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Sample records for activator upa gene

  1. Synergistic transcriptional activation of the mouse urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) gene and of its enhancer activator protein 1 (AP1) site by cAMP and retinoic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Mira-Y-Lopez, R; Jaramillo, S; Jing, Y

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism whereby all-trans retinoic acid (tRA) potentiates the 8-bromo-cAMP (8-BrcAMP)-dependent transcription of the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) gene in SC115 mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Photoaffinity labelling experiments showed that tRA did not alter the cellular content of cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunits I and II. In agreement with this, nuclear run-on analysis in the presence of the translational inhibitor puromycin demonstrated that the effect of 8-BrcAMP and its potentiation by tRA were independent of protein synthesis. A transiently transfected 6.6 kb uPA 5'-flanking region-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) fusion gene mimicked the response of the endogenous uPA gene. Thus 1 mM 8-BrcAMP induced a 100-200% increase in CAT content, 100 nM tRA had no effect and 100 nM tRA+1 mM 8-BrcAMP induced a 300-500% increase in cells co-transfected with tRA receptor and/or 9-cis-RA receptor. Analysis of 5'-deleted constructs showed that the tRA effect required at least two cis regions: -2657 to -2186, encompassing the 100 bp uPA enhancer, and -709 to -324, which exhibited silencing activity. Neither region contained a tRA-response element-like motif. Because tRA receptor and 9-cis-RA receptor interact with activator protein 1 (AP1), we tested whether tRA regulated the uPA enhancer AP1 site in the presence of 8-BrcAMP. We found that a dimer of this site fused to a minimal uPA-CAT fusion gene was responsive to 1 mM 8-BrcAMP (100% CAT increase), not responsive to 100 nM tRA, and synergistically responsive to 100 nM tRA+1 mM 8-BrcAMP (240% CAT increase) in cells co-transfected with Fos and Jun. Synergistic activation of the same construct and of the 6.6 kb uPA-CAT fusion gene was also obtained using tRA and 100 nM PMA. We conclude that multiple cis elements, probably including the uPA enhancer AP1 site, mediate the tRA potentiation of uPA transcription. PMID:9560322

  2. Murine monoclonal antibodies against murine uPA receptor produced in gene-deficient mice: inhibitory effects on receptor-mediated uPA activity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pass, Jesper; Jögi, Annika; Lund, Ida K; Rønø, Birgitte; Rasch, Morten G; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Lund, Leif R; Ploug, Michael; Rømer, John; Danø, Keld; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla

    2007-06-01

    Binding of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) to its cellular receptor, uPAR, potentiates plasminogen activation and localizes it to the cell surface. Focal plasminogen activation is involved in both normal and pathological tissue remodeling processes including cancer invasion. The interaction between uPA and uPAR therefore represents a potential target for anti-invasive cancer therapy. Inhibitors of the human uPA-uPAR interaction have no effect in the murine system. To enable in-vivo studies in murine cancer models we have now generated murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against murine uPAR (muPAR) by immunizing uPAR-deficient mice with recombinant muPAR and screened for antibodies, which inhibit the muPA-muPAR interaction. Two of the twelve mAbs obtained, mR1 and mR2, interfered with the interaction between muPAR and the amino-terminal fragment of muPA (mATF) when analyzed by surface plasmon resonance. The epitope for mR1 is located on domain I of muPAR, while that of mR2 is on domains (II-III). In cell binding experiments using radiolabelled mATF, the maximal inhibition obtained with mR1 was 85% while that obtained with mR2 was 50%. The IC(50) value for mR1 was 0.67 nM compared to 0.14 nM for mATF. In an assay based on modified anthrax toxins, requiring cell-bound muPA activity for its cytotoxity, an approximately 50% rescue of the cells could be obtained by addition of mR1. Importantly, in-vivo efficacy of mR1 was demonstrated by the ability of mR1 to rescue mice treated with a lethal dose of uPA-activatable anthrax toxins.

  3. Multifunctional roles of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in cancer stemness and chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Stepanova, Victoria; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Holterman, AiXuan L.; Estes, Norman; Cines, Douglas B.; Rao, Jasti S.; Gondi, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is almost always lethal. One of the underlying reasons for this lethality is believed to be the presence of cancer stem cells (CSC), which impart chemoresistance and promote recurrence, but the mechanisms responsible are unclear. Recently the poor prognosis of PDAC has been correlated with increased expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). In the present study we examine the role of uPA in the generation of PDAC CSC. We observe a subset of cells identifiable as a side population (SP) when sorted by flow cytometry of MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells that possess the properties of CSC. A large fraction of these SP cells are CD44 and CD24 positive, are gemcitabine resistant, possess sphere-forming ability, and exhibit increased tumorigenicity, known characteristics of cancer stemness. Increased tumorigenicity and gemcitabine resistance decrease after suppression of uPA. We observe that uPA interacts directly with transcription factors LIM homeobox-2 (Lhx2), homeobox transcription factor A5 (HOXA5), and Hey to possibly promote cancer stemness. uPA regulates Lhx2 expression by suppressing expression of miR-124 and p53 expression by repressing its promoter by inactivating HOXA5. These results demonstrate that regulation of gene transcription by uPA contributes to cancer stemness and clinical lethality. PMID:23864708

  4. Multifunctional roles of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in cancer stemness and chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Stepanova, Victoria; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Holterman, Aixuan L; Estes, Norman; Cines, Douglas B; Rao, Jasti S; Gondi, Christopher S

    2013-09-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is almost always lethal. One of the underlying reasons for this lethality is believed to be the presence of cancer stem cells (CSC), which impart chemoresistance and promote recurrence, but the mechanisms responsible are unclear. Recently the poor prognosis of PDAC has been correlated with increased expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). In the present study we examine the role of uPA in the generation of PDAC CSC. We observe a subset of cells identifiable as a side population (SP) when sorted by flow cytometry of MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells that possess the properties of CSC. A large fraction of these SP cells are CD44 and CD24 positive, are gemcitabine resistant, possess sphere-forming ability, and exhibit increased tumorigenicity, known characteristics of cancer stemness. Increased tumorigenicity and gemcitabine resistance decrease after suppression of uPA. We observe that uPA interacts directly with transcription factors LIM homeobox-2 (Lhx2), homeobox transcription factor A5 (HOXA5), and Hey to possibly promote cancer stemness. uPA regulates Lhx2 expression by suppressing expression of miR-124 and p53 expression by repressing its promoter by inactivating HOXA5. These results demonstrate that regulation of gene transcription by uPA contributes to cancer stemness and clinical lethality.

  5. The effects of upaB deletion and the double/triple deletion of upaB, aatA, and aatB genes on pathogenicity of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhu-Ge, Xiang-Kai; Pan, Zi-Hao; Tang, Fang; Mao, Xiang; Hu, Lin; Wang, Shao-Hui; Xu, Bin; Lu, Cheng-Ping; Fan, Hong-Jie; Dai, Jian-Jun

    2015-12-01

    Autotransporters (ATs) are associated with pathogenesis of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC). The molecular characterization of APEC ATs can provide insights about their relevance to APEC pathogenesis. Here, we characterized a conventional autotransporter UpaB in APEC DE205B genome. The upaB existed in 41.9 % of 236 APEC isolates and was predominantly associated with ECOR B2 and D. Our studies showed that UpaB mediates the DE205B adhesion in DF-1 cells, and enhances autoaggregation and biofilm formation of fimbria-negative E. coli AAEC189 (MG1655Δfim) in vitro. Deletion of upaB of DE205B attenuates the virulence in duck model and early colonization in the duck lungs during APEC systemic infection. Furthermore, double and triple deletion of upaB, aatA, and aatB genes cumulatively attenuated DE205B adhesion in DF-1 cells, accompanying with decreased 50 % lethal dose (LD50) in duck model and the early colonization in the duck lungs. However, DE205BΔupaB/ΔaatA/ΔaatB might "compensate" the influence of gene deletion by upregulating the expression of fimbrial adhesin genes yqiL, yadN, and vacuolating autotransporter vat during early colonization of APEC. Finally, we demonstrated that vaccination with recombinant UpaB, AatA, and AatB proteins conferred protection against colisepticemia caused by DE205B infection in duck model.

  6. Urinary-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its receptor (uPAR) in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zonggao; Stack, M Sharon

    2007-10-15

    OSCC (oral squamous cell carcinoma) is the most common oral malignancy and is estimated to affect approx. 350000 new patients worldwide this year. OSCC is characterized by a high degree of morbidity and mortality, as most patients exhibit local, regional and distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Recent genome-wide screening efforts have identified the serine proteinase uPA (urinary-type plasminogen activator, also known as urokinase) as a strong biomarker for prediction of poor disease outcome and a key candidate for molecular classification of oral neoplasms using a 'gene signature' approach. The proteinase uPA binds a surface-anchored receptor designated uPAR (uPA receptor), focalizing proteolytic activity to the pericellular milieu. Furthermore, uPA-uPAR can interact with transmembrane proteins to modify multiple signal transduction pathways and influence a wide variety of cellular behaviours. Correlative clinical data show elevated uPA-uPAR in oral tumour tissues, with tumours exhibiting high levels of both uPA and uPAR as the most invasive. Combined in vitro, pre-clinical and clinical data support the need for further analysis of uPA-uPAR as a prognostic indicator as well as a potential therapeutic target in OSCC.

  7. TGF-β2 promotes RPE cell invasion into a collagen gel by mediating urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expression.

    PubMed

    Sugioka, Koji; Kodama, Aya; Okada, Kiyotaka; Iwata, Mihoko; Yoshida, Koji; Kusaka, Shunji; Matsumoto, Chota; Kaji, Hiroshi; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2013-10-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is one of the main epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-inducing factors. In general, TGF-β-induced EMT promotes cell migration and invasion. TGF-β also acts as a potent regulator of pericellular proteolysis by regulating the expression and secretion of plasminogen activators. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a serine protease that binds to its cell surface receptor (uPAR) with high affinity. uPA binding to uPAR stimulates uPAR's interaction with transmembrane proteins, such as integrins, to regulate cytoskeletal reorganization and cell migration, differentiation and proliferation. However, the influence of TGF-β and the uPA/uPAR system on EMT in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of TGF-β2, which is the predominant isoform in the retina, and the uPA/uPAR system on RPE cells. In this study, we first examined the effect of TGF-β2 and/or the inhibitor of uPA (u-PA-STOP(®)) on the proliferation of a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19 cells). Treatment with TGF-β2 or u-PA-STOP(®) suppressed cell proliferation. Combination treatment of TGF-β2 and u-PA-STOP(®) enhanced cell growth suppression. Furthermore, western blot analysis, fibrin zymography and real-time reverse transcription PCR showed that that TGF-β2 induced EMT in ARPE-19 cells and that the expression of uPA and uPAR expression was up-regulated during EMT. The TGF-β inhibitor SB431542 suppressed TGF-β2-stimulated uPA expression and secretion but did not suppress uPAR expression. Furthermore, we seeded ARPE-19 cells onto Transwell chambers and allowed them to invade the collagen matrix in the presence of TGF-β2 alone or with TGF-β2 and u-PA-STOP(®). TGF-β2 treatment induced ARPE-19 cell invasion into the collagen gel. Treatment with a combination of TGF-β2 and the uPA inhibitor strongly inhibited ARPE-19 cell invasion compared with treatment with

  8. Expression of the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and its ligand (uPA) in brain tissues of human immunodeficiency virus patients with opportunistic cerebral diseases.

    PubMed

    Nebuloni, Manuela; Cinque, Paola; Sidenius, Nicolai; Ferri, Angelita; Lauri, Eleonora; Omodeo-Zorini, Elisabetta; Zerbi, Pietro; Vago, Luca

    2009-01-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and its ligand (uPA) play an important role in cell migration and extracellular proteolysis. We previously described uPAR/uPA overexpression in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain tissues of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related cerebral diseases. In this study, we examined uPAR/uPA expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in brains of HIV patients with opportunistic cerebral lesions and in HIV-positive/negative controls. uPAR was found in macrophages/microglia with the highest levels in cytomegalovirus (CMV) encephalitis, toxoplasmosis, and lymphomas; in cryptococcosis and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) cases, only a few positive cells were found and no positivity was observed in controls. uPA expression was demonstrated only in a few macrophages/microglia and lymphocytes in all the cases and HIV-positive controls without different pattern of distribution; no uPA immunostaining was found in cryptococcosis and HIV-negative controls. The higher expression of uPAR/uPA in most of the opportunistic cerebral lesions supports their role in these diseases, suggesting their contribution to tissue injury.

  9. C-phycocyanin transcriptionally regulates uPA mRNA through cAMP mediated PKA pathway in human fibroblast WI-38 cells.

    PubMed

    Madhyastha, H K; Radha, K S; Sugiki, M; Omura, S; Maruyama, M

    2006-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated the efficacy of c-phycocyanin in up-regulation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in bovine endothelial cell line. However, the mechanism of action and pathway elucidation in uPA regulation is unclear. In experiments reported here, we have investigated the mechanism of action of c-phycocyanin (c-pc) induced uPA gene modulation in human fibroblast (WI-38) cell line. ELISA test confirmed that c-pc increased the uPA antigen whereas PAI-1 antigen level was unaffected. Treatment of cells with c-pc significantly (P<0.05) enhanced the uPA mRNA level in a dose (50 microg/ml) and time dependent (up to 4 h) manner. This effect of c-pc was abolished by treatment with dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl benzamidazole (DRB) (10 microg/ml). Co-treatment of c-pc with 200 microg/ml cycloheximide (CHX), translation inhibitor, resulted in over accumulation of uPA mRNA. These results suggest that uPA induction by c-pc is transcriptionally regulated and does not require de novo protein synthesis. We also provide evidence that c-pc stimulates uPA gene through cAMP dependent pathway as adenylyl cyclase (AC) inhibitor, dideoxyadenosine (DDA) significantly inhibited the uPA mRNA expression and co-treatment with adenylyl cyclase analogue, dBcAMP recovered the effect of c-pc on gene activity. Furthermore, the present investigation provides evidence on the regulatory pathway involved in the c-pc stimulus. C-pc induced uPA expression was completely inhibited by PKA inhibitor (KT 5200), indicating the regulation is dependent on PKA pathway. Elimination of PKC pathway components by prolonged incubation with excess amount of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) failed to abolish the c-pc effect on uPA expression indicating the regulation is independent of PKC pathway. Taken together, our data indicate that uPA gene regulation by c-pc is transcriptionally controlled through cAMP mediated PKA pathway.

  10. Tumour-associated urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor PAI-1 in normal and neoplastic tissues of patients with squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity - clinical relevance and prognostic value.

    PubMed

    Hundsdorfer, Brigitte; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian; Bock, Klaus Peter; Dettmar, Peer; Schmitt, Manfred; Kolk, Andreas; Pautke, Christoph; Horch, Hans-Henning

    2005-06-01

    The central role of the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor, the plasminogen activator-inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), in tumour invasion and metastasis becomes more and more evident. In several studies, uPA and PAI-1 proved to be of prognostic relevance as shown for different types of cancer (e.g. breast, stomach, lung). Elevated antigen levels of uPA and/or PAI-1 predict poor outcome (relapse-free survival) for patients afflicted with cancer. For oral squamous cell carcinomas, however, the prognostic relevance of the tumour-associated proteolytic factors uPA and PAI-1 has still to be evaluated. In the present study, using tissue extracts of 79 oral cancer cases, 58 specimens of normal oral cavity mucosa and of 16 tumour positive lymph nodes taken from the same patients, uPA and PAI-1 antigen were determined by highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). A correlation was found between uPA and PAI-1 in tumour tissue, when compared with the normal mucosa of the same oral cavity. Median levels showed significant elevations in cancer tissue and in tumour positive lymph nodes versus normal oral mucosa. In patients with high levels of uPA or PAI-1, there were significantly more tumour relapses. There was no significant correlation between pathological TNM categories, grading, residual tumour category, tumour site and patient age. In summary, tumour uPA/PAI-1 content (as determined by ELISA) appears to be a strong independent prognostic factor for relapse-free survival in squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity. These observations might help to select patients with poor prognosis for additional adjuvant therapy in conjunction with complete surgical resection.

  11. Cloning of the 5' regulatory regions and functional characterization of the core promoters of ovine PLAU (u-PA) and SERPIN1 (PAI-1).

    PubMed

    Lampidonis, A D; Theodorou, G; Pecorini, C; Rebucci, R; Baldi, A; Politis, I

    2011-12-01

    The activation of plasminogen plays a crucial role in various extracellular proteolytic events (fibrinolysis, cell migration, ovulation and involution of the mammary gland). In the present study we describe the isolation of the 5' proximal and distal promoter regions of ovine PLAU (urokinase plasminogen activator, u-PA) and SERPIN1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, PAI-1) genes for the first time in ruminants. Analysis of the 5.645kb 5'-flanking region of u-PA revealed a putative TATA-less promoter. In contrast the isolated 2.787kb 5'-flanking region of PAI-1 included a TATA-box. It should be noted that both genes lack the initiator motif around the transcription start site. The two genes share a number of transcription factor binding sites, namely Nuclear Factor-kappa B, Stimulating Protein 1 and Activating protein 1, suggesting co-expression of the two genes. Moreover, additional, not shared, transcription factor binding sites were identified in u-PA and PAI-1. More important of these are the cis-regulatory elements for plasminogen activator inhibitor 2 located in the distal promoter region of u-PA, suggesting an involvement of the other specific inhibitor in the regulation of ovine u-PA gene expression, and the three stress response elements sites present in the proximal and distal promoter of PAI-1. Different genomic fragments of the two 5' flanking regions were directionally cloned into a suitable reporter vector upstream of a promoter-less luciferase gene. Transient transfection into bovine mammary epithelial (BME-UV) cells demonstrated that the regions of -384/+27 and -382/+22 for the u-PA and PAI-1genes, respectively, potentially function as core promoter regions.

  12. Urokinase gene transfer augments angiogenesis in ischemic skeletal and myocardial muscle.

    PubMed

    Traktuev, Dmitry O; Tsokolaeva, Zoya I; Shevelev, Alexander A; Talitskiy, Konstantin A; Stepanova, Victoria V; Johnstone, Brian H; Rahmat-Zade, Tahmina M; Kapustin, Alexander N; Tkachuk, Vsevolod A; March, Keith L; Parfyonova, Yelena V

    2007-11-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is required for both endogenous and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-augmented angiogenesis in normal tissues, leading us to hypothesize that uPA augmentation by gene transfer might promote angiogenesis in ischemic tissues. Overexpression of uPA was studied in rat myocardial infarction (MI) and mouse hind limb ischemia models and compared with VEGF overexpression effects. Animals were divided into control and three experimental groups (n = 6), receiving intramuscular injections of plasmids as follows: (i) control (empty vector or expressing beta-galactosidase); (ii) uPA; (iii) VEGF(165); (iv) a 1:1 mixture of uPA and VEGF(165). The capillary densities in both ischemic models were greater (P < 0.05) in tissues treated with uPA, VEGF, or a combination of both than in controls. Infarct size was reduced in hearts from uPA and VEGF experimental groups compared with controls (P < 0.05). Local overexpression of uPA induced a marked increase in the number of macrophages and myofibroblasts present within infarcts. Hind limb blood flow was greater in all experimental groups by day 10 (P < 0.05). Overall, the effects of uPA and VEGF were uniformly comparable. Additional analysis revealed association of local edema with VEGF but not with uPA treatment. This study established that uPA gene therapy effectively induces functionally significant angiogenesis in models of acute MI and hind limb ischemia.

  13. Functional Heterogeneity of the UpaH Autotransporter Protein from Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Allsopp, Luke P.; Beloin, Christophe; Moriel, Danilo Gomes; Totsika, Makrina; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is responsible for the majority of urinary tract infections (UTI). To cause a UTI, UPEC must adhere to the epithelial cells of the urinary tract and overcome the shear flow forces of urine. This function is mediated primarily by fimbrial adhesins, which mediate specific attachment to host cell receptors. Another group of adhesins that contributes to UPEC-mediated UTI is autotransporter (AT) proteins. AT proteins possess a range of virulence properties, such as adherence, aggregation, invasion, and biofilm formation. One recently characterized AT protein of UPEC is UpaH, a large adhesin-involved-in-diffuse-adherence (AIDA-I)-type AT protein that contributes to biofilm formation and bladder colonization. In this study we characterized a series of naturally occurring variants of UpaH. We demonstrate that extensive sequence variation exists within the passenger-encoding domain of UpaH variants from different UPEC strains. This sequence variation is associated with functional heterogeneity with respect to the ability of UpaH to mediate biofilm formation. In contrast, all of the UpaH variants examined retained a conserved ability to mediate binding to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Bioinformatic analysis of the UpaH passenger domain identified a conserved region (UpaHCR) and a hydrophobic region (UpaHHR). Deletion of these domains reduced biofilm formation but not the binding to ECM proteins. Despite variation in the upaH sequence, the transcription of upaH was repressed by a conserved mechanism involving the global regulator H-NS, and mutation of the hns gene relieved this repression. Overall, our findings shed new light on the regulation and functions of the UpaH AT protein. PMID:22904291

  14. A combination of desmopressin and docetaxel inhibit cell proliferation and invasion mediated by urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Hiroshi; Klotz, Laurence H.; Sugar, Linda M.; Kiss, Alexander; Venkateswaran, Vasundara

    2015-08-28

    Background: This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of a combination treatment using both desmopressin and docetaxel in prostate cancer treatment. Desmopressin is a well-known synthetic analogue of the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin. It has recently been demonstrated to inhibit tumor progression and metastasis in in vivo models. Docetaxel is widely used for the treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients. However, durable responses have been uncommon to date. In this study, we investigated the anti-tumor effect of desmopressin in combination with docetaxel in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Two prostate cancer cells (PC3, LNCaP) were treated with different concentrations of desmopressin alone, docetaxel alone, and a combination of desmopressin and docetaxel. Cell proliferation was determined by MTS assay. The anti-invasive and anti-migration potential of desmopressin and in combination with docetaxel were examined by wound healing assay, migration chamber assay, and matrigel invasion assay. Results: The combination of desmopressin and docetaxel resulted in a significant inhibition of PC3 and LNCaP cell proliferation (p < 0.01). Additionally, cell migration and invasion were also inhibited by the combination when compared to that of either treatment alone in PC3 cells (p < 0.01). The anti-tumor effect of this combination treatment was associated with down-regulation of both urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9) in PC3 cells. Conclusions: We are the first to elucidate the anti-tumor and anti-metastatic potential of desmopressin in combination with docetaxel in a prostate cancer model via the uPA-MMP pathway. Our finding could potentially contribute to the therapeutic profile of desmopressin and enhance the efficacy of docetaxel based treatment for CRPC. - Highlights: • Desmopressin inhibits cell proliferation in prostate cancer cells. • The expression of cyclin A and CDK2

  15. Interaction between plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) bound to fibrin and either tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) or urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA). Binding of t-PA/PAI-1 complexes to fibrin mediated by both the finger and the kringle-2 domain of t-PA.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, O F; de Vries, C; Hohmann, C; Veerman, H; Pannekoek, H

    1989-01-01

    Plasminogen activation is catalyzed both by tissue-type-(t-PA) and by urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA). This reaction is controlled by plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) that is either present in plasma or bound to fibrin, present in a thrombus. We studied the mechanism of in vitro inhibition of both t-PA and u-PA activity by PAI-1 bound to fibrin. It is shown that activation of latent PAI-1 unmasks a specific fibrin-binding site that is distinct from its reactive site. This reactive site of activated PAI-1 bound to fibrin is fully exposed to form complexes with t-PA and u-PA, that are unable to activate plasminogen. Upon complex formation with either one of the plasminogen activators, PAI-1 apparently undergoes a conformational change and loses its affinity for fibrin. Consequently, complexes of u-PA and PAI-1 dissociate from the fibrin matrix and are encountered in the fluid phase. In contrast, t-PA/PAI-1 complexes remain bound to fibrin. By employing recombinant t-PA deletion-mutant proteins, that precisely lack domains involved in fibrin binding, we demonstrate that binding of t-PA/PAI-1 complexes is mediated by both the "finger" (F) and the "kringle-2" (K2) domain of t-PA. A model is proposed that explains inhibition of the fibrinolytic process, at the level of plasminogen activation by t-PA, directed by PAI-1 bound to fibrin. An implication of the proposed model is that t-PA/PAI-1 complexes and free t-PA compete for the same binding sites on fibrin. Images PMID:2503541

  16. Degradation of Internalized αvβ5 Integrin Is Controlled by uPAR Bound uPA: Effect on β1 Integrin Activity and α-SMA Stress Fiber Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingyan; Pedroja, Benjamin S.; Meyers, Erin E.; Garcia, Angelo L.; Twining, Sally S.; Bernstein, Audrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Myofibroblasts (Mfs) that persist in a healing wound promote extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation and excessive tissue contraction. Increased levels of integrin αvβ5 promote the Mf phenotype and other fibrotic markers. Previously we reported that maintaining uPA (urokinase plasminogen activator) bound to its cell-surface receptor, uPAR prevented TGFβ-induced Mf differentiation. We now demonstrate that uPA/uPAR controls integrin β5 protein levels and in turn, the Mf phenotype. When cell-surface uPA was increased, integrin β5 levels were reduced (61%). In contrast, when uPA/uPAR was silenced, integrin β5 total and cell-surface levels were increased (2–4 fold). Integrin β5 accumulation resulted from a significant decrease in β5 ubiquitination leading to a decrease in the degradation rate of internalized β5. uPA-silencing also induced α-SMA stress fiber organization in cells that were seeded on collagen, increased cell area (1.7 fold), and increased integrin β1 binding to the collagen matrix, with reduced activation of β1. Elevated cell-surface integrin β5 was necessary for these changes after uPA-silencing since blocking αvβ5 function reversed these effects. Our data support a novel mechanism by which downregulation of uPA/uPAR results in increased integrin αvβ5 cell-surface protein levels that regulate the activity of β1 integrins, promoting characteristics of the persistent Mf. PMID:22470492

  17. Overexpression of SlUPA-like induces cell enlargement, aberrant development and low stress tolerance through phytohormonal pathway in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Baolu; Hu, Zongli; Hu, Jingtao; Zhang, Yanjie; Yin, Wencheng; Zhu, Zhiguo; Feng, Ye; Chen, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    upa20 induces cell enlargement and hypertrophy development. In our research, overexpression of SlUPA-like, orthologous to upa20, severely affected the growth of vegetative and reproductive tissues. Wilted leaves curled upwardly and sterile flowers were found in transgenic lines. Through anatomical analysis, palisade and spongy tissues showed fluffy and hypertrophic development in transgenic plants. Gene expression analysis showed that GA responsive, biosynthetic and signal transduction genes (e.g. GAST1, SlGA20OXs, SlGA3OXs, SlGID1s, and SlPREs) were significantly upregulated, indicating that GA response is stimulated by overproduction of SlUPA-like. Furthermore, SlUPA-like was strongly induced by exogenous JA and wounding. Decreased expression of PI-I and induced expression of SlJAZs (including SlJAZ2, SlJAZ10 and SlJAZ11) were observed in transgenic plants, suggesting that JA response is repressed. In addition, SlUPA-like overexpressed plant exhibited more opened stoma and higher water loss than the control when treated with dehydration stress, which was related to decreased ABA biosynthesis, signal transduction and response. Particularly, abnormal developments of transgenic plants promote the plant susceptibility to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. Therefore, it is deduced from these results that SlUPA-like plays vital role in regulation of plant development and stress tolerance through GA, JA and ABA pathways. PMID:27025226

  18. Overexpression of SlUPA-like induces cell enlargement, aberrant development and low stress tolerance through phytohormonal pathway in tomato.

    PubMed

    Cui, Baolu; Hu, Zongli; Hu, Jingtao; Zhang, Yanjie; Yin, Wencheng; Zhu, Zhiguo; Feng, Ye; Chen, Guoping

    2016-03-30

    upa20 induces cell enlargement and hypertrophy development. In our research, overexpression of SlUPA-like, orthologous to upa20, severely affected the growth of vegetative and reproductive tissues. Wilted leaves curled upwardly and sterile flowers were found in transgenic lines. Through anatomical analysis, palisade and spongy tissues showed fluffy and hypertrophic development in transgenic plants. Gene expression analysis showed that GA responsive, biosynthetic and signal transduction genes (e.g. GAST1, SlGA20OXs, SlGA3OXs, SlGID1s, and SlPREs) were significantly upregulated, indicating that GA response is stimulated by overproduction of SlUPA-like. Furthermore, SlUPA-like was strongly induced by exogenous JA and wounding. Decreased expression of PI-I and induced expression of SlJAZs (including SlJAZ2, SlJAZ10 and SlJAZ11) were observed in transgenic plants, suggesting that JA response is repressed. In addition, SlUPA-like overexpressed plant exhibited more opened stoma and higher water loss than the control when treated with dehydration stress, which was related to decreased ABA biosynthesis, signal transduction and response. Particularly, abnormal developments of transgenic plants promote the plant susceptibility to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. Therefore, it is deduced from these results that SlUPA-like plays vital role in regulation of plant development and stress tolerance through GA, JA and ABA pathways.

  19. Modulation of Cellular Migration and Survival by c-Myc through the Downregulation of Urokinase (uPA) and uPA Receptor▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Alfano, Daniela; Votta, Giuseppina; Schulze, Almut; Downward, Julian; Caputi, Mario; Stoppelli, Maria Patrizia; Iaccarino, Ingram

    2010-01-01

    It has been proposed that c-Myc proapoptotic activity accounts for most of its restraint of tumor formation. We established a telomerase-immortalized human epithelial cell line expressing an activatable c-Myc protein. We found that c-Myc activation induces, in addition to increased sensitivity to apoptosis, reductions in cell motility and invasiveness. Transcriptome analysis revealed that urokinase (uPA) and uPA receptor (uPAR) were strongly downregulated by c-Myc. Evidence is provided that the repression of uPA and uPAR may account for most of the antimigratory and proapoptotic activities of c-Myc. c-Myc is known to cooperate with Ras in cellular transformation. We therefore investigated if this cooperation could converge in the control of uPA/uPAR expression. We found that Ras is able to block the effects of c-Myc activation on apoptosis and cellular motility but not on cell invasiveness. Accordingly, the activation of c-Myc in the context of Ras expression had only minor influence on uPAR expression but still had a profound repressive effect on uPA expression. Thus, the differential regulation of uPA and uPAR by c-Myc and Ras correlates with the effects of these two oncoproteins on cell motility, invasiveness, and survival. In conclusion, we have discovered a novel link between c-Myc and uPA/uPAR. We propose that reductions of cell motility and invasiveness could contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis by c-Myc and that the regulation of uPA and uPAR expression may be a component of the ability of c-Myc to reduce motility and invasiveness. PMID:20123981

  20. PEITC inhibits human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cell migration and invasion through the inhibition of uPA, Rho A, and Ras with inhibition of MMP-2, -7 and -9 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Meng-Ya; Wang, Mei-Jen; Yu, Fu-Shun; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Harnod, Tomor; Hung, Chih-Huang; Lee, Hsu-Tung; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive primary brain malignancy, and the efficacy of multimodality treatments remains unsatisfactory. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), one member of the isothiocyanate family, was found to inhibit the migration and invasion of many types of human cancer cells. In our previous study, PEITC induced the apoptosis of human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells through the extrinsic and intrinsic signaling pathways. In the present study, we first investigated the effects of PEITC on the migration and invasion of GBM 8401 cells. PEITC decreased the migration of GBM 8401 cells in a dose-dependent manner as determined from scratch wound healing and Transwell migration assays. The percentage of inhibition ranged from 46.89 to 15.75%, and from 27.80 to 7.31% after a 48-h treatment of PEITC as determined from the Transwell migration assay and invasion assay, respectively. The western blot analysis indicated that PEITC decreased the levels of proteins associated with migration and invasion, Ras, uPA, RhoA, GRB2, p-p38, p-JNK, p-ERK, p65, SOS1, MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-13, in a dose-dependent manner. Real-time PCR analyses revealed that PEITC reduced the mRNA levels of MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9 and RhoA in a dose- and time-dependent manner. PEITC exhibited potent anticancer activities through the inhibition of migration and invasion in the GBM 8401 cells. Our findings elucidate the possible molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways of the anti-metastatic effects of PEITC on human brain glioblastoma cells, and PEITC may be considered as a therapeutic agent.

  1. The UPA score and teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Garlick, R; Ineichen, B; Hudson, F

    1993-03-01

    Teenage motherhood is often said to be the result of deficient contraceptive and abortion services. Using data from the Public Health Common Data Set (PH CDS) we demonstrate two important effects in a Regional Health Authority: higher rates of conception are related to a live birth rather than an abortion pregnancy outcome; District Health Authorities (DHAs) with high underprivileged area scores (UPA) are more likely to have high rates of conception in the teenage years than those districts with low scores.

  2. uPA Attenuated LPS-induced Inflammatory Osteoclastogenesis through the Plasmin/PAR-1/Ca2+/CaMKK/AMPK Axis

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Yosuke; Ishisaki, Akira; Kawashita, Eri; Kuretake, Hiromi; Ikeda, Kanako; Matsuo, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis-caused bone destruction, results from an increase of bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) induced by inflammation. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying this disorder remain unclear. We herein investigated that the effect of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) on inflammatory osteoclastogenesis induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which is a potent stimulator of bone resorption in inflammatory diseases. We found that the uPA deficiency promoted inflammatory osteoclastogenesis and bone loss induced by LPS. We also showed that LPS induced the expression of uPA, and the uPA treatment attenuated the LPS-induced inflammatory osteoclastogenesis of RAW264.7 mouse monocyte/macrophage lineage cells. Additionally, we showed that the uPA-attenuated inflammatory osteoclastgenesis is associated with the activation of plasmin/protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 axis by uPA. Moreover, we examined the mechanism underlying the effect of uPA on inflammatory osteoclastogenesis, and found that uPA/plasmin/PAR-1 activated the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway through Ca2+/calmodulin dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) activation, and attenuated inflammatory osteoclastogenesis by inactivation of NF-κB in RAW264.7 cells. These data suggest that uPA attenuated inflammatory osteoclastogenesis through the plasmin/PAR-1/Ca2+/CaMKK/AMPK axis. Our findings may provide a novel therapeutic approach to bone loss caused by inflammatory diseases. PMID:26722218

  3. uPA Binding to PAI-1 Induces Corneal Myofibroblast Differentiation on Vitronectin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingyan; Ly, Christine M.; Ko, Chun-Ying; Meyers, Erin E.; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Bernstein, Audrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Vitronectin (VN) in provisional extracellular matrix (ECM) promotes cell migration. Fibrotic ECM also includes VN and, paradoxically, strongly adherent myofibroblasts (Mfs). Because fibrotic Mfs secrete elevated amounts of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), we tested whether increased extracellular uPA promotes the persistence of Mfs on VN. Methods. Primary human corneal fibroblasts (HCFs) were cultured in supplemented serum-free medium on VN or collagen (CL) with 1ng/mL transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1). Adherent cells were quantified using crystal violet. Protein expression was measured by Western blotting and flow cytometry. Transfection of short interfering RNAs was performed by nucleofection. Mfs were identified by α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) stress fibers. Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) levels were quantified by ELISA. Results. TGFβ1-treated HCFs secreted PAI-1 (0.5uM) that bound to VN, competing with αvβ3/αvβ5 integrin/VN binding, thus promoting cell detachment from VN. However, addition of uPA to cells on VN increased Mf differentiation (9.7-fold), cell-adhesion (2.2-fold), and binding by the VN integrins αvβ3 and -β5 (2.2-fold). Plasmin activity was not involved in promoting these changes, as treatment with the plasmin inhibitor aprotinin had no effect. A dominant negative PAI-1 mutant (PAI-1R) that binds to VN but does not inhibit uPA prevented the increase in uPA-stimulated cell adhesion and reduced uPA-stimulated integrin αvβ3/αvβ5 binding to VN by 73%. Conclusions. uPA induction of TGFβ1-dependent Mf differentiation on VN supports the hypothesis that elevated secretion of uPA in fibrotic tissue may promote cell adhesion and the persistence of Mfs. By blocking uPA-stimulated cell adhesion, PAI-1R may be a useful agent in combating corneal scarring. PMID:22700714

  4. Beta-catenin up-regulates the expression of the urokinase plasminogen activator in human colorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Hiendlmeyer, Elke; Regus, Susanne; Wassermann, Stella; Hlubek, Falk; Haynl, Angela; Dimmler, Arno; Koch, Claudia; Knoll, Claudia; van Beest, Moniek; Reuning, Ute; Brabletz, Thomas; Kirchner, Thomas; Jung, Andreas

    2004-02-15

    Expression of the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) increases during the progression of colorectal tumors from adenomas to carcinomas. The highest amounts of uPA are found at the invasion front of carcinomas, which also displays a strong expression of nuclear beta-catenin and is therefore a region expressing beta-catenin target genes at high levels. Here we show that beta-catenin contributes to the transactivation of uPA. Therefore, beta-catenin might have an impact on the capacity of colorectal tumors for invasion and metastasis, as well as dormancy, which are hallmarks of cancer.

  5. The Triton from the Reid93 Potential in the UPA

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Benjamin F.

    2012-08-20

    The Unitary Pole Approximation (UPA) is an efficient means to construct a rank-one separable potential, reproduces the deuteron and {sup 1}S{sub 0} anti-bound-state wave functions, generates a reliable estimate of the two- and three-nucleon binding energies, and yields a simple representation of the three-nucleon ground-state wave function. The Reid93 potential provides a representation of the NN scattering data comparable in fit to a partial wave analysis, and reproduces the deuteron properties as well as any contemporary potential model. From comparing the UPA and the local potential results, we can see that the UPA gives a satisfactory approximation to the local potential, suggesting that one may use the UPA three-nucleon wave function to calculate the electric dipole moment (EDM) for the {sup 3}H and {sup 3}He considering the absence of any experimental measurement at this stage, or to investigate the variation in the two- and three-nucleon binding energy as a function of the hadronic mass.

  6. The construction and expression of chimeric urokinase-type plasminogen activator genes containing kringle domains of human plasminogen.

    PubMed

    Boutaud, A; Castellino, F J

    1993-06-01

    A series of chimeric urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) genes, which contain combinations of kringle domains of human plasminogen (HPg) in place of the uPA kringle (KuPA), has been constructed and expressed. Some of the resulting recombinant (r) variant uPA chimeras contain modules that potentially mediate the macroscopic binding of HPg to its activation effectors, fibrin(ogen) and 6-aminohexanoic acid (EACA). Such binding sites are not possessed by KuPA, but are present in certain of the HPg kringles, viz., kringle 1 (K1HPg), kringle 4 (K4HPg), and kringle 5 (K5HPg). The recombinant (r) chimeras constructed included molecules with replacements of KuPA with K1HPg (r-[KuPA-->K1HPg]uPA), and with KuPA replaced by double kringle combinations of K1HPgK4HPg (r-[KuPA-->K1HPgK4HPg]uPA), K2HPgK3HPg (r-[KuPA-->K2HPgK3HPg]uPA), and K4HPgK5HPg (r-[KuPA-->K4HPgK5HPg]uPA). All of these variant genes, along with their wild-type (wt) r-uPA counterparts, were expressed in human kidney 293 cells. In cases wherein EACA-binding kringles from HPg have been placed in uPA, this property has been retained in the chimeric molecule and employed as an essential part of the purification procedures for the variants. The steady state amidolytic activity of two-chain (tc) wtr-uPA toward the chromogenic substrate, H-D-pyroglutamyl-Gly-L-Arg-p-nitroanilide (S2444), is characterized by a kcat/KM (pH 7.4, 37 degrees C) of 120 s-1 mM-1. This value ranges from 92 s-1 mM-1 (tcr-[KuPA-->K1HPg]uPA) to 166 s-1 mM-1 (tcr-[KuPA-->K1HPgK4HPg]uPA) for each of the variants, demonstrating that the catalytic efficiency of the active site is altered only in a small way by changes in the noncatalytic domain of uPA. Small differences are also observed in the abilities of these tcr variants to interact with the fast-acting plasma inhibitor of uPA, viz., plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). The second-order rate constant for the interaction of PAI-1 with tcr-uPA, 0.46 x 10(7) M-1s-1 (pH 7.4, 10 degrees

  7. Expression of plasminogen activator-related genes in the adipose tissue of lactating dairy sheep in the early post-weaning period.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, G; Lampidonis, A D; Laliotis, G P; Bizelis, I; Politis, I

    2012-06-01

    There is growing evidence that plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is expressed in adipose tissue and its expression is implicated in inflammation that accompanies obesity-associated diseases. The physiological role of other genes implicated in the plasminogen-activating cascade such as urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), u-PA receptor (u-PAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2) in ovine adipose tissue remains unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the changes in the expression of four plasminogen activator (PA)-related genes during the early post-weaning period in dairy ewes. A total of 21 subcutaneous adipose tissue samples were obtained from seven lactating dairy ewes of the Chios breed at weeks 1, 2 and 4 after weaning. Results indicated that expression of all PA-related genes was detected in most of the samples examined. Greatest expression of u-PAR corresponded to highest (week 1), while greatest expression of PAI-2 corresponded to lowest (week 4) rate of lipolysis, as indicated by the expression of hormone-sensitive lipase, in the ovine adipose tissue. There were no significant differences in the expression of the other two PA-related genes (u-PA, PAI-1) throughout the experimental period. Plasminogen activator-related genes are not expressed in a coordinated manner in the adipose tissue of lactating dairy sheep in the early post-weaning period. In conclusion, adipose tissue mobilization is correlated with highest expression of u-PAR and lowest expression of PAI-2.

  8. RhoA/ROCK pathway mediates leptin-induced uPA expression to promote cell invasion in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Ahmad; Hashemy, Seyed Isaac; Aghaei, Mahmoud; Panjehpour, Mojtaba

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that leptin, an adipocyte-secreted hormone, stimulates ovarian cancer invasion. Here, we investigated the contribution of uPA in leptin-induced ovarian cancer cell invasion. The cell invasion and migration experiments were carried out using matrigel invasion and wound healing assays in ovarian cancer cell lines (OVCAR3, SKOV3and CaoV-3). The mechanism underlying the invasive effect of leptin was examined using cell transfection with Ob-Rb siRNA, pre-treatment with a specific inhibitor of RhoA and ROCK, RhoA activation assay, OB-Rb, Rock and upA protein expression. Our results show that leptin induced ovarian cancer cell invasion via up-regulating upA in a time and dose-dependent manner, which was attenuated using knockdown of OB-Rb by siRNA. Moreover, pre-incubation with C3 (inhibitor of RhoA) and Y-27632 (inhibitor of ROCK) effectively attenuated leptin-induced upA expression and inhibited invasive ability of ovarian cancer cells. We also found that pretreatment with inhibitors of PI3K/AKT (LY294002), JAK/STAT (AG490) and NF-kB (BAY 11-7082) significantly reduced leptin-induced upA expression. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that OB-Rb, RhoA/ROCK, PI3K/AKT, JAK/STAT pathways and NF-kB activation are involved in leptin-induced upA expression. These results may provide a new mechanism that facilitates leptin-induced ovarian cancer invasion.

  9. Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator Resulting from Endometrial Carcinogenesis Enhances Tumor Invasion and Correlates with Poor Outcome of Endometrial Carcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chia-Yen; Chang, Ming-Cheng; Huang, Wei-Yun; Huang, Ching-Ting; Tang, Yu-Chien; Huang, Hsien-Da; Kuo, Kuan-Ting; Chen, Chi-An; Cheng, Wen-Fang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the dysregulated genes involved in the tumorigenesis and progression of endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma (EEC), and their possible mechanisms. Endometrial specimens including normal endometrial tissues, atypical endometrial hyperplasia, and EEC were analyzed. The expression profiles were compared using GeneChip Array. The gene expression levels were determined by real-time RT-PCR in the training and testing sets to correlate the clinico-pathological parameters of EEC. Immunoblotting, in vitro cell migration and invasion assays were performed in human endometrial cancer cell lines and their transfectants. In microarray analysis, seven dysregulated genes were identified. Only the levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) were higher in EEC with deep myometrial invasion, positive lympho-vascular space invasion, lymph node metastasis, and advanced stages. After multivariate analysis, uPA was the only independent poor prognostic factor for disease-free survival in the EEC patients (hazard ratio: 4.65, p = 0.03). uPA may enhance the migratory and invasive capabilities of endometrial tumor cells by the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Akt and p38 molecules. uPA is a dysregulated gene involved in the tumorigenesis, bio-pathological features and outcomes of EEC. uPA may be a potential molecule and target for the detection and treatment of EEC. PMID:26033187

  10. uPA, uPAR and TGFβ₁ expression during early and late post myocardial infarction period in rat myocardium.

    PubMed

    Stavropoulou, Anastasia; Philippou, Anastassios; Halapas, Antonios; Sourla, Antigone; Pissimissis, Nikolaos; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The expression patterns of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ₁), urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and uPA receptor (uPAR) were analysed after artery ligation-induced myocardial infarction (MI) in the rat myocardium. uPA and uPAR expressions were significantly increased both at transcriptional and protein level during early phase post MI period (uPA at 1 hour and uPAR at 24 hours post infarction). TGFβ1 mRNA expression profile revealed a significant increase of TGFβ1 expression from day 4 up to 8 weeks post infarction. These data suggest that the need for an increasing TGFβ₁ bioavailability during the post-infarction period in rat myocardium is achieved in the early post MI period by an increased expression of uPA/uPAR proteolytic system (indirect activation of latent TGFβ₁) and in the late post MI period by direct regulation of TGFβ₁ expression. It is therefore concluded that differential regulation of the TGFβ₁ bioavailability may be a crucial step of the repair mechanisms during the post MI infarction period in the rat myocardium.

  11. uPA dependent and independent mechanisms of wound healing by C-phycocyanin.

    PubMed

    Madhyastha, H K; Radha, K S; Nakajima, Y; Omura, S; Maruyama, M

    2008-12-01

    Wound repair requires both recruitment and well co-ordinated actions of many cell types including inflammatory cells, endothelial cells, epithelial cells and importantly fibroblast cells. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) system plays a vital role in wound healing phenomenon. We have previously demonstrated that C-phycocyanin (C-pc), a biliprotein from blue-green algae, transcriptionally regulates uPA through cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. To date, a role for C-pc in wound-healing scenario is not elucidated. This study was designed to examine the wound-healing property of C-pc in relation to fibroblast proliferation and migration. C-pc increased fibroblast proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. It also enhanced G1 phase of cell cycle and increased the expressions of cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2, which facilitate cell cycle progression, in a uPA-independent manner. In vitro wound healing and migration assays revealed the pro-migratory properties of C-pc. Short-interference RNA studies demonstrated that uPA was necessary for C-pc-induced fibroblast migration. C-pc also significantly elevated the expressions of chemokines (MDC, RANTES, Eotaxin, GRO alpha, ENA78 and TARC) and Rho-GTPases (Cdc 42 and Rac 1) in a uPA-dependent manner. Pre-treatment of C-pc-stimulated cells with pharmacological inhibitor of PI-3K (LY294002) annulled the expression of GTPases implying that Rac 1 and Cdc 42 were induced through PI-3K pathway. C-pc-induced cellular migration towards wounded area was also negatively affected by PI-3K inhibition. In vivo wound-healing experiments in mice validated our finding that C-pc accelerates wound healing. Our data provides conclusive evidence of a novel therapeutic usage for C-pc as a wound-healing agent. C-pc is a food and drug administration (FDA)-approved health supplement. We believe this compound can also be beneficial in healing of internal wounds, such as ulcers.

  12. Soya protein hydrolysates modify the expression of various pro-inflammatory genes induced by fatty acids in ovine phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Politis, Ioannis; Theodorou, Georgios; Lampidonis, Antonios D; Chronopoulou, Roubini; Baldi, Antonella

    2012-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that fatty acids are the circulating mediators acting in a pro-inflammatory manner towards activated circulating ovine monocyte/macrophages and neutrophils. Furthermore, whether soya protein hydrolysates (SPH) inhibit the fatty acid-induced increase in the production of pro-inflammatory responses by ovine phagocytes was tested in vitro. All the fatty acids tested (myristic, palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic and oleic) increased (P<0·01; C18>C16>C14) membrane-bound urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA) and u-PA free binding sites in cell membranes of activated ovine blood monocytes/macrophages, but only the C18 fatty acids (stearic, oleic) were effective towards blood neutrophils. The C18 fatty acids up-regulated (P<0·05) the gene expression of u-PA, u-PA receptor, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and inducible NO synthase (in monocytes) but not that of cyclo-oxygenase-2, integrin α X and plasminogen activator inhibitor types 1 and 2 by ovine phagocytes. SPH blocked completely or partially all C18 fatty acid-induced changes in the expression of various pro-inflammatory genes. In conclusion, fatty acids selectively 'activate' ovine phagocytes, suggesting that these cells 'sense' metabolic signals derived from adipocytes. Soya protein peptides inhibit all changes in gene expression induced by fatty acids in ovine phagocytes in vitro. This constitutes a novel mechanism of action.

  13. RNA-mediated gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Alan L; Slack, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has become a new paradigm in biology. RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways have been studied extensively, revealing diverse epigenetic and posttranscriptional mechanisms. In contrast, the roles of ncRNAs in activating gene expression remains poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of gene activation by small RNAs, long non-coding RNAs, and enhancer-derived RNAs, with an emphasis on epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:24185374

  14. Altered expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor in high-risk soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Benassi, M S; Ponticelli, F; Azzoni, E; Gamberi, G; Pazzaglia, L; Chiechi, A; Conti, A; Spessotto, P; Scapolan, M; Pignotti, E; Bacchini, P; Picci, P

    2007-09-01

    In recent years, classification of soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) has improved with cytogenetic analyses, but their clinical behavior is still not easily predictable. The aim of this study was to detect alterations in the urokinase-type plasminogen system, involved in tumor growth and invasion, by comparing mRNA levels of its components with those of paired normal tissues, and relating them with patient clinical course. Real-time PCR was performed on human STS cell lines and tissues from highly malignant STS, including leiomyosarcomas and malignant fibrous histiocytomas, to evaluate the expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Immunohistochemistry of gene products was also performed. Median mRNA values of all genes studied were higher in tumors than in paired normal tissues. In agreement with data on STS cell lines, significant up-regulation for uPA and PAI-1 genes compared to reference values was seen. Moreover, different levels of expression were related to histotype and metastatic phenotype. There was accordance between uPA mRNA and protein expression, while immunodetection of PAI-1 product was weak and scattered. Clearly, the controversial role of PAI-1 protein requires further biological analyses, but evident involvement of uPA/PAI-1 gene overexpression in STS malignancy may highlight a molecular defect useful in discriminating STS high-risk patients.

  15. Inhibitory Monoclonal Antibodies against Mouse Proteases Raised in Gene-Deficient Mice Block Proteolytic Functions in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Ida K.; Rasch, Morten G.; Ingvarsen, Signe; Pass, Jesper; Madsen, Daniel H.; Engelholm, Lars H.; Behrendt, Niels; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla

    2012-01-01

    Identification of targets for cancer therapy requires the understanding of the in vivo roles of proteins, which can be derived from studies using gene-targeted mice. An alternative strategy is the administration of inhibitory monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), causing acute disruption of the target protein function(s). This approach has the advantage of being a model for therapeutic targeting. mAbs for use in mouse models can be obtained through immunization of gene-deficient mice with the autologous protein. Such mAbs react with both species-specific epitopes and epitopes conserved between species. mAbs against proteins involved in extracellular proteolysis, including plasminogen activators urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), their inhibitor PAI-1, the uPA receptor (uPAR), two matrix metalloproteinases (MMP9 and MMP14), as well as the collagen internalization receptor uPARAP, have been developed. The inhibitory mAbs against uPA and uPAR block plasminogen activation and thereby hepatic fibrinolysis in vivo. Wound healing, another plasmin-dependent process, is delayed by an inhibitory mAb against uPA in the adult mouse. Thromboembolism can be inhibited by anti-PAI-1 mAbs in vivo. In conclusion, function-blocking mAbs are well-suited for targeted therapy in mouse models of different diseases, including cancer. PMID:22754528

  16. Up-Regulation of PAI-1 and Down-Regulation of uPA Are Involved in Suppression of Invasiveness and Motility of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells by a Natural Compound Berberine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuanbin; Wang, Ning; Li, Hongliang; Liu, Ming; Cao, Fengjun; Yu, Xianjun; Zhang, Jingxuan; Tan, Yan; Xiang, Longchao; Feng, Yibin

    2016-04-16

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death and its prognosis remains poor due to the high risk of tumor recurrence and metastasis. Berberine (BBR) is a natural compound derived from some medicinal plants, and accumulating evidence has shown its potent anti-tumor activity with diverse action on tumor cells, including inducing cancer cell death and blocking cell cycle and migration. Molecular targets of berberine involved in its inhibitory effect on the invasiveness remains not yet clear. In this study, we identified that berberine exhibits a potent inhibition on the invasion and migration of HCC cells. This was accompanied by a dose-dependent down-regulation of expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in berberine-treated HCC cells. Furthermore, berberine inactivated p38 and Erk1/2 signaling pathway in HCC cells. Primarily, this may be attributed to the up-regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a tumor suppressor that can antagonize uPA receptor and down-regulation of uPA. Blockade of uPA receptor-associated pathways leads to reduced invasiveness and motility of berberine-treated HCC cells. In conclusion, our findings identified for the first time that inactivation of uPA receptor by up-regulation of PAI-1 and down-regulation of uPA is involved in the inhibitory effect of berberine on HCC cell invasion and migration.

  17. Fisetin inhibits migration and invasion of human cervical cancer cells by down-regulating urokinase plasminogen activator expression through suppressing the p38 MAPK-dependent NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Hsieh, Shu-Ching; Yu, Yung-Luen; Huang, Min-Hsien; Huang, Yi-Chang; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien

    2013-01-01

    Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been reported to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in several cancer types. However, its effect on the anti-metastatic potential of cervical cancer cells remains unclear. In the present study, we found that fisetin inhibits the invasion and migration of cervical cancer cells. The expression and activity of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) was significantly suppressed by fisetin in a dose-dependent manner. We also demonstrated that fisetin reduces the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, but not that of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, or AKT. Addition of a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, further enhanced the inhibitory effect of fisetin on the expression and activity of uPA and the invasion and motility in cervical cancer cells. Fisetin suppressed the TPA (tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate)-induced activation of p38 MAPK and uPA, and inhibited the TPA-enhanced migratory and invasive abilities. Furthermore, the promoter activity of the uPA gene was dramatically repressed by fisetin, which disrupted the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and its binding amount on the promoter of the uPA gene, and these suppressive effects could be further enhanced by SB203580. This study provides strong evidence for the molecular mechanism of fisetin in inhibiting the aggressive phenotypes by repression of uPA via interruption of p38 MAPK-dependent NF-κB signaling pathway in cervical cancer cells and thus contributes insight to the potential of using fisetin as a therapeutic strategy against cervical cancer by inhibiting migration and invasion.

  18. Fisetin Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Human Cervical Cancer Cells by Down-Regulating Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Expression through Suppressing the p38 MAPK-Dependent NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Hsieh, Shu-Ching; Yu, Yung-Luen; Huang, Min-Hsien; Huang, Yi-Chang; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien

    2013-01-01

    Fisetin (3,3’,4’,7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been reported to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in several cancer types. However, its effect on the anti-metastatic potential of cervical cancer cells remains unclear. In the present study, we found that fisetin inhibits the invasion and migration of cervical cancer cells. The expression and activity of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) was significantly suppressed by fisetin in a dose-dependent manner. We also demonstrated that fisetin reduces the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, but not that of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, or AKT. Addition of a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, further enhanced the inhibitory effect of fisetin on the expression and activity of uPA and the invasion and motility in cervical cancer cells. Fisetin suppressed the TPA (tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate)-induced activation of p38 MAPK and uPA, and inhibited the TPA-enhanced migratory and invasive abilities. Furthermore, the promoter activity of the uPA gene was dramatically repressed by fisetin, which disrupted the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and its binding amount on the promoter of the uPA gene, and these suppressive effects could be further enhanced by SB203580. This study provides strong evidence for the molecular mechanism of fisetin in inhibiting the aggressive phenotypes by repression of uPA via interruption of p38 MAPK-dependent NF-κB signaling pathway in cervical cancer cells and thus contributes insight to the potential of using fisetin as a therapeutic strategy against cervical cancer by inhibiting migration and invasion. PMID:23940799

  19. Cantharidin Impairs Cell Migration and Invasion of Human Lung Cancer NCI-H460 Cells via UPA and MAPK Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Yu, Chien-Chih; Hsiao, Yung-Ting; Wu, Shin-Hwar; Bau, DA-Tian; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chang, Shu-Jen; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-11-01

    Cantharidin (CTD), a component of natural mylabris (Mylabris phalerata Pallas), has been shown to have biological activities and induce cell death in many human cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of CTD on cell migration and invasion of NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells. Cell viability was examined and results indicated that CTD decreased the percentage of viable cells in dose-dependent manners. CTD inhibited cell migration and invasion in dose-dependent manners. Gelatin zymography analysis was used to measure the activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2/-9) and the results indicated that CTD inhibited the enzymatic activities of MMP-2/-9 of NCI-H460 cells. Western blotting was used to examine the protein expression of NCI-H460 cells after incubation with CTD and the results showed that CTD decreased the expression of MMP-2/-9, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Ras homolog gene family, member A (Rho A), phospho-protein kinase B (AKT) (Thr308)(p-AKT(308)), phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (p-ERK1/2), phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (p-p38), phospho c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (p-JNK1/2), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and urokinase plasminogen activator (UPA). Furthermore, confocal laser microscopy was used to confirm that CTD suppressed the expression of NF-κB p65, but did not significantly affect protein kinase C (PKC) translocation in NCI-H460 cells. Based on those observations, we suggest that CTD may be used as a novel anticancer metastasis agent for lung cancer in the future.

  20. Novel inhibitors of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and matrix metalloproteinase expression in metastatic cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cakarovski, Kristina; Leung, Jenny Y; Restall, Christina; Carin-Carlson, Anna; Yang, Eunice; Perlmutter, Patrick; Anderson, Robin; Medcalf, Robert; Dear, Anthony E

    2004-07-01

    The plasminogen-activating (PA) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) enzyme systems are implicated in proteolytic turnover of the extracellular matrix (ECM) associated with biologic processes including wound healing, inflammation and angiogenesis. Aberrant expression of components of the PA and MMP enzyme systems occurs in the pathogenesis of metastatic cancer. Oxamflatin (Ox), a novel hydroxamic acid derivative, inhibits u-PA mRNA expression and proteolytic activity while simultaneously upregulating the expression of the natural inhibitor of u-PA, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2) in metastatic cancer cells. We have characterized the effects of Ox and a novel derivative, Metacept-1 (MCT-1), on PA and MMP-mediated proteolysis and invasion in several metastatic tumor lines. Both compounds are able to inhibit u-PA-, MMP-2- and MMP-9-mediated gene expression at low micromolar concentrations as well as u-PA- and MMP-mediated proteolysis as assessed by zymography, with MCT-1 being the more effective of the 2 agents in some assays. Cellular invasion assays correlate with gene expression and zymography experiments identifying both Ox and MCT-1 as able to inhibit invasion of metastatic cancer cell lines through matrigel at nanomolar concentrations, with MCT-1 more effective than Ox in 2 of the 3 cancer cell lines assessed.

  1. Uniform {sup 15}N- and {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeling of proteins in mammalian cells and solution structure of the amino terminal fragment of u-PA

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.P.; Petros, A.M.; Meadows, R.P.; Mazar, A.P.; Nettesheim, D.G.; Pederson, T.M.; Fesik, S.W.

    1994-12-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) is a 54-kDa glycoprotein that catalyzes the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, a broad-specificity protease responsible for the degradation of fibrin clots and extracellular matrix components. The u-PA protein consists of three individual modules: a growth factor domain (GFD), a kringle, and a serine protease domain. The amino terminal fragment (ATF) includes the GFD-responsible for u-PA binding to its receptor-and the kringle domains. This protein was expressed and uniformly {sup 15}N-and {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled in mammalian cells by methods that will be described. In addition, we present the three-dimensional structure of ATF that was derived from 1299 NOE-derived distance restraints along with the {phi} angle and hydrogen bonding restraints. Although the individual domains in the structures were highly converged, the two domains are structurally independent. The overall structures of the individual domains are very similar to the structures of homologous proteins. However, important structural differences between the growth factor domain of u-PA and other homologous proteins were observed in the region that has been implicated in binding the urokinase receptor. These results may explain, in part, why other growth factors show no appreciable affinity for the urokinase receptor.

  2. UpaG, a New Member of the Trimeric Autotransporter Family of Adhesins in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Jaione; Mabbett, Amanda N.; Ulett, Glen C.; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Wecker, Karine; Totsika, Makrina; Schembri, Mark A.; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Beloin, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    The ability of Escherichia coli to colonize both intestinal and extraintestinal sites is driven by the presence of specific virulence factors, among which are the autotransporter (AT) proteins. Members of the trimeric AT adhesin family are important virulence factors for several gram-negative pathogens and mediate adherence to eukaryotic cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. In this study, we characterized a new trimeric AT adhesin (UpaG) from uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). Molecular analysis of UpaG revealed that it is translocated to the cell surface and adopts a multimeric conformation. We demonstrated that UpaG is able to promote cell aggregation and biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces in CFT073 and various UPEC strains. In addition, UpaG expression resulted in the adhesion of CFT073 to human bladder epithelial cells, with specific affinity to fibronectin and laminin. Prevalence analysis revealed that upaG is strongly associated with E. coli strains from the B2 and D phylogenetic groups, while deletion of upaG had no significant effect on the ability of CFT073 to colonize the mouse urinary tract. Thus, UpaG is a novel trimeric AT adhesin from E. coli that mediates aggregation, biofilm formation, and adhesion to various ECM proteins. PMID:18424525

  3. Characterization of the murine plasminogen/urokinase-type plasminogen-activator system.

    PubMed

    Lijnen, H R; Van Hoef, B; Collen, D

    1996-11-01

    The murine plasminogen/urokinase-type plasminogen-activator (u-PA) system was studied using purified proteins, plasma and endothelioma cells. Recombinant murine u-PA was obtained as a single-chain molecule of 45 kDa which was converted to two-chain u-PA with plasmin by cleavage of the Lys159-Ile160 peptide bond. Murine plasminogen, purified from plasma as a single-chain protein of 95 kDa, was resistant to quantitative activation with murine recombinant two-chain u-PA: only 15% activation within 1 h at 37 degrees C was obtained in mixtures of 1 microM plasminogen and 5 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA, whereas quantitative activation was observed in the autologous human system. Addition of 6-aminohexanoic acid to native murine plasminogen resulted in quantitative activation within 1 h. In murine plasma in vitro, plasminogen was also resistant to quantitative activation with u-PA (50% activation within 1 h at 37 degrees C with 50 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA, whereas in the human system nearly quantitative activation was obtained). Murine plasma clots submerged in murine plasma were resistant to lysis with u-PA; < or = 2% clot lysis in 2 h was obtained with 80 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA in the autologous murine system whereas 50% clot lysis in 2 h required only 15 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA in the autologous human system. Saturable binding of murine recombinant two-chain u-PA was observed to murine endothelioma cells that are genetically deficient in u-PA (u-PA-/- End cells). Binding was characterized by a Kd of 5.5 nM and 800000 binding sites/cell. However, u-PA-/- End cells did not significantly stimulate the activation rate of murine plasminogen by murine recombinant two-chain u-PA and did not enhance the plasmin-mediated conversion rate of murine recombinant single-chain u-PA to its two-chain derivative. Murine recombinant two-chain u-PA bound to murine endothelioma cells was quantitatively inhibited by murine plasminogen-activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Thus

  4. Ganodermanontriol (GDNT) exerts its effect on growth and invasiveness of breast cancer cells through the down-regulation of CDC20 and uPA

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jiahua; Jedinak, Andrej; Sliva, Daniel

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma mushroom alcohol, inhibits growth of breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors but not in the tumor surrounding tissue in breast cancer patients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits expression of CDC20 in breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits cell adhesion, cell migration and cell invasion of breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits secretion of uPA and down-regulates expression of uPAR in breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Ganoderma lucidum is a medicinal mushroom that has been recognized by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Although some of the direct anticancer activities are attributed to the presence of triterpenes-ganoderic and lucidenic acids-the activity of other compounds remains elusive. Here we show that ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma alcohol, specifically suppressed proliferation (anchorage-dependent growth) and colony formation (anchorage-independent growth) of highly invasive human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. GDNT suppressed expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein CDC20, which is over-expressed in precancerous and breast cancer cells compared to normal mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, we found that CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors when compared to the tissue surrounding the tumor in specimens from breast cancer patients. GDNT also inhibited invasive behavior (cell adhesion, cell migration, and cell invasion) through the suppression of secretion of urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPA) and inhibited expression of uPA receptor. In conclusion, mushroom GDNT is a natural agent that has potential as a therapy for invasive breast cancers.

  5. Reference datasets of tufA and UPA markers to identify algae in metabarcoding surveys.

    PubMed

    Rossetto Marcelino, Vanessa; Verbruggen, Heroen

    2017-04-01

    The data presented here are related to the research article "Multi-marker metabarcoding of coral skeletons reveals a rich microbiome and diverse evolutionary origins of endolithic algae" (Marcelino and Verbruggen, 2016) [1]. Here we provide reference datasets of the elongation factor Tu (tufA) and the Universal Plastid Amplicon (UPA) markers in a format that is ready-to-use in the QIIME pipeline (Caporaso et al., 2010) [2]. In addition to sequences previously available in GenBank, we included newly discovered endolithic algae lineages using both amplicon sequencing (Marcelino and Verbruggen, 2016) [1] and chloroplast genome data (Marcelino et al., 2016; Verbruggen et al., in press) [3], [4]. We also provide a script to convert GenBank flatfiles into reference datasets that can be used with other markers. The tufA and UPA reference datasets are made publicly available here to facilitate biodiversity assessments of microalgal communities.

  6. Tumor Budding, uPA, and PAI-1 in Colorectal Cancer: Update of a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Hardt, Jochen; Franz, Simon; Schaller, Tina; Schenkirsch, Gerhard; Kriening, Bernadette; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Rüth, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Aims. The prognostic role of the proteases uPA and PAI-1, as well as tumor budding, in colon cancer, has been investigated previously. Methods. We provide 6-year follow-up data and results of the validation set. The initial test set and validation set consisted of 55 colon cancers and 68 colorectal cancers, respectively. Tissue samples were analyzed for uPA and PAI-1 using a commercially available Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Tumor budding was analyzed on cytokeratin-stained slides. Survival analyses were performed using cut-offs that were determined previously. Results. uPA was not prognostic for outcome. PAI-1 showed a trend towards reduced cancer specific survival in PAI-1 high-grade cases (68 versus 83 months; P = 0.091). The combination of high-grade PAI-1 and tumor budding was associated with significantly reduced cancer specific survival (60 versus 83 months; P = 0.021). After pooling the data from both sets, multivariate analyses revealed that the factors pN-stage, V-stage, and a combination of tumor budding and PAI-1 were independently prognostic for the association with distant metastases. Conclusions. A synergistic adverse effect of PAI-1 and tumor budding in uni- and multivariable analyses was found. PAI-1 could serve as a target for anticancer therapy. PMID:28286517

  7. Expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator, stromelysin 1, stromelysin 3, and matrilysin genes in lung carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Bolon, I.; Devouassoux, M.; Robert, C.; Moro, D.; Brambilla, C.; Brambilla, E.

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that the extracellular-matrix-degrading enzymes, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), stromelysin 1, stromelysin 3, and matrilysin, may play an important role in the transition from lung preneoplasia to invasive carcinoma. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, we analyzed serial frozen sections for the expression of these enzymes in 89 lung carcinomas including 25 neuroendocrine (NE) carcinomas (10 small-cell lung carcinomas, 7 large-cell NE carcinomas, 1 atypical, and 7 typical carcinoids) and 64 non-small-cell, non-NE carcinomas (29 squamous and 7 basaloid carcinomas, 23 adenocarcinomas, and 5 large-cell carcinomas). Proteases, except matrilysin, were more often expressed in stromal than cancer cells. In non-small-cell, non-NE carcinomas, stromal co-expression of u-PA and stromelysin 3 was seen in 80 to 90% of the tumors and was highly correlated (P < 0.0001). Stromal u-PA and stromelysin 3 expression was linked to tumor size (P = 0.01 and 0.03, respectively) and lymph node involvement (P = 0.001 and 0.02, respectively). Epithelial expression of u-PA was correlated to tumor size (P = 0.04). Epithelial expression of stromelysin 3 predominated in squamous and basaloid carcinomas (P = 0.0005) and was inversely correlated to squamous differentiation (P = 0.018). Epithelial expression of matrilysin predominated in adenocarcinomas and large-cell carcinomas (P = 0.07). In NE carcinomas including small-cell lung carcinomas, stromal expression of u-PA was correlated to lymph node metastasis (P = 0.017). Epithelial expression of all enzymes were significantly less frequent in NE than in non-NE tumors. We conclude that 1) epithelial expression of matrix proteases in lung cancer is linked to cell phenotype (NE versus non-NE, squamous versus glandular) and 2) their stromal, rather than epithelial, expression influences local metastasis. Images Figure 1 PMID:9137088

  8. Prognostic significance of urokinase (uPA) and its inhibitor PAI-1 for survival in advanced ovarian carcinoma stage FIGO IIIc.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, W; Schmalfeldt, B; Reuning, U; Pache, L; Berger, U; Ulm, K; Harbeck, N; Späthe, K; Dettmar, P; Höfler, H; Jänicke, F; Schmitt, M; Graeff, H

    1999-04-01

    Strong evidence has accumulated on the prognostic value of tumour-associated proteolytic factors in patients afflicted with solid malignant tumours, including advanced ovarian cancer. We evaluated the prognostic impact of the protease urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor PAI-1 on overall survival in patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO IIIc in order to select patients at risk. uPA and PAI-1 antigen were determined by ELISA in primary tumour tissue extracts of 86 ovarian cancer patients FIGO stage IIIc enrolled in a prospective study. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using the Cox proportional hazard model. The time-varying coefficient model of Gray was used to assess the time-dependent strength of prognostic factors tumour mass, uPA and PAI-1 on overall survival. In all patients, uPA and PAI-1 (optimized cut-offs of 2.0 and 27.5 ng mg(-1) protein respectively), in addition to the traditional prognostic parameters of residual tumour mass, nodal status, grading and ascites volume, were of prognostic significance in univariate analysis for overall survival. Even in patients with residual tumour mass (n = 43), the statistically independent prognostic impact of PAI-1 persisted, allowing further discrimination between low- and high-risk patients. In multivariate analysis, residual tumour mass (P < 0.001, relative risk (RR) 4.5), PAI-1 (P < 0.001; RR 3.1) and nodal status (P = 0.022, RR 2.6) turned out to be strong, statistically independent prognostic parameters. Evaluation of the time-dependent prognostic impact of residual tumour mass and PAI-1 on overall survival (n = 86, 50 months) revealed that the prognostic power of these factors increased with time. In patients with advanced ovarian cancer, both residual tumour mass and PAI-1 are statistically independent strong prognostic factors. Even within patient subgroups with or without residual tumour mass, PAI-1 allowed selection of patients at risk who might benefit from

  9. Cell associated urokinase activity and colonic epithelial cells in health and disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, P R; van de Pol, E; Doe, W F

    1991-01-01

    It is not known if urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is associated with normal colonic epithelial cells. The aims of this study were to determine if normal colonic epithelial cells have uPA activity and whether this is concentrated at the cell membrane. In addition, the contribution of colonic epithelial cell associated uPA activity to disease related pertubations of mucosal uPA activity were examined. A highly enriched population of colonic epithelial cells was isolated from resected colon or biopsy specimens by an enzymatic technique. uPA activity was measured in cell homogenates by a specific and sensitive colorimetric method and expressed relative to cellular DNA. In two experiments subcellular fractionation of colonic epithelial cells was performed by nitrogen cavitation followed by ultracentrifugation over a linear sucrose gradient. The fractions collected were analysed for uPA and organelle-specific enzyme activities. Normal colonic epithelial cells have cell associated uPA activity (mean (SEM) 5.6 (1.1) IU/mg, n = 18). This colocalised with fractions enriched for leucine-beta-naphthylamidase and 5'-nucleotidase, markers of plasma membrane. uPA activities in epithelial cells from cancerous colons (9.8 (3.1) n = 7) or from mucosa affected by inflammatory bowel disease (3.8 (0.7) n = 15) were not significantly different from normal (paired t test), while that in epithelial cells from greatly inflamed mucosa was similar to that from autologous normal or mildly inflamed areas (4.4 (1.2) v 5.9 (3.6), n = 9). Thus normal colonic epithelial cells have cell associated uPA activity which is concentrated on the plasma membranes, suggesting the presence of uPA receptors. Increased mucosal levels of uPA previously reported in patients with inflammatory bowel disease are not due to increased colonic epithelial cell associated uPA. PMID:1650741

  10. Compatibility Testing of Non-Metallic Materials for the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) of International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles Doug; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In the International Space Station (ISS), astronauts will convert urine into potable water with the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA). The urine is distilled, with the concentrated form containing about 15% brine solids, and the dilute form as a blend of pre-treated urine/wastewater. Eighteen candidate non-metallic materials for use with the UPA were tested in 2000 for compatibility with the concentrated and dilute urine solutions for continuous times of at least 30 days, and at conditions of 0.5 psia pressure and 100 F, to simulate the working UPA environment. A primary screening test for each material (virgin and conditioned) was dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) in the stress relaxation mode, with the test data used to predict material performance for a 10-year use in space. Data showed that most of the candidate materials passed the compatibility testing, although a few significant changes in stress relaxation modulus were observed.

  11. Compatibility Testing of Polymeric Materials for the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) of International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles D.

    2003-01-01

    In the International Space Station (ISS), astronauts will convert urine into potable water with the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) by a distillation process. The urine is pre-treated, containing flush water and stabilizers. About 2.5% solids in the urine are concentrated up to 16% brine through distillation. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) in the stress relaxation mode was primarily used to test 15 polymeric UPA materials for compatibility with the pre-treated and brine solutions. There were concerns that chromium trioxide (CrO3), a stabilizer not in the original pre-treat formulation for similar compatibility testing in 2000, could have an adverse effect on these polymers. DMA testing is partially complete for polymeric material samples immersed in the two solutions at room temperature for as long as 200 days. By comparing each material (conditioned and virgin), the stress relaxation modulus (E) was determined for short-term use and predicted for as long as a 10-year use in space. Such a delta E showed a decrease of as much as 79% for a Nylon material, but an increase as much as 454% for a polysulfone material, with increasing immersion time.

  12. Urokinase-Targeted Fusion by Oncolytic Sendai Virus Eradicates Orthotopic Glioblastomas by Pronounced Synergy With Interferon-β Gene

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yuzo; Kinoh, Hiroaki; Iwadate, Yasuo; Onimaru, Mitsuho; Ueda, Yasuji; Harada, Yui; Saito, Satoru; Furuya, Aki; Saegusa, Takashi; Morodomi, Yosuke; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Saito, Shigeyoshi; Aoki, Ichio; Saeki, Naokatsu; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GM), the most frequent primary malignant brain tumor, is highly invasive due to the expression of proteases, including urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). Here, we show the potential of our new and powerful recombinant Sendai virus (rSeV) showing uPA-specific cell-to-cell fusion activity [rSeV/dMFct14 (uPA2), named “BioKnife”] for GM treatment, an effect that was synergistically enhanced by arming BioKnife with the interferon-β (IFN-β) gene. BioKnife killed human GM cell lines efficiently in a uPA-dependent fashion, and this killing was prevented by PA inhibitor-1. Rat gliosarcoma 9L cells expressing both uPA and its functional receptor uPAR (9L-L/R) exhibited high uPA activity on the cellular surface and were highly susceptible to BioKnife. Although parent 9L cells (9L-P) were resistant to BioKnife and to BioKnife expressing IFN-β (BioKnife-IFNβ), cell–cell fusion of 9L-L/R strongly facilitated the expression of IFN-β, and in turn, IFN-β significantly accelerated the fusion activity of BioKnife. A similar synergy was seen in a rat orthotopic brain GM model with 9L-L/R in vivo; therefore, these results suggest that BioKnife-IFNβ may have significant potential to improve the survival of GM patients in a clinical setting. PMID:20606645

  13. Expression of tissue type and urokinase type plasminogen activators as well as plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 and type-2 in human and rhesus monkey placenta

    PubMed Central

    HU, ZHAO-YUAN; LIU, YI-XUN; LIU, KUI; BYRNE, SIMON; NY, TOR; FENG, QIANG; OCKLEFORD, COLIN D.

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of mRNAs and antigens of tissue type (t) and urokinase type (u) plasminogen activators (PA) plus their corresponding inhibitors, type-1 (PAI-1) and type-2 (PAI-2) were studied in human and rhesus monkey placentae by in situ hybridisation and immunocytochemistry. Specific monkey cRNA and antibodies against human tPA, uPA, PAI-1 and PAI-2 were used as probes. The following results were obtained. (1) All the molecules tPA, uPA, PAI-1 and PAI-2 and their mRNAs were identified in the majority of the extravillous cytotrophoblast cells of the decidual layer between Rohr's and Nitabuch's striae and in cytotrophoblast cells of the chorionic plate, basal plate, intercotyledonary septae and cytotrophoblast cells of the chorionic villous tree. (2) Expression of uPA and PAI-2 was noted in villous trophoblast whereas tPA and PAI-1 were mainly concentrated where detachment from maternal tissue occurs. (3) No expression of tPA, uPA, PAI-1 and PAI-2 was observed in the basal plate endometrial stromal cells, chorionic plate connective tissue cells, septal endometrial stromal cells or villous core mesenchyme. (4) The distribution of probes observed following in situ hybridisation is generally consistent with the immunofluorescence pattern of the corresponding antigens and no significant interspecies differences were noted. It is possible that both decidual and extravillous trophoblast cells of placentae of human and rhesus monkey are capable of producing tPA, uPA, PAI-1 and PAI-2 to differing extents. Coordinated expression of these genes in the tissue may play an essential role in the maintenance of normal placentation and parturition. The differences in distribution we observed are consistent with the suggestion that coordinated expression of tPA and its inhibitor PAI-1 may play a key role in fibrinolytic activity in the early stages of placentation and separation of placenta from maternal tissue at term. On the other hand, uPA with its inhibitor PAI-2 appears

  14. Bone Regeneration Using Gene-Activated Matrices.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Sheetal; Atluri, Keerthi; Geary, Sean M; Hong, Liu; Elangovan, Satheesh; Salem, Aliasger K

    2017-01-01

    Gene delivery to bone is a potential therapeutic strategy for directed, sustained, and regulated protein expression. Tissue engineering strategies for bone regeneration include delivery of proteins, genes (viral and non-viral-mediated delivery), and/or cells to the bone defect site. In addition, biomimetic scaffolds and scaffolds incorporating bone anabolic agents greatly enhance the bone repair process. Regional gene therapy has the potential of enhancing bone defect healing and bone regeneration by delivering osteogenic genes locally to the osseous lesions, thereby reducing systemic toxicity and the need for using supraphysiological dosages of therapeutic proteins. By implanting gene-activated matrices (GAMs), sustained gene expression and continuous osteogenic protein production in situ can be achieved in a way that stimulates osteogenesis and bone repair within osseous defects. Critical parameters substantially affecting the therapeutic efficacy of gene therapy include the choice of osteogenic transgene(s), selection of non-viral or viral vectors, the wound environment, and the selection of ex vivo and in vivo gene delivery strategies, such as GAMs. It is critical for gene therapy applications that clinically beneficial amounts of proteins are synthesized endogenously within and around the lesion in a sustained manner. It is therefore necessary that reliable and reproducible methods of gene delivery be developed and tested for their efficacy and safety before translating into clinical practice. Practical considerations such as the age, gender, and systemic health of patients and the nature of the disease process also need to be taken into account in order to personalize the treatments and progress towards developing a clinically applicable gene therapy for healing bone defects. This review discusses tissue engineering strategies to regenerate bone with specific focus on non-viral gene delivery systems.

  15. The Role of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator and Plasmin Activator Inhibitor-1 on Vein Wall Remodeling in Experimental Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Joe F.; Sood, Vikram; Elfline, Megan A.; Luke, Cathy E.; Dewyer, Nicholas A.; Diaz, Jose A.; Myers, Dan D.; Wakefield, Thomas; Henke, Peter K.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) resolution instigates an inflammatory response, resulting in vessel wall damage and scarring. Urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), are integral components of the fibrinolytic system, essential for VT resolution. This study determined the vein wall response when exposed to increased and decreased plasmin activity. Methods A mouse inferior vena cava (IVC) ligation model in uPA −/− or PAI-1 −/− and their genetic wild types (B6/SvEv and C57/BL6, respectively) was used to create stasis thrombi, with tissue harvest at either 8 or 21d. Tissue analysis included gene expression of vascular smooth muscle cells (alpha SMA [αSMA], SM22) and endothelial marker (CD31), by real time PCR, ELISA, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -2 and 9 activity by zymography and vein wall collagen by picrosirius red histological analysis. A P < .05 was considered significant. RESULTS Thrombi were significantly larger in both 8d and 21d uPA −/− as compared to WT, and were significantly smaller in both 8 and 21d PAI-1 −/− as compared to WT. Correspondingly, 8d plasmin levels were reduced in half in uPA −/− and increased 3 fold in PAI-1 −/− when compared to respective WT thrombi (P < .05, N = 5 – 6). The endothelial marker CD31 was elevated 2 fold in PAI-1 −/− mice at 8d, but reduced 2.5 fold at 21d in uPA −/− as compared with WT (P = .02, N = 5 – 6), suggesting less endothelial preservation. Vein wall VSMC gene expression showed that 8d and 21d PAI-1 −/− mice had 2.3 and 3.8 fold more SM22 and 1.8 and 2.3 fold more αSMA expression than respective WT (P < .05, N = 5 – 7), as well as 1.8 fold increased αSMA (+) cells (N = 3 – 5, P ≤ .05). No significant difference in MMP2 or 9 activity was found in the PAI-1 −/− mice compared with WT, while 5.4 fold more MMP9 was present in 21d WT than 21d uPA −/− (P = .03, N = 5). Lastly, collagen was ~2 fold

  16. Inhibitors of Urokinase Type Plasminogen Activator and Cytostatic Activity from Crude Plants Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Xueqiang; Diaz, Ricardo; Franco, Jose Javier Rosado; Sanchez, Veronica Forbes; Fasoli, Ezio; Barletta, Gabriel; Carvajal, Augusto; Bansal, Vibha

    2014-01-01

    In view of the clear evidence that urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays an important role in the processes of tumor cell metastasis, aortic aneurysm, and multiple sclerosis, it has become a target of choice for pharmacological intervention. The goal of this study was thus to determine the presence of inhibitors of uPA in plants known traditionally for their anti-tumor properties. Crude methanol extracts were prepared from the leaves of plants (14) collected from the subtropical dry forest (Guanica, Puerto Rico), and tested for the presence of inhibitors of uPA using the fibrin plate assay. The extracts that tested positive (6) were then partitioned with petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol, in a sequential manner. The resulting fractions were then tested again using the fibrin plate assay. Extracts from leaves of Croton lucidus (C. lucidus) showed the presence of a strong uPA inhibitory activity. Serial dilutions of these C. lucidus partitions were performed to determine the uPA inhibition IC50 values. The chloroform extract showed the lowest IC50 value (3.52 μg/mL) and hence contained the most potent uPA inhibitor. Further investigations revealed that the crude methanol extract and its chloroform and n-butanol partitions did not significantly inhibit closely related proteases such as the tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasmin, indicating their selectivity for uPA, and hence superior potential for medicinal use with fewer side effects. In a further evaluation of their therapeutic potential for prevention of cancer metastasis, the C. lucidus extracts displayed cytostatic activity against human pancreatic carcinoma (PaCa-2) cells, as determined through an MTS assay. The cytostatic activities recorded for each of the partitions correlated with their relative uPA inhibitory activities. There are no existing reports of uPA inhibitors being present in any of the plants reported in this study. PMID:23896619

  17. Life testing of the vapor compression distillation urine processor assembly (VCD/UPA) at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

    PubMed

    Wieland, P

    1998-01-01

    Wastewater and urine generated on the International Space Station (ISS) will be processed to recover pure water using vapor compression distillation (VCD). To verify the long-term reliability and performance of the VCD Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), life testing was performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) from January 1993 to April 1996. Two UPAs, the VCD-5 and VCD-5A, were tested for 204 days and 665 days, respectively. The compressor gears and the distillation centrifuge drive belt were found to have operating lives of approximately 4800 h, equivalent to 3.9 years of operation on ISS for a crew of three at an average processing rate of 1.76 kg/h (3.87 lb/h). Precise alignment of the flex-splines of the fluids and purge pump motor drives is essential to avoid premature failure after about 400 h of operation. Results indicate that, with some design and procedural modifications and suitable quality control, the required performance and operational life can be met with the VCD/UPA.

  18. Life Testing of the Vapor Compression Distillation Urine Processing Assembly (VCD/UPA) at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, Paul O.

    1998-01-01

    Wastewater and urine generated on the International Space Station will be processed to recover pure water. The method selected is vapor compression distillation (VCD). To verify the long-term reliability and performance of the VCD Urine Processing Assembly (UPA), accelerated life testing was performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) from January 1993 to April 1996. Two UPAS, the VCD-5 and VCD-5A, were tested for 204 days and 665 days, respectively. The compressor gears and the distillation centrifuge drive belt were found to have an operating life of approximately 4800 hours. Precise alignment of the flex-spline of the fluids pump is essential to avoid failure of the pump after about 400 hours of operation. Also, leakage around the seals of the drive shaft of the fluids pump and purge pump must be eliminated for continued good performance. Results indicate that, with some design and procedural modifications and suitable quality control, the required performance and operational life can be met with the VCD/UPA.

  19. In vitro-assessment of putative antiprogestin activities of phytochemicals and synthetic UV absorbers in human endometrial Ishikawa cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qinan; Fischer, Lara; Noethling, Claudia; Schaefer, Wolfgang R

    2015-07-01

    Critical steps of embryo implantation are controlled by progesterone. These processes can be interrupted by progesterone receptor (PR) antagonists, e.g. drugs used for abortion. Antiprogestin effects induced by natural compounds and environmental chemicals have been rarely addressed. In our in vitro study, we investigated putative antiprogestin activities of the plant compounds apigenin (API) and trans-ferulic acid (t-FA) as well as the UV absorbers octyl methoxycinnamate (OMC) and 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC). They were compared with the selective progesterone receptor modulators (SPRMs) mifepristone (RU486) and ulipristal acetate (UPA) as well as the full PR-antagonist ZK137316. Effects of test compounds in combination with progesterone on the progesterone-sensitive target gene estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT1E1) were characterized by sigmoidal concentration-response curves obtained by RT-qPCR. The agonistic effect of progesterone on SULT1E1 mRNA levels was concentration-dependently antagonized by RU486, UPA and ZK137316 as well as, with lower potency, apigenin. t-FA, OMC and 4-MBC had no effect on SULT1E1 mRNA levels. We demonstrated that apigenin, although at higher concentrations, exerts a similar effect as the well-characterized SPRMs RU486 and UPA or the progesterone antagonist ZK137316 in this model. Our endometrium-specific Ishikawa cell assay is a useful complement to artificial transactivation assays for the identification of environmental substances with antiprogestin activities.

  20. Persistent Activation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases p42 and p44 and ets-2 Phosphorylation in Response to Colony-Stimulating Factor 1/c-fms Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fowles, Lindsay F.; Martin, Michele L.; Nelsen, Lori; Stacey, Katryn J.; Redd, Douglas; Clark, Ying Mei; Nagamine, Yoshikune; McMahon, Martin; Hume, David A.; Ostrowski, Michael C.

    1998-01-01

    An antibody that specifically recognized phosphothreonine 72 in ets-2 was used to determine the phosphorylation status of endogenous ets-2 in response to colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1)/c-fms signaling. Phosphorylation of ets-2 was detected in primary macrophages, cells that normally express c-fms, and in fibroblasts engineered to express human c-fms. In the former cells, ets-2 was a CSF-1 immediate-early response gene, and phosphorylated ets-2 was detected after 2 to 4 h, coincident with expression of ets-2 protein. In fibroblasts, ets-2 was constitutively expressed and rapidly became phosphorylated in response to CSF-1. In both cell systems, ets-2 phosphorylation was persistent, with maximal phosphorylation detected 8 to 24 h after CSF-1 stimulation, and was correlated with activation of the CSF-1 target urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) gene. Kinase assays that used recombinant ets-2 protein as a substrate demonstrated that mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases p42 and p44 were constitutively activated in both cell types in response to CSF-1. Immune depletion experiments and the use of the MAP kinase kinase inhibitor PD98059 indicate that these two MAP kinases are the major ets-2 kinases activated in response to CSF-1/c-fms signaling. In the macrophage cell line RAW264, conditional expression of raf kinase induced ets-2 expression and phosphorylation, as well as uPA mRNA expression. Transient assays mapped ets/AP-1 response elements as critical for basal and CSF-1-stimulated uPA reporter gene activity. These results indicate that persistent activation of the raf/MAP kinase pathway by CSF-1 is necessary for both ets-2 expression and posttranslational activation in macrophages. PMID:9710599

  1. Fibulin-5 binds urokinase-type plasminogen activator and mediates urokinase-stimulated β1-integrin-dependent cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, Alexander; Stepanova, Victoria; Aniol, Natalia; Cines, Douglas B; Poliakov, Alexei; Yarovoi, Serge; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Wait, Robin; Ryzhakov, Grigory; Parfyonova, Yelena; Gursky, Yaroslav; Yanagisawa, Hiromi; Minashkin, Mikhail; Beabealashvilli, Robert; Vorotnikov, Alexander; Bobik, Alex; Tkachuk, Vsevolod

    2012-04-15

    uPA (urokinase-type plasminogen activator) stimulates cell migration through multiple pathways, including formation of plasmin and extracellular metalloproteinases, and binding to the uPAR (uPA receptor; also known as CD87), integrins and LRP1 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1) which activate intracellular signalling pathways. In the present paper we report that uPA-mediated cell migration requires an interaction with fibulin-5. uPA stimulates migration of wild-type MEFs (mouse embryonic fibroblasts) (Fbln5+/+ MEFs), but has no effect on fibulin-5-deficient (Fbln5-/-) MEFs. Migration of MEFs in response to uPA requires an interaction of fibulin-5 with integrins, as MEFs expressing a mutant fibulin-5 incapable of binding integrins (Fbln(RGE/RGE) MEFs) do not migrate in response to uPA. Moreover, a blocking anti-(human β1-integrin) antibody inhibited the migration of PASMCs (pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells) in response to uPA. Binding of uPA to fibulin-5 generates plasmin, which excises the integrin-binding N-terminal cbEGF (Ca2+-binding epidermal growth factor)-like domain, leading to loss of β1-integrin binding. We suggest that uPA promotes cell migration by binding to fibulin-5, initiating its cleavage by plasmin, which leads to its dissociation from β1-integrin and thereby unblocks the capacity of integrin to facilitate cell motility.

  2. Fibulin-5 binds urokinase-type plasminogen activator and mediates urokinase-stimulated β1-integrin-dependent cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Kapustin, Alexander; Stepanova, Victoria; Aniol, Natalia; Cines, Douglas B.; Poliakov, Alexei; Yarovoi, Serge; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Wait, Robin; Ryzhakov, Grigory; Parfyonova, Yelena; Gursky, Yaroslav; Yanagisawa, Hiromi; Minashkin, Mikhail; Beabealashvilli, Robert; Vorotnikov, Alexander; Bobik, Alex; Tkachuk, Vsevolod

    2015-01-01

    uPA (urokinase-type plasminogen activator) stimulates cell migration through multiple pathways, including formation of plasmin and extracellular metalloproteinases, and binding to the uPAR (uPA receptor; also known as CD87), integrins and LRP1 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1) which activate intracellular signalling pathways. In the present paper we report that uPA-mediated cell migration requires an interaction with fibulin-5. uPA stimulates migration of wild-type MEFs (mouse embryonic fibroblasts) (Fbln5+/+ MEFs), but has no effect on fibulin-5-deficient (Fbln5−/−) MEFs. Migration of MEFs in response to uPA requires an interaction of fibulin-5 with integrins, as MEFs expressing a mutant fibulin-5 incapable of binding integrins (FblnRGE/RGE MEFs) do not migrate in response to uPA. Moreover, a blocking anti-(human β1-integrin) antibody inhibited the migration of PASMCs (pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells) in response to uPA. Binding of uPA to fibulin-5 generates plasmin, which excises the integrin-binding N-terminal cbEGF (Ca2+ -binding epidermal growth factor)-like domain, leading to loss of β1-integrin binding. We suggest that uPA promotes cell migration by binding to fibulin-5, initiating its cleavage by plasmin, which leads to its dissociation from β1-integrin and thereby unblocks the capacity of integrin to facilitate cell motility. PMID:22280367

  3. The crystal structures of 3-TAPAP in complexes with the urokinase-type plasminogen activator and picrate.

    PubMed

    Zesławska, Ewa; Jacob, Uwe; Stürzebecher, Jörg; Oleksyn, Barbara J

    2006-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a protein involved in tissue remodeling and other biological processes. The inhibitors of uPA have been shown to prevent the spread of metastasis and tumor growth, and accordingly this enzyme is widely accepted as a promising anticancer target. In this work, we have investigated the conformation of the uPA inhibitor 3-TAPAP in two different crystalline environments of a picrate and a uPA complex. These structures were compared to the known structure of the 3-TAPAP in the complex with trypsin. In the complexes with the proteins, trypsin, and uPA, the binding mode of 3-TAPAP is similar. A larger difference in the conformation, in the comparison to these structures, has been observed by us in the 3-TAPAP picrate crystal. This observation contradicts the hypothesis that 3-TAPAP derivatives inhibit serine proteinases in preformed stable conformations.

  4. Nuclear actin activates human transcription factor genes including the OCT4 gene.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; Tokunaga, Makio; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Harata, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    RNA microarray analyses revealed that nuclear actin activated many human transcription factor genes including OCT4, which is required for gene reprogramming. Oct4 is known to be activated by nuclear actin in Xenopus oocytes. Our findings imply that this process of OCT4 activation is conserved in vertebrates and among cell types and could be used for gene reprogramming of human cells.

  5. Steady States and Dynamics of Urokinase-Mediated Plasmin Activation In Silico and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Li, Huipeng; Dewey, C. Forbes; White, Jacob K.; Bhowmick, Sourav S.; Yu, Hanry; Tucker-Kellogg, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Plasmin (PLS) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (UPA) are ubiquitous proteases that regulate the extracellular environment. Although they are secreted in inactive forms, they can activate each other through proteolytic cleavage. This mutual interplay creates the potential for complex dynamics, which we investigated using mathematical modeling and in vitro experiments. We constructed ordinary differential equations to model the conversion of precursor plasminogen into active PLS, and precursor urokinase (scUPA) into active urokinase (tcUPA). Although neither PLS nor UPA exhibits allosteric cooperativity, modeling showed that cooperativity occurred at the system level because of substrate competition. Computational simulations and bifurcation analysis predicted that the system would be bistable over a range of parameters for cooperativity and positive feedback. Cell-free experiments with recombinant proteins tested key predictions of the model. PLS activation in response to scUPA stimulus was found to be cooperative in vitro. Finally, bistability was demonstrated in vitro by the presence of two significantly different steady-state levels of PLS activation for the same levels of stimulus. We conclude that ultrasensitive, bistable activation of UPA-PLS is possible in the presence of substrate competition. An ultrasensitive threshold for activation of PLS and UPA would have ramifications for normal and disease processes, including angiogenesis, metastasis, wound healing, and fibrosis. PMID:22004735

  6. Cancer genes: rare recombinants instead of activated oncogenes (a review).

    PubMed Central

    Duesberg, P H

    1987-01-01

    The 20 known transforming (onc) genes of retroviruses are defined by sequences that are transduced from cellular genes termed protooncogenes or cellular oncogenes. Based on these sequences, viral onc genes have been postulated to be transduced cellular cancer genes, and proto-onc genes have been postulated to be latent cancer genes that can be activated from within the cell to cause virus-negative tumors. The hypothesis is popular because it promises direct access to cellular cancer genes. However, the existence of latent cancer genes presents a paradox, since such genes are clearly undesirable. The hypothesis predicts that viral onc genes and proto-onc genes are isogenic; that expression of proto-onc genes induces tumors; that activated proto-onc genes transform diploid cells upon transfection, like viral onc genes; and that diploid tumors exist. As yet, none of these predictions is confirmed. Instead: Structural comparisons between viral onc genes, essential retroviral genes, and proto-onc genes show that all viral onc genes are indeed new genes, rather than transduced cellular cancer genes. They are recombinants put together from truncated viral and truncated proto-onc genes. Proto-onc genes are frequently expressed in normal cells. To date, not one activated proto-onc gene has been isolated that transforms diploid cells. Above all, no diploid tumors with activated proto-onc genes have been found. Moreover, the probability of spontaneous transformation in vivo is at least 10(9) times lower than predicted from the mechanisms thought to activate proto-onc genes. Therefore, the hypothesis that proto-onc genes are latent cellular oncogenes appears to be an overinterpretation of sequence homology to structural and functional homology with viral onc genes. Here it is proposed that only rare truncations and illegitimate recombinations that alter the germ-line configuration of cellular genes generate viral and possibly cellular cancer genes. The clonal chromosome

  7. Activities of Human Gene Nomenclature Committee

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-16

    The objective of this project, shared between NIH and DOE, has been and remains to enable the medical genetics communities to use common names for genes that are discovered by different gene hunting groups, in different species. This effort provides consistent gene nomenclature and approved gene symbols to the community at large. This contributes to a uniform and consistent understanding of genomes, particularly the human as well as functional genomics based on comparisons between homologous genes in related species (human and mice).

  8. The Insurgent Movement in Ukraine During 1940s-1950s: Lessons Learned from the Case Study of the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (OUN-UPA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-08

    assist defeat of the Soviet Union. That is why the major UPA adversaries were Nazi punitive forces ( SS units and auxiliary police) and Red partisans...the most radical OUN wing decided to wage an uncompromising war on “two fronts;” against Nazi Germany and Communist Soviet Union. The OUN became the...war on “two fronts;” against Nazi Germany and Communist Soviet Union. The OUN became the pillar for forming the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (UPA). The

  9. Involvement of urokinase-type plasminogen activator system in cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    Mekkawy, Ahmed H; Pourgholami, Mohammad H; Morris, David L

    2014-09-01

    Currently, there are several studies supporting the role of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) system in cancer. The association of uPA to its receptor triggers the conversion of plasminogen into plasmin. This process is regulated by the uPA inhibitors (PAI-1 and PAI-2). Plasmin promotes degradation of basement membrane and extracellular matrix (ECM) components as well as activation of ECM latent matrix metalloproteases. Degradation and remodeling of the surrounding tissues is crucial in the early steps of tumor progression by facilitating expansion of the tumor mass, release of tumor growth factors, activation of cytokines as well as induction of tumor cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Hence, many tumors showed a correlation between uPA system component levels and tumor aggressiveness and survival. Therefore, this review summarizes the structure of the uPA system, its contribution to cancer progression, and the clinical relevance of uPA family members in cancer diagnosis. In addition, the review evaluates the significance of uPA system in the development of cancer-targeted therapies.

  10. Transforming Growth Factor-Beta and Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator: Dangerous Partners in Tumorigenesis—Implications in Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santibanez, Juan F.

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic factor, with several different roles in health and disease. TGF-β has been postulated as a dual factor in tumor progression, since it represses epithelial tumor development in early stages, whereas it stimulates tumor progression in advanced stages. During tumorigenesis, cancer cells acquire the capacity to migrate and invade surrounding tissues and to metastasize different organs. The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) system, comprising uPA, the uPA cell surface receptor, and plasminogen-plasmin, is involved in the proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix and regulates key cellular events by activating intracellular signal pathways, which together allow cancer cells to survive, thus, enhancing cell malignance during tumor progression. Due to their importance, uPA and its receptor are tightly transcriptionally regulated in normal development, but are deregulated in cancer, when their activity and expression are related to further development of cancer. TGF-β regulates uPA expression in cancer cells, while uPA, by plasminogen activation, may activate the secreted latent TGF-β, thus, producing a pernicious cycle which contributes to the enhancement of tumor progression. Here we review the specific roles and the interplay between TGF-β and uPA system in cancer cells and their implication in skin cancer. PMID:23984088

  11. Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression Exposure to many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals can cause adverse outcomes. These adverse outcomes, such as cancer, have been linked to mol...

  12. Correspondence between resting state activity and brain gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guang-Zhong; Belgard, T. Grant; Mao, Deng; Chen, Leslie; Berto, Stefano; Preuss, Todd M.; Lu, Hanzhang; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Konopka, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The relationship between functional brain activity and gene expression has not been fully explored in the human brain. Here, we identify significant correlations between gene expression in the brain and functional activity by comparing fractional Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuations (fALFF) from two independent human fMRI resting state datasets to regional cortical gene expression from a newly generated RNA-seq dataset and two additional gene expression datasets to obtain robust and reproducible correlations. We find significantly more genes correlated with fALFF than expected by chance, and identify specific genes correlated with the imaging signals in multiple expression datasets in the default mode network. Together, these data support a population-level relationship between regional steady state brain gene expression and resting state brain activity. PMID:26590343

  13. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator: a new target for male contraception?

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ying; Han, Yan; Xiong, Cheng-Liang; Li, Hong-Gang; Hu, Lian; Zhang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is closely related to male reproduction. With the aim of investigating the possibility for uPA as a potential contraceptive target, in the present work, Kunming male mice were immunized by human uPA subcutaneous injection at three separate doses for 3 times. Then the potency of the anti-human uPA antibody in serum was analyzed, and mouse fertility was evaluated. Serum antibody titers for human uPA in immunized groups all reached 1:10,240 or higher levels by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, and mating experiments revealed that pregnancy rates and the mean number of embryos implanted after mating declined obviously (P < 0.05) when compared with control groups. However, the mating capacity and reproductive organ weights had no obvious change, and histological analysis of the testes and epididymides also showed normal morphology for immunized male mice. Sperm function tests suggested that the sperm concentration, sperm viability, sperm motility, and in vitro fertilization rate for the cauda epididymis sperm in uPA-immunized groups were lower than those in the controls (P < 0.05). Together, these observations indicated that subcutaneous injection human uPA to the male mice could effectively reduce their fertility, and uPA could become a new target for immunocontraception in male contraceptive development. PMID:25578931

  14. Evolution of Brain Active Gene Promoters in Human Lineage Towards the Increased Plasticity of Gene Regulation.

    PubMed

    Gunbin, Konstantin V; Ponomarenko, Mikhail P; Suslov, Valentin V; Gusev, Fedor; Fedonin, Gennady G; Rogaev, Evgeny I

    2017-02-24

    Adaptability to a variety of environmental conditions is a prominent feature of Homo sapiens. We hypothesize that this feature can be explained by evolutionary changes in gene promoters active in the brain prefrontal cortex leading to a more flexible gene regulation network. The genotype-dependent range of gene expression can be broader in humans than in other higher primates. Thus, we searched for specific signatures of evolutionary changes in promoter architectures of multiple hominid genes, including the genes active in human cortical neurons that may indicate an increase of variability of gene expression rather than just changes in the level of expression, such as downregulation or upregulation of the genes. We performed a whole-genome search for genetic-based alterations that may impact gene regulation "flexibility" in a process of hominids evolution, such as (i) CpG dinucleotide content, (ii) predicted nucleosome-DNA dissociation constant, and (iii) predicted affinities for TATA-binding protein (TBP) in gene promoters. We tested all putative promoter regions across the human genome and especially gene promoters in active chromatin state in neurons of prefrontal cortex, the brain region critical for abstract thinking and social and behavioral adaptation. Our data imply that the origin of modern man has been associated with an increase of flexibility of promoter-driven gene regulation in brain. In contrast, after splitting from the ancestral lineages of H. sapiens, the evolution of ape species is characterized by reduced flexibility of gene promoter functioning, underlying reduced variability of the gene expression.

  15. Induction of primary cutaneous melanocytic neoplasms in urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)-deficient and wild-type mice: cellular blue nevi invade but do not progress to malignant melanoma in uPA-deficient animals.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, R L; Duquette, J G; Roses, D F; Nunes, I; Harris, M N; Kamino, H; Wilson, E L; Rifkin, D B

    1996-08-01

    Evidence suggests that the plasminogen activators (PAs), in particular urokinase-type PA (uPA), play a pivotal role in tumor invasion and metastasis. We studied the contribution of the PAs to the malignant phenotype through the chemical induction of melanocytic neoplasms in uPA-deficient mice. Primary tumors were induced and promoted concurrently in 35 uPA-/- deficient and 35 uPA+/+ wild-type mice using a single application of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene followed by repetitive applications of croton oil. Animals were sacrificed at 60-day intervals for 1 year. At necropsy, the four largest pigmented lesions in each animal were excised, characterized histologically, and evaluated microscopically for evidence of invasion. The regional lymph nodes, lungs, and solid abdominal visceral organs were sectioned and examined microscopically for evidence of metastatic disease. Cellular blue nevi were induced in 100% of uPA-/- and uPA+/+ promoted animals. Although a reduction in the radial and vertical progression of these lesions was noted in the uPA-deficient mice compared with the wild-type group, more than 95% of cellular blue nevi induced in both groups of animals invaded the underlying tissues. These lesions did not metastasize to the regional lymph nodes. Malignant melanoma arose in 5 of 35 (14.3%) of promoted wild-type mice. These tumors were locally aggressive, produced tissue-type PA, but were not metastatic to the regional nodes, lungs, or abdominal viscera. These results indicate that the invasive capability of melanocytic lesions may depend more on tissue-type PA than uPA activity. No melanomas were induced in the uPA-/- mice. The resistance of the uPA -/- strain to melanoma induction suggests that uPA contributes to malignant progression. We propose that the absence of uPA negatively affects tumorigenesis by decreasing the liberation and availability of growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor.

  16. Does proximity to physical activity infrastructures predict maintenance of organized and unorganized physical activities in youth?

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, Jason; Brunet, Jennifer; Boudreau, Jonathan; Iancu, Horia-Daniel; Bélanger, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) infrastructures can provide youth chances to engage in PA. As determinants of organized and unorganized PA (OPA and UPA) may differ, we investigated if proximity to PA infrastructures (proximity) was associated with maintenance of OPA and UPA over 3 years. Youth from New Brunswick, Canada (n = 187; 10–12 years at baseline) reported participation in OPA and UPA every 4 months from 2011 to 2014 as part of the MATCH study. Proximity data were drawn from parent's questionnaires. Proximity scores were divided into tertiles. Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess associations between proximity and maintenance of OPA and UPA. There were no crude or adjusted differences in average maintenance of participation in OPA [mean number of survey cycle participation (95%CI) was 6.6 (5.7–7.5), 6.3 (5.5–7.1), and 5.8 (5.1–6.6)] or UPA [6.8 (6.2–7.4), 5.9 (5.3–6.5), and 6.6 (5.9–7.3)] across low, moderate, and high tertiles of proximity, respectively. Findings suggest that proximity does not affect maintenance of participation in OPA or UPA during adolescence. Other environmental aspects may have a greater effect. Further research is needed before conclusions can be made. PMID:26844149

  17. Orthogonal gene knock out and activation with a catalytically active Cas9 nuclease

    PubMed Central

    Dahlman, James E.; Abudayyeh, Omar O.; Joung, Julia; Gootenberg, Jonathan S.; Zhang, Feng; Konermann, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a CRISPR-based method that uses catalytically active Cas9 and distinct sgRNA constructs to knock out and activate different genes in the same cell. These sgRNAs, with 14 15 bp target sequences and MS2 binding loops, can activate gene expression using an active Cas9 nuclease, without inducing DSBs. We use these ‘dead RNAs’ to perform orthogonal gene knockout and transcriptional activation in human cells. PMID:26436575

  18. The murine Sry gene encodes a nuclear transcriptional activator

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, R.A.; Ostrer, H.

    1994-09-01

    The Sry gene functions as a genetic switch in gonadal ridge initiating testis determination. The murine Sry and human SRY open reading frames (ORF) share a conserved 79 amino acid motif, the HMG-box, that binds DNA. Outside this region the two genes share no additional homology. These studies were undertaken to determine whether the Sry/SRY genes encode nuclear transcriptional regulators. As judged by the accumulation of lacZ-SRY hybrid proteins in the nucleus, both the human and murine SRY ORFs contain a nuclear localization signal. The murine Sry HMG-box selectively binds the sequence NACAAT in vitro when presented with a random pool of oligonucleotides and binds AACAAT with the highest affinity. The murine Sry ORF, when expressed in HeLa cells, activates transcription of a reporter gene containing multiple copies of the AACAAT binding site. Activation was observed for a GAL4-responsive gene when the murine Sry ORF was linked to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. Using this system, the activation function was mapped to a C-terminal glutamine/histidine-rich domain. In addition, LexA-Sry fusion genes activated a LexA-responsive gene in yeast. In contrast, a GAL4-human SRY fusion gene did not cause transcriptional activation. These studies suggest that both the human and mouse SRY ORFs encode nuclear, DNA-binding proteins, and that the mouse Sry ORF can function as a transcriptional activator with separable DNA-binding and activator domains.

  19. Constitutive androstane receptor activation evokes the expression of glycolytic genes.

    PubMed

    Yarushkin, Andrei A; Kazantseva, Yuliya A; Prokopyeva, Elena A; Markova, Diana N; Pustylnyak, Yuliya A; Pustylnyak, Vladimir O

    2016-09-23

    It is well-known that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation by 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) increases the liver-to-body weight ratio. CAR-mediated liver growth is correlated with increased expression of the pleiotropic transcription factor cMyc, which stimulates cell cycle regulatory genes and drives proliferating cells into S phase. Because glycolysis supports cell proliferation and cMyc is essential for the activation of glycolytic genes, we hypothesized that CAR-mediated up-regulation of cMyc in mouse livers might play a role in inducing the expression of glycolytic genes. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of long-term CAR activation on glycolytic genes in a mouse model not subjected to metabolic stress. We demonstrated that long-term CAR activation by TCPOBOP increases expression of cMyc, which was correlated with reduced expression of gluconeogenic genes and up-regulation of glucose transporter, glycolytic and mitochondrial pyruvate metabolising genes. These changes in gene expression after TCPOBOP treatment were strongly correlated with changes in levels of glycolytic intermediates in mouse livers. Moreover, we demonstrated a significant positive regulatory effect of TCPOBOP-activated CAR on both mRNA and protein levels of Pkm2, a master regulator of glucose metabolism and cell proliferation. Thus, our findings provide evidence to support the conclusion that CAR activation initiates a transcriptional program that facilitates the coordinated metabolic activities required for cell proliferation.

  20. Modeling the Activity of Single Genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mjolsness, Eric; Gibson, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology states that information is stored in DNA, transcribed to messenger RNA (mRNA) and then translated into proteins. This picture is significantly augmentated when we consider the action of certain proteins in regulating transcription. These transcription factors provide a feedback pathway by which genes can regulate one another's expression as mRNA and then as protein. To review: DNA, RNA and proteins have different functions. DNA is the molecular storehouse of genetic information. When cells divide, the DNA is replicated, so that each daughter cell maintains the same genetic information as the mother cell. RNA acts as a go-between from DNA to proteins. Only a single copy of DNA is present, but multiple copies of the same piece of RNA may be present, allowing cells to make huge amounts of protein. In eukaryotes (organisms with a nucleus), DNA is found in the nucleus only. RNA is copied in the nucleus then translocates(moves) outside the nucleus, where it is transcribed into proteins. Along the way, the RNA may be spliced, i.e., may have pieces cut out. RNA then attaches to ribosomes and is translated to proteins. Proteins are the machinery of the cell other than DNA and RNA, all the complex molecules of the cell are proteins. Proteins are specialized machines, each of which fulfills its own task, which may be transporting oxygen, catalyzing reactions, or responding to extracellular signals, just to name a few. One of the more interesting functions a protein may have is binding directly or indirectly to DNA to perform transcriptional regulation, thus forming a closed feedback loop of gene regulation. The structure of DNA and the central dogma were understood in the 50s; in the early 80s it became possible to make arbitrary modifications to DNA and use cellular machinery to transcribe and translate the resulting genes; more recently, genomes (i.e., the complete DNA sequence) of many organisms have been sequenced. This large

  1. Carcinogen-induced trans activation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinberger, T; Flint, Y B; Blank, M; Etkin, S; Lavi, S

    1988-01-01

    We report a new mechanism of carcinogen action by which the expression of several genes was concomitantly enhanced. This mechanism involved the altered activity of cellular factors which modulate the expression of genes under their control. The increased expression was regulated at least in part on the transcriptional level and did not require amplification of the overexpressed genes. This phenomenon was transient; it was apparent as early as 24 h after carcinogen treatment and declined a few days later. Images PMID:2835673

  2. Carcinogen-induced trans activation of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinberger, T.; Flint, Y.B.; Blank, M.; Etkin, S.; Lavi, S.

    1988-03-01

    The authors report a new mechanism of carcinogen action by which the expression of several genes was concomitantly enhanced. This mechanism involved the altered activity of cellular factors which modulate the expression of genes under their control. The increased expression was regulated at least in part on the transcriptional level and did not require amplification of the overexpressed genes. This phenomenon was transient; it was apparent as early as 24 h after carcinogen treatment and declined a few days later.

  3. Dietary Methanol Regulates Human Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  4. Tissue-specific inhibition of urokinase-type plasminogen activator expression in the testes of mice by inducible lentiviral RNA interference causes male infertility.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Liu, Yan; Xiong, Zhe; Hu, Lian; Xiong, Cheng-Liang

    2017-03-16

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is involved in many physiological processes, including male infertility. To explore the effects of uPA in male reproduction, we constructed an inducible uPA short hairpin RNA (shRNA) system expressed by lentiviral vectors. After proving inhibition of uPA expression in the mouse Sertoli cell line TM4 by 1μgmL-1 doxycycline (Dox), two lentivirus (pLenti4-shRNA and pLenti6/TR) were co-microinjected into mouse testes to produce TetR&shuPA mice model. Though oral gavage by 0.75mgmL-1 Dox each day for 1 week, the Plau mRNA expression, uPA protein level and uPA enzyme activity in mice testis decreased significantly in TetR&shuPA mice model. After Dox induction of 1 week, the TetR&shuPA mice mated with female mice. Our results show that the pregnancy rate was reduced by approximately 40% and the sperm motility also decreased significantly. These data indicated that downregulation of uPA could decrease the fertility of male mice, which may be caused by a reduction in sperm motility. To investigate the reversible effect and safety of the inducible uPA shRNA system, we withdraw Dox and found the mating rate and sperm motility gradually recovered after 2 weeks. The histopathology structure of the testis, epididymis, and main organs was not altered significantly. The results of the present study indicating that uPA may be regarded as a novel target for the regulation of male fertility.

  5. Plasminogen activation in synovial tissues: differences between normal, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis joints

    PubMed Central

    Busso, N.; Peclat, V.; So, A.; Sappino, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To analyse the functional activity of the plasminogen activators urokinase (uPA) and tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA) in human synovial membrane, and to compare the pattern of expression between normal, osteoarthritic, and rheumatoid synovium. The molecular mechanisms underlying differences in PA activities between normal and pathological synovial tissues have been further examined.
METHODS—Synovial membranes from seven normal (N) subjects, 14 osteoarthritis (OA), and 10 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients were analysed for plasminogen activator activity by conventional zymography and in situ zymography on tissue sections. The tissue distribution of uPA, tPA, uPA receptor (uPAR), and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) was studied by immunohistochemistry. uPA, tPA, uPAR, and PAI-1 mRNA values and mRNA distribution were assessed by northern blot and in situ hybridisations respectively.
RESULTS—All normal and most OA synovial tissues expressed predominantly tPA catalysed proteolytic activity mainly associated to the synovial vasculature. In some OA, tPA activity was expressed together with variable amounts of uPA mediated activity. By contrast, most RA synovial tissues exhibited considerably increased uPA activity over the proliferative lining areas, while tPA activity was reduced when compared with N and OA synovial tissues. This increase in uPA activity was associated with increased levels of uPA antigen and its corresponding mRNA, which were localised over the synovial proliferative lining areas. In addition, in RA tissues, expression of the specific uPA receptor (uPAR) and of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-type 1 (PAI-1) were also increased.
CONCLUSION—Taken together, these results show an alteration of the PA/plasmin system in RA synovial tissues, resulting in increased uPA catalytic activity that may play a part in tissue destruction in RA.

 PMID:9370880

  6. Physical activity in adulthood: genes and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Karvinen, Sira; Waller, Katja; Silvennoinen, Mika; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kainulainen, Heikki; Kujala, Urho M.

    2015-01-01

    Observational studies report a strong inverse relationship between leisure-time physical activity and all-cause mortality. Despite suggestive evidence from population-based associations, scientists have not been able to show a beneficial effect of physical activity on the risk of death in controlled intervention studies among individuals who have been healthy at baseline. On the other hand, high cardiorespiratory fitness is known to be a strong predictor of reduced mortality, even more robust than physical activity level itself. Here, in both animals and/or human twins, we show that the same genetic factors influence physical activity levels, cardiorespiratory fitness, and risk of death. Previous observational follow-up studies in humans suggest that increasing fitness through physical activity levels could prolong life; however, our controlled interventional study with laboratory rats bred for low and high intrinsic fitness contrast with these findings. Also, we find no evidence for the suggested association using pairwise analysis among monozygotic twin pairs who are discordant in their physical activity levels. Based on both our animal and human findings, we propose that genetic pleiotropy might partly explain the frequently observed associations between high baseline physical activity and later reduced mortality in humans. PMID:26666586

  7. Overexpression of MMP-3 and uPA with Diminished PAI-1 Related to Metastasis in Ductal Breast Cancer Patients Attending a Public Hospital in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Barajas-Castañeda, Luis Miguel; Cortés-Gutiérrez, Evelin; García-Rodríguez, Francisco Mario; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Lara-Padilla, Eleazar; Enríquez-Rincón, Fernando; Castro-Mussot, María Eugenia; Figueroa-Arredondo, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteases and the fibrinolytic system are important protease systems interacting with each other in charge of remodeling and recycling of tissues. Their role in tumor invasion and metastasis is often discussed. In this study several metalloproteases such as MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 together with molecules from the fibrinolytic system like uPA, its receptor uPAR, and its inhibitor, PAI-1, were studied by immune-histochemistry to establish a comparison with and without metastasis. From the (118) primary tumors of Mexican patients with ductal breast cancer studied, 56% were grade II and 69% were size T2; the group with metastatic ganglia included 64 samples (54.3%). In patients with metastasis the estimated expression of MMP-3 and uPA (resp., 28% and 45%) was higher than that from no metastatic tumors; it means there is higher expression of both markers in metastatic tumors (p < 0.05). At the same time, metastatic tumors showed statistically significant lower signal of PAI-1 (24%) than tumors without metastasis (p < 0.05). We concluded that overexpression of MMP-3 and uPA, altogether with diminished expression of PAI-1 from metastatic tumors, might be a crucial step towards metastasis in ductal breast cancer. Nevertheless, additional studies in different populations are necessary to establish a pattern.

  8. Life Testing of the Vapor Compression Distillation/Urine Processing Assembly (VCD/UPA) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (1993 to 1997)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, P.; Hutchens, C.; Long, D.; Salyer, B.

    1998-01-01

    Wastewater and urine generated on the International Space Station will be processed to recover pure water using vapor compression distillation (VCD). To verify the long-term reliability and performance of the VCD Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), life testing was performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) from January 1993 to April 1996. Two UPA'S, the VCD-5 and VCD-5A, were tested for 204 days and 665 days, respectively. The compressor gears and the distillation centrifuge drive belt were found to have operating lives of approximately 4,800 hours, equivalent to 3.9 years of operation on ISS for a crew of three at an average processing rate of 1.76 kg/h (3.97 lb/h). Precise alignment of the flex-splines of the fluids and purge pump motor drives is essential to avoid premature failure after about 400 hours of operation. Results indicate that, with some design and procedural modifications and suitable quality control, the required performance and operational life can be met with the VCD/UPA.

  9. Overexpression of MMP-3 and uPA with Diminished PAI-1 Related to Metastasis in Ductal Breast Cancer Patients Attending a Public Hospital in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Barajas-Castañeda, Luis Miguel; Cortés-Gutiérrez, Evelin; García-Rodríguez, Francisco Mario; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Lara-Padilla, Eleazar; Enríquez-Rincón, Fernando; Figueroa-Arredondo, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteases and the fibrinolytic system are important protease systems interacting with each other in charge of remodeling and recycling of tissues. Their role in tumor invasion and metastasis is often discussed. In this study several metalloproteases such as MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 together with molecules from the fibrinolytic system like uPA, its receptor uPAR, and its inhibitor, PAI-1, were studied by immune-histochemistry to establish a comparison with and without metastasis. From the (118) primary tumors of Mexican patients with ductal breast cancer studied, 56% were grade II and 69% were size T2; the group with metastatic ganglia included 64 samples (54.3%). In patients with metastasis the estimated expression of MMP-3 and uPA (resp., 28% and 45%) was higher than that from no metastatic tumors; it means there is higher expression of both markers in metastatic tumors (p < 0.05). At the same time, metastatic tumors showed statistically significant lower signal of PAI-1 (24%) than tumors without metastasis (p < 0.05). We concluded that overexpression of MMP-3 and uPA, altogether with diminished expression of PAI-1 from metastatic tumors, might be a crucial step towards metastasis in ductal breast cancer. Nevertheless, additional studies in different populations are necessary to establish a pattern. PMID:27975070

  10. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha target genes.

    PubMed

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Knoch, Bianca; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well.

  11. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Knoch, Bianca; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well. PMID:20936127

  12. Absence of canonical active chromatin marks in developmentally regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Romero, Marina; Corominas, Montserrat; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of active and repressive histone modifications is assumed to play a key role in the regulation of gene expression. In contrast to this generally accepted view, we show that transcription of genes temporally regulated during fly and worm development occurs in the absence of canonically active histone modifications. Conversely, strong chromatin marking is related to transcriptional and post-transcriptional stability, an association that we also observe in mammals. Our results support a model in which chromatin marking is associated to stable production of RNA, while unmarked chromatin would permit rapid gene activation and de-activation during development. In this case, regulation by transcription factors would play a comparatively more important regulatory role. PMID:26280901

  13. Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Promotes Dendritic Spine Recovery and Improves Neurological Outcome Following Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fang; Catano, Marcela; Echeverry, Ramiro; Torre, Enrique; Haile, Woldeab B.; An, Jie; Chen, Changhua; Cheng, Lihong; Nicholson, Andrew; Tong, Frank C.; Park, Jaekeun

    2014-01-01

    Spines are dendritic protrusions that receive most of the excitatory input in the brain. Early after the onset of cerebral ischemia dendritic spines in the peri-infarct cortex are replaced by areas of focal swelling, and their re-emergence from these varicosities is associated with neurological recovery after acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a serine proteinase that plays a central role in tissue remodeling via binding to the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). We report that cerebral cortical neurons release uPA during the recovery phase from ischemic stroke in vivo or hypoxia in vitro. Although uPA does not have an effect on ischemia- or hypoxia-induced neuronal death, genetic deficiency of uPA (uPA−/−) or uPAR (uPAR−/−) abrogates functional recovery after AIS. Treatment with recombinant uPA after ischemic stroke induces neurological recovery in wild-type and uPA−/− but not in uPAR−/− mice. Diffusion tensor imaging studies indicate that uPA−/− mice have increased water diffusivity and decreased anisotropy associated with impaired dendritic spine recovery and decreased length of distal neurites in the peri-infarct cortex. We found that the excitotoxic injury induces the clustering of uPAR in dendritic varicosities, and that the binding of uPA to uPAR promotes the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and re-emergence of dendritic filopodia from uPAR-enriched varicosities. This effect is independent of uPA's proteolytic properties and instead is mediated by Rac-regulated profilin expression and cofilin phosphorylation. Our data indicate that binding of uPA to uPAR promotes dendritic spine recovery and improves functional outcome following AIS. PMID:25339736

  14. Components of the plasminogen activation system promote engraftment of porous polyethylene biomaterial via common and distinct effects.

    PubMed

    Reichel, Christoph A; Hessenauer, Maximilian E T; Pflieger, Kerstin; Rehberg, Markus; Kanse, Sandip M; Zahler, Stefan; Krombach, Fritz; Berghaus, Alexander; Strieth, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Rapid fibrovascularization is a prerequisite for successful biomaterial engraftment. In addition to their well-known roles in fibrinolysis, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) or their inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have recently been implicated as individual mediators in non-fibrinolytic processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Since these events are critical for fibrovascularization of biomaterial, we hypothesized that the components of the plasminogen activation system contribute to biomaterial engraftment. Employing in vivo and ex vivo microscopy techniques, vessel and collagen network formation within porous polyethylene (PPE) implants engrafted into dorsal skinfold chambers were found to be significantly impaired in uPA-, tPA-, or PAI-1-deficient mice. Consequently, the force required for mechanical disintegration of the implants out of the host tissue was significantly lower in the mutant mice than in wild-type controls. Conversely, surface coating with recombinant uPA, tPA, non-catalytic uPA, or PAI-1, but not with non-catalytic tPA, accelerated implant vascularization in wild-type mice. Thus, uPA, tPA, and PAI-1 contribute to the fibrovascularization of PPE implants through common and distinct effects. As clinical perspective, surface coating with recombinant uPA, tPA, or PAI-1 might provide a novel strategy for accelerating the vascularization of this biomaterial.

  15. Components of the Plasminogen Activation System Promote Engraftment of Porous Polyethylene Biomaterial via Common and Distinct Effects

    PubMed Central

    Reichel, Christoph A.; Hessenauer, Maximilian E. T.; Pflieger, Kerstin; Rehberg, Markus; Kanse, Sandip M.; Zahler, Stefan; Krombach, Fritz; Berghaus, Alexander; Strieth, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Rapid fibrovascularization is a prerequisite for successful biomaterial engraftment. In addition to their well-known roles in fibrinolysis, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) or their inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have recently been implicated as individual mediators in non-fibrinolytic processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Since these events are critical for fibrovascularization of biomaterial, we hypothesized that the components of the plasminogen activation system contribute to biomaterial engraftment. Employing in vivo and ex vivo microscopy techniques, vessel and collagen network formation within porous polyethylene (PPE) implants engrafted into dorsal skinfold chambers were found to be significantly impaired in uPA-, tPA-, or PAI-1-deficient mice. Consequently, the force required for mechanical disintegration of the implants out of the host tissue was significantly lower in the mutant mice than in wild-type controls. Conversely, surface coating with recombinant uPA, tPA, non-catalytic uPA, or PAI-1, but not with non-catalytic tPA, accelerated implant vascularization in wild-type mice. Thus, uPA, tPA, and PAI-1 contribute to the fibrovascularization of PPE implants through common and distinct effects. As clinical perspective, surface coating with recombinant uPA, tPA, or PAI-1 might provide a novel strategy for accelerating the vascularization of this biomaterial. PMID:25658820

  16. Tbx16 regulates hox gene activation in mesodermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Payumo, Alexander Y.; McQuade, Lindsey E.; Walker, Whitney J.; Yamazoe, Sayumi; Chen, James K.

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor T-box 16 (Tbx16/Spadetail) is an essential regulator of paraxial mesoderm development in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Mesodermal progenitor cells (MPCs) fail to differentiate into trunk somites in tbx16 mutants and instead accumulate within the tailbud in an immature state. The mechanisms by which Tbx16 controls mesoderm patterning have remained enigmatic, and we describe here the application of photoactivatable morpholino oligonucleotides to determine the Tbx16 transcriptome in MPCs. We identify 124 Tbx16-regulated genes that are expressed in zebrafish gastrulae, including several developmental signaling proteins and regulators of gastrulation, myogenesis, and somitogenesis. Unexpectedly, we observe that loss of Tbx16 function precociously activates posterior hox genes in MPCs, and overexpression of a single posterior hox gene is sufficient to disrupt MPC migration. Our studies support a model in which Tbx16 regulates the timing of collinear hox gene activation to coordinate the anterior-posterior fates and positions of paraxial MPCs. PMID:27376691

  17. Human DJ-1-specific Transcriptional Activation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice. PMID:20938049

  18. Human DJ-1-specific transcriptional activation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2010-12-17

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice.

  19. North Dakota 1991 Close Up--A Legislative Insight. Participant Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota State Dept. of Public Instruction, Bismarck.

    This guide is designed for those who participate in North Dakota's Close Up program, a program that provides the state's young people with the opportunity to experience government firsthand in an innovative and participatory setting. The state's 1991 legislative program offers a broad range of activities for student participants, including:…

  20. [Cascade of gene activation in Landouzy Dejerine muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Belayew, A

    2010-01-01

    Our laboratory studies the Landouzy Dejerine muscular dystrophy or FSHD, a genetic disease which affects 7 in 100,000 individuals. The genetic defect is a deletion on chromosome 4 that decreases the copy number of a repeated DNA element, disturbs chromatin structure and activates the expression of neighbouring genes. The originality of our team has been to identify a gene within the repeated element itself and to show its activation in FSHD muscle cells. This gene expresses DUX4, a transcription factor that targets tens of genes, some of which express other transcription factors which target other genes, leading to a general deregulation. This DUX4-mediated cascade recapitulates by itself the major pathological features of FSHD: muscle atrophy, differentiation defect, oxidative stress... The homologous DUX4c gene located 42 kb from the repeat array expresses a protein that triggers myoblast proliferation. Its high expression level in severe cases of FSHD most probably contributes to the pathology by interfering with myoblast fusion with the muscle fibers at the last steps of muscle regeneration. We are performing global analyses of proteins and metabolites in healthy and FSHD myotubes (collaboration R Wattiez and JM Colet, UMONS) to identify abnormalities and their links with DUX4 or DUX4C.

  1. The neurotensin gene is a downstream target for Ras activation.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, B M; Zhou, Z; Celano, P; Li, J

    1995-01-01

    Ras regulates novel patterns of gene expression and the differentiation of various eukaryotic cell types. Stable transfection of Ha-ras into the human colon cancer line CaCo2 results in the morphologic differentiation to a small bowel phenotype. The purpose of our study was to determine whether the Ras regulatory pathway plays a role in the expression of the neurotensin gene (NT/N), a terminally differentiated endocrine product specifically localized in the gastrointestinal tract to the adult small bowel. We found that CaCo2-ras cells, but not parental CaCo2, express high levels of the human NT/N gene and, moreover, that this increase in gene expression is regulated at the level of transcription. Transfection experiments using NT/N-CAT mutation constructs identify the proximal 200 bp of NT/N flanking sequence as sufficient for maximal Ras-mediated NT/N reporter gene induction. Furthermore, a proximal AP-1/CRE motif is crucial for this Ras-mediated NT/N activation. Wild-type Ha-ras induces NT/N gene expression, albeit at lower levels than activated Ras; a dominant-negative Raf blocks this NT/N induction, suggesting that Raf lies down-stream of Ras in this pathway. In addition, postconfluent cultures of CaCo2 cells, which are differentiated to a small bowel phenotype, express the NT/N gene by 6 d after reaching confluency; this increase of NT/N expression is associated with concomitant increases of cellular p21ras protein. We conclude that Ras (both wild-type and activated) enhances expression of the NT/N gene in the gut-derived CaCo2 cell line, suggesting an important role for the Ras signaling pathway in NT/N gene transcription. Our results underscore the possibility that tissue-specific genes (such as NT/N) expressed in distinct subpopulations of the gut may be subject to Ras regulation. Finally, we speculate that the NT/N gene and the CaCo2 and CaCo2-ras cell systems will provide unique models to further define the cellular mechanisms leading to mammalian

  2. Staurosporine induces ganglion cell differentiation in part by stimulating urokinase-type plasminogen activator expression and activation in the developing chick retina

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeoun-Hee; Chang, Yongmin; Jung, Jae-Chang

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Staurosporine mediates stimulation of RGC differentiation in vitro cultured retinal neuroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Staurosporine mediates uPA activation during RGC differentiation in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of uPA blocks the staurosporine mediated RGC differentiation both in vitro and in ovo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus, uPA may play a role in the staurosporine-mediated stimulation of RGC differentiation. -- Abstract: Here, we investigated whether staurosporine-mediated urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activation is involved in retinal ganglion cell (RGC) differentiation. Retinal cells were isolated from developing chick retinas at embryonic day 6 (E6). Relatively few control cells grown in serum-free medium started to form processes by 12 h. In contrast, staurosporine-treated cells had processes within 3 h, and processes were evident at 8 h. Immunofluorescence staining showed that Tuj-1-positive cells with shorter neurites could be detected in control cultures at 18 h, whereas numerous Tuj-1 positive ganglion cells with longer neuritic extensions were seen in staurosporine-treated cultures. BrdU-positive proliferating cells were more numerous in control cultures than in staurosporine-treated cultures, and the BrdU staining was not detected in post-mitotic Tuj-1 positive ganglion cells. Western blotting of cell lysates showed that staurosporine induced high levels of the active form of uPA. The staurosporine-induced uPA signal was localized predominantly in the soma, neurites and axons of Tuj-1-positive ganglion cells. Amiloride, an inhibitor of uPA, markedly reduced staurosporine-induced Tuj-1 staining, neurite length, neurite number, and uPA staining versus controls. In developing retinas in ovo, amiloride administration remarkably reduced the staurosporine-induced uPA staining and RGC differentiation. Taken together, our in vitro and in vivo data collectively indicate that

  3. Transcriptional activation of virulence genes of Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luyao; Lacroix, Benoît; Guo, Jianhua; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2017-01-09

    Recently, Rhizobium etli has emerged, in addition to Agrobacterium spp., as a prokaryotic species that encodes a functional machinery for DNA transfer to plant cells. To understand this R. etli-mediated genetic transformation, it would be useful to define how its vir genes respond to the host plants. Here, we explored the transcriptional activation of the vir genes contained on the R. etli p42a plasmid. Using a reporter construct harboring lacZ under the control of the R. etli virE promoter, we showed that the signal phenolic molecule acetosyringone (AS) induced R. etli vir gene expression both in R. etli and in A. tumefaciens background. Furthermore, in both bacterial backgrounds, the p42a plasmid also promoted plant genetic transformation with a reporter T-DNA. Importantly, the R. etli vir genes were transcriptionally activated by AS in a bacterial species-specific fashion in regard to the VirA/VirG signal sensor system, and this activation was induced by signals from the natural host species of this bacterium, but not from non-host plants. Early kinetics of transcriptional activation of the major vir genes of R. etli also revealed several features distinct from those known for A. tumefaciens: the expression of the virG gene reached saturation relatively quickly, and virB2, which in R. etli is located outside of the virB operon, was expressed only at low levels and did not respond to AS. These differences in vir gene transcription may contribute to the lower efficiency of T-DNA transfer of R. etli p42a versus pTiC58 of A. tumefaciens IMPORTANCE: The region encoding homologs of Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence genes in the Rhizobium etli CE3 p42a plasmid was the first endogenous virulence system encoded by a non-Agrobacterium species demonstrated to be functional in DNA transfer and stable integration into plant cell genome. In this study, we explore the transcriptional regulation and induction of virulence genes in R. etli and show similarities and differences

  4. RNA activation of haploinsufficient Foxg1 gene in murine neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Fimiani, Cristina; Goina, Elisa; Su, Qin; Gao, Guangping; Mallamaci, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    More than one hundred distinct gene hemizygosities are specifically linked to epilepsy, mental retardation, autism, schizophrenia and neuro-degeneration. Radical repair of these gene deficits via genome engineering is hardly feasible. The same applies to therapeutic stimulation of the spared allele by artificial transactivators. Small activating RNAs (saRNAs) offer an alternative, appealing approach. As a proof-of-principle, here we tested this approach on the Rett syndrome-linked, haploinsufficient, Foxg1 brain patterning gene. We selected a set of artificial small activating RNAs (saRNAs) upregulating it in neocortical precursors and their derivatives. Expression of these effectors achieved a robust biological outcome. saRNA-driven activation (RNAa) was limited to neural cells which normally express Foxg1 and did not hide endogenous gene tuning. saRNAs recognized target chromatin through a ncRNA stemming from it. Gene upregulation required Ago1 and was associated to RNApolII enrichment throughout the Foxg1 locus. Finally, saRNA delivery to murine neonatal brain replicated Foxg1-RNAa in vivo. PMID:27995975

  5. Linear topology confers in vivo gene transfer activity to polyethylenimines.

    PubMed

    Brissault, B; Leborgne, C; Guis, C; Danos, O; Cheradame, H; Kichler, A

    2006-01-01

    Although polyethylenimines (PEIs) are frequently used transfection agents, it is still unclear which of their properties are required for efficient gene delivery. This is even more striking when working in vivo since some PEIs are able to generate significant gene expression, whereas others are not. To facilitate a rational development of compounds with improved transfection activities, studies aimed at identifying the properties involved in the transfection process seem indispensable. In the present work, we investigated how transfection with linear PEI of 22 kDa allows for high reporter gene expression in lungs after intravenous injection, whereas the branched PEI of 25 kDa does not. To this end, we synthesized L-PEI derivatives that are intermediates between linear and branched PEIs. Our results show that the topology plays a crucial role in obtaining in vivo reporter gene expression, whereas the content of primary, secondary, and tertiary amines is only of minor importance.

  6. Activity-Regulated Genes as Mediators of Neural Circuit Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Jennifer H.; Nedivi, Elly

    2011-01-01

    Modifications of neuronal circuits allow the brain to adapt and change with experience. This plasticity manifests during development and throughout life, and can be remarkably long lasting. Many electrophysiological and molecular mechanisms are common to the seemingly diverse types of activity-dependent functional adaptation that take place during developmental critical periods, learning and memory, and alterations to sensory map representations in the adult. Experience-dependent plasticity is triggered when neuronal excitation activates cellular signaling pathways from the synapse to the nucleus that initiate new programs of gene expression. The protein products of activity-regulated genes then work via a diverse array of cellular mechanisms to modify neuronal functional properties. They fine-tune brain circuits by strengthening or weakening synaptic connections or by altering synapse numbers. Their effects are further modulated by posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms, often also dependent on activity, that control activity-regulated gene transcript and protein function. Thus, the cellular response to neuronal activity integrates multiple tightly coordinated mechanisms to precisely orchestrate long-lasting, functional and structural changes in brain circuits. PMID:21601615

  7. Transcriptional activation of cloned human beta-globin genes by viral immediate-early gene products.

    PubMed

    Green, M R; Treisman, R; Maniatis, T

    1983-11-01

    When the human beta-globin gene is transfected into Hela cells, no beta-globin RNA is detected unless the gene is linked to a viral transcription enhancer. In this paper we show that trans-acting adenovirus and herpesvirus (pseudorabies) transcriptional regulatory proteins can circumvent this enhancer requirement for detectable beta-globin transcription in transient expression assays. The viral gene products can be provided by constitutively expressed, integrated viral genes in established cell lines, by viral infection of permissive cells, or by transfection of cells with bacterial plasmids carrying the viral immediate-early genes. These results demonstrate the utility of transient expression assays for studying regulatory mechanisms involving trans-acting factors. Analysis of beta-globin promoter mutants indicates that between 75 and 128 bp of sequence 5' to the mRNA cap site is required for enhancer-dependent transcription in Hela cells. In contrast, beta-globin transcription in the presence of viral immediate-early gene products requires only 36 bp of 5'-flanking sequence, which includes the TATA box. Thus both cis and trans-acting viral factors activate beta-globin gene transcription in transient expression experiments, but the mechanisms by which they act appear to be fundamentally different.

  8. Inhibition of urokinase plasminogen activator “uPA” activity alters ethanol consumption and conditioned place preference in mice

    PubMed Central

    Al Maamari, Elyazia; Al Ameri, Mouza; Al Mansouri, Shamma; Bahi, Amine

    2014-01-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator, uPA, is a serine protease implicated in addiction to drugs of abuse. Using its specific inhibitor, B428, we and others have characterized the role of uPA in the rewarding properties of psychostimulants, including cocaine and amphetamine, but none have examined the role of uPA in ethanol use disorders. Therefore, in the current study, we extended our observations to the role of uPA in ethanol consumption and ethanol-induced conditioned place preference. The general aim of the present series of experiments was to investigate the effects of the administration of the B428 on voluntary alcohol intake and ethanol conditioned reward. A two-bottle choice, unlimited-access paradigm was used to compare ethanol intake between vehicle- and 3, 10, and 30 mg/kg B428-administered mice. For this purpose, the mice were presented with an ethanol solution (2.5%–20%) and water, at each concentration for 4 days, and their consumption was measured daily. Consumption of saccharin and quinine solutions was also measured. Systemic administration of B428 dose-dependently decreased ethanol intake and preference. Additionally, B428 mice did not differ from vehicle mice in their intake of graded solutions of tastants, suggesting that the uPA inhibition did not alter taste function. Also, ethanol metabolism was not affected following B428 injection. More importantly, 1.5 g/kg ethanol-induced conditioned place preference acquisition was blocked following B428 administration. Taken together, our results are the first to implicate uPA inhibition in the regulation of ethanol consumption and preference, and suggest that uPA may be considered as a possible therapeutic drug target for alcoholism and abstinence. PMID:25258509

  9. Metallothionein gene activation in the earthworm (Lumbricus rubellus).

    PubMed

    Höckner, M; Dallinger, R; Stürzenbaum, S R

    2015-05-08

    In order to cope with changing environmental conditions, organisms require highly responsive stress mechanisms. Heavy metal stress is handled by metallothioneins (MTs), the regulation of which is evolutionary conserved in insects and vertebrates and involves the binding of metal transcription factor 1 (MTF-1) to metal responsive elements (MREs) positioned in the promoter of MT genes. However, in most invertebrate phyla, the transcriptional activation of MTs is different and the exact mechanism is still unknown. Interestingly, although MREs are typically present also in invertebrate MT gene promoters, MTF-1 is notably absent. Here we use Lumbricus rubellus, the red earthworm, to study the elusive mechanism of wMT-2 activation in control and Cd-exposed conditions. EMSA and DNase I footprinting approaches were used to pinpoint functional binding sites within the wMT-2 promoter region, which revealed that the cAMP responsive element (CRE) is a promising candidate which may act as a transcriptional activator of invertebrate MTs.

  10. "Active" cancer immunotherapy by anti-Met antibody gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Vigna, Elisa; Pacchiana, Giovanni; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Chiriaco, Cristina; Fontani, Lara; Basilico, Cristina; Pennacchietti, Selma; Comoglio, Paolo M

    2008-11-15

    Gene therapy provides a still poorly explored opportunity to treat cancer by "active" immunotherapy as it enables the transfer of genes encoding antibodies directed against specific oncogenic proteins. By a bidirectional lentiviral vector, we transferred the cDNA encoding the heavy and light chains of a monoclonal anti-Met antibody (DN-30) to epithelial cancer cells. In vitro, the transduced cells synthesized and secreted correctly assembled antibodies with the expected high affinity, inducing down-regulation of the Met receptor and strong inhibition of the invasive growth response. The inhibitory activity resulted (a) from the interference of the antibody with the Met receptor intracellular processing ("cell autonomous activity," in cis) and (b) from the antibody-induced cleavage of Met expressed at the cell surface ("bystander effect," in trans). The monoclonal antibody gene transferred into live animals by systemic administration or by local intratumor delivery resulted in substantial inhibition of tumor growth. These data provide proof of concept both for targeting the Met receptor and for a gene transfer-based immunotherapy strategy.

  11. CRISPR RNA-guided activation of endogenous human genes.

    PubMed

    Maeder, Morgan L; Linder, Samantha J; Cascio, Vincent M; Fu, Yanfang; Ho, Quan H; Joung, J Keith

    2013-10-01

    Short guide RNAs (gRNAs) can direct catalytically inactive CRISPR-associated 9 nuclease (dCas9) to repress endogenous genes in bacteria and human cells. Here we show that single or multiple gRNAs can direct dCas9 fused to a VP64 transcriptional activation domain to increase expression of endogenous human genes. This proof-of-principle work shows that clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas systems can target heterologous effector domains to endogenous sites in human cells.

  12. Tumor suppressor genes are larger than apoptosis-effector genes and have more regions of active chromatin: Connection to a stochastic paradigm for sequential gene expression programs.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Marlene; Mauro, James A; Ramsamooj, Michael; Blanck, George

    2015-08-03

    Apoptosis- and proliferation-effector genes are substantially regulated by the same transactivators, with E2F-1 and Oct-1 being notable examples. The larger proliferation-effector genes have more binding sites for the transactivators that regulate both sets of genes, and proliferation-effector genes have more regions of active chromatin, i.e, DNase I hypersensitive and histone 3, lysine-4 trimethylation sites. Thus, the size differences between the 2 classes of genes suggest a transcriptional regulation paradigm whereby the accumulation of transcription factors that regulate both sets of genes, merely as an aspect of stochastic behavior, accumulate first on the larger proliferation-effector gene "traps," and then accumulate on the apoptosis effector genes, thereby effecting sequential activation of the 2 different gene sets. As IRF-1 and p53 levels increase, tumor suppressor proteins are first activated, followed by the activation of apoptosis-effector genes, for example during S-phase pausing for DNA repair. Tumor suppressor genes are larger than apoptosis-effector genes and have more IRF-1 and p53 binding sites, thereby likewise suggesting a paradigm for transcription sequencing based on stochastic interactions of transcription factors with different gene classes. In this report, using the ENCODE database, we determined that tumor suppressor genes have a greater number of open chromatin regions and histone 3 lysine-4 trimethylation sites, consistent with the idea that a larger gene size can facilitate earlier transcriptional activation via the inclusion of more transactivator binding sites.

  13. Rapid activation of the bivalent gene Sox21 requires displacement of multiple layers of gene-silencing machinery

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthy, Harini; Ormsbee, Briana D.; Mallanna, Sunil K.; Rizzino, Angie

    2011-01-01

    The rapid formation of numerous tissues during development is highly dependent on the swift activation of key developmental regulators. Recent studies indicate that many key regulatory genes are repressed in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), yet poised for rapid activation due to the presence of both activating (H3K4 trimethylation) and repressive (H3K27 trimethylation) histone modifications (bivalent genes). However, little is known about bivalent gene regulation. In this study, we investigated the regulation of the bivalent gene Sox21, which is activated rapidly when ESCs differentiate in response to increases in Sox2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that prior to differentiation, the Sox21 gene is bound by a complex array of repressive and activating transcriptional machinery. Upon activation, all identified repressive machinery and histone modifications associated with the gene are lost, but the activating modifications and transcriptional machinery are retained. Notably, these changes do not occur when ESCs differentiate in response to retinoic acid. Moreover, ESCs lacking a functional PRC2 complex fail to activate this gene, apparently due to its association with other repressive complexes. Together, these findings suggest that bivalent genes, such as Sox21, are silenced by a complex set of redundant repressive machinery, which exit rapidly in response to appropriate differentiation signals.—Chakravarthy, H., Ormsbee, B. D., Mallanna, S. K., Rizzino, A. Rapid activation of the bivalent gene Sox21 requires displacement of multiple layers of gene-silencing machinery. PMID:20876214

  14. Novel Cationic Lipids with Enhanced Gene Delivery and Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fein, David E.; Bucki, Robert; Byfield, Fitzroy; Leszczynska, Katarzyna; Janmey, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Cationic lipids facilitate plasmid delivery, and some cationic sterol-based compounds have antimicrobial activity because of their amphiphilic character. These dual functions are relevant in the context of local ongoing infection during intrapulmonary gene transfer for cystic fibrosis. The transfection activities of two cationic lipids, dexamethasone spermine (DS) and disubstituted spermine (D2S), were tested as individual components and mixtures in bovine aortic endothelial cells and A549 cells. The results showed a 3- to 7-fold improvement in transgene expression for mixtures of DS with 20 to 40 mol% D2S. D2S and coformulations with DS, dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, and DNA exhibited potent bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli MG1655, Bacillus subtilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, which was maintained in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Complete bacterial killing was demonstrated at ∼5 μM, including gene delivery formulations, with 2 orders of magnitude higher tolerance before eukaryotic membrane disruption (erythrocyte hemolysis). D2S also exhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS) scavenging activity resulting in significant inhibition of LPS-mediated activation of human neutrophils with 85 and 65% lower interleukin-8 released at 12 and 24 h, respectively. Mixtures of DS and D2S can improve transfection activity over common lipofection reagents, and D2S has strong antimicrobial action suited for the suppression of bacterial-mediated inflammation. PMID:20573781

  15. Adaptation of muscle gene expression to changes in contractile activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Babij, P.; Thomason, D. B.; Wong, T. S.; Morrison, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    A review of the existing literature regarding the effects of different types of physical activities on the gene expression of adult skeletal muscles leads us to conclude that each type of exercise training program has, as a result, a different phenotype, which means that there are multiple mechanisms, each producing a unique phenotype. A portion of the facts which support this position is presented and interpreted here. [Abstract translated from the original French by NASA].

  16. Binding site of amiloride to urokinase plasminogen activator depends on species.

    PubMed

    Jankun, J; Skrzypczak-Jankun, E

    2001-10-01

    A novel drug candidate is checked on its potency on animal models before it can advance to human phase of the research. Usually negative results on animal phase disqualify it. Targeting specific enzymes by small chemicals raises the question about the appropriateness of this approach. As an example, the urokinase (uPA) is recognized as an important enzyme responsible for cancer metastasis and angiogenesis. It is therefore important to ask the question if a small chemical will inhibit uPA of different species with the same or different potency. Using DNA sequence and known structure of uPA we have modeled 3D structures of uPAs for several different species. By theoretical calculations we have determined most probable structure of amiloride/uPAs complexes. Catalytic triad (B57, B102, B195) and specificity pocket (B187-B197, B212-B229) are highly conserved in all cases, and are the regions responsible for proteolytic activity and recognition of the substrate. Significant differences were observed in a different region (loop B93-B101), that we identified as binding site of amiloride to the tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Although tPA shares the same function of activating plasminogen and it is structurally similar to uPA. Amiloride is a specific inhibitor of uPA but does not inhibit tPA. Our study shows that predicted position of amiloride depends on species and in some cases was located, as expected, in the specificity pocket, but in the other cases close to the loop B93-B101. This location could weaken affinity of binding or prevent inhibition of uPA. Therefore, drug screening and elimination process based solely on animal study, without careful structural analysis, could lead to the elimination of potential drugs for humans.

  17. Metronidazole activation and isolation of Clostridium acetobutylicum electron transport genes.

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, J D; Jones, D T; Woods, D R

    1991-01-01

    An Escherichia coli F19 recA, nitrate reductase-deficient mutant was constructed by transposon mutagenesis and shown to be resistant to metronidazole. This mutant was a most suitable host for the isolation of Clostridium acetobutylicum genes on recombinant plasmids, which activated metronidazole and rendered the E. coli F19 strain sensitive to metronidazole. Twenty-five E. coli F19 clones containing different recombinant plasmids were isolated and classified into five groups on the basis of their sensitivity to metronidazole. The clones were tested for nitrate reductase, pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and hydrogenase activities. DNA hybridization and restriction endonuclease mapping revealed that four of the C. acetobutylicum insert DNA fragments on recombinant plasmids were linked in an 11.1-kb chromosomal fragment. DNA sequencing and amino acid homology studies indicated that this DNA fragment contained a flavodoxin gene which encoded a protein of 160 amino acids that activated metronidazole and made the E. coli F19 mutant very sensitive to metronidazole. The flavodoxin and hydrogenase genes which are involved in electron transfer systems were linked on the 11.1-kb DNA fragment from C. acetobutylicum. Images PMID:1991710

  18. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  19. Sensation-seeking genes and physical activity in youth.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, A V; Gabriel, K P; Wang, J; Bondy, M L; Dong, Q; Wu, X; Shete, S; Spitz, M R

    2013-03-01

    Many studies examining genetic influences on physical activity (PA) have evaluated the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to the development of lifestyle-related chronic diseases, under the hypothesis that they would be associated with PA. However, PA is a multidetermined behavior and associated with a multitude of health consequences. Thus, examining a broader range of candidate genes associated with a broader range of PA correlates may provide new insights into the genetic underpinnings of PA. In this study, we focus on one such correlate - sensation-seeking behavior. Participants (N = 1130 Mexican origin youth) provided a saliva sample and data on PA and sensation-seeking tendencies in 2008-2009. Participants were genotyped for 630 functional and tagging variants in the dopamine, serotonin and cannabinoid pathways. Overall 30% of participants (males - 37.6% and females - 22.0%) reported ≥60 min of PA on 5 of 7 days. After adjusting for gender, age and population stratification, and applying the Bayesian False Discovery Probability approach for assessing noteworthiness, four gene variants were significantly associated with PA. In a multivariable model, being male, having higher sensation-seeking tendencies and at least one copy of the minor allele for SNPs in angiotensin I-converting enzyme gene [ACE; rs8066276 odds ratio (OR) = 1.44; P = 0.012] and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 gene (TPH2; rs11615016 OR = 1.73; P = 0.021) were associated with increased likelihood of meeting PA recommendations. Participants with at least one copy of the minor allele for SNPs in synaptosomal-associated protein 25 gene (SNAP25; rs363035 OR = 0.53; P = 0.005) and cannabinoid receptor 1 gene (CNR1; rs6454672 OR = 0.62; P = 0.022) have decreased likelihood of meeting PA recommendations. Our findings extend current knowledge of the complex relationship between PA and possible genetic underpinnings.

  20. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator is induced in migrating capillary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Cellular migration is an essential component of invasive biological processes, many of which have been correlated with an increase in plasminogen activator production. Endothelial cell migration occurs in vivo during repair of vascular lesions and angiogenesis, and can be induced in vitro by wounding a confluent monolayer of cells. By combining the wounded monolayer model with a substrate overlay technique, we show that cells migrating from the edges of an experimental wound display an increase in urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activity, and that this activity reverts to background levels upon cessation of movement, when the wound has closed. Our results demonstrate a direct temporal relationship between endothelial cell migration and uPA activity, and suggest that induction of uPA activity is a component of the migratory process. PMID:3121633

  1. Immunohistochemical localization of urokinase-type plasminogen activator, urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor and α2-antiplasmin in human corneal perforation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Corneal ulceration leading to perforation is associated with infectious and non-infectious destructive conditions in the cornea. The fibrinolytic (plasminogen/plasmin) system is considered to contribute to tissue remodeling in the wound healing process and it is believed to play an important role in proteolysis and fibrosis. To determine the localization of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), u-PA receptor (u-PAR) and α2-antiplasmin (α2AP) in the tissue of a corneal perforation, we investigated immunohistochemical expressions of u-PA, u-PAR, α2AP, CD68, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in a patient with corneal perforation that developed from an ulcer of no clear cause. Case presentation The patient was a 77-year-old woman who presented with a perforated corneal ulcer in her right eye. The cause of her corneal ulcer was unknown. Double immunohistochemistry was performed for the combinations of u-PA with u-PAR, CD68 or α-SMA and α2AP with CD68 or α-SMA to detect the localization of u-PA and α2AP. u-PA and u-PAR co-localization was seen in the corneal ulceration area. u-PA was mainly observed in CD68-positive cells and in some α-SMA positive cells. On the other hand, α2AP was not expressed in CD68-positive cells, but was expressed in α-SMA positive cells. Conclusion We identified expression of the u-PA/u-PAR complex and α2AP in a patient with a corneal ulcer. These two molecules are believed to play a crucial role in inflammatory cell recruitment, ECM synthesis and degradation during corneal wound healing. PMID:23190581

  2. Three faces of recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) mutations.

    PubMed

    Patiroglu, Turkan; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Van Der Burg, Mirjam

    2015-12-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a group of genetic disorder associated with development of T- and/or B-lymphocytes. Recombination-activating genes (RAG1/2) play a critical role on VDJ recombination process that leads to the production of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoire in the development of T and B cells. RAG1/2 genes mutations result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from classic SCID to Omenn syndrome (OS) to atypical SCID with such as granuloma formation and autoimmunity. Herein, we reported 4 patients with RAG1 deficiency: classic SCID was seen in two patients who presented with recurrent pneumonia and chronic diarrhoea, and failure to thrive. OS was observed in one patient who presented with chronic diarrhoea, skin rash, recurrent lower respiratory infections, and atypical SCID was seen in one patient who presented with Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and had novel RAG1 mutation.

  3. Transcriptional activation of ribosomal RNA genes during compensatory renal hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Ouellette, A.J.; Moonka, R.; Zelenetz, A.; Malt, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    The overall rate of rDNA transcription increases by 50% during the first 24 hours of compensatory renal hypertrophy in the mouse. To study mechanisms of ribosome accumulation after uninephrectomy, transcription rates were measured in isolated kidneys by transcriptional runoff. /sup 32/P-labeled nascent transcripts were hybridized to blots containing linearized, denatured cloned rDNA, and hybridization was quantitated autoradiographically and by direct counting. Overall transcriptional activity of rDNA was increased by 30% above control levels at 6 hrs after nephrectomy and by 50% at 12, 18, and 24 hrs after operation. Hybridizing RNA was insensitive to inhibiby alpha-amanitin, and no hybridization was detected to vector DNA. Thus, accelerated rDNA transcription is one regulatory element in the accretion of ribosomes in renal growth, and the regulatory event is an early event. Mechanisms of activation may include enhanced transcription of active genes or induction of inactive DNA.

  4. A distinct basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2)/FGF receptor interaction distinguishes urokinase-type plasminogen activator induction from mitogenicity in endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rusnati, M; Dell'Era, P; Urbinati, C; Tanghetti, E; Massardi, M L; Nagamine, Y; Monti, E; Presta, M

    1996-01-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) induces cell proliferation and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) production in fetal bovine aortic endothelial GM 7373 cells. In the present paper we investigated the role of the interaction of FGF-2 with tyrosine-kinase (TK) FGF receptors (FGFRs) in mediating uPA up-regulation in these cells. The results show that FGF-2 antagonists suramin, protamine, heparin, the synthetic peptide FGF-2(112-155), and a soluble form of FGFR-1 do not inhibit FGF-2-mediated uPA up-regulation at concentrations that affect growth factor binding to cell surface receptors and mitogenic activity. In contrast, tyrosine phosphorylation inhibitors and overexpression of a dominant negative TK- mutant of FGFR-1 abolish the uPA-inducing activity of FGF-2, indicating that FGFR and its TK activity are essential in mediating uPA induction. Accordingly, FGF-2 induces uPA up-regulation in Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with wild-type FGFR-1, -2, -3, or -4 but not with TK- FGFR-1 mutant. Small unilamellar phosphatidyl choline:cholesterol vesicles loaded with FGF-2 increased uPA production in GM 7373 cells in the absence of a mitogenic response. Liposome-encapsulated FGF-2 showed a limited but significant capacity, relative to free FGF-2, to interact with FGFR both at 4 degrees C and 37 degrees C and to be internalized within the cell. uPA up-regulation by liposome-encapsulated FGF-2 was quenched by neutralizing anti-FGF-2 antibodies, indicating that the activity of liposome-delivered FGF-2 is mediated by an extracellular action of the growth factor. Taken together, the data indicate that a distinct interaction of FGF-2 with FGFR, quantitatively and/or qualitatively different from the one that leads to mitogenicity, is responsible for the uPA-inducing activity of the growth factor. Images PMID:8868466

  5. Recovering glycoside hydrolase genes from active tundra cellulolytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pinnell, Lee J; Dunford, Eric; Ronan, Patrick; Hausner, Martina; Neufeld, Josh D

    2014-07-01

    Bacteria responsible for cellulose hydrolysis in situ are poorly understood, largely because of the relatively recent development of cultivation-independent methods for their detection and characterization. This study combined DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) and metagenomics for identifying active bacterial communities that assimilated carbon from glucose and cellulose in Arctic tundra microcosms. Following DNA-SIP, bacterial fingerprint analysis of gradient fractions confirmed isotopic enrichment. Sequenced fingerprint bands and clone library analysis of 16S rRNA genes identified active bacterial taxa associated with cellulose-associated labelled DNA, including Bacteroidetes (Sphingobacteriales), Betaproteobacteria (Burkholderiales), Alphaproteobacteria (Caulobacteraceae), and Chloroflexi (Anaerolineaceae). We also compared glycoside hydrolase metagenomic profiles from bulk soil and heavy DNA recovered from DNA-SIP incubations. Active populations consuming [(13)C]glucose and [(13)C]cellulose were distinct, based on ordinations of light and heavy DNA. Metagenomic analysis demonstrated a ∼3-fold increase in the relative abundance of glycoside hydrolases in DNA-SIP libraries over bulk-soil libraries. The data also indicate that multiple displacement amplification introduced bias into the resulting metagenomic analysis. This research identified DNA-SIP incubation conditions for glucose and cellulose that were suitable for Arctic tundra soil and confirmed that DNA-SIP enrichment can increase target gene frequencies in metagenomic libraries.

  6. Mechanisms guiding Polycomb activities during gene silencing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    He, Chongsheng; Huang, Hai; Xu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins act in an evolutionarily conserved epigenetic pathway that regulates chromatin structures in plants and animals, repressing many developmentally important genes by modifying histones. PcG proteins can form at least two multiprotein complexes: Polycomb Repressive Complexes 1 and 2 (PRC1 and PRC2, respectively). The functions of Arabidopsis thaliana PRCs have been characterized in multiple stages of development and have diverse roles in response to environmental stimuli. Recently, the mechanism that precisely regulates Arabidopsis PcG activity was extensively studied. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries in the regulations of PcG at the three different layers: the recruitment of PRCs to specific target loci, the polyubiquitination and degradation of PRC2, and the antagonism of PRC2 activity by the Trithorax group proteins. Current knowledge indicates that the powerful activity of the PcG pathway is strictly controlled for specific silencing of target genes during plant development and in response to environmental stimuli. PMID:24312106

  7. Rapid activation of the bivalent gene Sox21 requires displacement of multiple layers of gene-silencing machinery.

    PubMed

    Chakravarthy, Harini; Ormsbee, Briana D; Mallanna, Sunil K; Rizzino, Angie

    2011-01-01

    The rapid formation of numerous tissues during development is highly dependent on the swift activation of key developmental regulators. Recent studies indicate that many key regulatory genes are repressed in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), yet poised for rapid activation due to the presence of both activating (H3K4 trimethylation) and repressive (H3K27 trimethylation) histone modifications (bivalent genes). However, little is known about bivalent gene regulation. In this study, we investigated the regulation of the bivalent gene Sox21, which is activated rapidly when ESCs differentiate in response to increases in Sox2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that prior to differentiation, the Sox21 gene is bound by a complex array of repressive and activating transcriptional machinery. Upon activation, all identified repressive machinery and histone modifications associated with the gene are lost, but the activating modifications and transcriptional machinery are retained. Notably, these changes do not occur when ESCs differentiate in response to retinoic acid. Moreover, ESCs lacking a functional PRC2 complex fail to activate this gene, apparently due to its association with other repressive complexes. Together, these findings suggest that bivalent genes, such as Sox21, are silenced by a complex set of redundant repressive machinery, which exit rapidly in response to appropriate differentiation signals.

  8. Inhibition of retinoic acid-induced activation of 3' human HOXB genes by antisense oligonucleotides affects sequential activation of genes located upstream in the four HOX clusters.

    PubMed Central

    Faiella, A; Zappavigna, V; Mavilio, F; Boncinelli, E

    1994-01-01

    Most homeobox genes belonging to the Hox family are sequentially activated in embryonal carcinoma cells upon treatment with retinoic acid. Genes located at the 3' end of each one of the four Hox clusters are activated first, whereas upstream Hox genes are activated progressively later. This activation has been extensively studied for human HOX genes in the NT2/D1 cell line and shown to take place at the transcriptional level. To understand the molecular mechanisms of sequential HOX gene activation in these cells, we tried to modulate the expression of 3' HOX genes through the use of antisense oligonucleotides added to the culture medium. We chose the HOXB locus. A 5- to 15-fold reduction of the expression of HOXB1 and HOXB3 was sufficient to produce a significant inhibition of the activation of the upstream HOXB genes, as well as of their paralogs in the HOXA, HOXC, and HOXD clusters. Conversely, no effect was detectable on downstream HOX genes. The extent of this inhibition increased for progressively more-5' genes. The stability of the corresponding mRNAs appeared to be unaffected, supporting the idea that the observed effect might be mediated at the transcriptional level. These data suggest a cascade model of progressive activation of Hox genes, with a 3'-to-5' polarity. Images PMID:7911240

  9. Hormonal activity of polycyclic musks evaluated by reporter gene assay.

    PubMed

    Mori, Taiki; Iida, Mitsuru; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Kohra, Shinya; Takao, Yuji; Takemasa, Takehiro; Arizono, Koji

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic musk fragrance compounds, such as polycyclic musks (PCMs), are a group of chemicals used extensively as personal care products, and can be found in the environment and the human body. PCMs, such as 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexa-methylcyclopenta-gamma-2-benzopyran (HHCB) and 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyltetralin (AHTN), are known to have agonistic activities toward human estrogen receptor alpha (hERalpha) and hERbeta, and have antagonistic activity toward the human androgen receptor (hAR), as shown in several reporter gene assays. However, little is known about the interaction of PCMs with the human thyroid hormone receptor (hTR), and the hormonal effects of other PCMs except for HHCB and AHTN. In this study, we focus on the interactions of six PCMs, namely, HHCB, AHTN, 4-acetyl-1,1-dimethyl-6-tert-butyl-indan (ADBI), 6-acetyl-1,1,2,3,3,5-hexamethylindan (AHMI), 6,7-dihydro-1,1,2,3,3-pentamethyl-4(5H)-indanone (DPMI), and 5-acetyl-1,1,2,6-tetramethyl-3-isopropy-lindan (ATII) with hERalpha, hAR, and hTRbeta by in vitro reporter gene assay using Chinese hamster ovary cells. All the samples were found to be agonists toward hERalpha, whereas no agonistic activities of these PCMs for hAR and hTRbeta were observed. No antagonistic activities for hERalpha and hTRbeta were observed at the concentrations tested. However, several PCMs, namely, HHCB, AHTN, ATII, ADBI, and AHMI, showed dose-dependent antagonistic activities for hAR, and the IC50 values of these compounds were estimated to be 1.0 x 10(-7), 1.5 x 10(-7), 1.4 x 10(-7), 9.8 x 10(-6), and 1.4 x 10(-7) M, respectively. The results suggest that these PCMs interact with hERalpha and hAR but have no hormonal effect on hTRbeta. This is the first report on the agonistic and antagonistic activities of ATII, ADBI, AHMI, and DPMI for hERalpha and hAR as determined by in vitro reporter gene assay using stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  10. A Bayesian Framework for the Classification of Microbial Gene Activity States

    PubMed Central

    Disselkoen, Craig; Greco, Brian; Cook, Kaitlyn; Koch, Kristin; Lerebours, Reginald; Viss, Chase; Cape, Joshua; Held, Elizabeth; Ashenafi, Yonatan; Fischer, Karen; Acosta, Allyson; Cunningham, Mark; Best, Aaron A.; DeJongh, Matthew; Tintle, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Numerous methods for classifying gene activity states based on gene expression data have been proposed for use in downstream applications, such as incorporating transcriptomics data into metabolic models in order to improve resulting flux predictions. These methods often attempt to classify gene activity for each gene in each experimental condition as belonging to one of two states: active (the gene product is part of an active cellular mechanism) or inactive (the cellular mechanism is not active). These existing methods of classifying gene activity states suffer from multiple limitations, including enforcing unrealistic constraints on the overall proportions of active and inactive genes, failing to leverage a priori knowledge of gene co-regulation, failing to account for differences between genes, and failing to provide statistically meaningful confidence estimates. We propose a flexible Bayesian approach to classifying gene activity states based on a Gaussian mixture model. The model integrates genome-wide transcriptomics data from multiple conditions and information about gene co-regulation to provide activity state confidence estimates for each gene in each condition. We compare the performance of our novel method to existing methods on both simulated data and real data from 907 E. coli gene expression arrays, as well as a comparison with experimentally measured flux values in 29 conditions, demonstrating that our method provides more consistent and accurate results than existing methods across a variety of metrics. PMID:27555837

  11. Structure-activity relationship in cationic lipid mediated gene transfection.

    PubMed

    Niculescu-Duvaz, Dan; Heyes, James; Springer, Caroline J

    2003-07-01

    Non-viral synthetic vectors for gene delivery represent a safer alternative to viral vectors. Their main drawback is the low transfection efficiency, especially in vivo. Among the non-viral vectors currently in use, the cationic liposomes composed of cationic lipids are the most common. This review discusses the physicochemical properties of cationic lipids, the formation, macrostructure and specific parameters of the corresponding formulated liposomes, and the effect of all these parameters on transfection efficiency. The optimisation of liposomal vectors requires both the understanding of the biological variables involved in the transfection process, and the effect of the structural elements of the cationic lipids on these biological variables. The biological barriers relevant for in vitro and in vivo transfection are identified, and solutions to overcome them based on rational design of the cationic lipids are discussed. The review focuses on the relationship between the structure of the cationic lipid and the transfection activity. The structure is analysed in a modular manner. The hydrophobic domain, the cationic head group, the backbone that acts as a scaffold for the other domains, the linkers between backbone, hydrophobic domain and cationic head group, the polyethyleneglycol chains and the targeting moiety are identified as distinct elements of the cationic lipids used in gene therapy. The main chemical functionalities used to built these domains, as well as overall molecular features such as architecture and geometry, are presented. Studies of structure-activity relationships of each cationic lipid domain, including the authors', and the trends identified by these studies, help furthering the understanding of the mechanism governing the formation and behaviour of cationic liposomes in gene delivery, and therefore the rational design of new improved cationic lipids vectors capable of achieving clinical significance.

  12. GeneSet2miRNA: finding the signature of cooperative miRNA activities in the gene lists

    PubMed Central

    Antonov, Alexey V.; Dietmann, Sabine; Wong, Philip; Lutter, Dominik; Mewes, Hans W.

    2009-01-01

    GeneSet2miRNA is the first web-based tool which is able to identify whether or not a gene list has a signature of miRNA-regulatory activity. As input, GeneSet2miRNA accepts a list of genes. As output, a list of miRNA-regulatory models is provided. A miRNA-regulatory model is a group of miRNAs (single, pair, triplet or quadruplet) that is predicted to regulate a significant subset of genes from the submitted list. GeneSet2miRNA provides a user friendly dialog-driven web page submission available for several model organisms. GeneSet2miRNA is freely available at http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/proj/gene2mir/. PMID:19420064

  13. Tandem orientation of duplicated xanthine dehydrogenase genes from Arabidopsis thaliana: differential gene expression and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Hesberg, Christine; Hänsch, Robert; Mendel, Ralf R; Bittner, Florian

    2004-04-02

    Xanthine dehydrogenase from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana was analyzed on molecular and biochemical levels. Whereas most other organisms appear to own only one gene for xanthine dehydrogenase A. thaliana possesses two genes in tandem orientation spaced by 704 base pairs. The cDNAs as well as the proteins AtXDH1 and AtXDH2 share an overall identity of 93% and show high homologies to xanthine dehydrogenases from other organisms. Whereas AtXDH2 mRNA is expressed constitutively, alterations of AtXDH1 transcript levels were observed at various stresses like drought, salinity, cold, and natural senescence, but also after abscisic acid treatment. Transcript alteration did not mandatorily result in changes of xanthine dehydrogenase activities. Whereas salt treatment had no effect on xanthine dehydrogenase activities, cold stress caused a decrease, but desiccation and senescence caused a strong increase of activities in leaves. Because AtXDH1 presumably is the more important isoenzyme in A. thaliana it was expressed in Pichia pastoris, purified, and used for biochemical studies. AtXDH1 protein is a homodimer of about 300 kDa consisting of identical subunits of 150 kDa. Like xanthine dehydrogenases from other organisms AtXDH1 uses hypoxanthine and xanthine as main substrates and is strongly inhibited by allopurinol. AtXDH1 could be activated by the purified molybdenum cofactor sulfurase ABA3 that converts inactive desulfo-into active sulfoenzymes. Finally it was found that AtXDH1 is a strict dehydrogenase and not an oxidase, but is able to produce superoxide radicals indicating that besides purine catabolism it might also be involved in response to various stresses that require reactive oxygen species.

  14. Activation of tissue plasminogen activator gene transcription by Neovastat, a multifunctional antiangiogenic agent.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Denis; Nyalendo, Carine; Di Tomasso, Geneviève; Annabi, Borhane; Béliveau, Richard

    2004-07-16

    We recently reported that Neovastat, an antiangiogenic drug that is currently undergoing Phase III clinical trials for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, may inhibit angiogenesis through an increase in tPA activity. Here, we show that Neovastat also stimulates tPA gene transcription in endothelial cells, in a TNFalpha-like manner. RT-PCR analysis and gene reporter assays using the human tPA promoter indicated that upregulation of the tPA gene transcription by both Neovastat and TNFalpha was correlated with the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 and of IkappaB and that SP600125 and BAY11-7082, inhibitors of JNK and IkappaK, respectively, inhibit the increase of tPA gene transcription induced by Neovastat and TNFalpha. These results suggest that Neovastat induces tPA gene transcription through activation of the JNK and NFkappaB signaling pathways, leading to an increase of tPA secretion by endothelial cells. This may lead to the localized destruction of the fibrin provisional matrix that is necessary for neovessel formation and thus contribute to the reported antiangiogenic properties of this compound.

  15. Polyphenols from Chilean Propolis and Pinocembrin Reduce MMP-9 Gene Expression and Activity in Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Nicolás; Cuevas, Alejandro; Cavalcante, Marcela F.; Dörr, Felipe A.; Saavedra, Kathleen; Zambrano, Tomás; Abdalla, Dulcineia S. P.; Salazar, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols from diverse sources have shown anti-inflammatory activity. In the context of atherosclerosis, macrophages play important roles including matrix metalloproteinases synthesis involved in degradation of matrix extracellular components affecting the atherosclerotic plaque stability. We prepared a propolis extract and pinocembrin in ethanol solution. Propolis extract was chemically characterized using LC-MS. The effect of treatments on gene expression and proteolytic activity was measured in vitro using murine macrophages activated with LPS. Cellular toxicity associated with both treatments and the vehicle was determined using MTT and apoptosis/necrosis detection assays. MMP-9 gene expression and proteolytic activity were measured using qPCR and zymography, respectively. Thirty-two compounds were identified in the propolis extract, including pinocembrin among its major components. Treatment with either ethanolic extract of propolis or pinocembrin inhibits MMP-9 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, an inhibitory effect was observed in proteolytic activity. However, the effect showed by ethanolic extract of propolis was higher than the effect of pinocembrin, suggesting that MMP-9 inhibition results from a joint contribution between the components of the extract. These data suggest a potential role of polyphenols from Chilean propolis in the control of extracellular matrix degradation in atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27119082

  16. Feasibility and Effects of Short Activity Breaks for Increasing Preschool-Age Children's Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhassan, Sofiya; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi; Mendoza, Albert; Shitole, Sanyog; Puleo, Elaine; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Whitt-Glover, Melicia C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: We examined the effects of short bouts of structured physical activity (SBS-PA) implemented within the classroom setting as part of designated gross-motor playtime on preschoolers PA. Methods: Preschools were randomized to SBS-PA (centers, N = 5; participants, N = 141) or unstructured free playtime (UPA) (centers, N = 5; participants,…

  17. MBD3 Localizes at Promoters, Gene Bodies and Enhancers of Active Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shimbo, Takashi; Du, Ying; Grimm, Sara A.; Dhasarathy, Archana; Mav, Deepak; Shah, Ruchir R.; Shi, Huidong; Wade, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    The Mi-2/nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) complex is a multiprotein machine proposed to regulate chromatin structure by nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylation activities. Recent reports describing localization of NuRD provide new insights that question previous models on NuRD action, but are not in complete agreement. Here, we provide location analysis of endogenous MBD3, a component of NuRD complex, in two human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) using two independent genomic techniques: DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID) and ChIP-seq. We observed concordance of the resulting genomic localization, suggesting that these studies are converging on a robust map for NuRD in the cancer cell genome. MBD3 preferentially associated with CpG rich promoters marked by H3K4me3 and showed cell-type specific localization across gene bodies, peaking around the transcription start site. A subset of sites bound by MBD3 was enriched in H3K27ac and was in physical proximity to promoters in three-dimensional space, suggesting function as enhancers. MBD3 enrichment was also noted at promoters modified by H3K27me3. Functional analysis of chromatin indicated that MBD3 regulates nucleosome occupancy near promoters and in gene bodies. These data suggest that MBD3, and by extension the NuRD complex, may have multiple roles in fine tuning expression for both active and silent genes, representing an important step in defining regulatory mechanisms by which NuRD complex controls chromatin structure and modification status. PMID:24385926

  18. Attenuation of the LPS-induced, ERK-mediated upregulation of fibrosis-related factors FGF-2, uPA, MMP-2, and MMP-9 by Carthamus tinctorius L in cardiomyoblasts.

    PubMed

    Han, Chien-Kuo; Tien, Yun-Chen; Jine-Yuan Hsieh, Dennis; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Lai, Chao-Hung; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Hsuan Day, Cecilia; Shen, Chia-Yao; Hsu, Hsi-Hsien; Lin, Jing-Ying; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2017-03-01

    Severe and potentially fatal hypotension and cardiac contractile dysfunction are common symptoms in patients with sepsis. LPS was previously found to dramatically upregulate expression of fibrosis-related factors FGF-2, uPA, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in primary cardiac fibroblasts. MMPs are capable of denaturing and degrading fibrillar collagens and other components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Studies have shown that dysregulation of expression of MMPs is associated with development of myocardial extracellular matrix remodeling and cardiac fibrosis, which contribute to progression of heart failure. In this study, H9c2 cells and cardiac fibroblasts were divided into five treatment groups: control, LPS (1 μg/mL) and three concentrations of FCEtOH (Carthami Flos ethanolic extract) (31.25, 62.5, and 125 μg/mL). Phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 was observed to be rapidly induced upon treatment with LPS. In contrast, it was significantly suppressed by the administration of FCEtOH (125 μg/mL). Effects of FCEtOH on LPS-induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression in H9c2 cells occurred directly through ERK1/2 were determined. H9c2 cells were therefore pretreated with EGF-R to activate ERK pathway. Both protein levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and immunefluorescent signals of MMP-9 were significantly enhanced by EGFR. In contrast, MMP-2 and MMP-9 were significantly reduced after FCEtOH administration. Based on these findings, the authors concluded that FCEtOH elicits a protective effect against LPS-induced cardio-fibrosis through the ERK1/2 pathway. Carthamus tinctorius L may potentially serve as a cardio-protective agent against LPS- induced cardiac fibrosis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 754-763, 2017.

  19. Thiazolidinediones repress ob gene expression in rodents via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, P; Lefebvre, A M; Miller, S G; Guerre-Millo, M; Wong, K; Saladin, R; Hamann, L G; Staels, B; Briggs, M R; Auwerx, J

    1996-01-01

    The ob gene product, leptin, is a signaling factor regulating body weight and energy balance. ob gene expression in rodents is increased in obesity and is regulated by feeding patterns and hormones, such as insulin and glucocorticoids. In humans with gross obesity, ob mRNA levels are higher, but other modulators of human ob expression are unknown. In view of the importance of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) in adipocyte differentiation, we analyzed whether ob gene expression is subject to regulation by factors activating PPARs. Treatment of rats with the PPARalpha activator fenofibrate did not change adipose tissue and body weight and had no significant effect on ob mRNA levels. However, administration of the thiazolidinedione BRL49653, a PPARgamma ligand, increased food intake and adipose tissue weight while reducing ob mRNA levels in rats in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of the thiazolidinedione BRL49653 on ob mRNA levels was also observed in vitro. Thiazolidinediones reduced the expression of the human ob promoter in primary adipocytes, however, in undifferentiated 3T3-L1 preadipocytes lacking endogenous PPARgamma, cotransfection of PPARgamma was required to observe the decrease. In conclusion, these data suggest that PPARgamma activators reduce ob mRNA levels through an effect of PPARgamma on the ob promoter. PMID:8770873

  20. Mouse ovarian granulosa cells produce urokinase-type plasminogen activator, whereas the corresponding rat cells produce tissue-type plasminogen activator

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    It is well established that rat ovarian granulosa cells produce tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). The synthesis and secretion of the enzyme are induced by gonadotropins, and correlate well with the time of follicular rupture in vivo. We have found that in contrast, mouse granulosa cells produce a different form of plasminogen activator, the urokinase-type (uPA). As with tPA synthesis in the rat, uPA production by mouse granulosa cells is induced by gonadotropins, dibutyryl cAMP, and prostaglandin E2. However, dexamethasone, a drug which has no effect on tPA synthesis in rat cells inhibits uPA synthesis in the mouse. Results of these determinations made in cell culture were corroborated by examining follicular fluid, which is secreted in vivo predominantly by granulosa cells, from stimulated rat and mouse ovarian follicles. Rat follicular fluid contained only tPA, and mouse follicular fluid only uPA, indicating that in vivo, granulosa cells from the two species are secreting different enzymes. The difference in the type of plasminogen activator produced by the rat and mouse granulosa cells was confirmed at the messenger RNA level. After hormone stimulation, only tPA mRNA was present in rat cells, whereas only uPA mRNA was found in mouse cells. Furthermore, the regulation of uPA levels in mouse cells occurs via transient modulation of steady-state levels of mRNA, a pattern similar to that seen with tPA in rat cells. PMID:3040774

  1. Behavioral science and the study of gene-nutrition and gene-physical activity interactions in obesity research.

    PubMed

    Faith, Myles S

    2008-12-01

    This report summarizes emerging opportunities for behavioral science to help advance the field of gene-environment and gene-behavior interactions, based on presentations at The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Workshop, "Gene-Nutrition and Gene-Physical Activity Interactions in the Etiology of Obesity." Three opportunities are highlighted: (i) designing potent behavioral "challenges" in experiments, (ii) determining viable behavioral phenotypes for genetics studies, and (iii) identifying specific measures of the environment or environmental exposures. Additional points are underscored, including the need to incorporate novel findings from neuroimaging studies regarding motivation and drive for eating and physical activity. Advances in behavioral science theory and methods can play an important role in advancing understanding of gene-brain-behavior relationships in obesity onset.

  2. A strategy to establish a gene-activated matrix on titanium using gene vectors protected in a polylactide coating.

    PubMed

    Kolk, Andreas; Haczek, Cornelia; Koch, Christian; Vogt, Stephan; Kullmer, Martin; Pautke, Christoph; Deppe, Herbert; Plank, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Bioactive implants are promising tools in regenerative medicine. Here we describe a versatile procedure for preparing a gene-activated matrix on titanium. Lyophilized copolymer-protected gene vectors (COPROGs) suspended in poly(d,l-lactide) (PDLLA) solutions in ethyl acetate were used to varnish solid surfaces. The gene-activated PDLLA surfaces were first established on polypropylene 96-well plates. Vector release from these surfaces in aqueous buffer, cell viability and gene transfer efficiency to NIH 3T3 fibroblasts was strongly dependent on the vector dose and its ratio to PDLLA film thickness. A detailed analysis of these relationships allowed establishing correlations which can be used to calculate suitable combinations of COPROGs and PDLLA yielding optimal gene transfer efficiency. This was verified with COPROG-activated PDLLA coatings on titanium foils. HEK 293 and mesenchymal stem cells expressed the BMP-2 gene comprised in the gene-activated surface in a manner that was consistent with the predicted dose-response and toxicity profiles found in NIH 3T3 cells. The systematic procedure presented here for identifying optimal coating compositions can be applied to any combination of vector type and coating material.

  3. Setting limits on homeotic gene function: restraint of Sex combs reduced activity by teashirt and other homeotic genes.

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, D J; Horner, M A; Petitt, M G; Smolik, S M; Scott, M P

    1994-01-01

    Each of the homeotic genes of the HOM or HOX complexes is expressed in a limited domain along the anterior-posterior axis. Each homeotic protein directs the formation of characteristic structures, such as wings or ribs. In flies, when a heat shock-inducible homeotic gene is used to produce a homeotic protein in all cells of the embryo, only some cells respond by altering their fates. We have identified genes that limit where the homeotic gene Sex combs reduced (Scr) can affect cell fates in the Drosophila embryo. In the abdominal cuticle Scr is prevented from inducing prothoracic structures by the three bithorax complex (BX-C) homeotic genes. However, two of the BX-C homeotic genes, Ultrabithorax (Ubx) and abdominal-A (abd-A), have no effect on the ability of Scr to direct the formation of salivary glands. Instead, salivary gland induction by Scr is limited in the trunk by the homeotic gene teashirt (tsh) and in the last abdominal segment by the third BX-C gene, Abdominal-B (AbdB). Therefore, spatial restrictions on homeotic gene activity differ between tissues and result both from the regulation of homeotic gene transcription and from restraints on where homeotic proteins can function. Images PMID:7907545

  4. A viral gene that activates lytic cycle expression of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ren; Lin, Su-Fang; Gradoville, Lyndle; Yuan, Yan; Zhu, Fanxiu; Miller, George

    1998-01-01

    Herpesviruses exist in two states, latency and a lytic productive cycle. Here we identify an immediate-early gene encoded by Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)/human herpesvirus eight (HHV8) that activates lytic cycle gene expression from the latent viral genome. The gene is a homologue of Rta, a transcriptional activator encoded by Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). KSHV/Rta activated KSHV early lytic genes, including virus-encoded interleukin 6 and polyadenylated nuclear RNA, and a late gene, small viral capsid antigen. In cells dually infected with Epstein–Barr virus and KSHV, each Rta activated only autologous lytic cycle genes. Expression of viral cytokines under control of the KSHV/Rta gene is likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of KSHV-associated diseases. PMID:9724796

  5. Compact and highly active next-generation libraries for CRISPR-mediated gene repression and activation

    PubMed Central

    Horlbeck, Max A; Gilbert, Luke A; Villalta, Jacqueline E; Adamson, Britt; Pak, Ryan A; Chen, Yuwen; Fields, Alexander P; Park, Chong Yon; Corn, Jacob E; Kampmann, Martin; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2016-01-01

    We recently found that nucleosomes directly block access of CRISPR/Cas9 to DNA (Horlbeck et al., 2016). Here, we build on this observation with a comprehensive algorithm that incorporates chromatin, position, and sequence features to accurately predict highly effective single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for targeting nuclease-dead Cas9-mediated transcriptional repression (CRISPRi) and activation (CRISPRa). We use this algorithm to design next-generation genome-scale CRISPRi and CRISPRa libraries targeting human and mouse genomes. A CRISPRi screen for essential genes in K562 cells demonstrates that the large majority of sgRNAs are highly active. We also find CRISPRi does not exhibit any detectable non-specific toxicity recently observed with CRISPR nuclease approaches. Precision-recall analysis shows that we detect over 90% of essential genes with minimal false positives using a compact 5 sgRNA/gene library. Our results establish CRISPRi and CRISPRa as premier tools for loss- or gain-of-function studies and provide a general strategy for identifying Cas9 target sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19760.001 PMID:27661255

  6. Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are a framework for predicting quantitative relationships between molecular initiatin...

  7. Aurora kinase B activity is modulated by thyroid hormone during transcriptional activation of pituitary genes.

    PubMed

    Tardáguila, Manuel; González-Gugel, Elena; Sánchez-Pacheco, Aurora

    2011-03-01

    Covalent histone modifications clearly play an essential role in ligand-dependent transcriptional regulation by nuclear receptors. One of the predominant mechanisms used by nuclear receptors to activate or repress target-gene transcription is the recruitment of coregulatory factors capable of covalently modify the amino terminal ends of histones. Here we show that the thyroid hormone (T3) produces a rapid increase in histone H3Ser10 phosphorylation (H3Ser10ph) concomitant to the rapid displacement of the heterochromatin protein 1β (HP1β) to the nuclear periphery. Moreover, we found that T3-mediated pituitary gene transcription is associated with an increase in H3Ser10ph. Interestingly, the Aurora kinase B inhibitor ZM443979 abolishes the effect of T3 on H3Ser10ph, blocks HP1β delocalization, and significantly reduces ligand-dependent transactivation. Similar effects were shown when Aurora kinase B expression was abrogated in small interfering RNA assays. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanism by which T3 increases H3Ser10ph, we demonstrate that liganded thyroid hormone receptor directly interacts with Aurora kinase B, increasing its kinase activity. Moreover, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we have shown that Aurora kinase B participates of a mechanism that displaces HP1β from promoter region, thus preparing the chromatin for the transcriptional activation of T3 regulated genes. Our findings reveal a novel role for Aurora kinase B during transcriptional initiation in GO/G1, apart from its well-known mitotic activity.

  8. Repositioning the substrate activity screening (SAS) approach as a fragment-based method for identification of weak binders.

    PubMed

    Gladysz, Rafaela; Cleenewerck, Matthias; Joossens, Jurgen; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; Augustyns, Koen; Van der Veken, Pieter

    2014-10-13

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has evolved into an established approach for "hit" identification. Typically, most applications of FBDD depend on specialised cost- and time-intensive biophysical techniques. The substrate activity screening (SAS) approach has been proposed as a relatively cheap and straightforward alternative for identification of fragments for enzyme inhibitors. We have investigated SAS for the discovery of inhibitors of oncology target urokinase (uPA). Although our results support the key hypotheses of SAS, we also encountered a number of unreported limitations. In response, we propose an efficient modified methodology: "MSAS" (modified substrate activity screening). MSAS circumvents the limitations of SAS and broadens its scope by providing additional fragments and more coherent SAR data. As well as presenting and validating MSAS, this study expands existing SAR knowledge for the S1 pocket of uPA and reports new reversible and irreversible uPA inhibitor scaffolds.

  9. Network activity-independent coordinated gene expression program for synapse assembly.

    PubMed

    Valor, Luis M; Charlesworth, Paul; Humphreys, Lawrence; Anderson, Chris N G; Grant, Seth G N

    2007-03-13

    Global biological datasets generated by genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics provide new approaches to understanding the relationship between the genome and the synapse. Combined transcriptome analysis and multielectrode recordings of neuronal network activity were used in mouse embryonic primary neuronal cultures to examine synapse formation and activity-dependent gene regulation. Evidence for a coordinated gene expression program for assembly of synapses was observed in the expression of 642 genes encoding postsynaptic and plasticity proteins. This synaptogenesis gene expression program preceded protein expression of synapse markers and onset of spiking activity. Continued expression was followed by maturation of morphology and electrical neuronal networks, which was then followed by the expression of activity-dependent genes. Thus, two distinct sequentially active gene expression programs underlie the genomic programs of synapse function.

  10. Xenoestrogenic gene expression: structural features of active polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Schultz, T Wayne; Sinks, Glendon D

    2002-04-01

    Estrogenicity was assessed using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based Lac-Z reporter assay and was reported as the logarithm of the inverse of the 50% molar beta-galactosidase activity (log[EC50(-1)]). In an effort to quantify the relationship between molecular structure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and estrogenic gene expression, a series of PAHs were evaluated. With noted exceptions, the results of these studies indicate that the initial two-dimensional structural warning for estrogenicity, the superpositioning of a hydroxylated aromatic system on the phenolic A-ring of 17-beta-estradiol, can be extended to the PAHs. This two-dimensional-alignment criterion correctly identified estrogenicity of 22 of the 29 PAHs evaluated. Moreover, the estrogenic potency of these compounds was directly related to the size of the hydrophobic backbone. The seven compounds classified incorrectly by this structural feature were either dihydroxylated naphthalenes or aromatic nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds; all such compounds were false positives. Results with dihydroxylated naphthalenes reveal derivatives that were nonestrogenic when superimposed on the phenolic A-ring of 17-beta-estradiol had the second hydroxyl group in the position of the C-ring or were catechol-like in structure. Structural alerts for nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds must take into account the position of the hydroxyl group and the in-ring nitrogen atom; compounds with the hydroxyl group and nitrogen atom involved with the same ring were observed to be nonactive.

  11. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, Eric E.; Roessler, Paul G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities.

  12. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, E.E.; Roessler, P.G.

    1999-07-27

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities. 8 figs.

  13. Providencia stuartii genes activated by cell-to-cell signaling and identification of a gene required for production or activity of an extracellular factor.

    PubMed

    Rather, P N; Ding, X; Baca-DeLancey, R R; Siddiqui, S

    1999-12-01

    By utilizing reporter transposons, five Providencia stuartii genes that are activated by the accumulation of self-produced extracellular signals have been identified. These genes have been designated cma for conditioned medium activated. The presence of conditioned medium from stationary-phase cultures grown in rich media resulted in the premature activation of each gene in cells at early log phase, with activation values ranging from 6- to 26-fold. Preparation of conditioned medium from an M9 salts medium and fractionation by gel filtration chromatography resulted in fractions within the included volume which activated three of the cma fusions. In addition, depending on the reporter fusion, peak activity was found in different fractions. The partially purified factors activated in a dose-dependent manner. Characterization of the factors activating the cma fusions indicated that they were stable to heat, alkali, and acid. Furthermore, for each cma fusion, factor activity was not reproduced by the addition of homoserine lactone, homocysteine thiolactone, pyruvate, Casamino Acids, or alpha-ketoglutarate. The identities of three cma genes have been determined and revealed physiological roles in amino acid biosynthesis and nutrient import. To begin to address the pathways for production of or response to the extracellular factors, we have identified a locus, aarA, that is required for the activation of four cma fusions. The AarA product was required for factor activity in extracellular supernatants, indicating a possible role in biosynthesis or export.

  14. Tissue and urokinase plasminogen activators instigate the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells in a mouse model of glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Chintala, Shravan K

    2015-01-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) promotes the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) during the progression of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma (POAG). However, the molecular mechanisms underpinning IOP-mediated degeneration of RGCs remain unclear. Therefore, by employing a mouse model of POAG, this study examined whether elevated IOP promotes the degeneration of RGCs by up-regulating tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in the retina. IOP was elevated in mouse eyes by injecting fluorescent-microbeads into the anterior chamber. Once a week, for eight weeks, IOP in mouse eyes was measured by using Tono-Pen XL. At various time periods after injecting microbeads, proteolytic activity of tPA and uPA in retinal protein extracts was determined by fibrinogen/plasminogen zymography assays. Localization of tPA and uPA, and their receptor LRP-1 (low-density receptor-related protein-1) in the retina was determined by immunohistochemistry. RGCs’ degeneration was assessed by immunostaining with antibodies against Brn3a. Injection of microbeads into the anterior chamber led to a progressive elevation in IOP, increased the proteolytic activity of tPA and uPA in the retina, activated plasminogen into plasmin, and promoted a significant degeneration of RGCs. Elevated IOP up-regulated tPA and LRP-1 in RGCs, and uPA in astrocytes. At four weeks after injecting microbeads, RAP (receptor associated protein; 0.5 and 1.0 μM) or tPA-Stop (1.0 and 4.0 μM) was injected into the vitreous humor. Treatment of IOP-elevated eyes with RAP led to a significant decrease in proteolytic activity of both tPA and uPA, and a significant decrease in IOP-mediated degeneration of RGCs. Also, treatment of IOP-elevated eyes with tPA-Stop decreased the proteolytic activity of both tPA and uPA, and, in turn, significantly attenuated IOP-mediated degeneration of RGCs. Results presented in this study provide evidence that elevated IOP promotes the degeneration of

  15. The great escape: Active genes on inactive sex chromosomes and their evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Sin, Ho-Su; Namekawa, Satoshi H

    2013-09-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms precisely regulate sex chromosome inactivation as well as genes that escape the silencing process. In male germ cells, DNA damage response factor RNF8 establishes active epigenetic modifications on the silent sex chromosomes during meiosis, and activates escape genes during a state of sex chromosome-wide silencing in postmeiotic spermatids. During the course of evolution, the gene content of escape genes in postmeiotic spermatids recently diverged on the sex chromosomes. This evolutionary feature mirrors the epigenetic processes of sex chromosomes in germ cells. In this article, we describe how epigenetic processes have helped to shape the evolution of sex chromosome-linked genes. Furthermore, we compare features of escape genes on sex chromosomes in male germ cells to escape genes located on the single X chromosome silenced during X-inactivation in females, clarifying the distinct evolutionary implications between male and female escape genes.

  16. Detecting microRNA activity from gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding to the messenger RNA (mRNA) of protein coding genes. They control gene expression by either inhibiting translation or inducing mRNA degradation. A number of computational techniques have been developed to identify the targets of miRNAs. In this study we used predicted miRNA-gene interactions to analyse mRNA gene expression microarray data to predict miRNAs associated with particular diseases or conditions. Results Here we combine correspondence analysis, between group analysis and co-inertia analysis (CIA) to determine which miRNAs are associated with differences in gene expression levels in microarray data sets. Using a database of miRNA target predictions from TargetScan, TargetScanS, PicTar4way PicTar5way, and miRanda and combining these data with gene expression levels from sets of microarrays, this method produces a ranked list of miRNAs associated with a specified split in samples. We applied this to three different microarray datasets, a papillary thyroid carcinoma dataset, an in-house dataset of lipopolysaccharide treated mouse macrophages, and a multi-tissue dataset. In each case we were able to identified miRNAs of biological importance. Conclusions We describe a technique to integrate gene expression data and miRNA target predictions from multiple sources. PMID:20482775

  17. Therapeutic antibody gene transfer: an active approach to passive immunity.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Joost M; Bleeker, Wim K; Parren, Paul W H I

    2004-09-01

    Advances in gene transfer approaches are enabling the possibility of applying therapeutic antibodies using DNA. In particular gene transfer in combination with electroporation is promising and can result in generating in vivo antibody concentrations in the low therapeutic range. However, several important problems need to be dealt with before antibody gene transfer can become a valuable supplement to the current therapies. As antibody production following gene transfer is difficult to control, the danger of inducing autoimmune conditions or uncontrollable side effects occurs in cases in which autologous antigens are targeted. It is suggested that the most promising area of application therefore appears to be infectious disease in which heterologous antigens are targeted and concerns for long-term antibody exposure are minimal. Finally, genes encoding fully human antibodies will enhance long-term expression and decrease problems linked to immunogenicity.

  18. Expression and activity analysis of a new fusion protein targeting ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Manman; Chang, Weiqin; Wang, Dingding; Cui, Manhua; Lin, Yang; Wu, Shuying; Xu, Tianmin

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a new therapeutic drug to improve the prognosis of ovarian cancer patients. Human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)17-34-kunitz-type protease inhibitor (KPI) eukaryotic expression vector was constructed and recombinant human uPA17-34-KPI (rhuPA17-34-KPI) in P. pastoris was expressed. In the present study, the DNA sequences that encode uPA 17-34 amino acids were created according to the native amino acids sequence and inserted into the KPI-pPICZαC vector, which was constructed. Then, uPA17‑34-KPI-pPICZαC was transformed into P. pastoris X-33, and rhuPA17-34-KPI was expressed by induction of methanol. The bioactivities of a recombinant fusion protein were detected with trypsin inhibition analysis, and the inhibitory effects on the growth of ovarian cancer cells were identified using the TUNEL assay, in vitro wound‑healing assay and Matrigel model analysis. The results of the DNA sequence analysis of the recombinant vector uPA17-34-KPI‑pPICZα demonstrated that the DNA‑encoding human uPA 17-34 amino acids, 285-288 amino acids of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and 1-57 amino acids of KPI were correctly inserted into the pPICZαC vector. Following induction by methonal, the fusion protein with a molecular weight of 8.8 kDa was observed using SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis. RhuPA17-34-KPI was expressed in P. pastoris with a yield of 50 mg/l in a 50-ml tube. The recombinant fusion protein was able to inhibit the activity of trypsin, inhibit growth and induce apoptosis of SKOV3 cells, and inhibit the invasion and metastasis of ovarian cancer cells. By considering uPA17-34 amino acid specific binding uPAR as the targeted part of fusion protein and utilizing the serine protease inhibitor activity of KPI, it was found that the recombinant fusion protein uPA17-34-KPI inhibited the invasion and metastasis of ovarian tumors, and may therefore be regarded as effective in targeted treatment.

  19. Gene editing activity on extrachromosomal arrays in C. elegans transgenics.

    PubMed

    Falgowski, Kerry A; Kmiec, Eric B

    2011-04-15

    Gene editing by modified single-stranded oligonucleotides is a strategy aimed at inducing single base changes into the genome, generating a permanent genetic change. The work presented here explores gene editing capabilities in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Current approaches to gene mutagenesis in C. elegans have been plagued by non-specificity and thus the ability to induce precise, directed alterations within the genome of C. elegans would offer a platform upon which structure/function analyses can be carried out. As such, several in vivo assay systems were developed to evaluate gene editing capabilities in C. elegans. Fluorescence was chosen as the selectable endpoint as fluorescence can be easily detected through the transparent worm body even from minimal expression. Two tissue specific fluorescent expression vectors containing either a GFP or mCherry transgene were mutagenized to create a single nonsense mutation within the open reading frame of each respective fluorescent gene. These served as the target site to evaluate the frequency of gene editing on extrachromosomal array transgenic lines. Extrachromosomal arrays can carry hundreds of copies of the transgene, therefore low frequency events (like those in the gene editing reaction) may be detected. Delivery of the oligonucleotide was accomplished by microinjection into the gonads of young adult worms in an effort to induce repair of the mutated fluorescent gene in the F1 progeny. Despite many microinjections on the transgenic strains with varying concentrations of ODNs, no gene editing events were detected. This result is consistent with the previous research, demonstrating the difficulties encountered in targeting embryonic stem cells and the pronuclei of single-celled embryos.

  20. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-03-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals.

  1. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals. PMID:26950874

  2. RNF8 regulates active epigenetic modifications and escape gene activation from inactive sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Ho-Su; Barski, Artem; Zhang, Fan; Kartashov, Andrey V.; Nussenzweig, Andre; Chen, Junjie; Andreassen, Paul R.; Namekawa, Satoshi H.

    2012-01-01

    Sex chromosomes are uniquely subject to chromosome-wide silencing during male meiosis, and silencing persists into post-meiotic spermatids. Against this background, a select set of sex chromosome-linked genes escapes silencing and is activated in post-meiotic spermatids. Here, we identify a novel mechanism that regulates escape gene activation in an environment of chromosome-wide silencing in murine germ cells. We show that RNF8-dependent ubiquitination of histone H2A during meiosis establishes active epigenetic modifications, including dimethylation of H3K4 on the sex chromosomes. RNF8-dependent active epigenetic memory, defined by dimethylation of H3K4, persists throughout meiotic division. Various active epigenetic modifications are subsequently established on the sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids. These RNF8-dependent modifications include trimethylation of H3K4, histone lysine crotonylation (Kcr), and incorporation of the histone variant H2AFZ. RNF8-dependent epigenetic programming regulates escape gene activation from inactive sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids. Kcr accumulates at transcriptional start sites of sex-linked genes activated in an RNF8-dependent manner, and a chromatin conformational change is associated with RNF8-dependent epigenetic programming. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this RNF8-dependent pathway is distinct from that which recognizes DNA double-strand breaks. Our results establish a novel connection between a DNA damage response factor (RNF8) and epigenetic programming, specifically in establishing active epigenetic modifications and gene activation. PMID:23249736

  3. Somatic Activation of rasK Gene in a Human Ovarian Carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feig, L. A.; Bast, R. C.; Knapp, R. C.; Cooper, G. M.

    1984-02-01

    A tumor isolate from a patient with serous cystadenocarcinoma of the ovary contained an activated rasK gene detected by transfection of NIH/3T3 cells. In contrast, DNA from normal cells of the same patient lacked transforming activity, indicating that activation of this transforming gene was the consequence of somatic mutation in the neoplastic cells. The transforming gene product displayed an electrophoretic mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels that differed from the mobilities of rasK transforming proteins in other tumors, indicating that a previously undescribed mutation was responsible for activation of rasK in this ovarian carcinoma.

  4. Activating human genes with zinc finger proteins, transcription activator-like effectors and CRISPR/Cas9 for gene therapy and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Gersbach, Charles A; Perez-Pinera, Pablo

    2014-08-01

    New technologies have recently been developed to control the expression of human genes in their native genomic context by engineering synthetic transcription factors that can be targeted to any DNA sequence. The ability to precisely regulate any gene as it occurs naturally in the genome provides a means to address a variety of diseases and disorders. This approach also circumvents some of the traditional challenges of gene therapy. In this editorial, we review the technologies that have enabled targeted human gene activation, including the engineering of transcription factors based on zinc finger proteins, transcription activator-like effectors and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Additionally, we highlight examples in which these methods have been developed for therapeutic applications and discuss challenges and opportunities.

  5. Activation of cryptic 3' splice sites within introns of cellular genes following gene entrapment.

    PubMed

    Osipovich, Anna B; White-Grindley, Erica K; Hicks, Geoffrey G; Roshon, Michael J; Shaffer, Christian; Moore, Jason H; Ruley, H Earl

    2004-01-01

    Gene trap vectors developed for genome-wide mutagenesis can be used to study factors governing the expression of exons inserted throughout the genome. For example, entrapment vectors consisting of a partial 3'-terminal exon [i.e. a neomycin resistance gene (Neo), a poly(A) site, but no 3' splice site] were typically expressed following insertion into introns, from cellular transcripts that spliced to cryptic 3' splice sites present either within the targeting vector or in the adjacent intron. A vector (U3NeoSV1) containing the wild-type Neo sequence preferentially disrupted genes that spliced in-frame to a cryptic 3' splice site in the Neo coding sequence and expressed functional neomycin phosphotransferase fusion proteins. Removal of the cryptic Neo 3' splice site did not reduce the proportion of clones with inserts in introns; rather, the fusion transcripts utilized cryptic 3' splice sites present in the adjacent intron or generated by virus integration. However, gene entrapment with U3NeoSV2 was considerably more random than with U3NeoSV1, consistent with the widespread occurrence of potential 3' splice site sequences in the introns of cellular genes. These results clarify the mechanisms of gene entrapment by U3 gene trap vectors and illustrate features of exon definition required for 3' processing and polyadenylation of cellular transcripts.

  6. Activation of cryptic 3′ splice sites within introns of cellular genes following gene entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Osipovich, Anna B.; White-Grindley, Erica K.; Hicks, Geoffrey G.; Roshon, Michael J.; Shaffer, Christian; Moore, Jason H.; Ruley, H. Earl

    2004-01-01

    Gene trap vectors developed for genome-wide mutagenesis can be used to study factors governing the expression of exons inserted throughout the genome. For example, entrapment vectors consisting of a partial 3′-terminal exon [i.e. a neomycin resistance gene (Neo), a poly(A) site, but no 3′ splice site] were typically expressed following insertion into introns, from cellular transcripts that spliced to cryptic 3′ splice sites present either within the targeting vector or in the adjacent intron. A vector (U3NeoSV1) containing the wild-type Neo sequence preferentially disrupted genes that spliced in-frame to a cryptic 3′ splice site in the Neo coding sequence and expressed functional neomycin phosphotransferase fusion proteins. Removal of the cryptic Neo 3′ splice site did not reduce the proportion of clones with inserts in introns; rather, the fusion transcripts utilized cryptic 3′ splice sites present in the adjacent intron or generated by virus integration. However, gene entrapment with U3NeoSV2 was considerably more random than with U3NeoSV1, consistent with the widespread occurrence of potential 3′ splice site sequences in the introns of cellular genes. These results clarify the mechanisms of gene entrapment by U3 gene trap vectors and illustrate features of exon definition required for 3′ processing and polyadenylation of cellular transcripts. PMID:15155860

  7. Transposable Elements Contribute to Activation of Maize Genes in Response to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Makarevitch, Irina; Waters, Amanda J.; West, Patrick T.; Stitzer, Michelle; Hirsch, Candice N.; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey; Springer, Nathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) account for a large portion of the genome in many eukaryotic species. Despite their reputation as “junk” DNA or genomic parasites deleterious for the host, TEs have complex interactions with host genes and the potential to contribute to regulatory variation in gene expression. It has been hypothesized that TEs and genes they insert near may be transcriptionally activated in response to stress conditions. The maize genome, with many different types of TEs interspersed with genes, provides an ideal system to study the genome-wide influence of TEs on gene regulation. To analyze the magnitude of the TE effect on gene expression response to environmental changes, we profiled gene and TE transcript levels in maize seedlings exposed to a number of abiotic stresses. Many genes exhibit up- or down-regulation in response to these stress conditions. The analysis of TE families inserted within upstream regions of up-regulated genes revealed that between four and nine different TE families are associated with up-regulated gene expression in each of these stress conditions, affecting up to 20% of the genes up-regulated in response to abiotic stress, and as many as 33% of genes that are only expressed in response to stress. Expression of many of these same TE families also responds to the same stress conditions. The analysis of the stress-induced transcripts and proximity of the transposon to the gene suggests that these TEs may provide local enhancer activities that stimulate stress-responsive gene expression. Our data on allelic variation for insertions of several of these TEs show strong correlation between the presence of TE insertions and stress-responsive up-regulation of gene expression. Our findings suggest that TEs provide an important source of allelic regulatory variation in gene response to abiotic stress in maize. PMID:25569788

  8. Antisense long noncoding RNAs regulate var gene activation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Amit-Avraham, Inbar; Pozner, Guy; Eshar, Shiri; Fastman, Yair; Kolevzon, Netanel; Yavin, Eylon; Dzikowski, Ron

    2015-03-03

    The virulence of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the deadliest form of human malaria, is attributed to its ability to evade human immunity through antigenic variation. These parasites alternate between expression of variable antigens, encoded by members of a multicopy gene family named var. Immune evasion through antigenic variation depends on tight regulation of var gene expression, ensuring that only a single var gene is expressed at a time while the rest of the family is maintained transcriptionally silent. Understanding how a single gene is chosen for activation is critical for understanding mutually exclusive expression but remains a mystery. Here, we show that antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) initiating from var introns are associated with the single active var gene at the time in the cell cycle when the single var upstream promoter is active. We demonstrate that these antisense transcripts are incorporated into chromatin, and that expression of these antisense lncRNAs in trans triggers activation of a silent var gene in a sequence- and dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, interference with these lncRNAs using complement peptide nucleic acid molecules down-regulated the active var gene, erased the epigenetic memory, and induced expression switching. Altogether, our data provide evidence that these antisense lncRNAs play a key role in regulating var gene activation and mutually exclusive expression.

  9. ihfA Gene of the Bacterium Myxococcus xanthus and Its Role in Activation of Carotenoid Genes by Blue Light

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Alberto J.; Fontes, Marta; Murillo, Francisco J.

    2001-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus responds to blue light by producing carotenoids. Several regulatory genes are known that participate in the light action mechanism, which leads to the transcriptional activation of the carotenoid genes. We had already reported the isolation of a carotenoid-less, Tn5-induced strain (MR508), whose mutant site was unlinked to the indicated regulatory genes. Here, we show that ΩMR508::Tn5 affects all known light-inducible promoters in different ways. It blocks the activation of two of them by light but makes the activity of a third one light independent. The ΩMR508 locus has been cloned and sequenced. The mutation had occurred at the promoter of a gene we propose is the M. xanthus ortholog of ihfA. This encodes the α subunit of the histone-like integration host factor protein. An in-frame deletion within ihfA causes the same effects as the ΩMR508::Tn5 insertion. Like other IhfA proteins, the deduced amino acid sequence of M. xanthus IhfA shows much similarity to HU, another histone-like protein. Sequence comparison data, however, and the finding that the M. xanthus gene is preceded by gene pheT, as happens in other gram-negative bacteria, strongly argue for the proposed orthology relationship. The M. xanthus ihfA gene shows some unusual features, both from structural and physiological points of view. In particular, the protein is predicted to have a unique, long acidic extension at the carboxyl terminus, and it appears to be necessary for normal cell growth and even vital for a certain wild-type strain of M. xanthus. PMID:11133949

  10. Protein kinase C alpha-CARMA3 signaling axis links Ras to NF-kappa B for lysophosphatidic acid-induced urokinase plasminogen activator expression in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mahanivong, C; Chen, H M; Yee, S W; Pan, Z K; Dong, Z; Huang, S

    2008-02-21

    We reported previously that a signaling pathway consisting of G(i)-Ras-NF-kappaB mediates lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) upregulation in ovarian cancer cells. However, it is not clear what signaling components link Ras to nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB for this LPA-induced event. In the present study, we found that treatment of protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors including conventional PKC (cPKC) inhibitor Gö6976 abolished LPA-induced uPA upregulation in ovarian cancer cell lines tested, indicating the importance of cPKC activity in this LPA-induced event. Indeed, LPA stimulation led to the activation of PKCalpha and Ras-PKCalpha interaction. Although constitutively active mutants of PKCalpha (a cPKC), PKCtheta (a novel PKC (nPKC)) and PKCzeta (an atypical PKC (aPKC)) were all able to activate NF-kappaB and upregulate uPA expression, only dominant-negative PKCalpha mutant attenuated LPA-induced NF-kappaB activation and uPA upregulation. These results suggest that PKCalpha, rather than PKC isoforms in other PKC classes, participates in LPA-induced NF-kappaB activation and uPA upregulation in ovarian cancer cells. To determine the signaling components downstream of PKCalpha mediating LPA-induced uPA upregulation, we showed that forced expression of dominant-negative CARMA3 or silencing CARMA3, Bcl10 and MALT1 with specific siRNAs diminished these LPA-induced events. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PKCalpha/CARMA3 signaling axis is important in LPA-induced ovarian cancer cell in vitro invasion.

  11. Regulation of Gene33 expression by insulin requires MEK-ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Adam B; Xu, Jie; Franklin, J Lee; Messina, Joseph L

    2004-09-17

    Gene33 and its human homologue, mitogen inducible gene-6/receptor-associated late transducer (mig-6, RALT), is a 53-kDa soluble protein that was identified as a hepatic gene regulated by glucocorticoids and insulin. Its mRNA is expressed in numerous tissues in addition to the liver. Mitogen inducibility of Gene33 mRNA has been described in several experimental systems. Recent reports have suggested a role for Gene33 in inhibition of proliferation induced by factors that bind to members of the ErbB family of receptors. In the present work, we examine the regulation of Gene33 protein by insulin in hepatoma cells of rat (H4IIE) and human (HepG2/Hep3B) origin. Inhibition of MEK1 significantly inhibited extracellularly regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 activation and insulin-regulated Gene33 transcription and protein levels in H4IIE cells. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) activity alone did not significantly alter transcription of Gene33. In Hep3B and HepG2 cells, insulin did not significantly induce either ERK1/2 activation or Gene33 expression. This work suggests that the MEK-ERK, but not the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), pathway plays a direct role in insulin regulation of Gene33 transcription and protein expression.

  12. Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunxiao; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2012-04-01

    It is well established that the ferric uptake regulatory protein (Fur) functions as a transcriptional repressor in diverse microorganisms. Recent studies demonstrated that Fur also functions as a transcriptional activator. In this study we defined Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the sexually transmitted disease pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Analysis of 37 genes which were previously determined to be iron induced and which contained putative Fur boxes revealed that only 30 of these genes exhibited reduced transcription in a gonococcal fur mutant strain. Fur-mediated activation was established by examining binding of Fur to the putative promoter regions of 16 Fur-activated genes with variable binding affinities observed. Only ∼50% of the newly identified Fur-regulated genes bound Fur in vitro, suggesting that additional regulatory circuits exist which may function through a Fur-mediated indirect mechanism. The gonococcal Fur-activated genes displayed variable transcription patterns in a fur mutant strain, which correlated with the position of the Fur box in each (promoter) region. These results suggest that Fur-mediated direct transcriptional activation is fulfilled by multiple mechanisms involving either competing with a repressor or recruiting RNA polymerase. Collectively, our studies have established that gonococcal Fur functions as an activator of gene transcription through both direct and indirect mechanisms.

  13. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Afsar U.; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Hannigan, Gregory E.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding. PMID:26569329

  14. Laughter up-regulates the genes related to NK cell activity in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takashi; Tsujii, Satoru; Iburi, Tadao; Tamanaha, Tamiko; Yamagami, Keiko; Ishibashi, Rieko; Hori, Miyo; Sakamoto, Shigeko; Ishii, Hitoshi; Murakami, Kazuo

    2007-12-01

    To elucidate the sustainable effects of laughter on gene expression, we recruited type 2 diabetic patients who were in-patient for receiving self-management education and examined time-dependent regulation for gene expression by laughter. Two-day experiment was performed. On one day, the patients watched comic video and laughed together with hospital staffs. On the other day, they participated in an inpatient diabetes educational program. Blood samples were collected before and 1.5, 4 h after watching comic video or spending lecture time, and changes in gene expression were comprehensively analyzed by microarray technique. Of the 41,000 genes analyzed, the laughter relatively up-regulated 39 genes, among which, 27 genes were relatively increased in the expression for all the observation period after watching comic video. By functional classification of these genes, 14 genes were found to be related to natural killer cell activity. No genes were included that are directly involved in blood glucose regulation, though successive suppression of postprandial blood glucose levels was observed. These results suggest that the laughter influences the expression of many genes classified into immune responses, and may contribute to amelioration of postprandial blood glucose elevation through a modulation of NK cell activity caused by up-regulation of relating genes.

  15. Changes in phytates and HCl extractability of calcium, phosphorus, and iron of soaked, dehulled, cooked, and sprouted pigeon pea cultivar (UPAS-120).

    PubMed

    Duhan, A; Khetarpaul, N; Bishnoi, S

    2002-01-01

    UPAS-120, a high yielding and early maturing variety of pigeon peas released by the Department of Plant Breeding, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar contained a significant amount of phytic acid, i.e. 886 mg/100 g. When it was subjected to various domestic processing and cooking methods viz. soaking (6, 12, 18 h), dehulling, ordinary as well as pressure cooking and germination (24, 36 and 48 h), a drastic decrease in level of phytic acid with a remarkable increase in the HCl-extractability of mono, divalent, and trivalent ions, like calcium, phosphorus, and iron occurred. Germination (48 h) was found to be the best method for decreasing the phytic acid content, i.e. 35 to 39 percent less than the control and significantly (p < 0.05) increasing the non-phytate phosphorus and HCl-extractable phosphorus. Pressure cooking of soaked-dehulled pigeon pea also rendered equally good results. The calcium, phosphorus, and iron contents of pigeon pea seeds were 197.3, 473.1, and 9.91 mg/100 g, respectively; some losses varying from 3 to 9 percent were noticed when the legume was subjected to soaking, cooking, and germination but the maximum losses, i.e. 23 percent, occurred when the seeds were dehulled. However, HCl-extractability of Ca, P, and Fe improved to a significant extent when the pigeon pea seeds were soaked, soaked-dehulled, cooked and sprouted which may have been due to decrease in the phytate content followed by processing and cooking. The significant negative correlations between the phytic acid and HCl-extractability of minerals of processed pigeon pea strengthens these findings.

  16. Impact of physical activity and doping on epigenetic gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenbach, Heidi

    2011-10-01

    To achieve success in sports, many athletes consume doping substances, such as anabolic androgenic steroids and growth hormones, and ignore the negative influence of these drugs on their health. Apart from the unethical aspect of doping in sports, it is essential to consider the tremendous risk it represents to their physical condition. The abuse of pharmaceuticals which improve athletic performance may alter the expression of specific genes involved in muscle and bone metabolism by epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications. Moreover, excessive and relentless training to increase the muscle mass, may also have an influence on the health of the athletes. This stress releases neurotransmitters and growth factors, and may affect the expression of endogenous genes by DNA methylation, too. This paper focuses on the relationship between epigenetic mechanisms and sports, highlights the potential consequences of abuse of doping drugs on gene expression, and describes methods to molecularly detect epigenetic changes of gene markers reflecting the physiological or metabolic effects of doping agents.

  17. Expression and localization of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor in bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    García, Daniela C; Miceli, Dora C; Rizo, Gabriela; García, Elina V; Valdecantos, Pablo A; Roldán-Olarte, Mariela

    2016-04-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a serine protease involved in extracellular matrix remodeling through plasmin generation. uPA usually binds to its receptor, uPAR, which is anchored to the plasma membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. uPA/uPAR binding increases proteolytic activity in the neighborhood of the cells containing uPAR and activates intracellular signaling pathways involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, cell migration and proliferation. The aim of this work was to study the expression of uPA, uPAR and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in immature and in vitro matured bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). uPA is only expressed in the cumulus cells of immature and in vitro matured COCs, while uPAR and PAI-1 are expressed in both the cumulus cells and the immature and in vitro matured oocytes. In addition, uPAR protein was localized by confocal microscopy in the plasma membrane of oocytes and cumulus cells of immature COCs. Results from this research led us to hypothesize that the uPA/uPAR interaction could cause the local production of uPA-mediated plasmin over oocyte and cumulus cell surface; plasmin formation could also be regulated by PAI-1.

  18. Plasminogen activators, their inhibitors, and urokinase receptor emerge in late stages of melanocytic tumor progression.

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, T. J.; Quax, P. H.; Denijn, M.; Verrijp, K. N.; Verheijen, J. H.; Verspaget, H. W.; Weidle, U. H.; Ruiter, D. J.; van Muijen, G. N.

    1994-01-01

    Degradation of the extracellular matrix and other tissue barriers by proteases like plasminogen activators (PAs) is a prerequisite for neoplastic growth and metastasis. Recently, we reported that highly metastatic behavior of human melanoma cells in nude mice correlates with urokinase-type PA (u-PA) expression and activity and with PA inhibitor type 1 and 2 (PAI-1, PAI-2) expression. Here we report on the occurrence of components of the PA system in the various stages of human melanoma tumor progression in situ. We studied the protein distribution on freshly frozen lesions of common nevocellular nevi (n = 25), dysplastic (= atypical) nevi (n = 16), early primary melanomas (n = 8), advanced primary melanomas (n = 11), and melanoma metastases (n = 17). Tissue-type PA was present in endothelial cells in all lesions, whereas in metastases it could be detected in tumor cells in a minority of the lesions. u-PA, its receptor, PAI-1, and PAI-2 could not be detected in benign and in early stages but appeared frequently in advanced primary melanoma and melanoma metastasis lesions. u-PA was detected in stromal cells and in tumor cells at the invasive front, the u-PA receptor and PAI-2 in tumor cells, and PAI-1 in the extracellular matrix surrounding tumor cells. Localization of the corresponding messenger RNAs and enzyme activities revealed a similar distribution. We conclude that plasminogen activation is a late event in melanoma tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8291613

  19. Activation and Characterization of a Cryptic Polycyclic Tetramate Macrolactam Biosynthetic Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yunzi; Huang, Hua; Liang, Jing; Wang, Meng; Lu, Lu; Shao, Zengyi; Cobb, Ryan E.; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic tetramate macrolactams (PTMs) are a widely distributed class of natural products with important biological activities. However, many of them have not been characterized. Here we apply a plug and play synthetic biology strategy to activate a cryptic PTM biosynthetic gene cluster SGR810-815 from Streptomyces griseus and discover three potential PTMs. This gene cluster is highly conserved in phylogenetically diverse bacterial strains and contains an unusual hybrid polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS) which resembles iterative PKSs known in fungi. To further characterize this gene cluster, we use the same synthetic biology approach to create a series of gene deletion constructs and elucidate the biosynthetic steps for the formation of the polycyclic system. The strategy we employ bypasses the traditional laborious processes to elicit gene cluster expression and should be generally applicable to many other silent or cryptic gene clusters for discovery and characterization of new natural products. PMID:24305602

  20. Recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogous genes in X-ray sensitive and resistant CHO cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubnitchaya-Labudová, O.; Portele, A.; Vaçata, V.; Lubec, G.; Rink, H.; Höfer, M.

    1997-10-01

    The XRCC1 gene (X-ray repair cross complementing) complements the DNA repair deficiency of the radiation sensitive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant cell line EM9 but the mechanism of the correction is not elucidated yet. XRCC1 shows substantial homology to the RAG2 gene (recombination activating gene) and we therefore tried to answer question, whether structural similarities (sequence of a putative recombination activating domain, aa 332-362 for XRCC1 and aa 286-316 in RAG2) would reflect similar functions of the homologous, putative recombination activating domain. PCR experiments revealed that no sequence homologous to the structural part of human XRCC1 was present in cDNA of CHO. Differential display demonstrated two putative recombination activating domains in the parental CHO line AA8 and one in the radiosensitive mutant EM9. Southern blot experiments showed the presence of several genes with partial homology to human XRCC1. Recombination studies consisted of expressing amplified target domains within chimeric proteins in recA - bacteria and subsequent detection of recombination events by sequencing the recombinant plasmids. Recombination experiments demonstrated recombination activating activity of all putative recombination activating domains amplified from AA8 and EM9 genomes as reflected by deletions within the insert of the recombinant plasmids. The recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogues could explain a mechanism responsible for the correction of the DNA repair defect in EM9.

  1. Lymphocyte activation gene 3 and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Diana; Kolmakova, Antonina; Sura, Sunitha; Vella, Anthony T.; Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Taylor, Kent D.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Rich, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The lipoprotein scavenger receptor BI (SCARB1) rs10846744 noncoding variant is significantly associated with atherosclerotic disease independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. We identified a potentially novel connection between rs10846744, the immune checkpoint inhibitor lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG3), and atherosclerosis. METHODS: In vitro approaches included flow cytometry, lipid raft isolation, phosphosignaling, cytokine measurements, and overexpressing and silencing LAG3 protein. Fasting plasma LAG3 protein was measured in hyperalphalipoproteinemic (HALP) and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) participants. RESULTS: In comparison with rs10846744 reference (GG homozygous) cells, LAG3 protein levels by flow cytometry (P < 0.001), in lipid rafts stimulated and unstimulated (P = 0.03), and phosphosignaling downstream of B cell receptor engagement of CD79A (P = 0.04), CD19 (P = 0.04), and LYN (P = 0.001) were lower in rs10846744 risk (CC homozygous) cells. Overexpressing LAG3 protein in risk cells and silencing LAG3 in reference cells confirmed its importance in phosphosignaling. Secretion of TNF-α was higher (P = 0.04) and IL-10 was lower (P = 0.04) in risk cells. Plasma LAG3 levels were lower in HALP carriers of the CC allele (P < 0.0001) and by race (P = 0.004). In MESA, race (P = 0.0005), age (P = 0.003), lipid medications (P = 0.03), smoking history (P < 0.0001), and rs10846744 genotype (P = 0.002) were independent predictors of plasma LAG3. In multivariable regression models, plasma LAG3 was significantly associated with HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) (P = 0.007), plasma IL-10 (P < 0.0001), and provided additional predictive value above the Framingham risk score (P = 0.04). In MESA, when stratified by high HDL-C, plasma LAG3 was associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) (odds ratio 1.45, P = 0.004). CONCLUSION: Plasma LAG3 is a potentially novel independent predictor of HDL-C levels and CHD risk. FUNDING: This work was

  2. Lymphocyte activation gene 3 and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Golden, Diana; Kolmakova, Antonina; Sura, Sunitha; Vella, Anthony T; Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Bielinski, Suzette J; Taylor, Kent D; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Rich, Stephen S; Rodriguez, Annabelle

    2016-10-20

    BACKGROUND: The lipoprotein scavenger receptor BI (SCARB1) rs10846744 noncoding variant is significantly associated with atherosclerotic disease independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. We identified a potentially novel connection between rs10846744, the immune checkpoint inhibitor lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG3), and atherosclerosis. METHODS: In vitro approaches included flow cytometry, lipid raft isolation, phosphosignaling, cytokine measurements, and overexpressing and silencing LAG3 protein. Fasting plasma LAG3 protein was measured in hyperalphalipoproteinemic (HALP) and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) participants. RESULTS: In comparison with rs10846744 reference (GG homozygous) cells, LAG3 protein levels by flow cytometry (P < 0.001), in lipid rafts stimulated and unstimulated (P = 0.03), and phosphosignaling downstream of B cell receptor engagement of CD79A (P = 0.04), CD19 (P = 0.04), and LYN (P = 0.001) were lower in rs10846744 risk (CC homozygous) cells. Overexpressing LAG3 protein in risk cells and silencing LAG3 in reference cells confirmed its importance in phosphosignaling. Secretion of TNF-α was higher (P = 0.04) and IL-10 was lower (P = 0.04) in risk cells. Plasma LAG3 levels were lower in HALP carriers of the CC allele (P < 0.0001) and by race (P = 0.004). In MESA, race (P = 0.0005), age (P = 0.003), lipid medications (P = 0.03), smoking history (P < 0.0001), and rs10846744 genotype (P = 0.002) were independent predictors of plasma LAG3. In multivariable regression models, plasma LAG3 was significantly associated with HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) (P = 0.007), plasma IL-10 (P < 0.0001), and provided additional predictive value above the Framingham risk score (P = 0.04). In MESA, when stratified by high HDL-C, plasma LAG3 was associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) (odds ratio 1.45, P = 0.004). CONCLUSION: Plasma LAG3 is a potentially novel independent predictor of HDL-C levels and CHD risk. FUNDING: This work was

  3. Pitavastatin attenuates the PDGF-induced LR11/uPA receptor-mediated migration of smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Meizi; Bujo, Hideaki . E-mail: hbujo@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Zhu, Yanjuan; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Hirayama, Satoshi; Kanaki, Tatsuro; Shibasaki, Manabu; Takahashi, Kazuo; Schneider, Wolfgang J.; Saito, Yasushi

    2006-10-06

    Statins, inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, elicit various actions on vascular cells including the modulation of proliferation and migration of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Here, we have elucidated the mechanism by which statins, in particular pitavastatin, attenuate the migration activity of SMCs. The expression of LR11, a member of the LDL receptor family and an enhancer of cell surface localization of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), is increased in cultured SMCs by treatment with PDGF-BB. Pitavastatin attenuates the PDGF-BB -induced surface expression of LR11 and uPAR. The increased migration of SMCs observed both upon overexpression of LR11 and via stimulation of secretion of soluble LR11 is not reversed by pitavastatin. In vivo studies showed that the SMCs expressing LR11 in plaques are almost congruent with intimal cells expressing nonmuscle myosin heavy chain (SMemb). Pitavastatin reduced the expression of LR11 and SMemb, and the levels of LR11, uPAR, and SMemb in cultured intimal SMCs were reduced to those seen in medial SMCs. We propose that this statin reduces PDGF-induced migration through the attenuation of the LR11/uPAR system in SMCs. Modulation of the LR11/uPAR system with statins suggests a novel treatment strategy for atherogenesis based on suppression of intimal SMC migration.

  4. Process and genes for expression and overexpression of active [FeFe] hydrogenases

    DOEpatents

    Seibert, Michael; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria Lucia; Posewitz, Matthew C; Smolinski, Sharon L

    2014-09-16

    A process for expression of active [FeFe]-hydrogenase in a host organism that does not contain either the structural gene(s) for [FeFe]-hydrogenases and/or homologues for the maturation genes HydE, HydF and HyG, comprising: cloning the structural hydrogenase gene(s) and/or the maturation genes HydE, HydF and HydG from an organisms that contains these genes into expression plasmids; transferring the plasmids into an organism that lacks a native [FeFe]-hydrogenase or that has a disrupted [FeFe]-hydrogenase and culturing it aerobically; and inducing anaerobiosis to provide [FeFe] hydrogenase biosynthesis and H?2#191 production.

  5. BRAIN NETWORKS. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks.

    PubMed

    Richiardi, Jonas; Altmann, Andre; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Chang, Catie; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Lemaître, Hervé; Mann, Karl F; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W; Smolka, Michael N; Spanagel, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Hawrylycz, Mike; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-06-12

    During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function.

  6. Cluster Analysis of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Canine Leukocytes Identifies Activation State

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Julie-Anne; Mortlock, Sally-Anne; Taylor, Rosanne M.; Williamson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the immune system undergo activation and subsequent proliferation in the normal course of an immune response. Infrequently, the molecular and cellular events that underlie the mechanisms of proliferation are dysregulated and may lead to oncogenesis, leading to tumor formation. The most common forms of immunological cancers are lymphomas, which in dogs account for 8%–20% of all cancers, affecting up to 1.2% of the dog population. Key genes involved in negatively regulating proliferation of lymphocytes include a group classified as tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). These genes are also known to be associated with progression of lymphoma in humans, mice, and dogs and are potential candidates for pathological grading and diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to analyze TSG profiles in stimulated leukocytes from dogs to identify genes that discriminate an activated phenotype. A total of 554 TSGs and three gene set collections were analyzed from microarray data. Cluster analysis of three subsets of genes discriminated between stimulated and unstimulated cells. These included 20 most upregulated and downregulated TSGs, TSG in hallmark gene sets significantly enriched in active cells, and a selection of candidate TSGs, p15 (CDKN2B), p18 (CDKN2C), p19 (CDKN1A), p21 (CDKN2A), p27 (CDKN1B), and p53 (TP53) in the third set. Analysis of two subsets suggested that these genes or a subset of these genes may be used as a specialized PCR set for additional analysis. PMID:27478369

  7. Effect Of Simulated Microgravity On Activated T Cell Gene Transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Maureen A.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of T lymphocytes under the shear stress environment of clinorotation have demonstrated an inhibition of activation in response to TCR mediated signaling. These results mimic those observed during space flight. This work investigates the molecular signaling events of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation. Purified human T lymphocytes and the T cell clone Jurkat exhibit an uncoupling of signaling as mediated through the TCR. Activation of the transcription factor AP-1 is inhibited while activation of NFAT occurs. NFAT dephosphorylation and activation is dependent on sustained Ca(++) influx. Alternatively, AP-1, which consists of two transcription factors, jun and fos, is activated by PKC and Ras mediated pathways. TCR signaling is known to be dependent on cytoskeletal rearrangements, in particular, raft aggregation is critical. Raft aggregation, as mediated through GM, crosslinking, overcomes the inhibition of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation, indicating that the block is occurring upstream of raft aggregation. Clinorotation is shown to have an effect similar to a weak TCR signal.

  8. Identification of two peanut germin-like genes and the potential superoxide dismutase activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Germin and germin-like protein (GLP) genes are members of large multigene families. These genes have been reported to play a role directly or indirectly in plant defense response. A number of GLPs have been demonstrated to have superoxidase dismutase (SOD) or oxalate oxidase (OxO) activity, leading ...

  9. Quantitative structure-activity relationships and docking studies of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kyani, Anahita; Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Jenssen, Håvard

    2012-02-01

    Defining the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine pathogenesis could lead to the application of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists as novel migraine therapeutics. In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of biological activities of a large range of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists was performed using a panel of physicochemical descriptors. The computational studies evaluated different variable selection techniques and demonstrated shuffling stepwise multiple linear regression to be superior over genetic algorithm-multiple linear regression. The linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model revealed better statistical parameters of cross-validation in comparison with the non-linear support vector regression technique. Implementing only five peptide descriptors into this linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model resulted in an extremely robust and highly predictive model with calibration, leave-one-out and leave-20-out validation R(2) of 0.9194, 0.9103, and 0.9214, respectively. We performed docking of the most potent calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists with the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor and demonstrated that peptide antagonists act by blocking access to the peptide-binding cleft. We also demonstrated the direct contact of residues 28-37 of the calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists with the receptor. These results are in agreement with the conclusions drawn from the quantitative structure-activity relationship model, indicating that both electrostatic and steric factors should be taken into account when designing novel calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists.

  10. Influence of tetracycline on tetracycline-resistant heterotrophs and tet genes in activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Liu, Dongfang; Li, Kexun

    2015-03-01

    The concentrations of tetracycline-intermediate resistant, tetracycline-resistant heterotrophic bacteria, and total heterotrophic bacteria were examined to assess the influence of tetracycline on tetracycline-resistant heterotrophs by the R2A agar cultivation method in the tetracycline fortified activated sludge process and in the natural background. Results showed that the percentages of both tetracycline-intermediate resistant and tetracycline-resistant heterotrophic bacteria in total heterotrophic bacteria were significantly increased, after tetracycline was fed to activated sludge for a 3 months period under four different operating conditions, as compared with the background. In order to investigate the mechanism of activated sludge resistance to tetracycline, polymerase chain reaction experiments were carried out to analyze the existence and evolution of tet genes in the presence of tetracycline. Results revealed that only tet A and tet B genes out of the 11 target tet genes were observed in tetracycline treated activated sludge while no tet gene was detected in background. This indicated that tet A gene could accumulate in activated sludge with slower and continuous influent, while the accumulation of tet B gene could be attributed to shorter hydraulic retention time. Therefore, it was proposed in this study that tetracycline-resistant genes created by efflux pumps spread earlier and quicker to encode resistance to tetracycline, which facilitated the increase in tetracycline-resistance.

  11. Novel Combinatorial Therapeutic Targeting of PAI-1 (SERPINE1) Gene Expression in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kutz, Stacie M.; Higgins, Craig E.; Higgins, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid peptides (Aβ) in the brain, generated by β-site proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is the hallmark pathophysiologic feature of Alzheimer's disease. The plasmin-activating cascade, in which urokinase (uPA) and tissue-type (tPA) plasminogen activators convert plasminogen to the broad-spectrum protease plasmin, appears to serve a protective, Aβ-clearing, role in the central nervous system. Plasmin degrades Aβ and catalyzes α- site APP proteolysis generating nontoxic peptides. Plasmin activation in the brain is negatively regulated by the fast-acting clade E serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN) plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1; SERPINE1) resulting in Aβ accumulation. PAI-1 and its major physiological inducer TGF-β1, moreover, are both increased in Alzheimer's disease models and implicated in the etiology and progression of human neurodegenerative disorders. Current findings support the hypothesis that targeting of PAI-1 function (by small molecule drugs) and/or gene expression (by histone deacetylase inhibitors) may constitute a clinically-relevant molecular approach to the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases associated with increased PAI-1 levels. PMID:23847772

  12. Gene expression profile of activated microglia under conditions associated with dopamine neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David M; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M; Kuhn, Donald M

    2006-03-01

    Microglia are the resident antigen-presenting cells within the central nervous system (CNS), and they serve immune-like functions in protecting the brain against injury and invading pathogens. By contrast, activated microglia can secrete numerous reactants that damage neurons. The pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases has been associated with microglial activation, but the signaling pathways that program a neuronally protective or destructive phenotype in microglia are not known. To increase the understanding of microglial activation, microarray analysis was used to profile the transcriptome of BV-2 microglial cells after activation. Microglia were activated by lipopolysaccharide, the HIV neurotoxic protein TAT, and dopamine quinone, each of which has been linked to dopamine neuronal damage. We identified 210 of 9882 genes whose expression was differentially regulated by all activators (116 increased and 94 decreased in expression). Gene ontology analysis assigned up-regulated genes to a number of specific biological processes and molecular functions, including immune response, inflammation, and cytokine/chemokine activity. Genes down-regulated in expression contribute to conditions that are permissive of microglial migration, lowered adhesion to matrix, lessened phagocytosis, and reduction in receptors that oppose chemotaxis and inflammation. These results elaborate a broad profile of microglial genes whose expression is altered by conditions associated with both neurodegenerative diseases and microglial activation.

  13. Potato tuber cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase genes: biochemical properties, activity, and expression during tuber dormancy progression.

    PubMed

    Suttle, Jeffrey C; Huckle, Linda L; Lu, Shunwen; Knauber, Donna C

    2014-03-15

    The enzymatic and biochemical properties of the proteins encoded by five potato cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKX)-like genes functionally expressed in yeast and the effects of tuber dormancy progression on StCKX expression and cytokinin metabolism were examined in lateral buds isolated from field-grown tubers. All five putative StCKX genes encoded proteins with in vitro CKX activity. All five enzymes were maximally active at neutral to slightly alkaline pH with 2,6-dichloro-indophenol as the electron acceptor. In silico analyses indicated that four proteins were likely secreted. Substrate dependence of two of the most active enzymes varied; one exhibiting greater activity with isopentenyl-type cytokinins while the other was maximally active with cis-zeatin as a substrate. [(3)H]-isopentenyl-adenosine was readily metabolized by excised tuber buds to adenine/adenosine demonstrating that CKX was active in planta. There was no change in apparent in planta CKX activity during either natural or chemically forced dormancy progression. Similarly although expression of individual StCKX genes varied modestly during tuber dormancy, there was no clear correlation between StCKX gene expression and tuber dormancy status. Thus although CKX gene expression and enzyme activity are present in potato tuber buds throughout dormancy, they do not appear to play a significant role in the regulation of cytokinin content during tuber dormancy progression.

  14. SUMO functions in constitutive transcription and during activation of inducible genes in yeast.

    PubMed

    Rosonina, Emanuel; Duncan, Sarah M; Manley, James L

    2010-06-15

    Transcription factors represent one of the largest groups of proteins regulated by SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification, and their sumoylation is usually associated with transcriptional repression. To investigate whether sumoylation plays a general role in regulating transcription in yeast, we determined the occupancy of sumoylated proteins at a variety of genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) using an antibody that recognizes the yeast SUMO peptide. Surprisingly, we detected sumoylated proteins at all constitutively transcribed genes tested but not at repressed genes. Ubc9, the SUMO conjugation enzyme, was not present on these genes, but its inactivation reduced SUMO at the constitutive promoters and modestly decreased RNA polymerase II levels. In contrast, activation of the inducible GAL1, STL1, and ARG1 genes caused not only a striking accumulation of SUMO at all three promoter regions, but also recruitment of Ubc9, indicating that gene activation involves sumoylation of promoter-bound factors. However, Ubc9 inactivation, while reducing sumoylation at the induced promoters, paradoxically resulted in increased transcription. Providing an explanation for this, the reduced sumoylation impaired the cell's ability to appropriately shut off transcription of the induced ARG1 gene, indicating that SUMO can facilitate transcriptional silencing. Our findings thus establish unexpected roles for sumoylation in both constitutive and activated transcription, and provide a novel mechanism for regulating gene expression.

  15. Ectopic Activation of Germline and Placental Genes Identifies Aggressive Metastasis-Prone Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rousseaux, Sophie; Debernardi, Alexandra; Jacquiau, Baptiste; Vitte, Anne-Laure; Vesin, Aurélien; Nagy-Mignotte, Hélène; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Brichon, Pierre-Yves; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Hainaut, Pierre; Laffaire, Julien; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Beer, David G.; Timsit, Jean-François; Brambilla, Christian; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Khochbin, Saadi

    2016-01-01

    Activation of normally silent tissue-specific genes and the resulting cell “identity crisis” are the unexplored consequences of malignant epigenetic reprogramming. We designed a strategy for investigating this reprogramming, which consisted of identifying a large number of tissue-restricted genes that are epigenetically silenced in normal somatic cells and then detecting their expression in cancer. This approach led to the demonstration that large-scale “off-context” gene activations systematically occur in a variety of cancer types. In our series of 293 lung tumors, we identified an ectopic gene expression signature associated with a subset of highly aggressive tumors, which predicted poor prognosis independently of the TNM (tumor size, node positivity, and metastasis) stage or histological subtype. The ability to isolate these tumors allowed us to reveal their common molecular features characterized by the acquisition of embryonic stem cell/germ cell gene expression profiles and the down-regulation of immune response genes. The methodical recognition of ectopic gene activations in cancer cells could serve as a basis for gene signature–guided tumor stratification, as well as for the discovery of oncogenic mechanisms, and expand the understanding of the biology of very aggressive tumors. PMID:23698379

  16. Targeting c-Myc-activated genes with a correlation method: Detection of global changes in large gene expression network dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Remondini, D.; O'Connell, B.; Intrator, N.; Sedivy, J. M.; Neretti, N.; Castellani, G. C.; Cooper, L. N.

    2005-01-01

    This work studies the dynamics of a gene expression time series network. The network, which is obtained from the correlation of gene expressions, exhibits global dynamic properties that emerge after a cell state perturbation. The main features of this network appear to be more robust when compared with those obtained with a network obtained from a linear Markov model. In particular, the network properties strongly depend on the exact time sequence relationships between genes and are destroyed by random temporal data shuffling. We discuss in detail the problem of finding targets of the c-myc protooncogene, which encodes a transcriptional regulator whose inappropriate expression has been correlated with a wide array of malignancies. The data used for network construction are a time series of gene expression, collected by microarray analysis of a rat fibroblast cell line expressing a conditional Myc-estrogen receptor oncoprotein. We show that the correlation-based model can establish a clear relationship between network structure and the cascade of c-myc-activated genes. PMID:15867157

  17. Activity-dependent regulation of genes implicated in X-linked non-specific mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Boda, B; Mas, C; Muller, D

    2002-01-01

    X-linked forms of non-specific mental retardation are complex disorders, for which mutations in several genes have recently been identified. These include OPHN1, GDI1, PAK3, IL1RAPL, TM4SF2, FMR2 and RSK2. To investigate the mechanisms through which alterations of these gene products could result in cognitive impairment, we analyzed their expression using quantitative PCR technique in two in vitro models of activity-dependent gene regulation: kainate-induced seizures and long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP). We found that the level of expression of four genes, PAK3, IL1RAPL, RSK2 and TM4SF2, was significantly up-regulated following kainate treatment. Furthermore we observed a significant increase in mRNA levels of PAK3 and IL1RAPL following LTP induction. These results suggest a possible role for these four genes in activity-dependent brain plasticity.

  18. NF-Y activates genes of metabolic pathways altered in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Benatti, Paolo; Chiaramonte, Maria Luisa; Lorenzo, Mariangela; Hartley, John A; Hochhauser, Daniel; Gnesutta, Nerina; Mantovani, Roberto; Imbriano, Carol; Dolfini, Diletta

    2016-01-12

    The trimeric transcription factor NF-Y binds to the CCAAT box, an element enriched in promoters of genes overexpressed in tumors. Previous studies on the NF-Y regulome identified the general term metabolism as significantly enriched. We dissect here in detail the targeting of metabolic genes by integrating analysis of NF-Y genomic binding and profilings after inactivation of NF-Y subunits in different cell types. NF-Y controls de novo biosynthetic pathways of lipids, teaming up with the master SREBPs regulators. It activates glycolytic genes, but, surprisingly, is neutral or represses mitochondrial respiratory genes. NF-Y targets the SOCG (Serine, One Carbon, Glycine) and Glutamine pathways, as well as genes involved in the biosynthesis of polyamines and purines. Specific cancer-driving nodes are generally under NF-Y control. Altogether, these data delineate a coherent strategy to promote expression of metabolic genes fuelling anaerobic energy production and other anabolic pathways commonly altered in cancer cells.

  19. A gene encoding a new cold-active lipase from an Antarctic isolate of Penicillium expansum.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Suja; Te'o, Junior; Nevalainen, Helena

    2013-08-01

    Cold-active lipases are of significant interest as biocatalysts in industrial processes. We have identified a lipase that displayed activity towards long carbon-chain-p-nitrophenyl substrates (C12-C18) at 25 °C from the culture supernatant of an Antarctic Penicillium expansum strain assigned P. expansum SM3. Zymography revealed a protein band of around 30 kDa with activity towards olive oil. DNA fragments of a lipase gene designated as lipPE were isolated from the genomic DNA of P. expansum SM3 by genomic walking PCR. Subsequently, the complete genomic lipPE gene was amplified using gene-specific primers designed from the 5'- and 3'-regions. Reverse transcription PCR was used to amplify the lipPE cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence consisted of 285 residues that included a predicted signal peptide. Three peptides identified by LC/MS/MS analysis of the proteins in the culture supernatant of P. expansum were also present in the deduced amino acid sequence of the lipPE gene suggesting that this gene encoded the lipase identified by initial zymogram activity analysis. Full analysis of the nucleotide and the deduced amino acid sequences indicated that the lipPE gene encodes a novel P. expansum lipase. The lipPE gene was expressed in E. coli for further characterization of the enzyme with a view of assessing its suitability for industrial applications.

  20. Intricate regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase activity and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kumer, S C; Vrana, K E

    1996-08-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of the catecholamines dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine. Therefore, the regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase enzyme number and intrinsic enzyme activity represents the central means for controlling the synthesis of these important biogenic amines. An intricate scheme has evolved whereby tyrosine hydroxylase activity is modulated by nearly every documented form of regulation. Beginning with the genomic DNA, evidence exists for the transcriptional regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels, alternative RNA processing, and the regulation of RNA stability. There is also experimental support for the role of both translational control and enzyme stability in establishing steady-state levels of active tyrosine hydroxylase protein. Finally, mechanisms have been proposed for feedback inhibition of the enzyme by catecholamine products, allosteric modulation of enzyme activity, and phosphorylation-dependent activation of the enzyme by various different kinase systems. Given the growing literature suggesting that different tissues regulate tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels and activity in different ways, regulatory mechanisms provide not only redundancy but also diversity in the control of catecholamine biosynthesis.

  1. Screening for novel human genes associated with CRE pathway activation with cell microarray.

    PubMed

    Tian, Linjie; Wang, Pingzhang; Guo, Jinhai; Wang, Xinyu; Deng, Weiwei; Zhang, Chenying; Fu, Dongxu; Gao, Xia; Shi, Taiping; Ma, Dalong

    2007-07-01

    In this study, cell microarray technology is used to identify novel human genes associated with CRE pathway activation. By reverse transfection, expression plasmids containing full-length cDNAs were cotransfected with the reporter plasmid pCRE-d2EGFP to monitor the activation of the CRE pathway via enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) expression. Of the 575 predominantly novel genes screened, 22 exhibited relatively higher EGFP fluorescence compared with a negative control. After a functional validation with a dual luciferase reporter system that included both cis- and trans-luciferase assays, 4 of the 22 genes (RNF41, C8orf32, C6orf208, and MEIS3P1) were confirmed as CRE-pathway activators. Western blot analysis revealed that RNF41 can promote CREB phosphorylation. These results demonstrate the successful combination of cell microarray technology with this reporting system and the potential of this tool to characterize functions of novel genes in a highly parallel format.

  2. The evolution of drug-activated nuclear receptors: one ancestral gene diverged into two xenosensor genes in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Handschin, Christoph; Blättler, Sharon; Roth, Adrian; Looser, Renate; Oscarson, Mikael; Kaufmann, Michel R; Podvinec, Michael; Gnerre, Carmela; Meyer, Urs A

    2004-01-01

    Background Drugs and other xenobiotics alter gene expression of cytochromes P450 (CYP) by activating the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) in mammals. In non-mammalian species, only one xenosensor gene has been found. Using chicken as a model organism, the aim of our study was to elucidate whether non-mammalian species only have one or two xenosensors like mammals. Results To explore the evolutionary aspect of this divergence, we tried to identify additional xenobiotic sensing nuclear receptors in chicken using various experimental approaches. However, none of those revealed novel candidates. Ablation of chicken xenobiotic receptor (CXR) function by RNAi or dominant-negative alleles drastically reduced drug-induction in a chicken hepatoma cell line. Subsequently, we functionally and structurally characterized CXR and compared our results to PXR and CAR. Despite the high similarity in their amino acid sequence, PXR and CAR have very distinct modes of activation. Some aspects of CXR function, e.g. direct ligand activation and high promiscuity are very reminiscent of PXR. On the other hand, cellular localization studies revealed common characteristics of CXR and CAR in terms of cytoplasmic-nuclear distribution. Finally, CXR has unique properties regarding its regulation in comparison to PXR and CAR. Conclusion Our finding thus strongly suggest that CXR constitutes an ancestral gene which has evolved into PXR and CAR in mammals. Future studies should elucidate the reason for this divergence in mammalian versus non-mammalian species. PMID:15479477

  3. Controlling nuclear JAKs and STATs for specific gene activation by IFN{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Noon-Song, Ezra N.; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Dabelic, Rea; Canton, Johnathan; Johnson, Howard M.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Gamma interferon (IFN{gamma}) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interact with the promoter region of IFN{gamma}-associated genes along with transcription factor STAT1{alpha}. {yields} We show that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also associate with IFNGR1 in the nucleus. {yields} The activated Janus kinases are responsible for phosphorylation of tyrosine 41 on histone H3, an important epigenetic event for specific gene activation. -- Abstract: We previously showed that gamma interferon (IFN{gamma}) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interacted with the promoter region of IFN{gamma}-activated genes along with transcription factor STAT1{alpha}. Recent studies have suggested that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also played a role in gene activation by phosphorylation of histone H3 on tyrosine 41. This study addresses the question of the role of activated JAKs in specific gene activation by IFN{gamma}. We carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by PCR in IFN{gamma} treated WISH cells and showed association of pJAK1, pJAK2, IFNGR1, and STAT1 on the same DNA sequence of the IRF-1 gene promoter. The {beta}-actin gene, which is not activated by IFN{gamma}, did not show this association. The movement of activated JAK to the nucleus and the IRF-1 promoter was confirmed by the combination of nuclear fractionation, confocal microscopy and DNA precipitation analysis using the biotinylated GAS promoter. Activated JAKs in the nucleus was associated with phosphorylated tyrosine 41 on histone H3 in the region of the GAS promoter. Unphosphorylated JAK2 was found to be constitutively present in the nucleus and was capable of undergoing activation in IFN{gamma} treated cells, most likely via nuclear IFNGR1. Association of pJAK2 and IFNGR1 with histone H3 in IFN{gamma} treated cells was demonstrated by histone H3 immunoprecipitation. Unphosphorylated STAT1 protein was associated with histone H3 of untreated cells. IFN

  4. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase Activity in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells Promotes Extracellular Matrix Remodelling and Limits Embryo Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Stuart P.; Quiñonero, Alicia; Martínez, Sebastián; Pellicer, Antonio; Simón, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Invasion of the trophoblast into the maternal decidua is regulated by both the trophoectoderm and the endometrial stroma, and entails the action of tissue remodeling enzymes. Trophoblast invasion requires the action of metalloproteinases (MMPs) to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and in turn, decidual cells express tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs). The balance between these promoting and restraining factors is a key event for the successful outcome of pregnancy. Gene expression is post-transcriptionally regulated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) that unpacks condensed chromatin activating gene expression. In this study we analyze the effect of histone acetylation on the expression of tissue remodeling enzymes and activity of human endometrial stromal cells (hESCs) related to trophoblast invasion control. Treatment of hESCs with the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) increased the expression of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 while decreased MMP-2, MMP-9 and uPA and have an inhibitory effect on trophoblast invasion. Moreover, histone acetylation is detected at the promoters of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 genes in TSA-treated. In addition, in an in vitro decidualized hESCs model, the increase of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 expression is associated with histone acetylation at the promoters of these genes. Our results demonstrate that histone acetylation disrupt the balance of ECM modulators provoking a restrain of trophoblast invasion. These findings are important as an epigenetic mechanism that can be used to control trophoblast invasion. PMID:22291969

  5. Active and inactive genes localize preferentially in the periphery of chromosome territories

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The intranuclear position of a set of genes was analyzed with respect to the territories occupied by the whole chromosomes in which these genes are localized. Genes and their respective chromosome territories were simultaneously visualized in three-dimensionally preserved nuclei applying dual color fluorescence in situ hybridization. Three coding (DMD, MYH7, and HBB) and two noncoding sequences (D1Z2 and an anonymous sequence) were analyzed in four different cell types, including cells where DMD and MYH7 are actively transcribed. Spatial analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the genes are preferentially located in the periphery of chromosome territories. This positioning was independent from the activity of the genes. In contrast, the non-expressed anonymous fragment was found randomly distributed or localized preferentially in the interior of the corresponding chromosome territory. Furthermore, the distribution of the analyzed genes within the territorial peripheries was found to be highly characteristic for each gene, and, again, independent from its expression. The impact of these findings with regard to the three- dimensional arrangement of the linear DNA string within chromosome territories, as well as with respect to a putative nuclear subcompartment confining gene expression, are discussed. PMID:8947544

  6. Gene expression analysis during acute hepatitis C virus infection associates dendritic cell activation with viral clearance.

    PubMed

    Zabaleta, Aintzane; Riezu-Boj, Jose-Ignacio; Larrea, Esther; Villanueva, Lorea; Lasarte, Juan Jose; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Fisicaro, Paola; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Missale, Gabriele; Ferrari, Carlo; Benjelloun, Soumaya; Prieto, Jesús; Sarobe, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Viral clearance during acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with the induction of potent antiviral T-cell responses. Since dendritic cells (DC) are essential in the activation of primary T-cell responses, gene expression was analyzed in DC from patients during acute HCV infection. By using microarrays, gene expression was compared in resting and activated peripheral blood plasmacytoid (pDC) and myeloid (mDC) DC from acute HCV resolving patients (AR) and from patients who become chronically infected (ANR), as well as in healthy individuals (CTRL) and chronically-infected patients (CHR). For pDC, a high number of upregulated genes was found in AR patients, irrespective of DC stimulation. However, for mDC, most evident differences were detected after DC stimulation, again corresponding to upregulated genes in AR patients. Divergent behavior of ANR was also observed when analyzing DC from CTRL and CHR, with ANR patients clustering again apart from these groups. These differences corresponded to metabolism-associated genes and genes belonging to pathways relevant for DC activation and cytokine responses. Thus, upregulation of relevant genes in DC during acute HCV infection may determine viral clearance, suggesting that dysfunctional DC may be responsible for the lack of efficient T-cell responses which lead to chronic HCV infection.

  7. Modulation of activation-associated host cell gene expression by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria annulata

    PubMed Central

    Durrani, Zeeshan; Weir, William; Pillai, Sreerekha; Kinnaird, Jane; Shiels, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Summary Infection of bovine leucocytes by Theileria annulata results in establishment of transformed, infected cells. Infection of the host cell is known to promote constitutive activation of pro-inflammatory transcription factors that have the potential to be beneficial or detrimental. In this study we have compared the effect of LPS activation on uninfected bovine leucocytes (BL20 cells) and their Theileria-infected counterpart (TBL20). Gene expression profiles representing activated uninfected BL20 relative to TBL20 cells were also compared. The results show that while prolonged stimulation with LPS induces cell death and activation of NF-κB in BL20 cells, the viability of Theileria-infected cells was unaffected. Analysis of gene expression networks provided evidence that the parasite establishes tight control over pathways associated with cellular activation by modulating reception of extrinsic stimuli and by significantly altering the expression outcome of genes targeted by infection-activated transcription factors. Pathway analysis of the data set identified novel candidate genes involved in manipulation of cellular functions associated with the infected transformed cell. The data indicate that the T. annulata parasite can irreversibly reconfigure host cell gene expression networks associated with development of inflammatory disease and cancer to generate an outcome thatis beneficial to survival and propagation of the infected leucocyte. PMID:22533473

  8. Physical activity-associated gene expression signature in nonhuman primate motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Amanda C; Leak, Rehana K; Garbett, Krassimira; Zigmond, Michael J; Cameron, Judy L; Mirnics, Károly

    2012-03-01

    It has been established that weight gain and weight loss are heavily influenced by activity level. In this study, we hypothesized that the motor cortex exhibits a distinct physical activity-associated gene expression profile, which may underlie changes in weight associated with movement. Using DNA microarrays we profiled gene expression in the motor cortex of a group of 14 female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with a wide range of stable physical activity levels. We found that neuronal growth factor signaling and nutrient sensing transcripts in the brain were highly correlated with physical activity. A follow-up of AKT3 expression changes (a gene at the apex of neuronal survival and nutrient sensing) revealed increased protein levels of total AKT, phosphorylated AKT, and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3), one of AKT's main downstream effectors. In addition, we successfully validated three other genes via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) (cereblon (CRBN), origin recognition complex subunit 4-like, and pyruvate dehydrogenase 4 (PDK4)). We conclude that these genes are important in the physical activity-associated pathway in the motor cortex, and may be critical for physical activity-associated changes in body weight and neuroprotection.

  9. Evolution of the perlecan/HSPG2 gene and its activation in regenerating Nematostella vectensis.

    PubMed

    Warren, Curtis R; Kassir, Elias; Spurlin, James; Martinez, Jerahme; Putnam, Nicholas H; Farach-Carson, Mary C

    2015-01-01

    The heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2 (HSPG2)/perlecan gene is ancient and conserved in all triploblastic species. Its presence maintains critical cell boundaries in tissue and its large (up to ~900 kDa) modular structure has prompted speculation about the evolutionary origin of the gene. The gene's conservation amongst basal metazoans is unclear. After the recent sequencing of their genomes, the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens have become favorite models for studying tissue regeneration and the evolution of multicellularity. More ancient basal metazoan phyla include the poriferan and ctenophore, whose evolutionary relationship has been clarified recently. Our in silico and PCR-based methods indicate that the HSPG2 gene is conserved in both the placozoan and cnidarian genomes, but not in those of the ctenophores and only partly in poriferan genomes. HSPG2 also is absent from published ctenophore and Capsaspora owczarzaki genomes. The gene in T. adhaerens is encoded as two separate but genetically juxtaposed genes that house all of the constituent pieces of the mammalian HSPG2 gene in tandem. These genetic constituents are found in isolated genes of various poriferan species, indicating a possible intronic recombinatory mechanism for assembly of the HSPG2 gene. Perlecan's expression during wound healing and boundary formation is conserved, as expression of the gene was activated during tissue regeneration and reformation of the basement membrane of N. vectensis. These data indicate that the complex HSPG2 gene evolved concurrently in a common ancestor of placozoans, cnidarians and bilaterians, likely along with the development of differentiated cell types separated by acellular matrices, and is activated to reestablish these tissue borders during wound healing.

  10. ALK1 signalling analysis identifies angiogenesis related genes and reveals disparity between TGF-β and constitutively active receptor induced gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Lux, Andreas; Salway, Fiona; Dressman, Holly K; Kröner-Lux, Gabriele; Hafner, Mathias; Day, Philip JR; Marchuk, Douglas A; Garland, John

    2006-01-01

    Background TGF-β1 is an important angiogenic factor involved in the different aspects of angiogenesis and vessel maintenance. TGF-β signalling is mediated by the TβRII/ALK5 receptor complex activating the Smad2/Smad3 pathway. In endothelial cells TGF-β utilizes a second type I receptor, ALK1, activating the Smad1/Smad5 pathway. Consequently, a perturbance of ALK1, ALK5 or TβRII activity leads to vascular defects. Mutations in ALK1 cause the vascular disorder hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Methods The identification of ALK1 and not ALK5 regulated genes in endothelial cells, might help to better understand the development of HHT. Therefore, the human microvascular endothelial cell line HMEC-1 was infected with a recombinant constitutively active ALK1 adenovirus, and gene expression was studied by using gene arrays and quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Results After 24 hours, 34 genes were identified to be up-regulated by ALK1 signalling. Analysing ALK1 regulated gene expression after 4 hours revealed 13 genes to be up- and 2 to be down-regulated. Several of these genes, including IL-8, ET-1, ID1, HPTPη and TEAD4 are reported to be involved in angiogenesis. Evaluation of ALK1 regulated gene expression in different human endothelial cell types was not in complete agreement. Further on, disparity between constitutively active ALK1 and TGF-β1 induced gene expression in HMEC-1 cells and primary HUVECs was observed. Conclusion Gene array analysis identified 49 genes to be regulated by ALK1 signalling and at least 14 genes are reported to be involved in angiogenesis. There was substantial agreement between the gene array and quantitative real-time PCR data. The angiogenesis related genes might be potential HHT modifier genes. In addition, the results suggest endothelial cell type specific ALK1 and TGF-β signalling. PMID:16594992

  11. Influence of redox-active compounds and PXR-activators on human MRP1 and MRP2 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, Hans Martin; Pfannschmidt, Sylvia; Zöller, Heike; Benz, Anke; Vorderstemann, Birgit; Webster, Jeanette I; Schrenk, Dieter

    2002-02-28

    In the present study, we investigated the inducibility of the drug conjugate transporter genes MRP1 and MRP2 by redox-active compounds such as tertiary butylated hydroquinone (tBHQ) and quercetin and by chemicals known to activate the pregnane X receptor (PXR) such as rifampicin and clotrimazol and by the metalloid compound arsenite. The human MRP2 gene was found to be inducible in HepG2 cells by rifampicin, clotrimazol, arsenite and tBHQ. As MRP1 expression is extremely low in HepG2 cells, its inducibility was studied in MCF-7 cells. However, only tBHQ and quercetin acted as inducers, but not the other compounds investigated. Reporter gene assays demonstrated that proximal promoter regions of the genes contribute to the induction by tBHQ, quercetin (MRP1) and clotrimazol (MRP2). However, the deletion of binding sites supposed to mediate the induction process (a PXR-binding element-like sequence for the clotrimazol effect and an ARE (antioxidative response element) for the tBHQ/quercetin effect) did not result in a significant decrease in the induction factor indicating that other parts of the promoter are probably involved in the induction process. In summary, expression of both genes can be up-regulated by redox-active compounds, while the other compounds tested induced only MRP2 but not MRP1 expression.

  12. Evaluating Transcription Factor Activity Changes by Scoring Unexplained Target Genes in Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Berchtold, Evi; Csaba, Gergely; Zimmer, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Several methods predict activity changes of transcription factors (TFs) from a given regulatory network and measured expression data. But available gene regulatory networks are incomplete and contain many condition-dependent regulations that are not relevant for the specific expression measurement. It is not known which combination of active TFs is needed to cause a change in the expression of a target gene. A method to systematically evaluate the inferred activity changes is missing. We present such an evaluation strategy that indicates for how many target genes the observed expression changes can be explained by a given set of active TFs. To overcome the problem that the exact combination of active TFs needed to activate a gene is typically not known, we assume a gene to be explained if there exists any combination for which the predicted active TFs can possibly explain the observed change of the gene. We introduce the i-score (inconsistency score), which quantifies how many genes could not be explained by the set of activity changes of TFs. We observe that, even for these minimal requirements, published methods yield many unexplained target genes, i.e. large i-scores. This holds for all methods and all expression datasets we evaluated. We provide new optimization methods to calculate the best possible (minimal) i-score given the network and measured expression data. The evaluation of this optimized i-score on a large data compendium yields many unexplained target genes for almost every case. This indicates that currently available regulatory networks are still far from being complete. Both the presented Act-SAT and Act-A* methods produce optimal sets of TF activity changes, which can be used to investigate the difficult interplay of expression and network data. A web server and a command line tool to calculate our i-score and to find the active TFs associated with the minimal i-score is available from https://services.bio.ifi.lmu.de/i-score. PMID:27723775

  13. Growth enhancement and gene expression of Arabidopsis thaliana irradiated with active oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Inoue, Asami; Yasuda, Kaori; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of plant growth enhancement effect and the mechanism of the enhancement induced by plasma irradiation are investigated using various active species in plasma. Active oxygen species in oxygen plasma are effective for growth enhancement of plants. DNA microarray analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that the genes coding proteins that counter oxidative stresses by eliminating active oxygen species are expressed at significantly high levels. The size of plant cells increases owing to oxygen plasma irradiation. The increases in gene expression levels and cell size suggest that the increase in the expression level of the expansin protein is essential for plant growth enhancement phenomena.

  14. Nostoc commune UTEX 584 gene expressing indole phosphate hydrolase activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Xie, W Q; Whitton, B A; Simon, J W; Jäger, K; Reed, D; Potts, M

    1989-01-01

    A gene encoding an enzyme capable of hydrolyzing indole phosphate was isolated from a recombinant gene library of Nostoc commune UTEX 584 DNA in lambda gt10. The gene (designated iph) is located on a 2.9-kilobase EcoRI restriction fragment and is present in a single copy in the genome of N. commune UTEX 584. The iph gene was expressed when the purified 2.9-kilobase DNA fragment, free of any vector sequences, was added to a cell-free coupled transcription-translation system. A polypeptide with an Mr of 74,000 was synthesized when the iph gene or different iph-vector DNA templates were expressed in vitro. When carried by different multicopy plasmids and phagemids (pMP005, pBH6, pB8) the cyanobacterial iph gene conferred an Iph+ phenotype upon various strains of Escherichia coli, including a phoA mutant. Hydrolysis of 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate was detected in recombinant E. coli strains grown in phosphate-rich medium, and the activity persisted in assay buffers that contained phosphate. In contrast, indole phosphate hydrolase activity only developed in cells of N. commune UTEX 584, when they were partially depleted of phosphorus, and the activity associated with these cells was suppressed partially by the addition of phosphate to assay buffers. Indole phosphate hydrolase activity was detected in periplasmic extracts from E. coli (Iph+) transformants. Images PMID:2536677

  15. Epigenomic Modifications Predict Active Promoters and Gene Structure in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Gissot, Mathieu; Kelly, Krystyna A; Ajioka, James W; Greally, John M; Kim, Kami

    2007-01-01

    Mechanisms of gene regulation are poorly understood in Apicomplexa, a phylum that encompasses deadly human pathogens like Plasmodium and Toxoplasma. Initial studies suggest that epigenetic phenomena, including histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, have a profound effect upon gene expression and expression of virulence traits. Using the model organism Toxoplasma gondii, we characterized the epigenetic organization and transcription patterns of a contiguous 1% of the T. gondii genome using custom oligonucleotide microarrays. We show that methylation and acetylation of histones H3 and H4 are landmarks of active promoters in T. gondii that allow us to deduce the position and directionality of gene promoters with >95% accuracy. These histone methylation and acetylation “activation” marks are strongly associated with gene expression. We also demonstrate that the pattern of histone H3 arginine methylation distinguishes certain promoters, illustrating the complexity of the histone modification machinery in Toxoplasma. By integrating epigenetic data, gene prediction analysis, and gene expression data from the tachyzoite stage, we illustrate feasibility of creating an epigenomic map of T. gondii tachyzoite gene expression. Further, we illustrate the utility of the epigenomic map to empirically and biologically annotate the genome and show that this approach enables identification of previously unknown genes. Thus, our epigenomics approach provides novel insights into regulation of gene expression in the Apicomplexa. In addition, with its compact genome, genetic tractability, and discrete life cycle stages, T. gondii provides an important new model to study the evolutionarily conserved components of the histone code. PMID:17559302

  16. UBA 1: an essential yeast gene encoding ubiquitin-activating enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, J P; Jentsch, S; Varshavsky, A

    1991-01-01

    All known functions of ubiquitin are mediated through its covalent attachment to other proteins. The post-translational formation of ubiquitin--protein conjugates is preceded by an ATP-requiring step in which the carboxyl terminus of ubiquitin is adenylated and subsequently joined, through a thiolester bond, to a cysteine residue in the ubiquitin-activating enzyme, also known as E1. We report the isolation and functional analysis of the gene (UBA1) for the ubiquitin-activating enzyme of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. UBA1 encodes a 114 kd protein whose amino acid sequence contains motifs characteristic of nucleotide-binding sites. Expression of catalytically active UBA1 protein in E. coli, which lacks the ubiquitin system, confirmed that the yeast UBA1 gene encodes a ubiquitin-activating enzyme. Deletion of the UBA1 gene is lethal, demonstrating that the formation of ubiquitin--protein conjugates is essential for cell viability. Images PMID:1989885

  17. Identification of chemical modulators of the constitutive activated receptor (CAR) in a gene expression compendium

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Jones, Carlton; Moore, Tanya; Hester, Susan; Nesnow, Stephen; Auerbach, Scott; Geter, David R.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Thomas, Russell S.; Applegate, Dawn; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Corton, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family member constitutive activated receptor (CAR) is activated by structurally diverse drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals leading to transcriptional regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and transport. Chronic activation of CAR increases liver cancer incidence in rodents, whereas suppression of CAR can lead to steatosis and insulin insensitivity. Here, analytical methods were developed to screen for chemical treatments in a gene expression compendium that lead to alteration of CAR activity. A gene expression biomarker signature of 83 CAR-dependent genes was identified using microarray profiles from the livers of wild-type and CAR-null mice after exposure to three structurally-diverse CAR activators (CITCO, phenobarbital, TCPOBOP). A rank-based algorithm (Running Fisher’s algorithm (p-value ≤ 10-4)) was used to evaluate the similarity between the CAR biomarker signature and a test set of 28 and 32 comparisons positive or negative, respectively, for CAR activation; the test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 97%. The biomarker signature was used to identify chemicals that activate or suppress CAR in an annotated mouse liver/primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ~1850 comparisons. CAR was activated by 1) activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in wild-type but not AhR-null mice, 2) pregnane X receptor (PXR) activators in wild-type and to lesser extents in PXR-null mice, and 3) activators of PPARα in wild-type and PPARα-null mice. CAR was consistently activated by five conazole fungicides and four perfluorinated compounds. Comparison of effects in wild-type and CAR-null mice showed that the fungicide propiconazole increased liver weight and hepatocyte proliferation in a CAR-dependent manner, whereas the perfluorinated compound perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) increased these endpoints in a CAR-independent manner. A number of compounds suppressed CAR coincident with increases in markers of

  18. Identification of chemical modulators of the constitutive activated receptor (CAR) in a gene expression compendium.

    PubMed

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Jones, Carlton; Moore, Tanya; Hester, Susan; Nesnow, Stephen; Auerbach, Scott; Geter, David R; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Thomas, Russell S; Applegate, Dawn; Klaassen, Curtis D; Corton, J Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family member constitutive activated receptor (CAR) is activated by structurally diverse drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals leading to transcriptional regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and transport. Chronic activation of CAR increases liver cancer incidence in rodents, whereas suppression of CAR can lead to steatosis and insulin insensitivity. Here, analytical methods were developed to screen for chemical treatments in a gene expression compendium that lead to alteration of CAR activity. A gene expression biomarker signature of 83 CAR-dependent genes was identified using microarray profiles from the livers of wild-type and CAR-null mice after exposure to three structurally-diverse CAR activators (CITCO, phenobarbital, TCPOBOP). A rank-based algorithm (Running Fisher's algorithm (p-value ≤ 10(-4))) was used to evaluate the similarity between the CAR biomarker signature and a test set of 28 and 32 comparisons positive or negative, respectively, for CAR activation; the test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 97%. The biomarker signature was used to identify chemicals that activate or suppress CAR in an annotated mouse liver/primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ~1850 comparisons. CAR was activated by 1) activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in wild-type but not AhR-null mice, 2) pregnane X receptor (PXR) activators in wild-type and to lesser extents in PXR-null mice, and 3) activators of PPARα in wild-type and PPARα-null mice. CAR was consistently activated by five conazole fungicides and four perfluorinated compounds. Comparison of effects in wild-type and CAR-null mice showed that the fungicide propiconazole increased liver weight and hepatocyte proliferation in a CAR-dependent manner, whereas the perfluorinated compound perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) increased these endpoints in a CAR-independent manner. A number of compounds suppressed CAR coincident with increases in markers of

  19. Comparison of potential diatom 'barcode' genes (the 18S rRNA gene and ITS, COI, rbcL) and their effectiveness in discriminating and determining species taxonomy in the Bacillariophyta.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liliang; Sui, Zhenghong; Zhang, Shu; Ren, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Diatoms form an enormous group of photoautotrophic micro-eukaryotes and play a crucial role in marine ecology. In this study, we evaluated typical genes to determine whether they were effective at different levels of diatom clustering analysis to assess the potential of these regions for barcoding taxa. Our test genes included nuclear rRNA genes (the nuclear small-subunit rRNA gene and the 5.8S rRNA gene+ITS-2), a mitochondrial gene (cytochrome c-oxidase subunit 1, COI), a chloroplast gene [ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit (rbcL)] and the universal plastid amplicon (UPA). Calculated genetic divergence was highest for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS; 5.8S+ITS-2) (p-distance of 1.569, 85.84% parsimony-informative sites) and COI (6.084, 82.14%), followed by the 18S rRNA gene (0.139, 57.69%), rbcL (0.120, 42.01%) and UPA (0.050, 14.97%), which indicated that ITS and COI were highly divergent compared with the other tested genes, and that their nucleotide compositions were variable within the whole group of diatoms. Bayesian inference (BI) analysis showed that the phylogenetic trees generated from each gene clustered diatoms at different phylogenetic levels. The 18S rRNA gene was better than the other genes in clustering higher diatom taxa, and both the 18S rRNA gene and rbcL performed well in clustering some lower taxa. The COI region was able to barcode species of some genera within the Bacillariophyceae. ITS was a potential marker for DNA based-taxonomy and DNA barcoding of Thalassiosirales, while species of Cyclotella, Skeletonema and Stephanodiscus gathered in separate clades, and were paraphyletic with those of Thalassiosira. Finally, UPA was too conserved to serve as a diatom barcode.

  20. Transcriptional activation of the human cytotoxic serine protease gene CSP-B in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R D; Ley, T J

    1990-01-01

    The cytotoxic serine protease B (CSP-B) gene is activated during cytotoxic T-lymphocyte maturation. In this report, we demonstrate that the PEER T-cell line (bearing gamma/delta T-cell receptors) accumulates CSP-B mRNA following exposure to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and N6-2'-O-dibutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (bt2cAMP) because of transcriptional activation of the CSP-B gene. TPA and bt2cAMP act synergistically to induce CSP-B expression, since neither agent alone causes activation of CSP-B transcription or mRNA accumulation. Chromatin upstream from the CSP-B gene is resistant to DNase I digestion in untreated PEER cells, but becomes sensitive following TPA-bt2cAMP treatment. Upon activation of PEER cells, a DNase I-hypersensitive site forms upstream from the CSP-B gene within a region that is highly conserved in the mouse. Transient transfection of CSP-B promoter constructs identified two regulatory regions in the CSP-B 5'-flanking sequence, located at positions -609 to -202 and positions -202 to -80. The region from -615 to -63 is sufficient to activate a heterologous promoter in activated PEER cells, but activation is orientation specific, suggesting that this region behaves as an upstream promoter element rather than a classical enhancer. Consensus AP-1, AP-2, and cAMP response elements are found upstream from the CSP-B gene (as are several T-cell-specific consensus elements), but the roles of these elements in CSP-B gene activation have yet to be determined. Images PMID:2233710

  1. Hypermethylation of Wnt antagonist gene promoters and activation of Wnt pathway in myelodysplastic marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Masala, Erico; Valencia, Ana; Buchi, Francesca; Nosi, Daniele; Spinelli, Elena; Gozzini, Antonella; Sassolini, Francesca; Sanna, Alessandro; Zecchi, Sandra; Bosi, Alberto; Santini, Valeria

    2012-10-01

    We observed aberrant gene methylation of Wnt antagonists: sFRP1, sFRP2, sFRP4, sFRP5 and DKK1 in marrow cells of 55 MDS cases. Methylation of Wnt antagonist genes was associated with activation of the Wnt signaling pathway, consistent with the up-regulation of the Wnt downstream genes TCF1 and LEF1. Azacitidine exposure induced demethylation of Wnt-antagonist gene promoters and reduction of the non-phosphorylated β-catenin (NPBC) which is prevalent during Wnt pathway inactivation. Presence of ≥5% of bone marrow blasts was associated with methylation of sFRP1 and DKK1 and with methylation of more than two of the five Wnt antagonist genes.

  2. The New State of the Art: Cas9 for Gene Activation and Repression

    PubMed Central

    La Russa, Marie F.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 technology has rapidly changed the landscape for how biologists and bioengineers study and manipulate the genome. Derived from the bacterial adaptive immune system, CRISPR-Cas9 has been coopted and repurposed for a variety of new functions, including the activation or repression of gene expression (termed CRISPRa or CRISPRi, respectively). This represents an exciting alternative to previously used repression or activation technologies such as RNA interference (RNAi) or the use of gene overexpression vectors. We have only just begun exploring the possibilities that CRISPR technology offers for gene regulation and the control of cell identity and behavior. In this review, we describe the recent advances of CRISPR-Cas9 technology for gene regulation and outline advantages and disadvantages of CRISPRa and CRISPRi (CRISPRa/i) relative to alternative technologies. PMID:26370509

  3. Transcription activation of a UV-inducible Clostridium perfringens bacteriocin gene by a novel sigma factor.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Bruno; Mani, Nagraj; Katayama, Seiichi; Sonenshein, Abraham L

    2005-02-01

    Expression of the plasmid-encoded Clostridium perfringens gene for bacteriocin BCN5 was shown to depend in vivo and in vitro on the activity of UviA protein. UviA, also plasmid-encoded, proved to be an RNA polymerase sigma factor and was also partly autoregulatory. The uviA gene has two promoters; one provided a UviA-independent, basal level of gene expression while the stronger, UviA-dependent promoter was only utilized after the cell experienced DNA damage. As a result, BCN5 synthesis is induced by treatment with UV light or mitomycin C. UviA is related to a special class of sigma factors found to date only in Clostridium species and responsible for activating transcription of toxin genes in Clostridium difficile, Clostridium tetani, and Clostridium botulinum.

  4. The circadian Clock gene regulates acrosin activity of sperm through serine protease inhibitor A3K

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shuting; Liang, Xin; Wang, Yuhui; Jiang, Zhou; Liu, Yanyou; Hou, Wang; Li, Shiping; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study found that CLOCK knockdown in the testes of male mice led to a reduced fertility, which might be associated with the lower acrosin activity. In this present study, we examined the differential expression in proteins of CLOCK knockdown sperm. Clock gene expression was knocked down in cells to confirm those differentially expressions and serine protease inhibitor SERPINA3K was identified as a potential target. The up-regulated SERPINA3K revealed an inverse relationship with Clock knockdown. Direct treatment of normal sperm with recombinant SERPINA3K protein inhibited the acrosin activity and reduced in vitro fertilization rate. The luciferase reporter gene assay showed that the down-regulated of Clock gene could activate the Serpina3k promoter, but this activation was not affected by the mutation of E-box core sequence. Co-IP demonstrated a natural interaction between SERPIAN3K and RORs (α and β). Taken together, these results demonstrated that SERPINA3K is involved in the Clock gene-mediated male fertility by regulating acrosin activity and provide the first evidence that SERPINA3K could be regulated by Clock gene via retinoic acid-related orphan receptor response elements. PMID:26264441

  5. High intensity focused ultrasound-induced gene activation in sublethally injured tumor cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunbo; Kon, Takashi; Li, Chuanyuan; Zhong, Pei

    2005-11-01

    Cultured human cervical cancer (HeLa) and rat mammary carcinoma (R3230Ac) cells were transfected with vectors encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of hsp70B promoter. Aliquots of 10-μl transfected cells (5×107 cells/ml) were placed in 0.2-ml thin-wall polymerase chain reaction tubes and exposed to 1.1-MHz high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) at a peak negative pressure P-=2.68 MPa. By adjusting the duty cycle of the HIFU transducer, the cell suspensions were heated to a peak temperature from 50 to 70 °C in 1-10 s. Exposure dependent cell viability and gene activation were evaluated. For a 5-s HIFU exposure, cell viability dropped from 95% at 50 °C to 13% at 70 °C. Concomitantly, gene activation in sublethally injured tumor cells increased from 4% at 50 °C to 41% at 70 °C. A similar trend was observed at 60 °C peak temperature as the exposure time increased from 1 to 5 s. Further increase of exposure duration to 10 s led to significantly reduced cell viability and lower overall gene activation in exposed cells. Altogether, maximum HIFU-induced gene activation was achieved at 60 °C in 5 s. Under these experimental conditions, HIFU-induced gene activation was found to be produced primarily by thermal rather than mechanical stresses.

  6. A trypanosome metacyclic VSG gene promoter with two functionally distinct, life cycle stage-specific activities.

    PubMed

    Graham, S V; Wymer, B; Barry, J D

    1998-04-15

    In the mammalian bloodstream, African trypanosomes express the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG), continual switching of which allows evasion of the host immune response. Bloodstream VSG genes are transcribed from polycistronic bloodstream expression sites with promoters which are located 45-60 kb upstream. These promoters are not exclusively stage-regulated, being active in the insect midgut stage where VSG is not expressed. However, the metacyclic VSG (M-VSG) genes, a small subset activated when VSG synthesis begins in the metacyclic stage in the tsetse fly salivary glands, are transcriptionally activated specifically in that stage from promoters <3 kb upstream. Using deletion mapping and transient transfection, we show that the entire 1.22 M-VSG gene promoter region (171 bp) is required for full activity in metacyclic-derived trypanosomes. However, a subsidiary, bloodstream stage-specific activity is present in its 5' half which directs transcription initiation very close to the initiation site used in metacyclic-derived trypanosomes. Our results imply that the M-VSG gene promoter is longer and more complex than other VSG gene promoters.

  7. SATB1 packages densely-looped, transciptionally-active chromatinfor coordinated expression of cytokine genes

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Shutao; Lee, Charles C.; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi

    2006-05-23

    SATB1 is an important regulator of nuclear architecture that anchors specialized DNA sequences onto its cage-like network and recruits chromatin remodeling/modifying factors to control gene transcription. We studied the role of SATB1 in regulating the coordinated expression of Il5, Il4, and Il13 from the 200kb cytokine gene cluster region of mouse chromosome 11 during T-helper 2 (Th2)-cell activation. We show that upon cell activation, SATB1 is rapidly induced to form a unique transcriptionally-active chromatin structure that includes the cytokine gene region. Chromatin is folded into numerous small loops all anchored by SATB1, is histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9/14, and associated with Th2-specific factors, GATA3, STAT6, c-Maf, the chromatin-remodeling enzyme Brg-1, and RNA polymerase II across the 200kb region. Before activation, the chromatin displays some of these features, such as association with GATA3 and STAT6, but these were insufficient for cytokine gene expression. Using RNA interference (RNAi), we show that upon cell activation, SATB1 is not only required for chromatin folding into dense loops, but also for c-Maf induction and subsequently for Il4, Il5, and Il13 transcription. Our results show that SATB1 is an important determinant for chromatin architecture that constitutes a novel higher-order, transcriptionally-active chromatin structure upon Th2-cell activation.

  8. Trithorax group proteins: switching genes on and keeping them active.

    PubMed

    Schuettengruber, Bernd; Martinez, Anne-Marie; Iovino, Nicola; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2011-11-23

    Cellular memory is provided by two counteracting groups of chromatin proteins termed Trithorax group (TrxG) and Polycomb group (PcG) proteins. TrxG proteins activate transcription and are perhaps best known because of the involvement of the TrxG protein MLL in leukaemia. However, in terms of molecular analysis, they have lived in the shadow of their more famous counterparts, the PcG proteins. Recent advances have improved our understanding of TrxG protein function and demonstrated that the heterogeneous group of TrxG proteins is of critical importance in the epigenetic regulation of the cell cycle, senescence, DNA damage and stem cell biology.

  9. Screening of the Enterocin-Encoding Genes and Antimicrobial Activity in Enterococcus Species.

    PubMed

    Ogaki, Mayara Baptistucci; Rocha, Katia Real; Terra, MÁrcia Regina; Furlaneto, MÁrcia Cristina; Maia, Luciana Furlaneto

    2016-06-28

    In the current study, a total of 135 enterococci strains from different sources were screened for the presence of the enterocin-encoding genes entA, entP, entB, entL50A, and entL50B. The enterocin genes were present at different frequencies, with entA occurring the most frequently, followed by entP and entB; entL50A and L50B were not detected. The occurrence of single enterocin genes was higher than the occurrence of multiple enterocin gene combinations. The 80 isolates that harbor at least one enterocin-encoding gene (denoted "Gene(+) strains") were screened for antimicrobial activity. A total of 82.5% of the Gene(+) strains inhibited at least one of the indicator strains, and the isolates harboring multiple enterocin-encoding genes inhibited a larger number of indicator strains than isolates harboring a single gene. The indicator strains that exhibited growth inhibition included Listeria innocua strain CLIP 12612 (ATCC BAA-680), Listeria monocytogenes strain CDC 4555, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, S. aureus ATCC 29213, S. aureus ATCC 6538, Salmonella enteritidis ATCC 13076, Salmonella typhimurium strain UK-1 (ATCC 68169), and Escherichia coli BAC 49LT ETEC. Inhibition due to either bacteriophage lysis or cytolysin activity was excluded. The growth inhibition of antilisterial Gene+ strains was further tested under different culture conditions. Among the culture media formulations, the MRS agar medium supplemented with 2% (w/v) yeast extract was the best solidified medium for enterocin production. Our findings extend the current knowledge of enterocin-producing enterococci, which may have potential applications as biopreservatives in the food industry due to their capability of controlling food spoilage pathogens.

  10. Genes Involved in Interleukin-1 Receptor Type II Activities Are Associated With Asthmatic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Madore, Anne-Marie; Vaillancourt, Vanessa T.; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Sarnowski, Chloé; Monier, Florent; Dizier, Marie-Hélène; Demenais, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Interleukin-1 (IL-1) plays a key role in inflammation and immunity and its decoy receptor, IL-1R2, has been implicated in transcriptomic and genetic studies of asthma. Methods Two large asthma family collections, the French-Canadian Saguenay—Lac-St-Jean (SLSJ) study and the French Epidemiological Study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA), were used to investigate the association of SNPs in 10 genes that modulate IL-1R2 activities with asthma, allergic asthma, and atopy. Gene-gene interactions were also tested. Results One SNP in BACE2 was associated with allergic asthma in the SLSJ study and replicated in the EGEA study before statistical correction for multiple testing. Additionally, two SNPs in the MMP2 gene were replicated in both studies prior to statistical correction and reached significance in the combined analysis. Moreover, three gene-gene interactions also survived statistical correction in the combined analyses (BACE1-IL1RAP in asthma and allergic asthma and IL1R1-IL1RAP in atopy). Conclusions Our results highlight the relevance of genes involved in the IL-1R2 activity in the context of asthma and asthma-related traits. PMID:27334786

  11. Discovery of Unusual Biaryl Polyketides by Activation of a Silent Streptomyces venezuelae Biosynthetic Gene Cluster.

    PubMed

    Thanapipatsiri, Anyarat; Gomez-Escribano, Juan Pablo; Song, Lijiang; Bibb, Maureen J; Al-Bassam, Mahmoud; Chandra, Govind; Thamchaipenet, Arinthip; Challis, Gregory L; Bibb, Mervyn J

    2016-11-17

    Comparative transcriptional profiling of a ΔbldM mutant of Streptomyces venezuelae with its unmodified progenitor revealed that the expression of a cryptic biosynthetic gene cluster containing both type I and type III polyketide synthase genes is activated in the mutant. The 29.5 kb gene cluster, which was predicted to encode an unusual biaryl metabolite, which we named venemycin, and potentially halogenated derivatives, contains 16 genes including one-vemR-that encodes a transcriptional activator of the large ATP-binding LuxR-like (LAL) family. Constitutive expression of vemR in the ΔbldM mutant led to the production of sufficient venemycin for structural characterisation, confirming its unusual biaryl structure. Co-expression of the venemycin biosynthetic gene cluster and vemR in the heterologous host Streptomyces coelicolor also resulted in venemycin production. Although the gene cluster encodes two halogenases and a flavin reductase, constitutive expression of all three genes led to the accumulation only of a monohalogenated venemycin derivative, both in the native producer and the heterologous host. A competition experiment in which equimolar quantities of sodium chloride and sodium bromide were fed to the venemycin-producing strains resulted in the preferential incorporation of bromine, thus suggesting that bromide is the preferred substrate for one or both halogenases.

  12. Organization of human ACAT-2 gene and its cell-type-specific promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Song, B L; Qi, W; Yang, X Y; Chang, C C; Zhu, J Q; Chang, T Y; Li, B L

    2001-03-30

    Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) plays important roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis. Two ACAT genes exist in mammals. We report here the genomic organization of human ACAT-2 gene and analysis of its promoter activity in various cell lines. The human ACAT-2 gene spans over 18 kb and contains 15 exons. Three transcription start sites and one poly(A) site are identified by the 5'/3'-RACE. In addition, the human ACAT-2 gene is linked to the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6 (IGFBP-6) gene in a head-to-tail manner with a small intergenic region of about 1.2 kb. The 5'-flanking region of human ACAT-2 gene contains many potential cis-acting elements for multiple transcriptional regulatory factors but lacks TATA and CCAAT boxes. Using promoter-luciferase reporter assays, we demonstrate the transcriptional activity of ACAT-2 gene promoter is high in Caco-2 cells, especially after these cells become postconfluent and behave as intestinal enterocytes.

  13. Genome-wide distribution of Auts2 binding localizes with active neurodevelopmental genes.

    PubMed

    Oksenberg, N; Haliburton, G D E; Eckalbar, W L; Oren, I; Nishizaki, S; Murphy, K; Pollard, K S; Birnbaum, R Y; Ahituv, N

    2014-09-02

    The autism susceptibility candidate 2 gene (AUTS2) has been associated with multiple neurological diseases including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Previous studies showed that AUTS2 has an important neurodevelopmental function and is a suspected master regulator of genes implicated in ASD-related pathways. However, the regulatory role and targets of Auts2 are not well known. Here, by using ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing) and RNA-seq on mouse embryonic day 16.5 forebrains, we elucidated the gene regulatory networks of Auts2. We find that the majority of promoters bound by Auts2 belong to genes highly expressed in the developing forebrain, suggesting that Auts2 is involved in transcriptional activation. Auts2 non-promoter-bound regions significantly overlap developing brain-associated enhancer marks and are located near genes involved in neurodevelopment. Auts2-marked sequences are enriched for binding site motifs of neurodevelopmental transcription factors, including Pitx3 and TCF3. In addition, we characterized two functional brain enhancers marked by Auts2 near NRXN1 and ATP2B2, both ASD-implicated genes. Our results implicate Auts2 as an active regulator of important neurodevelopmental genes and pathways and identify novel genomic regions that could be associated with ASD and other neurodevelopmental diseases.

  14. Different chromatin structures along the spacers flanking active and inactive Xenopus rRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Lucchini, R; Sogo, J M

    1992-01-01

    The accessibility of DNA in chromatin to psoralen was assayed to compare the chromatin structure of the rRNA coding and spacer regions of the two related frog species Xenopus laevis and Xenopus borealis. Isolated nuclei from tissue culture cells were photoreacted with psoralen, and the extent of cross-linking in the different rDNA regions was analyzed by using a gel retardation assay. In both species, restriction fragments from the coding regions showed two distinct extents of cross-linking, indicating the presence of two types of chromatin, one that contains nucleosomes and represents the inactive gene copies, and the other one which is more cross-linked and corresponds to the transcribed genes. A similar cross-linking pattern was obtained with restriction fragments from the enhancer region. Analysis of fragments including these sequences and the upstream portions of the genes suggests that active genes are preceded by nonnucleosomal enhancer regions. The spacer regions flanking the 3' end of the genes gave different results in the two frog species. In X. borealis, all these sequences are packaged in nucleosomes, whereas in X. laevis a distinct fraction, presumably those flanking the active genes, show a heterogeneous chromatin structure. This disturbed nucleosomal organization correlates with the presence of a weaker terminator at the 3' end of the X. laevis genes compared with those of X. borealis, which allows polymerases to transcribe into the downstream spacer. Images PMID:1406621

  15. Discovery of Unusual Biaryl Polyketides by Activation of a Silent Streptomyces venezuelae Biosynthetic Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Thanapipatsiri, Anyarat; Gomez‐Escribano, Juan Pablo; Song, Lijiang; Bibb, Maureen J.; Al‐Bassam, Mahmoud; Chandra, Govind

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Comparative transcriptional profiling of a ΔbldM mutant of Streptomyces venezuelae with its unmodified progenitor revealed that the expression of a cryptic biosynthetic gene cluster containing both type I and type III polyketide synthase genes is activated in the mutant. The 29.5 kb gene cluster, which was predicted to encode an unusual biaryl metabolite, which we named venemycin, and potentially halogenated derivatives, contains 16 genes including one—vemR—that encodes a transcriptional activator of the large ATP‐binding LuxR‐like (LAL) family. Constitutive expression of vemR in the ΔbldM mutant led to the production of sufficient venemycin for structural characterisation, confirming its unusual biaryl structure. Co‐expression of the venemycin biosynthetic gene cluster and vemR in the heterologous host Streptomyces coelicolor also resulted in venemycin production. Although the gene cluster encodes two halogenases and a flavin reductase, constitutive expression of all three genes led to the accumulation only of a monohalogenated venemycin derivative, both in the native producer and the heterologous host. A competition experiment in which equimolar quantities of sodium chloride and sodium bromide were fed to the venemycin‐producing strains resulted in the preferential incorporation of bromine, thus suggesting that bromide is the preferred substrate for one or both halogenases. PMID:27605017

  16. Expression profiles for macrophage alternative activation genes in AD and in mouse models of AD

    PubMed Central

    Colton, Carol A; Mott, Ryan T; Sharpe, Hayley; Xu, Qing; Van Nostrand, William E; Vitek, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    Background Microglia are associated with neuritic plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD) and serve as a primary component of the innate immune response in the brain. Neuritic plaques are fibrous deposits composed of the amyloid beta-peptide fragments (Abeta) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Numerous studies have shown that the immune cells in the vicinity of amyloid deposits in AD express mRNA and proteins for pro-inflammatory cytokines, leading to the hypothesis that microglia demonstrate classical (Th-1) immune activation in AD. Nonetheless, the complex role of microglial activation has yet to be fully explored since recent studies show that peripheral macrophages enter an "alternative" activation state. Methods To study alternative activation of microglia, we used quantitative RT-PCR to identify genes associated with alternative activation in microglia, including arginase I (AGI), mannose receptor (MRC1), found in inflammatory zone 1 (FIZZ1), and chitinase 3-like 3 (YM1). Results Our findings confirmed that treatment of microglia with anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13 induces a gene profile typical of alternative activation similar to that previously observed in peripheral macrophages. We then used this gene expression profile to examine two mouse models of AD, the APPsw (Tg-2576) and Tg-SwDI, models for amyloid deposition and for cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) respectively. AGI, MRC1 and YM1 mRNA levels were significantly increased in the Tg-2576 mouse brains compared to age-matched controls while TNFα and NOS2 mRNA levels, genes commonly associated with classical activation, increased or did not change, respectively. Only TNFα mRNA increased in the Tg-SwDI mouse brain. Alternative activation genes were also identified in brain samples from individuals with AD and were compared to age-matched control individuals. In AD brain, mRNAs for TNFα, AGI, MRC1 and the chitinase-3 like 1 and 2 genes (CHI3L1; CHI3L2) were significantly increased

  17. ERK signaling pathway regulates sleep duration through activity-induced gene expression during wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Mikhail, Cyril; Vaucher, Angélique; Jimenez, Sonia; Tafti, Mehdi

    2017-01-24

    Wakefulness is accompanied by experience-dependent synaptic plasticity and an increase in activity-regulated gene transcription. Wake-induced genes are certainly markers of neuronal activity and may also directly regulate the duration of and need for sleep. We stimulated murine cortical cultures with the neuromodulatory signals that are known to control wakefulness in the brain and found that norepinephrine alone or a mixture of these neuromodulators induced activity-regulated gene transcription. Pharmacological inhibition of the various signaling pathways involved in the regulation of gene expression indicated that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is the principal one mediating the effects of waking neuromodulators on gene expression. In mice, ERK phosphorylation in the cortex increased and decreased with wakefulness and sleep. Whole-body or cortical neuron-specific deletion of Erk1 or Erk2 significantly increased the duration of wakefulness in mice, and pharmacological inhibition of ERK phosphorylation decreased sleep duration and increased the duration of wakefulness bouts. Thus, this signaling pathway, which is highly conserved from Drosophila to mammals, is a key pathway that links waking experience-induced neuronal gene expression to sleep duration and quality.

  18. Differential activation of virulence gene expression by PrfA, the Listeria monocytogenes virulence regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, B; Klarsfeld, A; Msadek, T; Cossart, P

    1995-01-01

    PrfA is a pleiotropic activator of virulence gene expression in the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. Several lines of evidence have suggested that a hierarchy of virulence gene activation by PrfA exists. This hypothesis was investigated by assessing the ability of PrfA to activate the expression of virulence gene fusions to lacZ in Bacillus subtilis. Expression of PrfA in this heterologous host was sufficient for activation of transcription at the hly, plcA, mpl, and actA promoters. Activation was most efficient at the divergently transcribed hly and plcA promoters. The putative PrfA binding site shared by these promoters is perfectly symmetrical and appears to represent the optimum sequence for target gene activation by PrfA. The activation of actA and mpl expression was considerably weaker and occurred more slowly than that observed at the hly and plcA promoters, suggesting that greater quantities of PrfA are required for productive interaction at these promoters. Interestingly, expression of an inlA-lacZ transcriptional fusion was very poorly activated by PrfA in B. subtilis, suggesting that other Listeria factors, in addition to PrfA, are required for PrfA-mediated activation at this promoter. Further support for the involvement of such factors was obtained by constructing and analyzing a prfA deletion mutant of L. monocytogenes. We observed that, in contrast to that of the other genes of the PrfA regulon, expression of inlA is only partially dependent on PrfA. PMID:7592422

  19. Identification of the nik Gene Cluster of Brucella suis: Regulation and Contribution to Urease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jubier-Maurin, Véronique; Rodrigue, Agnès; Ouahrani-Bettache, Safia; Layssac, Marion; Mandrand-Berthelot, Marie-Andrée; Köhler, Stephan; Liautard, Jean-Pierre

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of a Brucella suis 1330 gene fused to a gfp reporter, and identified as being induced in J774 murine macrophage-like cells, allowed the isolation of a gene homologous to nikA, the first gene of the Escherichia coli operon encoding the specific transport system for nickel. DNA sequence analysis of the corresponding B. suis nik locus showed that it was highly similar to that of E. coli except for localization of the nikR regulatory gene, which lies upstream from the structural nikABCDE genes and in the opposite orientation. Protein sequence comparisons suggested that the deduced nikABCDE gene products belong to a periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport system. The nikA promoter-gfp fusion was activated in vitro by low oxygen tension and metal ion deficiency and was repressed by NiCl2 excess. Insertional inactivation of nikA strongly reduced the activity of the nickel metalloenzyme urease, which was restored by addition of a nickel excess. Moreover, the nikA mutant of B. suis was functionally complemented with the E. coli nik gene cluster, leading to the recovery of urease activity. Reciprocally, an E. coli strain harboring a deleted nik operon recovered hydrogenase activity by heterologous complementation with the B. suis nik locus. Taking into account these results, we propose that the nik locus of B. suis encodes a nickel transport system. The results further suggest that nickel could enter B. suis via other transport systems. Intracellular growth rates of the B. suis wild-type and nikA mutant strains in human monocytes were similar, indicating that nikA was not essential for this step of infection. We discuss a possible role of nickel transport in maintaining enzymatic activities which could be crucial for survival of the bacteria under the environmental conditions encountered within the host. PMID:11133934

  20. The influence of opioid peptides on matrix metalloproteinase-9 and urokinase plasminogen activator expression in three cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gach, K; Wyrebska, A; Szemraj, J; Janecka, A

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) regulate proteolysis of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and as a consequence are involved in a number of physiological and pathological states, including cancer. A crucial feature of cancer progression and metastasis is the disruption of the ECM and spreading of proliferating cancer cells. Over-expression of MMPs and uPA is common for most types of cancers and correlates well with the adverse prognosis. Compounds able to modulate the activity of these proteolytic enzymes may become important agents in cancer therapy. In the present study, we examined the effect of the mu-opioid receptor selective peptide, morphiceptin, and its two synthetic analogs on mRNA and protein levels of MMP-9 and uPA in three human cancer cell lines: MCF-7, HT-29, and SH-SY5Y. Our findings indicate that in all three cell lines morphiceptin and its analogs attenuated MMP-9 expression and secretion and that this effect is not mediated by opioid receptors but is under control of the nitric oxide system. On the other hand, tested opioids up-regulated uPA levels through a mechanism that involved opioid-receptors. Different pathways by which opioid peptides exert their actionin cancer cells can explain their contradictory influence on the level of cancer markers.

  1. Gyrase activity and number of copies of the gyrase B subunit gene in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Juárez, E; Setlow, J K

    1985-01-01

    Gyrase activities in extracts of various strains of Haemophilus influenzae can differ by more than an order of magnitude (J. K. Setlow, E. Cabrera-Juárez, W. L. Albritton, D. Spikes, and A. Mutschler, J. Bacteriol. 164:525-534, 1985). Measurements of in vitro activity and copy number indicated that most of these differences arose from variations in the number of copies of the gene for the gyrase B subunit, with some strains containing multicopy plasmids coding for that subunit. The quantitative relationship between gyrase and copy number depended on the mutations in the plasmids and in the host. The gyrase and copy number were considerably lower in plasmid-bearing strains carrying the prophage HP1c1. Two mutations affecting gyrase that are apparently regulatory caused an increase in gyrase without a concomitant increase in copy number. The possibility that the in vivo gyrase activity did not reflect the in vitro data was explored by measurement of alkaline phosphatase and ATPase activity in the extracts. Alkaline phosphatase activity increased with increasing gyrase activity measured in vitro, but ATPase activity did not. We conclude that extra supercoiling enhanced transcription of the alkaline phosphatase gene but not the ATPase gene and that it is unlikely that there is much discrepancy between gyrase activity assayed in vitro and the activity in the cell. PMID:2997116

  2. Involvement of Trichoderma Trichothecenes in the Biocontrol Activity and Induction of Plant Defense-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Malmierca, M. G.; Cardoza, R. E.; Alexander, N. J.; McCormick, S. P.; Hermosa, R.; Monte, E.

    2012-01-01

    Trichoderma species produce trichothecenes, most notably trichodermin and harzianum A (HA), by a biosynthetic pathway in which several of the involved proteins have significant differences in functionality compared to their Fusarium orthologues. In addition, the genes encoding these proteins show a genomic organization differing from that of the Fusarium tri clusters. Here we describe the isolation of Trichoderma arundinaceum IBT 40837 transformants which have a disrupted or silenced tri4 gene, a gene encoding a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase that oxygenates trichodiene to give rise to isotrichodiol, and the effect of tri4 gene disruption and silencing on the expression of other tri genes. Our results indicate that the tri4 gene disruption resulted in a reduced antifungal activity against Botrytis cinerea and Rhizoctonia solani and also in a reduced ability to induce the expression of tomato plant defense-related genes belonging to the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonate (JA) pathways against B. cinerea, in comparison to the wild-type strain, indicating that HA plays an important function in the sensitization of Trichoderma-pretreated plants against this fungal pathogen. Additionally, the effect of the interaction of T. arundinaceum with B. cinerea or R. solani and with tomato seedlings on the expressions of the tri genes was studied. PMID:22562989

  3. Inhibiting AP-1 activity alters cocaine induced gene expression and potentiates sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Paletzki, Ronald F.; Myakishev, Max V.; Polesskaya, Oksana; Orosz, Andras; Hyman, Steven E.; Vinson, Charles

    2008-01-01

    We have expressed A-FOS, an inhibitor of AP-1 DNA binding, in adult mouse striatal neurons. We observe normal behavior including locomotion and exploratory activities. Following a single injection of cocaine, locomotion increased similarly in both the A-FOS expressing and littermate controls. However, following repeated injections of cocaine, the A-FOS expressing mice showed increased locomotion relative to littermate controls, an increase that persisted following a week of withdrawal and subsequent cocaine administration. These results indicate that AP-1 suppresses this behavioral responses to cocaine. We analyzed mRNA from the striatum before and 4 and 24 hours after a single cocaine injection in both A-FOS and control striata using Affymetrix microarrays (430 2.0 Array) to identify genes mis-regulated by A-FOS that may mediate the increased locomotor sensitization to cocaine. A-FOS expression did not change gene expression in the basal state or 4 hours following cocaine treatment relative to controls. However, 24 hours after an acute cocaine treatment, 84 genes were identified that were differentially expressed between the A-FOS and control mice. 56 gene are down regulated while 28 genes are up regulated including previously identified candidates for addiction including BDNF and Per1. Using a random sample of identified genes, quantitative PCR was used to verify the microarray studies. The chromosomal location of these 84 genes was compared to human genome scans of addiction to identify potential genes in humans that are involved in addiction. PMID:18355967

  4. Child dopamine active transporter 1 genotype and parenting: evidence for evocative gene-environment correlations.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Elizabeth P; Hanna, Brigitte; Sheikh, Haroon I; Laptook, Rebecca S; Kim, Jiyon; Singh, Shiva M; Klein, Daniel N

    2013-02-01

    The dopamine active transporter 1 (DAT1) gene is implicated in psychopathology risk. Although the processes by which this gene exerts its effects on risk are poorly understood, a small body of research suggests that the DAT1 gene influences early emerging negative emotionality, a marker of children's psychopathology risk. As child negative emotionality evokes negative parenting practices, the DAT1 gene may also play a role in gene-environment correlations. To test this model, children (N = 365) were genotyped for the DAT1 gene and participated in standardized parent-child interaction tasks with their primary caregiver. The DAT1 gene 9-repeat variant was associated with child negative affect expressed toward the parent during parent-child interactions, and parents of children with a 9-repeat allele exhibited more hostility and lower guidance/engagement than parents of children without a 9-repeat allele. These gene-environment associations were partially mediated by child negative affect toward the parent. The findings implicate a specific polymorphism in eliciting negative parenting, suggesting that evocative associations play a role in elevating children's risk for emotional trajectories toward psychopathology risk.

  5. SWI/SNF enzymes promote SOX10- mediated activation of myelin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Marathe, Himangi G; Mehta, Gaurav; Zhang, Xiaolu; Datar, Ila; Mehrotra, Aanchal; Yeung, Kam C; de la Serna, Ivana L

    2013-01-01

    SOX10 is a Sry-related high mobility (HMG)-box transcriptional regulator that promotes differentiation of neural crest precursors into Schwann cells, oligodendrocytes, and melanocytes. Myelin, formed by Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, is essential for propagation of nerve impulses. SWI/SNF complexes are ATP dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes that are critical for cellular differentiation. It was recently demonstrated that the BRG1 subunit of SWI/SNF complexes activates SOX10 expression and also interacts with SOX10 to activate expression of OCT6 and KROX20, two transcriptional regulators of Schwann cell differentiation. To determine the requirement for SWI/SNF enzymes in the regulation of genes that encode components of myelin, which are downstream of these transcriptional regulators, we introduced SOX10 into fibroblasts that inducibly express dominant negative versions of the SWI/SNF ATPases, BRM or BRG1. Dominant negative BRM and BRG1 have mutations in the ATP binding site and inhibit gene activation events that require SWI/SNF function. Ectopic expression of SOX10 in cells derived from NIH 3T3 fibroblasts led to the activation of the endogenous Schwann cell specific gene, myelin protein zero (MPZ) and the gene that encodes myelin basic protein (MBP). Thus, SOX10 reprogrammed these cells into myelin gene expressing cells. Ectopic expression of KROX20 was not sufficient for activation of these myelin genes. However, KROX20 together with SOX10 synergistically activated MPZ and MBP expression. Dominant negative BRM and BRG1 abrogated SOX10 mediated activation of MPZ and MBP and synergistic activation of these genes by SOX10 and KROX20. SOX10 was required to recruit BRG1 to the MPZ locus. Similarly, in immortalized Schwann cells, BRG1 recruitment to SOX10 binding sites at the MPZ locus was dependent on SOX10 and expression of dominant negative BRG1 inhibited expression of MPZ and MBP in these cells. Thus, SWI/SNF enzymes cooperate with SOX10 to

  6. Customized Regulation of Diverse Stress Response Genes by the Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Activator MarA

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Stress response networks frequently have a single upstream regulator that controls many downstream genes. However, the downstream targets are often diverse, therefore it remains unclear how their expression is specialized when under the command of a common regulator. To address this, we focused on a stress response network where the multiple antibiotic resistance activator MarA from Escherichia coli regulates diverse targets ranging from small RNAs to efflux pumps. Using single-cell experiments and computational modeling, we showed that each downstream gene studied has distinct activation, noise, and information transmission properties. Critically, our results demonstrate that understanding biological context is essential; we found examples where strong activation only occurs outside physiologically relevant ranges of MarA and others where noise is high at wild type MarA levels and decreases as MarA reaches its physiological limit. These results demonstrate how a single regulatory protein can maintain specificity while orchestrating the response of many downstream genes. PMID:28060821

  7. Customized Regulation of Diverse Stress Response Genes by the Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Activator MarA.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Nicholas A; Dunlop, Mary J

    2017-01-01

    Stress response networks frequently have a single upstream regulator that controls many downstream genes. However, the downstream targets are often diverse, therefore it remains unclear how their expression is specialized when under the command of a common regulator. To address this, we focused on a stress response network where the multiple antibiotic resistance activator MarA from Escherichia coli regulates diverse targets ranging from small RNAs to efflux pumps. Using single-cell experiments and computational modeling, we showed that each downstream gene studied has distinct activation, noise, and information transmission properties. Critically, our results demonstrate that understanding biological context is essential; we found examples where strong activation only occurs outside physiologically relevant ranges of MarA and others where noise is high at wild type MarA levels and decreases as MarA reaches its physiological limit. These results demonstrate how a single regulatory protein can maintain specificity while orchestrating the response of many downstream genes.

  8. Gene deregulation and chronic activation in natural killer cells deficient in the transcription factor ETS1.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Kevin; Chandler, Katherine J; Spaulding, Christina; Zandi, Sasan; Sigvardsson, Mikael; Graves, Barbara J; Kee, Barbara L

    2012-06-29

    Multiple transcription factors guide the development of mature functional natural killer (NK) cells, yet little is known about their function. We used global gene expression and genome-wide binding analyses combined with developmental and functional studies to unveil three roles for the ETS1 transcription factor in NK cells. ETS1 functions at the earliest stages of NK cell development to promote expression of critical transcriptional regulators including T-BET and ID2, NK cell receptors (NKRs) including NKp46, Ly49H, and Ly49D, and signaling molecules essential for NKR function. As a consequence, Ets1(-/-) NK cells fail to degranulate after stimulation through activating NKRs. Nonetheless, these cells are hyperresponsive to cytokines and have characteristics of chronic stimulation including increased expression of inhibitory NKRs and multiple activation-associated genes. Therefore, ETS1 regulates a broad gene expression program in NK cells that promotes target cell recognition while limiting cytokine-driven activation.

  9. Gene activation properties of a mouse DNA sequence isolated by expression selection.

    PubMed Central

    von Hoyningen-Huene, V; Norbury, C; Griffiths, M; Fried, M

    1986-01-01

    The MES-1 element was previously isolated from restricted total mouse cellular DNA by "expression selection"--the ability to reactivate expression of a test gene devoid of its 5' enhancer sequences. Mes-1 has been tested in long-term transformation and short-term CAT expression assays. In both assays MES-1 is active independent of orientation and at a distance when placed 5' to the test gene. The element is active with heterologous promoters and functions efficiently in both rat and mouse cells. MES-1 activates expression by increasing transcription from the test gene's own start (cap) site. Thus the expression selection technique can be used for the isolation of DNA sequences with enhancer-like properties from total cellular DNA. Images PMID:3016657

  10. Amplification of the groESL operon in Pseudomonas putida increases siderophore gene promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Venturi, V; Wolfs, K; Leong, J; Weisbeek, P J

    1994-10-17

    Pseudobactin 358 is the yellow-green fluorescent siderophore [microbial iron(III) transport agent] produced by Pseudomonas putida WCS358 under iron-limiting conditions. The genes encoding pseudobactin 358 biosynthesis are iron-regulated at the level of transcription. In this study, the molecular characterization is reported of a cosmid clone of WCS358 DNA that can stimulate, in an iron-dependent manner, the activity of a WCS358 siderophore gene promoter in the heterologous Pseudomonas strain A225. The functional region in the clone was identified by subcloning, transposon mutagenesis and DNA sequencing as the groESL operon of strain WCS358. This increase in promoter activity was not observed when the groESL genes of strain WCS358 were integrated via a transposon vector into the genome of Pseudomonas A225, indicating that multiple copies of the operon are necessary for the increase in siderophore gene promoter activity. Amplification of the Escherichia coli and WCS358 groESL genes also increased iron-regulated promoter activity in the parent strain WCS358. The groESL operon codes for the chaperone proteins GroES and GroEL, which are responsible for mediating the folding and assembly of many proteins.

  11. Macro optical projection tomography for large scale 3D imaging of plant structures and gene activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Karen J I; Calder, Grant M; Hindle, Christopher R; Newman, Jacob L; Robinson, Simon N; Avondo, Jerome J H Y; Coen, Enrico S

    2016-12-26

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a well-established method for visualising gene activity in plants and animals. However, a limitation of conventional OPT is that the specimen upper size limit precludes its application to larger structures. To address this problem we constructed a macro version called Macro OPT (M-OPT). We apply M-OPT to 3D live imaging of gene activity in growing whole plants and to visualise structural morphology in large optically cleared plant and insect specimens up to 60 mm tall and 45 mm deep. We also show how M-OPT can be used to image gene expression domains in 3D within fixed tissue and to visualise gene activity in 3D in clones of growing young whole Arabidopsis plants. A further application of M-OPT is to visualise plant-insect interactions. Thus M-OPT provides an effective 3D imaging platform that allows the study of gene activity, internal plant structures and plant-insect interactions at a macroscopic scale.

  12. Changes in cathepsin gene expression and relative enzymatic activity during gilthead sea bream oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Carnevali, O; Cionna, C; Tosti, L; Cerdà, J; Gioacchini, G

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide evidence on the modulation of lysosomal enzymes in terms of both gene expression and enzymatic activity during follicle maturation. For this purpose three lysosomal enzymes, cathepsins B, D, and L, were studied in relation to yolk formation and degradation, during the main phases of ovarian follicle growth in the pelagophil species, the sea bream Sparus aurata. Specific attention was focused on the gene expression quantification method, on the assay of enzymatic activities, and on the relationship between the proteolytic cleavage of yolk proteins (YPs), cathepsin gene expression and cathepsin activities. For the gene expression study, the cathepsins B-like and L-like mRNAs were isolated and partially or fully characterized, respectively; the sequences were used as design specific primers for the quantification of cathepsin gene expression by real-time PCR, in follicles at different stages of maturation. The enzymatic assays for cathepsins B, D, and L were optimized in terms of specificity, sensitivity and reliability, using specific substrates and inhibitors. In ovulated eggs, the lipovitellin I (LV I) was degraded and the changes in electrophoretic pattern were preceded by an increase in the activity of a cysteine proteinase, cathepsin L, and its mRNA. Cathepsin B did not appear to be involved in YP changes during the final maturation stage.

  13. Characterization of human TCR Vbeta gene promoter. Role of the dodecamer motif in promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Deng, X; Sun, G R; Zheng, Q; Li, Y

    1998-09-11

    During T-lymphocyte development, the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) gene expression is controlled by its promoter and enhancer elements and regulated in tissue- and development stage-specific manner. To uncover the promoter function and to define positive and negative regulatory elements in TCR gene promoters, the promoter activities from 13 human TCR Vbeta genes were determined by the transient transfection system and luciferase reporter assay. Although most of the TCR Vbeta gene promoters that we tested are inactive by themselves, some promoters were found to be constitutively strong. Among them, Vbeta6.7 is the strongest. 5'-Deletion and fragmentation experiments have narrowed the full promoter activity of Vbeta6.7 to a fragment of 147 base pairs immediately 5' to the transcription initiation site. A decanucleotide motif with the consensus sequence AGTGAYRTCA has been found to be conserved in most TCR Vbeta gene promoters. There are three such decamer motifs in the promoter region of Vbeta6.7, and the contribution of each such motif to the promoter activity has been examined. Further site-directed mutagenesis analyses showed that: 1) when two Ts in the decamer were mutated, the promoter activity was totally abolished; 2) when two additional nucleotides 3' to the end of decamer were mutated, the promoter activity was decreased to two-thirds of the full level; and 3) when the element with the sequence AGTGATGTCACT was inserted into other promoters, the original weak promoters become very strong. Taken together, our data suggest that the positive regulatory element in Vbeta6.7 should be considered a dodecamer rather than a decamer and that it confers strong basal transcriptional activity on TCR Vbeta genes.

  14. Methylation of the mouse hprt gene differs on the active and inactive X chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Lock, L F; Melton, D W; Caskey, C T; Martin, G R

    1986-01-01

    It has been proposed that DNA methylation is involved in the mechanism of X inactivation, the process by which equivalence of levels of X-linked gene products is achieved in female (XX) and male (XY) mammals. In this study, Southern blots of female and male DNA digested with methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases and hybridized to various portions of the cloned mouse hprt gene were compared, and sites within the mouse hprt gene were identified that are differentially methylated in female and male cells. The extent to which these sites are methylated when carried on the active and inactive X chromosomes was directly determined in a similar analysis of DNA from clonal cell lines established from a female embryo derived from a mating of two species of mouse, Mus musculus and Mus caroli. The results revealed two regions of differential methylation in the mouse hprt gene. One region, in the first intron of the gene, includes four sites that are completely unmethylated when carried on the active X and extensively methylated when carried on the inactive X. These same sites are extensively demethylated in hprt genes reactivated either spontaneously or after 5-azacytidine treatment. The second region includes several sites in the 3' 20kilobases of the gene extending from exon 3 to exon 9 that show the converse pattern; i.e., they are completely methylated when carried on the active X and completely unmethylated when carried on the inactive X. At least one of these sites does not become methylated after reactivation of the gene. The results of this study, together with the results of previous studies by others of the human hprt gene, indicate that these regions of differential methylation on the active and inactive X are conserved between mammalian species. Furthermore, the data described here are consistent with the idea that at least the sites in the 5' region of the gene play a role in the X inactivation phenomenon and regulation of expression of the mouse hprt

  15. Mediator Kinase Inhibition Further Activates Super-Enhancer Associated Genes in AML

    PubMed Central

    Nitulescu, Ioana I.; Tangpeerachaikul, Anupong; Poss, Zachary C.; Da Silva, Diogo H.; Caruso, Brittany T.; Arefolov, Alexander; Fadeyi, Olugbeminiyi; Christie, Amanda L.; Du, Karrie; Banka, Deepti; Schneider, Elisabeth V.; Jestel, Anja; Zou, Ge; Si, Chong; Ebmeier, Christopher C.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Krivtsov, Andrei V.; Myers, Andrew G.; Kohl, Nancy E.; Kung, Andrew L.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Taatjes, Dylan J.; Shair, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Super-enhancers (SEs), which are composed of large clusters of enhancers densely loaded with the Mediator complex, transcription factors (TFs), and chromatin regulators, drive high expression of genes implicated in cell identity and disease, such as lineage-controlling TFs and oncogenes 1, 2. BRD4 and CDK7 are positive regulators of SE-mediated transcription3,4,5. In contrast, negative regulators of SE-associated genes have not been well described. Here we report that Mediator-associated kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and CDK19 restrain increased activation of key SE-associated genes in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. We determined that the natural product cortistatin A (CA) selectively inhibited Mediator kinases, had antileukaemic activity in vitro and in vivo, and disproportionately induced upregulation of SE-associated genes in CA-sensitive AML cell lines but not in CA-insensitive cell lines. In AML cells, CA upregulated SE-associated genes with tumour suppressor and lineage-controlling functions, including the TFs CEBPA, IRF8, IRF1 and ETV6 6, 7, 8. The BRD4 inhibitor I-BET151 downregulated these SE-associated genes, yet also has antileukaemic activity. Individually increasing or decreasing expression of these TFs suppressed AML cell growth, providing evidence that leukaemia cells are sensitive to dosage of SE-associated genes. Our results demonstrate that Mediator kinases can negatively regulate SE-associated gene expression in specific cell types and can be pharmacologically targeted as a therapeutic approach to AML. PMID:26416749

  16. Identification and characterization of genes related to cellulolytic activity in basidiomycetes.

    PubMed

    Volpini, A F N; Thomazine, T; Umeo, S H; Pereira, G A; Linde, G A; Valle, J S; Colauto, N B; Barcellos, F G; Souza, S G H

    2016-09-16

    Enzymes produced by basidiomycetes that are involved in the cellulose degradation process, and their respective codifying genes, must be identified to facilitate the development of novel biotechnological strategies and applications in the agro-industry. The objective of this study was to identify prospective cellulase-producing genes and characterize their cellulolytic activity, in order to elucidate the potential biotechnological applications (with respect to vegetal residues) of basidiomycetes. The basidiomycete strains Lentinula edodes U8-1, Lentinus crinitus U9-1, and Schizophyllum commune U6-7 were analyzed in this study. The cellulolytic activities of these fungi were evaluated based on the halo formation in carboxymethyl cellulose culture medium after dyeing with Congo red. The presence of cellulase-codifying genes (cel7A, cel6B, cel3A, and egl) in these fungal strains was also evaluated. L. edodes and S. commune presented the highest cellulolytic halo to mycelial growth radius ratio, followed by L. crinitus. Four genes were amplified in the L. edodes strain, whereas three and one genes were isolated from L. crinitus and S. commune, respectively. The cel6B gene (L. edodes) presented the conserved domain glyco_hydro_6 and characterized as cellobiohydrolase gene. The results of this study contribute to the existing knowledge on cellulases in basidiomycetes, and serve as a basis for future studies on the expression of these genes and the characterization of the catalytic activity of these enzymes. This allows for better utilization of these fungi in degrading vegetal fibers from agro-industrial residues and in other biotechnological applications.

  17. Heterogeneous activation of a slow myosin gene in proliferating myoblasts and differentiated single myofibers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing-hua; Wang, Qiao-jing; Wang, Chao; Reinholt, Brad; Grant, Alan L; Gerrard, David E; Kuang, Shihuan

    2015-01-01

    Each skeletal muscle contains a fixed ratio of fast and slow myofibers that are distributed in a stereotyped pattern to achieve a specific motor function. How myofibers are specified during development and regeneration is poorly understood. Here we address this question using transgenic reporter mice that indelibly mark the myofiber lineages based on activation of fast or slow myosin. Lineage tracing indicates that during development all muscles have activated the fast myosin gene Myl1, but not the slow myosin gene Myh7, which is activated in all slow but a subset of fast myofibers. Similarly, most nascent myofibers do not activate Myh7 during fast muscle regeneration, but the ratio and pattern of fast and slow myofibers are restored at the completion of regeneration. At the single myofiber level, most mature fast myofibers are heterogeneous in nuclear composition, manifested by mosaic activation of Myh7. Strikingly, Myh7 is activated in a subpopulation of proliferating myoblasts that co-express the myogenic progenitor marker Pax7. When induced to differentiate, the Myh7-activated myoblasts differentiate more readily than the non-activated myoblasts, and have a higher tendency, but not restricted, to become slow myotubes. Together, our data reveal significant nuclear heterogeneity within a single myofiber, and challenge the conventional view that myosin genes are only expressed after myogenic differentiation. These results provide novel insights into the regulation of muscle fiber type specification. PMID:25794679

  18. The euryhaline yeast Debaryomyces hansenii has two catalase genes encoding enzymes with differential activity profile.

    PubMed

    Segal-Kischinevzky, Claudia; Rodarte-Murguía, Beatriz; Valdés-López, Victor; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; González, Alicia; Alba-Lois, Luisa

    2011-03-01

    Debaryomyces hansenii is a spoilage yeast able to grow in a variety of ecological niches, from seawater to dairy products. Results presented in this article show that (i) D. hansenii has an inherent resistance to H2O2 which could be attributed to the fact that this yeast has a basal catalase activity which is several-fold higher than that observed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under the same culture conditions, (ii) D. hansenii has two genes (DhCTA1 and DhCTT1) encoding two catalase isozymes with a differential enzymatic activity profile which is not strictly correlated with a differential expression profile of the encoding genes.

  19. Repression of telomere-associated genes by microglia activation in neuropsychiatric disease.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Golo; Uhlemann, Ria; Schöner, Johanna; Wegner, Stephanie; Boujon, Valérie; Deigendesch, Nikolas; Endres, Matthias; Gertz, Karen

    2016-11-28

    Microglia senescence may promote neuropsychiatric disease. This prompted us to examine the relationship between microglia activation states and telomere biology. A panel of candidate genes associated with telomere maintenance, mitochondrial biogenesis, and cell-cycle regulation were investigated in M1- and M2-polarized microglia in vitro as well as in MACS-purified CD11b+ microglia/brain macrophages from models of stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and chronic stress. M1 polarization, ischemia, and Alzheimer pathology elicited a strikingly similar transcriptomic profile with, in particular, reduced expression of murine Tert. Our results link classical microglia activation with repression of telomere-associated genes, suggesting a new mechanism underlying microglia dysfunction.

  20. Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early gene product trans-activates gene expression from the human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, S.; Kamine, J.; Markovitz, D.; Fenrick, R.; Pagano, J.

    1988-03-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients are frequently coinfected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In this report, the authors demonstrate that an EBV immediate-early gene product, BamHI MLF1, stimulates expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene linked to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter. The HIV promoter sequences necessary for trans-activation by EBV do not include the tat-responsive sequences. In addition, in contrast to the other herpesvirus trans-activators previously studied, the EBV BamHI MLF1 gene product appears to function in part by a posttranscriptional mechanism, since it increases pHIV-CAT protein activity more than it increases HIV-CAT mRNA. This ability of an EBV gene product to activate HIV gene expression may have biologic consequences in persons coinfected with both viruses.

  1. A Homeodomain Transcription Factor Gene, PfMSX, Activates Expression of Pif Gene in the Pearl Oyster Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mi; He, Maoxian; Huang, Xiande; Wang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    We reported pearl oyster Pinctada fucata cDNA and genomic characterization of a new homeobox-containing protein, PfMSX. The PfMSX gene encodes a transcription factor that was localized to the nucleus. Analyses of PfMSX mRNA in tissues and developmental stages showed high expressions in mantle or D-shaped larvae. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) PfMSX binded to MSX consensus binding sites in the 5′ flanking region of the Pif promoter. In co-transfection experiment PfMSX transactivated reporter constructs containing Pif promoter sequences, and mutation of the MSX-binding sites attenuated transactivation. A knockdown experiment using PfMSX dsRNA showed decreased Pif mRNA and unregular crystallization of the nacreous layer using scanning electron microscopy. Our results suggested that PfMSX was a conserved homeodomain transcription factor gene, which can activate Pif gene expression through MSX binding site, and was then involved in the mineralization process in pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Our data provided important clues about mechanisms regulating biomineralization in pearl oyster. PMID:25099698

  2. Activating the expression of bacterial cryptic genes by rpoB mutations in RNA polymerase or by rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Kozo; Tanaka, Yukinori; Tojo, Shigeo

    2014-02-01

    Since bacteria were found to contain genes encoding enzymes that synthesize a plethora of potential secondary metabolites, interest has grown in the activation of these cryptic pathways. Homologous and heterologous expression of these cryptic secondary metabolite-biosynthetic genes, often "silent" under ordinary laboratory fermentation conditions, may lead to the discovery of novel secondary metabolites. We review current progress on this topic, describing concepts for activating silent genes. We especially focus on genetic manipulation of transcription and translation, as well as the utilization of rare earth elements as a novel method to activate the silent genes. The possible roles of silent genes in bacterial physiology are also discussed.

  3. Genetic Characterization of the Homeodomain-Independent Activity of the Drosophila Fushi Tarazu Gene Product

    PubMed Central

    Hyduk, D.; Percival-Smith, A.

    1996-01-01

    The gene product of fushi tarazu (FTZ) has a homeodomain (HD)-independent activity. Ectopic expression of a FTZ protein that lacks half the HD in embryos results in the anti-ftz phenotype. We have characterized this FTZ HD-independent activity further. Ectopic expression of the HD-independent FTZ activity, in the absence of FTZ activity expressed from the endogenous ftz gene, was sufficient to result in the anti-ftz phenotype. Since the anti-ftz phenotype is a first instar larvae composed nearly entirely of FTZ-dependent cuticular structures derived from the even-numbered parasegments, this result suggests that expression of the HD-independent FTZ activity is sufficient to establish FTZ-dependent cuticle. Activation of FTZ-dependent Engrailed (EN) expression and activation of the ftz enhancer were HD-independent. The ftz enhancer element, AE-1, was activated by the HD-independent FTZ activity; however, the ftz enhancer element, AE-BS2CCC, which is the same as AE-1 except for the inactivation of two FTZ HD DNA-binding sites, was not. Activation of the ftz enhancer by ectopic expression of FTZ activity was effective only during gastrulation and germ band extension. In the discussion, we propose an explanation for these results. PMID:8852847

  4. Preferential repair of DNA double-strand break at the active gene in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Priyasri; Sen, Rwik; Pandita, Tej K; Bhaumik, Sukesh R

    2012-10-19

    Previous studies have demonstrated transcription-coupled nucleotide/base excision repair. We report here for the first time that DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is also coupled to transcription. We generated a yeast strain by introducing a homing (Ho) endonuclease cut site followed by a nucleotide sequence for multiple Myc epitopes at the 3' end of the coding sequence of a highly active gene, ADH1. This yeast strain also contains the Ho cut site at the nearly silent or poorly active mating type α (MATα) locus and expresses Ho endonuclease under the galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter. Using this strain, DSBs were generated at the ADH1 and MATα loci in galactose-containing growth medium that induced HO expression. Subsequently, yeast cells were transferred to dextrose-containing growth medium to stop HO expression, and the DSB repair was monitored at the ADH1 and MATα loci by PCR, using the primer pairs flanking the Ho cut sites. Our results revealed a faster DSB repair at the highly active ADH1 than that at the nearly silent MATα locus, hence implicating a transcription-coupled DSB repair at the active gene in vivo. Subsequently, we extended this study to another gene, PHO5 (carrying the Ho cut site at its coding sequence), under transcriptionally active and inactive growth conditions. We found a fast DSB repair at the active PHO5 gene in comparison to its inactive state. Collectively, our results demonstrate a preferential DSB repair at the active gene, thus supporting transcription-coupled DSB repair in living cells.

  5. Timing and Variability of Galactose Metabolic Gene Activation Depend on the Rate of Environmental Change.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Huu, Truong D; Gupta, Chinmaya; Ma, Bo; Ott, William; Josić, Krešimir; Bennett, Matthew R

    2015-07-01

    Modulation of gene network activity allows cells to respond to changes in environmental conditions. For example, the galactose utilization network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated by the presence of galactose but repressed by glucose. If both sugars are present, the yeast will first metabolize glucose, depleting it from the extracellular environment. Upon depletion of glucose, the genes encoding galactose metabolic proteins will activate. Here, we show that the rate at which glucose levels are depleted determines the timing and variability of galactose gene activation. Paradoxically, we find that Gal1p, an enzyme needed for galactose metabolism, accumulates more quickly if glucose is depleted slowly rather than taken away quickly. Furthermore, the variability of induction times in individual cells depends non-monotonically on the rate of glucose depletion and exhibits a minimum at intermediate depletion rates. Our mathematical modeling suggests that the dynamics of the metabolic transition from glucose to galactose are responsible for the variability in galactose gene activation. These findings demonstrate that environmental dynamics can determine the phenotypic outcome at both the single-cell and population levels.

  6. Computer-aided design of modular protein devices: Boolean AND gene activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salis, H.; Kaznessis, Y. N.

    2006-12-01

    Many potentially useful synthetic gene networks require the expression of an engineered gene if and only if two different DNA-binding proteins exist in sufficient concentration. While some natural and engineered systems activate gene expression according to a logical AND-like behavior, they often utilize allosteric or cooperative protein-protein interactions, rendering their components unsuitable for a toolbox of modular parts for use in multiple applications. Here, we develop a quantitative model to demonstrate that a small system of interacting fusion proteins, called a protein device, can activate an engineered gene according to the Boolean AND behavior while using only modular protein domains and DNA sites. The fusion proteins are created from transactivating, DNA-binding, non-DNA binding, and protein-protein interaction domains along with the corresponding peptide ligands. Using a combined kinetic and thermodynamic model, we identify the characteristics of the molecular components and their rates of constitutive production that maximize the fidelity of AND behavior. These AND protein devices facilitate the creation of complex genetic programs and may be used to create gene therapies, biosensors and other biomedical and biotechnological applications that turn on gene expression only when multiple DNA-binding proteins are simultaneously present.

  7. Structural requirements for the functional activity of a U1 snRNA gene enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, C H; Fan, Q N; Stumph, W E

    1993-01-01

    The transcriptional enhancer of a chicken U1 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) gene contains a GC-box, an octamer motif, and an SPH motif that are recognized by the transcription factors Sp1, Oct-1, and SBF respectively. Previous work indicated that the octamer and the SPH motifs were both required for U1 gene enhancer activity in frog oocytes when the U1 gene was coinjected with a competing snRNA gene template. Here we show that neither two copies of the octamer motif, nor two copies of the SPH motif, can effectively substitute for the natural combination of octamer and SPH. Furthermore, neither the octamer nor the SPH motif (in the absence of the other) functioned efficiently in combination with a GC-box. Alteration of the spacing between the octamer and SPH motifs also reduced U1 template activity. Several potential cis-acting elements other than the SPH motif, with one possible exception among those tested, were unable to cooperate with the octamer motif to effectively enhance U1 gene expression. These results indicate that rather stringent structural requirements exist with respect to the essential cis-acting motifs present in the U1 enhancer, possibly reflecting the unique properties of the transcription complexes assembled on snRNA gene promoters. Images PMID:8441636

  8. Patterns of Gene-Specific and Total Transcriptional Activity during the Plasmodium falciparum Intraerythrocytic Developmental Cycle ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Jennifer S.; Militello, Kevin T.; Sims, Peter A.; Patel, Vishal P.; Kasper, Jacob M.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    2009-01-01

    The relationships among gene regulatory mechanisms in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum throughout its asexual intraerythrocytic developmental cycle (IDC) remain poorly understood. To investigate the level and nature of transcriptional activity and its role in controlling gene expression during the IDC, we performed nuclear run-on on whole-transcriptome samples from time points throughout the IDC and found a peak in RNA polymerase II-dependent transcriptional activity related to both the number of nuclei per parasite and variable transcriptional activity per nucleus over time. These differential total transcriptional activity levels allowed the calculation of the absolute transcriptional activities of individual genes from gene-specific nuclear run-on hybridization data. For half of the genes analyzed, sense-strand transcriptional activity peaked at the same time point as total activity. The antisense strands of several genes were substantially transcribed. Comparison of the transcriptional activity of the sense strand of each gene to its steady-state RNA abundance across the time points assayed revealed both correlations and discrepancies, implying transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation, respectively. Our results demonstrate that such comparisons can effectively indicate gene regulatory mechanisms in P. falciparum and suggest that genes with diverse transcriptional activity levels and patterns combine to produce total transcriptional activity levels tied to parasite development during the IDC. PMID:19151330

  9. Diversity of laccase-like multicopper oxidase genes in Morchellaceae: identification of genes potentially involved in extracellular activities related to plant litter decay.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Harald; Luis, Patricia; Buscot, François

    2007-07-01

    Despite the important role played by soil-inhabiting ascomycetes in plant litter decay processes, studies on the diversity and function of their laccase-like multicopper oxidase (LMCO) genes are scarce. In the present work, the LMCO gene diversity in 15 strains representing nine Morchellaceae and one Discinaceae species was evaluated by PCR. One to six different genes were found within the species, representing 26 different sequence types. Cluster analysis revealed LMCO genes belonging to four main gene families encoding different protein classes (Class I-IV). To identify the genes related to extracellular activities and potentially involved in litter decay processes, liquid cultures were induced by different aromatic compounds. Morchella conica and Verpa conica showed the strongest LMCO activity enhancement in the presence of the naturally occurring phenolic compound guaiacol, and their expressed LMCO genes were identified by sequencing. Only genes belonging to the gene families encoding the Class II and III proteins were expressed. Both genes (Class II and III) of the mycorrhizal-like strain M. conica were exclusively expressed in the presence of guaiacol. In contrast to the saprotrophic strain V. conica, the gene encoding the Class III protein was constitutively expressed as it was also found in control cultures without guaiacol.

  10. Tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene polymorphism in patients with gastric ulcer complicated with bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong-Soo; Hwang, Kyu-Yoon; Chung, Il-Kwon; Park, Sang-Heum; Lee, Moon-Ho; Kim, Sun-Joo; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2003-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) may be involved in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcers through suppression of fibrinolysis. This study was designed to investigate associations of t-PA and PAI-1 genes with clinical features of the patients with bleeding gastric ulcers. Eighty-four patients with peptic ulcers and 100 controls were studied between January 1998 and April 2000. We used polymerase chain reaction and endonuclease digestion to genotype for 4G/5G polymorphism in the promoter region of the PAI-1 gene and the Alurepeat insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in intron h of the t-PA gene. Various clinical features, including lesion site, bleeding event, recurrence of ulcer, and rebleeding, were assessed using a multiple logistic regression model. The genotype distributions of both the t-PA and PAI-1 genes did not differ between the patient and control groups. The occurrence of the I/D or D/D genotype of t-PA was significantly higher in cases of duodenal ulcer (adjusted OR=4.39, 95% CI=1.12-17.21). When a dominant effect (i.e., 4G/4G or 4G/5G versus 5G/5G) of the 4G allele was assumed, the PAI-1 4G/4G genotype was independently associated with rebleeding after hemostasis (adjusted OR=5.07, 95% CI=1.03-24.87). Our data suggest that t-PA gene polymorphism is associated with duodenal ulcers, and that the PAI-1 gene may be a risk factor leading to recurrent bleeding after initial hemostasis. PMID:12589088

  11. Mapping of Brain Activity by Automated Volume Analysis of Immediate Early Genes.

    PubMed

    Renier, Nicolas; Adams, Eliza L; Kirst, Christoph; Wu, Zhuhao; Azevedo, Ricardo; Kohl, Johannes; Autry, Anita E; Kadiri, Lolahon; Umadevi Venkataraju, Kannan; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Victoria X; Tang, Cheuk Y; Olsen, Olav; Dulac, Catherine; Osten, Pavel; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2016-06-16

    Understanding how neural information is processed in physiological and pathological states would benefit from precise detection, localization, and quantification of the activity of all neurons across the entire brain, which has not, to date, been achieved in the mammalian brain. We introduce a pipeline for high-speed acquisition of brain activity at cellular resolution through profiling immediate early gene expression using immunostaining and light-sheet fluorescence imaging, followed by automated mapping and analysis of activity by an open-source software program we term ClearMap. We validate the pipeline first by analysis of brain regions activated in response to haloperidol. Next, we report new cortical regions downstream of whisker-evoked sensory processing during active exploration. Last, we combine activity mapping with axon tracing to uncover new brain regions differentially activated during parenting behavior. This pipeline is widely applicable to different experimental paradigms, including animal species for which transgenic activity reporters are not readily available.

  12. Controlling Hox gene expression and activity to build the vertebrate axial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Casaca, Ana; Santos, Ana Cristina; Mallo, Moisés

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that Hox genes are central players in patterning the vertebrate axial skeleton. Extensive genetic studies in the mouse have revealed that the combinatorial activity of Hox genes along the anterior-posterior body axis specifies different vertebral identities. In addition, Hox genes were instrumental for the evolutionary diversification of the vertebrate body plan. In this review, we focus on fundamental questions regarding the intricate mechanisms controlling Hox gene activity. In particular, we discuss the functional relevance of the precise timing of Hox gene activation in the embryo. Moreover, we provide insight into the epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that are likely to control this process and are responsible for the maintenance of spatially restricted Hox expression domains throughout embryonic development. We also analyze how specific features of each Hox protein may contribute to the functional diversity of Hox family. Altogether, the work reviewed here further supports the notion that the Hox program is far more complex than initially assumed. Exciting new findings will surely emerge in the years ahead.

  13. Stem cell-based gene therapy activated using magnetic hyperthermia to enhance the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Perry T; Shah, Shreyas; Pasquale, Nicholas J; Garbuzenko, Olga B; Minko, Tamara; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2016-03-01

    Stem cell-based gene therapies, wherein stem cells are genetically engineered to express therapeutic molecules, have shown tremendous potential for cancer applications owing to their innate ability to home to tumors. However, traditional stem cell-based gene therapies are hampered by our current inability to control when the therapeutic genes are actually turned on, thereby resulting in detrimental side effects. Here, we report the novel application of magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for the dual purpose of delivering and activating a heat-inducible gene vector that encodes TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs). By combining the tumor tropism of the AD-MSCs with the spatiotemporal MCNP-based delivery and activation of TRAIL expression, this platform provides an attractive means with which to enhance our control over the activation of stem cell-based gene therapies. In particular, we found that these engineered AD-MSCs retained their innate ability to proliferate, differentiate, and, most importantly, home to tumors, making them ideal cellular carriers. Moreover, exposure of the engineered AD-MSCS to mild magnetic hyperthermia resulted in the selective expression of TRAIL from the engineered AD-MSCs and, as a result, induced significant ovarian cancer cell death in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Evolution of high cellulolytic activity in symbiotic Streptomyces through selection of expanded gene content and coordinated gene expression

    DOE PAGES

    Book, Adam J.; Lewin, Gina R.; McDonald, Bradon R.; ...

    2016-06-08

    In this study, the evolution of cellulose degradation was a defining event in the history of life. Without efficient decomposition and recycling, dead plant biomass would quickly accumulate and become inaccessible to terrestrial food webs and the global carbon cycle. On land, the primary drivers of plant biomass deconstruction are fungi and bacteria in the soil or associated with herbivorous eukaryotes. While the ecological importance of plant-decomposing microbes is well established, little is known about the distribution or evolution of cellulolytic activity in any bacterial genus. Here we show that in Streptomyces, a genus of Actinobacteria abundant in soil andmore » symbiotic niches, the ability to rapidly degrade cellulose is largely restricted to two clades of host-associated strains and is not a conserved characteristic of the Streptomyces genus or host-associated strains. Our comparative genomics identify that while plant biomass degrading genes (CAZy) are widespread in Streptomyces, key enzyme families are enriched in highly cellulolytic strains. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrate that cellulolytic strains express a suite of multi-domain CAZy enzymes that are coregulated by the CebR transcriptional regulator. Using targeted gene deletions, we verify the importance of a highly expressed cellulase (GH6 family cellobiohydrolase) and the CebR transcriptional repressor to the cellulolytic phenotype. Evolutionary analyses identify complex genomic modifications that drive plant biomass deconstruction in Streptomyces, including acquisition and selective retention of CAZy genes and transcriptional regulators. Our results suggest that host-associated niches have selected some symbiotic Streptomyces for increased cellulose degrading activity and that symbiotic bacteria are a rich biochemical and enzymatic resource for biotechnology.« less

  15. Evolution of High Cellulolytic Activity in Symbiotic Streptomyces through Selection of Expanded Gene Content and Coordinated Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Book, Adam J; Lewin, Gina R; McDonald, Bradon R; Takasuka, Taichi E; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Doering, Drew T; Suh, Steven; Raffa, Kenneth F; Fox, Brian G; Currie, Cameron R

    2016-06-01

    The evolution of cellulose degradation was a defining event in the history of life. Without efficient decomposition and recycling, dead plant biomass would quickly accumulate and become inaccessible to terrestrial food webs and the global carbon cycle. On land, the primary drivers of plant biomass deconstruction are fungi and bacteria in the soil or associated with herbivorous eukaryotes. While the ecological importance of plant-decomposing microbes is well established, little is known about the distribution or evolution of cellulolytic activity in any bacterial genus. Here we show that in Streptomyces, a genus of Actinobacteria abundant in soil and symbiotic niches, the ability to rapidly degrade cellulose is largely restricted to two clades of host-associated strains and is not a conserved characteristic of the Streptomyces genus or host-associated strains. Our comparative genomics identify that while plant biomass degrading genes (CAZy) are widespread in Streptomyces, key enzyme families are enriched in highly cellulolytic strains. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrate that cellulolytic strains express a suite of multi-domain CAZy enzymes that are coregulated by the CebR transcriptional regulator. Using targeted gene deletions, we verify the importance of a highly expressed cellulase (GH6 family cellobiohydrolase) and the CebR transcriptional repressor to the cellulolytic phenotype. Evolutionary analyses identify complex genomic modifications that drive plant biomass deconstruction in Streptomyces, including acquisition and selective retention of CAZy genes and transcriptional regulators. Our results suggest that host-associated niches have selected some symbiotic Streptomyces for increased cellulose degrading activity and that symbiotic bacteria are a rich biochemical and enzymatic resource for biotechnology.

  16. Evolution of High Cellulolytic Activity in Symbiotic Streptomyces through Selection of Expanded Gene Content and Coordinated Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Bradon R.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Doering, Drew T.; Raffa, Kenneth F.; Fox, Brian G.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of cellulose degradation was a defining event in the history of life. Without efficient decomposition and recycling, dead plant biomass would quickly accumulate and become inaccessible to terrestrial food webs and the global carbon cycle. On land, the primary drivers of plant biomass deconstruction are fungi and bacteria in the soil or associated with herbivorous eukaryotes. While the ecological importance of plant-decomposing microbes is well established, little is known about the distribution or evolution of cellulolytic activity in any bacterial genus. Here we show that in Streptomyces, a genus of Actinobacteria abundant in soil and symbiotic niches, the ability to rapidly degrade cellulose is largely restricted to two clades of host-associated strains and is not a conserved characteristic of the Streptomyces genus or host-associated strains. Our comparative genomics identify that while plant biomass degrading genes (CAZy) are widespread in Streptomyces, key enzyme families are enriched in highly cellulolytic strains. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrate that cellulolytic strains express a suite of multi-domain CAZy enzymes that are coregulated by the CebR transcriptional regulator. Using targeted gene deletions, we verify the importance of a highly expressed cellulase (GH6 family cellobiohydrolase) and the CebR transcriptional repressor to the cellulolytic phenotype. Evolutionary analyses identify complex genomic modifications that drive plant biomass deconstruction in Streptomyces, including acquisition and selective retention of CAZy genes and transcriptional regulators. Our results suggest that host-associated niches have selected some symbiotic Streptomyces for increased cellulose degrading activity and that symbiotic bacteria are a rich biochemical and enzymatic resource for biotechnology. PMID:27276034

  17. Keeping the blood flowing-plasminogen activator genes and feeding behavior in vampire bats.

    PubMed

    Tellgren-Roth, Asa; Dittmar, Katharina; Massey, Steven E; Kemi, Cecilia; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Savolainen, Peter; Lyons, Leslie A; Liberles, David A

    2009-01-01

    The blood feeding vampire bats emerged from New World leaf-nosed bats that fed on fruit and insects. Plasminogen activator, a serine protease that regulates blood coagulation, is known to be expressed in the saliva of Desmodus rotundus (common vampire bat) and is thought to be a key enzyme for the emergence of blood feeding in vampire bats. To better understand the evolution of this biological function, we studied the plasminogen activator (PA) genes from all vampire bat species in light of their feeding transition to bird and subsequently mammalian blood. We include the rare species Diphylla ecaudata and Diaemus youngi, where plasminogen activator had not previously been studied and demonstrate that PA gene duplication observed in Desmodus is not essential to the vampire phenotype, but relates to the emergence of predominant mammalian blood feeding in this species. Plasminogen activator has evolved through gene duplication, domain loss, and sequence evolution leading to change in fibrin-specificity and susceptibility to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Before undertaking this study, only the four plasminogen activator isoforms from Desmodus were known. The evolution of vampire bat plasminogen activators can now be linked phylogenetically to the transition in feeding behavior among vampire bat species from bird to mammalian blood.

  18. Keeping the blood flowing—plasminogen activator genes and feeding behavior in vampire bats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellgren-Roth, Åsa; Dittmar, Katharina; Massey, Steven E.; Kemi, Cecilia; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Savolainen, Peter; Lyons, Leslie A.; Liberles, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The blood feeding vampire bats emerged from New World leaf-nosed bats that fed on fruit and insects. Plasminogen activator, a serine protease that regulates blood coagulation, is known to be expressed in the saliva of Desmodus rotundus (common vampire bat) and is thought to be a key enzyme for the emergence of blood feeding in vampire bats. To better understand the evolution of this biological function, we studied the plasminogen activator (PA) genes from all vampire bat species in light of their feeding transition to bird and subsequently mammalian blood. We include the rare species Diphylla ecaudata and Diaemus youngi, where plasminogen activator had not previously been studied and demonstrate that PA gene duplication observed in Desmodus is not essential to the vampire phenotype, but relates to the emergence of predominant mammalian blood feeding in this species. Plasminogen activator has evolved through gene duplication, domain loss, and sequence evolution leading to change in fibrin-specificity and susceptibility to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Before undertaking this study, only the four plasminogen activator isoforms from Desmodus were known. The evolution of vampire bat plasminogen activators can now be linked phylogenetically to the transition in feeding behavior among vampire bat species from bird to mammalian blood.

  19. Gene targeting in rats using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Ménoret, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Rémy, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Thépenier, Virginie; Thinard, Reynald; Ouisse, Laure-Hélène; De Cian, Anne; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio

    2014-08-15

    The rat is a model of choice to understanding gene function and modeling human diseases. Since recent years, successful engineering technologies using gene-specific nucleases have been developed to gene edit the genome of different species, including the rat. This development has become important for the creation of new rat animals models of human diseases, analyze the role of genes and express recombinant proteins. Transcription activator-like (TALE) nucleases are designed nucleases consist of a DNA binding domain fused to a nuclease domain capable of cleaving the targeted DNA. We describe a detailed protocol for generating knockout rats via microinjection of TALE nucleases into fertilized eggs. This technology is an efficient, cost- and time-effective method for creating new rat models.

  20. Structure-activity investigation on the gene transfection properties of cardiolipin mimicking gemini lipid analogues.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Avinash; Paul, Bishwajit; Kondaiah, Paturu; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2008-06-01

    A structure-activity relationship has been explored on the gene transfection efficiencies of cardiolipin mimicking gemini lipid analogues upon variation of length and hydrophilicity of the spacer between the cationic ammonium headgroups and lipid hydrocarbon chain lengths. All the gemini lipids were found to be highly superior in gene transfer abilities as compared to their monomeric lipid and a related commercially available formulation. Pseudoglyceryl gemini lipids bearing an oxyethylene (-CH2-(CH2-O-CH2)m-CH2-) spacer were found to be superior gene transfecting agents as compared to those bearing polymethylene (-CH2)m-) spacers. The major characteristic feature of the present set of gemini lipids is their serum compatibility, which is most often the major hurdle in liposome-mediated gene delivery.

  1. Urokinase type plasminogen activator mediates Interleukin-17-induced peripheral blood mesenchymal stem cell motility and transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Krstić, Jelena; Obradović, Hristina; Jauković, Aleksandra; Okić-Đorđević, Ivana; Trivanović, Drenka; Kukolj, Tamara; Mojsilović, Slavko; Ilić, Vesna; Santibañez, Juan F; Bugarski, Diana

    2015-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the potential to migrate toward damaged tissues increasing tissue regeneration. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a proinflammatory cytokine with pleiotropic effects associated with many inflammatory diseases. Although IL-17 can modulate MSC functions, its capacity to regulate MSC migration is not well elucidated so far. Here, we studied the role of IL-17 on peripheral blood (PB) derived MSC migration and transmigration across endothelial cells. IL-17 increased PB-MSC migration in a wound healing assay as well as cell mobilization from collagen gel. Concomitantly IL-17 induced the expression of urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA) without affecting matrix metalloproteinase expression. The incremented uPA expression mediated the capacity of IL-17 to enhance PB-MSC migration in a ERK1,2 MAPK dependent way. Also, IL-17 induced PB-MSC migration alongside with changes in cell polarization and uPA localization in cell protrusions. Moreover, IL-17 increased PB-MSC adhesion to endothelial cells and transendothelial migration, as well as increased the capacity of PB-MSC adhesion to fibronectin, in an uPA-dependent fashion. Therefore, our data suggested that IL-17 may act as chemotropic factor for PB-MSCs by incrementing cell motility and uPA expression during inflammation development.

  2. Genetic Organization of Plasmid ColJs, Encoding Colicin Js Activity, Immunity, and Release Genes

    PubMed Central

    Šmajs, David; Weinstock, George M.

    2001-01-01

    The 5.2-kb ColJs plasmid of a colicinogenic strain of Shigella sonnei (colicin type 7) was isolated and sequenced. pColJs was partly homologous to pColE1 and to pesticin-encoding plasmid pPCP1, mainly in the rep, mob, and cer regions. A 1.2-kb unique region of pColJs showed significantly different G+C content (34%) compared to the rest of pColJs (53%). Within the unique region, seven open reading frames (ORFs) were identified. ORF94 was shown to code for colicin Js activity (cja), a 94-amino-acid polypeptide (molecular mass, 10.4 kDa); ORF129 (cji) was shown to code for the 129-amino-acid colicin Js immunity protein (molecular mass, 14.3 kDa); and ORF65 was shown to be involved in colicin Js release by producer bacteria (cjl) coding for a 65-amino-acid polypeptide (molecular mass, 7.5 kDa). In contrast to the gene order in other colicin operons, the cjl gene was found upstream from cja. Moreover, the promoter upstream from cjl was similar to promoters described upstream from several colicin activity genes. The cji gene was found to be located downstream from cja with a transcription polarity opposite to that of the cjl and cja genes. The cja, cji, and cjl genes were not similar to other known colicin genes. Colicin Js was purified as an inactive fusion protein with an N-terminal histidine tag. Activity of the purified fusion form of colicin Js was restored after cleavage of the amino acids fused to the colicin Js N terminus. PMID:11395458

  3. Gene expression profiling of pituitary melanotrope cells during their physiological activation.

    PubMed

    Kuribara, Miyuki; van Bakel, Nick H M; Ramekers, Dyan; de Gouw, Daan; Neijts, Roel; Roubos, Eric W; Scheenen, Wim J J M; Martens, Gerard J M; Jenks, Bruce G

    2012-01-01

    The pituitary melanotrope cells of the amphibian Xenopus laevis are responsible for the production of the pigment-dispersing peptide α-melanophore-stimulating hormone, which allows the animal to adapt its skin color to its environment. During adaptation to a dark background the melanotrope cells undergo remarkable changes characterized by dramatic increases in cell size and secretory activity. In this study we performed microarray mRNA expression profiling to identify genes important to melanotrope activation and growth. We show a strong increase in the expression of the immediate early gene (IEG) c-Fos and of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF). Furthermore, we demonstrate the involvement of another IEG in the adaptation process, Nur77, and conclude from in vitro experiments that the expression of both c-Fos and Nur77 are partially regulated by the adenylyl cyclase system and calcium ions. In addition, we found a steady up-regulation of Ras-like product during the adaptation process, possibly evoked by BDNF/TrkB signaling. Finally, the gene encoding the 105-kDa heat shock protein HSPh1 was transiently up-regulated in the course of black-background adaptation and a gene product homologous to ferritin (ferritin-like product) was >100-fold up-regulated in fully black-adapted animals. We suggest that these latter two genes are induced in response to cellular stress and that they may be involved in changing the mode of mRNA translation required to meet the increased demand for de novo protein synthesis. Together, our results show that microarray analysis is a valuable approach to identify the genes responsible for generating coordinated responses in physiologically activated cells.

  4. Characterization of the biocontrol activity of pseudomonas fluorescens strain X reveals novel genes regulated by glucose.

    PubMed

    Kremmydas, Gerasimos F; Tampakaki, Anastasia P; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios G

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain X, a bacterial isolate from the rhizosphere of bean seedlings, has the ability to suppress damping-off caused by the oomycete Pythium ultimum. To determine the genes controlling the biocontrol activity of strain X, transposon mutagenesis, sequencing and complementation was performed. Results indicate that, biocontrol ability of this isolate is attributed to gcd gene encoding glucose dehydrogenase, genes encoding its co-enzyme pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), and two genes (sup5 and sup6) which seem to be organized in a putative operon. This operon (named supX) consists of five genes, one of which encodes a non-ribosomal peptide synthase. A unique binding site for a GntR-type transcriptional factor is localized upstream of the supX putative operon. Synteny comparison of the genes in supX revealed that they are common in the genus Pseudomonas, but with a low degree of similarity. supX shows high similarity only to the mangotoxin operon of Ps. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that transcription of supX is strongly reduced in the gcd and PQQ-minus mutants of Ps. fluorescens strain X. On the contrary, transcription of supX in the wild type is enhanced by glucose and transcription levels that appear to be higher during the stationary phase. Gcd, which uses PQQ as a cofactor, catalyses the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid, which controls the activity of the GntR family of transcriptional factors. The genes in the supX putative operon have not been implicated before in the biocontrol of plant pathogens by pseudomonads. They are involved in the biosynthesis of an antimicrobial compound by Ps. fluorescens strain X and their transcription is controlled by glucose, possibly through the activity of a GntR-type transcriptional factor binding upstream of this putative operon.

  5. Effect of Regulatory Element DNA Methylation on Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rivier-Cordey, Anne-Sophie; Caetano, Carlos; Fish, Richard J.; Kruithof, Egbert K. O.

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the tissue-type plasminogen activator gene (t-PA; gene name PLAT) is regulated, in part, by epigenetic mechanisms. We investigated the relationship between PLAT methylation and PLAT expression in five primary human cell types and six transformed cell lines. CpG methylation was analyzed in the proximal PLAT gene promoter and near the multihormone responsive enhancer (MHRE) -7.3 kilobase pairs upstream of the PLAT transcriptional start site (TSS, -7.3 kb). In Bowes melanoma cells, the PLAT promoter and the MHRE were fully unmethylated and t-PA secretion was extremely high. In other cell types the region from -647 to -366 was fully methylated, whereas an unmethylated stretch of DNA from -121 to +94 was required but not sufficient for detectable t-PA mRNA and t-PA secretion. DNA methylation near the MHRE was not correlated with t-PA secretion. Specific methylation of the PLAT promoter region -151 to +151, inserted into a firefly luciferase reporter gene, abolished reporter gene activity. The region -121 to + 94 contains two well-described regulatory elements, a PMA-responsive element (CRE) near -106 and a GC-rich region containing an Sp1 binding site near +59. Methylation of double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides containing the CRE or the GC-rich region had little or no effect on transcription factor binding. Methylated CpGs may attract co-repressor complexes that contain histone deacetylases (HDAC). However, reporter gene activity of methylated plasmids was not restored by the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin. In conclusion, efficient PLAT gene expression requires a short stretch of unmethylated CpG sites in the proximal promoter. PMID:27973546

  6. Transcriptional Activity of rRNA Genes in Barley Cells after Mutagenic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the combination of the micronucleus test with analysis of the activity of the rRNA genes in mutagen-treated Hordeum vulgare (barley) by maleic hydrazide (MH) cells was performed. Simultaneously fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 25S rDNA as probes and an analysis of the transcriptional activity of 35S rRNA genes with silver staining were performed. The results showed that transcriptional activity is always maintained in the micronuclei although they are eliminated during the next cell cycle. The analysis of the transcriptional activity was extended to barley nuclei. MH influenced the fusion of the nucleoli in barley nuclei. The silver staining enabled detection of the nuclear bodies which arose after MH treatment. The results confirmed the usefulness of cytogenetic techniques in the characterization of micronuclei. Similar analyses can be now extended to other abiotic stresses to study the response of plant cells to the environment. PMID:27257817

  7. A long noncoding RNA induced by TLRs mediates both activation and repression of immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Susan; Atianand, Maninjay; Aiello, Daniel; Ricci, Emiliano; Gandhi, Pallavi; Hall, Lisa L.; Byron, Meg; Monks, Brian; Henry-Bezy, Meabh; O’Neill, Luke A.J; Lawrence, Jeanne B.; Moore, Melissa J.; Caffrey, Daniel R.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    An inducible program of inflammatory gene expression is central to anti-microbial defenses. Signal-dependent activation of transcription factors, transcriptional co-regulators and chromatin modifying factors collaborate to control this response. Here we identify a long noncoding RNA that acts as a key regulator of this inflammatory response. Germline-encoded receptors such as the Toll-like receptors induce the expression of numerous lncRNAs. One of these, lincRNA-Cox2 mediates both the activation and repression of distinct classes of immune genes. Transcriptional repression of target genes is dependent on interactions of lincRNA-Cox2 with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A/B and A2/B1. Collectively, these studies unveil a central role of lincRNA-Cox2 as a broad acting regulatory component of the circuit that controls the inflammatory response. PMID:23907535

  8. The full-length transcript of a caulimovirus is a polycistronic mRNA whose genes are trans activated by the product of gene VI.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, H B; Gowda, S; Wu, F C; Shepherd, R J

    1992-05-01

    Gene expression of figwort mosaic virus (FMV), a caulimovirus, was investigated by electroporation of Nicotiana edwardsonii cell suspension protoplasts with cloned viral constructs in which a reporter gene was inserted at various positions on the genome. The results showed that the genome of FMV contains two promoters; one is used for the production of a full-length RNA and another initiates synthesis of a separate monocistronic RNA for gene VI. Evidence is provided that the full-length transcript, the probable template for reverse transcription, can serve as a polycistronic mRNA for translation of genes I through V and perhaps also gene VI. Expression of all the genes on the polycistronic mRNA is trans activated by the gene VI protein. Reporter gene expression appears most efficient when its start codon is in close proximity to the stop codon of the preceding gene, as for the native genes of caulimoviruses. We propose that the gene VI product enables expression of the polycistronic mRNA by promoting reinitiation of ribosomes to give translational coupling of individual genes.

  9. Activation of Hh Signaling: A Critical Biological Consequence of ETS Gene Anomalies in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-31

    consequence of ETS gene overexpression in prostate cells is increased expression and activity of Gli transcription factors that are normally induced by...Additionally, we identified Gli overexpression induces androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells and this action is mediated by...interaction between GLIs and androgen receptor (AR) which leads to activation of AR signaling under androgen-deprived conditions. 15. SUBJECT TERMS

  10. Intermedin/adrenomedullin 2 is a stress-inducible gene controlled by activating transcription factor 4.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Irina E; Garaeva, Alisa A; Chumakov, Peter M; Evstafieva, Alexandra G

    2016-09-15

    Intermedin or adrenomedullin 2 is a set of calcitonin-related peptides with a putative tumor angiogenesis promoting activity that are formed by proteolytic processing of the ADM2 gene product. It has been proposed that the ADM2 gene is regulated by the estrogen response element (ERE) and hypoxia response elements (HRE) found within its promoter region. In the present study we reveal a functional mechanism by which ADM2 participates in the unfolded protein response (UPR) and in responses to the mitochondrial respiration chain inhibition. We show that the ADM2 gene is controlled by activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), the principal regulator of the integrated stress response (ISR). The upregulation of ADM2 mRNA could be prevented by the pharmacological ISR inhibitor ISRIB and by the downregulation of ATF4 with specific shRNA, while ectopic expression of ATF4 cDNA resulted in a notable increase in ADM2 gene transcription. A potential ATF4-binding site was identified in the coding region of the ADM2 gene and the requirement of this site during the ATF4-mediated ADM2 gene promoter activation was validated by the luciferase reporter assay. Mutagenesis of the putative ATF4-response element prevented the induction of luciferase activity in response to ATF4 overproduction, as well as in response to mitochondrial electron transfer chain inhibition by piericidin A and ER stress induction by tunicamycin and brefeldin A. Since ADM2 was shown to inhibit ATF4 expression during myocardial ER stress, a feedback mechanism could be proposed for the ADM2 regulation under ER stress conditions.

  11. Activation of Ftz-F1-Responsive Genes through Ftz/Ftz-F1 Dependent Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Field, Amanda; Xiang, Jie; Anderson, W. Ray; Graham, Patricia; Pick, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor Ftz-F1 is expressed in all somatic nuclei in Drosophila embryos, but mutations result in a pair-rule phenotype. This was explained by the interaction of Ftz-F1 with the homeodomain protein Ftz that is expressed in stripes in the primordia of segments missing in either ftz-f1 or ftz mutants. Ftz-F1 and Ftz were shown to physically interact and coordinately activate the expression of ftz itself and engrailed by synergistic binding to composite Ftz-F1/Ftz binding sites. However, attempts to identify additional target genes on the basis of Ftz-F1/ Ftz binding alone has met with only limited success. To discern rules for Ftz-F1 target site selection in vivo and to identify additional target genes, a microarray analysis was performed comparing wildtype and ftz-f1 mutant embryos. Ftz-F1-responsive genes most highly regulated included engrailed and nine additional genes expressed in patterns dependent on both ftz and ftz-f1. Candidate enhancers for these genes were identified by combining BDTNP Ftz ChIP-chip data with a computational search for Ftz-F1 binding sites. Of eight enhancer reporter genes tested in transgenic embryos, six generated expression patterns similar to the corresponding endogenous gene and expression was lost in ftz mutants. These studies identified a new set of Ftz-F1 targets, all of which are co-regulated by Ftz. Comparative analysis of enhancers containing Ftz/Ftz-F1 binding sites that were or were not bona fide targets in vivo suggested that GAF negatively regulates enhancers that contain Ftz/Ftz-F1 binding sites but are not actually utilized. These targets include other regulatory factors as well as genes involved directly in morphogenesis, providing insight into how pair-rule genes establish the body pattern. PMID:27723822

  12. DNA sequences that activate isocitrate lyase gene expression during late embryogenesis and during postgerminative growth.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J Z; Santes, C M; Engel, M L; Gasser, C S; Harada, J J

    1996-01-01

    We analyzed DNA sequences that regulate the expression of an isocitrate lyase gene from Brassica napus L. during late embryogenesis and during postgerminative growth to determine whether glyoxysomal function is induced by a common mechanism at different developmental stages. beta-Glucuronidase constructs were used both in transient expression assays in B. napus and in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana to identify the segments of the isocitrate lyase 5' flanking region that influence promoter activity. DNA sequences that play the principal role in activating the promoter during post-germinative growth are located more than 1,200 bp upstream of the gene. Distinct DNA sequences that were sufficient for high-level expression during late embryogenesis but only low-level expression during postgerminative growth were also identified. Other parts of the 5' flanking region increased promoter activity both in developing seed and in seedlings. We conclude that a combination of elements is involved in regulating the isocitrate lyase gene and that distinct DNA sequences play primary roles in activating the gene in embryos and in seedlings. These findings suggest that different signals contribute to the induction of glyoxysomal function during these two developmental stages. We also showed that some of the constructs were expressed differently in transient expression assays and in transgenic plants. PMID:8934622

  13. Resveratrol regulates gene transcription via activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Gerald; Rössler, Oliver G

    2017-03-01

    Resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenolic phytoalexin of grapes and other fruits and plants, is a common constituent of our diet and of dietary supplements. Many health-promoting benefits have been connected with resveratrol in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, inflammation, neurodegeneration, and diseases connected with aging. To explain the pleiotropic effects of resveratrol, the molecular targets of this compound have to be identified on the cellular level. Resveratrol induces intracellular signal transduction pathways which ultimately lead to changes in the gene expression pattern of the cells. Here, we review the effect of resveratrol on the activation of the stimulus-responsive transcription factors CREB, AP-1, Egr-1, Elk-1, and Nrf2. Following activation, these transcription factors induce transcription of delayed response genes. The gene products of these delayed response genes are ultimately responsible for the changes in the biochemistry and physiology of resveratrol-treated cells. The activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors may explain many of the intracellular activities of resveratrol. However, results obtained in vitro may not easily be transferred to in vivo systems.

  14. Global gene regulation during activation of immunoglobulin class switching in human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youming; Fear, David J.; Willis-Owen, Saffron A. G.; Cookson, William O.; Moffatt, Miriam F.

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR) to IgE is a tightly regulated process central to atopic disease. To profile the B-cell transcriptional responses underlying the activation of the germinal centre activities leading to the generation of IgE, naïve human B-cells were stimulated with IL-4 and anti-CD40. Gene expression and alternative splicing were profiled over 12 days using the Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST Array. A total of 1,399 genes, forming 13 temporal profiles were differentially expressed. CCL22 and CCL17 were dramatically induced but followed a temporal trajectory distinct from classical mediators of isotype switching. AICDA, NFIL3, IRF4, XBP1 and BATF3 shared a profile with several genes involved in innate immunity, but with no recognised role in CSR. A transcription factor BHLHE40 was identified at the core of this profile. B-cell activation was also accompanied by variation in exon retention affecting >200 genes including CCL17. The data indicate a circadian component and central roles for the Th2 chemokines CCL22 and CCL17 in the activation of CSR. PMID:27897229

  15. Chromatin recruitment of activated AMPK drives fasting response genes co-controlled by GR and PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Ratman, Dariusz; Mylka, Viacheslav; Bougarne, Nadia; Pawlak, Michal; Caron, Sandrine; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Paumelle, Réjane; De Cauwer, Lode; Thommis, Jonathan; Rider, Mark H.; Libert, Claude; Lievens, Sam; Tavernier, Jan; Staels, Bart; De Bosscher, Karolien

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to fasting involves both Glucocorticoid Receptor (GRα) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) activation. Given both receptors can physically interact we investigated the possibility of a genome-wide cross-talk between activated GR and PPARα, using ChIP- and RNA-seq in primary hepatocytes. Our data reveal extensive chromatin co-localization of both factors with cooperative induction of genes controlling lipid/glucose metabolism. Key GR/PPAR co-controlled genes switched from transcriptional antagonism to cooperativity when moving from short to prolonged hepatocyte fasting, a phenomenon coinciding with gene promoter recruitment of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and blocked by its pharmacological inhibition. In vitro interaction studies support trimeric complex formation between GR, PPARα and phospho-AMPK. Long-term fasting in mice showed enhanced phosphorylation of liver AMPK and GRα Ser211. Phospho-AMPK chromatin recruitment at liver target genes, observed upon prolonged fasting in mice, is dampened by refeeding. Taken together, our results identify phospho-AMPK as a molecular switch able to cooperate with nuclear receptors at the chromatin level and reveal a novel adaptation mechanism to prolonged fasting. PMID:27576532

  16. Transcriptomic sequencing reveals a set of unique genes activated by butyrate-induced histone modification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes induced by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell using deep RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq), a set of unique gen...

  17. FLUCONAZOLE-INDUCED HEPATIC CYTOCHROME P450 GENE EXPRESSION AND ENZYMATIC ACTIVITIES IN RATS AND MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was undertaken to examine the effects of the triazole antifungal agent fluconazole on the expression of hepatic cytochrome P450 (Cyp) genes and the activities of Cyp enzymes in male Sprague-Dawley rats and male CD-1 mice. Alkoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (AROD) methods w...

  18. ACTIVATION OF A CRYPTIC D-SERINE DEAMINASE (DSD) GENE FROM PSEUDOMONAS CEPACIA 17616

    EPA Science Inventory

    D-serine inhibits growth of P. cepacia 17616; however, resistant mutants able to express an ordinarily cryptic D-serine deaminase (dsd) gene were isolated readily. The resistant strains formed high levels of a D-serine deaminase active on D-threonine as well as D-serine. IS eleme...

  19. Gene-physical activity interactions in the etiology of obesity: behavioral considerations.

    PubMed

    Dishman, Rod K

    2008-12-01

    Understanding how genes, environment, and personal motivation operate to influence physical activity will require (i) inclusion of properly validated measures of putative mediators (e.g., cultural values, efficacy and control beliefs, goals, intentions, enjoyment, and self-management skills) and moderators (e.g., age or maturation, personality, race/ethnicity, fitness, fatness, skill, and competing behaviors) of physical activity, (ii) a search for candidate genes involved with motivational systems of energy expenditure in addition to energy intake pathways, (iii) assessment of specific features physical activity exposure (i.e., type, intensity, timing, and context), (iv) manipulation of physical activity or prospective observation of change in physical activity at multiple times, rather than cross-sectional association and linkage studies, and (v) use of statistical procedures that permit multilevel modeling (i.e., personal and group-level variables) of direct, indirect (i.e., mediated), and moderated (i.e., interactions of mediators with external factors) relations with physical activity within theoretical gene-environment networks.

  20. MALT1 Protease Activity Controls the Expression of Inflammatory Genes in Keratinocytes upon Zymosan Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Anja; Grondona, Paula; Maier, Tabea; Brändle, Marc; Schönfeld, Caroline; Jäger, Günter; Kosnopfel, Corinna; Eberle, Franziska C; Schittek, Birgit; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Yazdi, Amir S; Hailfinger, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    The protease activity of the paracaspase mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1 (MALT1) plays an important role in antigen receptor-mediated lymphocyte activation by controlling the activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB and is thus essential for the expression of inflammatory target genes. MALT1 is not only present in cells of the hematopoietic lineage, but is ubiquitously expressed. Here we report that stimulation with zymosan or Staphylococcus aureus induced MALT1 protease activity in human primary keratinocytes. Inhibition of the Src family of kinases or novel protein kinase C isoforms as well as silencing of CARMA2 or BCL10 interfered with activation of MALT1 protease. Silencing or inhibition of MALT1 protease strongly decreased the expression of important inflammatory genes such as TNFα, IL-17C, CXCL8 and HBD-2. MALT1-inhibited cells were unable to mount an antimicrobial response upon zymosan stimulation or phorbolester/ionomycin treatment, demonstrating a central role of MALT1 protease activity in keratinocyte immunity and suggesting MALT1 as a potential target in inflammatory skin diseases.

  1. Shaping synaptic plasticity: the role of activity-mediated epigenetic regulation on gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Mendoza, Javier; Díaz de León-Guerrero, Sol; Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor

    2013-10-01

    Learning and memory are basic functions of the brain that allowed human evolution. It is well accepted that during learning and memory formation the dynamic establishment of new active synaptic connections is crucial. Persistent synaptic activation leads to molecular events that include increased release of neurotransmitters, increased expression of receptors on the postsynaptic neuron, thus creating a positive feedback that results in the activation of distinct signaling pathways that temporally and permanently alter specific patterns of gene expression. However, the epigenetic changes that allow the establishment of long term genetic programs that control learning and memory are not completely understood. Even less is known regarding the signaling events triggered by synaptic activity that regulate these epigenetic marks. Here we review the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling activity-dependent gene transcription leading synaptic plasticity and memory formation. We describe how Ca(2+) entry through N-methyl-d-aspartate-type glutamate neurotransmitter receptors result in the activation of specific signaling pathways leading to changes in gene expression, giving special emphasis to the recent data pointing out different epigenetic mechanisms (histone acetylation, methylation and phosphorylation as well as DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation) underlying learning and memory.

  2. Exchange factors directly activated by cAMP mediate melanocortin 4 receptor-induced gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Glas, Evi; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gs protein-coupled receptors regulate many vital body functions by activation of cAMP response elements (CRE) via cAMP-dependent kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the CRE binding protein (CREB). Melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4R) are prototypical Gs-coupled receptors that orchestrate the hypothalamic control of food-intake and metabolism. Remarkably, the significance of PKA for MC4R-induced CRE-dependent transcription in hypothalamic cells has not been rigorously interrogated yet. In two hypothalamic cell lines, we observed that blocking PKA activity had only weak or no effects on reporter gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of exchange factors directly activated by cAMP-1/2 (EPAC-1/2) mitigated MC4R-induced CRE reporter activation and mRNA induction of the CREB-dependent genes c-fos and thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Furthermore, we provide first evidence that extracellular-regulated kinases-1/2 (ERK-1/2) activated by EPACs and not PKA are the elusive CREB kinases responsible for MC4R-induced CREB/CRE activation in hypothalamic cells. Overall, these data emphasize the pivotal role of EPACs rather than PKA in hypothalamic gene expression elicited by a prototypical Gs-coupled receptor. PMID:27612207

  3. High Expression of Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Is Associated with Lymph Node Metastasis of Invasive Ductal Carcinoma of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Do, Sung-Im; Hyun, Keehoon; Park, Yong Lai; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Chae, Seoung Wan; Sohn, Jin Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we evaluated the levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) by performing immunohistochemical staining to determine whether they were reliable prognostic markers in patients with breast cancer. Methods Demographic and clinicopathological parameters of 214 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and 80 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) who were diagnosed and treated from 2006 to 2010 were analyzed. Tissue microarray was constructed and immunohistochemical staining was performed for each specimen. Results Univariate analyses showed that age at diagnosis, history of hormone replacement therapy, radiation therapy, skin and chest wall invasion, Paget disease, lymphovascular invasion, estrogen receptor positivity, and triple-negative subtype were significantly associated with patient prognosis (p<0.005). Patients with DCIS showed higher PAI-1 expression than patients with IDC (82.5% and 36.2%, respectively; p=0.012). Lymph node metastasis was more frequent in patients with high uPA levels than in patients with low uPA levels (p=0.001). Conclusion Our results suggested that PAI-1 was involved in tumor progression in the early stages of breast cancer, such as DCIS. In addition, our results suggested that high uPA levels were associated with the lymph node metastasis of IDC. PMID:27382391

  4. A high-resolution map of the regulator of the complement activation gene cluster on 1q32 that integrates new genes and markers.

    PubMed

    Heine-Suñer, D; Díaz-Guillén, M A; de Villena, F P; Robledo, M; Benítez, J; Rodríguez de Córdoba, S

    1997-01-01

    Sixteen microsatellite markers, including two described here, were used to construct a high-resolution map of the 1q32 region encompassing the regulator of the complement activation (RCA) gene cluster. The RCA genes are a group of related genes coding for plasma and membrane associated proteins that collectively control activation of the complement component C3. We provide here the location of two new genes within the RCA gene cluster. These genes are PFKFB2 that maps 15 kilobases (kb) upstream of the C4BPB gene, and a gene located 4 kb downstream of C4BPA, which seems to code for the 72 000 Mr component of the signal recognition particle (SRP72). Neither of these two genes is related structurally or functionally to the RCA genes. In addition, our map shows the centromere-telomere orientation of the C4BPB/MCP linkage group, which is: centromere-PFKFB2-C4BPB-C4BPA-SRP72-C4BPAL1++ +-C4BPAL2-telomere, and outlines an interval with a significant female-male recombination difference which suggests the presence of a female-specific hotspot(s) of recombination.

  5. Mosquito larvicidal activity of Escherichia coli with combinations of genes from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Dov, E; Boussiba, S; Zaritsky, A

    1995-01-01

    The genes cryIVA and cryIVD, encoding 134- and 72-kDa proteins, respectively, and the gene for a regulatory 20-kDa polypeptide of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (serovar H14) were cloned in all seven possible combinations by the Escherichia coli expression vectors pT7 and pUHE. The four combinations containing cryIVA (cryIVA alone, with cryIVD, with the 20-kDa-protein gene, and with both) displayed high levels of mosquito larvicidal activity in pUHE. The toxicity of the combination of cryIVA and cryIVD, with or without the 20-kDa-protein gene, was higher than has ever been achieved with delta-endotoxin genes in recombinant E. coli. Fifty percent lethal concentrations against third-instar Aedes aegypti larvae for these clones decreased (i.e., toxicity increased) continuously to about 3 x 10(5) cells ml-1 after 4 h of induction. Larvicidal activities, obtained after 30 min of induction, were lower for clones in pT7 and decreased for an additional 3.5 h. Induction of either cryIVD or the 20-kDa-protein gene alone resulted in no larvicidal activity in either pT7 or pUHE20. Cloned together, these genes were slightly toxic in pT7 but not in pUHE20. Five minutes of induction of this combination (cryIVD with the 20-kDa-protein gene) in pT7 yielded a maximal mortality of about 40%, which decreased rapidly and disappeared completely after 50 min. CryIVD is thus apparently degraded in E. coli and partially stabilized by the 20-kDa regulatory protein. Larvicidal activity of the combination of cryIVA and cryIVD was sevenfold higher than that of cryIVA alone, probably because of the cross-stabilization of the polypeptides or the synergism between their activities. PMID:7751296

  6. A physiological increase in insulin suppresses gluconeogenic gene activation in fetal sheep with sustained hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Stephanie R; Sekar, Satya M; Lavezzi, Jinny R; O'Meara, Meghan C; Brown, Laura D; Hay, William W; Rozance, Paul J

    2012-10-15

    Reduced maternal glucose supply to the fetus and resulting fetal hypoglycemia and hypoinsulinemia activate fetal glucose production as a means to maintain cellular glucose uptake. However, this early activation of fetal glucose production may be accompanied by hepatic insulin resistance. We tested the capacity of a physiological increase in insulin to suppress fetal hepatic gluconeogenic gene activation following sustained hypoglycemia to determine whether hepatic insulin sensitivity is maintained. Control fetuses (CON), hypoglycemic fetuses induced by maternal insulin infusion for 8 wk (HG), and 8 wk HG fetuses that received an isoglycemic insulin infusion for the final 7 days (HG+INS) were studied. Glucose and insulin concentrations were 60% lower in HG compared with CON fetuses. Insulin was 50% higher in HG+INS compared with CON and four-fold higher compared with HG fetuses. Expression of the hepatic gluconeogenic genes, PCK1, G6PC, FBP1, GLUT2, and PGC1A was increased in the HG and reduced in the HG+INS liver. Expression of the insulin-regulated glycolytic and lipogenic genes, PFKL and FAS, was increased in the HG+INS liver. Total FOXO1 protein expression, a gluconeogenic activator, was 60% higher in the HG liver. Despite low glucose, insulin, and IGF1 concentrations, phosphorylation of AKT and ERK was higher in the HG liver. Thus, a physiological increase in fetal insulin is sufficient for suppression of gluconeogenic genes and activation of glycolytic and lipogenic genes in the HG fetal liver. These results demonstrate that fetuses exposed to sustained hypoglycemia have maintained hepatic insulin action in contrast to fetuses exposed to placental insufficiency.

  7. Integrating Circadian Activity and Gene Expression Profiles to Predict Chronotoxicity of Drosophila suzukii Response to Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Hamby, Kelly A.; Kwok, Rosanna S.; Zalom, Frank G.; Chiu, Joanna C.

    2013-01-01

    Native to Southeast Asia, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) is a recent invader that infests intact ripe and ripening fruit, leading to significant crop losses in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. Since current D. suzukii management strategies rely heavily on insecticide usage and insecticide detoxification gene expression is under circadian regulation in the closely related Drosophila melanogaster, we set out to determine if integrative analysis of daily activity patterns and detoxification gene expression can predict chronotoxicity of D. suzukii to insecticides. Locomotor assays were performed under conditions that approximate a typical summer or winter day in Watsonville, California, where D. suzukii was first detected in North America. As expected, daily activity patterns of D. suzukii appeared quite different between ‘summer’ and ‘winter’ conditions due to differences in photoperiod and temperature. In the ‘summer’, D. suzukii assumed a more bimodal activity pattern, with maximum activity occurring at dawn and dusk. In the ‘winter’, activity was unimodal and restricted to the warmest part of the circadian cycle. Expression analysis of six detoxification genes and acute contact bioassays were performed at multiple circadian times, but only in conditions approximating Watsonville summer, the cropping season, when most insecticide applications occur. Five of the genes tested exhibited rhythmic expression, with the majority showing peak expression at dawn (ZT0, 6am). We observed significant differences in the chronotoxicity of D. suzukii towards malathion, with highest susceptibility at ZT0 (6am), corresponding to peak expression of cytochrome P450s that may be involved in bioactivation of malathion. High activity levels were not found to correlate with high insecticide susceptibility as initially hypothesized. Chronobiology and chronotoxicity of D. suzukii provide valuable insights for monitoring and control efforts, because insect activity as well as

  8. High-efficiency and heritable gene targeting in mouse by transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhongwei; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Zhaohua; Shao, Yanjiao; Pan, Hongjie; Wei, Gaigai; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Long; Li, Xia; Wang, Ping; Fan, Heng-Yu; Du, Bing; Liu, Bin; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2013-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a powerful new approach for targeted gene disruption in various animal models, but little is known about their activities in Mus musculus, the widely used mammalian model organism. Here, we report that direct injection of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA of TALEN pairs into mouse zygotes induced somatic mutations, which were stably passed to the next generation through germ-line transmission. With one TALEN pair constructed for each of 10 target genes, mutant F0 mice for each gene were obtained with the mutation rate ranged from 13 to 67% and an average of ∼40% of total healthy newborns with no significant differences between C57BL/6 and FVB/N genetic background. One TALEN pair with single mismatch to their intended target sequence in each side failed to yield any mutation. Furthermore, highly efficient germ-line transmission was obtained, as all the F0 founders tested transmitted the mutations to F1 mice. In addition, we also observed that one bi-allele mutant founder of Lepr gene, encoding Leptin receptor, had similar diabetic phenotype as db/db mouse. Together, our results suggest that TALENs are an effective genetic tool for rapid gene disruption with high efficiency and heritability in mouse with distinct genetic background.

  9. Comprehensive developmental profiles of gene activity in regions and subregions of the Arabidopsis seed

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Mark F.; Kirkbride, Ryan C.; Stone, Sandra L.; Pelletier, Julie M.; Bui, Anhthu Q.; Yeung, Edward C.; Hashimoto, Meryl; Fei, Jiong; Harada, Corey M.; Munoz, Matthew D.; Le, Brandon H.; Drews, Gary N.; Brady, Siobhan M.; Goldberg, Robert B.; Harada, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Seeds are complex structures that consist of the embryo, endosperm, and seed-coat regions that are of different ontogenetic origins, and each region can be further divided into morphologically distinct subregions. Despite the importance of seeds for food, fiber, and fuel globally, little is known of the cellular processes that characterize each subregion or how these processes are integrated to permit the coordinated development of the seed. We profiled gene activity genome-wide in every organ, tissue, and cell type of Arabidopsis seeds from fertilization through maturity. The resulting mRNA datasets offer the most comprehensive description of gene activity in seeds with high spatial and temporal resolution, providing unique insights into the function of understudied seed regions. Global comparisons of mRNA populations reveal unexpected overlaps in the functional identities of seed subregions. Analyses of coexpressed gene sets suggest that processes that regulate seed size and filling are coordinated across several subregions. Predictions of gene regulatory networks based on the association of transcription factors with enriched DNA sequence motifs upstream of coexpressed genes identify regulators of seed development. These studies emphasize the utility of these datasets as an essential resource for the study of seed biology. PMID:23319655

  10. Gene activation-associated long noncoding RNAs function in mouse preimplantation development

    PubMed Central

    Hamazaki, Nobuhiko; Uesaka, Masahiro; Nakashima, Kinichi; Agata, Kiyokazu; Imamura, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    In mice, zygotic activation occurs for a wide variety of genes, mainly at the 2-cell stage. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are increasingly being recognized as modulators of gene expression. In this study, directional RNA-seq of MII oocytes and 2-cell embryos identified more than 1000 divergently transcribed lncRNA/mRNA gene pairs. Expression of these bidirectional promoter-associated noncoding RNAs (pancRNAs) was strongly associated with the upregulation of their cognate genes. Conversely, knockdown of three abundant pancRNAs led to reduced mRNA expression, accompanied by sustained DNA methylation even in the presence of enzymes responsible for DNA demethylation. In particular, microinjection of siRNA against the abundant pancRNA partner of interleukin 17d (Il17d) mRNA at the 1-cell stage caused embryonic lethality, which was rescued by supplying IL17D protein in vitro at the 4-cell stage. Thus, this novel class of lncRNAs can modulate the transcription machinery in cis to activate zygotic genes and is important for preimplantation development. PMID:25633350

  11. Quorum activation at a distance: spatiotemporal patterns of gene regulation from diffusion of an autoinducer signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilanji, Gabriel; Langebrake, Jessica; Deleenheer, Patrick; Hagen, Stephen J.

    2012-02-01

    Bacteria in colonies coordinate gene regulation through the exchange of diffusible signal molecules known as autoinducers (AI). This ``quorum signaling'' often occurs in physically heterogeneous and spatially extended environments such as biofilms. Under these conditions the space and time scales for diffusion of the signal limit the range and timing of effective gene regulation. We expect that spatial and temporal patterns of gene expression will reflect physical environmental constraints as well as nonlinear transcriptional activation and feedback within the gene regulatory system. We have combined experiments and modeling to investigate how these spatiotemporal patterns develop. We embed engineered plasmid/GFP quorum sensor strains or wild type strains in a long narrow agar lane, and then introduce AI signal at one terminus of the lane. Diffusion of the AI initiates reporter expression along the length of the lane, extending to macroscopic distances of mm-cm. Resulting patterns are captured quantitatively by a mathematical model that incorporates logistic growth of the population, diffusion of AI, and nonlinear transcriptional activation. Our results show that a diffusing quorum signal can coordinate gene expression over distances of order 1cm on time scales of order 10 hrs.

  12. High-efficiency and heritable gene targeting in mouse by transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhongwei; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Zhaohua; Shao, Yanjiao; Pan, Hongjie; Wei, Gaigai; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Long; Li, Xia; Wang, Ping; Fan, Heng-Yu; Du, Bing; Liu, Bin; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a powerful new approach for targeted gene disruption in various animal models, but little is known about their activities in Mus musculus, the widely used mammalian model organism. Here, we report that direct injection of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA of TALEN pairs into mouse zygotes induced somatic mutations, which were stably passed to the next generation through germ-line transmission. With one TALEN pair constructed for each of 10 target genes, mutant F0 mice for each gene were obtained with the mutation rate ranged from 13 to 67% and an average of ∼40% of total healthy newborns with no significant differences between C57BL/6 and FVB/N genetic background. One TALEN pair with single mismatch to their intended target sequence in each side failed to yield any mutation. Furthermore, highly efficient germ-line transmission was obtained, as all the F0 founders tested transmitted the mutations to F1 mice. In addition, we also observed that one bi-allele mutant founder of Lepr gene, encoding Leptin receptor, had similar diabetic phenotype as db/db mouse. Together, our results suggest that TALENs are an effective genetic tool for rapid gene disruption with high efficiency and heritability in mouse with distinct genetic background. PMID:23630316

  13. Age-associated activation of epigenetically repressed genes in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett-Baker, Pamela E; Wilkowski, Jodi; Burke, David T

    2003-01-01

    Epigenetic control of gene expression is a consistent feature of differentiated mammalian cell types. Epigenetic expression patterns are mitotically heritable and are stably maintained in adult cells. However, unlike somatic DNA mutation, little is known about the occurrence of epigenetic change, or epimutation, during normal adult life. We have monitored the age-associated maintenance of two epigenetic systems--X inactivation and genomic imprinting--using the genes Atp7a and Igf2, respectively. Quantitative measurements of RNA transcripts from the inactive and active alleles were performed in mice from 2 to 24 months of age. For both genes, older animal cohorts showed reproducible increases in transcripts expressed from the silenced alleles. Loss of X chromosome silencing showed cohort mean increases of up to 2.2%, while imprinted-gene activation increased up to 6.7%. The results support the hypothesis that epigenetic loss of gene repression occurs in normal tissues and may be a contributing factor in progressive physiological dysfunction seen during mammalian aging. Quantitatively, the loss of epigenetic control may be one to two orders of magnitude greater than previously determined somatic DNA mutation. PMID:14704185

  14. Gene expression profiling of HGF/Met activation in neonatal mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Stefano; Leo, Christian; Gallo, Simona; Sala, Valentina; Bucci, Enrico; Natale, Massimo; Cantarella, Daniela; Medico, Enzo; Crepaldi, Tiziana

    2013-06-01

    Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) controls growth and differentiation in different cell types, including cardiac cells. However, its downstream effectors are poorly understood. To investigate the transcriptional targets of HGF, we analyzed the hearts of neonatal mice with cardiomyocyte-specific HGF overexpression with whole genome DNA microarrays. When comparing HGF expressing versus control hearts, we found a total of 249 transcripts with significant gene expression changes (210 upregulated and 39 downregulated). Gene Ontology (GO) annotation analysis revealed that the transcripts modulated by HGF were enriched for metabolic functions including: protein translation, vesicle-mediated transport, regulation of transcription, regulation of muscle development. Using an automated literature meta-analysis approach, we obtained a co-occurrence network oriented to the positive regulatory role of Myc and Notch1 in controlling some of the genes which are downstream to HGF. GO analysis of this network returned genes involved in the regulation of heart development. HGF positively controls MyocD, an activator of cardiac gene expression, and Hdac5, an inhibitor of cardiac growth. These results may unveil a new role of HGF in the modulation of signaling pathways implicated in the activation or repression of cardiomyogenesis.

  15. Effects of tiaprofenic acid on plasminogen activators and inhibitors in human OA and RA synovium.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, J P; McCollum, R; Cloutier, J M; Martel-Pelletier, J

    1992-01-01

    The effect of therapeutic and pharmacological concentrations of tiaprofenic acid, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), on the synthesis of the plasminogen activators, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and the plasminogen activator inhibitors 1 and 2 (PAI-1 and PAI-2), by human synovial membranes isolated from osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) sufferers was evaluated. Both forms of plasminogen activator (PA) and PA inhibitor (PAI) were synthesized by the arthritic synovium. PAI-1 and PAI-2 were both synthesized in greater amounts than the plasminogen activators. Tiaprofenic acid induced a dose-dependent decrease in uPA synthesis in both OA and RA, particularly in OA synovium, but had no true effect on tPA. Tiaprofenic acid also exerted a suppressive effect on the synthesis of PAI-1 in both OA and RA synovial membranes, and on the release of PAI-2 in RA synovium. The results of this study indicate that a decrease in uPA synthesis may be one of the mechanisms by which tiaprofenic acid could exert its effects on the arthritic process. The suppressive action of tiaprofenic acid on PAI is not likely to have a significant impact on the balance of plasminogen activators and plasminogen activator inhibitors, as plasminogen activator inhibitors are synthesized in greater amounts than plasminogen activators.

  16. Retraction: "Down-regulation of uPA and uPAR by 3,3'-diindolylmethane contributes to the inhibition of cell growth and migration of breast cancer cells" by Ahmad et al.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    The above article, published online on August 19, 2009 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the third author and the corresponding author that found Figure 5C to be inappropriately re-used and re-labeled. REFERENCE Ahmad A, Kong D, Wang Z, Sarkar SH, Banerjee S, Sarkar FH. 2009. Down-regulation of uPA and uPAR by 3,3'-diindolylmethane contributes to the inhibition of cell growth and migration of breast cancer cells. J Cell Biochem 108:916-925; doi: 10.1002/jcb.22323.

  17. Dynamics of potentiation and activation: GAGA factor and its role in heat shock gene regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, R C; Lis, J T

    1997-01-01

    GAGA factor (GAF) binds to specific DNA sequences and participates in a complex spectrum of chromosomal activities.Products of the Trithorax-like locus (Trl), which encodes multiple GAF isoforms, are required for homeotic gene expression and are essential for Drosophila development. While homozygous null mutations in Trl are lethal, heterozygotes display enhanced position effect variegation (PEV) indicative of the broad role of GAF in chromatin architecture and its positive role in gene expression.The distribution of GAF on chromosomes is complex, as it is associated with hundreds of chromosomal loci in euchromatin of salivary gland polytene chromosomes, however, it also displays a strong association with pericentric heterochromatin in diploid cells, where it appears to have roles in chromosome condensation and segregation. At higher resolution GAF binding sites have been identified in the regulatory regions of many genes. In some cases, the positive role of GAF in gene expression has been examined in detail using a variety of genetic, biochemical, and cytological approaches. Here we review what is currently known of GAF and, in the context of the heat shock genes of Drosophila, we examine the effects of GAF on multiple steps in gene expression. PMID:9321643

  18. NF-Y activates genes of metabolic pathways altered in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Benatti, Paolo; Chiaramonte, Maria Luisa; Lorenzo, Mariangela; Hartley, John A.; Hochhauser, Daniel; Gnesutta, Nerina; Mantovani, Roberto; Imbriano, Carol; Dolfini, Diletta

    2016-01-01

    The trimeric transcription factor NF-Y binds to the CCAAT box, an element enriched in promoters of genes overexpressed in tumors. Previous studies on the NF-Y regulome identified the general term metabolism as significantly enriched. We dissect here in detail the targeting of metabolic genes by integrating analysis of NF-Y genomic binding and profilings after inactivation of NF-Y subunits in different cell types. NF-Y controls de novo biosynthetic pathways of lipids, teaming up with the master SREBPs regulators. It activates glycolytic genes, but, surprisingly, is neutral or represses mitochondrial respiratory genes. NF-Y targets the SOCG (Serine, One Carbon, Glycine) and Glutamine pathways, as well as genes involved in the biosynthesis of polyamines and purines. Specific cancer-driving nodes are generally under NF-Y control. Altogether, these data delineate a coherent strategy to promote expression of metabolic genes fuelling anaerobic energy production and other anabolic pathways commonly altered in cancer cells. PMID:26646448

  19. Differential activity of Drosophila Hox genes induces myosin expression and can maintain compartment boundaries.

    PubMed

    Curt, Jesús R; de Navas, Luis F; Sánchez-Herrero, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Compartments are units of cell lineage that subdivide territories with different developmental potential. In Drosophila, the wing and haltere discs are subdivided into anterior and posterior (A/P) compartments, which require the activity of Hedgehog, and into dorsal and ventral (D/V) compartments, needing Notch signaling. There is enrichment in actomyosin proteins at the compartment boundaries, suggesting a role for these proteins in their maintenance. Compartments also develop in the mouse hindbrain rhombomeres, which are characterized by the expression of different Hox genes, a group of genes specifying different structures along their main axis of bilaterians. We show here that the Drosophila Hox gene Ultrabithorax can maintain the A/P and D/V compartment boundaries when Hedgehog or Notch signaling is compromised, and that the interaction of cells with and without Ultrabithorax expression induces high levels of non-muscle myosin II. In the absence of Ultrabithorax there is occasional mixing of cells from different segments. We also show a similar role in cell segregation for the Abdominal-B Hox gene. Our results suggest that the juxtaposition of cells with different Hox gene expression leads to their sorting out, probably through the accumulation of non-muscle myosin II at the boundary of the different cell territories. The increase in myosin expression seems to be a general mechanism used by Hox genes or signaling pathways to maintain the segregation of different groups of cells.

  20. Duplicative activation mechanisms of two trypanosome telomeric VSG genes with structurally simple 5' flanks.

    PubMed

    Matthews, K R; Shiels, P G; Graham, S V; Cowan, C; Barry, J D

    1990-12-25

    In the mammalian bloodstream, African trypanosomes express variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes from a family of long and complex telomeric expression sites. VSG switching generally occurs by the duplication of different VSG genes into these sites by gene conversion involving a series of 70 base pair (70bp) repeats in the 5' flank. In contrast, when VSG is first synthesised by trypanosomes in the tsetse fly at the metacyclic stage, a separate set of telomeric expression sites is activated. These latter telomeres appear not to act as recipients in gene conversion. We have found that the structure of two such expression sites is simple, with very short 70bp repeat regions and very little other sequence in common with bloodstream expression sites. However, the two telomeres readily act as donors in VSG gene conversion in the bloodstream and we show for one a consistent association of the conversion 5' end point with the short 70bp repeat region. These findings help explain why a very predictable set of VSGs is expressed in the tsetse fly and have implications for VSG gene conversion mechanisms.

  1. Replication-dependent histone genes are actively transcribed in differentiating and aging retinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Banday, Abdul Rouf; Baumgartner, Marybeth; Al Seesi, Sahar; Karunakaran, Devi Krishna Priya; Venkatesh, Aditya; Congdon, Sean; Lemoine, Christopher; Kilcollins, Ashley M; Mandoiu, Ion; Punzo, Claudio; Kanadia, Rahul N

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian genome, each histone family contains multiple replication-dependent paralogs, which are found in clusters where their transcription is thought to be coupled to the cell cycle. Here, we wanted to interrogate the transcriptional regulation of these paralogs during retinal development and aging. We employed deep sequencing, quantitative PCR, in situ hybridization (ISH), and microarray analysis, which revealed that replication-dependent histone genes were not only transcribed in progenitor cells but also in differentiating neurons. Specifically, by ISH analysis we found that different histone genes were actively transcribed in a subset of neurons between postnatal day 7 and 14. Interestingly, within a histone family, not all paralogs were transcribed at the same level during retinal development. For example, expression of Hist1h1b was higher embryonically, while that of Hist1h1c was higher postnatally. Finally, expression of replication-dependent histone genes was also observed in the aging retina. Moreover, transcription of replication-dependent histones was independent of rapamycin-mediated mTOR pathway inactivation. Overall, our data suggest the existence of variant nucleosomes produced by the differential expression of the replication-dependent histone genes across retinal development. Also, the expression of a subset of replication-dependent histone isotypes in senescent neurons warrants re-examining these genes as "replication-dependent." Thus, our findings underscore the importance of understanding the transcriptional regulation of replication-dependent histone genes in the maintenance and functioning of neurons.

  2. SNORD116 and SNORD115 change expression of multiple genes and modify each other's activity.

    PubMed

    Falaleeva, Marina; Surface, Justin; Shen, Manli; de la Grange, Pierre; Stamm, Stefan

    2015-11-10

    The loss of two gene clusters encoding small nucleolar RNAs, SNORD115 and SNORD116 contribute to Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), the most common syndromic form of obesity in humans. SNORD115 and SNORD116 are considered to be orphan C/D box snoRNAs (SNORDs) as they do not target rRNAs or snRNAs. SNORD115 exhibits sequence complementarity towards the serotonin receptor 2C, but SNORD116 shows no extended complementarities to known RNAs. To identify molecular targets, we performed genome-wide array analysis after overexpressing SNORD115 and SNORD116 in HEK 293T cells, either alone or together. We found that SNORD116 changes the expression of over 200 genes. SNORD116 mainly changed mRNA expression levels. Surprisingly, we found that SNORD115 changes SNORD116's influence on gene expression. In similar experiments, we compared gene expression in post-mortem hypothalamus between individuals with PWS and aged-matched controls. The synopsis of these experiments resulted in 23 genes whose expression levels were influenced by SNORD116. Together our results indicate that SNORD115 and SNORD116 influence expression levels of multiple genes and modify each other activity.

  3. [Phytase activity in some groups of bacteria. Search for and cloning of genes for bacterial phytases].

    PubMed

    Shedova, E N; Berezina, O V; Khmel', I A; Lipasova, V A; Borriss, R; Velikodvorskaia, G A

    2004-01-01

    A search for phytase genes in 9 Bacillus strains from the collection of IMGAN was implemented. The growth optimum of strains IX-22, IX-12B, K17-2, K18, IMG I, IMG II, M4 and M8 was 50-60 degrees C; the optimal growth temperature for Bacillus sp. 790 was 45-47 degrees C. According to the sequence data of 16S RNA genes, Bacillus sp. 790 belongs to the B. subtilis/amyloliquefaciens group. The other 8 strains were identified as B. licheniformis. Selection of Bacillus strains, potentially containing the phytase genes, was performed via PCR with primers designed on the basis of the conserved sequence regions of the phyA gene from B. amyloliquefaciens FZB45 with chromosomal DNA being used as the template. The nucleotide sequences of all PCR fragments showed a high level of homology to the known Bacillus phytase genes. The gene libraries of B. licheniformis M8 and B. amyloliquefaciens 790 in E. coli were constructed and phytase-containing clones were selected from them. Twenty-four Pseudomonas strains of different species, 5 Xanthomonas maltophilia strains and 1 Xanthomonas malvacearum (all from the mentioned collection) were tested for phytase activity. Such activity was found in 13 Pseudomonas strains and in 6 Xanthomonas strains. The accumulation of phytase in Pseudomonas was shown to take place at later (over 2 days') growth stages. The optimum pH for phytase from 3 Pseudomonas strains were established. The enzymes were found to be most active at pH 5.5.

  4. Enhanced osteoclastogenesis by mitochondrial retrograde signaling through transcriptional activation of the cathepsin K gene.

    PubMed

    Guha, Manti; Srinivasan, Satish; Koenigstein, Alexander; Zaidi, Mone; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has emerged as an important factor in wide ranging human pathologies. We have previously defined a retrograde signaling pathway that originates from dysfunctional mitochondria (Mt-RS) and causes a global nuclear transcriptional reprograming as its end point. Mitochondrial dysfunction causing disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and consequent increase in cytosolic calcium [Ca(2) ](c) activates calcineurin and the transcription factors NF-κB, NFAT, CREB, and C/EBPδ. In macrophages, this signaling complements receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastic differentiation. Here, we show that the Mt-RS activated transcriptional coactivator heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2 (hnRNP A2) is induced by hypoxia in murine macrophages. We demonstrate that the cathepsin K gene (Ctsk), one of the key genes upregulated during osteoclast differentiation, is transcriptionally activated by Mt-RS factors. HnRNP A2 acts as a coactivator with nuclear transcription factors, cRel, and C/EBPδ for Ctsk promoter activation under hypoxic conditions. Notably, our study shows that hypoxia-induced activation of the stress target factors mediates effects similar to that of RANKL with regard to Ctsk activation. We therefore suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of Mt-RS, induced by various pathophysiologic conditions, is a potential risk factor for osteoclastogenesis and bone loss.

  5. Use of DSC and DMA Techniques to Help Investigate a Material Anomaly for PTFE Used in Processing a Piston Cup for the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) on International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Doug

    2010-01-01

    Human urine and flush water are eventually converted into drinking water with the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). This conversion is made possible through the Distillation Assembly (DA) of the UPA. One component of the DA is a molded circular piston cup made of virgin polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The piston cup is assembled to a titanium component using eight fasteners and washers. Molded PTFE produced for spare piston cups in the first quarter of 2010 was different in appearance and texture, and softer than material molded for previous cups. For the suspect newer PTFE material, cup fasteners were tightened to only one-half the required torque value, yet the washers embedded almost halfway into the material. The molded PTFE used in the DA piston cup should be Type II, based on AMS 3667D and ASTM D4894 specifications. The properties of molded PTFE are considerably different between Type I and II materials. Engineers working with the DA thought that if Type I PTFE was molded by mistake instead of Type II material, that could have resulted in the anomalous material properties. Typically, the vendor molds flat sheet PTFE from the same material lot used to mold the piston cups, and tensile testing as part of quality control should verify that the PTFE is Type II material. However, for this discrepant lot of material, such tensile data was not available. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) were two of the testing techniques used at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to investigate the anomaly for the PTFE material. Other techniques used on PTFE specimens were: Shore D hardness testing, tensile testing on dog bone specimens and a qualitative estimation of porosity by optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  6. LWD-TCP complex activates the morning gene CCA1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing-Fen; Tsai, Huang-Lung; Joanito, Ignasius; Wu, Yi-Chen; Chang, Chin-Wen; Li, Yi-Hang; Wang, Ying; Hong, Jong Chan; Chu, Jhih-Wei; Hsu, Chao-Ping; Wu, Shu-Hsing

    2016-10-13

    A double-negative feedback loop formed by the morning genes CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1)/LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) and the evening gene TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1 (TOC1) contributes to regulation of the circadian clock in Arabidopsis. A 24-h circadian cycle starts with the peak expression of CCA1 at dawn. Although CCA1 is targeted by multiple transcriptional repressors, including PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR9 (PRR9), PRR7, PRR5 and CCA1 HIKING EXPEDITION (CHE), activators of CCA1 remain elusive. Here we use mathematical modelling to infer a co-activator role for LIGHT-REGULATED WD1 (LWD1) in CCA1 expression. We show that the TEOSINTE BRANCHED 1-CYCLOIDEA-PCF20 (TCP20) and TCP22 proteins act as LWD-interacting transcriptional activators. The concomitant binding of LWD1 and TCP20/TCP22 to the TCP-binding site in the CCA1 promoter activates CCA1. Our study reveals activators of the morning gene CCA1 and provides an action mechanism that ensures elevated expression of CCA1 at dawn to sustain a robust clock.

  7. A Kinase-Independent Activity of Cdk9 Modulates Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Gene Induction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A gene induction competition assay has recently uncovered new inhibitory activities of two transcriptional cofactors, NELF-A and NELF-B, in glucocorticoid-regulated transactivation. NELF-A and -B are also components of the NELF complex, which participates in RNA polymerase II pausing shortly after the initiation of gene transcription. We therefore asked if cofactors (Cdk9 and ELL) best known to affect paused polymerase could reverse the effects of NELF-A and -B. Unexpectedly, Cdk9 and ELL augmented, rather than prevented, the effects of NELF-A and -B. Furthermore, Cdk9 actions are not blocked either by Ckd9 inhibitors (DRB or flavopiridol) or by two Cdk9 mutants defective in kinase activity. The mode and site of action of NELF-A and -B mutants with an altered NELF domain are similarly affected by wild-type and kinase-dead Cdk9. We conclude that Cdk9 is a new modulator of GR action, that Ckd9 and ELL have novel activities in GR-regulated gene expression, that NELF-A and -B can act separately from the NELF complex, and that Cdk9 possesses activities that are independent of Cdk9 kinase activity. Finally, the competition assay has succeeded in ordering the site of action of several cofactors of GR transactivation. Extension of this methodology should be helpful in determining the site and mode of action of numerous additional cofactors and in reducing unwanted side effects. PMID:24559102

  8. LWD–TCP complex activates the morning gene CCA1 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing-Fen; Tsai, Huang-Lung; Joanito, Ignasius; Wu, Yi-Chen; Chang, Chin-Wen; Li, Yi-Hang; Wang, Ying; Hong, Jong Chan; Chu, Jhih-Wei; Hsu, Chao-Ping; Wu, Shu-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    A double-negative feedback loop formed by the morning genes CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1)/LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) and the evening gene TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1 (TOC1) contributes to regulation of the circadian clock in Arabidopsis. A 24-h circadian cycle starts with the peak expression of CCA1 at dawn. Although CCA1 is targeted by multiple transcriptional repressors, including PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR9 (PRR9), PRR7, PRR5 and CCA1 HIKING EXPEDITION (CHE), activators of CCA1 remain elusive. Here we use mathematical modelling to infer a co-activator role for LIGHT-REGULATED WD1 (LWD1) in CCA1 expression. We show that the TEOSINTE BRANCHED 1-CYCLOIDEA-PCF20 (TCP20) and TCP22 proteins act as LWD-interacting transcriptional activators. The concomitant binding of LWD1 and TCP20/TCP22 to the TCP-binding site in the CCA1 promoter activates CCA1. Our study reveals activators of the morning gene CCA1 and provides an action mechanism that ensures elevated expression of CCA1 at dawn to sustain a robust clock. PMID:27734958

  9. Fruit preferential activity of the tomato RIP1 gene promoter in transgenic tomato and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Priyanka; Kumar, Rahul; Pareek, Amit; Sharma, Arun K

    2017-02-01

    Isolation and functional characterization of tissue- and stage-specific gene promoters is beneficial for genetic improvement of economically important crops. Here, we have characterized a putative promoter of a ripening-induced gene RIP1 (Ripening induced protein 1) in tomato. Quantification of the transcript level of RIP1 showed that its expression is fruit preferential, with maximum accumulation in red ripe fruits. To test the promoter activity, we made a reporter construct by cloning 1450 bp putative RIP1 promoter driving the GUS (ß-glucuronidase) gene expression and generated stable transgenic lines in tomato and Arabidopsis. Histochemical and fluorometric assays validated the fruit-specific expression of RIP1 as the highest GUS activity was found in red ripe tomatoes. Similarly, we detected high levels of GUS activity in the siliques of Arabidopsis. On the contrary, weak GUS activity was found in the flower buds in both tomato and Arabidopsis. To characterize the specific regions of the RIP1 promoter that might be essential for its maximum activity and specificity in fruits, we made stable transgenic lines of tomato and Arabidopsis with 5'-deletion constructs. Characterization of these transgenic plants showed that the full length promoter is essential for its function. Overall, we report the identification and characterization of a ripening-induced promoter of tomato, which would be useful for the controlled manipulation of the ripening-related agronomic traits in genetic manipulation studies in future.

  10. Repression and catabolite gene activation in the araBAD operon.

    PubMed

    Lichenstein, H S; Hamilton, E P; Lee, N

    1987-02-01

    Catabolite gene activation of the araBAD operon was examined by using catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) site deletion mutants. A high-affinity CAP-binding site between the divergently orientated araBAD and araC operons has been previously identified by DNase I footprinting techniques. Subsequent experiments disagreed as to whether this site is directly involved in stimulating araBAD expression. In this paper, we present data showing that deletions generated by in vitro mutagenesis of the CAP site led to a five- to sixfold reduction in single-copy araBAD promoter activity in vivo. We concluded that catabolite gene activation of araBAD involves this CAP site. The hypothesis that CAP stimulates the araBAD promoter primarily by relieving repression was then tested. The upstream operator araO2 was required for repression, but we observed that the magnitude of CAP stimulation was unaffected by the presence or absence of araO2. We concluded that CAP plays no role in relieving repression. Other experiments showed that when CAP binds it induces a bend in the ara DNA; similar bending has been reported upon CAP binding to lac DNA. This conformational change in the DNA may be essential to the mechanism of CAP activation.

  11. Altered activities of transcription factors and their related gene expression in cardiac tissues of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Y; Kashiwagi, A; Taki, H; Shinozaki, K; Maeno, Y; Kojima, H; Maegawa, H; Haneda, M; Hidaka, H; Yasuda, H; Horiike, K; Kikkawa, R

    1998-08-01

    Gene regulation in the cardiovascular tissues of diabetic subjects has been reported to be altered. To examine abnormal activities in transcription factors as a possible cause of this altered gene regulation, we studied the activity of two redox-sensitive transcription factors--nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and activating protein-1 (AP-1)--and the change in the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1, which is regulated by these transcription factors in the cardiac tissues of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Increased activity of NF-kappaB and AP-1 but not nuclear transcription-activating factor, as determined by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, was found in the hearts of 4-week diabetic rats. Glycemic control by a subcutaneous injection of insulin prevented these diabetes-induced changes in transcription factor activity. In accordance with these changes, the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1 was increased fourfold in 4-week diabetic rats and threefold in 24-week diabetic rats as compared with control rats (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). Insulin treatment also consistently prevented changes in the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1. The oral administration of an antioxidant, probucol, to these diabetic rats partially prevented the elevation of the activity of both NF-kappaB and AP-1, and normalized the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1 without producing any change in the plasma glucose concentration. These results suggest that elevated oxidative stress is involved in the activation of the transcription factors NF-kappaB and AP-1 in the cardiac tissues of diabetic rats, and that these abnormal activities of transcription factors could be associated with the altered gene regulation observed in the cardiovascular tissues of diabetic rats.

  12. APG: an Active Protein-Gene network model to quantify regulatory signals in complex biological systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiguang; Sun, Yidan; Zheng, Si; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Zhou, Huarong; Chen, Luonan

    2013-01-01

    Synergistic interactions among transcription factors (TFs) and their cofactors collectively determine gene expression in complex biological systems. In this work, we develop a novel graphical model, called Active Protein-Gene (APG) network model, to quantify regulatory signals of transcription in complex biomolecular networks through integrating both TF upstream-regulation and downstream-regulation high-throughput data. Firstly, we theoretically and computationally demonstrate the effectiveness of APG by comparing with the traditional strategy based only on TF downstream-regulation information. We then apply this model to study spontaneous type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) and Wistar control rats. Our biological experiments validate the theoretical results. In particular, SP1 is found to be a hidden TF with changed regulatory activity, and the loss of SP1 activity contributes to the increased glucose production during diabetes development. APG model provides theoretical basis to quantitatively elucidate transcriptional regulation by modelling TF combinatorial interactions and exploiting multilevel high-throughput information.

  13. Translating DPYD genotype into DPD phenotype: using the DPYD gene activity score.

    PubMed

    Henricks, Linda M; Lunenburg, Carin A T C; Meulendijks, Didier; Gelderblom, Hans; Cats, Annemieke; Swen, Jesse J; Schellens, Jan H M; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    The dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase enzyme (DPD, encoded by the gene DPYD) plays a key role in the metabolism of fluoropyrimidines. DPD deficiency occurs in 4-5% of the population and is associated with severe fluoropyrimidine-related toxicity. Several SNPs in DPYD have been described that lead to absent or reduced enzyme activity, including DPYD*2A, DPYD*13, c.2846A>T and c.1236G>A/haplotype B3. Since these SNPs differ in their effect on DPD enzyme activity, a differentiated dose adaption is recommended. We propose the gene activity score for translating DPYD genotype into phenotype, accounting for differences in functionality of SNPs. This method can be used to standardize individualized fluoropyrimidine dose adjustments, resulting in optimal safety and effectiveness.

  14. Tissue-specific activity of the pro-opiomelanocortin gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Jeannotte, L.; Trifiro, M.A.; Plante, R.K.; Chamberland, M.; Drouin, J.

    1987-11-01

    The pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene is specifically expressed in corticotroph cells of the anterior pituitary. To define the POMC promoter sequences responsible for tissue-specific expression, we assessed POMC promoter activity by gene transfer into POMC-expressing pituitary tumor cells (AtT-20) and fibroblast L cells. The rat POMC promoter was only efficiently utilized and correctly transcribed in AtT-20 cells. 5'-End deletion analysis revealed two promoter regions for activity in AtT-20 cells. When tested by fusion to a heterologuous promoter, DNA fragments corresponding to both regions exhibited tissue-specific activity, suggesting the presence of at least two tissue-specific DNA sequence elements within the promoter. In summary, POMC promoter sequences from -480 to -34 base pairs appear sufficient to mimic the specificity of anterior pituitary expression.

  15. Reciprocal activation of Xenobiotic response genes by nuclear receptors SXR/PXR and CAR

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen; Barwick, Joyce L.; Simon, Cynthia M.; Pierce, Alexis M.; Safe, Stephen; Blumberg, Bruce; Guzelian, Philip S.; Evans, Ronald M.

    2000-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) gene products such as CYP3A and CYP2B are essential for the metabolism of steroid hormones and xenochemicals including prescription drugs. Nuclear receptor SXR/PXR (steroid and xenobiotic receptor/pregnenolone X receptor) has been shown both biochemically and genetically to activate CYP3A genes, while similar studies have established constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) as a CYP2B regulator. The response elements in these genes are also distinct, furthering the concept of independent regulation. Unexpectedly, we found that SXR can regulate CYP2B, both in cultured cells and in transgenic mice via adaptive recognition of the phenobarbital response element (PBRE). In a type of functional symmetry, orphan receptor CAR was also found to activate CYP3A through previously defined SXR/PXR response elements. These observations not only provide a rational explanation for the activation of multiple CYP gene classes by certain xenobiotics, but also reveal the existence of a metabolic safety net that confers a second layer of protection to the harmful effects of toxic compounds and at the same time increases the propensity for drug–drug interactions. PMID:11114890

  16. Phytanic acid, a novel activator of uncoupling protein-1 gene transcription and brown adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, Agatha; Barberá, Maria José; Iglesias, Roser; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc

    2002-01-01

    Phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid) is a phytol-derived branched-chain fatty acid present in dietary products. Phytanic acid increased uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) mRNA expression in brown adipocytes differentiated in culture. Phytanic acid induced the expression of the UCP1 gene promoter, which was enhanced by co-transfection with a retinoid X receptor (RXR) expression vector but not with other expression vectors driving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha, PPARgamma or a form of RXR devoid of ligand-dependent sensitivity. The effect of phytanic acid on the UCP1 gene required the 5' enhancer region of the gene and the effects of phytanic acid were mediated in an additive manner by three binding sites for RXR. Moreover, phytanic acid activates brown adipocyte differentiation: long-term exposure of brown preadipocytes to phytanic acid promoted the acquisition of the brown adipocyte morphology and caused a co-ordinate induction of the mRNAs for gene markers of brown adipocyte differentiation, such as UCP1, adipocyte lipid-binding protein aP2, lipoprotein lipase, the glucose transporter GLUT4 or subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase. In conclusion, phytanic acid is a natural product of phytol metabolism that activates brown adipocyte thermogenic function. It constitutes a potential nutritional signal linking dietary status to adaptive thermogenesis. PMID:11829740

  17. Regulation of Proteome Maintenance Gene Expression by Activators of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor a (PPARa)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) is activated by a large number of xenobiotic and hypolipidemic compounds called peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC). One agonist of PPARa (WY-14,643) regulates responses in the mouse liver to chemic...

  18. Effect of base modifications on structure, thermodynamic stability, and gene silencing activity of short interfering RNA

    PubMed Central

    Sipa, Katarzyna; Sochacka, Elzbieta; Kazmierczak-Baranska, Julia; Maszewska, Maria; Janicka, Magdalena; Nowak, Genowefa; Nawrot, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    A series of nucleobase-modified siRNA duplexes containing “rare” nucleosides, 2-thiouridine (s2U), pseudouridine (Ψ), and dihydrouridine (D), were evaluated for their thermodynamic stability and gene silencing activity. The duplexes with modified units at terminal positions exhibited similar stability as the nonmodified reference. Introduction of the s2U or Ψ units into the central part of the antisense strand resulted in duplexes with higher melting temperatures (Tm). In contrary, D unit similarly like wobble base pair led to the less stable duplexes (ΔTm 3.9 and 6.6°C, respectively). Gene-silencing activity of siRNA duplexes directed toward enhanced green fluorescent protein or beta-site APP cleaving enzyme was tested in a dual fluorescence assay. The duplexes with s2U and Ψ units at their 3′-ends and with a D unit at their 5′-ends (with respect to the guide strands) were the most potent gene expression inhibitors. Duplexes with s2U and Ψ units at their 5′-ends were by 50% less active than the nonmodified counterpart. Those containing a D unit or wobble base pair in the central domain had the lowest Tm, disturbed the A-type helical structure, and had more than three times lower activity than their nonmodified congener. Activity of siRNA containing the wobble base pair could be rescued by placing the thio-nucleoside at the position 3′-adjacent to the mutation site. Thermally stable siRNA molecules containing several s2U units in the antisense strand were biologically as potent as their native counterparts. The present results provide a new chemical tool for modulation of siRNA gene-silencing activity. PMID:17585051

  19. Coordinative modulation of human zinc transporter 2 gene expression through active and suppressive regulators.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yu-Ju; Liu, Ya-Chuan; Lin, Meng-Chieh; Chen, Yi-Ting; Lin, Lih-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Zinc transporter 2 (ZnT2) is one of the cellular factors responsible for Zn homeostasis. Upon Zn overload, ZnT2 reduces cellular Zn by transporting it into excretory vesicles. We investigated the molecular mechanism that regulates human ZnT2 (hZnT2) gene expression. Zn induces hZnT2 expression in dose- and time-dependent manners. Overexpression of metal-responsive transcription factor 1 (MTF-1) increases hZnT2 transcription, whereas depletion of MTF-1 reduces hZnT2 expression. There are five putative metal response elements (MREs) within 1kb upstream of the hZnT2 gene. A serial deletion of the hZnT2 promoter region (from 5' to 3') shows that the two MREs proximal to the gene are essential for Zn-induced promoter activity. Further mutation analysis concludes that the penultimate MRE (MREb) supports the metal-induced promoter activity. The hZnT2 promoter has also a zinc finger E-box binding homeobox (ZEB) binding element. Mutation or deletion of this ZEB binding element elevates the basal and Zn-induced hZnT2 promoter activities. Knockdown of ZEB1 mRNA enhances the hZnT2 transcript level in HEK-293 cells. In MCF-7 (ZEB-deficient) cells, expression of ZEB proteins attenuates the Zn-induced hZnT2 expression. However, expressions of MTF-1 target genes such as human ZnT1 and metallothionein IIA were not affected. Our study shows the expression of the hZnT2 gene is coordinately regulated via active and suppressive modulators.

  20. Transrepression activity of T-box1 in a gene regulation network in mouse cells.

    PubMed

    Yee, Karen K L; Yagi, Hisato; Matsuoka, Rumiko; Nakanishi, Toshio; Furukawa, Toru

    2012-12-01

    T-box1 (TBX1) has been identified as a candidate disease-causing gene in DiGeorge syndrome/conotruncal anomaly face syndrome (DGS/CAFS). Tbx1 can function as a transcriptional transactivator as well as a transrepressor. Although the transactivating role of Tbx1 has been the focus of a number of published studies, its transrepression activity has been largely unexplored. Thus, this study centers on the identification of potential transrepressed targets of Tbx1. By subtractive hybridization, we compared the expression profiles of control mouse P19 cells and P19 cells depleted of Tbx1 via RNA interference. We identified 127 genes that were potentially transrepressed by Tbx1. Of the transrepressed genes, we focused on Ywhae and C1qbp and carried out promoter assays. The results showed that Tbx1 potentially transrepresses the promoter activities of these genes via palindromic sequences, including 5'-CCACAG-3' and 5'-(C/G)TGTG(C/G)-3', harbored within the promoters. Electromobility shift assays also showed that Tbx1 specifically interacts with certain portions of these promoter sequences. Moreover, the construction of Tbx1 mutants containing known human TBX1 mutations showed that these mutations result in the loss of Tbx1 transrepression activity. These results indicate that Tbx1 functions as a transrepressor in a gene regulation network, wherein Ywhae and C1qbp are 2 of the targets transrepressed by Tbx1 via T-box binding elements. Hence, the loss of TBX1 transrepression activity could be associated with the disease phenotypes of patients with DGS/CAFS.

  1. Effect of interleukin-1beta gene functional polymorphism on dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Papiol, Sergi; Molina, Vicente; Rosa, Araceli; Sanz, Javier; Palomo, Tomás; Fañanás, Lourdes

    2007-12-05

    Hypoactivity of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during cognitive tasks is among the most consistent findings in schizophrenia. The biological factors contributing to this hypofrontality are only partially known. Previous reports have shown the influence of genes mapped to IL-1 cluster (i) in the risk to develop schizophrenia and (ii) on brain morphological abnormalities in these patients. Moreover, Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), encoded by IL-1B gene (IL-1 cluster, chromosome 2q13) has a key role in dopaminergic differentiation and dendrite growth in developing cortical neurons. The authors explored the role of a genetic functional polymorphism at IL-1B gene in relation to DLPFC activity. DLPFC (left and right) metabolic activity was measured in a sample of 19 DSM-IV diagnosed schizophrenic patients of Spanish origin using a procedure based on MRI/PET image fusion. During PET studies, subjects performed a contingent Continuous Performance Test aiming to activate DLPFC. Functional promoter polymorphism -511 C/T (rs16944) of IL-1B gene was genotyped in these patients. Those patients who were allele 2 (-511 T) carriers showed a lower metabolic activity in the left DLPFC with respect to patients homozygous for allele 1 (-511 C) (U = 16, z = -2.32, P = 0.02). Our results suggest that hypofrontality reported in some schizophrenic patients might be explained, at least in part, by this functional polymorphism at IL-1B gene. Genetic variants with influence on brain functionality may account for the neurocognitive heterogeneity observed in schizophrenic patients.

  2. Use Of Low Light Image Microscopy To Monitor Genetically Engineered Bacterial Luciferase Gene Expression In Living Cells And Gene Activation Throughout The Development Of A Transgenic Organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langridge, W. H.; Escher, Alan P.; Baga, M.; O'Kane, Dennis J.; Wampler, John E.; Koncz, C.; Schell, John D.; Szalay, A. A.

    1989-12-01

    Procaryotic and eucaryotic expression vectors which contain a marker gene for selection of transformants linked to genes encoding bacterial luciferase for detection of promoter activated gene expression in vivo were used to transform the appropriate host organisms and drug resistant colonies, cells, or calli were obtained. Bacterial luciferase expression was measured by a luminescence assay for quantitative determination of promoter activation. The cellular localization of bacteria inside the host plant cell cytoplasm was achieved in a single infected plant cell based on the light emitting ability of the genetically engineered bacteria. In addition, the bacterial luciferase marker gene fusions were used to monitor cell type, tissue, and organ specific gene expression in transgenic plants in vivo. To monitor physiological changes during ontogeny of a transformed plant, low light video microscopy, aided by real time image processing techniques developed specifically to enhance extreme low light images, was successfully applied.

  3. Studying Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Area What are genes? Genes are sections of DNA that contain instructions for making the molecules—many ... material in an organism. This includes genes and DNA elements that control the activity of genes. Does ...

  4. AMP-activated protein kinase counteracted the inhibitory effect of glucose on the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene expression in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hubert, A; Husson, A; Chédeville, A; Lavoinne, A

    2000-09-22

    The effect of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the regulation of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene expression was studied in isolated rat hepatocytes. Activation of AMPK by AICAR counteracted the inhibitory effect of glucose on the PEPCK gene expression, both at the mRNA and the transcriptional levels. It is proposed that a target for AMPK is involved in the inhibitory effect of glucose on PEPCK gene transcription.

  5. Oscillation of p38 activity controls efficient pro-inflammatory gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Tomida, Taichiro; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro; Saito, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    The p38 MAP kinase signalling pathway controls inflammatory responses and is an important target of anti-inflammatory drugs. Although pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) appear to induce only transient activation of p38 (over ∼60 min), longer cytokine exposure is necessary to induce p38-dependent effector genes. Here we study the dynamics of p38 activation in individual cells using a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based p38 activity reporter. We find that, after an initial burst of activity, p38 MAPK activity subsequently oscillates for more than 8 h under continuous IL-1β stimulation. However, as this oscillation is asynchronous, the measured p38 activity population average is only slightly higher than basal level. Mathematical modelling, which we have experimentally verified, indicates that the asynchronous oscillation of p38 is generated through a negative feedback loop involving the dual-specificity phosphatase MKP-1/DUSP1. We find that the oscillatory p38 activity is necessary for efficient expression of pro-inflammatory genes such as IL-6, IL-8 and COX-2. PMID:26399197

  6. Regulation of neuronal gene expression and survival by basal NMDA receptor activity: a role for histone deacetylase 4.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yelin; Wang, Yuanyuan; Modrusan, Zora; Sheng, Morgan; Kaminker, Joshua S

    2014-11-12

    Neuronal gene expression is modulated by activity via calcium-permeable receptors such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs). While gene expression changes downstream of evoked NMDAR activity have been well studied, much less is known about gene expression changes that occur under conditions of basal neuronal activity. In mouse dissociated hippocampal neuronal cultures, we found that a broad NMDAR antagonist, AP5, induced robust gene expression changes under basal activity, but subtype-specific antagonists did not. While some of the gene expression changes are also known to be downstream of stimulated NMDAR activity, others appear specific to basal NMDAR activity. The genes altered by AP5 treatment of basal cultures were enriched for pathways related to class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs), apoptosis, and synapse-related signaling. Specifically, AP5 altered the expression of all three class IIa HDACs that are highly expressed in the brain, HDAC4, HDAC5, and HDAC9, and also induced nuclear accumulation of HDAC4. HDAC4 knockdown abolished a subset of the gene expression changes induced by AP5, and led to neuronal death under long-term tetrodotoxin or AP5 treatment in rat hippocampal organotypic slice cultures. These data suggest that basal, but not evoked, NMDAR activity regulates gene expression in part through HDAC4, and, that HDAC4 has neuroprotective functions under conditions of low NMDAR activity.

  7. Efficient targeted gene disruption in Xenopus embryos using engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs).

    PubMed

    Lei, Yong; Guo, Xiaogang; Liu, Yun; Cao, Yang; Deng, Yi; Chen, Xiongfeng; Cheng, Christopher H K; Dawid, Igor B; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2012-10-23

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are an approach for directed gene disruption and have been proved to be effective in various animal models. Here, we report that TALENs can induce somatic mutations in Xenopus embryos with reliably high efficiency and that such mutations are heritable through germ-line transmission. We modified the Golden Gate method for TALEN assembly to make the product suitable for RNA transcription and microinjection into Xenopus embryos. Eight pairs of TALENs were constructed to target eight Xenopus genes, and all resulted in indel mutations with high efficiencies of up to 95.7% at the targeted loci. Furthermore, mutations induced by TALENs were highly efficiently passed through the germ line to F(1) frogs. Together with simple and reliable PCR-based approaches for detecting TALEN-induced mutations, our results indicate that TALENs are an effective tool for targeted gene editing/knockout in Xenopus.

  8. Generation of gene disruptions by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in Xenopus tropicalis embryos.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yong; Guo, Xiaogang; Deng, Yi; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2013-05-10

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are novel engineered DNA nucleases, and have been proven to be effective for gene specific targeting in various species. Recently we reported gene disruptions in Xenopus embryos by using TALENs. Here we summarize the protocol that is used in our studies for gene disruption. This protocol covers selection of TALEN targeting sites, TALEN assembly with a modified Golden Gate method, and injection of TALEN mRNAs into Xenopus tropicalis embryos. We also provide details for detection of somatic and germ line transmitted mutations. And finally, we briefly describe establishment of knockout Xenopus lines. This protocol will facilitate broader applications of TALENs in studies of Xenopus biology.

  9. Chromatin structure implicated in activation of HIV-1 gene expression by ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Valerie, K.; Rosenberg, M. )

    1990-08-01

    We have investigated the effects of different DNA-damaging agents on HIV-1 gene expression. We find that agents that produce bulky DNA lesions, similar to those induced by ultraviolet light (UV), all dramatically increase HIV-1 gene expression, whereas agents that produce primarily base damage and DNA breakage, such as ionizing radiation, have little or no effect. We show that these effects are independent of DNA synthesis per se and do not require DNA nucleotide excision repair. The drug novobiocin effectively prevents the UV activation process, consistent with the idea that a change in DNA chromatin structure may be required. We suggest that a transient decondensation of chromatin structure, an early step in DNA nucleotide excision repair but not in base excision repair, may be the triggering mechanism. The decondensation may allow the transcriptional machinery better access to the HIV-1 promoter region, thereby increasing gene expression.

  10. Gene activation and cell fate control in plants: a chromatin perspective.

    PubMed

    Engelhorn, Julia; Blanvillain, Robert; Carles, Cristel C

    2014-08-01

    In plants, environment-adaptable organogenesis extends throughout the lifespan, and iterative development requires repetitive rounds of activation and repression of several sets of genes. Eukaryotic genome compaction into chromatin forms a physical barrier for transcription; therefore, induction of gene expression requires alteration in chromatin structure. One of the present great challenges in molecular and developmental biology is to understand how chromatin is brought from a repressive to permissive state on specific loci and in a very specific cluster of cells, as well as how this state is further maintained and propagated through time and cell division in a cell lineage. In this review, we report recent discoveries implementing our knowledge on chromatin dynamics that modulate developmental gene expression. We also discuss how new data sets highlight plant specificities, likely reflecting requirement for a highly dynamic chromatin.

  11. Function-Based Metagenomic Library Screening and Heterologous Expression Strategy for Genes Encoding Phosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Genis A Castillo; Nacke, Heiko; Daniel, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    The release of phosphate from inorganic and organic phosphorus compounds can be mediated enzymatically. Phosphate-releasing enzymes, comprising acid and alkaline phosphatases, are recognized as useful biocatalysts in applications such as plant and animal nutrition, bioremediation and diagnostic analysis. Metagenomic approaches provide access to novel phosphatase-encoding genes. Here, we describe a function-based screening approach for rapid identification of genes conferring phosphatase activity from small-insert and large-insert metagenomic libraries derived from various environments. This approach bears the potential for discovery of entirely novel phosphatase families or subfamilies and members of known enzyme classes hydrolyzing phosphomonoester bonds such as phytases. In addition, we provide a strategy for efficient heterologous phosphatase gene expression.

  12. Activity, Expression and Function of a Second Drosophila Protein Kinase a Catalytic Subunit Gene

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, A.; Li, W.; Kalderon, D.

    1995-01-01

    The DC2 gene was isolated previously on the basis of sequence similarity to DCO, the major Drosophila protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit gene. We show here that the 67-kD Drosophila DC2 protein behaves as a PKA catalytic subunit in vitro. DC2 is transcribed in mesodermal anlagen of early embryos. This expression depends on dorsal but on neither twist nor snail activity. DC2 transcriptional fusions mimic this embryonic expression and are also expressed in subsets of cells in the optic lamina, wing disc and leg discs of third instar larvae. A saturation screen of a small deficiency interval containing DC2 for recessive lethal mutations yielded no DC2 alleles. We therefore isolated new deficiencies to generate deficiency trans-heterozygotes that lacked DC2 activity. These animals were viable and fertile. The absence of DC2 did not affect the viability or phenotype of imaginal disc cells lacking DC0 activity or embryonic hatching of animals with reduced DC0 activity. Furthermore, transgenes expressing DC2 from a DC0 promoter did not efficiently rescue a variety of DC0 mutant phenotypes. These observations indicate that DC2 is not an essential gene and is unlikely to be functionally redundant with DC0, which has multiple unique functions during development. PMID:8601490

  13. Viral microRNAs Target a Gene Network, Inhibit STAT Activation, and Suppress Interferon Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Dhivya; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M.

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes 12 pre-microRNAs during latency that are processed to yield ~25 mature microRNAs (miRNAs). We were interested in identifying cellular networks that were targeted by KSHV-miRNAs and employed network building strategies using validated KSHV miRNA targets. Here, we report the identification of a gene network centering on the transcription factor- signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) that is targeted by KSHV miRNAs. KSHV miRNAs suppressed STAT3 and STAT5 activation and inhibited STAT3-dependent reporter activation upon IL6-treatment. KSHV miRNAs also repressed the induction of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes upon IFNα- treatment. Finally, we observed increased lytic reactivation of KSHV from latently infected cells upon STAT3 repression with siRNAs or a small molecule inhibitor. Our data suggest that treatment of infected cells with a STAT3 inhibitor and a viral replication inhibitor, ganciclovir, represents a possible strategy to eliminate latently infected cells without increasing virion production. Together, we show that KSHV miRNAs suppress a network of targets associated with STAT3, deregulate cytokine-mediated gene activation, suppress an interferon response, and influence the transition into the lytic phase of viral replication. PMID:28102325

  14. Regulation of Drug Disposition Gene Expression in Pregnant Mice with Car Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Amanda S.; Herrera-Garcia, Guadalupe; Moscovitz, Jamie E.; You, Dahea; Guo, Grace L.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.

    2016-01-01

    More than half of pregnant women use prescription medications in order to maintain both maternal and fetal health. The constitutive androstane receptor (Car) critically affects the disposition of chemicals by regulating the transcription of genes encoding metabolic enzymes and transporters. However, the effects of Car activation on chemical disposition during pregnancy are unclear. This study aims to determine the degree to which pregnancy alters the expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in response to the pharmacological activation of Car. To test this, pregnant C57BL/6 mice were administered IP doses of vehicle, or a potent Car agonist, TCPOBOP, on gestation days 14, 15 and 16. Hepatic mRNA and protein expression of Car target genes (phase I, II and transporters) were quantified on gestation day 17. Pregnancy-related changes, such as induction of Cyp2b10, Ugt1a1 and Sult1a1 and repression of Ugt1a6, Gsta1, Gsta2 and Mrp6, were observed. Interestingly, the induction of Cyp2b10, Gsta1, Gsta2 and Mrp2-4 mRNAs by TCPOBOP was attenuated in maternal livers suggesting that Car activation is impeded by the biochemical and/or physiological changes that occur during gestation. Taken together, these findings suggest that pregnancy and pharmacological activation of Car can differentially regulate the expression of drug metabolism and transport genes. PMID:27818994

  15. Evidence for evolutionary divergence of activity-dependent gene expression in developing neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jing; McQueen, Jamie; Bilican, Bilada; Dando, Owen; Magnani, Dario; Punovuori, Karolina; Selvaraj, Bhuvaneish T; Livesey, Matthew; Haghi, Ghazal; Heron, Samuel; Burr, Karen; Patani, Rickie; Rajan, Rinku; Sheppard, Olivia; Kind, Peter C; Simpson, T Ian; Tybulewicz, Victor LJ; Wyllie, David JA; Fisher, Elizabeth MC; Lowell, Sally; Chandran, Siddharthan; Hardingham, Giles E

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary differences in gene regulation between humans and lower mammalian experimental systems are incompletely understood, a potential translational obstacle that is challenging to surmount in neurons, where primary tissue availability is poor. Rodent-based studies show that activity-dependent transcriptional programs mediate myriad functions in neuronal development, but the extent of their conservation in human neurons is unknown. We compared activity-dependent transcriptional responses in developing human stem cell-derived cortical neurons with those induced in developing primary- or stem cell-derived mouse cortical neurons. While activity-dependent gene-responsiveness showed little dependence on developmental stage or origin (primary tissue vs. stem cell), notable species-dependent differences were observed. Moreover, differential species-specific gene ortholog regulation was recapitulated in aneuploid mouse neurons carrying human chromosome-21, implicating promoter/enhancer sequence divergence as a factor, including human-specific activity-responsive AP-1 sites. These findings support the use of human neuronal systems for probing transcriptional responses to physiological stimuli or indeed pharmaceutical agents. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20337.001 PMID:27692071

  16. Cyclical strain modulates metalloprotease and matrix gene expression in human tenocytes via activation of TGFβ.

    PubMed

    Jones, Eleanor R; Jones, Gavin C; Legerlotz, Kirsten; Riley, Graham P

    2013-12-01

    Tendinopathies are a range of diseases characterised by degeneration and chronic tendon pain and represent a significant cause of morbidity. Relatively little is known about the underlying mechanisms; however onset is often associated with physical activity. A number of molecular changes have been documented in tendinopathy such as a decrease in overall collagen content, increased extracellular matrix turnover and protease activity. Metalloproteinases are involved in the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix and expression is regulated by mechanical strain. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of strain upon matrix turnover by measuring metalloproteinase and matrix gene expression and to elucidate the mechanism of action. Primary Human Achilles tenocytes were seeded in type I rat tail collagen gels in a Flexcell™ tissue train system and subjected to 5% cyclic uniaxial strain at 1Hz for 48h. TGFβ1 and TGFβRI inhibitor were added to selected cultures. RNA was measured using qRT-PCR and TGFβ protein levels were determined using a cell based luciferase assay. We observed that mechanical strain regulated the mRNA levels of multiple protease and matrix genes anabolically, and this regulation mirrored that seen with TGFβ stimulation alone. We have also demonstrated that the inhibition of the TGFβ signalling pathway abrogated the strain induced changes in mRNA and that TGFβ activation, rather than gene expression, was increased with mechanical strain. We concluded that TGFβ activation plays an important role in mechanotransduction. Targeting this pathway may have its place in the treatment of tendinopathy.

  17. Involvement of SOX proteins in lens-specific activation of crystallin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Kamachi, Y; Sockanathan, S; Liu, Q; Breitman, M; Lovell-Badge, R; Kondoh, H

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the mechanism of delta 1-crystallin gene activation, which occurs early in lens cell differentiation, and have previously shown that an essential element of the delta 1-crystallin enhancer is bound by a group of nuclear factors, delta EF2, among which delta EF2a is highly enriched in lens cells. In this report we show that the cDNA of delta EF2a codes for the chicken SOX-2 protein (cSOX-2), which is structurally related to the sex-determining factor SRY. Sox-2 is expressed at high levels in the early developing lens in both chicken and mouse embryos. Overexpression of delta EF2a/cSOX-2 increased delta 1-crystallin enhancer activity to a plateau in lens cells, but not in fibroblasts, consistent with the previously drawn conclusion that delta EF2a activates transcription only in concert with another factor present in the lens. This result supports the model that SOX proteins act as architectural components in the activating complex formed on an enhancer, as indicated for another HMG domain protein, lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1 (LEF-1). We also show that SOX protein binding is essential for lens-specific promoter activity of the mouse gamma F-crystallin gene. This work is the first to show delta- and gamma-crystallin genes as examples of direct regulatory targets of SOX proteins and provides evidence that diversified crystallin genes are regulated, at least partly, by a common mechanism. Images PMID:7628452

  18. PcaU, a Transcriptional Activator of Genes for Protocatechuate Utilization in Acinetobacter†

    PubMed Central

    Gerischer, Ulrike; Segura, Ana; Ornston, L. Nicholas

    1998-01-01

    The Acinetobacter pcaIJFBDKCHG operon encodes the six enzymes that convert protocatechuate to citric acid cycle intermediates. Directly downstream from the operon are qui and pob genes encoding sets of enzymes that convert quinate and p-hydroxybenzoate, respectively, to protocatechuate. Prior to this investigation, the only known regulatory gene in the pca-qui-pob cluster was pobR, which encodes a transcriptional activator that responds to p-hydroxybenzoate and activates transcription of pobA. The pca and qui genes were known to be expressed in response to protocatechuate, but a protein that mediated this induction had not been identified. This study was initiated by characterization of a spontaneous mutation that mapped upstream from pcaI and prevented expression of the pca genes. Sequencing of wild-type DNA extending from the translational start of pcaI through and beyond the location of the mutation revealed a 282-bp intergenic region and a divergently transcribed open reading frame, designated pcaU. Downstream from pcaU are two open reading frames encoding proteins similar in amino acid sequence to those associated with the oxidation of acyl thioesters. Inactivation of pcaU reduced the induced expression of pca structural genes by about 90% and impeded but did not completely prevent growth of the mutant cells with protocatechuate. PcaU was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to bind to a portion of the pcaI-pcaU intergenic region containing a sequence identical in 16 of 19 nucleotide residues to a segment of the pob operator. Further similarity of the two regulatory systems is indicated by 54% amino acid sequence identity in the aligned primary structures of PobR and PcaU. The pob and pca systems were shown to differ, however, in the relative orientations of transcriptional starts with respect to the site where the activator binds to DNA, the size of the intergenic region, and the tightness of transcriptional control. The spontaneous mutation blocking pca

  19. Gene expression profiling in Ishikawa cells: A fingerprint for estrogen active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Boehme, Kathleen; Simon, Stephanie

    2009-04-01

    Several anthropogenous and naturally occurring substances, referred to as estrogen active compounds (EACs), are able to interfere with hormone and in particular estrogen receptor signaling. EACs can either cause adverse health effects in humans and wildlife populations or have beneficial effects on estrogen-dependent diseases. The aim of this study was to examine global gene expression profiles in estrogen receptor (ER)-proficient Ishikawa plus and ER-deficient Ishikawa minus endometrial cancer cells treated with selected well-known EACs (Diethylstilbestrol, Genistein, Zearalenone, Resveratrol, Bisphenol A and o,p'-DDT). We also investigated the effect of the pure antiestrogen ICI 182,780 (ICI) on the expression patterns caused by these compounds. Transcript levels were quantified 24 h after compound treatment using Illumina BeadChip Arrays. We identified 87 genes with similar expression changes in response to all EAC treatments in Ishikawa plus. ICI lowered the magnitude or reversed the expression of these genes, indicating ER dependent regulation. Apart from estrogenic gene regulation, Bisphenol A, o,p'-DDT, Zearalenone, Genistein and Resveratrol displayed similarities to ICI in their expression patterns, suggesting mixed estrogenic/antiestrogenic properties. In particular, the predominant antiestrogenic expression response of Resveratrol could be clearly distinguished from the other test compounds, indicating a distinct mechanism of action. Divergent gene expression patterns of the phytoestrogens, as well as weaker estrogenic gene expression regulation determined for the anthropogenous chemicals Bisphenol A and o,p'-DDT, warrants a careful assessment of potential detrimental and/or beneficial effects of EACs. The characteristic expression fingerprints and the identified subset of putative marker genes can be used for screening chemicals with an unknown mode of action and for predicting their potential to exert endocrine disrupting effects.

  20. The X protein of hepatitis B virus activates hepatoma cell proliferation through repressing melanoma inhibitory activity 2 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yilin; Yang, Yang; Cai, Yanyan; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yingle; Zhu, Ying; Wu, Jianguo

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrated that HBV represses MIA2 gene expression both invitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The X protein of HBV plays a major role in such regulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knock-down of MIA2 in HepG2 cells activates cell growth and proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBx activates cell proliferation, over-expression of MIA2 impaired such regulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBx activates hepatoma cell proliferation through repressing MIA2 expression. -- Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths globally. Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection accounts for over 75% of all HCC cases; however, the molecular pathogenesis of HCC is not well understood. In this study, we found that the expression of the newly identified gene melanoma inhibitory activity 2 (MIA2) was reduced by HBV infection invitro and invivo, and that HBV X protein (HBx) plays a major role in this regulation. Recent studies have revealed that MIA2 is a potential tumor suppressor, and that, in most HCCs, MIA2 expression is down-regulated or lost. We found that the knock-down of MIA2 in HepG2 cells activated cell growth and proliferation, suggesting that MIA2 inhibits HCC cell growth and proliferation. In addition, the over-expression of HBx alone induced cell proliferation, whereas MIA2 over-expression impaired the HBx-mediated induction of proliferation. Taken together, our results suggest that HBx activates hepatoma cell growth and proliferation through repression of the potential tumor suppressor MIA2.

  1. Synergistic and Antagonistic Interplay between Myostatin Gene Expression and Physical Activity Levels on Gene Expression Patterns in Triceps Brachii Muscles of C57/BL6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Anollés, Kelsey; Mishra, Sanjibita; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Levels of myostatin expression and physical activity have both been associated with transcriptome dysregulation and skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The transcriptome of triceps brachii muscles from male C57/BL6 mice corresponding to two genotypes (wild-type and myostatin-reduced) under two conditions (high and low physical activity) was characterized using RNA-Seq. Synergistic and antagonistic interaction and ortholog modes of action of myostatin genotype and activity level on genes and gene pathways in this skeletal muscle were uncovered; 1,836, 238, and 399 genes exhibited significant (FDR-adjusted P-value < 0.005) activity-by-genotype interaction, genotype and activity effects, respectively. The most common differentially expressed profiles were (i) inactive myostatin-reduced relative to active and inactive wild-type, (ii) inactive myostatin-reduced and active wild-type, and (iii) inactive myostatin-reduced and inactive wild-type. Several remarkable genes and gene pathways were identified. The expression profile of nascent polypeptide-associated complex alpha subunit (Naca) supports a synergistic interaction between activity level and myostatin genotype, while Gremlin 2 (Grem2) displayed an antagonistic interaction. Comparison between activity levels revealed expression changes in genes encoding for structural proteins important for muscle function (including troponin, tropomyosin and myoglobin) and for fatty acid metabolism (some linked to diabetes and obesity, DNA-repair, stem cell renewal, and various forms of cancer). Conversely, comparison between genotype groups revealed changes in genes associated with G1-to-S-phase transition of the cell cycle of myoblasts and the expression of Grem2 proteins that modulate the cleavage of the myostatin propeptide. A number of myostatin-feedback regulated gene products that are primarily regulatory were uncovered, including microRNA impacting central functions and Piezo proteins that make cationic current

  2. Activation of the Arabidopsis B class homeotic genes by APETALA1.

    PubMed

    Ng, M; Yanofsky, M F

    2001-04-01

    Proper development of petals and stamens in Arabidopsis flowers requires the activities of APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI), whose transcripts can be detected in the petal and stamen primordia. Localized expression of AP3 and PI requires the activities of at least three genes: APETALA1 (AP1), LEAFY (LFY), and UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO). It has been proposed that UFO provides spatial cues and that LFY specifies competence for AP3 and PI expression in the developing flower. To understand the epistatic relationship among AP1, LFY, and UFO in regulating AP3 and PI expression, we generated two versions of AP1 that have strong transcriptional activation potential. Genetic and molecular analyses of transgenic plants expressing these activated AP1 proteins show that the endogenous AP1 protein acts largely as a transcriptional activator in vivo and that AP1 specifies petals by regulating the spatial domains of AP3 and PI expression through UFO.

  3. The artificial zinc finger coding gene 'Jazz' binds the utrophin promoter and activates transcription.

    PubMed

    Corbi, N; Libri, V; Fanciulli, M; Tinsley, J M; Davies, K E; Passananti, C

    2000-06-01

    Up-regulation of utrophin gene expression is recognized as a plausible therapeutic approach in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have designed and engineered new zinc finger-based transcription factors capable of binding and activating transcription from the promoter of the dystrophin-related gene, utrophin. Using the recognition 'code' that proposes specific rules between zinc finger primary structure and potential DNA binding sites, we engineered a new gene named 'Jazz' that encodes for a three-zinc finger peptide. Jazz belongs to the Cys2-His2 zinc finger type and was engineered to target the nine base pair DNA sequence: 5'-GCT-GCT-GCG-3', present in the promoter region of both the human and mouse utrophin gene. The entire zinc finger alpha-helix region, containing the amino acid positions that are crucial for DNA binding, was specifically chosen on the basis of the contacts more frequently represented in the available list of the 'code'. Here we demonstrate that Jazz protein binds specifically to the double-stranded DNA target, with a dissociation constant of about 32 nM. Band shift and super-shift experiments confirmed the high affinity and specificity of Jazz protein for its DNA target. Moreover, we show that chimeric proteins, named Gal4-Jazz and Sp1-Jazz, are able to drive the transcription of a test gene from the human utrophin promoter.

  4. Meta-analysis of primary target genes of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Heinäniemi, Merja; Uski, J Oskari; Degenhardt, Tatjana; Carlberg, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are known for their critical role in the development of diseases, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer. Here, an in silico screening method is presented, which incorporates experiment- and informatics-derived evidence, such as DNA-binding data of PPAR subtypes to a panel of PPAR response elements (PPREs), PPRE location relative to the transcription start site (TSS) and PPRE conservation across multiple species, for more reliable prediction of PPREs. Results In vitro binding and in vivo functionality evidence agrees with in silico predictions, validating the approach. The experimental analysis of 30 putative PPREs in eight validated PPAR target genes indicates that each gene contains at least one functional, strong PPRE that occurs without positional bias relative to the TSS. An extended analysis of the cross-species conservation of PPREs reveals limited conservation of PPRE patterns, although PPAR target genes typically contain strong or multiple medium strength PPREs. Human chromosome 19 was screened using this method, with validation of six novel PPAR target genes. Conclusion An in silico screening approach is presented, which allows increased sensitivity of PPAR binding site and target gene detection. PMID:17650321

  5. Cadmium activates a mitogen-activated protein kinase gene and MBP kinases in rice.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chuan-Ming; Hsiao, Lin-June; Huang, Hao-Jen

    2004-09-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are modules involved in the transduction of extracellular signals to intracellular targets in all eukaryotes. In plants, it has been evidenced that MAPKs play a role in the signaling of biotic and abiotic stresses, plant hormones, and cell cycle cues. However, the effect of heavy metals on plant MAPKs has not been well examined. The Northern blot analysis of OsMAPK mRNA levels has shown that only OsMAPK2, but not OsMAPK3 and OsMAPK4, expressed in suspension-cultured cells in response to 100-400 microM Cd treatments. The OsMAPK2 transcripts increased within 12 h upon 400 microM Cd treatment. In addition, we found that 42- and 50-kDa MBP kinases were significantly activated by Cd treatment in rice suspension-cultured cells. And 40-, 42-, 50- and 64-kDa MBP kinases were activated in rice roots. Furthermore, GSH inhibits Cd-induced 40-kDa MBP kinase activation. By immunoblot analysis and immunoprecipitation followed by in-gel kinase assay, we confirmed that Cd-activated 42-kDa MBP kinase is a MAP kinase. Our results suggest that a MAP kinase cascade may function in the Cd-signalling pathway in rice.

  6. Transcriptome Sequencing of Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis to Analyze the Genes Related to Optically Active Phycoerythrin Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoyun; Zang, Xiaonan; Wu, Fei; Jin, Yuming; Wang, Haitao; Liu, Chang; Ding, Yating; He, Bangxiang; Xiao, Dongfang; Song, Xinwei; Liu, Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis (aka Gracilaria lemaneiformis) is a red macroalga rich in phycoerythrin, which can capture light efficiently and transfer it to photosystemⅡ. However, little is known about the synthesis of optically active phycoerythrinin in G. lemaneiformis at the molecular level. With the advent of high-throughput sequencing technology, analysis of genetic information for G. lemaneiformis by transcriptome sequencing is an effective means to get a deeper insight into the molecular mechanism of phycoerythrin synthesis. Illumina technology was employed to sequence the transcriptome of two strains of G. lemaneiformis- the wild type and a green-pigmented mutant. We obtained a total of 86915 assembled unigenes as a reference gene set, and 42884 unigenes were annotated in at least one public database. Taking the above transcriptome sequencing as a reference gene set, 4041 differentially expressed genes were screened to analyze and compare the gene expression profiles of the wild type and green mutant. By GO and KEGG pathway analysis, we concluded that three factors, including a reduction in the expression level of apo-phycoerythrin, an increase of chlorophyll light-harvesting complex synthesis, and reduction of phycoerythrobilin by competitive inhibition, caused the reduction of optically active phycoerythrin in the green-pigmented mutant. PMID:28135287

  7. Diet quality determines lipase gene expression and lipase/esterase activity in Daphnia pulex

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzenberger, Anke; Wacker, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We studied the short- (12 h) and long-term (144 h) response of Daphnia pulex lipases to quality shifts in diets consisting of different mixtures of the green alga Scenedesmus with the cyanobacterium Synechococcus, two species with contrasting lipid compositions. The lipase/esterase activity in both the gut and the body tissues had fast responses to the diet shift and increased with higher dietary contributions of Synechococcus. When screening the Daphnia genome for TAG lipases, we discovered a large gene-family expansion of these enzymes. We used a subset of eight genes for mRNA expression analyses and distinguished between influences of time and diet on the observed gene expression patterns. We identified five diet-responsive lipases of which three showed a sophisticated short- and long-term pattern of expression in response to small changes in food-quality. Furthermore, the gene expression of one of the lipases was strongly correlated to lipase/esterase activity in the gut suggesting its potentially major role in digestion. These findings demonstrate that the lipid-related enzymatic machinery of D. pulex is finely tuned to diet and might constitute an important mechanism of physiological adaptation in nutritionally complex environments. PMID:28069588

  8. ZNF395 Is an Activator of a Subset of IFN-Stimulated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Linda; Herwartz, Christine; Jordanovski, Darko

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the interferon (IFN) pathway in response to infection with pathogens results in the induction of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) including proinflammatory cytokines, which mount the proper antiviral immune response. However, aberrant expression of these genes is pathogenic to the host. In addition to IFN-induced transcription factors non-IFN-regulated factors contribute to the transcriptional control of ISGs. Here, we show by genome wide expression analysis, siRNA-mediated suppression and Doxycycline-induced overexpression that the cellular transcription factor ZNF395 activates a subset of ISGs including the chemokines CXCL10 and CXCL11 in keratinocytes. We found that ZNF395 acts independently of IFN but enhances the IFN-induced expression of CXCL10 and CXCL11. Luciferase reporter assays revealed a requirement of intact NFκB-binding sites for ZNF395 to stimulate the CXCL10 promoter. The transcriptional activation of CXCL10 and CXCL11 by ZNF395 was abolished after inhibition of IKK by BMS-345541, which increased the stability of ZNF395. ZNF395 encodes at least two motifs that mediate the enhanced degradation of ZNF395 in response to IKK activation. Thus, IKK is required for ZNF395-mediated activation of transcription and enhances its turn-over to keep the activity of ZNF395 low. Our results support a previously unrecognized role of ZNF395 in the innate immune response and inflammation. PMID:28316371

  9. Genistein mediated histone acetylation and demethylation activates tumor suppressor genes in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kikuno, Nobuyuki; Shiina, Hiroaki; Urakami, Shinji; Kawamoto, Ken; Hirata, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Majid, Shahana; Igawa, Mikio; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2008-08-01

    Genistein is a phytoestrogen that has been reported to suppress the AKT signaling pathway in several malignancies. However, the molecular mechanism of genistein action is not known. We tested the hypothesis that genistein activates expression of several aberrantly silenced tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) that have unmethylated promoters such as PTEN, CYLD, p53 and FOXO3a. We report here that genistein activates TSGs through remodeling of the heterochromatic domains at promoters in prostate cancer cells by modulating histone H3-Lysine 9 (H3-K9) methylation and deacetylation. Genistein activation involved demethylation and acetylation of H3-K9 at the PTEN and the CYLD promoter, while acetylation of H3-K9 at the p53 and the FOXO3a promoter occurred through reduction of endogenous SIRT1 activity. There was a decrease of SIRT1 expression and accumulation of SIRT1 in the cytoplasm from the nucleus. Increased expression of these TSGs was also reciprocally related to attenuation of phosphorylated-AKT and NF-kappaB binding activity in prostate cancer cells. This is the first report describing a novel epigenetic pathway that activates TSGs by modulating either histone H3-Lysine 9 (H3-K9) methylation or deacetylation at gene promoters leading to inhibition of the AKT signaling pathway. These findings strengthen the understanding of how genistein may be chemoprotective in prostate cancer.

  10. Detection of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation by Some Chemicals in Food Using a Reporter Gene Assay

    PubMed Central

    Amakura, Yoshiaki; Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Yoshimura, Morio; Nakamura, Masafumi; Handa, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Rieko; Teshima, Reiko; Watanabe, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether a simple bioassay used for the detection of dioxins (DXNs) could be applied to detect trace amounts of harmful DXN-like substances in food products. To identify substances with possible DXN-like activity, we assessed the ability of various compounds in the environment to bind the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) that binds specifically to DXNs. The compounds tested included 19 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 20 PAH derivatives (nitrated, halogenated, and aminated derivatives), 23 pesticides, six amino acids, and eight amino acid metabolites. The AhR binding activities (AhR activity) of these compounds were measured using the chemical activated luciferase gene expression (CALUX) reporter gene assay system. The majority of the PAHs exhibited marked AhR activity that increased in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, there was a positive link between AhR activity and the number of aromatic rings in the PAH derivatives. Conversely, there appeared to be a negative correlation between AhR activity and the number of chlorine residues present on halogenated PAH derivatives. However, there was no correlation between AhR activity and the number and position of substituents among nitrated and aminated derivatives. Among the pesticides tested, the indole-type compounds carbendazim and thiabendazole showed high levels of activity. Similarly, the indole compound tryptamine was the only amino acid metabolite to induce AhR activity. The results are useful in understanding the identification and characterization of AhR ligands in the CALUX assay. PMID:28231110

  11. Yeast homologous recombination-based promoter engineering for the activation of silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Daniel; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F

    2015-07-21

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic (meta)genomic DNA suggests that most bacterial natural product gene clusters are not expressed under common laboratory culture conditions. Silent gene clusters represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Unfortunately, the characterization of molecules encoded by these clusters is hampered owing to our inability to express these gene clusters in the laboratory. To address this bottleneck, we have developed a promoter-engineering platform to transcriptionally activate silent gene clusters in a model heterologous host. Our approach uses yeast homologous recombination, an auxotrophy complementation-based yeast selection system and sequence orthogonal promoter cassettes to exchange all native promoters in silent gene clusters with constitutively active promoters. As part of this platform, we constructed and validated a set of bidirectional promoter cassettes consisting of orthogonal promoter sequences, Streptomyces ribosome binding sites, and yeast selectable marker genes. Using these tools we demonstrate the ability to simultaneously insert multiple promoter cassettes into a gene cluster, thereby expediting the reengineering process. We apply this method to model active and silent gene clusters (rebeccamycin and tetarimycin) and to the silent, cryptic pseudogene-containing, environmental DNA-derived Lzr gene cluster. Complete promoter refactoring and targeted gene exchange in this "dead" cluster led to the discovery of potent indolotryptoline antiproliferative agents, lazarimides A and B. This potentially scalable and cost-effective promoter reengineering platform should streamline the discovery of natural products from silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

  12. Enhancement of gene transactivation activity of androgen receptor by hepatitis B virus X protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Yanyan; Chen Wenling; Ma, W.-L. Maverick; Chang Chawnshang; Ou, J.-H. James . E-mail: jamesou@hsc.usc.edu

    2007-07-05

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) is a regulatory protein that is required for efficient replication of HBV in its natural host. In this report, we demonstrate by co-immunoprecipitation experiments that HBx can physically bind to the androgen receptor (AR), which is a nuclear hormone receptor that is expressed in many different tissues including the liver. This observation is further supported by confocal microscopy, which reveals that HBx can alter the subcellular localization of the AR both in the presence and in the absence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Further studies indicate that HBx can enhance the gene transactivation activity of AR by enhancing its DNA binding activity in a DHT-dependent manner. However, HBx does not remain associated with AR on the DNA. As AR can regulate the expression of a number of cellular genes, our results raise the possibility that HBV pathogenesis may be mediated in part via the interaction between HBx and AR.

  13. The multiple sulfatase deficiency gene encodes an essential and limiting factor for the activity of sulfatases.

    PubMed

    Cosma, Maria Pia; Pepe, Stefano; Annunziata, Ida; Newbold, Robert F; Grompe, Markus; Parenti, Giancarlo; Ballabio, Andrea

    2003-05-16

    In multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), a human inherited disorder, the activities of all sulfatases are impaired due to a defect in posttranslational modification. Here we report the identification, by functional complementation using microcell-mediated chromosome transfer, of a gene that is mutated in MSD and is able to rescue the enzymatic deficiency in patients' cell lines. Functional conservation of this gene was observed among distantly related species, suggesting a critical biological role. Coexpression of SUMF1 with sulfatases results in a strikingly synergistic increase of enzymatic activity, indicating that SUMF1 is both an essential and a limiting factor for sulfatases. These data have profound implications on the feasibility of enzyme replacement therapy for eight distinct inborn errors of metabolism.

  14. A cleavage-resistant urokinase plasminogen activator receptor exhibits dysregulated cell-surface clearance.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Evelyn C; Manchanda, Naveen

    2010-04-23

    Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) binds urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA) and participates in plasminogen activation in addition to modulating several cellular processes such as adhesion, proliferation, and migration. u-PAR is susceptible to proteolysis by its cognate ligand and several other proteases. To elucidate the biological significance of receptor cleavage by u-PA, we engineered and expressed a two-chain urokinase plasminogen activator (tcu-PA) cleavage-resistant u-PAR (cr-u-PAR). This mutated receptor was similar to wild-type u-PAR in binding u-PA and initiating plasminogen activation. However, cr-u-PAR exhibited accelerated internalization and resurfacing due to direct association with the endocytic receptor alpha(2)-macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein in the absence of the enzyme x inhibitor complex of tcu-PA and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (tcu-PA.PAI-1). cr-u-PAR-expressing cells had enhanced migration compared with wild-type u-PAR-expressing cells, and cr-u-PAR was less sensitive to chymotrypsin cleavage as compared with wt u-PAR. Our studies suggest that these mutations in the linker region result in a rearrangement within the cr-u-PAR structure that makes it resemble its ligand-bound form. This constitutively active variant may mimic highly glycosylated cleavage-resistant u-PAR expressed in certain highly malignant cancer-cells.

  15. The coat protein gene of tobamovirus P 0 pathotype is a determinant for activation of temperature-insensitive L 1a-gene-mediated resistance in Capsicum plants.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Katsutoshi; Sawada, Hiromasa; Matsumoto, Kouhei; Hamada, Hiroyuki; Yoshimoto, Eri; Ito, Takao; Takeuchi, Shigeharu; Tsuda, Shinya; Suzuki, Kazumi; Kobayashi, Kappei; Kiba, Akinori; Okuno, Tetsuro; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2008-01-01

    Tobamovirus resistance in Capsicum plants, which is mediated by L genes (L(1), L(2), L(3) or L(4)), is known to be temperature sensitive. However, the L(1a ) gene, a newly identified tobamovirus resistance gene that is mapped to the L locus, confers temperature-insensitive resistance against the tobamovirus P(0) pathotype. To identify the viral elicitor that activates the L(1a )-gene-mediated resistance, several chimeric viral genomes were constructed between tobacco mosaic virus-L (P(0) pathotype), paprika mild mottle virus-J (P(1 )pathotype) and pepper mild mottle virus-J (P(1,2) pathotype). Infection patterns of these chimeric viruses in L(1a )-harboring plants revealed that the L(1a )-gene-mediated resistance was activated by the CP of a particular pathotype of tobamovirus, like other L-gene-mediated resistances, but the L(1a )-gene-mediated resistance differs from those conferred by other L genes in terms of temperature sensitivity.

  16. Optimal reference genes for qPCR in resting and activated human NK cells--Flow cytometric data correspond to qPCR gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaszubowska, Lucyna; Wierzbicki, Piotr Mieczysław; Karsznia, Sylwia; Damska, Marta; Ślebioda, Tomasz Jerzy; Foerster, Jerzy; Kmieć, Zbigniew

    2015-07-01

    Natural killer cells (NK cells) are cytotoxic lymphocytes critical to the innate immune system engaged in rapid response against tumor or virus infected cells. After activation NK cells acquire enhanced cytotoxicity and are capable of producing cytokines to stimulate other immune cells. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) is a method of choice for gene expression analysis but the usage of reliable reference genes for the normalization process is critical. Commonly used reference genes may vary in expression level between different experimental conditions providing wrong quantitative results of the studied genes' expression levels. Fourteen potential endogenous control genes were analyzed by qPCR method in NK-92 cell line that shows characteristics of human natural killer cells and is often used in studies on biology of NK lymphocytes. NK-92 cells were stimulated with IL-2 or TNF for 2, 24 or 72 h. Results were analyzed with RefFinder, a program which enables evaluation and screening of reference genes and integrates the currently available major computational programs (Genorm, Normfinder, BestKeeper and Delta Ct). The most stable gene in activated and non-activated NK cells was B2M, followed by IPO-8 and GAPDH and the least stable were HPRT1, PPIA and RPL32. The normalization process was performed on SOD2 gene and the results of qPCR experiments were confirmed by flow cytometry. The flow cytometric data corresponded to the results of qPCR gene expression analysis performed for the reference genes qualified by RefFinder as the most stable.

  17. S100A8/A9 activate key genes and pathways in colon tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Mie; Williams, Roy; Wang, Ling; Vogl, Thomas; Srikrishna, Geetha

    2011-02-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays an important role in modulating tumor progression. Earlier, we showed that S100A8/A9 proteins secreted by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) present within tumors and metastatic sites promote an autocrine pathway for accumulation of MDSC. In a mouse model of colitis-associated colon cancer, we also showed that S100A8/A9-positive cells accumulate in all regions of dysplasia and adenoma. Here we present evidence that S100A8/A9 interact with RAGE and carboxylated glycans on colon tumor cells and promote activation of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. Comparison of gene expression profiles of S100A8/A9-activated colon tumor cells versus unactivated cells led us to identify a small cohort of genes upregulated in activated cells, including Cxcl1, Ccl5 and Ccl7, Slc39a10, Lcn2, Zc3h12a, Enpp2, and other genes, whose products promote leukocyte recruitment, angiogenesis, tumor migration, wound healing, and formation of premetastatic niches in distal metastatic organs. Consistent with this observation, in murine colon tumor models we found that chemokines were upregulated in tumors, and elevated in sera of tumor-bearing wild-type mice. Mice lacking S100A9 showed significantly reduced tumor incidence, growth and metastasis, reduced chemokine levels, and reduced infiltration of CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells within tumors and premetastatic organs. Studies using bone marrow chimeric mice revealed that S100A8/A9 expression on myeloid cells is essential for development of colon tumors. Our results thus reveal a novel role for myeloid-derived S100A8/A9 in activating specific downstream genes associated with tumorigenesis and in promoting tumor growth and metastasis.

  18. Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Genes URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  19. Activation of the human mitochondrial transcription factor A gene by nuclear respiratory factors: a potential regulatory link between nuclear and mitochondrial gene expression in organelle biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Virbasius, J V; Scarpulla, R C

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA), the product of a nuclear gene, stimulates transcription from the two divergent mitochondrial promoters and is likely the principal activator of mitochondrial gene expression in vertebrates. Here we establish that the proximal promoter of the human mtTFA gene is highly dependent upon recognition sites for the nuclear respiratory factors, NRF-1 and NRF-2, for activity. These factors have been previously implicated in the activation of numerous nuclear genes that contribute to mitochondrial respiratory function. The affinity-purified factors from HeLa cells specifically bind to the mtTFA NRF-1 and NRF-2 sites through guanine nucleotide contacts that are characteristic for each site. Mutations in these contacts eliminate NRF-1 and NRF-2 binding and also dramatically reduce promoter activity in transfected cells. Although both factors contribute, NRF-1 binding appears to be the major determinant of promoter function. This dependence on NRF-1 activation is confirmed by in vitro transcription using highly purified recombinant proteins that display the same binding specificities as the HeLa cell factors. The activation of the mtTFA promoter by both NRF-1 and NRF-2 therefore provides a link between the expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes and suggests a mechanism for their coordinate regulation during organelle biogenesis. Images PMID:8108407

  20. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain gene expression by activated blood monocytes precedes the expression of the PDGF A-chain gene

    SciTech Connect

    Martinet, Y.; Jaffe, H.A.; Yamauchi, K.; Betsholtz, C.; Westermark, B.; Heldin, C.H.; Crystal, R.G.

    1987-05-01

    When activated, normal human blood monocytes are known to express the c-sis proto-oncogene coding for PDGF B-chain. Since normal human platelet PDGF molecules are dimers of A and B chains and platelets and monocytes are derived from the same marrow precursors, activated blood monocytes were simultaneously evaluated for their expression of PDGF A and B chain genes. Human blood monocytes were purified by adherence, cultured with or without activation by lipopolysaccharide and poly(A)+ RNA evaluated using Northern analysis and /sup 32/P-labeled A-chain and B-chain (human c-sis) probes. Unstimulated blood monocytes did not express either A-chain or B-chain genes. In contrast, activated monocytes expressed a 4.2 kb mRNA B-chain transcript at 4 hr, but the B-chain mRNA levels declined significantly over the next 18 hr. In comparison, activated monocytes expressed very little A-chain mRNA at 4 hr, but at 12 hr 1.9, 2.3, and 2.8 kb transcripts were observed and persisted through 24 hr. Thus, activation of blood monocytes is followed by PDGF B-chain gene expression preceding PDGF A-chain gene expression, suggesting a difference in the regulation of the expression of the genes for these two chains by these cells.

  1. Wnt6 activates endoderm in the sea urchin gene regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    Croce, Jenifer; Range, Ryan; Wu, Shu-Yu; Miranda, Esther; Lhomond, Guy; Peng, Jeff Chieh-fu; Lepage, Thierry; McClay, David R.

    2011-01-01

    In the sea urchin, entry of β-catenin into the nuclei of the vegetal cells at 4th and 5th cleavages is necessary for activation of the endomesoderm gene regulatory network. Beyond that, little is known about how the embryo uses maternal information to initiate specification. Here, experiments establish that of the three maternal Wnts in the egg, Wnt6 is necessary for activation of endodermal genes in the endomesoderm GRN. A small region of the vegetal cortex is shown to be necessary for activation of the endomesoderm GRN. If that cortical region of the egg is removed, addition of Wnt6 rescues endoderm. At a molecular level, the vegetal cortex region contains a localized concentration of Dishevelled (Dsh) protein, a transducer of the canonical Wnt pathway; however, Wnt6 mRNA is not similarly localized. Ectopic activation of the Wnt pathway, through the expression of an activated form of β-catenin, of a dominant-negative variant of GSK-3β or of Dsh itself, rescues endomesoderm specification in eggs depleted of the vegetal cortex. Knockdown experiments in whole embryos show that absence of Wnt6 produces embryos that lack endoderm, but those embryos continue to express a number of mesoderm markers. Thus, maternal Wnt6 plus a localized vegetal cortical molecule, possibly Dsh, is necessary for endoderm specification; this has been verified in two species of sea urchin. The data also show that Wnt6 is only one of what are likely to be multiple components that are necessary for activation of the entire endomesoderm gene regulatory network. PMID:21750039

  2. Synchronous activation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene transcription and secretion by pulsatile kisspeptin stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Han Kyoung; Kim, Hee-Dae; Park, Sung Ho; Lee, Han-Woong; Park, Jae-Yong; Seong, Jae Young; Lightman, Stafford L.; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin

    2013-01-01

    Pulsatile release of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is essential for pituitary gonadotrope function. Although the importance of pulsatile GnRH secretion has been recognized for several decades, the mechanisms underlying GnRH pulse generation in hypothalamic neural networks remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate the ultradian rhythm of GnRH gene transcription in single GnRH neurons using cultured hypothalamic slices prepared from transgenic mice expressing a GnRH promoter-driven destabilized luciferase reporter. Although GnRH promoter activity in each GnRH neuron exhibited an ultradian pattern of oscillations with a period of ∼10 h, GnRH neuronal cultures exhibited partially synchronized bursts of GnRH transcriptional activity at ∼2-h intervals. Surprisingly, pulsatile administration of kisspeptin, a potent GnRH secretagogue, evoked dramatic synchronous activation of GnRH gene transcription with robust stimulation of pulsatile GnRH secretion. We also addressed the issue of hierarchical interaction between the circadian and ultradian rhythms by using Bmal1-deficient mice with defective circadian clocks. The circadian molecular oscillator barely affected basal ultradian oscillation of GnRH transcription but was heavily involved in kisspeptin-evoked responses of GnRH neurons. In conclusion, we have clearly shown synchronous bursts of GnRH gene transcription in the hypothalamic GnRH neuronal population in association with episodic neurohormone secretion, thereby providing insight into GnRH pulse generation. PMID:23509283

  3. Partially phosphorylated Pho4 activates transcription of a subset of phosphate-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Springer, Michael; Wykoff, Dennis D; Miller, Nicole; O'Shea, Erin K

    2003-11-01

    A cell's ability to generate different responses to different levels of stimulus is an important component of an adaptive environmental response. Transcriptional responses are frequently controlled by transcription factors regulated by phosphorylation. We demonstrate that differential phosphorylation of the budding yeast transcription factor Pho4 contributes to differential gene expression. When yeast cells are grown in high-phosphate growth medium, Pho4 is phosphorylated on four critical residues by the cyclin-CDK complex Pho80-Pho85 and is inactivated. When yeast cells are starved for phosphate, Pho4 is dephosphorylated and fully active. In intermediate-phosphate conditions, a form of Pho4 preferentially phosphorylated on one of the four sites accumulates and activates transcription of a subset of phosphate-responsive genes. This Pho4 phosphoform binds differentially to phosphate-responsive promoters and helps to trigger differential gene expression. Our results demonstrate that three transcriptional outputs can be generated by a pathway whose regulation is controlled by one kinase, Pho80-Pho85, and one transcription factor, Pho4. Differential phosphorylation of Pho4 by Pho80-Pho85 produces phosphorylated forms of Pho4 that differ in their ability to activate transcription, contributing to multiple outputs.

  4. Partially Phosphorylated Pho4 Activates Transcription of a Subset of Phosphate-Responsive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Nicole

    2003-01-01

    A cell's ability to generate different responses to different levels of stimulus is an important component of an adaptive environmental response. Transcriptional responses are frequently controlled by transcription factors regulated by phosphorylation. We demonstrate that differential phosphorylation of the budding yeast transcription factor Pho4 contributes to differential gene expression. When yeast cells are grown in high-phosphate growth medium, Pho4 is phosphorylated on four critical residues by the cyclin–CDK complex Pho80–Pho85 and is inactivated. When yeast cells are starved for phosphate, Pho4 is dephosphorylated and fully active. In intermediate-phosphate conditions, a form of Pho4 preferentially phosphorylated on one of the four sites accumulates and activates transcription of a subset of phosphate-responsive genes. This Pho4 phosphoform binds differentially to phosphate-responsive promoters and helps to trigger differential gene expression. Our results demonstrate that three transcriptional outputs can be generated by a pathway whose regulation is controlled by one kinase, Pho80–Pho85, and one transcription factor, Pho4. Differential phosphorylation of Pho4 by Pho80–Pho85 produces phosphorylated forms of Pho4 that differ in their ability to activate transcription, contributing to multiple outputs. PMID:14624238

  5. World's First Clinical Case of Gene-Activated Bone Substitute Application

    PubMed Central

    Deev, R. V.; Drobyshev, A. Y.; Isaev, A. A.; Eremin, I. I.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of patients with large bone defects is a complex clinical problem. We have initiated the first clinical study of a gene-activated bone substitute composed of the collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold and plasmid DNA encoding vascular endothelial growth factor. The first patient with two nonunions of previously reconstructed mandible was enrolled into the study. Scar tissues were excised; bone defects (5–14 mm) between the mandibular fragments and nonvascularized rib-bone autograft were filled in with the gene-activated bone substitute. No adverse events were observed during 12 months of follow-up. In 3 months, the average density of newly formed tissues within the implantation zone was 402.21 ± 84.40 and 447.68 ± 106.75 HU in the frontal and distal regions, respectively, which correlated with the density of spongy bone. Complete distal bone defect repair with vestibular and lingual cortical plates formation was observed in 6 and 12 months after surgery; thereby the posterior nonunion was successfully eliminated. However, there was partial resorption of the proximal edge of the autograft entailed to relapse of the anterior nonunion. Thus, the first clinical data on the safety and efficacy of the gene-activated bone substitute were obtained. Given a high complexity of the clinical situation the treatment, results might be considered as promising. NCT02293031. PMID:27891264

  6. VIP1 response elements mediate mitogen-activated protein kinase 3-induced stress gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Pitzschke, Andrea; Djamei, Armin; Teige, Markus; Hirt, Heribert

    2009-01-01

    The plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens transforms plant cells by delivering its T-DNA into the plant cell nucleus where it integrates into the plant genome and causes tumor formation. A key role of VirE2-interacting protein 1 (VIP1) in the nuclear import of T-DNA during Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation has been unravelled and VIP1 was shown to undergo nuclear localization upon phosphorylation by the mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK3. Here, we provide evidence that VIP1 encodes a functional bZIP transcription factor that stimulates stress-dependent gene expression by binding to VIP1 response elements (VREs), a DNA hexamer motif. VREs are overrepresented in promoters responding to activation of the MPK3 pathway such as Trxh8 and MYB44. Accordingly, plants overexpressing VIP1 accumulate high levels of Trxh8 and MYB44 transcripts, whereas stress-induced expression of these genes is impaired in mpk3 mutants. Trxh8 and MYB44 promoters are activated by VIP1 in a VRE-dependent manner. VIP1 strongly enhances expression from a synthetic promoter harboring multiple VRE copies and directly interacts with VREs in vitro and in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of the MYB44 promoter confirm that VIP1 binding to VREs is enhanced under conditions of MPK3 pathway stimulation. These results provide molecular insight into the cellular mechanism of target gene regulation by the MPK3 pathway. PMID:19820165

  7. TRIM33 switches off Ifnb1 gene transcription during the late phase of macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Federica; Parcelier, Aude; Petit, Vanessa; Gallouet, Anne-Sophie; Lewandowski, Daniel; Dalloz, Marion; van den Heuvel, Anita; Kolovos, Petros; Soler, Eric; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; De Palma, Michele; Davidson, Irwin; Rousselet, Germain; Romeo, Paul-Henri

    2015-01-01

    Despite its importance during viral or bacterial infections, transcriptional regulation of the interferon-β gene (Ifnb1) in activated macrophages is only partially understood. Here we report that TRIM33 deficiency results in high, sustained expression of Ifnb1 at late stages of toll-like receptor-mediated activation in macrophages but not in fibroblasts. In macrophages, TRIM33 is recruited by PU.1 to a conserved region, the Ifnb1 Control Element (ICE), located 15 kb upstream of the Ifnb1 transcription start site. ICE constitutively interacts with Ifnb1 through a TRIM33-independent chromatin loop. At late phases of lipopolysaccharide activation of macrophages, TRIM33 is bound to ICE, regulates Ifnb1 enhanceosome loading, controls Ifnb1 chromatin structure and represses Ifnb1 gene transcription by preventing recruitment of CBP/p300. These results characterize a previously unknown mechanism of macrophage-specific regulation of Ifnb1 transcription whereby TRIM33 is critical for Ifnb1 gene transcription shutdown. PMID:26592194

  8. The human PRD-like homeobox gene LEUTX has a central role in embryo genome activation

    PubMed Central

    Jouhilahti, Eeva-Mari; Madissoon, Elo; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Töhönen, Virpi; Krjutškov, Kaarel; Plaza Reyes, Alvaro; Petropoulos, Sophie; Månsson, Robert; Linnarsson, Sten; Bürglin, Thomas; Lanner, Fredrik; Hovatta, Outi; Katayama, Shintaro

    2016-01-01

    Leucine twenty homeobox (LEUTX) is a paired (PRD)-like homeobox gene that is expressed almost exclusively in human embryos during preimplantation development. We previously identified a novel transcription start site for the predicted human LEUTX gene based on the transcriptional analysis of human preimplantation embryos. The novel variant encodes a protein with a complete homeodomain. Here, we provide a detailed description of the molecular cloning of the complete homeodomain-containing LEUTX. Using a human embryonic stem cell overexpression model we show that the complete homeodomain isoform is functional and sufficient to activate the transcription of a large proportion of the genes that are upregulated in human embryo genome activation (EGA), whereas the previously predicted partial homeodomain isoform is largely inactive. Another PRD-like transcription factor, DPRX, is then upregulated as a powerful repressor of transcription. We propose a two-stage model of human EGA in which LEUTX acts as a transcriptional activator at the 4-cell stage, and DPRX as a balancing repressor at the 8-cell stage. We conclude that LEUTX is a candidate regulator of human EGA. PMID:27578796

  9. Pyrophosphate Stimulates Differentiation, Matrix Gene Expression and Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Pujari-Palmer, Michael; Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli; Lu, Xi; Lind, Thomas; Melhus, Håkan; Engstrand, Thomas; Karlsson-Ott, Marjam; Engqvist, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Pyrophosphate is a potent mitogen, capable of stimulating proliferation in multiple cell types, and a critical participant in bone mineralization. Pyrophosphate can also affect the resorption rate and bioactivity of orthopedic ceramics. The present study investigated whether calcium pyrophosphate affected proliferation, differentiation and gene expression in early (MC3T3 pre-osteoblast) and late stage (SAOS-2 osteosarcoma) osteoblasts. Pyrophosphate stimulated peak alkaline phosphatase activity by 50% and 150% at 100μM and 0.1μM in MC3T3, and by 40% in SAOS-2. The expression of differentiation markers collagen 1 (COL1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteopontin (OPN), and osteocalcin (OCN) were increased by an average of 1.5, 2, 2 and 3 fold, by high concentrations of sodium pyrophosphate (100μM) after 7 days of exposure in MC3T3. COX-2 and ANK expression did not differ significantly from controls in either treatment group. Though both high and low concentrations of pyrophosphate stimulate ALP activity, only high concentrations (100μM) stimulated osteogenic gene expression. Pyrophosphate did not affect proliferation in either cell type. The results of this study confirm that chronic exposure to pyrophosphate exerts a physiological effect upon osteoblast differentiation and ALP activity, specifically by stimulating osteoblast differentiation markers and extracellular matrix gene expression. PMID:27701417

  10. TRIM33 switches off Ifnb1 gene transcription during the late phase of macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Federica; Parcelier, Aude; Petit, Vanessa; Gallouet, Anne-Sophie; Lewandowski, Daniel; Dalloz, Marion; van den Heuvel, Anita; Kolovos, Petros; Soler, Eric; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; De Palma, Michele; Davidson, Irwin; Rousselet, Germain; Romeo, Paul-Henri

    2015-11-23

    Despite its importance during viral or bacterial infections, transcriptional regulation of the interferon-β gene (Ifnb1) in activated macrophages is only partially understood. Here we report that TRIM33 deficiency results in high, sustained expression of Ifnb1 at late stages of toll-like receptor-mediated activation in macrophages but not in fibroblasts. In macrophages, TRIM33 is recruited by PU.1 to a conserved region, the Ifnb1 Control Element (ICE), located 15 kb upstream of the Ifnb1 transcription start site. ICE constitutively interacts with Ifnb1 through a TRIM33-independent chromatin loop. At late phases of lipopolysaccharide activation of macrophages, TRIM33 is bound to ICE, regulates Ifnb1 enhanceosome loading, controls Ifnb1 chromatin structure and represses Ifnb1 gene transcription by preventing recruitment of CBP/p300. These results characterize a previously unknown mechanism of macrophage-specific regulation of Ifnb1 transcription whereby TRIM33 is critical for Ifnb1 gene transcription shutdown.

  11. Gene-set activity toolbox (GAT): A platform for microarray-based cancer diagnosis using an integrative gene-set analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Engchuan, Worrawat; Meechai, Asawin; Tongsima, Sissades; Doungpan, Narumol; Chan, Jonathan H

    2016-08-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that cannot be diagnosed reliably using only single gene expression analysis. Using gene-set analysis on high throughput gene expression profiling controlled by various environmental factors is a commonly adopted technique used by the cancer research community. This work develops a comprehensive gene expression analysis tool (gene-set activity toolbox: (GAT)) that is implemented with data retriever, traditional data pre-processing, several gene-set analysis methods, network visualization and data mining tools. The gene-set analysis methods are used to identify subsets of phenotype-relevant genes that will be used to build a classification model. To evaluate GAT performance, we performed a cross-dataset validation study on three common cancers namely colorectal, breast and lung cancers. The results show that GAT can be used to build a reasonable disease diagnostic model and the predicted markers have biological relevance. GAT can be accessed from http://gat.sit.kmutt.ac.th where GAT's java library for gene-set analysis, simple classification and a database with three cancer benchmark datasets can be downloaded.

  12. Continuous activity and no cycling of clock genes in the Antarctic midge during the polar summer.

    PubMed

    Kobelkova, Alena; Goto, Shin G; Peyton, Justin T; Ikeno, Tomoko; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2015-10-01

    The extreme seasonal shifts of day length in polar regions, ranging from constant light in the summer to constant darkness in the winter, pose an intriguing environment for probing activity rhythms and the functioning of circadian clocks. Here, we monitor locomotor activity during the summer on the Antarctic Peninsula and under laboratory conditions, as well as the accompanying patterns of clock gene expression in the Antarctic midge, the only insect endemic to Antarctica. Larvae and adults are most active during the warmest portion of the day, but at a constant temperature they remain continuously active regardless of the photoregime, and activity also persists in constant darkness. The canonical clock genes period, timeless, Clock, and vrille are expressed in the head but we detected no cycling of expression in either the field or under diverse photoregimes in the laboratory. The timekeeping function of the clock has possibly been lost, enabling the midge to opportunistically exploit the unpredictable availability of permissive thermal conditions for growth, development, and reproduction during the short summer in Antarctica.

  13. PKA/CREB regulates the constitutive promoter activity of the USP22 gene.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jianjun; Zhou, Xiaoou; Gong, Zhen; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Jianyun; Li, Weidong

    2015-03-01

    The human ubiquitin-specific processing enzyme 22 (USP22) plays a crucial role in regulating cell cycle processes and its overexpression has been linked to tumor progression. However, the mechanisms leading to USP22 transcriptional activation in human cancer cells are still unclear. Previously, we characterized the 5'-flanking sequence of the human USP22 gene and found a potential CREB/ATF binding site within the basic promoter region. The present study found that this site was required for constitutive USP22 transcriptional activity in HeLa and HepG2 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay confirmed that CREB interacted with this site. siRNA knockdown of CREB decreased USP22 transcriptional activation and endogenous expression, whereas CREB overexpression did not affect transcriptional levels. Furthermore, USP22 promoter activity and expression were decreased by inhibiting PKA with H-89, but were not responsive to forskolin induction. All of these results demonstrate that PKA/CREB is involved in the regulation of constitutive promoter activity of the USP22 gene.

  14. Expression of an activated rasD gene changes cell fate decisions during Dictyostelium development.

    PubMed

    Louis, S A; Spiegelman, G B; Weeks, G

    1997-02-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that the expression of an activated rasD gene in wild-type Dictyostelium cells results in formation of aggregates with multitips, instead of the normal single tips, and a block in further development. In an attempt to better understand the role of activated RasD development, we examined cell-type-specific gene expression in a strain stably expressing high levels of RasD[G12T]. We found that the expression of prestalk cell-specific genes ecmA and tagB was markedly enhanced, whereas the expression of the prespore cell-specific gene cotC was reduced to very low levels. When the fate of cells in the multitipped aggregate was monitored with an ecmA/lacZ fusion, it appeared that most of the cells eventually adopted prestalk gene expression characteristics. When mixtures of the [G12T]rasD cells and Ax3 cells were induced to differentiate, chimeric pseudoplasmodia were not formed. Thus, although the [G12T]rasD transformant had a marked propensity to form prestalk cells, it could not supply the prestalk cell population when mixed with wild-type cells. Both stalk and spore cell formation occurred in low cell density monolayers of the [G12T]rasD strain, suggesting that at least part of the inhibition of stalk and spore formation during multicellular development involved inhibitory cell interactions within the cell mass. Models for the possible role of rasD in development are discussed.

  15. Retrovolution: HIV-driven evolution of cellular genes and improvement of anticancer drug activation.

    PubMed

    Rossolillo, Paola; Winter, Flore; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Gallois-Montbrun, Sarah; Negroni, Matteo

    2012-08-01

    In evolution strategies aimed at isolating molecules with new functions, screening for the desired phenotype is generally performed in vitro or in bacteria. When the final goal of the strategy is the modification of the human cell, the mutants selected with these preliminary screenings may fail to confer the desired phenotype, due to the complex networks that regulate gene expression in higher eukaryotes. We developed a system where, by mimicking successive infection cycles with HIV-1 derived vectors containing the gene target of the evolution in their genome, libraries of gene mutants are generated in the human cell, where they can be directly screened. As a proof of concept we created a library of mutants of the human deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) gene, involved in the activation of nucleoside analogues used in cancer treatment, with the aim of isolating a variant sensitizing cancer cells to the chemotherapy compound Gemcitabine, to be used in gene therapy for anti-cancer approaches or as a poorly immunogenic negative selection marker for cell transplantation approaches. We describe the isolation of a dCK mutant, G12, inducing a 300-fold sensitization to Gemcitabine in cells originally resistant to the prodrug (Messa 10K), an effect 60 times stronger than the one induced by the wt enzyme. The phenotype is observed in different tumour cell lines irrespective of the insertion site of the transgene and is due to a change in specificity of the mutated kinase in favour of the nucleoside analogue. The mutations characterizing G12 are distant from the active site of the enzyme and are unpredictable on a rational basis, fully validating the pragmatic approach followed. Besides the potential interest of the G12 dCK variant for therapeutic purposes, the methodology developed is of interest for a large panel of applications in biotechnology and basic research.

  16. Retrovolution: HIV–Driven Evolution of Cellular Genes and Improvement of Anticancer Drug Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rossolillo, Paola; Winter, Flore; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Gallois-Montbrun, Sarah; Negroni, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    In evolution strategies aimed at isolating molecules with new functions, screening for the desired phenotype is generally performed in vitro or in bacteria. When the final goal of the strategy is the modification of the human cell, the mutants selected with these preliminary screenings may fail to confer the desired phenotype, due to the complex networks that regulate gene expression in higher eukaryotes. We developed a system where, by mimicking successive infection cycles with HIV-1 derived vectors containing the gene target of the evolution in their genome, libraries of gene mutants are generated in the human cell, where they can be directly screened. As a proof of concept we created a library of mutants of the human deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) gene, involved in the activation of nucleoside analogues used in cancer treatment, with the aim of isolating a variant sensitizing cancer cells to the chemotherapy compound Gemcitabine, to be used in gene therapy for anti-cancer approaches or as a poorly immunogenic negative selection marker for cell transplantation approaches. We describe the isolation of a dCK mutant, G12, inducing a 300-fold sensitization to Gemcitabine in cells originally resistant to the prodrug (Messa 10K), an effect 60 times stronger than the one induced by the wt enzyme. The phenotype is observed in different tumour cell lines irrespective of the insertion site of the transgene and is due to a change in specificity of the mutated kinase in favour of the nucleoside analogue. The mutations characterizing G12 are distant from the active site of the enzyme and are unpredictable on a rational basis, fully validating the pragmatic approach followed. Besides the potential interest of the G12 dCK variant for therapeutic purposes, the methodology developed is of interest for a large panel of applications in biotechnology and basic research. PMID:22927829

  17. Active α-macroglobulin is a reservoir for urokinase after fibrinolytic therapy in rabbits with tetracycline-induced pleural injury and in human pleural fluids

    PubMed Central

    Florova, Galina; Azghani, Ali; Karandashova, Sophia; Kurdowska, Anna K.; Idell, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Intrapleural processing of prourokinase (scuPA) in tetracycline (TCN)-induced pleural injury in rabbits was evaluated to better understand the mechanisms governing successful scuPA-based intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy (IPFT), capable of clearing pleural adhesions in this model. Pleural fluid (PF) was withdrawn 0–80 min and 24 h after IPFT with scuPA (0–0.5 mg/kg), and activities of free urokinase (uPA), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and uPA complexed with α-macroglobulin (αM) were assessed. Similar analyses were performed using PFs from patients with empyema, parapneumonic, and malignant pleural effusions. The peak of uPA activity (5–40 min) reciprocally correlated with the dose of intrapleural scuPA. Endogenous active PAI-1 (10–20 nM) decreased the rate of intrapleural scuPA activation. The slow step of intrapleural inactivation of free uPA (t1/2β = 40 ± 10 min) was dose independent and 6.7-fold slower than in blood. Up to 260 ± 70 nM of αM/uPA formed in vivo [second order association rate (kass) = 580 ± 60 M−1·s−1]. αM/uPA and products of its degradation contributed to durable intrapleural plasminogen activation up to 24 h after IPFT. Active PAI-1, active α2M, and α2M/uPA found in empyema, pneumonia, and malignant PFs demonstrate the capacity to support similar mechanisms in humans. Intrapleural scuPA processing differs from that in the bloodstream and includes 1) dose-dependent control of scuPA activation by endogenous active PAI-1; 2) two-step inactivation of free uPA with simultaneous formation of αM/uPA; and 3) slow intrapleural degradation of αM/uPA releasing active free uPA. This mechanism offers potential clinically relevant advantages that may enhance the bioavailability of intrapleural scuPA and may mitigate the risk of bleeding complications. PMID:23997178

  18. Passenger mutations and aberrant gene expression in congenic tissue plasminogen activator-deficient mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, R.; Samson, A. L.; Lawrence, D. A.; Medcalf, R. L.; Bugge, T. H.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background The ability to generate defined null mutations in mice revolutionized the analysis of gene function in mammals. However, gene-deficient mice generated by using 129-derived embryonic stem cells may carry large segments of 129 DNA, even when extensively backcrossed to reference strains, such as C57BL/6J, and this may confound interpretation of experiments performed in these mice. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), encoded by the PLAT gene, is a fibrinolytic serine protease that is widely expressed in the brain. A number of neurological abnormalities have been reported in tPA-deficient mice. Objectives To study genetic contamination of tPA-deficient mice. Materials and methods Whole genome expression array analysis, RNAseq expression profiling, low- and high-density SNP analysis, bioinformatics, and genome editing was used to analyze gene expression in tPA-deficient mouse brains. Results and conclusions Genes differentially expressed in the brain of Plat−/− mice from two independent colonies highly backcrossed onto the C57BL/6J strain clustered near Plat on chromosome 8. SNP analysis attributed this anomaly to about 20 Mbp of DNA flanking Plat being of 129 origin in both strains. Bioinformatic analysis of these 129-derived chromosomal segments identified a significant number of mutations in genes co-segregating with the targeted Plat allele, including several potential null mutations. Using zinc finger nuclease technology, we generated novel “passenger mutation”-free isogenic C57BL/6J-Plat−/− and FVB/NJ-Plat−/− mouse strains by introducing an 11 bp deletion in the exon encoding the signal peptide. These novel mouse strains will be a useful community resource for further exploration of tPA function in physiological and pathological processes. PMID:27079292

  19. Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbria-dependent activation of inflammatory genes in human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsin-Hua; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Davey, Michael; Takahashi, Yusuke; Miyamoto, Takanari; Gibson, Frank C; Genco, Caroline A

    2005-09-01

    Epidemiological and pathological studies have suggested that infection with the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis can potentiate atherosclerosis and human coronary heart disease. Furthermore, infection with invasive, but not noninvasive P. gingivalis has been demonstrated to accelerate atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice and to accelerate local inflammatory responses in aortic tissue. In the present study, using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays, we have defined the gene expression profile of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) after infection with invasive and noninvasive P. gingivalis. After infection of HAEC with invasive P. gingivalis strain 381, we observed the upregulation of 68 genes. Genes coding for the cytokines Gro2 and Gro3; the adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, and ELAM-1 (E-selectin); the chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8); and the proinflammatory molecules IL-6 and cyclooxygenase-2 were among the most highly upregulated genes in P. gingivalis 381-infected HAEC compared to uninfected HAEC control. Increased mRNA levels for signaling molecules, transcriptional regulators, and cell surface receptors were also observed. Of note, only 4 of these 68 genes were also upregulated in HAEC infected with the noninvasive P. gingivalis fimA mutant. Reverse transcription-PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis confirmed the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-/P-selectins, IL-6, and IL-8 in HAEC infected with invasive P. gingivalis. We also demonstrated that increased expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in aortic tissue of ApoE(-/-) mice orally challenged with invasive P. gingivalis but not with the noninvasive P. gingivalis fimA mutant by immunohistochemical analysis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that P. gingivalis fimbria-mediated invasion upregulates inflammatory gene expression in HAEC and in aortic

  20. Promoter Methylation Pattern Controls Corticotropin Releasing Hormone Gene Activity in Human Trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xin; Bowman, Maria; Scott, Rodney J.; Fitter, John; Smith, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Placental CRH production increases with advancing pregnancy in women and its course predicts gestational length. We hypothesized that CRH gene expression in the placenta is epigenetically controlled setting gestational trajectories characteristic of normal and pathological pregnancies. Here we determined histone modification and DNA methylation levels and DNA methylation patterns at the CRH promoter in primary trophoblast cultures by chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with clonal bisulfite sequencing and identified the transcriptionally active epialleles that associate with particular histone modifications and transcription factors during syncytialisation and cAMP-stimulation. CRH gene expression increased during syncytial differentiation and cAMP stimulation, which was associated with increased activating and decreased repressive histone modification levels at the promoter. DNA methylation levels remained unchanged. The nine CpGs of the CRH proximal promoter were partially and allele-independently methylated displaying many (>100) epialleles. RNA-polymerase-II (Pol-II) bound only to three particular epialleles in cAMP-stimulated cells, while phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) bound to only one epiallele, which was different from those selected by Pol-II. Binding of TATA-binding protein increased during syncytial differentiation preferentially at epialleles compatible with Pol-II and pCREB binding. Histone-3 acetylation was detected only at epialleles targeted by Pol-II and pCREB, while gene activating histone-4 acetylation and histone-3-lysine-4 trimethylation occurred at CRH epialleles not associated with Pol-II or pCREB. The suppressive histone-3-lysine-27 trimethyl and–lysine-9 trimethyl modifications showed little or no epiallele preference. The epiallele selectivity of activating histone modifications and transcription factor binding demonstrates the epigenetic and functional diversity of the CRH gene in trophoblasts, which is

  1. Decreased glucocorticoid receptor activity following glucocorticoid receptor antisense RNA gene fragment transfection.

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, M C; Barden, N

    1991-01-01

    Depression is often characterized by increased cortisol secretion caused by hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and by nonsuppression of cortisol secretion following dexamethasone administration. This hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis could result from a reduced glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity in neurons involved in its control. To investigate the effect of reduced neuronal GR levels, we have blocked cellular GR mRNA processing and/or translation by introduction of a complementary GR antisense RNA strand. Two cell lines were transfected with a reporter plasmid carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene under control of the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (a glucocorticoid-inducible promoter). This gene construction permitted assay of the sensitivity of the cells to glucocorticoid hormones. Cells were also cotransfected with a plasmid containing 1,815 bp of GR cDNA inserted in the reverse orientation downstream from either a neurofilament gene promoter element or the Rous sarcoma virus promoter element. Northern (RNA) blot analysis demonstrated formation of GR antisense RNA strands. Measurement of the sensitivity of CAT activity to exogeneous dexamethasone showed that although dexamethasone increased CAT activity by as much as 13-fold in control incubations, expression of GR antisense RNA caused a 2- to 4-fold decrease in the CAT response to dexamethasone. Stable transfectants bearing the GR antisense gene fragment construction demonstrated a 50 to 70% decrease of functional GR levels compared with normal cells, as evidenced by a ligand-binding assay with the type II glucocorticoid receptor-specific ligand [3H]RU 28362. These results validate the use of antisense RNA to GR to decrease cellular response to glucocorticoids. Images PMID:1996114

  2. GBF-dependent family genes morphologically suppress the partially active Dictyostelium STATa strain.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Nao; Kanno-Tanabe, Naoko; Minemura, Kakeru; Kawata, Takefumi

    2008-02-01

    Transcription factor Dd-STATa, a functional Dictyostelium homologue of metazoan signal transducers and activators of transcription proteins, is necessary for culmination during development. We have isolated more than 18 putative multicopy suppressors of Dd-STATa using genetic screening. One was hssA gene, whose expression is known to be G-box-binding-factor-dependent and which was specific to prestalk A (pstA) cells, where Dd-STATa is activated. Also, hssA mRNA was expressed in pstA cells in the Dd-STATa-null mutant. At least 40 hssA-related genes are present in the genome and constitute a multigene family. The tagged HssA protein was translated; hssA encodes an unusually high-glycine-serine-rich small protein (8.37 kDa), which has strong homology to previously reported cyclic-adenosine-monophosphate-inducible 2C and 7E proteins. Overexpression of hssA mRNA as well as frame-shifted versions of hssA RNA suppressed the phenotype of the partially active Dd-STATa strain, suggesting that translation is not necessary for suppression. Although overexpression of prespore-specific genes among the family did not suppress the parental phenotype, prestalk-specific family members did. Although overexpression of the hssA did not revert the expression of Dd-STATa target genes, and although its suppression mechanism remains unknown, morphological reversion implies functional relationships between Dd-STATa and hssA.

  3. Evaluation of estrogenic activities of pesticides using an in vitro reporter gene assay.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Mihoko; Fukunaga, Kenji; Sasaki, Mari; Nakamura, Masafumi; Tsuji, Motohiro; Nishiyama, Toshimasa

    2005-08-01

    The estrogenic activities of 32 pesticides in agricultural products were evaluated using the E-CALUX assay system developed by Xenobiotic Detection Systems Inc (North Carolina, USA). This system utilizes human ovarian carcinoma cells (BG1) stably transfected with an estrogen-responsive luciferase reporter gene plasmid. It was found that tolclofos-methyl, prothiofos, diazinon, Thiabenclazole (TBZ) and pyriproxyfen had estrogenic activity. Several pesticides are often present in agricultural products. Therefore the estrogenicity of the mixtures of two kinds of pesticides was evaluated. The activity of diazinon/tolclofos-methyl, pyriproxyfen/prothiofos and TBZ/o-phenylphenol (OPP) was increased up to 1.2-5.3 fold. On the other hand, chlorfluazuron, imazalil and chlorfenapyr had anti-estrogenic activity. Further, to evaluate the change in the estrogenic activity of pesticide metabolites, an experimental system was established using a rat S9 mixture. Metabolites of permethrin and OPP had no estrogenic activity, but they had weak activity after the metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolites of TBZ exhibited less estrogenic activity than the original compounds.

  4. Tumor Suppressor Genes within Common Fragile Sites Are Active Players in the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Hazan, Idit; Hofmann, Thomas G; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2016-12-01

    The role of common fragile sites (CFSs) in cancer remains controversial. Two main views dominate the discussion: one suggests that CFS loci are hotspots of genomic instability leading to inactivation of genes encoded within them, while the other view proposes that CFSs are functional units and that loss of the encoded genes confers selective pressure, leading to cancer development. The latter view is supported by emerging evidence showing that expression of a given CFS is associated with genome integrity and that inactivation of CFS-resident tumor suppressor genes leads to dysregulation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and increased genomic instability. These two viewpoints of CFS function are not mutually exclusive but rather coexist; when breaks at CFSs are not repaired accurately, this can lead to deletions by which cells acquire growth advantage because of loss of tumor suppressor activities. Here, we review recent advances linking some CFS gene products with the DDR, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis and discuss how their inactivation might represent a selective advantage for cancer cells.

  5. CRISPR-ERA: a comprehensive design tool for CRISPR-mediated gene editing, repression and activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Honglei; Wei, Zheng; Dominguez, Antonia; Li, Yanda; Wang, Xiaowo; Qi, Lei S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: The CRISPR/Cas9 system was recently developed as a powerful and flexible technology for targeted genome engineering, including genome editing (altering the genetic sequence) and gene regulation (without altering the genetic sequence). These applications require the design of single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) that are efficient and specific. However, this remains challenging, as it requires the consideration of many criteria. Several sgRNA design tools have been developed for gene editing, but currently there is no tool for the design of sgRNAs for gene regulation. With accumulating experimental data on the use of CRISPR/Cas9 for gene editing and regulation, we implement a comprehensive computational tool based on a set of sgRNA design rules summarized from these published reports. We report a genome-wide sgRNA design tool and provide an online website for predicting sgRNAs that are efficient and specific. We name the tool CRISPR-ERA, for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-mediated editing, repression, and activation (ERA). Availability and implementation: http://CRISPR-ERA.stanford.edu. Contact: stanley.qi@stanford.edu or xwwang@tsinghua.edu.cn Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26209430

  6. Sensory experience and sensory activity regulate chemosensory receptor gene expression in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Peckol, Erin L.; Troemel, Emily R.; Bargmann, Cornelia I.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in the environment cause both short-term and long-term changes in an animal's behavior. Here we show that specific sensory experiences cause changes in chemosensory receptor gene expression that may alter sensory perception in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Three predicted chemosensory receptor genes expressed in the ASI chemosensory neurons, srd-1, str-2, and str-3, are repressed by exposure to the dauer pheromone, a signal of crowding. Repression occurs at pheromone concentrations below those that induce formation of the alternative dauer larva stage, suggesting that exposure to pheromones can alter the chemosensory behaviors of non-dauer animals. In addition, ASI expression of srd-1, but not str-2 and str-3, is induced by sensory activity of the ASI neurons. Expression of two receptor genes is regulated by developmental entry into the dauer larva stage. srd-1 expression in ASI neurons is repressed in dauer larvae. str-2 expression in dauer animals is induced in the ASI neurons, but repressed in the AWC neurons. The ASI and AWC neurons remodel in the dauer stage, and these results suggest that their sensory specificity changes as well. We suggest that experience-dependent changes in chemosensory receptor gene expression may modify olfactory behaviors. PMID:11572964

  7. Transcriptional activation by heat and cold of a thiol protease gene in tomato. [Lycopersicon esculentum

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, M.A.; Fischer, R.L. )

    1990-08-01

    We previously determined that low temperature induces the accumulation in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit of a cloned mRNA, designated C14, encoding a polypeptide related to thiol proteases. We now demonstrate that C14 mRNA accumulation is a response common to both high (40{degree}C) and low (4{degree}C) temperature stresses. Exposure of tomato fruit to 40{degree}C results in the accumulation of C14 mRNA, by 8 hours. This response is more rapid than that to 4{degree}C, but slower than the induction of many heat shock messages by 40{degree}C, and therefore unique. We have also studied the mechanism by which heat and cold exposure activate C14 gene expression. Both high and low temperature regulate protease gene expression through transcriptional induction of a single C14 gene. A hypothesis for the function of C14 thiol protease gene expression in response to heat and cold is discussed.

  8. A single nucleotide polymorphism of porcine MX2 gene provides antiviral activity against vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Keisuke; Tungtrakoolsub, Pullop; Morozumi, Takeya; Uenishi, Hirohide; Kawahara, Manabu; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to determine if single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in porcine MX2 gene affect its antiviral potential. MX proteins are known to suppress the multiplication of several viruses, including influenza virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). In domestic animals possessing highly polymorphic genome, our previous research indicated that a specific SNP in chicken Mx gene was responsible for its antiviral function. However, there still has been no information about SNPs in porcine MX2 gene. In this study, we first conducted polymorphism analysis in 17 pigs of MX2 gene derived from seven breeds. Consequently, a total of 30 SNPs, of which 11 were deduced to cause amino acid variations, were detected, suggesting that the porcine MX2 is very polymorphic. Next, we classified MX2 into eight alleles (A1-A8) and subsequently carried out infectious experiments with recombinant VSVΔG*-G to each allele. In A1-A5 and A8, position 514 amino acid (514 aa) of MX2 was glycine (Gly), which did not inhibit VSV multiplication, whereas in A6 and A7, 514 aa was arginine (Arg), which exhibited the antiviral ability against VSV. These results demonstrate that a SNP at 514 aa (Gly-Arg) of porcine MX2 plays a pivotal role in the antiviral activity as well as that at 631 aa of chicken Mx.

  9. Identification, nomenclature, and evolutionary relationships of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) genes in soybean.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Achal; Nepal, Madhav P; Piya, Sarbottam; Subramanian, Senthil; Rohila, Jai S; Reese, R Neil; Benson, Benjamin V

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) genes in eukaryotes regulate various developmental and physiological processes including those associated with biotic and abiotic stresses. Although MAPKs in some plant species including Arabidopsis have been identified, they are yet to be identified in soybean. Major objectives of this study were to identify GmMAPKs, assess their evolutionary relationships, and analyze their functional divergence. We identified a total of 38 MAPKs, eleven MAPKKs, and 150 MAPKKKs in soybean. Within the GmMAPK family, we also identified a new clade of six genes: four genes with TEY and two genes with TQY motifs requiring further investigation into possible legume-specific functions. The results indicated the expansion of the GmMAPK families attributable to the ancestral polyploidy events followed by chromosomal rearrangements. The GmMAPK and GmMAPKKK families were substantially larger than those in other plant species. The duplicated GmMAPK members presented complex evolutionary relationships and functional divergence when compared to their counterparts in Arabidopsis. We also highlighted existing nomenclatural issues, stressing the need for nomenclatural consistency. GmMAPK identification is vital to soybean crop improvement, and novel insights into the evolutionary relationships will enhance our understanding about plant genome evolution.

  10. Identification, Nomenclature, and Evolutionary Relationships of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Genes in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Achal; Nepal, Madhav P.; Piya, Sarbottam; Subramanian, Senthil; Rohila, Jai S.; Reese, R. Neil; Benson, Benjamin V.

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) genes in eukaryotes regulate various developmental and physiological processes including those associated with biotic and abiotic stresses. Although MAPKs in some plant species including Arabidopsis have been identified, they are yet to be identified in soybean. Major objectives of this study were to identify GmMAPKs, assess their evolutionary relationships, and analyze their functional divergence. We identified a total of 38 MAPKs, eleven MAPKKs, and 150 MAPKKKs in soybean. Within the GmMAPK family, we also identified a new clade of six genes: four genes with TEY and two genes with TQY motifs requiring further investigation into possible legume-specific functions. The results indicated the expansion of the GmMAPK families attributable to the ancestral polyploidy events followed by chromosomal rearrangements. The GmMAPK and GmMAPKKK families were substantially larger than those in other plant species. The duplicated GmMAPK members presented complex evolutionary relationships and functional divergence when compared to their counterparts in Arabidopsis. We also highlighted existing nomenclatural issues, stressing the need for nomenclatural consistency. GmMAPK identification is vital to soybean crop improvement, and novel insights into the evolutionary relationships will enhance our understanding about plant genome evolution. PMID:24137047

  11. Molluscan mobile elements similar to the vertebrate recombination-activating genes

    PubMed Central

    Panchin, Yuri; Moroz, Leonid L.

    2009-01-01

    Animal genomes contain ~20,000 genes. Additionally millions of genes for antigen receptors are generated in cells of the immune system from the sets of separate gene segments by a mechanism known as the V(D)J somatic recombination. The components of the V(D)J recombination system, Recombination-Activating Gene proteins (RAG1 and RAG2) and recombination signal sequence (RSS), are thought to have “entered” the vertebrate genome as a hypothetical “RAG transposon”. Recently discovered mobile elements have terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) similar to RSS and may encode proteins with a different degree of similarity to RAG1. We describe a novel N-RAG-TP transposon identified from the sea slug Aplysia californica that encodes a protein similar to the N-terminal part of RAG1 in vertebrates. This refines the “RAG transposon” hypothesis and allows us to propose a scenario for V(D)J recombination machinery evolution from a relic transposon related to the existing mobile elements N-RAG-TP, Chapaev and Transib. PMID:18313399

  12. Tumor Suppressor Genes within Common Fragile Sites Are Active Players in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Hazan, Idit; Hofmann, Thomas G.; Aqeilan, Rami I.

    2016-01-01

    The role of common fragile sites (CFSs) in cancer remains controversial. Two main views dominate the discussion: one suggests that CFS loci are hotspots of genomic instability leading to inactivation of genes encoded within them, while the other view proposes that CFSs are functional units and that loss of the encoded genes confers selective pressure, leading to cancer development. The latter view is supported by emerging evidence showing that expression of a given CFS is associated with genome integrity and that inactivation of CFS-resident tumor suppressor genes leads to dysregulation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and increased genomic instability. These two viewpoints of CFS function are not mutually exclusive but rather coexist; when breaks at CFSs are not repaired accurately, this can lead to deletions by which cells acquire growth advantage because of loss of tumor suppressor activities. Here, we review recent advances linking some CFS gene products with the DDR, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis and discuss how their inactivation might represent a selective advantage for cancer cells. PMID:27977694

  13. Potentially novel copper resistance genes in copper-enriched activated sludge revealed by metagenomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Guan; Cai, Lin; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Zhang, Tong

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we utilized the Illumina high-throughput metagenomic approach to investigate diversity and abundance of both microbial community and copper resistance genes (CuRGs) in activated sludge (AS) which was enriched under copper selective stress up to 800 mg/L. The raw datasets (~3.5 Gb for each sample, i.e., the copper-enriched AS and the control AS) were merged and normalized for the BLAST analyses against the SILVA SSU rRNA gene database and self-constructed copper resistance protein database (CuRD). Also, the raw metagenomic sequences were assembled into contigs and analyzed based on Open Reading Frames (ORFs) to identify potentially novel copper resistance genes. Among the different resistance systems for copper detoxification under the high copper stress condition, the Cus system was the most enriched system. The results also indicated that genes encoding multi-copper oxidase played a more important role than those encoding efflux proteins. More significantly, several potentially novel copper resistance ORFs were identified by Pfam search and phylogenic analysis. This study demonstrated a new understanding of microbial-mediated copper resistance under high copper stress using high-throughput shotgun sequencing technique.

  14. Cannabidiol Activates Neuronal Precursor Genes in Human Gingival Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Soundara Rajan, Thangavelu; Giacoppo, Sabrina; Scionti, Domenico; Diomede, Francesca; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Pollastro, Federica; Piattelli, Adriano; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela; Trubiani, Oriana

    2016-12-05

    In the last years, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from oral tissues have received considerable interest in regenerative medicine since they can be obtained with minimal invasive procedure and exhibit immunomodulatory properties. This study was aimed to investigate whether in vitro pre-treatment of MSCs obtained from human gingiva (hGMSCs) with Cannabidiol (CBD), a cannabinoid component produced by the plant Cannabis sativa, may promote human gingiva derived MSCs to differentiate toward neuronal precursor cells. Specifically, we have treated the hGMSCs with CBD (5 µM) for 24 h in order to evaluate the expression of genes involved in cannabidiol signaling, cell proliferation, self-renewal and multipotency, and neural progenitor cells differentiation. Next generation sequencing (NGS) demonstrated that CBD activates genes associated with G protein coupled receptor signaling in hGMSCs. Genes involved in DNA replication, cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptosis were regulated. Moreover, genes associated with the biological process of neuronal progenitor cells (NCPs) proliferation, neuron differentiation, neurogenesis, and nervous system development were significantly modulated. From our results, we hypothesize that human gingiva-derived MSCs conditioned with CBD could represent a valid method for improving the hGMSCs phenotype and thus might be a potential therapeutic tool in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-16, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Pharmacological and Genetic Modulation of REV-ERB Activity and Expression Affects Orexigenic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Ariadna; Wang, Yongjun; Banerjee, Subhashis; Kameneka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ are transcription factors that play pivotal roles in the regulation of the circadian rhythm and various metabolic processes. The circadian rhythm is an endogenous mechanism, which generates entrainable biological changes that follow a 24-hour period. It regulates a number of physiological processes, including sleep/wakeful cycles and feeding behaviors. We recently demonstrated that REV-ERB-specific small molecules affect sleep and anxiety. The orexinergic system also plays a significant role in mammalian physiology and behavior, including the regulation of sleep and food intake. Importantly, orexin genes are expressed in a circadian manner. Given these overlaps in function and circadian expression, we wanted to determine whether the REV-ERBs might regulate orexin. We found that acute in vivo modulation of REV-ERB activity, with the REV-ERB-specific synthetic ligand SR9009, affects the circadian expression of orexinergic genes in mice. Long term dosing with SR9009 also suppresses orexinergic gene expression in mice. Finally, REV-ERBβ-deficient mice present with increased orexinergic transcripts. These data suggest that the REV-ERBs may be involved in the repression of orexinergic gene expression. PMID:26963516

  16. Infection of Ustilaginoidea virens intercepts rice seed formation but activates grain-filling-related genes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jing; Guo, Xiao-Yi; Li, Liang; Huang, Fu; Sun, Wen-Xian; Li, Yan; Huang, Yan-Yan; Xu, Yong-Ju; Shi, Jun; Lei, Yang; Zheng, Ai-Ping; Wang, Wen-Ming

    2015-06-01

    Rice false smut has become an increasingly serious disease in rice (Oryza sativa L.) production worldwide. The typical feature of this disease is that the fungal pathogen Ustilaginoidea virens (Uv) specifically infects rice flower and forms false smut ball, the ustiloxin-containing ball-like fungal colony, of which the size is usually several times larger than that of a mature rice seed. However, the underlying mechanisms of Uv-rice interaction are poorly understood. Here, we applied time-course microscopic and transcriptional approaches to investigate rice responses to Uv infection. The results demonstrated that the flower-opening process and expression of associated transcription factors, including ARF6 and ARF8, were inhibited in Uv-infected spikelets. The ovaries in infected spikelets were interrupted in fertilization and thus were unable to set seeds. However, a number of grain-filling-related genes, including seed storage protein genes, starch anabolism genes and endosperm-specific transcription factors (RISBZ1 and RPBF), were highly transcribed as if the ovaries were fertilized. In addition, critical defense-related genes like NPR1 and PR1 were downregulated by Uv infection. Our data imply that Uv may hijack host nutrient reservoir by activation of the grain-filling network because of growth and formation of false smut balls.

  17. cis and trans activation of globin gene transcription in transient assays.

    PubMed

    Treisman, R; Green, M R; Maniatis, T

    1983-12-01

    We examined the effects of the simian virus 40 enhancer sequence on transcription of cloned human alpha- and beta-globin genes shortly after their introduction into cultured mammalian cells. We find that (i) detectable transcription of the beta-globin gene but not the alpha-globin gene requires linkage to the enhancer; (ii) the enhancer increases the amount of beta-globin RNA at least 100-fold but results in only a 5- to 10-fold increase in the amount of alpha-globin RNA; (iii) plasmid replication does not increase the level of beta-globin RNA, regardless of linkage to the enhancer, but does result in an approximately equal to 50-fold increase in the level of alpha-globin RNA; (iv) the enhancer is not required for and does not increase transcription of either gene in 293 cells, an adenovirus 5-transformed human kidney cell line. We also show that an enhancer sequence is not required for activity of the normally enhancer-dependent simian virus 40 early promoter in 293 cells, indicating that these cells contain a trans-acting factor(s) that circumvents the requirement for the enhancer sequence.

  18. Effects of soil type and farm management on soil ecological functional genes and microbial activities

    SciTech Connect

    Reeve, Jennifer; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Carpenter-Boggs, Lynne; Kang, S.; Zhou, Jizhong; Reganold, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Relationships between soil microbial diversity and soil function are the subject of much debate. Process-level analyses have shown that microbial function varies with soil type and responds to soil management. However, such measurements cannot determine the role of community structure and diversity in soil function. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of gene frequency and diversity, measured by microarray analysis, on soil processes. The study was conducted in an agro-ecosystem characterized by contrasting management practices and soil types. Eight pairs of adjacent commercial organic and conventional strawberry fields were matched for soil type, strawberry variety, and all other environmental conditions. Soil physical, chemical and biological analyses were conducted including functional gene microarrays (FGA). Soil physical and chemical characteristics were primarily determined by soil textural type (coarse vs fine-textured), but biological and FGA measures were more influenced by management (organic vs conventional). Organically managed soils consistently showed greater functional activity as well as FGA signal intensity (SI) and diversity. Overall FGA SI and diversity were correlated to total soil microbial biomass. Functional gene group SI and/or diversity were correlated to related soil chemical and biological measures such as microbial biomass, cellulose, dehydrogenase, ammonium and sulfur. Management was the dominant determinant of soil biology as measured by microbial gene frequency and diversity, which paralleled measured microbial processes.

  19. TBP/TFIID-dependent activation of MyoD target genes in skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Malecova, Barbora; Dall'Agnese, Alessandra; Madaro, Luca; Gatto, Sole; Coutinho Toto, Paula; Albini, Sonia; Ryan, Tammy; Tora, Làszlò; Puri, Pier Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Change in the identity of the components of the transcription pre-initiation complex is proposed to control cell type-specific gene expression. Replacement of the canonical TFIID-TBP complex with TRF3/TBP2 was reported to be required for activation of muscle-gene expression. The lack of a developmental phenotype in TBP2 null mice prompted further analysis to determine whether TBP2 deficiency can compromise adult myogenesis. We show here that TBP2 null mice have an intact regeneration potential upon injury and that TBP2 is not expressed in established C2C12 muscle cell or in primary mouse MuSCs. While TFIID subunits and TBP are downregulated during myoblast differentiation, reduced amounts of these proteins form a complex that is detectable on promoters of muscle genes and is essential for their expression. This evidence demonstrates that TBP2 does not replace TBP during muscle differentiation, as previously proposed, with limiting amounts of TFIID-TBP being required to promote muscle-specific gene expression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12534.001 PMID:26880551

  20. Hydrogen peroxide activates cell death and defense gene expression in birch.

    PubMed

    Pellinen, Riikka I; Korhonen, Minna-Sisko; Tauriainen, Airi A; Palva, E Tapio; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2002-10-01

    The function of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as a signal molecule regulating gene expression and cell death induced by external stresses was studied in birch (Betula pendula). Ozone (O(3)), Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae (Pss), and wounding all induced cell death of various extents in birch leaves. This was temporally preceded and closely accompanied by H(2)O(2) accumulation at, and especially surrounding, the lesion sites. O(3) and Pss, along with an artificial H(2)O(2) producing system glucose (Glc)/Glc oxidase, elicited elevated mRNA levels corresponding to genes encoding reactive oxygen species detoxifying enzymes, Pal, Ypr10, and mitochondrial phosphate translocator 1. In addition to the regulation of gene expression, Glc/Glc oxidase also induced endogenous H(2)O(2) production in birch leaves, accompanied by cell death that resembled O(3) and Pss damage. Wound-induced gene expression differed from that induced by O(3) and Pss. Thus, it appears that at least two separate defense pathways can be activated in birch leaves by stress factors, even though the early H(2)O(2) accumulation response is common among them all.

  1. Isolation and structural characterization of the human 4F2 heavy-chain gene, an inducible gene involved in T-lymphocyte activation.

    PubMed Central

    Gottesdiener, K M; Karpinski, B A; Lindsten, T; Strominger, J L; Jones, N H; Thompson, C B; Leiden, J M

    1988-01-01

    The human 4F2 cell surface antigen is a 120-kilodalton (kDa) disulfide-linked heterodimer which is composed of an 80- to 90-kDa glycosylated heavy chain (4F2HC) and a 35- to 40-kDa nonglycosylated light chain (4F2LC). 4F2 belongs to a family of inducible cell surface molecules which are involved in T-lymphocyte activation and growth. To better understand the molecular mechanism(s) that controls 4F2HC gene expression in both resting and activated T cells, a 4F2HC human genomic clone was isolated and structurally characterized. The 4F2HC gene spans 8 kilobases of chromosome 11 and is composed of nine exons. The 5' upstream region of the gene displays several properties which are characteristic of housekeeping genes. It is G+C rich and hypomethylated in peripheral blood lymphocyte DNA and contains multiple binding sites for the Sp1 transcription factor while lacking TATA or CCAAT sequences. This region of the gene also displays sequence homologies with several other inducible T-cell genes, including the interleukin-2, interleukin-2 receptor alpha chain, dihydrofolate reductase, thymidine kinase, and transferrin receptor genes. A 255-base-pair fragment of the 4F2HC gene which contains 154 base pairs of the 5' flanking sequence was able to efficiently promote expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene in human Jurkat T cells, indicating that it contains promoter or enhancer (or both) sequences. Analyses of chromatin structure in resting and lectin-activated T cells revealed the presence of stable DNase I-hypersensitive sites within both the 5' flanking and intron 1 regions of the 4F2HC gene. Although the 4F2HC gene displayed many of the structural features characteristic of a constitutively expressed gene, lectin-mediated activation of resting peripheral blood T lymphocytes resulted in a dramatic increase in steady-state levels of 4F2HC mRNA. Images PMID:3265470

  2. Interaction Effects of BDNF and COMT Genes on Resting-State Brain Activity and Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Chunhui; Xia, Mingrui; Wu, Karen; Chen, Chuansheng; He, Qinghua; Xue, Gui; Wang, Wenjing; He, Yong; Dong, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) genes have been found to interactively influence working memory (WM) as well as brain activation during WM tasks. However, whether the two genes have interactive effects on resting-state activities of the brain and whether these spontaneous activations correlate with WM are still unknown. This study included behavioral data from WM tasks and genetic data (COMT rs4680 and BDNF Val66Met) from 417 healthy Chinese adults and resting-state fMRI data from 298 of them. Significant interactive effects of BDNF and COMT were found for WM performance as well as for resting-state regional homogeneity (ReHo) in WM-related brain areas, including the left medial frontal gyrus (lMeFG), left superior frontal gyrus (lSFG), right superior and medial frontal gyrus (rSMFG), right medial orbitofrontal gyrus (rMOFG), right middle frontal gyrus (rMFG), precuneus, bilateral superior temporal gyrus, left superior occipital gyrus, right middle occipital gyrus, and right inferior parietal lobule. Simple effects analyses showed that compared to other genotypes, subjects with COMT-VV/BDNF-VV had higher WM and lower ReHo in all five frontal brain areas. The results supported the hypothesis that COMT and BDNF polymorphisms influence WM performance and spontaneous brain activity (i.e., ReHo). PMID:27853425

  3. Enterococcus faecalis reconfigures its gene regulatory network activation under copper exposure

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Mauricio; Galloway-Peña, Jessica; Roh, Jung Hyeob; Budinich, Marko; Reyes-Jara, Angélica; Murray, Barbara E.; Maass, Alejandro; González, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    A gene regulatory network was generated in the bacterium Enterococcus faecalis in order to understand how this organism can activate its expression under different copper concentrations. The topological evaluation of the network showed common patterns described in other organisms. Integrating microarray experiments allowed the identification of sub-networks activated under low (0.05 mM CuSO4) and high (0.5 mM CuSO4) copper concentrations. The analysis indicates the presence of specific functionally activated modules induced by copper, highlighting the regulons LysR, ArgR as global regulators and CopY, Fur and LexA as local regulators. Taking advantage of the fact that E. faecalis presented a homeostatic module isolated, we produced an in vivo intervention removing this system from the cell without affecting the connectivity of the global transcriptional network. This strategy led us to find that this bacterium can reconfigure its gene expression to maintain cellular homeostasis, activating new modules principally related to glucose metabolism and transcriptional processes. Finally, these results position E. faecalis as the organism having the most complete and controllable systemic model of copper homeostasis available to date. PMID:24382465

  4. Different Gene Expression and Activity Pattern of Antioxidant Enzymes in Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Edyta; Jablonowski, Zbigniew; Tomasik, Bartlomiej; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Jablonska, Ewa; Konecki, Tomasz; Fendler, Wojciech; Sosnowski, Marek; Wasowicz, Wojciech; Reszka, Edyta

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible role in and contribution of antioxidant enzymes to bladder cancer (BC) etiology and recurrence after transurethral resection (TUR). We enrolled 40 patients with BC who underwent TUR and 100 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. The analysis was performed at diagnosis and recurrence, taking into account the time of recurrence. Gene expression of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) and manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) was determined in peripheral blood leukocytes. The activity of glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPX3) was examined in plasma, and GPX1 and copper-zinc containing superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) in erythrocytes. SOD2 and GPX1 expression and GPX1 and SOD1 activity were significantly higher in patients at diagnosis of BC in comparison to controls. In patients who had recurrence earlier than 1 year from TUR, CAT and SOD2 expression was lower (at diagnosis p=0.024 and p=0.434, at recurrence p=0.022 and p=0.010), while the GPX1 and GPX3 activity was higher (at diagnosis p=0.242 and p=0.394, at recurrence p=0.019 and p=0.025) compared to patients with recurrence after 1 year from TUR. This study revealed that the gene expression and activity of the antioxidant enzymes are elevated in blood of patients with BC, although a low expression of CAT might contribute to the recurrence of BC, in early prognosis.

  5. Epigenetic activation of Sox2 gene in the developing vertebrate neural plate.

    PubMed

    Bouzas, Santiago O; Marini, Melisa S; Torres Zelada, Eliana; Buzzi, Ailín L; Morales Vicente, David A; Strobl-Mazzulla, Pablo H

    2016-06-15

    One of the earliest manifestations of neural induction is onset of expression of the neural marker Sox2, mediated by the activation of the enhancers N1 and N2. By using loss and gain of function, we find that Sox2 expression requires the activity of JmjD2A and the Msk1 kinase, which can respectively demethylate the repressive H3K9me3 mark and phosphorylate the activating H3S10 (H3S10ph) mark. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation reveals that the adaptor protein 14-3-3, known to bind to H3S10ph, interacts with JMJD2A and may be involved in its recruitment to regulatory regions of the Sox2 gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals dynamic binding of JMJD2A to the Sox2 promoter and N-1 enhancer at the time of neural plate induction. Finally, we show a clear temporal antagonism on the occupancy of H3K9me3 and H3S10ph modifications at the promoter of the Sox2 locus before and after the neural plate induction. Taken together, our results propose a series of epigenetic events necessary for the early activation of the Sox2 gene in neural progenitor cells.

  6. Regulation of gene expression by manipulating transcriptional repressor activity using a novel CoSRI technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yue; Li, Song Feng; Parish, Roger W

    2016-12-20

    Targeted gene manipulation is a central strategy for studying gene function and identifying related biological processes. However, a methodology for manipulating the regulatory motifs of transcription factors is lacking as these factors commonly possess multiple motifs (eg. repression and activation motifs) which collaborate with each other to regulate multiple biological processes. We describe a novel approach designated Conserved Sequence-guided Repressor Inhibition (CoSRI) that can specifically reduce or abolish the repressive activities of transcription factors in vivo. The technology was evaluated using the chimeric MYB80-EAR transcription factor and subsequently the endogenous WUS transcription factor. The technology was employed to develop a reversible male sterility system applicable to hybrid seed production. In order to determine the capacity of the technology to regulate the activity of endogenous transcription factors, the WUS repressor was chosen. The WUS repression motif could be inhibited in vivo and the transformed plants exhibited the wus-1 phenotype. Consequently, the technology can be used to manipulate the activities of transcriptional repressor motifs regulating beneficial traits in crop plants and other eukaryotic organisms. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Disrupted Ultradian Activity Rhythms and Differential Expression of Several Clock Genes in Interleukin-6-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Monje, Francisco J.; Cicvaric, Ana; Acevedo Aguilar, Juan Pablo; Elbau, Immanuel; Horvath, Orsolya; Diao, Weifei; Glat, Micaela; Pollak, Daniela D.

    2017-01-01

    The characteristics of the cycles of activity and rest stand out among the most intensively investigated aspects of circadian rhythmicity in humans and experimental animals. Alterations in the circadian patterns of activity and rest are strongly linked to cognitive and emotional dysfunctions in severe mental illnesses such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and major depression (MDD). The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6) has been prominently associated with the pathogenesis of AD and MDD. However, the potential involvement of IL-6 in the modulation of the diurnal rhythms of activity and rest has not been investigated. Here, we set out to study the role of IL-6 in circadian rhythmicity through the characterization of patterns of behavioral locomotor activity in IL-6 knockout (IL-6 KO) mice and wild-type littermate controls. Deletion of IL-6 did not alter the length of the circadian period or the amount of locomotor activity under either light-entrained or free-running conditions. IL-6 KO mice also presented a normal phase shift in response to light exposure at night. However, the temporal architecture of the behavioral rhythmicity throughout the day, as characterized by the quantity of ultradian activity bouts, was significantly impaired under light-entrained and free-running conditions in IL-6 KO. Moreover, the assessment of clock gene expression in the hippocampus, a brain region involved in AD and depression, revealed altered levels of cry1, dec2, and rev-erb-beta in IL-6 KO mice. These data propose that IL-6 participates in the regulation of ultradian activity/rest rhythmicity and clock gene expression in the mammalian brain. Furthermore, we propose IL-6-dependent circadian misalignment as a common pathogenetic principle in some neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:28382017

  8. Temperature and water loss affect ADH activity and gene expression in grape berry during postharvest dehydration.

    PubMed

    Cirilli, Marco; Bellincontro, Andrea; De Santis, Diana; Botondi, Rinaldo; Colao, Maria Chiara; Muleo, Rosario; Mencarelli, Fabio

    2012-05-01

    Clusters of Aleatico wine grape were picked at 18°Brix and placed at 10, 20, or 30°C, 45% relative humidity (RH) and 1.5m/s of air flow to dehydrate the berries up to 40% of loss of initial fresh weight. Sampling was done at 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% weight loss (wl). ADH (alcohol dehydrogenase) gene expression, enzyme activity, and related metabolites were analysed. At 10°C, acetaldehyde increased rapidly and then declined, while ethanol continued to rise. At 20°C, acetaldehyde and ethanol increased significantly with the same pattern and declined at 40%wl. At 30°C, acetaldehyde did not increase but ethanol increased rapidly already at 10%wl. At the latter temperature, a significant increase in acetic acid and ethyl acetate occurred, while at 10°C their values were low. At 30°C, the ADH activity (ethanol to acetaldehyde direction), increased rapidly but acetaldehyde did not rise because of its oxidation to acetic acid, which increased together with ethyl acetate. At 10°C, the ADH activity increased at 20%wl and continued to rise even at 40%wl, meaning that ethanol oxidation was delayed. At 20°C, the behaviour was intermediate to the other temperatures. The relative expression of the VvAdh2 gene was the highest at 10°C already at 10%wl in a synchrony with the ADH activity, indicating a rapid response likely due to low temperature. The expression subsequently declined. At 20 and 30°C, the expression was lower and increased slightly during dehydration in combination with the ADH activity. This imbalance between gene expression and ADH activity at 10°C, as well as the unexpected expression of the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 1 (CCD1) gene, opens the discussion on the stress sensitivity and transcription event during postharvest dehydration, and the importance of carefully monitoring temperature during dehydration.

  9. Activation of GATA4 gene expression at the early stage of cardiac specification

    PubMed Central

    Yilbas, Ayse E.; Hamilton, Alison; Wang, Yingjian; Mach, Hymn; Lacroix, Natascha; Davis, Darryl R.; Chen, Jihong; Li, Qiao

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there are no effective treatments to directly repair damaged heart tissue after cardiac injury since existing therapies focus on rescuing or preserving reversibly damaged tissue. Cell-based therapies using cardiomyocytes generated from stem cells present a promising therapeutic approach to directly replace damaged myocardium with new healthy tissue. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the commitment of stem cells into cardiomyocytes are not fully understood and will be critical to guide this new technology into the clinic. Since GATA4 is a critical regulator of cardiac differentiation, we examined the molecular basis underlying the early activation of GATA4 gene expression during cardiac differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Our studies demonstrate the direct involvement of histone acetylation and transcriptional coactivator p300 in the regulation of GATA4 gene expression. More importantly, we show that histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity is important for GATA4 gene expression with the use of curcumin, a HAT inhibitor. In addition, the widely used histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid enhances both histone acetylation and cardiac specification. PMID:24790981

  10. Editing of the heavy chain gene of Bombyx mori using transcription activator like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujun; Nakagaki, Masao

    2014-07-18

    The silk gland of Bombyx mori represents an established in vivo system for producing recombinant proteins. However, low yields of recombinant proteins have limited the system's further development because endogenous silk proteins were present. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) tool which work in pairs to bind and cleave DNA at specific sites, have recently been shown to be effective for genome editing in various organisms, including silkworms. To improve the yield of recombinant proteins synthesized in the silkworm by eliminated competition with endogenous fibroin synthesis, the heavy chain (H-chain) gene was knocked out using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). A pair of TALENs that targets the 1st exon in the H-chain gene was synthesized and microinjected into silkworm embryos; the injected silkworms were screened for H-chain gene knock out (H-KO) based on their sericin cocoon-making characteristics. Sequence analysis revealed that the H-chain of the mutation was successfully edited. The TALENs was very efficient in editing the genome DNA of silkworm. By being eliminated competition with the H-chain, the production of recombinant proteins would be expected to increase markedly if this H-KO system is used.

  11. Expression and Enzyme Activity Detection of a Sepiapterin Reductase Gene from Musca domestica Larva.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan; Pei, Zhihua; Liu, Lei; Wang, Dongfang; Kong, Lingcong; Liu, Shuming; Jiang, Xiuyun; Gao, Yunhang; Ma, Hongxia

    2017-02-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor for aromatic acid hydroxylases and nitric oxide synthase. Sepiapterin reductase (SPR) catalyzes the final steps of BH4 biosynthesis. Studies on SPR from several insects and other organisms have been reported. However, thus far, enzyme activity of SPR in Musca domestica is kept unknown. In this study, 186 differentially expressed genes including SPR gene from Musca domestica (MDSPR) were screened in subtractive cDNA library. The MDSPR gene was cloned, and the recombinant MDSPI16 protein was expressed as a 51-kDa protein in soluble form. The MDSPR exhibited strong activity to the substrate sepiapterin (SP). The values of Vmax and Km of the MDSPR for SP were 6.83 μM/min and 23.48 μM, and the optimum temperature and pH of MDSPR were 50 °C and 4.0, respectively. This study provides new hypotheses and methods for the production of BH4 using insect-derived SPR.