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Sample records for activator-like effector nuclease

  1. Comparing zinc finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases for gene targeting in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Beumer, Kelly J; Trautman, Jonathan K; Christian, Michelle; Dahlem, Timothy J; Lake, Cathleen M; Hawley, R Scott; Grunwald, David J; Voytas, Daniel F; Carroll, Dana

    2013-10-03

    Zinc-finger nucleases have proven to be successful as reagents for targeted genome manipulation in Drosophila melanogaster and many other organisms. Their utility has been limited, however, by the significant failure rate of new designs, reflecting the complexity of DNA recognition by zinc fingers. Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA-binding domains depend on a simple, one-module-to-one-base-pair recognition code, and they have been very productively incorporated into nucleases (TALENs) for genome engineering. In this report we describe the design of TALENs for a number of different genes in Drosophila, and we explore several parameters of TALEN design. The rate of success with TALENs was substantially greater than for zinc-finger nucleases , and the frequency of mutagenesis was comparable. Knockout mutations were isolated in several genes in which such alleles were not previously available. TALENs are an effective tool for targeted genome manipulation in Drosophila.

  2. Generation of knockout rabbits using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Fan, Nana; Song, Jun; Zhong, Juan; Guo, Xiaogang; Tian, Weihua; Zhang, Quanjun; Cui, Fenggong; Li, Li; Newsome, Philip N; Frampton, Jon; Esteban, Miguel A; Lai, Liangxue

    2014-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases are novel gene-editing platforms contributing to redefine the boundaries of modern biological research. They are composed of a non-specific cleavage domain and a tailor made DNA-binding module, which enables a broad range of genetic modifications by inducing efficient DNA double-strand breaks at desired loci. Among other remarkable uses, these nucleases have been employed to produce gene knockouts in mid-size and large animals, such as rabbits and pigs, respectively. This approach is cost effective, relatively quick, and can produce invaluable models for human disease studies, biotechnology or agricultural purposes. Here we describe a protocol for the efficient generation of knockout rabbits using transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and a perspective of the field.

  3. The application of transcription activator-like effector nucleases for genome editing in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Yi, Peishan; Li, Wei; Ou, Guangshuo

    2014-08-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been a powerful model system for biomedical research in the past decades, however, the efficient genetic tools are still demanding for gene knockout, knock-in or conditional gene mutations. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that comprise a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain fused to a FokI nuclease domain facilitate the targeted genome editing in various cell types or organisms. Here we summarize the recent progresses and protocols using TALENs in C. elegans that generate gene mutations and knock-ins in the germ line and the conditional gene knockout in somatic tissues.

  4. Exploring the transcription activator-like effectors scaffold versatility to expand the toolbox of designer nucleases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The past decade has seen the emergence of several molecular tools that render possible modification of cellular functions through accurate and easy addition, removal, or exchange of genomic DNA sequences. Among these technologies, transcription activator-like effectors (TALE) has turned out to be one of the most versatile and incredibly robust platform for generating targeted molecular tools as demonstrated by fusion to various domains such as transcription activator, repressor and nucleases. Results In this study, we generated a novel nuclease architecture based on the transcription activator-like effector scaffold. In contrast to the existing Tail to Tail (TtT) and head to Head (HtH) nuclease architectures based on the symmetrical association of two TALE DNA binding domains fused to the C-terminal (TtT) or N-terminal (HtH) end of FokI, this novel architecture consists of the asymmetrical association of two different engineered TALE DNA binding domains fused to the N- and C-terminal ends of FokI (TALE::FokI and FokI::TALE scaffolds respectively). The characterization of this novel Tail to Head (TtH) architecture in yeast enabled us to demonstrate its nuclease activity and define its optimal target configuration. We further showed that this architecture was able to promote substantial level of targeted mutagenesis at three endogenous loci present in two different mammalian cell lines. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that this novel functional TtH architecture which requires binding to only one DNA strand of a given endogenous locus has the potential to extend the targeting possibility of FokI-based TALE nucleases. PMID:24997498

  5. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs): a highly efficient and versatile tool for genome editing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ning; Zhao, Huimin

    2013-07-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs) have recently emerged as a revolutionary genome editing tool in many different organisms and cell types. The site-specific chromosomal double-strand breaks introduced by TALENs significantly increase the efficiency of genomic modification. The modular nature of the TALE central repeat domains enables researchers to tailor DNA recognition specificity with ease and target essentially any desired DNA sequence. Here, we comprehensively review the development of TALEN technology in terms of scaffold optimization, DNA recognition, and repeat array assembly. In addition, we provide some perspectives on the future development of this technology.

  6. Genome Modification of Pluripotent Cells by Using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs).

    PubMed

    Taheri-Ghahfarokhi, Amir; Malaver-Ortega, Luis F; Sumer, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Interest is increasing in transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) as a tool to introduce targeted double-strand breaks into the large genomes of human and animal cell lines. The produced DNA lesions stimulate DNA repair pathways, error-prone but dominant non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and accurate but less occurring homology-directed repair (HDR), and as a result targeted genes can be modified. Here, we describe a modified Golden-Gate cloning method for generating TALENs and also details for targeting genes in mouse embryonic stem cells. The protocol described here can be used for modifying the genome of a broad range of pluripotent cell lines.

  7. Generation of gene disruptions by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in Xenopus tropicalis embryos.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yong; Guo, Xiaogang; Deng, Yi; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2013-05-10

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are novel engineered DNA nucleases, and have been proven to be effective for gene specific targeting in various species. Recently we reported gene disruptions in Xenopus embryos by using TALENs. Here we summarize the protocol that is used in our studies for gene disruption. This protocol covers selection of TALEN targeting sites, TALEN assembly with a modified Golden Gate method, and injection of TALEN mRNAs into Xenopus tropicalis embryos. We also provide details for detection of somatic and germ line transmitted mutations. And finally, we briefly describe establishment of knockout Xenopus lines. This protocol will facilitate broader applications of TALENs in studies of Xenopus biology.

  8. Improved somatic mutagenesis in zebrafish using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs).

    PubMed

    Moore, Finola E; Reyon, Deepak; Sander, Jeffry D; Martinez, Sarah A; Blackburn, Jessica S; Khayter, Cyd; Ramirez, Cherie L; Joung, J Keith; Langenau, David M

    2012-01-01

    Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) made by Context-Dependent Assembly (CoDA) and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) provide robust and user-friendly technologies for efficiently inactivating genes in zebrafish. These designer nucleases bind to and cleave DNA at particular target sites, inducing error-prone repair that can result in insertion or deletion mutations. Here, we assess the relative efficiencies of these technologies for inducing somatic DNA mutations in mosaic zebrafish. We find that TALENs exhibited a higher success rate for obtaining active nucleases capable of inducing mutations than compared with CoDA ZFNs. For example, all six TALENs tested induced DNA mutations at genomic target sites while only a subset of CoDA ZFNs exhibited detectable rates of mutagenesis. TALENs also exhibited higher mutation rates than CoDA ZFNs that had not been pre-screened using a bacterial two-hybrid assay, with DNA mutation rates ranging from 20%-76.8% compared to 1.1%-3.3%. Furthermore, the broader targeting range of TALENs enabled us to induce mutations at the methionine translation start site, sequences that were not targetable using the CoDA ZFN platform. TALENs exhibited similar toxicity to CoDA ZFNs, with >50% of injected animals surviving to 3 days of life. Taken together, our results suggest that TALEN technology provides a robust alternative to CoDA ZFNs for inducing targeted gene-inactivation in zebrafish, making it a preferred technology for creating targeted knockout mutants in zebrafish.

  9. Editing of the heavy chain gene of Bombyx mori using transcription activator like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujun; Nakagaki, Masao

    2014-07-18

    The silk gland of Bombyx mori represents an established in vivo system for producing recombinant proteins. However, low yields of recombinant proteins have limited the system's further development because endogenous silk proteins were present. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) tool which work in pairs to bind and cleave DNA at specific sites, have recently been shown to be effective for genome editing in various organisms, including silkworms. To improve the yield of recombinant proteins synthesized in the silkworm by eliminated competition with endogenous fibroin synthesis, the heavy chain (H-chain) gene was knocked out using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). A pair of TALENs that targets the 1st exon in the H-chain gene was synthesized and microinjected into silkworm embryos; the injected silkworms were screened for H-chain gene knock out (H-KO) based on their sericin cocoon-making characteristics. Sequence analysis revealed that the H-chain of the mutation was successfully edited. The TALENs was very efficient in editing the genome DNA of silkworm. By being eliminated competition with the H-chain, the production of recombinant proteins would be expected to increase markedly if this H-KO system is used.

  10. Comprehensive analysis of the specificity of transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Juillerat, Alexandre; Dubois, Gwendoline; Valton, Julien; Thomas, Séverine; Stella, Stefano; Maréchal, Alan; Langevin, Stéphanie; Benomari, Nassima; Bertonati, Claudia; Silva, George H; Daboussi, Fayza; Epinat, Jean-Charles; Montoya, Guillermo; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    A key issue when designing and using DNA-targeting nucleases is specificity. Ideally, an optimal DNA-targeting tool has only one recognition site within a genomic sequence. In practice, however, almost all designer nucleases available today can accommodate one to several mutations within their target site. The ability to predict the specificity of targeting is thus highly desirable. Here, we describe the first comprehensive experimental study focused on the specificity of the four commonly used repeat variable diresidues (RVDs; NI:A, HD:C, NN:G and NG:T) incorporated in transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN). The analysis of >15 500 unique TALEN/DNA cleavage profiles allowed us to monitor the specificity gradient of the RVDs along a TALEN/DNA binding array and to present a specificity scoring matrix for RVD/nucleotide association. Furthermore, we report that TALEN can only accommodate a relatively small number of position-dependent mismatches while maintaining a detectable activity at endogenous loci in vivo, demonstrating the high specificity of these molecular tools. We thus envision that the results we provide will allow for more deliberate choices of DNA binding arrays and/or DNA targets, extending our engineering capabilities.

  11. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-03-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals.

  12. Efficient targeted gene disruption in Xenopus embryos using engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs).

    PubMed

    Lei, Yong; Guo, Xiaogang; Liu, Yun; Cao, Yang; Deng, Yi; Chen, Xiongfeng; Cheng, Christopher H K; Dawid, Igor B; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2012-10-23

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are an approach for directed gene disruption and have been proved to be effective in various animal models. Here, we report that TALENs can induce somatic mutations in Xenopus embryos with reliably high efficiency and that such mutations are heritable through germ-line transmission. We modified the Golden Gate method for TALEN assembly to make the product suitable for RNA transcription and microinjection into Xenopus embryos. Eight pairs of TALENs were constructed to target eight Xenopus genes, and all resulted in indel mutations with high efficiencies of up to 95.7% at the targeted loci. Furthermore, mutations induced by TALENs were highly efficiently passed through the germ line to F(1) frogs. Together with simple and reliable PCR-based approaches for detecting TALEN-induced mutations, our results indicate that TALENs are an effective tool for targeted gene editing/knockout in Xenopus.

  13. Engineering designer transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) by REAL or REAL-Fast assembly.

    PubMed

    Reyon, Deepak; Khayter, Cyd; Regan, Maureen R; Joung, J Keith; Sander, Jeffry D

    2012-10-01

    Engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are broadly useful tools for performing targeted genome editing in a wide variety of organisms and cell types including plants, zebrafish, C. elegans, rat, human somatic cells, and human pluripotent stem cells. Here we describe detailed protocols for the serial, hierarchical assembly of TALENs that require neither PCR nor specialized multi-fragment ligations and that can be implemented by any laboratory. These restriction enzyme and ligation (REAL)-based protocols can be practiced using plasmid libraries and user-friendly, Web-based software that both identifies target sites in sequences of interest and generates printable graphical guides that facilitate assembly of TALENs. With the described platform of reagents, protocols, and software, researchers can easily engineer multiple TALENs within 2 weeks using standard cloning techniques.

  14. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals. PMID:26950874

  15. Rh D blood group conversion using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyun O; Baek, Eun J; Kurita, Ryo; Cha, Hyuk-Jin; Nakamura, Yukio; Kim, Hyongbum

    2015-06-16

    Group O D-negative blood cells are universal donors in transfusion medicine and methods for converting other blood groups into this universal donor group have been researched. However, conversion of D-positive cells into D-negative is yet to be achieved, although conversion of group A or B cells into O cells has been reported. The Rh D blood group is determined by the RHD gene, which encodes a 12-transmembrane domain protein. Here we convert Rh D-positive erythroid progenitor cells into D-negative cells using RHD-targeting transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). After transfection of TALEN-encoding plasmids, RHD-knockout clones are obtained. Erythroid-lineage cells differentiated from these knockout erythroid progenitor cells do not agglutinate in the presence of anti-D reagents and do not express D antigen, as assessed using flow cytometry. Our programmable nuclease-induced blood group conversion opens new avenues for compatible donor cell generation in transfusion medicine.

  16. Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALEN)-Mediated Targeted DNA Insertion in Potato Plants.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Adrienne; Weeks, Troy; Richael, Craig; Duan, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Targeted DNA integration into known locations in the genome has potential advantages over the random insertional events typically achieved using conventional means of genetic modification. Specifically integrated transgenes are guaranteed to co-segregate, and expression level is more predictable, which makes downstream characterization and line selection more manageable. Because the site of DNA integration is known, the steps to deregulation of transgenic crops may be simplified. Here we describe a method that combines transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated induction of double strand breaks (DSBs) and non-autonomous marker selection to insert a transgene into a pre-selected, transcriptionally active region in the potato genome. In our experiment, TALEN was designed to create a DSB in the genome sequence following an endogenous constitutive promoter. A cytokinin vector was utilized for TALENs expression and prevention of stable integration of the nucleases. The donor vector contained a gene of interest cassette and a promoter-less plant-derived herbicide resistant gene positioned near the T-DNA left border which was used to select desired transgenic events. Our results indicated that TALEN induced T-DNA integration occurred with high frequency and resulting events have consistent expression of the gene of interest. Interestingly, it was found that, in most lines integration took place through one sided homology directed repair despite the minimal homologous sequence at the right border. An efficient transient assay for TALEN activity verification is also described.

  17. Rh D blood group conversion using transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyun O.; Baek, Eun J.; Kurita, Ryo; Cha, Hyuk-Jin; Nakamura, Yukio; Kim, Hyongbum

    2015-01-01

    Group O D-negative blood cells are universal donors in transfusion medicine and methods for converting other blood groups into this universal donor group have been researched. However, conversion of D-positive cells into D-negative is yet to be achieved, although conversion of group A or B cells into O cells has been reported. The Rh D blood group is determined by the RHD gene, which encodes a 12-transmembrane domain protein. Here we convert Rh D-positive erythroid progenitor cells into D-negative cells using RHD-targeting transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). After transfection of TALEN-encoding plasmids, RHD-knockout clones are obtained. Erythroid-lineage cells differentiated from these knockout erythroid progenitor cells do not agglutinate in the presence of anti-D reagents and do not express D antigen, as assessed using flow cytometry. Our programmable nuclease-induced blood group conversion opens new avenues for compatible donor cell generation in transfusion medicine. PMID:26078220

  18. Generation of myostatin B knockout yellow catfish (Tachysurus fulvidraco) using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhangji; Ge, Jiachun; Xu, Zhiqiang; Dong, Xiaohua; Cao, Shasha; Pan, Jianlin; Zhao, Qingshun

    2014-06-01

    Myostatin (Mstn), a member of the transforming growth factor β superfamily, plays an inhibiting role in mammalian muscle growth. Mammals like human, cattle, mouse, sheep, and dog carrying null alleles of Mstn display a double-muscle phenotype. Mstn is conserved in fish; however, little is known whether the fish with mutated mstn display a similar phenotype to mammals because of the lack of mutant fish with mstn null alleles. Previously, we knocked out one of the duplicated copies of myostatin gene (mstna) in yellow catfish using zinc-finger nucleases. In this study, we report the identification of the second myostatin gene (mstnb) and knockout of mstnb in yellow catfish. The gene comprises three exons. It is predicted to encode 373 amino acid residues. The predicted protein exhibits 59.3% identity with yellow catfish Mstna and 57.3% identity with human MSTN. Employing TALEN (transcription activator-like effector nucleases) technology, we obtained two founders (from four randomly selected founders) of yellow catfish carrying the mutated mstnb gene in their germ cells. Totally, six mutated alleles of mstnb were obtained from the founders. Among the six alleles, four are nonframeshift and two are frameshift mutation. The frameshift mutated alleles include mstnb(nju22), an 8 bp deletion, and mstnb(nju24), a complex type of mutation comprising a 7 bp deletion and a 12 bp insertion. They are predicted to encode function null Mstnb. Our results will help to understand the roles of mstn genes in fish growth.

  19. Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALEN)-Mediated Targeted DNA Insertion in Potato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Adrienne; Weeks, Troy; Richael, Craig; Duan, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Targeted DNA integration into known locations in the genome has potential advantages over the random insertional events typically achieved using conventional means of genetic modification. Specifically integrated transgenes are guaranteed to co-segregate, and expression level is more predictable, which makes downstream characterization and line selection more manageable. Because the site of DNA integration is known, the steps to deregulation of transgenic crops may be simplified. Here we describe a method that combines transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated induction of double strand breaks (DSBs) and non-autonomous marker selection to insert a transgene into a pre-selected, transcriptionally active region in the potato genome. In our experiment, TALEN was designed to create a DSB in the genome sequence following an endogenous constitutive promoter. A cytokinin vector was utilized for TALENs expression and prevention of stable integration of the nucleases. The donor vector contained a gene of interest cassette and a promoter-less plant-derived herbicide resistant gene positioned near the T-DNA left border which was used to select desired transgenic events. Our results indicated that TALEN induced T-DNA integration occurred with high frequency and resulting events have consistent expression of the gene of interest. Interestingly, it was found that, in most lines integration took place through one sided homology directed repair despite the minimal homologous sequence at the right border. An efficient transient assay for TALEN activity verification is also described. PMID:27826306

  20. Efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka using custom-designed transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Ansai, Satoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2013-03-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have become powerful tools for targeted genome editing. Here we demonstrate efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka (Oryzias latipes), which serves as an excellent vertebrate model for genetics and genomics. We designed and constructed a pair of TALENs targeting the medaka DJ-1 gene, a homolog of human DJ-1 (PARK7). These TALENs induced a number of insertions and deletions in the injected embryos with extremely high efficiency. This induction of mutations occurred in a dose-dependent manner. All screened G0 fish injected with the TALENs transmitted the TALEN-induced mutations to the next generation with high efficiency (44-100%). We also confirmed that these TALENs induced site-specific mutations because none of the mutations were found at potential off-target sites. In addition, the DJ-1 protein was lost in DJ-1(Δ7/Δ7) fish that carried a TALEN-induced frameshift mutation in both alleles. We also investigated the effect of the N- and C-terminal regions of the transcription activator-like (TAL) effector domain on the gene-disrupting activity of DJ1-TALENs and found that 287 amino acids at the N terminus and 63 amino acids at the C terminus of the TAL domain exhibited the highest disrupting activity in the injected embryos. Our results suggest that TALENs enable us to rapidly and efficiently establish knockout medaka strains. This is the first report of targeted mutagenesis in medaka using TALENs. The TALEN technology will expand the potential of medaka as a model system for genetics and genomics.

  1. Efficient Targeted Mutagenesis in Medaka Using Custom-Designed Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Ansai, Satoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have become powerful tools for targeted genome editing. Here we demonstrate efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka (Oryzias latipes), which serves as an excellent vertebrate model for genetics and genomics. We designed and constructed a pair of TALENs targeting the medaka DJ-1 gene, a homolog of human DJ-1 (PARK7). These TALENs induced a number of insertions and deletions in the injected embryos with extremely high efficiency. This induction of mutations occurred in a dose-dependent manner. All screened G0 fish injected with the TALENs transmitted the TALEN-induced mutations to the next generation with high efficiency (44–100%). We also confirmed that these TALENs induced site-specific mutations because none of the mutations were found at potential off-target sites. In addition, the DJ-1 protein was lost in DJ-1Δ7/Δ7 fish that carried a TALEN-induced frameshift mutation in both alleles. We also investigated the effect of the N- and C-terminal regions of the transcription activator-like (TAL) effector domain on the gene-disrupting activity of DJ1-TALENs and found that 287 amino acids at the N terminus and 63 amino acids at the C terminus of the TAL domain exhibited the highest disrupting activity in the injected embryos. Our results suggest that TALENs enable us to rapidly and efficiently establish knockout medaka strains. This is the first report of targeted mutagenesis in medaka using TALENs. The TALEN technology will expand the potential of medaka as a model system for genetics and genomics. PMID:23288935

  2. Gene targeting in rats using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Ménoret, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Rémy, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Thépenier, Virginie; Thinard, Reynald; Ouisse, Laure-Hélène; De Cian, Anne; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio

    2014-08-15

    The rat is a model of choice to understanding gene function and modeling human diseases. Since recent years, successful engineering technologies using gene-specific nucleases have been developed to gene edit the genome of different species, including the rat. This development has become important for the creation of new rat animals models of human diseases, analyze the role of genes and express recombinant proteins. Transcription activator-like (TALE) nucleases are designed nucleases consist of a DNA binding domain fused to a nuclease domain capable of cleaving the targeted DNA. We describe a detailed protocol for generating knockout rats via microinjection of TALE nucleases into fertilized eggs. This technology is an efficient, cost- and time-effective method for creating new rat models.

  3. High-efficiency and heritable gene targeting in mouse by transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhongwei; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Zhaohua; Shao, Yanjiao; Pan, Hongjie; Wei, Gaigai; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Long; Li, Xia; Wang, Ping; Fan, Heng-Yu; Du, Bing; Liu, Bin; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2013-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a powerful new approach for targeted gene disruption in various animal models, but little is known about their activities in Mus musculus, the widely used mammalian model organism. Here, we report that direct injection of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA of TALEN pairs into mouse zygotes induced somatic mutations, which were stably passed to the next generation through germ-line transmission. With one TALEN pair constructed for each of 10 target genes, mutant F0 mice for each gene were obtained with the mutation rate ranged from 13 to 67% and an average of ∼40% of total healthy newborns with no significant differences between C57BL/6 and FVB/N genetic background. One TALEN pair with single mismatch to their intended target sequence in each side failed to yield any mutation. Furthermore, highly efficient germ-line transmission was obtained, as all the F0 founders tested transmitted the mutations to F1 mice. In addition, we also observed that one bi-allele mutant founder of Lepr gene, encoding Leptin receptor, had similar diabetic phenotype as db/db mouse. Together, our results suggest that TALENs are an effective genetic tool for rapid gene disruption with high efficiency and heritability in mouse with distinct genetic background.

  4. Genome Editing in Astyanax mexicanus Using Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases (TALENs).

    PubMed

    Kowalko, Johanna E; Ma, Li; Jeffery, William R

    2016-06-20

    Identifying alleles of genes underlying evolutionary change is essential to understanding how and why evolution occurs. Towards this end, much recent work has focused on identifying candidate genes for the evolution of traits in a variety of species. However, until recently it has been challenging to functionally validate interesting candidate genes. Recently developed tools for genetic engineering make it possible to manipulate specific genes in a wide range of organisms. Application of this technology in evolutionarily relevant organisms will allow for unprecedented insight into the role of candidate genes in evolution. Astyanax mexicanus (A. mexicanus) is a species of fish with both surface-dwelling and cave-dwelling forms. Multiple independent lines of cave-dwelling forms have evolved from ancestral surface fish, which are interfertile with one another and with surface fish, allowing elucidation of the genetic basis of cave traits. A. mexicanus has been used for a number of evolutionary studies, including linkage analysis to identify candidate genes responsible for a number of traits. Thus, A. mexicanus is an ideal system for the application of genome editing to test the role of candidate genes. Here we report a method for using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to mutate genes in surface A. mexicanus. Genome editing using TALENs in A. mexicanus has been utilized to generate mutations in pigmentation genes. This technique can also be utilized to evaluate the role of candidate genes for a number of other traits that have evolved in cave forms of A. mexicanus.

  5. High-efficiency and heritable gene targeting in mouse by transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhongwei; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Zhaohua; Shao, Yanjiao; Pan, Hongjie; Wei, Gaigai; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Long; Li, Xia; Wang, Ping; Fan, Heng-Yu; Du, Bing; Liu, Bin; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a powerful new approach for targeted gene disruption in various animal models, but little is known about their activities in Mus musculus, the widely used mammalian model organism. Here, we report that direct injection of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA of TALEN pairs into mouse zygotes induced somatic mutations, which were stably passed to the next generation through germ-line transmission. With one TALEN pair constructed for each of 10 target genes, mutant F0 mice for each gene were obtained with the mutation rate ranged from 13 to 67% and an average of ∼40% of total healthy newborns with no significant differences between C57BL/6 and FVB/N genetic background. One TALEN pair with single mismatch to their intended target sequence in each side failed to yield any mutation. Furthermore, highly efficient germ-line transmission was obtained, as all the F0 founders tested transmitted the mutations to F1 mice. In addition, we also observed that one bi-allele mutant founder of Lepr gene, encoding Leptin receptor, had similar diabetic phenotype as db/db mouse. Together, our results suggest that TALENs are an effective genetic tool for rapid gene disruption with high efficiency and heritability in mouse with distinct genetic background. PMID:23630316

  6. Gene targeting technologies in rats: zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Tomoji

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory rat has been widely used as an animal model in biomedical science for more than 150 years. Applying zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases to rat embryos via microinjection is an efficient genome editing tool for generating targeted knockout rats. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated endonucleases have been used as an effective tool for precise and multiplex genome editing in mice and rats. In this review, the advantages and disadvantages of these site-specific nuclease technologies for genetic analysis and manipulation in rats are discussed.

  7. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases enable efficient plant genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Feng; Li, Xiaohong; Baller, Joshua A; Qi, Yiping; Starker, Colby G; Bogdanove, Adam J; Voytas, Daniel F

    2013-01-01

    The ability to precisely engineer plant genomes offers much potential for advancing basic and applied plant biology. Here, we describe methods for the targeted modification of plant genomes using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). Methods were optimized using tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) protoplasts and TALENs targeting the acetolactate synthase (ALS) gene. Optimal TALEN scaffolds were identified using a protoplast-based single-strand annealing assay in which TALEN cleavage creates a functional yellow fluorescent protein gene, enabling quantification of TALEN activity by flow cytometry. Single-strand annealing activity data for TALENs with different scaffolds correlated highly with their activity at endogenous targets, as measured by high-throughput DNA sequencing of polymerase chain reaction products encompassing the TALEN recognition sites. TALENs introduced targeted mutations in ALS in 30% of transformed cells, and the frequencies of targeted gene insertion approximated 14%. These efficiencies made it possible to recover genome modifications without selection or enrichment regimes: 32% of tobacco calli generated from protoplasts transformed with TALEN-encoding constructs had TALEN-induced mutations in ALS, and of 16 calli characterized in detail, all had mutations in one allele each of the duplicate ALS genes (SurA and SurB). In calli derived from cells treated with a TALEN and a 322-bp donor molecule differing by 6 bp from the ALS coding sequence, 4% showed evidence of targeted gene replacement. The optimized reagents implemented in plant protoplasts should be useful for targeted modification of cells from diverse plant species and using a variety of means for reagent delivery.

  8. Design, evaluation, and screening methods for efficient targeted mutagenesis with transcription activator-like effector nucleases in medaka.

    PubMed

    Ansai, Satoshi; Inohaya, Keiji; Yoshiura, Yasutoshi; Schartl, Manfred; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing using engineered nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) has become a powerful technology for reverse genetics. In this study, we have described efficient detection methods for TALEN-induced mutations at endogenous loci and presented guidelines of TALEN design for efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka, Oryzias latipes. We performed a heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) using an automated microchip electrophoresis system, which is a simple and high-throughput method for evaluation of in vivo activity of TALENs and for genotyping mutant fish of F1 or later generations. We found that a specific pattern of mutations is dominant for TALENs harboring several base pairs of homologous sequences in target sequence. Furthermore, we found that a 5' T, upstream of each TALEN-binding sequence, is not essential for genomic DNA cleavage. Our findings provide information that expands the potential of TALENs and other engineered nucleases as tools for targeted genome editing in a wide range of organisms, including medaka.

  9. Inactivation of hepatitis B virus replication in cultured cells and in vivo with engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Kristie; Ely, Abdullah; Mussolino, Claudio; Cathomen, Toni; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains an important global health problem. Stability of the episomal covalently closed circular HBV DNA (cccDNA) is largely responsible for the modest curative efficacy of available therapy. Since licensed anti-HBV drugs have a post-transcriptional mechanism of action, disabling cccDNA is potentially of therapeutic benefit. To develop this approach, we engineered mutagenic transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that target four HBV-specific sites within the viral genome. TALENs with cognate sequences in the S or C open-reading frames (ORFs) efficiently disrupted sequences at the intended sites and suppressed markers of viral replication. Following triple transfection of cultured HepG2.2.15 cells under mildly hypothermic conditions, the S TALEN caused targeted mutation in ~35% of cccDNA molecules. Markers of viral replication were also inhibited in vivo in a murine hydrodynamic injection model of HBV replication. HBV target sites within S and C ORFs of the injected HBV DNA were mutated without evidence of toxicity. These findings are the first to demonstrate a targeted nuclease-mediated disruption of HBV cccDNA. Efficacy in vivo also indicates that these engineered nucleases have potential for use in treatment of chronic HBV infection.

  10. Site-specific gene targeting using transcription activator-like effector (TALE)-based nuclease in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zijian; Li, Nianzu; Huang, Guodong; Xu, Junqiang; Pan, Yu; Wang, Zhimin; Tang, Qinglin; Song, Ming; Wang, Xiaojia

    2013-11-01

    Site-specific recognition modules with DNA nuclease have tremendous potential as molecular tools for genome targeting. The type III transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) contain a DNA binding domain consisting of tandem repeats that can be engineered to bind user-defined specific DNA sequences. We demonstrated that customized TALE-based nucleases (TALENs), constructed using a method called "unit assembly", specifically target the endogenous FRIGIDA gene in Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L. The results indicate that the TALENs bound to the target site and cleaved double-strand DNA in vitro and in vivo, whereas the effector binding elements have a 23 bp spacer. The T7 endonuclease I assay and sequencing data show that TALENs made double-strand breaks, which were repaired by a non-homologous end-joining pathway within the target sequence. These data show the feasibility of applying customized TALENs to target and modify the genome with deletions in those organisms that are still in lacking gene target methods to provide germplasms in breeding improvement.

  11. Generation of GFP Reporter Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using AAVS1 Safe Harbor Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongquan; Rao, Mahendra; Zou, Jizhong

    2014-05-16

    Generation of a fluorescent GFP reporter line in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) provides enormous potentials in both basic stem cell research and regenerative medicine. A protocol for efficiently generating such an engineered reporter line by gene targeting is highly desired. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a new class of artificial restriction enzymes that have been shown to significantly promote homologous recombination by >1000-fold. The AAVS1 (adeno-associated virus integration site 1) locus is a "safe harbor" and has an open chromatin structure that allows insertion and stable expression of transgene. Here, we describe a step-by-step protocol from determination of TALENs activity, hiPSC culture, and delivery of a donor into AAVS1 targeting site, to validation of targeted integration by PCR and Southern blot analysis using hiPSC line, and a pair of open-source AAVS1 TALENs.

  12. DNA Methylation Affects the Efficiency of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases-Mediated Genome Editing in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Hidetaka; Numa, Hisataka; Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Toki, Seiichi; Habu, Yoshiki

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing in plants becomes popular since the advent of sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) that are simple to set up and efficient in various plant species. Although transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are one of the most prevalent SSNs and have a potential to provide higher target specificity by their dimeric property, TALENs are sensitive to methylated cytosines that are present not only in transposons but also in active genes in plants. In mammalian cells, the methylation sensitivity of TALENs could be overcome by using a base-recognition module (N∗) that has a higher affinity to methylated cytosine. In contrast to mammals, plants carry DNA methylation at all cytosine contexts (CG, CHG, and CHH, where H represents A, C, or T) with various degrees and effectiveness of N∗ module in genome editing in plants has not been explored. In this study, we designed sets of TALENs with or without N∗ modules and examined their efficiency in genome editing of methylated regions in rice. Although improvement in genome editing efficiency was observed with N∗-TALENs designed to a stably methylated target, another target carrying cytosines with various levels of methylation showed resistance to both normal and N∗-TALENs. The results suggest that variability of cytosine methylation in target regions is an additional factor affecting the genome editing efficiency of TALENs. PMID:28348570

  13. Efficient Gene Editing in Pluripotent Stem Cells by Bacterial Injection of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jingyue; Bai, Fang; Jin, Yongxin; Santostefano, Katherine E.; Ha, Un-Hwan; Wu, Donghai

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a powerful tool for direct protein delivery into mammalian cells and has successfully been used to deliver various exogenous proteins into mammalian cells. In the present study, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) proteins have been efficiently delivered using the P. aeruginosa T3SS into mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), human ESCs (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for genome editing. This bacterial delivery system offers an alternative method of TALEN delivery that is highly efficient in cleavage of the chromosomal target and presumably safer by avoiding plasmid DNA introduction. We combined the method of bacterial T3SS-mediated TALEN protein injection and transfection of an oligonucleotide template to effectively generate precise genetic modifications in the stem cells. Initially, we efficiently edited a single-base in the gfp gene of a mESC line to silence green fluorescent protein (GFP) production. The resulting GFP-negative mESC was cloned from a single cell and subsequently mutated back to a GFP-positive mESC line. Using the same approach, the gfp gene was also effectively knocked out in hESCs. In addition, a defined single-base edition was effectively introduced into the X-chromosome-linked HPRT1 gene in hiPSCs, generating an in vitro model of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. T3SS-mediated TALEN protein delivery provides a highly efficient alternative for introducing precise gene editing within pluripotent stem cells for the purpose of disease genotype-phenotype relationship studies and cellular replacement therapies. Significance The present study describes a novel and powerful tool for the delivery of the genome editing enzyme transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) directly into pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), achieving desired base changes on the genomes of PSCs with high efficiency. This novel approach uses bacteria as a protein delivery

  14. Simultaneous gene editing by injection of mRNAs encoding transcription activator-like effector nucleases into mouse zygotes.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunliang; Qi, Rong; Singleterry, Rebecca; Hyle, Judith; Balch, Amanda; Li, Xiuling; Sublett, Jack; Berns, Hartmut; Valentine, Marcus; Valentine, Virginia; Sherr, Charles J

    2014-05-01

    Injection of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) mRNAs into mouse zygotes transferred into foster mothers efficiently generated founder mice with heritable mutations in targeted genes. Immunofluorescence visualization of phosphorylated histone 2A (γH2AX) combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that TALEN pairs targeting the Agouti locus induced site-directed DNA breaks in zygotes within 6 h of injection, an activity that continued at reduced efficiency in two-cell embryos. TALEN-Agouti mRNAs injected into zygotes of brown FvB × C57BL/6 hybrid mice generated completely black pups, confirming that mutations were induced prior to, and/or early after, cell division. Founder mice, many of which were mosaic, transmitted altered Agouti alleles to F1 pups to yield an allelic series of mutant strains. Although mutations were targeted to "spacer" sequences flanked by TALEN binding sites, larger deletions that extended beyond the TALEN-binding sequences were also detected and were similarly inherited through the germ line. Zygotic coinjection of TALEN mRNAs directed to the Agouti, miR-205, and the Arf tumor suppressor loci yielded pups containing frequent and heritable mutations of two or three genes. Simultaneous gene editing in zygotes affords an efficient approach for producing mice with compound mutant phenotypes, bypassing constraints of conventional mouse knockout technology in embryonic stem cells.

  15. Generation of obese rat model by transcription activator-like effector nucleases targeting the leptin receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuting; Lu, Wenqing; Gao, Na; Long, Yi; Shao, Yanjiao; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Huaqing; Ye, Shixin; Ma, Xueyun; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2017-02-01

    The laboratory rat is a valuable mammalian model organism for basic research and drug discovery. Here we demonstrate an efficient methodology by applying transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) technology to generate Leptin receptor (Lepr) knockout rats on the Sprague Dawley (SD) genetic background. Through direct injection of in vitro transcribed mRNA of TALEN pairs into SD rat zygotes, somatic mutations were induced in two of three resulting pups. One of the founders carrying bi-allelic mutation exhibited early onset of obesity and infertility. The other founder carried a chimeric mutation which was efficiently transmitted to the progenies. Through phenotyping of the resulting three lines of rats bearing distinct mutations in the Lepr locus, we found that the strains with a frame-shifted or premature stop codon mutation led to obesity and metabolic disorders. However, no obvious defect was observed in a strain with an in-frame 57 bp deletion in the extracellular domain of Lepr. This suggests the deleted amino acids do not significantly affect Lepr structure and function. This is the first report of generating the Lepr mutant obese rat model in SD strain through a reverse genetic approach. This suggests that TALEN is an efficient and powerful gene editing technology for the generation of disease models.

  16. A One-Step System for Convenient and Flexible Assembly of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinlong; Sun, Wenye; Liang, Jing; Jiang, Jing; Wu, Zhao

    2016-09-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are powerful tools for targeted genome editing in diverse cell types and organisms. However, the highly identical TALE repeat sequences make it challenging to assemble TALEs using conventional cloning approaches, and multiple repeats in one plasmid are easily catalyzed for homologous recombination in bacteria. Although the methods for TALE assembly are constantly improving, these methods are not convenient because of laborious assembly steps or large module libraries, limiting their broad utility. To overcome the barrier of multiple assembly steps, we report a one-step system for the convenient and flexible assembly of a 180 TALE module library. This study is the first demonstration to ligate 9 mono-/dimer modules and one circular TALEN backbone vector in a one step process, generating 9.5 to 18.5 repeat sequences with an overall assembly rate higher than 50%. This system makes TALEN assembly much simpler than the conventional cloning of two DNA fragments because this strategy combines digestion and ligation into one step using circular vectors and different modules to avoid gel extraction. Therefore, this system provides a convenient tool for the application of TALEN-mediated genome editing in scientific studies and clinical trials.

  17. Inactivation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum urease gene using transcription activator-like effector nuclease-based targeted mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Weyman, Philip D; Beeri, Karen; Lefebvre, Stephane C; Rivera, Josefa; McCarthy, James K; Heuberger, Adam L; Peers, Graham; Allen, Andrew E; Dupont, Christopher L

    2015-05-01

    Diatoms are unicellular photosynthetic algae with promise for green production of fuels and other chemicals. Recent genome-editing techniques have greatly improved the potential of many eukaryotic genetic systems, including diatoms, to enable knowledge-based studies and bioengineering. Using a new technique, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), the gene encoding the urease enzyme in the model diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, was targeted for interruption. The knockout cassette was identified within the urease gene by PCR and Southern blot analyses of genomic DNA. The lack of urease protein was confirmed by Western blot analyses in mutant cell lines that were unable to grow on urea as the sole nitrogen source. Untargeted metabolomic analysis revealed a build-up of urea, arginine and ornithine in the urease knockout lines. All three intermediate metabolites are upstream of the urease reaction within the urea cycle, suggesting a disruption of the cycle despite urea production. Numerous high carbon metabolites were enriched in the mutant, implying a breakdown of cellular C and N repartitioning. The presented method improves the molecular toolkit for diatoms and clarifies the role of urease in the urea cycle.

  18. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases mediated metabolic engineering for enhanced fatty acids production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Aouida, Mustapha; Li, Lixin; Mahjoub, Ali; Alshareef, Sahar; Ali, Zahir; Piatek, Agnieszka; Mahfouz, Magdy M

    2015-10-01

    Targeted engineering of microbial genomes holds much promise for diverse biotechnological applications. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 systems are capable of efficiently editing microbial genomes, including that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we demonstrate the use of TALENs to edit the genome of S. cerevisiae with the aim of inducing the overproduction of fatty acids. Heterodimeric TALENs were designed to simultaneously edit the FAA1 and FAA4 genes encoding acyl-CoA synthetases in S. cerevisiae. Functional yeast double knockouts generated using these TALENs over-produce large amounts of free fatty acids into the cell. This study demonstrates the use of TALENs for targeted engineering of yeast and demonstrates that this technology can be used to stimulate the enhanced production of free fatty acids, which are potential substrates for biofuel production. This proof-of-principle study extends the utility of TALENs as excellent genome editing tools and highlights their potential use for metabolic engineering of yeast and other organisms, such as microalgae and plants, for biofuel production.

  19. Targeted mutagenesis of multiple and paralogous genes in Xenopus laevis using two pairs of transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Sakane, Yuto; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Kashiwagi, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi T

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have been extensively used in genome editing in various organisms. In some cases, however, it is difficult to efficiently disrupt both paralogous genes using a single pair of TALENs in Xenopus laevis because of its polyploidy. Here, we report targeted mutagenesis of multiple and paralogous genes using two pairs of TALENs in X. laevis. First, we show simultaneous targeted mutagenesis of three genes, tyrosinase paralogues (tyra and tyrb) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) by injection of two TALENs pairs in transgenic embryos carrying egfp. Consistent with the high frequency of both severe phenotypic traits, albinism and loss of GFP fluorescence, frameshift mutation rates of tyr paralogues and egfp reached 40-80%. Next, we show early introduction of TALEN-mediated mutagenesis of these target loci during embryogenesis. Finally, we also demonstrate that two different pairs of TALENs can simultaneously introduce mutations to both paralogues encoding histone chaperone with high efficiency. Our results suggest that targeted mutagenesis of multiple genes using TALENs can be applied to analyze the functions of paralogous genes with redundancy in X. laevis.

  20. Efficient genome engineering by targeted homologous recombination in mouse embryos using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Daniel; Peters, Annika; Wirtz, Tristan; Mai, Maren; Ackermann, Justus; Thabet, Yasser; Schmidt, Jürgen; Weighardt, Heike; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Degen, Joachim; Schultze, Joachim L; Beyer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Generation of mouse models by introducing transgenes using homologous recombination is critical for understanding fundamental biology and pathology of human diseases. Here we investigate whether artificial transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs)-powerful tools that induce DNA double-strand breaks at specific genomic locations-can be combined with a targeting vector to induce homologous recombination for the introduction of a transgene in embryonic stem cells and fertilized murine oocytes. We describe the generation of a conditional mouse model using TALENs, which introduce double-strand breaks at the genomic locus of the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein-1 in combination with a large 14.4 kb targeting template vector. We report successful germline transmission of this allele and demonstrate its recombination in primary cells in the presence of Cre-recombinase. These results suggest that TALEN-assisted induction of DNA double-strand breaks can facilitate homologous recombination of complex targeting constructs directly in oocytes.

  1. An efficient antiviral strategy for targeting hepatitis B virus genome using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jieliang; Zhang, Wen; Lin, Junyu; Wang, Fan; Wu, Min; Chen, Cuncun; Zheng, Ye; Peng, Xiuhua; Li, Jianhua; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2014-02-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a DNA virus that can cause chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in humans. Current therapies for CHB infection are limited in efficacy and do not target the pre-existing viral genomic DNA, which are present in the nucleus as a covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) form. The transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) are newly developed enzymes that can cleave sequence-specific DNA targets. Here, TALENs targeting the conserved regions of the viral genomic DNA among different HBV genotypes were constructed. The expression of TALENs in Huh7 cells transfected with monomeric linear full-length HBV DNA significantly reduced the viral production of HBeAg, HBsAg, HBcAg, and pgRNA, resulted in a decreased cccDNA level and misrepaired cccDNAs without apparent cytotoxic effects. The anti-HBV effect of TALENs was further demonstrated in a hydrodynamic injection-based mouse model. In addition, an enhanced antiviral effect with combinations of TALENs and interferon-α (IFN-α) treatment was observed and expression of TALENs restored HBV suppressed IFN-stimulated response element-directed transcription. Taken together, these data indicate that TALENs can specifically target and successfully inactivate the HBV genome and are potently synergistic with IFN-α, thus providing a potential therapeutic strategy for treating CHB infection.

  2. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Mahfouz, Magdy M; Li, Lixin; Shamimuzzaman, Md; Wibowo, Anjar; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-02-08

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions, and inactivation. Zinc finger nucleases have been used to generate DSBs and subsequently, for genome editing but with low efficiency and reproducibility. The transcription activator-like family of type III effectors (TALEs) contains a central domain of tandem repeats that could be engineered to bind specific DNA targets. Here, we report the generation of a Hax3-based hybrid TALE nuclease with a user-selected DNA binding specificity. We show that the engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence in vitro and that the homodimeric TALE nuclease can cleave double-stranded DNA in vitro if the DNA binding sites have the proper spacing and orientation. Transient expression assays in tobacco leaves suggest that the hybrid nuclease creates DSB in its target sequence, which is subsequently repaired by nonhomologous end-joining repair. Taken together, our data show the feasibility of engineering TALE-based hybrid nucleases capable of generating site-specific DSBs and the great potential for site-specific genome modification in plants and eukaryotes in general.

  3. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases efficiently disrupt the target gene in Iberian ribbed newts (Pleurodeles waltl), an experimental model animal for regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Toshinori; Sakamoto, Kousuke; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yokotani, Naoki; Inoue, Takeshi; Kawaguchi, Eri; Agata, Kiyokazu; Yamamoto, Takashi; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of a lost tissue in an animal is an important issue. Although regenerative studies have a history of research spanning more than a century, the gene functions underlying regulation of the regeneration are mostly unclear. Analysis of knockout animals is a very powerful tool with which to elucidate gene function. Recently, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have been developed as an effective technique for genome editing. This technique enables gene targeting in amphibians such as newts that were previously impossible. Here we show that newts microinjected with TALEN mRNAs designed for targeting the tyrosinase gene in single-cell stage embryos revealed an albino phenotype. Sequence analysis revealed that the tyrosinase genes were effectively disrupted in these albino newts. Moreover, precise genome alteration was achieved using TALENs and single strand oligodeoxyribonucleotides. Our results suggest that TALENs are powerful tools for genome editing for regenerative research in newts.

  4. TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR-LIKE EFFECTOR NUCLEASE-Mediated Generation and Metabolic Analysis of Camalexin-Deficient cyp71a12 cyp71a13 Double Knockout Lines.

    PubMed

    Müller, Teresa M; Böttcher, Christoph; Morbitzer, Robert; Götz, Cornelia C; Lehmann, Johannes; Lahaye, Thomas; Glawischnig, Erich

    2015-07-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a number of defense-related metabolites are synthesized via indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN), including camalexin and indole-3-carboxylic acid (ICOOH) derivatives. Cytochrome P450 71A13 (CYP71A13) is a key enzyme for camalexin biosynthesis and catalyzes the conversion of indole-3-acetaldoxime (IAOx) to IAN. The CYP71A13 gene is located in tandem with its close homolog CYP71A12, also encoding an IAOx dehydratase. However, for CYP71A12, indole-3-carbaldehyde and cyanide were identified as major reaction products. To clarify CYP71A12 function in vivo and to better understand IAN metabolism, we generated two cyp71a12 cyp71a13 double knockout mutant lines. CYP71A12-specific transcription activator-like effector nucleases were introduced into the cyp71a13 background, and very efficient somatic mutagenesis was achieved. We observed stable transmission of the cyp71a12 mutation to the following generations, which is a major challenge for targeted mutagenesis in Arabidopsis. In contrast to cyp71a13 plants, in which camalexin accumulation is partially reduced, double mutants synthesized only traces of camalexin, demonstrating that CYP71A12 contributes to camalexin biosynthesis in leaf tissue. A major role of CYP71A12 was identified for the inducible biosynthesis of ICOOH. Specifically, the ICOOH methyl ester was reduced to 12% of the wild-type level in AgNO3-challenged cyp71a12 leaves. In contrast, indole-3-carbaldehyde derivatives apparently are synthesized via alternative pathways, such as the degradation of indole glucosinolates. Based on these results, we present a model for this surprisingly complex metabolic network with multiple IAN sources and channeling of IAOx-derived IAN into camalexin biosynthesis. In conclusion, transcription activator-like effector nuclease-mediated mutation is a powerful tool for functional analysis of tandem genes in secondary metabolism.

  5. Stable enhanced green fluorescent protein expression after differentiation and transplantation of reporter human induced pluripotent stem cells generated by AAVS1 transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongquan; Liu, Chengyu; Cerbini, Trevor; San, Hong; Lin, Yongshun; Chen, Guokai; Rao, Mahendra S; Zou, Jizhong

    2014-07-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cell lines with tissue-specific or ubiquitous reporter genes are extremely useful for optimizing in vitro differentiation conditions as well as for monitoring transplanted cells in vivo. The adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) locus has been used as a "safe harbor" locus for inserting transgenes because of its open chromatin structure, which permits transgene expression without insertional mutagenesis. However, it is not clear whether targeted transgene expression at the AAVS1 locus is always protected from silencing when driven by various promoters, especially after differentiation and transplantation from hiPS cells. In this paper, we describe a pair of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that enable more efficient genome editing than the commercially available zinc finger nuclease at the AAVS1 site. Using these TALENs for targeted gene addition, we find that the cytomegalovirus-immediate early enhancer/chicken β-actin/rabbit β-globin (CAG) promoter is better than cytomegalovirus 7 and elongation factor 1α short promoters in driving strong expression of the transgene. The two independent AAVS1, CAG, and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) hiPS cell reporter lines that we have developed do not show silencing of EGFP either in undifferentiated hiPS cells or in randomly and lineage-specifically differentiated cells or in teratomas. Transplanting cardiomyocytes from an engineered AAVS1-CAG-EGFP hiPS cell line in a myocardial infarcted mouse model showed persistent expression of the transgene for at least 7 weeks in vivo. Our results show that high-efficiency targeting can be obtained with open-source TALENs and that careful optimization of the reporter and transgene constructs results in stable and persistent expression in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Use of the heteroduplex mobility assay and cell sorting to select genome sequences of the CCR5 gene in HEK 293T cells edited by transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Nerys-Junior, Arildo; Costa, Lendel C.; Braga-Dias, Luciene P.; Oliveira, Márcia; Rossi, Átila D.; da Cunha, Rodrigo Delvecchio; Gonçalves, Gabriel S.; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) are one of the most promising tools for modifying genomes. These site-specific enzymes cause double-strand breaks that allow gene disruption or gene insertion, thereby facilitating genetic manipulation. The major problem associated with this approach is the labor-intensive procedures required to screen and confirm the cellular modification by nucleases. In this work, we produced a TALEN that targets the human CCR5 gene and developed a heteroduplex mobility assay for HEK 293T cells to select positive colonies for sequencing. This approach provides a useful tool for the quick detection and easy assessment of nuclease activity. PMID:24688299

  7. Use of the heteroduplex mobility assay and cell sorting to select genome sequences of the CCR5 gene in HEK 293T cells edited by transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Nerys-Junior, Arildo; Costa, Lendel C; Braga-Dias, Luciene P; Oliveira, Márcia; Rossi, Atila D; da Cunha, Rodrigo Delvecchio; Gonçalves, Gabriel S; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2014-03-01

    Engineered nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) are one of the most promising tools for modifying genomes. These site-specific enzymes cause double-strand breaks that allow gene disruption or gene insertion, thereby facilitating genetic manipulation. The major problem associated with this approach is the labor-intensive procedures required to screen and confirm the cellular modification by nucleases. In this work, we produced a TALEN that targets the human CCR5 gene and developed a heteroduplex mobility assay for HEK 293T cells to select positive colonies for sequencing. This approach provides a useful tool for the quick detection and easy assessment of nuclease activity.

  8. Production of α1,3-galactosyltransferase targeted pigs using transcription activator-like effector nuclease-mediated genome editing technology.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Taek; Kwon, Dae-Kee; Park, A-Rum; Lee, Eun-Jin; Yun, Yun-Jin; Ji, Dal-Young; Lee, Kiho; Park, Kwang-Wook

    2016-03-01

    Recent developments in genome editing technology using meganucleases demonstrate an efficient method of producing gene edited pigs. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of the transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) system in generating specific mutations on the pig genome. Specific TALEN was designed to induce a double-strand break on exon 9 of the porcine α1,3-galactosyltransferase (GGTA1) gene as it is the main cause of hyperacute rejection after xenotransplantation. Human decay-accelerating factor (hDAF) gene, which can produce a complement inhibitor to protect cells from complement attack after xenotransplantation, was also integrated into the genome simultaneously. Plasmids coding for the TALEN pair and hDAF gene were transfected into porcine cells by electroporation to disrupt the porcine GGTA1 gene and express hDAF. The transfected cells were then sorted using a biotin-labeled IB4 lectin attached to magnetic beads to obtain GGTA1 deficient cells. As a result, we established GGTA1 knockout (KO) cell lines with biallelic modification (35.0%) and GGTA1 KO cell lines expressing hDAF (13.0%). When these cells were used for somatic cell nuclear transfer, we successfully obtained live GGTA1 KO pigs expressing hDAF. Our results demonstrate that TALEN-mediated genome editing is efficient and can be successfully used to generate gene edited pigs.

  9. Knockout of a transgene by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in the sawfly, Athalia rosae (Hymenoptera) and the ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, M; Yatomi, J; Sumitani, M; Takasu, Y; Sekiné, K; Niimi, T; Sezutsu, H

    2016-02-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are efficient tools for targeted genome editing and have been utilized in a number of insects. Here, we demonstrate the gene disruption (knockout) caused by TALENs targeting a transgene, 3xP3-driven enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), that is integrated in the genome of two species, the sawfly Athalia rosae (Hymenoptera) and the ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera). Messenger RNAs of TALENs targeting the sequences adjacent to the chromophore region were microinjected into the eggs/embryos of each species. In At. rosae, when microinjection was performed at the posterior end of eggs, 15% of G(0) individuals showed a somatic mosaic phenotype for eye EGFP fluorescence. Three-quarters of the somatic mosaics produced EGFP-negative G(1) progeny. When eggs were injected at the anterior end, 63% of the G(0) individuals showed somatic mosaicism, and 17% of them produced EGFP-negative G(1) progeny. In H. axyridis, 25% of posterior-injected and 8% of anterior-injected G(0) individuals produced EGFP-negative G(1) progeny. In both species, the EGFP-negative progeny retained the EGFP gene, and various deletions were detected in the target sequences, indicating that gene disruption was successfully induced. Finally, for both species, 18-21% of G(0) founders produced gene knockout progeny sufficient for establishing knockout strains.

  10. Knockout of the adp gene related with colonization in Bacillus nematocida B16 using customized transcription activator-like effectors nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Qiuhong; Zheng, Haoying; Zhang, Lin; Qin, Fujun; Facemire, Loryn; Zhang, Guo; Cao, Feng; Zhang, Ke-qin; Huang, Xiaowei; Yang, Jianwei; He, Lei; Liu, Chanjuan

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus nematocida B16 is able to dominate in the intestines of the worm Caenorhabditis elegans in ‘Trojan horse’ pathogenic mechanism. The adp is one candidate gene which potentially play a vital role in the colonization from our previous random mutagenesis screening results. To analyse the functional role of this gene, we constructed the adp knockout mutant through customized transcription activator-like effectors nucleases (TALEN), which has been successfully used in yeasts, nematodes, zebrafish and human pluripotent cells. Here, we first time report this knockout method in bacteria on this paper. Bioassay experiments demonstrated that the adp knockout mutant of B16 showed considerably lower colonization activity, reduced numbers of intestines and less than 80% nematocidal activity compared with the wild-type strain when infected for 48 h. However, no obvious change on proteolytic activity was observed in the mutant. Conversely, the complementation of adp gene restored most of the above deficient phenotypes. These results indicated that the adp gene was involved in surface adhesion and played a comparatively important role in colonizing host nematodes. Moreover, TALENs successfully disrupt target genes in bacteria. PMID:25912819

  11. Generation of Foxo3-targeted Mice by Injection of mRNAs Encoding Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) into Zygotes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, P; Liu, Q; Liu, S; Su, X; Feng, W; Lei, X; Liu, J; Cui, K; Huang, B; Shi, D

    2015-06-01

    In this study, for exploring the mechanism of forkhead box O3(Foxo3) participating in regulation of the activation of primordial oocytes, Foxo3-targeted mice were generated by injection of mRNAs encoding transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) into mouse zygotes. The TALEN sites were designed with high conservative homologous region among pig, bovine, buffalo and mouse by commercial bio-companies. The TALENs mutagenic non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair activity were determined to be 31.3% in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK-293T) cells by dual luciferase reporter assay system. Then, we firstly injected TALEN-mRNAs into the cytoplasm of mouse zygotes by micromanipulation, and four of 48 mouse blastocysts were identified as mutation by sequencing. Subsequently, by the method of TALEN-mRNAs injected into the zygotes with pronucleus micromanipulation technique, we obtained seven Foxo3 mutants of 20 FVB/NJ backgrounds mice which were Foxo3-independent alleles with frameshift and deletion mutations. It was very interesting that all seven were heterozygous mutants (Foxo3(-/+) ), and the gene mutagenesis rates of the mice reached 35%. The five Foxo3 mutant females were all infertile in the following 6 months after birth. The histological examination results showed that there were rare primordial follicles and primary follicles in the ovary of Foxo3 mutant compared to that of wide-type female mice. Moreover, one of two mutant males was subfertile and another was fertile normally. Those results suggested that the mutant of Foxo3 severely affected the fertile ability of female and perhaps male in some degree; furthermore, an even more efficient TALENs-based gene mutation method has been established to be poised to revolutionize the study of mouse and other species genetics.

  12. Targeting of the Plzf Gene in the Rat by Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease Results in Caudal Regression Syndrome in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Liška, František; Peterková, Renata; Peterka, Miroslav; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šilhavý, Jan; Šimáková, Miroslava; Křen, Vladimír; Starker, Colby G; Voytas, Daniel F; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Pravenec, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been found that spontaneous mutation Lx (polydactyly-luxate syndrome) in the rat is determined by deletion of a conserved intronic sequence of the Plzf (Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein) gene. In addition, Plzf is a prominent candidate gene for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). In the current study, we tested the effects of Plzf gene targeting in the SHR using TALENs (transcription activator-like effector nucleases). SHR ova were microinjected with constructs pTAL438/439 coding for a sequence-specific endonuclease that binds to target sequence in the first coding exon of the Plzf gene. Out of 43 animals born after microinjection, we detected a single male founder. Sequence analysis revealed a deletion of G that resulted in frame shift mutation starting in codon 31 and causing a premature stop codon at position of amino acid 58. The Plzftm1Ipcv allele is semi-lethal since approximately 95% of newborn homozygous animals died perinatally. All homozygous animals exhibited manifestations of a caudal regression syndrome including tail anomalies and serious size reduction and deformities of long bones, and oligo- or polydactyly on the hindlimbs. The heterozygous animals only exhibited the tail anomalies. Impaired development of the urinary tract was also revealed: one homozygous and one heterozygous rat exhibited a vesico-ureteric reflux with enormous dilatation of ureters and renal pelvis. In the homozygote, this was combined with a hypoplastic kidney. These results provide evidence for the important role of Plzf gene during development of the caudal part of a body-column vertebrae, hindlimbs and urinary system in the rat.

  13. Targeting of the Plzf Gene in the Rat by Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease Results in Caudal Regression Syndrome in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liška, František; Peterková, Renata; Peterka, Miroslav; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šilhavý, Jan; Šimáková, Miroslava; Křen, Vladimír; Starker, Colby G.; Voytas, Daniel F.; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Pravenec, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been found that spontaneous mutation Lx (polydactyly-luxate syndrome) in the rat is determined by deletion of a conserved intronic sequence of the Plzf (Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein) gene. In addition, Plzf is a prominent candidate gene for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). In the current study, we tested the effects of Plzf gene targeting in the SHR using TALENs (transcription activator-like effector nucleases). SHR ova were microinjected with constructs pTAL438/439 coding for a sequence-specific endonuclease that binds to target sequence in the first coding exon of the Plzf gene. Out of 43 animals born after microinjection, we detected a single male founder. Sequence analysis revealed a deletion of G that resulted in frame shift mutation starting in codon 31 and causing a premature stop codon at position of amino acid 58. The Plzftm1Ipcv allele is semi-lethal since approximately 95% of newborn homozygous animals died perinatally. All homozygous animals exhibited manifestations of a caudal regression syndrome including tail anomalies and serious size reduction and deformities of long bones, and oligo- or polydactyly on the hindlimbs. The heterozygous animals only exhibited the tail anomalies. Impaired development of the urinary tract was also revealed: one homozygous and one heterozygous rat exhibited a vesico-ureteric reflux with enormous dilatation of ureters and renal pelvis. In the homozygote, this was combined with a hypoplastic kidney. These results provide evidence for the important role of Plzf gene during development of the caudal part of a body—column vertebrae, hindlimbs and urinary system in the rat. PMID:27727328

  14. Targeting DNA double-strand breaks with TAL effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Christian, Michelle; Cermak, Tomas; Doyle, Erin L; Schmidt, Clarice; Zhang, Feng; Hummel, Aaron; Bogdanove, Adam J; Voytas, Daniel F

    2010-10-01

    Engineered nucleases that cleave specific DNA sequences in vivo are valuable reagents for targeted mutagenesis. Here we report a new class of sequence-specific nucleases created by fusing transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) to the catalytic domain of the FokI endonuclease. Both native and custom TALE-nuclease fusions direct DNA double-strand breaks to specific, targeted sites.

  15. Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated CLYBL targeting enables enhanced transgene expression and one-step generation of dual reporter human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) and neural stem cell (NSC) lines.

    PubMed

    Cerbini, Trevor; Funahashi, Ray; Luo, Yongquan; Liu, Chengyu; Park, Kyeyoon; Rao, Mahendra; Malik, Nasir; Zou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    Targeted genome engineering to robustly express transgenes is an essential methodology for stem cell-based research and therapy. Although designer nucleases have been used to drastically enhance gene editing efficiency, targeted addition and stable expression of transgenes to date is limited at single gene/locus and mostly PPP1R12C/AAVS1 in human stem cells. Here we constructed transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) targeting the safe-harbor like gene CLYBL to mediate reporter gene integration at 38%-58% efficiency, and used both AAVS1-TALENs and CLYBL-TALENs to simultaneously knock-in multiple reporter genes at dual safe-harbor loci in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and neural stem cells (NSCs). The CLYBL-TALEN engineered cell lines maintained robust reporter expression during self-renewal and differentiation, and revealed that CLYBL targeting resulted in stronger transgene expression and less perturbation on local gene expression than PPP1R12C/AAVS1. TALEN-mediated CLYBL engineering provides improved transgene expression and options for multiple genetic modification in human stem cells.

  16. Gene knockout using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) reveals that human NDUFA9 protein is essential for stabilizing the junction between membrane and matrix arms of complex I.

    PubMed

    Stroud, David A; Formosa, Luke E; Wijeyeratne, Xiaonan W; Nguyen, Thanh N; Ryan, Michael T

    2013-01-18

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) represent a promising approach for targeted knock-out of genes in cultured human cells. We used TALEN-technology to knock out the nuclear gene encoding NDUFA9, a subunit of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I in HEK293T cells. Screening for the knock-out revealed a mixture of NDUFA9 cell clones that harbored partial deletions of the mitochondrial N-terminal targeting signal but were still capable of import. A cell line lacking functional copies of both NDUFA9 alleles resulted in a loss of NDUFA9 protein expression, impaired assembly of complex I, and cells incapable of growth in galactose medium. Cells lacking NDUFA9 contained a complex I subcomplex consisting of membrane arm subunits but not marker subunits of the matrix arm. Re-expression of NDUFA9 restored the defects in complex I assembly. We conclude that NDUFA9 is involved in stabilizing the junction between membrane and matrix arms of complex I, a late assembly step critical for complex I biogenesis and activity.

  17. Identification of off-target cleavage sites of zinc finger nucleases and TAL effector nucleases using predictive models.

    PubMed

    Fine, Eli J; Cradick, Thomas J; Bao, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Using engineered nucleases, such as Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), to make targeted genomic modifications has become a common technique to create new model organisms and custom cell lines, and has shown great promise for disease treatment. However, these nucleases have the potential for off-target cleavage that could confound interpretation of experimental results and be detrimental for therapeutic use. Here, we describe a method to test for nuclease cleavage at potential off-target sites predicted by bioinformatics models.

  18. Designing and testing the activities of TAL effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yanni; Cradick, Thomas J; Bao, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have rapidly developed into a powerful tool for genome editing. To avoid labor-intensive and time-consuming experimental screening for active TALENs, a scoring system can help select optimal target sites. Here we describe a procedure to design active TALENs using a scoring system named Scoring Algorithm for Predicted TALEN Activity (SAPTA) and a method to test the activity of individual and pairs of TALENs.

  19. A transcription activator-like effector toolbox for genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Sanjana, Neville E; Cong, Le; Zhou, Yang; Cunniff, Margaret M; Feng, Guoping; Zhang, Feng

    2012-01-05

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are a class of naturally occurring DNA-binding proteins found in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas sp. The DNA-binding domain of each TALE consists of tandem 34-amino acid repeat modules that can be rearranged according to a simple cipher to target new DNA sequences. Customized TALEs can be used for a wide variety of genome engineering applications, including transcriptional modulation and genome editing. Here we describe a toolbox for rapid construction of custom TALE transcription factors (TALE-TFs) and nucleases (TALENs) using a hierarchical ligation procedure. This toolbox facilitates affordable and rapid construction of custom TALE-TFs and TALENs within 1 week and can be easily scaled up to construct TALEs for multiple targets in parallel. We also provide details for testing the activity in mammalian cells of custom TALE-TFs and TALENs using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and Surveyor nuclease, respectively. The TALE toolbox described here will enable a broad range of biological applications.

  20. Non-transgenic genome modifications in a hemimetabolous insect using zinc-finger and TAL effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takahito; Ochiai, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Horch, Hadley W; Hamaguchi, Naoya; Nakamura, Taro; Bando, Tetsuya; Ohuchi, Hideyo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Noji, Sumihare; Mito, Taro

    2012-01-01

    Hemimetabolous, or incompletely metamorphosing, insects are phylogenetically relatively basal and comprise many pests. However, the absence of a sophisticated genetic model system, or targeted gene-manipulation system, has limited research on hemimetabolous species. Here we use zinc-finger nuclease and transcription activator-like effector nuclease technologies to produce genetic knockouts in the hemimetabolous insect Gryllus bimaculatus. Following the microinjection of mRNAs encoding zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases into cricket embryos, targeting of a transgene or endogenous gene results in sequence-specific mutations. Up to 48% of founder animals transmit disrupted gene alleles after zinc-finger nucleases microinjection compared with 17% after microinjection of transcription activator-like effector nucleases. Heterozygous offspring is selected using mutation detection assays that use a Surveyor (Cel-I) nuclease, and subsequent sibling crosses create homozygous knockout crickets. This approach is independent from a mutant phenotype or the genetic tractability of the organism of interest and can potentially be applied to manage insect pests using a non-transgenic strategy.

  1. Non-transgenic genome modifications in a hemimetabolous insect using zinc-finger and TAL effector nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Takahito; Ochiai, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Horch, Hadley W.; Hamaguchi, Naoya; Nakamura, Taro; Bando, Tetsuya; Ohuchi, Hideyo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Noji, Sumihare; Mito, Taro

    2012-01-01

    Hemimetabolous, or incompletely metamorphosing, insects are phylogenetically relatively basal and comprise many pests. However, the absence of a sophisticated genetic model system, or targeted gene-manipulation system, has limited research on hemimetabolous species. Here we use zinc-finger nuclease and transcription activator-like effector nuclease technologies to produce genetic knockouts in the hemimetabolous insect Gryllus bimaculatus. Following the microinjection of mRNAs encoding zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases into cricket embryos, targeting of a transgene or endogenous gene results in sequence-specific mutations. Up to 48% of founder animals transmit disrupted gene alleles after zinc-finger nucleases microinjection compared with 17% after microinjection of transcription activator-like effector nucleases. Heterozygous offspring is selected using mutation detection assays that use a Surveyor (Cel-I) nuclease, and subsequent sibling crosses create homozygous knockout crickets. This approach is independent from a mutant phenotype or the genetic tractability of the organism of interest and can potentially be applied to manage insect pests using a non-transgenic strategy. PMID:22910363

  2. A library of TAL effector nucleases spanning the human genome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongsub; Kweon, Jiyeon; Kim, Annie; Chon, Jae Kyung; Yoo, Ji Yeon; Kim, Hye Joo; Kim, Sojung; Lee, Choongil; Jeong, Euihwan; Chung, Eugene; Kim, Doyoung; Lee, Mi Seon; Go, Eun Mi; Song, Hye Jung; Kim, Hwangbeom; Cho, Namjin; Bang, Duhee; Kim, Seokjoong; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2013-03-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) can be readily engineered to bind specific genomic loci, enabling the introduction of precise genetic modifications such as gene knockouts and additions. Here we present a genome-scale collection of TALENs for efficient and scalable gene targeting in human cells. We chose target sites that did not have highly similar sequences elsewhere in the genome to avoid off-target mutations and assembled TALEN plasmids for 18,740 protein-coding genes using a high-throughput Golden-Gate cloning system. A pilot test involving 124 genes showed that all TALENs were active and disrupted their target genes at high frequencies, although two of these TALENs became active only after their target sites were partially demethylated using an inhibitor of DNA methyltransferase. We used our TALEN library to generate single- and double-gene-knockout cells in which NF-κB signaling pathways were disrupted. Compared with cells treated with short interfering RNAs, these cells showed unambiguous suppression of signal transduction.

  3. Targeted genome editing by lentiviral protein transduction of zinc-finger and TAL-effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yujia; Bak, Rasmus O; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2014-04-24

    Future therapeutic use of engineered site-directed nucleases, like zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), relies on safe and effective means of delivering nucleases to cells. In this study, we adapt lentiviral vectors as carriers of designer nuclease proteins, providing efficient targeted gene disruption in vector-treated cell lines and primary cells. By co-packaging pairs of ZFN proteins with donor RNA in 'all-in-one' lentiviral particles, we co-deliver ZFN proteins and the donor template for homology-directed repair leading to targeted DNA insertion and gene correction. Comparative studies of ZFN activity in a predetermined target locus and a known nearby off-target locus demonstrate reduced off-target activity after ZFN protein transduction relative to conventional delivery approaches. Additionally, TALEN proteins are added to the repertoire of custom-designed nucleases that can be delivered by protein transduction. Altogether, our findings generate a new platform for genome engineering based on efficient and potentially safer delivery of programmable nucleases.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01911.001.

  4. [Transcription activator-like effectors(TALEs)based genome engineering].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mei-Wei; Duan, Cheng-Li; Liu, Jiang

    2013-10-01

    Systematic reverse-engineering of functional genome architecture requires precise modifications of gene sequences and transcription levels. The development and application of transcription activator-like effectors(TALEs) has created a wealth of genome engineering possibilities. TALEs are a class of naturally occurring DNA-binding proteins found in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas species. The DNA-binding domain of each TALE typically consists of tandem 34-amino acid repeat modules rearranged according to a simple cipher to target new DNA sequences. Customized TALEs can be used for a wide variety of genome engineering applications, including transcriptional modulation and genome editing. Such "genome engineering" has now been established in human cells and a number of model organisms, thus opening the door to better understanding gene function in model organisms, improving traits in crop plants and treating human genetic disorders.

  5. Direct observation of transcription activator-like effector (TALE) protein dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuculis, Luke; Abil, Zhanar; Zhao, Huimin; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we describe a single molecule assay to probe the site-search dynamics of transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins along DNA. In modern genetics, the ability to selectively edit the human genome is an unprecedented development, driven by recent advances in targeted nuclease proteins. Specific gene editing can be accomplished using TALE proteins, which are programmable DNA-binding proteins that can be fused to a nuclease domain. In this way, TALENs are a leading technology that has shown great success in the genomic editing of pluripotent stem cells. A major hurdle facing clinical implementation, however, is the potential for deleterious off-target binding events. For these reasons, a molecular-level understanding of TALE binding and target sequence search on DNA is essential. To this end, we developed a single-molecule fluorescence imaging assay that provides a first-of-its-kind view of the 1-D diffusion of TALE proteins along stretched DNA. Taken together with co-crystal structures of DNA-bound TALEs, our results suggest a rotationally-coupled, major groove tracking model for diffusion. We further report diffusion constants for TALE proteins as a function of salt concentration, consistent with previously described models of 1-D protein diffusion.

  6. Modularly assembled designer TAL effector nucleases for targeted gene knockout and gene replacement in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Huang, Sheng; Zhao, Xuefeng; Wright, David A; Carpenter, Susan; Spalding, Martin H; Weeks, Donald P; Yang, Bing

    2011-08-01

    Recent studies indicate that the DNA recognition domain of transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors can be combined with the nuclease domain of FokI restriction enzyme to produce TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) that, in pairs, bind adjacent DNA target sites and produce double-strand breaks between the target sequences, stimulating non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination. Here, we exploit the four prevalent TAL repeats and their DNA recognition cipher to develop a 'modular assembly' method for rapid production of designer TALENs (dTALENs) that recognize unique DNA sequence up to 23 bases in any gene. We have used this approach to engineer 10 dTALENs to target specific loci in native yeast chromosomal genes. All dTALENs produced high rates of site-specific gene disruptions and created strains with expected mutant phenotypes. Moreover, dTALENs stimulated high rates (up to 34%) of gene replacement by homologous recombination. Finally, dTALENs caused no detectable cytotoxicity and minimal levels of undesired genetic mutations in the treated yeast strains. These studies expand the realm of verified TALEN activity from cultured human cells to an intact eukaryotic organism and suggest that low-cost, highly dependable dTALENs can assume a significant role for gene modifications of value in human and animal health, agriculture and industry.

  7. Modularly assembled designer TAL effector nucleases for targeted gene knockout and gene replacement in eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T; Huang, S; Zhao, XF; Wright, DA; Carpenter, S; Spalding, MH; Weeks, DP; Yang, B

    2011-08-08

    Recent studies indicate that the DNA recognition domain of transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors can be combined with the nuclease domain of FokI restriction enzyme to produce TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) that, in pairs, bind adjacent DNA target sites and produce double-strand breaks between the target sequences, stimulating non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination. Here, we exploit the four prevalent TAL repeats and their DNA recognition cipher to develop a 'modular assembly' method for rapid production of designer TALENs (dTALENs) that recognize unique DNA sequence up to 23 bases in any gene. We have used this approach to engineer 10 dTALENs to target specific loci in native yeast chromosomal genes. All dTALENs produced high rates of site-specific gene disruptions and created strains with expected mutant phenotypes. Moreover, dTALENs stimulated high rates (up to 34%) of gene replacement by homologous recombination. Finally, dTALENs caused no detectable cytotoxicity and minimal levels of undesired genetic mutations in the treated yeast strains. These studies expand the realm of verified TALEN activity from cultured human cells to an intact eukaryotic organism and suggest that low-cost, highly dependable dTALENs can assume a significant role for gene modifications of value in human and animal health, agriculture and industry.

  8. Rapid and efficient assembly of transcription activator-like effector genes by USER cloning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Li, Wei; Wang, Shuo; Hu, Baoyang

    2014-06-20

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) that were related to bacteria immune system have lately been employed in a promising approach of precise gene targeting. Because of the repetitive characteristics of TALEs, existing TALE assembly methods are either very complicated, time-consuming, or too tricky to be handled in common labs. Here, we reported a rapid, efficient and easy method for TALE assembly. This method takes advantage of uracil-specific excision reagent (USER), an enzyme that can cleave DNA constructs and create long, unique single-strand DNA overhangs. Upon USER treatment, the overhangs on each individual TALE repeat unit can be rejoined hierarchically to form pentamers in a ligation-independent manner. Eventually, three pentamers are assembled into a full TALE construct by Golden Gate cloning. TALE nucleases (TALENs) generated with this method exhibit high genome-editing activity in human cells such as HEK293FT cells. Using this method, we have successfully synthesized three TALEN pairs targeting endogenous Tet1 locus, and proved that all can specifically target Tet1 gene, though in various degree. Comparing to other methods of TALEN assembly, this one is much less labor intensive and fairly faster, and positive clones can be obtained at high efficiency within only two days. We thus contribute to an easier approach for effective TALENs synthesis, which may highly facilitate the wide application of TALEN technology in genome editing, especially for human cells that require precise targeting.

  9. Transcription activator like effector (TALE)-directed piggyBac transposition in human cells.

    PubMed

    Owens, Jesse B; Mauro, Damiano; Stoytchev, Ilko; Bhakta, Mital S; Kim, Moon-Soo; Segal, David J; Moisyadi, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    Insertional therapies have shown great potential for combating genetic disease and safer methods would undoubtedly broaden the variety of possible illness that can be treated. A major challenge that remains is reducing the risk of insertional mutagenesis due to random insertion by both viral and non-viral vectors. Targetable nucleases are capable of inducing double-stranded breaks to enhance homologous recombination for the introduction of transgenes at specific sequences. However, off-target DNA cleavages at unknown sites can lead to mutations that are difficult to detect. Alternatively, the piggyBac transposase is able perform all of the steps required for integration; therefore, cells confirmed to contain a single copy of a targeted transposon, for which its location is known, are likely to be devoid of aberrant genomic modifications. We aimed to retarget transposon insertions by comparing a series of novel hyperactive piggyBac constructs tethered to a custom transcription activator like effector DNA-binding domain designed to bind the first intron of the human CCR5 gene. Multiple targeting strategies were evaluated using combinations of both plasmid-DNA and transposase-protein relocalization to the target sequence. We demonstrated user-defined directed transposition to the CCR5 genomic safe harbor and isolated single-copy clones harboring targeted integrations.

  10. TAL effector nucleases induce mutations at a pre-selected location in the genome of primary barley transformants.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Toni; Holm, Preben Bach; Starker, Colby G; Christian, Michelle; Voytas, Daniel F; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Holme, Inger Bæksted

    2013-10-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) enable targeted mutagenesis in a variety of organisms. The primary advantage of TALENs over other sequence-specific nucleases, namely zinc finger nucleases and meganucleases, lies in their ease of assembly, reliability of function, and their broad targeting range. Here we report the assembly of several TALENs for a specific genomic locus in barley. The cleavage activity of individual TALENs was first tested in vivo using a yeast-based, single-strand annealing assay. The most efficient TALEN was then selected for barley transformation. Analysis of the resulting transformants showed that TALEN-induced double strand breaks led to the introduction of short deletions at the target site. Additional analysis revealed that each barley transformant contained a range of different mutations, indicating that mutations occurred independently in different cells.

  11. Germline-transmitted genome editing in Arabidopsis thaliana Using TAL-effector-nucleases.

    PubMed

    Forner, Joachim; Pfeiffer, Anne; Langenecker, Tobias; Manavella, Pablo A; Manavella, Pablo; Lohmann, Jan U

    2015-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are custom-made bi-partite endonucleases that have recently been developed and applied for genome engineering in a wide variety of organisms. However, they have been only scarcely used in plants, especially for germline-modification. Here we report the efficient creation of small, germline-transmitted deletions in Arabidopsis thaliana via TALENs that were delivered by stably integrated transgenes. Using meristem specific promoters to drive expression of two TALEN arms directed at the CLV3 coding sequence, we observed very high phenotype frequencies in the T2 generation. In some instances, full CLV3 loss-of-function was already observed in the T1 generation, suggesting that transgenic delivery of TALENs can cause highly efficient genome modification. In contrast, constitutive TALEN expression in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) did not cause additional phenotypes and genome re-sequencing confirmed little off-target effects, demonstrating exquisite target specificity.

  12. EssD, a Nuclease Effector of the Staphylococcus aureus ESS Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ohr, Ryan Jay; Anderson, Mark; Shi, Miaomiao; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Specialized secretion systems of bacteria evolved for selective advantage, either killing microbial competitors or implementing effector functions during parasitism. Earlier work characterized the ESAT-6 secretion system (ESS) of Staphylococcus aureus and demonstrated its contribution to persistent staphylococcal infection of vertebrate hosts. Here, we identify a novel secreted effector of the ESS pathway, EssD, that functions as a nuclease and cleaves DNA but not RNA. EssI, a protein of the DUF600 family, binds EssD to block its nuclease activity in the staphylococcal cytoplasm. An essD knockout mutant or a variant lacking nuclease activity, essD(L546P), elicited a diminished interleukin-12 (IL-12) cytokine response following bloodstream infection of mice, suggesting that the effector function of EssD stimulates immune signaling to support the pathogenesis of S. aureus infections.

  13. Overcoming transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA binding domain sensitivity to cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Valton, Julien; Dupuy, Aurélie; Daboussi, Fayza; Thomas, Séverine; Maréchal, Alan; Macmaster, Rachel; Melliand, Kevin; Juillerat, Alexandre; Duchateau, Philippe

    2012-11-09

    Within the past 2 years, transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA binding domains have emerged as the new generation of engineerable platform for production of custom DNA binding domains. However, their recently described sensitivity to cytosine methylation represents a major bottleneck for genome engineering applications. Using a combination of biochemical, structural, and cellular approaches, we were able to identify the molecular basis of such sensitivity and propose a simple, drug-free, and universal method to overcome it.

  14. FusX: A Rapid One-Step Transcription Activator-Like Effector Assembly System for Genome Science.

    PubMed

    Ma, Alvin C; McNulty, Melissa S; Poshusta, Tanya L; Campbell, Jarryd M; Martínez-Gálvez, Gabriel; Argue, David P; Lee, Han B; Urban, Mark D; Bullard, Cassandra E; Blackburn, Patrick R; Man, Toni K; Clark, Karl J; Ekker, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are extremely effective, single-molecule DNA-targeting molecular cursors used for locus-specific genome science applications, including high-precision molecular medicine and other genome engineering applications. TALEs are used in genome engineering for locus-specific DNA editing and imaging, as artificial transcriptional activators and repressors, and for targeted epigenetic modification. TALEs as nucleases (TALENs) are effective editing tools and offer high binding specificity and fewer sequence constraints toward the targeted genome than other custom nuclease systems. One bottleneck of broader TALE use is reagent accessibility. For example, one commonly deployed method uses a multitube, 5-day assembly protocol. Here we describe FusX, a streamlined Golden Gate TALE assembly system that (1) is backward compatible with popular TALE backbones, (2) is functionalized as a single-tube 3-day TALE assembly process, (3) requires only commonly used basic molecular biology reagents, and (4) is cost-effective. More than 100 TALEN pairs have been successfully assembled using FusX, and 27 pairs were quantitatively tested in zebrafish, with each showing high somatic and germline activity. Furthermore, this assembly system is flexible and is compatible with standard molecular biology laboratory tools, but can be scaled with automated laboratory support. To demonstrate, we use a highly accessible and commercially available liquid-handling robot to rapidly and accurately assemble TALEs using the FusX TALE toolkit. Together, the FusX system accelerates TALE-based genomic science applications from basic science screening work for functional genomics testing and molecular medicine applications.

  15. FusX: A Rapid One-Step Transcription Activator-Like Effector Assembly System for Genome Science

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Alvin C.; McNulty, Melissa S.; Poshusta, Tanya L.; Campbell, Jarryd M.; Martínez-Gálvez, Gabriel; Argue, David P.; Lee, Han B.; Urban, Mark D.; Bullard, Cassandra E.; Blackburn, Patrick R.; Man, Toni K.; Clark, Karl J.; Ekker, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are extremely effective, single-molecule DNA-targeting molecular cursors used for locus-specific genome science applications, including high-precision molecular medicine and other genome engineering applications. TALEs are used in genome engineering for locus-specific DNA editing and imaging, as artificial transcriptional activators and repressors, and for targeted epigenetic modification. TALEs as nucleases (TALENs) are effective editing tools and offer high binding specificity and fewer sequence constraints toward the targeted genome than other custom nuclease systems. One bottleneck of broader TALE use is reagent accessibility. For example, one commonly deployed method uses a multitube, 5-day assembly protocol. Here we describe FusX, a streamlined Golden Gate TALE assembly system that (1) is backward compatible with popular TALE backbones, (2) is functionalized as a single-tube 3-day TALE assembly process, (3) requires only commonly used basic molecular biology reagents, and (4) is cost-effective. More than 100 TALEN pairs have been successfully assembled using FusX, and 27 pairs were quantitatively tested in zebrafish, with each showing high somatic and germline activity. Furthermore, this assembly system is flexible and is compatible with standard molecular biology laboratory tools, but can be scaled with automated laboratory support. To demonstrate, we use a highly accessible and commercially available liquid-handling robot to rapidly and accurately assemble TALEs using the FusX TALE toolkit. Together, the FusX system accelerates TALE-based genomic science applications from basic science screening work for functional genomics testing and molecular medicine applications. PMID:26854857

  16. Allele-Specific Reduction of the Mutant Huntingtin Allele Using Transcription Activator-Like Effectors in Human Huntington's Disease Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fink, Kyle D; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Josh; Anderson, Joseph S; Torrest, Audrey; Komarla, Anvita; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Cary, Whitney; Anderson, Johnathon D; Gruenloh, William; Duffy, Alexandra; Tempkin, Teresa; Annett, Geralyn; Wheelock, Vicki; Segal, David J; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats. Although pathogenesis has been attributed to this polyglutamine expansion, the underlying mechanisms through which the huntingtin protein functions have yet to be elucidated. It has been suggested that postnatal reduction of mutant huntingtin through protein interference or conditional gene knockout could prove to be an effective therapy for patients suffering from HD. For allele-specific targeting, transcription activator-like effectors (TALE) were designed to target single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the mutant allele and packaged into a vector backbone containing KRAB to promote transcriptional repression of the disease-associated allele. Additional TALEs were packaged into a vector backbone containing heterodimeric FokI and were designed to be used as nucleases (TALEN) to cause a CAG-collapse in the mutant allele. Human HD fibroblasts were treated with each TALE-SNP or TALEN. Allele-expression was measured using a SNP-genotyping assay and mutant protein aggregation was quantified with Western blots for anti-ubiquitin. The TALE-SNP and TALEN significantly reduced mutant allele expression (p < 0.05) when compared to control transfections while not affecting expression of the nondisease allele. This study demonstrates the potential of allele-specific gene modification using TALE proteins, and provides a foundation for targeted treatment for individuals suffering from Huntington's or other genetically linked diseases.

  17. Locked and proteolysis-based transcription activator-like effector (TALE) regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lonzarić, Jan; Lebar, Tina; Majerle, Andreja; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Jerala, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Development of orthogonal, designable and adjustable transcriptional regulators is an important goal of synthetic biology. Their activity has been typically modulated through stimulus-induced oligomerization or interaction between the DNA-binding and activation/repression domain. We exploited a feature of the designable Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA-binding domain that it winds around the DNA which allows to topologically prevent it from binding by intramolecular cyclization. This new approach was investigated through noncovalent ligand-induced cyclization or through a covalent split intein cyclization strategy, where the topological inhibition of DNA binding by cyclization and its restoration by a proteolytic release of the topologic constraint was expected. We show that locked TALEs indeed have diminished DNA binding and regain full transcriptional activity by stimulation with the rapamycin ligand or site-specific proteolysis of the peptide linker, with much higher level of activation than rapamycin-induced heterodimerization. Additionally, we demonstrated reversibility, activation of genomic targets and implemented logic gates based on combinations of protein cyclization, proteolytic cleavage and ligand-induced dimerization, where the strongest fold induction was achieved by the proteolytic cleavage of a repression domain from a linear TALE. PMID:26748097

  18. TAL nucleases (TALNs): hybrid proteins composed of TAL effectors and FokI DNA-cleavage domain.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Huang, Sheng; Jiang, Wen Zhi; Wright, David; Spalding, Martin H; Weeks, Donald P; Yang, Bing

    2011-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks enhance homologous recombination in cells and have been exploited for targeted genome editing through use of engineered endonucleases. Here we report the creation and initial characterization of a group of rare-cutting, site-specific DNA nucleases produced by fusion of the restriction enzyme FokI endonuclease domain (FN) with the high-specificity DNA-binding domains of AvrXa7 and PthXo1. AvrXa7 and PthXo1 are members of the transcription activator-like (TAL) effector family whose central repeat units dictate target DNA recognition and can be modularly constructed to create novel DNA specificity. The hybrid FN-AvrXa7, AvrXa7-FN and PthXo1-FN proteins retain both recognition specificity for their target DNA (a 26 bp sequence for AvrXa7 and 24 bp for PthXo1) and the double-stranded DNA cleaving activity of FokI and, thus, are called TAL nucleases (TALNs). With all three TALNs, DNA is cleaved adjacent to the TAL-binding site under optimal conditions in vitro. When expressed in yeast, the TALNs promote DNA homologous recombination of a LacZ gene containing paired AvrXa7 or asymmetric AvrXa7/PthXo1 target sequences. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of creating a tool box of novel TALNs with potential for targeted genome modification in organisms lacking facile mechanisms for targeted gene knockout and homologous recombination.

  19. Tandem repeat modification during double-strand break repair induced by an engineered TAL effector nuclease in zebrafish genome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wanxu; Zheng, Jianbo; He, Ying; Luo, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Tandem repeats (TRs) are abundant and widely distributed in eukaryotic genomes. TRs are thought to have various functions in gene transcription, DNA methylation, nucleosome position and chromatin organization. Variation of repeat units in the genome is observed in association with a number of diseases, such as Fragile X Syndrome, Huntington's disease and Friedreich's ataxia. However, the underlying mechanisms involved are poorly understood, largely owing to the technical limitations in modification of TRs at definite sites in the genome in vivo. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are widely used in recent years in gene targeting for their specific binding to target sequences when engineered in vitro. Here, we show that the repair of a double-strand break (DSB) induced by TALENs adjacent to a TR can produce serial types of mutations in the TR region. Sequencing analysis revealed that there are three types of mutations induced by the DSB repair, including indels only within the TR region or within the flanking TALEN target region or simutaneously within both regions. Therefore, desired TR mutant types can be conveniently obtained by using engineered TALENs. These results demonstrate that TALENs can serve as a convenient tool for modifying TRs in the genome in studying the functions of TRs.

  20. Draft genome sequence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines 8ra possessing transcription activator-like effectors used for genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Hoon; Shin, Hakdong; Park, Hye-Jee; Ryu, Sangryeol; Han, Sang-Wook

    2014-06-10

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines 8ra is a causal agent of bacterial pustule disease in soybean. This bacterium possesses transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors which are useful for genetic/protein engineering applications in higher organisms including plants and humans. Here, we report that the draft genome sequence consists of 5,337,885-bp double-stranded DNA encoding 4674 open reading frames (ORFs) in 13 different contigs. This genome sequence would be useful in applications of TAL effectors in genetic engineering and in elucidating virulence factors against plants.

  1. The last half-repeat of transcription activator-like effector (TALE) is dispensable and thereby TALE-based technology can be simplified.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chong-Ke; Wang, Chun-Lian; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Fu-Jun; Qin, Teng-Fei; Zhao, Kai-Jun

    2014-09-01

    To activate the expression of host genes that contribute to pathogen growth, pathogenic Xanthomonas bacteria inject their transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) into plant cells and the TALEs bind to target gene promoters by the central repeat region consisting of near-perfect 34-amino-acid repeats (34-aa repeats). Based on the recognition codes between the 34-aa repeats and the targeted nucleotides, TALE-based technologies, such as designer TALEs (dTALEs) and TALE nucleases (TALENs), have been developed. Amazingly, every natural TALE invariantly has a truncated last half-repeat (LHR) at the end of the 34-aa repeats. Consequently, all the reported dTALEs and TALENs also harbour their LHRs. Here, we show that the LHRs in dTALEs are dispensable for the function of gene activation by both transient expression assays in Nicotiana benthamiana and gene-specific targeting in the rice genome, indicating that TALEs might originate from a single progenitor. In the light of this finding, we demonstrate that dTALEs can be constructed through two simple steps. Moreover, the activation strengths of dTALEs lacking the LHR are comparable with those of dTALEs harbouring the LHR. Our results provide new insights into the origin of natural TALEs, and will facilitate the simplification of the design and assembly of TALE-based tools, such as dTALEs and TALENs, in the near future.

  2. Transcription activator-like effector-mediated regulation of gene expression based on the inducible packaging and delivery via designed extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Lainšček, Duško; Lebar, Tina; Jerala, Roman

    2017-02-26

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins present a powerful tool for genome editing and engineering, enabling introduction of site-specific mutations, gene knockouts or regulation of the transcription levels of selected genes. TALE nucleases or TALE-based transcription regulators are introduced into mammalian cells mainly via delivery of the coding genes. Here we report an extracellular vesicle-mediated delivery of TALE transcription regulators and their ability to upregulate the reporter gene in target cells. Designed transcriptional activator TALE-VP16 fused to the appropriate dimerization domain was enriched as a cargo protein within extracellular vesicles produced by mammalian HEK293 cells stimulated by Ca-ionophore and using blue light- or rapamycin-inducible dimerization systems. Blue light illumination or rapamycin increased the amount of the TALE-VP16 activator in extracellular vesicles and their addition to the target cells resulted in an increased expression of the reporter gene upon addition of extracellular vesicles to the target cells. This technology therefore represents an efficient delivery for the TALE-based transcriptional regulators.

  3. A transcription activator-like effector from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola elicits dose-dependent resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Aaron W; Wilkins, Katherine E; Wang, Li; Cernadas, R Andres; Bogdanove, Adam J

    2017-01-01

    Xanthomonas spp. reduce crop yields and quality worldwide. During infection of their plant hosts, many strains secrete transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors, which enter the host cell nucleus and activate specific corresponding host genes at effector binding elements (EBEs) in the promoter. TAL effectors may contribute to disease by activating the expression of susceptibility genes or trigger resistance associated with the hypersensitive reaction (HR) by activating an executor resistance (R) gene. The rice bacterial leaf streak pathogen X. oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) is known to suppress host resistance, and no host R gene has been identified against it, despite considerable effort. To further investigate Xoc suppression of host resistance, we conducted a screen of effectors from BLS256 and identified Tal2a as an HR elicitor in rice when delivered heterologously by a strain of the closely related rice bacterial blight pathogen X. oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) or by the soybean pathogen X. axonopodis pv. glycines. The HR required the Tal2a activation domain, suggesting an executor R gene. Tal2a activity was differentially distributed among geographically diverse Xoc isolates, being largely conserved among Asian isolates. We identified four genes induced by Tal2a in next-generation RNA sequencing experiments and confirmed them using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). However, neither individual nor collective activation of these genes by designer TAL effectors resulted in HR. A tal2a knockout mutant of BLS256 showed virulence comparable with the wild-type, but plasmid-based overexpression of tal2a at different levels in the wild-type reduced virulence in a directly corresponding way. Overall, the results reveal that host resistance suppression by Xoc plays a critical role in pathogenesis. Further, the dose-dependent avirulence activity of Tal2a and the apparent lack of a single canonical target that accounts for HR point to

  4. Minimizing off-Target Mutagenesis Risks Caused by Programmable Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Kentaro; Gee, Peter; Hotta, Akitsu

    2015-01-01

    Programmable nucleases, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats associated protein-9 (CRISPR-Cas9), hold tremendous potential for applications in the clinical setting to treat genetic diseases or prevent infectious diseases. However, because the accuracy of DNA recognition by these nucleases is not always perfect, off-target mutagenesis may result in undesirable adverse events in treated patients such as cellular toxicity or tumorigenesis. Therefore, designing nucleases and analyzing their activity must be carefully evaluated to minimize off-target mutagenesis. Furthermore, rigorous genomic testing will be important to ensure the integrity of nuclease modified cells. In this review, we provide an overview of available nuclease designing platforms, nuclease engineering approaches to minimize off-target activity, and methods to evaluate both on- and off-target cleavage of CRISPR-Cas9. PMID:26501275

  5. [TALE nuclease engineering and targeted genome modification].

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Xiao, An; Huang, Peng; Wang, Wei-Ye; Zhu, Zuo-Yan; Zhang, Bo

    2013-04-01

    Artificial designer nucleases targeting specific DNA sequences open up a new field for reverse genetics study. The rapid development of engineered endonucleases (EENs) enables targeted genome modification theoretically in any species. The construction of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) is simpler with higher specificity and less toxicity than zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Here, we summarized the recent progresses and prospects of TALEN technology, with an emphasis on its structure, function, and construction strategies, as well as a collection of species and genes that have been successfully modified by TALENs, especially the application in zebrafish.

  6. TALE nucleases: tailored genome engineering made easy.

    PubMed

    Mussolino, Claudio; Cathomen, Toni

    2012-10-01

    Custom-made designer nucleases have evolved into an indispensable platform to precisely alter complex genomes for basic research, biotechnology, synthetic biology, or human gene therapy. In this review we describe how transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have rapidly developed into a chief technology for targeted genome editing in different model organisms as well as human stem cells. We summarize the technological background and provide an overview of the current state-of-the-art of TALENs with regard to activity and specificity of these nucleases for targeted genome engineering.

  7. Genetic diversity of transcriptional activator-like effector genes in Chinese isolates of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhi-Yuan; Zakria, Muhammad; Zou, Li-Fang; Xiong, Li; Li, Zheng; Ji, Guang-Hai; Chen, Gong-You

    2014-07-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola causes bacterial leaf streak (BLS), a devastating disease of rice in Asia countries. X. oryzae pv. oryzicola utilizes repertoires of transcriptional activator-like effectors (TALEs) to manipulate host resistance or susceptibility; thus, TALEs can determine the outcome of BLS. In this report, we studied genetic diversity in putative tale genes of 65 X. oryzae pv. oryzicola strains that originated from nine provinces of southern China. Genomic DNAs from the 65 strains were digested with BamHI and hybridized with an internal fragment of avrXa3, a tale gene originating from the related pathogen, X. oryzae pv. oryzae, which causes bacterial leaf blight (BLB). Southern blot analysis indicated that the strains contained a variable number (9 to 22) of avrXa3-hybridizing fragments (e.g., putative tale genes). Based on the number and size of hybridizing bands, strains were classified into 14 genotypes (designated 1 to 14), and genotypes 3 and 10 represented 29.23 and 24.64% of the total, respectively. A high molecular weight BamHI fragment (HMWB; ≈6.0 kb) was present in 12 of the 14 genotypes, and sequence analysis of the HMWB revealed the presence of a C-terminally truncated tale, an insertion element related to IS1403, and genes encoding phosphoglycerate mutase and endonuclease V. Primers were developed from the 6.0-kb HMWB fragment and showed potential in genotyping X. oryzae pv. oryzicola strains by polymerase chain reaction. Virulence of X. oryzae pv. oryzicola strains was assessed on 23 rice cultivars containing different resistance genes for BLB. The X. oryzae pv. oryzicola strains could be grouped into 14 pathotypes (I to XIV), and the grouping of strains was almost identical to the categories determined by genotypic analysis. In general, strains containing higher numbers of putative tale genes were more virulent on rice than strains containing fewer tales. The results also indicate that there are no gene-for-gene relationships

  8. Genome engineering with targetable nucleases.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Current technology enables the production of highly specific genome modifications with excellent efficiency and specificity. Key to this capability are targetable DNA cleavage reagents and cellular DNA repair pathways. The break made by these reagents can produce localized sequence changes through inaccurate nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), often leading to gene inactivation. Alternatively, user-provided DNA can be used as a template for repair by homologous recombination (HR), leading to the introduction of desired sequence changes. This review describes three classes of targetable cleavage reagents: zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and CRISPR/Cas RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs). As a group, these reagents have been successfully used to modify genomic sequences in a wide variety of cells and organisms, including humans. This review discusses the properties, advantages, and limitations of each system, as well as the specific considerations required for their use in different biological systems.

  9. A guide to genome engineering with programmable nucleases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyongbum; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2014-05-01

    Programmable nucleases - including zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs) derived from the bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) system - enable targeted genetic modifications in cultured cells, as well as in whole animals and plants. The value of these enzymes in research, medicine and biotechnology arises from their ability to induce site-specific DNA cleavage in the genome, the repair (through endogenous mechanisms) of which allows high-precision genome editing. However, these nucleases differ in several respects, including their composition, targetable sites, specificities and mutation signatures, among other characteristics. Knowledge of nuclease-specific features, as well as of their pros and cons, is essential for researchers to choose the most appropriate tool for a range of applications.

  10. Genetic engineering of human pluripotent cells using TALE nucleases.

    PubMed

    Hockemeyer, Dirk; Wang, Haoyi; Kiani, Samira; Lai, Christine S; Gao, Qing; Cassady, John P; Cost, Gregory J; Zhang, Lei; Santiago, Yolanda; Miller, Jeffrey C; Zeitler, Bryan; Cherone, Jennifer M; Meng, Xiangdong; Hinkley, Sarah J; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2011-07-07

    Targeted genetic engineering of human pluripotent cells is a prerequisite for exploiting their full potential. Such genetic manipulations can be achieved using site-specific nucleases. Here we engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) for five distinct genomic loci. At all loci tested we obtained human embryonic stem cell (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) clones carrying transgenic cassettes solely at the TALEN-specified location. Our data suggest that TALENs employing the specific architectures described here mediate site-specific genome modification in human pluripotent cells with similar efficiency and precision as do zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs).

  11. Single molecule real-time sequencing of Xanthomonas oryzae genomes reveals a dynamic structure and complex TAL (transcription activator-like) effector gene relationships

    PubMed Central

    Booher, Nicholas J.; Carpenter, Sara C. D.; Sebra, Robert P.; Wang, Li; Salzberg, Steven L.; Leach, Jan E.; Bogdanove, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen-injected, direct transcriptional activators of host genes, TAL (transcription activator-like) effectors play determinative roles in plant diseases caused by Xanthomonas spp. A large domain of nearly identical, 33–35 aa repeats in each protein mediates DNA recognition. This modularity makes TAL effectors customizable and thus important also in biotechnology. However, the repeats render TAL effector (tal) genes nearly impossible to assemble using next-generation, short reads. Here, we demonstrate that long-read, single molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing solves this problem. Taking an ensemble approach to first generate local, tal gene contigs, we correctly assembled de novo the genomes of two strains of the rice pathogen X. oryzae completed previously using the Sanger method and even identified errors in those references. Sequencing two more strains revealed a dynamic genome structure and a striking plasticity in tal gene content. Our results pave the way for population-level studies to inform resistance breeding, improve biotechnology and probe TAL effector evolution. PMID:27148456

  12. Designed nucleases for targeted genome editing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junwon; Chung, Jae-Hee; Kim, Ho Min; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Hyongbum

    2016-02-01

    Targeted genome-editing technology using designed nucleases has been evolving rapidly, and its applications are widely expanding in research, medicine and biotechnology. Using this genome-modifying technology, researchers can precisely and efficiently insert, remove or change specific sequences in various cultured cells, micro-organisms, animals and plants. This genome editing is based on the generation of double-strand breaks (DSBs), repair of which modifies the genome through nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR). In addition, designed nickase-induced generation of single-strand breaks can also lead to precise genome editing through HDR, albeit at relatively lower efficiencies than that induced by nucleases. Three kinds of designed nucleases have been used for targeted DSB formation: zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases derived from the bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) system. A growing number of researchers are using genome-editing technologies, which have become more accessible and affordable since the discovery and adaptation of CRISPR-Cas9. Here, the repair mechanism and outcomes of DSBs are reviewed and the three types of designed nucleases are discussed with the hope that such understanding will facilitate applications to genome editing.

  13. Activating human genes with zinc finger proteins, transcription activator-like effectors and CRISPR/Cas9 for gene therapy and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Gersbach, Charles A; Perez-Pinera, Pablo

    2014-08-01

    New technologies have recently been developed to control the expression of human genes in their native genomic context by engineering synthetic transcription factors that can be targeted to any DNA sequence. The ability to precisely regulate any gene as it occurs naturally in the genome provides a means to address a variety of diseases and disorders. This approach also circumvents some of the traditional challenges of gene therapy. In this editorial, we review the technologies that have enabled targeted human gene activation, including the engineering of transcription factors based on zinc finger proteins, transcription activator-like effectors and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Additionally, we highlight examples in which these methods have been developed for therapeutic applications and discuss challenges and opportunities.

  14. Measuring and Reducing Off-Target Activities of Programmable Nucleases Including CRISPR-Cas9.

    PubMed

    Koo, Taeyoung; Lee, Jungjoon; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2015-06-01

    Programmable nucleases, which include zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs) repurposed from the type II clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system are now widely used for genome editing in higher eukaryotic cells and whole organisms, revolutionising almost every discipline in biological research, medicine, and biotechnology. All of these nucleases, however, induce off-target mutations at sites homologous in sequence with on-target sites, limiting their utility in many applications including gene or cell therapy. In this review, we compare methods for detecting nuclease off-target mutations. We also review methods for profiling genome-wide off-target effects and discuss how to reduce or avoid off-target mutations.

  15. Mouse genome engineering using designer nucleases.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Mario; Cermak, Tomas; Voytas, Daniel F; Pelczar, Pawel

    2014-04-02

    Transgenic mice carrying site-specific genome modifications (knockout, knock-in) are of vital importance for dissecting complex biological systems as well as for modeling human diseases and testing therapeutic strategies. Recent advances in the use of designer nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) 9 system for site-specific genome engineering open the possibility to perform rapid targeted genome modification in virtually any laboratory species without the need to rely on embryonic stem (ES) cell technology. A genome editing experiment typically starts with identification of designer nuclease target sites within a gene of interest followed by construction of custom DNA-binding domains to direct nuclease activity to the investigator-defined genomic locus. Designer nuclease plasmids are in vitro transcribed to generate mRNA for microinjection of fertilized mouse oocytes. Here, we provide a protocol for achieving targeted genome modification by direct injection of TALEN mRNA into fertilized mouse oocytes.

  16. Genome Editing in Human Cells Using CRISPR/Cas Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Wyvekens, Nicolas; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Joung, J Keith

    2015-10-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has been broadly adopted for highly efficient genome editing in a variety of model organisms and human cell types. Unlike previous genome editing technologies such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), CRISPR/Cas technology does not require complex protein engineering and can be utilized by any researcher proficient in basic molecular biology and cell culture techniques. This unit describes protocols for design and cloning of vectors expressing single or multiplex gRNAs, for transient transfection of human cell lines, and for quantitation of mutation frequencies by T7 endonuclease I assay. These protocols also include guidance for using two improvements that increase the specificity of CRISPR/Cas nucleases: truncated gRNAs and dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases.

  17. The broad bacterial blight resistance of rice line CBB23 is triggered by a novel transcription activator-like (TAL) effector of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Lian; Qin, Teng-Fei; Yu, Hong-Man; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Che, Jin-Ying; Gao, Ying; Zheng, Chong-Ke; Yang, Bing; Zhao, Kai-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial blight (BB), caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is not only a disease devastating rice production worldwide, but also an ideal model system for the study of the interaction between plants and their bacterial pathogens. The rice near-isogenic line (NIL) CBB23, derived from a cross between a wild rice Oryza rufipogon accession (RBB16) and a susceptible indica rice variety (Jingang 30), is highly resistant to all field Xoo strains tested so far. Although the BB resistance of CBB23 has been widely used in rice breeding programmes, the mechanism of its extremely broad-spectrum resistance remains unknown. Here, we report the molecular cloning of an avirulence gene, designated as avrXa23, from Xoo strain PXO99(A) . We validate that AvrXa23, a novel transcription activator-like effector, specifically triggers the broad-spectrum BB resistance in CBB23. The prevalence of avrXa23 in all 38 Xoo strains surveyed may explain the broad-spectrum feature of BB resistance in CBB23. The results will significantly facilitate the molecular cloning of the corresponding resistance (R) gene in the host, and provide new insights into our understanding of the molecular mechanism for broad-spectrum disease resistance in plants.

  18. Biological and biomedical applications of engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yunzhi; Xiao, Li; Li, Alice S S; Zhang, Xu; Sirois, Pierre; Zhang, Jia; Li, Kai

    2013-09-01

    The development of engineered nucleases is the fruit of a new technological approach developed in the last two decades which has led to significant benefits on genome engineering, particularly on gene therapy. These applications enable efficient and specific genetic modifications via the induction of a double-strand break (DSB) in a specific genomic target sequence, followed by the homology-directed repair (HDR) or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathways. In addition to the application on gene modification in cells and intact organisms, a number of recent papers have reported that this gene editing technology can be applied effectively to human diseases. With the promising data obtained using engineered endonucleases in gene therapy, it appears reasonable to expect that more diseases could be treated and even be cured in this new era of individualized medicine. This paper first brief introduces the development of engineered nucleases with a special emphasis on zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs), and then takes CCR5-based gene therapy as an example to discuss the therapeutic applications of engineered nucleases.

  19. Structure and activity of the Cas3 HD nuclease MJ0384, an effector enzyme of the CRISPR interference

    SciTech Connect

    Beloglazova, Natalia; Petit, Pierre; Flick, Robert; Brown, Greg; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2012-03-15

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and Cas proteins represent an adaptive microbial immunity system against viruses and plasmids. Cas3 proteins have been proposed to play a key role in the CRISPR mechanism through the direct cleavage of invasive DNA. Here, we show that the Cas3 HD domain protein MJ0384 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii cleaves endonucleolytically and exonucleolytically (3'-5') single-stranded DNAs and RNAs, as well as 3'-flaps, splayed arms, and R-loops. The degradation of branched DNA substrates by MJ0384 is stimulated by the Cas3 helicase MJ0383 and ATP. The crystal structure of MJ0384 revealed the active site with two bound metal cations and together with site-directed mutagenesis suggested a catalytic mechanism. Our studies suggest that the Cas3 HD nucleases working together with the Cas3 helicases can completely degrade invasive DNAs through the combination of endo- and exonuclease activities.

  20. mRNA transfection of a novel TAL effector nuclease (TALEN) facilitates efficient knockout of HIV co-receptor CCR5.

    PubMed

    Mock, Ulrike; Machowicz, Rafał; Hauber, Ilona; Horn, Stefan; Abramowski, Pierre; Berdien, Belinda; Hauber, Joachim; Fehse, Boris

    2015-06-23

    Homozygosity for a natural deletion variant of the HIV-coreceptor molecule CCR5, CCR5Δ32, confers resistance toward HIV infection. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation from a CCR5Δ32-homozygous donor has resulted in the first cure from HIV ('Berlin patient'). Based thereon, genetic disruption of CCR5 using designer nucleases was proposed as a promising HIV gene-therapy approach. Here we introduce a novel TAL-effector nuclease, CCR5-Uco-TALEN that can be efficiently delivered into T cells by mRNA electroporation, a gentle and truly transient gene-transfer technique. CCR5-Uco-TALEN mediated high-rate CCR5 knockout (>90% in PM1 and >50% in primary T cells) combined with low off-target activity, as assessed by flow cytometry, next-generation sequencing and a newly devised, very convenient gene-editing frequency digital-PCR (GEF-dPCR). GEF-dPCR facilitates simultaneous detection of wild-type and gene-edited alleles with remarkable sensitivity and accuracy as shown for the CCR5 on-target and CCR2 off-target loci. CCR5-edited cells were protected from infection with HIV-derived lentiviral vectors, but also with the wild-type CCR5-tropic HIV-1BaL strain. Long-term exposure to HIV-1BaL resulted in almost complete suppression of viral replication and selection of CCR5-gene edited T cells. In conclusion, we have developed a novel TALEN for the targeted, high-efficiency knockout of CCR5 and a useful dPCR-based gene-editing detection method.

  1. The Development of TALE Nucleases for Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Ousterout, David G; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    The development of a facile genome engineering technology based on transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) has led to significant advances in diverse areas of science and medicine. In this review, we provide a broad overview of the development of TALENs and the use of this technology in basic science, biotechnology, and biomedical applications. This includes the discovery of DNA recognition by TALEs, engineering new TALE proteins to diverse targets, general advances in nuclease-based editing strategies, and challenges that are specific to various applications of the TALEN technology. We review examples of applying TALENs for studying gene function and regulation, generating disease models, and developing gene therapies. The current status of genome editing and future directions for other uses of these technologies are also discussed.

  2. The Development of TALE Nucleases for Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Ousterout, David G.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2017-01-01

    The development of a facile genome engineering technology based on transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) has led to significant advances in diverse areas of science and medicine. In this review, we provide a broad overview of the development of TALENs and the use of this technology in basic science, biotechnology, and biomedical applications. This includes the discovery of DNA recognition by TALEs, engineering new TALE proteins to diverse targets, general advances in nuclease-based editing strategies, and challenges that are specific to various applications of the TALEN technology. We review examples of applying TALENs for studying gene function and regulation, generating disease models, and developing gene therapies. The current status of genome editing and future directions for other uses of these technologies are also discussed. PMID:26443211

  3. Non-viral delivery of genome-editing nucleases for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Glass, Z A; Xu, Q

    2017-03-01

    Manipulating the genetic makeup of mammalian cells using programmable nuclease-based genome-editing technology has recently evolved into a powerful avenue that holds great potential for treating genetic disorders. There are four types of genome-editing nucleases, including meganucleases, zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases and clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat-associated nucleases such as Cas9. These nucleases have been harnessed to introduce precise and specific changes of the genome sequence at virtually any genome locus of interest. The therapeutic relevance of these genome-editing technologies, however, is challenged by the safe and efficient delivery of nuclease into targeted cells. Herein, we summarize recent advances that have been made on non-viral delivery of genome-editing nucleases. In particular, we focus on non-viral delivery of Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins for genome editing. In addition, the future direction for developing non-viral delivery of programmable nucleases for genome editing is discussed.

  4. Addition of transcription activator-like effector binding sites to a pathogen strain-specific rice bacterial blight resistance gene makes it effective against additional strains and against bacterial leaf streak.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Aaron W; Doyle, Erin L; Bogdanove, Adam J

    2012-09-01

    Xanthomonas transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors promote disease in plants by binding to and activating host susceptibility genes. Plants counter with TAL effector-activated executor resistance genes, which cause host cell death and block disease progression. We asked whether the functional specificity of an executor gene could be broadened by adding different TAL effector binding elements (EBEs) to it. We added six EBEs to the rice Xa27 gene, which confers resistance to strains of the bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) that deliver the TAL effector AvrXa27. The EBEs correspond to three other effectors from Xoo strain PXO99(A) and three from strain BLS256 of the bacterial leaf streak pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc). Stable integration into rice produced healthy lines exhibiting gene activation by each TAL effector, and resistance to PXO99(A) , a PXO99(A) derivative lacking AvrXa27, and BLS256, as well as two other Xoo and 10 Xoc strains virulent toward wildtype Xa27 plants. Transcripts initiated primarily at a common site. Sequences in the EBEs were found to occur nonrandomly in rice promoters, suggesting an overlap with endogenous regulatory sequences. Thus, executor gene specificity can be broadened by adding EBEs, but caution is warranted because of the possible coincident introduction of endogenous regulatory elements.

  5. A TALE nuclease architecture for efficient genome editing.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jeffrey C; Tan, Siyuan; Qiao, Guijuan; Barlow, Kyle A; Wang, Jianbin; Xia, Danny F; Meng, Xiangdong; Paschon, David E; Leung, Elo; Hinkley, Sarah J; Dulay, Gladys P; Hua, Kevin L; Ankoudinova, Irina; Cost, Gregory J; Urnov, Fyodor D; Zhang, H Steve; Holmes, Michael C; Zhang, Lei; Gregory, Philip D; Rebar, Edward J

    2011-02-01

    Nucleases that cleave unique genomic sequences in living cells can be used for targeted gene editing and mutagenesis. Here we develop a strategy for generating such reagents based on transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins from Xanthomonas. We identify TALE truncation variants that efficiently cleave DNA when linked to the catalytic domain of FokI and use these nucleases to generate discrete edits or small deletions within endogenous human NTF3 and CCR5 genes at efficiencies of up to 25%. We further show that designed TALEs can regulate endogenous mammalian genes. These studies demonstrate the effective application of designed TALE transcription factors and nucleases for the targeted regulation and modification of endogenous genes.

  6. Quantification of designer nuclease induced mutation rates: a direct comparison of different methods

    PubMed Central

    Ehrke-Schulz, Eric; Bergmann, Thorsten; Schiwon, Maren; Doerner, Johannes; Saydaminova, Kamola; Lieber, Andre; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Designer nucleases are broadly applied to induce site-specific DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in genomic DNA. These are repaired by nonhomologous end joining leading to insertions or deletions (in/dels) at the respective DNA-locus. To detect in/del mutations, the heteroduplex based T7-endonuclease I -assay is widely used. However, it only provides semi-quantitative evidence regarding the number of mutated alleles. Here we compared T7-endonuclease I- and heteroduplex mobility assays, with a quantitative polymerase chain reaction mutation detection method. A zinc finger nuclease pair specific for the human adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1), a transcription activator-like effector nuclease pair specific for the human DMD gene, and a zinc finger nuclease- and a transcription activator-like effector nuclease pair specific for the human CCR5 gene were explored. We found that the heteroduplex mobility assays and T7-endonuclease I - assays detected mutations but the relative number of mutated cells/alleles can only be estimated. In contrast, the quantitative polymerase chain reaction based method provided quantitative results which allow calculating mutation and homologous recombination rates in different eukaryotic cell types including human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In conclusion, our quantitative polymerase chain reaction based mutation detection method expands the array of methods for in/del mutation detection and facilitates quantification of introduced in/del mutations for a genomic locus containing a mixture of mutated and unmutated DNA. PMID:27419195

  7. Genome editing with engineered nucleases in plants.

    PubMed

    Osakabe, Yuriko; Osakabe, Keishi

    2015-03-01

    Numerous examples of successful 'genome editing' now exist. Genome editing uses engineered nucleases as powerful tools to target specific DNA sequences to edit genes precisely in the genomes of both model and crop plants, as well as a variety of other organisms. The DNA-binding domains of zinc finger (ZF) proteins were the first to be used as genome editing tools, in the form of designed ZF nucleases (ZFNs). More recently, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), as well as the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system, which utilizes RNA-DNA interactions, have proved useful. A key step in genome editing is the generation of a double-stranded DNA break that is specific to the target gene. This is achieved by custom-designed endonucleases, which enable site-directed mutagenesis via a non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair pathway and/or gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR) to occur efficiently at specific sites in the genome. This review provides an overview of recent advances in genome editing technologies in plants, and discusses how these can provide insights into current plant molecular biology research and molecular breeding technology.

  8. Targeted mutagenesis in the malaria mosquito using TALE nucleases.

    PubMed

    Smidler, Andrea L; Terenzi, Olivier; Soichot, Julien; Levashina, Elena A; Marois, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Anopheles gambiae, the main mosquito vector of human malaria, is a challenging organism to manipulate genetically. As a consequence, reverse genetics studies in this disease vector have been largely limited to RNA interference experiments. Here, we report the targeted disruption of the immunity gene TEP1 using transgenic expression of Transcription-Activator Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), and the isolation of several TEP1 mutant A. gambiae lines. These mutations inhibited protein production and rendered TEP1 mutants hypersusceptible to Plasmodium berghei. The TALEN technology opens up new avenues for genetic analysis in this disease vector and may offer novel biotechnology-based approaches for malaria control.

  9. Adenoviral vector DNA for accurate genome editing with engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Henriques, Sara F D; Janssen, Josephine M; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2014-10-01

    Engineered sequence-specific nucleases and donor DNA templates can be customized to edit mammalian genomes via the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. Here we report that the nature of the donor DNA greatly affects the specificity and accuracy of the editing process following site-specific genomic cleavage by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 nucleases. By applying these designer nucleases together with donor DNA delivered as protein-capped adenoviral vector (AdV), free-ended integrase-defective lentiviral vector or nonviral vector templates, we found that the vast majority of AdV-modified human cells underwent scarless homology-directed genome editing. In contrast, a significant proportion of cells exposed to free-ended or to covalently closed HR substrates were subjected to random and illegitimate recombination events. These findings are particularly relevant for genome engineering approaches aiming at high-fidelity genetic modification of human cells.

  10. Enhanced gene disruption by programmable nucleases delivered by a minicircle vector.

    PubMed

    Dad, A-B K; Ramakrishna, S; Song, M; Kim, H

    2014-11-01

    Targeted genetic modification using programmable nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) is of great value in biomedical research, medicine and biotechnology. Minicircle vectors, which lack extraneous bacterial sequences, have several advantages over conventional plasmids for transgene delivery. Here, for the first time, we delivered programmable nucleases into human cells using transient transfection of a minicircle vector and compared the results with those obtained using a conventional plasmid. Surrogate reporter assays and T7 endonuclease analyses revealed that cells in the minicircle vector group displayed significantly higher mutation frequencies at the target sites than those in the conventional plasmid group. Quantitative PCR and reverse transcription-PCR showed higher vector copy number and programmable nuclease transcript levels, respectively, in 293T cells after minicircle versus conventional plasmid vector transfection. In addition, tryphan blue staining and flow cytometry after annexin V and propidium iodide staining showed that cell viability was also significantly higher in the minicircle group than in the conventional plasmid group. Taken together, our results show that gene disruption using minicircle vector-mediated delivery of ZFNs and TALENs is a more efficient, safer and less toxic method than using a conventional plasmid, and indicate that the minicircle vector could serve as an advanced delivery method for programmable nucleases.

  11. Genome editing using FACS enrichment of nuclease-expressing cells and indel detection by amplicon analysis.

    PubMed

    Lonowski, Lindsey A; Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Riaz, Anjum; Delay, Catherine E; Yang, Zhang; Niola, Francesco; Duda, Katarzyna; Ober, Elke A; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H; Hansen, Steen H; Bennett, Eric P; Frödin, Morten

    2017-03-01

    This protocol describes methods for increasing and evaluating the efficiency of genome editing based on the CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated 9) system, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). First, Indel Detection by Amplicon Analysis (IDAA) determines the size and frequency of insertions and deletions elicited by nucleases in cells, tissues or embryos through analysis of fluorophore-labeled PCR amplicons covering the nuclease target site by capillary electrophoresis in a sequenator. Second, FACS enrichment of cells expressing nucleases linked to fluorescent proteins can be used to maximize knockout or knock-in editing efficiencies or to balance editing efficiency and toxic/off-target effects. The two methods can be combined to form a pipeline for cell-line editing that facilitates the testing of new nuclease reagents and the generation of edited cell pools or clonal cell lines, reducing the number of clones that need to be generated and increasing the ease with which they are screened. The pipeline shortens the time line, but it most prominently reduces the workload of cell-line editing, which may be completed within 4 weeks.

  12. Origins of Programmable Nucleases for Genome Engineering.

    PubMed

    Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan; Carroll, Dana

    2016-02-27

    Genome engineering with programmable nucleases depends on cellular responses to a targeted double-strand break (DSB). The first truly targetable reagents were the zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) showing that arbitrary DNA sequences could be addressed for cleavage by protein engineering, ushering in the breakthrough in genome manipulation. ZFNs resulted from basic research on zinc finger proteins and the FokI restriction enzyme (which revealed a bipartite structure with a separable DNA-binding domain and a non-specific cleavage domain). Studies on the mechanism of cleavage by 3-finger ZFNs established that the preferred substrates were paired binding sites, which doubled the size of the target sequence recognition from 9 to 18bp, long enough to specify a unique genomic locus in plant and mammalian cells. Soon afterwards, a ZFN-induced DSB was shown to stimulate homologous recombination in cells. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that are based on bacterial TALEs fused to the FokI cleavage domain expanded this capability. The fact that ZFNs and TALENs have been used for genome modification of more than 40 different organisms and cell types attests to the success of protein engineering. The most recent technology platform for delivering a targeted DSB to cellular genomes is that of the RNA-guided nucleases, which are based on the naturally occurring Type II prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas9 system. Unlike ZFNs and TALENs that use protein motifs for DNA sequence recognition, CRISPR-Cas9 depends on RNA-DNA recognition. The advantages of the CRISPR-Cas9 system-the ease of RNA design for new targets and the dependence on a single, constant Cas9 protein-have led to its wide adoption by research laboratories around the world. These technology platforms have equipped scientists with an unprecedented ability to modify cells and organisms almost at will, with wide-ranging implications across biology and medicine. However, these nucleases have also been shown to cut

  13. Chemical Biology Approaches to Genome Editing: Understanding, Controlling, and Delivering Programmable Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Hu, Johnny H; Davis, Kevin M; Liu, David R

    2016-01-21

    Programmable DNA nucleases have provided scientists with the unprecedented ability to probe, regulate, and manipulate the human genome. Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-Cas9 system (CRISPR-Cas9) represent a powerful array of tools that can bind to and cleave a specified DNA sequence. In their canonical forms, these nucleases induce double-strand breaks at a DNA locus of interest that can trigger cellular DNA repair processes that disrupt or replace genes. The fusion of these programmable nucleases with a variety of other protein domains has led to a rapidly growing suite of tools for activating, repressing, visualizing, and modifying loci of interest. Maximizing the usefulness and therapeutic relevance of these tools, however, requires precisely controlling their activity and specificity to minimize potentially toxic side effects arising from off-target activities. This need has motivated the application of chemical biology principles and methods to genome-editing proteins, including the engineering of variants of these proteins with improved or altered specificities, and the development of genetic, chemical, optical, and protein delivery methods that control the activity of these agents in cells. Advancing the capabilities, safety, effectiveness, and therapeutic relevance of genome-engineering proteins will continue to rely on chemical biology strategies that manipulate their activity, specificity, and localization.

  14. Nuclease-mediated genome editing: At the front-line of functional genomics technology.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Tetsushi; Woltjen, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing with engineered endonucleases is rapidly becoming a staple method in developmental biology studies. Engineered nucleases permit random or designed genomic modification at precise loci through the stimulation of endogenous double-strand break repair. Homology-directed repair following targeted DNA damage is mediated by co-introduction of a custom repair template, allowing the derivation of knock-out and knock-in alleles in animal models previously refractory to classic gene targeting procedures. Currently there are three main types of customizable site-specific nucleases delineated by the source mechanism of DNA binding that guides nuclease activity to a genomic target: zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). Among these genome engineering tools, characteristics such as the ease of design and construction, mechanism of inducing DNA damage, and DNA sequence specificity all differ, making their application complementary. By understanding the advantages and disadvantages of each method, one may make the best choice for their particular purpose.

  15. Editing livestock genomes with site-specific nucleases.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Daniel F; Tan, Wenfang; Hackett, Perry B; Fahrenkrug, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 5 years there has been a major transformation in our ability to precisely manipulate the genomes of animals. Efficiencies of introducing precise genetic alterations in large animal genomes have improved 100000-fold due to a succession of site-specific nucleases that introduce double-strand DNA breaks with a specificity of 10(-9). Herein we describe our applications of site-specific nucleases, especially transcription activator-like effector nucleases, to engineer specific alterations in the genomes of pigs and cows. We can introduce variable changes mediated by non-homologous end joining of DNA breaks to inactive genes. Alternatively, using homology-directed repair, we have introduced specific changes that support either precise alterations in a gene's encoded polypeptide, elimination of the gene or replacement by another unrelated DNA sequence. Depending on the gene and the mutation, we can achieve 10%-50% effective rates of precise mutations. Applications of the new precision genetics are extensive. Livestock now can be engineered with selected phenotypes that will augment their value and adaption to variable ecosystems. In addition, animals can be engineered to specifically mimic human diseases and disorders, which will accelerate the production of reliable drugs and devices. Moreover, animals can be engineered to become better providers of biomaterials used in the medical treatment of diseases and disorders.

  16. A rapid assay to quantify the cleavage efficiency of custom-designed nucleases in planta.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ross A; Gurevich, Vyacheslav; Levy, Avraham A

    2013-06-01

    Custom-designed nucleases are a promising technology for genome editing through the catalysis of double-strand DNA breaks within target loci and subsequent repair by the host cell, which can result in targeted mutagenesis or gene replacement. Implementing this new technology requires a rapid means to determine the cleavage efficiency of these custom-designed proteins in planta. Here we present such an assay that is based on cleavage-dependent luciferase gene correction as part of a transient dual-luciferase(®) reporter (Promega) expression system. This assay consists of co-infiltrating Nicotiana benthamiana leaves with two Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains: one contains the target sequence embedded within a luciferase reporter gene and the second strain contains the custom-designed nuclease gene(s). We compared repair following site-specific nuclease digestion through non-homologous DNA end-joining, as opposed to single strand DNA annealing, as a means to restore an out-of-frame luciferase gene cleavage-reporter construct. We show, using luminometer measurements and bioluminescence imaging, that the assay for non-homologous end-joining is sensitive, quantitative, reproducible and rapid in estimating custom-designed nucleases' cleavage efficiency. We detected cleavage by two out of three transcription activator-like effector nucleases that we custom-designed for targets in the Arabidopsis CRUCIFERIN3 gene, and we compared with the well-established 'QQR' zinc-finger nuclease. The assay we report requires only standard equipment and basic plant molecular biology techniques, and it can be carried out within a few days. Different types of custom-designed nucleases can be preliminarily tested in our assay system before their downstream application in plant genome editing.

  17. Efficient gene targeting of the Rosa26 locus in mouse zygotes using TALE nucleases.

    PubMed

    Kasparek, Petr; Krausova, Michaela; Haneckova, Radka; Kriz, Vitezslav; Zbodakova, Olga; Korinek, Vladimir; Sedlacek, Radislav

    2014-11-03

    Gene targeting in mice mainly employs homologous recombination (HR) in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Although it is a standard way for production of genetically modified mice, the procedure is laborious and time-consuming. This study describes targeting of the mouse Rosa26 locus by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). We employed TALEN-assisted HR in zygotes to introduce constructs encoding TurboRFP and TagBFP fluorescent proteins into the first intron of the Rosa26 gene, and in this way generated two transgenic mice. We also demonstrated that these Rosa26-specific TALENs exhibit high targeting efficiency superior to that of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) specific for the same targeting sequence. Moreover, we devised a reporter assay to assess TALENs activity and specificity to improve the quality of TALEN-assisted targeting.

  18. Genome editing using artificial site-specific nucleases in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hisano, Yu; Ota, Satoshi; Kawahara, Atsuo

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish is a model vertebrate suitable for genetic analysis. Forward genetic analysis via chemical mutagenesis screening has established a variety of zebrafish mutants that are defective in various types of organogenesis, and the genes responsible for the individual mutants have been identified from genome mapping. On the other hand, reverse genetic analysis via targeted gene disruption using embryonic stem (ES) cells (e.g., knockout mouse) can uncover gene functions by investigating the phenotypic effects. However, this approach is mostly limited to mice among the vertebrate models because of the difficulty in establishing ES cells. Recently, new gene targeting technologies, such as the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 systems, have been developed: that can directly introduce genome modifications at the targeted genomic locus. Here, we summarize these new and powerful genome editing techniques for the study of zebrafish.

  19. Donor plasmid design for codon and single base genome editing using zinc finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Pruett-Miller, Shondra M; Davis, Gregory D

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, CompoZr zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) technology has matured to the point that a user-defined double strand break (DSB) can be placed at virtually any location in the human genome within 50 bp of a desired site. Such high resolution ZFN engineering is well within the conversion tract limitations demarcated by the mammalian DNA repair machinery, resulting in a nearly universal ability to create point mutations throughout the human genome. Additionally, new architectures for targeted nuclease engineering have been rapidly developed, namely transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas systems, further expanding options for placement of DSBs. This new capability has created a need to explore the practical limitations of delivering plasmid-based information to the sites of chromosomal double strand breaks so that nuclease-donor methods can be widely deployed in fundamental and therapeutic research. In this chapter, we explore a ZFN-compatible donor design in the context of codon changes at an endogenous locus encoding the human RSK2 kinase.

  20. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M.; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A.F.V.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. PMID:26762977

  1. Geminivirus-Mediated Genome Editing in Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Using Sequence-Specific Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Nathaniel M.; Baltes, Nicholas J.; Voytas, Daniel F.; Douches, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) is rapidly being developed for genetic engineering in crop species. The utilization of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated systems (CRISPR/Cas) for inducing double-strand breaks facilitates targeting of virtually any sequence for modification. Targeted mutagenesis via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) has been demonstrated extensively as being the preferred DNA repair pathway in plants. However, gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR) remains more elusive but could be a powerful tool for directed DNA repair. To overcome barriers associated with gene targeting, a geminivirus replicon (GVR) was used to deliver SSNs targeting the potato ACETOLACTATE SYNTHASE1 (ALS1) gene and repair templates designed to incorporate herbicide-inhibiting point mutations within the ALS1 locus. Transformed events modified with GVRs held point mutations that were capable of supporting a reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype, while events transformed with conventional T-DNAs held no detectable mutations and were similar to wild-type. Regeneration of transformed events improved detection of point mutations that supported a stronger reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype. These results demonstrate the use of geminiviruses for delivering genome editing reagents in plant species, and a novel approach to gene targeting in a vegetatively propagated species. PMID:27493650

  2. Geminivirus-Mediated Genome Editing in Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Using Sequence-Specific Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Butler, Nathaniel M; Baltes, Nicholas J; Voytas, Daniel F; Douches, David S

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) is rapidly being developed for genetic engineering in crop species. The utilization of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated systems (CRISPR/Cas) for inducing double-strand breaks facilitates targeting of virtually any sequence for modification. Targeted mutagenesis via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) has been demonstrated extensively as being the preferred DNA repair pathway in plants. However, gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR) remains more elusive but could be a powerful tool for directed DNA repair. To overcome barriers associated with gene targeting, a geminivirus replicon (GVR) was used to deliver SSNs targeting the potato ACETOLACTATE SYNTHASE1 (ALS1) gene and repair templates designed to incorporate herbicide-inhibiting point mutations within the ALS1 locus. Transformed events modified with GVRs held point mutations that were capable of supporting a reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype, while events transformed with conventional T-DNAs held no detectable mutations and were similar to wild-type. Regeneration of transformed events improved detection of point mutations that supported a stronger reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype. These results demonstrate the use of geminiviruses for delivering genome editing reagents in plant species, and a novel approach to gene targeting in a vegetatively propagated species.

  3. Digital PCR to assess gene-editing frequencies (GEF-dPCR) mediated by designer nucleases.

    PubMed

    Mock, Ulrike; Hauber, Ilona; Fehse, Boris

    2016-03-01

    Genome editing using designer nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 nucleases is an emerging technology in basic and applied research. Whereas the application of editing tools, namely CRISPR-Cas9, has recently become very straightforward, quantification of resulting gene knockout rates still remains a bottleneck. This is particularly true if the product of a targeted gene is not easily detectable. To address this problem, we devised a novel gene-editing frequency digital PCR (GEF-dPCR) technique. GEF-dPCR exploits two differently labeled probes that are placed within one amplicon at the gene-editing target site to simultaneously detect wild-type and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)-affected alleles. Taking advantage of the principle of dPCR, this enables concurrent quantification of edited and wild-type alleles in a given sample. We propose that our method is optimal for the monitoring of gene-edited cells in vivo, e.g., in clinical settings. Here we describe preparation, design of primers and probes, and setup and analysis of GEF-dPCR. The setup of GEF-dPCR requires up to 2 weeks (depending on the starting point); once the dPCR has been established, the protocol for sample analysis takes <1 d.

  4. [Tale nucleases--new tool for genome editing].

    PubMed

    Glazkova, D V; Shipulin, G A

    2014-01-01

    The ability to introduce targeted changes in the genome of living cells or entire organisms enables researchers to meet the challenges of basic life sciences, biotechnology and medicine. Knockdown of target genes in the zygotes gives the opportunity to investigate the functions of these genes in different organisms. Replacement of single nucleotide in the DNA sequence allows to correct mutations in genes and thus to cure hereditary diseases. Adding transgene to specific genomic.loci can be used in biotechnology for generation of organisms with certain properties or cell lines for biopharmaceutical production. Such manipulations of gene sequences in their natural chromosomal context became possible after the emergence of the technology called "genome editing". This technology is based on the induction of a double-strand break in a specific genomic target DNA using endonucleases that recognize the unique sequences in the genome and on subsequent recovery of DNA integrity through the use of cellular repair mechanisms. A necessary tool for the genome editing is a custom-designed endonuclease which is able to recognize selected sequences. The emergence of a new type of programmable endonucleases, which were constructed on the basis of bacterial proteins--TAL-effectors (Transcription activators like effector), has become an important stage in the development of technology and promoted wide spread of the genome editing. This article reviews the history of the discovery of TAL effectors and creation of TALE nucleases, and describes their advantages over zinc finger endonucleases that appeared earlier. A large section is devoted to description of genetic modifications that can be performed using the genome editing.

  5. Genetic correction using engineered nucleases for gene therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongmei Lisa; Nakano, Takao; Hotta, Akitsu

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations in humans are associated with congenital disorders and phenotypic traits. Gene therapy holds the promise to cure such genetic disorders, although it has suffered from several technical limitations for decades. Recent progress in gene editing technology using tailor-made nucleases, such as meganucleases (MNs), zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) and, more recently, CRISPR/Cas9, has significantly broadened our ability to precisely modify target sites in the human genome. In this review, we summarize recent progress in gene correction approaches of the human genome, with a particular emphasis on the clinical applications of gene therapy.

  6. Systematic quantification of HDR and NHEJ reveals effects of locus, nuclease, and cell type on genome-editing.

    PubMed

    Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Berman, Jennifer R; Cooper, Samantha B; Mayerl, Steven J; Chan, Amanda H; Zhang, Bin; Karlin-Neumann, George A; Conklin, Bruce R

    2016-03-31

    Precise genome-editing relies on the repair of sequence-specific nuclease-induced DNA nicking or double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homology-directed repair (HDR). However, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), an error-prone repair, acts concurrently, reducing the rate of high-fidelity edits. The identification of genome-editing conditions that favor HDR over NHEJ has been hindered by the lack of a simple method to measure HDR and NHEJ directly and simultaneously at endogenous loci. To overcome this challenge, we developed a novel, rapid, digital PCR-based assay that can simultaneously detect one HDR or NHEJ event out of 1,000 copies of the genome. Using this assay, we systematically monitored genome-editing outcomes of CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), Cas9 nickases, catalytically dead Cas9 fused to FokI, and transcription activator-like effector nuclease at three disease-associated endogenous gene loci in HEK293T cells, HeLa cells, and human induced pluripotent stem cells. Although it is widely thought that NHEJ generally occurs more often than HDR, we found that more HDR than NHEJ was induced under multiple conditions. Surprisingly, the HDR/NHEJ ratios were highly dependent on gene locus, nuclease platform, and cell type. The new assay system, and our findings based on it, will enable mechanistic studies of genome-editing and help improve genome-editing technology.

  7. SAPTA: a new design tool for improving TALE nuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yanni; Fine, Eli J; Zheng, Zhilan; Antico, Christopher J; Voit, Richard A; Porteus, Matthew H; Cradick, Thomas J; Bao, Gang

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have become a powerful tool for genome editing due to the simple code linking the amino acid sequences of their DNA-binding domains to TALEN nucleotide targets. While the initial TALEN-design guidelines are very useful, user-friendly tools defining optimal TALEN designs for robust genome editing need to be developed. Here we evaluated existing guidelines and developed new design guidelines for TALENs based on 205 TALENs tested, and established the scoring algorithm for predicting TALEN activity (SAPTA) as a new online design tool. For any input gene of interest, SAPTA gives a ranked list of potential TALEN target sites, facilitating the selection of optimal TALEN pairs based on predicted activity. SAPTA-based TALEN designs increased the average intracellular TALEN monomer activity by >3-fold, and resulted in an average endogenous gene-modification frequency of 39% for TALENs containing the repeat variable di-residue NK that favors specificity rather than activity. It is expected that SAPTA will become a useful and flexible tool for designing highly active TALENs for genome-editing applications. SAPTA can be accessed via the website at http://baolab.bme.gatech.edu/Research/BioinformaticTools/TAL_targeter.html.

  8. Myostatin gene mutated mice induced with tale nucleases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fangfang; Sun, Ruilin; Chen, Hongyan; Fei, Jian; Lu, Daru

    2015-01-01

    Myostain gene (MSTN) is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle, and negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass; it has been suggested that mice with MSTN inhibition have reduced adiposity and improved insulin sensitivity. Therefore, it is important to establish a fast and effective gene editing method. In this report, we established the myostatin mutated-mouse model by microinjection of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) mRNA within the mouse fertilized oocytes and achieved high rates of mutagenesis of the mouse MSTN in C57BL/6J. Six of 45 born mice carried target mutations and we appointed one as the parental mating with wild mouse to produce the F1 and backcross to produce the F2 generation. All the mutations of the mice were examined quickly and efficiently by high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRMA) and then verified by direct sequencing. We obtained the homozygous of the F2 generation which transmitted the mutant alleles to the progeny with 100% efficiency. Mutant mice exhibited increases in muscle mass comparable to those observed in wild-type mice. Therefore, combining TALEN-mediated gene targeting with HRMA technology is a superior method of constructing genetically modified mice through microinjection in the mouse fertilized oocytes with high efficiency and short time of selection.

  9. Genome Editing with Engineered Nucleases in Economically Important Animals and Plants: State of the Art in the Research Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Sovová, Tereza; Kerins, Gerard; Demnerová, Kateřina; Ovesná, Jaroslava

    2017-01-01

    After induced mutagenesis and transgenesis, genome editing is the next step in the development of breeding techniques. Genome editing using site-directed nucleases - including meganucleases, zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the CRISPR/Cas9 system - is based on the mechanism of double strand breaks. The nuclease is directed to cleave the DNA at a specific place of the genome which is then repaired by natural repair mechanisms. Changes are introduced during the repair that are either accidental or can be targeted if a DNA template with the desirable sequence is provided. These techniques allow making virtually any change to the genome including specific DNA sequence changes, gene insertion, replacements or deletions with unprecedented precision and specificity while being less laborious and more straightforward compared to traditional breeding techniques or transgenesis. Therefore, the research in this field is developing quickly and, apart from model species, multiple studies have focused on economically important species and agronomically important traits that were the key subjects of this review. In plants, studies have been undertaken on disease resistance, herbicide tolerance, nutrient metabolism and nutritional value. In animals, the studies have mainly focused on disease resistance, meat production and allergenicity of milk. However, none of the promising studies has led to commercialization despite several patent applications. The uncertain legal status of genome-editing methods is one of the reasons for poor commercial development, as it is not clear whether the products would fall under the GMO regulation. We believe this issue should be clarified soon in order to allow promising methods to reach their full potential.

  10. STAR: a simple TAL effector assembly reaction using isothermal assembly

    PubMed Central

    Gogolok, Sabine; Garcia-Diaz, Claudia; Pollard, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) contain modular programmable DNA binding domains. Fusing TALEs with effector domains creates synthetic transcription factors (TALE-TFs) or nucleases (TALENs), enabling precise gene manipulations. The construction of TALEs remains challenging due to their repetitive sequences. Here we report a simple TALE assembly reaction (STAR) that enables individual laboratories to generate multiple TALEs in a facile manner. STAR uses an isothermal assembly (‘Gibson assembly’) that is labour- and cost-effective, accessible, rapid and scalable. A small 68-part fragment library is employed, and the specific TALE repeat sequence is generated within ~8 hours. Sequence-verified TALENs or TALE-TF plasmids targeting 17 bp target sequences can be produced within three days, without the need for stepwise intermediate plasmid production. We demonstrate the utility of STAR through production of functional TALE-TFs capable of activating human SOX2 expression. STAR addresses some of the shortcomings of existing Golden Gate or solid-phase assembly protocols and enables routine production of TALE-TFs that will complement emerging CRISPR/Cas9-based reagents across diverse applications in mammalian stem cell and synthetic biology. PMID:27615025

  11. Current and future delivery systems for engineered nucleases: ZFN, TALEN and RGEN.

    PubMed

    Ul Ain, Qurrat; Chung, Jee Young; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2015-05-10

    Gene therapy by engineered nucleases is a genetic intervention being investigated for curing the hereditary disorders by targeting selected genes with specific nucleotides for establishment, suppression, abolishment of a function or correction of mutation. Here, we review the fast developing technology of targeted genome engineering using site specific programmable nucleases zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator like nucleases (TALENs) and cluster regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeat/CRISPR associated proteins (CRISPR/Cas) based RNA-guided DNA endonucleases (RGENs) and their different characteristics including pros and cons of genome modifications by these nucleases. We have further discussed different types of delivery methods to induce gene editing, novel development in genetic engineering other than nucleases and future prospects.

  12. Nuclease-mediated double-strand break (DSB) enhancement of small fragment homologous recombination (SFHR) gene modification in human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs).

    PubMed

    Sargent, R Geoffrey; Suzuki, Shingo; Gruenert, Dieter C

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in methods to specifically modify genomic DNA using sequence-specific endonucleases and donor DNA have opened the door to a new therapeutic paradigm for cell and gene therapy of inherited diseases. Sequence-specific endonucleases, in particular transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs), have been coupled with polynucleotide small/short DNA fragments (SDFs) to correct the most common mutation in the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, a 3-base-pair deletion at codon 508 (delF508), in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. The studies presented here describe the generation of candidate TALENs and their co-transfection with wild-type (wt) CFTR-SDFs into CF-iPS cells homozygous for the delF508 mutation. Using an allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR)-based cyclic enrichment protocol, clonal populations of corrected CF-iPS cells were isolated and expanded.

  13. Turbidimetric Assay of Staphylococcal Nuclease

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Alan; Deibel, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    A simplified turbidimetric procedure was developed to assay staphylococcal nuclease activity. The ease of performance and sensitivity to nanogram quantities enhance the utilization of the method for the quantitative or qualitative estimation of the enzyme. Unlike plating methods, the turbidimetric procedure affords the differentiation between heat-stable and heat-labile nuclease activity. PMID:4735446

  14. Targeted Myostatin Gene Editing in Multiple Mammalian Species Directed by a Single Pair of TALE Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Zhao, Piming; Mariano, Andrew; Han, Renzhi

    2013-07-30

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. Strategies to block myostatin signaling pathway have been extensively pursued to increase muscle mass in various disease settings including muscular dystrophy. Here, we report a new class of reagents based on transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to disrupt myostatin expression at the genome level. We designed a pair of MSTN TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the myostatin gene. We demonstrate that codelivery of these MSTN TALENs induce highly specific and efficient gene disruption in a variety of human, cattle, and mouse cells. Based upon sequence analysis, this pair of TALENs is expected to be functional in many other mammalian species. Moreover, we demonstrate that these MSTN TALENs can facilitate targeted integration of a mCherry expression cassette or a larger muscular dystrophy gene (dysferlin) expression cassette into the MSTN locus in mouse or human cells. Therefore, targeted editing of the myostatin gene using our highly specific and efficient TALEN pair would facilitate cell engineering, allowing potential use in translational research for cell-based therapy.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e112; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.39; published online 30 July 2013.

  15. Production of CMAH Knockout Preimplantation Embryos Derived From Immortalized Porcine Cells Via TALE Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Moon, JoonHo; Lee, Choongil; Kim, Su Jin; Choi, Ji-Yei; Lee, Byeong Chun; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jang, Goo

    2014-05-27

    Although noncancerous immortalized cell lines have been developed by introducing genes into human and murine somatic cells, such cell lines have not been available in large domesticated animals like pigs. For immortalizing porcine cells, primary porcine fetal fibroblasts were isolated and cultured using the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene. After selecting cells with neomycin for 2 weeks, outgrowing colonized cells were picked up and subcultured for expansion. Immortalized cells were cultured for more than 9 months without changing their doubling time (~24 hours) or their diameter (< 20 µm) while control cells became replicatively senescent during the same period. Even a single cell expanded to confluence in 100 mm dishes. Furthermore, to knockout the CMAH gene, designed plasmids encoding a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALENs) pairs were transfected into the immortalized cells. Each single colony was analyzed by the mutation-sensitive T7 endonuclease I assay, fluorescent PCR, and dideoxy sequencing to obtain three independent clonal populations of cells that contained biallelic modifications. One CMAH knockout clone was chosen and used for somatic cell nuclear transfer. Cloned embryos developed to the blastocyst stage. In conclusion, we demonstrated that immortalized porcine fibroblasts were successfully established using the human hTERT gene, and the TALENs enabled biallelic gene disruptions in these immortalized cells.

  16. Broad specificity profiling of TALENs results in engineered nucleases with improved DNA-cleavage specificity.

    PubMed

    Guilinger, John P; Pattanayak, Vikram; Reyon, Deepak; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Sander, Jeffry D; Joung, J Keith; Liu, David R

    2014-04-01

    Although transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) can be designed to cleave chosen DNA sequences, TALENs have activity against related off-target sequences. To better understand TALEN specificity, we profiled 30 unique TALENs with different target sites, array length and domain sequences for their abilities to cleave any of 10(12) potential off-target DNA sequences using in vitro selection and high-throughput sequencing. Computational analysis of the selection results predicted 76 off-target substrates in the human genome, 16 of which were accessible and modified by TALENs in human cells. The results suggest that (i) TALE repeats bind DNA relatively independently; (ii) longer TALENs are more tolerant of mismatches yet are more specific in a genomic context; and (iii) excessive DNA-binding energy can lead to reduced TALEN specificity in cells. Based on these findings, we engineered a TALEN variant that exhibits equal on-target cleavage activity but tenfold lower average off-target activity in human cells.

  17. Precise Genome Modification via Sequence-Specific Nucleases-Mediated Gene Targeting for Crop Improvement.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongwei; Li, Jingying; Xia, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR). While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes' encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT) that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired "safe" harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs, such as zinc finger nucleases, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential mechanisms underlying HDR events in plant

  18. Precise Genome Modification via Sequence-Specific Nucleases-Mediated Gene Targeting for Crop Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yongwei; Li, Jingying; Xia, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR). While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes’ encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT) that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired “safe” harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs, such as zinc finger nucleases, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential mechanisms underlying HDR events in

  19. Engineering customized TALE nucleases (TALENs) and TALE transcription factors by fast ligation-based automatable solid-phase high-throughput (FLASH) assembly.

    PubMed

    Reyon, Deepak; Maeder, Morgan L; Khayter, Cyd; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Foley, Jonathan E; Sander, Jeffry D; Joung, J Keith

    2013-07-01

    Customized DNA-binding domains made using transcription activator-like effector (TALE) repeats are rapidly growing in importance as widely applicable research tools. TALE nucleases (TALENs), composed of an engineered array of TALE repeats fused to the FokI nuclease domain, have been used successfully for directed genome editing in various organisms and cell types. TALE transcription factors (TALE-TFs), consisting of engineered TALE repeat arrays linked to a transcriptional regulatory domain, have been used to up- or downregulate expression of endogenous genes in human cells and plants. This unit describes a detailed protocol for the recently described fast ligation-based automatable solid-phase high-throughput (FLASH) assembly method. FLASH enables automated high-throughput construction of engineered TALE repeats using an automated liquid handling robot or manually using a multichannel pipet. Using the automated approach, a single researcher can construct up to 96 DNA fragments encoding TALE repeat arrays of various lengths in a single day, and then clone these to construct sequence-verified TALEN or TALE-TF expression plasmids in a week or less. Plasmids required for FLASH are available by request from the Joung lab (http://eGenome.org). This unit also describes improvements to the Zinc Finger and TALE Targeter (ZiFiT Targeter) web server (http://ZiFiT.partners.org) that facilitate the design and construction of FLASH TALE repeat arrays in high throughput.

  20. A comprehensive overview of computational resources to aid in precision genome editing with engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Periwal, Vinita

    2016-07-03

    Genome editing with engineered nucleases (zinc finger nucleases, TAL effector nucleases s and Clustered regularly inter-spaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated) has recently been shown to have great promise in a variety of therapeutic and biotechnological applications. However, their exploitation in genetic analysis and clinical settings largely depends on their specificity for the intended genomic target. Large and complex genomes often contain highly homologous/repetitive sequences, which limits the specificity of genome editing tools and could result in off-target activity. Over the past few years, various computational approaches have been developed to assist the design process and predict/reduce the off-target activity of these nucleases. These tools could be efficiently used to guide the design of constructs for engineered nucleases and evaluate results after genome editing. This review provides a comprehensive overview of various databases, tools, web servers and resources for genome editing and compares their features and functionalities. Additionally, it also describes tools that have been developed to analyse post-genome editing results. The article also discusses important design parameters that could be considered while designing these nucleases. This review is intended to be a quick reference guide for experimentalists as well as computational biologists working in the field of genome editing with engineered nucleases.

  1. Mutation detection using Surveyor nuclease.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Peter; Shandilya, Harini; D'Alessio, James M; O'Connor, Kevin; Durocher, Jeffrey; Gerard, Gary F

    2004-04-01

    We have developed a simple and flexible mutation detection technology for the discovery and mapping of both known and unknown mutations. This technology is based on a new mismatch-specific DNA endonuclease from celery, Surveyor nuclease, which is a member of the CEL nuclease family of plant DNA endonucleases. Surveyor nuclease cleaves with high specificity at the 3' side of any mismatch site in both DNA strands, including all base substitutions and insertion/deletions up to at least 12 nucleotides. Surveyor nuclease technology involves four steps: (i) PCR to amplify target DNA from both mutant and wild-type reference DNA; (ii) hybridization to form heteroduplexes between mutant and wild-type reference DNA; (iii) treatment of annealed DNA with Surveyor nuclease to cleave heteroduplexes; and (iv) analysis of digested DNA products using the detection/separation platform of choice. The technology is highly sensitive, detecting rare mutants present at as low as 1 in 32 copies. Unlabeled Surveyor nuclease digestion products can be analyzed using conventional gel electrophoresis or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), while end labeled digestion products are suitable for analysis by automated gel or capillary electrophoresis. The entire protocol can be performed in less than a day and is suitable for automated and high-throughput procedures.

  2. Iterative capped assembly: rapid and scalable synthesis of repeat-module DNA such as TAL effectors from individual monomers

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Adrian W.; Rios, Xavier; Chari, Raj; Yang, Luhan; Zhang, Feng; Mali, Prashant; Church, George M.

    2012-01-01

    DNA built from modular repeats presents a challenge for gene synthesis. We present a solid surface-based sequential ligation approach, which we refer to as iterative capped assembly (ICA), that adds DNA repeat monomers individually to a growing chain while using hairpin ‘capping’ oligonucleotides to block incompletely extended chains, greatly increasing the frequency of full-length final products. Applying ICA to a model problem, construction of custom transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) for genome engineering, we demonstrate efficient synthesis of TALE DNA-binding domains up to 21 monomers long and their ligation into a nuclease-carrying backbone vector all within 3 h. We used ICA to synthesize 20 TALENs of varying DNA target site length and tested their ability to stimulate gene editing by a donor oligonucleotide in human cells. All the TALENS show activity, with the ones >15 monomers long tending to work best. Since ICA builds full-length constructs from individual monomers rather than large exhaustive libraries of pre-fabricated oligomers, it will be trivial to incorporate future modified TALE monomers with improved or expanded function or to synthesize other types of repeat-modular DNA where the diversity of possible monomers makes exhaustive oligomer libraries impractical. PMID:22740649

  3. Oligonucleotide-Mediated Genome Editing Provides Precision and Function to Engineered Nucleases and Antibiotics in Plants[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Noel J.; Narváez-Vásquez, Javier; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B.; Warburg, Zachary J.; Woodward, Melody J.; Mihiret, Yohannes A.; Lincoln, Tracey A.; Segami, Rosa E.; Sanders, Steven L.; Walker, Keith A.; Beetham, Peter R.; Schöpke, Christian R.; Gocal, Greg F.W.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a form of oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis for precision genome editing in plants that uses single-stranded oligonucleotides (ssODNs) to precisely and efficiently generate genome edits at DNA strand lesions made by DNA double strand break reagents. Employing a transgene model in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we obtained a high frequency of precise targeted genome edits when ssODNs were introduced into protoplasts that were pretreated with the glycopeptide antibiotic phleomycin, a nonspecific DNA double strand breaker. Simultaneous delivery of ssODN and a site-specific DNA double strand breaker, either transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/Cas9), resulted in a much greater targeted genome-editing frequency compared with treatment with DNA double strand-breaking reagents alone. Using this site-specific approach, we applied the combination of ssODN and CRISPR/Cas9 to develop an herbicide tolerance trait in flax (Linum usitatissimum) by precisely editing the 5′-ENOLPYRUVYLSHIKIMATE-3-PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE (EPSPS) genes. EPSPS edits occurred at sufficient frequency that we could regenerate whole plants from edited protoplasts without employing selection. These plants were subsequently determined to be tolerant to the herbicide glyphosate in greenhouse spray tests. Progeny (C1) of these plants showed the expected Mendelian segregation of EPSPS edits. Our findings show the enormous potential of using a genome-editing platform for precise, reliable trait development in crop plants. PMID:26864017

  4. Requirements for Driving Antipathogen Effector Genes into Populations of Disease Vectors by Homing

    PubMed Central

    Beaghton, Andrea; Hammond, Andrew; Nolan, Tony; Crisanti, Andrea; Godfray, H. Charles J.; Burt, Austin

    2017-01-01

    There is a need for new interventions against the ongoing burden of vector-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue. One suggestion has been to develop genes encoding effector molecules that block parasite development within the vector, and then use the nuclease-based homing reaction as a form of gene drive to spread those genes through target populations. If the effector gene reduces the fitness of the mosquito and does not contribute to the drive, then loss-of-function mutations in the effector will eventually replace functional copies, but protection may nonetheless persist sufficiently long to provide a public health benefit. Here, we present a quantitative model allowing one to predict the duration of protection as a function of the probabilities of different molecular processes during the homing reaction, various fitness effects, and the efficacy of the effector in blocking transmission. Factors that increase the duration of protection include reducing the frequency of pre-existing resistant alleles, the probability of nonrecombinational DNA repair, the probability of homing-associated loss of the effector, the fitness costs of the nuclease and effector, and the completeness of parasite blocking. For target species that extend over an area much larger than the typical dispersal distance, the duration of protection is expected to be highest at the release site, and decrease away from there, eventually falling to zero, as effector-less drive constructs replace effector-containing ones. We also model an alternative strategy of using the nuclease to target an essential gene, and then linking the effector to a sequence that restores the essential function and is resistant to the nuclease. Depending upon parameter values, this approach can prolong the duration of protection. Our models highlight the key design criteria needed to achieve a desired level of public health benefit. PMID:28159753

  5. Therapeutic genome editing with engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Haas, Simone A; Dettmer, Viviane; Cathomen, Toni

    2017-01-31

    Targeted genome editing with designer nucleases, such as zinc finger nucleases, TALE nucleases, and CRISPR-Cas nucleases, has heralded a new era in gene therapy. Genetic disorders, which have not been amenable to conventional gene-addition-type gene therapy approaches, such as disorders with dominant inheritance or diseases caused by mutations in tightly regulated genes, can now be treated by precise genome surgery. Moreover, engineered nucleases enable novel genetic interventions to fight infectious diseases or to improve cancer immunotherapies. Here, we review the development of the different classes of programmable nucleases, discuss the challenges and improvements in translating gene editing into clinical use, and give an outlook on what applications can expect to enter the clinic in the near future.

  6. TAL effectors and the executor R genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junli; Yin, Zhongchao; White, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors are bacterial type III secretion proteins that function as transcription factors in plants during Xanthomonas/plant interactions, conditioning either host susceptibility and/or host resistance. Three types of TAL effector associated resistance (R) genes have been characterized—recessive, dominant non-transcriptional, and dominant TAL effector-dependent transcriptional based resistance. Here, we discuss the last type of R genes, whose functions are dependent on direct TAL effector binding to discrete effector binding elements in the promoters. Only five of the so-called executor R genes have been cloned, and commonalities are not clear. We have placed the protein products in two groups for conceptual purposes. Group 1 consists solely of the protein from pepper, BS3, which is predicted to have catalytic function on the basis of homology to a large conserved protein family. Group 2 consists of BS4C-R, XA27, XA10, and XA23, all of which are relatively short proteins from pepper or rice with multiple potential transmembrane domains. Group 2 members have low sequence similarity to proteins of unknown function in closely related species. Firm predictions await further experimentation on these interesting new members to the R gene repertoire, which have potential broad application in new strategies for disease resistance. PMID:26347759

  7. Quantitative Microplate Assay for Real-Time Nuclease Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Langel, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the phenomenon of nucleases exposing oligonucleotide phosphate backbones to phosphatases we present a novel quantitative method for kinetics of nuclease catalysis. Inorganic phosphate released from nuclease products by phosphatases could be quantified in real-time by a fluorescent sensor of inorganic phosphate. Two different nucleases were employed, showing the versatility of this assay for multiple turnover label-free nuclease studies. PMID:27101307

  8. Translocated effectors of Yersinia

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Young, Glenn M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Currently, all known translocated effectors of Yersinia are delivered into host cells by type III secretion systems (T3SSs). Pathogenic Yersinia maintain the plasmid-encoded Ysc T3SS for the specific delivery of the well-studied Yop effectors. New horizons for effector biology have opened with the discovery of the Ysps of Y. enterocolitica Biovar 1B, which are translocated into host cells by the chromosome-endoded Ysa T3SS. The reported arsenal of effectors is likely to expand since genomic analysis has revealed gene-clusters in some Yersinia that code for other T3SSs. These efforts also revealed possible type VI secretion (T6S) systems, which may indicate translocation of effectors occurs by multiple mechanisms. PMID:19185531

  9. TAL effector-mediated susceptibility to bacterial blight of cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial blight of cotton (BBC) caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. malvacearum (Xcm) is a destructive disease that has recently re-emerged in the U.S. Xcm injects transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors that directly induce the expression of host susceptibility (S) or resistance (R) genes. ...

  10. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  11. End-effector microprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: automated structures assembly facility current control hierarchy; automated structures assembly facility purposed control hierarchy; end-effector software state transition diagram; block diagram for ideal install composite; and conclusions.

  12. The SMX DNA Repair Tri-nuclease.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Haley D M; Laister, Rob C; Martin, Stephen R; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; West, Stephen C

    2017-03-02

    The efficient removal of replication and recombination intermediates is essential for the maintenance of genome stability. Resolution of these potentially toxic structures requires the MUS81-EME1 endonuclease, which is activated at prometaphase by formation of the SMX tri-nuclease containing three DNA repair structure-selective endonucleases: SLX1-SLX4, MUS81-EME1, and XPF-ERCC1. Here we show that SMX tri-nuclease is more active than the three individual nucleases, efficiently cleaving replication forks and recombination intermediates. Within SMX, SLX4 co-ordinates the SLX1 and MUS81-EME1 nucleases for Holliday junction resolution, in a reaction stimulated by XPF-ERCC1. SMX formation activates MUS81-EME1 for replication fork and flap structure cleavage by relaxing substrate specificity. Activation involves MUS81's conserved N-terminal HhH domain, which mediates incision site selection and SLX4 binding. Cell cycle-dependent formation and activation of this tri-nuclease complex provides a unique mechanism by which cells ensure chromosome segregation and preserve genome integrity.

  13. Differentiation of staphylococci on the basis of nuclease properties.

    PubMed

    Gudding, R

    1983-11-01

    The quantity, thermostability, and serological pattern of nucleases produced by different staphylococci were studied. Staphylococcal strains were isolated from nine different species of animals or from humans. Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus intermedius, and Staphylococcus hyicus subsp. hyicus were vigorous producers of nuclease, whereas the coagulase-negative staphylococci, except S. hyicus subsp. hyicus, produced significantly less nuclease. The nucleases of all strains were found to be thermostable. S. aureus, S. intermedius, and S. hyicus subsp. hyicus could be distinguished from each other and from coagulase-negative staphylococci on the basis of inhibition of nuclease activity by specific antibodies.

  14. Pneumatic inflatable end effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, K. H.; Johnston, J. D. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    The invention relates to an end effector device for robot or teleoperated type space vehicle which includes an inflatable balloon member carried on the end of tubular member which has a hollow center or conduit through which a suitable pressurized fluid is supplied. The device may be inserted into a variety of shaped openings or truss-type structures for handling in space.

  15. Robotic end effector

    DOEpatents

    Minichan, R.L.

    1993-10-05

    An end effector is described for use in probing a surface with a robotic arm. The end effector has a first portion that carries a gimbal with a probe, the gimbal holding the probe normal to the surface, and a second portion with a set of three shafts within a housing for urging the gimbal and probe against the surface. The second portion contains a potentiometer connected by another shaft to the first portion to measure the position of the first portion with respect to the second so that the second portion can be moved to place and maintain the shafts at the midpoint of their travel. Then, as irregularities in the surface are encountered, the first portion can respond by moving closer to or farther from the second portion. 7 figures.

  16. Robotic end effector

    DOEpatents

    Minichan, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    An end effector for use in probing a surface with a robotic arm. The end effector has a first portion that carries a gimbal with a probe, the gimbal holding the probe normal to the surface, and a second portion with a set of three shafts within a housing for urging the gimbal and probe against the surface. The second portion contains a potentiometer connected by another shaft to the first portion to measure the position of the first portion with respect to the second so that the second portion can be moved to place and maintain the shafts at the midpoint of their travel. Then, as irregularities in the surface are encountered, the first portion can respond by moving closer to or farther from the second portion.

  17. Robotic end effector

    SciTech Connect

    Minichan, R.L.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an end effector for use in probing a surface with a robotic arm. The end effector has a first portion that carries a gamble with a probe, the gamble holding the probe normal to the surface, and a second portion with a set of three shafts within a housing for urging the gamble and probe against the surface. The second portion contains a potentiometer connected by another shaft to the first portion to measure the position of the first portion with respect to the second so that the second portion can be moved to place and maintain the shafts at the midpoint of their travel. Then, as irregularities in the surface are encountered, the first portion can respond by moving closer to or farther from the second portion.

  18. Genome Editing in Mice Using TALE Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Wefers, Benedikt; Brandl, Christina; Ortiz, Oskar; Wurst, Wolfgang; Kühn, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Gene engineering for generating targeted mouse mutants is a key technology for biomedical research. Using TALENs as sequence-specific nucleases to induce targeted double-strand breaks, the mouse genome can be directly modified in zygotes in a single step without the need for embryonic stem cells. By embryo microinjection of TALEN mRNAs and targeting vectors, knockout and knock-in alleles can be generated fast and efficiently. In this chapter we provide protocols for the application of TALENs in mouse zygotes.

  19. Two-axis angular effector

    DOEpatents

    Vaughn, Mark R.; Robinett, III, Rush D.; Phelan, John R.; Van Zuiden, Don M.

    1997-01-21

    A new class of coplanar two-axis angular effectors. These effectors combine a two-axis rotational joint analogous to a Cardan joint with linear actuators in a manner to produce a wider range of rotational motion about both axes defined by the joint. This new class of effectors also allows design of robotic manipulators having very high strength and efficiency. These effectors are particularly suited for remote operation in unknown surroundings, because of their extraordinary versatility. An immediate application is to the problems which arise in nuclear waste remediation.

  20. MorTAL Kombat: the story of defense against TAL effectors through loss-of-susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Hutin, Mathilde; Pérez-Quintero, Alvaro L.; Lopez, Camilo; Szurek, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Many plant-pathogenic xanthomonads rely on Transcription Activator-Like (TAL) effectors to colonize their host. This particular family of type III effectors functions as specific plant transcription factors via a programmable DNA-binding domain. Upon binding to the promoters of plant disease susceptibility genes in a sequence-specific manner, the expression of these host genes is induced. However, plants have evolved specific strategies to counter the action of TAL effectors and confer resistance. One mechanism is to avoid the binding of TAL effectors by mutations of their DNA binding sites, resulting in resistance by loss-of-susceptibility. This article reviews our current knowledge of the susceptibility hubs targeted by Xanthomonas TAL effectors, possible evolutionary scenarios for plants to combat the pathogen with loss-of-function alleles, and how this knowledge can be used overall to develop new pathogen-informed breeding strategies and improve crop resistance. PMID:26236326

  1. Use of designer nucleases for targeted gene and genome editing in plants.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Donald P; Spalding, Martin H; Yang, Bing

    2016-02-01

    The ability to efficiently inactivate or replace genes in model organisms allowed a rapid expansion of our understanding of many of the genetic, biochemical, molecular and cellular mechanisms that support life. With the advent of new techniques for manipulating genes and genomes that are applicable not only to single-celled organisms, but also to more complex organisms such as animals and plants, the speed with which scientists and biotechnologists can expand fundamental knowledge and apply that knowledge to improvements in medicine, industry and agriculture is set to expand in an exponential fashion. At the heart of these advancements will be the use of gene editing tools such as zinc finger nucleases, modified meganucleases, hybrid DNA/RNA oligonucleotides, TAL effector nucleases and modified CRISPR/Cas9. Each of these tools has the ability to precisely target one specific DNA sequence within a genome and (except for DNA/RNA oligonucleotides) to create a double-stranded DNA break. DNA repair to such breaks sometimes leads to gene knockouts or gene replacement by homologous recombination if exogenously supplied homologous DNA fragments are made available. Genome rearrangements are also possible to engineer. Creation and use of such genome rearrangements, gene knockouts and gene replacements by the plant science community is gaining significant momentum. To document some of this progress and to explore the technology's longer term potential, this review highlights present and future uses of designer nucleases to greatly expedite research with model plant systems and to engineer genes and genomes in major and minor crop species for enhanced food production.

  2. Effector Mechanisms of Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Aurélie; Varey, Emilie; Anegon, Ignacio; Cuturi, Maria-Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Organ transplantation appears today to be the best alternative to replace the loss of vital organs induced by various diseases. Transplants can, however, also be rejected by the recipient. In this review, we provide an overview of the mechanisms and the cells/molecules involved in acute and chronic rejections. T cells and B cells mainly control the antigen-specific rejection and act either as effector, regulatory, or memory cells. On the other hand, nonspecific cells such as endothelial cells, NK cells, macrophages, or polymorphonuclear cells are also crucial actors of transplant rejection. Last, beyond cells, the high contribution of antibodies, chemokines, and complement molecules in graft rejection is discussed in this article. The understanding of the different components involved in graft rejection is essential as some of them are used in the clinic as biomarkers to detect and quantify the level of rejection. PMID:24186491

  3. Code-assisted discovery of TAL effector targets in bacterial leaf streak of rice reveals contrast with bacterial blight and a novel susceptibility gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors found in Xanthomonas spp. promote bacterial growth and plant susceptibility by binding specific DNA sequences or, effector-binding elements (EBEs), and inducing host gene expression. In this study, we have found substantially different transcriptional pro...

  4. Computational predictions provide insights into the biology of TAL effector target sites.

    PubMed

    Grau, Jan; Wolf, Annett; Reschke, Maik; Bonas, Ulla; Posch, Stefan; Boch, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors are injected into host plant cells by Xanthomonas bacteria to function as transcriptional activators for the benefit of the pathogen. The DNA binding domain of TAL effectors is composed of conserved amino acid repeat structures containing repeat-variable diresidues (RVDs) that determine DNA binding specificity. In this paper, we present TALgetter, a new approach for predicting TAL effector target sites based on a statistical model. In contrast to previous approaches, the parameters of TALgetter are estimated from training data computationally. We demonstrate that TALgetter successfully predicts known TAL effector target sites and often yields a greater number of predictions that are consistent with up-regulation in gene expression microarrays than an existing approach, Target Finder of the TALE-NT suite. We study the binding specificities estimated by TALgetter and approve that different RVDs are differently important for transcriptional activation. In subsequent studies, the predictions of TALgetter indicate a previously unreported positional preference of TAL effector target sites relative to the transcription start site. In addition, several TAL effectors are predicted to bind to the TATA-box, which might constitute one general mode of transcriptional activation by TAL effectors. Scrutinizing the predicted target sites of TALgetter, we propose several novel TAL effector virulence targets in rice and sweet orange. TAL-mediated induction of the candidates is supported by gene expression microarrays. Validity of these targets is also supported by functional analogy to known TAL effector targets, by an over-representation of TAL effector targets with similar function, or by a biological function related to pathogen infection. Hence, these predicted TAL effector virulence targets are promising candidates for studying the virulence function of TAL effectors. TALgetter is implemented as part of the open-source Java library

  5. SNARC Effect in Different Effectors.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Philipp N; Fiehler, Katja; Bremmer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The SNARC (spatial numerical association of response codes) effect, indicating that subjects react faster to the left for small numbers and to the right for large numbers, is used as evidence for the idea that humans use space to organize number representations. Previous studies compared the SNARC effect across sensory modalities within participants and concluded modality independence. So far, it is unknown what sensory-to-motor mappings are involved in generating the SNARC effect and whether these mappings are identical for different effectors within subjects. Hence, we tested whether the SNARC effect is effector specific. Participants performed an auditory parity judgment task and responded with three different effectors: finger (button release), eyes (saccades), and arm (pointing). The SNARC effect occurred in each effector but varied in strength across the effectors. Across subjects, we found a significant correlation of SNARC strength for finger and arm responses suggesting the use of a shared sensory-to-motor mapping. SNARC strength did not correlate, however, between finger and eyes or arm and eyes. An additional statistical analysis based on conditional probabilities provided further evidence for SNARC-effector specificity. Taken together, our results suggest that the sensory-to-motor mapping is not as tight as it would be expected if the SNARC effect was effector independent.

  6. The DNA Binding Domain of a Papillomavirus E2 Protein Programs a Chimeric Nuclease To Cleave Integrated Human Papillomavirus DNA in HeLa Cervical Carcinoma Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Stacy M.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Viral DNA binding proteins that direct nucleases or other protein domains to viral DNA in lytically or latently infected cells may provide a novel approach to modulate viral gene expression or replication. Cervical carcinogenesis is initiated by high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and viral DNA persists in the cancer cells. To test whether a DNA binding domain of a papillomavirus protein can direct a nuclease domain to cleave HPV DNA in cervical cancer cells, we fused the DNA binding domain of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1) E2 protein to the catalytic domain of the FokI restriction endonuclease, generating a BPV1 E2-FokI chimeric nuclease (BEF). BEF introduced DNA double-strand breaks on both sides of an E2 binding site in vitro, whereas DNA binding or catalytic mutants of BEF did not. After expression of BEF in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells, we detected cleavage at E2 binding sites in the integrated HPV18 DNA in these cells and also at an E2 binding site in cellular DNA. BEF-expressing cells underwent senescence, which required the DNA binding activity of BEF, but not its nuclease activity. These results demonstrate that DNA binding domains of viral proteins can target effector molecules to cognate binding sites in virally infected cells. PMID:17392356

  7. A ligation-independent cloning technique for high-throughput assembly of transcription activator–like effector genes.

    PubMed

    Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L; Schmidt, Tobias; Kaiser, Vera; Höning, Klara; Hornung, Veit

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator–like (TAL) effector proteins derived from Xanthomonas species have emerged as versatile scaffolds for engineering DNA-binding proteins of user-defined specificity and functionality. Here we describe a rapid, simple, ligation-independent cloning (LIC) technique for synthesis of TAL effector genes. Our approach is based on a library of DNA constructs encoding individual TAL effector repeat unit combinations that can be processed to contain long, unique single-stranded DNA overhangs suitable for LIC. Assembly of TAL effector arrays requires only the combinatorial mixing of fluids and has exceptional fidelity. TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) produced by this method had high genome-editing activity at endogenous loci in HEK 293T cells (64% were active). To maximize throughput, we generated a comprehensive 5-mer TAL effector repeat unit fragment library that allows automated assembly of >600 TALEN genes in a single day. Given its simplicity, throughput and fidelity, LIC assembly will permit the generation of TAL effector gene libraries for large-scale functional genomics studies.

  8. Rapid qualitative method for detecting staphylococcal nuclease in foods.

    PubMed Central

    Koupal, A; Deibel, R H

    1978-01-01

    A rapid method for the detection of heat-stable staphylococcal nuclease in foods is described. The procedure consists of an acid precipitation, boiling, and centrifugation followed by enzyme detection in an agar plate containing deoxyribonucleic acid. To test the efficacy of the procedure, purified Staphylococcus aureus nuclease was added to various foods and recovery experiments were performed. Additionally, foods were inoculated and incubated with S. aureus, and the staphylococcal counts were compared with nuclease activity. The results indicate that the procedure possesses merit for a rapid method that can be incorporated into quality control programs. The procedure requires approximately 2.5 h, and it will detect nuclease levels as low as 10 ng/g of food. Images PMID:677882

  9. Catalytic activity of nuclease P1: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Falcone, J.M.; Shibata, M.; Box, H.C.

    1994-10-01

    Nuclease P1 from Penicillium citrinum is a zinc dependent glyco-enzyme that recognizes single stranded DNA and RNA as substrates and hydrolyzes the phosphate ester bond. Nuclease Pl seems to recognize particular conformations of the phosphodiester backbone and shows significant variation in the rate of hydrolytic activity depending upon which nucleosides are coupled by the phosphodiester bond. The efficiency of nuclease Pl in hydrolyzing the phosphodiester bonds of a substrate can be altered by modifications to one of the substrate bases induced by ionizing radiation or oxidative stress. Measurements have been made of the effect of several radiation induced lesions on the catalytic rate of nuclease Pl. A model of the structure of the enzyme has been constructed in order to better understand the binding and activity of this enzyme on various ssDNA substrates.

  10. Targeted mutagenesis of zebrafish: use of zinc finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Leong, Ivone Un San; Lai, Daniel; Lan, Chuan-Ching; Johnson, Ross; Love, Donald R; Johnson, Ross; Love, Donald R

    2011-09-01

    The modeling of human disease in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) is moving away from chemical mutagensis and transient downregulation using morpholino oligomers to more targeted and stable transgenic methods. In this respect, zinc finger nucleases offer a means of introducing mutations at targeted sites at high efficiency. We describe here the development of zinc finger nucleases and their general use in model systems with a focus on the zebrafish.

  11. Disruption of the Membrane Nuclease Gene (MBOVPG45_0215) of Mycoplasma bovis Greatly Reduces Cellular Nuclease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shukriti; Tivendale, Kelly A.; Markham, Philip F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although the complete genome sequences of three strains of Mycoplasma bovis are available, few studies have examined gene function in this important pathogen. Mycoplasmas lack the biosynthetic machinery for the de novo synthesis of nucleic acid precursors, so nucleases are likely to be essential for them to acquire nucleotide precursors. Three putative membrane nucleases have been annotated in the genome of M. bovis strain PG45, MBOVPG45_0089 and MBOVPG45_0310, both of which have the thermonuclease (TNASE_3) functional domain, and MBOVPG45_0215 (mnuA), which has an exonuclease/endonuclease/phosphatase domain. While previous studies have demonstrated the function of TNASE_3 domain nucleases in several mycoplasmas, quantitative comparisons of the contributions of different nucleases to cellular nuclease activity have been lacking. Mapping of a library of 319 transposon mutants of M. bovis PG45 by direct genome sequencing identified mutants with insertions in MBOVPG45_0310 (the Δ0310 mutant) and MBOVPG45_0215 (the Δ0215 mutant). In this study, the detection of the product of MBOVPG45_0215 in the Triton X-114 fraction of M. bovis cell lysates, its cell surface exposure, and its predicted signal peptide suggested that it is a surface-exposed lipoprotein nuclease. Comparison of a ΔmnuA mutant with wild-type M. bovis on native and denatured DNA gels and in digestion assays using double-stranded phage λ DNA and closed circular plasmid DNA demonstrated that inactivation of this gene abolishes most of the cellular exonuclease and endonuclease activity of M. bovis. This activity could be fully restored by complementation with the wild-type mnuA gene, demonstrating that MnuA is the major cellular nuclease of M. bovis. IMPORTANCE Nucleases are thought to be important contributors to virulence and crucial for the maintenance of a nutritional supply of nucleotides in mycoplasmas that are pathogenic in animals. This study demonstrates for the first time that of the

  12. Probing the initiation and effector phases of the somatic piRNA pathway in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Astrid D.; Fenoglio, Silvia; Muerdter, Felix; Guzzardo, Paloma M.; Czech, Benjamin; Pappin, Darryl J.; Chen, Caifu; Gordon, Assaf; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Combining RNAi in cultured cells and analysis of mutant animals, we probed the roles of known Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway components in the initiation and effector phases of transposon silencing. Squash associated physically with Piwi, and reductions in its expression led to modest transposon derepression without effects on piRNAs, consistent with an effector role. Alterations in Zucchini or Armitage reduced both Piwi protein and piRNAs, indicating functions in the formation of a stable Piwi RISC (RNA-induced silencing complex). Notably, loss of Zucchini or mutations within its catalytic domain led to accumulation of unprocessed precursor transcripts from flamenco, consistent with a role for this putative nuclease in piRNA biogenesis. PMID:20966049

  13. QueTAL: a suite of tools to classify and compare TAL effectors functionally and phylogenetically

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Quintero, Alvaro L.; Lamy, Léo; Gordon, Jonathan L.; Escalon, Aline; Cunnac, Sébastien; Szurek, Boris; Gagnevin, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Transcription Activator-Like (TAL) effectors from Xanthomonas plant pathogenic bacteria can bind to the promoter region of plant genes and induce their expression. DNA-binding specificity is governed by a central domain made of nearly identical repeats, each determining the recognition of one base pair via two amino acid residues (a.k.a. Repeat Variable Di-residue, or RVD). Knowing how TAL effectors differ from each other within and between strains would be useful to infer functional and evolutionary relationships, but their repetitive nature precludes reliable use of traditional alignment methods. The suite QueTAL was therefore developed to offer tailored tools for comparison of TAL effector genes. The program DisTAL considers each repeat as a unit, transforms a TAL effector sequence into a sequence of coded repeats and makes pair-wise alignments between these coded sequences to construct trees. The program FuncTAL is aimed at finding TAL effectors with similar DNA-binding capabilities. It calculates correlations between position weight matrices of potential target DNA sequence predicted from the RVD sequence, and builds trees based on these correlations. The programs accurately represented phylogenetic and functional relationships between TAL effectors using either simulated or literature-curated data. When using the programs on a large set of TAL effector sequences, the DisTAL tree largely reflected the expected species phylogeny. In contrast, FuncTAL showed that TAL effectors with similar binding capabilities can be found between phylogenetically distant taxa. This suite will help users to rapidly analyse any TAL effector genes of interest and compare them to other available TAL genes and should improve our understanding of TAL effectors evolution. It is available at http://bioinfo-web.mpl.ird.fr/cgi-bin2/quetal/quetal.cgi. PMID:26284082

  14. Oomycetes, effectors, and all that jazz.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Tolga O; Schornack, Sebastian; Banfield, Mark J; Kamoun, Sophien

    2012-08-01

    Plant pathogenic oomycetes secrete a diverse repertoire of effector proteins that modulate host innate immunity and enable parasitic infection. Understanding how effectors evolve, translocate and traffic inside host cells, and perturb host processes are major themes in the study of oomycete-plant interactions. The last year has seen important progress in the study of oomycete effectors with, notably, the elucidation of the 3D structures of five RXLR effectors, and novel insights into how cytoplasmic effectors subvert host cells. In this review, we discuss these and other recent advances and highlight the most important open questions in oomycete effector biology.

  15. Effector proteins of rust fungi

    PubMed Central

    Petre, Benjamin; Joly, David L.; Duplessis, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi include many species that are devastating crop pathogens. To develop resistant plants, a better understanding of rust virulence factors, or effector proteins, is needed. Thus far, only six rust effector proteins have been described: AvrP123, AvrP4, AvrL567, AvrM, RTP1, and PGTAUSPE-10-1. Although some are well established model proteins used to investigate mechanisms of immune receptor activation (avirulence activities) or entry into plant cells, how they work inside host tissues to promote fungal growth remains unknown. The genome sequences of four rust fungi (two Melampsoraceae and two Pucciniaceae) have been analyzed so far. Genome-wide analyses of these species, as well as transcriptomics performed on a broader range of rust fungi, revealed hundreds of small secreted proteins considered as rust candidate secreted effector proteins (CSEPs). The rust community now needs high-throughput approaches (effectoromics) to accelerate effector discovery/characterization and to better understand how they function in planta. However, this task is challenging due to the non-amenability of rust pathosystems (obligate biotrophs infecting crop plants) to traditional molecular genetic approaches mainly due to difficulties in culturing these species in vitro. The use of heterologous approaches should be promoted in the future. PMID:25191335

  16. Improving a Gripper End Effector

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, O Dennis; Smith, Christopher M.; Gervais, Kevin L.

    2001-01-31

    This paper discusses the improvement made to an existing four-bar linkage gripping end effector to adapt it for use in a current project. The actuating linkage was modified to yield higher jaw force overall and particularly in the critical range of jaw displacement

  17. Hybrid nanosensor for colorimetric and ultrasensitive detection of nuclease contaminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecere, Paola; Valentini, Paola; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Nucleases are ubiquitous enzymes that degrade DNA or RNA, thus they can prejudice the good outcome of molecular biology experiments involving nucleic acids. We propose a colorimetric test for the naked-eye detection of nuclease contaminations. The system uses an hybrid nanosensor, based on gold nanoparticles functionalized with DNA probes. Our assay is rapid, instrument-free, simple and low-cost. Moreover, it reaches sensitivity equal or better than those of commercial kits, and presents a lot of advantageous aspects. Therefore, it is very competitive, with a real market potential. This test will be relevant in routine process monitoring in scientific laboratories, and in quality control in clinical laboratories and industrial processes, allowing the simultaneous detection of nucleases with different substrate specificities and large-scale screening.

  18. NMR analysis of staphylococcal nuclease thermal quench refolding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kautz, R A; Fox, R O

    1993-05-01

    Thermally unfolded staphylococcal nuclease has been rapidly quenched to temperatures near 0 degree C and the refolding behavior examined using an NMR kinetic experiment. Unfolded protein, exhibiting random coil chemical shifts, persists following the quench and refolds in two distinct kinetic phases. A protein folding intermediate with a trans Lys 116-Pro 117 peptide bond is transiently overpopulated and relaxes to the predominantly cis native cis-trans equilibrium. The rate of trans-->cis isomerization in the native-like nuclease intermediate is approximately 100-fold faster than that observed in a Lys-Pro model peptide. The activation enthalpy of 20 kcal/mol observed for the nuclease Lys 116-Pro 117 peptide bond is comparable to that observed for other X-Pro isomerizations.

  19. The type III effectors of Xanthomonas.

    PubMed

    White, Frank F; Potnis, Neha; Jones, Jeffrey B; Koebnik, Ralf

    2009-11-01

    A review of type III effectors (T3 effectors) from strains of Xanthomonas reveals a growing list of candidate and known effectors based on functional assays and sequence and structural similarity searches of genomic data. We propose that the effectors and suspected effectors should be distributed into 39 so-called Xop groups reflecting sequence similarity. Some groups have structural motifs for putative enzymatic functions, and recent studies have provided considerable insight into the interaction with host factors in their function as mediators of virulence and elicitors of resistance for a few specific T3 effectors. Many groups are related to T3 effectors of plant and animal pathogenic bacteria, and several groups appear to have been exploited primarily by Xanthomonas species based on available data. At the same time, a relatively large number of candidate effectors remain to be examined in more detail with regard to their function within host cells.

  20. Engineering nucleases for gene targeting: safety and regulatory considerations.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Katia; Podevin, Nancy; Breyer, Didier; Carroll, Dana; Herman, Philippe

    2014-01-25

    Nuclease-based gene targeting (NBGT) represents a significant breakthrough in targeted genome editing since it is applicable from single-celled protozoa to human, including several species of economic importance. Along with the fast progress in NBGT and the increasing availability of customized nucleases, more data are available about off-target effects associated with the use of this approach. We discuss how NBGT may offer a new perspective for genetic modification, we address some aspects crucial for a safety improvement of the corresponding techniques and we also briefly relate the use of NBGT applications and products to the regulatory oversight.

  1. EffectorP: predicting fungal effector proteins from secretomes using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Sperschneider, Jana; Gardiner, Donald M; Dodds, Peter N; Tini, Francesco; Covarelli, Lorenzo; Singh, Karam B; Manners, John M; Taylor, Jennifer M

    2016-04-01

    Eukaryotic filamentous plant pathogens secrete effector proteins that modulate the host cell to facilitate infection. Computational effector candidate identification and subsequent functional characterization delivers valuable insights into plant-pathogen interactions. However, effector prediction in fungi has been challenging due to a lack of unifying sequence features such as conserved N-terminal sequence motifs. Fungal effectors are commonly predicted from secretomes based on criteria such as small size and cysteine-rich, which suffers from poor accuracy. We present EffectorP which pioneers the application of machine learning to fungal effector prediction. EffectorP improves fungal effector prediction from secretomes based on a robust signal of sequence-derived properties, achieving sensitivity and specificity of over 80%. Features that discriminate fungal effectors from secreted noneffectors are predominantly sequence length, molecular weight and protein net charge, as well as cysteine, serine and tryptophan content. We demonstrate that EffectorP is powerful when combined with in planta expression data for predicting high-priority effector candidates. EffectorP is the first prediction program for fungal effectors based on machine learning. Our findings will facilitate functional fungal effector studies and improve our understanding of effectors in plant-pathogen interactions. EffectorP is available at http://effectorp.csiro.au.

  2. TAL effectors and activation of predicted host targets distinguish Asian from African strains of the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola while strict conservation suggests universal importance of five TAL effectors.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Katherine E; Booher, Nicholas J; Wang, Li; Bogdanove, Adam J

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) causes the increasingly important disease bacterial leaf streak of rice (BLS) in part by type III delivery of repeat-rich transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors to upregulate host susceptibility genes. By pathogen whole genome, single molecule, real-time sequencing and host RNA sequencing, we compared TAL effector content and rice transcriptional responses across 10 geographically diverse Xoc strains. TAL effector content is surprisingly conserved overall, yet distinguishes Asian from African isolates. Five TAL effectors are conserved across all strains. In a prior laboratory assay in rice cv. Nipponbare, only two contributed to virulence in strain BLS256 but the strict conservation indicates all five may be important, in different rice genotypes or in the field. Concatenated and aligned, TAL effector content across strains largely reflects relationships based on housekeeping genes, suggesting predominantly vertical transmission. Rice transcriptional responses did not reflect these relationships, and on average, only 28% of genes upregulated and 22% of genes downregulated by a strain are up- and down- regulated (respectively) by all strains. However, when only known TAL effector targets were considered, the relationships resembled those of the TAL effectors. Toward identifying new targets, we used the TAL effector-DNA recognition code to predict effector binding elements in promoters of genes upregulated by each strain, but found that for every strain, all upregulated genes had at least one. Filtering with a classifier we developed previously decreases the number of predicted binding elements across the genome, suggesting that it may reduce false positives among upregulated genes. Applying this filter and eliminating genes for which upregulation did not strictly correlate with presence of the corresponding TAL effector, we generated testable numbers of candidate targets for four of the five strictly conserved TAL

  3. TAL effectors and activation of predicted host targets distinguish Asian from African strains of the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola while strict conservation suggests universal importance of five TAL effectors

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Katherine E.; Booher, Nicholas J.; Wang, Li; Bogdanove, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) causes the increasingly important disease bacterial leaf streak of rice (BLS) in part by type III delivery of repeat-rich transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors to upregulate host susceptibility genes. By pathogen whole genome, single molecule, real-time sequencing and host RNA sequencing, we compared TAL effector content and rice transcriptional responses across 10 geographically diverse Xoc strains. TAL effector content is surprisingly conserved overall, yet distinguishes Asian from African isolates. Five TAL effectors are conserved across all strains. In a prior laboratory assay in rice cv. Nipponbare, only two contributed to virulence in strain BLS256 but the strict conservation indicates all five may be important, in different rice genotypes or in the field. Concatenated and aligned, TAL effector content across strains largely reflects relationships based on housekeeping genes, suggesting predominantly vertical transmission. Rice transcriptional responses did not reflect these relationships, and on average, only 28% of genes upregulated and 22% of genes downregulated by a strain are up- and down- regulated (respectively) by all strains. However, when only known TAL effector targets were considered, the relationships resembled those of the TAL effectors. Toward identifying new targets, we used the TAL effector-DNA recognition code to predict effector binding elements in promoters of genes upregulated by each strain, but found that for every strain, all upregulated genes had at least one. Filtering with a classifier we developed previously decreases the number of predicted binding elements across the genome, suggesting that it may reduce false positives among upregulated genes. Applying this filter and eliminating genes for which upregulation did not strictly correlate with presence of the corresponding TAL effector, we generated testable numbers of candidate targets for four of the five strictly conserved TAL

  4. Induction of double-strand breaks by S1 nuclease, mung bean nuclease and nuclease P1 in DNA containing abasic sites and nicks.

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, M A; Weinfeld, M

    1995-01-01

    Defined DNA substrates containing discrete abasic sites or paired abasic sites set 1, 3, 5 and 7 bases apart on opposite strands were constructed to examine the reactivity of S1, mung bean and P1 nucleases towards abasic sites. None of the enzymes acted on the substrate containing discrete abasic sites. Under conditions where little or no non-specific DNA degradation was observed, all three nucleases were able to generate double-strand breaks when the bistranded abasic sites were 1 and 3 base pairs apart. However, when the abasic sites were further apart, the enzymes again failed to cleave the DNA. These results indicate that single abasic sites do not cause sufficient denaturation of the DNA to allow incision by these single-strand specific endonucleases. The reactivity of these enzymes was also investigated on DNA substrates that were nicked by DNasel or more site-specifically by endonuclease III incision at the discrete abasic sites. The three nucleases readily induced a strand break opposite such nicks. Images PMID:7479020

  5. Purification, cloning, and characterization of the CEL I nuclease.

    PubMed

    Yang, B; Wen, X; Kodali, N S; Oleykowski, C A; Miller, C G; Kulinski, J; Besack, D; Yeung, J A; Kowalski, D; Yeung, A T

    2000-04-04

    CEL I, isolated from celery, is the first eukaryotic nuclease known that cleaves DNA with high specificity at sites of base-substitution mismatch and DNA distortion. The enzyme requires Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) for activity, with a pH optimum at neutral pH. We have purified CEL I 33 000-fold to apparent homogeneity. A key improvement is the use of alpha-methyl-mannoside in the purification buffers to overcome the aggregation of glycoproteins with endogenous lectins. The SDS gel electrophoresis band for the homogeneous CEL I, with and without the removal of its carbohydrate moieties, was extracted, renatured, and shown to have mismatch cutting specificity. After determination of the amino acid sequence of 28% of the CEL I polypeptide, we cloned the CEL I cDNA. Potential orthologs are nucleases putatively encoded by the genes BFN1 of Arabidopsis, ZEN1 of Zinnia, and DSA6 of daylily. Homologies of CEL I with S1 and P1 nucleases are much lower. We propose that CEL I exemplifies a new family of neutral pH optimum, magnesium-stimulated, mismatch duplex-recognizing nucleases, within the S1 superfamily.

  6. Nucleases from Prevotella intermedia can degrade neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Doke, M; Fukamachi, H; Morisaki, H; Arimoto, T; Kataoka, H; Kuwata, H

    2016-08-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease caused by periodontal bacteria in subgingival plaque. These bacteria are able to colonize the periodontal region by evading the host immune response. Neutrophils, the host's first line of defense against infection, use various strategies to kill invading pathogens, including neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These are extracellular net-like fibers comprising DNA and antimicrobial components such as histones, LL-37, defensins, myeloperoxidase, and neutrophil elastase from neutrophils that disarm and kill bacteria extracellularly. Bacterial nuclease degrades the NETs to escape NET killing. It has now been shown that extracellular nucleases enable bacteria to evade this host antimicrobial mechanism, leading to increased pathogenicity. Here, we compared the DNA degradation activity of major Gram-negative periodontopathogenic bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. We found that Pr. intermedia showed the highest DNA degradation activity. A genome search of Pr. intermedia revealed the presence of two genes, nucA and nucD, putatively encoding secreted nucleases, although their enzymatic and biological activities are unknown. We cloned nucA- and nucD-encoding nucleases from Pr. intermedia ATCC 25611 and characterized their gene products. Recombinant NucA and NucD digested DNA and RNA, which required both Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) for optimal activity. In addition, NucA and NucD were able to degrade the DNA matrix comprising NETs.

  7. Functional genetics for all: engineered nucleases, CRISPR and the gene editing revolution.

    PubMed

    Gilles, Anna F; Averof, Michalis

    2014-01-01

    Developmental biology, as all experimental science, is empowered by technological advances. The availability of genetic tools in some species - designated as model organisms - has driven their use as major platforms for understanding development, physiology and behavior. Extending these tools to a wider range of species determines whether (and how) we can experimentally approach developmental diversity and evolution. During the last two decades, comparative developmental biology (evo-devo) was marked by the introduction of gene knockdown and deep sequencing technologies that are applicable to a wide range of species. These approaches allowed us to test the developmental role of specific genes in diverse species, to study biological processes that are not accessible in established models and, in some cases, to conduct genome-wide screens that overcome the limitations of the candidate gene approach. The recent discovery of CRISPR/Cas as a means of precise alterations into the genome promises to revolutionize developmental genetics. In this review we describe the development of gene editing tools, from zinc-finger nucleases to TALENs and CRISPR, and examine their application in gene targeting, their limitations and the opportunities they present for evo-devo. We outline their use in gene knock-out and knock-in approaches, and in manipulating gene functions by directing molecular effectors to specific sites in the genome. The ease-of-use and efficiency of CRISPR in diverse species provide an opportunity to close the technology gap that exists between established model organisms and emerging genetically-tractable species.

  8. Transposons to toxins: the provenance, architecture and diversification of a widespread class of eukaryotic effectors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dapeng; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Vidal, Newton D.; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Aravind, L.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymatic effectors targeting nucleic acids, proteins and other cellular components are the mainstay of conflicts across life forms. Using comparative genomics we identify a large class of eukaryotic proteins, which include effectors from oomycetes, fungi and other parasites. The majority of these proteins have a characteristic domain architecture with one of several N-terminal ‘Header’ domains, which are predicted to play a role in trafficking of these effectors, including a novel version of the Ubiquitin fold. The Headers are followed by one or more diverse C-terminal domains, such as restriction endonuclease (REase), protein kinase, HNH endonuclease, LK-nuclease (a RNase) and multiple distinct peptidase domains, which are predicted to carry their toxicity determinants. The most common types of these proteins appear to have originated from prokaryotic transposases (e.g. TN7 and Mu) and combine a CDC6/ORC1-STAND clade NTPase domain with a C-terminal REase domain. Other than the so-called Crinkler effectors of oomycetes and fungi, these effectors are encoded by other eukaryotic parasites such as trypanosomatids (the RHS proteins) and the rhizarian Plasmodiophora, and symbionts like Capsaspora. Remarkably, we also find these proteins in free-living eukaryotes, including several viridiplantae, fungi, amoebozoans and animals. These versions might either still be transposons or function in other poorly understood eukaryote-specific inter-organismal and inter-genomic conflicts. These include the Medea1 selfish element of Tribolium that spreads via post-zygotic killing. We present a unified mechanism for the recombination-dependent diversification and action of this widespread class of molecular weaponry deployed across diverse conflicts ranging from parasitic to free-living forms. PMID:27060143

  9. Marker for type VI secretion system effectors

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Dor; Kinch, Lisa N.; Trudgian, David C.; Guo, Xiaofeng; Klimko, John A.; Grishin, Nick V.; Mirzaei, Hamid; Orth, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria use diverse mechanisms to kill, manipulate, and compete with other cells. The recently discovered type VI secretion system (T6SS) is widespread in bacterial pathogens and used to deliver virulence effector proteins into target cells. Using comparative proteomics, we identified two previously unidentified T6SS effectors that contained a conserved motif. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that this N-terminal motif, named MIX (marker for type six effectors), is found in numerous polymorphic bacterial proteins that are primarily located in the T6SS genome neighborhood. We demonstrate that several MIX-containing proteins are T6SS effectors and that they are not required for T6SS activity. Thus, we propose that MIX-containing proteins are T6SS effectors. Our findings allow for the identification of numerous uncharacterized T6SS effectors that will undoubtedly lead to the discovery of new biological mechanisms. PMID:24927539

  10. Space Station end effector strategy study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzberg, Stephen J.; Jensen, Robert L.; Willshire, Kelli F.; Satterthwaite, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a study are presented for terminology definition, identification of functional requirements, technolgy assessment, and proposed end effector development strategies for the Space Station Program. The study is composed of a survey of available or under-developed end effector technology, identification of requirements from baselined Space Station documents, a comparative assessment of the match between technology and requirements, and recommended strategies for end effector development for the Space Station Program.

  11. Mechanism for nuclease regulation in RecBCD

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Martin; Chaban, Yuriy; Wigley, Dale B

    2016-01-01

    In bacterial cells, processing of double-stranded DNA breaks for repair by homologous recombination is catalysed by AddAB, AdnAB or RecBCD-type helicase-nucleases. These enzyme complexes are highly processive, duplex unwinding and degrading machines that require tight regulation. Here, we report the structure of E.coli RecBCD, determined by cryoEM at 3.8 Å resolution, with a DNA substrate that reveals how the nuclease activity of the complex is activated once unwinding progresses. Extension of the 5’-tail of the unwound duplex induces a large conformational change in the RecD subunit, that is transferred through the RecC subunit to activate the nuclease domain of the RecB subunit. The process involves a SH3 domain that binds to a region of the RecB subunit in a binding mode that is distinct from others observed previously in SH3 domains and, to our knowledge, this is the first example of peptide-binding of an SH3 domain in a bacterial system. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18227.001 PMID:27644322

  12. Safety evaluation of nuclease P1 from Penicillium citrinum.

    PubMed

    Okado, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Kazushige; Mizuhashi, Fukutaro; Lynch, Barry S; Vo, Trung D; Roberts, Ashley S

    2016-02-01

    Nuclease P1 has been widely used in the food industry to enhance or create flavor. One commercial source of this enzyme is Penicillium citrinum, an anamorphic mesophilic fungus with a long history of safe use in Europe and Asia as a fermentation organism used in the production of ribonucleases. Given the intended use in food for human consumption, and noting its potential presence at trace levels in finished products, a series of safety studies including an in vitro Ames and chromosome aberration assay, an in vivo rat erythrocyte micronucleus assay and a 90-day oral toxicity study in rats were conducted. No mutagenic activity was observed in the Ames assay. Equivocal activity in the chromosome aberration assay was not replicated in the micronucleus assay at doses of up to 1007 mg total organic solids (TOS)/kg body weight (bw)/day. Following oral administration of nuclease P1 at dosages of 10.1, 101 or 1007 mg TOS/kg bw/day to Sprague-Dawley rats, no adverse effects on any study parameter were observed. The no-observed-adverse-effect level was considered to be 1007 mg TOS/kg bw/day. The results of the genotoxicity studies and subchronic rat study support the safe use in food production of nuclease P1 produced from P. citrinum.

  13. Nanoplasmonic molecular ruler for nuclease activity and DNAfootprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Fanqing Frank; Liu, Gang L.; Yin, Yadong; Gerion, Daniele; Kunchakarra, Siri; Mukherjee, Bipasha; Jett, Stephen D.; Bear, David G.; Alivisatos, Paul; Lee, Luke P.

    2006-08-15

    We have constructed a nanoplasmonic molecular ruler, which can perform label-free and real-time monitoring of DNA length changes and perform DNA footprinting. The ruler was created by tethering double-stranded DNA to single Au nanoparticles. The scattering spectra of Au-DNA nanoconjugates showed red-shifted peak plasmon resonance wavelength dependent on DNA length, which can be measured with sub-nanometer axial resolution, averaging {approx}1.24 nm peak wavelength shift per DNA base pair. The spectra of individual Au-DNA nanoconjugates in the presence of nuclease showed a time-resolved dependence on the reaction dynamics, allowing quantitative, kinetic and real-time measurement of nuclease activity. The ruler was further developed into a new DNA footprinting platform. We showed the specific binding of a protein to DNA and the accurate mapping of its footprint. This work promises a very fast and convenient platform for mapping DNA-protein interactions, for nuclease activity monitoring, and for other DNA size-based methods.

  14. Phylogenomic analysis of the GIY-YIG nuclease superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Feder, Marcin; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2006-01-01

    Background The GIY-YIG domain was initially identified in homing endonucleases and later in other selfish mobile genetic elements (including restriction enzymes and non-LTR retrotransposons) and in enzymes involved in DNA repair and recombination. However, to date no systematic search for novel members of the GIY-YIG superfamily or comparative analysis of these enzymes has been reported. Results We carried out database searches to identify all members of known GIY-YIG nuclease families. Multiple sequence alignments together with predicted secondary structures of identified families were represented as Hidden Markov Models (HMM) and compared by the HHsearch method to the uncharacterized protein families gathered in the COG, KOG, and PFAM databases. This analysis allowed for extending the GIY-YIG superfamily to include members of COG3680 and a number of proteins not classified in COGs and to predict that these proteins may function as nucleases, potentially involved in DNA recombination and/or repair. Finally, all old and new members of the GIY-YIG superfamily were compared and analyzed to infer the phylogenetic tree. Conclusion An evolutionary classification of the GIY-YIG superfamily is presented for the very first time, along with the structural annotation of all (sub)families. It provides a comprehensive picture of sequence-structure-function relationships in this superfamily of nucleases, which will help to design experiments to study the mechanism of action of known members (especially the uncharacterized ones) and will facilitate the prediction of function for the newly discovered ones. PMID:16646971

  15. Orbital maneuvering vehicle end effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Forbes, John C. (Inventor); Barnes, Wayne L. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An end effector device (A) for grasping and holding an article such as a handle (18) of a space telescope is disclosed. The device includes a V-shaped capture window (74) defined as inclined surfaces (76, 78) in parallel face plates (22, 24) which converge toward a retainer recess (54) in which the handle is retained. A pivotal finger (30) meshes with a pair of pivoted fingers (26, 28) which rotate in counterrotation. The fingers rotate to pull a handle within the capture window into recess (54) where latches (50) lock handle (18) in the recess. To align the capture window, plates (22, 24) may be cocked plus or minus five degrees on base (64).

  16. DNA nuclease activity of Rev-coupled transition metal chelates.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Jeff C; Keuper, Kevin D; Cowan, J A

    2012-06-07

    Artificial nucleases containing Rev-coupled metal chelates based on combinations of the transition metals Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Cu(2+) and the chelators DOTA, DTPA, EDTA, NTA, tripeptide GGH, and tetrapeptide KGHK have been tested for DNA nuclease activity. Originally designed to target reactive transition metal chelates (M-chelates) to the HIV-1 Rev response element mRNA, attachment to the arginine-rich Rev peptide also increases DNA-binding affinity for the attached M-chelates. Apparent K(D) values ranging from 1.7 to 3.6 µM base pairs for binding of supercoiled pUC19 plasmid DNA by Ni-chelate-Rev complexes were observed, as a result of electrostatic attraction between the positively-charged Rev peptide and negatively-charged DNA. Attachment of M-chelates to the Rev peptide resulted in enhancements of DNA nuclease activity ranging from 1-fold (no enhancement) to at least 13-fold (for Cu-DTPA-Rev), for the rate of DNA nicking, with second order rate constants for conversion of DNA(supercoiled) to DNA(nicked) up to 6 × 10(6) M(-1) min(-1), and for conversion of DNA(nicked) to DNA(linear) up to 1 × 10(5) M(-1) min(-1). Freifelder-Trumbo analysis and the ratios of linearization and nicking rate constants (k(lin)/k(nick)) revealed concerted mechanisms for nicking and subsequent linearization of plasmid DNA for all of the Rev-coupled M-chelates, consistent with higher DNA residency times for the Rev-coupled M-chelates. Observed rates for Rev-coupled M-chelates were less skewed by differing DNA-binding affinities than for M-chelates lacking Rev, as a result of the narrow range of DNA-binding affinities observed, and therefore relationships between DNA nuclease activity and other catalyst properties, such as coordination unsaturation, the ability to consume ascorbic acid and generate diffusible radicals, and the identity of the metal center, are now clearly illustrated in light of the similar DNA-binding affinities of all M-chelate-Rev complexes. This work

  17. 203 SINGLE-STEP GENE EDITING OF 3 XENOANTIGENS IN PORCINE FIBROBLASTS USING PROGRAMMABLE NUCLEASES.

    PubMed

    Perota, A; Lagutina, I; Quadalti, C; Duchi, R; Turini, P; Crotti, G; Colleoni, S; Conchon, S; Concordet, J-P; Lazzari, G; Soulillou, J-P; Galli, C

    2016-01-01

    Programmable nucleases (ZFN, Tal Effector Nucleases, and CRISPR) opened a new era for mammal genome editing, in particular for the pigs used for xenotransplantation. Multiple gene editing events are required both for knockout (KO) of xenoantigens and for targeted integration of human protective genes (Perota et al. 2016 J. Genet. Genomics 43, 233-23). The objective of the present work was to edit selected pig lines to KO the enzymes coding for the most relevant xenoantigens (i.e. GGTA1, CMAH, and B4GalNT2), combining Talens and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies to magnetic beads selection (Li et al. 2013 Xenotransplantation 22, 20-31). Primary porcine adult fibroblasts were transfected using Nucleofector (V-024 program). In a single reaction 2×10(6) fibroblasts were co-transfected using 2 different sets of TALENS (4μg/set) specific for CMAH (Conchon et al., 2013) and GGTA1 (Perota et al., 2015) genes together with B4GalNT2-specific CRISPR/Cas9 expression vector (2μg; pX330-B4GalNT2; Estrada et al., 2015). Eight days post-transfection (DPT), Gal-/- cells were selected initially using biotin-conjugated IB4 lectin (Sigma, St. Louis, MO, USA) and magnetic beads (Dynabeads M-280, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA, USA). The selected cells were then plated on 150-mm Petri dishes (200 cells/dish) and cultured for 10 days. Selected colonies were expanded for PCR analysis and cryopreserved for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). All colonies were analysed by PCR for CMAH gene and their resulting products were digested with HindIII (HindIII-RFLP). Colonies that lost wild-type HindIII as a consequence of Talens effected deletion were PCR characterised for GGTA1, selecting those that had detectable Indels after gel electrophoresis and finally analysed by PCR for B4GalNT2. All PCR products were validated by sequencing for all the 3 genes of interest (TopoTA, Thermo Fisher Scientific). Selected colonies were used as nuclear donors for SCNT (Lagutina et al., 2006). Eight DPT we

  18. ROBOTIC TANK INSPECTION END EFFECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel Landry

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this contract between Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) was to provide a tool for the DOE to inspect the inside tank walls of underground radioactive waste storage tanks in their tank farms. Some of these tanks are suspected to have leaks, but the harsh nature of the environment within the tanks precludes human inspection of tank walls. As a result of these conditions only a few inspection methods can fulfill this task. Of the methods available, OSS chose to pursue Alternating Current Field Measurement (ACFM), because it does not require clean surfaces for inspection, nor any contact with the Surface being inspected, and introduces no extra by-products in the inspection process (no coupling fluids or residues are left behind). The tool produced by OSS is the Robotic Tank Inspection End Effector (RTIEE), which is initially deployed on the tip of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA). The RTEE combines ACFM with a color video camera for both electromagnetic and visual inspection The complete package consists of an end effector, its corresponding electronics and software, and a user's manual to guide the operator through an inspection. The system has both coarse and fine inspection modes and allows the user to catalog defects and suspected areas of leakage in a database for further examination, which may lead to emptying the tank for repair, decommissioning, etc.. The following is an updated report to OSS document OSS-21100-7002, which was submitted in 1995. During the course of the contract, two related subtasks arose, the Wall and Coating Thickness Sensor and the Vacuum Scarifying and Sampling Tool Assembly. The first of these subtasks was intended to evaluate the corrosion and wall thinning of 55-gallon steel drums. The second was retrieved and characterized the waste material trapped inside the annulus region of the underground tanks on the DOE's tank farms. While these subtasks were derived from the original intent of

  19. Oxysterols and Their Cellular Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Béaslas, Olivier; Nissilä, Eija

    2012-01-01

    Oxysterols are oxidized 27-carbon cholesterol derivatives or by-products of cholesterol biosynthesis, with a spectrum of biologic activities. Several oxysterols have cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic activities, the ability to interfere with the lateral domain organization, and packing of membrane lipids. These properties may account for their suggested roles in the pathology of diseases such as atherosclerosis, age-onset macular degeneration and Alzheimer’s disease. Oxysterols also have the capacity to induce inflammatory responses and play roles in cell differentiation processes. The functions of oxysterols as intermediates in the synthesis of bile acids and steroid hormones, and as readily transportable forms of sterol, are well established. Furthermore, their actions as endogenous regulators of gene expression in lipid metabolism via liver X receptors and the Insig (insulin-induced gene) proteins have been investigated in detail. The cytoplasmic oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) homologues form a group of oxysterol/cholesterol sensors that has recently attracted a lot of attention. However, their mode of action is, as yet, poorly understood. Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors (ROR) α and γ, and Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (EBI2) have been identified as novel oxysterol receptors, revealing new physiologic oxysterol effector mechanisms in development, metabolism, and immunity, and evoking enhanced interest in these compounds in the field of biomedicine. PMID:24970128

  20. Five phylogenetically close rice SWEET genes confer TAL effector-mediated susceptibility to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Streubel, Jana; Pesce, Céline; Hutin, Mathilde; Koebnik, Ralf; Boch, Jens; Szurek, Boris

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial plant-pathogenic Xanthomonas strains translocate transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors into plant cells to function as specific transcription factors. Only a few plant target genes of TAL effectors have been identified, so far. Three plant SWEET genes encoding putative sugar transporters are known to be induced by TAL effectors from rice-pathogenic Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). We predict and validate that expression of OsSWEET14 is induced by a novel TAL effector, Tal5, from an African Xoo strain. Artificial TAL effectors (ArtTALs) were constructed to individually target 20 SWEET orthologs in rice. They were used as designer virulence factors to study which rice SWEET genes can support Xoo virulence. The Tal5 target box differs from those of the already known TAL effectors TalC, AvrXa7 and PthXo3, which also induce expression of OsSWEET14, suggesting evolutionary convergence on key targets. ArtTALs efficiently complemented an Xoo talC mutant, demonstrating that specific induction of OsSWEET14 is the key target of TalC. ArtTALs that specifically target individual members of the rice SWEET family revealed three known and two novel SWEET genes to support bacterial virulence. Our results demonstrate that five phylogenetically close SWEET proteins, which presumably act as sucrose transporters, can support Xoo virulence.

  1. Nanoplasmonic molecular ruler for nuclease activity and DNA footprinting

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Fanqing Frank; Liu, Gang L; Lee, Luke P

    2013-10-29

    This invention provides a nanoplasmonic molecular ruler, which can perform label-free and real-time monitoring of nucleic acid (e.g., DNA) length changes and perform nucleic acid footprinting. In various embodiments the ruler comprises a nucleic acid attached to a nanoparticle, such that changes in the nucleic acid length are detectable using surface plasmon resonance. The nanoplasmonic ruler provides a fast and convenient platform for mapping nucleic acid-protein interactions, for nuclease activity monitoring, and for other footprinting related methods.

  2. Tudor Nuclease Genes and Programmed DNA Rearrangements in Tetrahymena thermophila▿

    PubMed Central

    Howard-Till, Rachel A.; Yao, Meng-Chao

    2007-01-01

    Proteins containing a Tudor domain and domains homologous to staphylococcal nucleases are found in a number of eukaryotes. These “Tudor nucleases” have been found to be associated with the RNA-induced silencing complex (A. A. Caudy, R. F. Ketting, S. M. Hammond, A. M. Denli, A. M. Bathoorn, B. B. Tops, J. M. Silva, M. M. Myers, G. J. Hannon, and R. H. Plasterk, Nature 425:411-414, 2003). We have identified two Tudor nuclease gene homologs, TTN1 and TTN2, in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, which has two distinct small-RNA pathways. Characterization of single and double KOs of TTN1 and TTN2 shows that neither of these genes is essential for growth or sexual reproduction. Progeny of TTN2 KOs and double knockouts occasionally show minor defects in the small-RNA-guided process of DNA deletion but appear to be normal in hairpin RNA-induced gene silencing, suggesting that Tudor nucleases play only a minor role in RNA interference in Tetrahymena. Previous studies of Tetrahymena have shown that inserted copies of the neo gene from Escherichia coli are often deleted from the developing macronucleus during sexual reproduction (Y. Liu, X. Song, M. A. Gorovsky, and K. M. Karrer, Eukaryot. Cell 4:421-431, 2005; M. C. Yao, P. Fuller, and X. Xi, Science 300:1581-1584, 2003). This transgene deletion phenomenon is hypothesized to be a form of genome defense. Analysis of the Tudor nuclease mutants revealed exceptionally high rates of deletion of the neo transgene at the TTN2 locus but no deletion at the TTN1 locus. When present in the same genome, however, the neo gene is deleted at high rates even at the TTN1 locus, further supporting a role for trans-acting RNA in this process. This deletion is not affected by the presence of the same sequence in the macronucleus, thus providing a counterargument for the role of the macronuclear genome in specifying all sequences for deletion. PMID:17715366

  3. Epigenetic control of effectors in plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gijzen, Mark; Ishmael, Chelsea; Shrestha, Sirjana D

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogens display impressive versatility in adapting to host immune systems. Pathogen effector proteins facilitate disease but can become avirulence (Avr) factors when the host acquires discrete recognition capabilities that trigger immunity. The mechanisms that lead to changes to pathogen Avr factors that enable escape from host immunity are diverse, and include epigenetic switches that allow for reuse or recycling of effectors. This perspective outlines possibilities of how epigenetic control of Avr effector gene expression may have arisen and persisted in filamentous plant pathogens, and how it presents special problems for diagnosis and detection of specific pathogen strains or pathotypes.

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis effectors interfering host apoptosis signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minqiang; Li, Wu; Xiang, Xiaohong; Xie, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis remains a serious human public health concern. The coevolution between its pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human host complicated the way to prevent and cure TB. Apoptosis plays subtle role in this interaction. The pathogen endeavors to manipulate the apoptosis via diverse effectors targeting key signaling nodes. In this paper, we summarized the effectors pathogen used to subvert the apoptosis, such as LpqH, ESAT-6/CFP-10, LAMs. The interplay between different forms of cell deaths, such as apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis, is also discussed with a focus on the modes of action of effectors, and implications for better TB control.

  5. Interfering TAL effectors of Xanthomonas oryzae neutralize R-gene-mediated plant disease resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhiyuan; Ji, Chonghui; Liu, Bo; Zou, Lifang; Chen, Gongyou; Yang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria of the genus Xanthomonas possess transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) that activate transcription of disease susceptibility genes in the host, inducing a state of disease. Here we report that some isolates of the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae use truncated versions of TALEs (which we term interfering TALEs, or iTALEs) to overcome disease resistance. In comparison with typical TALEs, iTALEs lack a transcription activation domain but retain nuclear localization motifs and are expressed from genes that were previously considered pseudogenes. We show that the rice gene Xa1, encoding a nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein, confers resistance against X. oryzae isolates by recognizing multiple TALEs. However, the iTALEs present in many isolates interfere with the otherwise broad-spectrum resistance conferred by Xa1. Our findings illustrate how bacterial effectors that trigger disease resistance in the host can evolve to interfere with the resistance process and, thus, promote disease. PMID:27811915

  6. Characterization of a novel non-specific nuclease from thermophilic bacteriophage GBSV1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qing; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2008-01-01

    Background Thermostable enzymes from thermophiles have attracted extensive studies. In this investigation, a nuclease-encoding gene (designated as GBSV1-NSN) was obtained from a thermophilic bacteriophage GBSV1 for the first time. Results After recombinant expression in Escherichia coli, the purified GBSV1-NSN exhibited non-specific nuclease activity, being able to degrade various nucleic acids, including RNA, single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA that was circular or linear. Based on sequence analysis, the nuclease shared no homology with any known nucleases, suggesting that it was a novel nuclease. The characterization of the recombinant GBSV1-NSN showed that its optimal temperature and pH were 60°C and 7.5, respectively. The results indicated that the enzymatic activity was inhibited by enzyme inhibitors or detergents, such as ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, citrate, dithiothreitol, β-mercaptoethanol, guanidine hydrochloride, urea and SDS. In contrast, the nuclease activity was enhanced by TritonX-100, Tween-20 or chaps to approximately 124.5% – 141.6%. The Km of GBSV1-NSN nuclease was 231, 61 and 92 μM, while its kcat was 1278, 241 and 300 s-1 for the cleavage of dsDNA, ssDNA and RNA, respectively. Conclusion Our study, therefore, presented a novel thermostable non-specific nuclease from thermophilic bacteriophage and its overexpression and purification for scientific research and applications. PMID:18439318

  7. Jet Engine Exhaust Nozzle Flow Effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Silox, Richard J. (Inventor); Buehrle, Ralph D. (Inventor); Cagle, Christopher M. (Inventor); Cabell, Randolph H. (Inventor); Hilton, George C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A jet engine exhaust nozzle flow effector is a chevron formed with a radius of curvature with surfaces of the flow effector being defined and opposing one another. At least one shape memory alloy (SMA) member is embedded in the chevron closer to one of the chevron's opposing surfaces and substantially spanning from at least a portion of the chevron's root to the chevron's tip.

  8. Jet Engine Exhaust Nozzle Flow Effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Silcox, Richard J. (Inventor); Buehrle, Ralph D. (Inventor); Cagle, Christopher M. (Inventor); Cabell, Randolph H. (Inventor); Hilton, George C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A jet engine exhaust nozzle flow effector is a chevron formed with a radius of curvature with surfaces of the flow effector being defined and opposing one another. At least one shape memory alloy (SMA) member is embedded in the chevron closer to one of the chevron's opposing surfaces and substantially spanning from at least a portion of the chevron's root to the chevron's tip.

  9. Compact designer TALENs for efficient genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Beurdeley, Marine; Bietz, Fabian; Li, Jin; Thomas, Severine; Stoddard, Thomas; Juillerat, Alexandre; Zhang, Feng; Voytas, Daniel F; Duchateau, Philippe; Silva, George H

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases are readily targetable 'molecular scissors' for genome engineering applications. These artificial nucleases offer high specificity coupled with simplicity in design that results from the ability to serially chain transcription activator-like effector repeat arrays to target individual DNA bases. However, these benefits come at the cost of an appreciably large multimeric protein complex, in which DNA cleavage is governed by the nonspecific FokI nuclease domain. Here we report a significant improvement to the standard transcription activator-like effector nuclease architecture by leveraging the partially specific I-TevI catalytic domain to create a new class of monomeric, DNA-cleaving enzymes. In vivo yeast, plant and mammalian cell assays demonstrate that the half-size, single-polypeptide compact transcription activator-like effector nucleases exhibit overall activity and specificity comparable to currently available designer nucleases. In addition, we harness the catalytic mechanism of I-TevI to generate novel compact transcription activator-like effector nuclease-based nicking enzymes that display a greater than 25-fold increase in relative targeted gene correction efficacy.

  10. Involvement of TatD nuclease during programmed cell death in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Debrabant, Alain

    2012-03-01

    In this report, we describe the involvement of TatD nuclease during programmed cell death (PCD) in the human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. T. brucei TatD nuclease showed intrinsic DNase activity, was localized in the cytoplasm and translocated to the nucleus when cells were treated with inducers previously demonstrated to cause PCD in T. brucei. Overexpression of TatD nuclease resulted in elevated PCD and conversely, loss of TatD expression by RNAi conferred significant resistance to the induction of PCD in T. brucei. Co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed that TatD nuclease interacts with endonucleaseG suggesting that these two nucleases could form a DNA degradation complex in the nucleus. Together, biochemical activity, RNAi and subcellular localization results demonstrate the role of TatD nuclease activity in DNA degradation during PCD in these evolutionarily ancient eukaryotic organisms. Further, in conjunction with endonucleaseG, TatD may represent a critical nuclease in a caspase-independent PCD pathway in trypanosomatid parasites since caspases have not been identified in these organisms.

  11. Characterization of Rv0888, a Novel Extracellular Nuclease from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Guanghui; Cao, Jun; Cui, Yingying; Song, Ningning; Chen, Liping; Pang, Hai; Liu, Siguo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial extracellular nucleases play important roles in virulence, biofilm formation, utilization of extracellular DNA as a nutrient, and degradation of neutrophil DNA extracellular traps. However, there is no current data available for extracellular nucleases derived from M. tuberculosis. Herein, we have identified and characterized Rv0888, an extracellular nuclease in M. tuberculosis. The protein was overexpressed in E. coli, and the purified Rv0888 protein was found to require divalent cations for activity, with an optimal temperature and pH of 41 °C and 6.5, respectively. Further results demonstrated that Rv0888 nuclease activity could be inhibited by four Chinese medicine monomers. Based on sequence analysis, Rv0888 nuclease exhibited no homology with any known extracellular nucleases, indicating that Rv0888 is a novel nuclease. Site-directed mutagenesis studies revealed that the H353, D387, and D438 residues play catalytic roles in Rv0888. In vivo infection studies confirmed that Rv0888 is required for infection and is related to pathogenicity, as the persistent ability of recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis (rMS) Rv0888NS/MS and Rv0888S/MS is significantly higher than pMV262/MS in the lung tissue, and the Rv0888NS/MS and Rv0888S/MS could produce pathological changes in the mice lung. These results show that Rv0888 is relevant to pathogenicity of M. tuberculosis. PMID:26742696

  12. The nuclease domain of the SPP1 packaging motor coordinates DNA cleavage and encapsidation

    PubMed Central

    Cornilleau, Charlène; Atmane, Noureddine; Jacquet, Eric; Smits, Callum; Alonso, Juan C.; Tavares, Paulo; Oliveira, Leonor

    2013-01-01

    The large terminase subunit is a central component of the genome packaging motor from tailed bacteriophages and herpes viruses. This two-domain enzyme has an N-terminal ATPase activity that fuels DNA translocation during packaging and a C-terminal nuclease activity required for initiation and termination of the packaging cycle. Here, we report that bacteriophage SPP1 large terminase (gp2) is a metal-dependent nuclease whose stability and activity are strongly and preferentially enhanced by Mn2+ ions. Mutation of conserved residues that coordinate Mn2+ ions in the nuclease catalytic site affect the metal-induced gp2 stabilization and impair both gp2-specific cleavage at the packaging initiation site pac and unspecific nuclease activity. Several of these mutations block also DNA encapsidation without affecting ATP hydrolysis or gp2 C-terminus binding to the procapsid portal vertex. The data are consistent with a mechanism in which the nuclease domain bound to the portal switches between nuclease activity and a coordinated action with the ATPase domain for DNA translocation. This switch of activities of the nuclease domain is critical to achieve the viral chromosome packaging cycle. PMID:23118480

  13. Contribution of nuclease to the pathogenesis of Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yachan; Li, Jinquan; Qin, Zhendong; Li, Aihua; Gu, Zemao; Liu, Xiaoling; Lin, Li; Zhou, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is a gram-negative bacterium that is widely distributed in aquatic environments and can cause septicemia in both fish and humans. However, the underlying mechanisms leading to severe infection are not well understood. In this study, an A. hydrophila nuclease (ahn) deletion mutant was constructed to investigate its contribution to pathogenesis. This mutant did not differ from the wild-type strain in terms of its growth or hemolytic phenotype. However, the ahn-deficient mutant was more susceptible to being killed by fish macrophages and mouse blood in vitro. Furthermore, evidence obtained using both fish and murine infection models strongly indicated that the inactivation of Ahn impaired the ability of A. hydrophila to evade innate immune clearance in vivo. More importantly, the virulence of the mutant was attenuated in both fish and mice, with reductions in dissemination capacities and mortality rates. These findings implicate Ahn in A. hydrophila virulence, with important functions in evading innate immune defenses. PMID:26039879

  14. Editing the Trypanosoma cruzi genome with zinc finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Burle-Caldas, Gabriela Assis; Grazielle-Silva, Viviane; Soares-Simões, Melissa; Schumann Burkard, Gabriela; Roditi, Isabel; DaRocha, Wanderson Duarte; Teixeira, Santuza M

    2017-03-01

    Gene function studies in Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease, have been hindered by the lack of efficient genetic manipulation protocols. In most organisms, insertion and deletion of DNA fragments in the genome are dependent on the generation of double-stranded DNA break (DSB) and repair. By inducing a site-specific DSB, zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) have proven to be useful to enhance gene editing in many cell types. Using a pair of ZFNs targeted to the T. cruzi gp72 gene, we were able to generate gp72 knockout parasites with improved efficiency compared to the conventional gene knockout protocol. We also provide evidence that, in T. cruzi, repair of DSBs generated by ZFNs occurs primarily by the homologous recombination pathway.

  15. Targeted Mutagenesis in Zebrafish Using Customized Zinc Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Jonathan E.; Maeder, Morgan L.; Pearlberg, Joseph; Joung, J. Keith; Peterson, Randall T.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey J.

    2009-01-01

    Zebrafish mutants have traditionally been obtained using random mutagenesis or retroviral insertions, methods that cannot be targeted to a specific gene and require laborious gene mapping and sequencing. Recently, we and others have shown that customized zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) can introduce targeted frame-shift mutations with high efficiency, thereby enabling directed creation of zebrafish gene mutations. Here we describe a detailed protocol for constructing ZFN expression vectors, for generating and introducing ZFN-encoding RNAs into zebrafish embryos, and for identifying ZFN-generated mutations in targeted genomic sites. All of our vectors and methods are compatible with previously described Zinc Finger Consortium reagents for constructing engineered zinc finger arrays. Using these methods, zebrafish founders carrying targeted mutations can be identified within four months. PMID:20010934

  16. Generation of albino Xenopus tropicalis using zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Keisuke; Nakajima, Taeko; Takase, Minoru; Yaoita, Yoshio

    2012-12-01

    To generate albino lines of Xenopus tropicalis, we injected fertilized eggs with mRNAs encoding zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) targeting the tyrosinase coding region. Surprisingly, vitiligo was observed on the skin of F0 frogs that had been injected with ZFN mRNAs, indicating that both tyrosinase genes in the genome were disrupted in all melanocytes within the vitiligo patches. Mutation analysis using genomic DNA from the skin revealed that two mosaic F0 frogs underwent spatially complex tyrosinase gene mutations. The data implies that the ZFN-induced tyrosinase gene ablations occurred randomly over space and time throughout the entire body, possibly until the young tadpole stage, and that melanocyte precursors lacking functional tyrosinase proliferated and formed vitiligo patches. Several albino X. tropicalis, which are compound heterozygotes for biallelic tyrosinase mutations, were obtained by mating the mosaic F0 frogs. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the albino vertebrates generated by the targeted gene knockout.

  17. The effect of micrococcal nuclease digestion on nucleosome positioning data.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ho-Ryun; Dunkel, Ilona; Heise, Franziska; Linke, Christian; Krobitsch, Sylvia; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E; Sperling, Silke R; Vingron, Martin

    2010-12-29

    Eukaryotic genomes are packed into chromatin, whose basic repeating unit is the nucleosome. Nucleosome positioning is a widely researched area. A common experimental procedure to determine nucleosome positions involves the use of micrococcal nuclease (MNase). Here, we show that the cutting preference of MNase in combination with size selection generates a sequence-dependent bias in the resulting fragments. This strongly affects nucleosome positioning data and especially sequence-dependent models for nucleosome positioning. As a consequence we see a need to re-evaluate whether the DNA sequence is a major determinant of nucleosome positioning in vivo. More generally, our results show that data generated after MNase digestion of chromatin requires a matched control experiment in order to determine nucleosome positions.

  18. Structure based design of protein linkers for zinc finger nuclease.

    PubMed

    Anand, Priya; Schug, Alexander; Wenzel, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    Zinc finger nucleases are a promising tool to edit DNA in many biological applications, in particular for gene knockout. Despite many efforts the number of genes that can be effectively targeted with ZFNs remains severely limited, as available constructs cannot address arbitrary gene sequences. Here, we develop a novel concept to significantly enhance the number of DNA sequences that can be targeted by ZFN. Using an efficient computational model, we provide an extensive library of possible linker molecules between individual zinc finger motifs in the construct that can skip up to 10 base pairs between adjacent zinc finger recognition sites in the DNA sequence, which increases the number of genes that can be efficiently targeted by more than an order of magnitude.

  19. Bacterial Effector Nanoparticles as Breast Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Herrera Estrada, Lina; Padmore, Trudy J; Champion, Julie A

    2016-03-07

    Bacterial pathogens trigger cell death by a variety of mechanisms, including injection of effector proteins. Effector proteins have great potential as anticancer agents because they efficiently subvert a variety of eukaryotic signaling pathways involved in cancer development, drug resistance, and metastasis. In breast cancer, MAPK and NFκB pathways are known to be dysregulated. YopJ, an effector from Yersinia pestis, downregulates MAPK and NFκB pathways to induce cell death in specific cell types. We expressed YopJ in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase (GST), forming self-assembled protein nanoparticles with diameters of 100 nm. YopJ-GST nanoparticles efficiently delivered protein to cells, replacing the need for the pathogen secretion mechanism for effector delivery to cells. These nanoparticles induced dose and time dependent death in SKBR-3 breast cancer cells. After 72 h, 97% of cells died, significantly more than with the same molar dose of doxorubicin. Treatment with sublethal doses of nanoparticles decreased cell migration in vitro and downregulated the MAPK ERK 1/2 pathway, which has been correlated to metastasis. Exposure to a panel of breast cancer cell lines showed that YopJ-GST nanoparticles are cytotoxic to different subtypes, including doxorubicin resistant cells. However, they were not cytotoxic to NIH/3T3 fibroblasts or HeLa cells. Thus, YopJ-GST nanoparticles demonstrate the potential of effector proteins as breast cancer therapeutics with selective cytotoxicity and the capacity to decrease metastatic predictive behaviors.

  20. End effector with astronaut foot restraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The combination of a foot restraint platform designed primarily for use by an astronaut being rigidly and permanently attached to an end effector which is suitable for attachment to the manipulator arm of a remote manipulating system is described. The foot restraint platform is attached by a brace to the end effector at a location away from the grappling interface of the end effector. The platform comprises a support plate provided with a pair of stirrups for receiving the toe portion of an astronaut's boots when standing on the platform and a pair of heel retainers in the form of raised members which are fixed to the surface of the platform and located to provide abutment surfaces for abutting engagement with the heels of the astronaut's boots when his toes are in the stirrups. The heel retainers preclude a backward sliding movement of the feet on the platform and instead require a lifting of the heels in order to extract the feet. The brace for attaching the foot restraint platform to the end effector may include a pivot or swivel joint to permit various orientations of the platform with respect to the end effector.

  1. Specific DNA-RNA hybrid recognition by TAL effectors.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ping; Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Pan, Xiaojing; Xi, Jianzhong Jeff; Yan, Nieng; Shi, Yigong

    2012-10-25

    The transcription activator-like (TAL) effector targets specific host promoter through its central DNA-binding domain, which comprises multiple tandem repeats (TALE repeats). Recent structural analyses revealed that the TALE repeats form a superhelical structure that tracks along the forward strand of the DNA duplex. Here, we demonstrate that TALE repeats specifically recognize a DNA-RNA hybrid where the DNA strand determines the binding specificity. The crystal structure of a designed TALE in complex with the DNA-RNA hybrid was determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å. Although TALE repeats are in direct contact with only the DNA strand, the phosphodiester backbone of the RNA strand is inaccessible by macromolecules such as RNases. Consistent with this observation, sequence-specific recognition of an HIV-derived DNA-RNA hybrid by an engineered TALE efficiently blocked RNase H-mediated degradation of the RNA strand. Our study broadens the utility of TALE repeats and suggests potential applications in processes involving DNA replication and retroviral infections.

  2. RXLR effectors of plant pathogenic oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Morgan, William; Kamoun, Sophien

    2007-08-01

    Oomycetes are a phylogenetically distinct group of organisms that include some of the most devastating plant pathogens. Recent characterization of four oomycete Avr genes revealed that they encode effector proteins with a common modular structure, including a N-terminal conserved RXLR motif. Several lines of evidence initially indicated, with support from more recent works, that these Avr proteins are secreted by the pathogen and then translocated into the host cell during infection. In addition to elucidating the machinery required for host-cell transport, future works remain to determine the myriad virulence functions of oomycete RXLR effector proteins.

  3. Clinical Scale Zinc Finger Nuclease-mediated Gene Editing of PD-1 in Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes for the Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Beane, Joal D; Lee, Gary; Zheng, Zhili; Mendel, Matthew; Abate-Daga, Daniel; Bharathan, Mini; Black, Mary; Gandhi, Nimisha; Yu, Zhiya; Chandran, Smita; Giedlin, Martin; Ando, Dale; Miller, Jeff; Paschon, David; Guschin, Dmitry; Rebar, Edward J; Reik, Andreas; Holmes, Michael C; Gregory, Philip D; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A; Feldman, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) is expressed on activated T cells and represents an attractive target for gene-editing of tumor targeted T cells prior to adoptive cell transfer (ACT). We used zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) directed against the gene encoding human PD-1 (PDCD-1) to gene-edit melanoma tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). We show that our clinical scale TIL production process yielded efficient modification of the PD-1 gene locus, with an average modification frequency of 74.8% (n = 3, range 69.9–84.1%) of the alleles in a bulk TIL population, which resulted in a 76% reduction in PD-1 surface-expression. Forty to 48% of PD-1 gene-edited cells had biallelic PD-1 modification. Importantly, the PD-1 gene-edited TIL product showed improved in vitro effector function and a significantly increased polyfunctional cytokine profile (TNFα, GM-CSF, and IFNγ) compared to unmodified TIL in two of the three donors tested. In addition, all donor cells displayed an effector memory phenotype and expanded approximately 500–2,000-fold in vitro. Thus, further study to determine the efficiency and safety of adoptive cell transfer using PD-1 gene-edited TIL for the treatment of metastatic melanoma is warranted. PMID:25939491

  4. Clinical Scale Zinc Finger Nuclease-mediated Gene Editing of PD-1 in Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes for the Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Beane, Joal D; Lee, Gary; Zheng, Zhili; Mendel, Matthew; Abate-Daga, Daniel; Bharathan, Mini; Black, Mary; Gandhi, Nimisha; Yu, Zhiya; Chandran, Smita; Giedlin, Martin; Ando, Dale; Miller, Jeff; Paschon, David; Guschin, Dmitry; Rebar, Edward J; Reik, Andreas; Holmes, Michael C; Gregory, Philip D; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A; Feldman, Steven A

    2015-08-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) is expressed on activated T cells and represents an attractive target for gene-editing of tumor targeted T cells prior to adoptive cell transfer (ACT). We used zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) directed against the gene encoding human PD-1 (PDCD-1) to gene-edit melanoma tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). We show that our clinical scale TIL production process yielded efficient modification of the PD-1 gene locus, with an average modification frequency of 74.8% (n = 3, range 69.9-84.1%) of the alleles in a bulk TIL population, which resulted in a 76% reduction in PD-1 surface-expression. Forty to 48% of PD-1 gene-edited cells had biallelic PD-1 modification. Importantly, the PD-1 gene-edited TIL product showed improved in vitro effector function and a significantly increased polyfunctional cytokine profile (TNFα, GM-CSF, and IFNγ) compared to unmodified TIL in two of the three donors tested. In addition, all donor cells displayed an effector memory phenotype and expanded approximately 500-2,000-fold in vitro. Thus, further study to determine the efficiency and safety of adoptive cell transfer using PD-1 gene-edited TIL for the treatment of metastatic melanoma is warranted.

  5. Delivery methods for site-specific nucleases: Achieving the full potential of therapeutic gene editing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Shui, Sai-Lan

    2016-12-28

    The advent of site-specific nucleases, particularly CRISPR/Cas9, provides researchers with the unprecedented ability to manipulate genomic sequences. These nucleases are used to create model cell lines, engineer metabolic pathways, produce transgenic animals and plants, perform genome-wide functional screen and, most importantly, treat human diseases that are difficult to tackle by traditional medications. Considerable efforts have been devoted to improving the efficiency and specificity of nucleases for clinical applications. However, safe and efficient delivery methods remain the major obstacle for therapeutic gene editing. In this review, we summarize the recent progress on nuclease delivery methods, highlight their impact on the outcomes of gene editing and discuss the potential of different delivery approaches for therapeutic gene editing.

  6. Immobilization of sugar-non-specific nucleases by utilizing the streptavidin--biotin interaction.

    PubMed

    Gast, F U; Franke, I; Meiss, G; Pingoud, A

    2001-05-04

    Due to their high enzymatic activity, the sugar-non-specific endonucleases from Serratia marcescens and Anabaena can be used for a number of applications, such as the removal of contaminating genetic material from biological preparations, footprinting studies, and the determination of nucleic acids in biochemical samples. These methods would benefit from immobilized nucleases. For this purpose, a single cysteine residue was added at the N-terminus of the Serratia and Anabaena nucleases and subsequently modified with a maleimide-biotin conjugate. Alternatively, a biotin acceptor domain was fused to the Anabaena nuclease, allowing biotinylation during expression in E. coli without a further chemical step. The attachment of biotin-modified nucleases to streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads and to streptavidin-coated surface plasmon resonance sensor chips (to study interactions with substrate and inhibitor) worked well when aggregates present in the protein preparations were removed by ultrafiltration. These methods should be of general use for similar enzyme systems.

  7. Theoretical studies on binding modes of copper-based nucleases with DNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunmei; Zhu, Yanyan; Tang, Mingsheng

    2016-03-01

    In the present work, molecular simulations were performed for the purpose of predicting the binding modes of four types of copper nucleases (a total 33 compounds) with DNA. Our docking results accurately predicted the groove binding and electrostatic interaction for some copper nucleases with B-DNA. The intercalation modes were also reproduced by "gap DNA". The obtained results demonstrated that the ligand size, length, functional groups and chelate ring size bound to the copper center could influence the binding affinities of copper nucleases. The binding affinities obtained from the docking calculations herein also replicated results found using MM-PBSA approach. The predicted DNA binding modes of copper nucleases with DNA will ultimately help us to better understand the interaction of copper compounds with DNA.

  8. Minimal mimicry: mere effector matching induces preference.

    PubMed

    Sparenberg, Peggy; Topolinski, Sascha; Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2012-12-01

    Both mimicking and being mimicked induces preference for a target. The present experiments investigate the minimal sufficient conditions for this mimicry-preference link to occur. We argue that mere effector matching between one's own and the other person's movement is sufficient to induce preference, independent of which movement is actually performed. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants moved either their arms or legs, and watched avatars that moved either their arms or legs, respectively, without any instructions to mimic. The executed movements themselves and their pace were completely different between participants (fast circular movements) and targets (slow linear movements). Participants preferred avatars that moved the same body part as they did over avatars that moved a different body part. In Experiment 3, using human targets and differently paced movements, movement similarity was manipulated in addition to effector overlap (moving forward-backward or sideways with arms or legs, respectively). Only effector matching, but not movement matching, influenced preference ratings. These findings suggest that mere effector overlap is sufficient to trigger preference by mimicry.

  9. Cellular effector mechanisms against Plasmodium liver stages.

    PubMed

    Frevert, Ute; Nardin, Elizabeth

    2008-10-01

    Advances in our understanding of the molecular and cell biology of the malaria parasite have led to new vaccine development efforts resulting in a pipeline of over 40 candidates undergoing clinical phase I-III trials. Vaccine-induced CD4+ and CD8+ T cells specific for pre-erythrocytic stage antigens have been found to express cytolytic and multi-cytokine effector functions that support a key role for these T cells within the hepatic environment. However, little is known of the cellular interactions that occur during the effector phase in which the intracellular hepatic stage of the parasite is targeted and destroyed. This review focuses on cell biological aspects of the interaction between malaria-specific effector cells and the various antigen-presenting cells that are known to exist within the liver, including hepatocytes, dendritic cells, Kupffer cells, stellate cells and sinusoidal endothelia. Considering the unique immune properties of the liver, it is conceivable that these different hepatic antigen-presenting cells fulfil distinct but complementary roles during the effector phase against Plasmodium liver stages.

  10. Kinematic evaluation of end effector design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Gary W.

    1992-09-01

    The complex, many degree-of-freedom end effectors at the leading edge of technology would be unusable in the sea bottom research environment. Simpler designs are required to provide adequate reliability for subsea use. This work examines selection of end effector designs to achieve optimum grasping ability with minimal mechanical complexity. A new method of calculating grasp stability is developed, incorporating elements of previous works in the field. Programs are developed which evaluate the ability of different end effector configurations to grasp representative objects (a cube, sphere, and infinite cylinder). End effector designs considered had circular palms with fingers located at the periphery, oriented so that each pointed to the center of the palm. The program tested configurations of from 1 to 4 fingers and from 1 to 3 links per finger. Three sets of finger proportions were considered: equal length links, half length links, and anthropomorphic proportions. The 2 finger, 2 link per finger configuration was determined to be the optimum design, and the half length proportions were selected as the best set of proportions.

  11. Minimal Mimicry: Mere Effector Matching Induces Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparenberg, Peggy; Topolinski, Sascha; Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Both mimicking and being mimicked induces preference for a target. The present experiments investigate the minimal sufficient conditions for this mimicry-preference link to occur. We argue that mere effector matching between one's own and the other person's movement is sufficient to induce preference, independent of which movement is actually…

  12. Growth and productivity impacts of periplasmic nuclease expression in an Escherichia coli Fab' fragment production strain.

    PubMed

    Nesbeth, Darren N; Perez-Pardo, Miguel-Angel; Ali, Shaukat; Ward, John; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli

    2012-02-01

    Host cell engineering is becoming a realistic option in whole bioprocess strategies to maximize product manufacturability. High molecular weight (MW) genomic DNA currently hinders bioprocessing of Escherichia coli by causing viscosity in homogenate feedstocks. We previously showed that co-expressing Staphylococcal nuclease and human Fab' fragment in the periplasm of E. coli enables auto-hydrolysis of genomic DNA upon cell disruption, with a consequent reduction in feedstock viscosity and improvement in clarification performance. Here we report the impact of periplasmic nuclease expression on stability of DNA and Fab' fragment in homogenates, host-strain growth kinetics, cell integrity at harvest and Fab' fragment productivity. Nuclease and Fab' plasmids were shown to exert comparable levels of growth burden on the host W3110 E. coli strain. Nuclease co-expression did not compromise either the growth performance or volumetric yield of the production strain. 0.5 g/L Fab' fragment (75 L scale) and 0.7 g/L (20 L scale) was achieved for both unmodified and cell-engineered production strains. Unexpectedly, nuclease-modified cells achieved maximum Fab' levels 8-10 h earlier than the original, unmodified production strain. Scale-down studies of homogenates showed that nuclease-mediated hydrolysis of high MW DNA progressed to completion within minutes of homogenization, even when homogenates were chilled on ice, with no loss of Fab' product and no need for additional co-factors or buffering.

  13. Role of the nuclease of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in dispersal of organisms from biofilms.

    PubMed

    Cho, Christine; Chande, Aroon; Gakhar, Lokesh; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Ketterer, Margaret; Shao, Jian; Gotoh, Kenji; Foster, Eric; Hunt, Jason; O'Brien, Erin; Apicella, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) forms biofilms in the middle ear during human infection. The biofilm matrix of NTHI contains extracellular DNA. We show that NTHI possesses a potent nuclease, which is a homolog of the thermonuclease of Staphylococcus aureus. Using a biofilm dispersal assay, studies showed a biofilm dispersal pattern in the parent strain, no evidence of dispersal in the nuclease mutant, and a partial return of dispersion in the complemented mutant. Quantitative PCR of mRNA from biofilms from a 24-h continuous flow system demonstrated a significantly increased expression of the nuclease from planktonic organisms compared to those in the biofilm phase of growth (P < 0.042). Microscopic analysis of biofilms grown in vitro showed that in the nuclease mutant the nucleic acid matrix was increased compared to the wild-type and complemented strains. Organisms were typically found in large aggregates, unlike the wild-type and complement biofilms in which the organisms were evenly dispersed throughout the biofilm. At 48 h, the majority of the organisms in the mutant biofilm were dead. The nuclease mutant formed a biofilm in the chinchilla model of otitis media and demonstrated a propensity to also form similar large aggregates of organisms. These studies indicate that NTHI nuclease is involved in biofilm remodeling and organism dispersal.

  14. Removing residual DNA from Vero-cell culture-derived human rabies vaccine by using nuclease.

    PubMed

    Li, Si-Ming; Bai, Fu-Liang; Xu, Wen-Juan; Yang, Yong-Bi; An, Ying; Li, Tian-He; Yu, Yin-Hang; Li, De-Shan; Wang, Wen-Fei

    2014-09-01

    The clearance of host cell DNA is a critical indicator for Vero-cell culture-derived rabies vaccine. In this study, we evaluated the clearance of DNA in Vero-cell culture-derived rabies vaccine by purification process utilizing ultrafiltration, nuclease digestion, and gel filtration chromatography. The results showed that the bioprocess of using nuclease decreased residual DNA. Dot-blot hybridization analysis showed that the residual host cell DNA was <100 pg/ml in the final product. The residual nuclease in rabies vaccine was less than 0.1 ng/ml protein. The residual nuclease could not paly the biologically active role of digestion of DNA. Experiments of stability showed that the freeze-drying rabies virus vaccine was stable and titers were >5.0 IU/ml. Immunogenicity test and protection experiments indicated mice were greatly induced generation of neutralizing antibodies and invoked protective effects immunized with intraperitoneal injections of the rabies vaccine. These results demonstrated that the residual DNA was removed from virus particles and nuclease was removed by gel filtration chromatography. The date indicated that technology was an efficient method to produce rabies vaccine for human use by using nuclease.

  15. Genome-wide detection of DNA double-stranded breaks induced by engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Frock, Richard L; Hu, Jiazhi; Meyers, Robin M; Ho, Yu-Jui; Kii, Erina; Alt, Frederick W

    2015-02-01

    Although great progress has been made in the characterization of the off-target effects of engineered nucleases, sensitive and unbiased genome-wide methods for the detection of off-target cleavage events and potential collateral damage are still lacking. Here we describe a linear amplification-mediated modification of a previously published high-throughput, genome-wide, translocation sequencing (HTGTS) method that robustly detects DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) generated by engineered nucleases across the human genome based on their translocation to other endogenous or ectopic DSBs. HTGTS with different Cas9:sgRNA or TALEN nucleases revealed off-target hotspot numbers for given nucleases that ranged from a few or none to dozens or more, and extended the number of known off-targets for certain previously characterized nucleases more than tenfold. We also identified translocations between bona fide nuclease targets on homologous chromosomes, an undesired collateral effect that has not been described previously. Finally, HTGTS confirmed that the Cas9D10A paired nickase approach suppresses off-target cleavage genome-wide.

  16. A catalogue of the effector secretome of plant pathogenic oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Sophien

    2006-01-01

    The oomycetes form a phylogenetically distinct group of eukaryotic microorganisms that includes some of the most notorious pathogens of plants. Oomycetes accomplish parasitic colonization of plants by modulating host cell defenses through an array of disease effector proteins. The biology of effectors is poorly understood but tremendous progress has been made in recent years. This review classifies and catalogues the effector secretome of oomycetes. Two classes of effectors target distinct sites in the host plant: Apoplastic effectors are secreted into the plant extracellular space, and cytoplasmic effectors are translocated inside the plant cell, where they target different subcellular compartments. Considering that five species are undergoing genome sequencing and annotation, we are rapidly moving toward genome-wide catalogues of oomycete effectors. Already, it is evident that the effector secretome of pathogenic oomycetes is more complex than expected, with perhaps several hundred proteins dedicated to manipulating host cell structure and function.

  17. The RAS-Effector Interface: Isoform-Specific Differences in the Effector Binding Regions

    PubMed Central

    Nakhaeizadeh, Hossein; Amin, Ehsan; Nakhaei-Rad, Saeideh; Dvorsky, Radovan; Ahmadian, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    RAS effectors specifically interact with the GTP-bound form of RAS in response to extracellular signals and link them to downstream signaling pathways. The molecular nature of effector interaction by RAS is well-studied but yet still incompletely understood in a comprehensive and systematic way. Here, structure-function relationships in the interaction between different RAS proteins and various effectors were investigated in detail by combining our in vitro data with in silico data. Equilibrium dissociation constants were determined for the binding of HRAS, KRAS, NRAS, RRAS1 and RRAS2 to both the RAS binding (RB) domain of CRAF and PI3Kα, and the RAS association (RA) domain of RASSF5, RALGDS and PLCε, respectively, using fluorescence polarization. An interaction matrix, constructed on the basis of available crystal structures, allowed identification of hotspots as critical determinants for RAS-effector interaction. New insights provided by this study are the dissection of the identified hotspots in five distinct regions (R1 to R5) in spite of high sequence variability not only between, but also within, RB/RA domain-containing effectors proteins. Finally, we propose that intermolecular β-sheet interaction in R1 is a central recognition region while R3 may determine specific contacts of RAS versus RRAS isoforms with effectors. PMID:27936046

  18. Targeted genome modification in mice using zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Carbery, Iara D; Ji, Diana; Harrington, Anne; Brown, Victoria; Weinstein, Edward J; Liaw, Lucy; Cui, Xiaoxia

    2010-10-01

    Homologous recombination-based gene targeting using Mus musculus embryonic stem cells has greatly impacted biomedical research. This study presents a powerful new technology for more efficient and less time-consuming gene targeting in mice using embryonic injection of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), which generate site-specific double strand breaks, leading to insertions or deletions via DNA repair by the nonhomologous end joining pathway. Three individual genes, multidrug resistant 1a (Mdr1a), jagged 1 (Jag1), and notch homolog 3 (Notch3), were targeted in FVB/N and C57BL/6 mice. Injection of ZFNs resulted in a range of specific gene deletions, from several nucleotides to >1000 bp in length, among 20-75% of live births. Modified alleles were efficiently transmitted through the germline, and animals homozygous for targeted modifications were obtained in as little as 4 months. In addition, the technology can be adapted to any genetic background, eliminating the need for generations of backcrossing to achieve congenic animals. We also validated the functional disruption of Mdr1a and demonstrated that the ZFN-mediated modifications lead to true knockouts. We conclude that ZFN technology is an efficient and convenient alternative to conventional gene targeting and will greatly facilitate the rapid creation of mouse models and functional genomics research.

  19. Targeted Genome Modification in Mice Using Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Carbery, Iara D.; Ji, Diana; Harrington, Anne; Brown, Victoria; Weinstein, Edward J.; Liaw, Lucy; Cui, Xiaoxia

    2010-01-01

    Homologous recombination-based gene targeting using Mus musculus embryonic stem cells has greatly impacted biomedical research. This study presents a powerful new technology for more efficient and less time-consuming gene targeting in mice using embryonic injection of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), which generate site-specific double strand breaks, leading to insertions or deletions via DNA repair by the nonhomologous end joining pathway. Three individual genes, multidrug resistant 1a (Mdr1a), jagged 1 (Jag1), and notch homolog 3 (Notch3), were targeted in FVB/N and C57BL/6 mice. Injection of ZFNs resulted in a range of specific gene deletions, from several nucleotides to >1000 bp in length, among 20–75% of live births. Modified alleles were efficiently transmitted through the germline, and animals homozygous for targeted modifications were obtained in as little as 4 months. In addition, the technology can be adapted to any genetic background, eliminating the need for generations of backcrossing to achieve congenic animals. We also validated the functional disruption of Mdr1a and demonstrated that the ZFN-mediated modifications lead to true knockouts. We conclude that ZFN technology is an efficient and convenient alternative to conventional gene targeting and will greatly facilitate the rapid creation of mouse models and functional genomics research. PMID:20628038

  20. RNA-protein analysis using a conditional CRISPR nuclease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Young; Haurwitz, Rachel E; Apffel, Alex; Zhou, Kaihong; Smart, Brian; Wenger, Craig D; Laderman, Stephen; Bruhn, Laurakay; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2013-04-02

    RNA-binding proteins control the fate and function of the transcriptome in all cells. Here we present technology for isolating RNA-protein partners efficiently and accurately using an engineered clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) endoribonuclease. An inactive version of the Csy4 nuclease binds irreversibly to transcripts engineered with a 16-nt hairpin sequence at their 5' ends. Once immobilized by Csy4 on a solid support, contaminating proteins and other molecules can be removed by extensive washing. Upon addition of imidazole, Csy4 is activated to cleave the RNA, removing the hairpin tag and releasing the native transcript along with its specifically bound protein partners. This conditional Csy4 enzyme enables recovery of specific RNA-binding partners with minimal false-positive contamination. We use this method, coupled with quantitative MS, to identify cell type-specific human pre-microRNA-binding proteins. We also show that this technology is suitable for analyzing diverse size transcripts, and that it is suitable for adaptation to a high-throughput discovery format.

  1. Designer TAL effectors induce disease susceptibility and resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae in rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Huang, Sheng; Zhou, Junhui; Yang, Bing

    2013-05-01

    TAL (transcription activator-like) effectors from Xanthomonas bacteria activate the cognate host genes, leading to disease susceptibility or resistance dependent on the genetic context of host target genes. The modular nature and DNA recognition code of TAL effectors enable custom-engineering of designer TAL effectors (dTALE) for gene activation. However, the feasibility of dTALEs as transcription activators for gene functional analysis has not been demonstrated. Here, we report the use of dTALEs, as expressed and delivered by the pathogenic Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), in revealing the new function of two previously identified disease-related genes and the potential of one developmental gene for disease susceptibility in rice/Xoo interactions. The dTALE gene dTALE-xa27, designed to target the susceptible allele of the resistance gene Xa27, elicited a resistant reaction in the otherwise susceptible rice cultivar IR24. Four dTALE genes were made to induce the four annotated Xa27 homologous genes in rice cultivar Nipponbare, but none of the four induced Xa27-like genes conferred resistance to the dTALE-containing Xoo strains. A dTALE gene was also generated to activate the recessive resistance gene xa13, an allele of the disease-susceptibility gene Os8N3 (also named Xa13 or OsSWEET11, a member of sucrose efflux transporter SWEET gene family). The induction of xa13 by the dTALE rendered the resistant rice IRBB13 (xa13/xa13) susceptible to Xoo. Finally, OsSWEET12, an as-yet uncharacterized SWEET gene with no corresponding naturally occurring TAL effector identified, conferred susceptibility to the Xoo strains expressing the corresponding dTALE genes. Our results demonstrate that dTALEs can be delivered through the bacterial secretion system to activate genes of interest for functional analysis in plants.

  2. The broadly effective recessive resistance gene xa5 of rice is a virulence effector-dependent quantitative trait for bacterial blight.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng; Antony, Ginny; Li, Ting; Liu, Bo; Obasa, Ken; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in disease susceptibility (S) genes, here referred to as recessive resistance genes, have promise for providing broad durable resistance in crop species. However, few recessive disease resistance genes have been characterized. Here, we show that the broadly effective resistance gene xa5,for resistance to bacterial blight of rice (Oryza sativa), is dependent on the effector genes present in the pathogen. Specifically, the effectiveness of xa5 in preventing disease by strains of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is dependent on major transcription activation-like (TAL) effector genes, and correlates with reduced expression of the cognate S genes. xa5 is ineffective in preventing disease by strains containing the TAL effector gene pthXo1, which directs robust expression of the S gene OsSWEET11, a member of sucrose transporter gene family. Incompatibility is associated with major TAL effectors that target the known alternative S genes OsSWEET14 and OsSWEET13. Incompatibility is defeated by transfer of pthXo1 to otherwise xa5-incompatible strains or by engineering a synthetic designer TAL effector to boost SWEET gene expression. In either case, compatible or incompatible, target gene expression and lesion formation are reduced in the presence of xa5. The results indicate that xa5 functions as a quantitative trait locus, dampening effector function, and, regardless of compatibility, target gene expression. Resistance is hypothesized to occur when S gene expression, and, by inference, sucrose leakage, falls below a threshold level.

  3. Identification of putative TAL effector targets of the citrus canker pathogens shows functional convergence underlying disease development and defense response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors, formerly known as the AvrBs3/PthA protein family, are DNA-binding effectors broadly found in Xanthomonas spp. that transactivate host genes upon injection via the bacterial type three-secretion system. Biologically relevant targets of TAL effectors, i.e. host genes whose induction is vital to establish a compatible interaction, have been reported for xanthomonads that colonize rice and pepper; however, citrus genes modulated by the TAL effectors PthA“s” and PthC“s” of the citrus canker bacteria Xanthomonas citri (Xc) and Xanthomonas aurantifolii pathotype C (XaC), respectively, are poorly characterized. Of particular interest, XaC causes canker disease in its host lemon (Citrus aurantifolia), but triggers a defense response in sweet orange. Results Based on, 1) the TAL effector-DNA binding code, 2) gene expression data of Xc and XaC-infiltrated sweet orange leaves, and 3) citrus hypocotyls transformed with PthA2, PthA4 or PthC1, we have identified a collection of Citrus sinensis genes potentially targeted by Xc and XaC TAL effectors. Our results suggest that similar with other strains of Xanthomonas TAL effectors, PthA2 and PthA4, and PthC1 to some extent, functionally converge. In particular, towards induction of genes involved in the auxin and gibberellin synthesis and response, cell division, and defense response. We also present evidence indicating that the TAL effectors act as transcriptional repressors and that the best scoring predicted DNA targets of PthA“s” and PthC“s” in citrus promoters predominantly overlap with or localize near to TATA boxes of core promoters, supporting the idea that TAL effectors interact with the host basal transcriptional machinery to recruit the RNA pol II and start transcription. Conclusions The identification of PthA“s” and PthC“s” targets, such as the LOB (LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARY) and CCNBS genes that we report here, is key for the understanding

  4. Natural effector T lymphocytes in normal mice.

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, P; Larsson, E L; Forni, L; Bandeira, A; Coutinho, A

    1985-01-01

    The "natural" T-cell activity in normal unimmunized mice was studied. By double-parameter fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis, it was found that 5-10% of all splenic Lyt-2+ and L3T4+ lymphocytes are large, of which more than half are in mitotic cycle. In contrast with small resting cells of the same phenotype, activated (large) T cells isolated from normal mice are functional effector cells: L3T4+ large cells induce normal B lymphocytes into proliferation and antibody secretion, while large Lyt-2+ cells efficiently suppress B-lymphocyte responses. No effector cell cytolytic activity could be detected among naturally activated T cells. The significance of these findings for the internal activity in the normal immune system is discussed. PMID:2933744

  5. SplitAx: A novel method to assess the function of engineered nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Axton, Richard A.; Haideri, Sharmin S.; Lopez-Yrigoyen, Martha; Taylor, Helen A.; Forrester, Lesley M.

    2017-01-01

    Engineered nucleases have been used to generate knockout or reporter cell lines and a range of animal models for human disease. These new technologies also hold great promise for therapeutic genome editing. Current methods to evaluate the activity of these nucleases are time consuming, require extensive optimization and are hampered by readouts with low signals and high background. We have developed a simple and easy to perform method (SplitAx) that largely addresses these issues and provides a readout of nuclease activity. The assay involves splitting the N-terminal (amino acid 1–158) coding region of GFP and an out-of-frame of C-terminal region with a nuclease binding site sequence. Following exposure to the test nuclease, cutting and repair by error prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) restores the reading frame resulting in the production of a full length fluorescent GFP protein. Fluorescence can also be restored by complementation between the N-terminal and C-terminal coding sequences in trans. We demonstrate successful use of the SplitAx assay to assess the function of zinc finger nucleases, CRISPR hCAS9 and TALENS. We also test the activity of multiple gRNAs in CRISPR/hCas9/D10A systems. The zinc finger nucleases and guide RNAs that showed functional activity in the SplitAx assay were then used successfully to target the endogenous AAVS1, SOX6 and Cfms loci. This simple method can be applied to other unrelated proteins such as ZsGreen1 and provides a test system that does not require complex optimization. PMID:28212417

  6. Protection of HIV neutralizing aptamers against rectal and vaginal nucleases: implications for RNA-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael D; Cookson, Jonathan; Coventry, Veronica K; Sproat, Brian; Rabe, Lorna; Cranston, Ross D; McGowan, Ian; James, William

    2011-01-28

    RNA-based drugs are an emerging class of therapeutics. They have the potential to regulate proteins, chromatin, as well as bind to specific proteins of interest in the form of aptamers. These aptamers are protected from nuclease attack by chemical modifications that enhance their stability for in vivo usage. However, nucleases are ubiquitous, and as we have yet to characterize the entire human microbiome it is likely that many nucleases are yet to be identified. Any novel, unusual enzymes present in vivo might reduce the efficacy of RNA-based therapeutics, even when they are chemically modified. We have previously identified an RNA-based aptamer capable of neutralizing a broad spectrum of clinical HIV-1 isolates and are developing it as a vaginal and rectal microbicide candidate. As a first step we addressed aptamer stability in the milieu of proteins present in these environments. Here we uncover a number of different nucleases that are able to rapidly degrade 2'-F-modified RNA. We demonstrate that the aptamer can be protected from the nuclease(s) present in the vaginal setting, without affecting its antiviral activity, by replacement of key positions with 2'-O-Me-modified nucleotides. Finally, we show that the aptamer can be protected from all nucleases present in both vaginal and rectal compartments using Zn(2+) cations. In conclusion we have derived a stable, antiviral RNA-based aptamer that could form the basis of a pre-exposure microbicide or be a valuable addition to the current tenofovir-based microbicide candidate undergoing clinical trials.

  7. Novel Control Effectors for Truss Braced Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Edward V.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Joshi, Shiv

    2015-01-01

    At cruise flight conditions very high aspect ratio/low sweep truss braced wings (TBW) may be subject to design requirements that distinguish them from more highly swept cantilevered wings. High aspect ratio, short chord length and relative thinness of the airfoil sections all contribute to relatively low wing torsional stiffness. This may lead to aeroelastic issues such as aileron reversal and low flutter margins. In order to counteract these issues, high aspect ratio/low sweep wings may need to carry additional high speed control effectors to operate when outboard ailerons are in reversal and/or must carry additional structural weight to enhance torsional stiffness. The novel control effector evaluated in this study is a variable sweep raked wing tip with an aileron control surface. Forward sweep of the tip allows the aileron to align closely with the torsional axis of the wing and operate in a conventional fashion. Aft sweep of the tip creates a large moment arm from the aileron to the wing torsional axis greatly enhancing aileron reversal. The novelty comes from using this enhanced and controllable aileron reversal effect to provide roll control authority by acting as a servo tab and providing roll control through intentional twist of the wing. In this case the reduced torsional stiffness of the wing becomes an advantage to be exploited. The study results show that the novel control effector concept does provide roll control as described, but only for a restricted class of TBW aircraft configurations. For the configuration studied (long range, dual aisle, Mach 0.85 cruise) the novel control effector provides significant benefits including up to 12% reduction in fuel burn.

  8. Avian Interferons and Their Antiviral Effectors.

    PubMed

    Santhakumar, Diwakar; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Munir, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) responses, mediated by a myriad of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), are the most profound innate immune responses against viruses. Cumulatively, these IFN effectors establish a multilayered antiviral state to safeguard the host against invading viral pathogens. Considerable genetic and functional characterizations of mammalian IFNs and their effectors have been made, and our understanding on the avian IFNs has started to expand. Similar to mammalian counterparts, three types of IFNs have been genetically characterized in most avian species with available annotated genomes. Intriguingly, chickens are capable of mounting potent innate immune responses upon various stimuli in the absence of essential components of IFN pathways including retinoic acid-inducible gene I, IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), and possibility IRF9. Understanding these unique properties of the chicken IFN system would propose valuable targets for the development of potential therapeutics for a broader range of viruses of both veterinary and zoonotic importance. This review outlines recent developments in the roles of avian IFNs and ISGs against viruses and highlights important areas of research toward our understanding of the antiviral functions of IFN effectors against viral infections in birds.

  9. Avian Interferons and Their Antiviral Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Santhakumar, Diwakar; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Munir, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) responses, mediated by a myriad of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), are the most profound innate immune responses against viruses. Cumulatively, these IFN effectors establish a multilayered antiviral state to safeguard the host against invading viral pathogens. Considerable genetic and functional characterizations of mammalian IFNs and their effectors have been made, and our understanding on the avian IFNs has started to expand. Similar to mammalian counterparts, three types of IFNs have been genetically characterized in most avian species with available annotated genomes. Intriguingly, chickens are capable of mounting potent innate immune responses upon various stimuli in the absence of essential components of IFN pathways including retinoic acid-inducible gene I, IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), and possibility IRF9. Understanding these unique properties of the chicken IFN system would propose valuable targets for the development of potential therapeutics for a broader range of viruses of both veterinary and zoonotic importance. This review outlines recent developments in the roles of avian IFNs and ISGs against viruses and highlights important areas of research toward our understanding of the antiviral functions of IFN effectors against viral infections in birds. PMID:28197148

  10. Identifying p53 Transactivation Domain 1-Specific Inhibitors to Alleviate the Side Effects of Prostate Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    further expanded with the exciting   7   development of Tal-effector and CRISPR guided nucleases. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases...also be achieved by the recently developed CRISPR -Cas9 system. CRISPR (Clustered Regulatory Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) is widely believed...to be the most efficient method to engineer mammalian genomes. CRISPR RNAs (crRNA) that hybridize to a specific target DNA can be utilized to guide a

  11. Impact of end effector technology on telemanipulation performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Szakaly, Z.; Ohm, T.

    1990-01-01

    Generic requirements for end effector design are briefly summarized as derived from generic functional and operational requirements. Included is a brief summary of terms and definitions related to end effector technology. The second part contains a brief overview of end effector technology work as JPL during the past ten years, with emphasis on the evolution of new mechanical, sensing and control capabilities of end effectors. The third and major part is devoted to the description of current end effector technology. The ongoing work addresses mechanical, sensing and control details with emphasis on mechanical ruggedness, increased resolution in sensing, and close electronic and control integration with overall telemanipulator control system.

  12. Thermodynamic characterization of an equilibrium folding intermediate of staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Xie, D.; Fox, R.; Freire, E.

    1994-01-01

    High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry and CD spectroscopy have been used to probe the structural stability and measure the folding/unfolding thermodynamics of a Pro117-->Gly variant of staphylococcal nuclease. It is shown that at neutral pH the thermal denaturation of this protein is well accounted for by a 2-state mechanism and that the thermally denatured state is a fully hydrated unfolded polypeptide. At pH 3.5, thermal denaturation results in a compact denatured state in which most, if not all, of the helical structure is missing and the beta subdomain apparently remains largely intact. At pH 3.0, no thermal transition is observed and the molecule exists in the compact denatured state within the 0-100 degrees C temperature interval. At high salt concentration and pH 3.5, the thermal unfolding transition exhibits 2 cooperative peaks in the heat capacity function, the first one corresponding to the transition from the native to the intermediate state and the second one to the transition from the intermediate to the unfolded state. As is the case with other proteins, the enthalpy of the intermediate is higher than that of the unfolded state at low temperatures, indicating that, under those conditions, its stabilization must be of an entropic origin. The folding intermediate has been modeled by structural thermodynamic calculations. Structure-based thermodynamic calculations also predict that the most probable intermediate is one in which the beta subdomain is essentially intact and the rest of the molecule unfolded, in agreement with the experimental data. The structural features of the equilibrium intermediate are similar to those of a kinetic intermediate previously characterized by hydrogen exchange and NMR spectroscopy. PMID:7756977

  13. Compact dimension of denatured states of staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed

    Chow, C-Y; Wu, Ming-Chya; Fang, Huey-Jen; Hu, Chin-Kun; Chen, Hueih-Min; Tsong, Tian-Yow

    2008-08-15

    Fluorescence and circular dichroism stopped-flow have been widely used to determine the kinetics of protein folding including folding rates and possible folding pathways. Yet, these measurements are not able to provide spatial information of protein folding/unfolding. Especially, conformations of denatured states cannot be elaborated in detail. In this study, we apply the method of fluorescence energy transfer with a stopped-flow technique to study global structural changes of the staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) mutant K45C, where lysine 45 is replaced by cysteine, during folding and unfolding. By labeling the thiol group of cysteine with TNB (5,5'-dithiobis-2-nitrobenzoic acid) as an energy acceptor and the tryptophan at position 140 as a donor, distance changes between the acceptor and the donor during folding and unfolding are measured from the efficiency of energy transfer. Results indicate that the denatured states of SNase are highly compact regardless of how the denatured states (pH-induced or GdmCl-induced) are induced. The range of distance changes between two probes is between 25.6 and 25.4 A while it is 20.4 A for the native state. Furthermore, the folding process consists of three kinetic phases while the unfolding process is a single phase. These observations agree with our previous sequential model: N(0) left arrow over right arrow D(1) left arrow over right arrow D(2) left arrow over right arrow D(3) (Chen et al., J Mol Biol 1991;220:771-778). The efficiency of protein folding may be attributed to initiating the folding process from these compact denatured structures.

  14. DNA Oxidation Profiles of Copper Phenanthrene Chemical Nucleases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molphy, Zara; Slator, Creina; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Kellett, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The deleterious effects of metal-catalyzed reactive oxygen species (ROS) in biological systems can be seen in a wide variety of pathological conditions including cancer, cardiovascular disease, ageing, and neurodegenerative disorder. On the other hand however, targeted ROS production in the vicinity of nucleic acids - as demonstrated by metal-activated bleomycin - has paved the way for ROS-active chemotherapeutic drug development. Herein we report mechanistic investigations into the oxidative nuclease activity and redox properties of copper(II) developmental therapeutics [Cu(DPQ)(phen)]2+ (Cu-DPQ-Phen), [Cu(DPPZ)(phen)]2+ (Cu-DPPZ-Phen), and [{Cu(phen)2}2(μ-terph)](terph) (Cu-Terph), with results being compared directly to Sigman’s reagent [Cu(phen)2]2+ throughout (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; DPQ = dipyridoquinoxaline; DPPZ = dipyridophenazine). Oxidative DNA damage was identified at the minor groove through use of surface bound recognition elements of methyl green, netropsin, and [Co(NH3)6]Cl3 that functioned to control complex accessibility at selected regions. ROS-specific scavengers and stabilisers were employed to identify the cleavage process, the results of which infer hydrogen peroxide produced metal-hydroxo or free hydroxyl radicals (•OH) as the predominant species. The extent of DNA damage owing to these radicals was then quantified through 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) lesion detection under ELISA protocol with the overall trend following Cu-DPQ-Phen > Cu-Terph > Cu-Phen > Cu-DPPZ. Finally, the effects of oxidative damage on DNA replication processes were investigated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) where amplification of 120 base pair DNA sequences of varying base content were inhibited - particularly along A-T rich chains - through oxidative damage of the template strands.

  15. Legionella Metaeffector Exploits Host Proteasome to Temporally Regulate Cognate Effector

    PubMed Central

    Kubori, Tomoko; Shinzawa, Naoaki; Kanuka, Hirotaka; Nagai, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Pathogen-associated secretion systems translocate numerous effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells to coordinate cellular processes important for infection. Spatiotemporal regulation is therefore important for modulating distinct activities of effectors at different stages of infection. Here we provide the first evidence of “metaeffector,” a designation for an effector protein that regulates the function of another effector within the host cell. Legionella LubX protein functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that hijacks the host proteasome to specifically target the bacterial effector protein SidH for degradation. Delayed delivery of LubX to the host cytoplasm leads to the shutdown of SidH within the host cells at later stages of infection. This demonstrates a sophisticated level of coevolution between eukaryotic cells and L. pneumophila involving an effector that functions as a key regulator to temporally coordinate the function of a cognate effector protein. PMID:21151961

  16. Purification and identification of a nuclease activity in embryo axes from French bean.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Rocío; Quiles, Francisco Antonio; Cabello-Díaz, Juan Miguel; Piedras, Pedro

    2014-07-01

    Plant nucleases are involved in nucleic acid degradation associated to programmed cell death processes as well as in DNA restriction, repair and recombination processes. However, the knowledge about the function of plant nucleases is limited. A major nuclease activity was detected by in-gel assay with whole embryonic axes of common bean by using ssDNA or RNA as substrate, whereas this activity was minimal in cotyledons. The enzyme has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from embryonic axes. The main biochemical properties of the purified enzyme indicate that it belongs to the S1/P1 family of nucleases. This was corroborated when this protein, after SDS-electrophoresis, was excised from the gel and further analysis by MALDI TOF/TOF allowed identification of the gene (PVN1) that codes this protein. The gene that codes the purified protein was identified. The expression of PVN1 gene was induced at the specific moment of radicle protrusion. The inclusion of inorganic phosphate to the imbibition media reduced the level of expression of this gene and the nuclease activity suggesting a relationship with the phosphorous status in French bean seedlings.

  17. High-frequency homologous recombination in plants mediated by zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Wright, David A; Townsend, Jeffrey A; Winfrey, Ronnie Joe; Irwin, Phillip A; Rajagopal, Jyothi; Lonosky, Patricia M; Hall, Bradford D; Jondle, Michael D; Voytas, Daniel F

    2005-11-01

    Homologous recombination offers great promise for plant genome engineering. This promise has not been realized, however, because when DNA enters plant cells homologous recombination occurs infrequently and random integration predominates. Using a tobacco test system, we demonstrate that chromosome breaks created by zinc-finger nucleases greatly enhance the frequency of localized recombination. Homologous recombination was measured by restoring function to a defective GUS:NPTII reporter gene integrated at various chromosomal sites in 10 different transgenic tobacco lines. The reporter gene carried a recognition site for a zinc-finger nuclease, and protoplasts from each tobacco line were electroporated with both DNA encoding the nuclease and donor DNA to effect repair of the reporter. Homologous recombination occurred in more than 10% of the transformed protoplasts regardless of the reporter's chromosomal position. Approximately 20% of the GUS:NPTII reporter genes were repaired solely by homologous recombination, whereas the remainder had associated DNA insertions or deletions consistent with repair by both homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining. The DNA-binding domain encoded by zinc-finger nucleases can be engineered to recognize a variety of chromosomal target sequences. This flexibility, coupled with the enhancement in homologous recombination conferred by double-strand breaks, suggests that plant genome engineering through homologous recombination can now be reliably accomplished using zinc-finger nucleases.

  18. Cellular Site in Bacillus subtilis of a Nuclease Which Preferentially Degrades Single-Stranded Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Birnboim, H. C.

    1966-01-01

    Birnboim, H. C. (Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, N.Y.). Cellular site in Bacillus subtilis of a nuclease which preferentially degrades single-stranded nucleic acids. J. Bacteriol. 91:1004–1011. 1966.—A nuclease, identified by a marked preference for single-stranded nucleic acids, has been demonstrated in extracts of Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme was associated with the cell wall-membrane fraction of mechanically disrupted cells and was released from cells which had been converted to protoplasts by lysozyme. The nuclease activity prepared by the latter procedure was found to be activated and solubilized by treatment with trypsin. The enzyme had about 2% activity on native deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) as compared with denatured DNA. By use of CsCl analytical density gradient ultracentrifugation, this preparation was shown to degrade denatured DNA selectively in mixtures of native and denatured DNA. PMID:4956329

  19. In vivo analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HO nuclease recognition site by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Nickoloff, J A; Singer, J D; Heffron, F

    1990-01-01

    HO nuclease introduces a specific double-strand break in the mating-type locus (MAT) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, initiating mating-type interconversion. To define the sequence recognized by HO nuclease, random mutations were produced in a 30-base-pair region homologous to either MAT alpha or MATa by a chemical synthesis procedure. The mutant sites were introduced into S. cerevisiae on a shuttle vector and tested for the ability to stimulate recombination in an assay that mimics mating-type interconversion. The results suggest that a core of 8 noncontiguous bases near the Y-Z junction of MAT is essential for HO nuclease to bind and cleave its recognition site. Other contacts must be required because substrates that contain several mutations outside an intact core reduce or eliminate cleavage in vivo. The results show that HO site recognition is a complex phenomenon, similar to promoter-polymerase interactions. Images PMID:2406563

  20. Repeat-containing protein effectors of plant-associated organisms

    PubMed Central

    Mesarich, Carl H.; Bowen, Joanna K.; Hamiaux, Cyril; Templeton, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Many plant-associated organisms, including microbes, nematodes, and insects, deliver effector proteins into the apoplast, vascular tissue, or cell cytoplasm of their prospective hosts. These effectors function to promote colonization, typically by altering host physiology or by modulating host immune responses. The same effectors however, can also trigger host immunity in the presence of cognate host immune receptor proteins, and thus prevent colonization. To circumvent effector-triggered immunity, or to further enhance host colonization, plant-associated organisms often rely on adaptive effector evolution. In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that several effectors of plant-associated organisms are repeat-containing proteins (RCPs) that carry tandem or non-tandem arrays of an amino acid sequence or structural motif. In this review, we highlight the diverse roles that these repeat domains play in RCP effector function. We also draw attention to the potential role of these repeat domains in adaptive evolution with regards to RCP effector function and the evasion of effector-triggered immunity. The aim of this review is to increase the profile of RCP effectors from plant-associated organisms. PMID:26557126

  1. Comparative assessments of CRISPR-Cas nucleases' cleavage efficiency in planta.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ross A; Gurevich, Vyacheslav; Filler, Shdema; Samach, Aviva; Levy, Avraham A

    2015-01-01

    Custom-designed nucleases can enable precise plant genome editing by catalyzing DNA-breakage at specific targets to stimulate targeted mutagenesis or gene replacement. The CRISPR-Cas system, with its target-specifying RNA molecule to direct the Cas9 nuclease, is a recent addition to existing nucleases that bind and cleave the target through linked protein domains (e.g. TALENs and zinc-finger nucleases). We have conducted a comparative study of these different types of custom-designed nucleases and we have assessed various components of the CRISPR-Cas system. For this purpose, we have adapted our previously reported assay for cleavage-dependent luciferase gene correction in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves (Johnson et al. in Plant Mol Biol 82(3):207-221, 2013). We found that cleavage by CRISPR-Cas was more efficient than cleavage of the same target by TALENs. We also compared the cleavage efficiency of the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 protein based on expression using three different Cas9 gene variants. We found significant differences in cleavage efficiency between these variants, with human and Arabidopsis thaliana codon-optimized genes having the highest cleavage efficiencies. We compared the activity of 12 de novo-designed single synthetic guide RNA (sgRNA) constructs, and found their cleavage efficiency varied drastically when using the same Cas9 nuclease. Finally, we show that, for one of the targets tested with our assay, we could induce a germinally-transmitted deletion in a repeat array in A. thaliana. This work emphasizes the efficiency of the CRISPR-Cas system in plants. It also shows that further work is needed to be able to predict the optimal design of sgRNAs or Cas9 variants.

  2. Design and fabrication of an end effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossley, F. R. E.; Umholtz, F. G.

    1975-01-01

    The construction is described of a prototype mechanical hand or 'end effector' for use on a remotely controlled robot, but with possible application as a prosthetic device. An analysis of hand motions is reported, from which it is concluded that the two most important manipulations (apart from grasps) are to be able to pick up a tool and draw it into a nested grip against the palm, and to be able to hold a pistol-grip tool such as an electric drill and pull the trigger. A model was tested and found capable of both these operations.

  3. Discovery, regulation, and action of the major apoptotic nucleases DFF40/CAD and endonuclease G.

    PubMed

    Widlak, Piotr; Garrard, William T

    2005-04-15

    Toward the end of the 20th and beginning of the 21st centuries, clever in vitro biochemical complementation experiments and genetic screens from the laboratories of Xiaodong Wang, Shigekazu Nagata, and Ding Xue led to the discovery of two major apoptotic nucleases, termed DNA fragmentation factor (DFF) or caspase-activated DNase (CAD) and endonuclease G (Endo G). Both endonucleases attack chromatin to yield 3'-hydroxyl groups and 5'-phosphate residues, first at the level of 50-300 kb cleavage products and next at the level of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, but these nucleases possess completely different cellular locations in normal cells and are regulated in vastly different ways. In non-apoptotic cells, DFF exists in the nucleus as a heterodimer, composed of a 45 kD chaperone and inhibitor subunit (DFF45) [also called inhibitor of CAD (ICAD-L)] and a 40 kD latent nuclease subunit (DFF40/CAD). Apoptotic activation of caspase-3 or -7 results in the cleavage of DFF45/ICAD and release of active DFF40/CAD nuclease. DFF40's nuclease activity is further activated by specific chromosomal proteins, such as histone H1, HMGB1/2, and topoisomerase II. DFF is regulated by multiple pre- and post-activation fail-safe steps, which include the requirements for DFF45/ICAD, Hsp70, and Hsp40 proteins to mediate appropriate folding during translation to generate a potentially activatable nuclease, and the synthesis in stoichiometric excess of the inhibitors (DFF45/35; ICAD-S/L). By contrast, Endo G resides in the mitochondrial intermembrane space in normal cells, and is released into the nucleus upon apoptotic disruption of mitochondrial membrane permeability in association with co-activators such as apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). Understanding further regulatory check-points involved in safeguarding non-apoptotic cells against accidental activation of these nucleases remain as future challenges, as well as designing ways to selectively activate these nucleases in tumor cells.

  4. Modification of Bacterial Effector Proteins Inside Eukaryotic Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Crina M.; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Valls, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria manipulate their hosts by delivering a number of virulence proteins -called effectors- directly into the plant or animal cells. Recent findings have shown that such effectors can suffer covalent modifications inside the eukaryotic cells. Here, we summarize the recent reports where effector modifications by the eukaryotic machinery have been described. We restrict our focus on proteins secreted by the type III or type IV systems, excluding other bacterial toxins. We describe the known examples of effectors whose enzymatic activity is triggered by interaction with plant and animal cell factors, including GTPases, E2-Ubiquitin conjugates, cyclophilin and thioredoxins. We focus on the structural interactions with these factors and their influence on effector function. We also review the described examples of host-mediated post-translational effector modifications which are required for proper subcellular location and function. These host-specific covalent modifications include phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, and lipidations such as prenylation, fatty acylation and phospholipid binding. PMID:27489796

  5. Holliday junction resolvases and related nucleases: identification of new families, phyletic distribution and evolutionary trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Aravind, L.; Makarova, Kira S.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2000-01-01

    Holliday junction resolvases (HJRs) are key enzymes of DNA recombination. A detailed computer analysis of the structural and evolutionary relationships of HJRs and related nucleases suggests that the HJR function has evolved independently from at least four distinct structural folds, namely RNase H, endonuclease, endonuclease VII–colicin E and RusA. The endonuclease fold, whose structural prototypes are the phage λ exonuclease, the very short patch repair nuclease (Vsr) and type II restriction enzymes, is shown to encompass by far a greater diversity of nucleases than previously suspected. This fold unifies archaeal HJRs, repair nucleases such as RecB and Vsr, restriction enzymes and a variety of predicted nucleases whose specific activities remain to be determined. Within the RNase H fold a new family of predicted HJRs, which is nearly ubiquitous in bacteria, was discovered, in addition to the previously characterized RuvC family. The proteins of this family, typified by Escherichia coli YqgF, are likely to function as an alternative to RuvC in most bacteria, but could be the principal HJRs in low-GC Gram-positive bacteria and Aquifex. Endonuclease VII of phage T4 is shown to serve as a structural template for many nucleases, including McrA and other type II restriction enzymes. Together with colicin E7, endonuclease VII defines a distinct metal-dependent nuclease fold. As a result of this analysis, the principal HJRs are now known or confidently predicted for all bacteria and archaea whose genomes have been completely sequenced, with many species encoding multiple potential HJRs. Horizontal gene transfer, lineage-specific gene loss and gene family expansion, and non-orthologous gene displacement seem to have been major forces in the evolution of HJRs and related nucleases. A remarkable case of displacement is seen in the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, which does not possess any of the typical HJRs, but instead encodes, in its chromosome and each

  6. Analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica Effector Translocation into Host Cells Using Beta-lactamase Effector Fusions.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Manuel; Zobiak, Bernd; Nauth, Theresa; Aepfelbacher, Martin

    2015-10-13

    Many gram-negative bacteria including pathogenic Yersinia spp. employ type III secretion systems to translocate effector proteins into eukaryotic target cells. Inside the host cell the effector proteins manipulate cellular functions to the benefit of the bacteria. To better understand the control of type III secretion during host cell interaction, sensitive and accurate assays to measure translocation are required. We here describe the application of an assay based on the fusion of a Yersinia enterocolitica effector protein fragment (Yersinia outer protein; YopE) with TEM-1 beta-lactamase for quantitative analysis of translocation. The assay relies on cleavage of a cell permeant FRET dye (CCF4/AM) by translocated beta-lactamase fusion. After cleavage of the cephalosporin core of CCF4 by the beta-lactamase, FRET from coumarin to fluorescein is disrupted and excitation of the coumarin moiety leads to blue fluorescence emission. Different applications of this method have been described in the literature highlighting its versatility. The method allows for analysis of translocation in vitro and also in in vivo, e.g., in a mouse model. Detection of the fluorescence signals can be performed using plate readers, FACS analysis or fluorescence microscopy. In the setup described here, in vitro translocation of effector fusions into HeLa cells by different Yersinia mutants is monitored by laser scanning microscopy. Recording intracellular conversion of the FRET reporter by the beta-lactamase effector fusion in real-time provides robust quantitative results. We here show exemplary data, demonstrating increased translocation by a Y. enterocolitica YopE mutant compared to the wild type strain.

  7. Fibre optic sensor on robot end effector for flexible assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, K.L.; Lau, W.S.; Choi, C.K.; Shan, Y.Y.

    1995-12-31

    A fibre optic sensor system was constructed for use on robot end effectors for flexible assembly. The sensor detected the deviations between robot end effector and the workpiece. The signal was fed back to robot controller to shift the end effector until the centre of end effector and the centre of workpiece were aligned at the correct orientation. Then workpiece can be grasped symmetrically. Sensor fusion concept was used to guard against sensor system failure. Fuzzy linguistic variable and control rule concept were introduced in the sensor integration. The experimental setup for the sensor integrated system was shown. The accuracy was also discussed.

  8. Nuclease stability of boron-modified nucleic acids: application to label-free mismatch detection.

    PubMed

    Reverte, Maëva; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Smietana, Michael

    2015-11-21

    5'-End boronic acid-modified oligonucleotides were evaluated against various nucleases at single and double stranded levels. The results show that these modifications induce a high resistance to degradation by calf-spleen and snake venom phosphodiesterases. More importantly, this eventually led to the development of a new label-free enzyme-assisted fluorescence-based method for single mismatch detection.

  9. Escherichia coli DNA photolyase stimulates uvrABC excision nuclease in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sancar, A; Franklin, K A; Sancar, G B

    1984-01-01

    Pyrimidine dimers are the major photoproducts produced in cellular DNA upon UV irradiation. In Escherichia coli there are dark and photorepair mechanisms that eliminate the dimers from DNA and prevent their lethal and mutagenic effects. To determine whether these repair mechanisms act cooperatively or competitively in repairing DNA, we investigated the effects upon one another of DNA photolyase, which mediates photorepair, and uvrABC excision nuclease, an enzyme complex of the uvrABC gene products, which catalyzes nucleotide excision repair. We found that photolyase stimulates the removal of pyrimidine dimers but not other DNA adducts by uvrABC excision nuclease. The two subunits of uvrABC excision nuclease, the uvrA and uvrB proteins which together bind to the dimer region of DNA, had no effect on the activity of photolyase. T4 endonuclease V, which like photolyase is specific for pyrimidine dimers, was inhibited by photolyase, suggesting that these two proteins recognize the same or similar chemical structures in UV-irradiated DNA that are different from those recognized by uvrABC excision nuclease. Images PMID:6390436

  10. Multicomponent synthesis of artificial nucleases and their RNase and DNase activity

    PubMed Central

    Gulevich, Anton V; Koroleva, Lyudmila S; Morozova, Olga V; Bakhvalova, Valentina N

    2011-01-01

    Summary The synthesis of new, artificial ribonucleases containing two amino acid residues connected by an aliphatic linker has been developed. Target molecules were synthesized via a catalytic three-component Ugi reaction from aliphatic diisocyanides. Preliminary investigations proved unspecific nuclease activity of the new compounds towards single-stranded RNA and double-stranded circular DNA. PMID:21915218

  11. Sulfonamide-bridged nucleic acid: synthesis, high RNA selective hybridization, and high nuclease resistance.

    PubMed

    Mitsuoka, Yasunori; Fujimura, Yuko; Waki, Reiko; Kugimiya, Akira; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Hari, Yoshiyuki; Obika, Satoshi

    2014-11-07

    2'-N,4'-C-(N-methylamino)sulfonylmethylene-bridged thymidine (SuNA), which has a six-membered linkage including a sulfonamide moiety, was synthesized and introduced into oligonucleotides. The oligonucleotides containing SuNA exhibited excellent nuclease resistance, a high affinity toward single-stranded RNA, and a low affinity toward single-stranded DNA compared to the natural oligonucleotide.

  12. Genome-wide specificities of CRISPR-Cas Cpf1 nucleases in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P.; Tsai, Shengdar Q.; Prew, Michelle S.; Nguyen, Nhu T.; Welch, Moira M.; Lopez, Jose M.; McCaw, Zachary R.; Aryee, Martin J.; Joung, J. Keith

    2016-01-01

    The activities and genome-wide specificities of CRISPR-Cas Cpf1 nucleases1 are not well defined. We show that two Cpf1 nucleases from Acidaminococcus sp. BV3L6 and Lachnospiraceae bacterium ND2006 (AsCpf1 and LbCpf1, respectively) have on-target efficiencies in human cells comparable with those of the widely used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9)2–5. We also report that four to six bases at the 3’ end of the short CRISPR RNA (crRNA) used to program Cpf1 nucleases are insensitive to single base mismatches, but that many of the other bases in this region of the crRNA are highly sensitive to single or double substitutions. Using GUIDE-seq and targeted deep sequencing analyses performed with both Cpf1 nucleases, we were unable to detect off-target cleavage for more than half of 20 different crRNAs. Our results suggest that AsCpf1 and LbCpf1 are highly specific in human cells. PMID:27347757

  13. Tudor domain proteins in protozoan parasites and characterization of Plasmodium falciparum tudor staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Manzar J; Korde, Reshma; Singh, Shivani; Mohmmed, Asif; Dasaradhi, P V N; Chauhan, V S; Malhotra, Pawan

    2008-04-01

    RNA-binding proteins play key roles in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. In eukaryotic cells, a multitude of RNA-binding proteins with several RNA-binding domains/motifs have been described. Here, we show the existence of two Tudor domain containing proteins, a survival of motor neuron (SMN)-like protein and a Staphylococcus aureus nuclease homologue referred to as TSN, in Plasmodium and other protozoan parasites. Activity analysis shows that Plasmodium falciparum TSN (PfTSN) possesses nuclease activity and Tudor domain is the RNA-binding domain. A specific inhibitor of micrococcal nucleases, 3',5'-deoxythymidine bisphosphate (pdTp) inhibits the nuclease as well as RNA-binding activities of the protein. PfTSN shows a predominant nuclear localization. Treatment of P. falciparum with pdTp, inhibited in vitro growth of both chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains of P. falciparum, while a four fold concentration of pdTp did not have any significant effect on the mammalian cell line, Huh-7D12. Altogether, these results suggest that PfTSN is an essential enzyme in the parasite's life cycle.

  14. Kinetic analysis of the cleavage of natural and synthetic substrates by the Serratia nuclease.

    PubMed

    Friedhoff, P; Meiss, G; Kolmes, B; Pieper, U; Gimadutdinow, O; Urbanke, C; Pingoud, A

    1996-10-15

    The extracellular nuclease from Serratia marcescens is a non-specific endonuclease that hydrolyzes double-stranded and single-stranded DNA and RNA with high specific activity. Steady-state and presteady-state kinetic cleavage experiments were performed with natural and synthetic DNA and RNA substrates to understand the mechanism of action of the Serratia nuclease. Most of the natural substrates are cleaved with similar Kcat and K(m) values, the Kcat/K(m) ratios being comparable to that of staphylococcal nuclease. Substrates with extreme structural features, like poly(dA).poly(dT) or poly(dG).poly(dC), are cleaved by the Serratia nuclease with a 50 times higher or 10 times lower K(m), respectively, as salmon testis DNA. Neither with natural DNA or RNA nor synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide substrates did we observe substrate inhibition for the Serratia nuclease as reported recently. Experiments with short oligodeoxynucleotides confirmed previous results that for moderately good cleavage activity the substrate should contain at least five phosphate residues. Shorter substrates are still cleaved by the Serratia nuclease, albeit at a rate reduced by a factor of more than 100. Cleavage experiments with oligodeoxynucleotides substituted by a single phosphorothioate group showed that the negative charge of the pro-Rp-oxygen of the phosphate group 3' adjacent to the scissile phosphodiester bond is essential for cleavage, as only the Rp-phosphorothioate supports cleavage at the 5' adjacent phosphodiester bond. Furthermore, the modified bond itself is only cleaved in the Rp-diastereomer, albeit 1000 times more slowly than the corresponding unmodified phosphodiester bond, which offers the possibility to determine the stereochemical outcome of cleavage. Pre-steady-state cleavage experiments demonstrate that it is not dissociation of products but association of enzyme and substrate or the cleavage of the phosphodiester bond that is the rate-limiting step of the reaction. Finally

  15. Active membrane cholesterol as a physiological effector.

    PubMed

    Lange, Yvonne; Steck, Theodore L

    2016-09-01

    Sterols associate preferentially with plasma membrane sphingolipids and saturated phospholipids to form stoichiometric complexes. Cholesterol in molar excess of the capacity of these polar bilayer lipids has a high accessibility and fugacity; we call this fraction active cholesterol. This review first considers how active cholesterol serves as an upstream regulator of cellular sterol homeostasis. The mechanism appears to utilize the redistribution of active cholesterol down its diffusional gradient to the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, where it binds multiple effectors and directs their feedback activity. We have also reviewed a broad literature in search of a role for active cholesterol (as opposed to bulk cholesterol or lipid domains such as rafts) in the activity of diverse membrane proteins. Several systems provide such evidence, implicating, in particular, caveolin-1, various kinds of ABC-type cholesterol transporters, solute transporters, receptors and ion channels. We suggest that this larger role for active cholesterol warrants close attention and can be tested easily.

  16. Miniature Trailing Edge Effector for Aerodynamic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hak-Tae (Inventor); Bieniawski, Stefan R. (Inventor); Kroo, Ilan M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Improved miniature trailing edge effectors for aerodynamic control are provided. Three types of devices having aerodynamic housings integrated to the trailing edge of an aerodynamic shape are presented, which vary in details of how the control surface can move. A bucket type device has a control surface which is the back part of a C-shaped member having two arms connected by the back section. The C-shaped section is attached to a housing at the ends of the arms, and is rotatable about an axis parallel to the wing trailing edge to provide up, down and neutral states. A flip-up type device has a control surface which rotates about an axis parallel to the wing trailing edge to provide up, down, neutral and brake states. A rotating type device has a control surface which rotates about an axis parallel to the chord line to provide up, down and neutral states.

  17. Rack Insertion End Effector (RIEE) automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malladi, Narasimha

    1993-01-01

    NASA is developing a mechanism to manipulate and insert Racks into the Space Station Logistic modules. The mechanism consists of the following: a base with three motorized degrees of freedom, a 3 section motorized boom that goes from 15 to 44 feet in length, and a Rack Insertion End Effector (RIEE) with 5 hand wheels for precise alignment. The robotics section was tasked with the automation of the RIEE unit. In this report, for the automation of the RIEE unit, application of the Perceptics Vision System was conceptually developed to determine the position and orientation of the RIEE relative to the logistic module, and a MathCad program is written to display the needed displacements for precise alignment and final insertion of the Rack. The uniqueness of this report is that the whole report is in fact a MathCad program including text, derivations, and executable equations with example inputs and outputs.

  18. The extracellular nuclease Dns and its role in natural transformation of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Blokesch, Melanie; Schoolnik, Gary K

    2008-11-01

    Free extracellular DNA is abundant in many aquatic environments. While much of this DNA will be degraded by nucleases secreted by the surrounding microbial community, some is available as transforming material that can be taken up by naturally competent bacteria. One such species is Vibrio cholerae, an autochthonous member of estuarine, riverine, and marine habitats and the causative agent of cholera, whose competence program is induced after colonization of chitin surfaces. In this study, we investigate how Vibrio cholerae's two extracellular nucleases, Xds and Dns, influence its natural transformability. We show that in the absence of Dns, transformation frequencies are significantly higher than in its presence. During growth on a chitin surface, an increase in transformation efficiency was found to correspond in time with increasing cell density and the repression of dns expression by the quorum-sensing regulator HapR. In contrast, at low cell density, the absence of HapR relieves dns repression, leading to the degradation of free DNA and to the abrogation of the transformation phenotype. Thus, as cell density increases, Vibrio cholerae undergoes a switch from nuclease-mediated degradation of extracellular DNA to the uptake of DNA by bacteria induced to a state of competence by chitin. Taken together, these results suggest the following model: nuclease production by low-density populations of V. cholerae might foster rapid growth by providing a source of nucleotides for the repletion of nucleotide pools. In contrast, the termination of nuclease production by static, high-density populations allows the uptake of intact DNA and coincides with a phase of potential genome diversification.

  19. Mouse spermatozoa contain a nuclease that is activated by pretreatment with EGTA and subsequent calcium incubation.

    PubMed

    Boaz, Segal M; Dominguez, Kenneth; Shaman, Jeffrey A; Ward, W Steven

    2008-04-01

    We demonstrated that mouse spermatozoa cleave their DNA into approximately 50 kb loop-sized fragments with topoisomerase IIB when treated with MnCl(2) and CaCl(2) in a process we term sperm chromatin fragmentation (SCF). SCF can be reversed by EDTA. A nuclease then further degrades the DNA in a process we term sperm DNA degradation (SDD). MnCl(2) alone could elicit this activity, but CaCl(2) had no effect. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a nuclease in the vas deferens that can be activated by ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) to digest the sperm DNA by SDD. Spermatozoa were extracted with salt and dithiothreitol to remove protamines and then incubated with EGTA. Next, the EGTA was removed and divalent cations were added. We found that Mn(2+), Ca(2+), or Zn(2+) could each activate SDD in spermatozoa but Mg(2+) could not. When the reaction was slowed by incubation on ice, EGTA pretreatment followed by incubation in Ca(2+) elicited the reversible fragmentation of sperm DNA evident in SCF. When the reactions were then incubated at 37 degrees C they progressed to the more complete degradation of DNA by SDD. EDTA could also be used to activate the nuclease, but required a higher concentration than EGTA. This EGTA-activatable nuclease activity was found in each fraction of the vas deferens plasma: in the spermatozoa, in the surrounding fluid, and in the insoluble components in the fluid. These results suggest that this sperm nuclease is regulated by a mechanism that is sensitive to EGTA, possibly by removing inhibition of a calcium binding protein.

  20. The large terminase DNA packaging motor grips DNA with its ATPase domain for cleavage by the flexible nuclease domain.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Brendan J; Hayes, Janelle A; Stone, Nicholas P; Xu, Rui-Gang; Kelch, Brian A

    2017-01-12

    Many viruses use a powerful terminase motor to pump their genome inside an empty procapsid shell during virus maturation. The large terminase (TerL) protein contains both enzymatic activities necessary for packaging in such viruses: the adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) that powers DNA translocation and an endonuclease that cleaves the concatemeric genome at both initiation and completion of genome packaging. However, how TerL binds DNA during translocation and cleavage remains mysterious. Here we investigate DNA binding and cleavage using TerL from the thermophilic phage P74-26. We report the structure of the P74-26 TerL nuclease domain, which allows us to model DNA binding in the nuclease active site. We screened a large panel of TerL variants for defects in binding and DNA cleavage, revealing that the ATPase domain is the primary site for DNA binding, and is required for nuclease activity. The nuclease domain is dispensable for DNA binding but residues lining the active site guide DNA for cleavage. Kinetic analysis of DNA cleavage suggests flexible tethering of the nuclease domains during DNA cleavage. We propose that interactions with the procapsid during DNA translocation conformationally restrict the nuclease domain, inhibiting cleavage; TerL release from the capsid upon completion of packaging unlocks the nuclease domains to cleave DNA.

  1. Comparison of T7E1 and surveyor mismatch cleavage assays to detect mutations triggered by engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Vouillot, Léna; Thélie, Aurore; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-07

    Genome editing using engineered nucleases is used for targeted mutagenesis. But because genome editing does not target all loci with similar efficiencies, the mutation hit-rate at a given locus needs to be evaluated. The analysis of mutants obtained using engineered nucleases requires specific methods for mutation detection, and the enzyme mismatch cleavage method is used commonly for this purpose. This method uses enzymes that cleave heteroduplex DNA at mismatches and extrahelical loops formed by single or multiple nucleotides. Bacteriophage resolvases and single-stranded nucleases are used commonly in the assay but have not been compared side-by-side on mutations obtained by engineered nucleases. We present the first comparison of the sensitivity of T7E1 and Surveyor EMC assays on deletions and point mutations obtained by zinc finger nuclease targeting in frog embryos. We report the mutation detection limits and efficiencies of T7E1 and Surveyor. In addition, we find that T7E1 outperforms the Surveyor nuclease in terms of sensitivity with deletion substrates, whereas Surveyor is better for detecting single nucleotide changes. We conclude that T7E1 is the preferred enzyme to scan mutations triggered by engineered nucleases.

  2. Comparison of T7E1 and Surveyor Mismatch Cleavage Assays to Detect Mutations Triggered by Engineered Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Vouillot, Léna; Thélie, Aurore; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing using engineered nucleases is used for targeted mutagenesis. But because genome editing does not target all loci with similar efficiencies, the mutation hit-rate at a given locus needs to be evaluated. The analysis of mutants obtained using engineered nucleases requires specific methods for mutation detection, and the enzyme mismatch cleavage method is used commonly for this purpose. This method uses enzymes that cleave heteroduplex DNA at mismatches and extrahelical loops formed by single or multiple nucleotides. Bacteriophage resolvases and single-stranded nucleases are used commonly in the assay but have not been compared side-by-side on mutations obtained by engineered nucleases. We present the first comparison of the sensitivity of T7E1 and Surveyor EMC assays on deletions and point mutations obtained by zinc finger nuclease targeting in frog embryos. We report the mutation detection limits and efficiencies of T7E1 and Surveyor. In addition, we find that T7E1 outperforms the Surveyor nuclease in terms of sensitivity with deletion substrates, whereas Surveyor is better for detecting single nucleotide changes. We conclude that T7E1 is the preferred enzyme to scan mutations triggered by engineered nucleases. PMID:25566793

  3. Effects of thyrotropin on the phosphorylation of histones and nonhistone phosphoproteins in micrococcal nuclease-sensitive and resistant thyroid chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, E.; Spaulding, S.W.

    1983-05-01

    Actively transcribed regions of chromatin are more susceptible than bulk chromatin to digestion by nucleases, and useful information about the composition and structure of active chromatin may be obtained by studying the chromatin fragments released from nuclei by limited nuclease digestion. In the present study, we have used micrococcal nuclease to investigate the effects of TSH on protein phosphorylation in nuclease-sensitive fractions of calf thyroid chromatin. Batches of calf thyroid slices were incubated for 2 h with /sup 32/Pi, with or without 50 mU/ml TSH. Nuclei were then prepared and the distribution of /sup 32/P-labeled histones, high mobility group (HMG) proteins, and other acid-soluble phosphoproteins between micrococcal nuclease-sensitive and resistant fractions of chromatin was examined. TSH increased the amount of /sup 32/P incorporated into HMG 14 and the histones H1 and H3. Hormone-dependent increases in the /sup 32/P-labeling of H1 and H3 were not selectively associated with micrococcal nuclease-sensitive chromatin. In contrast, (/sup 32/P) HMG-14 was preferentially solubilized from nuclei by micrococcal nuclease. This lends support to the view that TSH-induced effects on the structure and function of transcriptionally active chromatin may be mediated in part by phosphorylation of HMG 14.

  4. A novel nuclease-ATPase (Nar71) from archaea is part of a proposed thermophilic DNA repair system.

    PubMed

    Guy, Colin P; Majerník, Alan I; Chong, James P J; Bolt, Edward L

    2004-01-01

    We have identified a novel structure-specific nuclease in highly fractionated extracts of the thermophilic archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (Mth). The 71 kDa protein product of open reading frame mth1090 is a nuclease with ATPase activity, which we call Nar71 (Nuclease-ATPase in Repair, 71 kDa). The nar71 gene is located in a gene neighbourhood proposed by genomics to encode a novel DNA repair system conserved in thermophiles. The biochemical characterization of Nar71 presented here is the first analysis from within this neighbourhood, and it supports the insight from genomics. Nuclease activity of Nar71 is specific for 3' flaps and flayed duplexes, targeting single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) regions. This activity requires Mg2+ or Mn2+ and is greatly reduced in ATP. In ATP, Nar71 displaces ssDNA, also with high specificity for 3' flap and flayed duplex DNA. Strand displacement is weak compared with nuclease activity, but in ATPS it is abolished, suggesting that Nar71 couples ATP hydrolysis to DNA strand separation. ATPase assays confirmed that Nar71 is stimulated by ssDNA, though not double-stranded DNA. Mutation of Lys-117 in Nar71 abolished ATPase and nuclease activity, and we describe a separation-of-function mutant (K68A) that has lost ATPase activity but retains nuclease activity. A model of possible Nar71 function in DNA repair is presented.

  5. Computational Prediction of Effector Proteins in Fungi: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Sonah, Humira; Deshmukh, Rupesh K.; Bélanger, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Effector proteins are mostly secretory proteins that stimulate plant infection by manipulating the host response. Identifying fungal effector proteins and understanding their function is of great importance in efforts to curb losses to plant diseases. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have facilitated the availability of several fungal genomes and 1000s of transcriptomes. As a result, the growing amount of genomic information has provided great opportunities to identify putative effector proteins in different fungal species. There is little consensus over the annotation and functionality of effector proteins, and mostly small secretory proteins are considered as effector proteins, a concept that tends to overestimate the number of proteins involved in a plant–pathogen interaction. With the characterization of Avr genes, criteria for computational prediction of effector proteins are becoming more efficient. There are 100s of tools available for the identification of conserved motifs, signature sequences and structural features in the proteins. Many pipelines and online servers, which combine several tools, are made available to perform genome-wide identification of effector proteins. In this review, available tools and pipelines, their strength and limitations for effective identification of fungal effector proteins are discussed. We also present an exhaustive list of classically secreted proteins along with their key conserved motifs found in 12 common plant pathogens (11 fungi and one oomycete) through an analytical pipeline. PMID:26904083

  6. The Pseudomonas syringae effector protein HopZ1a suppresses effector-triggered immunity.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Guevara, Carlos M; Tornero, Pablo; Ruiz-Albert, Javier; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2010-09-01

    *The Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae type III effector HopZ1a is a member of the HopZ effector family of cysteine-proteases that triggers immunity in Arabidopsis. This immunity is dependent on HopZ1a cysteine-protease activity, and independent of known resistance genes. We have previously shown that HopZ1a-triggered immunity is partially additive to that triggered by AvrRpt2. These partially additive effects could be caused by at least two mechanisms: their signalling pathways share a common element(s), or one effector interferes with the response triggered by the other. *Here, we investigate the molecular basis for the partially additive effect displayed by AvrRpt2- and HopZ1a-triggered immunities, by analysing competitive indices, hypersensitive response and symptom induction, PR-1 accumulation, expression of PR genes, and systemic acquired resistance (SAR) induction. *Partially additive effects between these defence responses require HopZ1a cysteine-protease activity, and also take place between HopZ1a and AvrRps4 or AvrRpm1-triggered responses. We establish that HopZ1a-triggered immunity is independent of salicylic acid (SA), EDS1, jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET)-dependent pathways, and show that HopZ1a suppresses the induction of PR-1 and PR-5 associated with P. syringae pv tomato (Pto)-triggered effector-triggered immunity (ETI)-like defences, AvrRpt2-triggered immunity, and Pto or Pto (avrRpt2) activation of SAR, and that suppression requires HopZ1a cysteine-protease activity. *Our results indicate that HopZ1a triggers an unusual resistance independent of known pathways and suppresses SA and EDS1-dependent resistance.

  7. Double lead spiral platen parallel jaw end effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beals, David C.

    1989-01-01

    The double lead spiral platen parallel jaw end effector is an extremely powerful, compact, and highly controllable end effector that represents a significant improvement in gripping force and efficiency over the LaRC Puma (LP) end effector. The spiral end effector is very simple in its design and has relatively few parts. The jaw openings are highly predictable and linear, making it an ideal candidate for remote control. The finger speed is within acceptable working limits and can be modified to meet the user needs; for instance, greater finger speed could be obtained by increasing the pitch of the spiral. The force relaxation is comparable to the other tested units. Optimization of the end effector design would involve a compromise of force and speed for a given application.

  8. Secretion, delivery and function of oomycete effector proteins.

    PubMed

    Wawra, Stephan; Belmonte, Rodrigo; Löbach, Lars; Saraiva, Marcia; Willems, Ariane; van West, Pieter

    2012-12-01

    Oomycetes are responsible for multi-billion dollar damages in aquaculture, agriculture and forestry. One common strategy they share with most cellular disease agents is the secretion of effector proteins. Effectors are molecules that change host physiology by initiating and allowing an infection to develop. Oomycetes secrete both extracellular and intracellular effectors. Studying secretion, delivery and function of effectors will hopefully lead to alternative control measures, which is much needed as several chemicals to control plant and animal pathogenic oomycetes cannot be used anymore; due to resistance in the host, or because the control measures have been prohibited as a result of toxicity to the environment and/or consumers. Here the latest findings on oomycete effector secretion, delivery and function are discussed.

  9. Type III effector-mediated processes in Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Joris; Finlay, B Brett

    2012-06-01

    Salmonella is one of the most successful bacterial pathogens that infect humans in both developed and developing countries. In order to cause infection, Salmonella uses type III secretion systems to inject bacterial effector proteins into host cells. In the age of antibiotic resistance, researchers have been looking for new strategies to reduce Salmonella infection. To understand infection and to analyze type III secretion as a potential therapeutic target, research has focused on identification of effectors, characterization of effector functions and how they contribute to disease. Many effector-mediated processes have been identified that contribute to infection but thus far no specific treatment has been found. In this perspective we discuss our current understanding of effector-mediated processes and discuss new techniques and approaches that may help us to find a solution to this worldwide problem.

  10. Advanced Aerodynamic Design of Passive Porosity Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.; Viken, Sally A.; Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes aerodynamic design work aimed at developing a passive porosity control effector system for a generic tailless fighter aircraft. As part of this work, a computational design tool was developed and used to layout passive porosity effector systems for longitudinal and lateral-directional control at a low-speed, high angle of attack condition. Aerodynamic analysis was conducted using the NASA Langley computational fluid dynamics code USM3D, in conjunction with a newly formulated surface boundary condition for passive porosity. Results indicate that passive porosity effectors can provide maneuver control increments that equal and exceed those of conventional aerodynamic effectors for low-speed, high-alpha flight, with control levels that are a linear function of porous area. This work demonstrates the tremendous potential of passive porosity to yield simple control effector systems that have no external moving parts and will preserve an aircraft's fixed outer mold line.

  11. Genome Editing in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells: Approaches, Pitfalls, and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, William T; Warren, Curtis R; Cowan, Chad A

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) with knockout or mutant alleles can be generated using custom-engineered nucleases. Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 - nucleases are the most commonly employed technologies for editing hPSC genomes. In this Protocol Review we provide a brief overview of custom-engineered nucleases in the context of gene editing in hPSCs with a focus on the application of TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9. We will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of each method and discuss theoretical and technical considerations for experimental design. PMID:26748756

  12. Genome editing comes of age.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Soo

    2016-09-01

    Genome editing harnesses programmable nucleases to cut and paste genetic information in a targeted manner in living cells and organisms. Here, I review the development of programmable nucleases, including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), TAL (transcription-activator-like) effector nucleases (TALENs) and CRISPR (cluster of regularly interspaced palindromic repeats)-Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) RNA-guided endonucleases (RGENs). I specifically highlight the key advances that set the foundation for the rapid and widespread implementation of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing approaches that has revolutionized the field.

  13. Action selection in multi-effector decision making

    PubMed Central

    Madlon-Kay, Seth; Pesaran, Bijan; Daw, Nathaniel D.

    2012-01-01

    Decision making and reinforcement learning over movements suffer from the curse of dimensionality: the space of possible movements is too vast to search or even represent in its entirety. When actions involve only a single effector, this problem can be ameliorated by considering that effector separately; accordingly, the brain’s sensorimotor systems can subdivide choice by representing values and actions separately for each effector. However, for many actions, such as playing the piano, the value of an action by an effector (e.g., a hand) depends inseparably on the actions of other effectors. By definition, the values of such coordinated multi-effector actions cannot be represented by effector-specific action values, such as those that have been most extensively investigated in parietal and premotor regions. For such actions, one possible solution is to choose according to more abstract valuations over different goods or options, which can then be mapped onto the necessary motor actions. Such an approach separates the learning and decision problem, which will often be lower-dimensional than the space of possible movements, from the multi-effector movement planning problem. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) is thought to contain goods-based value signals, so we hypothesized that this region might preferentially drive multi-effector action selection. To examine how the brain solves this problem, we used fMRI to compare patterns of BOLD activity in humans during reward learning tasks in which options were selected through either unimanual or bimanual actions, and in which the response requirements in the latter condition inseparably coupled valuation across both hands. We found value signals in the bilateral medial motor cortex and vmPFC, and consistent with previous studies, the medial motor value signals contained contra-lateral biases indicating effector-specificity, while the vmPFC value signals did not exhibit detectable effector specificity. Although

  14. Genome engineering in human cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Minjung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing in human cells is of great value in research, medicine, and biotechnology. Programmable nucleases including zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases recognize a specific target sequence and make a double-strand break at that site, which can result in gene disruption, gene insertion, gene correction, or chromosomal rearrangements. The target sequence complexities of these programmable nucleases are higher than 3.2 mega base pairs, the size of the haploid human genome. Here, we briefly introduce the structure of the human genome and the characteristics of each programmable nuclease, and review their applications in human cells including pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we discuss various delivery methods for nucleases, programmable nickases, and enrichment of gene-edited human cells, all of which facilitate efficient and precise genome editing in human cells.

  15. Signals for the execution of Th2 effector function.

    PubMed

    Fowell, Deborah J

    2009-04-01

    Appropriate control of infection depends on the generation of lymphocytes armed with a particular array of cytokine and chemokine effector molecules. The differentiation of naïve T cells into functionally distinct effector subsets is regulated by signals from the T cell receptor (TCR) and cytokine receptors. Using gene knock-out approaches, the initiation of discrete effector programs appears differentially sensitive to the loss of individual TCR signaling components; likely due to differences in the transcription factors needed to activate individual cytokine genes. Less well understood however, are the signal requirements for the execution of effector function. With a focus on Th2 cells and the kinase ITK, we review recent observations that point to differences between the signals needed for the initiation and implementation of cytokine programs in CD4+ T cells. Indeed, Th2 effector cells signal differently from both their naïve counterparts and from Th1 effectors suggesting they may transduce activation signals differently or may be selectively receptive to different activation signals. Potential regulation points for effector function lie at the level of transcription and translation of cytokine genes. We also discuss how provision of these execution signals may be spatially segregated in vivo occurring at tissue sites of inflammation and subject to modulation by the pathogen itself.

  16. A nuclease that mediates cell death induced by DNA damage and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingfei; An, Ran; Umanah, George K.; Park, Hyejin; Nambiar, Kalyani; Eacker, Stephen M.; Kim, BongWoo; Bao, Lei; Harraz, Maged M.; Chang, Calvin; Chen, Rong; Wang, Jennifer E.; Kam, Tae-In; Jeong, Jun Seop; Xie, Zhi; Neifert, Stewart; Qian, Jiang; Andrabi, Shaida A.; Blackshaw, Seth; Zhu, Heng; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-li; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition or genetic deletion of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is protective against toxic insults in many organ systems. The molecular mechanisms underlying PARP-1–dependent cell death involve release of mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and its translocation to the nucleus, which results in chromatinolysis. We identified macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) as a PARP-1–dependent AIF-associated nuclease (PAAN). AIF was required for recruitment of MIF to the nucleus, where MIF cleaves genomic DNA into large fragments. Depletion of MIF, disruption of the AIF-MIF interaction, or mutation of glutamic acid at position 22 in the catalytic nuclease domain blocked MIF nuclease activity and inhibited chromatinolysis, cell death induced by glutamate excitotoxicity, and focal stroke. Inhibition of MIF's nuclease activity is a potential therapeutic target for diseases caused by excessive PARP-1 activation. PMID:27846469

  17. Nuclease Target Site Selection for Maximizing On-target Activity and Minimizing Off-target Effects in Genome Editing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ciaran M; Cradick, Thomas J; Fine, Eli J; Bao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The rapid advancement in targeted genome editing using engineered nucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 systems has resulted in a suite of powerful methods that allows researchers to target any genomic locus of interest. A complementary set of design tools has been developed to aid researchers with nuclease design, target site selection, and experimental validation. Here, we review the various tools available for target selection in designing engineered nucleases, and for quantifying nuclease activity and specificity, including web-based search tools and experimental methods. We also elucidate challenges in target selection, especially in predicting off-target effects, and discuss future directions in precision genome editing and its applications. PMID:26750397

  18. Cleavage of the HIV replication primer tRNALys,3 in human cells expressing bacterial anticodon nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Shterman, N; Elroy-Stein, O; Morad, I; Amitsur, M; Kaufmann, G

    1995-01-01

    Anticodon nuclease is a bacterial restriction enzyme directed against tRNA(Lys). We report that anticodon nuclease also cleaves mammalian tRNA(Lys) molecules, with preference and site specificity shown towards the natural substrate. Expression of the anticodon nuclease core polypeptide PrrC in HeLa cells from a recombinant vaccinia virus elicited cleavage of intracellular tRNA(Lys),3. The data justify an inquiry into the possible application of anticodon nuclease as an inhibitor of tRNA(Lys),3-primed HIV replication. They also indicate that the anticodon region of tRNA(Lys) is a substrate recognition site and suggest that PrrC harbors the enzymatic activity. Images PMID:7784179

  19. Gene targeting by the TAL effector PthXo2 reveals cryptic resistance gene for bacterial blight of rice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junhui; Peng, Zhao; Long, Juying; Sosso, Davide; Liu, Bo; Eom, Joon-Seob; Huang, Sheng; Liu, Sanzhen; Vera Cruz, Casiana; Frommer, Wolf B; White, Frank F; Yang, Bing

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial blight of rice is caused by the γ-proteobacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, which utilizes a group of type III TAL (transcription activator-like) effectors to induce host gene expression and condition host susceptibility. Five SWEET genes are functionally redundant to support bacterial disease, but only two were experimentally proven targets of natural TAL effectors. Here, we report the identification of the sucrose transporter gene OsSWEET13 as the disease-susceptibility gene for PthXo2 and the existence of cryptic recessive resistance to PthXo2-dependent X. oryzae pv. oryzae due to promoter variations of OsSWEET13 in japonica rice. PthXo2-containing strains induce OsSWEET13 in indica rice IR24 due to the presence of an unpredicted and undescribed effector binding site not present in the alleles in japonica rice Nipponbare and Kitaake. The specificity of effector-associated gene induction and disease susceptibility is attributable to a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), which is also found in a polymorphic allele of OsSWEET13 known as the recessive resistance gene xa25 from the rice cultivar Minghui 63. The mutation of OsSWEET13 with CRISPR/Cas9 technology further corroborates the requirement of OsSWEET13 expression for the state of PthXo2-dependent disease susceptibility to X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Gene profiling of a collection of 104 strains revealed OsSWEET13 induction by 42 isolates of X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Heterologous expression of OsSWEET13 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells elevates sucrose concentrations in the apoplasm. The results corroborate a model whereby X. oryzae pv. oryzae enhances the release of sucrose from host cells in order to exploit the host resources.

  20. Computational investigation of miniature trailing edge effectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hak-Tae

    Miniature trailing edge effectors (MiTEs) are small flaps (typically 1% to 5% chord) actuated with deflection angles of up to 90 degrees. The small size, combined with little required power and good control authority, enables the device to be used for high bandwidth control as well as conventional attitude control. However, some of the aerodynamic characteristics of these devices are complex and poorly understood. This research investigated the aerodynamics of MiTEs using incompressible Navier-Stokes flow solvers, INS2D and INS3D. To understand the flow structure and establish a parametric database, two dimensional steady-state computations were performed for MiTEs with various geometries and flow conditions. Time accurate computations were used to resolve the unsteady characteristics including transient response and vortex shedding phenomena. The frequency response was studied to fully identify the dynamics of MiTEs. Three dimensional computations show the change in control effectiveness with respect to the spanwise length of MiTEs as well as the spanwise lift distribution induced by these devices. Based on the CFD results, an approximate vortex panel model was developed for design purposes that reproduces the key characteristics of MiTEs. Two application areas for MiTEs were explored. Flutter suppression was demonstrated by combining a finite element structural model with the vortex panel model. The application of MiTEs to augment maximum lift and improve the post stall behavior of an airfoil was also investigated.

  1. Bioprospecting open reading frames for peptide effectors.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ling; Scott, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Recent successes in the development of small-molecule antagonists of protein-protein interactions designed based on co-crystal structures of peptides bound to their biological targets confirm that short peptides derived from interacting proteins can be high-value ligands for pharmacologic validation of targets and for identification of druggable sites. Evolved sequence space is likely to be enriched for interacting peptides, but identifying minimal peptide effectors within genomic sequence can be labor intensive. Here we describe the use of incremental truncation to diversify genetic material on the scale of open reading frames into comprehensive libraries of constituent peptides. The approach is capable of generating peptides derived from both continuous and discontinuous sequence elements, and is compatible with the expression of free linear or backbone cyclic peptides, with peptides tethered to amino- or carboxyl-terminal fusion partners or with the expression of peptides displayed within protein scaffolds (peptide aptamers). Incremental truncation affords a valuable source of molecular diversity to interrogate the druggable genome or evaluate the therapeutic potential of candidate genes.

  2. Rack Insertion End Effector (RIEE) guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malladi, Narasimha S.

    1994-01-01

    NASA-KSC has developed a mechanism to handle and insert Racks into the Space Station Logistic Modules. This mechanism consists of a Base with 3 motorized degrees of freedom, a 3 section motorized Boom that goes from 15 to 44 feet in length, and a Rack Insertion End Effector (RIEE) with 5 hand wheels for precise alignment. During the 1993 NASA-ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at KSC, I designed an Active Vision (Camera) Arrangement and developed an algorithm to determine (1) the displacements required by the Room for its initial positioning and (2) the rotations required at the five hand-wheels of the RIEE, for the insertion of the Rack, using the centroids fo the Camera Images of the Location Targets in the Logistic Module. Presently, during the summer of '94, I completed the preliminary design of an easily portable measuring instrument using encoders to obtain the 3-Dimensional Coordinates of Location Targets in the Logistics Module relative to the RIEE mechanism frame. The algorithm developed in '93 can use the output of this instrument also. Simplification of the '93 work and suggestions for the future work are discussed.

  3. Effectors from Wheat Rust Fungi Suppress Multiple Plant Defense Responses.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Sowmya R; Yin, Chuntao; Kud, Joanna; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Mahoney, Aaron K; Xiao, Fangming; Hulbert, Scot H

    2017-01-01

    Fungi that cause cereal rust diseases (genus Puccinia) are important pathogens of wheat globally. Upon infection, the fungus secretes a number of effector proteins. Although a large repository of putative effectors has been predicted using bioinformatic pipelines, the lack of available high-throughput effector screening systems has limited functional studies on these proteins. In this study, we mined the available transcriptomes of Puccinia graminis and P. striiformis to look for potential effectors that suppress host hypersensitive response (HR). Twenty small (<300 amino acids), secreted proteins, with no predicted functions were selected for the HR suppression assay using Nicotiana benthamiana, in which each of the proteins were transiently expressed and evaluated for their ability to suppress HR caused by four cytotoxic effector-R gene combinations (Cp/Rx, ATR13/RPP13, Rpt2/RPS-2, and GPA/RBP-1) and one mutated R gene-Pto(Y207D). Nine out of twenty proteins, designated Shr1 to Shr9 (suppressors of hypersensitive response), were found to suppress HR in N. benthamiana. These effectors varied in the effector-R gene defenses they suppressed, indicating these pathogens can interfere with a variety of host defense pathways. In addition to HR suppression, effector Shr7 also suppressed PAMP-triggered immune response triggered by flg22. Finally, delivery of Shr7 through Pseudomonas fluorescens EtHAn suppressed nonspecific HR induced by Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 in wheat, confirming its activity in a homologous system. Overall, this study provides the first evidence for the presence of effectors in Puccinia species suppressing multiple plant defense responses.

  4. The TAL effector PthA4 interacts with nuclear factors involved in RNA-dependent processes including a HMG protein that selectively binds poly(U) RNA.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Tiago Antonio; Soprano, Adriana Santos; de Lira, Nayara Patricia Vieira; Quaresma, Alexandre José Christino; Pauletti, Bianca Alves; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria utilize an array of effector proteins to cause disease. Among them, transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors are unusual in the sense that they modulate transcription in the host. Although target genes and DNA specificity of TAL effectors have been elucidated, how TAL proteins control host transcription is poorly understood. Previously, we showed that the Xanthomonas citri TAL effectors, PthAs 2 and 3, preferentially targeted a citrus protein complex associated with transcription control and DNA repair. To extend our knowledge on the mode of action of PthAs, we have identified new protein targets of the PthA4 variant, required to elicit canker on citrus. Here we show that all the PthA4-interacting proteins are DNA and/or RNA-binding factors implicated in chromatin remodeling and repair, gene regulation and mRNA stabilization/modification. The majority of these proteins, including a structural maintenance of chromosomes protein (CsSMC), a translin-associated factor X (CsTRAX), a VirE2-interacting protein (CsVIP2), a high mobility group (CsHMG) and two poly(A)-binding proteins (CsPABP1 and 2), interacted with each other, suggesting that they assemble into a multiprotein complex. CsHMG was shown to bind DNA and to interact with the invariable leucine-rich repeat region of PthAs. Surprisingly, both CsHMG and PthA4 interacted with PABP1 and 2 and showed selective binding to poly(U) RNA, a property that is novel among HMGs and TAL effectors. Given that homologs of CsHMG, CsPABP1, CsPABP2, CsSMC and CsTRAX in other organisms assemble into protein complexes to regulate mRNA stability and translation, we suggest a novel role of TAL effectors in mRNA processing and translational control.

  5. System for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot

    DOEpatents

    Burry, D.B.; Williams, P.M.

    1991-02-19

    A system and method for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot permits exchange during a programmed task. The exchange mechanism is located off the robot, thus reducing the mass of the robot arm and permitting smaller robots to perform designated tasks. A simple spring/collet mechanism mounted on the robot is used which permits the engagement and disengagement of the tool or end effector without the need for a rotational orientation of the tool to the end effector/collet interface. As the tool changing system is not located on the robot arm no umbilical cords are located on robot. 12 figures.

  6. System for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot

    DOEpatents

    Burry, David B.; Williams, Paul M.

    1991-02-19

    A system and method for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot permits exchange during a programmed task. The exchange mechanism is located off the robot, thus reducing the mass of the robot arm and permitting smaller robots to perform designated tasks. A simple spring/collet mechanism mounted on the robot is used which permits the engagement and disengagement of the tool or end effector without the need for a rotational orientation of the tool to the end effector/collet interface. As the tool changing system is not located on the robot arm no umbilical cords are located on robot.

  7. Germ cell mutations of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis with TALE nucleases.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Keita; Treen, Nicholas; Hozumi, Akiko; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2014-05-01

    Targeted mutagenesis of genes-of-interest, or gene-knockout, is a powerful method to address the functions of genes. Engineered nucleases have enabled this approach in various organisms because of their ease of use. The ascidian Ciona intestinalis is an excellent organism to analyze gene functions by means of genetic technologies. In our previous study, we reported mutagenesis of Ciona somatic cells with TALE nucleases (TALENs) by electroporating expression constructs. In this study, we report germ cell mutagenesis of Ciona by microinjecting mRNAs encoding TALENs. TALEN mRNAs introduced mutations to target genes in both somatic and germ cells. TALEN-mediated mutations in the germ cell genome were inherited by the next generation. We conclude that knockout lines of Ciona that have disrupted target genes can be established through TALEN-mediated germ cell mutagenesis.

  8. Exploiting CRISPR-Cas nucleases to produce sequence-specific antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Bikard, David; Euler, Chad W; Jiang, Wenyan; Nussenzweig, Philip M; Goldberg, Gregory W; Duportet, Xavier; Fischetti, Vincent A; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2014-11-01

    Antibiotics target conserved bacterial cellular pathways or growth functions and therefore cannot selectively kill specific members of a complex microbial population. Here, we develop programmable, sequence-specific antimicrobials using the RNA-guided nuclease Cas9 (refs.1,2) delivered by a bacteriophage. We show that Cas9, reprogrammed to target virulence genes, kills virulent, but not avirulent, Staphylococcus aureus. Reprogramming the nuclease to target antibiotic resistance genes destroys staphylococcal plasmids that harbor antibiotic resistance genes and immunizes avirulent staphylococci to prevent the spread of plasmid-borne resistance genes. We also show that CRISPR-Cas9 antimicrobials function in vivo to kill S. aureus in a mouse skin colonization model. This technology creates opportunities to manipulate complex bacterial populations in a sequence-specific manner.

  9. An improved zinc-finger nuclease architecture for highly specific genome editing.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jeffrey C; Holmes, Michael C; Wang, Jianbin; Guschin, Dmitry Y; Lee, Ya-Li; Rupniewski, Igor; Beausejour, Christian M; Waite, Adam J; Wang, Nathaniel S; Kim, Kenneth A; Gregory, Philip D; Pabo, Carl O; Rebar, Edward J

    2007-07-01

    Genome editing driven by zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) yields high gene-modification efficiencies (>10%) by introducing a recombinogenic double-strand break into the targeted gene. The cleavage event is induced using two custom-designed ZFNs that heterodimerize upon binding DNA to form a catalytically active nuclease complex. Using the current ZFN architecture, however, cleavage-competent homodimers may also form that can limit safety or efficacy via off-target cleavage. Here we develop an improved ZFN architecture that eliminates this problem. Using structure-based design, we engineer two variant ZFNs that efficiently cleave DNA only when paired as a heterodimer. These ZFNs modify a native endogenous locus as efficiently as the parental architecture, but with a >40-fold reduction in homodimer function and much lower levels of genome-wide cleavage. This architecture provides a general means for improving the specificity of ZFNs as gene modification reagents.

  10. Studies of interaction between a new synthesized minor-groove targeting artificial nuclease and DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Qiang; Zhang, Zhen; Zhao, Yu-Fen

    2007-04-01

    Nuclease plays an important role in molecular biology, such as DNA sequencing. Synthetic polyamide conjugates can be considered as new tool in the selective inhibition of gene expression and as potential drugs in anticancer or antiviral chemotherapy. In this paper, a new synthesized minor-groove targeting artificial nuclease, oligopyrrol-containing peptide, was reported. It was found that this new compound can bind DNA in AT-riched minor groove with high affinity and site specificity. DNA binding behavior was determined by UV-vis and circular dichroism (CD) methods. It was indicated that compound 6 can enhance the Tm of oligomer DNA from 51.8 to 63.5 °C and possesses large binding constant ( Kb = 8.83 × 10 4 L/mol).

  11. Processing of meiotic DNA double strand breaks requires cyclin-dependent kinase and multiple nucleases.

    PubMed

    Manfrini, Nicola; Guerini, Ilaria; Citterio, Andrea; Lucchini, Giovanna; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2010-04-09

    Meiotic recombination requires the formation of programmed Spo11-dependent DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Sae2 protein and the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex are necessary to remove the covalently attached Spo11 protein from the DNA ends, which are then resected by so far unknown nucleases. Here, we demonstrate that phosphorylation of Sae2 Ser-267 by cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) is required to initiate meiotic DSB resection by allowing Spo11 removal from DSB ends. This finding suggests that Cdk1 activity is required for the processing of Spo11-induced DSBs, thus providing a mechanism for coordinating DSB resection with progression through meiotic prophase. Furthermore, the helicase Sgs1 and the nucleases Exo1 and Dna2 participate in lengthening the 5'-3' resection tracts during meiosis by controlling a step subsequent to Spo11 removal.

  12. Crystal Structure of the First Eubacterial Mre11 Nuclease Reveals Novel Features that may Discriminate Substrates During DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debanu; Moiani, Davide; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Miller, Mitchell D.; McMullan, Daniel; Jin, Kevin K.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Burra, Prasad; Carlton, Dennis; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ernst, Dustin; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Tainer, John A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Mre11 nuclease plays a central role in the repair of cytotoxic and mutagenic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). As x-ray structural information has only been available for the Pyrococcus furiosus enzyme (PfMre11), the conserved and variable features of this nuclease across the domains of life have not been experimentally defined. Our crystal structure and biochemical studies demonstrate that TM1635 from Thermotoga maritima, originally annotated as a putative nuclease, is the Mre11 endo/exonuclease from T. maritima (TmMre11) and the first such structure from eubacteria. TmMre11 and PfMre11 display similar overall structures, despite sequence identity in the twilight zone of only ∼20%. However, they differ substantially in their DNA specificity domains and in their dimeric organization. Residues in the nuclease domain are highly conserved, but those in the DNA specificity domain are not. The structural differences likely affect how Mre11s from different organisms recognize and interact with single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA and DNA hairpin structures during DNA repair. The TmMre11 nuclease active site has no bound metal ions, but is conserved in sequence and structure with exception of a histidine that is important in PfMre11 nuclease activity. Nevertheless, biochemical characterization confirms that TmMre11 possesses both endonuclease and exonuclease activities on ssDNA and dsDNA substrates, respectively. PMID:20122942

  13. Enhancement of nuclease P1 production by Penicillium citrinum YL104 immobilized on activated carbon filter sponge.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Nan; Ren, Hengfei; Li, Zhenjian; Zhao, Ting; Shi, Xinchi; Cheng, Hao; Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Yong; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-02-01

    The efficiency of current methods for industrial production of the enzyme nuclease P1 is limited. In this study, we sought to improve fermentation methods for the production of nuclease P1. An immobilized fermentation system using an activated carbon filter sponge as a carrier was used for the production of nuclease P1. In an airlift internal loop reactor (ALR), the fermentation performance of three different fermentation modes, including free-cell fermentation, repeated-batch fermentation, and semi-continuous immobilized fermentation, were compared. The fermentation kinetics in the fermentation broth of the three fermentation modes, including dissolved oxygen (DO), pH value, cell concentration, residual sugar concentration, and enzyme activity, were tested. The productivity of semi-continuous immobilized fermentation reached 8.76 U/mL/h, which was 33.3 and 80.2% higher than that of repeated-batch fermentation and free-cell fermentation, respectively. The sugar consumption of free-cell, repeated-batch, and semi-continuous immobilized fermentations was 41.2, 30.8, and 25.9 g/L, respectively. These results showed that immobilized-cell fermentation by using Penicillium citrinum with activated carbon filter sponge in an ALR was advantageous for nuclease P1 production, especially in the semi-continuous immobilized fermentation mode. In spite of the significant improvement in nuclease P1 production in semi-continuous immobilized fermentation mode, the specific activity of nuclease P1 was almost equal among the three fermentation modes.

  14. Orthogonal gene knock out and activation with a catalytically active Cas9 nuclease

    PubMed Central

    Dahlman, James E.; Abudayyeh, Omar O.; Joung, Julia; Gootenberg, Jonathan S.; Zhang, Feng; Konermann, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a CRISPR-based method that uses catalytically active Cas9 and distinct sgRNA constructs to knock out and activate different genes in the same cell. These sgRNAs, with 14 15 bp target sequences and MS2 binding loops, can activate gene expression using an active Cas9 nuclease, without inducing DSBs. We use these ‘dead RNAs’ to perform orthogonal gene knockout and transcriptional activation in human cells. PMID:26436575

  15. The structural biochemistry of Zucchini implicates it as a nuclease in piRNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ipsaro, Jonathan J; Haase, Astrid D; Knott, Simon R; Joshua-Tor, Leemor; Hannon, Gregory J

    2012-11-08

    PIWI-family proteins and their associated small RNAs (piRNAs) act in an evolutionarily conserved innate immune mechanism to provide essential protection for germ-cell genomes against the activity of mobile genetic elements. piRNA populations comprise a molecular definition of transposons, which permits them to distinguish transposons from host genes and selectively silence them. piRNAs can be generated in two distinct ways, forming either primary or secondary piRNAs. Primary piRNAs come from discrete genomic loci, termed piRNA clusters, and seem to be derived from long, single-stranded precursors. The biogenesis of primary piRNAs involves at least two nucleolytic steps. An unknown enzyme cleaves piRNA cluster transcripts to generate monophosphorylated piRNA 5' ends. piRNA 3' ends are probably formed by exonucleolytic trimming, after a piRNA precursor is loaded into its PIWI partner. Secondary piRNAs arise during the adaptive 'ping-pong' cycle, with their 5' termini being formed by the activity of PIWIs themselves. A number of proteins have been implicated genetically in primary piRNA biogenesis. One of these, Drosophila melanogaster Zucchini, is a member of the phospholipase-D family of phosphodiesterases, which includes both phospholipases and nucleases. Here we produced a dimeric, soluble fragment of the mouse Zucchini homologue (mZuc; also known as PLD6) and show that it possesses single-strand-specific nuclease activity. A crystal structure of mZuc at 1.75 Å resolution indicates greater architectural similarity to phospholipase-D family nucleases than to phospholipases. Together, our data suggest that the Zucchini proteins act in primary piRNA biogenesis as nucleases, perhaps generating the 5' ends of primary piRNAs.

  16. The history and market impact of CRISPR RNA-guided nucleases.

    PubMed

    van Erp, Paul Bg; Bloomer, Gary; Wilkinson, Royce; Wiedenheft, Blake

    2015-06-01

    The interface between viruses and their hosts' are hot spots for biological and biotechnological innovation. Bacteria use restriction endonucleases to destroy invading DNA, and industry has exploited these enzymes for molecular cut-and-paste reactions that are central to many recombinant DNA technologies. Today, another class of nucleases central to adaptive immune systems that protect bacteria and archaea from invading viruses and plasmids are blazing a similar path from basic science to profound biomedical and industrial applications.

  17. Breaking the DNA-binding code of Ralstonia solanacearum TAL effectors provides new possibilities to generate plant resistance genes against bacterial wilt disease.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Orlando; Schreiber, Tom; Schandry, Niklas; Radeck, Jara; Braun, Karl Heinz; Koszinowski, Julia; Heuer, Holger; Strauß, Annett; Lahaye, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a devastating bacterial phytopathogen with a broad host range. Ralstonia solanacearum injected effector proteins (Rips) are key to the successful invasion of host plants. We have characterized Brg11(hrpB-regulated 11), the first identified member of a class of Rips with high sequence similarity to the transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors of Xanthomonas spp., collectively termed RipTALs. Fluorescence microscopy of in planta expressed RipTALs showed nuclear localization. Domain swaps between Brg11 and Xanthomonas TAL effector (TALE) AvrBs3 (avirulence protein triggering Bs3 resistance) showed the functional interchangeability of DNA-binding and transcriptional activation domains. PCR was used to determine the sequence of brg11 homologs from strains infecting phylogenetically diverse host plants. Brg11 localizes to the nucleus and activates promoters containing a matching effector-binding element (EBE). Brg11 and homologs preferentially activate promoters containing EBEs with a 5' terminal guanine, contrasting with the TALE preference for a 5' thymine. Brg11 and other RipTALs probably promote disease through the transcriptional activation of host genes. Brg11 and the majority of homologs identified in this study were shown to activate similar or identical target sequences, in contrast to TALEs, which generally show highly diverse target preferences. This information provides new options for the engineering of plants resistant to R. solanacearum.

  18. Elimination of unaltered DNA in mixed clinical samples via nuclease-assisted minor-allele enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chen; Liu, Yibin; Fontana, Rachel; Makrigiorgos, Alexander; Mamon, Harvey; Kulke, Matthew H.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike

    2016-01-01

    Presence of excess unaltered, wild-type (WT) DNA providing no information of biological or clinical value often masks rare alterations containing diagnostic or therapeutic clues in cancer, prenatal diagnosis, infectious diseases or organ transplantation. With the surge of high-throughput technologies there is a growing demand for removing unaltered DNA over large pools-of-sequences. Here we present nuclease-assisted minor-allele enrichment with probe-overlap (NaME-PrO), a single-step approach with broad genome coverage that can remove WT-DNA from numerous sequences simultaneously, prior to genomic analysis. NaME-PrO employs a double-strand-DNA-specific nuclease and overlapping oligonucleotide-probes interrogating WT-DNA targets and guiding nuclease digestion to these sites. Mutation-containing DNA creates probe-DNA mismatches that inhibit digestion, thus subsequent DNA-amplification magnifies DNA-alterations at all selected targets. We demonstrate several-hundred-fold mutation enrichment in diverse human samples on multiple clinically relevant targets including tumor samples and circulating DNA in 50-plex reactions. Enrichment enables routine mutation detection at 0.01% abundance while by adjusting conditions it is possible to sequence mutations down to 0.00003% abundance, or to scan tumor-suppressor genes for rare mutations. NaME-PrO introduces a simple and highly parallel process to remove un-informative DNA sequences and unmask clinically and biologically useful alterations. PMID:27431322

  19. Applications of genome editing by programmable nucleases to the metabolic engineering of secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Leitão, Ana Lúcia; Costa, Marina C; Enguita, Francisco J

    2017-01-10

    Genome engineering is a branch of modern biotechnology composed of a cohort of protocols designed to construct and modify a genotype with the main objective of giving rise to a desired phenotype. Conceptually, genome engineering is based on the so called genome editing technologies, a group of genetic techniques that allow either to delete or to insert genetic information in a particular genomic locus. Ten years ago, genome editing tools were limited to virus-driven integration and homologous DNA recombination. However, nowadays the uprising of programmable nucleases is rapidly changing this paradigm. There are two main families of modern tools for genome editing depending on the molecule that controls the specificity of the system and drives the editor machinery to its place of action. Enzymes such as Zn-finger and TALEN nucleases are protein-driven genome editors; while CRISPR system is a nucleic acid-guided editing system. Genome editing techniques are still not widely applied for the design of new compounds with pharmacological activity, but they are starting to be considered as promising tools for rational genome manipulation in biotechnology applications. In this review we will discuss the potential applications of programmable nucleases for the metabolic engineering of secondary metabolites with biological activity.

  20. Recent developments and clinical studies utilizing engineered zinc finger nuclease technology.

    PubMed

    Jo, Young-Il; Kim, Hyongbum; Ramakrishna, Suresh

    2015-10-01

    Efficient methods for creating targeted genetic modifications have long been sought for the investigation of gene function and the development of therapeutic modalities for various diseases, including genetic disorders. Although such modifications are possible using homologous recombination, the efficiency is extremely low. Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are custom-designed artificial nucleases that make double-strand breaks at specific sequences, enabling efficient targeted genetic modifications such as corrections, additions, gene knockouts and structural variations. ZFNs are composed of two domains: (i) a DNA-binding domain comprised of zinc finger modules and (ii) the FokI nuclease domain that cleaves the DNA strand. Over 17 years after ZFNs were initially developed, a number of improvements have been made. Here, we will review the developments and future perspectives of ZFN technology. For example, ZFN activity and specificity have been significantly enhanced by modifying the DNA-binding domain and FokI cleavage domain. Advances in culture methods, such as the application of a cold shock and the use of small molecules that affect ZFN stability, have also increased ZFN activity. Furthermore, ZFN-induced mutant cells can be enriched using episomal surrogate reporters. Additionally, we discuss several ongoing clinical studies that are based on ZFN-mediated genome editing in humans. These breakthroughs have substantially facilitated the use of ZFNs in research, medicine and biotechnology.

  1. Disruption of mouse Slx4, a regulator of structure-specific nucleases, phenocopies Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Crossan, Gerry P; van der Weyden, Louise; Rosado, Ivan V; Langevin, Frederic; Gaillard, Pierre-Henri L; McIntyre, Rebecca E; Gallagher, Ferdia; Kettunen, Mikko I; Lewis, David Y; Brindle, Kevin; Arends, Mark J; Adams, David J; Patel, Ketan J

    2011-02-01

    The evolutionarily conserved SLX4 protein, a key regulator of nucleases, is critical for DNA damage response. SLX4 nuclease complexes mediate repair during replication and can also resolve Holliday junctions formed during homologous recombination. Here we describe the phenotype of the Btbd12 knockout mouse, the mouse ortholog of SLX4, which recapitulates many key features of the human genetic illness Fanconi anemia. Btbd12-deficient animals are born at sub-Mendelian ratios, have greatly reduced fertility, are developmentally compromised and are prone to blood cytopenias. Btbd12(-/-) cells prematurely senesce, spontaneously accumulate damaged chromosomes and are particularly sensitive to DNA crosslinking agents. Genetic complementation reveals a crucial requirement for Btbd12 (also known as Slx4) to interact with the structure-specific endonuclease Xpf-Ercc1 to promote crosslink repair. The Btbd12 knockout mouse therefore establishes a disease model for Fanconi anemia and genetically links a regulator of nuclease incision complexes to the Fanconi anemia DNA crosslink repair pathway.

  2. Efficient homologous recombination-mediated genome engineering in zebrafish using TALE nucleases.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jimann; Chen, Jiakun; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna

    2014-10-01

    Custom-designed nucleases afford a powerful reverse genetic tool for direct gene disruption and genome modification in vivo. Among various applications of the nucleases, homologous recombination (HR)-mediated genome editing is particularly useful for inserting heterologous DNA fragments, such as GFP, into a specific genomic locus in a sequence-specific fashion. However, precise HR-mediated genome editing is still technically challenging in zebrafish. Here, we establish a GFP reporter system for measuring the frequency of HR events in live zebrafish embryos. By co-injecting a TALE nuclease and GFP reporter targeting constructs with homology arms of different size, we defined the length of homology arms that increases the recombination efficiency. In addition, we found that the configuration of the targeting construct can be a crucial parameter in determining the efficiency of HR-mediated genome engineering. Implementing these modifications improved the efficiency of zebrafish knock-in generation, with over 10% of the injected F0 animals transmitting gene-targeting events through their germline. We generated two HR-mediated insertion alleles of sox2 and gfap loci that express either superfolder GFP (sfGFP) or tandem dimeric Tomato (tdTomato) in a spatiotemporal pattern that mirrors the endogenous loci. This efficient strategy provides new opportunities not only to monitor expression of endogenous genes and proteins and follow specific cell types in vivo, but it also paves the way for other sophisticated genetic manipulations of the zebrafish genome.

  3. Bioinformatics analysis of a non-specific nuclease from Yersinia enterocolitica subsp. palearctica.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Hua; Tang, Zhen-Xing; Fang, Xiu-Juan; Zhang, Zhi-Liang; Shi, Lu-E

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the physical and chemical characteristics, biological structure and function of a non-specific nuclease from Yersinia enterocolitica subsp. palearctica (Y. NSN) found in our group were studied using multiple bioinformatics approaches. The results showed that Y. NSN had 283 amino acids, a weight of 30,692.5 ku and a certain hydrophilic property. Y. NSN had a signal peptide, no transmembrane domains and disulphide bonds. Cleavage site in Y. NSN was between pos. 23 and 24. The prediction result of the secondary structure showed Y. NSN was a coil structure-based protein. The ratio of α-helix, β-folded and random coil were 18.73%, 16.96% and 64.31%, respectively. Active sites were pos. 124, 125, 127, 157, 165 and 169. Mg(2+) binding site was pos. 157. Substrate binding sites were pos. 124, 125 and 169. The analysis of multisequencing alignment and phylogenetic tree indicated that Y. NSN shared high similarity with the nuclease from Y. enterocolitica subsp. enterocolitica 8081. The enzyme activity results showed that Y. NSN was a nuclease with good thermostability.

  4. Actin dynamics shape microglia effector functions.

    PubMed

    Uhlemann, Ria; Gertz, Karen; Boehmerle, Wolfgang; Schwarz, Tobias; Nolte, Christiane; Freyer, Dorette; Kettenmann, Helmut; Endres, Matthias; Kronenberg, Golo

    2016-06-01

    Impaired actin filament dynamics have been associated with cellular senescence. Microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, are emerging as a central pathophysiological player in neurodegeneration. Microglia activation, which ranges on a continuum between classical and alternative, may be of critical importance to brain disease. Using genetic and pharmacological manipulations, we studied the effects of alterations in actin dynamics on microglia effector functions. Disruption of actin dynamics did not affect transcription of genes involved in the LPS-triggered classical inflammatory response. By contrast, in consequence of impaired nuclear translocation of phospho-STAT6, genes involved in IL-4 induced alternative activation were strongly downregulated. Functionally, impaired actin dynamics resulted in reduced NO secretion and reduced release of TNFalpha and IL-6 from LPS-stimulated microglia and of IGF-1 from IL-4 stimulated microglia. However, pathological stabilization of the actin cytoskeleton increased LPS-induced release of IL-1beta and IL-18, which belong to an unconventional secretory pathway. Reduced NO release was associated with decreased cytoplasmic iNOS protein expression and decreased intracellular arginine uptake. Furthermore, disruption of actin dynamics resulted in reduced microglia migration, proliferation and phagocytosis. Finally, baseline and ATP-induced [Ca(2+)]int levels were significantly increased in microglia lacking gelsolin, a key actin-severing protein. Together, the dynamic state of the actin cytoskeleton profoundly and distinctly affects microglia behaviours. Disruption of actin dynamics attenuates M2 polarization by inhibiting transcription of alternative activation genes. In classical activation, the role of actin remodelling is complex, does not relate to gene transcription and shows a major divergence between cytokines following conventional and unconventional secretion.

  5. Genomic analysis of 38 Legionella species identifies large and diverse effector repertoires.

    PubMed

    Burstein, David; Amaro, Francisco; Zusman, Tal; Lifshitz, Ziv; Cohen, Ofir; Gilbert, Jack A; Pupko, Tal; Shuman, Howard A; Segal, Gil

    2016-02-01

    Infection by the human pathogen Legionella pneumophila relies on the translocation of ∼ 300 virulence proteins, termed effectors, which manipulate host cell processes. However, almost no information exists regarding effectors in other Legionella pathogens. Here we sequenced, assembled and characterized the genomes of 38 Legionella species and predicted their effector repertoires using a previously validated machine learning approach. This analysis identified 5,885 predicted effectors. The effector repertoires of different Legionella species were found to be largely non-overlapping, and only seven core effectors were shared by all species studied. Species-specific effectors had atypically low GC content, suggesting exogenous acquisition, possibly from the natural protozoan hosts of these species. Furthermore, we detected numerous new conserved effector domains and discovered new domain combinations, which allowed the inference of as yet undescribed effector functions. The effector collection and network of domain architectures described here can serve as a roadmap for future studies of effector function and evolution.

  6. An intelligent end-effector for a rehabilitation robot.

    PubMed

    Gosine, R G; Harwin, W S; Furby, L J; Jackson, R D

    1989-01-01

    A UMI RTX robot, modified with limited end-effector sensors and a restricted but effective vision system, is currently used in a developmental education setting for severely physically disabled children. The low physical and cognitive abilities of the children involved in the project require a semi-autonomous robot with environmental sensing capability to operate in a task oriented mode. A variety of low-cost sensors including proximity, distance, force and slip sensors, have been investigated for integration in end-effectors for the RTX robot. The sensors employed on a modified end-effector are detailed and experimental results are presented. A design for an end-effector with integrated sensors is discussed. The integration of the sensor information into a high-level, task-oriented programming language is detailed and examples of high-level control sequences using sensor inputs are presented. Finally, the development of intelligent gripping strategies based on sensor information is discussed.

  7. Vision-based end-effector position error compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajracharya, Max; Backes, Paul; DiCicco, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a computationally efficient algorithm that provides the ability to accurately place an arm end-effector on a target designated in an image using low speed feed back from a fixed stero camera.

  8. Effector-triggered immunity: from pathogen perception to robust defense.

    PubMed

    Cui, Haitao; Tsuda, Kenichi; Parker, Jane E

    2015-01-01

    In plant innate immunity, individual cells have the capacity to sense and respond to pathogen attack. Intracellular recognition mechanisms have evolved to intercept perturbations by pathogen virulence factors (effectors) early in host infection and convert it to rapid defense. One key to resistance success is a polymorphic family of intracellular nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich-repeat (NLR) receptors that detect effector interference in different parts of the cell. Effector-activated NLRs connect, in various ways, to a conserved basal resistance network in order to transcriptionally boost defense programs. Effector-triggered immunity displays remarkable robustness against pathogen disturbance, in part by employing compensatory mechanisms within the defense network. Also, the mobility of some NLRs and coordination of resistance pathways across cell compartments provides flexibility to fine-tune immune outputs. Furthermore, a number of NLRs function close to the nuclear chromatin by balancing actions of defense-repressing and defense-activating transcription factors to program cells dynamically for effective disease resistance.

  9. Gunite Scarifying End Effector. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    2001-09-01

    The Gunite Scarifying End Effector (GSEE) is designed to remove a layer of the gunite tank walls, which are contaminated with radioactivity. Removing this radioactivity is necessary to close the tank.

  10. Interactions of legionella effector proteins with host phosphoinositide lipids.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stephen; Dolinsky, Stephanie; Hilbi, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    By means of the Icm/Dot type IV secretion system Legionella pneumophila translocates several effector proteins into host cells, where they anchor to the cytoplasmic face of the LCV membrane by binding to phosphoinositide (PI) lipids. Thus, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate anchors the effector proteins SidC and SidM, which promote the interaction of LCVs with the ER and the secretory vesicle trafficking -pathway. In this chapter, we describe protocols to (1) identify PI-binding proteins in Legionella lysates using PI-beads, (2) determine PI-binding specificities and affinities of recombinant Legionella effector proteins by protein-lipid overlays, and (3) use Legionella effectors to identify cellular PI lipids.

  11. Functional redundancy of necrotrophic effectors - consequences for exploitation for breeding.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kar-Chun; Phan, Huyen T T; Rybak, Kasia; John, Evan; Chooi, Yit H; Solomon, Peter S; Oliver, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    Necrotrophic diseases of wheat cause major losses in most wheat growing areas of world. Tan spot (caused by Pyrenophora tritici-repentis) and septoria nodorum blotch (SNB; Parastagonospora nodorum) have been shown to reduce yields by 10-20% across entire agri-ecological zones despite the application of fungicides and a heavy focus over the last 30 years on resistance breeding. Efforts by breeders to improve the resistance of cultivars has been compromised by the universal finding that resistance was quantitative and governed by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL). Most QTL had a limited effect that was hard to measure precisely and varied significantly from site to site and season to season. The discovery of necrotrophic effectors has given breeding for disease resistance new methods and tools. In the case of tan spot in West Australia, a single effector, PtrToxA and its recogniser gene Tsn1, has a dominating impact in disease resistance. The delivery of ToxA to breeders has had a major impact on cultivar choice and breeding strategies. For P. nodorum, three effectors - SnToxA, SnTox1, and SnTox3 - have been well characterized. Unlike tan spot, no one effector has a dominating role. Genetic analysis of various mapping populations and pathogen isolates has shown that different effectors have varying impact and that epistatic interactions also occur. As a result of these factors the deployment of these effectors for SNB resistance breeding is more complex. We have deleted the three effectors in a strain of P. nodorum and measured effector activity and disease potential of the triple knockout mutant. The culture filtrate causes necrosis in several cultivars and the strain causes disease, albeit the overall levels are less than in the wild type. Modeling of the field disease resistance scores of cultivars from their reactions to the microbially expressed effectors SnToxA, SnTox1, and SnTox3 is significantly improved by including the response to the triple knockout

  12. Design, testing and evaluation of latching end effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, B.; Vandersluis, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Latching End Effector (LEE) forms part of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) for which Spar Aerospace Ltd, Space Systems Division is the prime contractor. The design, testing and performance evaluation of the Latching End Effector mechanisms is the subject of this paper focusing on: (1) ambient, thermal and vibration testing; (2) snare/rigidize performance testing and interaction during payload acquisition; and (3) latch/umbilical test results and performance.

  13. Views of the manipulator development facility end effector simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Closeup view of the manipulator development facility (MDF) during an end effector simulation showing the two specially made extensions deployed on April 16 by the STS 51-D crewmembers (30953); Medium closeup view of MDF. The white cylindar at right represents the Syncon IV (LEASAT) satellite. The robot device in the foreground is the forearm and end effector of a training version of the remote manipulator system (RMS). Attached to the arm's end are two flyswatter-like tools (30954-5).

  14. Functional heterogeneity of human effector CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Takata, Hiroshi; Naruto, Takuya; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2012-02-09

    Effector CD8(+) T cells are believed to be terminally differentiated cells having cytotoxic activity and the ability to produce effector cytokines such as INF-γ and TNF-α. We investigated the difference between CXCR1(+) and CXCR1(-) subsets of human effector CD27(-)CD28(-)CD8(+) T cells. The subsets expressed cytolytic molecules similarly and exerted substantial cytolytic activity, whereas only the CXCR1(-) subset had IL-2 productivity and self-proliferative activity and was more resistant to cell death than the CXCR1(+) subset. These differences were explained by the specific up-regulation of CAMK4, SPRY2, and IL-7R in the CXCR1(-) subset and that of pro-apoptotic death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) in the CXCR1(+) subset. The IL-2 producers were more frequently found in the IL-7R(+) subset of the CXCR1(-) effector CD8(+) T cells than in the IL-7R(-) subset. IL-7/IL-7R signaling promoted cell survival only in the CXCR1(-) subset. The present study has highlighted a novel subset of effector CD8(+) T cells producing IL-2 and suggests the importance of this subset in the homeostasis of effector CD8(+) T cells.

  15. Characterization of the Largest Effector Gene Cluster of Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Vincon, Volker; Kahmann, Regine

    2014-01-01

    In the genome of the biotrophic plant pathogen Ustilago maydis, many of the genes coding for secreted protein effectors modulating virulence are arranged in gene clusters. The vast majority of these genes encode novel proteins whose expression is coupled to plant colonization. The largest of these gene clusters, cluster 19A, encodes 24 secreted effectors. Deletion of the entire cluster results in severe attenuation of virulence. Here we present the functional analysis of this genomic region. We show that a 19A deletion mutant behaves like an endophyte, i.e. is still able to colonize plants and complete the infection cycle. However, tumors, the most conspicuous symptoms of maize smut disease, are only rarely formed and fungal biomass in infected tissue is significantly reduced. The generation and analysis of strains carrying sub-deletions identified several genes significantly contributing to tumor formation after seedling infection. Another of the effectors could be linked specifically to anthocyanin induction in the infected tissue. As the individual contributions of these genes to tumor formation were small, we studied the response of maize plants to the whole cluster mutant as well as to several individual mutants by array analysis. This revealed distinct plant responses, demonstrating that the respective effectors have discrete plant targets. We propose that the analysis of plant responses to effector mutant strains that lack a strong virulence phenotype may be a general way to visualize differences in effector function. PMID:24992561

  16. The rise of the undead:Pseudokinases as mediators of effector-triggered immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogens use effector proteins to suppress host immunity and promote infection. However, plants can recognize specific effectors and mount an effector-triggered immune response that suppresses pathogen growth. The YopJ/HopZ family of type III secreted effector proteins is broadly distributed in bac...

  17. Protein switches identified from diverse insertion libraries created using S1 nuclease digestion of supercoiled-form plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Tullman, Jennifer; Guntas, Gurkan; Dumont, Matthew; Ostermeier, Marc

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate that S1 nuclease converts supercoiled plasmid DNA to unit-length, linear dsDNA through the creation of a single, double-stranded break in a plasmid molecule. These double-stranded breaks occur not only in the origin of replication near inverted repeats but also at a wide variety of locations throughout the plasmid. S1 nuclease exhibits this activity under conditions typically employed for the nuclease's single-stranded nuclease activity. Thus, S1 nuclease digestion of plasmid DNA, unlike analogous digestion with DNaseI, effectively halts after the first double-stranded break. This property makes easier the construction of large domain insertion libraries in which the goal is to insert linear DNA at a variety of locations throughout a plasmid. We used this property to create a library in which a circularly permuted TEM1 β-lactamase gene was inserted throughout a plasmid containing the gene encoding Escherichia coli ribose binding protein. Gene fusions that encode allosteric switch proteins in which ribose modulates β-lactamase catalytic activity were isolated from this library using a combination of a genetic selection and a screen.

  18. A conditional suicide system for Saccharomyces cerevisiae relying on the intracellular production of the Serratia marcescens nuclease.

    PubMed

    Balan, Andrea; Schenberg, Ana Clara G

    2005-02-01

    A conditional lethal system for biological containment of genetically modified strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is described. This suicide system is based on the intracellular production of the Serratia marcescens nuclease in the yeast cell, aiming at the destruction of the host genetic material. The S. marcescens nuclease, encoded by the nucA gene, is normally secreted by the bacterium into the medium. In the present work, the nucA gene, devoid of its signal peptide coding sequence, was cloned in a yeast expression vector, under control of the glucose-repressed S. cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase 2 gene (ADH2) promoter. When transformed into S. cerevisiae, the recombinant plasmid proved to be effective in killing the host cells upon glucose depletion from the medium, and the nuclease activity was found in lysates prepared from the transformants. In addition, the nuclease degrading effect was shown to reach chromosomal DNA in the yeast host. The killing effect of the nucA plasmid was also demonstrated in soil microcosm assays, indicating that whenever the GMM escapes into the environment where glucose is scarce, the nucA gene will be expressed and the resulting nuclease will destroy the genetic material and kill the cells. In contrast to other suicide systems that target the cell envelope, the advantage of the one described here is that it disfavours horizontal gene transfer from recombinant yeast cells to other microorganisms found in the environment.

  19. Multi-reporter selection for the design of active and more specific zinc-finger nucleases for genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, Benjamin L.; Xia, Danny F.; Rowland, Elizabeth F.; Xu, Denise J.; Ankoudinova, Irina; Borchardt, Jennifer S.; Zhang, Lei; Li, Patrick; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Rebar, Edward J.; Noyes, Marcus B.

    2016-01-01

    Engineered nucleases have transformed biological research and offer great therapeutic potential by enabling the straightforward modification of desired genomic sequences. While many nuclease platforms have proven functional, all can produce unanticipated off-target lesions and have difficulty discriminating between homologous sequences, limiting their therapeutic application. Here we describe a multi-reporter selection system that allows the screening of large protein libraries to uncover variants able to discriminate between sequences with substantial homology. We have used this system to identify zinc-finger nucleases that exhibit high cleavage activity (up to 60% indels) at their targets within the CCR5 and HBB genes and strong discrimination against homologous sequences within CCR2 and HBD. An unbiased screen for off-target lesions using a novel set of CCR5-targeting nucleases confirms negligible CCR2 activity and demonstrates minimal off-target activity genome wide. This system offers a straightforward approach to generate nucleases that discriminate between similar targets and provide exceptional genome-wide specificity. PMID:26738816

  20. Target selection biases from recent experience transfer across effectors.

    PubMed

    Moher, Jeff; Song, Joo-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Target selection is often biased by an observer's recent experiences. However, not much is known about whether these selection biases influence behavior across different effectors. For example, does looking at a red object make it easier to subsequently reach towards another red object? In the current study, we asked observers to find the uniquely colored target object on each trial. Randomly intermixed pre-trial cues indicated the mode of action: either an eye movement or a visually guided reach movement to the target. In Experiment 1, we found that priming of popout, reflected in faster responses following repetition of the target color on consecutive trials, occurred regardless of whether the effector was repeated from the previous trial or not. In Experiment 2, we examined whether an inhibitory selection bias away from a feature could transfer across effectors. While priming of popout reflects both enhancement of the repeated target features and suppression of the repeated distractor features, the distractor previewing effect isolates a purely inhibitory component of target selection in which a previewed color is presented in a homogenous display and subsequently inhibited. Much like priming of popout, intertrial suppression biases in the distractor previewing effect transferred across effectors. Together, these results suggest that biases for target selection driven by recent trial history transfer across effectors. This indicates that representations in memory that bias attention towards or away from specific features are largely independent from their associated actions.

  1. Structural Analysis of Iac Repressor Bound to Allosteric Effectors

    SciTech Connect

    Daber,R.; Stayrook, S.; Rosenberg, A.; Lewis, M.

    2007-01-01

    The lac operon is a model system for understanding how effector molecules regulate transcription and are necessary for allosteric transitions. The crystal structures of the lac repressor bound to inducer and anti-inducer molecules provide a model for how these small molecules can modulate repressor function. The structures of the apo repressor and the repressor bound to effector molecules are compared in atomic detail. All effectors examined here bind to the repressor in the same location and are anchored to the repressor through hydrogen bonds to several hydroxyl groups of the sugar ring. Inducer molecules form a more extensive hydrogen-bonding network compared to anti-inducers and neutral effector molecules. The structures of these effector molecules suggest that the O6 hydroxyl on the galactoside is essential for establishing a water-mediated hydrogen bonding network that bridges the N-terminal and C-terminal sub-domains. The altered hydrogen bonding can account in part for the different structural conformations of the repressor, and is vital for the allosteric transition.

  2. Selection-independent generation of gene knockout mouse embryonic stem cells using zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Osiak, Anna; Radecke, Frank; Guhl, Eva; Radecke, Sarah; Dannemann, Nadine; Lütge, Fabienne; Glage, Silke; Rudolph, Cornelia; Cantz, Tobias; Schwarz, Klaus; Heilbronn, Regine; Cathomen, Toni

    2011-01-01

    Gene knockout in murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) has been an invaluable tool to study gene function in vitro or to generate animal models with altered phenotypes. Gene targeting using standard techniques, however, is rather inefficient and typically does not exceed frequencies of 10(-6). In consequence, the usage of complex positive/negative selection strategies to isolate targeted clones has been necessary. Here, we present a rapid single-step approach to generate a gene knockout in mouse ESCs using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Upon transient expression of ZFNs, the target gene is cleaved by the designer nucleases and then repaired by non-homologous end-joining, an error-prone DNA repair process that introduces insertions/deletions at the break site and therefore leads to functional null mutations. To explore and quantify the potential of ZFNs to generate a gene knockout in pluripotent stem cells, we generated a mouse ESC line containing an X-chromosomally integrated EGFP marker gene. Applying optimized conditions, the EGFP locus was disrupted in up to 8% of ESCs after transfection of the ZFN expression vectors, thus obviating the need of selection markers to identify targeted cells, which may impede or complicate downstream applications. Both activity and ZFN-associated cytotoxicity was dependent on vector dose and the architecture of the nuclease domain. Importantly, teratoma formation assays of selected ESC clones confirmed that ZFN-treated ESCs maintained pluripotency. In conclusion, the described ZFN-based approach represents a fast strategy for generating gene knockouts in ESCs in a selection-independent fashion that should be easily transferrable to other pluripotent stem cells.

  3. Selection-Independent Generation of Gene Knockout Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Using Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Osiak, Anna; Radecke, Frank; Guhl, Eva; Radecke, Sarah; Dannemann, Nadine; Lütge, Fabienne; Glage, Silke; Rudolph, Cornelia; Cantz, Tobias; Schwarz, Klaus; Heilbronn, Regine; Cathomen, Toni

    2011-01-01

    Gene knockout in murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) has been an invaluable tool to study gene function in vitro or to generate animal models with altered phenotypes. Gene targeting using standard techniques, however, is rather inefficient and typically does not exceed frequencies of 10−6. In consequence, the usage of complex positive/negative selection strategies to isolate targeted clones has been necessary. Here, we present a rapid single-step approach to generate a gene knockout in mouse ESCs using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Upon transient expression of ZFNs, the target gene is cleaved by the designer nucleases and then repaired by non-homologous end-joining, an error-prone DNA repair process that introduces insertions/deletions at the break site and therefore leads to functional null mutations. To explore and quantify the potential of ZFNs to generate a gene knockout in pluripotent stem cells, we generated a mouse ESC line containing an X-chromosomally integrated EGFP marker gene. Applying optimized conditions, the EGFP locus was disrupted in up to 8% of ESCs after transfection of the ZFN expression vectors, thus obviating the need of selection markers to identify targeted cells, which may impede or complicate downstream applications. Both activity and ZFN-associated cytotoxicity was dependent on vector dose and the architecture of the nuclease domain. Importantly, teratoma formation assays of selected ESC clones confirmed that ZFN-treated ESCs maintained pluripotency. In conclusion, the described ZFN-based approach represents a fast strategy for generating gene knockouts in ESCs in a selection-independent fashion that should be easily transferrable to other pluripotent stem cells. PMID:22194948

  4. Nuclear gene targeting in Chlamydomonas using engineered zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Sizova, Irina; Greiner, Andre; Awasthi, Mayanka; Kateriya, Suneel; Hegemann, Peter

    2013-03-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a versatile model for fundamental and biotechnological research. A wide range of tools for genetic manipulation have been developed for this alga, but specific modification of nuclear genes is still not routinely possible. Here, we present a nuclear gene targeting strategy for Chlamydomonas that is based on the application of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Our approach includes (i) design of gene-specific ZFNs using available online tools, (ii) evaluation of the designed ZFNs in a Chlamydomonas in situ model system, (iii) optimization of ZFN activity by modification of the nuclease domain, and (iv) application of the most suitable enzymes for mutagenesis of an endogenous gene. Initially, we designed a set of ZFNs to target the COP3 gene that encodes the light-activated ion channel channelrhodopsin-1. To evaluate the designed ZFNs, we constructed a model strain by inserting a non-functional aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase VIII (aphVIII) selection marker interspaced with a short COP3 target sequence into the nuclear genome. Upon co-transformation of this recipient strain with the engineered ZFNs and an aphVIII DNA template, we were able to restore marker activity and select paromomycin-resistant (Pm-R) clones with expressing nucleases. Of these Pm-R clones, 1% also contained a modified COP3 locus. In cases where cells were co-transformed with a modified COP3 template, the COP3 locus was specifically modified by homologous recombination between COP3 and the supplied template DNA. We anticipate that this ZFN technology will be useful for studying the functions of individual genes in Chlamydomonas.

  5. Proline cis-trans isomerization in staphylococcal nuclease: multi-substrate free energy perturbation calculations.

    PubMed Central

    Hodel, A.; Rice, L. M.; Simonson, T.; Fox, R. O.; Brünger, A. T.

    1995-01-01

    Staphylococcal nuclease A exists in two folded forms that differ in the isomerization state of the Lys 116-Pro 117 peptide bond. The dominant form (90% occupancy) adopts a cis peptide bond, which is observed in the crystal structure. NMR studies show that the relatively small difference in free energy between the cis and trans forms (delta Gcis-->trans approximately 1.2 kcal/mol) results from large and nearly compensating differences in enthalpy and entropy (delta Hcis-->trans approximately delta TScis-->trans approximately 10 kcal/mol). There is evidence from X-ray crystal structures that the structural differences between the cis and the trans forms of nuclease are confined to the conformation of residues 112-117, a solvated protein loop. Here, we obtain a thermodynamic and structural description of the conformational equilibrium of this protein loop through an exhaustive conformational search that identified several substates followed by free energy simulations between the substrates. By partitioning the search into conformational substates, we overcame the multiple minima problem in this particular case and obtained precise and reproducible free energy values. The protein and water environment was implicitly modeled by appropriately chosen nonbonded terms between the explicitly treated loop and the rest of the protein. These simulations correctly predicted a small free energy difference between the cis and trans forms composed of larger, compensating differences in enthalpy and entropy. The structural predictions of these simulations were qualitatively consistent with known X-ray structures of nuclease variants and yield a model of the unknown minor trans conformation. PMID:7613463

  6. Zinc finger nuclease technology: A stable tool for high efficiency transformation in bloodstream form T. brucei.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Gabriela; Kangussu-Marcolino, Monica M; Doiron, Nicholas; Käser, Sandro; de Assis Burle-Caldas, Gabriela; DaRocha, Wanderson D; Teixeira, Santuza M; Roditi, Isabel

    2017-04-01

    In Trypanosoma brucei, the generation of knockout mutants is relatively easy compared to other organisms as transfection methods are well established. These methods have their limitations, however, when it comes to the generation of genome-wide libraries that require a minimum of several hundred thousand transformants. Double-strand breaks with the meganuclease ISce-I dramatically increase transformation efficiency, but are not widely in use as cell lines need to be generated de novo before each transfection. Here we show that zinc finger nucleases are a robust and stable tool that can enhance transformation in bloodstream forms by more than an order of magnitude.

  7. A new thio-Schiff base fluorophore with copper ion sensing, DNA binding and nuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Vikneswaran, R; Syafiq, Muhamad Syamir; Eltayeb, Naser Eltaher; Kamaruddin, Mohd Naqiuddin; Ramesh, S; Yahya, R

    2015-01-01

    Copper ion recognition and DNA interaction of a newly synthesized fluorescent Schiff base (HPyETSC) were investigated using UV-vis and fluorescent spectroscopy. Examination using these two techniques revealed that the detection of copper by HPyETSC is highly sensitive and selective, with a detection limit of 0.39 μm and the mode of interaction between HPyETSC and DNA is electrostatic, with a binding constant of 8.97×10(4) M(-1). Furthermore, gel electrophoresis studies showed that HPyETSC exhibited nuclease activity through oxidative pathway.

  8. Zinc finger nuclease technology: advances and obstacles in modelling and treating genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Jabalameli, Hamid Reza; Zahednasab, Hamid; Karimi-Moghaddam, Amin; Jabalameli, Mohammad Reza

    2015-03-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are engineered restriction enzymes designed to target specific DNA sequences within the genome. Assembly of zinc finger DNA-binding domain to a DNA-cleavage domain enables the enzyme machinery to target unique locus in the genome and invoke endogenous DNA repair mechanisms. This machinery offers a versatile approach in allele editing and gene therapy. Here we discuss the architecture of ZFNs and strategies for generating targeted modifications within the genome. We review advances in gene therapy and modelling of the disease using these enzymes and finally, discuss the practical obstacles in using this technology.

  9. Nuclease Resistant DNA via High-Density Packing in Polymeric Micellar Nanoparticle Coronas

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Anthony M.; Thompson, Matthew P.; Tatro, Erick T.

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we describe a polymeric micellar nanoparticle capable of rendering nucleic acids resistant to nuclease digestion. This approach relies on utilizing DNA as the polar head group of a DNA-polymer amphiphile in order to assemble well-defined, discrete nanoparticles. Dense packing of DNA in the micelle corona allows for hybridization of complementary oligonucleotides while prohibiting enzymatic degradation. We demonstrate the preparation, purification and characterization of the nanoparticles, then describe their resistance to treatment with endo- and exonucleases including snake-venom phosphodiesterase (SVP) a common, general DNA digestion enzyme. PMID:23379679

  10. TALEs from a spring--superelasticity of Tal effector protein structures.

    PubMed

    Flechsig, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are DNA-related proteins that recognise and bind specific target sequences to manipulate gene expression. Recently determined crystal structures show that their common architecture reveals a superhelical overall structure that may undergo drastic conformational changes. To establish a link between structure and dynamics in TALE proteins we have employed coarse-grained elastic-network modelling of currently available structural data and implemented a force-probe setup that allowed us to investigate their mechanical behaviour in computer experiments. Based on the measured force-extension curves we conclude that TALEs exhibit superelastic dynamical properties allowing for large-scale global conformational changes along their helical axis, which represents the soft direction in such proteins. For moderate external forcing the TALE models behave like linear springs, obeying Hooke's law, and the investigated structures can be characterised and compared by a corresponding spring constant. We show that conformational flexibility underlying the large-scale motions is not homogeneously distributed over the TALE structure, but instead soft spot residues around which strain is accumulated and which turn out to represent key agents in the transmission of conformational motions are identified. They correspond to the RVD loop residues that have been experimentally determined to play an eminent role in the binding process of target DNA.

  11. Effector-triggered defence against apoplastic fungal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Stotz, Henrik U.; Mitrousia, Georgia K.; de Wit, Pierre J.G.M.; Fitt, Bruce D.L.

    2014-01-01

    R gene-mediated host resistance against apoplastic fungal pathogens is not adequately explained by the terms pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) or effector-triggered immunity (ETI). Therefore, it is proposed that this type of resistance is termed ‘effector-triggered defence’ (ETD). Unlike PTI and ETI, ETD is mediated by R genes encoding cell surface-localised receptor-like proteins (RLPs) that engage the receptor-like kinase SOBIR1. In contrast to this extracellular recognition, ETI is initiated by intracellular detection of pathogen effectors. ETI is usually associated with fast, hypersensitive host cell death, whereas ETD often triggers host cell death only after an elapsed period of endophytic pathogen growth. In this opinion, we focus on ETD responses against foliar fungal pathogens of crops. PMID:24856287

  12. Structural Insights into Rab27 Recruitment by its Effectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. G. Chavas, Leonard; Ihara, Kentaro; Kawasaki, Masato; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    An increasing number of Rab GTPases associated with partial dysfunction has been linked to several human diseases characterized by a diminution in vesicle transport. Due to its direct implication in human disorders, the Rab27 subfamily is considered as a standard for vesicle docking studies. By which mechanism Rab27 effectors distinguish among the pool of Rab GTPases? What is the underneath machinery rendering the interaction of eleven distinct effectors specific of Rab27 when compared to other Rabs of the secretory pathway? By solving the X-ray structures of Rab27, both in its inactive form and active form bound to the effector protein Slp2-a, attempts have been given to unravel the molecular basis of regulation of the delivering process of vesicles to fusion by the Rab27 subfamily.

  13. Signaling in Effector Lymphocytes: Insights toward Safer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Kamalakannan; Riese, Matthew J.; Rao, Sridhar; Wang, Li; Thakar, Monica S.; Sentman, Charles L.; Malarkannan, Subramaniam

    2016-01-01

    Receptors on T and NK cells systematically propagate highly complex signaling cascades that direct immune effector functions, leading to protective immunity. While extensive studies have delineated hundreds of signaling events that take place upon receptor engagement, the precise molecular mechanism that differentially regulates the induction or repression of a unique effector function is yet to be fully defined. Such knowledge can potentiate the tailoring of signal transductions and transform cancer immunotherapies. Targeted manipulations of signaling cascades can augment one effector function such as antitumor cytotoxicity while contain the overt generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines that contribute to treatment-related toxicity such as “cytokine storm” and “cytokine-release syndrome” or lead to autoimmune diseases. Here, we summarize how individual signaling molecules or nodes may be optimally targeted to permit selective ablation of toxic immune side effects. PMID:27242783

  14. Diacylglycerol Kinases in T Cell Tolerance and Effector Function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shelley S.; Hu, Zhiming; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) are a family of enzymes that regulate the relative levels of diacylglycerol (DAG) and phosphatidic acid (PA) in cells by phosphorylating DAG to produce PA. Both DAG and PA are important second messengers cascading T cell receptor (TCR) signal by recruiting multiple effector molecules, such as RasGRP1, PKCθ, and mTOR. Studies have revealed important physiological functions of DGKs in the regulation of receptor signaling and the development and activation of immune cells. In this review, we will focus on recent progresses in our understanding of two DGK isoforms, α and ζ, in CD8 T effector and memory cell differentiation, regulatory T cell development and function, and invariant NKT cell development and effector lineage differentiation. PMID:27891502

  15. Effector proteins that modulate plant--insect interactions.

    PubMed

    Hogenhout, Saskia A; Bos, Jorunn I B

    2011-08-01

    Insect herbivores have highly diverse life cycles and feeding behaviors. They establish close interactions with their plant hosts and suppress plant defenses. Chewing herbivores evoke characteristic defense responses distinguishable from general mechanical damage. In addition, piercing-sucking hemipteran insects display typical feeding behavior that suggests active suppression of plant defense responses. Effectors that modulate plant defenses have been identified in the saliva of these insects. Tools for high-throughput effector identification and functional characterization have been developed. In addition, in some insect species it is possible to silence gene expression by RNAi. Together, this technological progress has enabled the identification of insect herbivore effectors and their targets that will lead to the development of novel strategies for pest resistances in plants.

  16. Effector and suppressor T cells in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Mazzarella, Giuseppe

    2015-06-28

    Celiac disease (CD) is a T-cell mediated immune disease in which gliadin-derived peptides activate lamina propria effector CD4+ T cells. This activation leads to the release of cytokines, compatible with a Th1-like pattern, which play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of CD, controlling many aspects of the inflammatory immune response. Recent studies have shown that a novel subset of effector T cells, characterized by expression of high levels of IL-17A, termed Th17 cells, plays a pathogenic role in CD. While these effector T cell subsets produce proinflammatory cytokines, which cause substantial tissue injury in vivo in CD, recent studies have suggested the existence of additional CD4(+) T cell subsets with suppressor functions. These subsets include type 1 regulatory T cells and CD25(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells, expressing the master transcription factor Foxp3, which have important implications for disease progression.

  17. Structural differences in the chromatin from compartmentalized cells of the sea urchin embryo: differential nuclease accessibility of micromere chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Cognetti, G; Shaw, B R

    1981-01-01

    The chromatin structure of three cell types isolated from the 16-cell stage sea urchin embryo has been probed with micrococcal nuclease. In micromeres, the four small cells at the vegetal pole, the chromatin is found to be considerably more resistant to degradation by micrococcal nuclease than chromatin in the larger mesomere and macromere cells which undergo more cellular divisions and are committed to different developmental fates. The micromeres show an order of magnitude decrease in the initial digestion rate and a limit digest value which is one third that of the larger blastomeres; both observations are suggestive of the formation of a more condensed chromatin structure during the process of commitment, or as the rate of cell division decreases. The decreased sensitivity to nuclease for micromeres is similar to results reported for sperm and larval stages of development. Images PMID:7312627

  18. Yersinia type III effectors perturb host innate immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Pha, Khavong; Navarro, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Innate immune cells recognize molecular patterns from the pathogen and mount a response to resolve the infection. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, phagocytosis, and induced programmed cell death are processes initiated by innate immune cells in order to combat invading pathogens. However, pathogens have evolved various virulence mechanisms to subvert these responses. One strategy utilized by Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the deployment of a complex machine termed the type III secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS is composed of a syringe-like needle structure and the effector proteins that are injected directly into a target host cell to disrupt a cellular response. The three human pathogenic Yersinia spp. (Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis) are Gram-negative bacteria that share in common a 70 kb virulence plasmid which encodes the T3SS. Translocation of the Yersinia effector proteins (YopE, YopH, YopT, YopM, YpkA/YopO, and YopP/J) into the target host cell results in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton to inhibit phagocytosis, downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, and induction of cellular apoptosis of the target cell. Over the past 25 years, studies on the Yersinia effector proteins have unveiled tremendous knowledge of how the effectors enhance Yersinia virulence. Recently, the long awaited crystal structure of YpkA has been solved providing further insights into the activation of the YpkA kinase domain. Multisite autophosphorylation by YpkA to activate its kinase domain was also shown and postulated to serve as a mechanism to bypass regulation by host phosphatases. In addition, novel Yersinia effector protein targets, such as caspase-1, and signaling pathways including activation of the inflammasome were identified. In this review, we summarize the recent discoveries made on Yersinia

  19. How Do Filamentous Pathogens Deliver Effector Proteins into Plant Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Petre, Benjamin; Kamoun, Sophien

    2014-01-01

    Fungal and oomycete plant parasites are among the most devastating pathogens of food crops. These microbes secrete effector proteins inside plant cells to manipulate host processes and facilitate colonization. How these effectors reach the host cytoplasm remains an unclear and debated area of plant research. In this article, we examine recent conflicting findings that have generated discussion in the field. We also highlight promising approaches based on studies of both parasite and host during infection. Ultimately, this knowledge may inform future broad spectrum strategies for protecting crops from such pathogens. PMID:24586116

  20. Nanorobotic end-effectors: Design, fabrication, and in situ characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zheng

    Nano-robotic end-effectors have promising applications for nano-fabrication, nano-manufacturing, nano-optics, nano-medical, and nano-sensing; however, low performances of the conventional end-effectors have prevented the widespread utilization of them in various fields. There are two major difficulties in developing the end-effectors: their nano-fabrication and their advanced characterization in the nanoscale. Here we introduce six types of end-effectors: the nanotube fountain pen (NFP), the super-fine nanoprobe, the metal-filled carbon nanotube (m CNT)-based sphere-on-pillar (SOP) nanoantennas, the tunneling nanosensor, and the nanowire-based memristor. The investigations on the NFP are focused on nano-fluidics and nano-fabrications. The NFP could direct write metallic "inks" and fabricating complex metal nanostructures from 0D to 3D with a position servo control, which is critically important to future large-scale, high-throughput nanodevice production. With the help of NFP, we could fabricate the end-effectors such as super-fine nanoprobe and m CNT-based SOP nanoantennas. Those end-effectors are able to detect local flaws or characterize the electrical/mechanical properties of the nanostructure. Moreover, using electron-energy-loss-spectroscopy (EELS) technique during the operation of the SOP optical antenna opens a new basis for the application of nano-robotic end-effectors. The technique allows advanced characterization of the physical changes, such as carrier diffusion, that are directly responsible for the device's properties. As the device was coupled with characterization techniques of scanning-trasmission-electron-microscopy (STEM), the development of tunneling nanosensor advances this field of science into quantum world. Furthermore, the combined STEM-EELS technique plays an important role in our understanding of the memristive switching performance in the nanowire-based memristor. The developments of those nano-robotic end-effectors expend the study

  1. Visual End-Effector Position Error Compensation for Planetary Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajracharya, Max; DiCicco, Matthew; Backes, Paul; Nickels, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a vision-guided manipulation algorithm that improves arm end-effector positioning to subpixel accuracy and meets the highly restrictive imaging and computational constraints of a planetary robotic flight system. Analytical, simulation-based, and experimental analyses of the algorithm's effectiveness and sensitivity to camera and arm model error is presented along with results on several prototype research systems and 'ground-in-the-loop' technology experiments on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) vehicles. A computationally efficient and robust subpixel end-effector fiducial detector that is instrumental to the algorithm's ability to achieve high accuracy is also described along with its validation results on MER data.

  2. Hemipteran and dipteran pests: Effectors and plant host immune regulators.

    PubMed

    Kaloshian, Isgouhi; Walling, Linda L

    2016-04-01

    Hemipteran and dipteran insects have behavioral, cellular and chemical strategies for evading or coping with the host plant defenses making these insects particularly destructive pests worldwide. A critical component of a host plant's defense to herbivory is innate immunity. Here we review the status of our understanding of the receptors that contribute to perception of hemipteran and dipteran pests and highlight the gaps in our knowledge in these early events in immune signaling. We also highlight recent advances in identification of the effectors that activate pattern-triggered immunity and those involved in effector-triggered immunity.

  3. LOCALIZER: subcellular localization prediction of both plant and effector proteins in the plant cell

    PubMed Central

    Sperschneider, Jana; Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; DeBoer, Kathleen; Petre, Benjamin; Gardiner, Donald M.; Singh, Karam B.; Dodds, Peter N.; Taylor, Jennifer M.

    2017-01-01

    Pathogens secrete effector proteins and many operate inside plant cells to enable infection. Some effectors have been found to enter subcellular compartments by mimicking host targeting sequences. Although many computational methods exist to predict plant protein subcellular localization, they perform poorly for effectors. We introduce LOCALIZER for predicting plant and effector protein localization to chloroplasts, mitochondria, and nuclei. LOCALIZER shows greater prediction accuracy for chloroplast and mitochondrial targeting compared to other methods for 652 plant proteins. For 107 eukaryotic effectors, LOCALIZER outperforms other methods and predicts a previously unrecognized chloroplast transit peptide for the ToxA effector, which we show translocates into tobacco chloroplasts. Secretome-wide predictions and confocal microscopy reveal that rust fungi might have evolved multiple effectors that target chloroplasts or nuclei. LOCALIZER is the first method for predicting effector localisation in plants and is a valuable tool for prioritizing effector candidates for functional investigations. LOCALIZER is available at http://localizer.csiro.au/. PMID:28300209

  4. A Biochemical Approach to Understanding the Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Regulated Nucleases in Genome Maintenance for Preventing Bone Marrow Failure and Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    the Fanconi Anemia Pathway- Regulated Nucleases in Genome Maintenance for Preventing Bone Marrow Failure and Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Biochemical Approach to Understanding the Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Regulated Nucleases in Genome Maintenance for...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Fanconi anemia is the most prevalent inherited BMF syndromes, caused by mutations in

  5. Steady-State and Kinetics-Based Affinity Determination in Effector-Effector Target Interactions.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, André; Nürnberger, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    Dissecting the functional basis of pathogenicity and resistance in the context of plant innate immunity benefits greatly from detailed knowledge about biomolecular interactions, as both resistance and virulence depend on specific interactions between pathogen and host biomolecules. While in vivo systems provide biological context to host-pathogen interactions, these experiments typically cannot provide quantitative biochemical characterization of biomolecular interactions. However, in many cases, the biological function does not only depend on whether an interaction occurs at all, but rather on the "intensity" of the interaction, as quantified by affinity. Specifically, microbial effector proteins may bind more than one host target to exert virulence functions, and looking at these interactions more closely than would be possible in a purely black-and-white qualitative assay (as classically based on plant or yeast systems) can reveal new insights into the evolutionary arms race between host and pathogen. Recent advances in biomolecular interaction assays that can be performed in vitro allow quantification of binding events with ever greater fidelity and application range. Here, we describe assays based on microscale thermophoresis (MST) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Using these technologies allows affinity determination both in steady-state and in kinetic configurations, providing two conceptually independent pathways to arrive at quantitative affinity data describing the interactions of pathogen and host biomolecules.

  6. Robotic End Effectors for Hard-Rock Climbing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Brett; Leger, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Special-purpose robot hands (end effectors) now under development are intended to enable robots to traverse cliffs much as human climbers do. Potential applications for robots having this capability include scientific exploration (both on Earth and other rocky bodies in space), military reconnaissance, and outdoor search and rescue operations. Until now, enabling robots to traverse cliffs has been considered too difficult a task because of the perceived need of prohibitively sophisticated planning algorithms as well as end effectors as dexterous as human hands. The present end effectors are being designed to enable robots to attach themselves to typical rock-face features with less planning and simpler end effectors. This advance is based on the emulation of the equipment used by human climbers rather than the emulation of the human hand. Climbing-aid equipment, specifically cams, aid hooks, and cam hooks, are used by sport climbers when a quick ascent of a cliff is desired (see Figure 1). Currently two different end-effector designs have been created. The first, denoted the simple hook emulator, consists of three "fingers" arranged around a central "palm." Each finger emulates the function of a particular type of climbing hook (aid hook, wide cam hook, and a narrow cam hook). These fingers are connected to the palm via a mechanical linkage actuated with a leadscrew/nut. This mechanism allows the fingers to be extended or retracted. The second design, denoted the advanced hook emulator (see Figure 2), shares these features, but it incorporates an aid hook and a cam hook into each finger. The spring-loading of the aid hook allows the passive selection of the type of hook used. The end effectors can be used in several different modes. In the aid-hook mode, the aid hook on one of the fingers locks onto a horizontal ledge while the other two fingers act to stabilize the end effector against the cliff face. In the cam-hook mode, the broad, flat tip of the cam hook is

  7. Efficient targeted mutagenesis in the monarch butterfly using zinc-finger nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Merlin, Christine; Beaver, Lauren E.; Taylor, Orley R.; Wolfe, Scot A.; Reppert, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of reverse-genetic tools in “nonmodel” insect species with distinct biology is critical to establish them as viable model systems. The eastern North American monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), whose genome is sequenced, has emerged as a model to study animal clocks, navigational mechanisms, and the genetic basis of long-distance migration. Here, we developed a highly efficient gene-targeting approach in the monarch using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), engineered nucleases that generate mutations at targeted genomic sequences. We focused our ZFN approach on targeting the type 2 vertebrate-like cryptochrome gene of the monarch (designated cry2), which encodes a putative transcriptional repressor of the monarch circadian clockwork. Co-injections of mRNAs encoding ZFNs targeting the second exon of monarch cry2 into “one nucleus” stage embryos led to high-frequency nonhomologous end-joining-mediated, mutagenic lesions in the germline (up to 50%). Heritable ZFN-induced lesions in two independent lines produced truncated, nonfunctional CRY2 proteins, resulting in the in vivo disruption of circadian behavior and the molecular clock mechanism. Our work genetically defines CRY2 as an essential transcriptional repressor of the monarch circadian clock and provides a proof of concept for the use of ZFNs for manipulating genes in the monarch butterfly genome. Importantly, this approach could be used in other lepidopterans and “nonmodel” insects, thus opening new avenues to decipher the molecular underpinnings of a variety of biological processes. PMID:23009861

  8. Surveyor nuclease detection of mutations and polymorphisms of mtDNA in children.

    PubMed

    Pilch, Jacek; Asman, Marek; Jamroz, Ewa; Kajor, Maciej; Kotrys-Puchalska, Elżbieta; Goss, Małgorzata; Krzak, Maria; Witecka, Joanna; Gmiński, Jan; Sieroń, Aleksander L

    2010-11-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathies are complex disorders with wide range of clinical manifestations. Particularly time-consuming is the identification of mutations in mitochondrial DNA. A group of 20 children with clinical manifestations of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies was selected for molecular studies. The aims were (a) to identify mutations in mtDNA isolated from muscle and (b) to verify detected mutations in DNA isolated from blood, in order to assess the utility of a Surveyor nuclease assay kit for patient screening. The most common changes found were polymorphisms, including a few missense mutations altering the amino acid sequence of mitochondrial proteins. In two boys with MELAS (i.e., mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes), a mutation A→G3243 was detected in the tRNALeu gene of mtDNA isolated from muscle and blood. In one boy, the carrier status of his mother was confirmed, based on molecular analysis of DNA isolated from blood. A method using Surveyor nuclease allows systematic screening for small mutations in mtDNA, using as its source blood of the patients and asymptomatic carriers. The method still requires confirmation studying a larger group. In some patients, the use of this method should precede and might limit indications for traumatic muscle and skin biopsy.

  9. Improved Cell-Penetrating Zinc-Finger Nuclease Proteins for Precision Genome Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Gaj, Thomas; Wallen, Mark C; Barbas, Carlos F

    2015-01-01

    Safe, efficient, and broadly applicable methods for delivering site-specific nucleases into cells are needed in order for targeted genome editing to reach its full potential for basic research and medicine. We previously reported that zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) proteins have the innate capacity to cross cell membranes and induce genome modification via their direct application to human cells. Here, we show that incorporation of tandem nuclear localization signal (NLS) repeats into the ZFN protein backbone enhances cell permeability nearly 13-fold and that single administration of multi-NLS ZFN proteins leads to genome modification rates of up to 26% in CD4+ T cells and 17% in CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. In addition, we show that multi-NLS ZFN proteins attenuate off-target effects and that codelivery of ZFN protein pairs facilitates dual gene modification frequencies of 20–30% in CD4+ T cells. These results illustrate the applicability of ZFN protein delivery for precision genome engineering. PMID:25756962

  10. Targeted gene knockout in mammalian cells by using engineered zinc-finger nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Yolanda; Chan, Edmond; Liu, Pei-Qi; Orlando, Salvatore; Zhang, Lin; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Guschin, Dmitry; Waite, Adam; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Klug, Aaron; Collingwood, Trevor N.

    2008-01-01

    Gene knockout is the most powerful tool for determining gene function or permanently modifying the phenotypic characteristics of a cell. Existing methods for gene disruption are limited by their efficiency, time to completion, and/or the potential for confounding off-target effects. Here, we demonstrate a rapid single-step approach to targeted gene knockout in mammalian cells, using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). ZFNs can be designed to target a chosen locus with high specificity. Upon transient expression of these nucleases the target gene is first cleaved by the ZFNs and then repaired by a natural—but imperfect—DNA repair process, nonhomologous end joining. This often results in the generation of mutant (null) alleles. As proof of concept for this approach we designed ZFNs to target the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line. We observed biallelic gene disruption at frequencies >1%, thus obviating the need for selection markers. Three new genetically distinct DHFR−/− cell lines were generated. Each new line exhibited growth and functional properties consistent with the specific knockout of the DHFR gene. Importantly, target gene disruption is complete within 2–3 days of transient ZFN delivery, thus enabling the isolation of the resultant DHFR−/− cell lines within 1 month. These data demonstrate further the utility of ZFNs for rapid mammalian cell line engineering and establish a new method for gene knockout with application to reverse genetics, functional genomics, drug discovery, and therapeutic recombinant protein production. PMID:18359850

  11. Multinuclear magnetic resonance and kinetic studies of single amino acid replacements in staphylococcal nuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Grissom, C.B.; Alexandrescu, A.T.; Ulrich, E.L.; Mills, D.A.; Markley, J.L.

    1986-05-01

    Staphylococcal nuclease hydrolyzes the 5'-phosphate bond of deoxythymidine 5'-p-nitrophenylphosphate to yield p-nitrophenyl phosphate (PNPP) and deoxythymidine in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/. The PNPP produced can be hydrolyzed to p-nitrophenol and inorganic phosphate by alkaline phosphatase in a coupled assay to provide a chromophore suitable for kinetic studies. By using this assay, the following single amino acid replacements have been characterized at 20 mM Ca/sup 2 +/ and pH 9.25 with the following results (kinetic parameters are expressed relative to those for SNase). SNase, Km = 2.5 mM, V = 1, V/K = 1; substitution of Tyr for Phe at position 85 (Y85F), Km = 61 mM, V/K = 1; H124R, Km = 3.8 mM, V = 3, V/K = 6; H46Y, Km = 2.5 mM, V = 0.78, V/K = 0.66; F76V, Km = 2.4 mM, V = 2.1, and V/K = 2. Only a small perturbation in the kinetic constants is seen for H124R, H46Y, and F76V. Removal of the hydroxyl from tyrosine 85 diminishes the affinity for substrate. Interactions of the wild-type and variant nucleases with metal ions and inhibitors are being investigated by /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, and /sup 113/Cd NMR.

  12. Dimeric CRISPR RNA-guided FokI nucleases for highly specific genome editing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shengdar Q; Wyvekens, Nicolas; Khayter, Cyd; Foden, Jennifer A; Thapar, Vishal; Reyon, Deepak; Goodwin, Mathew J; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J Keith

    2014-06-01

    Monomeric CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for targeted genome editing but can induce unwanted off-target mutations with high frequencies. Here we describe dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases (RFNs) that can recognize extended sequences and edit endogenous genes with high efficiencies in human cells. RFN cleavage activity depends strictly on the binding of two guide RNAs (gRNAs) to DNA with a defined spacing and orientation substantially reducing the likelihood that a suitable target site will occur more than once in the genome and therefore improving specificities relative to wild-type Cas9 monomers. RFNs guided by a single gRNA generally induce lower levels of unwanted mutations than matched monomeric Cas9 nickases. In addition, we describe a simple method for expressing multiple gRNAs bearing any 5' end nucleotide, which gives dimeric RFNs a broad targeting range. RFNs combine the ease of RNA-based targeting with the specificity enhancement inherent to dimerization and are likely to be useful in applications that require highly precise genome editing.

  13. Nuclease activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mre11 functions in targeted nucleotide alteration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Usher, Michael; Hu, Yiling; Kmiec, Eric B

    2003-10-01

    Oligonucleotides can be used to direct site-specific changes in genomic DNA through a process in which mismatched base pairs in the oligonucleotide and the target DNA are created. The mechanism by which these complexes are developed and resolved is being studied by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system. Genetic analyses have revealed that in all likelihood the reaction occurs in two phases: DNA pairing and DNA repair. While the former phase involves strand assimilation, the latter phase likely involves an endonucleolytic processing step that leads to joint resolution. In this study, we established the importance of a functioning MRE11 gene in the overall reaction, as yeast strains deficient in MRE11 exhibited severely reduced activity. The activity could be rescued by complementation with wild-type MRE11 genes but not with MRE11 alleles lacking the nuclease function. Taken together, the data suggest that Mre11 provides nuclease activity for targeted nucleotide exchange, a process that could be used to reengineer yeast genes.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of two thermostable DNA nucleases

    SciTech Connect

    Kuettner, E. Bartholomeus; Pfeifer, Sven; Keim, Antje; Greiner-Stöffele, Thomas; Sträter, Norbert

    2006-12-01

    Two thermostable DNA nucleases from archaea were crystallized in different space groups; the crystals were suitable for X-ray analysis. Temperature-tolerant organisms are an important source to enhance the stability of enzymes used in biotechnological processes. The DNA-cleaving enzyme exonuclease III from Escherichia coli is used in several applications in gene technology. A thermostable variant could expand the applicability of the enzyme in these methods. Two homologous nucleases from Archaeoglobus fulgidus (ExoAf) and Methanothermobacter thermoautrophicus (ExoMt) were studied for this purpose. Both enzymes were crystallized in different space groups using (poly)ethylene glycols, 2,4-methyl pentandiol, dioxane, ethanol or 2-propanol as precipitants. The addition of a 10-mer DNA oligonucleotide was important to obtain monoclinic crystals of ExoAf and ExoMt that diffracted to resolutions better than 2 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystal structures of the homologous proteins can serve as templates for genetic engineering of the E. coli exonuclease III and will aid in understanding the different catalytic properties of the enzymes.

  15. Butyrate-induced changes in nuclease sensitivity of chromatin cannot be correlated with transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Birren, B W; Taplitz, S J; Herschman, H R

    1987-01-01

    We examined in the H4IIE rat hepatoma cell line the relationship between butyrate-induced changes in the nuclease sensitivity of chromatin and changes in transcriptional activity of specific genes. The butyrate-inducible metallothionein I (MT-I) gene underwent a dramatic increase in DNase I sensitivity after 3 h of butyrate treatment. However, genes not transcribed in H4IIE cells underwent the same changes in DNase I sensitivity. Thus, butyrate-induced increases in DNase I sensitivity are not sufficient for the transcriptional activation of a gene. Butyrate treatment has also been reported to alter the sensitivity of sequences to micrococcal nuclease (MNase) in a manner reflecting their tissue-specific expression. Butyrate exposure caused increased digestion of the MT-I gene by MNase. However, butyrate-induced MNase sensitivity also occurred for genes which are neither transcribed in untreated cells nor butyrate inducible. Moreover, cadmium, a potent transcriptional activator of the MT-I gene, does not alter the sensitivity of the MT-I gene to MNase. Thus, the butyrate-induced alterations in MNase sensitivity are neither sufficient for, necessary for, nor indicative of transcriptional activation. Images PMID:3431545

  16. Efficient targeted mutagenesis in the monarch butterfly using zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Christine; Beaver, Lauren E; Taylor, Orley R; Wolfe, Scot A; Reppert, Steven M

    2013-01-01

    The development of reverse-genetic tools in "nonmodel" insect species with distinct biology is critical to establish them as viable model systems. The eastern North American monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), whose genome is sequenced, has emerged as a model to study animal clocks, navigational mechanisms, and the genetic basis of long-distance migration. Here, we developed a highly efficient gene-targeting approach in the monarch using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), engineered nucleases that generate mutations at targeted genomic sequences. We focused our ZFN approach on targeting the type 2 vertebrate-like cryptochrome gene of the monarch (designated cry2), which encodes a putative transcriptional repressor of the monarch circadian clockwork. Co-injections of mRNAs encoding ZFNs targeting the second exon of monarch cry2 into "one nucleus" stage embryos led to high-frequency nonhomologous end-joining-mediated, mutagenic lesions in the germline (up to 50%). Heritable ZFN-induced lesions in two independent lines produced truncated, nonfunctional CRY2 proteins, resulting in the in vivo disruption of circadian behavior and the molecular clock mechanism. Our work genetically defines CRY2 as an essential transcriptional repressor of the monarch circadian clock and provides a proof of concept for the use of ZFNs for manipulating genes in the monarch butterfly genome. Importantly, this approach could be used in other lepidopterans and "nonmodel" insects, thus opening new avenues to decipher the molecular underpinnings of a variety of biological processes.

  17. An efficient targeted nuclease strategy for high-resolution mapping of DNA binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Skene, Peter J; Henikoff, Steven

    2017-01-01

    We describe Cleavage Under Targets and Release Using Nuclease (CUT&RUN), a chromatin profiling strategy in which antibody-targeted controlled cleavage by micrococcal nuclease releases specific protein-DNA complexes into the supernatant for paired-end DNA sequencing. Unlike Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP), which fragments and solubilizes total chromatin, CUT&RUN is performed in situ, allowing for both quantitative high-resolution chromatin mapping and probing of the local chromatin environment. When applied to yeast and human nuclei, CUT&RUN yielded precise transcription factor profiles while avoiding crosslinking and solubilization issues. CUT&RUN is simple to perform and is inherently robust, with extremely low backgrounds requiring only ~1/10th the sequencing depth as ChIP, making CUT&RUN especially cost-effective for transcription factor and chromatin profiling. When used in conjunction with native ChIP-seq and applied to human CTCF, CUT&RUN mapped directional long range contact sites at high resolution. We conclude that in situ mapping of protein-DNA interactions by CUT&RUN is an attractive alternative to ChIP-seq. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21856.001 PMID:28079019

  18. The adnAB locus, encoding a putative helicase-nuclease activity, is essential in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingli; Nguyen, Hoang Chuong; Chipot, Ludovic; Piotrowski, Emilie; Bertrand, Claire; Thibessard, Annabelle; Leblond, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Homologous recombination is a crucial mechanism that repairs a wide range of DNA lesions, including the most deleterious ones, double-strand breaks (DSBs). This multistep process is initiated by the resection of the broken DNA ends by a multisubunit helicase-nuclease complex exemplified by Escherichia coli RecBCD, Bacillus subtilis AddAB, and newly discovered Mycobacterium tuberculosis AdnAB. Here we show that in Streptomyces, neither recBCD nor addAB homologues could be detected. The only putative helicase-nuclease-encoding genes identified were homologous to M. tuberculosis adnAB genes. These genes are conserved as a single copy in all sequenced genomes of Streptomyces. The disruption of adnAB in Streptomyces ambofaciens and Streptomyces coelicolor could not be achieved unless an ectopic copy was provided, indicating that adnAB is essential for growth. Both adnA and adnB genes were shown to be inducible in response to DNA damage (mitomycin C) and to be independently transcribed. Introduction of S. ambofaciens adnAB genes in an E. coli recB mutant restored viability and resistance to UV light, suggesting that Streptomyces AdnAB could be a functional homologue of RecBCD and be involved in DNA damage resistance.

  19. S1 nuclease definition of highly repeated DNA sequences in the Guinea pig, Cavia porcellus.

    PubMed Central

    Hubbell, H R; Robberson, D L; Hsu, T C

    1979-01-01

    Native DNA of the Guinea pig, Cavia porcellus, purified from liver or tissue culture cells, was heat denatured and reassociated to a Cot value of 0.01 (equivalent Cot value of 7.2 x 10(-2)). The reassociated DNA was isolated by digestion with the single-strand DNA specific enzyme S1 nuclease. Spectrophotometric and radioactivity assays demonstrated that 24% of the total DNA was resistant to S1 nuclease treatment. Zero-time reassociation indicated that approximately 3% of the DNA was inverted repeat sequences. Thus, highly repeated sequences comprised 21% of the total genome. CsCl buoyant density ultracentrifugation indicated that this fraction was composed of both main band and satellite sequences. Although actinomycin D - CsCl density gradients failed to give significant separation of the repetitive sequences, distamycin A - CsCl gradients were able to fractionate the DNA into several overlapping bands. The heterogeneity of the repetitive DNA was further demonstrated by the first derivative plots calculated from their thermal denaturation profiles. This analysis revealed six major thermalytes which indicate that there may be at least six discrete components in the repetitive DNA. Images PMID:523322

  20. Genome Editing in Mouse Spermatogonial Stem/Progenitor Cells Using Engineered Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Fanslow, Danielle A.; Wirt, Stacey E.; Barker, Jenny C.; Connelly, Jon P.; Porteus, Matthew H.; Dann, Christina Tenenhaus

    2014-01-01

    Editing the genome to create specific sequence modifications is a powerful way to study gene function and promises future applicability to gene therapy. Creation of precise modifications requires homologous recombination, a very rare event in most cell types that can be stimulated by introducing a double strand break near the target sequence. One method to create a double strand break in a particular sequence is with a custom designed nuclease. We used engineered nucleases to stimulate homologous recombination to correct a mutant gene in mouse “GS” (germline stem) cells, testicular derived cell cultures containing spermatogonial stem cells and progenitor cells. We demonstrated that gene-corrected cells maintained several properties of spermatogonial stem/progenitor cells including the ability to colonize following testicular transplantation. This proof of concept for genome editing in GS cells impacts both cell therapy and basic research given the potential for GS cells to be propagated in vitro, contribute to the germline in vivo following testicular transplantation or become reprogrammed to pluripotency in vitro. PMID:25409432

  1. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of Bacillus subtilis genes involved in ATP-dependent nuclease synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, J; Venema, G

    1991-01-01

    The genes encoding the subunits of the Bacillus subtilis ATP-dependent nuclease (add genes) have been cloned. The genes were located on an 8.8-kb SalI-SmaI chromosomal DNA fragment. Transformants of a recBCD deletion mutant of Escherichia coli with plasmid pGV1 carrying this DNA fragment showed ATP-dependent nuclease activity. Three open reading frames were identified on the 8.8-kb SalI-SmaI fragment, which could encode three proteins with molecular masses of 135 (AddB protein), 141 (AddA protein), and 28 kDa. Only the AddB and AddA proteins are required for ATP-dependent exonuclease activity. Both the AddB and AddA proteins contained a conserved amino acid sequence for ATP binding. In the AddA protein, a number of small regions were present showing a high degree of sequence similarity with regions in the E. coli RecB protein. The AddA protein contained six conserved motifs which were also present in the E. coli helicase II (UvrD protein) and the Rep helicase, suggesting that these motifs are involved in the DNA unwinding activity of the enzyme. When linked to the T7 promoter, a high level of expression was obtained in E. coli. Images PMID:1646786

  2. Simultaneous Screening and Validation of Effective Zinc Finger Nucleases in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Lin, Juan; Zhang, Tingting; Xu, Kun; Ren, Chonghua; Zhang, Zhiying

    2013-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) have been successfully used for genome modification in various cell types and species. However, construction of an effective ZFN remained challenging. Previous studies all focused on obtaining specific zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) first via bacterial 2-hybrid approach, and then fusing selected ZFPs to FokI nuclease domain. These assembled ZFNs have high rate of failing to cleave target sites in vivo. In this study, we developed a simultaneous screening and validation system to obtain effective ZFNs directly in yeast AH109. This system is based on Gal4 reporter system carrying a unique intermediate reporter plasmid with two 30-bp Gal4 homology arms and a ZFN target site. DNA double strand breaks introduced on target sequence by ZFNs were repaired by single strand annealing (SSA) mechanism, and the restored Gal4 drove reporter genes expression. Taking the advantage of OPEN (Oligomerized Pool ENgineering) selection, we constructed 3 randomized ZFNs libraries and 9 reporter strains for each target gene. We tested this system by taking goat α s1-casein as target gene following three-step selection. Consequently, 3 efficient pairs of ZFNs were obtained from positive colonies on selective medium. The ZFNs achieved a 15.9% disruption frequency in goat mammary epithelial cells. In conclusion, we created a novel system to obtain effective ZFNs directly with simultaneous screening and validation. PMID:23741369

  3. Hand to Mouth: Automatic Imitation across Effector Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leighton, Jane; Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    The effector dependence of automatic imitation was investigated using a stimulus-response compatibility (SRC) procedure during which participants were required to make an open or closed response with their hand or their mouth. The correct response for each trial was indicated by a pair of letters in Experiments 1 and 2 and by a colored square in…

  4. Plasmodium cellular effector mechanisms and the hepatic microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Frevert, Ute; Krzych, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains one of the most serious health problems globally. Immunization with attenuated parasites elicits multiple cellular effector mechanisms capable of eliminating Plasmodium liver stages. However, malaria liver stage (LS) immunity is complex and the mechanisms effector T cells use to locate the few infected hepatocytes in the large liver in order to kill the intracellular LS parasites remain a mystery to date. Here, we review our current knowledge on the behavior of CD8 effector T cells in the hepatic microvasculature, in malaria and other hepatic infections. Taking into account the unique immunological and lymphogenic properties of the liver, we discuss whether classical granule-mediated cytotoxicity might eliminate infected hepatocytes via direct cell contact or whether cytokines might operate without cell–cell contact and kill Plasmodium LSs at a distance. A thorough understanding of the cellular effector mechanisms that lead to parasite death hence sterile protection is a prerequisite for the development of a successful malaria vaccine to protect the 40% of the world’s population currently at risk of Plasmodium infection. PMID:26074888

  5. Modulation of hemoglobin dynamics by an allosteric effector

    PubMed Central

    Maccarini, Marco; Fouquet, Peter; Ho, Nancy T.; Ho, Chien; Makowski, Lee

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Hemoglobin (Hb) is an extensively studied paradigm of proteins that alter their function in response to allosteric effectors. Models of its action have been used as prototypes for structure‐function relationships in many proteins, and models for the molecular basis of its function have been deeply studied and extensively argued. Recent reports suggest that dynamics may play an important role in its function. Relatively little is known about the slow, correlated motions of hemoglobin subunits in various structural states because experimental and computational strategies for their characterization are challenging. Allosteric effectors such as inositol hexaphosphate (IHP) bind to both deoxy‐Hb and HbCO, albeit at different sites, leading to a lowered oxygen affinity. The manner in which these effectors impact oxygen binding is unclear and may involve changes in structure, dynamics or both. Here we use neutron spin echo measurements accompanied by wide‐angle X‐ray scattering to show that binding of IHP to HbCO results in an increase in the rate of coordinated motions of Hb subunits relative to one another with little if any change in large scale structure. This increase of large‐scale dynamics seems to be coupled with a decrease in the average magnitude of higher frequency modes of individual residues. These observations indicate that enhanced dynamic motions contribute to the functional changes induced by IHP and suggest that they may be responsible for the lowered oxygen affinity triggered by these effectors. PMID:27977887

  6. Type IV secretion system of Brucella spp. and its effectors

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Yufei; Li, Wengfeng; Chen, Zeliang

    2015-01-01

    Brucella spp. are intracellular bacterial pathogens that cause infection in domestic and wild animals. They are often used as model organisms to study intracellular bacterial infections. Brucella VirB T4SS is a key virulence factor that plays important roles in mediating intracellular survival and manipulating host immune response to infection. In this review, we discuss the roles of Brucella VirB T4SS and 15 effectors that are proposed to be crucial for Brucella pathogenesis. VirB T4SS regulates the inflammation response and manipulates vesicle trafficking inside host cells. VirB T4SS also plays crucial roles in the inhibition of the host immune response and intracellular survival during infection. Here, we list the key molecular events in the intracellular life cycle of Brucella that are potentially targeted by the VirB T4SS effectors. Elucidating the functions of these effectors will help clarify the molecular role of T4SS during infection. Furthermore, studying the effectors secreted by Brucella spp. might provide insights into the mechanisms used by the bacteria to hijack the host signaling pathways and aid in the development of better vaccines and therapies against brucellosis. PMID:26528442

  7. Electroporation of Functional Bacterial Effectors into Mammalian Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Mihai, Cosmin; Orr, Galya; ...

    2015-01-19

    Electroporation was used to insert purified bacterial virulence effector proteins directly into living eukaryotic cells. Protein localization was monitored by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. This method allows for studies on trafficking, function, and protein-protein interactions using active exogenous proteins, avoiding the need for heterologous expression in eukaryotic cells.

  8. Dissociating Visual Attention and Effector Selection in Spatial Precuing Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Jos J.; Pratt, Jay

    2004-01-01

    In this study the authors tested and rejected a recent proposal that response precuing effects depend on the spatial extent of the precues rather than on the number of response choices. Moreover, the authors tested and supported the hypothesis that the number of effectors in the response set is an important determinant of spatial precuing effects.…

  9. Type IV secretion system of Brucella spp. and its effectors.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Yufei; Li, Wengfeng; Chen, Zeliang

    2015-01-01

    Brucella spp. are intracellular bacterial pathogens that cause infection in domestic and wild animals. They are often used as model organisms to study intracellular bacterial infections. Brucella VirB T4SS is a key virulence factor that plays important roles in mediating intracellular survival and manipulating host immune response to infection. In this review, we discuss the roles of Brucella VirB T4SS and 15 effectors that are proposed to be crucial for Brucella pathogenesis. VirB T4SS regulates the inflammation response and manipulates vesicle trafficking inside host cells. VirB T4SS also plays crucial roles in the inhibition of the host immune response and intracellular survival during infection. Here, we list the key molecular events in the intracellular life cycle of Brucella that are potentially targeted by the VirB T4SS effectors. Elucidating the functions of these effectors will help clarify the molecular role of T4SS during infection. Furthermore, studying the effectors secreted by Brucella spp. might provide insights into the mechanisms used by the bacteria to hijack the host signaling pathways and aid in the development of better vaccines and therapies against brucellosis.

  10. Ehrlichia Moonlighting Effectors and Interkingdom Interactions with the Mononuclear Phagocyte

    PubMed Central

    Dunphy, Paige Selvy; Luo, Tian; McBride, Jere W.

    2013-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligately intracellular gram negative bacterium with a small genome that thrives in mammalian mononuclear phagoctyes by exploiting eukaryotic processes. Herein, we discuss the latest findings on moonlighting tandem repeat protein effectors and their secretion mechanisms, and novel molecular interkingdom interactions that provide insight into the intracellular pathobiology of ehrlichiae. PMID:24141087

  11. Structure Analysis Uncovers a Highly Diverse but Structurally Conserved Effector Family in Phytopathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Gracy, Jérome; Fournier, Elisabeth; Kroj, Thomas; Padilla, André

    2015-01-01

    Phytopathogenic ascomycete fungi possess huge effector repertoires that are dominated by hundreds of sequence-unrelated small secreted proteins. The molecular function of these effectors and the evolutionary mechanisms that generate this tremendous number of singleton genes are largely unknown. To get a deeper understanding of fungal effectors, we determined by NMR spectroscopy the 3-dimensional structures of the Magnaporthe oryzae effectors AVR1-CO39 and AVR-Pia. Despite a lack of sequence similarity, both proteins have very similar 6 β-sandwich structures that are stabilized in both cases by a disulfide bridge between 2 conserved cysteins located in similar positions of the proteins. Structural similarity searches revealed that AvrPiz-t, another effector from M. oryzae, and ToxB, an effector of the wheat tan spot pathogen Pyrenophora tritici-repentis have the same structures suggesting the existence of a family of sequence-unrelated but structurally conserved fungal effectors that we named MAX-effectors (Magnaporthe Avrs and ToxB like). Structure-informed pattern searches strengthened this hypothesis by identifying MAX-effector candidates in a broad range of ascomycete phytopathogens. Strong expansion of the MAX-effector family was detected in M. oryzae and M. grisea where they seem to be particularly important since they account for 5–10% of the effector repertoire and 50% of the cloned avirulence effectors. Expression analysis indicated that the majority of M. oryzae MAX-effectors are expressed specifically during early infection suggesting important functions during biotrophic host colonization. We hypothesize that the scenario observed for MAX-effectors can serve as a paradigm for ascomycete effector diversity and that the enormous number of sequence-unrelated ascomycete effectors may in fact belong to a restricted set of structurally conserved effector families. PMID:26506000

  12. Genome-Scale Identification of Legionella pneumophila Effectors Using a Machine Learning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, David; Zusman, Tal; Degtyar, Elena; Viner, Ram; Segal, Gil; Pupko, Tal

    2009-01-01

    A large number of highly pathogenic bacteria utilize secretion systems to translocate effector proteins into host cells. Using these effectors, the bacteria subvert host cell processes during infection. Legionella pneumophila translocates effectors via the Icm/Dot type-IV secretion system and to date, approximately 100 effectors have been identified by various experimental and computational techniques. Effector identification is a critical first step towards the understanding of the pathogenesis system in L. pneumophila as well as in other bacterial pathogens. Here, we formulate the task of effector identification as a classification problem: each L. pneumophila open reading frame (ORF) was classified as either effector or not. We computationally defined a set of features that best distinguish effectors from non-effectors. These features cover a wide range of characteristics including taxonomical dispersion, regulatory data, genomic organization, similarity to eukaryotic proteomes and more. Machine learning algorithms utilizing these features were then applied to classify all the ORFs within the L. pneumophila genome. Using this approach we were able to predict and experimentally validate 40 new effectors, reaching a success rate of above 90%. Increasing the number of validated effectors to around 140, we were able to gain novel insights into their characteristics. Effectors were found to have low G+C content, supporting the hypothesis that a large number of effectors originate via horizontal gene transfer, probably from their protozoan host. In addition, effectors were found to cluster in specific genomic regions. Finally, we were able to provide a novel description of the C-terminal translocation signal required for effector translocation by the Icm/Dot secretion system. To conclude, we have discovered 40 novel L. pneumophila effectors, predicted over a hundred additional highly probable effectors, and shown the applicability of machine learning algorithms for

  13. Active Flow Effectors for Noise and Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    New flow effector technology for separation control and enhanced mixing is based upon shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) technology. The technology allows for variable shape control of aircraft structures through actively deformable surfaces. The flow effectors are made by embedding shape memory alloy actuator material in a composite structure. When thermally actuated, the flow effector def1ects into or out of the flow in a prescribed manner to enhance mixing or induce separation for a variety of applications, including aeroacoustic noise reduction, drag reduction, and f1ight control. The active flow effectors were developed for noise reduction as an alternative to fixed-configuration effectors, such as static chevrons, that cannot be optimized for airframe installation effects or variable operating conditions and cannot be retracted for off-design or fail-safe conditions. Benefits include: Increased vehicle control, overall efficiency, and reduced noise throughout all f1ight regimes, Reduced flow noise, Reduced drag, Simplicity of design and fabrication, Simplicity of control through direct current stimulation, autonomous re sponse to environmental heating, fast re sponse, and a high degree of geometric stability. The concept involves embedding prestrained SMA actuators on one side of the chevron neutral axis in order to generate a thermal moment and def1ect the structure out of plane when heated. The force developed in the host structure during def1ection and the aerodynamic load is used for returning the structure to the retracted position. The chevron design is highly scalable and versatile, and easily affords active and/or autonomous (environmental) control. The technology offers wide-ranging market applications, including aerospace, automotive, and any application that requires flow separation or noise control.

  14. Die another day: molecular mechanisms of effector-triggered immunity elicited by type III secreted effector proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial pathogens inject type III secreted effector (T3SE) proteins into their hosts where they display dual roles depending on the host genotype. T3SEs promote bacterial virulence in susceptible hosts, and elicit immunity in resistant hosts. T3SEs are typically recognized when they modify a host ...

  15. A simple, high sensitivity mutation screening using Ampligase mediated T7 endonuclease I and Surveyor nuclease with microfluidic capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mo Chao; Cheong, Wai Chye; Lim, Li Shi; Li, Mo-Huang

    2012-03-01

    Mutation and polymorphism detection is of increasing importance for a variety of medical applications, including identification of cancer biomarkers and genotyping for inherited genetic disorders. Among various mutation-screening technologies, enzyme mismatch cleavage (EMC) represents a great potential as an ideal scanning method for its simplicity and high efficiency, where the heteroduplex DNAs are recognized and cleaved into DNA fragments by mismatch-recognizing nucleases. Thereby, the enzymatic cleavage activities of the resolving nucleases play a critical role for the EMC sensitivity. In this study, we utilized the unique features of microfluidic capillary electrophoresis and de novo gene synthesis to explore the enzymatic properties of T7 endonuclease I and Surveyor nuclease for EMC. Homoduplex and HE DNAs with specific mismatches at desired positions were synthesized using PCR (polymerase chain reaction) gene synthesis. The effects of nonspecific cleavage, preference of mismatches, exonuclease activity, incubation time, and DNA loading capability were systematically examined. In addition, the utilization of a thermostable DNA ligase for real-time ligase mediation was investigated. Analysis of the experimental results has led to new insights into the enzymatic cleavage activities of T7 endonuclease I and Surveyor nuclease, and aided in optimizing EMC conditions, which enhance the sensitivity and efficiency in screening of unknown DNA variations.

  16. Cell Wall-Anchored Nuclease of Streptococcus sanguinis Contributes to Escape from Neutrophil Extracellular Trap-Mediated Bacteriocidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Masanobu; Okahashi, Nobuo; Wada, Satoshi; Yamashiro, Takashi; Hayashi, Mikako; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis, a member of the commensal mitis group of streptococci, is a primary colonizer of the tooth surface, and has been implicated in infectious complications including bacteremia and infective endocarditis. During disease progression, S. sanguinis may utilize various cell surface molecules to evade the host immune system to survive in blood. In the present study, we discovered a novel cell surface nuclease with a cell-wall anchor domain, termed SWAN (streptococcal wall-anchored nuclease), and investigated its contribution to bacterial resistance against the bacteriocidal activity of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Recombinant SWAN protein (rSWAN) digested multiple forms of DNA including NET DNA and human RNA, which required both Mg2+ and Ca2+ for optimum activity. Furthermore, DNase activity of S. sanguinis was detected around growing colonies on agar plates containing DNA. In-frame deletion of the swan gene mostly reduced that activity. These findings indicated that SWAN is a major nuclease displayed on the surface, which was further confirmed by immuno-detection of SWAN in the cell wall fraction. The sensitivity of S. sanguinis to NET killing was reduced by swan gene deletion. Moreover, heterologous expression of the swan gene rendered a Lactococcus lactis strain more resistant to NET killing. Our results suggest that the SWAN nuclease on the bacterial surface contributes to survival in the potential situation of S. sanguinis encountering NETs during the course of disease progression. PMID:25084357

  17. The C. elegans apoptotic nuclease NUC-1 is related in sequence and activity to mammalian DNase II.

    PubMed

    Lyon, C J; Evans, C J; Bill, B R; Otsuka, A J; Aguilera, R J

    2000-07-11

    The Caenorhabditis elegans nuc-1 gene has previously been implicated in programmed cell death due to the presence of persistent undegraded apoptotic DNA in nuc-1 mutant animals. In this report, we describe the cloning and characterization of nuc-1, which encodes an acidic nuclease with significant sequence similarity to mammalian DNase II. Database searches performed with human DNase II protein sequence revealed a significant similarity with the predicted C. elegans C07B5.5 ORF. Subsequent analysis of crude C. elegans protein extracts revealed that wild-type animals contained a potent endonuclease activity with a cleavage preference similar to DNase II, while nuc-1 mutant worms demonstrated a marked reduction in this nuclease activity. Sequence analysis of C07B5.5 DNA and mRNA also revealed that nuc-1(e1392), but not wild-type animals contained a nonsense mutation within the CO7B5.5 coding region. Furthermore, nuc-1 transgenic lines carrying the wild-type C07B5.5 locus demonstrated a complete complementation of the nuc-1 mutant phenotype. Our results therefore provide compelling evidence that the C07B5.5 gene encodes the NUC-1 apoptotic nuclease and that this nuclease is related in sequence and activity to DNase II.

  18. The structure of ends determines the pathway choice and Mre11 nuclease dependency of DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Shuren; Tammaro, Margaret; Yan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The key event in the choice of repair pathways for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is the initial processing of ends. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) involves limited processing, but homology-dependent repair (HDR) requires extensive resection of the 5′ strand. How cells decide if an end is channeled to resection or NHEJ is not well understood. We hypothesize that the structure of ends is a major determinant and tested this hypothesis with model DNA substrates in Xenopus egg extracts. While ends with normal nucleotides are efficiently channeled to NHEJ, ends with damaged nucleotides or bulky adducts are channeled to resection. Resection is dependent on Mre11, but its nuclease activity is critical only for ends with 5′ bulky adducts. CtIP is absolutely required for activating the nuclease-dependent mechanism of Mre11 but not the nuclease-independent mechanism. Together, these findings suggest that the structure of ends is a major determinant for the pathway choice of DSB repair and the Mre11 nuclease dependency of resection. PMID:27084932

  19. Opening the Ralstonia solanacearum type III effector tool box: insights into host cell subversion mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Deslandes, Laurent; Genin, Stephane

    2014-08-01

    Effectors delivered to host cells by the Type III secretion system are essential to Ralstonia solanacearum pathogenicity, as in several other plant pathogenic bacteria. The establishment of exhaustive effector repertoires in multiple R. solanacearum strains drew a first picture of the evolutionary dynamics of the pathogen effector suites. Effector repertoires are diversified, with a core of 20-30 effectors present in most of the strains and the obtention of mutants lacking one or more effector genes revealed the functional overlap among this effector network. Recent functional studies have provided insights into the ability of single effectors to manipulate the host proteasome, elicit cell death, trigger the expression of plant genes, and/or display biochemical activities on plant protein targets.

  20. Early effector cells survive the contraction phase in malaria infection and generate both central and effector memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Opata, Michael M; Carpio, Victor H; Ibitokou, Samad A; Dillon, Brian E; Obiero, Joshua M; Stephens, Robin

    2015-06-01

    CD4 T cells orchestrate immunity against blood-stage malaria. However, a major challenge in designing vaccines to the disease is poor understanding of the requirements for the generation of protective memory T cells (Tmem) from responding effector T cells (Teff) in chronic parasite infection. In this study, we use a transgenic mouse model with T cells specific for the merozoite surface protein (MSP)-1 of Plasmodium chabaudi to show that activated T cells generate three distinct Teff subsets with progressive activation phenotypes. The earliest observed Teff subsets (CD127(-)CD62L(hi)CD27(+)) are less divided than CD62L(lo) Teff and express memory genes. Intermediate (CD62L(lo)CD27(+)) effector subsets include the most multicytokine-producing T cells, whereas fully activated (CD62L(lo)CD27(-)) late effector cells have a terminal Teff phenotype (PD-1(+), Fas(hi), AnnexinV(+)). We show that although IL-2 promotes expansion, it actually slows terminal effector differentiation. Using adoptive transfer, we show that only early Teff survive the contraction phase and generate the terminal late Teff subsets, whereas in uninfected recipients, they become both central and effector Tmem. Furthermore, we show that progression toward full Teff activation is promoted by increased duration of infection, which in the long-term promotes Tem differentiation. Therefore, we have defined markers of progressive activation of CD4 Teff at the peak of malaria infection, including a subset that survives the contraction phase to make Tmem, and show that Ag and cytokine levels during CD4 T cell expansion influence the proportion of activated cells that can survive contraction and generate memory in malaria infection.

  1. Mm19, a Mycoplasma meleagridis Major Surface Nuclease that Is Related to the RE_AlwI Superfamily of Endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Elhem; Ben Abdelmoumen Mardassi, Boutheina

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma meleagridis infection is widespread in turkeys, causing poor growth and feathering, airsacculitis, osteodystrophy, and reduction in hatchability. Like most mycoplasma species, M. meleagridis is characterized by its inability to synthesize purine and pyrimidine nucleotides de novo. Consistent with this intrinsic deficiency, we here report the cloning, expression, and characterization of a M. meleagridis gene sequence encoding a major surface nuclease, referred to as Mm19. Mm19 consists of a 1941- bp ORF encoding a 646-amino-acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 74,825 kDa. BLASTP analysis revealed a significant match with the catalytic/dimerization domain of type II restriction enzymes of the RE_AlwI superfamily. This finding is consistent with the genomic location of Mm19 sequence, which dispalys characteristics of a typical type II restriction-modification locus. Like intact M. meleagridis cells, the E. coli-expressed Mm19 fusion product was found to exhibit a nuclease activity against plasmid DNA, double-stranded DNA, single-stranded DNA, and RNA. The Mm19-associated nuclease activity was consistently enhanced with Mg2+ divalent cations, a hallmark of type II restriction enzymes. A rabbit hyperimmune antiserum raised against the bacterially expressed Mm19 strongly reacted with M. meleagridis intact cells and fully neutralized the surface-bound nuclease activity. Collectively, the results show that M. meleagridis expresses a strong surface-bound nuclease activity, which is the product of a single gene sequence that is related to the RE_AlwI superfamily of endonucleases. PMID:27010566

  2. Homologous recombination mediated by the mycobacterial AdnAB helicase without end resection by the AdnAB nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Richa; Unciuleac, Mihaela-Carmen; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Current models of bacterial homologous recombination (HR) posit that extensive resection of a DNA double-strand break (DSB) by a multisubunit helicase–nuclease machine (e.g. RecBCD, AddAB or AdnAB) generates the requisite 3′ single-strand DNA substrate for RecA-mediated strand invasion. AdnAB, the helicase–nuclease implicated in mycobacterial HR, consists of two subunits, AdnA and AdnB, each composed of an N-terminal ATPase domain and a C-terminal nuclease domain. DSB unwinding by AdnAB in vitro is stringently dependent on the ATPase activity of the ‘lead’ AdnB motor translocating on the 3′ ssDNA strand, but not on the putative ‘lagging’ AdnA ATPase. Here, we queried genetically which activities of AdnAB are pertinent to its role in HR and DNA damage repair in vivo by inactivating each of the four catalytic domains. Complete nuclease-dead AdnAB enzyme can sustain recombination in vivo, as long as its AdnB motor is intact and RecO and RecR are available. We conclude that AdnAB's processive DSB unwinding activity suffices for AdnAB function in HR. Albeit not excluding the agency of a backup nuclease, our findings suggest that mycobacterial HR can proceed via DSB unwinding and protein capture of the displaced 3′-OH single strand, without a need for extensive end-resection. PMID:27899634

  3. End-Effector Development for the PIP Puck Handling Robot

    SciTech Connect

    Fowley, M.D.

    2001-01-31

    It has been decided that excess, weapons-grade plutonium shall be immobilized to prevent nuclear proliferation. The method of immobilization is to encapsulate the plutonium in a ceramic puck, roughly the size of a hockey puck, using a sintering process. This method has been officially identified as the Plutonium Immobilization Process (PIP). A Can-in-Canister storage method will be used to further immobilize the plutonium. The Can-in-Canister method uses the existing design of a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister to house the plutonium pucks. the process begins with several pucks being stacked in a stainless steel can. Several of the stainless steel cans are stacked in a cage-like magazine. Several of the magazines are then placed in a DWPF canister. The DWPF canister is then filled with molten glass containing high-level, radioactive waste from the DWPF vitrification process. The Can-in-Canister method makes reclamation of plutonium from the pucks technically difficult and highly undesirable. The mechanical requirements of the Can-in-Canister process, in conjunction with the amount of time required to immobilize the vast quantities of weapons-grade plutonium, will expose personnel to unnecessarily high levels of radiation if the processes were completed manually, in glove boxes. Therefore, automated equipment is designed into the process to reduce or eliminate personnel exposure. Robots are used whenever the automated handling operations become complicated. There are two such operations in the initial stages of the Can-in-Canister process, which required a six-axis robot. The first operation is a press unloading process. The second operation is a tray transfer process. To successfully accomplish the operational tasks described in the two operations, the end-effector of the robot must be versatile, lightweight, and rugged. As a result of these demands, an extensive development process was undertaken to design the optimum end-effector for these puck

  4. End-Effector Development for the PIP Puck Handling Robot

    SciTech Connect

    Fowley, M.D.

    2001-01-03

    It has been decided that excess, weapons-grade plutonium shall be immobilized to prevent nuclear proliferation. The method of immobilization is to encapsulate the plutonium in a ceramic puck, roughly the size of a hockey puck, using a sintering process. This method has been officially identified as the Plutonium Immobilization Process (PIP). A Can-in-Canister storage method will be used to further immobilize the plutonium. The Can-in-Canister method uses the existing design of a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister to house the plutonium pucks. the process begins with several pucks being stacked in a stainless steel can. Several of the stainless steel cans are stacked in a cage-like magazine. Several of the magazines are then placed in a DWPF canister. The DWPF canister is then filled with molten glass containing high-level, radioactive waste from the DWPF vitrification process. The Can-in-Canister method makes reclamation of plutonium from the pucks technically difficult and highly undesirable. The mechanical requirements of the Can-in-Canister process, in conjunction with the amount of time required to immobilize the vast quantities of weapons-grade plutonium, will expose personnel to unnecessarily high levels of radiation if the processes were completed manually, in glove boxes. Therefore, automated equipment is designed into the process to reduce or eliminate personnel exposure. Robots are used whenever the automated handling operations become complicated. There are two such operations in the initial stages of the Can-in-Canister process, which required a six-axis robot. The first operation is a press unloading process. The second operation is a tray transfer process. To successfully accomplish the operational tasks described in the two operations, the end-effector of the robot must be versatile, lightweight, and rugged. As a result of these demands, an extensive development process was undertaken to design the optimum end-effector for these puck

  5. [Overview of patents on targeted genome editing technologies and their implications for innovation and entrepreneurship education in universities].

    PubMed

    Xiangyu, Fan; Yanping, Lin; Guojian, Liao; Jianping, Xie

    2015-12-01

    Zinc finger nuclease, transcription activator-like effector nuclease, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 nuclease are important targeted genome editing technologies. They have great significance in scientific research and applications on aspects of functional genomics research, species improvement, disease prevention and gene therapy. There are past or ongoing disputes over ownership of the intellectual property behind every technology. In this review, we summarize the patents on these three targeted genome editing technologies in order to provide some reference for developing genome editing technologies with self-owned intellectual property rights and some implications for current innovation and entrepreneurship education in universities.

  6. TALENs: a widely applicable technology for targeted genome editing.

    PubMed

    Joung, J Keith; Sander, Jeffry D

    2013-01-01

    Engineered nucleases enable the targeted alteration of nearly any gene in a wide range of cell types and organisms. The newly-developed transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) comprise a nonspecific DNA-cleaving nuclease fused to a DNA-binding domain that can be easily engineered so that TALENs can target essentially any sequence. The capability to quickly and efficiently alter genes using TALENs promises to have profound impacts on biological research and to yield potential therapeutic strategies for genetic diseases.

  7. Rapid Identification of Yersinia enterocolitica in Blood by the 5′ Nuclease PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Keya

    2000-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica accounts for 50% of the clinical sepsis episodes caused by the transfusion of contaminated red blood cells. A 5′ nuclease TaqMan PCR assay was developed to detect Y. enterocolitica in blood. Primers and a probe based on the nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA gene from Y. enterocolitica were designed. Whole-blood samples were spiked with various numbers of Y. enterocolitica cells, and total chromosomal DNA was extracted. When the TaqMan PCR assay was performed, as few as six bacteria spiked in 200 μl of blood could be detected. The assay was specific and did not detect other Yersinia species. The TaqMan assay is easy to perform, takes 2 h, and has the potential for use in the rapid detection of Y. enterocolitica contamination in stored blood units. PMID:10790127

  8. The RAG proteins in V(D)J recombination: more than just a nuclease

    PubMed Central

    Sadofsky, Moshe J.

    2001-01-01

    V(D)J recombination is the process that generates the diversity among T cell receptors and is one of three mechanisms that contribute to the diversity of antibodies in the vertebrate immune system. The mechanism requires precise cutting of the DNA at segment boundaries followed by rejoining of particular pairs of the resulting termini. The imprecision of aspects of the joining reaction contributes significantly to increasing the variability of the resulting functional genes. Signal sequences target DNA recombination and must participate in a highly ordered protein–DNA complex in order to limit recombination to appropriate partners. Two proteins, RAG1 and RAG2, together form the nuclease that cleaves the DNA at the border of the signal sequences. Additional roles of these proteins in organizing the reaction complex for subsequent steps are explored. PMID:11266539

  9. Evaluation of Novel Design Strategies for Developing Zinc Finger Nucleases Tools for Treating Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Christian; Sherman, William; Pallis, Jani; Bajwa, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are associated with cell death and apoptosis by binding at countless undesired locations. This cytotoxicity is associated with the binding ability of engineered zinc finger domains to bind dissimilar DNA sequences with high affinity. In general, binding preferences of transcription factors are associated with significant degenerated diversity and complexity which convolutes the design and engineering of precise DNA binding domains. Evolutionary success of natural zinc finger proteins, however, evinces that nature created specific evolutionary traits and strategies, such as modularity and rank-specific recognition to cope with binding complexity that are critical for creating clinical viable tools to precisely modify the human genome. Our findings indicate preservation of general modularity and significant alteration of the rank-specific binding preferences of the three-finger binding domain of transcription factor SP1 when exchanging amino acids in the 2nd finger. PMID:24808958

  10. Targeted disruption of exogenous EGFP gene in medaka using zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Ansai, Satoshi; Ochiai, Hiroshi; Kanie, Yuta; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Gou, Yuki; Kitano, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kinoshita, Masato

    2012-06-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are artificial enzymes that create site-specific double-strand breaks and thereby induce targeted genome editing. Here, we demonstrated successful gene disruption in somatic and germ cells of medaka (Oryzias latipes) using ZFN to target exogenous EGFP genes. Embryos that were injected with an RNA sequence pair coding for ZFNs showed mosaic loss of green fluorescent protein fluorescence in skeletal muscle. A number of mutations that included both deletions and insertions were identified within the ZFN target site in each embryo, whereas no mutations were found at the non-targeted sites. In addition, ZFN-induced mutations were introduced in germ cells and efficiently transmitted to the next generation. The mutation frequency varied (6-100%) in the germ cells from each founder, and a founder carried more than two types of mutation in germ cells. Our results have introduced the possibility of targeted gene disruption and reverse genetics in medaka.

  11. Disruption of the myostatin gene in porcine primary fibroblasts and embryos using zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian-Ju; Zhang, Hong-Xiao; Wang, Huili; Xiong, Kai; Qin, Ling; Liu, Honglin

    2014-04-01

    Myostatin represses muscle growth by negatively regulating the number and size of muscle fibers. Myostatin lossof- function can result in the double-muscling phenotype and increased muscle mass. Thus, knockout of myostatin gene could improve the quality of meat from mammals. In the present study, zinc finger nucleases, a useful tool for generating gene knockout animals, were designed to target exon 1 of the myostatin gene. The designed ZFNs were introduced into porcine primary fibroblasts and early implantation embryos via electroporation and microinjection, respectively. Mutations around the ZFNs target site were detected in both primary fibroblasts and blastocysts. The proportion of mutant fibroblast cells and blastocyst was 4.81% and 5.31%, respectively. Thus, ZFNs can be used to knockout myostatin in porcine primary fibroblasts and early implantation embryos.

  12. Functional identification of the non-specific nuclease from white spot syndrome virus

    SciTech Connect

    Li Li; Lin Shumei; Yanga Feng . E-mail: mbiotech@public.xm.fj.cn

    2005-07-05

    The product encoded by the wsv191 gene from shrimp white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is homologous with non-specific nucleases (NSN) of other organisms. To functionally identify the protein, the wsv191 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein with 6His-tag at C-terminal. The fusion protein (termed as rWSSV-NSN) was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography under denatured conditions, renatured and characterized by three methods. The results showed that rWSSV-NSN could hydrolyze both DNA and RNA. 5'-RACE result revealed that the transcription initiation site of the wsv191 gene was located at nucleotide residue G of the predicted ATG triplet. Therefore, we concluded that the next ATG should be the genuine translation initiation codon of the wsv191 gene. Western blot analysis revealed that the molecular mass of natural WSSV-NSN was 37 kDa.

  13. Sequence-specific antimicrobials using efficiently delivered RNA-guided nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Citorik, Robert J.; Mimee, Mark; Lu, Timothy K.

    2014-01-01

    Current antibiotics tend to be broad spectrum, leading to indiscriminate killing of commensal bacteria and accelerated evolution of drug resistance. Here, we use CRISPR-Cas technology to create antimicrobials whose spectrum of activity is chosen by design. RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) targeting specific DNA sequences are delivered efficiently to microbial populations using bacteriophage or bacteria carrying plasmids transmissible by conjugation. The DNA targets of RGNs can be undesirable genes or polymorphisms, including antibiotic resistance and virulence determinants in carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. Delivery of RGNs significantly improves survival in a Galleria mellonella infection model. We also show that RGNs enable modulation of complex bacterial populations by selective knockdown of targeted strains based on genetic signatures. RGNs constitute a class of highly discriminatory, customizable antimicrobials that enact selective pressure at the DNA level to reduce the prevalence of undesired genes, minimize off-target effects and enable programmable remodeling of microbiota. PMID:25240928

  14. Genome-Wide Probing of RNA Structures In Vitro Using Nucleases and Deep Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yue; Qu, Kun; Ouyang, Zhengqing; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-01-01

    RNA structure probing is an important technique that studies the secondary and tertiary conformations of an RNA. While it was traditionally performed on one RNA at a time, recent advances in deep sequencing has enabled the secondary structure mapping of thousands of RNAs simultaneously. Here, we describe the method Parallel Analysis for RNA Structures (PARS), which couples double and single strand specific nuclease probing to high throughput sequencing. Upon cloning of the cleavage sites into a cDNA library, deep sequencing and mapping of reads to the transcriptome, the position of paired and unpaired bases along cellular RNAs can be identified. PARS can be performed under diverse solution conditions and on different organismal RNAs to provide genome-wide RNA structural information. This information can also be further used to constrain computational predictions to provide better RNA structure models under different conditions.

  15. Evaluation of Novel Design Strategies for Developing Zinc Finger Nucleases Tools for Treating Human Diseases

    DOE PAGES

    Bach, Christian; Sherman, William; Pallis, Jani; ...

    2014-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are associated with cell death and apoptosis by binding at countless undesired locations. This cytotoxicity is associated with the binding ability of engineered zinc finger domains to bind dissimilar DNA sequences with high affinity. In general, binding preferences of transcription factors are associated with significant degenerated diversity and complexity which convolutes the design and engineering of precise DNA binding domains. Evolutionary success of natural zinc finger proteins, however, evinces that nature created specific evolutionary traits and strategies, such as modularity and rank-specific recognition to cope with binding complexity that are critical for creating clinical viable toolsmore » to precisely modify the human genome. Our findings indicate preservation of general modularity and significant alteration of the rank-specific binding preferences of the three-finger binding domain of transcription factor SP1 when exchanging amino acids in the 2nd finger.« less

  16. Indirect DNA Sequence Recognition and Its Impact on Nuclease Cleavage Activity.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Abigail R; Hallinan, Jazmine P; Shen, Betty W; Chik, Jennifer K; Bolduc, Jill M; Kulshina, Nadia; Robins, Lori I; Kaiser, Brett K; Jarjour, Jordan; Havens, Kyle; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Stoddard, Barry L

    2016-06-07

    LAGLIDADG meganucleases are DNA cleaving enzymes used for genome engineering. While their cleavage specificity can be altered using several protein engineering and selection strategies, their overall targetability is limited by highly specific indirect recognition of the central four base pairs within their recognition sites. In order to examine the physical basis of indirect sequence recognition and to expand the number of such nucleases available for genome engineering, we have determined the target sites, DNA-bound structures, and central four cleavage fidelities of nine related enzymes. Subsequent crystallographic analyses of a meganuclease bound to two noncleavable target sites, each containing a single inactivating base pair substitution at its center, indicates that a localized slip of the mutated base pair causes a small change in the DNA backbone conformation that results in a loss of metal occupancy at one binding site, eliminating cleavage activity.

  17. Disruption of the Myostatin Gene in Porcine Primary Fibroblasts and Embryos Using Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xian-Ju; Zhang, Hong-Xiao; Wang, Huili; Xiong, Kai; Qin, Ling; Liu, Honglin

    2014-01-01

    Myostatin represses muscle growth by negatively regulating the number and size of muscle fibers. Myostatin loss-of-function can result in the double-muscling phenotype and increased muscle mass. Thus, knockout of myostatin gene could improve the quality of meat from mammals. In the present study, zinc finger nucleases, a useful tool for generating gene knockout animals, were designed to target exon 1 of the myostatin gene. The designed ZFNs were introduced into porcine primary fibroblasts and early implantation embryos via electroporation and microinjection, respectively. Mutations around the ZFNs target site were detected in both primary fibroblasts and blastocysts. The proportion of mutant fibroblast cells and blastocyst was 4.81% and 5.31%, respectively. Thus, ZFNs can be used to knockout myostatin in porcine primary fibroblasts and early implantation embryos. PMID:24802055

  18. Knockout of Myostatin by Zinc-finger Nuclease in Sheep Fibroblasts and Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuemei; Wang, Liqin; Wu, Yangsheng; Li, Wenrong; An, Jing; Zhang, Fuchun; Liu, Mingjun

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) can negatively regulate the growth and development of skeletal muscle, and natural mutations can cause “double-muscling” trait in animals. In order to block the inhibiting effect of MSTN on muscle growth, we transferred zinc-finger nucleases (ZFN) which targeted sheep MSTN gene into cultured fibroblasts. Gene targeted colonies were isolated from transfected fibroblasts by serial dilution culture and screened by sequencing. Two colonies were identified with mono-allele mutation and one colony with bi-allelic deletion. Further, we introduced the MSTN-ZFN mRNA into sheep embryos by microinjection. Thirteen of thirty-seven parthenogenetic embryos were targeted by ZFN, with the efficiency of 35%. Our work established the technical foundation for generation of MSTN gene editing sheep by somatic cloning and microinjection ZFN into embryos. PMID:27189642

  19. Nuclease Delivery: Versatile Functions of SLX4/FANCP in Genome Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yonghwan

    2014-01-01

    As a scaffold, SLX4/FANCP interacts with multiple proteins involved in genome integrity. Although not having recognizable catalytic domains, SLX4 participates in diverse genome maintenance pathways by delivering nucleases where they are needed, and promoting their cooperative execution to prevent genomic instabilities. Physiological importance of SLX4 is emphasized by the identification of causative mutations of SLX4 genes in patients diagnosed with Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare recessive genetic disorder characterized by genomic instability and predisposition to cancers. Recent progress in understanding functional roles of SLX4 has greatly expanded our knowledge in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), Holliday junction (HJ) resolution, telomere homeostasis and regulation of DNA damage response induced by replication stress. Here, these diverse functions of SLX4 are reviewed in detail. PMID:24938228

  20. Erwinia amylovora effector protein Eop1 suppresses PAMP-triggered immunity in Malus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Erwinia amylovora (Ea) utilizes a type three secretion system (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into plant host cells. Several Ea effectors have been identified based on their sequence similarity to plant and animal bacterial pathogen effectors; however, the function of the majority of Ea effecto...

  1. Planning Keypress and Reaching Responses: Effects of Response Location and Number of Potential Effectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Jos J.; Taminiau, Bettine; van Veen, Natasja; Ament, Bart; Rijcken, Jons M.; Meijer, Kenneth; Pratt, Jay

    2008-01-01

    In previous work the authors argued that the potential number of effectors in the response set is crucial in discriminating (multiple-effector) keypress from (single-effector) reaching responses. It is not clear, however, what influence the locus of responding (on vs. off the stimulus location for reaching and keypressing, respectively) has on…

  2. Efficient targeted mutagenesis of the chordate Ciona intestinalis genome with zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Narudo; Ochiai, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamada, Lixy; Sawada, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2012-06-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are engineered nucleases that induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at target sequences. They have been used as tools for generating targeted mutations in the genomes of multiple organisms in both animals and plants. The DSB induced by ZFNs is repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or by homologous recombination (HR) mechanisms. Non-homologous end joining induces some errors because it is independent of a reference DNA sequence. Through the NHEJ mechanism, ZFNs generate insertional or deletional mutations at the target sequence. We examined the usability, specificity and toxicity of ZFNs in the basal chordate Ciona intestinalis. As the target of ZFNs, we chose an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene artificially inserted in the C. intestinalis genome because this locus is neutral for the development and growth of C. intestinalis, and the efficiency of mutagenesis with ZFNs can thus be determined without any bias. We introduced EGFP -ZFN mRNAs into the embryos of an EGFP -transgenic line and observed the mutation frequency in the target site of EGFP . We also examined the effects of the EGFP -ZFNs at off-target sites resembling the EGFP target sequence in the C. intestinalis genome in order to examine the specificity of ZFNs. We further investigated the influence of ZFNs on embryogenesis, and showed that adequate amounts of ZFNs, which do not disrupt embryogenesis, can efficiently induce mutations on the on-target site with less effect on the off-target sites. This suggests that target mutagenesis with ZFNs will be a powerful technique in C. intestinalis.

  3. Molecular insights into DNA interference by CRISPR-associated nuclease-helicase Cas3.

    PubMed

    Gong, Bei; Shin, Minsang; Sun, Jiali; Jung, Che-Hun; Bolt, Edward L; van der Oost, John; Kim, Jeong-Sun

    2014-11-18

    Mobile genetic elements in bacteria are neutralized by a system based on clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins. Type I CRISPR-Cas systems use a "Cascade" ribonucleoprotein complex to guide RNA specifically to complementary sequence in invader double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), a process called "interference." After target recognition by Cascade, formation of an R-loop triggers recruitment of a Cas3 nuclease-helicase, completing the interference process by destroying the invader dsDNA. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of CRISPR interference, we analyzed crystal structures of Cas3 from the bacterium Thermobaculum terrenum, with and without a bound ATP analog. The structures reveal a histidine-aspartate (HD)-type nuclease domain fused to superfamily-2 (SF2) helicase domains and a distinct C-terminal domain. Binding of ATP analog at the interface of the SF2 helicase RecA-like domains rearranges a motif V with implications for the enzyme mechanism. The HD-nucleolytic site contains two metal ions that are positioned at the end of a proposed nucleic acid-binding tunnel running through the SF2 helicase structure. This structural alignment suggests a mechanism for 3' to 5' nucleolytic processing of the displaced strand of invader DNA that is coordinated with ATP-dependent 3' to 5' translocation of Cas3 along DNA. In agreement with biochemical studies, the presented Cas3 structures reveal important mechanistic details on the neutralization of genetic invaders by type I CRISPR-Cas systems.

  4. A dynamic bundle of four adjacent hydrophobic segments in the denatured state of staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Shortle, D.

    1996-01-01

    In an earlier study of the denatured state of staphylococcal nuclease (Wang Y, Shortle D, 1995, Biochemistry 34:15895-15905), we reported evidence of a three-strand antiparallel beta sheet that persists at high urea concentrations and is stabilized by a local "non-native" interaction with four large hydrophobic residues. Because the amide proton resonances for all of the involved residues are severely broadened, this unusual structure is not amenable to conventional NMR analysis and must be studied by indirect methods. In this report, we present data that confirm the important role of interactions involving four hydrophobic residues (Leu 36, Leu 37, Leu 38, and Val 39) in stabilizing the structure formed by the chain segments corresponding to beta 1-beta 2-beta 3-h, interactions that are not present in the native state. Glycine substitutions for each of these large hydrophobic residues destabilizes or disrupts this beta structure, as assessed by HN line sharpening and changes in the CD spectrum. The 13C resonances of the carbonyl carbon for several of the residues in this structure indicate conformational dynamics that respond in a complex way to addition of urea or changes in sequence. Studies of hydrogen exchange kinetics in a closely related variant of staphylococcal nuclease demonstrate the absence of the stable hydrogen bonding between the strands expected for a native-like three-strand beta sheet. Instead, the data are more consistent with the three beta strand segments plus the four adjacent hydrophobic residues forming a dynamic, aligned array or bundle held together by hydrophobic interactions. PMID:8880914

  5. Gene Editing With CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-Directed Nuclease.

    PubMed

    Doetschman, Thomas; Georgieva, Teodora

    2017-03-03

    Genetic engineering of model organisms and cultured cells has for decades provided important insights into the mechanisms underlying cardiovascular development and disease. In the past few years the development of several nuclease systems has broadened the range of model/cell systems that can be engineered. Of these, the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) system has become the favorite for its ease of application. Here we will review this RNA-guided nuclease system for gene editing with respect to its usefulness for cardiovascular studies and with an eye toward potential therapy. Studies on its off-target activity, along with approaches to minimize this activity will be given. The advantages of gene editing versus gene targeting in embryonic stem cells, including the breadth of species and cell types to which it is applicable, will be discussed. We will also cover its use in iPSC for research and possible therapeutic purposes; and we will review its use in muscular dystrophy studies where considerable progress has been made toward dystrophin correction in mice. The CRISPR/Ca9s system is also being used for high-throughput screening of genes, gene regulatory regions, and long noncoding RNAs. In addition, the CRISPR system is being used for nongene-editing purposes such as activation and inhibition of gene expression, as well as for fluorescence tagging of chromosomal regions and individual mRNAs to track their cellular location. Finally, an approach to circumvent the inability of post-mitotic cells to support homologous recombination-based gene editing will be presented. In conclusion, applications of the CRISPR/Cas system are expanding at a breath-taking pace and are revolutionizing approaches to gain a better understanding of human diseases.

  6. Unifying the DNA End-processing Roles of the Artemis Nuclease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Howard H. Y.; Watanabe, Go; Lieber, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Artemis is a member of the metallo-β-lactamase protein family of nucleases. It is essential in vertebrates because, during V(D)J recombination, the RAG complex generates hairpins when it creates the double strand breaks at V, D, and J segments, and Artemis is required to open the hairpins so that they can be joined. Artemis is a diverse endo- and exonuclease, and creating a unified model for its wide range of nuclease properties has been challenging. Here we show that Artemis resects iteratively into blunt DNA ends with an efficiency that reflects the AT-richness of the DNA end. GC-rich ends are not cut by Artemis alone because of a requirement for DNA end breathing (and confirmed using fixed pseudo-Y structures). All DNA ends are cut when both the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit and Ku accompany Artemis but not when Ku is omitted. These are the first biochemical data demonstrating a Ku dependence of Artemis action on DNA ends of any configuration. The action of Artemis at blunt DNA ends is slower than at overhangs, consistent with a requirement for a slow DNA end breathing step preceding the cut. The AT sequence dependence, the order of strand cutting, the length of the cuts, and the Ku-dependence of Artemis action at blunt ends can be reconciled with the other nucleolytic properties of both Artemis and Artemis·DNA-PKcs in a model incorporating DNA end breathing of blunt ends to form transient single to double strand boundaries that have structural similarities to hairpins and fixed 5′ and 3′ overhangs. PMID:26276388

  7. Interferon-inducible effector mechanisms in cell-autonomous immunity.

    PubMed

    MacMicking, John D

    2012-04-25

    Interferons (IFNs) induce the expression of hundreds of genes as part of an elaborate antimicrobial programme designed to combat infection in all nucleated cells - a process termed cell-autonomous immunity. As described in this Review, recent genomic and subgenomic analyses have begun to assign functional properties to novel IFN-inducible effector proteins that restrict bacteria, protozoa and viruses in different subcellular compartments and at different stages of the pathogen life cycle. Several newly described host defence factors also participate in canonical oxidative and autophagic pathways by spatially coordinating their activities to enhance microbial killing. Together, these IFN-induced effector networks help to confer vertebrate host resistance to a vast and complex microbial world.

  8. Interchangeable end effector tools utilized on the protoflight manipulator arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A subset of teleoperator and effector tools was designed, fabricated, delivered and successfully demonstrated on the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) protoflight manipulator arm (PFMA). The tools delivered included a rotary power tool with interchangeable collets and two fluid coupling mate/demate tools; one for a Fairchild coupling and the other for a Purolator coupling. An electrical interface connector was also provided for the rotary power tool. A tool set, from which the subset was selected, for performing on-orbit satellite maintenance was identified and conceptionally designed. Maintenance requirements were synthesized, evaluated and prioritized to develop design requirements for a set of end effector tools representative of those needed to provide on-orbit maintenance of satellites to be flown in the 1986 to 2000 timeframe.

  9. A robot end effector exchange mechanism for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorin, Barney F.

    1990-01-01

    Efficient robot operation requires the use of specialized end effectors or tools for tasks. In spacecraft applications, the microgravity environment precludes the use of gravitational forces to retain the tools in holding fixture. As a result of this, a retention mechanism which forms a part of the tool storage container is required. A unique approach to this problem has resulted in the development of an end effector exchange mechanism that meets the requirements for spaceflight applications while avoiding the complexity usually involved. This mechanism uses multiple latching cams both on the manipulator and in the tool storage container, combined with a system of catch rings to provide retention in both locations and the required failure tolerance. Because of the cam configuration the mechanism operates passively, requiring no electrical commands except those needed to move the manipulator into position. Similarly, it inherently provides interlocks to prevent the release of one cam before its opposite number is engaged.

  10. TLR-exosomes exhibit distinct kinetics and effector function

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Swetha; Su, Michelle; Ravishankar, Shashidhar; Moore, James; Head, PamelaSara; Dixon, J. Brandon; Vannberg, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    The innate immune system is vital to rapidly responding to pathogens and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a critical component of this response. Nanovesicular exosomes play a role in immunity, but to date their exact contribution to the dissemination of the TLR response is unknown. Here we show that exosomes from TLR stimulated cells can largely recapitulate TLR activation in distal cells in vitro. We can abrogate the action-at-a-distance signaling of exosomes by UV irradiation, demonstrating that RNA is crucial for their effector function. We are the first to show that exosomes derived from poly(I:C) stimulated cells induce in vivo macrophage M1-like polarization within murine lymph nodes. These poly(I:C) exosomes demonstrate enhanced trafficking to the node and preferentially recruit neutrophils as compared to control exosomes. This work definitively establishes the differential effector function for exosomes in communicating the TLR activation state of the cell of origin. PMID:28290538

  11. Design and Implementation of Multifunctional Automatic Drilling End Effector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhanxi; Qin, Xiansheng; Bai, Jing; Tan, Xiaoqun; Li, Jing

    2017-03-01

    In order to realize the automatic drilling in aircraft assembly, a drilling end effector is designed by integrating the pressure unit, drilling unit, measurement unit, control system and frame structure. In order to reduce the hole deviation, this paper proposes a vertical normal adjustment program based on 4 laser distance sensors. The actual normal direction of workpiece surface can be calculated through the sensors measurements, and then robot posture is adjusted to realize the hole deviation correction. A base detection method is proposed to detect and locate the hole automatically by using the camera and the reference hole. The experiment results show that the position accuracy of the system is less than 0.3mm, and the normal precision is less than 0.5°. The drilling end effector and robot can greatly improve the efficiency of the aircraft parts and assembly quality, and reduce the product development cycle.

  12. Helicases in antiviral immunity: dual properties as sensors and effectors

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Sadeem; Hur, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Many helicases have a unique ability to couple cognate RNA binding to ATP hydrolysis, which can induce a large conformational change that affects its interaction with RNA, position along RNA, or oligomeric state. A growing number of these helicases contribute to the innate immune system, either as sensors that detect foreign nucleic acids and/or as effectors that directly participate in the clearance of such foreign species. We here discuss a few examples, including retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I), melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) and Dicer, focusing on their dual functions as both sensors and effectors. We will also discuss the closely related, but less understood helicases, laboratory of genetics and physiology 2 (LGP2) and Dicer-related helicase-1 and -3 (DRH-1 and -3). PMID:26410598

  13. Identification of novel type III effectors using latent Dirichlet allocation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Among the six secretion systems identified in Gram-negative bacteria, the type III secretion system (T3SS) plays important roles in the disease development of pathogens. T3SS has attracted a great deal of research interests. However, the secretion mechanism has not been fully understood yet. Especially, the identification of effectors (secreted proteins) is an important and challenging task. This paper adopts machine learning methods to identify type III secreted effectors (T3SEs). We extract features from amino acid sequences and conduct feature reduction based on latent semantic information by using latent Dirichlet allocation model. The experimental results on Pseudomonas syringae data set demonstrate the good performance of the new methods.

  14. Suppression of Xo1-Mediated Disease Resistance in Rice by a Truncated, Non-DNA-Binding TAL Effector of Xanthomonas oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Read, Andrew C.; Rinaldi, Fabio C.; Hutin, Mathilde; He, Yong-Qiang; Triplett, Lindsay R.; Bogdanove, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Delivered into plant cells by type III secretion from pathogenic Xanthomonas species, TAL (transcription activator-like) effectors are nuclear-localized, DNA-binding proteins that directly activate specific host genes. Targets include genes important for disease, genes that confer resistance, and genes inconsequential to the host-pathogen interaction. TAL effector specificity is encoded by polymorphic repeats of 33–35 amino acids that interact one-to-one with nucleotides in the recognition site. Activity depends also on N-terminal sequences important for DNA binding and C-terminal nuclear localization signals (NLS) and an acidic activation domain (AD). Coding sequences missing much of the N- and C-terminal regions due to conserved, in-frame deletions are present and annotated as pseudogenes in sequenced strains of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) and pv. oryzae (Xoo), which cause bacterial leaf streak and bacterial blight of rice, respectively. Here we provide evidence that these sequences encode proteins we call “truncTALEs,” for “truncated TAL effectors.” We show that truncTALE Tal2h of Xoc strain BLS256, and by correlation truncTALEs in other strains, specifically suppress resistance mediated by the Xo1 locus recently described in the heirloom rice variety Carolina Gold. Xo1-mediated resistance is triggered by different TAL effectors from diverse X. oryzae strains, irrespective of their DNA binding specificity, and does not require the AD. This implies a direct protein-protein rather than protein-DNA interaction. Similarly, truncTALEs exhibit diverse predicted DNA recognition specificities. And, in vitro, Tal2h did not bind any of several potential recognition sites. Further, a single candidate NLS sequence in Tal2h was dispensable for resistance suppression. Many truncTALEs have one 28 aa repeat, a length not observed previously. Tested in an engineered TAL effector, this repeat required a single base pair deletion in the DNA, suggesting that it

  15. Production of 5′ Nucleotide by Using Halophilic Nuclease H Preferentially Adsorbed on Flocculated Cells of the Halophile Micrococcus varians subsp. halophilus

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Hiroshi; Kamekura, Masahiro; Yokoi, Haruhiko; Kobayashi, Takekazu

    1988-01-01

    A bioreactor with a column of flocculated cells of the moderate halophile Micrococcus varians subsp. halophilus which adsorbed the halophilic nuclease H was designed to be used in the production of 5′ nucleotides from RNA. A remarkable characteristic of the flocculated cells was that they preferentially adsorbed much exogenous nuclease, excluding adsorbed 5′ nucleotidase. Furthermore, desalting treatment of the flocculated cells in the presence of 2% MgSO4 · 7H2O gave rise to selective inactivation of 5′ nucleotidase without the loss of nuclease H activity, and 5′-guanylic acid was produced with the bioreactor. PMID:16347767

  16. Xanthomonas and the TAL Effectors: Nature's Molecular Biologist.

    PubMed

    White, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Agrobacterium, due to the transfer of T-DNA to the host genome, is known as nature's genetic engineer. Once again, bacteria have led the way to newfound riches in biotechnology. Xanthomonas has emerged as nature's molecular biologist as the functional domains of the sequence-specific DNA transcription factors known as TAL effectors were characterized and associated with the cognate disease susceptibility and resistance genes of plants.

  17. A secreted fungal effector of Glomus intraradices promotes symbiotic biotrophy.

    PubMed

    Kloppholz, Silke; Kuhn, Hannah; Requena, Natalia

    2011-07-26

    Biotrophic fungi interacting with plants establish long-term relationships with their hosts to fulfill their life cycles. In contrast to necrotrophs, they need to contend with the defense mechanisms of the plant to develop within the host and feed on living cells. It is generally accepted that microbial pathogens produce and deliver a myriad of effector proteins to hijack the cellular program of their hosts. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are the most widespread biotrophs of plant roots. We investigated whether AM fungi use effector proteins to short-circuit the plant defense program. Here we show that Glomus intraradices secretes a protein, SP7, that interacts with the pathogenesis-related transcription factor ERF19 in the plant nucleus. ERF19 is highly induced in roots by the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum trifolii as well as by several fungal extracts, but only transiently during mycorrhiza colonization. When constitutively expressed in roots, SP7 leads to higher mycorrhization while reducing the levels of C. trifolii-mediated defense responses. Furthermore, expression of SP7 in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae attenuates root decay symptoms. Taken together, these results suggest that SP7 is an effector that contributes to develop the biotrophic status of AM fungi in roots by counteracting the plant immune program.

  18. Compact effector optics for processing in limited physical access situations.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Andreas; Fox, Mahlen D T; French, Paul W; Hettrick, Simon; Hand, Duncan P; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Watkins, Kenneth G; Ireland, Clive L M; Jones, Julian D C

    2003-09-01

    A major advantage of fiber-optic beam delivery in laser materials processing is the ability to guide the laser power to the location where it is needed, leaving the laser itself remote and protected from the process. This is of special importance if the processing is to be performed in a hazardous environment. Particular problems are faced by the nuclear industry where weld repair and surface treatment work are required inside radioactive installations. By use of fiber beam delivery, only part of the delivery system and effector optics become contaminated, but the expensive laser system does not. However, in many cases the region where repair is required is not only radioactive but has only limited physical access, e.g., inside tubes or into corners, which prevents use of standard effector optics. We present a new design to deal with such constraints of a 2-mm outer diameter employing a hollow waveguide and gas shielding. This design is optically characterized and its performance assessed in welding and surface treatment applications. The potential of this compact effector optics in limited physical access situations is clearly demonstrated.

  19. AraC regulatory protein mutants with altered effector specificity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shuang-Yan; Fazelinia, Hossein; Cirino, Patrick C

    2008-04-16

    The AraC regulatory protein of the Escherichia coli ara operon has been engineered to activate transcription in response to D-arabinose and not in response to its native effector L-arabinose. Two different AraC mutant libraries, each with four randomized binding pocket residues, were subjected to FACS-mediated dual screening using a GFP reporter. Both libraries yielded mutants with the desired switch in effector specificity, and one mutant we describe maintains tight repression in the absence of effector. The presence of 100 mM L-arabinose does not influence the response of the reported mutants to D-arabinose, and the mutants are not induced by other sugars tested (D-xylose, D-fucose, D-lyxose). Co-expression of the FucP transporter in E. coli enabled induction by D-arabinose in the 0.1 mM range. Our results demonstrate the power of dual screening for altering AraC inducer specificity and represent steps toward the design of customized in vivo molecular reporters and gene switches for metabolic engineering.

  20. A Legionella Effector Disrupts Host Cytoskeletal Structure by Cleaving Actin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yao; Zhu, Wenhan; Tan, Yunhao; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of Legionnaires’ disease, replicates intracellularly in protozoan and human hosts. Successful colonization and replication of this pathogen in host cells requires the Dot/Icm type IVB secretion system, which translocates approximately 300 effector proteins into the host cell to modulate various cellular processes. In this study, we identified RavK as a Dot/Icm substrate that targets the host cytoskeleton and reduces actin filament abundance in mammalian cells upon ectopic expression. RavK harbors an H95EXXH99 motif associated with diverse metalloproteases, which is essential for the inhibition of yeast growth and for the induction of cell rounding in HEK293T cells. We demonstrate that the actin protein itself is the cellular target of RavK and that this effector cleaves actin at a site between residues Thr351 and Phe352. Importantly, RavK-mediated actin cleavage also occurs during L. pneumophila infection. Cleavage by RavK abolishes the ability of actin to form polymers. Furthermore, an F352A mutation renders actin resistant to RavK-mediated cleavage; expression of the mutant in mammalian cells suppresses the cell rounding phenotype caused by RavK, further establishing that actin is the physiological substrate of RavK. Thus, L. pneumophila exploits components of the host cytoskeleton by multiple effectors with distinct mechanisms, highlighting the importance of modulating cellular processes governed by the actin cytoskeleton in the intracellular life cycle of this pathogen. PMID:28129393

  1. Multiple recognition of RXLR effectors is associated with nonhost resistance of pepper against Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Shin-Young; Oh, Sang-Keun; Yeom, Seon-In; Kim, Saet-Byul; Kim, Myung-Shin; Kamoun, Sophien; Choi, Doil

    2014-01-01

    Nonhost resistance (NHR) is a plant immune response to resist most pathogens. The molecular basis of NHR is poorly understood, but recognition of pathogen effectors by immune receptors, a response known as effector-triggered immunity, has been proposed as a component of NHR. We performed transient expression of 54 Phytophthora infestansRXLR effectors in pepper (Capsicum annuum) accessions. We used optimized heterologous expression methods and analyzed the inheritance of effector-induced cell death in an F2 population derived from a cross between two pepper accessions. Pepper showed a localized cell death response upon inoculation with P. infestans, suggesting that recognition of effectors may contribute to NHR in this system. Pepper accessions recognized as many as 36 effectors. Among the effectors, PexRD8 and Avrblb2 induced cell death in a broad range of pepper accessions. Segregation of effector-induced cell death in an F2 population derived from a cross between two pepper accessions fit 15 : 1, 9 : 7 or 3 : 1 ratios, depending on the effector. Our genetic data suggest that a single or two independent/complementary dominant genes are involved in the recognition of RXLR effectors. Multiple loci recognizing a series of effectors may underpin NHR of pepper to P. infestans and confer resistance durability. PMID:24889686

  2. Multiple recognition of RXLR effectors is associated with nonhost resistance of pepper against Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Shin-Young; Oh, Sang-Keun; Yeom, Seon-In; Kim, Saet-Byul; Kim, Myung-Shin; Kamoun, Sophien; Choi, Doil

    2014-08-01

    Nonhost resistance (NHR) is a plant immune response to resist most pathogens. The molecular basis of NHR is poorly understood, but recognition of pathogen effectors by immune receptors, a response known as effector-triggered immunity, has been proposed as a component of NHR. We performed transient expression of 54 Phytophthora infestansRXLR effectors in pepper (Capsicum annuum) accessions. We used optimized heterologous expression methods and analyzed the inheritance of effector-induced cell death in an F2 population derived from a cross between two pepper accessions. Pepper showed a localized cell death response upon inoculation with P. infestans, suggesting that recognition of effectors may contribute to NHR in this system. Pepper accessions recognized as many as 36 effectors. Among the effectors, PexRD8 and Avrblb2 induced cell death in a broad range of pepper accessions. Segregation of effector-induced cell death in an F2 population derived from a cross between two pepper accessions fit 15:1, 9:7 or 3:1 ratios, depending on the effector. Our genetic data suggest that a single or two independent/complementary dominant genes are involved in the recognition of RXLR effectors. Multiple loci recognizing a series of effectors may underpin NHR of pepper to P. infestans and confer resistance durability.

  3. Gene editing and its application for hematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Mark J; Belanto, Joseph J; Tolar, Jakub; Voytas, Daniel F

    2016-07-01

    The use of precise, rationally designed gene-editing nucleases allows for targeted genome and transcriptome modification, and at present, four major classes of nucleases are being employed: zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), meganucleases (MNs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9. Each reagent shares the ability to recognize and bind a target sequence of DNA. Depending on the properties of the reagent, the DNA can be cleaved on one or both strands, or epigenetic changes can be mediated. These novel properties can impact hematological disease by allowing for: (1) direct modification of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), (2) gene alteration of hematopoietic lineage committed terminal effectors, (3) genome engineering in non-hematopoietic cells with reprogramming to a hematopoietic phenotype, and (4) transcriptome modulation for gene regulation, modeling, and discovery.

  4. Behind the lines–actions of bacterial type III effector proteins in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Büttner, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenicity of most Gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacteria depends on the type III secretion (T3S) system, which translocates bacterial effector proteins into plant cells. Type III effectors modulate plant cellular pathways to the benefit of the pathogen and promote bacterial multiplication. One major virulence function of type III effectors is the suppression of plant innate immunity, which is triggered upon recognition of pathogen-derived molecular patterns by plant receptor proteins. Type III effectors also interfere with additional plant cellular processes including proteasome-dependent protein degradation, phytohormone signaling, the formation of the cytoskeleton, vesicle transport and gene expression. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular functions of type III effector proteins with known plant target molecules. Furthermore, plant defense strategies for the detection of effector protein activities or effector-triggered alterations in plant targets are discussed. PMID:28201715

  5. Plant-Pathogen Effectors: Cellular Probes Interfering with Plant Defenses in Spatial and Temporal Manners

    PubMed Central

    Toruño, Tania Y.; Stergiopoulos, Ioannis; Coaker, Gitta

    2017-01-01

    Plants possess large arsenals of immune receptors capable of recognizing all pathogen classes. To cause disease, pathogenic organisms must be able to overcome physical barriers, suppress or evade immune perception, and derive nutrients from host tissues. Consequently, to facilitate some of these processes, pathogens secrete effector proteins that promote colonization. This review covers recent advances in the field of effector biology, focusing on conserved cellular processes targeted by effectors from diverse pathogens. The ability of effectors to facilitate pathogen entry into the host interior, suppress plant immune perception, and alter host physiology for pathogen benefit is discussed. Pathogens also deploy effectors in a spatial and temporal manner, depending on infection stage. Recent advances have also enhanced our understanding of effectors acting in specific plant organs and tissues. Effectors are excellent cellular probes that facilitate insight into biological processes as well as key points of vulnerability in plant immune signaling networks. PMID:27359369

  6. Deletions in the repertoire of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 type III secretion effector genes reveal functional overlap among effectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many bacterial pathogens of plants and animals disarm and remodel host cells by injecting large repertoires of effectors via the type III secretion system (T3SS). The repertoires of individual strains appear to function as robust systems that can tolerate loss of individual effectors with little or ...

  7. Mre11 nuclease and C-terminal tail-mediated DDR functions are required for initiating yeast telomere healing.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, M K; Matthews, K M; Lustig, A J

    2008-08-01

    Mre11 is a central factor in creating an optimal substrate for telomerase loading and elongation. We have used a G2/M synchronized telomere-healing assay as a tool to separate different functions of Mre11 that are not apparent in null alleles. An analysis of healing efficiencies of several mre11 alleles revealed that both nuclease and C-terminal mutations led to a loss of healing. Interestingly, trans-complementation of the 49 amino acid C-terminal deletion (DeltaC49) and the D16A mutant, deficient in nuclease activity and partially defective in MRX complex formation, restores healing. DeltaC49 provokes Rad53 phosphorylation after treatment with the radiomimetic agent MMS exclusively through the Tel1 pathway, suggesting that a Tel1-mediated function is initiated through the C-terminal tail.

  8. Structure elucidation of DNA interstrand cross-link by a combination of nuclease P1 digestion with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuesong; Wang, Yinsheng

    2003-11-15

    DNA interstrand cross-link reagents are among the most powerful agents for cancer treatment. Here we report a combined nuclease P1 digestion/mass spectrometry method for the structure elucidation of duplex oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing an interstrand cross-link. Our results demonstrate that nuclease P1 digestion of a double-stranded ODN containing an interstrand cross-link (ICL) of 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen or mitomycin C gives a tetranucleotide bearing the cross-linked nucleobase moiety. Product ion spectra of the deprotonated ions of the tetranucleotides provide information about the structure of the cross-link. Furthermore, product-ion spectra of tetranucleotides containing two orientation isomers of mitomycin C interstrand cross-link are distinctive. We believe that the method described in this paper can be generally applicable for investigating the structures of other DNA ICLs.

  9. Nuclease S1-sensitive sites on superhelical DNA molecules carrying the LTR region of Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Kimura, T; Takeya, T

    1987-04-29

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) from proviral DNA of Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MLV) was cloned on a derivative of pBR322, and after introducing superhelical torsions into the resulting recombinant, the sites of conformational transition were investigated by the nuclease S1-digestion method. With an increase in the negative linking differences, fourteen dominant cutting sites were identified, of which two were mapped inside the LTR and one at the 3' end of the LTR. By searching the sequence data, all these sites were localized in the regions having either palindromic sequences or AT-rich sequences. Free energy calculation for the local secondary structure on one strand indicated that nuclease S1 attacked the palindromic sequence regions which could form relatively stable hairpin structures. Under the conditions used, no correlation was found between the S1-sensitive sites and the potential Z-DNA-forming regions, including those within the enhancer sequence.

  10. Interactions between avian myeloblastosis reverse transcriptase and tRNATrp. Mapping of complexed tRNA with chemicals and nucleases.

    PubMed

    Garret, M; Romby, P; Giegé, R; Litvak, S

    1984-03-12

    The interactions between beef tRNATrp with avian myeloblastosis reverse transcriptase have been studied by statistical chemical modifications of phosphate (ethylnitrosourea) and cytidine (dimethyl sulfate) residues, as well as by digestion of complexed tRNA by Cobra venom nuclease and Neurospora crassa endonuclease. Results with nucleases and chemicals show that reverse transcriptase interacts preferentially with the D arm, the anticodon stem and the T psi stem. All these regions are located in the outside of the L-shaped structure of tRNA. This domain of interaction is different to that reported previously in the complex of beef tRNA with the cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (M. Garret et al.; Eur. J. Biochem. In press). Avian reverse transcriptase destabilizes the region of tRNA where most of the tertiary interactions maintaining the structure of tRNA are located.

  11. Interactions between avian myeloblastosis reverse transcriptase and tRNATrp. Mapping of complexed tRNA with chemicals and nucleases.

    PubMed Central

    Garret, M; Romby, P; Giegé, R; Litvak, S

    1984-01-01

    The interactions between beef tRNATrp with avian myeloblastosis reverse transcriptase have been studied by statistical chemical modifications of phosphate (ethylnitrosourea) and cytidine (dimethyl sulfate) residues, as well as by digestion of complexed tRNA by Cobra venom nuclease and Neurospora crassa endonuclease. Results with nucleases and chemicals show that reverse transcriptase interacts preferentially with the D arm, the anticodon stem and the T psi stem. All these regions are located in the outside of the L-shaped structure of tRNA. This domain of interaction is different to that reported previously in the complex of beef tRNA with the cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (M. Garret et al.; Eur. J. Biochem. In press). Avian reverse transcriptase destabilizes the region of tRNA where most of the tertiary interactions maintaining the structure of tRNA are located. Images PMID:6200830

  12. Arabidopsis cysteine proteinase inhibitor AtCYSb interacts with a Ca(2+)-dependent nuclease, AtCaN2.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kunyuan; Bu, Yuanyuan; Takano, Tetsuo; Liu, Shenkui; Zhang, Xinxin

    2013-11-01

    Plant cysteine proteinase inhibitors (cystatins) play important roles in plant defense mechanisms. Some proteins that interact with cystatins may defend against abiotic stresses. Here, we showed that AtCaN2, a Ca(2+)-dependent nuclease in Arabidopsis, is transcribed in senescent leaves and stems and interacts with an Arabidopsis cystatin (AtCYSb) in a yeast two-hybrid screen. The interaction between AtCYSb and AtCaN2 was confirmed by in vitro pull-down assay and bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Agarose gel electrophoresis showed that the nuclease activity of AtCaN2 against λDNA was inhibited by AtCYSb, which suggests that AtCYSb regulates nucleic acid degradation in cells.

  13. Cleavage specificity of chloroplast and nuclear tRNA 3'-processing nucleases.

    PubMed Central

    Oommen, A; Li, X Q; Gegenheimer, P

    1992-01-01

    tRNAs in eukaryotic nuclei and organelles are synthesized as precursors lacking the 3'-terminal CCA sequence and possessing 5' (leader) and 3' (trailer) extensions. Nucleolytic cleavage of the 3' trailer and addition of CCA are therefore required for formation of functional tRNA 3' termini. Many chloroplast tRNA genes encode a C at position 74 which is not removed during processing but which can be incorporated as the first base of the CCAOH terminus. Sequences downstream of nucleotide 74, however, are always removed. Synthetic yeast pre-tRNA(Phe) substrates containing the complete CCA74-76 sequence were processed with crude or partially purified chloroplast enzyme fractions. The 3'-extended substrates (tRNA-CCA-trailer) were cleaved exclusively between nucleotides 74 and 75 to give tRNA-COH, whereas a 3'-mature transcript (tRNA-CCAOH) was not cleaved at all. A 5'-, 3'-extended chloroplast tRNA-CAG-trailer was also processed entirely to tRNA-COH. Furthermore, a 5'-mature, 3'-extended yeast pre-tRNA(Phe) derivative, tRNA-ACA-trailer, in which C74 was replaced by A, was cleaved precisely after A74. In contrast, we found that a partially purified enzyme fraction (a nuclear/cytoplasmic activity) from wheat embryo cleaved the 3'-extended yeast tRNA(Phe) precursors between nucleotides 73 and 74 to give tRNA(OH). This specificity is consistent with that of all previously characterized nuclear enzyme preparations. We conclude that (i) chloroplast tRNA 3'-processing endonuclease cleaves after nucleotide 74 regardless of the nature of the surrounding sequences; (ii) this specificity differs from that of the plant nuclear/cytoplasmic processing nuclease, which cleaves after base 73; and (iii) since 3'-mature tRNA is not a substrate for either activity, these 3' nucleases must require substrates possessing a 3'-terminal extension that extends past nucleotide 76. This substrate specificity may prevent mature tRNA from counterproductive cleavage by the 3' processing system

  14. Detection and Characterization of Verocytotoxin-Producing Escherichia coli by Automated 5′ Nuclease PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Eva Møller; Andersen, Marianne Thorup

    2003-01-01

    In recent years increased attention has been focused on infections caused by isolates of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) serotypes other than O157. These non-O157 VTEC isolates are commonly present in food and food production animals. Easy detection, isolation, and characterization of non-O157 VTEC isolates are essential for improving our knowledge of these organisms. In the present study, we detected VTEC isolates in bovine fecal samples by a duplex 5′ nuclease PCR assay (real-time PCR) that targets vtx1 and vtx2. VTEC isolates were obtained by colony replication by use of hydrophobic-grid membrane filters and DNA probe hybridization. Furthermore, we have developed 5′ nuclease PCR assays for the detection of virulence factors typically present in VTEC isolates, including subtypes of three genes of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island. The 22 assays included assays for the detection of verocytotoxin genes (vtx1, vtx2), pO157-associated genes (ehxA, katP, espP, and etpD), a recently identified adhesin (saa), intimin (eae, all variants), seven subtypes of eae, four subtypes of tir, and three subtypes of espD. A number of reference strains (VTEC and enteropathogenic E. coli strains) and VTEC strains isolated from calves were tested to validate the PCR assays. The expected virulence profiles were detected for all reference strains. In addition, new information on the subtypes of LEE genes was obtained. For reference strains as well as bovine isolates, a consistent relationship between subtypes of the LEE genes was found, so that a total of seven different combinations of these were recognized (corresponding to the seven subtypes of eae). Isolates with 15 different serogroup-virulence profiles were isolated from 16 calves. Among these, 53% harbored LEE and 73% harbored factors carried by the large virulence plasmid. One LEE-negative isolate had the gene for the adhesin Saa. The most common virulence profile among the bovine

  15. Both CRISPR/Cas-based nucleases and nickases can be used efficiently for genome engineering in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Fauser, Friedrich; Schiml, Simon; Puchta, Holger

    2014-07-01

    Engineered nucleases can be used to induce site-specific double-strand breaks (DSBs) in plant genomes. Thus, homologous recombination (HR) can be enhanced and targeted mutagenesis can be achieved by error-prone non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Recently, the bacterial CRISPR/Cas9 system was used for DSB induction in plants to promote HR and NHEJ. Cas9 can also be engineered to work as a nickase inducing single-strand breaks (SSBs). Here we show that only the nuclease but not the nickase is an efficient tool for NHEJ-mediated mutagenesis in plants. We demonstrate the stable inheritance of nuclease-induced targeted mutagenesis events in the ADH1 and TT4 genes of Arabidopsis thaliana at frequencies from 2.5 up to 70.0%. Deep sequencing analysis revealed NHEJ-mediated DSB repair in about a third of all reads in T1 plants. In contrast, applying the nickase resulted in the reduction of mutation frequency by at least 740-fold. Nevertheless, the nickase is able to induce HR at similar efficiencies as the nuclease or the homing endonuclease I-SceI. Two different types of somatic HR mechanisms, recombination between tandemly arranged direct repeats as well as gene conversion using the information on an inverted repeat could be enhanced by the nickase to a similar extent as by DSB-inducing enzymes. Thus, the Cas9 nickase has the potential to become an important tool for genome engineering in plants. It should not only be applicable for HR-mediated gene targeting systems but also by the combined action of two nickases as DSB-inducing agents excluding off-target effects in homologous genomic regions.

  16. Modulation of epidermal growth factor receptor proto-oncogene transcription by a promoter site sensitive to S1 nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, A C; Jinno, Y; Merlino, G T

    1988-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is the functional target of the mitogen EGF and the cellular homolog of the avian erythroblastosis virus erbB oncogene product. Regulation of expression of the proto-oncogene encoding the EGF receptor can be elucidated by studying the structure and function of the gene promoter outside the confines of the cell. Previously, we reported the isolation of the human EGF receptor gene promoter. The promoter is highly GC rich, contains no TATA or CAAT box, and has multiple transcription start sites. An S1 nuclease-sensitive site has now been found 80 to 110 base pairs (bp) upstream from the major in vivo transcription initiation site. Two sets of direct repeat sequences were found in this area; both conform to the motif TCCTCCTCC. When deletion mutations were made in this region of the promoter by using either Bal 31 exonuclease or S1 nuclease, we found that in vivo activity dropped three- to fivefold, on the basis of transient-transfection analysis. Examination of nuclear protein binding to normal and mutated promoter DNAs by gel retardation analysis and DNase I footprinting revealed that two specific factors bind to the direct repeat region but cannot bind to the S1 nuclease-mutated promoter. One of the specific factors is the transcription factor Sp1. The results suggest that these nuclear trans-acting factors interact with the S1 nuclease-sensitive region of the EGF receptor gene promoter and either directly or indirectly stimulate transcription. Images PMID:2847030

  17. Identification of novel type III secretion effectors in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Ayako; Takaoka, Minako; Sanada, Harumi; Noguchi, Yukari; Oku, Takashi; Tsuno, Kazunori; Ochiai, Hirokazu; Tsuge, Seiji

    2009-01-01

    Many gram-negative bacteria secrete so-called effector proteins via a type III secretion (T3S) system. Through genome screening for genes encoding potential T3S effectors, 60 candidates were selected from rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae MAFF311018 using these criteria: i) homologs of known T3S effectors in plant-pathogenic bacteria, ii) genes with expression regulated by hrp regulatory protein HrpX, or iii) proteins with N-terminal amino acid patterns associated with T3S substrates of Pseudomonas syringae. Of effector candidates tested with the Bordetella pertussis calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase reporter for translocation into plant cells, 16 proteins were translocated in a T3S system-dependent manner. Of these 16 proteins, nine were homologs of known effectors in other plant-pathogenic bacteria and seven were not. Most of the effectors were widely conserved in Xanthomonas spp.; however, some were specific to X. oryzae. Interestingly, all these effectors were expressed in an HrpX-dependent manner, suggesting coregulation of effectors and the T3S system. In X. campestris pv. vesicatoria, HpaB and HpaC (HpaP in X. oryzae pv. oryzae) have a central role in recruiting T3S substrates to the secretion apparatus. Secretion of all but one effector was reduced in both HpaB() and HpaP() mutant strains, indicating that HpaB and HpaP are widely involved in efficient secretion of the effectors.

  18. Identification and Characterisation CRN Effectors in Phytophthora capsici Shows Modularity and Functional Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Stam, Remco; Jupe, Julietta; Howden, Andrew J. M.; Morris, Jenny A.; Boevink, Petra C.; Hedley, Pete E.; Huitema, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora species secrete a large array of effectors during infection of their host plants. The Crinkler (CRN) gene family encodes a ubiquitous but understudied class of effectors with possible but as of yet unknown roles in infection. To appreciate CRN effector function in Phytophthora, we devised a simple Crn gene identification and annotation pipeline to improve effector prediction rates. We predicted 84 full-length CRN coding genes and assessed CRN effector domain diversity in sequenced Oomycete genomes. These analyses revealed evidence of CRN domain innovation in Phytophthora and expansion in the Peronosporales. We performed gene expression analyses to validate and define two classes of CRN effectors, each possibly contributing to infection at different stages. CRN localisation studies revealed that P. capsici CRN effector domains target the nucleus and accumulate in specific sub-nuclear compartments. Phenotypic analyses showed that few CRN domains induce necrosis when expressed in planta and that one cell death inducing effector, enhances P. capsici virulence on Nicotiana benthamiana. These results suggest that the CRN protein family form an important class of intracellular effectors that target the host nucleus during infection. These results combined with domain expansion in hemi-biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens, suggests specific contributions to pathogen lifestyles. This work will bolster CRN identification efforts in other sequenced oomycete species and set the stage for future functional studies towards understanding CRN effector functions. PMID:23536880

  19. Substrate masking: binding of RNA by EGTA-inactivated micrococcal nuclease results in artifactual inhibition of RNA processing reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M J; Gegenheimer, P

    1990-01-01

    Inhibition of an RNA processing reaction after treatment with the Ca2(+)-dependent micrococcal nuclease (MN) is often used as a criterion for the presence of a required RNA or ribonucleoprotein component in the system. Following MN digestion, the nuclease is inactivated with EGTA and radiolabeled substrate is added to assay for remaining RNA processing activity. We found previously that inhibition of RNA processing by MN need not involve RNA hydrolysis: EGTA-inactivated MN can suppress RNA processing if the assay is performed in the absence of carrier RNA. We now demonstrate both by native gel electrophoresis and by nitrocellulose filter retention that EGTA-inactivated MN forms a complex with free RNA which can be dissociated by addition of synthetic polynucleotides or heparin. In the absence of Ca2+, nuclease binds to precursor tRNA with an apparent KD congruent to 1.4 x 10(-6) M, comparable to its reported affinity for DNA. In an assay for endonucleolytic tRNA maturation, inactivated MN bound to radiolabeled pre-tRNA physically blocks the sites of endonuclease cleavage and prevents tRNA processing. We call this phenomenon 'substrate masking'. Addition of excess carrier RNA competes with pre-tRNA for MN binding and restores normal processing. Images PMID:2123540

  20. Structural and functional analyses of an archaeal XPF/Rad1/Mus81 nuclease: asymmetric DNA binding and cleavage mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Tatsuya; Komori, Kayoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2005-08-01

    XPF/Rad1/Mus81/Hef proteins recognize and cleave branched DNA structures. XPF and Rad1 proteins cleave the 5' side of nucleotide excision repair bubble, while Mus81 and Hef cleave similar sites of the nicked Holliday junction, fork, or flap structure. These proteins all function as dimers and consist of catalytic and helix-hairpin-helix DNA binding (HhH) domains. We have determined the crystal structure of the HhH domain of Pyrococcus furiosus Hef nuclease (HefHhH), which revealed the distinct mode of protein dimerization. Our structural and biochemical analyses also showed that each of the catalytic and HhH domains binds to distinct regions within the fork-structured DNA: each HhH domain from two separate subunits asymmetrically binds to the arm region, while the catalytic domain binds near the junction center. Upon binding to DNA, Hef nuclease disrupts base pairs near the cleavage site. It is most likely that this bipartite binding mode is conserved in the XPF/Rad1/Mus81 nuclease family.

  1. Enhanced Sensitivity for Detection of HIV-1 p24 Antigen by a Novel Nuclease-Linked Fluorescence Oligonucleotide Assay

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Peihu; Li, Xiaojun; Su, Weiheng; Kong, Wei; Kong, Xianggui; Wang, Zhenxin; Wang, Youchun; Jiang, Chunlai; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high detection limit of the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) prevents its application for detection of low concentrations of antigens. To increase the sensitivity for detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen, we developed a highly sensitive nuclease-linked fluorescence oligonucleotide assay (NLFOA). Two major improvements were incorporated in NLFOA to amplify antibody-antigen interaction signals and reduce the signal/noise ratio; a large number of nuclease molecules coupled to the gold nanoparticle/streptavidin complex and fluorescent signals generated from fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotides by the nuclease. The detection limit of p24 by NLFOA was 1 pg/mL, which was 10-fold more sensitive than the conventional ELISA (10 pg/mL). The specificity was 100% and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 7.8% at low p24 concentration (1.5 pg/mL) with various concentrations of spiked p24 in HIV-1 negative sera. Thus, NLFOA is highly sensitive, specific, reproducible and user-friendly. The more sensitive detection of low p24 concentrations in HIV-1-infected individuals by NLFOA could allow detection of HIV-1 infections that are missed by the conventional ELISA at the window period during acute infection to further reduce the risk for HIV-1 infection due to the undetected HIV-1 in the blood products. Moreover, NLFOA can be easily applied to more sensitive detection of other antigens. PMID:25915630

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Small-Subunit rRNA Genes in Mixed Microbial Populations via 5′-Nuclease Assays

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Marcelino T.; Taylor, Lance T.; DeLong, Edward F.

    2000-01-01

    Few techniques are currently available for quantifying specific prokaryotic taxa in environmental samples. Quantification of specific genotypes has relied mainly on oligonucleotide hybridization to extracted rRNA or intact rRNA in whole cells. However, low abundance and cellular rRNA content limit the application of these techniques in aquatic environments. In this study, we applied a newly developed quantitative PCR assay (5′-nuclease assay, also known as TaqMan) to quantify specific small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes (rDNAs) from uncultivated planktonic prokaryotes in Monterey Bay. Primer and probe combinations for quantification of SSU rDNAs at the domain and group levels were developed and tested for specificity and quantitative reliability. We examined the spatial and temporal variations of SSU rDNAs from Synechococcus plus Prochlorococcus and marine Archaea and compared the results of the quantitative PCR assays to those obtained by alternative methods. The 5′-nuclease assays reliably quantified rDNAs over at least 4 orders of magnitude and accurately measured the proportions of genes in artificial mixtures. The spatial and temporal distributions of planktonic microbial groups measured by the 5′-nuclease assays were similar to the distributions estimated by quantitative oligonucleotide probe hybridization, whole-cell hybridization assays, and flow cytometry. PMID:11055900

  3. Visualizing the dynamics of viral replication in living cells via Tat peptide delivery of nuclease-resistant molecular beacons

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Hsiao-Yun; Yates, Marylynn V.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, Wilfred

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we describe the use of nuclease-resistant molecular beacons (MBs) for the real-time detection of coxsackievirus B6 replication in living Buffalo green monkey kidney (BGMK) cells via Tat peptide delivery. A nuclease-resistant MB containing 2′-O-methyl RNA bases with phosphorothioate internucleotide linkages was designed to specifically target an 18-bp 5′ noncoding region of the viral genome. For intracellular delivery, a cell-penetrating Tat peptide was conjugated to the MB by using a thiol–maleimide linkage. Presence of the Tat peptide enabled nearly 100% intracellular delivery within 15 min. When the conjugate was introduced into BGMK cell monolayers infected with coxsackievirus B6, a discernible fluorescence was observed at 30 min after infection, and as few as 1 infectious viral particle could be detected within 2 h. The stability and the intracellular delivery properties of the modified MBs enabled real-time monitoring of the cell-to-cell spreading of viral infection. These results suggest that the Tat-modified, nuclease-resistant MBs may be powerful tools for improving our understanding of the dynamic behavior of viral replication and for therapeutic studies of antiviral treatments. PMID:18988730

  4. GUIDE-Seq enables genome-wide profiling of off-target cleavage by CRISPR-Cas nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nhu T.; Liebers, Matthew; Topkar, Ved V.; Thapar, Vishal; Wyvekens, Nicolas; Khayter, Cyd; Iafrate, A. John; Le, Long P.; Aryee, Martin J.; Joung, J. Keith

    2014-01-01

    CRISPR RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) are widely used genome-editing reagents, but methods to delineate their genome-wide off-target cleavage activities have been lacking. Here we describe an approach for global detection of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) introduced by RGNs and potentially other nucleases. This method, called Genome-wide Unbiased Identification of DSBs Enabled by Sequencing (GUIDE-Seq), relies on capture of double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides into breaks Application of GUIDE-Seq to thirteen RGNs in two human cell lines revealed wide variability in RGN off-target activities and unappreciated characteristics of off-target sequences. The majority of identified sites were not detected by existing computational methods or ChIP-Seq. GUIDE-Seq also identified RGN-independent genomic breakpoint ‘hotspots’. Finally, GUIDE-Seq revealed that truncated guide RNAs exhibit substantially reduced RGN-induced off-target DSBs. Our experiments define the most rigorous framework for genome-wide identification of RGN off-target effects to date and provide a method for evaluating the safety of these nucleases prior to clinical use. PMID:25513782

  5. CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease-mediated gene knock-in in bovine-induced pluripotent cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Young Tae; Quan, Xiaoyuan; Xu, Yong Nan; Baek, Soonbong; Choi, Hwan; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Jongpil

    2015-02-01

    Efficient and precise genetic engineering in livestock such as cattle holds great promise in agriculture and biomedicine. However, techniques that generate pluripotent stem cells, as well as reliable tools for gene targeting in livestock, are still inefficient, and thus not routinely used. Here, we report highly efficient gene targeting in the bovine genome using bovine pluripotent cells and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 nuclease. First, we generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from bovine somatic fibroblasts by the ectopic expression of yamanaka factors and GSK3β and MEK inhibitor (2i) treatment. We observed that these bovine iPSCs are highly similar to naïve pluripotent stem cells with regard to gene expression and developmental potential in teratomas. Moreover, CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease, which was specific for the bovine NANOG locus, showed highly efficient editing of the bovine genome in bovine iPSCs and embryos. To conclude, CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease-mediated homologous recombination targeting in bovine pluripotent cells is an efficient gene editing method that can be used to generate transgenic livestock in the future.

  6. Repeatable Construction Method for Engineered Zinc Finger Nuclease Based on Overlap Extension PCR and TA-Cloning

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Wataru; Kano, Kiyoshi; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko

    2013-01-01

    Zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) is a useful tool for endogenous site-directed genome modification. The development of an easier, less expensive and repeatedly usable construction method for various sequences of ZFNs should contribute to the further widespread use of this technology. Here, we establish a novel construction method for ZFNs. Zinc finger (ZF) fragments were synthesized by PCR using short primers coding DNA recognition helices of the ZF domain. DNA-binding domains composed of 4 to 6 ZFs were synthesized by overlap extension PCR of these PCR products, and the DNA-binding domains were joined with a nuclease vector by TA cloning. The short primers coding unique DNA recognition helices can be used repeatedly for other ZFN constructions. By using this novel OLTA (OverLap extension PCR and TA-cloning) method, arbitrary ZFN vectors were synthesized within 3 days, from the designing to the sequencing of the vector. Four different ZFN sets synthesized by OLTA showed nuclease activities at endogenous target loci. Genetically modified mice were successfully generated using ZFN vectors constructed by OLTA. This method, which enables the construction of intended ZFNs repeatedly and inexpensively in a short period of time, should contribute to the advancement of ZFN technology. PMID:23536890

  7. Gene- and protein-delivered zinc finger-staphylococcal nuclease hybrid for inhibition of DNA replication of human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Mino, Takashi; Mori, Tomoaki; Aoyama, Yasuhiro; Sera, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we reported that artificial zinc-finger proteins (AZPs) inhibited virus DNA replication in planta and in mammalian cells by blocking binding of a viral replication protein to its replication origin. However, the replication mechanisms of viruses of interest need to be disentangled for the application. To develop more widely applicable methods for antiviral therapy, we explored the feasibility of inhibition of HPV-18 replication as a model system by cleaving its viral genome. To this end, we fused the staphylococcal nuclease cleaving DNA as a monomer to an AZP that binds to the viral genome. The resulting hybrid nuclease (designated AZP-SNase) cleaved its target DNA plasmid efficiently and sequence-specifically in vitro. Then, we confirmed that transfection with a plasmid expressing AZP-SNase inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication in transient replication assays using mammalian cells. Linker-mediated PCR analysis revealed that the AZP-SNase cleaved an HPV-18 ori plasmid around its binding site. Finally, we demonstrated that the protein-delivered AZP-SNase inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication as well and did not show any significant cytotoxicity. Thus, both gene- and protein-delivered hybrid nucleases efficiently inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication, leading to development of a more universal antiviral therapy for human DNA viruses.

  8. p53 as an Effector or Inhibitor of Therapy Response.

    PubMed

    Ablain, Julien; Poirot, Brigitte; Esnault, Cécile; Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; de Thé, Hugues

    2015-12-04

    Although integrity of the p53 signaling pathway in a given tumor was expected to be a critical determinant of response to therapies, most clinical studies failed to link p53 status and treatment outcome. Here, we present two opposite situations: one in which p53 is an essential effector of cure by targeted leukemia therapies and another one in advanced breast cancers in which p53 inactivation is required for the clinical efficacy of dose-dense chemotherapy. If p53 promotes or blocks therapy response, therapies must be tailored on its status in individual tumors.

  9. Telepresence Master Glove Controller For Dexterous Robotic End-Effectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, A. M.; Joyce, R. R.; Britt, J. P.

    1987-03-01

    This paper describes recent research in the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division at NASA's Ames Research Center to develop a glove-like, control and data-recording device (DataGlove) that records and transmits to a host computerin real time, and at appropriate resolution, a numeric data-record of a user's hand/finger shape and dynamics. System configuration and performance specifications are detailed, and current research is discussed investigating its applications in operator control of dexterous robotic end-effectors and for use as a human factors research tool in evaluation of operator hand function requirements and performance in other specialized task environments.

  10. Telepresence master glove controller for dexterous robotic end-effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Scott S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes recent research in the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division at NASA's Ames Research Center to develop a glove-like, control and data-recording device (DataGlove) that records and transmits to a host computer in real time, and at appropriate resolution, a numeric data-record of a user's hand/finger shape and dynamics. System configuration and performance specifications are detailed, and current research is discussed investigating its applications in operator control of dexterous robotic end-effectors and for use as a human factors research tool in evaluation of operator hand function requirements and performance in other specialized task environments.

  11. Exact positioning of the robotic arm end effector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korepanov, Valery; Dudkin, Fedir

    2016-07-01

    Orbital service becomes a new challenge of space exploration. The necessity to introduce it is connected first of all with an attractive opportunity to prolong the exploitation terms of expensive commercial satellites by, e.g., refilling of fuel or changing batteries. Other application area is a fight with permanently increasing amount of space litter - defunct satellites, burnt-out rocket stages, discarded trash and other debris. Now more than few tens of thousands orbiting objects larger than 5-10 cm (or about 1 million junks larger than 1 cm) are a huge problem for crucial and costly satellites and manned vehicles. For example, in 2014 the International Space Station had to change three times its orbit to avoid collision with space debris. So the development of the concepts and actions related to removal of space debris or non-operational satellites with use of robotic arm of a servicing satellite is very actual. Such a technology is also applicable for unmanned exploratory missions in solar system, for example for collecting a variety of samples from a celestial body surface. Naturally, the robotic arm movements should be controlled with great accuracy at influence of its non-rigidity, thermal and other factors. In these circumstances often the position of the arm end effector has to be controlled with high accuracy. The possibility of coordinate determination for the robotic arm end effector with use of a low frequency active electromagnetic system has been considered in the presented report. The proposed design of such a system consists of a small magnetic dipole source, which is mounted inside of the arm end effector and two or three 3-component magnetic field sensors mounted on a servicing satellite body. The data from this set of 3-component magnetic field sensors, which are fixed relatively to the satellite body, allows use of the mathematical approach for determination of position and orientation of the magnetic dipole source. The theoretical

  12. Complement--tapping into new sites and effector systems.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaelle; Kemper, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    Complement is traditionally known to be a system of serum proteins that provide protection against pathogens through direct cell lysis and the mobilization of innate and adaptive immunity. However, recent work indicates that the complement system has additional physiological roles beyond those in host defence. In this Opinion article, we describe the new modes and locations of complement activation that enable it to interact with other cell effector systems, such as growth factor receptors, inflammasomes and metabolic pathways. We propose that the location of complement activation dictates its function.

  13. Tool use and the distalization of the end-effector

    PubMed Central

    Bonaiuto, James B.; Jacobs, Stéphane; Frey, Scott H.

    2009-01-01

    We review recent neurophysiological data from macaques and humans suggesting that the use of tools extends the internal representation of the actor’s hand, and relate it to our modeling of the visual control of grasping. We introduce the idea that, in addition to extending the body schema to incorporate the tool, tool use involves distalization of the end-effector from hand to tool. Different tools extend the body schema in different ways, with a displaced visual target and a novel, task-specific processing of haptic feedback to the hand. This distalization is critical in order to exploit the unique functional capacities engendered by complex tools. PMID:19347356

  14. Hacker within! Ehrlichia chaffeensis Effector Driven Phagocyte Reprogramming Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Lina, Taslima T.; Farris, Tierra; Luo, Tian; Mitra, Shubhajit; Zhu, Bing; McBride, Jere W.

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a small, gram negative, obligately intracellular bacterium that preferentially infects mononuclear phagocytes. It is the etiologic agent of human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (HME), an emerging life-threatening tick-borne zoonosis. Mechanisms by which E. chaffeensis establishes intracellular infection, and avoids host defenses are not well understood, but involve functionally relevant host-pathogen interactions associated with tandem and ankyrin repeat effector proteins. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie Ehrlichia host cellular reprogramming strategies that enable intracellular survival. PMID:27303657

  15. Heritable Targeted Gene Disruption in Zebrafish Using Designed Zinc Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Doyon, Yannick; McCammon, Jasmine M; Miller, Jeffrey C; Faraji, Farhoud; Ngo, Catherine; Katibah, George E; Amora, Rainier; Hocking, Toby D; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Amacher, Sharon L

    2009-01-01

    We describe here the use of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) for somatic and germline disruption of genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio), where targeted mutagenesis was previously intractable. ZFNs induce a targeted double-strand break in the genome that is repaired to generate small insertions and deletions. We designed ZFNs targeting the zebrafish golden and no tail/Brachyury genes. In both cases, injection of ZFN-encoding mRNA into 1-cell embryos yielded a high percentage of animals carrying distinct mutations at the ZFN-specified position and exhibiting expected loss-of-function phenotypes. Disrupted ntl alleles were transmitted from ZFN mRNA-injected founder animals in over half the adults tested at frequencies averaging 20%. The frequency and precision of gene disruption events observed, in combination with the ability to design ZFNs against any locus, open fundamentally novel avenues of experimentation, and suggest that ZFN technology may be widely applied to many organisms that allow mRNA delivery into the fertilized egg. PMID:18500334

  16. Zinc-finger Nucleases as a Novel Therapeutic Strategy for Targeting Hepatitis B Virus DNAs

    PubMed Central

    Cradick, Thomas J; Keck, Kathy; Bradshaw, Shannon; Jamieson, Andrew C; McCaffrey, Anton P

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronically infects 350–400 million people worldwide and causes >1 million deaths yearly. Current therapies prevent new viral genome formation, but do not target pre-existing viral genomic DNA, thus curing only ~1/2 of patients. We targeted HBV DNA for cleavage using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), which cleave as dimers. Co-transfection of our ZFN pair with a target plasmid containing the HBV genome resulted in specific cleavage. After 3 days in culture, 26% of the target remained linear, whereas ~10% was cleaved and misjoined tail-to-tail. Notably, ZFN treatment decreased levels of the hepatitis C virus pregenomic RNA by 29%. A portion of cleaved plasmids are repaired in cells, often with deletions and insertions. To track misrepair, we introduced an XbaI restriction site in the spacer between the ZFN sites. Targeted cleavage and misrepair destroys the XbaI site. After 3 days in culture, ~6% of plasmids were XbaI-resistant. Thirteen of 16 clones sequenced contained frameshift mutations that would lead to truncations of the viral core protein. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the possibility of targeting episomal viral DNA genomes using ZFNs. PMID:20160705

  17. A Nuclease from Streptococcus mutans Facilitates Biofilm Dispersal and Escape from Killing by Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Sun, Luping; Liu, Wei; Guo, Lihong; Liu, Zhaohui; Wei, Xi; Ling, Junqi

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary etiologic agent of dental caries and occasionally infective endocarditis, with the ability to form biofilms and disperse cells into distal sites to exacerbate and spread infection. In this study, we identified a nuclease (DeoC) as a S. mutans biofilm dispersal modulating factor through microarray analysis. In vitro assays revealed a dispersal defect of a deoC deletion mutant, and functional studies with purified protein were indicative of the biofilm dispersal activity of DeoC. Neutrophils are a key host response factor restraining bacterial spreading through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which consist of a nuclear DNA backbone associated with antimicrobial peptides. Therefore, we hypothesized that the dispersed S. mutans might utilize DeoC to degrade NETs and escape killing by the immune system. It was found that S. mutans induced NET formation upon contact with neutrophils, while the presence of NETs in turn enhanced the deoC expression of S. mutans. Fluorescence microscopy inspection showed that deoC deletion resulted in a decreased NET degradation ability of S. mutans and enhanced susceptibility to neutrophil killing. Data obtained from this study assigned two important roles for DeoC in S. mutans: contributing to the spread of infection through mediating biofilm dispersal, and facilitating the escape of S. mutans from neutrophil killing through NET degradation.

  18. Copper-nuclease efficiency correlates with cytotoxicity for the 4-methoxypyrrolic natural products.

    PubMed

    Melvin, M S; Wooton, K E; Rich, C C; Saluta, G R; Kucera, G L; Lindquist, N; Manderville, R A

    2001-12-01

    The DNA-targeting activities of the 4-methoxypyrrolic natural products, that include prodigiosin (1), tambjamine E (2), and the blue pigment (3), have been compared using fluorescence spectroscopy to study DNA binding and agarose gel electrophoresis to assess their ability to facilitate oxidative copper-promoted DNA cleavage. Fluorescence emission titration of 3 with calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) shows that the natural product occupies a site size (n) of ca. two base pairs and possesses an affinity constant (K) of approximately 6x10(5) x M(-1). Similar to prodigiosin (1), the blue pigment 3 was found to facilitate oxidative double-strand DNA (dsDNA) cleavage without the aid of an external reducing agent. Quantitation of ds- (n2) and ss- (n1) breaks provided n1:n2 ratios of approximately 8-12, which were significantly greater than the number expected from the accumulation of ss-breaks (approximately 120). This was contrasted by the nicking activity of tambjamine E (2), which only generates ss-breaks in the presence of copper. The superior copper-nuclease activity of 1 and 3 also correlated with their superior anticancer properties against leukemia (HL-60) cells. These results are discussed with respect to the mode of cytotoxicity by the 4-methoxypyrrolic natural products.

  19. Potential DNA binding and nuclease functions of ComEC domains characterized in silico

    PubMed Central

    Baker, James A.; Simkovic, Felix; Taylor, Helen M.C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial competence, which can be natural or induced, allows the uptake of exogenous double stranded DNA (dsDNA) into a competent bacterium. This process is known as transformation. A multiprotein assembly binds and processes the dsDNA to import one strand and degrade another yet the underlying molecular mechanisms are relatively poorly understood. Here distant relationships of domains in Competence protein EC (ComEC) of Bacillus subtilis (Uniprot: P39695) were characterized. DNA‐protein interactions were investigated in silico by analyzing models for structural conservation, surface electrostatics and structure‐based DNA binding propensity; and by data‐driven macromolecular docking of DNA to models. Our findings suggest that the DUF4131 domain contains a cryptic DNA‐binding OB fold domain and that the β‐lactamase‐like domain is the hitherto cryptic competence nuclease. Proteins 2016; 84:1431–1442. © 2016 The Authors Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27318187

  20. Precise genome modification in the crop species Zea mays using zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Vipula K; Doyon, Yannick; Miller, Jeffrey C; DeKelver, Russell C; Moehle, Erica A; Worden, Sarah E; Mitchell, Jon C; Arnold, Nicole L; Gopalan, Sunita; Meng, Xiangdong; Choi, Vivian M; Rock, Jeremy M; Wu, Ying-Ying; Katibah, George E; Zhifang, Gao; McCaskill, David; Simpson, Matthew A; Blakeslee, Beth; Greenwalt, Scott A; Butler, Holly J; Hinkley, Sarah J; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D

    2009-05-21

    Agricultural biotechnology is limited by the inefficiencies of conventional random mutagenesis and transgenesis. Because targeted genome modification in plants has been intractable, plant trait engineering remains a laborious, time-consuming and unpredictable undertaking. Here we report a broadly applicable, versatile solution to this problem: the use of designed zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) that induce a double-stranded break at their target locus. We describe the use of ZFNs to modify endogenous loci in plants of the crop species Zea mays. We show that simultaneous expression of ZFNs and delivery of a simple heterologous donor molecule leads to precise targeted addition of an herbicide-tolerance gene at the intended locus in a significant number of isolated events. ZFN-modified maize plants faithfully transmit these genetic changes to the next generation. Insertional disruption of one target locus, IPK1, results in both herbicide tolerance and the expected alteration of the inositol phosphate profile in developing seeds. ZFNs can be used in any plant species amenable to DNA delivery; our results therefore establish a new strategy for plant genetic manipulation in basic science and agricultural applications.

  1. Nuclease Footprints in Sperm Project Past and Future Chromatin Regulatory Events

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Graham D.; Jodar, Meritxell; Pique-Regi, Roger; Krawetz, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear remodeling to a condensed state is a hallmark of spermatogenesis. This is achieved by replacement of histones with protamines. Regions retaining nucleosomes may be of functional significance. To determine their potential roles, sperm from wild type and transgenic mice harboring a single copy insert of the human protamine cluster were subjected to Micrococcal Nuclease-seq. CENTIPEDE, a hierarchical Bayesian model, was used to identify multiple spatial patterns, "footprints", of MNase-seq reads along the sperm genome. Regions predicted by CENTIPEDE analysis to be bound by a regulatory factor in sperm were correlated with genomic landmarks and higher order chromatin structure datasets to identify potential roles for these factors in regulating either prior or post spermatogenic, i.e., early embryonic events. This approach linked robust endogenous protamine transcription and transgene suppression to its chromatin environment within topologically associated domains. Of the candidate enhancer-bound regulatory proteins, Ctcf, was associated with chromatin domain boundaries in testes and embryonic stem cells. The continuity of Ctcf binding through the murine germline may permit rapid reconstitution of chromatin organization following fertilization. This likely reflects its preparation for early zygotic genome activation and comparatively accelerated preimplantation embryonic development program observed in mouse as compared to human and bull. PMID:27184706

  2. Formation of Linear Amplicons with Inverted Duplications in Leishmania Requires the MRE11 Nuclease

    PubMed Central

    Laffitte, Marie-Claude N.; Genois, Marie-Michelle; Mukherjee, Angana; Légaré, Danielle; Masson, Jean-Yves; Ouellette, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Extrachromosomal DNA amplification is frequent in the protozoan parasite Leishmania selected for drug resistance. The extrachromosomal amplified DNA is either circular or linear, and is formed at the level of direct or inverted homologous repeated sequences that abound in the Leishmania genome. The RAD51 recombinase plays an important role in circular amplicons formation, but the mechanism by which linear amplicons are formed is unknown. We hypothesized that the Leishmania infantum DNA repair protein MRE11 is required for linear amplicons following rearrangements at the level of inverted repeats. The purified LiMRE11 protein showed both DNA binding and exonuclease activities. Inactivation of the LiMRE11 gene led to parasites with enhanced sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. The MRE11−/− parasites had a reduced capacity to form linear amplicons after drug selection, and the reintroduction of an MRE11 allele led to parasites regaining their capacity to generate linear amplicons, but only when MRE11 had an active nuclease activity. These results highlight a novel MRE11-dependent pathway used by Leishmania to amplify portions of its genome to respond to a changing environment. PMID:25474106

  3. A FANCD2/FANCI-Associated Nuclease 1-Knockout Model Develops Karyomegalic Interstitial Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Airik, Rannar; Schueler, Markus; Airik, Merlin; Cho, Jang; Porath, Jonathan D; Mukherjee, Elina; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2016-12-01

    Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis (KIN) is a chronic interstitial nephropathy characterized by tubulointerstitial nephritis and formation of enlarged nuclei in the kidneys and other tissues. We recently reported that recessive mutations in the gene encoding FANCD2/FANCI-associated nuclease 1 (FAN1) cause KIN in humans. FAN1 is a major component of the Fanconi anemia-related pathway of DNA damage response (DDR) signaling. To study the pathogenesis of KIN, we generated a Fan1 knockout mouse model, with abrogation of Fan1 expression confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Challenging Fan1(-/-) and wild-type mice with 20 mg/kg cisplatin caused AKI in both genotypes. In contrast, chronic injection of cisplatin at 2 mg/kg induced KIN that led to renal failure within 5 weeks in Fan1(-/-) mice but not in wild-type mice. Cell culture studies showed decreased survival and reduced colony formation of Fan1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells compared with wild-type counterparts in response to treatment with genotoxic agents, suggesting that FAN1 mutations cause chemosensitivity and bone marrow failure. Our data show that Fan1 is involved in the physiologic response of kidney tubular cells to DNA damage, which contributes to the pathogenesis of CKD. Moreover, Fan1(-/-) mice provide a new model with which to study the pathomechanisms of CKD.

  4. A nanoplasmonic molecular ruler for measuring nuclease activity and DNA footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang L.; Yin, Yadong; Kunchakarra, Siri; Mukherjee, Bipasha; Gerion, Daniele; Jett, Stephen D.; Bear, David G.; Gray, Joe W.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Lee, Luke P.; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2006-10-01

    Interactions between nucleic acids and proteins are essential to genetic information processing. The detection of size changes in nucleic acids is the key to mapping such interactions, and usually requires substrates with fluorescent, electrochemical or radioactive labels. Recently, methods have been developed to tether DNA to highly water-soluble Au nanoparticles, and nanoparticle pairs linked by DNA have been used to measure nanoscale distances. Here we demonstrate a molecular ruler in which double-stranded DNA is attached to a Au nanoparticle. The change in plasmon resonance wavelength of individual Au-DNA conjugates depends on the length of the DNA and can be measured with subnanometre axial resolution. An average wavelength shift of approximately 1.24 nm is observed per DNA base pair. This system allows for a label-free, quantitative, real-time measurement of nuclease activity and also serves as a new DNA footprinting platform, which can accurately detect and map the specific binding of a protein to DNA.

  5. Regulation of Nucleosome Architecture and Factor Binding Revealed by Nuclease Footprinting of the ESC Genome.

    PubMed

    Hainer, Sarah J; Fazzio, Thomas G

    2015-10-06

    Functional interactions between gene regulatory factors and chromatin architecture have been difficult to directly assess. Here, we use micrococcal nuclease (MNase) footprinting to probe the functions of two chromatin-remodeling complexes. By simultaneously quantifying alterations in small MNase footprints over the binding sites of 30 regulatory factors in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we provide evidence that esBAF and Mbd3/NuRD modulate the binding of several regulatory proteins. In addition, we find that nucleosome occupancy is reduced at specific loci in favor of subnucleosomes upon depletion of esBAF, including sites of histone H2A.Z localization. Consistent with these data, we demonstrate that esBAF is required for normal H2A.Z localization in ESCs, suggesting esBAF either stabilizes H2A.Z-containing nucleosomes or promotes subnucleosome to nucleosome conversion by facilitating H2A.Z deposition. Therefore, integrative examination of MNase footprints reveals insights into nucleosome dynamics and functional interactions between chromatin structure and key gene-regulatory factors.

  6. Efficient generation of myostatin (MSTN) biallelic mutations in cattle using zinc finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junjie; Song, Zhiyuan; Yu, Shengli; Cui, Dan; Wang, Benli; Ding, Fangrong; Li, Song; Dai, Yunping; Li, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Genetically engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are useful for marker-free gene targeting using a one-step approach. We used ZFNs to efficiently disrupt bovine myostatin (MSTN), which was identified previously as the gene responsible for double muscling in cattle. The mutation efficiency of bovine somatic cells was approximately 20%, and the biallelic mutation efficiency was 8.3%. To evaluate the function of the mutated MSTN locus before somatic cell nuclear transfer, MSTN mRNA and protein expression was examined in four mutant cell colonies. We generated marker-gene-free cloned cattle, in which the MSTN biallelic mutations consisted of a 6-bp deletion in one of the alleles and a 117-bp deletion and 9-bp insertion in the other allele, resulting in at least four distinct mRNA splice variants. In the MSTN mutant cattle, the total amount of MSTN protein with the C-terminal domain was reduced by approximately 50%, and hypertrophied muscle fibers of the quadriceps and the double-muscled phenotype appeared at one month of age. Our proof-of-concept study is the first to produce MSTN mutations in cattle, and may allow the development of genetically modified strains of double-muscled cattle.

  7. Structural roles of guide RNAs in the nuclease activity of Cas9 endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Youngbin; Bak, So Young; Sung, Keewon; Jeong, Euihwan; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kim, Jin-Soo; Bae, Sangsu; Kim, Seong Keun

    2016-01-01

    The type II CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 recognizes and cleaves target DNA with the help of two guide RNAs (gRNAs; tracrRNA and crRNA). However, the detailed mechanisms and kinetics of these gRNAs in the Cas9 nuclease activity are unclear. Here, we investigate the structural roles of gRNAs in the CRISPR-Cas9 system by single-molecule spectroscopy and reveal a new conformation of inactive Cas9 that is thermodynamically more preferable than active apo-Cas9. We find that tracrRNA prevents Cas9 from changing into the inactive form and leads to the Cas9:gRNA complex. For the Cas9:gRNA complex, we identify sub-conformations of the RNA–DNA heteroduplex during R-loop expansion. Our single-molecule study indicates that the kinetics of the sub-conformations is controlled by the complementarity between crRNA and target DNA. We conclude that both tracrRNA and crRNA regulate the conformations and kinetics of the Cas9 complex, which are crucial in the DNA cleavage activity of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. PMID:27804953

  8. Mutational and Biochemical Analysis of the DNA-entry Nuclease EndA from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    M Midon; P Schafer; A Pingoud; M Ghosh; A Moon; M Cuneo; R London; G Meiss

    2011-12-31

    EndA is a membrane-attached surface-exposed DNA-entry nuclease previously known to be required for genetic transformation of Streptococcus pneumoniae. More recent studies have shown that the enzyme also plays an important role during the establishment of invasive infections by degrading extracellular chromatin in the form of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), enabling streptococci to overcome the innate immune system in mammals. As a virulence factor, EndA has become an interesting target for future drug design. Here we present the first mutational and biochemical analysis of recombinant forms of EndA produced either in a cell-free expression system or in Escherichia coli. We identify His160 and Asn191 to be essential for catalysis and Asn182 to be required for stability of EndA. The role of His160 as the putative general base in the catalytic mechanism is supported by chemical rescue of the H160A variant of EndA with imidazole added in excess. Our study paves the way for the identification and development of protein or low-molecular-weight inhibitors for EndA in future high-throughput screening assays.

  9. Predicting the equilibrium protein folding pathway: structure-based analysis of staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed

    Hilser, V J; Freire, E

    1997-02-01

    The equilibrium folding pathway of staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) has been approximated using a statistical thermodynamic formalism that utilizes the high-resolution structure of the native state as a template to generate a large ensemble of partially folded states. Close to 400,000 different states ranging from the native to the completely unfolded states were included in the analysis. The probability of each state was estimated using an empirical structural parametrization of the folding energetics. It is shown that this formalism predicts accurately the stability of the protein, the cooperativity of the folding/unfolding transition observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) or urea denaturation and the thermodynamic parameters for unfolding. More importantly, this formalism provides a quantitative account of the experimental hydrogen exchange protection factors measured under native conditions for SNase. These results suggest that the computer-generated distribution of states approximates well the ensemble of conformations existing in solution. Furthermore, this formalism represents the first model capable of quantitatively predicting within a unified framework the probability distribution of states seen under native conditions and its change upon unfolding.

  10. Structural roles of guide RNAs in the nuclease activity of Cas9 endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Lim, Youngbin; Bak, So Young; Sung, Keewon; Jeong, Euihwan; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kim, Jin-Soo; Bae, Sangsu; Kim, Seong Keun

    2016-11-02

    The type II CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 recognizes and cleaves target DNA with the help of two guide RNAs (gRNAs; tracrRNA and crRNA). However, the detailed mechanisms and kinetics of these gRNAs in the Cas9 nuclease activity are unclear. Here, we investigate the structural roles of gRNAs in the CRISPR-Cas9 system by single-molecule spectroscopy and reveal a new conformation of inactive Cas9 that is thermodynamically more preferable than active apo-Cas9. We find that tracrRNA prevents Cas9 from changing into the inactive form and leads to the Cas9:gRNA complex. For the Cas9:gRNA complex, we identify sub-conformations of the RNA-DNA heteroduplex during R-loop expansion. Our single-molecule study indicates that the kinetics of the sub-conformations is controlled by the complementarity between crRNA and target DNA. We conclude that both tracrRNA and crRNA regulate the conformations and kinetics of the Cas9 complex, which are crucial in the DNA cleavage activity of the CRISPR-Cas9 system.

  11. DNA replication restart and cellular dynamics of Hef helicase/nuclease protein in Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Lestini, Roxane; Delpech, Floriane; Myllykallio, Hannu

    2015-11-01

    Understanding how frequently spontaneous replication arrests occur and how archaea deal with these arrests are very interesting and challenging research topics. Here we will described how genetic and imaging studies have revealed the central role of the archaeal helicase/nuclease Hef belonging to the XPF/MUS81/FANCM family of endonucleases in repair of arrested replication forks. Special focus will be on description of a recently developed combination of genetic and imaging tools to study the dynamic localization of a functional Hef::GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein) fusion protein in the living cells of halophilic archaea Haloferax volcanii. As Archaea provide an excellent and unique model for understanding how DNA replication is regulated to allow replication of a circular DNA molecule either from single or multiple replication origins, we will also summarize recent studies that have revealed peculiar features regarding DNA replication, particularly in halophilic archaea. We strongly believe that fundamental knowledge of our on-going studies will shed light on the evolutionary history of the DNA replication machinery and will help to establish general rules concerning replication restart and the key role of recombination proteins not only in bacteria, yeast and higher eukaryotes but also in archaea.

  12. Heritable Targeted Inactivation of Myostatin Gene in Yellow Catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) Using Engineered Zinc Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kui; Xu, Zhiqiang; Liang, Dong; Li, Jingyun; Li, Junbo; Jia, Wenshuang; Li, Yuehua; Dong, Xiaohua; Cao, Shasha; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Pan, Jianlin; Zhao, Qingshun

    2011-01-01

    Yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) is one of the most important freshwater aquaculture species in China. However, its small size and lower meat yield limit its edible value. Myostatin (MSTN) is a negative regulator of mammalian muscle growth. But, the function of Mstn in fish remains elusive. To explore roles of mstn gene in fish growth and create a strain of yellow catfish with high amount of muscle mass, we performed targeted disruption of mstn in yellow catfish using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Employing zebrafish embryos as a screening system to identify ZFN activity, we obtained one pair of ZFNs that can edit mstn in yellow catfish genome. Using the ZFNs, we successfully obtained two founders (Founder July29-7 and Founder July29-8) carrying mutated mstn gene in their germ cells. The mutated mstn allele inherited from Founder July29-7 was a null allele (mstnnju6) containing a 4 bp insertion, predicted to encode function null Mstn. The mutated mstn inherited from Founder July29-8 was a complex type of mutation (mstnnju7), predicted to encode a protein lacking two amino acids in the N-terminal secretory signal of Mstn. Totally, we obtained 6 mstnnju6/+ and 14 mstnnju7/+ yellow catfish. To our best knowledge, this is the first endogenous gene knockout in aquaculture fish. Our result will help in understanding the roles of mstn gene in fish. PMID:22194943

  13. Efficient Generation of Myostatin (MSTN) Biallelic Mutations in Cattle Using Zinc Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shengli; Cui, Dan; Wang, Benli; Ding, Fangrong; Li, Song; Dai, Yunping; Li, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Genetically engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are useful for marker-free gene targeting using a one-step approach. We used ZFNs to efficiently disrupt bovine myostatin (MSTN), which was identified previously as the gene responsible for double muscling in cattle. The mutation efficiency of bovine somatic cells was approximately 20%, and the biallelic mutation efficiency was 8.3%. To evaluate the function of the mutated MSTN locus before somatic cell nuclear transfer, MSTN mRNA and protein expression was examined in four mutant cell colonies. We generated marker-gene-free cloned cattle, in which the MSTN biallelic mutations consisted of a 6-bp deletion in one of the alleles and a 117-bp deletion and 9-bp insertion in the other allele, resulting in at least four distinct mRNA splice variants. In the MSTN mutant cattle, the total amount of MSTN protein with the C-terminal domain was reduced by approximately 50%, and hypertrophied muscle fibers of the quadriceps and the double-muscled phenotype appeared at one month of age. Our proof-of-concept study is the first to produce MSTN mutations in cattle, and may allow the development of genetically modified strains of double-muscled cattle. PMID:24743319

  14. Coordinated nuclease activities counteract Ku at single-ended DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Chanut, Pauline; Britton, Sébastien; Coates, Julia; Jackson, Stephen P.; Calsou, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Repair of single-ended DNA double-strand breaks (seDSBs) by homologous recombination (HR) requires the generation of a 3′ single-strand DNA overhang by exonuclease activities in a process called DNA resection. However, it is anticipated that the highly abundant DNA end-binding protein Ku sequesters seDSBs and shields them from exonuclease activities. Despite pioneering works in yeast, it is unclear how mammalian cells counteract Ku at seDSBs to allow HR to proceed. Here we show that in human cells, ATM-dependent phosphorylation of CtIP and the epistatic and coordinated actions of MRE11 and CtIP nuclease activities are required to limit the stable loading of Ku on seDSBs. We also provide evidence for a hitherto unsuspected additional mechanism that contributes to prevent Ku accumulation at seDSBs, acting downstream of MRE11 endonuclease activity and in parallel with MRE11 exonuclease activity. Finally, we show that Ku persistence at seDSBs compromises Rad51 focus assembly but not DNA resection. PMID:27641979

  15. Investigation of a bio-inspired lift-enhancing effector on a 2D airfoil.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Joe; Gopalarathnam, Ashok

    2012-09-01

    A flap mounted on the upper surface of an airfoil, called a 'lift-enhancing effector', has been shown in wind tunnel tests to have a similar function to a bird's covert feathers, which rise off the wing's surface in response to separated flows. The effector, fabricated from a thin Mylar sheet, is allowed to rotate freely about its leading edge. The tests were performed in the NCSU subsonic wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of 4 × 10(5). The maximum lift coefficient with the effector was the same as that for the clean airfoil, but was maintained over an angle-of-attack range from 12° to almost 20°, resulting in a very gentle stall behavior. To better understand the aerodynamics and to estimate the deployment angle of the free-moving effector, fixed-angle effectors fabricated out of stiff wood were also tested. A progressive increase in the stall angle of attack with increasing effector angle was observed, with diminishing returns beyond the effector angle of 60°. Drag tests on both the free-moving and fixed effectors showed a marked improvement in drag at high angles of attack. Oil flow visualization on the airfoil with and without the fixed-angle effectors proved that the effector causes the separation point to move aft on the airfoil, as compared to the clean airfoil. This is thought to be the main mechanism by which an effector improves both lift and drag. A comparison of the fixed-effector results with those from the free-effector tests shows that the free effector's deployment angle is between 30° and 45°. When operating at and beyond the clean airfoil's stall angle, the free effector automatically deploys to progressively higher angles with increasing angles of attack. This slows down the rapid upstream movement of the separation point and avoids the severe reduction in the lift coefficient and an increase in the drag coefficient that are seen on the clean airfoil at the onset of stall. Thus, the effector postpones the stall by 4-8° and makes the

  16. bMERB domains are bivalent Rab8 family effectors evolved by gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Rai, Amrita; Oprisko, Anastasia; Campos, Jeremy; Fu, Yangxue; Friese, Timon; Itzen, Aymelt; Goody, Roger S; Gazdag, Emerich Mihai; Müller, Matthias P

    2016-08-23

    In their active GTP-bound form, Rab proteins interact with proteins termed effector molecules. In this study, we have thoroughly characterized a Rab effector domain that is present in proteins of the Mical and EHBP families, both known to act in endosomal trafficking. Within our study, we show that these effectors display a preference for Rab8 family proteins (Rab8, 10, 13 and 15) and that some of the effector domains can bind two Rab proteins via separate binding sites. Structural analysis allowed us to explain the specificity towards Rab8 family members and the presence of two similar Rab binding sites that must have evolved via gene duplication. This study is the first to thoroughly characterize a Rab effector protein that contains two separate Rab binding sites within a single domain, allowing Micals and EHBPs to bind two Rabs simultaneously, thus suggesting previously unknown functions of these effector molecules in endosomal trafficking.

  17. Cellular Signaling Pathways and Posttranslational Modifications Mediated by Nematode Effector Proteins1

    PubMed Central

    Hewezi, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst and root-knot nematodes synthesize and secrete a suite of effector proteins into infected host cells and tissues. These effectors are the major virulence determinants mediating the transformation of normal root cells into specialized feeding structures. Compelling evidence indicates that these effectors directly hijack or manipulate refined host physiological processes to promote the successful parasitism of host plants. Here, we provide an update on recent progress in elucidating the molecular functions of nematode effectors. In particular, we emphasize how nematode effectors modify plant cell wall structure, mimic the activity of host proteins, alter auxin signaling, and subvert defense signaling and immune responses. In addition, we discuss the emerging evidence suggesting that nematode effectors target and recruit various components of host posttranslational machinery in order to perturb the host signaling networks required for immunity and to regulate their own activity and subcellular localization. PMID:26315856

  18. MIX and match: mobile T6SS MIX-effectors enhance bacterial fitness.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Dor

    2016-01-01

    Protein secretion systems that mediate interbacterial competition secret a wide repertoire of antibacterial toxins. A major player in these competitions is the newly discovered bacterial type VI secretion system (T6SS). We recently found that a subset of polymorphic MIX-effectors, which are a widespread class of effectors secreted by T6SSs, are horizontally shared between marine bacteria and are used to diversify their T6SS effector repertoires, thus enhancing their environmental fitness. In this commentary, I expand on the ideas that were introduced in the previous report, and further speculate on the possible mobility of other MIX-effectors. In addition, I discuss the possible role of horizontal gene transfer in the dissemination of MIX-effectors through bacterial genomes, as well as its possible role in diversifying the T6SS effector repertoire.

  19. Local sensory control of a dexterous end effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinto, Victor H.; Everett, Louis J.; Driels, Morris

    1990-01-01

    A numerical scheme was developed to solve the inverse kinematics for a user-defined manipulator. The scheme was based on a nonlinear least-squares technique which determines the joint variables by minimizing the difference between the target end effector pose and the actual end effector pose. The scheme was adapted to a dexterous hand in which the joints are either prismatic or revolute and the fingers are considered open kinematic chains. Feasible solutions were obtained using a three-fingered dexterous hand. An algorithm to estimate the position and orientation of a pre-grasped object was also developed. The algorithm was based on triangulation using an ideal sensor and a spherical object model. By choosing the object to be a sphere, only the position of the object frame was important. Based on these simplifications, a minimum of three sensors are needed to find the position of a sphere. A two dimensional example to determine the position of a circle coordinate frame using a two-fingered dexterous hand was presented.

  20. Expression of epigenetic effectors in decidualizing human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Giulia; Christian, Mark; Quenby, Siobhan; Brosens, Jan J

    2012-09-01

    Cyclic differentiation of human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs) into decidual cells is a highly coordinated process essential for embryo implantation and pregnancy. This differentiation process is closely recapitulated in culture upon exposure of purified HESCs to cyclic AMP and progesterone signaling. Mining of gene expression data revealed that HESCs express 147 genes coding for epigenetic effectors, 33 (22%) of which are significantly regulated (P < 0.05) upon decidualization. Among these are genes encoding for histone-modifying proteins and their cofactors, histone-binding proteins, histone variants, CpG-binding proteins and DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). Interestingly, more than two-thirds of differentially expressed chromatin-modifying genes are down-regulated upon the transition from a proliferative to a differentiated HESC phenotype. Despite the strong regulation of DNMTs, colorimetric and long interspersed nuclear element 1 methylation assays did not show global changes in DNA methylation levels upon differentiation of HESCs. Taken together, the coordinated regulation of diverse effector molecules suggests that complex epigenetic modification at specific loci underpins the acquisition of a decidual endometrial phenotype.