an inflammatory mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The (+)-catechin emulsified gel further suppressed the activity of pro-inflammatory cytokines, viz. tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). The in vitro permeation study revealed that release of (+)-catechin from an emulsified gel base reached a steady state after 6 h, while pH of the entire emulsified gel was found to be between 6.2 and 6.5 that falls well within the normal pH range of the skin.

  6. Relationship between exposure to TPA and appearance of transformed cells in MNNG-initiated transformation of BALB/c 3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, T; Umeda, M

    1997-10-01

    In the BALB/c-3T3-cell transformation system, the effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) exposure on the appearance of transformed cells was examined in order to investigate the mechanisms of in vitro tumor promotion. Optimal duration of TPA exposure on N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine(MNNG)-initiated cells was at least 11 days. To investigate the effect of transformation frequencies of altering inoculating cell density at the replating of MNNG-exposed cells and of altering the time of starting TPA exposure, MNNG-exposed cells were replated at various inoculum sizes. With lower inoculum sizes (1 x 10(3) to 3 x 10(4) cells/dish), maximum TPA-induced transformation occurred for TPA commencement at confluence, while with higher inoculum size (1 x 10(5) cells/dish), maximum transformation frequency was observed when TPA exposure was started on day 7 after replating, being some 2 days after confluence. This may suggest that there are different mechanisms involved, depending on inoculum size, and that these may involve cell-cell interactions (at lower inoculum) and mutation expression periods (at higher inoculum). By means of redispersion experiments, it was demonstrated that the appearance of transformed cells begins on about day 7 after replating at a cell density of 1 x 10(4) cells/dish. These results suggest the usefulness of the replating method for optimizing transformation in the BALB/c-3T3-cell transformation assay, and provide insight into the time frame of expression of MNNG-initiated transformants and TPA-induced expansion of these transformants.

  7. Tissue plasminogen activator mediates amyloid-induced neurotoxicity via Erk1/2 activation.

    PubMed

    Medina, Manel G; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Domínguez, Jorge E; Medina, Miguel; Zafra, Delia; Alameda, Francesc; Dotti, Carlos G; Navarro, Pilar

    2005-05-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the main activator of plasminogen into plasmin in the brain where it may have beneficial roles but also neurotoxic effects that could be plasmin dependent or not. Little is known about the substrates and pathways that mediate plasmin-independent tPA neurotoxicity. Here we show in primary hippocampal neurons that tPA promotes a catalytic-independent activation of the extracellular regulated kinase (Erk)1/2 signal transduction pathway through the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, G-proteins and protein kinase C. This results in GSK3 activation in a process that requires de novo synthesis of proteins, and leads to tau aberrant phosphorylation, microtubule destabilization and apoptosis. Similar effects are produced by amyloid aggregates in a tPA-dependent manner, as demonstrated by pharmacological treatments and in wt and tPA-/- mice neurons. Consistently, in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients' brains, high levels of tPA colocalize with amyloid-rich areas, activated Erk1/2 and phosphorylated tau. This is the first demonstration of an intracellular pathway by which tPA triggers kinase activation, tau phosphorylation and neurotoxicity, suggesting a key role for this molecule in AD pathology.

  8. Neuroprotection by urokinase plasminogen activator in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunsil; Lee, Kyung Jin; Seo, Jung-Woo; Byun, Catherine Jeonghae; Chung, Sun-Ju; Suh, Dae Chul; Carmeliet, Peter; Koh, Jae-Young; Kim, Jong S; Lee, Joo-Yong

    2012-04-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), which are both used for thrombolytic treatment of acute ischemic stroke, are serine proteases that convert plasminogen to active plasmin. Although recent experimental evidences have raised controversy about the neurotoxic versus neuroprotective roles of tPA in acute brain injury, uPA remains unexplored in this context. In this study, we evaluated the effect of uPA on neuronal death in the hippocampus of mice after kainate-induced seizures. In the normal brain, uPA was localized to both nuclei and cytosol of neurons. Following severe kainate-induced seizures, uPA completely disappeared in degenerating neurons, whereas uPA-expressing astrocytes substantially increased, suggesting reactive astrogliosis. uPA-knockout mice were more vulnerable to kainate-induced neuronal death than wild-type mice. Consistent with this, inhibition of uPA by intracerebral injection of the uPA inhibitor UK122 increased the level of neuronal death. In contrast, prior administration of recombinant uPA significantly attenuated neuronal death. Collectively, these results indicate that uPA renders neurons resistant to kainate-induced excitotoxicity. Moreover, recombinant uPA suppressed cell death in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons exposed to H2O2, zinc, or various excitotoxins, suggesting that uPA protects against neuronal injuries mediated by the glutamate receptor, or by oxidation- or zinc-induced death signaling pathways. Considering that tPA may facilitate neurodegeneration in acute brain injury, we suggest that uPA, as a neuroprotectant, might be beneficial for the treatment of acute brain injuries such as ischemic stroke.

  9. Treatment of a Class II Division 2 Patient with Severe Skeletal Discrepancy by Using a Custom Made TPA Proclination Spring

    PubMed Central

    Paduano, Sergio; Spagnuolo, Gianrico; Biase, Giuseppe di; Cioffi, Iacopo

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes the orthodontic treatment of a boy, aged 15.3 years, with permanent dentition, mesofacial typology, affected with a severe sagittal skeletal Class II division 2 malocclusion, due to a mandibular retrusion. His chief compliant was the position of the maxillary incisors, displaced too palatally, and an impaired facial profile. Herbst and multi-bracket straightwire fixed appliances, together with a custom made modified transpalatal arch (i.e. TPA proclination spring), were used to correct the sagittal discrepancy and to improve the attractiveness of the impaired facial profile. PMID:24155800

  10. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of the thermophysical properties of shocked liquid ammonia for pressures up to 1.3 TPa.

    PubMed

    Li, Dafang; Zhang, Ping; Yan, Jun

    2013-10-01

    We investigate via quantum molecular-dynamics simulations the thermophysical properties of shocked liquid ammonia up to the pressure 1.3 TPa and temperature 120,000 K. The principal Hugoniot is predicted from the wide-range equation of state, which agrees well with the available experimental measurements up to 64 GPa. Our systematic study of the structural properties demonstrates that the liquid ammonia undergoes a gradual phase transition along the Hugoniot. At about 4800 K, the system transforms into a metallic, complex mixture state consisting of NH3, N2, H2, N, and H. Furthermore, we discuss the implications for the interiors of Uranus and Neptune. PMID:24116573

  11. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of the thermophysical properties of shocked liquid ammonia for pressures up to 1.3 TPa.

    PubMed

    Li, Dafang; Zhang, Ping; Yan, Jun

    2013-10-01

    We investigate via quantum molecular-dynamics simulations the thermophysical properties of shocked liquid ammonia up to the pressure 1.3 TPa and temperature 120,000 K. The principal Hugoniot is predicted from the wide-range equation of state, which agrees well with the available experimental measurements up to 64 GPa. Our systematic study of the structural properties demonstrates that the liquid ammonia undergoes a gradual phase transition along the Hugoniot. At about 4800 K, the system transforms into a metallic, complex mixture state consisting of NH3, N2, H2, N, and H. Furthermore, we discuss the implications for the interiors of Uranus and Neptune.

  12. Tissue plasminogen activator involvement in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis: aggravation and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Gur-Wahnon, Devorah; Mizrachi, Tehila; Wald-Altman, Shane; Al-Roof Higazi, Abd; Brenner, Talma

    2014-08-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a component of the PA/plasmin system, is elevated in inflammatory areas and plays a role in inflammatory neurological disorders. In the present study we explored the involvement of tPA and the potential immunomodulatory activity of tPA in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Mice deficient in tPA (tPA(-/-)) present with a markedly more severe disease than wild type EAMG mice. In an attempt to treat EAMG with an 18aa peptide derived from the PA system inhibitor (PAI-1), designed to tether out the endogenous inhibitor, a significant suppression of disease severity was demonstrated. The more severe disease in tPA(-/-) mice was accompanied by a higher level of anti-AChR antibodies and increased expression of B-cell markers. In view of the essential role of B-cell activating factor (BAFF) in B-cell maturation, the expression of BAFF family components was tested. An increase in BAFF and BAFF receptor was observed in EAMG tPA(-/-) mice, whereas BCMA expression was reduced, consistent with the increased level of pathogenic antibodies and the more severe disease. Given the importance of T regulatory cells (Tregs) in EAMG, they were evaluated and their number was reduced in tPA(-/-) mice, in which EAMG was aggravated, whereas following PAI-1dp treatment, Tregs were replenished and the disease was ameliorated. The results show the involvement of tPA in EAMG, implying a protective role for tPA in EAMG pathogenesis. The amelioration of EAMG by PAI-1dp treatment suggests that the PA system may be considered a potential site for therapeutic intervention in neuroimmune diseases.

  13. Coamplification and coexpression of human tissue-type plasminogen activator and murine dihydrofolate reductase sequences in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, R J; Wasley, L C; Spiliotes, A J; Gossels, S D; Latt, S A; Larsen, G R; Kay, R M

    1985-01-01

    Expression of human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) at high levels has been achieved in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by cotransfection and subsequent coamplification of the transfected sequences. Expression vectors containing the t-PA cDNA gene and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) cDNA gene were cotransfected into CHO DHFR-deficient cells. Transformants expressing DHFR were selected by growth in media lacking nucleosides and contained low numbers of t-PA genes and DHFR genes. Stepwise selection of the DHFR+ transformants in increasing concentrations of methotrexate generated cells which had amplified both DHFR genes and t-PA genes over 100-fold. These cell lines expressed elevated levels of enzymatically active t-PA. To optimize both t-PA sequence amplification and t-PA expression, various modifications of the original procedure were used. These included alterations to the DHFR expression vector, optimization of the molar ratio of t-PA to DHFR sequences in the cotransfection, and modification of the methotrexate resistance selection procedure. The structure of the amplified DNA, its chromosomal location, and its stability during growth in the absence of methotrexate are reported. Images PMID:4040603

  14. Synthesis, structure and properties of one novel 2D Mn-heterocyclic carboxylic acid complex [Mn(TPA)Cl(H 2O)] n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Peng; Li, Hui-Min

    2011-04-01

    A novel 2D layer complex [Mn(TPA)Cl(H 2O)] n ( 1) has been synthesized by two methods through the reaction of MnCl 2 and TPC or TPA under hydrothermal conditions and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, infrared spectrometry (IR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), where heterocyclic carboxylic acid ligand TPA = 2-(5-(pyridin-2-yl)-2H-tetrazol-2-yl)acetic acid, TPC = 2-(5-(pyridin-2-yl)-2H-tetrazol-2-yl)acetonitrile. The distorted octahedral Mn(II) centers are bridged by carboxylic O atoms resulting in the formation of a 1D chain. Then the 1D chains are connected with each other through TPA ligands into a 2D (3,3)-connected topology framework. The H-bonding interactions extend the complex into a three-dimensional network, and such weak interactions further stabilized the complex. Furthermore, solid-state fluorescence spectrum of complex 1 exhibits intense broad emissions at 396 nm at room temperature, which is red-shifted by 21 nm relative to that of free ligand TPA.

  15. Resveratrol inhibits phorbol ester-induced expression of COX-2 and activation of NF-kappaB in mouse skin by blocking IkappaB kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Shin, Young Kee; Kim, Sung Hoon; Surh, Young-Joon

    2006-07-01

    Aberrant expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been implicated in tumor promotion. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin present in grapes, was reported to inhibit multistage mouse skin carcinogenesis. In the present study, we found that topically applied resveratrol significantly inhibited COX-2 expression induced by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Resveratrol-suppressed phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IkappaBalpha, thereby inhibiting activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) in TPA-stimulated mouse skin. Pretreatment with resveratrol also suppressed TPA-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. Resveratrol blunted TPA-induced phosphorylation of p65 and its interaction with CBP/p300, rendering NF-kappaB transcriptionally inactive. To get further insights into the molecular basis of NF-kappaB inactivation by resveratrol, we examined the role of IkappaB kinase (IKK) in mediating TPA-induced activation of NF-kappaB and COX-2 expression. TPA treatment led to rapid induction of IKK activity in mouse skin, which was abolished either by resveratrol or an IKK inhibitor Bay 11-7082. Topical application of Bay 11-7082 also abrogated TPA-induced NF-kappaB activation and COX-2 expression, supporting the involvement of IKK in TPA-induced COX-2 expression. Taken together, the above findings suggest that resveratrol targets IKK in blocking TPA-induced NF-kappaB activation and COX-2 expression in mouse skin in vivo.

  16. Ginkgo biloba Extract (EGb 761®) Inhibits Glutamate-induced Up-regulation of Tissue Plasminogen Activator Through Inhibition of c-Fos Translocation in Rat Primary Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyu Suk; Lee, Ian Myungwon; Sim, Seobo; Lee, Eun Joo; Gonzales, Edson Luck; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Shin, Chan Young; Kwon, Kyoung Ja; Han, Seol-Heui

    2016-01-01

    EGb 761(®) , a standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves, has antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties in experimental models of neurodegenerative disorders such as stroke and Alzheimer's disease. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) acts a neuromodulator and plays a crucial role in the manifestation of neurotoxicity leading to exaggerated neuronal cell death in neurological insult conditions. In this study, we investigated the effects of EGb 761 on the basal and glutamate-induced activity and expression of tPA in rat primary cortical neurons. Under basal condition, EGb 761 inhibited both secreted and cellular tPA activities, without altering tPA mRNA level, as modulated by the activation of p38. Compared with basal condition, EGb 761 inhibited the glutamate-induced up-regulation of tPA mRNA resulting in the normalization of overt tPA activity and expression. c-Fos is a component of AP-1, which plays a critical role in the modulation of tPA expression. Interestingly, EGb 761 inhibited c-Fos nuclear translocation without affecting c-Fos expression in glutamate-induced rat primary cortical neurons. These results demonstrated that EGb 761 can modulate tPA activity under basal and glutamate-stimulated conditions by both translational and transcriptional mechanisms. Thus, EGb 761 could be a potential and effective therapeutic strategy in tPA-excessive neurotoxic conditions.

  17. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Lee, Tet Woo; Christie, David L.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM) but not high (50 μM) concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and receptor-associated protein (RAP), a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs. PMID:26500501

  18. A family of uranyl-aromatic dicarboxylate (pht-, ipa-, tpa-) framework hybrid materials: photoluminescence, surface photovoltage and dye adsorption.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xue; Wang, Che; Shi, Zhong-Feng; Song, Jian; Bai, Feng-Ying; Wang, Ji-Xiao; Xing, Yong-Heng

    2015-07-01

    Four uranyl complexes [(UO2)(pht)H2O]·H2O (pht = phthalic acid) (1), (UO2)2(Hipa)4(H2O)2 (Hipa = isophthalic acid) (2), (UO2)(tpa)(DMF)2 (tpa = terephthalic acid) (3) and (UO2)(box)2 (box = benzoic acid) (4) were synthesized by the reaction of UO2(CH3COO)2·2H2O as the metal source and phthalic acid, isophthalic acid, terephthalic acid or benzoic acid as the ligand. They were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, UV-Vis, XRD, single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and thermal gravimetric analysis. The structural analysis reveals that complex 1 exhibits a one-dimensional chain structure constructed by the building unit [(UO2)2(pht)4(H2O)2] and further extends the chain into a 2D supramolecular architecture by hydrogen bonding interactions. Complex 2 is a discrete [(UO2)2(Hipa)4(H2O)2] structure, and by the hydrogen bonding interaction, forms a 3D supramolecular structure. In complexes 3 and 4, adjacent uranyl polyhedra form a 1D chain through bridging terephthalic acid and benzoic acid, respectively. In order to extend their functional properties, their photoluminescence, surface photovoltage and dye adsorption properties have been studied. PMID:26038888

  19. Comparison of altered expression of histocompatibility antigens with altered immune function in murine spleen cells treated with ultraviolet radiation and/or TPA

    SciTech Connect

    Pretell, J.O.; Cone, R.E.

    1985-02-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory demonstrated that several treatments that inhibited the ability of cells to stimulate the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) also blocked the shedding of histocompatibility antigens and Ia antigens from murine spleen cells. In the present studies, one of these treatments, ultraviolet radiation (UV), was shown to cause an initial loss in the density of H-2K, IA, and IE antigens prior to the block in shedding observed after culture of these cells. Further analysis revealed that the UV-induced loss of antigens could be prevented by the presence of colchicine during irradiation. Biosynthetic analyses revealed the IA antigen synthesis was also inhibited in the UV-irradiated cells. Examination of the effects of a second agent, 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on the turnover of histocompatibility antigens revealed that the biosynthesis and shedding of these antigens were accelerated by this agent. However, addition of TPA to UV-irradiated cells did not result in a reversal of the UV-induced block in biosynthesis of IA antigens. Results of immune function assays correlated with the biochemical studies: UV-irradiation inhibited the generation of the MLR, but TPA enhanced this reaction, and addition of TPA to mixed lymphocyte cultures with UV-irradiated stimulators did not reverse the UV-induced inhibition. These results suggest that, although the turnover of histocompatibility antigens may be affected by TPA and UV in an antagonistic fashion, additional factors other than the expression of histocompatibility antigens are operating in the inhibition of stimulation of an MLR by UV radiation or its enhancement by TPA.

  20. A case-control study of the effectiveness of tissue plasminogen activator on 6 month patients--reported outcomes and health care utilization.

    PubMed

    Lang, Catherine E; Bland, Marghuretta D; Cheng, Nuo; Corbetta, Maurizio; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2014-01-01

    We examined the benefit of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), delivered as part of usual stroke management, on patient-reported outcomes and health care utilization. Using a case control design, patients who received tPA as part of usual stroke management were compared with patients who would have received tPA had they arrived to the hospital within the therapeutic time window. Data were collected from surveys 6 months after stroke using standardized patient-reported outcome measures and questions about health care utilization. Demographic and medical data were acquired from hospital records. Patients were matched on stroke severity, age, race, and gender. Matching was done with 1:2 ratio of tPA to controls. Results were compared between groups with 1-tailed tests because of a directionally specific hypothesis in favor of the tPA group. The tPA (n = 78) and control (n = 156) groups were matched across variables, except for stroke severity, which was better in the control group; subsequent analyses controlled for this mismatch. The tPA group reported better physical function, communication, cognitive ability, depressive symptomatology, and quality of life/participation compared with the control group. Fewer people in the tPA group reported skilled nursing facility stays, emergency department visits, and rehospitalizations after their stroke compared with controls. Reports of other postacute services were not different between groups. Although it is known that tPA reduces disability, this is the first study to demonstrate the effectiveness of tPA in improving meaningful, patient-reported outcomes. Thus, use of tPA provides a large benefit to the daily lives of people with ischemic stroke.

  1. Tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke: calculation of dose based on estimated patient weight can increase the risk of cerebral bleeding.

    PubMed

    García-Pastor, Andrés; Díaz-Otero, Fernando; Funes-Molina, Carmen; Benito-Conde, Beatriz; Grandes-Velasco, Sandra; Sobrino-García, Pilar; Vázquez-Alén, Pilar; Fernández-Bullido, Yolanda; Villanueva-Osorio, Jose Antonio; Gil-Núñez, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    A dose of 0.9 mg/kg of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) has proven to be beneficial in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Dosing of t-PA based on estimated patient weight (PW) increases the likelihood of errors. Our objectives were to evaluate the accuracy of estimated PW and assess the effectiveness and safety of the actual applied dose (AAD) of t-PA. We performed a prospective single-center study of AIS patients treated with t-PA from May 2010 to December 2011. Dose was calculated according to estimated PW. Patients were weighed during the 24 h following treatment with t-PA. Estimation errors and AAD were calculated. Actual PW was measured in 97 of the 108 included patients. PW estimation errors were recorded in 22.7 % and were more frequent when weight was estimated by stroke unit staff (44 %). Only 11 % of patients misreported their own weight. Mean AAD was significantly higher in patients who had intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) after t-PA than in patients who did not (0.96 vs. 0.92 mg/kg; p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis showed an increased risk of ICH for each 10 % increase in t-PA dose above the optimal dose of 0.90 mg/kg (OR 3.10; 95 % CI 1.14-8.39; p = 0.026). No effects of t-PA misdosing were observed on symptomatic ICH, functional outcome or mortality. Estimated PW is frequently inaccurate and leads to t-PA dosing errors. Increasing doses of t-PA above 0.90 mg/kg may increase the risk of ICH. Standardized weighing methods before t-PA is administered should be considered.

  2. Spatial patterning of vulture scavenged human remains.

    PubMed

    Spradley, M Katherine; Hamilton, Michelle D; Giordano, Alberto

    2012-06-10

    This article presents the results of a pilot study on the effects of vulture modification to human remains. A donated body from the Willed Body Donation Program was placed at the Forensic Anthropology Research Facility (FARF), an outdoor human decomposition laboratory located at Texas State University-San Marcos. The effects of vulture scavenging on the timing and sequence, and the rate of skeletonization, disarticulation, and dispersal were observed via a motion sensing camera and direct observation. Using GIS (Geographic Information Systems) and GPS (Global Positioning System) technologies and spatial analytical methods, the transport of skeletal elements was mapped in order to analyze dispersal and terrain-influenced patterns of active vulture scavenging. Results showed that the initial scavenging took place 37 days after placement at FARF. This delay in scavenging differs from previous research. After the initial appearance of the vultures, the body was reduced from a fully-fleshed individual to a skeleton within only 5h. This underscores the potential for errors in postmortem interval estimations made at vulture scavenged scenes. Additionally, spatial analysis showed that skeletal elements were dispersed by vultures to lower elevations, and that the disarticulation and dispersal of the skeletal elements occurs early in the scavenging sequence.

  3. Smart Point Cloud: Definition and Remaining Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poux, F.; Hallot, P.; Neuville, R.; Billen, R.

    2016-10-01

    Dealing with coloured point cloud acquired from terrestrial laser scanner, this paper identifies remaining challenges for a new data structure: the smart point cloud. This concept arises with the statement that massive and discretized spatial information from active remote sensing technology is often underused due to data mining limitations. The generalisation of point cloud data associated with the heterogeneity and temporality of such datasets is the main issue regarding structure, segmentation, classification, and interaction for an immediate understanding. We propose to use both point cloud properties and human knowledge through machine learning to rapidly extract pertinent information, using user-centered information (smart data) rather than raw data. A review of feature detection, machine learning frameworks and database systems indexed both for mining queries and data visualisation is studied. Based on existing approaches, we propose a new 3-block flexible framework around device expertise, analytic expertise and domain base reflexion. This contribution serves as the first step for the realisation of a comprehensive smart point cloud data structure.

  4. Activation of immobilized plasminogen by tissue activator. Multimolecular complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, R.L.; Nachman, R.L.; Leung, L.L.; Harpel, P.C.

    1985-08-25

    Ternary complex formation of tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) and plasminogen (Plg) with thrombospondin (TSP) or histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) has been demonstrated using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, an affinity bead assay, and a rocket immunoelectrophoresis assay. The formation of these complexes was specific, concentration dependent, saturable, lysine binding site-dependent, and inhibitable by fluid phase plasminogen. Apparent Kd values were approximately 12-36 nM for the interaction of TPA with TSP-Plg complexes and 15-31 nM with HRGP-Plg complexes. At saturation the relative molar stoichiometry of Plg:TPA was 3:1 within the TSP-containing complexes and 1:1 within HRGP-containing complexes. The activation of Plg to plasmin by TPA on TSP- and HRGP-coated surfaces was studied using a synthetic fluorometric plasmin substrate (D-Val-Leu-Lys-7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl coumarin). Kinetic analysis demonstrated a marked increase in the affinity of TPA for plasminogen in the presence of surface-associated TSP or HRGP. Complex formation of locally released tissue plasminogen activator with Plg immobilized on TSP or HRGP surfaces may thus play an important role in effecting proteolytic events in nonfibrin-containing microenvironments.

  5. Fluid Flow Stimulates Tissue Plasminogen Activator Secretion by Cultured Human Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, S. L.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    1989-03-01

    Wall shear stress generated by blood flow may regulate the expression of fibrinolytic proteins by endothelial cells. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor, type 1 (PAI-1) secretion by cultured human endothelial cells were not affected by exposure to venous shear stress (4 dynes/cm2). However, at arterial shear stresses of 15 and 25 dynes/cm2, the tPA secretion rate was 2.1 and 3.0 times greater, respectively, than the basal tPA secretion rate. PAI-1 secretion was unaffected by shear stress over the entire physiological range.

  6. A TPA-caged precursor of (imino)coumarin for "turn-on" fluorogenic detection of Cu(.).

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhangjun; Hu, Jiwen; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Qiong; Zhao, Meng; Brommesson, Caroline; Tian, Yupeng; Gao, Hongwen; Zhang, Xuanjun; Uvdal, Kajsa

    2016-08-24

    We strategize to utilize the precursors of (imino)coumarin fluorophores to deliver novel reactive Cu(+) probes, where tris[(2-pyridyl)-methyl] amine (TPA) works as a reactive receptor towards Cu(+). To verify this strategy, CP1, a representative probe and relevant sensing behaviors towards Cu(+) are presented here. CP1 features good solubility and fast response for monitoring labile copper in aqueous solution and live cells. The sensing mechanism of CP1 is determined by HPLC titration and mass spectrometric analysis. The probe CP1 exhibits a 60-fold fluorescence enhancement and a detection limitation of 10.8 nM upon the detection of Cu(+). CP1 is further applied for imaging labile copper in live cells. This work provides a starting point for future development of Cu(+) probes, based on in situ formation of (imino)coumarin scaffolds, as well as their further investigations of copper signaling and biological events.

  7. Liganded thyroid hormone receptor inhibits phorbol 12-O-tetradecanoate-13-acetate-induced enhancer activity via firefly luciferase cDNA.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Hiroko; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Matsushita, Akio; Ohba, Kenji; Iwaki, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Shingo; Ishizuka, Keiko; Oki, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptor (TR) belongs to the nuclear hormone receptor (NHR) superfamily and regulates the transcription of its target genes in a thyroid hormone (T3)-dependent manner. While the detail of transcriptional activation by T3 (positive regulation) has been clarified, the mechanism of T3-dependent repression (negative regulation) remains to be determined. In addition to naturally occurring negative regulations typically found for the thyrotropin β gene, T3-bound TR (T3/TR) is known to cause artificial negative regulation in reporter assays with cultured cells. For example, T3/TR inhibits the transcriptional activity of the reporter plasmids harboring AP-1 site derived from pUC/pBR322-related plasmid (pUC/AP-1). Artificial negative regulation has also been suggested in the reporter assay with firefly luciferase (FFL) gene. However, identification of the DNA sequence of the FFL gene using deletion analysis was not performed because negative regulation was evaluated by measuring the enzymatic activity of FFL protein. Thus, there remains the possibility that the inhibition by T3 is mediated via a DNA sequence other than FFL cDNA, for instance, pUC/AP-1 site in plasmid backbone. To investigate the function of FFL cDNA as a transcriptional regulatory sequence, we generated pBL-FFL-CAT5 by ligating FFL cDNA in the 5' upstream region to heterologous thymidine kinase promoter in pBL-CAT5, a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT)-based reporter gene, which lacks pUC/AP-1 site. In kidney-derived CV1 and choriocarcinoma-derived JEG3 cells, pBL-FFL-CAT5, but not pBL-CAT5, was strongly activated by a protein kinase C activator, phorbol 12-O-tetradecanoate-13-acetate (TPA). TPA-induced activity of pBL-FFL-CAT5 was negatively regulated by T3/TR. Mutation of nt. 626/640 in FFL cDNA attenuated the TPA-induced activation and concomitantly abolished the T3-dependent repression. Our data demonstrate that FFL cDNA sequence mediates the TPA-induced transcriptional activity

  8. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Coating on Implant Surfaces Reduces Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Jacobsson, Gunnar; Peetermans, Marijke; Verhamme, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are a major medical challenge because of their high prevalence and antibiotic resistance. As fibrin plays an important role in S. aureus biofilm formation, we hypothesize that coating of the implant surface with fibrinolytic agents can be used as a new method of antibiofilm prophylaxis. The effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) coating on S. aureus biofilm formation was tested with in vitro microplate biofilm assays and an in vivo mouse model of biofilm infection. tPA coating efficiently inhibited biofilm formation by various S. aureus strains. The effect was dependent on plasminogen activation by tPA, leading to subsequent local fibrin cleavage. A tPA coating on implant surfaces prevented both early adhesion and later biomass accumulation. Furthermore, tPA coating increased the susceptibility of biofilm infections to antibiotics. In vivo, significantly fewer bacteria were detected on the surfaces of implants coated with tPA than on control implants from mice treated with cloxacillin. Fibrinolytic coatings (e.g., with tPA) reduce S. aureus biofilm formation both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a novel way to prevent bacterial biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices. PMID:26519394

  9. Novel non-invasive distribution measurement of texture profile analysis (TPA) in salmon fillet by using visible and near infrared hyperspectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Sun, Da-Wen; He, Yong

    2014-02-15

    This study developed a pushbroom visible and near-infrared hyperspectral imaging system in the wavelength range of 400-1758 nm to determine the spatial distribution of texture profile analysis (TPA) parameters of salmon fillets. Six TPA parameters (hardness, adhesiveness, chewiness, springiness, cohesiveness, and gumminess) were analysed. Five spectral features (mean, standard deviation, skew, energy, and entropy) and 22 image texture features obtained from graylevel co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) were extracted from hyperspectral images. Quantitative models were established with the extracted spectral and image texture signatures of samples based on partial least squares regression (PLSR). The results indicated that spectral features had better ability to predict TPA parameters of salmon samples than image texture features, and Spectral Set I (400-1000 nm) performed better than Spectral II (967-1634 nm). On the basis of the wavelengths selected by regression coefficients of PLSR models, instrumental optimal wavelengths (IOW) and predictive optimal wavelengths (POW) were further chosen to reduce the high dimensionality of the hyperspectral image data. Our results show that hyperspectral imaging holds promise as a reliable and rapid alternative to traditional universal testing machines for measuring the spatial distribution of TPA parameters.

  10. Inhibitory Effects of 4'-Demethylnobiletin, a Metabolite of Nobiletin, on 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-Induced Inflammation in Mouse Ears.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xian; Song, Mingyue; Rakariyatham, Kanyasiri; Zheng, Jinkai; Wang, Minqi; Xu, Fei; Gao, Zili; Xiao, Hang

    2015-12-30

    Nobiletin (NOB) is major citrus flavonoid with many health-promoting benefits. We reported previously that 4'-demethylnobiletin (4DN), a major metabolite of NOB, significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated inflammation in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In this study, we further studied the anti-inflammatory effects of 4DN in TPA-induced skin inflammation in mice. We demonstrated that topical application of 4DN decreased TPA-induced ear edema by >88 ± 4.77% in mice. This inhibitory effect was associated with inhibition on TPA-induced up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α. Immunoblotting results showed that 4DN resulted in profound effects on multiple proteins related with inflammation and carcinogenesis. 4DN significantly decreased the expression levels of iNOS, COX-2, and MMP-9, suppressed phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt and ERK, and increased the levels of HO-1 and NQO1 in TPA-treated mice. Overall, the results demonstrated that 4DN had strong anti-inflammatory effects in vivo, which provided a scientific basis for using NOB to inhibit inflammation-driven diseases.

  11. Politics of Policy: Assessing the Implementation, Impact, and Evolution of the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT) and edTPA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reagan, Emilie Mitescu; Schram, Thomas; McCurdy, Kathryn; Chang, Te-Hsin; Evans, Carla M.

    2016-01-01

    Summative performance assessments in teacher education, such as the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT) and the edTPA, have been heralded through polices intended to enhance the quality of the teaching profession and raise its stature among other professions. However, the development and implementation of the PACT, and…

  12. Toys Remain Viral Playground for 24 Hours

    MedlinePlus

    ... a toy's surface at typical indoor temperatures and humidity levels. Specifically, they tested the ability of so- ... East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS). At 60 percent relative humidity, 1 percent of the virus remained infectious on ...

  13. Excitotoxin-induced neuronal degeneration and seizure are mediated by tissue plasminogen activator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsirka, Stella E.; Gualandris, Anna; Amaral, David G.; Strickland, Sidney

    1995-09-01

    NEURONAL degeneration in the hippocampus, a region of the brain important for acquisition of memory in humans, occurs in various pathological conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, brain ischaemia and epilepsy. When neuronal activity is stimulated in the adult rat and mouse hippocampus, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease that converts inactive plasminogen to the active protease plasmin, is transcriptionally induced1,2. The activity of tPA in neural tissue is correlated with neurite outgrowth3, regeneration4 and migration5, suggesting that it might be involved in neuronal plasticity. Here we show that tPA is produced primarily by microglia in the hippocampus. Using excitotoxins to induce neuronal cell loss, we demonstrate that tPA-deficient mice are resistant to neuronal degeneration. These mice are also less susceptible to pharmacologically induced seizures than wild-type mice. These findings identify a role for tPA in neuronal degeneration and seizure.

  14. Excitotoxin-induced neuronal degeneration and seizure are mediated by tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Tsirka, S E; Gualandris, A; Amaral, D G; Strickland, S

    1995-09-28

    Neuronal degeneration in the hippocampus, a region of the brain important for acquisition of memory in humans, occurs in various pathological conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, brain ischaemia and epilepsy. When neuronal activity is stimulated in the adult rat and mouse hippocampus, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease that converts inactive plasminogen to the active protease plasmin, is transcriptionally induced. The activity of tPA in neural tissue is correlated with neurite outgrowth, regeneration and migration, suggesting that it might be involved in neuronal plasticity. Here we show that tPA is produced primarily by microglia in the hippocampus. Using excitotoxins to induce neuronal cell loss, we demonstrate that tPA-deficient mice are resistant to neuronal degeneration. These mice are also less susceptible to pharmacologically induced seizures than wild-type mice. These findings identify a role for tPA in neuronal degeneration and seizure.

  15. Ciguatera: recent advances but the risk remains.

    PubMed

    Lehane, L; Lewis, R J

    2000-11-01

    Ciguatera is an important form of human poisoning caused by the consumption of seafood. The disease is characterised by gastrointestinal, neurological and cardiovascular disturbances. In cases of severe toxicity, paralysis, coma and death may occur. There is no immunity, and the toxins are cumulative. Symptoms may persist for months or years, or recur periodically. The epidemiology of ciguatera is complex and of central importance to the management and future use of marine resources. Ciguatera is an important medical entity in tropical and subtropical Pacific and Indian Ocean regions, and in the tropical Caribbean. As reef fish are increasingly exported to other areas, it has become a world health problem. The disease is under-reported and often misdiagnosed. Lipid-soluble, polyether toxins known as ciguatoxins accumulated in the muscles of certain subtropical and tropical marine finfish cause ciguatera. Ciguatoxins arise from biotransformation in the fish of less polar ciguatoxins (gambiertoxins) produced by Gambierdiscus toxicus, a marine dinoflagellate that lives on macroalgae, usually attached to dead coral. The toxins and their metabolites are concentrated in the food chain when carnivorous fish prey on smaller herbivorous fish. Humans are exposed at the end of the food chain. More than 400 species of fish can be vectors of ciguatoxins, but generally only a relatively small number of species are regularly incriminated in ciguatera. Ciguateric fish look, taste and smell normal, and detection of toxins in fish remains a problem. More than 20 precursor gambiertoxins and ciguatoxins have been identified in G. toxicus and in herbivorous and carnivorous fish. The toxins become more polar as they undergo oxidative metabolism and pass up the food chain. The main Pacific ciguatoxin (P-CTX-1) causes ciguatera at levels=0.1 microg/kg in the flesh of carnivorous fish. The main Caribbean ciguatoxin (C-CTX-1) is less polar and 10-fold less toxic than P-CTX-1. Ciguatoxins

  16. Interferons Induce STAT1-Dependent Expression of Tissue Plasminogen Activator, a Pathogenicity Factor in Puumala Hantavirus Disease.

    PubMed

    Strandin, Tomas; Hepojoki, Jussi; Laine, Outi; Mäkelä, Satu; Klingström, Jonas; Lundkvist, Åke; Julkunen, Ilkka; Mustonen, Jukka; Vaheri, Antti

    2016-05-15

    Hantaviruses are zoonotic viruses that show various degrees of vasculopathy in humans. In this study, we analyzed the regulation of 2 fibrinolytic parameters, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and its physiological inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), in Puumala hantavirus (PUUV)-infected patients and in human microvascular endothelial cells. We detected strong upregulation of tPA in the acute phase of illness and in PUUV-infected macaques and found the tPA level to positively correlate with disease severity. The median levels of PAI-1 during the acute stage did not differ from those during the recovery phase. In concordance, hantaviruses induced tPA but not PAI-1 in microvascular endothelial cells, and the induction was demonstrated to be dependent on type I interferon. Importantly, type I and II interferons directly upregulated tPA through signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), which regulated tPA gene expression via a STAT1-responsive enhancer element. These results suggest that tPA may be a general factor in the immunological response to viruses.

  17. Dynamic changes in plasma tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and beta-thromboglobulin content in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Ping; Wo, Da; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Wei, Wei; Mao, Hui-ming

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the corresponding variations of plasma tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) activities, and beta-thromboglobulin (β-TG) content in patients during different stages of ischemic stroke. Ischemic stroke is a common disease among aging people and its occurrence is associated with abnormalities in the fibrinolytic system and platelet function. However, few reports focus on the dynamic changes in the plasma fibrinolytic system and β-TG content in patients with ischemic stroke. Patients were divided into three groups: acute, convalescent and chronic. Plasma t-PA and PAI-1 activities were determined by chromogenic substrate analysis and plasma β-TG content was detected by radioimmunoassay. Patients in the acute stage of ischemic stroke had significantly increased levels of t-PA activity and β-TG content, but PAI-1 activity was significantly decreased. Negative correlations were found between plasma t-PA and PAI-1 activities and between plasma t-PA activity and β-TG content in patients with acute ischemic stroke. There were significant differences in plasma t-PA and PAI-1 activities in the aged control group, as well as in the acute, convalescent and chronic groups. It can be speculated that the increased activity of t-PA in patients during the acute stage was the result of compensatory function, and that the increase in plasma β-TG level not only implies the presence of ischemic stroke but is likely a cause of ischemic stroke. During the later stages of ischemic stroke, greater attention is required in monitoring levels of PAI-1.

  18. Identification of infant skeletal remains: case report.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, M; Miyasaka, S; Sato, H; Miyake, B; Seta, S

    1989-12-01

    Three cases of infant skeletal remains were described from the view point of personal identification. The age was exactly estimated from union of ossification centers, dental calcification and eruption. While, the sex estimation was not highly reliable, because sex differences had not clearly appeared in infant skeletons, and it was rather difficult in some cases. In infant skeletal remains, age estimation is especially important to help personal identification. The most recent photograph of a presumed person should be used for personal identification by superimposition technique since the size and proportion of infant skull constantly change as a result of its development.

  19. Tissue plasminogen activator-based clot busting: Controlled delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim M.; Elkholi, Islam E.; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. Thrombosis, the formation of blood clot (thrombus) in the circulatory system obstructing the blood flow, is one of the main causes behind various ischemic arterial syndromes such as ischemic stroke and myocardial infarction, as well as vein syndromes such as deep vein thrombosis, and consequently, pulmonary emboli. Several thrombolytic agents have been developed for treating thrombosis, the most common being tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), administrated systemically or locally via IV infusion directly proximal to the thrombus, with the aim of restoring and improving the blood flow. TPA triggers the dissolution of thrombi by inducing the conversion of plasminogen to protease plasmin followed by fibrin digestion that eventually leads to clot lysis. Although tPA provides powerful thrombolytic activity, it has many shortcomings, including poor pharmacokinetic profiles, impairment of the reestablishment of normal coronary flow, and impairment of hemostasis, leading to life-threatening bleeding consequences. The bleeding consequence is ascribed to the ability of tPA to circulate throughout the body and therefore can lysis all blood clots in the circulation system, even the good ones that prevent the bleeding and promote injury repair. This review provides an overview of the different delivery approaches for tPA including: liposomes, ultrasound-triggered thrombolysis, anti-fibrin antibody-targeted tPA, camouflaged-tPA, tpA-loaded microcarriers, and nano-modulated delivery approaches. PMID:25780787

  20. Intrapleural tissue plasminogen activator and deoxyribonuclease therapy for pleural infection.

    PubMed

    Piccolo, Francesco; Popowicz, Natalia; Wong, Donny; Lee, Yun Chor Gary

    2015-06-01

    Pleural infection remains a global health burden associated with significant morbidity. Drainage of the infected pleural fluid is important but can often be hindered by septations and loculations. Intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy alone, to break pleural adhesions, has shown no convincing advantages over placebo in improving clinical outcome. Deoxyribonucleoprotein from degradation of leukocytes contributes significantly to high viscosity of infected pleural fluid. Recombinant deoxyribonuclease (DNase) is effective in reducing pleural fluid viscosity in pre-clinical studies. The combination of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and DNase was effective in animal model experiments of empyema. The benefits were established in a randomized clinical trial: those (n=48) treated with tPA/DNase had significantly improved radiological outcomes and reduced need of surgery and duration of hospital stay. A longitudinal observational series of 107 patients further confirmed the effectiveness and safety of tPA/DNase therapy, including its use as 'rescue therapy' when patients failed to respond to antibiotics and chest tube drainage. Overall, a short course of intrapleural tPA (10 mg) and DNase (5 mg) therapy provides a cure in over 90% of patients without requiring surgery. The treatment stimulates pleural fluid formation, enhances radiographic clearance and resolution of systemic inflammation. Serious complications are uncommon; pleural bleeding requiring transfusion occurred in ~2% of cases. Pain can occur, especially with the first dose. Treatment is contraindicated in those with significant bleeding diathesis or a bronchopleural fistula. Future research is required to optimize dosing regimens and in refining patient selection. PMID:26150913

  1. Juveniles' Motivations for Remaining in Prostitution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Shu-Ling; Bedford, Olwen

    2004-01-01

    Qualitative data from in-depth interviews were collected in 1990-1991, 1992, and 2000 with 49 prostituted juveniles remanded to two rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. These data are analyzed to explore Taiwanese prostituted juveniles' feelings about themselves and their work, their motivations for remaining in prostitution, and their difficulties…

  2. Predicting the remaining service life of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, J.F.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear power plants are providing, currently, about 17 percent of the U.S. electricity and many of these plants are approaching their licensed life of 40 years. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory are carrying out a program to develop a methodology for assessing the remaining safe-life of the concrete components and structures in nuclear power plants. This program has the overall objective of identifying potential structural safety issues, as well as acceptance criteria, for use in evaluations of nuclear power plants for continued service. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is contributing to this program by identifying and analyzing methods for predicting the remaining life of in-service concrete materials. This report examines the basis for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials of nuclear power facilities. Methods for predicting the service life of new and in-service concrete materials are analyzed. These methods include (1) estimates based on experience, (2) comparison of performance, (3) accelerated testing, (4) stochastic methods, and (5) mathematical modeling. New approaches for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials are proposed and recommendations for their further development given. Degradation processes are discussed based on considerations of their mechanisms, likelihood of occurrence, manifestations, and detection. They include corrosion, sulfate attack, alkali-aggregate reactions, frost attack, leaching, radiation, salt crystallization, and microbiological attack.

  3. Immunoradiometric quantitation of tissue plasminogen activator-related antigen in human plasma: crypticity phenomenon and relationship to plasma fibrinolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wun, T.C.; Capuano, A.

    1987-05-01

    A two-site immunoradiometric assay for tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) antigen has been developed using immunoaffinity purified antibody. Various treatments enhanced the detection of tPA antigen in the plasma samples. Maximum detection was obtained by acidification of plasma to pH 4.8 to 6.5 or addition of 0.5 mol/L of L-lysine or L-arginine. Acidification or addition of lysine to plasma is also required for maximum immunoadsorption of plasma tPA antigen on anti-tPA-Ig-sepharose. These results indicate that plasma tPA antigen is partially cryptic to antibody in untreated plasma. The plasma tPA antigen isolated by immunoadsorption of either untreated plasma or acidified plasma on anti-tPA-Ig-sepharose consists mainly of a 100-kd plasminogen activator species as determined by fibrin-agar zymography. The 100-kd activity is possibly a tPA:inhibitor complex. A standardized sample preparation method was conveniently adopted by mixing 3 vol of plasma and 1 vol of 2 mol/L of L-lysine for the assay. Reconstitution and recovery studies showed that the method is specific and permits full detection of both free tPA and tPA:inhibitor complex. The validity of the assay is further supported by the finding that the spontaneous plasma fibrinolysis previously demonstrated to be dependent on plasma tPA antigen is correlated with tPA antigen content. Using the standardized assay, we found that tPA antigen concentrations in 16 blood bank plasmas are equivalent to 3.7 to 20 ng of 60 kd tPA/mL. In all the plasma tested, more than half of the antigen is undetected unless the plasma is treated as described above.

  4. Cell type-specific roles for tissue plasminogen activator released by neurons or microglia after excitotoxic injury.

    PubMed

    Siao, Chia-Jen; Fernandez, Susana R; Tsirka, Stella E

    2003-04-15

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) plays important roles in the brain after excitotoxic injury. It is released by both neurons and microglia and mediates neuronal death and microglial activation. Mice lacking tPA are resistant to excitotoxicity and show very limited microglial activation. Activated microglia are neurotoxic in culture, but this phenomenon is not well documented in vivo. To further understand the sequence of events through which tPA mediates microglial activation and neurodegeneration, we have generated mice that exhibit restricted expression of tPA through introduction of tPA transgenes under the control of neuronal- or microglial-specific promoters into tPA-deficient mice. Neither strain of transgenic mice shows abnormal brain morphology or inflammation in the absence of injury, and unilateral intrahippocampal kainate injections into the transgenic mice induced excitotoxicity and microglial activation reminiscent of wild-type mice. However, there are differences in the kinetics of the resulting pathology. The neuronal tPA-expressing mice exhibit accelerated microglial activation compared with wild-type or microglial tPA-expressing mice. However, microglial tPA-expressing mice exhibit greater neurodegeneration. These data suggest a model in which tPA plays different roles after kainate injection depending on whether it is released by neurons or microglia. We propose that tPA, initially secreted from injured neurons, acts as a cytokine to activate microglia at the site of injury. These activated microglia then secrete additional tPA, which promotes extracellular matrix degradation, neurodegeneration, and self-proliferation. We suggest that an approach to attenuate microglia-mediated neuronal death in vivo might be to pharmacologically prevent microglial activation.

  5. Mill and the right to remain uninformed.

    PubMed

    Strasser, M

    1986-08-01

    In a recent article in the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, David Ost (1984) claims that patients do not have a right to waive their right to information. He argues that patients cannot make informed rational decisions without full information and thus, a right to waive information would involve a right to avoid one's responsibility to act as an autonomous moral agent. In support of his position, Ost cites a passage from Mill. Yet, a correct interpretation of the passage in question would support one's right to remain uninformed in certain situations. If the information would hurt one's chances for survival or hurt one's ability to make calm, rational decisions, then one not only does not have a duty to find out the information, but one's exercising one's right to remain uninformed may be the only rational course of action to take.

  6. Explosives remain preferred methods for platform abandonment

    SciTech Connect

    Pulsipher, A.; Daniel, W. IV; Kiesler, J.E.; Mackey, V. III

    1996-05-06

    Economics and safety concerns indicate that methods involving explosives remain the most practical and cost-effective means for abandoning oil and gas structures in the Gulf of Mexico. A decade has passed since 51 dead sea turtles, many endangered Kemp`s Ridleys, washed ashore on the Texas coast shortly after explosives helped remove several offshore platforms. Although no relationship between the explosions and the dead turtles was ever established, in response to widespread public concern, the US Minerals Management Service (MMS) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) implemented regulations limiting the size and timing of explosive charges. Also, more importantly, they required that operators pay for observers to survey waters surrounding platforms scheduled for removal for 48 hr before any detonations. If observers spot sea turtles or marine mammals within the danger zone, the platform abandonment is delayed until the turtles leave or are removed. However, concern about the effects of explosives on marine life remains.

  7. Direct Dating of Hominids Remains In Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Y.; Falguères, C.

    When archaeological sites are associated with human remains, it is relevant to be able to date those valuable remains for different reasons. The main one is that it avoids the stratigraphical problems which can be due to intrusive burials in the sequence. The other reason consists in the fact that human bones may be encountered out of established stratigraphical context. On the other hand, the majority of dating methods currently used are destructive and can not be applied on these precious samples particularly when they are older than 40,000 years and can not be dated by radiocarbon. Since several years, we have developped a completely non-destructive method which consists in the measurement of human remains using the gamma -ray spectrometry. This technique has been used recently by other laboratories. We present here two important cases for the knowledge of human evolution in Eurasia. The first example is Qafzeh site in Israel where many human skeletons have been unearthed from burials associated with fauna and lithic artefacts. This site has been dated by several independent radiometric methods. So, it was possible to compare our gamma results with the other results yielded by the different methods. The second case concerns the most evolved Homo erectus found in Java, Indonesia, at Ngandong site, close to the Solo river. A recent debate has been focused on the age of these fossils and their direct dating is of outmost importance for the knowledge of settlement of Modern Humans in South-East Asia.

  8. A novel fibrinogenase from Agkistrodon acutus venom protects against DIC via direct degradation of thrombosis and activation of protein C.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jie-zhen; Lin, Xi; Chen, Jia-shu; Huang, Zhen-hua; Qiu, Bi-tao; Qiu, Peng-xin; Yan, Guang-mei

    2012-10-01

    The incidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), which leads to multiple organ dysfunction and high mortality, has remained constant in recent years. At present, treatments of DIC have focused on preventing cytokine induction, inhibiting coagulation processes and promoting fibrinolysis. Recent clinical trials have supported the use of antithrombin and activated protein C supplementation in DIC. To better understand the mechanism of treatment on DIC, we here report a novel fibrinogenase from Agkistrodon acutus (FIIa) that effectively protected against LPS-induced DIC in a rabbit model, and detected the tissue factors expression in HUVE cells after using FIIa. In vivo, administration of FIIa reduced hepatic and renal damage, increased the concentration of fibrinogen, the activities of protein C, the platelet count, APTT, PT, FDP, the level of AT-III and t-PA, decreased the level of PAI-1, and increased survival rate in LPS-induced DIC rabbits. In vitro experiments, we further confirmed that FIIa up-regulated the expression of t-PA and u-PA, down-regulated the expression of PAI-1, and directly activated protein C. Our findings suggest that FIIa could effectively protect against DIC via direct degradation of microthrombi and activation of protein C as well as provide a novel strategy to develop a single proteinase molecule for targeting the main pathological processes of this disease. PMID:22728069

  9. Distribution of albatross remains in the Far East regions during the Holocene, based on zooarchaeological remains.

    PubMed

    Eda, Masaki; Higuchi, Hiroyoshi

    2004-07-01

    Many albatross remains have been found in the Japanese Islands and the surrounding areas, such as Sakhalin and South Korea. These remains are interesting for two reasons: numerous sites from which albatross remains have been found are located in coastal regions of the Far East where no albatrosses have been distributed recently, and there are some sites in which albatross remains represent a large portion of avian remains, although albatrosses are not easily preyed upon by human beings. We collected data on albatross remains from archaeological sites in the Far East regions during the Holocene and arranged the remains geographically, temporally and in terms of quantity. Based on these results, we showed that coastal areas along the Seas of Okhotsk and Japan have rarely been used by albatrosses in Modern times, though formerly there were many albatrosses. We proposed two explanations for the shrinkage of their distributional range: excessive hunting in the breeding areas, and distributional changes of prey for albatrosses. PMID:15277721

  10. Improvement of Psychotic Symptoms and the Role of Tissue Plasminogen Activator.

    PubMed

    Hoirisch-Clapauch, Silvia; Nardi, Antonio E

    2015-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mediates a number of processes that are pivotal for synaptogenesis and remodeling of synapses, including proteolysis of the brain extracellular matrix, degradation of adhesion molecules, activation of neurotrophins, and activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor. Abnormalities in these processes have been consistently described in psychotic disorders. In this paper, we review the physiological roles of tPA, focusing on conditions characterized by low tPA activity, which are prevalent in schizophrenia. We then describe how tPA activity is influenced by lifestyle interventions and nutritional supplements that may ameliorate psychotic symptoms. Next, we analyze the role of tPA in the mechanism of action of hormones and medications effective in mitigating psychotic symptoms, such as pregnenolone, estrogen, oxytocin, dopamine D3 receptor antagonists, retinoic acid, valproic acid, cannabidiol, sodium nitroprusside, N-acetyl cysteine, and warfarin. We also review evidence that tPA participates in the mechanism by which electroconvulsive therapy and cigarette smoking may reduce psychotic symptoms. PMID:26593907

  11. Improvement of Psychotic Symptoms and the Role of Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    PubMed Central

    Hoirisch-Clapauch, Silvia; Nardi, Antonio E.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mediates a number of processes that are pivotal for synaptogenesis and remodeling of synapses, including proteolysis of the brain extracellular matrix, degradation of adhesion molecules, activation of neurotrophins, and activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor. Abnormalities in these processes have been consistently described in psychotic disorders. In this paper, we review the physiological roles of tPA, focusing on conditions characterized by low tPA activity, which are prevalent in schizophrenia. We then describe how tPA activity is influenced by lifestyle interventions and nutritional supplements that may ameliorate psychotic symptoms. Next, we analyze the role of tPA in the mechanism of action of hormones and medications effective in mitigating psychotic symptoms, such as pregnenolone, estrogen, oxytocin, dopamine D3 receptor antagonists, retinoic acid, valproic acid, cannabidiol, sodium nitroprusside, N-acetyl cysteine, and warfarin. We also review evidence that tPA participates in the mechanism by which electroconvulsive therapy and cigarette smoking may reduce psychotic symptoms. PMID:26593907

  12. Acceleration of Tissue Plasminogen Activator-Mediated Thrombolysis by Magnetically Powered Nanomotors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dose control and effectiveness promotion of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) for thrombolysis are vitally important to alleviate serious side effects such as hemorrhage in stroke treatments. In order to increase the effectiveness and reduce the risk of stroke treatment, we use rotating magnetic nanomotors to enhance the mass transport of t-PA molecules at the blood clot interface for local ischemic stroke therapy. The in vitro experiments demonstrate that, when combined with magnetically activated nanomotors, the thrombolysis speed of low-concentration t-PA (50 μg mL–1) can be enhanced up to 2-fold, to the maximum lysis speed at high t-PA concentration. Based on the convection enhanced transport theory due to rotating magnetic nanomotors, a theoretical model is proposed and predicts the experimental results reasonably well. The validity and efficiency of this enhanced treatment has been demonstrated in a rat embolic model. PMID:25006696

  13. The Influence of Differentially Expressed Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis: Implications for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Lisa Cm; Nasa, Zeyad; Chung, JieYu; Niego, Be'eri; Tarlac, Volga; Ho, Heidi; Galle, Adam; Petratos, Steven; Lee, Jae Young; Alderuccio, Frank; Medcalf, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Tissue type plasminogen activator (t-PA) has been implicated in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS) and in rodent models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We show that levels of t-PA mRNA and activity are increased ~4 fold in the spinal cords of wild-type mice that are mice subjected to EAE. This was also accompanied with a significant increase in the levels of pro-matrix metalloproteinase 9 (pro-MMP-9) and an influx of fibrinogen. We next compared EAE severity in wild-type mice, t-PA-/- mice and T4+ transgenic mice that selectively over-express (~14-fold) mouse t-PA in neurons of the central nervous system. Our results confirm that t-PA deficient mice have an earlier onset and more severe form of EAE. T4+ mice, despite expressing higher levels of endogenous t-PA, manifested a similar rate of onset and neurological severity of EAE. Levels of proMMP-9, and extravasated fibrinogen in spinal cord extracts were increased in mice following EAE onset regardless of the absence or over-expression of t-PA wild-type. Interestingly, MMP-2 levels also increased in spinal cord extracts of T4+ mice following EAE, but not in the other genotypes. Hence, while the absence of t-PA confers a more deleterious form of EAE, neuronal over-expression of t-PA does not overtly protect against this condition with regards to symptom onset or severity of EAE. PMID:27427941

  14. The Influence of Differentially Expressed Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis: Implications for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Lisa CM; Nasa, Zeyad; Chung, JieYu; Niego, Be’eri; Tarlac, Volga; Ho, Heidi; Galle, Adam; Petratos, Steven; Lee, Jae Young; Alderuccio, Frank; Medcalf, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue type plasminogen activator (t-PA) has been implicated in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS) and in rodent models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We show that levels of t-PA mRNA and activity are increased ~4 fold in the spinal cords of wild-type mice that are mice subjected to EAE. This was also accompanied with a significant increase in the levels of pro-matrix metalloproteinase 9 (pro-MMP-9) and an influx of fibrinogen. We next compared EAE severity in wild-type mice, t-PA-/- mice and T4+ transgenic mice that selectively over-express (~14-fold) mouse t-PA in neurons of the central nervous system. Our results confirm that t-PA deficient mice have an earlier onset and more severe form of EAE. T4+ mice, despite expressing higher levels of endogenous t-PA, manifested a similar rate of onset and neurological severity of EAE. Levels of proMMP-9, and extravasated fibrinogen in spinal cord extracts were increased in mice following EAE onset regardless of the absence or over-expression of t-PA wild-type. Interestingly, MMP-2 levels also increased in spinal cord extracts of T4+ mice following EAE, but not in the other genotypes. Hence, while the absence of t-PA confers a more deleterious form of EAE, neuronal over-expression of t-PA does not overtly protect against this condition with regards to symptom onset or severity of EAE. PMID:27427941

  15. Monoclonal antibody specific for human colon fibroblast-derived T-PA

    SciTech Connect

    Schaumann, J.P.; Olander, J.V.; Harakas, N.K.; Feder, J

    1989-05-23

    This patent describes a murine-derived hybridoma cell line capable of producing monoclonal antibody against human colon fibroblast-derived tissue plasminogen activator and the cell line selected from the group consisting of cell lines 63-4 (ATCC HB 9155), 54-2 (ATCC HB 9157) or 79-7 (ATCC HB 9156).

  16. Why Do Some Cores Remain Starless?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anathpindika, S.

    2016-08-01

    Prestellar cores, by definition, are gravitationally bound but starless pockets of dense gas. Physical conditions that could render a core starless (in the local Universe) is the subject of investigation in this work. To this end, we studied the evolution of four starless cores, B68, L694-2, L1517B, L1689, and L1521F, a VeLLO. We demonstrate: (i) cores contracted in quasistatic manner over a timescale on the order of ~ 105 yr. Those that remained starless briefly acquired a centrally concentrated density configuration that mimicked the profile of a unstable BonnorEbert sphere before rebounding, (ii) three cores viz. L694-2, L1689-SMM16, and L1521F remained starless despite becoming thermally super-critical. By contrast, B68 and L1517B remained sub-critical; L1521F collapsed to become a VeLLO only when gas-cooling was enhanced by increasing the size of dust-grains. This result is robust, for other starless cores viz. B68, L694-2, L1517B, and L1689 could also be similarly induced to collapse. The temperature-profile of starless cores and those that collapsed was found to be radically different. While in the former type, only very close to the centre of a core was there any evidence of decline in gas temperature, by contrast, a core of the latter type developed a more uniformly cold interior. Our principle conclusions are: (a) thermal super-criticality of a core is insufficient to ensure it will become protostellar, (b) potential star-forming cores (the VeLLO L1521F here), could be experiencing dust-coagulation that must enhance gasdust coupling and in turn lower gas temperature, thereby assisting collapse. This also suggests, mere gravitational/virial boundedness of a core is insufficient to ensure it will form stars.

  17. Subacute intranasal administration of tissue plasminogen activator promotes neuroplasticity and improves functional recovery following traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yuling; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Yanlu; Liu, Zhongwu; An, Aaron; Mahmood, Asim; Xiong, Ye

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and long-term disability worldwide. To date, there are no effective pharmacological treatments for TBI. Recombinant human tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the effective drug for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. In addition to its thrombolytic effect, tPA is also involved in neuroplasticity in the central nervous system. However, tPA has potential adverse side effects when administered intravenously including brain edema and hemorrhage. Here we report that tPA, administered by intranasal delivery during the subacute phase after TBI, provides therapeutic benefit. Animals with TBI were treated intranasally with saline or tPA initiated 7 days after TBI. Compared with saline treatment, subacute intranasal tPA treatment significantly 1) improved cognitive (Morris water maze test) and sensorimotor (footfault and modified neurological severity score) functional recovery in rats after TBI, 2) reduced the cortical stimulation threshold evoking ipsilateral forelimb movement, 3) enhanced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus and axonal sprouting of the corticospinal tract originating from the contralesional cortex into the denervated side of the cervical gray matter, and 4) increased the level of mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Our data suggest that subacute intranasal tPA treatment improves functional recovery and promotes brain neurogenesis and spinal cord axonal sprouting after TBI, which may be mediated, at least in part, by tPA/plasmin-dependent maturation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

  18. p-HPEA-EDA, a phenolic compound of virgin olive oil, activates AMP-activated protein kinase to inhibit carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Prem; Oh, Won-Keun; Yun, Hyo Jeong; Namgoong, Gwang Mo; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Kwon, Seong-Min; Choi, Hoo-Kyun; Choi, Hong Seok

    2011-04-01

    Phenolic constituents of virgin olive oil are reported to have antitumor activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and specific target proteins of virgin olive oil remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl ligstroside aglycone (p-HPEA-EDA), a phenolic compound of virgin olive oil, inhibits tumor promoter-induced cell transformation in JB6 Cl41 cells and suppress cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and tumorigenicity by adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in HT-29 cells. p-HPEA-EDA inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and p90RSK in JB6 Cl41 cells, resulting in the inhibition of cell proliferation, activator protein-1 transactivation and cell transformation promoted by TPA. Moreover, p-HPEA-EDA strongly inhibited the cell viability and COX-2 expression by activation of AMPK activity in HT-29 cells, resulted from depletion of intracellular adenosine triphosphate. p-HPEA-EDA-induced activation of caspase-3 and poly-adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase, phosphorylation of p53 (Ser15) and DNA fragmentation in HT-29 cells, leading to apoptosis. Importantly, p-HPEA-EDA suppressed the colony formation of HT-29 cells in soft agar. In contrast, Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, and Z-DEVD-FMK, a caspase-3 inhibitor, blocked the p-HPEA-EDA-inhibited colony formation in HT-29 cells. In vivo chorioallantoic membrane assay also showed that p-HPEA-EDA-inhibited tumorigenicity of HT-29 cells. These findings revealed that targeted activation of AMPK and inhibition of COX-2 expression by p-HPEA-EDA contribute to the chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential of virgin olive oil against colon cancer cells. PMID:21216846

  19. So close: remaining challenges to eradicating polio.

    PubMed

    Toole, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative, launched in 1988, is close to achieving its goal. In 2015, reported cases of wild poliovirus were limited to just two countries - Afghanistan and Pakistan. Africa has been polio-free for more than 18 months. Remaining barriers to global eradication include insecurity in areas such as Northwest Pakistan and Eastern and Southern Afghanistan, where polio cases continue to be reported. Hostility to vaccination is either based on extreme ideologies, such as in Pakistan, vaccination fatigue by parents whose children have received more than 15 doses, and misunderstandings about the vaccine's safety and effectiveness such as in Ukraine. A further challenge is continued circulation of vaccine-derived poliovirus in populations with low immunity, with 28 cases reported in 2015 in countries as diverse as Madagascar, Ukraine, Laos, and Myanmar. This paper summarizes the current epidemiology of wild and vaccine-derived poliovirus, and describes the remaining challenges to eradication and innovative approaches being taken to overcome them.

  20. Decomposition Technique for Remaining Useful Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Bhaskar (Inventor); Goebel, Kai F. (Inventor); Saxena, Abhinav (Inventor); Celaya, Jose R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic tool disclosed here decomposes the problem of estimating the remaining useful life (RUL) of a component or sub-system into two separate regression problems: the feature-to-damage mapping and the operational conditions-to-damage-rate mapping. These maps are initially generated in off-line mode. One or more regression algorithms are used to generate each of these maps from measurements (and features derived from these), operational conditions, and ground truth information. This decomposition technique allows for the explicit quantification and management of different sources of uncertainty present in the process. Next, the maps are used in an on-line mode where run-time data (sensor measurements and operational conditions) are used in conjunction with the maps generated in off-line mode to estimate both current damage state as well as future damage accumulation. Remaining life is computed by subtracting the instance when the extrapolated damage reaches the failure threshold from the instance when the prediction is made.

  1. Immunotherapy prolongs the serum CEA-TPA-CA15.3 lead time at the metastatic progression in endocrine-dependent breast cancer patients: a retrospective longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, A; Carpi, A; Ferrari, P; Rossi, G

    2008-05-01

    In metastatic breast cancer tumour markers' increase predicts, by a few months (lead time) disease progression. In breast cancer patients with endocrine dependent metastatic disease, we reported a prolonged clinical benefit and overall survival when first line conventional antiestrogen hormone therapy was started at the lead time and also when an immunotherapy schedule was added to the same conventional hormone treatment. Thirty-two of these last patients were considered (group a). In 27 (group b) of these 32 patients who progressed during first line salvage hormone plus immunotherapy the lead time at the progression of metastatic disease during therapy was compared with that at the onset of metastases when the same patients were without treatment and with that of a control group (group c) who did not receive immunotherapy. At disease progression, CEA-TPA-CA15.3 sensitivity was 92.5% in the group b (studied patients) and 88.5% in the group c (controls). At the progression in the group b, CEA-TPA-CA15.3 lead time (m+/-sd, months) was significantly longer than in group c (12.1+/-12.9 vs 2.4+/-4.0) (P=0.000). Besides, in group b the lead time was significantly longer at the progression than at the metastatic onset (P=0.003) while in the group c the difference was near to significance (P=0.05). The CEA-TPA-CA15.3 tumour marker panel accurately predicted metastatic disease progression and immunotherapy significantly prolonged the CEA-TPA-CA15.3 lead time. This can be used for anticipating salvage treatment in these patients.

  2. Interior of control house showing remains of controller. Moving the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of control house showing remains of controller. Moving the handle rotated the vertical shaft and porcelain cams to engage various electrical switches and activate the lift mechanism. All electrical components have been removed. - Potomac Edison Company, Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Bridge, Spanning C & O Canal South of U.S. 11, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

  3. Some remaining problems in HCDA analysis. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.W.

    1981-01-01

    The safety assessment and licensing of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) requires an analysis on the capability of the reactor primary system to sustain the consequences of a hypothetical core-disruptive accident (HCDA). Although computational methods and computer programs developed for HCDA analyses can predict reasonably well the response of the primary containment system, and follow up the phenomena of HCDA from the start of excursion to the time of dynamic equilibrium in the system, there remain areas in the HCDA analysis that merit further analytical and experimental studies. These are the analysis of fluid impact on reactor cover, three-dimensional analysis, the treatment of the perforated plates, material properties under high strain rates and under high temperatures, the treatment of multifield flows, and the treatment of prestressed concrete reactor vessels. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the structural mechanics of HCDA analysis in these areas where improvements are needed.

  4. Environmental threats to buried archaeological remains.

    PubMed

    Nord, Anders G; Tronner, Kate; Mattsson, Einar; Borg, Gunnar Ch; Ullén, Inga

    2005-05-01

    The last century's environmental pollution has created health problems, acidification of ground and lakes, and serious damage to our cultural heritage. Outdoor monuments suffer from this pollution, but so do buried archaeological remains. However, research on the deterioration of archaeological artifacts underground has so far been limited, and it is important to draw attention to this neglected field. This article presents results obtained at the Swedish National Heritage Board on the degradation of archaeological objects of bronze and iron and of bones from prehistoric graves, materials of which seem to be most affected by pollutants. The investigation methods, which were employed, are described. Other relevant studies are briefly reviewed. It is obvious that the deterioration rate of archaeological artifacts, especially of inorganic materials, has accelerated in recent years, and that this increased deterioration to a large part can be attributed to anthropogenic pollution. Regions that might be endangered are exemplified.

  5. Effects of lowering the aluminium content of a dTpa vaccine on its immunogenicity and reactogenicity when given as a booster to adolescents.

    PubMed

    Theeten, H; Van Damme, P; Hoppenbrouwers, K; Vandermeulen, C; Leback, E; Sokal, E M; Wolter, J; Schuerman, L

    2005-02-10

    As aluminium in vaccines has been associated with the incidence of local side effects occurring after vaccination, this observer-blind randomised clinical trial was designed to evaluate the effect of lowering the aluminium content of a combined reduced-antigen-content dTpa vaccine on immunogenicity and safety when administered to healthy adolescents aged 10-18 years. A total of 647 subjects were enrolled, 224 (35%) received a dTpa formulation with 0.5 mg aluminium, 209 (32%) a formulation with 0.3 mg aluminium and 214 (33%) a formulation with 0.133 mg aluminium. One month after boostering, all subjects were seroprotected against diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. All subjects were seropositive for anti-FHA and anti-PRN but 4% of the initially seronegatives in both reduced aluminium groups did not seroconvert for anti-PT. Booster responses did not differ significantly between groups for any antibody, but post booster vaccination anti-PT GMC's differed significantly between groups and decreased when vaccine aluminium content decreased. No clear difference between study groups in local or general side effects was demonstrated. The most frequently reported symptoms after vaccination were injection site pain (89.5-90.7%), fatigue (42.1-47.4%) and headache (41.1-45.1%). This study showed that the aluminium content has a specific influence on the immunogenicity of this dTpa vaccine.

  6. Inhaler devices: what remains to be done?

    PubMed

    Smith, Ian J; Bell, John; Bowman, Nic; Everard, Mark; Stein, Stephen; Weers, Jeffry G

    2010-12-01

    The 1000 Years of Pharmaceutical Aerosols Conference convened posing the question; "what remains to be done?" When applying this question to the topic of inhaler devices, two hugely different perspectives could be taken. On the one hand, it could be argued that because there is an array of delivery systems available and the industry, prescribing physicians and patients alike have considerable choice, why would we believe it necessary to do anything further? On the other hand, as an industry, we are constantly reminded by our "customers" that the inhaler devices available are less than adequate, and in some cases woefully inadequate, that they are not "patient" friendly, not intuitive to use and importantly do nothing to encourage the patient to take the medication as intended and as prescribed. So, taking the second point of view as more reflective of reality--the Voice of the Customer--our starting point must be that there is still much to do in the field of inhaler devices. The purpose of this article is to outline some key basic requirements for inhaler design and perhaps to question some of the entrenched thinking that has pervaded inhaler product design for too many years.

  7. Preliminary experience with air transfer of patients for rescue endovascular therapy after failure of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Masanori; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Enomoto, Yukiko; Yamada, Noriaki; Matsumaru, Naoki; Kumada, Keisuke; Toyoda, Izumi; Ogura, Shinji; Iwama, Toru

    2015-01-01

    The present report describes our experience with air transfer of patients with acute ischemic stroke in whom intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV t-PA) failed for rescue endovascular therapy (EVT). Twenty-three consecutive patients in whom IV t-PA failed were transferred to our hospital for rescue EVT between February 2011 and April 2013. The amount of time required for transfer, distance, clinical outcomes, and complications were compared between patients transferred by ground (TG group; n = 17) and by air (TA group; n = 6). Computed tomography imaging on arrival revealed hemorrhagic transformation in 1 (5.9%) patient in the TG group, whereas none of the patients in the TA group developed any type of complication. The remaining 22 patients received rescue EVT. The elapsed time from the request call to arrival at our hospital did not significantly differ between the TG and TA groups (45.8 ± 4.9 min vs. 41.6 ± 2.3 min). However, the distance from the primary hospital to our institution was significantly longer for the TA group than for the TG group (38.8 ± 10.4 km vs. 13.5 ± 1.2 km, p = 0.001). The frequency of favorable outcomes (modified Rankin Scale 0-1 at 90 days after onset) in the TG and TA groups were 25.0% and 50.0%, respectively (p = 0.267). Air transfer for patients after IV t-PA failure allowed for more rapid delivery of patients over longer distances than ground transfer. PMID:25739430

  8. Ghost Remains After Black Hole Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has found a cosmic "ghost" lurking around a distant supermassive black hole. This is the first detection of such a high-energy apparition, and scientists think it is evidence of a huge eruption produced by the black hole. This discovery presents astronomers with a valuable opportunity to observe phenomena that occurred when the Universe was very young. The X-ray ghost, so-called because a diffuse X-ray source has remained after other radiation from the outburst has died away, is in the Chandra Deep Field-North, one of the deepest X-ray images ever taken. The source, a.k.a. HDF 130, is over 10 billion light years away and existed at a time 3 billion years after the Big Bang, when galaxies and black holes were forming at a high rate. "We'd seen this fuzzy object a few years ago, but didn't realize until now that we were seeing a ghost", said Andy Fabian of the Cambridge University in the United Kingdom. "It's not out there to haunt us, rather it's telling us something - in this case what was happening in this galaxy billions of year ago." Fabian and colleagues think the X-ray glow from HDF 130 is evidence for a powerful outburst from its central black hole in the form of jets of energetic particles traveling at almost the speed of light. When the eruption was ongoing, it produced prodigious amounts of radio and X-radiation, but after several million years, the radio signal faded from view as the electrons radiated away their energy. HDF 130 Chandra X-ray Image of HDF 130 However, less energetic electrons can still produce X-rays by interacting with the pervasive sea of photons remaining from the Big Bang - the cosmic background radiation. Collisions between these electrons and the background photons can impart enough energy to the photons to boost them into the X-ray energy band. This process produces an extended X-ray source that lasts for another 30 million years or so. "This ghost tells us about the black hole's eruption long after

  9. Ghost Remains After Black Hole Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has found a cosmic "ghost" lurking around a distant supermassive black hole. This is the first detection of such a high-energy apparition, and scientists think it is evidence of a huge eruption produced by the black hole. This discovery presents astronomers with a valuable opportunity to observe phenomena that occurred when the Universe was very young. The X-ray ghost, so-called because a diffuse X-ray source has remained after other radiation from the outburst has died away, is in the Chandra Deep Field-North, one of the deepest X-ray images ever taken. The source, a.k.a. HDF 130, is over 10 billion light years away and existed at a time 3 billion years after the Big Bang, when galaxies and black holes were forming at a high rate. "We'd seen this fuzzy object a few years ago, but didn't realize until now that we were seeing a ghost", said Andy Fabian of the Cambridge University in the United Kingdom. "It's not out there to haunt us, rather it's telling us something - in this case what was happening in this galaxy billions of year ago." Fabian and colleagues think the X-ray glow from HDF 130 is evidence for a powerful outburst from its central black hole in the form of jets of energetic particles traveling at almost the speed of light. When the eruption was ongoing, it produced prodigious amounts of radio and X-radiation, but after several million years, the radio signal faded from view as the electrons radiated away their energy. HDF 130 Chandra X-ray Image of HDF 130 However, less energetic electrons can still produce X-rays by interacting with the pervasive sea of photons remaining from the Big Bang - the cosmic background radiation. Collisions between these electrons and the background photons can impart enough energy to the photons to boost them into the X-ray energy band. This process produces an extended X-ray source that lasts for another 30 million years or so. "This ghost tells us about the black hole's eruption long after

  10. N6-isopentenyladenosine and analogs activate the NRF2-mediated antioxidant response

    PubMed Central

    Dassano, Alice; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Giardullo, Paola; Cecco, Loris De; Ciuffreda, Pierangela; Santaniello, Enzo; Saran, Anna; Dragani, Tommaso A.; Colombo, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    N6-isopentenyladenosine (i6A), a naturally occurring modified nucleoside, inhibits the proliferation of human tumor cell lines in vitro, but its mechanism of action remains unclear. Treatment of MCF7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells with i6A or with three synthetic analogs (allyl6A, benzyl6A, and butyl6A) inhibited growth and altered gene expression. About 60% of the genes that were differentially expressed in response to i6A treatment were also modulated by the analogs, and pathway enrichment analysis identified the NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response as being significantly modulated by all four compounds. Luciferase reporter gene assays in transfected MCF7 cells confirmed that i6A activates the transcription factor NRF2. Assays for cellular production of reactive oxygen species indicated that i6A and analogs had antioxidant effects, reducing basal levels and inhibiting the H2O2- or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced production in MCF7 or dHL-60 (HL-60 cells induced to differentiate along the neutrophilic lineage) cell lines, respectively. In vivo, topical application of i6A or benzyl6A to mouse ears prior to TPA stimulation lessened the inflammatory response and significantly reduced the number of infiltrating neutrophils. These results suggest that i6A and analogs trigger a cellular response against oxidative stress and open the possibility of i6A and benzyl6A being used as topical anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:24688894

  11. Modulation of NR2B-regulated contextual fear in the hippocampus by the tissue plasminogen activator system.

    PubMed

    Norris, Erin H; Strickland, Sidney

    2007-08-14

    Contextual fear conditioning is regulated by the hippocampus, and NR2B, a subunit of the NMDA receptor (NR), is involved in this process. We show that acute stress modulates tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) activity in the hippocampus by inducing expression of its inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Acute stress increases NR2B expression and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, a classical marker of postsynaptic plasticity, in the hippocampus. tPA forms a complex with NR2B and is necessary for binding NR2B to postsynaptic density-95, allowing for NR activation and membrane anchoring. Acute stress increases the interaction between NR2B and RACK-1, which is also dependent on tPA, further suggesting that tPA is an important factor in NMDA signaling and plasticity in the hippocampus. Finally, acutely stressed tPA(-/-) mice show a decrease in contextual fear conditioning compared with stressed WT mice. These results indicate that tPA is a key modulator in stabilizing the NR complex during stress and participates in changes in behavior and synaptic plasticity.

  12. Tissue plasminogen activator protects hippocampal neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation injury.

    PubMed

    Flavin, M P; Zhao, G

    2001-03-01

    We have previously shown that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) participates in the neurotoxicity of microglial conditioned medium (MgCM). Killing of hippocampal neurons by MgCM was prevented by both plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and anti-tPA antibody. An N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blocker protected neurons from MgCM, suggesting that this subtype of glutamate receptor is involved. Whereas glutamate receptor-mediated events are important in cerebral ischemia and tPA has previously been shown to enhance excitotoxicity in hippocampus, we hypothesized that tPA would exaggerate oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) injury in cultures of hippocampal neurons. Dissociated rat hippocampal cells were grown under conditions designed to optimize neuronal growth while minimizing glial replication. At 7--10 days, cultures were subjected to OGD for 2.5 hr. Recombinant human tPA (1,000 IU) was added immediately after OGD. Viability was assessed 24 hr later. Viable, apoptotic, and necrotic cells were classified and quantified based on staining patterns of acridine orange and ethidium bromide under fluorescence microscopy. tPA alone did not alter neuronal integrity. OGD produced significant neuronal death (viability reduced by 45%, P < 0.001). tPA completely protected OGD-exposed cultures. Potential mechanisms of tPA protection were explored. Whereas tPA antibody abolished the protective effect of tPA, its proteolytic inhibitor PAI-1 did not alter the effect. The effect of tPA was tested in separate free radical and excitatory amino acid insults. It did not protect neurons from hydrogen peroxide (1 microM), S-nitro-acetylpenicillamine (10 microM), glutamate (50 microM), or NMDA (10 microM) damage but significantly attenuated injury caused by 250 microM kainate. We conclude that tPA is capable of protecting hippocampal neurons from OGD by a nonproteolytic action. The mechanism of protection was not defined, although attenuation of AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors

  13. Differential biological significance of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activator in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, J.; Ogawa, M.; Yamashita, S.; Nakashima, Y.; Saishoji, T.; Nomura, K.; Inada, K.; Kawano, I.

    1993-01-01

    Plasminogen activator (PA) is a serine protease existing in two forms known as tissue-type (t-PA) and urokinase-type (u-PA). To examine whether PA is related to the postoperative clinical course of human breast cancer, total PA activity, t-PA activity, u-PA activity, and immunoreactive t-PA were determined in tissue extracts from 144 breast cancer specimens. The patients were initially divided into four groups according to the postoperative clinical course: Group I (83 patients who are disease-free), Group II (20 patients whose first metastases were found only in bone), Group III (19 patients whose first metastases were found in both bone and lung), and Group IV (22 patients whose first metastases were found only in lung). Total PA activity was significantly lower in Groups, II, III and IV than in Group I. Both t-PA activity and t-PA antigen levels were also significantly lower in Groups II, III and IV than in Group I, while no significant difference was found in u-PA activity among these groups, indicating that low activity of total PA in Groups II, III and IV was due to a decrease in t-PA but not in u-PA. In the multivariate analyses, t-PA activity was found to be an independent prognostic factor for relapse-free survival. When four groups of patients were further analysed in terms of nodal status, both t-PA activity and antigen levels were markedly decreased in the node-negative Group II compared with the node-negative Groups III and IV or with the node-positive Groups II, III and IV. Of additional interest, u-PA activity was significantly higher in node-positive patients than in node-negative patients with any group. The clinico-pathologic analyses of the patients in this series showed that node involvement and lymphatic invasion were more frequently positive in Groups III and IV than in Groups I and II. When 144 breast cancers were categorised in terms of combinations of oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) status, breast cancers which were

  14. Effects of molarity and solvents on the optical properties of the solutions of tris[4-(5-dicyanomethylidenemethyl-2-thienyl)phenyl]amine (TDCV-TPA) and structural properties of its film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gündüz, Bayram

    2013-12-01

    The surface morphology of the tris[4-(5-dicyanomethylidenemethyl-2-thienyl)phenyl]amine (TDCV-TPA) film was investigated by high performance atomic force microscopy and the surface roughness parameters such as roughness average (sa), root mean square roughness (sq), surface skewness (ssk) and surface kurtosis (sku) of the TDCV-TPA film were obtained. The TDCV-TPA film indicated the low valleys with bumpy surface. The optical properties of the solutions of the small-molecule semiconducting dye TDCV-TPA for different high molarities, lower molarities and different solvents were investigated in detail. The molar extinction coefficient, optical band gap, angle values of refraction of the TDCV-TPA decreased with increasing molarity, while the absorbance at maximum absorption wavelengths, angle of incidence, electric susceptibility, real part values of the optical conductivity of the TDCV-TPA increased with increasing molarity. The maximum molar extinction coefficient (ɛmax) at λmax values (510 and 509 nm) of the solutions of the TDCV-TPA for 0.024 and 0.010 mM were found to be 1.175 × 105 and 1.931 × 105 L mol-1 cm-1, respectively. The maximum mass extinction coefficient (αmax) of the solutions of the TDCV-TPA for 0.024 and 0.010 mM were found to be 163.226 and 268.247 L g-1 cm-1, respectively. The optical band gap (Eg) values of the TDCV-TPA for 1, 2 and 3 mM were found to be 1.916, 1.898 and 1.892 eV, respectively. The absorption band edge for DCM varied from 1.882 to 1.997 eV, while the absorption band edge for chloroform varied from 1.923 to 2.027 eV. To obtain lower optical band gap of the TDCV-TPA can be prefered DCM solvent.

  15. Enzymatic vitreolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for vitreomacular traction

    PubMed Central

    Raczyńska, Dorota; Lipowski, Paweł; Zorena, Katarzyna; Skorek, Andrzej; Glasner, Paulina

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aim of our research was to gain data about the efficacy of intravitreal injections of a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) in dissolving vitreoretinal tractions (VRTs). Materials and methods The study group consisted of patients of our Ophthalmology Clinic who had received an injection of rTPA (TPA Group) for an existent vitreomacular traction confirmed by optical coherence tomography and stereoscopic examinations. The control group consisted of patients who had declined treatment despite the existence of a vitreomacular traction confirmed by the same diagnostic methods. Each group consisted of 30 people (30 eyes). The observation period was 6 months. Conclusion In both groups some of the VRTs had dissolved. In the TPA group the traction dissolved in 10 patients (33.33%) and in the control group only in 5 (16.67%). It is also important to point out that the mean baseline membrane thickness was higher in the TPA group than in the control group. Observing patients in both groups we noticed that the dissolution of vitreoretinal membrane occurred most frequently in those cases where the membrane was thin. In the TPA group, the mean membrane thickness after 6 months decreased considerably. At the same time, no significant change in the membrane thickness could be observed in the control group. Observation of the retinal thickness allows us to draw the following conclusion: in the TPA group, the retinal thickness in the macular area (edema) had decreased over the study period, whereas in the control group it had increased. In those cases where the traction had dissolved, the edema of the retina decreased by the end of the 6-month period in both groups. In the TPA group, the dissolution of the membrane occurred most often within 3 months from the primary injection. Based on statistics, we can confirm that in the control group there was a decrease in visual acuity during the 6 months of the study period. At the same time, visual acuity in the TPA

  16. Binding of Tissue-type Plasminogen Activator to the Glucose-regulated Protein 78 (GRP78) Modulates Plasminogen Activation and Promotes Human Neuroblastoma Cell Proliferation in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Gomez, Cristian Farias; de Ridder, Gustaaf G.; Ray, Rupa; Pizzo, Salvatore V.

    2014-01-01

    The glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) is a plasminogen (Pg) receptor on the cell surface. In this study, we demonstrate that GRP78 also binds the tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), which results in a decrease in Km and an increase in the Vmax for both its amidolytic activity and activation of its substrate, Pg. This results in accelerated Pg activation when GRP78, t-PA, and Pg are bound together. The increase in t-PA activity is the result of a mechanism involving a t-PA lysine-dependent binding site in the GRP78 amino acid sequence 98LIGRTWNDPSVQQDIKFL115. We found that GRP78 is expressed on the surface of neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells where it is co-localized with the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), which is also a t-PA-binding protein in these cells. We demonstrate that both Pg and t-PA serve as a bridge between GRP78 and VDAC bringing them together to facilitate Pg activation. t-PA induces SK-N-SH cell proliferation via binding to GRP78 on the cell surface. Furthermore, Pg binding to the COOH-terminal region of GRP78 stimulates cell proliferation via its microplasminogen domain. This study confirms previous findings from our laboratory showing that GRP78 acts as a growth factor-like receptor and that its association with t-PA, Pg, and VDAC on the cell surface may be part of a system controlling cell growth. PMID:25059665

  17. Tissue plasminogen activator induces microglial inflammation via a noncatalytic molecular mechanism involving activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and Akt signaling pathways and AnnexinA2 and Galectin-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Pineda, David; Ampurdanés, Coral; Medina, Manel G; Serratosa, Joan; Tusell, Josep Maria; Saura, Josep; Planas, Anna M; Navarro, Pilar

    2012-04-01

    Inflammatory responses mediated by glial cells play a critical role in many pathological situations related to neurodegeneration such as Alzheimer's disease. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease which best-known function is fibrinolysis, but it is also involved in many other physiological and pathological events as microglial activation. Here, we found that tPA is required for Aβ-mediated microglial inflammatory response and tumor necrosis factor-α release. We further investigated the molecular mechanism responsible for tPA-mediated microglial activation. We found that tPA induces a catalytic-independent rapid and sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), Akt, and p38 signaling pathways. Inhibition of ERK1/2 and JNK resulted in a strong inhibition of microglial activation, whereas Akt inhibition led to increased inflammatory response, suggesting specific functions for each signaling pathway in the regulation of microglial activation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that AnnexinA2 and Galectin-1 receptors are involved in tPA signaling and inflammatory response in glial cells. This study provides new evidences supporting that tPA plays a cytokine-like role in glial activation by triggering receptor-mediated intracellular signaling circuits and opens new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of neurological disorders in which neuroinflammation plays a pathogenic role.

  18. Inhibition of T-cell antigen receptor-mediated transmembrane signaling by protein kinase C activation.

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, R T; Ho, S N; Barna, T J; Rusovick, K M; McKean, D J

    1988-01-01

    The murine T-lymphoma cell line LBRM-33 is known to require synergistic signals delivered through the antigen receptor (Ti-CD3) complex, together with interleukin 1 (IL-1), for activation of IL-2 gene expression and IL-2 production. Although 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was capable of replacing IL-1 as an activating stimulus under certain conditions, biologic studies indicated that TPA failed to synergize with Ti-CD3-dependent stimuli under conditions in which IL-1 was clearly active. Acute exposure to TPA and other active phorbol esters resulted in a concentration-dependent inhibition of the increases in phosphoinositide hydrolysis and intracellular free Ca2+ concentration stimulated by phytohemagglutinin or anti-Ti antibodies. TPA treatment induced no direct alteration of phospholipase C enzymatic activities in LBRM-33 cells. In contrast, both Ti-CD3 cross-linkage and TPA rapidly stimulated the phosphorylation of identical CD3 complex polypeptides, presumably via activation of protein kinase C. Exposure of LBRM-33 cells to TPA resulted in a time-dependent, partial down-regulation of surface Ti-CD3 expression. Thus, TPA treatment inhibited the responsiveness of LBRM-33 cells to Ti-CD3-dependent stimuli by inducing an early desensitization of Ti-CD3 receptors, followed by a decrease in membrane receptor expression. These studies indicate that phorbol esters deliver bidirectional signals that both inhibit Ti-CD3-dependent phosphoinositide hydrolysis and augment IL-2 production in LBRM-33 cells. Images PMID:2977423

  19. Leprosy: ancient disease remains a public health problem nowadays*

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Leandro Fonseca; Chiacchio, Nilton Di; Noriega, Angélica Fonseca; Pereira, Gilmayara Alves Abreu Maciel; Vieira, Marina Lino

    2016-01-01

    Despite being an ancient disease, leprosy remains a public health problem in several countries - particularly in India, Brazil and Indonesia. The current operational guidelines emphasize the evaluation of disability from the time of diagnosis and stipulate as fundamental principles for disease control: early detection and proper treatment. Continued efforts are needed to establish and improve quality leprosy services. A qualified primary care network that is integrated into specialized service and the development of educational activities are part of the arsenal in the fight against the disease, considered neglected and stigmatizing. PMID:27579761

  20. Leprosy: ancient disease remains a public health problem nowadays.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Leandro Fonseca; Chiacchio, Nilton Di; Noriega, Angélica Fonseca; Pereira, Gilmayara Alves Abreu Maciel; Vieira, Marina Lino

    2016-01-01

    Despite being an ancient disease, leprosy remains a public health problem in several countries -particularly in India, Brazil and Indonesia. The current operational guidelines emphasize the evaluation of disability from the time of diagnosis and stipulate as fundamental principles for disease control: early detection and proper treatment. Continued efforts are needed to establish and improve quality leprosy services. A qualified primary care network that is integrated into specialized service and the development of educational activities are part of the arsenal in the fight against the disease, considered neglected and stigmatizing. PMID:27579761

  1. Dynamic compression of dense oxide (Gd3Ga5O12) from 0.4 to 2.6 TPa: Universal Hugoniot of fluid metals

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, N.; Nellis, W. J.; Mashimo, T.; Ramzan, M.; Ahuja, R.; Kaewmaraya, T.; Kimura, T.; Knudson, M.; Miyanishi, K.; Sakawa, Y.; Sano, T.; Kodama, R.

    2016-01-01

    Materials at high pressures and temperatures are of great current interest for warm dense matter physics, planetary sciences, and inertial fusion energy research. Shock-compression equation-of-state data and optical reflectivities of the fluid dense oxide, Gd3Ga5O12 (GGG), were measured at extremely high pressures up to 2.6 TPa (26 Mbar) generated by high-power laser irradiation and magnetically-driven hypervelocity impacts. Above 0.75 TPa, the GGG Hugoniot data approach/reach a universal linear line of fluid metals, and the optical reflectivity most likely reaches a constant value indicating that GGG undergoes a crossover from fluid semiconductor to poor metal with minimum metallic conductivity (MMC). These results suggest that most fluid compounds, e.g., strong planetary oxides, reach a common state on the universal Hugoniot of fluid metals (UHFM) with MMC at sufficiently extreme pressures and temperatures. The systematic behaviors of warm dense fluid would be useful benchmarks for developing theoretical equation-of-state and transport models in the warm dense matter regime in determining computational predictions. PMID:27193942

  2. Dynamic compression of dense oxide (Gd3Ga5O12) from 0.4 to 2.6 TPa: Universal Hugoniot of fluid metals.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, N; Nellis, W J; Mashimo, T; Ramzan, M; Ahuja, R; Kaewmaraya, T; Kimura, T; Knudson, M; Miyanishi, K; Sakawa, Y; Sano, T; Kodama, R

    2016-01-01

    Materials at high pressures and temperatures are of great current interest for warm dense matter physics, planetary sciences, and inertial fusion energy research. Shock-compression equation-of-state data and optical reflectivities of the fluid dense oxide, Gd3Ga5O12 (GGG), were measured at extremely high pressures up to 2.6 TPa (26 Mbar) generated by high-power laser irradiation and magnetically-driven hypervelocity impacts. Above 0.75 TPa, the GGG Hugoniot data approach/reach a universal linear line of fluid metals, and the optical reflectivity most likely reaches a constant value indicating that GGG undergoes a crossover from fluid semiconductor to poor metal with minimum metallic conductivity (MMC). These results suggest that most fluid compounds, e.g., strong planetary oxides, reach a common state on the universal Hugoniot of fluid metals (UHFM) with MMC at sufficiently extreme pressures and temperatures. The systematic behaviors of warm dense fluid would be useful benchmarks for developing theoretical equation-of-state and transport models in the warm dense matter regime in determining computational predictions. PMID:27193942

  3. Dynamic compression of dense oxide (Gd3Ga5O12) from 0.4 to 2.6 TPa: Universal Hugoniot of fluid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, N.; Nellis, W. J.; Mashimo, T.; Ramzan, M.; Ahuja, R.; Kaewmaraya, T.; Kimura, T.; Knudson, M.; Miyanishi, K.; Sakawa, Y.; Sano, T.; Kodama, R.

    2016-05-01

    Materials at high pressures and temperatures are of great current interest for warm dense matter physics, planetary sciences, and inertial fusion energy research. Shock-compression equation-of-state data and optical reflectivities of the fluid dense oxide, Gd3Ga5O12 (GGG), were measured at extremely high pressures up to 2.6 TPa (26 Mbar) generated by high-power laser irradiation and magnetically-driven hypervelocity impacts. Above 0.75 TPa, the GGG Hugoniot data approach/reach a universal linear line of fluid metals, and the optical reflectivity most likely reaches a constant value indicating that GGG undergoes a crossover from fluid semiconductor to poor metal with minimum metallic conductivity (MMC). These results suggest that most fluid compounds, e.g., strong planetary oxides, reach a common state on the universal Hugoniot of fluid metals (UHFM) with MMC at sufficiently extreme pressures and temperatures. The systematic behaviors of warm dense fluid would be useful benchmarks for developing theoretical equation-of-state and transport models in the warm dense matter regime in determining computational predictions.

  4. Dynamic compression of dense oxide (Gd3Ga5O12) from 0.4 to 2.6 TPa: Universal Hugoniot of fluid metals

    DOE PAGES

    Ozaki, N.; Nellis, W. J.; Mashimo, T.; Ramzan, M.; Ahuja, R.; Kaewmaraya, T.; Kimura, T.; Knudson, M.; Miyanishi, K.; Sakawa, Y.; et al

    2016-05-19

    Materials at high pressures and temperatures are of great current interest for warm dense matter physics, planetary sciences, and inertial fusion energy research. Shock-compression equation-of-state data and optical reflectivities of the fluid dense oxide, Gd3Ga5O12 (GGG), were measured at extremely high pressures up to 2.6 TPa (26 Mbar) generated by high-power laser irradiation and magnetically-driven hypervelocity impacts. Above 0.75 TPa, the GGG Hugoniot data approach/reach a universal linear line of fluid metals, and the optical reflectivity most likely reaches a constant value indicating that GGG undergoes a crossover from fluid semiconductor to poor metal with minimum metallic conductivity (MMC). Thesemore » results suggest that most fluid compounds, e.g., strong planetary oxides, reach a common state on the universal Hugoniot of fluid metals (UHFM) with MMC at sufficiently extreme pressures and temperatures. Lastly, the systematic behaviors of warm dense fluid would be useful benchmarks for developing theoretical equation-of-state and transport models in the warm dense matter regime in determining computational predictions.« less

  5. Concordance of Hypermethylated DNA and the Tumor Markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA in Serum during Monitoring of Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Lars Mønster; Hansen, Morten Høgh; Nielsen, Dorte; Sölétormos, György

    2015-01-01

    The serological protein tumor markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA are frequently used to monitor tumor burden among metastatic breast cancer patients. Breast cancer is associated with global DNA hypomethylation and hypermethylation of some promoter regions. No monitoring study has yet investigated the interrelationship between protein tumor markers, the global DNA hypomethylation, and hypermethylated genes in serum from patients with advanced disease. Twenty-nine patients with histologically proven advanced breast cancer received first-line chemotherapy with epirubicin. Samples were collected prior to each treatment and prospectively analyzed for CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA. The same samples were retrospectively analyzed for the concentration of hypermethylated RASSF1A and for global DNA hypomethylation using LINE-1. Among patients with elevated concentrations of the protein markers, concordance could be observed between serial changes of the hypermethylated RASSF1A gene and the protein markers. Among patients with lower concentrations, RASSF1A could only be detected periodically. There was discordance between changes of the hypomethylated LINE-1 as compared to the protein markers. Circulating hypermethylated RASSF1A and protein markers may have similar kinetics during monitoring of tumor burden. Further investigations are needed to determine whether any of the hypermethylated DNA genes may provide predictive information during monitoring. PMID:26339655

  6. Roles of protein kinase C on the mechanical activity of vascular smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Itoh, T; Fujiwara, T; Kubota, Y; Nishiye, E; Kuriyama, H

    1990-08-01

    We investigated the role of protein kinase C in the mechanical responses evoked by high K or by acetylcholine (ACh) in intact vascular smooth muscle tissues, and by Ca in skinned vascular smooth muscle tissues. To activate protein kinase C, the phorbol ester 12-o-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a potent tumor promoter, or 1,2-diolein, plus phosphatidylserine (PS) was used. TPA enhanced or reduced the amplitude of the contraction evoked by increased concentrations of K below 39 mmol/L or over 90 mmol/L, respectively, but consistently enhanced the resting tension at any given concentration of high K. Similar effects of TPA were observed on the Ca-induced contraction in saponin skinned muscle tissues. The enhancing action of TPA on the K-induced contraction was not related to activation of either the voltage-dependent Ca channel or the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and did not occur in the case of Ca-independent contraction in skinned muscle tissues. During the enhancement of the contraction induced by TPA, the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and the shortening velocity of contraction as measured using the slack test, were enhanced with no remarkable change in the free Ca concentration in the cytosol. TPA consistently inhibited the ACH-induced contraction accompanied by a marked reduction in free Ca due to inhibition of the hydrolysis of phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Under the assumption that TPA possesses the same action as DG, activation of protein kinase C increased the Ca sensitivity of contractile proteins in vascular smooth muscles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Taphonomy of the Tianyuandong human skeleton and faunal remains.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Jalvo, Yolanda; Andrews, Peter; Tong, HaoWen

    2015-06-01

    Tianyuan Cave is an Upper Palaeolithic site, 6 km from the core area of the Zhoukoudian Site Complex. Tianyuandong (or Tianyuan Cave) yielded one ancient (though not the earliest) fossil skeleton of Homo sapiens in China (42-39 ka cal BP). Together with the human skeleton, abundant animal remains were found, but no stone tools were recovered. The animal fossil remains are extremely fragmentary, in contrast to human skeletal elements that are, for the most part, complete. We undertook a taphonomic study to investigate the circumstances of preservation of the human skeleton in Tianyuan Cave, and in course of this we considered four hypotheses: funerary ritual, cannibalism, carnivore activity or natural death. Taphonomic results characterize the role of human action in the site and how these agents acted in the past. Because of disturbance of the human skeleton during its initial excavation, it is not known if it was in a grave cut or if there was any funerary ritual. No evidence was found for cannibalism or carnivore activity in relation to the human skeleton, suggesting natural death as the most reasonable possibility. PMID:25929706

  8. Taphonomy of the Tianyuandong human skeleton and faunal remains.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Jalvo, Yolanda; Andrews, Peter; Tong, HaoWen

    2015-06-01

    Tianyuan Cave is an Upper Palaeolithic site, 6 km from the core area of the Zhoukoudian Site Complex. Tianyuandong (or Tianyuan Cave) yielded one ancient (though not the earliest) fossil skeleton of Homo sapiens in China (42-39 ka cal BP). Together with the human skeleton, abundant animal remains were found, but no stone tools were recovered. The animal fossil remains are extremely fragmentary, in contrast to human skeletal elements that are, for the most part, complete. We undertook a taphonomic study to investigate the circumstances of preservation of the human skeleton in Tianyuan Cave, and in course of this we considered four hypotheses: funerary ritual, cannibalism, carnivore activity or natural death. Taphonomic results characterize the role of human action in the site and how these agents acted in the past. Because of disturbance of the human skeleton during its initial excavation, it is not known if it was in a grave cut or if there was any funerary ritual. No evidence was found for cannibalism or carnivore activity in relation to the human skeleton, suggesting natural death as the most reasonable possibility.

  9. Phorbol ester and spontaneous activity in SHR aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Moisey, D.M.; Cox, R.H.

    1986-03-01

    Thoracic aortas (TA) were excised from 6-week old SHR and WKY. 2mm rings were mounted isometrically at optimum preload. Spontaneous rhythmical activity developed in TA from SHR and had a frequency of 3-4/min with varying periods of quiescence between bursts of activity. The spontaneous activity often produced an increase in tension development which was associated with increased frequency of oscillations. Verapamil (10/sup -7/ M) or Ca/sup + +/-free solution added during the contractile phase resulted in an immediate loss of tension and spontaneous activity. Addition of ouabain (10/sup -4/ M) during the contractile phase of spontaneous activity, increased the frequency of oscillations which appeared to fuse into a tetanus. Spontaneous rhythmical activity was infrequently observed in TA from WKY. However, addition of phorbol 12-myristate-13 acetate (TPA), frequently induced spontaneous rhythmic oscillations associated with tension development in TA from WKY. TPA contracted the SHR TA and increased the frequency of oscillations. SHR TA were more sensitive to TPA than WKY. This study demonstrates (1) spontaneous rhythmical activity, independent of agonist stimulation in TA from 6-week old SHR and (2) TPA induced spontaneous oscillatory activity. The mechanism underlying the spontaneous oscillatory activity may involve membrane coupling events and Na-pump difference between SHR and WKY.

  10. Biomimetic oxidation studies. 11: Alkane functionalization in aqueous solution utilizing in situ formed [Fe{sub 2}O({eta}{sup 1}-H{sub 2}O)({eta}{sup 1}-OAc)(TPA){sub 2}]{sup 3+}, as an MMO model precatalyst, embedded in surface-derivatized silica and contained in micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Neimann, K.; Neumann, R.; Rabion, A. |; Buchanan, R.M.; Fish, R.H.

    1999-07-26

    The biomimetic, methane monooxygenase enzyme (MMO) precatalyst, [Fe{sub 2}O({eta}{sup 1}-H{sub 2}O)({eta}{sup 1}-OAc)(TPA){sub 2}]{sup 3+} (TPA = tris[(2-pyridyl)methyl]amine), 1, formed in situ at pH 4.2 from [Fe{sub 2}O({mu}-OAc)(TPA){sub 2}]{sup 3+}, 2, was embedded in an amorphous silicate surface modified by a combination of hydrophilic poly(ethylene oxide) and hydrophobic poly(propylene oxide). The resulting catalytic assembly was found to be a biomimetic model for the MMO active site within a hydrophobic macroenvironment, allowing alkane functionalization with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP)/O{sub 2} in an aqueous reaction medium (pH 4.2). For example, cyclohexane was oxidized to a mixture of cyclohexanone, cyclohexanol, and cyclohexyl-tert-butyl peroxide, in a ratio of {approximately}3:1:2. The balance between poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(propylene oxide), tethered on the silica surface, was crucial for maximizing the catalytic activity. The silica-based catalytic assembly showed reactivity somewhat higher in comparison to an aqueous micelle system utilizing the surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium hydrogen sulfate at its critical micelle concentration, in which functionalization of cyclohexane with TBHP/O{sub 2} in the presence of 1 was also studied at pH 4.2 and was found to provide similar products: cyclohexanol, cyclohexanone, and cyclohexyl-tert-butyl peroxide, in a ratio of {approximately}2:3:1. Moreover, the mechanism for both the silica-based catalytic assembly and the aqueous micelle system was found to occur via the Haber-Weiss process, in which redox chemistry between 1 and TBHP provides both the t-BuO{sup {sm_bullet}} and t-BuOO{sup {sm_bullet}} radicals. The t-BuO{sup {sm_bullet}} radical initiates the C-H functionalization reaction to form the carbon radical, followed by O{sub 2} trapping, to provide cyclohexyl hydroperoxide, which produces the cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone in the presence of 1, whereas the coupling product emanates from t

  11. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Alters Intracellular Sequestration of Zinc through Interaction with the Transporter ZIP4

    SciTech Connect

    Emmetsberger, Jaime; Mirrione, Martine M.; Zhou, Chun; Fernandez-Monreal, Monica; Siddiq, Mustafa M.; Ji, Kyungmin; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2010-09-17

    Glutamatergic neurons contain free zinc packaged into neurotransmitter-loaded synaptic vesicles. Upon neuronal activation, the vesicular contents are released into the synaptic space, whereby the zinc modulates activity of postsynaptic neurons though interactions with receptors, transporters and exchangers. However, high extracellular concentrations of zinc trigger seizures and are neurotoxic if substantial amounts of zinc reenter the cells via ion channels and accumulate in the cytoplasm. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a secreted serine protease, is also proepileptic and excitotoxic. However, tPA counters zinc toxicity by promoting zinc import back into the neurons in a sequestered form that is nontoxic. Here, we identify the zinc influx transporter, ZIP4, as the pathway through which tPA mediates the zinc uptake. We show that ZIP4 is upregulated after excitotoxin stimulation of the mouse, male and female, hippocampus. ZIP4 physically interacts with tPA, correlating with an increased intracellular zinc influx and lysosomal sequestration. Changes in prosurvival signals support the idea that this sequestration results in neuroprotection. These experiments identify a mechanism via which neurons use tPA to efficiently neutralize the toxic effects of excessive concentrations of free zinc.

  12. Gene Therapy to Promote Thromboresistance: Local Overexpression of Tissue Plasminogen Activator to Prevent Arterial Thrombosis in an in vivo Rabbit Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waugh, J. M.; Kattash, M.; Li, J.; Yuksel, E.; Kuo, M. D.; Lussier, M.; Weinfeld, A. B.; Saxena, R.; Rabinovsky, E. D.; Thung, S.; Woo, S. L. C.; Shenaq, S. M.

    1999-02-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) catalyzes the rate-limiting initial step in the fibrinolytic cascade. Systemic infusion of tPA has become the standard of care for acute myocardial infarction. However, even the relatively short-duration protocols currently employed have encountered significant hemorrhagic complications, as well as complications from rebound thrombosis. Gene therapy offers a method of local high-level tPA expression over a prolonged time period to avoid both systemic hemorrhage and local rebound thrombosis. To examine the impact of local tPA overexpression, an adenoviral vector expressing tPA was created. The construct was characterized functionally in vitro, and the function of the vector was confirmed in vivo by delivery to the rabbit common femoral artery. Systemic coagulation parameters were not perturbed at any of the doses examined. The impact of local overexpression of tPA on in vivo thrombus formation was examined subsequently in a stasis/injury model of arterial thrombosis. The construct effectively prevented arterial thrombosis in treated animals, whereas viral and nonviral controls typically developed occluding thrombi. This construct thus offers a viable technique for promoting a locally thromboresistant small-caliber artery.

  13. Characterization of the human spr2 promoter: induction after UV irradiation or TPA treatment and regulation during differentiation of cultured primary keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, S; Lohman, F; Teubel, W; van de Putte, P; Backendorf, C

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated genomic clones from several members of the UV and TPA inducible human spr2 gene-family in order to analyse the regulation of these genes at a molecular level. From one of these members, the spr2-1 gene, we have identified and sequenced the regulatory region. By using CAT fusion plasmids and a liposome mediated transfection procedure we show that the isolated promoter region contains all the cis-elements necessary for induced expression after UV irradiation or phorbolester treatment of cultured human keratinocytes. Additionally the spr2-1 promoter is shown to be regulated aswell during the normal process of keratinocyte differentiation. This makes the spr2-1 promoter sequence an ideal tool to study the molecular mechanisms by which environmental agents such as UV radiation and chemical tumor promoters interfere with normal gene expression during cell proliferation and differentiation. Images PMID:2388825

  14. PKCα activation down-regulates ATM and radio-sensitizes androgen-sensitive human prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Jean-Philip; Rotenberg, Susan A.; Kang, Ji-Hye; Lerman, Gabriel; Fuks, Zvi; Kolesnick, Richard; Marquez, Victor E.; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that treatment of human androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and CWR22-Rv1 with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), a known protein kinase C (PKC) activator, decreases ATM protein levels, thus de-repressing the enzyme ceramide synthase (CS) and promoting apoptosis as well as radio-sensitizing these cells.1 Here we show that PKCα mediates the TPA effect on ATM expression, since ATM suppression and apoptosis induced by either TPA or diacylglycerol-lactone (DAG-lactone), both inducing PKCα activation,2 are abrogated in LNCaP cells following transfection of a kinase-dead PKCα mutant (KD-PKCα). Similarly, KD-PKCα blocks the apoptotic response elicited by combination of TPA and radiation, whereas expression of constitutively active PKCα is sufficient to sensitize cells to radiation alone, without a need to pre-treat the cells with TPA. These findings identify CS activation as a downstream event of PKCα activity in LNCaP cells. Similar results were obtained in CWR22-Rv1 cells with DAG-lactone treatment. Using the LNCaP orthotopic prostate model it is shown that treatment with TPA or DAG-lactone induces significant reduction in tumor ATM levels coupled with tumor growth delay. Furthermore, while fractionated radiation alone produces significant tumor growth delay, pretreatment with TPA or DAG-lactone significantly potentiates tumor cure. These findings support a model in which activation of PKCα downregulates ATM, thus relieving CS repression by ATM and enhancing apoptosis via ceramide generation. This model may provide a basis for the design of new therapies in prostate cancer. PMID:19029835

  15. Cancer chemopreventive activity of carotenoids in the fruits of red paprika Capsicum annuum L.

    PubMed

    Maoka, T; Mochida, K; Kozuka, M; Ito, Y; Fujiwara, Y; Hashimoto, K; Enjo, F; Ogata, M; Nobukuni, Y; Tokuda, H; Nishino, H

    2001-10-30

    Capsanthin and related carotenoids isolated from the fruits of red paprika Capsicum annuum L. showed potent in vitro anti-tumor-promoting activity with inhibitory effects on Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation induced by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Among them, capsanthin diester and capsorbin diester showed strong inhibitory effects. Furthermore, capsanthin , capsanthin 3'-ester and capsanthin 3,3'-diester , major carotenoids in paprika, exhibited potent anti-tumor-promoting activity in an in vivo mouse skin two-stage carcinogenesis assay using 7, 12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene as an initiator and TPA as a promoter.

  16. Tissue-type plasminogen activator mediates neuroglial coupling in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    An, J; Haile, W B; Wu, F; Torre, E; Yepes, M

    2014-01-17

    The interaction between neurons, astrocytes and endothelial cells plays a central role coupling energy supply with changes in neuronal activity. For a long time it was believed that glucose was the only source of energy for neurons. However, a growing body of experimental evidence indicates that lactic acid, generated by aerobic glycolysis in perivascular astrocytes, is also a source of energy for neuronal activity, particularly when the supply of glucose from the intravascular space is interrupted. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionary conserved kinase that couples cellular activity with energy consumption via induction of the uptake of glucose and activation of the glycolytic pathway. The uptake of glucose by the blood-brain barrier is mediated by glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1), which is abundantly expressed in endothelial cells and astrocytic end-feet processes. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine proteinase that is found in endothelial cells, astrocytes and neurons. Genetic overexpression of neuronal tPA or treatment with recombinant tPA protects neurons from the deleterious effects of metabolic stress or excitotoxicity, via a mechanism independent of tPA's ability to cleave plasminogen into plasmin. The work presented here shows that exposure to metabolic stress induces the rapid release of tPA from murine neurons but not from astrocytes. This tPA induces AMPK activation, membrane recruitment of GLUT1, and GLUT1-mediated glucose uptake in astrocytes and endothelial cells. Our data indicate that this is followed by the synthesis and release of lactic acid from astrocytes, and that the uptake of this lactic acid via the monocarboxylate transporter-2 promotes survival in neurons exposed to metabolic stress.

  17. [6]-Gingerol inhibits COX-2 expression by blocking the activation of p38 MAP kinase and NF-kappaB in phorbol ester-stimulated mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sue Ok; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Shin, Young Kee; Park, Jin-Hong; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Tae-Yoon; Surh, Young-Joon

    2005-04-01

    [6]-Gingerol, a pungent ingredient of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe, Zingiberaceae), has a wide array of pharmacologic effects. The present study was aimed at unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying previously reported antitumor promoting effects of [6]-gingerol in mouse skin in vivo. One of the well-recognized molecular targets for chemoprevention is cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) that is abnormally upregulated in many premalignant and malignant tissues and cells. In our present study, topical application of [6]-gingerol inhibited COX-2 expression in mouse skin stimulated with a prototype tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Since the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) is known to regulate COX-2 induction, we attempted to determine the effect of [6]-gingerol on TPA-induced activation of NF-kappaB. Pretreatment with [6]-gingerol resulted in a decrease in both TPA-induced DNA binding and transcriptional activities of NF-kappaB through suppression of IkappaBalpha degradation and p65 nuclear translocation. Phosphorylation of both IkappaBalpha and p65 was substantially blocked by [6]-gingerol. In addition, [6]-gingerol inhibited TPA-stimulated interaction of phospho-p65-(Ser-536) with cAMP response element binding protein-binding protein, a transcriptional coactivator of NF-kappaB. Moreover, [6]-gingerol prevented TPA-induced phosphorylation and catalytic activity of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase that regulates COX-2 expression in mouse skin. The p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580 attenuated NF-kappaB activation and subsequent COX-2 induction in TPA-treated mouse skin. Taken together, our data suggest that [6]-gingerol inhibits TPA-induced COX-2 expression in mouse skin in vivo by blocking the p38 MAP kinase-NF-kappaB signaling pathway. PMID:15735738

  18. 7 CFR 160.29 - Containers to remain intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Containers to remain intact. 160.29 Section 160.29... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Analysis, Inspection, and Grading on Request § 160.29 Containers to remain intact... the containers holding such naval stores remain intact as sampled until the analysis,...

  19. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  20. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  1. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  2. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  3. Southern copperhead venom enhances tissue-type plasminogen activator induced fibrinolysis but does not directly lyse human plasma thrombi.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G

    2016-07-01

    In addition to degrading fibrinogen as a source of consumptive coagulopathy, purified fractions of southern copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix; A. c. contortrix) venom has been demonstrated to enhance fibrinolysis. The goal of this investigation was to characterize the kinetic fibrinolytic profile of A. c. contortrix venom in the absence and presence of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) to determine if intact venom had tPA independent fibrinolytic properties. Utilizing thrombelastographic methods, the coagulation and fibrinolytic kinetic profiles of human plasma exposed to A. c. contortrix venom (0-6 μg/ml) were determined in the absence or presence of tPA (0-100 IU/ml). Then, plasma was exposed to 0-6 μg/ml of venom without tPA added and coagulation observed for 3 h. Venom significantly prolonged the onset of coagulation, decreased the velocity of thrombus growth but did not significantly decrease clot strength. In the presence of tPA, venom significantly decreased clot strength, shortened the time of onset of fibrinolysis, decreased clot lysis time but did not significantly affect the maximum rate of lysis. Lastly, while venom exposure in the absence of tPA significantly prolonged the onset of coagulation and decreased the velocity of clot growth, venom exposure did not result in detectable fibrinolysis over the 3 h observation period. A. c. contortrix venom enhances tPA mediated fibrinolysis by degrading plasma coagulation kinetics. Intact A. c. contortrix venom does not possess sufficient fibrinolytic activity to cause fibrinolysis in human plasma at the concentration tested. PMID:26407681

  4. Technical planning activity: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    In April 1985, the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Fusion Energy commissioned the Technical Planning Activity (TPA). The purpose of this activity was to develop a technical planning methodology and prepare technical plans in support of the strategic and policy framework of the Magnetic Fusion Program Plan issued by DOE in February 1985. Although this report represents the views of only the US magnetic fusion community, it is international in scope in the sense that the technical plans contained herein describe the full scope of the tasks that are prerequisites for the commercialization of fusion energy. The TPA has developed a well-structured methodology that includes detailed definitions of technical issues, definitions of program areas and elements, statements of research and development objectives, identification of key decision points and milestones, and descriptions of facility requirements.

  5. Unmasking Proteolytic Activity for Adult Visual Cortex Plasticity by the Removal of Lynx1

    PubMed Central

    Bukhari, Noreen; Burman, Poromendro N.; Hussein, Ayan; Demars, Michael P.; Sadahiro, Masato; Brady, Daniel M.; Tsirka, Stella E.; Russo, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Experience-dependent cortical plasticity declines with age. At the molecular level, experience-dependent proteolytic activity of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) becomes restricted in the adult brain if mice are raised in standard cages. Understanding the mechanism for the loss of permissive proteolytic activity is therefore a key link for improving function in adult brains. Using the mouse primary visual cortex (V1) as a model, we demonstrate that tPA activity in V1 can be unmasked following 4 d of monocular deprivation when the mice older than 2 months are raised in standard cages by the genetic removal of Lynx1, a negative regulator of adult plasticity. This was also associated with the reduction of stubby and thin spine density and enhancement of ocular dominance shift in adult V1 of Lynx1 knock-out (KO) mice. These structural and functional changes were tPA-dependent because genetic removal of tPA in Lynx1 KO mice can block the monocular deprivation-dependent reduction of dendritic spine density, whereas both genetic and adult specific inhibition of tPA activity can ablate the ocular dominance shift in Lynx1 KO mice. Our work demonstrates that the adult brain has an intrinsic potential for experience-dependent elevation of proteolytic activity to express juvenile-like structural and functional changes but is effectively limited by Lynx1 if mice are raised in standard cages. Insights into the Lynx1-tPA plasticity mechanism may provide novel therapeutic targets for adult brain disorders. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Experience-dependent proteolytic activity of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) becomes restricted in the adult brain in correlation with the decline in cortical plasticity when mice are raised in standard cages. We demonstrated that removal of Lynx1, one of negative regulators of plasticity, unmasks experience-dependent tPA elevation in visual cortex of adult mice reared in standard cages. This proteolytic elevation facilitated dendritic spine reduction

  6. Remaining Useful Life Estimation in Prognosis: An Uncertainty Propagation Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankararaman, Shankar; Goebel, Kai

    2013-01-01

    The estimation of remaining useful life is significant in the context of prognostics and health monitoring, and the prediction of remaining useful life is essential for online operations and decision-making. However, it is challenging to accurately predict the remaining useful life in practical aerospace applications due to the presence of various uncertainties that affect prognostic calculations, and in turn, render the remaining useful life prediction uncertain. It is challenging to identify and characterize the various sources of uncertainty in prognosis, understand how each of these sources of uncertainty affect the uncertainty in the remaining useful life prediction, and thereby compute the overall uncertainty in the remaining useful life prediction. In order to achieve these goals, this paper proposes that the task of estimating the remaining useful life must be approached as an uncertainty propagation problem. In this context, uncertainty propagation methods which are available in the literature are reviewed, and their applicability to prognostics and health monitoring are discussed.

  7. Feasibility of Tissue Plasminogen Activator Formulated for Pulmonary Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, John S.; Nayar, Rajiv; Campos, Jackie; Hybertson, Brooks M.; Zhou, Yue; Manning, Mark Cornell; Repine, John E.; Stringer, Kathleen A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to assess the feasibility of a pulmonary formulation of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for nebulization into the airway by measuring protein stability, biologic activity, particle size, and estimating human lung distribution. Methods Formulations were derived by varying the surfactant and protein concentrations. Protein stability and recovery of each nebulized tPA formulation were assessed by ultraviolet spectroscopy. Formulations that met protein stability feasibility criteria were assessed for biologic and fibrinolytic activities. Biologic activity was determined by their ability to inhibit superoxide anion production by human neutrophils. Fibrinolytic activity was assessed by the cleavage of plasminogen to plasmin. Aerodynamic properties were assessed using a cascade impactor, and an estimation of human airway deposition was made via a human lung replica. Results Twenty-seven tPA formulations were initially assessed, 15 of which met protein stability criteria. Subsequently, three of these formulations maintained biologic and fibrinolytic activities. These formulations exhibited particle sizes of 2.4–3.1 μm, and had respirable doses ≥65%. A formulation of 1 mg mL−1 tPA and 0.1% Tween 80 exhibited a 45% deposition in the lower airways of a human lung replica. Conclusions A suitable pulmonary tPA formulation was identified that, following nebulization, maintained protein stability as well as biologic and fibrinolytic activities, and resulted in an optimal respirable dose and human airway deposition. This formulation may be applicable in the treatment of lung diseases, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome by permitting targeted pulmonary delivery of a therapeutic protein to the lungs. PMID:16180128

  8. Isotope Tales: Remaining Problems, Unsolvable Questions, and Gentle Successes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    fogel, marilyn; bradley, christina; newsome, seth; filipp, fabian

    2014-05-01

    Earth's biomes function and adapt today as climate changes and ecosystems and the organisms within them adapt. Stable isotope biogeochemistry has had a major influence in understanding climate perturbations and continues to be an active area of research on many fronts. Banking on the success of compound specific stable isotope analyses of amino acids, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen isotopes continue to reveal subtle shifts in oceanic food webs and metabolic changes in microbes, plants, and animals. A biochemical understanding of exactly how organisms process and partition stable isotopes during metabolism remains unsolved, but is required if this field is to move beyond description to quantitation. Although the patterns of carbon and nitrogen isotopes are fairly well established in the common amino acids, we need to consider specifics: How do shifting metabolic pathways (metabolomics) influence the outcome of stable isotope partitioning? What influence does the gut microflora in animals have on isotopic labeling? What are the intramolecular isotope patterns of common amino acids and what do they tell us? What can be learned with other isotope systems, such as hydrogen? Results and ideas of how to move forward in this field will be presented starting at the molecular level and ending with ecosystems.

  9. Canonical Wnt signaling in the oligodendroglial lineage--puzzles remain.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fuzheng; Lang, Jordan; Sohn, Jiho; Hammond, Elizabeth; Chang, Marcello; Pleasure, David

    2015-10-01

    The straightforward concept that accentuated Wnt signaling via the Wnt-receptor-β-catenin-TCF/LEF cascade (also termed canonical Wnt signaling or Wnt/β-catenin signaling) delays or blocks oligodendrocyte differentiation is very appealing. According to this concept, canonical Wnt signaling is responsible for remyelination failure in multiple sclerosis and for persistent hypomyelination in periventricular leukomalacia. This has given rise to the hope that pharmacologically inhibiting this signaling will be of therapeutic potential in these disabling neurological disorders. But current studies suggest that Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays distinct roles in oligodendrogenesis, oligodendrocyte differentiation, and myelination in a context-dependent manner (central nervous system regions, developmental stages), and that Wnt/β-catenin signaling interplays with, and is subjected to regulation by, other central nervous system factors and signaling pathways. On this basis, we propose the more nuanced concept that endogenous Wnt/β-catenin activity is delicately and temporally regulated to ensure the seamless development of oligodendroglial lineage cells in different contexts. In this review, we discuss the role Wnt/β-catenin signaling in oligodendrocyte development, focusing on the interpretation of disparate results, and highlighting areas where important questions remain to be answered about oligodendroglial lineage Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:25782433

  10. Involvement of tissue plasminogen activator in stress responsivity during acute cocaine withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Maiya, Rajani; Norris, Erin H; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Strickland, Sidney

    2010-11-01

    There is evidence that increased release of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) contributes to stress responsivity during cocaine withdrawal (WD). Recent studies suggest that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in the CeA is a downstream effector protein for CRF after acute "binge" cocaine administration. The purpose of this study was to determine if tPA modulates cocaine WD-induced stress responsivity. Wild-type (WT) and tPA-deficient (tPA - / - ) mice were subjected to chronic (14 days) "binge" cocaine (45 mg/kg per day) or its acute (1 day) WD. Extracellular tPA activity, CRF mRNA levels, and plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels were measured in tPA - / -  and WT mice. Extracellular tPA activity was reduced by 50% in the CeA and medial amygdala of WT mice after chronic cocaine and returned to basal levels after acute WD. Unlike WT mice, tPA - / -  mice did not display elevated amygdalar CRF mRNA levels during cocaine WD. In comparison to WT mice, tPA - / -  mice showed a blunted plasma CORT response during acute WD. These results demonstrate that tPA activity in the amygdala (Amy) is altered by chronic cocaine exposure, and further suggest an involvement of tPA in modulating amygdalar CRF stress responsive system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to acute cocaine WD.

  11. Detection of the Remaining Files Copied from Removable Storage Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizawa, Chikako; Andoh, Yuu; Nishida, Makoto

    This paper proposes a method for detecting remaining files copied from removable storage medium. The proposed method logs events that the database of a file system, “Folder”, is changed. The remaining file can be detected by tracing the sequence of logs using path/file-name matching. Our experimental result suggests that the proposed method can accurately detect remaining files left on the computer.

  12. Vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator promotes rapid and sustained reperfusion without concomitant systemic plasminogen activation in a canine model of arterial thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mellott, M J; Stabilito, I I; Holahan, M A; Cuca, G C; Wang, S; Li, P; Barrett, J S; Lynch, J J; Gardell, S J

    1992-02-01

    The efficacy of recombinant vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator (bat-PA) as a thrombolytic agent was compared with that of human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) in a canine model of arterial thrombosis. An occlusive thrombus was formed in the femoral artery by insertion of a thrombogenic copper coil; femoral arterial blood flow was monitored with a Doppler flow meter. Bat-PA and t-PA, when administered by 5-minute intravenous infusion (14 nmol/kg), reperfused seven out of eight and four out of eight dogs, respectively. The median reperfusion times in the bat-PA and t-PA groups were 24 and greater than or equal to 131 minutes, respectively. The mean reperfusion times (+/- SEM) in the recanalized bat-PA- and t-PA-treated dogs were similar (20 +/- 5 and 11 +/- 2 minutes, respectively, p = NS). Maximal blood flow after reperfusion was greater with bat-PA than with t-PA (80 +/- 10% and 41 +/- 15% of control flow, respectively, p less than 0.05). Furthermore, the median reocclusion time was markedly delayed in the bat-PA group relative to the t-PA group (131 versus 34 minutes, respectively, p less than 0.05). Plasma fibrinogen and plasminogen were not significantly depleted by the administration of t-PA or bat-PA. However, plasma alpha 2-antiplasmin activity was moderately depressed in the t-PA group relative to the bat-PA group (p less than 0.05). The clearance profile for t-PA was monoexponential, with a half-life (t1/2) of 2.4 +/- 0.3 minutes and a mean residence time of 3.5 +/- 0.4 minutes. The clearance profile for bat-PA was biexponential, with a t1/2 alpha of 0.9 +/- 0.2 minutes, a t1/2 beta of 20.2 +/- 2.7 minutes, and a mean residence time of 21.3 +/- 4.3 minutes. The steady-state volume of distribution displayed by bat-PA was 16-fold greater than that of t-PA. Zymography of serial plasma samples from the bat-PA-treated dogs failed to demonstrate the apparent generation of a complex between bat-PA and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1; the

  13. Arrhenius temperature dependence of in vitro tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, George J.; Dhamija, Ashima; Bavani, Nazli; Wagner, Kenneth R.; Holland, Christy K.

    2007-06-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease and a leading cause of death and disability. Currently, the only FDA approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the intravenous administration of the thrombolytic medication, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, this treatment has many contraindications and can have dangerous side effects such as intra-cerebral hemorrhage. These treatment limitations have led to much interest in potential adjunctive therapies, such as therapeutic hypothermia (T <= 35 °C) and ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis. Such interest may lead to combining these therapies with tPA to treat stroke, however little is known about the effects of temperature on the thrombolytic efficacy of tPA. In this work, we measure the temperature dependence of the fractional clot mass loss Δm(T) resulting from tPA exposure in an in vitro human clot model. We find that the temperature dependence is well described by an Arrhenius temperature dependence with an effective activation energy Eeff of 42.0 ± 0.9 kJ mole-1. Eeff approximates the activation energy of the plasminogen-to-plasmin reaction of 48.9 kJ mole-1. A model to explain this temperature dependence is proposed. These results will be useful in predicting the effects of temperature in future lytic therapies.

  14. The activation of the tissue plasminogen activator-plasmin system induced in the mouse hippocampus after injection of trimethyltin: possible proteolysis of highly polysialylated NCAM.

    PubMed

    Endo, A; Hashimoto, K; Takada, Y; Takada, A

    1999-10-01

    Trimethyltin (TMT) is a neurotoxicant that causes the death of granule cells and degrades highly polysialylated NCAM (PSA-NCAM) in the dentate gyrus. To investigate the role of the tPA-plasmin system in the degradation of PSA-NCAM, we injected trimethyltin (TMT) into mice. As a result, tPA activity was significantly increased in CA1-CA4 and the dentate gyrus after TMT injection. These results suggest that up-regulated tPA may contribute to the degradation of PSA-NCAM.

  15. Determinants of variance in the habitual physical activity of overweight adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The number of days of data and number of subjects necessary to estimate total physical activity (TPA) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) requires an understanding of within-and between-subject variances, and the influence of sex, body composition, and age. Seventy-one adults wore ac...

  16. 49 CFR 845.51 - Investigation to remain open.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Investigation to remain open. 845.51 Section 845.51 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION... § 845.51 Investigation to remain open. Accident investigations are never officially closed but are...

  17. 49 CFR 845.51 - Investigation to remain open.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Investigation to remain open. 845.51 Section 845... § 845.51 Investigation to remain open. Accident investigations are never officially closed but are kept open for the submission of new and pertinent evidence by any interested person. If the Board finds...

  18. Genetic analysis of the skeletal remains attributed to Francesco Petrarca.

    PubMed

    Caramelli, David; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Capelli, Cristian; Lari, Martina; Sampietro, María Lourdes; Gigli, Elena; Milani, Lucio; Pilli, Elena; Guimaraes, Silvia; Chiarelli, Brunetto; Marin, Vito Terribile Wien; Casoli, Antonella; Stanyon, Roscoe; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Barbujani, Guido

    2007-11-15

    We report on the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis of the supposed remains of Francesco Petrarca exhumed in November 2003, from the S. Maria Assunta church, in Arquà Padua (Italy) where he died in 1374. The optimal preservation of the remains allowed the retrieval of sufficient mtDNA for genetic analysis. DNA was extracted from a rib and a tooth and mtDNA sequences were determined in multiple clones using the strictest criteria currently available for validation of ancient DNA sequences, including independent replication. MtDNA sequences from the tooth and rib were not identical, suggesting that they belonged to different individuals. Indeed, molecular gender determination showed that the postcranial remains belonged to a male while the skull belonged to a female. Historical records indicated that the remains were violated in 1630, possibly by thieves. These results are consistent with morphological investigations and confirm the importance of integrating molecular and morphological approaches in investigating historical remains.

  19. Curcumin suppresses activation of NF-kappaB and AP-1 induced by phorbol ester in cultured human promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Seong-Su; Keum, Young-Sam; Seo, Hyo-Joung; Surh, Young-Joon

    2002-05-31

    Many components that are derived from medicinal or dietary plants possess potential chemopreventive properties. Curcumin, a yellow coloring agent from turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn, Zingiberaceae), possesses strong antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activities. In this study, we have found that curcumin inhibits the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced nuclear factor kB (NF-kappaB) activation by preventing the degradation of the inhibitory protein IkBalpa; and the subsequent translocation of the p65 subunit in cultured human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells. Alternatively, curcumin repressed the TPA-induced activation of NF-kappaB through direct interruption of the binding of NF-kappaB to its consensus DNA sequences. Likewise, the TPA-induced DNA binding of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) was inhibited by curcumin pretreatment. PMID:12297018

  20. Head direction maps remain stable despite grid map fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Jonathan R.; Derdikman, Dori

    2012-01-01

    Areas encoding space in the brain contain both representations of position (place cells and grid cells) and representations of azimuth (head direction cells). Previous studies have already suggested that although grid cells and head direction cells reside in the same brain areas, the calculation of head direction is not dependent on the calculation of position. Here we demonstrate that realignment of grid cells does not affect head direction tuning. We analyzed head direction cell data collected while rats performed a foraging task in a multi-compartment environment (the hairpin maze) vs. an open-field environment, demonstrating that the tuning of head direction cells did not change when the environment was divided into multiple sub-compartments, in the hairpin maze. On the other hand, as we have shown previously (Derdikman et al., 2009), the hexagonal firing pattern expressed by grid cells in the open-field broke down into repeating patterns in similar alleys when rats traversed the multi-compartment hairpin maze. The grid-like firing of conjunctive cells, which express both grid properties and head direction properties in the open-field, showed a selective fragmentation of grid-like firing properties in the hairpin maze, while the head directionality property of the same cells remained unaltered. These findings demonstrate that head direction is not affected during the restructuring of grid cell firing fields as a rat actively moves between compartments, thus strengthening the claim that the head direction system is upstream from or parallel to the grid-place system. PMID:22479237

  1. Neuroimmunomodulatory effects of transcranial laser therapy combined with intravenous tPA administration for acute cerebral ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Peplow, Philip V.

    2015-01-01

    At present, the only FDA approved treatment for ischemic strokes is intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator within 4.5 hours of stroke onset. Owing to this brief window only a small percentage of patients receive tissue plasminogen activator. Transcranial laser therapy has been shown to be effective in animal models of acute ischemic stroke, resulting in significant improvement in neurological score and function. NEST-1 and NEST-2 clinical trials in human patients have demonstrated the safety and positive trends in efficacy of transcranial laser therapy for the treatment of ischemic stroke when initiated close to the time of stroke onset. Combining intravenous tissue plasminogen activator treatment with transcranial laser therapy may provide better functional outcomes. Statins given within 4 weeks of stroke onset improve stroke outcomes at 90 days compared to patients not given statins, and giving statins following transcranial laser therapy may provide an effective treatment for patients not able to be given tissue plasminogen activator due to time constraints. PMID:26487831

  2. Properties and effects of remaining carbon from waste plastics gasifying on iron scale reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongmin; Chen, Shuwen; Miao, Xincheng; Yuan, Hao

    2011-06-01

    The carbonous activities of three kinds of carbon-bearing materials gasified from plastics were tested with coal coke as reference. The results showed that the carbonous activities of these remaining carbon-bearing materials were higher than that of coal-coke. Besides, the fractal analyses showed that the porosities of remaining carbon-bearing materials were higher than that of coal-coke. It revealed that these kinds of remaining carbon-bearing materials are conducive to improve the kinetics conditions of gas-solid phase reaction in iron scale reduction.

  3. 6. REMAINS OF PLANK WALL NAILED TO POSTS WITHIN CANAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. REMAINS OF PLANK WALL NAILED TO POSTS WITHIN CANAL CONSTRUCTED TO PROTECT OUTSIDE CANAL BANK. VIEW IS TO THE WEST. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  4. 7. REMAINS OF PLANK WALL WITHIN CANAL CONSTRUCTED TO PROTECT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. REMAINS OF PLANK WALL WITHIN CANAL CONSTRUCTED TO PROTECT OUTSIDE CANAL BANK, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. NOTE CROSS SUPPORT POLES EXTENDING TO HILLSIDE. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  5. 53. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTH NORTHEAST SHOWING THE REMAINS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTH NORTHEAST SHOWING THE REMAINS OF A WOODEN SETTLING BOX IN THE BACKGROUND RIGHT. AMALGAMATING PANS IN THE FOREGROUND. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  6. 11. DOUBLE CURVED RACK. UPPER PORTION ROTATES; LOWER PORTION REMAINS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DOUBLE CURVED RACK. UPPER PORTION ROTATES; LOWER PORTION REMAINS STATIONARY. DISCARDED ROLLER NEAR CENTER OF FRAME. - Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, Bridge No. Z-6, Spanning North Branch of Chicago River, South of Cortland Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  7. Looking east inside of casthouse no. 6 at the remains ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking east inside of casthouse no. 6 at the remains of slag runner and slag notch of blast furnace no. 6. - U.S. Steel Edgar Thomson Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Braddock, Allegheny County, PA

  8. 60. NORTHEASTERN VIEW OF THE REMAINS OF THE DOROTHY SIX ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. NORTHEASTERN VIEW OF THE REMAINS OF THE DOROTHY SIX BLAST FURNACE COMPLEX. (Martin Stupich) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  9. 59. REMAINS OF THE DOROTHY SIX BLAST FURNACE COMPLEX LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. REMAINS OF THE DOROTHY SIX BLAST FURNACE COMPLEX LOOKING NORTHEAST. THE LADLE HOUSE IS ON THE RIGHT. (Martin Stupich) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  10. 14. VIEW LOOKING WEST, GRAIN LEG REMAINS AND CHUTE OPENING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW LOOKING WEST, GRAIN LEG REMAINS AND CHUTE OPENING OVER RECEIVING HOPPER, ON TRACK DECK - West Shore Railroad, Pier 7 Grain Elevator, Hudson River & Pershing Road vicinity, West New York, Hudson County, NJ

  11. 13. VIEW LOOKING EAST, REMAINS OF HATCH COVER AND CHUTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW LOOKING EAST, REMAINS OF HATCH COVER AND CHUTE TO SMALL HOPPER, GRAIN LEGS, AND CONVEYOR DRIVE SHAFT FROM TRACK DECK - West Shore Railroad, Pier 7 Grain Elevator, Hudson River & Pershing Road vicinity, West New York, Hudson County, NJ

  12. 7. Detail view: east side of north end, showing remains ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail view: east side of north end, showing remains of Fort San Antonio - Puente Guillermo Esteves, Spanning San Antonio Channel at PR-25 (Juan Ponce de Leon Avenue), San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

  13. 25. CAFETERIA Note remains of tile floor in foreground. Food ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. CAFETERIA Note remains of tile floor in foreground. Food cooked on the stove was served to workers in the eating area to the left of the counter (off picture). - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  14. 4. Band Wheel and Walking Beam Mechanism, Including Remains of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Band Wheel and Walking Beam Mechanism, Including Remains of Frame Belt House, Looking Southeast - David Renfrew Oil Rig, East side of Connoquenessing Creek, 0.4 mile North of confluence with Thorn Creek, Renfrew, Butler County, PA

  15. 33. VIEW SHOWING THE REMAINS OF THE ORIGINAL ARIZONA CANAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. VIEW SHOWING THE REMAINS OF THE ORIGINAL ARIZONA CANAL HEADING, ARIZONA DAM, LOOKING EAST Photographer: Mark Durben, December 1990 - Arizona Canal, North of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  16. 7. VIEW SOUTH, REMAINS OF ORIGINAL STONE ABUTMENTS ON HILLSIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW SOUTH, REMAINS OF ORIGINAL STONE ABUTMENTS ON HILLSIDE SOUTH OF BRIDGE, EAST END - Cincinnati, Jackson & Mackinaw Railroad Bridge, Abandonned Penn Central Route, spanning Tom's Run, Farmersville, Montgomery County, OH

  17. 12. DETAIL VIEW NORTHWEST OF BOILER REMAINS, WITH FRAGMENTS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL VIEW NORTHWEST OF BOILER REMAINS, WITH FRAGMENTS OF SEVEN-PISTON UNDERFEED STOKER - Turners Falls Power & Electric Company, Hampden Station, East bank of Connecticut River, Chicopee, Hampden County, MA

  18. 7. VIEW OF VESSEL FROM PORT BON, SHOWING REMAINS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF VESSEL FROM PORT BON, SHOWING REMAINS OF MAIN CABIN. AFT CABIN STILL STANDS ON STERN IN BACKGROUND - Motorized Sailing Vessel "Fox", Beached on East Bank ofBayou Lafourche, Larose, Lafourche Parish, LA

  19. 11. Remains of Douglasfir cordwood abandoned when kilns ceased operation, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Remains of Douglas-fir cordwood abandoned when kilns ceased operation, looking northeast. - Warren King Charcoal Kilns, 5 miles west of Idaho Highway 28, Targhee National Forest, Leadore, Lemhi County, ID

  20. View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, view to the southwest - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  1. View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, view to the west-northwest - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  2. View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, view to the south - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  3. View of remains of Feature 17, a cottage, view to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of remains of Feature 17, a cottage, view to the northwest - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  4. View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, view to the north - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  5. View of the remains of Feature 19, a cottage, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the remains of Feature 19, a cottage, view to the west-northwest - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  6. View of Feature 3, the remains of an administration building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Feature 3, the remains of an administration building, view to the south - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  7. 13. View South, showing the remaining pier footings for the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View South, showing the remaining pier footings for the steam engine water tower for the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad. - Cotton Hill Station Bridge, Spanning New River at State Route 16, Cotton Hill, Fayette County, WV

  8. 6. REMAINS OF 48' MILL SHIPPING BUILDING. THE END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. REMAINS OF 48' MILL SHIPPING BUILDING. THE END OF THE MILL TABLE IS VISIBLE IN THE MIDDLE OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, 48" Plate Mill, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  9. 21. Detail of remains of machinery house viewed from below ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Detail of remains of machinery house viewed from below anchor-span deck, showing drawspan cable running back to the winding drum of the winch; view to northeast. - Summer Street Bridge, Spanning Reserved Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  10. View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill, with floor boards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill, with floor boards removed, showing cross beams, foundation sill and mortises, and horizontal wall boards. - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  11. View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill, showing floor boards, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill, showing floor boards, wall boards, tenoned uprights and mortised sill beams. - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  12. View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill with most floorboards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill with most floorboards removed, showing cross beams with mortises, vertical wall boards, and horizontal floor boards. - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  13. Cellar: Detail of paired relieving arch and remains of herringbone ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cellar: Detail of paired relieving arch and remains of herringbone brick pattern from earlier cooking fireplace at back, southeast wall looking southeast - Kingston-Upon-Hill, Kitts Hummock Road, Dover, Kent County, DE

  14. Detail view looking northeast at ramp 3. View shows remaining ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view looking northeast at ramp 3. View shows remaining stone inlay to provide traction surface. - Naval Air Station North Island, Seaplane Ramps Nos. 2, 3 & 4, North Island, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  15. 11. LOOKING SOUTH AT THE ONLY REMAINING PART OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. LOOKING SOUTH AT THE ONLY REMAINING PART OF THE NORTH SIDE OF ORIGINAL LAB, FROM COURTYARD. - U.S. Geological Survey, Rock Magnetics Laboratory, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, San Mateo County, CA

  16. View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill, showing floor boards, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill, showing floor boards, cross beams and notches for wall post beams. - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  17. The taphonomy of human remains in a glacial environment.

    PubMed

    Pilloud, Marin A; Megyesi, Mary S; Truffer, Martin; Congram, Derek

    2016-04-01

    A glacial environment is a unique setting that can alter human remains in characteristic ways. This study describes glacial dynamics and how glaciers can be understood as taphonomic agents. Using a case study of human remains recovered from Colony Glacier, Alaska, a glacial taphonomic signature is outlined that includes: (1) movement of remains, (2) dispersal of remains, (3) altered bone margins, (4) splitting of skeletal elements, and (5) extensive soft tissue preservation and adipocere formation. As global glacier area is declining in the current climate, there is the potential for more materials of archaeological and medicolegal significance to be exposed. It is therefore important for the forensic anthropologist to have an idea of the taphonomy in this setting and to be able to differentiate glacial effects from other taphonomic agents. PMID:26917542

  18. Looking northeast at the remains of the steam Jenny which ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking northeast at the remains of the steam Jenny which drove the boiler stokes. - Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corporation, Allenport Works, Boiler House, Route 88 on West bank of Monongahela River, Allenport, Washington County, PA

  19. 3. INTERIOR OF THE WATER FILTRATION PLANT SHOWING REMAINS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. INTERIOR OF THE WATER FILTRATION PLANT SHOWING REMAINS OF THE FILTRATION APPARATUS. - Tower Hill No. 2 Mine, Approximately 0.47 mile Southwest of intersection of Stone Church Road & Township Route 561, Hibbs, Fayette County, PA

  20. 1. VIEW SHOWING REMAINS OF CAMOUFLAGE COVERING CONCRETE FOOTING FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW SHOWING REMAINS OF CAMOUFLAGE COVERING CONCRETE FOOTING FOR A GENERATOR PAD - Fort Cronkhite, Anti-Aircraft Battery No. 1, Concrete Footing-Generator Pad, Wolf Road, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  1. 1. SOUTHWEST FRONT AND SOUTHEAST SIDE OF BLACKSMITH SHOP REMAINS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SOUTHWEST FRONT AND SOUTHEAST SIDE OF BLACKSMITH SHOP REMAINS, TENANT HOUSE IN BACKGROUND - Mount Etna Iron Works, Blacksmith Shop, East of U.S. Route 22 on T.R. 463, Williamsburg, Blair County, PA

  2. Activated Ki-Ras suppresses 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase pathway in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Okumura, K; Shirasawa, S; Nishioka, M; Sasazuki, T

    1999-05-15

    Although the frequency of activated Ki-ras genes is high in human colorectal tumors, much less is known of activated Ki-ras-mediated signaling pathways. Using gene targeting, we examined HCT116 cells that contain the Gly-13-->Asp mutation of Ki-ras and activated Ki-ras-disrupted clones derived from HCT116. 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced immediate early genes, such as c-Jun, c-Fos, and Egr-1 in activated Ki-ras-disrupted clones, whereas c-Jun induction was rare in HCT116. TPA induced both phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (SEK1) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) in the activated Ki-ras-disrupted clones but not in HCT116. On the other hand, TPA-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation was equally induced between HCT116 and the Ki-ras-disrupted clones. Furthermore, TPA-induced SEK1-JNK activation was observed in a DLD-1-derived activated Ki-ras-disrupted clone but not in DLD-1. The TPA-induced SEK1-JNK activation in these disrupted clones was completely inhibited by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, GF109203X (1 microM), but not by another PKC inhibitor, H7 (50 microM), whereas TPA-induced MEK1/2-ERK activation was partially and completely inhibited by GF109203X (1 microM) and H7 (50 microM), respectively. A phosphoinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002, did not inhibit the TPA-induced SEK1-JNK activation. Taken together, these results suggest that activated Ki-Ras-mediated signals are involved in the SEK1-JNK pathway through a PKC isotype that is distinct from that involved in MEK1/2-ERK activation in human colon cancer cells and independent of phosphoinositol 3-kinase activation, and the imbalance between ERK and JNK activity caused by activated Ki-Ras may play critical roles in human colorectal tumorigenesis.

  3. 52. VIEW OF REMAINS OF ORIGINAL 1907 CONTROL PANEL, LOCATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. VIEW OF REMAINS OF ORIGINAL 1907 CONTROL PANEL, LOCATED ON NORTH WALL OF EAST END OF CONTROL ROOM. PORTIONS OF THIS PANEL REMAINED IN USE UNTIL THE PLANT CLOSED. THE METERS AND CONTROLS ARE MOUNTED ON SOAPSTONE PANELS. THE INSTRUMENT IN THE LEFT CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH IS A TIRRILL VOLTAGE REGULATOR. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  4. A non-destructive method for dating human remains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lail, Warren K.; Sammeth, David; Mahan, Shannon; Nevins, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The skeletal remains of several Native Americans were recovered in an eroded state from a creek bank in northeastern New Mexico. Subsequently stored in a nearby museum, the remains became lost for almost 36 years. In a recent effort to repatriate the remains, it was necessary to fit them into a cultural chronology in order to determine the appropriate tribe(s) for consultation pursuant to the Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). Because the remains were found in an eroded context with no artifacts or funerary objects, their age was unknown. Having been asked to avoid destructive dating methods such as radiocarbon dating, the authors used Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) to date the sediments embedded in the cranium. The OSL analyses yielded reliable dates between A.D. 1415 and A.D. 1495. Accordingly, we conclude that the remains were interred somewhat earlier than A.D. 1415, but no later than A.D. 1495. We believe the remains are from individuals ancestral to the Ute Mouache Band, which is now being contacted for repatriation efforts. Not only do our methods contribute to the immediate repatriation efforts, they provide archaeologists with a versatile, non-destructive, numerical dating method that can be used in many burial contexts.

  5. Influence of activating hormones on human platelet membrane Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Resink, T.J.; Dimitrov, D.; Stucki, S.; Buehler, F.R.

    1986-07-16

    Intact platelets were pretreated with hormones and thereafter membranes were prepared and Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity determined. Thrombin decreased the V/sub max/ of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase after pretreatment of intact platelets. Platelet activating factor, vasopressin and ADP also decreased Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or A23187 or ionomycin alone had no effect, while the simultaneous pretreatment with TPA and Ca/sup 2 +/-ionophore decreased Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity. cAMP elevating agents prostaglandin E/sub 1/ (PGE/sub 1/) and forskolin had no influence per se on Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase, but antagonized the inhibitory effect of thrombin. The data suggest a close connection between phosphoinositide metabolism and the Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase system.

  6. rac p21 is involved in insulin-induced membrane ruffling and rho p21 is involved in hepatocyte growth factor- and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced membrane ruffling in KB cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, T; Sasaki, T; Takaishi, K; Kato, M; Yaku, H; Araki, K; Matsuura, Y; Takai, Y

    1994-01-01

    Insulin and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induced morphologically different membrane rufflings in KB cells. Insulin-induced membrane ruffling was inhibited by microinjection of rho GDI, an inhibitory GDP/GTP exchange regulator for both rho p21 and rac p21 small GTP-binding proteins, but not inhibited by microinjection of botulinum exoenzyme C3, known to selectively ADP-ribosylate rho p21 and to impair its function. This rho GDI action was prevented by comicroinjection with guanosine 5'-(3-O-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S)-bound rac1 p21. In contrast, HGF-induced membrane ruffling was inhibited by microinjection of rho GDI or C3. This rho GDI action was prevented by comicroinjection with GTP gamma S-bound rhoA p21, and this C3 action was prevented by comicroinjection with GTP gamma S-bound rhoAIle-41 p21, which is resistant to C3. Microinjection of either GTP gamma S-bound rac1 p21 or rhoA p21 alone induced membrane ruffling in the absence of the growth factors. The rac1 p21-induced membrane ruffling was morphologically similar to the insulin-induced kind, whereas rhoA p21-induced ruffling was apparently different from both the insulin- and HGF-induced kinds. Membrane ruffling was also induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a protein kinase C-activating phorbol ester, but not by Ca2+ ionophore or microinjection of a dominant active Ki-ras p21 mutant (Ki-rasVal-12 p21). The phorbol ester-induced membrane ruffling was morphologically similar to the rhoA p21-induced kind and inhibited by microinjection of rho GDI or C3. These results indicate that rac p21 and rho GDI are involved in insulin-induced membrane ruffling and that rho p21 and rho GDI are involved in HGF- and phorbol ester-induced membrane rufflings. Images PMID:8139548

  7. Protein kinase C activators selectively inhibit insulin-stimulated system A transport activity in skeletal muscle at a post-receptor level.

    PubMed Central

    Gumà, A; Camps, M; Palacín, M; Testar, X; Zorzano, A

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the role of phorbol esters on different biological effects induced by insulin in muscle, such as activation of system A transport activity, glucose utilization and insulin receptor function. System A transport activity was measured by monitoring the uptake of the system A-specific analogue alpha-(methyl)aminoisobutyric acid (MeAIB), by intact rat extensor digitorum longus muscle. The addition of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA, 0.5 microM) for 60 or 180 min did not modify basal MeAIB uptake by muscle, suggesting that insulin signalling required to stimulate MeAIB transport does not involve protein kinase C activation. However, TPA added 30 min before insulin (100 nM) markedly inhibited insulin-stimulated MeAIB uptake. The addition of polymyxin B (0.1 mM) or H-7 (1 mM), protein kinase C inhibitors, alone or in combination with TPA leads to impairment of insulin-stimulated MeAIB uptake. This paradoxical pattern is incompatible with a unique action of Polymyxin B or H-7 on protein kinase C activity. Therefore these agents are not suitable tools with which to investigate whether a certain insulin effect is mediated by protein kinase C. TPA did not cause a generalized inhibition of insulin action. Thus both TPA and insulin increased 3-O-methylglucose uptake by muscle, and their effects were not additive. Furthermore, TPA did not modify insulin-stimulated lactate production by muscle. In keeping with this selective modification of insulin action, treatment of muscles with TPA did not modify insulin receptor binding or kinase activities. In conclusion, phorbol esters do not mimic insulin action on system A transport activity; however, they markedly inhibit insulin-stimulated amino acid transport, with no modification of insulin receptor function in rat skeletal muscle. It is suggested that protein kinase C activation causes a selective post-receptor modification on the biochemical pathway by which insulin activates system A amino acid

  8. Fluvial transport of human remains in the lower Mississippi River.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Helen E; Manhein, Mary H

    2002-07-01

    The Mississippi River has claimed many lives over the last several decades. A better understanding of the universal dynamics of its fluvial system can help direct the production of a predictive model regarding the transportation of human remains in the river. The model may then be applied to situations where the location and the identification of water victims are necessarily part of the recovery process. Results from the preliminary phase of a longitudinal project involving the transport of human remains in the Mississippi River are presented and represent the analyses of 233 case files of river victims. A provisional model for fluvial transport of human remains in the Mississippi River is proposed and examined. This model indicates that time in the river and distance a body travels are related. Such a model may assist in pinpointing entry location for unidentified human remains found in the river or on its banks. Further, it has the potential to provide local and regional law enforcement agencies, the United States Coast Guard, and other search and rescue organizations with primary search areas when someone is missing in the river. Other results from this study indicate that a relationship exists between the side of the river where victims enter the water and the side of the river where the remains are recovered. Finally, relationships are established between the length of time before recovery of the remains and state of preservation exhibited by those remains. A secondary benefit from this study is a database of river victims that can be used by a variety of different agencies.

  9. Fisetin Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Human Cervical Cancer Cells by Down-Regulating Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Expression through Suppressing the p38 MAPK-Dependent NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Hsieh, Shu-Ching; Yu, Yung-Luen; Huang, Min-Hsien; Huang, Yi-Chang; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien

    2013-01-01

    Fisetin (3,3’,4’,7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been reported to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in several cancer types. However, its effect on the anti-metastatic potential of cervical cancer cells remains unclear. In the present study, we found that fisetin inhibits the invasion and migration of cervical cancer cells. The expression and activity of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) was significantly suppressed by fisetin in a dose-dependent manner. We also demonstrated that fisetin reduces the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, but not that of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, or AKT. Addition of a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, further enhanced the inhibitory effect of fisetin on the expression and activity of uPA and the invasion and motility in cervical cancer cells. Fisetin suppressed the TPA (tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate)-induced activation of p38 MAPK and uPA, and inhibited the TPA-enhanced migratory and invasive abilities. Furthermore, the promoter activity of the uPA gene was dramatically repressed by fisetin, which disrupted the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and its binding amount on the promoter of the uPA gene, and these suppressive effects could be further enhanced by SB203580. This study provides strong evidence for the molecular mechanism of fisetin in inhibiting the aggressive phenotypes by repression of uPA via interruption of p38 MAPK-dependent NF-κB signaling pathway in cervical cancer cells and thus contributes insight to the potential of using fisetin as a therapeutic strategy against cervical cancer by inhibiting migration and invasion. PMID:23940799

  10. Fisetin inhibits migration and invasion of human cervical cancer cells by down-regulating urokinase plasminogen activator expression through suppressing the p38 MAPK-dependent NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Hsieh, Shu-Ching; Yu, Yung-Luen; Huang, Min-Hsien; Huang, Yi-Chang; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien

    2013-01-01

    Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been reported to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in several cancer types. However, its effect on the anti-metastatic potential of cervical cancer cells remains unclear. In the present study, we found that fisetin inhibits the invasion and migration of cervical cancer cells. The expression and activity of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) was significantly suppressed by fisetin in a dose-dependent manner. We also demonstrated that fisetin reduces the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, but not that of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, or AKT. Addition of a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, further enhanced the inhibitory effect of fisetin on the expression and activity of uPA and the invasion and motility in cervical cancer cells. Fisetin suppressed the TPA (tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate)-induced activation of p38 MAPK and uPA, and inhibited the TPA-enhanced migratory and invasive abilities. Furthermore, the promoter activity of the uPA gene was dramatically repressed by fisetin, which disrupted the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and its binding amount on the promoter of the uPA gene, and these suppressive effects could be further enhanced by SB203580. This study provides strong evidence for the molecular mechanism of fisetin in inhibiting the aggressive phenotypes by repression of uPA via interruption of p38 MAPK-dependent NF-κB signaling pathway in cervical cancer cells and thus contributes insight to the potential of using fisetin as a therapeutic strategy against cervical cancer by inhibiting migration and invasion.

  11. Regression Analysis of Ordinal Stroke Clinical Trial Outcomes: An Application to the NINDS t-PA Trial

    PubMed Central

    DeSantis, Stacia M; Lazaridis, Christos; Palesch, Yuko; Ramakrishnan, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Background The modified Rankin scale (mRS) is the most common functional outcome assessed in stroke trials. The proportional odds model is commonly used to analyze this ordinal outcome but it requires a restrictive assumption that a single odds ratio applies across the entire outcome scale. Aims To model the effect of tissue-type plasminogen activator on ordinal mRS, test model assumptions, and compare fits and predictive ability of the statistical models. Methods Several ordinal regression methods are presented and applied to a re-analysis of the 1995 NINDS tissue-type plasminogen activator study. Violations of the proportional odds assumption are demonstrated using graphs and statistical tests, and the partial proportional odds model is introduced and recommended as an alternative for the analysis of mRS. Results The partial proportional odds model relaxes the assumptions about treatment effect on the ordinal outcome scale and provides a better fit to the data than the commonly used proportional odds model (likelihood ratio test chi square = 8.05, p=0.005). It provides easily interpretable odds ratios and it is able to detect efficacy at the lower end and a lack of efficacy at the upper end of the mRS scale. Further, it provides lower prediction error than the proportional odds model (0.002 versus 0.005). Conclusions Assuming proportional odds when it does not hold can mask differential treatment effects at the upper end of the ordinal mRS scale and has implications for reduced power when studies are designed under this assumption. PMID:23803174

  12. Cell-free synthesis of enzymically active tissue-type plasminogen activator. Protein folding determines the extent of N-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed Central

    Bulleid, N J; Bassel-Duby, R S; Freedman, R B; Sambrook, J F; Gething, M J

    1992-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is synthesized in mammalian cells as a mixture of two forms that differ in their extent of N-linked glycosylation. We have investigated the mechanism underlying this variation in glycosylation, using a cell-free system that consists of a rabbit reticulocyte lysate optimized for the formation of disulphide bonds and supplemented with dog pancreas microsomal membranes. Molecules of human t-PA synthesized in vitro are enzymically active and responsive to natural activators and inhibitors, and are glycosylated in a pattern identical with that of the protein produced in vivo. This demonstrates that t-PA synthesized in vitro folds into the same conformation as the protein synthesized in vivo. We show that the extent of glycosylation of individual t-PA molecules is dependent on the state of folding of the polypeptide chain, since the probability of addition of an oligosaccharide side chain at Asn-184 is decreased under conditions that promote the formation of enzymically active molecules. This variation in glycosylation is independent of the rate of protein synthesis. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1520279

  13. Forensic considerations when dealing with incinerated human dental remains.

    PubMed

    Reesu, Gowri Vijay; Augustine, Jeyaseelan; Urs, Aadithya B

    2015-01-01

    Establishing the human dental identification process relies upon sufficient post-mortem data being recovered to allow for a meaningful comparison with ante-mortem records of the deceased person. Teeth are the most indestructible components of the human body and are structurally unique in their composition. They possess the highest resistance to most environmental effects like fire, desiccation, decomposition and prolonged immersion. In most natural as well as man-made disasters, teeth may provide the only means of positive identification of an otherwise unrecognizable body. It is imperative that dental evidence should not be destroyed through erroneous handling until appropriate radiographs, photographs, or impressions can be fabricated. Proper methods of physical stabilization of incinerated human dental remains should be followed. The maintenance of integrity of extremely fragile structures is crucial to the successful confirmation of identity. In such situations, the forensic dentist must stabilise these teeth before the fragile remains are transported to the mortuary to ensure preservation of possibly vital identification evidence. Thus, while dealing with any incinerated dental remains, a systematic approach must be followed through each stage of evaluation of incinerated dental remains to prevent the loss of potential dental evidence. This paper presents a composite review of various studies on incinerated human dental remains and discusses their impact on the process of human identification and suggests a step by step approach. PMID:25572078

  14. Identification of the remains of King Richard III.

    PubMed

    King, Turi E; Fortes, Gloria Gonzalez; Balaresque, Patricia; Thomas, Mark G; Balding, David; Maisano Delser, Pierpaolo; Neumann, Rita; Parson, Walther; Knapp, Michael; Walsh, Susan; Tonasso, Laure; Holt, John; Kayser, Manfred; Appleby, Jo; Forster, Peter; Ekserdjian, David; Hofreiter, Michael; Schürer, Kevin

    2014-12-02

    In 2012, a skeleton was excavated at the presumed site of the Grey Friars friary in Leicester, the last-known resting place of King Richard III. Archaeological, osteological and radiocarbon dating data were consistent with these being his remains. Here we report DNA analyses of both the skeletal remains and living relatives of Richard III. We find a perfect mitochondrial DNA match between the sequence obtained from the remains and one living relative, and a single-base substitution when compared with a second relative. Y-chromosome haplotypes from male-line relatives and the remains do not match, which could be attributed to a false-paternity event occurring in any of the intervening generations. DNA-predicted hair and eye colour are consistent with Richard's appearance in an early portrait. We calculate likelihood ratios for the non-genetic and genetic data separately, and combined, and conclude that the evidence for the remains being those of Richard III is overwhelming.

  15. Characterization of the volatile organic compounds present in the headspace of decomposing animal remains, and compared with human remains.

    PubMed

    Cablk, Mary E; Szelagowski, Erin E; Sagebiel, John C

    2012-07-10

    Human Remains Detection (HRD) dogs can be a useful tool to locate buried human remains because they rely on olfactory rather than visual cues. Trained specifically to locate deceased humans, it is widely believed that HRD dogs can differentiate animal remains from human remains. This study analyzed the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in the headspace above partially decomposed animal tissue samples and directly compared them with results published from human tissues using established solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) methods. Volatile organic compounds present in the headspace of four different animal tissue samples (bone, muscle, fat and skin) from each of cow, pig and chicken were identified and compared to published results from human samples. Although there were compounds common to both animal and human remains, the VOC signatures of each of the animal remains differed from those of humans. Of particular interest was the difference between pigs and humans, because in some countries HRD dogs are trained on pig remains rather than human remains. Pig VOC signatures were not found to be a subset of human; in addition to sharing only seven of thirty human-specific compounds, an additional nine unique VOCs were recorded from pig samples which were not present in human samples. The VOC signatures from chicken and human samples were most similar sharing the most compounds of the animals studied. Identifying VOCs that are unique to humans may be useful to develop human-specific training aids for HRD canines, and may eventually lead to an instrument that can detect clandestine human burial sites.

  16. Cutmarked human remains bearing Neandertal features and modern human remains associated with the Aurignacian at Les Rois.

    PubMed

    Ramirez Rozzi, Fernando V; d'Errico, Francesco; Vanhaeren, Marian; Grootes, Pieter M; Kerautret, Bertrand; Dujardin, Véronique

    2009-01-01

    The view that Aurignacian technologies and their associated symbolic manifestations represent the archaeologicalproxy for the spread of Anatomically Modern Humans into Europe, is supported by few diagnostic human remains, including those from the Aurignacian site of Les Rois in south-western France. Here we reassess the taxonomic attribution of the human remains, their cultural affiliation, and provide five new radiocarbon dates for the site. Patterns of tooth growth along with the morphological and morphometric analysis of the human remains indicate that a juvenile mandible showing cutmarks presents some Neandertal features, whereas another mandible is attributed to Anatomically Modern Humans. Reappraisal of the archaeological sequence demonstrates that human remains derive from two layers dated to 28-30 kyr BP attributed to the Aurignacian, the only cultural tradition detected at the site. Three possible explanations may account for this unexpected evidence. The first one is that the Aurignacian was exclusively produced by AMH and that the child mandible from unit A2 represents evidence for consumption or, more likely, symbolic use of a Neandertal child by Aurignacian AMH The second possible explanation is that Aurignacian technologies were produced at Les Rois by human groups bearing both AMH and Neandertal features. Human remains from Les Rois would be in this case the first evidence of a biological contact between the two human groups. The third possibility is that all human remains from Les Rois represent an AMH population with conserved plesiomorphic characters suggesting a larger variation in modern humans from the Upper Palaeolithic.

  17. Microscopic residues of bone from dissolving human remains in acids.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Erwin; Zoon, Peter; van Wijk, Mayonne; Gerretsen, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Dissolving bodies is a current method of disposing of human remains and has been practiced throughout the years. During the last decade in the Netherlands, two cases have emerged in which human remains were treated with acid. In the first case, the remains of a cremated body were treated with hydrofluoric acid. In the second case, two complete bodies were dissolved in a mixture of hydrochloric and sulfuric acid. In both cases, a great variety of evidence was collected at the scene of crime, part of which was embedded in resin, polished, and investigated using SEM/EDX. Apart from macroscopic findings like residual bone and artificial teeth, in both cases, distinct microscopic residues of bone were found as follows: (partly) digested bone, thin-walled structures, and recrystallized calcium phosphate. Although some may believe it is possible to dissolve a body in acid completely, at least some of these microscopic residues will always be found.

  18. Classification of pelvic ring fractures in skeletonized human remains.

    PubMed

    Báez-Molgado, Socorro; Bartelink, Eric J; Jellema, Lyman M; Spurlock, Linda; Sholts, Sabrina B

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic ring fractures are associated with high rates of mortality and thus can provide key information about circumstances surrounding death. These injuries can be particularly informative in skeletonized remains, yet difficult to diagnose and interpret. This study adapted a clinical system of classifying pelvic ring fractures according to their resultant degree of pelvic stability for application to gross human skeletal remains. The modified Tile criteria were applied to the skeletal remains of 22 individuals from the Cleveland Museum of Natural History and Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México that displayed evidence of pelvic injury. Because these categories are tied directly to clinical assessments concerning the severity and treatment of injuries, this approach can aid in the identification of manner and cause of death, as well as interpretations of possible mechanisms of injury, such as those typical in car-to-pedestrian and motor vehicle accidents. PMID:25381919

  19. Microscopic residues of bone from dissolving human remains in acids.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Erwin; Zoon, Peter; van Wijk, Mayonne; Gerretsen, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Dissolving bodies is a current method of disposing of human remains and has been practiced throughout the years. During the last decade in the Netherlands, two cases have emerged in which human remains were treated with acid. In the first case, the remains of a cremated body were treated with hydrofluoric acid. In the second case, two complete bodies were dissolved in a mixture of hydrochloric and sulfuric acid. In both cases, a great variety of evidence was collected at the scene of crime, part of which was embedded in resin, polished, and investigated using SEM/EDX. Apart from macroscopic findings like residual bone and artificial teeth, in both cases, distinct microscopic residues of bone were found as follows: (partly) digested bone, thin-walled structures, and recrystallized calcium phosphate. Although some may believe it is possible to dissolve a body in acid completely, at least some of these microscopic residues will always be found. PMID:25677640

  20. Osteometric sex determination of burned human skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, D; Thompson, T J U; Cunha, E

    2013-10-01

    Sex determination of human burned skeletal remains is extremely hard to achieve because of heat-related fragmentation, warping and dimensional changes. In particular, the latter is impeditive of osteometric analyses that are based on references developed on unburned bones. New osteometric references were thus obtained which allow for more reliable sex determinations. The calcined remains of cremated Portuguese individuals were examined and specific standard measurements of the humerus, femur, talus and calcaneus were recorded. This allowed for the compilation of new sex discriminating osteometric references which were then tested on independent samples with good results. Both the use of simple section points and of logistic regression equations provided successful sex classification scores. These references may now be used for the sex determination of burned skeletons. Its reliability is highest for contemporary Portuguese remains but nonetheless these results have important repercussion for forensic research. More conservative use of these references may also prove valuable for other populations as well as for archaeological research.

  1. OVERVIEW OF REMAINS OF DEWATERING BUILDING, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD CYANIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF REMAINS OF DEWATERING BUILDING, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD CYANIDE PROCESSING AREA. WATER USED IN PROCESSING AT THE STAMP MILL WAS CIRCULATED HERE FOR RECLAMATION. SANDS WERE SETTLED OUT AND DEPOSITED IN ONE OF TWO TAILINGS HOLDING AREAS. CLEARED WATER WAS PUMPED BACK TO THE MILL FOR REUSE. THIS PROCESS WAS ACCOMPLISHED BY THE USE OF SETTLING CONES, EIGHT FEET IN DIAMETER AND SIX FEET HIGH. THE REMAINS OF FOUR CONES ARE AT CENTER, BEHIND THE TANK IN THE FOREGROUND. TO THE LEFT IS THE MAIN ACCESS ROAD BETWEEN THE MILL AND THE PARKING LOT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  2. Caveolin-1 mediates tissue plasminogen activator-induced MMP-9 up-regulation in cultured brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xinchun; Sun, Yanyun; Xu, Ji; Liu, Wenlan

    2015-03-01

    Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in the ischemic brain, which exacerbates blood-brain barrier injury and increases the risk of symptomatic cerebral hemorrhage. The mechanism through which tPA enhances MMP-9 activity is not well understood. Here we report an important role of caveolin-1 in mediating tPA-induced MMP-9 synthesis. Brain microvascular endothelial cell line bEnd3 cells were incubated with 5 or 20 μg/ml tPA for 24 hrs before analyzing MMP-9 levels in the conditioned media and cellular extracts by gelatin zymography. tPA at a dose of 20 μg/mL tPA, but not 5 μg/mL, significantly increased MMP-9 level in cultured media while decreasing it in cellular extracts. Concurrently, tPA treatment induced a 2.3-fold increase of caveolin-1 protein levels in endothelial cells. Interestingly, knockdown of Cav-1 with siRNA inhibited tPA-induced MMP-9 mRNA up-regulation and MMP-9 increase in the conditioned media, but did not affect MMP-9 decrease in cellular extracts. These results suggest that caveolin-1 critically contributes to tPA-mediated MMP-9 up-regulation, but may not facilitate MMP-9 secretion in endothelial cells. Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in the ischemic brain, which exacerbates ischemic blood brain barrier (BBB) injury and increases the risk of symptomatic cerebral hemorrhage. Our results suggest a novel mechanism underlying this tPA-MMP 9 axis. In response to tPA treatment, caveolin-1 protein levels increased in endothelial cells, which mediate MMP-9 mRNA up-regulation and its secretion into extracellular space. Caveolin-1 may, however, not facilitate MMP-9 secretion in endothelial cells. Our data suggest caveolin-1 as a novel therapeutic target for protecting the BBB against ischemic damage. The schematic outlines tPA-induced MMP-9 upreguation.

  3. Caveolin-1 mediates tissue plasminogen activator-induced MMP-9 up-regulation in cultured brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xinchun; Sun, Yanyun; Xu, Ji; Liu, Wenlan

    2015-03-01

    Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in the ischemic brain, which exacerbates blood-brain barrier injury and increases the risk of symptomatic cerebral hemorrhage. The mechanism through which tPA enhances MMP-9 activity is not well understood. Here we report an important role of caveolin-1 in mediating tPA-induced MMP-9 synthesis. Brain microvascular endothelial cell line bEnd3 cells were incubated with 5 or 20 μg/ml tPA for 24 hrs before analyzing MMP-9 levels in the conditioned media and cellular extracts by gelatin zymography. tPA at a dose of 20 μg/mL tPA, but not 5 μg/mL, significantly increased MMP-9 level in cultured media while decreasing it in cellular extracts. Concurrently, tPA treatment induced a 2.3-fold increase of caveolin-1 protein levels in endothelial cells. Interestingly, knockdown of Cav-1 with siRNA inhibited tPA-induced MMP-9 mRNA up-regulation and MMP-9 increase in the conditioned media, but did not affect MMP-9 decrease in cellular extracts. These results suggest that caveolin-1 critically contributes to tPA-mediated MMP-9 up-regulation, but may not facilitate MMP-9 secretion in endothelial cells. Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in the ischemic brain, which exacerbates ischemic blood brain barrier (BBB) injury and increases the risk of symptomatic cerebral hemorrhage. Our results suggest a novel mechanism underlying this tPA-MMP 9 axis. In response to tPA treatment, caveolin-1 protein levels increased in endothelial cells, which mediate MMP-9 mRNA up-regulation and its secretion into extracellular space. Caveolin-1 may, however, not facilitate MMP-9 secretion in endothelial cells. Our data suggest caveolin-1 as a novel therapeutic target for protecting the BBB against ischemic damage. The schematic outlines tPA-induced MMP-9 upreguation. PMID:25683686

  4. Airway Tissue Plasminogen Activator Prevents Acute Mortality Due to Lethal Sulfur Mustard Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Veress, Livia A.; Anderson, Dana R.; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.; Houin, Paul R.; Rioux, Jacqueline S.; Garlick, Rhonda B.; Loader, Joan E.; Paradiso, Danielle C.; Smith, Russell W.; Rancourt, Raymond C.; Holmes, Wesley W.; White, Carl W.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical weapon stockpiled today in volatile regions of the world. SM inhalation causes a life-threatening airway injury characterized by airway obstruction from fibrin casts, which can lead to respiratory failure and death. Mortality in those requiring intubation is more than 80%. No therapy exists to prevent mortality after SM exposure. Our previous work using the less toxic analog of SM, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, identified tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) an effective rescue therapy for airway cast obstruction (Veress, L. A., Hendry-Hofer, T. B., Loader, J. E., Rioux, J. S., Garlick, R. B., and White, C. W. (2013). Tissue plasminogen activator prevents mortality from sulfur mustard analog-induced airway obstruction. Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. 48, 439–447). It is not known if exposure to neat SM vapor, the primary agent used in chemical warfare, will also cause death due to airway casts, and if tPA could be used to improve outcome. Methods: Adult rats were exposed to SM, and when oxygen saturation reached less than 85% (median: 6.5 h), intratracheal tPA or placebo was given under isoflurane anesthesia every 4 h for 48 h. Oxygen saturation, clinical distress, and arterial blood gases were assessed. Microdissection was done to assess airway obstruction by casts. Results: Intratracheal tPA treatment eliminated mortality (0% at 48 h) and greatly improved morbidity after lethal SM inhalation (100% death in controls). tPA normalized SM-associated hypoxemia, hypercarbia, and lactic acidosis, and improved respiratory distress. Moreover, tPA treatment resulted in greatly diminished airway casts, preventing respiratory failure from airway obstruction. Conclusions: tPA given via airway more than 6 h after exposure prevented death from lethal SM inhalation, and normalized oxygenation and ventilation defects, thereby rescuing from respiratory distress and failure. Intra-airway tPA should be considered as a life

  5. Summary of Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) Potential Impacts Related to Hanford Cleanup and the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA)

    SciTech Connect

    IWATATE, D.F.

    2000-07-14

    This white paper provides an initial assessment of the potential impacts of the Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) regulations (and proposed revisions) on the Hanford site cleanup and addresses concerns that MTCA might impose inappropriate or unachievable clean-up levels and drive clean-up costs higher. The white paper and supporting documentation (Appendices A and B) provide DOE with a concise and up-to-date review of potential MTCA impacts to cost and schedule for the Hanford site activities. MTCA, Chapter 70.105D RCW, is the State of Washington's risk based law governing clean-up of contaminated sites and is implemented by The Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) under the MTCA Clean-up Regulations, Chapter 173-340 WAC. Hanford cleanup is subject to the MTCA requirements as Applicable, Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) for those areas of Hanford being managed under the authority of the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the state Dangerous Waste Regulations. MTCA provides Ecology with authority to implement site clean-up actions under both the federal RCRA and CERCLA regulations as well as the state regulations. Most of the Hanford clean-up actions are being implemented under the CERCLA program, however, there is a trend is toward increased use of MTCA procedures and standards. The application of MTCA to the Hanford clean-up has been an evolving process with some of the Hanford clean-up actions considering MTCA standards as an ARAR and using MTCA procedures for remedy selection. The increased use and application of MTCA standards and procedures could potentially impact both cost and schedule for the Hanford cleanup.

  6. Loss of CRABP-II Characterizes Human Skin Poorly Differentiated Squamous Cell Carcinomas and Favors DMBA/TPA-Induced Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Passeri, Daniela; Doldo, Elena; Tarquini, Chiara; Costanza, Gaetana; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Agostinelli, Sara; Campione, Elena; Di Stefani, Alessandro; Giunta, Alessandro; Bianchi, Luca; Orlandi, Augusto

    2016-06-01

    Retinol and its derivatives play an important role in epidermal growth and differentiation and represent chemopreventive agents in nonmelanoma skin cancer. Retinoic acid binding protein II (CRABP-II) is a cytoplasmic receptor that critically regulates all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) trafficking. We documented the marked reduced expression of CRABP-II and its promoter methylation in human poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinomas. To investigate the role of CRABP-II in skin carcinogenesis we used skin lesion induction by dimethylbenz[a]anthracene/12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate in CRABP-II-knockout C57BL/6 mice. We observed earlier and more diffuse epidermal dysplasia, greater incidence and severity of tumors, reduced expression of cytokeratin 1/cytokeratin 10 and involucrin, increased proliferation, and impaired ATRA inhibition of tumor promotion compared with wild-type animals. CRABP-II-transfected HaCaT, FaDu, and A431 cells showed expression of differentiation markers, retinoic acid receptor-β/-γ signaling, ATRA sensitivity, and suppression of EGFR/v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT) pathways in a fatty acid binding protein 5/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/-δ-independent manner. The opposite was true in keratinocytes isolated from CRABP-II-knockout mice. Finally, CRABP-II accumulation induced ubiquitination-associated reduction of EGFR. Our results showed reduced CRABP-II expression in human poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinomas, and its gene deletion favored experimental skin carcinogenesis and impaired ATRA antitumor efficacy, likely modulating EGFR/AKT pathways and retinoic acid receptor-β/-γ signaling. Therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring CRABP-II-mediated signaling may amplify therapeutic retinoid efficacy in nonmelanoma skin cancer. PMID:26945879

  7. Diminution of mouse epidermal superoxide dismutase and catalase activities by tumor promotors

    SciTech Connect

    Solanki, V.; Rana, R.S.; Slaga, T.J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of phorbol ester tumor promoters and related compounds on superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase were examined. The treatment of adult mouse skin with 2 ..mu..g 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) resulted in a sustained decrease in the basal levels of both SOD and catalase activities in the epidermis. A decline in SOD activity occurred within 2 h after application and the maximum effect was seen at 16-17 h. The decrease in SOD activity was always accompanied by a similar decline in the epidermal catalase activity. The alterations in both enzymes occurred against a high background of enhanced protein synthesis which indicates that the effect of TPA is selective for SOD and catalase. Other tumor promoters such as phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate and the non-phorbol tumor promoter anthraline also lowered the activities of both the enzymes. Mezerein, a resiniferonol derivative with weak promoting activity but a potent stage-II promoter, appeared to be more potent than TPA in lowering the basal levels. These results indicate that damage which favors neoplastic progression would occur in TPA-treated mouse skin due to the accumulation of free radicals resulting from low levels of SOD and catalase activity. In addition, the TPA-caused decrease in the levels of SOD and catalase was not prevented by either retinoic acid, fluocinolone acetonide, tosyl amino-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, or butylated hydroxytoluene, suggesting that inhibition of tumor promotion by these agents is not mediated through alterations in the levels of enzymatic activities which decrease free radical concentrations.

  8. Prevention of EP Migratory Contamination in a Cluster Randomized Trial to Increase tPA Use in Stroke (The INSTINCT Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Victoria C.; Meurer, William J.; Frederiksen, Shirley M.; Fox, Allison K.; Scott, Phillip A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cluster randomized trials (CRTs) are increasingly utilized to evaluate quality improvement interventions aimed at healthcare providers. In trials testing emergency department interventions, migration of emergency physicians (EPs) between hospitals is an important concern, as contamination may affect both internal and external validity. We hypothesized that geographically isolating emergency departments would prevent migratory contamination in a CRT designed to increase ED delivery of tPA in stroke (The INSTINCT Trial). Methods INSTINCT was a prospective, cluster randomized, controlled trial. 24 Michigan community hospitals were randomly selected in matched pairs for study. Contamination was defined at the cluster level, with substantial contamination defined a priori as >10% of EPs affected. Non-adherence, total crossover (contamination + non-adherence), migration distance and characteristics were determined. Results 307 emergency physicians were identified at all sites. Overall, 7 (2.3%) changed study sites. 1 moved between control sites, leaving 6 (2.0%) total crossovers. Of these, 2 (0.7%) moved from intervention to control (contamination) and 4 (1.3%) moved from control to intervention (non-adherence). Contamination was observed in 2 of 12 control sites, with 17% and 9% contamination of the total site EP workforce at follow-up, respectively. Average migration distance was 42 miles for all EPs moving in the study and 35 miles for EPs moving from intervention to control sites. Conclusion The mobile nature of emergency physicians should be considered in the design of quality improvement CRTs. Increased reporting of contamination in CRTs is encouraged to clarify thresholds and facilitate CRT design. PMID:25440230

  9. DETAIL VIEW OF FILTER PRESS REMAINS, BOILER, SECONDARY ORE BIN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF FILTER PRESS REMAINS, BOILER, SECONDARY ORE BIN, TRAM TRESTLE AND WATER TANK, LOOKING NORTHWEST. HIS VIEW IS TAKEN FROM THE THIRD LEVEL OF THE MILL, NEARBY THE BLACKSMITH'S FORGE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  10. 15. CYLINDRICAL FISH SCALER Remnants of the wire screen remain, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. CYLINDRICAL FISH SCALER Remnants of the wire screen remain, through which the fish tumbled as the cylinder revolved. Note geared ring around cylinder, and the small drive shaft by which it was driven. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  11. 8. NORTHWEST VIEW OF REMAINS OF CAST HOUSE No. 2. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. NORTHWEST VIEW OF REMAINS OF CAST HOUSE No. 2. BLAST FURNACE No. 1 IS ON THE RIGHT, AND HOIST HOUSE No. 2 IS ON THE LEFT. (Martin Stupich) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  12. 17. DETAIL OF THE REMAINS OF BLAST FURNACE No. 2 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL OF THE REMAINS OF BLAST FURNACE No. 2 LOOKING EAST. THE BUSTLE PIPE IS VISIBLE ACROSS THE CENTER OF THE IMAGE. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  13. 15. NORTHERN VIEW OF THE REMAINS OF BLAST FURNACE No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. NORTHERN VIEW OF THE REMAINS OF BLAST FURNACE No. 2 IN LOWER CENTER OF PHOTO AT THE BASE OF HOT BLAST STOVES. HOIST HOUSE No. 2 IS ON THE LEFT. (Martin Stupich) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  14. 6. Remains Beneath Collapsed Engine House Roof, Showing Foundation Timbers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Remains Beneath Collapsed Engine House Roof, Showing Foundation Timbers and Automobile Engine Connected to Pulley Wheel, Looking Southwest - David Renfrew Oil Rig, East side of Connoquenessing Creek, 0.4 mile North of confluence with Thorn Creek, Renfrew, Butler County, PA

  15. Aftermath. The remains of the southwest end of the bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aftermath. The remains of the southwest end of the bridge lie next to the southwest pier. View is south-southeast from confluence of Trinity and South Fork Trinity Rivers - South Fork Trinity River Bridge, State Highway 299 spanning South Fork Trinity River, Salyer, Trinity County, CA

  16. 3. GENERAL VIEW OF REMAINS OF 40" BLOOMING MILL; THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. GENERAL VIEW OF REMAINS OF 40" BLOOMING MILL; THE ENGINE ROOM CONTAINING THE MESTA-CORLISS STEAM ENGINE, IS LOCATED AT THE FAR END OF THE MILL AS SEEN TO THE FAR RIGHT (THE BUILDING WITH THE SHED ROOF). - Republic Iron & Steel Company, Youngstown Works, Blooming Mill & Blooming Mill Engines, North of Poland Avenue, Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

  17. 19. REMAINS OF FLYWHEEL OF No. 1 PRESS PUMPING ENGINE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. REMAINS OF FLYWHEEL OF No. 1 PRESS PUMPING ENGINE. GEARS ON EITHER SIDE OF THE FLYWHEEL WERE TURNED INTERMEDIATE GEARS WHICH POWERED THE PUMPS. - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, Press Shop No. 1, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  18. Downsized Weather Satellite Program on Track, But Uncertainty Remains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2007-06-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) was downsized after a review that was required when the program far exceeded its budget and schedule. A year later, NPOESS-a major civilian and military weather satellite program-appears to be proceeding well with its new schedule and budget. However, whether the program will remain on track is uncertain.

  19. Plans and objectives of the remaining Apollo missions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherer, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    The three remaining Apollo missions will have significantly increased scientific capabilities. These result from increased payload, more time on the surface, improved range, and more sophisticated experiments on the surface and in orbit. Landing sites for the last three missions will be carefully selected to maximize the total scientific return.

  20. 5. View of remaining rock ledge from construction of passage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of remaining rock ledge from construction of passage to enter mill (Riverdale Cotton Mill was built into the side of a hill). Partially subterranean area was popular with employees trying to escape the heat of the mill, now an unofficial smoking area. - Riverdale Cotton Mill, Corner of Middle & Lower Streets, Valley, Chambers County, AL

  1. Remains of abutments for Bridge No. 1575 at MD Rt. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Remains of abutments for Bridge No. 1575 at MD Rt. 51 in Spring Gap, Maryland, looking northeast. (Compare with HAER MD-115 photos taken 1988). - Western Maryland Railway, Cumberland Extension, Pearre to North Branch, from WM milepost 125 to 160, Pearre, Washington County, MD

  2. Neanderthal infant and adult infracranial remains from Marillac (Charente, France).

    PubMed

    Dolores Garralda, María; Maureille, Bruno; Vandermeersch, Bernard

    2014-09-01

    At the site of Marillac, near the Ligonne River in Marillac-le-Franc (Charente, France), a remarkable stratigraphic sequence has yielded a wealth of archaeological information, palaeoenvironmental data, as well as faunal and human remains. Marillac must have been a sinkhole used by Neanderthal groups as a hunting camp during MIS 4 (TL date 57,600 ± 4,600BP), where Quina Mousterian lithics and fragmented bones of reindeer predominate. This article describes three infracranial skeleton fragments. Two of them are from adults and consist of the incomplete shafts of a right radius (Marillac 24) and a left fibula (Marillac 26). The third fragment is the diaphysis of the right femur of an immature individual (Marillac 25), the size and shape of which resembles those from Teshik-Tash and could be assigned to a child of a similar age. The three fossils have been compared with the remains of other Neanderthals or anatomically Modern Humans (AMH). Furthermore, the comparison of the infantile femora, Marillac 25 and Teshik-Tash, with the remains of several European children from the early Middle Ages clearly demonstrates the robustness and rounded shape of both Neanderthal diaphyses. Evidence of peri-mortem manipulations have been identified on all three bones, with spiral fractures, percussion pits and, in the case of the radius and femur, unquestionable cutmarks made with flint implements, probably during defleshing. Traces of periostosis appear on the fibula fragment and on the immature femoral diaphysis, although their aetiology remains unknown. PMID:24919796

  3. Liposomes remain intact when complexed with polycationic brushes.

    PubMed

    Yaroslavov, Alexander A; Sybachin, Andrei V; Schrinner, Marc; Ballauff, Matthias; Tsarkova, Larisa; Kesselman, Ellina; Schmidt, Judith; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Menger, Fredric M

    2010-05-01

    Anionic liposomes adsorb onto the surface of spherical polymer particles bearing grafted linear cationic macromolecules. The size, shape, and encapsulation ability of the liposomes remain unchanged upon adsorption, thus providing immobilized self-organizing containers that have potential applications in the biomedical field. PMID:20387892

  4. Authentic leadership: becoming and remaining an authentic nurse leader.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Lin G

    2012-11-01

    This article explores how chief nurse executives became and remained authentic leaders. Using narrative inquiry, this qualitative study focused on the life stories of participants. Results demonstrate the importance of reframing, reflection in alignment with values, and the courage needed as nurse leaders progress to authenticity.

  5. Robotics to Enable Older Adults to Remain Living at Home

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Alan J.; Adair, Brooke; Ozanne, Elizabeth; Said, Catherine; Santamaria, Nick; Morris, Meg E.

    2012-01-01

    Given the rapidly ageing population, interest is growing in robots to enable older people to remain living at home. We conducted a systematic review and critical evaluation of the scientific literature, from 1990 to the present, on the use of robots in aged care. The key research questions were as follows: (1) what is the range of robotic devices available to enable older people to remain mobile, independent, and safe? and, (2) what is the evidence demonstrating that robotic devices are effective in enabling independent living in community dwelling older people? Following database searches for relevant literature an initial yield of 161 articles was obtained. Titles and abstracts of articles were then reviewed by 2 independent people to determine suitability for inclusion. Forty-two articles met the criteria for question 1. Of these, 4 articles met the criteria for question 2. Results showed that robotics is currently available to assist older healthy people and people with disabilities to remain independent and to monitor their safety and social connectedness. Most studies were conducted in laboratories and hospital clinics. Currently limited evidence demonstrates that robots can be used to enable people to remain living at home, although this is an emerging smart technology that is rapidly evolving. PMID:23304507

  6. REAR DETAIL OF RIGHT ENGINE AND WING. THRUST REVERSER REMAINS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REAR DETAIL OF RIGHT ENGINE AND WING. THRUST REVERSER REMAINS OPEN. MECHANICS JONI BAINE (R) AND BILL THEODORE(L) OPEN FLAP CARRIAGE ACCESS WITH AN IMPACT GUN. THEY WILL CHECK TRANSMISSION FLUID AND OIL THE JACK SCREW. AT FAR LEFT UTILITY MECHANICS BEGIN BODY POLISHING. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  7. Neanderthal infant and adult infracranial remains from Marillac (Charente, France).

    PubMed

    Dolores Garralda, María; Maureille, Bruno; Vandermeersch, Bernard

    2014-09-01

    At the site of Marillac, near the Ligonne River in Marillac-le-Franc (Charente, France), a remarkable stratigraphic sequence has yielded a wealth of archaeological information, palaeoenvironmental data, as well as faunal and human remains. Marillac must have been a sinkhole used by Neanderthal groups as a hunting camp during MIS 4 (TL date 57,600 ± 4,600BP), where Quina Mousterian lithics and fragmented bones of reindeer predominate. This article describes three infracranial skeleton fragments. Two of them are from adults and consist of the incomplete shafts of a right radius (Marillac 24) and a left fibula (Marillac 26). The third fragment is the diaphysis of the right femur of an immature individual (Marillac 25), the size and shape of which resembles those from Teshik-Tash and could be assigned to a child of a similar age. The three fossils have been compared with the remains of other Neanderthals or anatomically Modern Humans (AMH). Furthermore, the comparison of the infantile femora, Marillac 25 and Teshik-Tash, with the remains of several European children from the early Middle Ages clearly demonstrates the robustness and rounded shape of both Neanderthal diaphyses. Evidence of peri-mortem manipulations have been identified on all three bones, with spiral fractures, percussion pits and, in the case of the radius and femur, unquestionable cutmarks made with flint implements, probably during defleshing. Traces of periostosis appear on the fibula fragment and on the immature femoral diaphysis, although their aetiology remains unknown.

  8. MDs remain sceptical as chelation therapy goes mainstream in Saskatchewan

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, M

    1997-01-01

    The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan recently agreed to allow physicians to administer chelation therapy. Supporters, relying on anecdotal evidence, say it works wonders in overcoming heart disease, but many physicians remain profoundly sceptical. In Saskatchewan, the college decision has proved popular with patients but has drawn an angry reaction from doctors. PMID:9307563

  9. 4. An interior view of remaining duct system and grain ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. An interior view of remaining duct system and grain separating equipment is situated within the 'Landmark' (1940) in the section above the silo portion of the structure. - Quaker Oats Cereal Factory, Southeast corner of Broadway & Mill Streets, Akron, Summit County, OH

  10. 18. A view looking southeast at the remains of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. A view looking southeast at the remains of the director's office, his reception room and a portion of the elevator lobby. These two rooms were equipped with their own air conditioners. - John T. Beasley Building, 632 Cherry Street (between Sixth & Seventh Streets), Terre Haute, Vigo County, IN

  11. Treatment of High-risk Venous Thrombosis Patients Using Low-dose Intraclot Injections of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator and Regional Anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Richard; Butman, John A.; Lonser, Russell R.; Sherry, Richard M.; Pandalai, Prakash K.; Horne, McDonald K.; Lozier, Jay N.

    2013-01-01

    Seven patients with venous thrombosis and contraindications to traditional thrombolytic therapy, consisting of recent intracranial surgery, recent pineal or retroperitoneal hemorrhage, active genitourinary or gastrointestinal bleeding, epidural procedures, and impending surgery, were successfully treated with a modified thrombolytic regimen. To improve safety, prolonged continuous infusions of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) was eliminated in favor of once-daily low-dose intraclot injections of tPA to minimize the amount and duration of tPA in the systemic circulation, and low-therapeutic or regional anticoagulation was used to reduce anticoagulant risks. These modifications may allow thrombolytic treatment for selected patients with severe venous thrombosis who are deemed to be at high risk. PMID:23273695

  12. Tyrosine hydroxylase is activated and phosphorylated at different sites in rat pheochromocytoma PC 12 cells treated with phorbol ester and forskolin

    SciTech Connect

    Tachikawa, E.; Tank, A.W.; Weiner, D.H.; Mosimann, W.F.; Yanagihara, N.; Weiner, N.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of phorbol ester (4..beta..-phorbol, 12..beta..-myristate, 13..cap alpha..-acetate; TPA), an activator of Ca/sup + +//phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (PK-C), and forskolin, which stimulates adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP-PK), on the activation and phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in rat pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells were examined. Incubation of the cells with TPA (0.01-1 ..mu..M) or forskolin (0.01-0.1 ..mu..M) produces increases in activation and phosphorylation of TH in a concentration-dependent manner. The stimulatory effects of TPA are dependent on extracellular Ca/sup + +/ and are inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with trifluoperazine (TFP). The effects of forskolin are independent of Ca/sup + +/ and are not inhibited by TFP. In cells treated with forskolin, the time course of the increase in cAMP correlates with the increases in TH activity and phosphorylation. cAMP levels do not increase in cells treated with TPA. There is an increase in the phosphorylation of only one tryptic phosphopeptide derived from TH in cells treated with either forskolin or TPA. The peptide phosphorylated in TPA-treated cells exhibits different elution characteristics on HPLC from that in forskolin-treated cells. The authors conclude that TH in PC 12 cells is phosphorylated on different sites by cAMP-PK and PK-C. Phosphorylation of either of these sites is associated with enzyme activation.

  13. Test-Retest Reliability of a Survey to Measure Transport-Related Physical Activity in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badland, Hannah; Schofield, Grant

    2006-01-01

    The present research details test-retest reliability of a newly developed, telephone-administered TPA survey for adults. This instrument examines barriers, perceptions, and current travel behaviors to place of work/study and local convenience shops. Demonstrated test-retest reliability of the Active Friendly Environments-Transport-Related Physical…

  14. Environmental Influences on Preschoolers' Physical Activity Levels in Various Early-Learning Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderloo, Leigh M.; Tucker, Patricia; Johnson, Andrew M.; Burke, Shauna M.; Irwin, Jennifer D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to: (a) compare the physical activity (PA) levels (i.e., moderate-to-vigorous PA [MVPA] and total PA [TPA]) of preschoolers in 3 different early-learning environments (center-based childcare, home-based childcare, and full-day kindergarten [FDK]); and (b) assess which characteristics (e.g., play equipment, policies, etc.)…

  15. The Effects of Soil Texture on the Ability of Human Remains Detection Dogs to Detect Buried Human Remains.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Michael B; Hodges, Theresa K; Wescott, Daniel J; Aitkenhead-Peterson, Jacqueline A

    2016-05-01

    Despite technological advances, human remains detection (HRD) dogs still remain one of the best tools for locating clandestine graves. However, soil texture may affect the escape of decomposition gases and therefore the effectiveness of HDR dogs. Six nationally credentialed HRD dogs (three HRD only and three cross-trained) were evaluated on novel buried human remains in contrasting soils, a clayey and a sandy soil. Search time and accuracy were compared for the clayey soil and sandy soil to assess odor location difficulty. Sandy soil (p < 0.001) yielded significantly faster trained response times, but no significant differences were found in performance accuracy between soil textures or training method. Results indicate soil texture may be significant factor in odor detection difficulty. Prior knowledge of soil texture and moisture may be useful for search management and planning. Appropriate adjustments to search segment sizes, sweep widths and search time allotment depending on soil texture may optimize successful detection.

  16. 30 CFR 285.303 - How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain... Renewable Energy Activities Row Grants and Rue Grants § 285.303 How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain in effect? Your ROW grant or RUE grant will remain in effect for as long as the...

  17. 30 CFR 585.303 - How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain... Row Grants and Rue Grants § 585.303 How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain in effect? Your ROW grant or RUE grant will remain in effect for as long as the associated activities are...

  18. 30 CFR 585.303 - How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain... Row Grants and Rue Grants § 585.303 How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain in effect? Your ROW grant or RUE grant will remain in effect for as long as the associated activities are...

  19. Dental DNA fingerprinting in identification of human remains

    PubMed Central

    Girish, KL; Rahman, Farzan S; Tippu, Shoaib R

    2010-01-01

    The recent advances in molecular biology have revolutionized all aspects of dentistry. DNA, the language of life yields information beyond our imagination, both in health or disease. DNA fingerprinting is a tool used to unravel all the mysteries associated with the oral cavity and its manifestations during diseased conditions. It is being increasingly used in analyzing various scenarios related to forensic science. The technical advances in molecular biology have propelled the analysis of the DNA into routine usage in crime laboratories for rapid and early diagnosis. DNA is an excellent means for identification of unidentified human remains. As dental pulp is surrounded by dentin and enamel, which forms dental armor, it offers the best source of DNA for reliable genetic type in forensic science. This paper summarizes the recent literature on use of this technique in identification of unidentified human remains. PMID:21731342

  20. Identifying and Reducing Remaining Stocks of Rinderpest Virus.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Keith; Visser, Dawid; Evans, Brian; Vallat, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    In 2011, the world was declared free from rinderpest, one of the most feared and devastating infectious diseases of animals. Rinderpest is the second infectious disease, after smallpox, to have been eradicated. However, potentially infectious rinderpest virus material remains widely disseminated among research and diagnostic facilities across the world and poses a risk for disease recurrence should it be released. Member Countries of the World Organisation for Animal Health and the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations are committed to destroying remaining stocks of infectious material or ensuring that it is stored under international supervision in a limited number of approved facilities. To facilitate this commitment and maintain global freedom from rinderpest, World Organisation for Animal Health Member Countries must report annually on rinderpest material held in their countries. The first official surveys, conducted during 2013-2015, revealed that rinderpest material was stored in an unacceptably high number of facilities and countries. PMID:26584400

  1. Mineral remains of early life on Earth? On Mars?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iberall, Robbins E.; Iberall, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    The oldest sedimentary rocks on Earth, the 3.8-Ga Isua Iron-Formation in southwestern Greenland, are metamorphosed past the point where organic-walled fossils would remain. Acid residues and thin sections of these rocks reveal ferric microstructures that have filamentous, hollow rod, and spherical shapes not characteristic of crystalline minerals. Instead, they resemble ferric-coated remains of bacteria. Because there are no earlier sedimentary rocks to study on Earth, it may be necessary to expand the search elsewhere in the solar system for clues to any biotic precursors or other types of early life. A study of morphologies of iron oxide minerals collected in the southern highlands during a Mars sample return mission may therefore help to fill in important gaps in the history of Earth's earliest biosphere. -from Authors

  2. USING CONDITION MONITORING TO PREDICT REMAINING LIFE OF ELECTRIC CABLES.

    SciTech Connect

    LOFARO,R.; SOO,P.; VILLARAN,M.; GROVE,E.

    2001-03-29

    Electric cables are passive components used extensively throughout nuclear power stations to perform numerous safety and non-safety functions. It is known that the polymers commonly used to insulate the conductors on these cables can degrade with time; the rate of degradation being dependent on the severity of the conditions in which the cables operate. Cables do not receive routine maintenance and, since it can be very costly, they are not replaced on a regular basis. Therefore, to ensure their continued functional performance, it would be beneficial if condition monitoring techniques could be used to estimate the remaining useful life of these components. A great deal of research has been performed on various condition monitoring techniques for use on electric cables. In a research program sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, several promising techniques were evaluated and found to provide trendable information on the condition of low-voltage electric cables. These techniques may be useful for predicting remaining life if well defined limiting values for the aging properties being measured can be determined. However, each technique has advantages and limitations that must be addressed in order to use it effectively, and the necessary limiting values are not always easy to obtain. This paper discusses how condition monitoring measurements can be used to predict the remaining useful life of electric cables. The attributes of an appropriate condition monitoring technique are presented, and the process to be used in estimating the remaining useful life of a cable is discussed along with the difficulties that must be addressed.

  3. Skeletal preservation of children's remains in the archaeological record.

    PubMed

    Manifold, B M

    2015-12-01

    Taphonomy is an important consideration in the reconstruction of past environments and events. Taphonomic alterations and processes are commonly encountered on human skeletal remains in both archaeological and forensic contexts. It is these processes that can alter the appearance of bone after death and the properties of the bones influence their reaction to these processes thus leading to differential preservation within a skeletal sample, none more so than the remains of children. This study investigates the skeletal preservation of 790 child and adolescent skeletons from six contrasting early and late medieval cemeteries from Britain in an attempt to assess whether geographical location and geology had an effect on the overall preservation of the skeletons. Skeletons were examined from six cemeteries, namely; Auldhame in Scotland, Edix Hill and Great Chesterford from Cambridgeshire; St Oswald's Priory from Gloucester and Wharram Percy from Yorkshire, and finally, the site of Llandough in Wales. The state of preservation was assessed using the anatomical preservation index (AP1), qualitative bone index (QBI) and the bone representation index (BRI). Also the presence of natural and artificial taphonomic processes was recorded for each skeleton. The results show a specific pattern of preservation and representation for non-adult remains across all sites with some differences in the states of preservation from different geographical locations and geological influences. Children under two years of age were found to be less affected by taphonomic processes than their older counterparts.

  4. Direct dating of Early Upper Palaeolithic human remains from Mladec.

    PubMed

    Wild, Eva M; Teschler-Nicola, Maria; Kutschera, Walter; Steier, Peter; Trinkaus, Erik; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2005-05-19

    The human fossil assemblage from the Mladec Caves in Moravia (Czech Republic) has been considered to derive from a middle or later phase of the Central European Aurignacian period on the basis of archaeological remains (a few stone artefacts and organic items such as bone points, awls, perforated teeth), despite questions of association between the human fossils and the archaeological materials and concerning the chronological implications of the limited archaeological remains. The morphological variability in the human assemblage, the presence of apparently archaic features in some specimens, and the assumed early date of the remains have made this fossil assemblage pivotal in assessments of modern human emergence within Europe. We present here the first successful direct accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of five representative human fossils from the site. We selected sample materials from teeth and from one bone for 14C dating. The four tooth samples yielded uncalibrated ages of approximately 31,000 14C years before present, and the bone sample (an ulna) provided an uncertain more-recent age. These data are sufficient to confirm that the Mladec human assemblage is the oldest cranial, dental and postcranial assemblage of early modern humans in Europe and is therefore central to discussions of modern human emergence in the northwestern Old World and the fate of the Neanderthals.

  5. Microsatellites identify depredated waterfowl remains from glaucous gull stomachs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, K.T.; Bowman, T.D.

    1998-01-01

    Prey remains can provide valuable sources of information regarding causes of predation and the species composition of a predator's diet. Unfortunately, the highly degraded state of many prey samples from gastrointestinal tracts often precludes unambiguous identification. We describe a procedure by which PCR amplification of taxonomically informative microsatellite loci were used to identify species of waterfowl predated by glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus). We found that one microsatellite locus unambiguously distinguished between species of the subfamily Anserinae (whistling ducks, geese and swans) and those of the subfamily Anatidae (all other ducks). An additional locus distinguished the remains of all geese and swan species known to nest on the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta in western Alaska. The study focused on two waterfowl species which have experienced precipitous declines in population numbers: emperor geese (Chen canagica) and spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri). No evidence of predation on spectacled eiders was observed. Twenty-six percent of all glaucous gull stomachs examined contained the remains of juvenile emperor geese.

  6. Osteometric sex determination of burned human skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, D; Thompson, T J U; Cunha, E

    2013-10-01

    Sex determination of human burned skeletal remains is extremely hard to achieve because of heat-related fragmentation, warping and dimensional changes. In particular, the latter is impeditive of osteometric analyses that are based on references developed on unburned bones. New osteometric references were thus obtained which allow for more reliable sex determinations. The calcined remains of cremated Portuguese individuals were examined and specific standard measurements of the humerus, femur, talus and calcaneus were recorded. This allowed for the compilation of new sex discriminating osteometric references which were then tested on independent samples with good results. Both the use of simple section points and of logistic regression equations provided successful sex classification scores. These references may now be used for the sex determination of burned skeletons. Its reliability is highest for contemporary Portuguese remains but nonetheless these results have important repercussion for forensic research. More conservative use of these references may also prove valuable for other populations as well as for archaeological research. PMID:24112343

  7. Prognostic modelling options for remaining useful life estimation by industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikorska, J. Z.; Hodkiewicz, M.; Ma, L.

    2011-07-01

    Over recent years a significant amount of research has been undertaken to develop prognostic models that can be used to predict the remaining useful life of engineering assets. Implementations by industry have only had limited success. By design, models are subject to specific assumptions and approximations, some of which are mathematical, while others relate to practical implementation issues such as the amount of data required to validate and verify a proposed model. Therefore, appropriate model selection for successful practical implementation requires not only a mathematical understanding of each model type, but also an appreciation of how a particular business intends to utilise a model and its outputs. This paper discusses business issues that need to be considered when selecting an appropriate modelling approach for trial. It also presents classification tables and process flow diagrams to assist industry and research personnel select appropriate prognostic models for predicting the remaining useful life of engineering assets within their specific business environment. The paper then explores the strengths and weaknesses of the main prognostics model classes to establish what makes them better suited to certain applications than to others and summarises how each have been applied to engineering prognostics. Consequently, this paper should provide a starting point for young researchers first considering options for remaining useful life prediction. The models described in this paper are Knowledge-based (expert and fuzzy), Life expectancy (stochastic and statistical), Artificial Neural Networks, and Physical models.

  8. Early activation of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus RTA, RAP, and MTA promoters by the tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate-induced AP1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shizhen Emily; Wu, Frederick Y; Chen, Honglin; Shamay, Meir; Zheng, Qizhi; Hayward, Gary S

    2004-04-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) maintains a latent infection in primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells, but treatment with tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) can trigger the full lytic-cycle replication in some of these cells. During lytic-cycle replication, the KSHV-encoded replication and transcription activator (RTA or ORF50), the mRNA transport and accumulation protein (MTA), and the replication-associated protein (RAP) all play crucial roles in expression of downstream viral genes as well as in mediation of viral DNA replication. The cellular CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha) is induced in TPA-treated PEL cells and contributes to transactivation of the promoters for all of these genes through both direct binding and cooperative interactions with RTA and RAP targeted to upstream C/EBP sites. However, little is known about how RTA expression is triggered initially at the earliest stages after TPA induction when the C/EBP alpha levels are still limited. Treatment with TPA proved to significantly induce both AP1 DNA-binding activity and levels of activated phosphorylated cJUN in PEL cells and ectopic expression of cJUN-plus-cFOS-induced RTA protein expression in PEL cells. Cotransfected cJUN plus cFOS or TPA treatment transactivated the KSHV RTA, RAP, and MTA promoters in an AP1-binding site-dependent manner in all three promoters. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that cJUN associates with these KSHV target promoters in PEL cells as early as 4 h after TPA treatment. Furthermore, the KSHV RTA and RAP proteins both interact with cJUN or both cJUN and cFOS in vitro or by coimmunoprecipitation from induced PEL cells and enhance cJUN-plus-cFOS-mediated transactivation of these viral promoters. Both increased phosphorylated cJUN and AP1 DNA-binding activity was detected as early as 1 h after TPA treatment in PEL cells, suggesting that AP1 activity may be crucial for very early activation of the RAP, MTA, and RTA promoters

  9. CCl4 induces tissue-type plasminogen activator in rat brain; protective effects of oregano, rosemary or vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Lavrentiadou, Sophia N; Tsantarliotou, Maria P; Zervos, Ioannis A; Nikolaidis, Efstathios; Georgiadis, Marios P; Taitzoglou, Ioannis A

    2013-11-01

    The high metabolic rate and relatively low antioxidant defenses of the lipid-rich brain tissue render it highly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress, whereas the implication of ROS in the pathogenesis of several diseases in the central nervous system is well-established. The plasminogen activator (PA) system is a key modulator of extracellular proteolysis, extracellular matrix remodeling and neuronal cell signaling and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of these diseases. This study evaluates the role of tissue-type PA (t-PA) in oxidative stress and the protective role of dietary antioxidants in the rat brain. We used the CCl4 experimental model of ROS-induced lipid peroxidation and evaluated the antioxidant effect of oregano, rosemary or vitamin E. CCl4-treated Wistar rats exhibited elevated brain t-PA activity, which was decreased upon long-term administration of oregano, rosemary or vitamin E. PA inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) activity was also slightly elevated by CCl4, but this increase was not affected by the antioxidants. We hypothesize that the CCl4-induced t-PA activity indicates extracellular proteolytic activity that may be linked to neuronal cell death and brain damage. Vitamin E or antioxidants present in oregano or rosemary are effective in inhibiting t-PA elevation and can be considered as a potential protection against neuronal damage.

  10. Effects of protein kinase C activators on germinal vesicle breakdown and polar body emission of mouse oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bornslaeger, E.A.; Poueymirou, W.T.; Mattei, P.; Schultz, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation mediated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase is instrumental in maintaining meiotic arrest of mouse oocytes. To assess whether protein phosphorylation mediated by calcium/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) might also inhibit the resumption of meiosis, oocytes were treated with activators of this enzyme. The active phorbol esters 12-O-tetra-decanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and 4..beta..-phorbol, 12,13-didecanoate (4..beta..-PDD) inhibited germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), as did a more natural activator of protein kinase, C, sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol (diC/sub 8/). An inactive phorbol ester, 4a-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4..cap alpha..-PDD), did not inhibit GVBD. TPA did not inhibit the maturation-associated decrease in oocyte cAMP. Microinjected heat-stable protein inhibitor of a cAMP-dependent protein kinase failed to induce GVBD in the presence of TPA. Both TPA and diC/sub 8/ partially inhibited specific changes in oocyte phosphoprotein metabolism that are tightly correlated with resumption of meiosis; these agents also induced the apparent phosphorylation of specific oocyte proteins. These results suggest that protein kinase C activators may inhibit resumption of meiosis by acting distal to a decrease in cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity, but prior to changes in oocyte phosphoprotein metabolism that are presumably required for resumption of meiosis.

  11. Cardiac work remains high after strength exercise in elderly.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, A C C; Kanegusuku, H; Chehuen, M R; Costa, L A R; Wallerstein, L F; Dias da Silva, V J; Mello, M T; Ugrinowitsch, C; Forjaz, C L M

    2013-05-01

    Moderate- to high-intensity strength training is recommended for healthy adults. In young subjects, a single session of strength training decreases blood pressure, while heart rate and cardiac work remain elevated afterwards. However, these effects have not been clearly demonstrated in elderly subjects. To investigate this issue, 16 elderly subjects each underwent a Control and an Exercise (3 sets, 8 RM, 9 exercises) session conducted in random order. Haemodynamic variables and heart rate variability were measured before and after the interventions. Systolic blood pressure did not change after the exercise session but did increase after the control session (+8.1±1.6 mm Hg, P≤0.05). Diastolic blood pressure, as well as systemic vascular resistance increased similarly after both sessions. Cardiac output and stroke volume decreased, while heart rate, rate-pressure product and the low- to high-frequency ratio of heart rate variability increased only after the exercise session ( - 0.5±0.1 L/min, - 9.3±2.0 ml,+3.8±1.6 bpm, +579.3±164.1 mmHg.bpm and +0.71±0.34, P≤0.05). Ambulatory blood pressure was similar after both sessions, while heart rate and rate pressure product remained higher after the exercise session for up to 4.5 h. After a single session of strength training, cardiac sympathetic modulation and heart rate remain elevated in elderly subjects, keeping cardiac work elevated for a long period of time.

  12. Latissimus dorsi flap remains an excellent choice for breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Erez G; Perdikis, Galen; McLaughlin, Sarah A; Terkonda, Sarvam P; Waldorf, James C

    2006-01-01

    Latissimus dorsi flap has been unfairly relegated to a second option in breast reconstruction. One hundred consecutive latissimus dorsi muscle flaps (LDMF) with tissue-expander reconstruction were studied, mean follow-up 34.5 months (range, 1-175), 50 immediate, 50 delayed. With attention to a few technical details, excellent esthetic, soft reconstructions were achieved. Complications included 1 partial flap loss; 2 patients required inframammary fold revision; and 6 patients required surgery for capsular contracture. Donor-site seroma occurred in 34 patients; 6 required operative revision. Results were similar in the immediate versus the delayed groups. LDMF remains an esthetic, reliable, safe reconstructive choice.

  13. Tuberculosis remains a challenge despite economic growth in Panama.

    PubMed

    Tarajia, M; Goodridge, A

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease associated with inequality, and wise investment of economic resources is considered critical to its control. Panama has recently secured its status as an upper-middle-income country with robust economic growth. However, the prioritisation of resources for TB control remains a major challenge. In this article, we highlight areas that urgently require action to effectively reduce TB burden to minimal levels. Our conclusions suggest the need for fund allocation and a multidisciplinary approach to ensure prompt laboratory diagnosis, treatment assurance and workforce reinforcement, complemented by applied and operational research, development and innovation.

  14. Remaining challenges in childhood cancer and newer targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Malcolm A; Reaman, Gregory H

    2015-02-01

    Despite the enormously important and gratifying advances in cancer treatment outcomes for children with cancer, cancer remains the biggest cause of death from disease in children. Because the etiology and biology of cancers that occur in children differ dramatically from those that occur in adults, the immediate extrapolation of efficacy and safety of new cancer drugs to childhood cancer indications is not possible. We discuss factors that will play key roles in guiding pediatric oncologists as they select lines of research to pursue in their quest for more effective treatments for children with cancer.

  15. Yellow Fever Remains a Potential Threat to Public Health.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Pedro F C; Monath, Thomas P

    2016-08-01

    Yellow fever (YF) remains a serious public health threat in endemic countries. The recent re-emergence in Africa, initiating in Angola and spreading to Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda, with imported cases in China and Kenya is of concern. There is such a shortage of YF vaccine in the world that the World Health Organization has proposed the use of reduced doses (1/5) during emergencies. In this short communication, we discuss these and other problems including the risk of spread of YF to areas free of YF for decades or never before affected by this arbovirus disease.

  16. Remains to be transmitted: Primo Levi's traumatic dream.

    PubMed

    Blévis, Jean-Jacques

    2004-07-01

    Drawing on the writings of Primo Levi and the psychoanalysis of Jacques Lacan, the author attempts to conceive psychic trauma as a coalescence of traumas, since this is perhaps the only way to prevent a subject from being forced back into identification with the catastrophic event, whatever that may have been. A recurrent dream of Primo Levi's suggests to the author the way that traumas may have coalesced within Levi. The hope would be to restore the entire significance of what remains from that traumatic event to the speech (parole) of the Other, to the speech of every human, even the most helpless, bruised, or destroyed among us. PMID:15287444

  17. "Recent" macrofossil remains from the Lomonosov Ridge, central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Duc, Cynthia; de Vernal, Anne; Archambault, Philippe; Brice, Camille; Roberge, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The examination of surface sediment samples collected from 17 sites along the Lomonosov Ridge at water depths ranging from 737 to 3339 meters during Polarstern Expedition PS87 in 2014 (Stein, 2015), indicates a rich biogenic content almost exclusively dominated by calcareous remains. Amongst biogenic remains, microfossils (planktic and benthic foraminifers, pteropods, ostracods, etc.) dominate but millimetric to centrimetric macrofossils occurred frequently at the surface of the sediment. The macrofossil remains consist of a large variety of taxa, including gastropods, bivalvia, polychaete tubes, scaphopods, echinoderm plates and spines, and fish otoliths. Among the Bivalvia, the most abundant taxa are Portlandia arctica, Hyalopecten frigidus, Cuspidaria glacilis, Policordia densicostata, Bathyarca spp., and Yoldiella spp. Whereas a few specimens are well preserved and apparently pristine, most mollusk shells displayed extensive alteration features. Moreover, most shells were covered by millimeter scale tubes of the serpulid polychaete Spirorbis sp. suggesting transport from low intertidal or subtidal zone. Both the ecological affinity and known geographic distribution of identified bivalvia as named above support the hypothesis of transportation rather than local development. In addition to mollusk shells, more than a hundred fish otoliths were recovered in surface sediments. The otoliths mostly belong to the Gadidae family. Most of them are well preserved and without serpulid tubes attached to their surface, suggesting a local/regional origin, unlike the shell remains. Although recovered at the surface, the macrofaunal assemblages of the Lomonosov Ridge do not necessarily represent the "modern" environments as they may result from reworking and because their occurrence at the surface of the sediment may also be due to winnowing of finer particles. Although the shells were not dated, we suspect that their actual ages may range from modern to several thousands of

  18. Why assisted suicide must remain illegal in the UK.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Vicky; Scott, Helen

    Many people with life-limiting disease are vulnerable to emotional distress associated with physical, spiritual, psychological and social stressors. Psychological stress and affective disorders have the potential to influence decision making, particularly at the end of life. This article discusses the main reasons why assisted suicide and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) should remain illegal in the UK. In particular, it explores the problems associated with safeguarding 'vulnerable' patient groups and assessing mental capacity. The article also examines guidance for nurses regarding what to do if a patient asks for assistance to die or for information on assisted suicide and PAS. PMID:22272539

  19. Research potential and limitations of trace analyses of cremated remains.

    PubMed

    Harbeck, Michaela; Schleuder, Ramona; Schneider, Julius; Wiechmann, Ingrid; Schmahl, Wolfgang W; Grupe, Gisela

    2011-01-30

    Human cremation is a common funeral practice all over the world and will presumably become an even more popular choice for interment in the future. Mainly for purposes of identification, there is presently a growing need to perform trace analyses such as DNA or stable isotope analyses on human remains after cremation in order to clarify pending questions in civil or criminal court cases. The aim of this study was to experimentally test the potential and limitations of DNA and stable isotope analyses when conducted on cremated remains. For this purpose, tibiae from modern cattle were experimentally cremated by incinerating the bones in increments of 100°C until a maximum of 1000°C was reached. In addition, cremated human remains were collected from a modern crematory. The samples were investigated to determine level of DNA preservation and stable isotope values (C and N in collagen, C and O in the structural carbonate, and Sr in apatite). Furthermore, we assessed the integrity of microstructural organization, appearance under UV-light, collagen content, as well as the mineral and crystalline organization. This was conducted in order to provide a general background with which to explain observed changes in the trace analyses data sets. The goal is to develop an efficacious screening method for determining at which degree of burning bone still retains its original biological signals. We found that stable isotope analysis of the tested light elements in bone is only possible up to a heat exposure of 300°C while the isotopic signal from strontium remains unaltered even in bones exposed to very high temperatures. DNA-analyses seem theoretically possible up to a heat exposure of 600°C but can not be advised in every case because of the increased risk of contamination. While the macroscopic colour and UV-fluorescence of cremated bone give hints to temperature exposure of the bone's outer surface, its histological appearance can be used as a reliable indicator for the

  20. Major remaining technical issues in coal-fired MHD technology

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.D.; Johnson, T.R.; Petrick, M.; Redman, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    A recent assessment of the current status of MHD technology has revealed significant progress in recent years toward establishing the technical base required for commercial coal-fired MHD power plants. The review also identified the many major technical issues that remain. Here attention is directed only to these major areas, to provide perspective regarding the diversity of additional development work required, and to indicate those aspects deserving priority. The underlying assumption is that a systematic development of a sound and broad technical base will be more cost-effective than initially building a large-scale integrated system to acquire operating experience.

  1. Encephalitozoon cuniculi in Raw Cow's Milk Remains Infectious After Pasteurization.

    PubMed

    Kváč, Martin; Tomanová, Vendula; Samková, Eva; Koubová, Jana; Kotková, Michaela; Hlásková, Lenka; McEvoy, John; Sak, Bohumil

    2016-02-01

    This study describes the prevalence of Encephalitozoon cuniculi in raw cow's milk and evaluates the effect of different milk pasteurization treatments on E. cuniculi infectivity for severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Using a nested polymerase chain reaction approach, 1 of 50 milking cows was found to repeatedly shed E. cuniculi in its feces and milk. Under experimental conditions, E. cuniculi spores in milk remained infective for SCID mice following pasteurization treatments at 72 °C for 15 s or 85 °C for 5 s. Based on these findings, pasteurized cow's milk should be considered a potential source of E. cuniculi infection in humans.

  2. Kidney disease in children: latest advances and remaining challenges.

    PubMed

    Bertram, John F; Goldstein, Stuart L; Pape, Lars; Schaefer, Franz; Shroff, Rukshana C; Warady, Bradley A

    2016-03-01

    To mark World Kidney Day 2016, Nature Reviews Nephrology invited six leading researchers to highlight the key advances and challenges within their specialist field of paediatric nephrology. Here, advances and remaining challenges in the fields of prenatal patterning, acute kidney injury, renal transplantation, genetics, cardiovascular health, and growth and nutrition, are all discussed within the context of paediatric and neonatal patients with kidney disease. Our global panel of researchers describe areas in which further studies and clinical advances are needed, and suggest ways in which research in these areas should progress to optimize renal care and long-term outcomes for affected patients.

  3. Studies on protozoa in ancient remains - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Frías, Liesbeth; Leles, Daniela; Araújo, Adauto

    2013-01-01

    Paleoparasitological research has made important contributions to the understanding of parasite evolution and ecology. Although parasitic protozoa exhibit a worldwide distribution, recovering these organisms from an archaeological context is still exceptional and relies on the availability and distribution of evidence, the ecology of infectious diseases and adequate detection techniques. Here, we present a review of the findings related to protozoa in ancient remains, with an emphasis on their geographical distribution in the past and the methodologies used for their retrieval. The development of more sensitive detection methods has increased the number of identified parasitic species, promising interesting insights from research in the future. PMID:23440107

  4. Yellow Fever Remains a Potential Threat to Public Health.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Pedro F C; Monath, Thomas P

    2016-08-01

    Yellow fever (YF) remains a serious public health threat in endemic countries. The recent re-emergence in Africa, initiating in Angola and spreading to Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda, with imported cases in China and Kenya is of concern. There is such a shortage of YF vaccine in the world that the World Health Organization has proposed the use of reduced doses (1/5) during emergencies. In this short communication, we discuss these and other problems including the risk of spread of YF to areas free of YF for decades or never before affected by this arbovirus disease. PMID:27400066

  5. Why assisted suicide must remain illegal in the UK.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Vicky; Scott, Helen

    Many people with life-limiting disease are vulnerable to emotional distress associated with physical, spiritual, psychological and social stressors. Psychological stress and affective disorders have the potential to influence decision making, particularly at the end of life. This article discusses the main reasons why assisted suicide and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) should remain illegal in the UK. In particular, it explores the problems associated with safeguarding 'vulnerable' patient groups and assessing mental capacity. The article also examines guidance for nurses regarding what to do if a patient asks for assistance to die or for information on assisted suicide and PAS.

  6. Assessment of the anti-inflammatory activity and free radical scavenger activity of tiliroside.

    PubMed

    Sala, Araceli; Recio, M Carmen; Schinella, Guillermo R; Máñez, Salvador; Giner, Rosa M; Cerdá-Nicolás, Miguel; Rosí, José Luis

    2003-02-01

    Three flavonoids, gnaphaliin, pinocembrin and tiliroside, isolated from Helichrysum italicum, were studied in vitro for their antioxidant and/or scavenger properties and in vivo in different models of inflammation. In vitro tests included lipid peroxidation in rat liver microsomes, superoxide radical generation in the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system and the reduction of the stable radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-pycryl-hydrazyl (DPPH). Acute inflammation was induced by application of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) to the mouse ear or by subcutaneous injection of phospholipase A(2) or serotonin in the mouse paw. Eczema provoked on the mouse ear by repeated administration of TPA was selected as a model of chronic inflammation. The flavonoids were assayed against sheep red blood cell-induced mouse paw oedema as a model of delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction. The most active compound, both in vitro and in vivo, was tiliroside. It significantly inhibited enzymatic and non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation (IC(50)=12.6 and 28 microM, respectively). It had scavenger properties (IC(50)=21.3 microM) and very potent antioxidant activity in the DPPH test (IC(50)=6 microM). In vivo, tiliroside significantly inhibited the mouse paw oedema induced by phospholipase A(2)(ED(50)=35.6 mg/kg) and the mouse ear inflammation induced by TPA (ED(50)=357 microg/ear). Pinocembrin was the only flavonoid that exhibited anti-inflammatory activity in the sheep red blood cell-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction. However, only tiliroside significantly reduced the oedema and leukocyte infiltration induced by TPA. As in the case of other flavonoids, the anti-inflammatory activity of tiliroside could be based on its antioxidant properties, although other mechanisms are probably involved.

  7. OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT REMAINS, TAILINGS PILES, PARKING LOT, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT REMAINS, TAILINGS PILES, PARKING LOT, AND MINE MANAGER'S HOME, LOOKING SOUTH SOUTHEAST. RIGHT, TAILINGS PILES ARE AT CENTER WITH CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS TO THE LEFT OF THE PILES. PARKING LOT IS AT UPPER LEFT. THE AREA BETWEEN THE COLLAPSED TANK AT CENTER LEFT AND THE REMAINS OF THE MANAGER'S HOUSE AT LOWER RIGHT IS A TAILINGS HOLDING AREA. TAILINGS FROM THE MILL WERE HELD HERE. THE LARGE SETTLING TANKS WERE CHARGED FROM THIS HOLDING AREA BY A TRAM ON RAILS AND BY A SLUICEWAY SEEN AS THE DARK SPOT ON THE CENTER LEFT EDGE OF THE FRAME. AFTER THE TAILINGS WERE LEACHED, THEY WERE DEPOSITED ON THE LARGE WASTE PILE AT CENTER RIGHT. THE TANK AT CENTER RIGHT EDGE IS WHERE THE WATER PIPELINE ENTERED THE WORKS. A STRAIGHT LINE OF POSTS IN THE GROUND GO ACROSS THE CENTER FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, WHICH ORIGINALLY SUSPENDED THE WATER PIPELINE GOING FROM THE WATER HOLDING TANK AT RIGHT UP TO THE SECONDARY WATER TANKS ABOVE THE MILL. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  8. Odontological identification of human remains from mass graves in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Brkic, H; Strinovic, D; Kubat, M; Petrovecki, V

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports the results and methods of dental identification of 1000 human remains exhumed from mass graves in Croatia up to July 1998. Personal identification of the victims was performed at the Department of Forensic Medicine and Criminology at the School of Medicine in Zagreb. A forensic odontologist participated in the identification process by carrying out the dental identification. A total of 824 victims were positively identified, while 176 victims remained unidentified. Dental identification based on available dental antemortem data was achieved in 25% of the cases. Dental identification based on dental charts was achieved in 35%, on x-rays in 15%, on photographs of teeth in 22%, on interviews in 18%, and on confirmation by odontologists in 10% of the cases. Teeth, in combination with anthropological parameters, age, sex and height, as well as other specific characteristics such as tattoos, personal identification cards, clothes, jewellery and DNA, were helpful for identification of 64% of the victims, but the significance for the identification was not dominant. Only in 11% of the cases was identification achieved by other relevant means and teeth not used at all. Identification procedures in Croatia will continue until another 1700 people who are still missing or kept as prisoners of war since the aggression on Croatia in 1991 are found and/or identified. PMID:11197622

  9. Usefulness of protein analysis for detecting pathologies in bone remains.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martínez, Cristina; Prieto-Bonete, Gemma; Pérez-Cárceles, María D; Luna, Aurelio

    2016-01-01

    Forensic pathology often uses osteobiography, which involves biological profiles based on a determination of the age, sex, constitution, pathological states and other anomalies (paleopathology) of subjects for identification purposes. In this paper, proteins were analysed in bone remains. A total of 45 long bones from 45 different cadavers (29 males, 16 females) with a mean age of 66.31 years (S.D.=19.48, range 20-97) were used to search for pathological biomarkers which are closely related to several diseases. The bones were removed from the cement niches of a cemetery in Murcia (south-eastern Spain), where they had lain for between 18 and 45 years (mean time 25.84 years, S.D.=8.91). After a specific extraction using Tris-Urea buffer, were measured using HPLC/MS/MS. Our results show that proteins resulting from tumoral diseases and bacterial and viral pathogens can be detected and identified in the skeletal remains, making them useful pathological biomarkers for constructing biological profiles.

  10. Detection of Buried Human Remains Using Bioreporter Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Vass, A. Dr.; Singleton, G. B.

    2001-10-01

    The search for buried human remains is a difficult, laborious and time-consuming task for law enforcement agencies. This study was conducted as a proof of principle demonstration to test the concept of using bioreporter microorganisms as a means to cover large areas in such a search. These bioreporter microorganisms are affected by a particular component of decaying organic matter that is distinct from decaying vegetation. The diamino compounds cadaverine and putrescine were selected as target compounds for the proof-of-principle investigation, and a search for microorganisms and genes that are responsive to either of these compounds was conducted. One recombinant clone was singled out for characterization based on its response to putrescine. The study results show that small concentrations of putrescine increased expression from this bioreporter construct. Although the level of increase was small (making it difficult to distinguish the signal from background), the results demonstrate the principle that bioreporters can be used to detect compounds resulting from decaying human remains and suggest that a wider search for target compounds should be conducted.

  11. Ambient aerosols remain highly acidic despite dramatic sulfate reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenes, Athanasios; Weber, Rodney; Guo, Hongyu; Russell, Armistead

    2016-04-01

    The pH of fine particles has many vital environmental impacts. By affecting aerosol concentrations, chemical composition and toxicity, particle pH is linked to regional air quality and climate, and adverse effects on human health. Sulfate is often the main acid component that drives pH of fine particles (i.e., PM2.5) and is neutralized to varying degrees by gas phase ammonia. Sulfate levels have decreased by approximately 70% over the Southeastern United States in the last fifteen years, but measured ammonia levels have been fairly steady implying the aerosol may becoming more neutral. Using a chemically comprehensive data set, combined with a thermodynamic analysis, we show that PM2.5 in the Southeastern U.S. is highly acidic (pH between 0 and 2), and that pH has remained relatively unchanged throughout the past decade and a half of decreasing sulfate. Even with further sulfate reductions, pH buffering by gas-particle partitioning of ammonia is expected to continue until sulfate drops to near background levels, indicating that fine particle pH will remain near current levels into the future. These results are non-intuitive and reshape expectations of how sulfur emission reductions impact air quality in the Southeastern U.S. and possibly other regions across the globe.

  12. Prions and lymphoid organs: solved and remaining mysteries.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Tracy; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2013-01-01

    Prion colonization of secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) is a critical step preceding neuroinvasion in prion pathogenesis. Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), which depend on both tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) and lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) signaling for maintenance, are thought to be the primary sites of prion accumulation in SLOs. However, prion titers in RML-infected TNFR1 (-/-) lymph nodes and rates of neuroinvasion in TNFR1 (-/-) mice remain high despite the absence of mature FDCs. Recently, we discovered that TNFR1-independent prion accumulation in lymph nodes relies on LTβR signaling. Loss of LTβR signaling in TNFR1 (-/-) lymph nodes coincided with the de-differentiation of high endothelial venules (HEVs)-the primary sites of lymphocyte entry into lymph nodes. These findings suggest that HEVs are the sites through which prions initially invade lymph nodes from the bloodstream. Identification of HEVs as entry portals for prions clarifies a number of previous observations concerning peripheral prion pathogenesis. However, a number of questions still remain: What is the mechanism by which prions are taken up by HEVs? Which cells are responsible for delivering prions to lymph nodes? Are HEVs the main entry site for prions into lymph nodes or do alternative routes also exist? These questions and others are considered in this article.

  13. Enhanced risk of thromboembolic disease in hypertension from platelet hyperfunction and decreased fibrinolytic activity: has antihypertensive therapy any influence?

    PubMed

    Winther, K; Gleerup, G; Hedner, T

    1992-01-01

    Enhanced platelet function and a decrease in fibrinolytic activity have been reported in patients with mild hypertension after treatment with various nonselective beta-blockers. Until now, such changes have not been reported during treatment with beta 1-selective drugs or with agents that have intrinsic sympathomimetic activity. The impact of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and diuretics on platelet function and fibrinolytic activity has not been fully elucidated. Calcium antagonists of various types, however, are known to decrease platelet release in vivo whereas their effects on platelet aggregation and fibrinolytic activity are less clear. The new dihydropyridine calcium antagonist isradipine, when tested in a group of patients with mild hypertension, resulted in a decrease in platelet aggregation, a shortened euglobulin clot-lysis time, and a dramatic increase in t-PA (tissue-plasminogen activator) activity after 14 days of treatment. These changes remained stable throughout the 1-year study period. The fact that antihypertensive therapy does not always result in the hoped-for prolongation of life, despite satisfactory blood pressure reduction, may be in part due to an unfavorable impact on various components of the blood-clotting system.

  14. Nano-zymography Using Laser-Scanning Confocal Microscopy Unmasks Proteolytic Activity of Cell-Derived Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Briens, Aurélien; Gauberti, Maxime; Parcq, Jérôme; Montaner, Joan; Vivien, Denis; Martinez de Lizarrondo, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Cell-derived microparticles (MPs) are nano-sized vesicles released by activated cells in the extracellular milieu. They act as vectors of biological activity by carrying membrane-anchored and cytoplasmic constituents of the parental cells. Although detection and characterization of cell-derived MPs may be of high diagnostic and prognostic values in a number of human diseases, reliable measurement of their size, number and biological activity still remains challenging using currently available methods. In the present study, we developed a protocol to directly image and functionally characterize MPs using high-resolution laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Once trapped on annexin-V coated micro-wells, we developed several assays using fluorescent reporters to measure their size, detect membrane antigens and evaluate proteolytic activity (nano-zymography). In particular, we demonstrated the applicability and specificity of this method to detect antigens and proteolytic activities of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), urokinase and plasmin at the surface of engineered MPs from transfected cell-lines. Furthermore, we were able to identify a subset of tPA-bearing fibrinolytic MPs using plasma samples from a cohort of ischemic stroke patients who received thrombolytic therapy and in an experimental model of thrombin-induced ischemic stroke in mice. Overall, this method is promising for functional characterization of cell-derived MPs. PMID:27022410

  15. 25 CFR 139.4 - Deferment of assessments on lands remaining in Indian ownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deferment of assessments on lands remaining in Indian ownership. 139.4 Section 139.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES REIMBURSEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION COSTS, WAPATO-SATUS UNIT, WAPATO INDIAN IRRIGATION...

  16. 25 CFR 138.4 - Deferment of assessments on lands remaining in Indian ownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deferment of assessments on lands remaining in Indian ownership. 138.4 Section 138.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES REIMBURSEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION COSTS, AHTANUM UNIT, WAPATO INDIAN IRRIGATION PROJECT,...

  17. Oldest directly dated remains of sheep in China.

    PubMed

    Dodson, John; Dodson, Eoin; Banati, Richard; Li, Xiaoqiang; Atahan, Pia; Hu, Songmei; Middleton, Ryan J; Zhou, Xinying; Nan, Sun

    2014-01-01

    The origins of domesticated sheep (Ovis sp.) in China remain unknown. Previous workers have speculated that sheep may have been present in China up to 7000 years ago, however many claims are based on associations with archaeological material rather than independent dates on sheep material. Here we present 7 radiocarbon dates on sheep bone from Inner Mongolia, Ningxia and Shaanxi provinces. DNA analysis on one of the bones confirms it is Ovis sp. The oldest ages are about 4700 to 4400 BCE and are thus the oldest objectively dated Ovis material in eastern Asia. The graphitisised bone collagen had δ(13)C values indicating some millet was represented in the diet. This probably indicates sheep were in a domestic setting where millet was grown. The younger samples had δ(13)C values indicating that even more millet was in the diet, and this was likely related to changes in foddering practices.

  18. Weight references for burned human skeletal remains from Portuguese samples.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, David; Cunha, Eugénia; Thompson, Tim J U

    2013-09-01

    Weight is often one of the few recoverable data when analyzing human cremains but references are still rare, especially for European populations. Mean weights for skeletal remains were thus documented for Portuguese modern cremations of both recently deceased individuals and dry skeletons, and the effect of age, sex, and the intensity of combustion was investigated using both multivariate and univariate statistics. The cremains from fresh cadavers were significantly heavier than the ones from dry skeletons regardless of sex and age cohort (p < 0.001 to p = 0.003). As expected, males were heavier than females and age had a powerful effect in female skeletal weight. The effect of the intensity of combustion in cremains weight was unclear. These weight references may, in some cases, help estimating the minimum number of individuals, the completeness of the skeletal assemblage, and the sex of an unknown individual.

  19. Oldest Directly Dated Remains of Sheep in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson, John; Dodson, Eoin; Banati, Richard; Li, Xiaoqiang; Atahan, Pia; Hu, Songmei; Middleton, Ryan J.; Zhou, Xinying; Nan, Sun

    2014-11-01

    The origins of domesticated sheep (Ovis sp.) in China remain unknown. Previous workers have speculated that sheep may have been present in China up to 7000 years ago, however many claims are based on associations with archaeological material rather than independent dates on sheep material. Here we present 7 radiocarbon dates on sheep bone from Inner Mongolia, Ningxia and Shaanxi provinces. DNA analysis on one of the bones confirms it is Ovis sp. The oldest ages are about 4700 to 4400 BCE and are thus the oldest objectively dated Ovis material in eastern Asia. The graphitisised bone collagen had δ13C values indicating some millet was represented in the diet. This probably indicates sheep were in a domestic setting where millet was grown. The younger samples had δ13C values indicating that even more millet was in the diet, and this was likely related to changes in foddering practices

  20. Advances and remaining challenges in adult literacy research.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brett; McCardle, Peggy; Hernandez, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Low literacy levels in adult learners pose an educational and public health challenge to practitioners and the scientific community. Increasing demands placed on literacy can limit opportunities in the workplace and access to health-related resources, negatively affecting public health. Current estimates from the National Center for Education Statistics suggest that more than 40 million adults in the United States possess only the most basic and concrete literacy skills. Despite the estimated number of learners possessing minimal literacy skills in English in the United States, there remains a paucity of research focused on adult learners to inform remediation efforts. This special issue of the Journal of Learning Disabilities represents an important step in highlighting the current scientific knowledge base and the implications for future directions and lines of inquiry with adult learners. PMID:20179305

  1. Weight references for burned human skeletal remains from Portuguese samples.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, David; Cunha, Eugénia; Thompson, Tim J U

    2013-09-01

    Weight is often one of the few recoverable data when analyzing human cremains but references are still rare, especially for European populations. Mean weights for skeletal remains were thus documented for Portuguese modern cremations of both recently deceased individuals and dry skeletons, and the effect of age, sex, and the intensity of combustion was investigated using both multivariate and univariate statistics. The cremains from fresh cadavers were significantly heavier than the ones from dry skeletons regardless of sex and age cohort (p < 0.001 to p = 0.003). As expected, males were heavier than females and age had a powerful effect in female skeletal weight. The effect of the intensity of combustion in cremains weight was unclear. These weight references may, in some cases, help estimating the minimum number of individuals, the completeness of the skeletal assemblage, and the sex of an unknown individual. PMID:23822840

  2. Remaining Creep Life Assessment Techniques Based on Creep Cavitation Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankit, Kumar

    2009-05-01

    The boiler and its components are built with assumed nominal design and reasonable life of operation about two to three decades (one or two hundred thousand hours). These units are generally replaced or life is extended at the end of this period. Under normal operating conditions, after the initial period of teething troubles, the reliability of these units remains fairly constant up to about two decades of normal operation. The failure rate then increases as a result of their time-dependent material damage. Further running of these units may become uneconomical and dangerous in some cases. In the following article, step-by-step methodology to quantify creep cavitation based on statistical probability analysis and continuum damage mechanics has been described. The concepts of creep cavity nucleation have also been discussed with a special emphasis on the need for development of a model based on creep cavity growth kinetics.

  3. High CJD infectivity remains after prion protein is destroyed.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Emmerling, Kaitlin; Manuelidis, Laura

    2011-12-01

    The hypothesis that host prion protein (PrP) converts into an infectious prion form rests on the observation that infectivity progressively decreases in direct proportion to the decrease of PrP with proteinase K (PK) treatment. PrP that resists limited PK digestion (PrP-res, PrP(sc)) has been assumed to be the infectious form, with speculative types of misfolding encoding the many unique transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) agent strains. Recently, a PK sensitive form of PrP has been proposed as the prion. Thus we re-evaluated total PrP (sensitive and resistant) and used a cell-based assay for titration of infectious particles. A keratinase (NAP) known to effectively digest PrP was compared to PK. Total PrP in FU-CJD infected brain was reduced to ≤0.3% in a 2 h PK digest, yet there was no reduction in titer. Remaining non-PrP proteins were easily visualized with colloidal gold in this highly infectious homogenate. In contrast to PK, NAP digestion left 0.8% residual PrP after 2 h, yet decreased titer by >2.5 log; few residual protein bands remained. FU-CJD infected cells with 10× the infectivity of brain by both animal and cell culture assays were also evaluated. NAP again significantly reduced cell infectivity (>3.5 log). Extreme PK digestions were needed to reduce cell PrP to <0.2%, yet a very high titer of 8 logs survived. Our FU-CJD brain results are in good accord with the only other report on maximal PrP destruction and titer. It is likely that one or more residual non-PrP proteins may protect agent nucleic acids in infectious particles.

  4. Reidentification of Avian Embryonic Remains from the Cretaceous of Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Varricchio, David J.; Balanoff, Amy M.; Norell, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic remains within a small (4.75 by 2.23 cm) egg from the Late Cretaceous, Mongolia are here re-described. High-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRCT) was used to digitally prepare and describe the enclosed embryonic bones. The egg, IGM (Mongolian Institute for Geology, Ulaanbaatar) 100/2010, with a three-part shell microstructure, was originally assigned to Neoceratopsia implying extensive homoplasy among eggshell characters across Dinosauria. Re-examination finds the forelimb significantly longer than the hindlimbs, proportions suggesting an avian identification. Additional, postcranial apomorphies (strut-like coracoid, cranially located humeral condyles, olecranon fossa, slender radius relative to the ulna, trochanteric crest on the femur, and ulna longer than the humerus) identify the embryo as avian. Presence of a dorsal coracoid fossa and a craniocaudally compressed distal humerus with a strongly angled distal margin support a diagnosis of IGM 100/2010 as an enantiornithine. Re-identification eliminates the implied homoplasy of this tri-laminate eggshell structure, and instead associates enantiornithine birds with eggshell microstructure composed of a mammillary, squamatic, and external zones. Posture of the embryo follows that of other theropods with fore- and hindlimbs folded parallel to the vertebral column and the elbow pointing caudally just dorsal to the knees. The size of the egg and embryo of IGM 100/2010 is similar to the two other Mongolian enantiornithine eggs. Well-ossified skeletons, as in this specimen, characterize all known enantiornithine embryos suggesting precocial hatchlings, comparing closely to late stage embryos of modern precocial birds that are both flight- and run-capable upon hatching. Extensive ossification in enantiornithine embryos may contribute to their relatively abundant representation in the fossil record. Neoceratopsian eggs remain unrecognized in the fossil record. PMID:26030147

  5. Decreased fibrinolytic activity and increased platelet function in hypertension. Possible influence of calcium antagonism.

    PubMed

    Gleerup, G; Winther, K

    1991-02-01

    Twelve patients with mild hypertension were compared, after 14 days of placebo, with an age- and gender-matched group of 12 healthy volunteers for platelet aggregability and fibrinolytic activity. Following this, 10 of the 12 hypertensives were treated with the calcium antagonist isradipine for 12 months. Blood was drawn for determinations of platelet aggregation and fibrinolytic activity after two weeks and 12 months of treatment. Platelet aggregation tended to increase in the hypertensives compared with controls, indicated by a lowering of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) threshold value for irreversible aggregation. Tissue-plasminogen activator (t-PA) activity was significantly decreased in hypertensives compared to controls (P less than .05). During therapy, platelet aggregation decreased and t-PA activity increased (P less than .05). The present data suggest that fibrinolytic activity is decreased and platelet aggregation increased in mild hypertension. Besides the blood pressure-lowering effect, isradipine may protect against thromboembolic diseases by modifying platelet function and fibrinolytic activity.

  6. Genistein inhibits phorbol ester-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity and COX-2 expression by blocking the phosphorylation of p65/RelA in human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Do-Hee; Na, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Ha-Na; Haegeman, Guy; Surh, Young-Joon

    2014-10-01

    Genistein, an isoflavone present in soy products, has chemopreventive effects on mammary carcinogenesis. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of genistein on phorbol ester-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) that plays an important role in the pathophysiology of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. Pretreatment of cultured human breast epithelial (MCF10A) cells with genistein reduced COX-2 expression induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). There are multiple lines of evidence supporting that the induction of COX-2 is regulated by the eukaryotic transcription factor NF-κB. Genistein failed to inhibit TPA-induced nuclear translocation and DNA binding of NF-κB as well as degradation of IκB. However, genistein abrogated the TPA-induced transcriptional activity of NF-κB as determined by the luciferase reporter gene assay. Genistein inhibited phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB and its interaction with cAMP regulatory element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP)/p300 and TATA-binding protein (TBP). TPA-induced NF-κB phosphorylation was abolished by pharmacological inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Likewise, pharmacologic inhibition or dominant negative mutation of ERK suppressed phosphorylation of p65. The above findings, taken together, suggest that genistein inhibits TPA-induced COX-2 expression in MCF10A cells by blocking ERK-mediated phosphorylation of p65 and its subsequent interaction with CBP and TBP.

  7. Acute and chronic effects of oestrogen on endothelial tissue-type plasminogen activator release in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Hoetzer, Greta L; Stauffer, Brian L; Irmiger, Heather M; Ng, Marilyn; Smith, Derek T; DeSouza, Christopher A

    2003-01-01

    The capacity of vascular endothelium to locally release tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) represents an important endogenous defence mechanism against intravascular fibrin deposition and thrombosis. We determined the influence of chronic and acute oestrogen administration on endothelial t-PA release in postmenopausal women. Sixty-three healthy postmenopausal women were studied: 31 non-users (age 58 ± 1 years) and 32 users of hormone replacement therapy, including oestrogen alone (ORT: 62 ± 2 years; n = 15) and in combination with progesterone (HRT: 57 ± 1 years; n = 17). Net endothelial t-PA release was determined in vivo, in response to intrabrachial infusions of bradykinin and sodium nitroprusside. To examine the acute effects of oestrogen on endothelial t-PA release, bradykinin and sodium nitroprusside dose-response curves were repeated in the presence of 17 β-oestradiol in 20 of the 31 non-users. Net endothelial release of t-PA was ≈30 % higher (P < 0.01) in women taking ORT (from 2.0 ± 1.0 to 83.6 ± 9.2 ng (100 ml tissue)−1 min−1) compared with those taking HRT (from 1.4 ± 0.4 to 63.5 ± 5.6 ng (100 ml tissue)−1 min−1) and those not taking supplementation (1.0 ± 0.7 to 63.0 ± 4.7 ng (100 ml tissue)−1 min−1). Intra-arterial infusion of 17 β-oestradiol significantly potentiated bradykinin-induced t-PA release. Net endothelial release of t-PA was ≈45 % higher (P < 0.01) after (from 1.0 ± 0.8 to 87.4 ± 9.9 ng (100 ml tissue)−1 min−1) versus before (1.2 ± 0.6 to 60.8 ± 5.6 ng (100 ml tissue)−1 min−1) acute 17 β-oestradiol administration. Our results suggest that oestrogen has a direct modulatory effect on the capacity of the endothelium to release t-PA in healthy postmenopausal women. However, progesterone appears to oppose the favourable influence of oestrogen on endothelial fibrinolytic capacity. PMID:12815179

  8. Mineralized Remains of Morphotypes of Filamentous Cyanobacteria in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    ) investigations of freshly fractured interior surfaces of carbonaceous meteorites, terrestrial rocks, and recent microbial extremophiles and filamentous cyanobacteria. These studies have resulted in the detection in a several carbonaceous meteorites of the mineralized remains of a wide variety of complex filamentous trichomic microorganisms. These embedded forms are consistent in size and microstructure with well-preserved morphotypes of mat- forming filamentous trichomic cyanobacteria and the degraded remains of microfibrils of cyanobacterial sheaths. We present the results of comparative imaging studies and EDAX elemental analyses of recent cyanobacteria (e.g. Calothrix, Oscillatoria, and Lyngbya) that are similar in size, morphology and microstructure to morphotypes found embedded in meteorites. EDAX elemental studies reveal that forms found in carbonaceous meteorites often have highly carbonized sheaths in close association with permineralized filaments, trichomes and microbial cells. Ratios of critical bioelements (C:O, C:N, C:P, and C:S) reveal dramatic differences between microfossils in Earth rocks and meteorites and in filaments, trichomes, hormogonia, and cells of recent cyanobacteria.

  9. Future Remains: Industrial Heritage at the Hanford Plutonium Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, Brian

    This dissertation argues that U.S. environmental and historic preservation regulations, industrial heritage projects, history, and art only provide partial frameworks for successfully transmitting an informed story into the long range future about nuclear technology and its related environmental legacy. This argument is important because plutonium from nuclear weapons production is toxic to humans in very small amounts, threatens environmental health, has a half-life of 24, 110 years and because the industrial heritage project at Hanford is the first time an entire U.S. Department of Energy weapons production site has been designated a U.S. Historic District. This research is situated within anthropological interest in industrial heritage studies, environmental anthropology, applied visual anthropology, as well as wider discourses on nuclear studies. However, none of these disciplines is really designed or intended to be a completely satisfactory frame of reference for addressing this perplexing challenge of documenting and conveying an informed story about nuclear technology and its related environmental legacy into the long range future. Others have thought about this question and have made important contributions toward a potential solution. Examples here include: future generations movements concerning intergenerational equity as evidenced in scholarship, law, and amongst Native American groups; Nez Perce and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation responses to the Hanford End State Vision and Hanford's Canyon Disposition Initiative; as well as the findings of organizational scholars on the advantages realized by organizations that have a long term future perspective. While these ideas inform the main line inquiry of this dissertation, the principal approach put forth by the researcher of how to convey an informed story about nuclear technology and waste into the long range future is implementation of the proposed Future Remains clause, as

  10. Scavenging behavior of Lynx rufus on human remains during the winter months of Southeast Texas.

    PubMed

    Rippley, Angela; Larison, Nicole C; Moss, Kathryn E; Kelly, Jeffrey D; Bytheway, Joan A

    2012-05-01

    Animal-scavenging alterations on human remains can be mistaken as human criminal activity. A 32-day study, documenting animal scavenging on a human cadaver, was conducted at the Southeast Texas Applied Forensic Science facility, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas. A Stealth Cam Rogue IR was positioned near the cadaver to capture scavenging activity. An atypical scavenger, the bobcat, Lynx rufus, was recorded feeding on the cadaver. Scavenging by bobcats on human remains is not a predominant behavior and has minimal documentation. Scavenging behaviors and destruction of body tissues were analyzed. Results show that the bobcat did not feed on areas of the body that it does for other large animal carcasses. Results also show the bobcat feeds similarly during peak and nonpeak hours. Understanding the destruction of human tissue and covering of the body with leaf debris may aid forensic anthropologists and pathologists in differentiating between nefarious human activity and animal scavenging.

  11. Tissue plasminogen activator promotes the effects of corticotropin-releasing factor on the amygdala and anxiety-like behavior

    PubMed Central

    Matys, Tomasz; Pawlak, Robert; Matys, Elzbieta; Pavlides, Constantine; McEwen, Bruce S.; Strickland, Sidney

    2004-01-01

    Stress-induced plasticity in the brain requires a precisely orchestrated sequence of cellular events involving novel as well as well known mediators. We have previously demonstrated that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in the amygdala promotes stress-induced synaptic plasticity and anxiety-like behavior. Here, we show that tPA activity in the amygdala is up-regulated by a major stress neuromodulator, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), acting on CRF type-1 receptors. Compared with WT, tPA-deficient mice responded to CRF treatment with attenuated expression of c-fos (an indicator of neuronal activation) in the central and medial amygdala but had normal c-fos responses in paraventricular nuclei. They exhibited reduced anxiety-like behavior to CRF but had a sustained corticosterone response after CRF administration. This effect of tPA deficiency was not mediated by plasminogen, because plasminogen-deficient mice demonstrated normal behavioral and hormonal changes to CRF. These studies establish tPA as an important mediator of cellular, behavioral, and hormonal responses to CRF. PMID:15522965

  12. Estimation of body size and physique from hominin skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Porter, A M W

    2002-01-01

    Three methods of measuring stature from skeletal remains are reviewed: the reconstructed skeletal length, the correspondence of long bone length to stature and the regression of stature on long bone length. Each involves problems and difficulties. For the anthropologist, there is the additional problem of applying findings from extant taxa to extinct taxa with potentially different morphologies and limb proportions. Of the various studies involving regression of the stature the findings of Trotter and Gleser are judged the most robust and useful notwithstanding problems and limitations. The lumbar vertebrae are potentially important as stature predictors. Estimation of body mass from the skeleton is also beset with problems. Eight methods are reviewed: Hartwig-Scherer's taxon independent solution, four methods involving measurements from the weight-bearing appendicular skeleton, Ruff's method using the length of the reconstructed skeleton and an estimate of body breadth, estimates from the total skeletal mass and estimates from the body mass index when the stature is known approximately. Lumbar vertebrae provide reasonable estimates of both body mass and stature and thus by derivation the body mass index. At present both forensic scientists and anthropologists lack adequate data and methods to estimate body size and shape from hominin skeletons. A further large and well-designed study using magnetic resonance imaging is required.

  13. Rummaging through Earth's Attic for Remains of Ancient Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, John C.; Wells, Llyd E.; Gonzalez, Guillermo

    2002-11-01

    We explore the likelihood that early remains of Earth, Mars, and Venus have been preserved on the Moon in high enough concentrations to motivate a search mission. During the Late Heavy Bombardment, the inner planets experienced frequent large impacts. Material ejected by these impacts near the escape velocity would have had the potential to land and be preserved on the surface of the Moon. Such ejecta could yield information on the geochemical and biological state of early Earth, Mars, and Venus. To determine whether the Moon has preserved enough ejecta to justify a search mission, we calculate the amount of terran material incident on the Moon over its history by considering the distribution of ejecta launched from the Earth by large impacts. In addition, we make analogous estimates for Mars and Venus. We find, for a well-mixed regolith, that the median surface abundance of terran material is roughly 7 ppm, corresponding to a mass of approximately 20,000 kg of terran material over a 10×10-square-km area. Over the same area, the amount of material transferred from Venus is 1-30 kg and material from Mars as much as 180 kg. Given that the amount of terran material is substantial, we estimate the fraction of this material surviving impact with intact geochemical and biological tracers.

  14. Late Pleistocene mammoth remains from Coastal Maine, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoyle, B.G.; Fisher, D.C.; Borns, H.W.; Churchill-Dickson, L. L.; Dorion, C.C.; Weddle, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    Remains identified as those of a woolly mammoth ( Mammuthus primigenius ) dated at 12,200 ?? 55 14C yr B.P. were recovered while excavating in a complex sequence of glaciomarine sediments in Scarborough, Maine, USA. The mammoth was found in the top meter of a fossiliferous unit of mud and sand laminites. These sediments were deposited during a marine regressive phase following the transgression that accompanied northward retreat of the margin of the Laurentide ice sheet. A Portlandia arctica valve from the underlying transgressive unit provides a minimum age of 14,820 ?? 105 14C yr B.P. for local deglaciation. The mammoth, an adult female, died in midwinter with no evidence of human involvement. Tusk growth rates and oxygen-isotope variation over the last few years of life record low seasonality. The mammoth was transported to the site as a partial carcass by the late-glacial proto-Saco River. It sank in a near-shore setting, was subjected to additional disarticulation and scattering of elements, and was finally buried in sediments reworked by the shallowing sea. ?? 2004 University of Washington. All rights reserved.

  15. Prions Adhere to Soil Minerals and Remain Infectious

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Christopher J; Phillips, Kristen E; Schramm, Peter T; McKenzie, Debbie; Aiken, Judd M; Pedersen, Joel A

    2006-01-01

    An unidentified environmental reservoir of infectivity contributes to the natural transmission of prion diseases (transmissible spongiform encephalopathies [TSEs]) in sheep, deer, and elk. Prion infectivity may enter soil environments via shedding from diseased animals and decomposition of infected carcasses. Burial of TSE-infected cattle, sheep, and deer as a means of disposal has resulted in unintentional introduction of prions into subsurface environments. We examined the potential for soil to serve as a TSE reservoir by studying the interaction of the disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc) with common soil minerals. In this study, we demonstrated substantial PrPSc adsorption to two clay minerals, quartz, and four whole soil samples. We quantified the PrPSc-binding capacities of each mineral. Furthermore, we observed that PrPSc desorbed from montmorillonite clay was cleaved at an N-terminal site and the interaction between PrPSc and Mte was strong, making desorption of the protein difficult. Despite cleavage and avid binding, PrPSc bound to Mte remained infectious. Results from our study suggest that PrPSc released into soil environments may be preserved in a bioavailable form, perpetuating prion disease epizootics and exposing other species to the infectious agent. PMID:16617377

  16. Carnivoran remains from the Malapa hominin site, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Brian F; Werdelin, Lars; Hartstone-Rose, Adam; Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Berger, Lee R

    2011-01-01

    Recent discoveries at the new hominin-bearing deposits of Malapa, South Africa, have yielded a rich faunal assemblage associated with the newly described hominin taxon Australopithecus sediba. Dating of this deposit using U-Pb and palaeomagnetic methods has provided an age of 1.977 Ma, being one of the most accurately dated, time constrained deposits in the Plio-Pleistocene of southern Africa. To date, 81 carnivoran specimens have been identified at this site including members of the families Canidae, Viverridae, Herpestidae, Hyaenidae and Felidae. Of note is the presence of the extinct taxon Dinofelis cf. D. barlowi that may represent the last appearance date for this species. Extant large carnivores are represented by specimens of leopard (Panthera pardus) and brown hyaena (Parahyaena brunnea). Smaller carnivores are also represented, and include the genera Atilax and Genetta, as well as Vulpes cf. V. chama. Malapa may also represent the first appearance date for Felis nigripes (Black-footed cat). The geochronological age of Malapa and the associated hominin taxa and carnivoran remains provide a window of research into mammalian evolution during a relatively unknown period in South Africa and elsewhere. In particular, the fauna represented at Malapa has the potential to elucidate aspects of the evolution of Dinofelis and may help resolve competing hypotheses about faunal exchange between East and Southern Africa during the late Pliocene or early Pleistocene. PMID:22073222

  17. DNA Profiling Success Rates from Degraded Skeletal Remains in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Emma; Stephenson, Mishel

    2016-07-01

    No data are available regarding the success of DNA Short Tandem Repeat (STR) profiling from degraded skeletal remains in Guatemala. Therefore, DNA profiling success rates relating to 2595 skeletons from eleven cases at the Forensic Anthropology Foundation of Guatemala (FAFG) are presented. The typical postmortem interval was 30 years. DNA was extracted from bone powder and amplified using Identifiler and Minifler. DNA profiling success rates differed between cases, ranging from 50.8% to 7.0%, the overall success rate for samples was 36.3%. The best DNA profiling success rates were obtained from femur (36.2%) and tooth (33.7%) samples. DNA profiles were significantly better from lower body bones than upper body bones (p = <0.0001). Bone samples from males gave significantly better profiles than samples from females (p = <0.0001). These results are believed to be related to bone density. The findings are important for designing forensic DNA sampling strategies in future victim recovery investigations. PMID:27364268

  18. Atomic data for stellar spectroscopy: recent successes and remaining needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneden, Christopher; Lawler, James E.; Wood, Michael P.; Den Hartog, Elizabeth A.; Cowan, John J.

    2014-11-01

    Stellar chemical composition analyses provide vital insights into galactic nucleosynthesis. Atomic line data are critical inputs to stellar abundance computations. Recent lab studies have made significant progress in refining and extending knowledge of transition probabilities, isotopic wavelength shifts, and hyperfine substructure patterns for the absorption lines that are of most interest to stellar spectroscopists. The observable neutron-capture (n-capture) element species (Z \\gt 30) have been scrutinized in lab studies by several groups. For many species the uncertainties in experimental oscillator strengths are ≤slant 10%, which permits detailed assessment of rapid and slow n-capture nucleosynthesis contributions. In this review, extreme examples of r-process-enriched stars in the galactic halo will be shown, which suggest that the description of observable n-capture abundances in these stars is nearly complete. Unfortunately, there are serious remaining concerns about the reliability of observed abundances of lighter elements. In particular, it is not clear that line formation in real stellar atmospheres is being modeled correctly. But for many elements with Z \\lt 30 the atomic transition data are not yet settled. Highlights will be given of some recent large improvements, with suggestions for the most important needs for the near future.

  19. New Evidence Links Stellar Remains to Oldest Recorded Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-09-01

    Recent observations have uncovered evidence that helps to confirm the identification of the remains of one of the earliest stellar explosions recorded by humans. The new study shows that the supernova remnant RCW 86 is much younger than previously thought. As such, the formation of the remnant appears to coincide with a supernova observed by Chinese astronomers in 185 A.D. The study used data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton Observatory, "There have been previous suggestions that RCW 86 is the remains of the supernova from 185 A.D.," said Jacco Vink of University of Utrecht, the Netherlands, and lead author of the study. "These new X-ray data greatly strengthen the case." When a massive star runs out of fuel, it collapses on itself, creating a supernova that can outshine an entire galaxy. The intense explosion hurls the outer layers of the star into space and produces powerful shock waves. The remains of the star and the material it encounters are heated to millions of degrees and can emit intense X-ray radiation for thousands of years. Animation of a Massive Star Explosion Animation of a Massive Star Explosion In their stellar forensic work, Vink and colleagues studied the debris in RCW 86 to estimate when its progenitor star originally exploded. They calculated how quickly the shocked, or energized, shell is moving in RCW 86, by studying one part of the remnant. They combined this expansion velocity with the size of the remnant and a basic understanding of how supernovas expand to estimate the age of RCW 86. "Our new calculations tell us the remnant is about 2,000 years old," said Aya Bamba, a coauthor from the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Japan. "Previously astronomers had estimated an age of 10,000 years." The younger age for RCW 86 may explain an astronomical event observed almost 2000 years ago. In 185 AD, Chinese astronomers (and possibly the Romans) recorded the appearance of a new

  20. DNA Profiling Success Rates from Degraded Skeletal Remains in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Emma; Stephenson, Mishel

    2016-07-01

    No data are available regarding the success of DNA Short Tandem Repeat (STR) profiling from degraded skeletal remains in Guatemala. Therefore, DNA profiling success rates relating to 2595 skeletons from eleven cases at the Forensic Anthropology Foundation of Guatemala (FAFG) are presented. The typical postmortem interval was 30 years. DNA was extracted from bone powder and amplified using Identifiler and Minifler. DNA profiling success rates differed between cases, ranging from 50.8% to 7.0%, the overall success rate for samples was 36.3%. The best DNA profiling success rates were obtained from femur (36.2%) and tooth (33.7%) samples. DNA profiles were significantly better from lower body bones than upper body bones (p = <0.0001). Bone samples from males gave significantly better profiles than samples from females (p = <0.0001). These results are believed to be related to bone density. The findings are important for designing forensic DNA sampling strategies in future victim recovery investigations.

  1. Identifying the Crystal Graveyards Remaining After Large Silicic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, S. E.; Deering, C. D.; Bachmann, O.; Huber, C.; Gutiérrez, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    The accumulation of voluminous crystal-poor rhyolites from an upper crustal mush environment inherently necessitates the complementary formation of unerupted silicic cumulates. However, identification of such frozen cumulates remains controversial. This has motivated us to develop of a new geochemical model aimed at better constraining the behavior of trace elements in a magma reservoir concurrently tracking crystallization and imperfect segregation of melt. We use a numerical method to solve our model equations rather than seek analytical solutions, thereby relieving overly simplistic assumptions for the dependencies between partition coefficient or melt segregation rate as functions of crystallinity. Our model allows partition coefficient to vary depending on the crystallinizing mineralogy at any particular stage in magma cooling, as well as the ability to test different rates and efficiencies of crystal-melt segregation. We apply our model first to the Searchlight Pluton as a well-constrained case study, which allows us to quantitatively test existing interpretations of that pluton. Building on this, we broaden our model to better understand the relationship between volcanic and plutonic rocks utilizing the NAVDAT database. Our results produce unambiguous fractionation signatures for segregated melts, while those signatures are muted for their cumulate counterparts. These models suggest that some large granitiods may represent accumulations of crystals, having lost melt in some cases to volcanic eruptions or to higher level evolved plutonic units, although the trace element signature of this process is expected to be subtle.

  2. National Endoscopy Quality Improvement Program Remains Suboptimal in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jae Myung; Moon, Jeong Seop; Chung, Il-Kwun; Kim, Jin-Oh; Im, Jong Pil; Cho, Yu Kyung; Kim, Hyun Gun; Lee, Sang Kil; Lee, Hang Lak; Jang, Jae Young; Kim, Eun Sun; Jung, Yunho; Moon, Chang Mo; Kim, Yeol; Park, Bo Young

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims We evaluated the characteristics of the National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP) and opinions regarding the National Endoscopy Quality Improvement Program (NEQIP). Methods We surveyed physicians performing esophagogastroduodenoscopy and/or colonoscopy screenings as part of the NCSP via e-mail between July and August in 2015. The 32-item survey instrument included endoscopic capacity, sedation, and reprocessing of endoscopes as well as opinions regarding the NEQIP. Results A total of 507 respondents were analyzed after the exclusion of 40 incomplete answers. Under the current capacity of the NCSP, the typical waiting time for screening endoscopy was less than 4 weeks in more than 90% of endoscopy units. Performance of endoscopy reprocessing was suboptimal, with 28% of respondents using unapproved disinfectants or not knowing the main ingredient of their disinfectants and 15% to 17% of respondents not following reprocessing protocols. Agreement with the NEQIP was optimal, because only 5.7% of respondents did not agree with NEQIP; however, familiarity with the NEQIP was suboptimal, because only 37.3% of respondents were familiar with the NEQIP criteria. Conclusions The NEQ-IP remains suboptimal in Korea. Given the suboptimal performance of endoscopy reprocessing and low familiarity with the NEQIP, improved quality in endoscopy reprocessing and better understanding of the NEQIP should be emphasized in Korea. PMID:27282270

  3. Carnivoran Remains from the Malapa Hominin Site, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Brian F.; Werdelin, Lars; Hartstone-Rose, Adam; Lacruz, Rodrigo S.; Berger, Lee R.

    2011-01-01

    Recent discoveries at the new hominin-bearing deposits of Malapa, South Africa, have yielded a rich faunal assemblage associated with the newly described hominin taxon Australopithecus sediba. Dating of this deposit using U-Pb and palaeomagnetic methods has provided an age of 1.977 Ma, being one of the most accurately dated, time constrained deposits in the Plio-Pleistocene of southern Africa. To date, 81 carnivoran specimens have been identified at this site including members of the families Canidae, Viverridae, Herpestidae, Hyaenidae and Felidae. Of note is the presence of the extinct taxon Dinofelis cf. D. barlowi that may represent the last appearance date for this species. Extant large carnivores are represented by specimens of leopard (Panthera pardus) and brown hyaena (Parahyaena brunnea). Smaller carnivores are also represented, and include the genera Atilax and Genetta, as well as Vulpes cf. V. chama. Malapa may also represent the first appearance date for Felis nigripes (Black-footed cat). The geochronological age of Malapa and the associated hominin taxa and carnivoran remains provide a window of research into mammalian evolution during a relatively unknown period in South Africa and elsewhere. In particular, the fauna represented at Malapa has the potential to elucidate aspects of the evolution of Dinofelis and may help resolve competing hypotheses about faunal exchange between East and Southern Africa during the late Pliocene or early Pleistocene. PMID:22073222

  4. Coal's role in electrical power generation: Will it remain competitive?

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, C.

    1999-07-01

    Coal is the most abundant worldwide fossil fuel. In the US, coal represents 95% of fossil energy reserves. The US coal resources represent more energy than either proven oil or natural gas reserves and can be expected to last more than 250 years at current consumption rates. Coal fired power plants currently produce 56% of electrical generation in the US and 36% worldwide, and forecasts show coal use to increase. Impressive statistics such as these, along with the direct correlation between electrical growth and GDP should indicate that coal has a bright future. There are some clouds on the horizon, however, that could dim this seemingly rosy picture. Potentially, the greatest challenge to coal's future is CO2 emission restrictions to address global climate change. Realistically, coal has to be a part of the generation mix of developing nations, particularly those with abundant coal resources such as China and India. If electrification of these countries and corresponding economic growth is to take place, there are not presently a lot of cost effective alternatives. This paper presents a discussion of what the coal industry is doing to remain competitive. It looks at environmental and competitive issues facing coal use.

  5. Nattokinase-promoted tissue plasminogen activator release from human cells.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Chieko; Maruyama, Masugi; Kawahara, Tomoko; Sumi, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    When heated to a temperature of 70 degrees C or higher, the strong fibrinolytic activity of nattokinase in a solution was deactivated. Similar results were observed in the case of using Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-pNA, which are synthetic substrates of nattokinase. In the current study, tests were conducted on the indirect fibrinolytic effects of the substances containing nattokinase that had been deactivated through heating at 121 degrees C for 15 min. Bacillus subtilis natto culture solutions made from three types of bacteria strain were heat-treated and deactivated, and it was found that these culture solutions had the ability to generate tissue plasminogen activators (tPA) from vascular endothelial cells and HeLa cells at certain concentration levels. For example, it was found that the addition of heat-treated culture solution of the Naruse strain (undiluted solution) raises the tPA activity of HeLa cells to about 20 times that of the control. Under the same conditions, tPA activity was raised to a level about 5 times higher for human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), and to a level about 24 times higher for nattokinase sold on the market. No change in cell count was observed for HeLa cells and HUVEC in the culture solution at these concentrations, and the level of activity was found to vary with concentration.

  6. High-level expression of a novel recombinant human plasminogen activator (rhPA) in the milk of transgenic rabbits and its thrombolytic bioactivity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Song, Shaozheng; Ge, Xin; Cheng, Yaobin; Lu, Rui; Zhang, Ting; Yu, Baoli; Ji, Xueqiao; Qi, Zhengqiang; Rong, Yao; Yuan, Yuguo; Cheng, Yong

    2016-08-01

    The human tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a key kinase of fibrinolysis that plays an important role in dissolving fibrin clots to promote thrombolysis. The recombinant human plasminogen activator (rhPA) has more thrombolytic advantages than the wild type tPA. To increase the half-life and thrombolytic activity of tPA, a mutant containing only the essential K2 fibrin-binding and P activating plasminogen domains of the wild type tPA was cloned. This fragment was then inserted into goat β-casein regulatory sequences. Then, a mammary gland-specific expression vector, PCL25/rhPA, was constructed, and the transgenic rabbits were generated. In this study, 18 live transgenic founders (12♀, 6♂) were generated using pronuclear microinjection. Six transgenic rabbits were obtained, and the expression levels of rhPA in the milk had a range of 15.2-630 µg/ml. A fibrin agarose plate assay of rhPA showed that it had strong thrombolytic bioactivity in vitro, and the highest specific activity was >360 (360 times more than that of alteplase). The results indicated that the rhPA containing only the K2 and P domains is efficiently expressed with higher thrombolytic bioactivity in the milk of transgenic rabbits. Our study also demonstrated a new method for the large-scale production of clinically relevant recombinant pharmaceutical proteins in the mammary glands of transgenic rabbits. PMID:27230577

  7. Mineralized remains of morphotypes of filamentous cyanobacteria in carbonaceous meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-09-01

    rocks, living, cryopreserved and fossilized extremophiles and cyanobacteria. These studies have resulted in the detection of mineralized remains of morphotypes of filamentous cyanobacteria, mats and consortia in many carbonaceous meteorites. These well-preserved and embedded microfossils are consistent with the size, morphology and ultra-microstructure of filamentous trichomic prokaryotes and degraded remains of microfibrils of cyanobacterial sheaths. EDAX elemental studies reveal that the forms in the meteorites often have highly carbonized sheaths in close association with permineralized filaments, trichomes, and microbial cells. The eextensive protocols and methodologies that have been developed to protect the samples from contamination and to distinguish recent contaminants from indigenous microfossils are described recent bio-contaminants. Ratios of critical bioelements (C:O, C:N, C:P, and C:S) reveal dramatic differences between microfossils in Earth rocks and meteorites and in the cells, filaments, trichomes, and hormogonia of recently living cyanobacteria. The results of comparative optical, ESEM and FESEM studies and EDAX elemental analyses of recent cyanobacteria (e.g. Calothrix, Oscillatoria, and Lyngbya) of similar size, morphology and microstructure to microfossils found embedded in the Murchison CM2 and the Orgueil CI1 carbonaceous meteorites are presented

  8. Hypothermia Increases Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression and Decreases Post-Operative Intra-Abdominal Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chien-Chang; Wang, Hsuan-Mao; Chou, Tzung-Hsin; Wu, Meng-Che; Hsueh, Kuang-Lung; Chen, Shyr-Chyr

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia during operation decreases postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion formation. We sought to determine the most appropriate duration of hypothermia, and whether hypothermia affects the expression of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Methods 80 male BALB/c mice weighing 25–30 g are randomized into one of five groups: adhesion model with infusion of 15°C saline for 15 minutes (A); 30 minutes (B); 45 minute (C); adhesion model without infusion of cold saline (D); and sham operation without infusion of cold saline (E). Adhesion scores and tPA levels in the peritoneum fluid levels were analyzed on postoperative days 1, 7, and 14. Results On day 14, the cold saline infusion groups (A, B, and C) had lower adhesion scores than the without infusion of cold saline group (D). However, only group B (cold saline infusion for 30 minutes) had a significantly lower adhesion scores than group D. Also, group B was found to have 3.4 fold, 2.3 fold, and 2.2 fold higher levels of tPA than group D on days 1, 7, and 14 respectively. Conclusions Our results suggest that cold saline infusion for 30 minutes was the optimum duration to decrease postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion formation. The decrease in the adhesion formations could be partly due to an increase in the level of tPA. PMID:27583464

  9. Human Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression in Escherichia coli using Cytoplasmic and Periplasmic Cumulative Power.

    PubMed

    Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Mahboudi, Fereidoun; Hemayatkar, Mahdi; Davami, Fatemeh; Barkhordary, Farzaneh; Adeli, Ahmad; Soleimani, Mohammad; Davoudi, Noushin; Khalaj, Vahid

    2010-07-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease, which is composed of five distinct structural domains with 17 disulfide bonds, representing a model of high-disulfide proteins in human body. One of the most important limitations for high yield heterologous protein production in Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the expression of complex proteins with multiple disulfide bridges. In this study the combination of two distinct strategies, manipulated cytoplasm and native periplasm, was applied to produce the functional full length tPA enzyme in E. coli. Using a PelB signal peptide sequence at 5' site of tPA gene, the expression cassette was prepared and subsequently was transformed into a strain with manipulated oxidizing cytoplasm. Then the induction was made to express the protein of interest. The SDS-PAGE analysis and gelatin hydrolysis confirmed the successful expression of functional tPA. The results of this study showed that complex proteins can be produced in E. coli using the cumulative power of both cytoplasm and periplasm.

  10. Human Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression in Escherichia coli using Cytoplasmic and Periplasmic Cumulative Power

    PubMed Central

    Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Mahboudi, Fereidoun; Hemayatkar, Mahdi; Davami, Fatemeh; Barkhordary, Farzaneh; Adeli, Ahmad; Soleimani, Mohammad; Davoudi, Noushin; Khalaj, Vahid

    2010-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease, which is composed of five distinct structural domains with 17 disulfide bonds, representing a model of high-disulfide proteins in human body. One of the most important limitations for high yield heterologous protein production in Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the expression of complex proteins with multiple disulfide bridges. In this study the combination of two distinct strategies, manipulated cytoplasm and native periplasm, was applied to produce the functional full length tPA enzyme in E. coli. Using a PelB signal peptide sequence at 5′ site of tPA gene, the expression cassette was prepared and subsequently was transformed into a strain with manipulated oxidizing cytoplasm. Then the induction was made to express the protein of interest. The SDS-PAGE analysis and gelatin hydrolysis confirmed the successful expression of functional tPA. The results of this study showed that complex proteins can be produced in E. coli using the cumulative power of both cytoplasm and periplasm. PMID:23408156

  11. Mammalian gonocyte and spermatogonia differentiation: recent advances and remaining challenges.

    PubMed

    Manku, Gurpreet; Culty, Martine

    2015-03-01

    The production of spermatozoa relies on a pool of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), formed in infancy from the differentiation of their precursor cells, the gonocytes. Throughout adult life, SSCs will either self-renew or differentiate, in order to maintain a stem cell reserve while providing cells to the spermatogenic cycle. By contrast, gonocytes represent a transient and finite phase of development leading to the formation of SSCs or spermatogonia of the first spermatogenic wave. Gonocyte development involves phases of quiescence, cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Spermatogonia, on the other hand, remain located at the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubules throughout their successive phases of proliferation and differentiation. Apoptosis is an integral part of both developmental phases, allowing for the removal of defective cells and the maintenance of proper germ-Sertoli cell ratios. While gonocytes and spermatogonia mitosis are regulated by distinct factors, they both undergo differentiation in response to retinoic acid. In contrast to postpubertal spermatogenesis, the early steps of germ cell development have only recently attracted attention, unveiling genes and pathways regulating SSC self-renewal and proliferation. Yet, less is known on the mechanisms regulating differentiation. The processes leading from gonocytes to spermatogonia have been seldom investigated. While the formation of abnormal gonocytes or SSCs could lead to infertility, defective gonocyte differentiation might be at the origin of testicular germ cell tumors. Thus, it is important to better understand the molecular mechanisms regulating these processes. This review summarizes and compares the present knowledge on the mechanisms regulating mammalian gonocyte and spermatogonial differentiation. PMID:25670871

  12. Fertility remains high in Guatemala despite increasing use of contraception.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    With a total fertility rate of 5.1, Guatemala has one of the highest levels of fertility in Latin America, according to findings from the 1995 DHS survey in Guatemala (Encuesta Nacional de Salud Materno Infantil--ENSMI-95). Fertility is lower among educated women, urban women, and Ladino women. The differences are most striking by education: on average, women with no formal education will have 7 children, compared with 2 or 3 children among women with at least some secondary education. Contraceptive use among currently married women increased from 23% in 1987 to 32% in 1995; however, this level of use is still low compared with other countries in the region. Almost half of contraceptive users (15%) rely on female sterilization; relatively few use the pill (4%) or the IUD (3%). It is estimated that 24% of married women want to space or limit their births but are not using a contraceptive method. The survey indicates that there have been improvements in most indicators of maternal and child health, but many challenges remain. Only about half of the women receive antenatal care and just one-third receive assistance at delivery from trained medical personnel. Less than half of the children aged 12-23 months have received all the recommended vaccinations, and half of the children under 5 years are malnourished (stunted). At the same time, infant mortality has shown a steady decline. In the 5-year period preceding the survey the infant mortality rate was 51/1000 live births (under-five mortality was 68/1000). The ENSMI-95 was implemented by the Instituto Nacional de Estadistica. A total of 12,403 women aged 15-49 years were interviewed. The final report and summary report are available in Spanish.

  13. 24/7 Neurocritical Care Nurse Practitioner Coverage Reduced Door-to-Needle Time in Stroke Patients Treated with Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Jennifer L.; Nakagawa, Kazuma; Asai, Susan M.; Koenig, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Stroke centers with limited on-site neurovascular physician coverage may experience delays in acute stroke treatment. We sought to assess the impact of providing 24/7 neurocritical care acute care nurse practitioner (ACNP) “stroke code” first responder coverage on treatment delays in acute stroke patients who received tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Methods Consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients treated with intravenous tPA at a primary stroke center on Oahu between 2009 and 2014 were retrospectively studied. 24/7 ACNP stroke code coverage (intervention) was introduced on July 1, 2011. The tPA utilization, door-to-needle (DTN) time, imaging-to-needle (ITN) time, and independent ambulation at hospital discharge were compared between the preintervention period (24 months) and the postintervention period (33 months). Results We studied 166 stroke code patients who were treated with intravenous tPA, 44 of whom were treated during the preintervention period and 122 of whom were treated during the postintervention period. After the intervention, the median DTN time was reduced from 53 minutes (interquartile range [IQR] 45–73) to 45 minutes (IQR 35–58) (P = .001), and the median ITN time was reduced from 36 minutes (IQR 28–64) to 21 minutes (IQR 16–31) (P < .0001). Compliance with the 60-minute target DTN improved from 61.4% (27 of 44 patients) in the preintervention period to 81.2% (99 of 122 patients) in the postintervention period (P = .004). The tPA treatment rates were similar between the preintervention and postintervention periods (P = .60). Conclusions Addition of 24/7 on-site neurocritical care ACNP first responder coverage for acute stroke code significantly reduced the DTN time among acute stroke patients treated with tPA. PMID:26907680

  14. Hypoxia-Ischemia or Excitotoxin-Induced Tissue Plasminogen Activator- Dependent Gelatinase Activation in Mice Neonate Brain Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Omouendze, Priscilla L.; Henry, Vincent J.; Porte, Baptiste; Dupré, Nicolas; Carmeliet, Peter; Gonzalez, Bruno J.; Marret, Stéphane; Leroux, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) and excitotoxicity are validated causes of neonatal brain injuries and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) participates in the processes through proteolytic and receptor-mediated pathways. Brain microvascular endothelial cells from neonates in culture, contain and release more t-PA and gelatinases upon glutamate challenge than adult cells. We have studied t-PA to gelatinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9) activity links in HI and excitotoxicity lesion models in 5 day–old pups in wild type and in t-PA or its inhibitor (PAI-1) genes inactivated mice. Gelatinolytic activities were detected in SDS-PAGE zymograms and by in situ fluorescent DQ-gelatin microscopic zymographies. HI was achieved by unilateral carotid ligature followed by a 40 min hypoxia (8%O2). Excitotoxic lesions were produced by intra parenchymal cortical (i.c.) injections of 10 µg ibotenate (Ibo). Gel zymograms in WT cortex revealed progressive extinction of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities near day 15 or day 8 respectively. MMP-2 expression was the same in all strains while MMP-9 activity was barely detectable in t-PA−/− and enhanced in PAI-1−/− mice. HI or Ibo produced activation of MMP-2 activities 6 hours post-insult, in cortices of WT mice but not in t-PA−/− mice. In PAI-1−/− mice, HI or vehicle i.c. injection increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. In situ zymograms using DQ-gelatin revealed vessel associated gelatinolytic activity in lesioned areas in PAI-1−/− and in WT mice. In WT brain slices incubated ex vivo, glutamate (200 µM) induced DQ-gelatin activation in vessels. The effect was not detected in t-PA−/−mice, but was restored by concomitant exposure to recombinant t-PA (20 µg/mL). In summary, neonatal brain lesion paradigms and ex vivo excitotoxic glutamate evoked t-PA-dependent gelatinases activation in vessels. Both MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities appeared t-PA-dependent. The data suggest that vascular directed protease inhibition may have neuroprotection

  15. Child health and survival remains poor in Malawi.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    The results of the 1992 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) in Malawi show that Malawi still has one of the highest levels of mortality for less than 5 year old children in the world ( 5 mortality = 25%). During the last 10 years, an increase in postneonatal mortality has offset the modest decrease in neonatal mortality. Infant mortality has hovered around 135/1000 live births since the early 1980s. More children in Malawi suffer from chronic undernutrition (stunting) than in any African country surveyed by DHS. In fact, almost 50% of all less than 5 year old children are stunted. Another 6.7% suffer from wasting (acute undernutrition). Poor infant feeding practices contribute to undernutrition and increased vulnerability to death. Just 3% of less than 4 month old infants are exclusively breast fed. 75% of 2-3 month olds receive supplementary feedings. On the other hand, progress has occurred in the provision of basic maternal and child health services. Just 3% of 12-23 month old children have had no vaccinations. 85% have received all their vaccinations. 97% have received their BCG vaccine and the first dose of DPT and polio vaccine. A trained health professional has provided prenatal care to mothers for 90% of recent births. 86% of mothers have had at least 1 dose of tetanus toxoid during pregnancy. More than 50% of recent births occurred at a health facility. The maternal mortality ratio is still high (620/100,000 births). Even though contraceptive use is increasing and fertility is falling (1984-1992, 1-7% using a modern method and 7.5-6.7, respectively), fertility is still high. Ideal family size has fallen from 5 to 6 between 1984 and 1992. Age at first marriage and age at first birth have increased slightly. These findings suggest that Malawi is just entering the demographic transition. AIDS remains a serious public health problem with many people having little knowledge about it, about modes of transmission, and about means of prevention.

  16. AIDS, individual behaviour and the unexplained remaining variation.

    PubMed

    Katz, Alison

    2002-01-01

    From the start of the AIDS pandemic, individual behaviour has been put forward, implicitly or explicitly, as the main explanatory concept for understanding the epidemiology of HIV infection and in particular for the rapid spread and high prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa. This has had enormous implications for the international response to AIDS and has heavily influenced public health policy and strategy and the design of prevention and care interventions at national, community and individual level. It is argued that individual behaviour alone cannot possibly account for the enormous variation in HIV prevalence between population groups, countries and regions and that the unexplained remaining variation has been neglected by the international AIDS community. Biological vulnerability to HIV due to seriously deficient immune systems has been ignored as a determinant of the high levels of infection in certain populations. This is in sharp contrast to well proven public health approaches to other infectious diseases. In particular, it is argued that poor nutrition and co-infection with the myriad of other diseases of poverty including tuberculosis, malaria, leishmaniasis and parasitic infections, have been neglected as root causes of susceptibility, infectiousness and high rates of transmission of HIV at the level of populations. Vulnerability in terms of non-biological factors such as labour migration, prostitution, exchange of sex for survival, population movements due to war and violence, has received some attention but the solutions proposed to these problems are also inappropriately focused on individual behaviour and suffer from the same neglect of economic and political root causes. As the foundation for the international community's response to the AIDS pandemic, explanations of HIV/AIDS epidemiology in terms of individual behaviour are not only grossly inadequate, they are highly stigmatising and may in some cases, be racist. They have diverted attention from

  17. Self-phase modulation and two-photon absorption imaging of cells and active neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Martin C.; Liu, Henry; Piletic, Ivan R.; Ye, Tong; Yasuda, Ryohei; Warren, Warren S.

    2007-02-01

    Even though multi-photon fluorescence microscopy offers higher resolution and better penetration depth than traditional fluorescence microscopy, its use is restricted to the detection of molecules that fluoresce. Two-photon absorption (TPA) imaging can provide contrast in non-fluorescent molecules while retaining the high resolution and sectioning capabilities of nonlinear imaging modalities. In the long-wavelength water window, tissue TPA is dominated by the endogenous molecules melanin and hemoglobin with an almost complete absence of endogenous two-photon fluorescence. A complementary nonlinear contrast mechanism is self-phase modulation (SPM), which can provide intrinsic signatures that can depend on local tissue anisotropy, chemical environment, or other structural properties. We have developed a spectral hole refilling measurement technique for TPA and SPM measurements using shaped ultrafast laser pulses. Here we report on a microscopy setup to simultaneously acquire 3D, high-resolution TPA and SPM images. We have acquired data in mounted B16 melanoma cells with very modest laser power levels. We will also discuss the possible application of this measurement technique to neuronal imaging. Since SPM is sensitive to material structure we can expect SPM properties of neurons to change during neuronal firing. Using our hole-refilling technique we have now demonstrated strong novel intrinsic nonlinear signatures of neuronal activation in a hippocampal brain slice. The observed changes in nonlinear signal upon collective activation were up to factors of two, unlike other intrinsic optical signal changes on the percent level. These results show that TPA and SPM imaging can provide important novel functional contrast in tissue using very modest power levels suitable for in vivo applications.

  18. Cerebrovascular Thromboprophylaxis in Mice by Erythrocyte-Coupled Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator

    PubMed Central

    Danielyan, Kristina; Ganguly, Kumkum; Ding, Bi-Sen; Atochin, Dmitriy; Zaitsev, Sergei; Murciano, Juan-Carlos; Huang, Paul L.; Kasner, Scott E.; Cines, Douglas B.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cerebrovascular thrombosis is a major source of morbidity and mortality after surgery, but thromboprophylaxis in this setting is limited because of the formidable risk of perioperative bleeding. Thrombolytics (eg, tissue-type plasminogen activator [tPA]) cannot be used prophylactically in this high-risk setting because of their short duration of action and risk of causing hemorrhage and central nervous system damage. We found that coupling tPA to carrier red blood cells (RBCs) prolongs and localizes tPA activity within the bloodstream and converts it into a thromboprophylactic agent, RBC/tPA. To evaluate the utility of this new approach for preventing cerebrovascular thrombosis, we examined the effect of RBC/tPA in animal models of cerebrovascular thromboembolism and ischemia. Methods and Results Preformed fibrin microemboli were injected into the middle carotid artery of mice, occluding downstream perfusion and causing severe infarction and 50% mortality within 48 hours. Preinjected RBC/tPA rapidly lysed nascent cerebral thromboemboli, providing rapid, durable reperfusion and reducing morbidity and mortality. These beneficial effects were not achieved by preinjection of tPA, even at a 10-fold higher dose, which increased mortality from 50% to 90% by 10 hours after embolization. RBC/tPA injected 10 minutes after tail amputation to simulate postsurgical hemostasis did not cause bleeding from the wound, whereas soluble tPA caused profuse bleeding. RBC/tPA neither aggravated brain damage caused by focal ischemia in a filament model of middle carotid artery occlusion nor caused postthrombotic hemorrhage in hypertensive rats. Conclusions These results suggest a potential RBC/tPA utility as thromboprophylaxis in patients who are at risk for acute cerebrovascular thromboembolism. PMID:18794394

  19. The effect of ageing on platelet function and fibrinolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Gleerup, G; Winther, K

    1995-08-01

    Twelve healthy male volunteers, mean age twenty-five, range twenty-one to thirty years, and 12 healthy middle-aged male volunteers mean age fifty-eight, range forty-four to seventy-two years, were tested regarding platelet aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate and fibrinolytic activity, estimated as euglobulin clot lysis time (ECLT), tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), and the fast-acting inhibitor against t-PA normally referred to as (PAI-1). Platelet aggregation increased significantly in the middle-aged group as compared with the young, as shown by a decrease in ADP thresholds for irreversible aggregation (P < 0.01). In healthy young volunteers, vigorous cycling exercise by itself caused platelet aggregability to decrease (P < 0.05). Such changes were not observed in the elderly. Fibrinolytic activity decreased significantly in the middle-aged group as shown by a prolongation of the ECLT (P < 0.01) and PAI-1, although not significantly, increased by approximately 100%, whereas t-PA significantly increased in the middle-aged group (P < 0.01). The present results suggest that increasing age is associated with not only increased platelet aggregability but also decreased fibrinolytic activity.

  20. Involvement of tissue plasminogen activator-plasmin system in depolarization-evoked dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens of mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mina; Nagai, Taku; Kamei, Hiroyuki; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2006-11-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease, catalyzes the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin. In the present study, we investigated the role of the tPA-plasmin system in depolarization-evoked dopamine (DA) and acetylcholine (ACh) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and hippocampus, respectively, of mice, by using in vivo microdialysis. Microinjection of either tPA or plasmin significantly potentiated 40 mM KCl-induced DA release without affecting basal DA levels. In contrast, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 dose-dependently reduced 60 mM KCl-induced DA release. The 60 mM KCl-evoked DA release in the NAc was markedly diminished in tPA-deficient (tPA-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice, although basal DA levels did not differ between the two groups. Microinjections of either exogenous tPA (100 ng) or plasmin (100 ng) into the NAc of tPA-/-mice restored 60 mM KCl-induced DA release, as observed in wild-type mice. In contrast, there was no difference in either basal or 60 mM KCl-induced ACh release in the hippocampus between wild-type and tPA-/-mice. Our findings suggest that the tPA-plasmin system is involved in the regulation of depolarization-evoked DA release in the NAc.

  1. 'Bacoside B'--the need remains for establishing identity.

    PubMed

    Deepak, Mundkinajeddu; Amit, Agarwal

    2013-06-01

    Bacopa monnieri is fast gaining popularity for its beneficial effects on cognition and memory. The active constituents of the plant were putatively identified as 'bacosides A and B' in older publications. Subsequently 'bacoside A' was identified as a mixture of four saponins [bacoside A3 (1), bacopaside II (2), bacopasaponin C (3) and the jujobogenin isomer of the latter (4)] and was considered as part of major constituents of the herb along with bacopaside I (5). These major saponins now form part of analytical monographs in many Pharmacopoeia. However identity of 'bacoside B' still appears controversial with seemingly contradictory information available in the scientific literature. At the same time quality of many extracts and herbal products derived from the plant is still being determined based on the content of 'bacosides A and B'. We have elaborated these issues in this article along with our recommendations to move forward towards achieving scientific clarity on the subject.

  2. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Giancaspero, Teresa A; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina M; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in a broad spectrum of biological activities, among which energetic metabolism and chromatin remodeling. Subcellular localisation of FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2, FADS), the second enzyme in the FAD forming pathway, is addressed here in HepG2 cells by confocal microscopy, in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalyzed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesizing activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD "chaperone." The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) or a mitochondrial dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4). Both enzymes carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, in which tetrahydrofolate is converted into 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells. PMID:25954742

  3. Circadian rhythms of photorefractory siberian hamsters remain responsive to melatonin.

    PubMed

    Butler, Matthew P; Paul, Matthew J; Turner, Kevin W; Park, Jin Ho; Driscoll, Joseph R; Kriegsfeld, Lance J; Zucker, Irving

    2008-04-01

    Short day lengths increase the duration of nocturnal melatonin (Mel) secretion, which induces the winter phenotype in Siberian hamsters. After several months of continued exposure to short days, hamsters spontaneously revert to the spring-summer phenotype. This transition has been attributed to the development of refractoriness of Mel-binding tissues, including the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), to long-duration Mel signals. The SCN of Siberian hamsters is required for the seasonal response to winter-like Mel signals, and becomes refractory to previously effective long-duration Mel signals restricted to this area. Acute Mel treatment phase shifts circadian locomotor rhythms of photosensitive Siberian hamsters, presumably by affecting circadian oscillators in the SCN. We tested whether seasonal refractoriness of the SCN to long-duration Mel signals also renders the circadian system of Siberian hamsters unresponsive to Mel. Males manifesting free-running circadian rhythms in constant dim red light were injected with Mel or vehicle for 5 days on a 23.5-h T-cycle beginning at circadian time 10. Mel injections caused significantly larger phase advances in activity onset than did the saline vehicle, but the magnitude of phase shifts to Mel did not differ between photorefractory and photosensitive hamsters. Similarly, when entrained to a 16-h light/8-h dark photocycle, photorefractory and photosensitive hamsters did not differ in their response to Mel injected 4 h before the onset of the dark phase. Activity onset in Mel-injected hamsters was masked by light but was revealed to be significantly earlier than in vehicle-injected hamsters upon transfer to constant dim red light. The acute effects of melatonin on circadian behavioral rhythms are preserved in photorefractory hamsters.

  4. Oncolytic viruses as immunotherapy: progress and remaining challenges

    PubMed Central

    Aurelian, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) comprise an emerging cancer therapeutic modality whose activity involves both direct tumor cell lysis and the induction of immunogenic cell death (ICD). Cellular proteins released from the OV-lysed tumor cells, known as damage-associated molecular patterns and tumor-associated antigens, activate dendritic cells and elicit adaptive antitumor immunity. Interaction with the innate immune system and the development of long-lasting immune memory also contribute to OV-induced cell death. The degree to which the ICD component contributes to the clinical efficacy of OV therapy is still unclear. Modulation of a range of immune interactions may be beneficial or detrimental in nature and the interactions depend on the specific tumor, the site and extent of the disease, the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, the OV platform, the dose, time, and delivery conditions, as well as individual patient responses. To enhance the contribution of ICD, OVs have been engineered to express immunostimulatory genes and strategies have been developed to combine OV therapy with chemo- and immune-based therapeutic regimens. However, these approaches carry the risk that they may also be tolerogenic depending on their levels and the presence of other cytokines, their direct antiviral effects, and the timing and conditions of their expression. The contribution of autophagy to adaptive immunity, the ability of the OVs to kill cancer stem cells, and the patient’s baseline immune status are additional considerations. This review focuses on the complex and as yet poorly understood balancing act that dictates the outcome of OV therapy. We summarize current understanding of the OVs’ function in eliciting antitumor immunity and its relationship to therapeutic efficacy. Also discussed are the criteria involved in restraining antiviral immune responses and minimizing pathology while promoting antitumor immunity to override immune tolerance. PMID:27226725

  5. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Giancaspero, Teresa A.; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina M.; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in a broad spectrum of biological activities, among which energetic metabolism and chromatin remodeling. Subcellular localisation of FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2, FADS), the second enzyme in the FAD forming pathway, is addressed here in HepG2 cells by confocal microscopy, in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalyzed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesizing activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD “chaperone.” The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) or a mitochondrial dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4). Both enzymes carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, in which tetrahydrofolate is converted into 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells. PMID:25954742

  6. Oncolytic viruses as immunotherapy: progress and remaining challenges.

    PubMed

    Aurelian, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) comprise an emerging cancer therapeutic modality whose activity involves both direct tumor cell lysis and the induction of immunogenic cell death (ICD). Cellular proteins released from the OV-lysed tumor cells, known as damage-associated molecular patterns and tumor-associated antigens, activate dendritic cells and elicit adaptive antitumor immunity. Interaction with the innate immune system and the development of long-lasting immune memory also contribute to OV-induced cell death. The degree to which the ICD component contributes to the clinical efficacy of OV therapy is still unclear. Modulation of a range of immune interactions may be beneficial or detrimental in nature and the interactions depend on the specific tumor, the site and extent of the disease, the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, the OV platform, the dose, time, and delivery conditions, as well as individual patient responses. To enhance the contribution of ICD, OVs have been engineered to express immunostimulatory genes and strategies have been developed to combine OV therapy with chemo- and immune-based therapeutic regimens. However, these approaches carry the risk that they may also be tolerogenic depending on their levels and the presence of other cytokines, their direct antiviral effects, and the timing and conditions of their expression. The contribution of autophagy to adaptive immunity, the ability of the OVs to kill cancer stem cells, and the patient's baseline immune status are additional considerations. This review focuses on the complex and as yet poorly understood balancing act that dictates the outcome of OV therapy. We summarize current understanding of the OVs' function in eliciting antitumor immunity and its relationship to therapeutic efficacy. Also discussed are the criteria involved in restraining antiviral immune responses and minimizing pathology while promoting antitumor immunity to override immune tolerance. PMID:27226725

  7. Neuroserpin, a brain-associated inhibitor of tissue plasminogen activator is localized primarily in neurons. Implications for the regulation of motor learning and neuronal survival.

    PubMed

    Hastings, G A; Coleman, T A; Haudenschild, C C; Stefansson, S; Smith, E P; Barthlow, R; Cherry, S; Sandkvist, M; Lawrence, D A

    1997-12-26

    A cDNA clone for the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin), neuroserpin, was isolated from a human whole brain cDNA library, and recombinant protein was expressed in insect cells. The purified protein is an efficient inhibitor of tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA), having an apparent second-order rate constant of 6. 2 x 10(5) M-1 s-1 for the two-chain form. However, unlike other known plasminogen activator inhibitors, neuroserpin is a more effective inactivator of tPA than of urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Neuroserpin also effectively inhibited trypsin and nerve growth factor-gamma but reacted only slowly with plasmin and thrombin. Northern blot analysis showed a 1.8 kilobase messenger RNA expressed predominantly in adult human brain and spinal cord, and immunohistochemical studies of normal mouse tissue detected strong staining primarily in neuronal cells with occasionally positive microglial cells. Staining was most prominent in the ependymal cells of the choroid plexus, Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, select neurons of the hypothalamus and hippocampus, and in the myelinated axons of the commissura. Expression of tPA within these regions is reported to be high and has previously been correlated with both motor learning and neuronal survival. Taken together, these data suggest that neuroserpin is likely to be a critical regulator of tPA activity in the central nervous system, and as such may play an important role in neuronal plasticity and/or maintenance.

  8. Evaluation of Prognostic Values of Tissue Plasminogen Activator and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gurbuz, Yunus; Ozturk, Baris; Tutuncu, Emin Ediz; Sencan, Irfan; Cicek Senturk, Gonul; Altay, Fatma Aybala

    2015-01-01

    Background: Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a widespread disease in Turkey, and was responsible for many deaths in endemic regions during the last decade. The pathogenesis of the disease is not fully understood yet. Objectives: In this study we aimed to determine the levels of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) as predictors of prognosis in CCHF. Patients and Methods: Patients who were diagnosed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and IgM positivity in the reference laboratory were included in this study. Tissue Plasminogen activator and PAI-1 levels were measured by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a commercial kit (human t-PA ELISA and human PAL-1 ELISA; BioVendor research and diagnostic products, BioVendor-Laboratorni medicina a.s., Brno, Czech Republic). Results: A total of 46 patients participated in this study. The significant differences between recovering patients and the patients who died, regarding Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), Creatine Phosphokinase (CPK), Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH), Prothrombin Time (PT), activated Partial Thromboplastin time (aPTT), and thrombocyte and fibrinogen levels, were consistent with many clinical studies in the literature. The fatal cases were found to have higher tPA and PAI-1 levels in contrast to the patients who completely recovered. Conclusions: We think that these findings may help the progress of understanding of CCHF pathogenesis. PMID:26587219

  9. Presumably bacterial remains in banded iron formations: beginning of investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafieva, M.

    2014-04-01

    Ancient Archaean and Protherozoic rocks are the model objects for investigation of rocks comprising astromaterials. Judging by their age these terrestrial rocks are the nearest to the rocks of meteorites. They are represented as a rule by deeply metamorphized layers of volcanogenic and volcanogenic-sedimentary rocks and bacterial-paleontological investigations of these rocks usually meet some difficulties. But paleontological studies of these rocks usually meet some difficulties. One of these difficulties is usual high metamorphization of rocks. That is why investigation of Archaean banded iron formations is of great importance. Banded iron formations are known everywhere. The oldest banded iron formations are met in Archaean. Their widest distribution was in Proterozoic. They are constituent part of metamorphic complexes of all ancient shields. Formation of these units ended in Phanerozoic. Peculiarity of their development in time, thin layering, rhythmyc repetitiveness are reasons of great interest to these formations. Banded iron formations are sedimentary rocks. Interbedding of ferrigenous (magnetite, hematite, siderite etc.) interlayers and siliceous layers are typical to these formations. Stratificatification is thin, thickness of interlayers is less than 1-2 mm. Iron content exceeds 15%. Potentially all minerals of ferrigenous interlayers could be of biogenic nature because both for oxygenized (hematite) and reduced (magnetite and siderite) minerals direct mechanism of bacterial production is established by microbiologists. Basic ore mineral of banded iron formations is magnetite. But magnetite origin is not clear till nowadays and this problem is very actual [2]. Nevertheless bacterial remains by themselves have not been found and it is not surprising. It is proved that finely dispersed non-completely formed magnetite compose basic mass of magnetite formed for example by thermophylic iron-reducing bacteria. Processes of structure arrangement and crystal

  10. Tissue plasminogen activator in central nervous system physiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Melchor, Jerry P.; Strickland, Sidney

    2005-01-01

    Summary Although conventionally associated with fibrin clot degradation, recent work has uncovered new functions for the tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasminogen cascade in central nervous system physiology and pathology. This extracellular proteolytic cascade has been shown to have roles in learning and memory, stress, neuronal degeneration, addiction and Alzheimer’s disease. The current review considers the different ways tPA functions in the brain. PMID:15841309

  11. Protein kinase C activation and alpha 2-autoreceptor-modulated release of noradrenaline.

    PubMed Central

    Allgaier, C.; Hertting, G.; Huang, H. Y.; Jackisch, R.

    1987-01-01

    1 Effects of phorbol esters on the evoked noradrenaline release were studied in slices of the rabbit hippocampus, labelled with [3H]-noradrenaline, superfused continuously with a medium containing the reuptake inhibitor cocaine and stimulated electrically for 2 min (stimulation parameters: 2 ms, 24 mA, 5 V cm-1, 3 or 0.3 Hz). 2 The electrically-evoked overflow of [3H]-noradrenaline in the slices was increased in a concentration-dependent manner by the protein kinase C (PKC) activators 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) and 4 beta-phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (4 beta-PDB). Phorbol esters, which do not activate PKC, 4-O-methyl-TPA and 4 alpha-PDB, showed no effect on neurotransmitter release. The effect of 4 beta-PDB was abolished in the presence of tetrodotoxin and in the absence of calcium. The PKC inhibitor polymyxin B inhibited the evoked noradrenaline release. 3 In the presence of 4 beta-PDB the inhibitory effects of the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine or the facilitatory effects of the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine seemed to be modified only by changes in the concentration of noradrenaline in the synaptic region. At a stimulation frequency of 3 Hz the inhibitory action of clonidine was reduced whereas the facilitatory effect of the yohimbine was even slightly enhanced by the phorbol ester. At 0.3 Hz and in the presence of 4 beta-PDB the effect of clonidine remained and that of yohimbine was strongly enhanced. 4 Pretreatment of the slices with islet-activating protein or N-ethylmaleimide significantly reduced the enhancement of noradrenaline release caused by 4 beta-PDB. It is possible that a regulatory N-protein is involved in steps following PKC activation. 5 These results suggest that PKC participates in the mechanism of action-potential-induced noradrenaline release from noradrenergic nerve terminals of the rabbit hippocampus and that effects on the autoinhibitory feedback system were not responsible for the 4 beta-PDB-induced increase

  12. Chemical Loss of Polar Ozone: Present Understanding and Remaining Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, Ross; Canty, Tim; Cunnold, Derek; Dorf, Marcel; Frieler, Katja; Godin-Beekman, Sophie; Newchurch, Michael; Pfeilsticker, Klaus; Rex, Markus; Stimpfle, Rick; Streibel, Martin; vonderGathen, Peter; Weisenstein, Debra; Yan, Eun-Su

    2005-01-01

    Not long after the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, it was established that halogen compounds, supplied to the atmosphere mainly by anthropogenic activities, are the primary driver of polar ozone loss. We will briefly review the chemical mechanisms that cause polar ozone loss and the early evidence showing the key role played by anthropogenic halogens. Recently, stratospheric halogen loading has leveled off, due to adherence to the Montreal Protocol and its amendments that has essentially banned CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) and other halocarbons. We will describe recent reports of the first stage of recovery of the Antarctic ozone hole (e.g., a statistically significant slowing of the downward trend), associated with the leveling off of stratospheric halogens. Despite this degree of understanding, we will discuss the tendency of photochemical models to underestimate the observed rate of polar ozone loss and a hypothesis that has recently been put forth that might resolve this discrepancy. Finally, we will briefly discuss chemical loss of Arctic ozone, which

  13. DNA extraction: an anthropologic aspect of bone remains from sixth- to seventh-century ad bone remains.

    PubMed

    Di Nunno, Nunzio; Saponetti, Sandro Sublimi; Scattarella, Vito; Emanuel, Patrizia; Baldassarra, Stefania Lonero; Volpe, Giuliano; Di Nunno, Cosimo

    2007-12-01

    In the archeological site of the early Christian Episcopal complex of Saint Peter, in Canosa di Puglia (Bari, Italy), during the operations of archaeological excavations, tombs were discovered. They were dated between the sixth and seventh centuries ad with carbon 14 methodology. Five skeletons were found in the 5 tombs: 28A: male individual, 43 years old. The height was 170 cm; the biomass was 65.7 kg. The analysis of the bones indicated several noteworthy pathologies, such as a number of hypoplasia lines of the enamel, the presence of Schmorl hernias on the first 2 lumbar vertebrae, and the outcome of subacromial impingement syndrome. 28E was a male individual, with a biologic age of death of between 44 and 60 years. The height was 177 cm. He had a posttraumatic fracture callus of the medial third of the clavicle, with an oblique fracture rima. 29B was a female individual, 44-49 years old. The height was 158.8 cm; the biomass was 64.8 kg. There was Wells bursitis on the ischial tuberosity on both sides. 29E was a male individual, 45-50 years old. The height was 169.47 cm; the biomass was 70.8 kg. The third and the fourth vertebrae showed Baastrup syndrome (compression of the vertebral spine). There were radiologic signs of deformity on the higher edge of the acetabula and results of frequent sprains of the ankles. 31A was a male individual, 47-54 years old. The height was 178.65 cm; the biomass was 81 kg. The vertebral index showed a heavy overloading in the thoracic lumbar region. There were bony formations under the periosteum on both on the higher and medium facets of the first metatarsus and on the higher and lateral facets of the fifth metatarsus on both sides. As the topography indicates, these small ossifications coincided with the contact points between the back of the foot and parts of the upper shoe. From the osseous remains, in particular from the teeth (central incisors), the DNA was extracted and typed to identify potential family ties among all the

  14. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina Maria; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in energetic metabolism, epigenetics, protein folding, as well as in a number of diverse regulatory processes. The problem of localisation of flavin cofactor synthesis events and in particular of the FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2) in HepG2 cells is addressed here by confocal microscopy in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalysed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesising activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD "chaperone". The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear or a mitochondrial enzyme that is lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1, EC 1.-.-.-) and dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4), respectively which carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, assisted by tetrahydrofolate used to form 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells.

  15. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator is a useful alternative to heparin in priming quinton permcath.

    PubMed

    Schenk, P; Rosenkranz, A R; Wölfl, G; Hörl, W H; Traindl, O

    2000-01-01

    Soft, cuffed, implantable central venous catheters such as the Quinton Permcath (Quinton Instrument Co, Seattle, WA) are increasingly used as permanent access in patients with end-stage renal disease. Their major limitations, besides infection, are thrombosis and inadequate blood flow. To prevent those complications, heparin is conventionally used for priming the Quinton Permcath between dialysis sessions. In this study, we compared recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) with heparin for priming the Quinton Permcath in a prospective, randomized, crossover design. Twelve patients were randomly assigned to receive 2,000 IU of heparin or 2 mg of rTPA injected into each catheter lumen at the end of each dialysis session over a period of 4 months, followed by a switch to the other substance. Blood flow rate (flow), venous pressure (VP), and arterial pressure (AP) were monitored at each dialysis session hourly. Flow was significantly greater (P = 0.0001) with rTPA (mean +/- SD, 237.7 +/- 18.1 and 231.6 +/- 12.4 mL/min for the first and second 2 months, respectively) compared with heparin (208.5 +/- 10.1 and 206.9 +/- 14.2 mL/min for the first and second 2 months, respectively). VP was significantly less (P = 0.0001) with rTPA (135.4 +/- 8.2 and 140 +/- 15.2 mm Hg for the first and second 2 months, respectively) compared with heparin (160.5 +/- 16.1 and 159.2 +/- 20.7 mm Hg for the first and second 2 months, respectively). AP was significantly greater (P = 0.0002) with rTPA (-113.5 +/- 11.8 and -115.9 +/- 12.7 mm Hg for the first and second 2 months, respectively) compared with heparin (-136.5 +/- 23.3 and -134.7 +/- 25.8 mm Hg for the first and second 2 months, respectively). In addition, fewer complications (flow problems, clotting, and need for fibrinolysis) occurred in the rTPA period. These results show that rTPA is superior to heparin for priming the Quinton Permcath between hemodialysis sessions and can be used as a valuable alternative to conventional

  16. Impacts of aging and amyloid-β deposition on plasminogen activators and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bi Oh, Shin; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, Inki; Lee, Joo-Yong

    2015-02-01

    Plasminogen activators (PAs), which convert plasminogen into the fibrinolytic protease plasmin, may initiate the degradation of amyloid-β (Aβ) to suppress the amyloid pathogenesis. In that way, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-mediated plasmin activation could maintain a low level of Aβ deposition to delay the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In a previous study, we reported that tPA/plasmin proteolytic activity is attenuated throughout the brain during aging or with Aβ accumulation but clustered intense around the amyloid plaques in AD brain. The present study demonstrates that the altered proteolytic activity primarily results from the competition between the expressions of tPA and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in the brains of Tg2576 Aβ-transgenic mice, as revealed by immunohistochemistry and immunoblot assays. Compared with that in the brains of younger Tg2576 mice, tPA protein is generally reduced throughout the brain in older Tg2576 mice but elevated near amyloid plaques. In contrary, PAI-1 expression increases during aging or Aβ deposition with its clusters surrounding amyloid plaques. No significant alteration in the expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is detected. These results suggest reciprocal feedback influences between tPA, PAI-1 and Aβ during aging and amyloid pathogenesis in AD brain; tPA-mediated plasmin activity is declined throughout the brain causing Aβ deposition during aging, and the Aβ deposits locally attract the cluster of tPA and/or PAI-1 around their deposits to competitively determine tPA/plasmin-mediated Aβ proteolysis.

  17. Stimulatory effect of an algal fucoidan on the release of vascular endothelial tissue-type plasminogen activator as a mechanism of fucoidan-mediated thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Min, Soon-Ki; Han, Sung-Mi; Jang, Jae-Seok; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2016-07-01

    Identifying a pharmacological means for increasing the production of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is always desirable to cure impaired production of this enzyme. An algal fucoidan has been shown to exhibit both novel thrombolytic and synergistic stimulatory effects in a mouse thrombosis model. The plasma levels of active t-PA were measured in mouse arterial thrombus models that were treated with various fucoidans to investigate the mechanism of thrombolysis. The mean plasma level of active t-PA after the infusion of fucoidan was 2.136 ± 0.231 ng/ml for nonthrombolytic Fucus fucoidan and 3.917 ± 0.0.529 ng/ml for thrombolytic Undaria fucoidan, which resulted in a 1.56-2.29-fold increase compared with the healthy control group (1.706 ± 0.194 ng/ml) and the untreated thrombus group (2.506 ± 0.301 ng/ml) (P < 0.01). An algal fucoidan has demonstrated to exert a thrombolytic and stimulatory effect via the induction of t-PA release in a dose-dependent manner in an arterial thrombosis model.

  18. Docosahexaenoic Acid Inhibits Tumor Promoter-Induced Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor by Suppressing PKCδ- and MAPKs-Mediated Pathways in ECV304 Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Sen; Xia, Yong; Nguyen, Thi Thinh; Ung, Trong Thuan; Yoon, Hyun Joong; Kim, Nam Ho; Kim, Kyung Keun; Jung, Young Do

    2016-01-01

    The overexpression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is associated with inflammation and virtually all human cancers. Despite the fact that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor properties, the negative regulation of uPAR by DHA is still undefined. Here, we investigated the effect of DHA on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced uPAR expression and the underlying molecular mechanisms in ECV304 human endothelial cells. DHA concentration-dependently inhibited TPA-induced uPAR. Specific inhibitors and mutagenesis studies showed that PKCδ, JNK1/2, Erk1/2, NF-κB, and AP-1 were critical for TPA-induced uPAR expression. Application of DHA suppressed TPA-induced translocation of PKCδ, activation of the JNK1/2 and Erk1/2 signaling pathways, and subsequent AP-1 and NF-κB transactivation. In conclusion, these observations suggest a novel role for DHA in reducing uPAR expression and cell invasion by inhibition of PKCδ, JNK1/2, and Erk1/2, and the reduction of AP-1 and NF-κB activation in ECV304 human endothelial cells. PMID:27654969

  19. Chemopreventive and Anticancer Activities of Allium victorialis var. platyphyllum Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Park, Min Jeong; Park, Hee-Juhn; Chung, Won-Yoon; Kim, Ki-Rim; Park, Kwang-Kyun

    2014-01-01

    Background: Allium victorialis var. platyphyllum is an edible perennial herb and has been used as a vegetable or as a Korean traditional medicine. Allium species have received much attention owing to their diverse pharmacological properties, including antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities. However, A. victorialis var. platyphyllum needs more study. Methods: The chemopreventive potential of A. victorialis var. platyphyllum methanol extracts was examined by measuring 12-O-tetra-decanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-induced superoxide anion production in the differentiated HL-60 cells, TPA-induced mouse ear edema, and Ames/Salmonella mutagenicity. The apoptosis-inducing capabilities of the extracts were evaluated by the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay, 4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining, and the DNA fragmentation assay in human colon cancer HT-29 cells. Antimetastatic activities of the extracts were also investigated in an experimental mouse lung metastasis model. Results: The methanol extracts of A. victorialis var. platyphyllum rhizome (AVP-R) and A. victorialis var. platyphyllum stem (AVP-S) dose-dependently inhibited the TPA-induced generation of superoxide anion in HL-60 cells and TPA-induced ear edema in mice, as well as 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH) -induced bacterial mutagenesis. AVP-R and AVP-S reduced cell viability in a dose-related manner and induced apoptotic morphological changes and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in HT-29 cells. In the experimental mouse lung metastasis model, the formation of tumor nodules in lung tissue was significantly inhibited by the treatment of the extracts. Conclusions: AVP-R and AVP-S possess antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic, proapoptotic, and antimetastatic activities. Therefore, these extracts can serve as a beneficial supplement for the prevention and treatment of cancer. PMID:25337587

  20. Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator Can Be Safely Given without Complete Blood Count Results Back

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yi; Yang, Lumeng; Ren, Jinma; Nair, Deepak S.; Parker, Sarah; Jahnel, Jan L.; Swanson-Devlin, Teresa G.; Beck, Judith M.; Mathews, Maureen; McNeil, Clayton J.; Ling, Yifeng; Cheng, Xin; Gao, Yuan; Dong, Qiang; Wang, David Z.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction It is well known that the efficacy of intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is time-dependent when used to treat patients with acute ischemic strokes. Aim Our study examines the safety issue of giving IV tPA without complete blood count (CBC) resulted. Materials and Methods This is a retrospective observational study by examining the database from Huashan Hospital in China and OSF/INI Comprehensive Stroke Center in United States. Patient data collected included demographics, occurrence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, door to needle intervals, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale scores on admission, CBC results on admission and follow-up modified Rankin Scale scores. Linear regression and multivariable logistic regression analysis were used to identify factors that would have an impact on door-to-needle intervals. Results Our study included120 patients from Huashan Hospital and 123 patients from INI. Among them, 36 in Huashan Hospital and 51in INI received IV tPA prior to their CBC resulted. Normal platelet count was found in 98.8% patients after tPA was given. One patient had thrombocytopenia but no hemorrhagic event. A significantly shorter door to needle interval (DTN) was found in the group without CBC resulted. There was also a difference in treatment interval between the two hospitals. Door to needle intervals had a strong correlation to onset to treatment intervals and NIHSS scores on admission. Conclusion In patients presented with acute ischemic stroke, the risk of developing hemorrhagic event is low if IV tPA is given before CBC has resulted. The door to needle intervals can be significantly reduced. PMID:26147994