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Sample records for active acid sites

  1. Active site amino acid sequence of human factor D.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1980-08-01

    Factor D was isolated from human plasma by chromatography on CM-Sephadex C50, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite. Digestion of reduced, S-carboxymethylated factor D with cyanogen bromide resulted in three peptides which were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex G-75 (superfine) equilibrated in 20% formic acid. NH2-Terminal sequences were determined by automated Edman degradation with a Beckman 890C sequencer using a 0.1 M Quadrol program. The smallest peptide (CNBr III) consisted of the NH2-terminal 14 amino acids. The other two peptides had molecular weights of 17,000 (CNBr I) and 7000 (CNBr II). Overlap of the NH2-terminal sequence of factor D with the NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr I established the order of the peptides. The NH2-terminal 53 residues of factor D are somewhat more homologous with the group-specific protease of rat intestine than with other serine proteases. The NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr II revealed the active site serine of factor D. The typical serine protease active site sequence (Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro was found at residues 12-17. The region surrounding the active site serine does not appear to be more highly homologous with any one of the other serine proteases. The structural data obtained point out the similarities between factor D and the other proteases. However, complete definition of the degree of relationship between factor D and other proteases will require determination of the remainder of the primary structure.

  2. Influence of different forms of acidities on soil microbiological properties and enzyme activities at an acid mine drainage contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Prafulla Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Pradip; Tripathy, Subhasish; Equeenuddin, Sk Md; Panigrahi, M K

    2010-07-15

    Assessment of microbial parameters, viz. microbial biomass, fluorescence diacetate, microbial respiration, acid phosphatase, beta-glucosidase and urease with respect to acidity helps in evaluating the quality of soils. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different forms of acidities on soil microbial parameters in an acid mine drainage contaminated site around coal deposits in Jainta Hills of India. Total potential and exchangeable acidity, extractable and exchangeable aluminium were significantly higher in contaminated soil compared to the baseline (p<0.01). Different forms of acidity were significantly and positively correlated with each other (p<0.05). Further, all microbial properties were positively and significantly correlated with organic carbon and clay (p<0.05). The ratios of microbial parameters with organic carbon were negatively correlated with different forms of acidity. Principal component analysis and cluster analyses showed that the microbial activities are not directly influenced by the total potential acidity and extractable aluminium. Though acid mine drainage affected soils had higher microbial biomass and activities due to higher organic matter content than those of the baseline soils, the ratios of microbial parameters/organic carbon indicated suppression of microbial growth and activities due to acidity stress.

  3. Effect of acidic amino acids engineered into the active site cleft of Thermopolyspora flexuosa GH11 xylanase.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Turunen, Ossi

    2015-01-01

    Thermopolyspora flexuosa GH11 xylanase (XYN11A) shows optimal activity at pH 6-7 and 75-80 °C. We studied how mutation to aspartic acid (N46D and V48D) in the vicinity of the catalytic acid/base affects the pH activity of highly thermophilic GH11 xylanase. Both mutations shifted the pH activity profile toward acidic pH. In general, the Km values were lower at pH 4-5 than at pH 6, and in line with this, the rate of hydrolysis of xylotetraose was slightly faster at pH 4 than at pH 6. The N46D mutation and also lower pH in XYN11A increased the hydrolysis of xylotriose. The Km value increased remarkably (from 2.5 to 11.6 mg/mL) because of V48D, which indicates the weakening of binding affinity of the substrate to the active site. Xylotetraose functioned well as a substrate for other enzymes, but with lowered reaction rate for V48D. Both N46D and V48D increased the enzyme inactivation by ionic liquid [emim]OAc. In conclusion, the pH activity profile could be shifted to acidic pH due to an effect from two different directions, but the tightly packed GH11 active site can cause steric problems for the mutations.

  4. Site-directed mutagenesis of an alkaline phytase: influencing specificity, activity and stability in acidic milieu.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thuy T; Mamo, Gashaw; Búxo, Laura; Le, Nhi N; Gaber, Yasser; Mattiasson, Bo; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2011-07-10

    Site-directed mutagenesis of a thermostable alkaline phytase from Bacillus sp. MD2 was performed with an aim to increase its specific activity and activity and stability in an acidic environment. The mutation sites are distributed on the catalytic surface of the enzyme (P257R, E180N, E229V and S283R) and in the active site (K77R, K179R and E227S). Selection of the residues was based on the idea that acid active phytases are more positively charged around their catalytic surfaces. Thus, a decrease in the content of negatively charged residues or an increase in the positive charges in the catalytic region of an alkaline phytase was assumed to influence the enzyme activity and stability at low pH. Moreover, widening of the substrate-binding pocket is expected to improve the hydrolysis of substrates that are not efficiently hydrolysed by wild type alkaline phytase. Analysis of the phytase variants revealed that E229V and S283R mutants increased the specific activity by about 19% and 13%, respectively. Mutation of the active site residues K77R and K179R led to severe reduction in the specific activity of the enzyme. Analysis of the phytase mutant-phytate complexes revealed increase in hydrogen bonding between the enzyme and the substrate, which might retard the release of the product, resulting in decreased activity. On the other hand, the double mutant (K77R-K179R) phytase showed higher stability at low pH (pH 2.6-3.0). The E227S variant was optimally active at pH 5.5 (in contrast to the wild type enzyme that had an optimum pH of 6) and it exhibited higher stability in acidic condition. This mutant phytase, displayed over 80% of its initial activity after 3h incubation at pH 2.6 while the wild type phytase retained only about 40% of its original activity. Moreover, the relative activity of this mutant phytase on calcium phytate, sodium pyrophosphate and p-nitro phenyl phosphate was higher than that of the wild type phytase.

  5. Counting Active Sites on Titanium Oxide-Silica Catalysts for Hydrogen Peroxide Activation through In Situ Poisoning with Phenylphosphonic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, Todd R.; Boston, Andrew M.; Thompson, Anthony B.; Gray, Kimberly A.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2015-06-04

    Quantifying specific active sites in supported catalysts improves our understanding and assists in rational design. Supported oxides can undergo significant structural changes as surface densities increase from site-isolated cations to monolayers and crystallites, which changes the number of kinetically relevant sites. Herein, TiOx domains are titrated on TiOx–SiO2 selectively with phenylphosphonic acid (PPA). An ex situ method quantifies all fluid-accessible TiOx, whereas an in situ titration during cis-cyclooctene epoxidation provides previously unavailable values for the number of tetrahedral Ti sites on which H2O2 activation occurs. We use this method to determine the active site densities of 22 different catalysts with different synthesis methods, loadings, and characteristic spectra and find a single intrinsic turnover frequency for cis-cyclooctene epoxidation of (40±7) h-1. This simple method gives molecular-level insight into catalyst structure that is otherwise hidden when bulk techniques are used.

  6. Purification, enzymatic properties, and active site environment of a novel manganese(III)-containing acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Y; Kawabe, H; Tanaka, H; Fujimoto, S; Ohara, A

    1981-10-25

    A new manganese-containing acid phosphatase has been isolated and crystallized from sweet potato tubers. The pure enzyme contains one atom of manganese per Mr = 110,000 polypeptide and shows phosphatase activity toward various phosphate substrates. The pH optimum of the enzyme was 5.8 and the enzyme activity was inhibited by Cu2+, Zn2+, Hg2+, AsO43-, and MoO42-. This stable metalloenzyme is red-violet in color with an intense absorption band at 515 nm (epsilon - 2460). Our electronic, circular dichroism, and electron spin resonance findings strongly indicate that the Mn-valence state of the native enzyme is trivalent. When the Mn-enzyme is excited by the 5145 A line of Ar+ laser, prominent Raman lines at 1230, 1298, 1508, and 1620 cm-1 were detected. This Raman spectrum can probably be interpreted in terms of internal vibration of a coordinated tyrosine phenolate anion. The tryptophan-modified enzyme showed a positive Raman band at 370 cm-1, which is preferentially assigned to a Mn(III)-S streching mode. The modification of the Mn-enzyme by N-bromosuccinimide led to a large decrease in the fluorescence intensity of 335 nm which was dominated by its tryptophan residues within a considerable hydrophobic environment. The acid phosphatase activity was significantly decreased by the tryptophan modification. With respect to the active site donor sets, the Mn(III)-containing acid phosphatase is distinctly different from the Zn(II)-containing alkaline phosphatase. Of interest is also the appreciable similarity of some enzymatic and spectroscopic properties between the present enzyme and uteroferrin.

  7. Composite active site of chondroitin lyase ABC accepting both epimers of uronic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Shaya, D.; Hahn, Bum-Soo; Bjerkan, Tonje Marita; Kim, Wan Seok; Park, Nam Young; Sim, Joon-Soo; Kim, Yeong-Shik; Cygler, M.

    2008-03-19

    Enzymes have evolved as catalysts with high degrees of stereospecificity. When both enantiomers are biologically important, enzymes with two different folds usually catalyze reactions with the individual enantiomers. In rare cases a single enzyme can process both enantiomers efficiently, but no molecular basis for such catalysis has been established. The family of bacterial chondroitin lyases ABC comprises such enzymes. They can degrade both chondroitin sulfate (CS) and dermatan sulfate (DS) glycosaminoglycans at the nonreducing end of either glucuronic acid (CS) or its epimer iduronic acid (DS) by a {beta}-elimination mechanism, which commences with the removal of the C-5 proton from the uronic acid. Two other structural folds evolved to perform these reactions in an epimer-specific fashion: ({alpha}/{alpha}){sub 5} for CS (chondroitin lyases AC) and {beta}-helix for DS (chondroitin lyases B); their catalytic mechanisms have been established at the molecular level. The structure of chondroitinase ABC from Proteus vulgaris showed surprising similarity to chondroitinase AC, including the presence of a Tyr-His-Glu-Arg catalytic tetrad, which provided a possible mechanism for CS degradation but not for DS degradation. We determined the structure of a distantly related Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron chondroitinase ABC to identify additional structurally conserved residues potentially involved in catalysis. We found a conserved cluster located {approx}12 {angstrom} from the catalytic tetrad. We demonstrate that a histidine in this cluster is essential for catalysis of DS but not CS. The enzyme utilizes a single substrate-binding site while having two partially overlapping active sites catalyzing the respective reactions. The spatial separation of the two sets of residues suggests a substrate-induced conformational change that brings all catalytically essential residues close together.

  8. Identification of Arg-12 in the active site of Escherichia coli K1 CMP-sialic acid synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Stoughton, D M; Zapata, G; Picone, R; Vann, W F

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli K1 CMP-sialic acid synthetase catalyses the synthesis of CMP-sialic acid from CTP and sialic acid. The active site of the 418 amino acid E. coli enzyme was localized to its N-terminal half. The bacterial CMP-sialic acid synthetase enzymes have a conserved motif, IAIIPARXXSKGLXXKN, at their N-termini. Several basic residues have been identified at or near the active site of the E. coli enzyme by chemical modification and site-directed mutagenesis. Only one of the lysines in the N-terminal motif, Lys-21, appears to be essential for activity. Mutation of Lys-21 in the N-terminal motif results in an inactive enzyme. Furthermore, Arg-12 of the N-terminal motif appears to be an active-site residue, based on the following evidence. Substituting Arg-12 with glycine or alanine resulted in inactive enzymes, indicating that this residue is required for enzymic activity. The Arg-12-->Lys mutant was partially active, demonstrating that a positive charge is required at this site. Steady-state kinetic analysis reveals changes in k(cat), K(m) and K(s) for CTP, which implicates Arg-12 in catalysis and substrate binding. PMID:10510306

  9. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta; Lital , Schultz; Peter G. , Zhang; Zhiwen

    2010-10-12

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  10. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2011-08-30

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  11. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital [San Diego, CA; Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Zhang, Zhiwen [San Diego, CA

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  12. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2009-02-24

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  13. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  14. A Mutational Analysis of the Active Site Loop Residues in cis-3-Chloroacrylic Acid Dehalogenase

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Gottfried K.; Huddleston, Jamison P.; Johnson, William H.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    cis -3-Chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (cis-CaaD) from Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170 and a homologue from Corynebacterium glutamicum designated Cg10062 share 34% sequence identity (54% similarity). The former catalyzes a key step in a bacterial catabolic pathway for the nematocide 1,3-dichloropropene, whereas the latter has no known biological activity. Although Cg10062 has the six active site residues (Pro-1, His-28, Arg-70, Arg-73, Tyr-103, Glu-114) that are critical for cis-CaaD activity, it shows only a low level cis-CaaD activity and lacks the specificity of cis-CaaD: Cg10062 processes both isomers of 3-chloroacrylate with a preference for the cis-isomer. Although the basis for these differences is unknown, a comparison of the crystal structures of the enzymes covalently modified by an adduct resulting from their incubation with the same inhibitor offers a possible explanation. A 6-residue active site loop in cis-CaaD shows a strikingly different conformation from that observed in Cg10062: the loop closes down on the active site of cis-CaaD, but not on that of Cg10062. In order to examine what this loop might contribute to cis-CaaD catalysis and specificity, the residues were changed individually to those found in Cg10062. Subsequent kinetic and mechanistic analysis suggests that the T34A mutant of cis-CaaD is more Cg10062-like. The mutant enzyme shows a 4-fold increase in Km (using cis-3-bromoacrylate), but not to the degree observed for Cg10062 (687-fold). The mutation also causes a 4-fold decrease in the burst rate (compared to the wild type cis-CaaD), whereas Cg10062 shows no burst rate. More telling is the reaction of the T34A mutant of cis-CaaD with the alternate substrate, 2,3-butadienoate. In the presence of NaBH4 and the allene, cis-CaaD is completely inactivated after one turnover due to the covalent modification of Pro-1. The same experiment with Cg10062 does not result in the covalent modification of Pro-1. The different outcomes are attributed to

  15. The effect of the distance between acidic site and basic site immobilized on mesoporous solid on the activity in catalyzing aldol condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Xiaofang; Yu Xiaobo; Wu Shujie; Liu Bo; Liu Heng; Guan Jingqi; Kan Qiubin

    2011-02-15

    Acid-base bifunctional heterogeneous catalysts containing carboxylic and amine groups, which were immobilized at defined distance from one another on the mesoporous solid were synthesized by immobilizing lysine onto carboxyl-SBA-15. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron micrographs (SEM), transmission electron micrographs (TEM), elemental analysis, and back titration. Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance was more active than maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance in aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes. It appears that the distance between acidic site and basic site immobilized on mesoporous solid should be an essential factor for catalysis optimization. -- Graphical abstract: Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance and maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance were synthesized by immobilizing lysine onto carboxyl-SBA-15. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance. {yields} Maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance. {yields} Compared to maximum-C-A-SBA-15, proximal-C-A-SBA-15 was more active toward aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes.

  16. Effects of sex and site on amino acid metabolism enzyme gene expression and activity in rat white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Arriarán, Sofía; Agnelli, Silvia; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. White adipose tissue (WAT) shows marked sex- and diet-dependent differences. However, our metabolic knowledge of WAT, especially on amino acid metabolism, is considerably limited. In the present study, we compared the influence of sex on the amino acid metabolism profile of the four main WAT sites, focused on the paths related to ammonium handling and the urea cycle, as a way to estimate the extent of WAT implication on body amino-nitrogen metabolism. Experimental Design. Adult female and male rats were maintained, undisturbed, under standard conditions for one month. After killing them under isoflurane anesthesia. WAT sites were dissected and weighed. Subcutaneous, perigonadal, retroperitoneal and mesenteric WAT were analyzed for amino acid metabolism gene expression and enzyme activities. Results. There was a considerable stability of the urea cycle activities and expressions, irrespective of sex, and with only limited influence of site. Urea cycle was more resilient to change than other site-specialized metabolic pathways. The control of WAT urea cycle was probably related to the provision of arginine/citrulline, as deduced from the enzyme activity profiles. These data support a generalized role of WAT in overall amino-N handling. In contrast, sex markedly affected WAT ammonium-centered amino acid metabolism in a site-related way, with relatively higher emphasis in males’ subcutaneous WAT. Conclusions. We found that WAT has an active amino acid metabolism. Its gene expressions were lower than those of glucose-lipid interactions, but the differences were quantitatively less important than usually reported. The effects of sex on urea cycle enzymes expression and activity were limited, in contrast with the wider variations observed in other metabolic pathways. The results agree with a centralized control of urea cycle operation affecting the adipose organ as a whole. PMID:26587356

  17. The amino acid sequence around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues, and the buried cysteine residue in ficin.

    PubMed

    Husain, S S; Lowe, G

    1970-04-01

    Ficin that had been prepared from the latex of Ficus glabrata by salt fractionation and chromatography on carboxymethylcellulose was completely and irreversibly inhibited with 1,3-dibromo[2-(14)C]acetone and then treated with N-(4-dimethylamino-3,5-dinitrophenyl)maleimide in 6m-guanidinium chloride. After reduction and carboxymethylation of the labelled protein, it was digested with trypsin and alpha-chymotrypsin. Two radioactive peptides and two coloured peptides were isolated chromatographically and their sequences determined. The radioactive peptides revealed the amino acid sequences around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues and showed a high degree of homology with the omino acid sequence around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues in papain. The coloured peptides allowed the amino acid sequence around the buried cysteine residue in ficin to be determined.

  18. Dual mechanism of activation of plant plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase by acidic phospholipids: evidence for a phospholipid binding site which overlaps the calmodulin-binding site.

    PubMed

    Meneghelli, Silvia; Fusca, Tiziana; Luoni, Laura; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    2008-09-01

    The effect of phospholipids on the activity of isoform ACA8 of Arabidopsis thaliana plasma membrane (PM) Ca2+-ATPase was evaluated in membranes isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain K616 expressing wild type or mutated ACA8 cDNA. Acidic phospholipids stimulated the basal Ca2+-ATPase activity in the following order of efficiency: phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate > phosphatidylserine > phosphatidylcholine approximately = phosphatidylethanolamine approximately = 0. Acidic phospholipids increased V(max-Ca2+) and lowered the value of K(0.5-Ca2+) below the value measured in the presence of calmodulin (CaM). In the presence of CaM acidic phospholipids activated ACA8 by further decreasing its K(0.5-Ca2+) value. Phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate and, with lower efficiency, phosphatidylserine bound peptides reproducing ACA8 N-terminus (aa 1-116). Single point mutation of three residues (A56, R59 and Y62) within the sequence A56-T63 lowered the apparent affinity of ACA8 for phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate by two to three fold, indicating that this region contains a binding site for acidic phospholipids. However, the N-deleted mutant Delta74-ACA8 was also activated by acidic phospholipids, indicating that acidic phospholipids activate ACA8 through a complex mechanism, involving interaction with different sites. The striking similarity between the response to acidic phospholipids of ACA8 and animal plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase provides new evidence that type 2B Ca2+-ATPases share common regulatory properties independently of structural differences such as the localization of the terminal regulatory region at the N- or C-terminal end of the protein.

  19. Interaction of aspartic acid-104 and proline-287 with the active site of m-calpain.

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, J S; Elce, J S

    1996-01-01

    In an ongoing study of the mechanisms of calpain catalysis and Ca(2+)-induced activation, the effects of Asp-104-->Ser and Pro-287-->Ser large subunit mutations on m-calpain activity, the pH-activity profile, Ca(2+)-sensitivity, and autolysis were measured. The importance of these positions was suggested by sequence comparisons between the calpain and papain families of cysteine proteinases. Asp-104 is adjacent to the active-site Cys-105, and Pro-287 is adjacent to the active-site Asn-286 and probably to the active-site His-262; both Asp-104 and Pro-287 are absolutely conserved in the known calpains, but are replaced by highly conserved serine residues in the papains. The single mutants had approx. 10-15% of wild-type activity, due mainly to a decrease in kcat, since Km was only slightly increased. The Pro-287-->Ser mutation appeared to cause a local perturbation of the catalytic Cys-105/His-262 catalytic ion pair, reducing its efficiency without major effect on the conformation and stability of the enzyme. The Asp-104-->Ser mutation caused a marked narrowing of the pH-activity curve, a 9-fold increase in Ca2+ requirement, and an acceleration of autolysis, when compared with the wild-type enzyme. The results indicated that Asp-104 alters the nature of its interaction with the catalytic ion pair during Ca(2+)-induced conformational change in calpain. This interaction may be direct or indirect, but is important in activation of the enzyme. PMID:8912692

  20. Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of heterodinuclear complexes modeling active sites in purple acid phospatases.

    PubMed

    Jarenmark, Martin; Haukka, Matti; Demeshko, Serhiy; Tuczek, Felix; Zuppiroli, Luca; Meyer, Franc; Nordlander, Ebbe

    2011-05-02

    To model the heterodinuclear active sites in plant purple acid phosphatases, a mononuclear synthon, [Fe(III)(H(2)IPCPMP)(Cl(2))][PF(6)] (1), has been generated in situ from the ligand 2-(N-isopropyl-N-((2-pyridyl)methyl)aminomethyl)-6-(N-(carboxylmethyl)-N-((2-pyridyl)methyl)amino methyl)-4-methylphenol (IPCPMP) and used to synthesize heterodinuclear complexes of the formulas [Fe(III)M(II)(IPCPMP)(OAc)(2)(CH(3)OH)][PF(6)] (M = Zn (2), Co (3), Ni (4), Mn (5)), [Fe(III)Zn(II)(IPCPMP)(mpdp)][PF(6)] (6) (mpdp = meta-phenylene-dipropionate), and [Fe(III)Cu(II)(IPCPMP) (OAc)}(2)(μ-O)][PF(6)] (7). Complexes 2-4, 6, and 7 have been crystallographically characterized. The structure of 6 is a solid state coordination polymer with heterodinuclear monomeric units, and 7 is a tetranuclear complex consisting of two heterodinuclear phenolate-bridged Fe(III)Cu(II) units bridged through a μ-oxido group between the two Fe(III) ions. Mössbauer spectra confirm the presence of high spin Fe(III) in an octahedral environment for 1, 3, and 5 while 2 and 4 display relaxation effects. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate weak antiferromagnetic coupling for 3, 4, and 5 and confirm the assignment of the metal centers in 2-5 as high spin Fe(III)-M(II) (M = Zn, Co (high spin), Ni (high spin), Mn (high spin)). Complexes 2-5 are intact in acetonitrile solution as indicated by IR spectroscopy (for 2-4) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) but partly dissociate to hydroxide species and a mononuclear complex in water/acetonitrile solutions. UV-vis spectroscopy reveal pH-dependent behavior, and species that form upon increasing the pH have been assigned to μ-hydroxido-bridged Fe(III)M(II) complexes for 2-5 although 2 and 3 is further transformed into what is propsed to be a μ-oxido-bridged tetranuclear complex similar to 7. Complexes 2-5 enhance phosphodiester cleavage of 2-hydroxy-propyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNP) and bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl)phosphate (BDNPP), but

  1. Lysophosphatidic acid directly activates TRPV1 through a C-terminal binding site.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Posadas, Andrés; Picazo-Juárez, Giovanni; Llorente, Itzel; Jara-Oseguera, Andrés; Morales-Lázaro, Sara; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Islas, León D; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2011-11-20

    Since 1992, there has been growing evidence that the bioactive phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), whose amounts are increased upon tissue injury, activates primary nociceptors resulting in neuropathic pain. The TRPV1 ion channel is expressed in primary afferent nociceptors and is activated by physical and chemical stimuli. Here we show that in control mice LPA produces acute pain-like behaviors, which are substantially reduced in Trpv1-null animals. Our data also demonstrate that LPA activates TRPV1 through a unique mechanism that is independent of G protein-coupled receptors, contrary to what has been widely shown for other ion channels, by directly interacting with the C terminus of the channel. We conclude that TRPV1 is a direct molecular target of the pain-producing molecule LPA and that this constitutes, to our knowledge, the first example of LPA binding directly to an ion channel to acutely regulate its function.

  2. Using Unnatural Amino Acids to Probe the Energetics of Oxyanion Hole Hydrogen Bonds in the Ketosteroid Isomerase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds are ubiquitous in enzyme active sites, providing binding interactions and stabilizing charge rearrangements on substrate groups over the course of a reaction. But understanding the origin and magnitude of their catalytic contributions relative to hydrogen bonds made in aqueous solution remains difficult, in part because of complexities encountered in energetic interpretation of traditional site-directed mutagenesis experiments. It has been proposed for ketosteroid isomerase and other enzymes that active site hydrogen bonding groups provide energetic stabilization via “short, strong” or “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds that are formed due to matching of their pKa or proton affinity to that of the transition state. It has also been proposed that the ketosteroid isomerase and other enzyme active sites provide electrostatic environments that result in larger energetic responses (i.e., greater “sensitivity”) to ground-state to transition-state charge rearrangement, relative to aqueous solution, thereby providing catalysis relative to the corresponding reaction in water. To test these models, we substituted tyrosine with fluorotyrosines (F-Tyr’s) in the ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) oxyanion hole to systematically vary the proton affinity of an active site hydrogen bond donor while minimizing steric or structural effects. We found that a 40-fold increase in intrinsic F-Tyr acidity caused no significant change in activity for reactions with three different substrates. F-Tyr substitution did not change the solvent or primary kinetic isotope effect for proton abstraction, consistent with no change in mechanism arising from these substitutions. The observed shallow dependence of activity on the pKa of the substituted Tyr residues suggests that the KSI oxyanion hole does not provide catalysis by forming an energetically exceptional pKa-matched hydrogen bond. In addition, the shallow dependence provides no indication of an active site electrostatic

  3. Spectroscopic insights into the nature of active sites in iron–nitrogen–carbon electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction in acid

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Qingying; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Tylus, Urszula; Strickland, Kara; Li, Jingkun; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Anibal, Jacob; Gumeci, Cenk; Barton, Scott Calabrese; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frederic; Halevi, Barr; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2016-11-01

    Developing efficient and inexpensive catalysts for the sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) constitutes one of the grand challenges in the fabrication of commercially viable fuel cell devices and metal–air batteries for future energy applications. Despite recent achievements in designing advanced Pt-based and Pt-free catalysts, current progress primarily involves an empirical approach of trial-and-error combination of precursors and synthesis conditions, which limits further progress. Rational design of catalyst materials requires proper understanding of the mechanistic origin of the ORR and the underlying surface properties under operating conditions that govern catalytic activity. Herein, several different groups of iron-based catalysts synthesized via different methods and/or precursors were systematically studied by combining multiple spectroscopic techniques under ex situ and in situ conditions in an effort to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the synthesis-products correlations, nature of active sites, and the reaction mechanisms. These catalysts include original macrocycles, macrocycle-pyrolyzed catalysts, and Fe-N–C catalysts synthesized from individual Fe, N, and C precursors including polymer-based catalysts, metal organic framework (MOF)-based catalysts, and sacrificial support method (SSM)-based catalysts. The latter group of catalysts is most promising as not only they exhibit exceptional ORR activity and/or durability, but also the final products are controllable. We show that the high activity observed for most pyrolyzed Fe-based catalysts can mainly be attributed to a single active site: non-planar Fe–N4 moiety embedded in distorted carbon matrix characterized by a high potential for the Fe2+/3+ redox transition in acidic electrolyte/environment. The high intrinsic ORR activity, or turnover frequency (TOF), of this site is shown to be accounted for by redox catalysis mechanism that highlights the dominant role

  4. Hydrogenation of biofuels with formic acid over a palladium-based ternary catalyst with two types of active sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Zhang, Bingsen; Meng, Xiangju; Su, Dang Sheng; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2014-06-01

    A composite catalyst including palladium nanoparticles on titania (TiO2) and on nitrogen-modified porous carbon (Pd/TiO2@N-C) is synthesized from palladium salts, tetrabutyl titanate, and chitosan. N2 sorption isotherms show that the catalyst has a high BET surface area (229 m(2)  g(-1)) and large porosity. XPS and TEM characterization of the catalyst shows that palladium species with different chemical states are well dispersed across the TiO2 and nitrogen-modified porous carbon, respectively. The Pd/TiO2@N-C catalyst is very active and shows excellent stability towards hydrogenation of vanillin to 2-methoxy-4-methylphenol using formic acid as hydrogen source. This activity can be attributed to a synergistic effect between the Pd/TiO2 (a catalyst for dehydrogenation of formic acid) and Pd/N-C (a catalyst for hydrogenation of vanillin) sites.

  5. Acid-Sulfate-Weathering Activity in Shergottite Sites on Mars Recorded in Grim Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Ross, K.; Sutton, S. R.; Schwandt, C. S.

    2011-01-01

    Based on mass spectrometric studies of sulfur species in Shergotty and EET79001, [1] and [2] showed that sulfates and sulfides occur in different proportions in shergottites. Sulfur speciation studies in gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses in EET79001 by the XANES method [3] showed that S K-XANES spectra in GRIM glasses from Lith A indicate that S is associated with Ca and Al presumably as sulfides/sulfates whereas the XANES spectra of amorphous sulfide globules in GRIM glasses from Lith B indicate that S is associated with Fe as FeS. In these amorphous iron sulfide globules, [4] found no Ni using FE-SEM and suggested that the globules resulting from immiscible sulfide melt may not be related to the igneous iron sulfides having approximately 1-3% Ni. Furthermore, in the amorphous iron sulfides from 507 GRIM glass, [5] determined delta(sup 34)S values ranging from +3.5%o to -3.1%o using Nano-SIMS. These values plot between the delta(sup 34)S value of +5.25%o determined in the sulfate fraction in Shergotty [6] at one extreme and the value of -1.7%o obtained for igneous sulfides in EET79001 and Shergotty [7] at the other. These results suggest that the amorphous Fe-S globules likely originated by shock reduction of secondary iron sulfate phases occurring in the regolith precursor materials during impact [7]. Sulfates in the regolith materials near the basaltic shergottite sites on Mars owe their origin to surficial acid-sulfate interactions. We examine the nature of these reactions by studying the composition of the end products in altered regolith materials. For the parent material composition, we use that of the host shergottite material in which the impact glasses are situated.

  6. Chicoric acid binds to two sites and decreases the activity of the YopH bacterial virulence factor

    PubMed Central

    Kuban-Jankowska, Alicja; Sahu, Kamlesh K.; Gorska, Magdalena; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Wozniak, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Chicoric acid (CA) is a phenolic compound present in dietary supplements with a large spectrum of biological properties reported ranging from antioxidant, to antiviral, to immunostimulatory properties. Due to the fact that chicoric acid promotes phagocytic activity and was reported as an allosteric inhibitor of the PTP1B phosphatase, we examined the effect of CA on YopH phosphatase from pathogenic bacteria, which block phagocytic processes of a host cell. We performed computational studies of chicoric acid binding to YopH as well as validation experiments with recombinant enzymes. In addition, we performed similar studies for caffeic and chlorogenic acids to compare the results. Docking experiments demonstrated that, from the tested compounds, only CA binds to both catalytic and secondary binding sites of YopH. Our experimental results showed that CA reduces activity of recombinant YopH phosphatase from Yersinia enterocolitica and human CD45 phosphatase. The inhibition caused by CA was irreversible and did not induce oxidation of catalytic cysteine. We proposed that inactivation of YopH induced by CA is involved with allosteric inhibition by interacting with essential regions responsible for ligand binding. PMID:26735581

  7. Chicoric acid binds to two sites and decreases the activity of the YopH bacterial virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Kuban-Jankowska, Alicja; Sahu, Kamlesh K; Gorska, Magdalena; Tuszynski, Jack A; Wozniak, Michal

    2016-01-19

    Chicoric acid (CA) is a phenolic compound present in dietary supplements with a large spectrum of biological properties reported ranging from antioxidant, to antiviral, to immunostimulatory properties. Due to the fact that chicoric acid promotes phagocytic activity and was reported as an allosteric inhibitor of the PTP1B phosphatase, we examined the effect of CA on YopH phosphatase from pathogenic bacteria, which block phagocytic processes of a host cell. We performed computational studies of chicoric acid binding to YopH as well as validation experiments with recombinant enzymes. In addition, we performed similar studies for caffeic and chlorogenic acids to compare the results. Docking experiments demonstrated that, from the tested compounds, only CA binds to both catalytic and secondary binding sites of YopH. Our experimental results showed that CA reduces activity of recombinant YopH phosphatase from Yersinia enterocolitica and human CD45 phosphatase. The inhibition caused by CA was irreversible and did not induce oxidation of catalytic cysteine. We proposed that inactivation of YopH induced by CA is involved with allosteric inhibition by interacting with essential regions responsible for ligand binding.

  8. Mutation of Arg-115 of human class III alcohol dehydrogenase: a binding site required for formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity and fatty acid activation.

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, K; Höög, J O; Holmquist, B; Estonius, M; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B L

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the fatty acid activation and formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that distinguishes human class III alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) from all other alcohol dehydrogenases has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis of its Arg-115 residue. The Ala- and Asp-115 mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The activities of the recombinant native and mutant enzymes toward ethanol are essentially identical, but mutagenesis greatly decreases the kcat/Km values for glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation. The catalytic efficiency for the Asp variant is < 0.1% that of the unmutated enzyme, due to both a higher Km and a lower kcat value. As with the native enzyme, neither mutant can oxidize methanol, be saturated by ethanol, or be inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole; i.e., they retain these class III characteristics. In contrast, however, their activation by fatty acids, another characteristic unique to class III alcohol dehydrogenase, is markedly attenuated. The Ala mutant is activated only slightly, but the Asp mutant is not activated at all. The results strongly indicate that Arg-115 in class III alcohol dehydrogenase is a component of the binding site for activating fatty acids and is critical for the binding of S-hydroxymethylglutathione in glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. PMID:8460164

  9. The active site sulfenic acid ligand in nitrile hydratases can function as a nucleophile.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Salette; Wu, Rui; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Liu, Dali; Holz, Richard

    2014-01-29

    Nitrile hydratase (NHase) catalyzes the hydration of nitriles to their corresponding commercially valuable amides at ambient temperatures and physiological pH. Several reaction mechanisms have been proposed for NHase enzymes; however, the source of the nucleophile remains a mystery. Boronic acids have been shown to be potent inhibitors of numerous hydrolytic enzymes due to the open shell of boron, which allows it to expand from a trigonal planar (sp(2)) form to a tetrahedral form (sp(3)). Therefore, we examined the inhibition of the Co-type NHase from Pseudonocardia thermophila JCM 3095 (PtNHase) by boronic acids via kinetics and X-ray crystallography. Both 1-butaneboronic acid (BuBA) and phenylboronic acid (PBA) function as potent competitive inhibitors of PtNHase. X-ray crystal structures for BuBA and PBA complexed to PtNHase were solved and refined at 1.5, 1.6, and 1.2 Å resolution. The resulting PtNHase-boronic acid complexes represent a "snapshot" of reaction intermediates and implicate the cysteine-sulfenic acid ligand as the catalytic nucleophile, a heretofore unknown role for the αCys(113)-OH sulfenic acid ligand. Based on these data, a new mechanism of action for the hydration of nitriles by NHase is presented.

  10. Conformational transition of FGFR kinase activation revealed by site-specific unnatural amino acid reporter and single molecule FRET

    PubMed Central

    Perdios, Louis; Lowe, Alan R.; Saladino, Giorgio; Bunney, Tom D.; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M. W.; Chin, Jason W.; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Tate, Edward W.; Katan, Matilda

    2017-01-01

    Protein kinases share significant structural similarity; however, structural features alone are insufficient to explain their diverse functions. Thus, bridging the gap between static structure and function requires a more detailed understanding of their dynamic properties. For example, kinase activation may occur via a switch-like mechanism or by shifting a dynamic equilibrium between inactive and active states. Here, we utilize a combination of FRET and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to probe the activation mechanism of the kinase domain of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR). Using genetically-encoded, site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids in regions essential for activation, followed by specific labeling with fluorescent moieties, we generated a novel class of FRET-based reporter to monitor conformational differences corresponding to states sampled by non phosphorylated/inactive and phosphorylated/active forms of the kinase. Single molecule FRET analysis in vitro, combined with MD simulations, shows that for FGFR kinase, there are populations of inactive and active states separated by a high free energy barrier resulting in switch-like activation. Compared to recent studies, these findings support diversity in features of kinases that impact on their activation mechanisms. The properties of these FRET-based constructs will also allow further studies of kinase dynamics as well as applications in vivo. PMID:28045057

  11. Conformational transition of FGFR kinase activation revealed by site-specific unnatural amino acid reporter and single molecule FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdios, Louis; Lowe, Alan R.; Saladino, Giorgio; Bunney, Tom D.; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M. W.; Chin, Jason W.; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Tate, Edward W.; Katan, Matilda

    2017-01-01

    Protein kinases share significant structural similarity; however, structural features alone are insufficient to explain their diverse functions. Thus, bridging the gap between static structure and function requires a more detailed understanding of their dynamic properties. For example, kinase activation may occur via a switch-like mechanism or by shifting a dynamic equilibrium between inactive and active states. Here, we utilize a combination of FRET and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to probe the activation mechanism of the kinase domain of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR). Using genetically-encoded, site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids in regions essential for activation, followed by specific labeling with fluorescent moieties, we generated a novel class of FRET-based reporter to monitor conformational differences corresponding to states sampled by non phosphorylated/inactive and phosphorylated/active forms of the kinase. Single molecule FRET analysis in vitro, combined with MD simulations, shows that for FGFR kinase, there are populations of inactive and active states separated by a high free energy barrier resulting in switch-like activation. Compared to recent studies, these findings support diversity in features of kinases that impact on their activation mechanisms. The properties of these FRET-based constructs will also allow further studies of kinase dynamics as well as applications in vivo.

  12. Amino acid sequence around the active-site serine residue in the acyltransferase domain of goat mammary fatty acid synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, J; Højrup, P; Rasmussen, M M; Roepstorff, P; Knudsen, J

    1985-01-01

    Goat mammary fatty acid synthetase was labelled in the acyltransferase domain by formation of O-ester intermediates by incubation with [1-14C]acetyl-CoA and [2-14C]malonyl-CoA. Tryptic-digest and CNBr-cleavage peptides were isolated and purified by high-performance reverse-phase and ion-exchange liquid chromatography. The sequences of the malonyl- and acetyl-labelled peptides were shown to be identical. The results confirm the hypothesis that both acetyl and malonyl groups are transferred to the mammalian fatty acid synthetase complex by the same transferase. The sequence is compared with those of other fatty acid synthetase transferases. PMID:3922356

  13. Experimental and computational investigation of acetic acid deoxygenation over oxophilic molybdenum carbide: Surface chemistry and active site identity

    SciTech Connect

    Schaidle, Joshua A.; Blackburn, Jeffrey; Farberow, Carrie A.; Nash, Connor; Steirer, K. Xerxes; Clark, Jared; Robichaud, David J.; Ruddy, Daniel A.

    2016-01-21

    Ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) is a promising route for producing fungible biofuels; however, this process requires bifunctional catalysts that favor C–O bond cleavage, activate hydrogen at near atmospheric pressure and high temperature (350–500 °C), and are stable under high-steam, low hydrogen-to-carbon environments. Recently, early transition-metal carbides have been reported to selectively cleave C–O bonds of alcohols, aldehydes, and oxygenated aromatics, yet there is limited understanding of the metal carbide surface chemistry under reaction conditions and the identity of the active sites for deoxygenation. In this study, we evaluated molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) for the deoxygenation of acetic acid, an abundant component of biomass pyrolysis vapors, under ex situ CFP conditions, and we probed the Mo2C surface chemistry, identity of the active sites, and deoxygenation pathways using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  14. Experimental and computational investigation of acetic acid deoxygenation over oxophilic molybdenum carbide: Surface chemistry and active site identity

    DOE PAGES

    Schaidle, Joshua A.; Blackburn, Jeffrey; Farberow, Carrie A.; ...

    2016-01-21

    Ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) is a promising route for producing fungible biofuels; however, this process requires bifunctional catalysts that favor C–O bond cleavage, activate hydrogen at near atmospheric pressure and high temperature (350–500 °C), and are stable under high-steam, low hydrogen-to-carbon environments. Recently, early transition-metal carbides have been reported to selectively cleave C–O bonds of alcohols, aldehydes, and oxygenated aromatics, yet there is limited understanding of the metal carbide surface chemistry under reaction conditions and the identity of the active sites for deoxygenation. In this study, we evaluated molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) for the deoxygenation of acetic acid, anmore » abundant component of biomass pyrolysis vapors, under ex situ CFP conditions, and we probed the Mo2C surface chemistry, identity of the active sites, and deoxygenation pathways using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations.« less

  15. p-Coumaric acid decarboxylase from Lactobacillus plantarum: structural insights into the active site and decarboxylation catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Héctor; Angulo, Iván; de Las Rivas, Blanca; Campillo, Nuria; Páez, Juan A; Muñoz, Rosario; Mancheño, José M

    2010-05-15

    p-Coumaric acid decarboxylases (PDCs) catalyze the nonoxidative decarboxylation of hydroxycinnamic acids to generate the corresponding vinyl derivatives. Despite the biotechnological relevance of PDCs in food industry, their catalytic mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we report insights into the structural basis of catalysis for the homodimeric PDC from Lactobacillus plantarum (LpPDC). The global fold of LpPDC is based on a flattened beta-barrel surrounding an internal cavity. Crystallographic and functional analyses of single-point mutants of residues located within this cavity have permitted identifying a potential substrate-binding pocket and also to provide structural evidences for rearrangements of surface loops so that they can modulate the accessibility to the active site. Finally, combination of the structural and functional data with in silico results enables us to propose a two-step catalytic mechanism for decarboxylation of p-coumaric acid by PDCs where Glu71 is involved in proton transfer, and Tyr18 and Tyr20 are involved in the proper substrate orientation and in the release of the CO(2) product.

  16. Conversion of citrate synthase into citryl-CoA lyase as a result of mutation of the active-site aspartic acid residue to glutamic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Man, W J; Li, Y; O'Connor, C D; Wilton, D C

    1991-01-01

    The active-site aspartic acid residue, Asp-362, of Escherichia coli citrate synthase was changed by site-directed mutagenesis to Glu-362, Asn-362 or Gly-362. Only very low catalytic activity could be detected with the Asp----Asn and Asp----Gly mutations. The Asp----Glu mutation produced an enzyme that expressed about 0.8% of the overall catalytic rate, and the hydrolysis step in the reaction, monitored as citryl-CoA hydrolysis, was inhibited to a similar extent. However, the condensation reaction, measured in the reverse direction as citryl-CoA cleavage to oxaloacetate and acetyl-CoA, was not affected by the mutation, and this citryl-CoA lyase activity was the major catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme. This high condensation activity in an enzyme in which the subsequent hydrolysis step was about 98% inhibited permitted considerable exchange of the methyl protons of acetyl-CoA during catalysis by the mutant enzyme. The Km for oxaloacetate was not significantly altered in the D362E mutant enzyme, whereas the Km for acetyl-CoA was about 5 times lower. A mechanism is proposed in which Asp-362 is involved in the hydrolysis reaction of this enzyme, and not as a base in the deprotonation of acetyl-CoA as recently suggested by others. [Karpusas, Branchaud & Remington (1990) Biochemistry 29, 2213-2219; Alter, Casazza, Zhi, Nemeth, Srere & Evans, (1990) Biochemistry 29, 7557-7563]. PMID:1684105

  17. Analysis of Active-Site Amino-Acid Residues of Human Serum Paraoxonase Using Competitive Substrates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    inhibitor Paraoxonase activity was determined using 0.26-2.6 mM of paraoxon hydrolysis by H115W, competitive inhi- paraoxon (diethyl p- nitrophenyl phosphate ...simultaneously,Tel: +1 410 436 1338 E-mail: douglas.cerasoli@us.army.mil phenyl acetate competitively inhibits paraoxon hydrolysis by HI 15W. Con- versely...has no effect on the ability of F222Y to catalyze the doi:10.1 111/i.1742-4658.2005.04646.x hydrolysis of phenyl acetate, suggesting that the F222Y

  18. Rational Design of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Inhibitors that Act by Covalently Bonding to Two Active Site Residues

    PubMed Central

    Otrubova, Katerina; Brown, Monica; McCormick, Michael S.; Han, Gye W.; O’Neal, Scott T.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Lichtman, Aron H.; Boger, Dale L.

    2013-01-01

    The design and characterization of α-ketoheterocycle fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors are disclosed that additionally and irreversibly target a cysteine (Cys269) found in the enzyme cytosolic port while maintaining the reversible covalent Ser241 attachment responsible for their rapid and initially reversible enzyme inhibition. Two α-ketooxazoles (3 and 4) containing strategically placed electrophiles at the C5 position of the pyridyl substituent of 2 (OL-135) were prepared and examined as inhibitors of FAAH. Consistent with the observed time-dependent non-competitive inhibition, the co-crystal X-ray structure of 3 bound to a humanized variant of rat FAAH revealed that 3 was not only covalently bound to the active site catalytic nucleophile Ser241 as a deprotonated hemiketal, but also to Cys269 through the pyridyl C5-substituent, thus providing an inhibitor with dual covalent attachment in the enzyme active site. In vivo characterization of the prototypical inhibitors in mice demonstrate that they raise endogenous brain levels of FAAH substrates to a greater extent and for a much longer duration (>6 h) than the reversible inhibitor 2, indicating that the inhibitors accumulate and persist in the brain to completely inhibit FAAH for a prolonged period. Consistent with this behavior and the targeted irreversible enzyme inhibition, 3 reversed cold allodynia in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain in mice for a sustained period (>6 h) beyond that observed with the reversible inhibitor 2, providing effects that were unchanged over the 1–6 h time course monitored. PMID:23581831

  19. In Silico Structure Prediction of Human Fatty Acid Synthase-Dehydratase: A Plausible Model for Understanding Active Site Interactions.

    PubMed

    John, Arun; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Samdani, A; Sangeetha, Manoharan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Deepa, Perinkulam Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN, UniProt ID: P49327) is a multienzyme dimer complex that plays a critical role in lipogenesis. Consequently, this lipogenic enzyme has gained tremendous biomedical importance. The role of FASN and its inhibition is being extensively researched in several clinical conditions, such as cancers, obesity, and diabetes. X-ray crystallographic structures of some of its domains, such as β-ketoacyl synthase, acetyl transacylase, malonyl transacylase, enoyl reductase, β-ketoacyl reductase, and thioesterase, (TE) are already reported. Here, we have attempted an in silico elucidation of the uncrystallized dehydratase (DH) catalytic domain of human FASN. This theoretical model for DH domain was predicted using comparative modeling methods. Different stand-alone tools and servers were used to validate and check the reliability of the predicted models, which suggested it to be a highly plausible model. The stereochemical analysis showed 92.0% residues in favorable region of Ramachandran plot. The initial physiological substrate β-hydroxybutyryl group was docked into active site of DH domain using Glide. The molecular dynamics simulations carried out for 20 ns in apo and holo states indicated the stability and accuracy of the predicted structure in solvated condition. The predicted model provided useful biochemical insights into the substrate-active site binding mechanisms. This model was then used for identifying potential FASN inhibitors using high-throughput virtual screening of the National Cancer Institute database of chemical ligands. The inhibitory efficacy of the top hit ligands was validated by performing molecular dynamics simulation for 20 ns, where in the ligand NSC71039 exhibited good enzyme inhibition characteristics and exhibited dose-dependent anticancer cytotoxicity in retinoblastoma cancer cells in vitro.

  20. In Silico Structure Prediction of Human Fatty Acid Synthase–Dehydratase: A Plausible Model for Understanding Active Site Interactions

    PubMed Central

    John, Arun; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Samdani, A.; Sangeetha, Manoharan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Deepa, Perinkulam Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN, UniProt ID: P49327) is a multienzyme dimer complex that plays a critical role in lipogenesis. Consequently, this lipogenic enzyme has gained tremendous biomedical importance. The role of FASN and its inhibition is being extensively researched in several clinical conditions, such as cancers, obesity, and diabetes. X-ray crystallographic structures of some of its domains, such as β-ketoacyl synthase, acetyl transacylase, malonyl transacylase, enoyl reductase, β-ketoacyl reductase, and thioesterase, (TE) are already reported. Here, we have attempted an in silico elucidation of the uncrystallized dehydratase (DH) catalytic domain of human FASN. This theoretical model for DH domain was predicted using comparative modeling methods. Different stand-alone tools and servers were used to validate and check the reliability of the predicted models, which suggested it to be a highly plausible model. The stereochemical analysis showed 92.0% residues in favorable region of Ramachandran plot. The initial physiological substrate β-hydroxybutyryl group was docked into active site of DH domain using Glide. The molecular dynamics simulations carried out for 20 ns in apo and holo states indicated the stability and accuracy of the predicted structure in solvated condition. The predicted model provided useful biochemical insights into the substrate–active site binding mechanisms. This model was then used for identifying potential FASN inhibitors using high-throughput virtual screening of the National Cancer Institute database of chemical ligands. The inhibitory efficacy of the top hit ligands was validated by performing molecular dynamics simulation for 20 ns, where in the ligand NSC71039 exhibited good enzyme inhibition characteristics and exhibited dose-dependent anticancer cytotoxicity in retinoblastoma cancer cells in vitro. PMID:27559295

  1. Newly identified essential amino acid residues affecting ^8-sphingolipid desaturase activity revealed by site-directed mutagenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to identify amino acid residues crucial for the enzymatic activity of ^8-sphingolipid desaturases, a sequence comparison was performed among ^8-sphingolipid desaturases and ^6-fatty acid desaturase from various plants. In addition to the known conserved cytb5 (cytochrome b5) HPGG motif and...

  2. Exploring the role of putative active site amino acids and pro-region motif of recombinant falcipain-2: a principal hemoglobinase of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Dasaradhi, P V N; Chauhan, Virander S; Malhotra, Pawan

    2004-04-23

    Falcipain-2 is one of the principal hemoglobinases of Plasmodium falciparum, a human malaria parasite. It has a typical papain family cysteine protease structural organization, a large pro-domain, a mature domain with conserved active site amino acids. Pro-domain of falcipain-2 also contains two important conserved motifs, "GNFD" and "ERFNIN." The "GNFD" motif has been shown to be responsible for correct folding and stability in case of many papain family proteases. In the present study, we carried out site-directed mutagenesis to assess the roles of active site residues and pro-domain residues for the activity of falcipain-2. Our results showed that substitutions of putative active site residues; Q36, C42, H174, and N204 resulted in complete loss of falcipain-2 activity, while W206 and D155 mutants retained partial/complete activity in comparison to the wild type falcipain-2. Homology modeling data also corroborate the results of mutagenesis; Q36, C42, H174, N204, and W206 residues form the active site loop of the enzyme and D155 lie outside the active pocket. Substitutions in the pro-region did not affect the activity of falcipain-2. This implies that falcipain-2 shares active site residues with other members of papain family, however pro-region of falcipain-2 does not play any role in the activity of enzyme.

  3. List 9 - Active CERCLIS Sites:

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The List 9 displays the sequence of activities undertaken at active CERCLIS sites. An active site is one at which site assessment, removal, remedial, enforcement, cost recovery, or oversight activities are being planned or conducted.

  4. The cooperative effect between active site ionized groups and water desolvation controls the alteration of acid/base catalysis in serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Shokhen, Michael; Khazanov, Netaly; Albeck, Amnon

    2007-08-13

    What is the driving force that alters the catalytic function of His57 in serine proteases between general base and general acid in each step along the enzymatic reaction? The stable tetrahedral complexes (TC) of chymotrypsin with trifluoromethyl ketone transition state analogue inhibitors are topologically similar to the catalytic transition state. Therefore, they can serve as a good model to study the enzyme catalytic reaction. We used DFT quantum mechanical calculations to analyze the effect of solvation and of polar factors in the active site of chymotrypsin on the pKa of the catalytic histidine in FE (the free enzyme), EI (the noncovalent enzyme inhibitor complex), and TC. We demonstrated that the acid/base alteration is controlled by the charged groups in the active site--the catalytic Asp102 carboxylate and the oxyanion. The effect of these groups on the catalytic His is modulated by water solvation of the active site.

  5. Comparative analysis of amino acid composition in the active site of nirk gene encoding copper-containing nitrite reductase (CuNiR) in bacterial spp.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Utpal Kumar; Rahman, M Mizanur

    2017-04-01

    The nirk gene encoding the copper-containing nitrite reductase (CuNiR), a key catalytic enzyme in the environmental denitrification process that helps to produce nitric oxide from nitrite. The molecular mechanism of denitrification process is definitely complex and in this case a theoretical investigation has been conducted to know the sequence information and amino acid composition of the active site of CuNiR enzyme using various Bioinformatics tools. 10 Fasta formatted sequences were retrieved from the NCBI database and the domain and disordered regions identification and phylogenetic analyses were done on these sequences. The comparative modeling of protein was performed through Modeller 9v14 program and visualized by PyMOL tools. Validated protein models were deposited in the Protein Model Database (PMDB) (PMDB id: PM0080150 to PM0080159). Active sites of nirk encoding CuNiR enzyme were identified by Castp server. The PROCHECK showed significant scores for four protein models in the most favored regions of the Ramachandran plot. Active sites and cavities prediction exhibited that the amino acid, namely Glycine, Alanine, Histidine, Aspartic acid, Glutamic acid, Threonine, and Glutamine were common in four predicted protein models. The present in silico study anticipates that active site analyses result will pave the way for further research on the complex denitrification mechanism of the selected species in the experimental laboratory.

  6. Enhancement of the catalytic activity of ferulic acid decarboxylase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 through random and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jiyoung; Jung, Chaewon; Han, Dongfei; Seo, Jiyoung; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Chong, Youhoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2015-11-01

    The enzyme ferulic acid decarboxylase (FADase) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 catalyzes the decarboxylation reaction of lignin monomers and phenolic compounds such as p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid into their corresponding 4-vinyl derivatives, that is, 4-vinylphenol, 4-vinylcatechol, and 4-vinylguaiacol, respectively. Among various ferulic acid decarboxylase enzymes, we chose the FADase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4, whose crystal structure is known, and produced mutants to enhance its catalytic activity by random and site-directed mutagenesis. After three rounds of sequential mutations, FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) showed approximately 34-fold higher catalytic activity than wild-type for the production of 4-vinylguaiacol from ferulic acid. Docking analyses suggested that the increased activity of FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) could be due to formation of compact active site compared with that of the wild-type FADase. Considering the amount of phenolic compounds such as lignin monomers in the biomass components, successfully bioengineered FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 could provide an ecofriendly biocatalytic tool for producing diverse styrene derivatives from biomass.

  7. Active site inhibitors of HCV NS5B polymerase. The development and pharmacophore of 2-thienyl-5,6-dihydroxypyrimidine-4-carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, Ian; Avolio, Salvatore; Colarusso, Stefania; Gennari, Nadia; Narjes, Frank; Pacini, Barbara; Ponzi, Simona; Harper, Steven

    2004-10-18

    5,6-Dihydroxypyrimidine-4-carboxylic acids are a promising series of hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase inhibitors that bind at the active site of the enzyme. Here we report a simple 2-thienyl substituted analogue that shows 10-fold improved activity over the original lead, and which allowed us to further delineate the key elements of the pharmacophore of this class of inhibitor. This work led to the identification of a trifluoromethyl acylsulfonamide group as a viable replacement for the C4 carboxylic acid in this series.

  8. Introduction of lewis acidic and redox-active sites into a porous framework for ammonia capture with visual color response.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bin; Chen, Cheng; Cai, Li-Xuan; Zhang, Ya-Jun; Huang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Jie

    2015-04-06

    Based on the Lewis acidic site and redox ability of bipyridinium ligand, a porous framework with an adsorption advantage for ammonia over water and color response ability has been constructed. The compound is highly stable and flexible to external stimuli, exhibiting reversible single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations, in response to temperature change and NH3 capture. More attractively, the title compound shows obvious color change from yellow to dark blue when exposed to ammonia vapor within just a few seconds, indicating a strong ability to function as a visual colorimetric absorbent for ammonia.

  9. Active-Site Engineering of ω-Transaminase for Production of Unnatural Amino Acids Carrying a Side Chain Bulkier than an Ethyl Substituent

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang-Woo; Park, Eul-Soo; Dong, Joo-Young

    2015-01-01

    ω-Transaminase (ω-TA) is a promising enzyme for use in the production of unnatural amino acids from keto acids using cheap amino donors such as isopropylamine. The small substrate-binding pocket of most ω-TAs permits entry of substituents no larger than an ethyl group, which presents a significant challenge to the preparation of structurally diverse unnatural amino acids. Here we report on the engineering of an (S)-selective ω-TA from Ochrobactrum anthropi (OATA) to reduce the steric constraint and thereby allow the small pocket to readily accept bulky substituents. On the basis of a docking model in which l-alanine was used as a ligand, nine active-site residues were selected for alanine scanning mutagenesis. Among the resulting variants, an L57A variant showed dramatic activity improvements in activity for α-keto acids and α-amino acids carrying substituents whose bulk is up to that of an n-butyl substituent (e.g., 48- and 56-fold increases in activity for 2-oxopentanoic acid and l-norvaline, respectively). An L57G mutation also relieved the steric constraint but did so much less than the L57A mutation did. In contrast, an L57V substitution failed to induce the improvements in activity for bulky substrates. Molecular modeling suggested that the alanine substitution of L57, located in a large pocket, induces an altered binding orientation of an α-carboxyl group and thereby provides more room to the small pocket. The synthetic utility of the L57A variant was demonstrated by carrying out the production of optically pure l- and d-norvaline (i.e., enantiomeric excess [ee] > 99%) by asymmetric amination of 2-oxopantanoic acid and kinetic resolution of racemic norvaline, respectively. PMID:26231640

  10. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein: nucleotide sequence of mRNA, identification of cleavage activation site and amino acid sequence of N-terminus of F1 subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Elango, N; Satake, M; Coligan, J E; Norrby, E; Camargo, E; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein (Fo) was deduced from the sequence of a partial cDNA clone of mRNA and from the 5' mRNA sequence obtained by primer extension and dideoxysequencing. The encoded protein of 574 amino acids is extremely hydrophobic and has a molecular weight of 63371 daltons. The site of proteolytic cleavage within this protein was accurately mapped by determining a partial amino acid sequence of the N-terminus of the larger subunit (F1) purified by radioimmunoprecipitation using monoclonal antibodies. Alignment of the N-terminus of the F1 subunit within the deduced amino acid sequence of Fo permitted us to identify a sequence of lys-lys-arg-lys-arg-arg at the C-terminus of the smaller N-terminal F2 subunit that appears to represent the cleavage/activation domain. Five potential sites of glycosylation, four within the F2 subunit, were also identified. Three extremely hydrophobic domains are present in the protein; a) the N-terminal signal sequence, b) the N-terminus of the F1 subunit that is analogous to the N-terminus of the paramyxovirus F1 subunit and the HA2 subunit of influenza virus hemagglutinin, and c) the putative membrane anchorage domain near the C-terminus of F1. Images PMID:2987829

  11. Identification of Active and Spectator Sn Sites in Sn-β Following Solid-State Stannation, and Consequences for Lewis Acid Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Ceri; Padovan, Daniele; Al-Nayili, Abbas; Wells, Peter P; Gibson, Emma K; Dimitratos, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Lewis acidic zeolites are rapidly emerging liquid-phase Lewis acid catalysts. Nevertheless, their inefficient synthesis procedure currently prohibits greater utilization and exploitation of these promising materials. Herein, we demonstrate that SnIV-containing zeolite beta can readily be prepared both selectively and extremely rapidly by solid-state incorporation (SSI) method. Through a combination of spectroscopic (XRD, UV/Vis, X-ray absorption, magic-angle spinning NMR, and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy) studies, we unambiguously demonstrate that site-isolated, isomorphously substituted SnIV sites dominate the Sn population up to a loading of 5 wt % Sn. These sites are identical to those found in conventionally prepared Sn-beta, and result in our SSI material exhibiting identical levels of intrinsic activity (that is, turnover frequency) despite the threefold increase in Sn loading, and the extremely rapid and benign nature of our preparation methodology. We also identify the presence of spectator sites, in the form of SnIV oligomers, at higher levels of Sn loading. The consequences of this mixed population with regards to catalysis (Meerwein–Pondorf–Verley reaction and glucose isomerization) are also identified. PMID:26583051

  12. Mutational analysis of the three cysteines and active-site aspartic acid 103 of ketosteroid isomerase from Pseudomonas putida biotype B.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S W; Joo, S; Choi, G; Cho, H S; Oh, B H; Choi, K Y

    1997-01-01

    In order to clarify the roles of three cysteines in ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) from Pseudomonas putida biotype B, each of the cysteine residues has been changed to a serine residue (C69S, C81S, and C97S) by site-directed mutagenesis. All cysteine mutations caused only a slight decrease in the k(cat) value, with no significant change of Km for the substrate. Even modification of the sulfhydryl group with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) has almost no effect on enzyme activity. These results demonstrate that none of the cysteines in the KSI from P. putida is critical for catalytic activity, contrary to the previous identification of a cysteine in an active-site-directed photoinactivation study of KSI. Based on the three-dimensional structures of KSIs with and without dienolate intermediate analog equilenin, as determined by X-ray crystallography at high resolution, Asp-103 was found to be located within the range of the hydrogen bond to the equilenin. To assess the role of Asp-103 in catalysis, Asp-103 has been replaced with either asparagine (D103N) or alanine (D103A) by site-directed mutagenesis. For D103A mutant KSI there was a significant decrease in the k(cat) value: the k(cat) of the mutant was 85-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme; however, for the D103N mutant, which retained some hydrogen bonding capability, there was a minor decrease in the k(cat) value. These findings support the idea that aspartic acid 103 in the active site is an essential catalytic residue involved in catalysis by hydrogen bonding to the dienolate intermediate. PMID:9401033

  13. Non-coding nucleotides and amino acids near the active site regulate peptide deformylase expression and inhibitor susceptibility in Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiaofeng; Pachikara, Niseema D.; Oey, Christopher B.; Balakrishnan, Amit; Westblade, Lars F.; Tan, Ming; Chase, Theodore; Nickels, Bryce E.

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis, an obligate intracellular bacterium, is a highly prevalent human pathogen. Hydroxamic-acid-based matrix metalloprotease inhibitors can effectively inhibit the pathogen both in vitro and in vivo, and have exhibited therapeutic potential. Here, we provide genome sequencing data indicating that peptide deformylase (PDF) is the sole target of the inhibitors in this organism. We further report molecular mechanisms that control chlamydial PDF (cPDF) expression and inhibition efficiency. In particular, we identify the σ66-dependent promoter that controls cPDF gene expression and demonstrate that point mutations in this promoter lead to resistance by increasing cPDF transcription. Furthermore, we show that substitution of two amino acids near the active site of the enzyme alters enzyme kinetics and protein stability. PMID:21719536

  14. Binding of 3,4,5,6-Tetrahydroxyazepanes to the Acid-[beta]-glucosidase Active Site: Implications for Pharmacological Chaperone Design for Gaucher Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Orwig, Susan D.; Tan, Yun Lei; Grimster, Neil P.; Yu, Zhanqian; Powers, Evan T.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Lieberman, Raquel L.

    2013-03-07

    Pharmacologic chaperoning is a therapeutic strategy being developed to improve the cellular folding and trafficking defects associated with Gaucher disease, a lysosomal storage disorder caused by point mutations in the gene encoding acid-{beta}-glucosidase (GCase). In this approach, small molecules bind to and stabilize mutant folded or nearly folded GCase in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), increasing the concentration of folded, functional GCase trafficked to the lysosome where the mutant enzyme can hydrolyze the accumulated substrate. To date, the pharmacologic chaperone (PC) candidates that have been investigated largely have been active site-directed inhibitors of GCase, usually containing five- or six-membered rings, such as modified azasugars. Here we show that a seven-membered, nitrogen-containing heterocycle (3,4,5,6-tetrahydroxyazepane) scaffold is also promising for generating PCs for GCase. Crystal structures reveal that the core azepane stabilizes GCase in a variation of its proposed active conformation, whereas binding of an analogue with an N-linked hydroxyethyl tail stabilizes GCase in a conformation in which the active site is covered, also utilizing a loop conformation not seen previously. Although both compounds preferentially stabilize GCase to thermal denaturation at pH 7.4, reflective of the pH in the ER, only the core azepane, which is a mid-micromolar competitive inhibitor, elicits a modest increase in enzyme activity for the neuronopathic G202R and the non-neuronopathic N370S mutant GCase in an intact cell assay. Our results emphasize the importance of the conformational variability of the GCase active site in the design of competitive inhibitors as PCs for Gaucher disease.

  15. Site- and kinase-specific phosphorylation-mediated activation of SLAC1, a guard cell anion channel stimulated by abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Maierhofer, Tobias; Diekmann, Marion; Offenborn, Jan Niklas; Lind, Christof; Bauer, Hubert; Hashimoto, Kenji; S Al-Rasheid, Khaled A; Luan, Sheng; Kudla, Jörg; Geiger, Dietmar; Hedrich, Rainer

    2014-09-09

    Under drought stress, abscisic acid (ABA) triggers closure of leaf cell pores called stomata, which are formed by two specialized cells called guard cells in plant epidermis. Two pathways downstream of ABA stimulate phosphorylation of the S-type anion channels SLAC1 (slow anion channel associated 1) and SLAH3 (SLAC1 homolog 3), which causes these channels to open, reducing guard cell volume and triggering stomatal closure. One branch involves OST1 (open stomata 1), a calcium-independent SnRK2-type kinase, and the other branch involves calcium-dependent protein kinases of the CPK (calcium-dependent protein kinase) family. We used coexpression analyses in Xenopus oocytes to show that the calcineurin B-like (CBL) calcium sensors CBL1 and CBL9 and their interacting protein kinase CIPK23 also triggered SLAC1 and SLAH3 opening. We analyzed whether regulation of SLAC1 opening by these different families of kinases involved the same or different sites on SLAC1 by measuring channel conductance of SLAC1 with mutations in the putative phosphorylation sites in the amino or carboxyl termini coexpressed with specific kinases in Xenopus oocytes. SLAC1 mutants lacking the OST1-phosphorylated site were still activated by CPK or by CBL/CIPK complexes. Phosphorylation and activation of SLAC1 by any of the kinases were inhibited by the phosphatase ABI1 (ABA insensitive 1), which is inactivated in response to ABA signaling. These findings identified CBL/CIPK complexes as potential regulators of stomatal aperture through S-type anion channels and indicated that phosphorylation at distinct sites enables SLAC1 activation by both calcium-dependent and calcium-independent pathways downstream of ABA.

  16. Probing catalysis by Escherichia coli dTDP-glucose-4,6-dehydratase: identification and preliminary characterization of functional amino acid residues at the active site.

    PubMed

    Hegeman, A D; Gross, J W; Frey, P A

    2001-06-05

    A model of the Escherichia coli dTDP-glucose-4,6-dehydratase (4,6-dehydratase) active site has been generated by combining amino acid sequence alignment information with the 3-dimensional structure of UDP-galactose-4-epimerase. The active site configuration is consistent with the partially refined 3-dimensional structure of 4,6-dehydratase, which lacks substrate-nucleotide but contains NAD(+) (PDB file ). From the model, two groups of active site residues were identified. The first group consists of Asp135(DEH), Glu136(DEH), Glu198(DEH), Lys199(DEH), and Tyr301(DEH). These residues are near the substrate-pyranose binding pocket in the model, they are completely conserved in 4,6-dehydratase, and they differ from the corresponding equally well-conserved residues in 4-epimerase. The second group of residues is Cys187(DEH), Asn190(DEH), and His232(DEH), which form a motif on the re face of the cofactor nicotinamide binding pocket that resembles the catalytic triad of cysteine-proteases. The importance of both groups of residues was tested by mutagenesis and steady-state kinetic analysis. In all but one case, a decrease in catalytic efficiency of approximately 2 orders of magnitude below wild-type activity was observed. Mutagenesis of each of these residues, with the exception of Cys187(DEH), which showed near-wild-type activity, clearly has important negative consequences for catalysis. The allocation of specific functions to these residues and the absolute magnitude of these effects are obscured by the complex chemistry in this multistep mechanism. Tools will be needed to characterize each chemical step individually in order to assign loss of catalytic efficiency to specific residue functions. To this end, the effects of each of these variants on the initial dehydrogenation step were evaluated using a the substrate analogue dTDP-xylose. Additional steady-state techniques were employed in an attempt to further limit the assignment of rate limitation. The results are

  17. Probing the Active Site of MIO-dependent Aminomutases, Key Catalysts in the Biosynthesis of amino Acids Incorporated in Secondary Metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, H.; Bruner, S

    2010-01-01

    The tyrosine aminomutase SgTAM produces (S)-{beta}-tyrosine from L-tyrosine in the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027. This conversion is promoted by the methylideneimidazole-5-one (MIO) prosthetic group. MIO was first identified in the homologous family of ammonia lyases, which deaminate aromatic amino acids to form {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carboxylates. Studies of substrate specificity have been described for lyases but there have been limited reports in altering the substrate specificity of aminomutases. Furthermore, it remains unclear as to what structural properties are responsible for catalyzing the presumed readdition of the amino group into the {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated intermediates to form {beta}-amino acids. Attempts to elucidate specificity and mechanistic determinants of SgTAM have also proved to be difficult as it is recalcitrant to perturbations to the active site via mutagenesis. An X-ray cocrystal structure of the SgTAM mutant of the catalytic base with L-tyrosine verified important substrate binding residues as well as the enzymatic base. Further mutagenesis revealed that removal of these crucial interactions renders the enzyme inactive. Proposed structural determinants for mutase activity probed via mutagenesis, time-point assays and X-ray crystallography revealed a complicated role for these residues in maintaining key quaternary structure properties that aid in catalysis.

  18. A replacement of the active-site aspartic acid residue 293 in mouse cathepsin D affects its intracellular stability, processing and transport in HEK-293 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, Sanna; Storch, Stephan; Löffler, Hans-Gerhard; Hasilik, Andrej; Tyynelä, Jaana; Braulke, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The substitution of an active-site aspartic acid residue by asparagine in the lysosomal protease cathepsin D (CTSD) results in a loss of enzyme activity and severe cerebrocortical atrophy in a novel form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in sheep [Tyynelä, Sohar, Sleat, Gin, Donnelly, Baumann, Haltia and Lobel (2000) EMBO J. 19, 2786-2792]. In the present study we have introduced the corresponding mutation by replacing aspartic acid residue 293 with asparagine (D293N) into the mouse CTSD cDNA to analyse its effect on synthesis, transport and stability in transfected HEK-293 cells. The complete inactivation of mutant D293N mouse CTSD was confirmed by a newly developed fluorimetric quantification system. Moreover, in the heterologous overexpression systems used, mutant D293N mouse CTSD was apparently unstable and proteolytically modified during early steps of the secretory pathway, resulting in a loss of mass by about 1 kDa. In the affected sheep, the endogenous mutant enzyme was stable but also showed the shift in its molecular mass. In HEK-293 cells, the transport of the mutant D293N mouse CTSD to the lysosome was delayed and associated with a low secretion rate compared with wild-type CTSD. These data suggest that the mutation may result in a conformational change which affects stability, processing and transport of the enzyme. PMID:12350228

  19. [Structural regularities in activated cleavage sites of thrombin receptors].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlik, I V; Verevka, S V

    1999-01-01

    Comparison of thrombin receptors activation splitting sites sequences testifies to their similarity both in activation splitting sites of protein precursors and protein proteinase inhibitors reactive sites. In all these sites corresponded to effectory sites P2'-positions are placed by hydrophobic amino-acids only. The regularity defined conforms with previous thesis about the role of effectory S2'-site in regulation of the processes mediated by serine proteinases.

  20. The roles of active-site residues in the catalytic mechanism of trans-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase: a kinetic, NMR, and mutational analysis.

    PubMed

    Azurmendi, Hugo F; Wang, Susan C; Massiah, Michael A; Poelarends, Gerrit J; Whitman, Christian P; Mildvan, Albert S

    2004-04-13

    trans-3-Chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (CaaD) converts trans-3-chloroacrylic acid to malonate semialdehyde by the addition of H(2)O to the C-2, C-3 double bond, followed by the loss of HCl from the C-3 position. Sequence similarity between CaaD, an (alphabeta)(3) heterohexamer (molecular weight 47,547), and 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), an (alpha)(6) homohexamer, distinguishes CaaD from those hydrolytic dehalogenases that form alkyl-enzyme intermediates. The recently solved X-ray structure of CaaD demonstrates that betaPro-1 (i.e., Pro-1 of the beta subunit), alphaArg-8, alphaArg-11, and alphaGlu-52 are at or near the active site, and the >or=10(3.4)-fold decreases in k(cat) on mutating these residues implicate them as mechanistically important. The effect of pH on k(cat)/K(m) indicates a catalytic base with a pK(a) of 7.6 and an acid with a pK(a) of 9.2. NMR titration of (15)N-labeled wild-type CaaD yielded pK(a) values of 9.3 and 11.1 for the N-terminal prolines, while the fully active but unstable alphaP1A mutant showed a pK(a) of 9.7 (for the betaPro-1), implicating betaPro-1 as the acid catalyst, which may protonate C-2 of the substrate. These results provide the first evidence for an amino-terminal proline, conserved in all known tautomerase superfamily members, functioning as a general acid, rather than as a general base as in 4-OT. Hence, a reasonable candidate for the general base in CaaD is the active site residue alphaGlu-52. CaaD has 10 arginine residues, six in the alpha-subunit (Arg-8, Arg-11, Arg-17, Arg-25, Arg-35, and Arg-43), and four in the beta-subunit (Arg-15, Arg-21, Arg-55, and Arg-65). (1)H-(15)N-heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra of CaaD showed seven to nine Arg-NepsilonH resonances (denoted R(A) to R(I)) depending on the protein concentration and pH. One of these signals (R(D)) disappeared in the spectrum of the largely inactive alphaR11A mutant (deltaH = 7.11 ppm, deltaN = 89.5 ppm), and another one (R

  1. Synergistic transcriptional activation of the mouse urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) gene and of its enhancer activator protein 1 (AP1) site by cAMP and retinoic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Mira-Y-Lopez, R; Jaramillo, S; Jing, Y

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism whereby all-trans retinoic acid (tRA) potentiates the 8-bromo-cAMP (8-BrcAMP)-dependent transcription of the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) gene in SC115 mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Photoaffinity labelling experiments showed that tRA did not alter the cellular content of cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunits I and II. In agreement with this, nuclear run-on analysis in the presence of the translational inhibitor puromycin demonstrated that the effect of 8-BrcAMP and its potentiation by tRA were independent of protein synthesis. A transiently transfected 6.6 kb uPA 5'-flanking region-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) fusion gene mimicked the response of the endogenous uPA gene. Thus 1 mM 8-BrcAMP induced a 100-200% increase in CAT content, 100 nM tRA had no effect and 100 nM tRA+1 mM 8-BrcAMP induced a 300-500% increase in cells co-transfected with tRA receptor and/or 9-cis-RA receptor. Analysis of 5'-deleted constructs showed that the tRA effect required at least two cis regions: -2657 to -2186, encompassing the 100 bp uPA enhancer, and -709 to -324, which exhibited silencing activity. Neither region contained a tRA-response element-like motif. Because tRA receptor and 9-cis-RA receptor interact with activator protein 1 (AP1), we tested whether tRA regulated the uPA enhancer AP1 site in the presence of 8-BrcAMP. We found that a dimer of this site fused to a minimal uPA-CAT fusion gene was responsive to 1 mM 8-BrcAMP (100% CAT increase), not responsive to 100 nM tRA, and synergistically responsive to 100 nM tRA+1 mM 8-BrcAMP (240% CAT increase) in cells co-transfected with Fos and Jun. Synergistic activation of the same construct and of the 6.6 kb uPA-CAT fusion gene was also obtained using tRA and 100 nM PMA. We conclude that multiple cis elements, probably including the uPA enhancer AP1 site, mediate the tRA potentiation of uPA transcription. PMID:9560322

  2. Synthesis of Site-Specifically (13)C Labeled Linoleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Offenbacher, Adam R; Zhu, Hui; Klinman, Judith P

    2016-10-12

    Soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1) catalyzes the C-H abstraction from the reactive carbon (C-11) in linoleic acid as the first and rate-determining step in the formation of alkylhydroperoxides. While previous labeling strategies have focused on deuterium labeling to ascertain the primary and secondary kinetic isotope effects for this reaction, there is an emerging interest and need for selectively enriched (13)C isotopologues. In this report, we present synthetic strategies for site-specific (13)C labeled linoleic acid substrates. We take advantage of a Corey-Fuchs formyl to terminal (13)C-labeled alkyne conversion, using (13)CBr4 as the labeling source, to reduce the number of steps from a previous fatty acid (13)C synthetic labeling approach. The labeled linoleic acid substrates are useful as nuclear tunneling markers and for extracting active site geometries of the enzyme-substrate complex in lipoxygenase.

  3. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Active site directed irreversible inactivation of brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase by the conjugated substrate analogue (E)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid: development of a suicide substrate.

    PubMed

    Kuo, D J; Jordan, F

    1983-08-02

    (E)-4-(4-Chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid (CPB) was found to irreversibly inactivate brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC, EC 4.1.1.1) in a biphasic, sigmoidal manner, as is found for the kinetic behavior of substrate. An expression was derived for two-site irreversible inhibition of allosteric enzymes, and the kinetic behavior of CPB fit the expression for two-site binding. The calculated Ki's of 0.7 mM and 0.3 mM for CPB were assigned to the catalytic site and the regulatory site, respectively. The presence of pyruvic acid at high concentrations protected PDC from inactivation, whereas low concentrations of pyruvic acid accelerated inactivation by CPB. Pyruvamide, a known allosteric activator of PDC, was found to enhance inactivation by CPB. The results can be explained if pyruvamide binds only to a regulatory site, but CPB and pyruvic acid compete for both the regulatory and the catalytic centers. [1-14C]CPB was found to lose 14CO2 concurrently with the inactivation of the enzyme. Therefore, CPB was being turned over by PDC, in addition to inactivating it. CPB can be labeled a suicide-type inactivator for PDC.

  5. Action at a distance: amino acid substitutions that affect binding of the phosphorylated CheY response regulator and catalysis of dephosphorylation can be far from the CheZ phosphatase active site.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Ashalla M; Mole, Beth M; Silversmith, Ruth E; Bourret, Robert B

    2011-09-01

    Two-component regulatory systems, in which phosphorylation controls the activity of a response regulator protein, provide signal transduction in bacteria. For example, the phosphorylated CheY response regulator (CheYp) controls swimming behavior. In Escherichia coli, the chemotaxis phosphatase CheZ stimulates the dephosphorylation of CheYp. CheYp apparently binds first to the C terminus of CheZ and then binds to the active site where dephosphorylation occurs. The phosphatase activity of the CheZ(2) dimer exhibits a positively cooperative dependence on CheYp concentration, apparently because the binding of the first CheYp to CheZ(2) is inhibited compared to the binding of the second CheYp. Thus, CheZ phosphatase activity is reduced at low CheYp concentrations. The CheZ21IT gain-of-function substitution, located far from either the CheZ active site or C-terminal CheY binding site, enhances CheYp binding and abolishes cooperativity. To further explore mechanisms regulating CheZ activity, we isolated 10 intragenic suppressor mutations of cheZ21IT that restored chemotaxis. The suppressor substitutions were located along the central portion of CheZ and were not allele specific. Five suppressor mutants tested biochemically diminished the binding of CheYp and/or the catalysis of dephosphorylation, even when the suppressor substitutions were distant from the active site. One suppressor mutant also restored cooperativity to CheZ21IT. Consideration of results from this and previous studies suggests that the binding of CheYp to the CheZ active site (not to the C terminus) is rate limiting and leads to cooperative phosphatase activity. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions distant from the active site can affect CheZ catalytic activity and CheYp binding, perhaps via the propagation of structural or dynamic perturbations through a helical bundle.

  6. Support Effects on Bronsted acid site densities and alcohol dehydration turnover rates on tungsten oxide domains

    SciTech Connect

    Macht, Josef; Baertsch, Chelsey D.; May-Lozano, Marcos; Soled, Stuart L.; Wang, Yong; Iglesia, Enrique

    2005-03-01

    Initial activity and acid site density of several WAl, WSi (MCM41) and one WSn sample were determined. Trans/cis 2-butene selectivity is dependent on the support. Presumably, these differences are due to subtle differences in base strengths. 2-Butanol dehydration rates (per W-atom) reached maximum values at intermediate WOx surface densities on WAl, as reported for 2-butanol dehydration reactions on WZr. Titration results indicate that Bronsted acid sites are required for 2-butanol dehydration on WAl, WSi and WSn. UV-visible studies suggest that WAl is much more difficult to reduce than WZr. The detection of reduced centers on WAl, the number of which correlates to Bronsted acid site density and catalyst activity, as well as the temperature dependence of Bronsted acid site density indicate the in-situ formation of these active sites. We infer that this mechanism is common among all supported WOx samples described in this study. Turnover rates are a function of Bronsted acid site density only. High acid site densities lead to high turnover rates. Higher active site densities may cause stronger conjugate bases, as a higher electron density has to be stabilized, and thus weaker acidity, enabling a faster rate of product desorption. The maximum achievable active site density is dependent on the support. WZr reaches a higher active site density than WAl.

  7. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of a Copper-Binding Mutant of the Organomercurial Lyase MerB: Insight into the Key Role of the Active Site Aspartic Acid in Hg-Carbon Bond Cleavage and Metal Binding Specificity.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Haytham M; Lecoq, Lauriane; Stevenson, Michael; Mansour, Ahmed; Cappadocia, Laurent; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Sygusch, Jurgen; Wilcox, Dean E; Omichinski, James G

    2016-02-23

    In bacterial resistance to mercury, the organomercurial lyase (MerB) plays a key role in the detoxification pathway through its ability to cleave Hg-carbon bonds. Two cysteines (C96 and C159; Escherichia coli MerB numbering) and an aspartic acid (D99) have been identified as the key catalytic residues, and these three residues are conserved in all but four known MerB variants, where the aspartic acid is replaced with a serine. To understand the role of the active site serine, we characterized the structure and metal binding properties of an E. coli MerB mutant with a serine substituted for D99 (MerB D99S) as well as one of the native MerB variants containing a serine residue in the active site (Bacillus megaterium MerB2). Surprisingly, the MerB D99S protein copurified with a bound metal that was determined to be Cu(II) from UV-vis absorption, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron paramagnetic resonance studies. X-ray structural studies revealed that the Cu(II) is bound to the active site cysteine residues of MerB D99S, but that it is displaced following the addition of either an organomercurial substrate or an ionic mercury product. In contrast, the B. megaterium MerB2 protein does not copurify with copper, but the structure of the B. megaterium MerB2-Hg complex is highly similar to the structure of the MerB D99S-Hg complexes. These results demonstrate that the active site aspartic acid is crucial for both the enzymatic activity and metal binding specificity of MerB proteins and suggest a possible functional relationship between MerB and its only known structural homologue, the copper-binding protein NosL.

  8. Use of H2S to Probe the Active Sites in FeNC Catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) in Acidic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Deepika; Mamtani, Kuldeep; Bruening, Christopher R.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Ozkan, Umit S.

    2014-10-01

    H2S has been used as a probe molecule both in an “in situ” poisoning experiment and in intermediate-temperature heat-treatment steps during and after the preparation of FeNC catalysts in an attempt to analyze its effect on their ORR activity. The heat treatments were employed either on the ball-milled precursor of FeNC or after the Ar-NH3 high temperature heat treatments. ORR activity of the H2S-treated catalysts was seen to be significantly lower than the sulfur-free catalysts, whether the sulfur exposure was during a half-cell testing, or as an intermediate-temperature exposure to H2S. The incorporation of sulfur species and interaction of Fe with sulfur were confirmed by characterization using XPS, EXAFS, TPO, and TPD. This study provides crucial evidence regarding differences in active sites in FeNC versus nitrogen-containing carbon nanostructured (CNx) catalysts.

  9. Normal Modes Expose Active Sites in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Glantz-Gashai, Yitav; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of active sites is an important tool in bioinformatics. Here we present an improved structure based technique to expose active sites that is based on large changes of solvent accessibility accompanying normal mode dynamics. The technique which detects EXPOsure of active SITes through normal modEs is named EXPOSITE. The technique is trained using a small 133 enzyme dataset and tested using a large 845 enzyme dataset, both with known active site residues. EXPOSITE is also tested in a benchmark protein ligand dataset (PLD) comprising 48 proteins with and without bound ligands. EXPOSITE is shown to successfully locate the active site in most instances, and is found to be more accurate than other structure-based techniques. Interestingly, in several instances, the active site does not correspond to the largest pocket. EXPOSITE is advantageous due to its high precision and paves the way for structure based prediction of active site in enzymes. PMID:28002427

  10. Kinetic analysis of Escherichia coli 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate cytidyltransferase, wild type and mutants, reveals roles of active site amino acids.

    PubMed

    Richard, Stéphane B; Lillo, Antonietta M; Tetzlaff, Charles N; Bowman, Marianne E; Noel, Joseph P; Cane, David E

    2004-09-28

    Escherichia coli 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate cytidyltransferase (YgbP or IspD) catalyzes the conversion of 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) and cytidine triphosphate (CTP) to 4-diphosphocytidyl-2-C-methylerythritol (CDPME). Pulse chase experiments established that the reaction involves an ordered sequential mechanism with mandatory initial binding of CTP. On the basis of analysis of the previously reported crystal structures of apo-YgbP as well as YgbP complexed with both CTP.Mg(2+) and CDPME.Mg(2+) [Richard, S. B., Bowman, M. E., Kwiatkowski, W., Kang, I., Chow, C., Lillo, A. M., Cane, D. E., and Noel, J. P. (2001) Nat. Struct. Biol. 8, 641-648], a group of active site residues were selected for site-directed mutagenesis and steady-state kinetic analysis. Both Lys27 and Lys213 were shown to be essential to catalytic activity, consistent with their proposed role in stabilization of a pentacoordinate phosphate transition state resulting from in-line attack of the MEP phosphate on the alpha-phosphate of CTP. In addition, Thr140, Arg109, Asp106, and Thr165 were all shown to play critical roles in the binding and proper orientation of the MEP substrate.

  11. His-65 in the proton–sucrose symporter is an essential amino acid whose modification with site-directed mutagenesis increases transport activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jade M.-Y.; Bush, Daniel R.

    1998-01-01

    The proton–sucrose symporter that mediates phloem loading is a key component of assimilate partitioning in many higher plants. Previous biochemical investigations showed that a diethyl pyrocarbonate-sensitive histidine residue is at or near the substrate-binding site of the symporter. Among the proton–sucrose symporters cloned to date, only the histidine residue at position 65 of AtSUC1 from Arabidopsis thaliana is conserved across species. To test whether His-65 is involved in the transport reaction, we have used site-directed mutagenesis and functional expression in yeast to determine the significance of this residue in the reaction mechanism. Symporters with mutations at His-65 exhibited a range of activities; for example, the H65C mutant resulted in the complete loss of transport capacity, whereas H65Q was almost as active as wild type. Surprisingly, the H65K and H65R symporters transport sucrose at significantly higher rates (increased Vmax) than the wild-type symporter, suggesting His-65 may be associated with a rate-limiting step in the transport reaction. RNA gel blot and protein blot analyses showed that, with the exception of H65C, the variation in transport activity was not because of alterations in steady-state levels of mRNA or symporter protein. Significantly, those symporters with substitutions of His-65 that remained transport competent were no longer sensitive to inactivation by diethyl pyrocarbonate, demonstrating that this is the inhibitor-sensitive histidine residue. Taken together with our previous results, these data show that His-65 is involved in sucrose binding, and increased rates of transport implicate this region of the protein in the transport reaction. PMID:9671798

  12. Layered materials with coexisting acidic and basic sites for catalytic one-pot reaction sequences.

    PubMed

    Motokura, Ken; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2009-06-17

    Acidic montmorillonite-immobilized primary amines (H-mont-NH(2)) were found to be excellent acid-base bifunctional catalysts for one-pot reaction sequences, which are the first materials with coexisting acid and base sites active for acid-base tamdem reactions. For example, tandem deacetalization-Knoevenagel condensation proceeded successfully with the H-mont-NH(2), affording the corresponding condensation product in a quantitative yield. The acidity of the H-mont-NH(2) was strongly influenced by the preparation solvent, and the base-catalyzed reactions were enhanced by interlayer acid sites.

  13. Controlled Orientation of Active Sites in a Nanostructured Multienzyme Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Yang, Byungseop; Jung, Younghan; Cha, Jaehyun; Cho, Jinhwan; Choi, Eun-Sil; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-01-01

    Multistep cascade reactions in nature maximize reaction efficiency by co-assembling related enzymes. Such organization facilitates the processing of intermediates by downstream enzymes. Previously, the studies on multienzyme nanocomplexes assembled on DNA scaffolds demonstrated that closer interenzyme distance enhances the overall reaction efficiency. However, it remains unknown how the active site orientation controlled at nanoscale can have an effect on multienzyme reaction. Here, we show that controlled alignment of active sites promotes the multienzyme reaction efficiency. By genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and two compatible bioorthogonal chemistries, we conjugated mannitol dehydrogenase to formate dehydrogenase with the defined active site arrangement with the residue-level accuracy. The study revealed that the multienzyme complex with the active sites directed towards each other exhibits four-fold higher relative efficiency enhancement in the cascade reaction and produces 60% more D-mannitol than the other complex with active sites directed away from each other. PMID:28004799

  14. Determination of the Substrate Binding Mode to the Active Site Iron of (S)-2-Hydroxypropylphosphonic Acid Epoxidase Using 17O-Enriched Substrates and Substrate Analogues†

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Feng; Moon, Sung-Ju; Liu, Pinghua; Zhao, Zongbao; Lipscomb, John D.; Liu, Aimin; Liu, Hung-wen

    2009-01-01

    (S)-2-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid epoxidase (HppE) is an O2-dependent, nonheme Fe(II)-containing oxidase that converts (S)-2-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid ((S)-HPP) to the regio-and enantiomerically specific epoxide, fosfomycin. Use of (R)-2-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid ((R)-HPP) yields the 2-keto-adduct rather than the epoxide. Here we report the chemical synthesis of a range of HPP analogs designed to probe the basis for this specificity. In past studies, NO has been used as an O2 surrogate to provide an EPR probe of the Fe(II) environment. These studies suggest that O2 binds to the iron, and substrates bind in a single orientation that strongly perturbs the iron environment. Recently, the X-ray crystal structure showed direct binding of the substrate to the iron, but both monodentate (via the phosphonate) and chelated (via the hydroxyl and phosphonate) orientations were observed. In the current study, hyperfine broadening of the homogeneous S = 3/2 EPR spectrum of the HppE-NO-HPP complex was observed when either the hydroxyl or the phosphonate group of HPP was enriched with 17O (I = 5/2). These results indicate that both functional groups of HPP bind to Fe(II) ion at the same time as NO, suggesting that the chelated substrate binding mode dominates in solution. (R)- and (S)-analog compounds that maintained the core structure of HPP but added bulky terminal groups were turned over to give products analogous to those from (R)- and (S)-HPP, respectively. In contrast, substrate analogs lacking either the phosphonate or hydroxyl group were not turned over. Elongation of the carbon chain between the hydroxyl and phosphonate allowed binding to the iron in a variety of orientations to give keto and diol products at positions determined by the hydroxyl substituent, but no stable epoxide was formed. These studies show the importance of the Fe(II)-substrate chelate structure to active antibiotic formation. This fixed orientation may align the substrate next to the iron

  15. Contrasting features of ERK1/2 activity and synapsin I phosphorylation at the ERK1/2-dependent site in the rat brain in status epilepticus induced by kainic acid in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, Yoko; Nairn, Angus C.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) plays diverse roles in the central nervous system. Activation of ERK1/2 has been observed in various types of neuronal excitation, including seizure activity in vivo and in vitro. However, studies examining ERK1/2 activity and its substrate phosphorylation in parallel are scarce especially in seizure models. We have been studying the phosphorylation state of the presynaptic protein, synapsin I at ERK1/2-dependent and -independent sites in various types of seizure models and showed that ERK1/2-dependent phosphorylation of synapsin I was indeed under control of ERK1/2 activity in vivo. To further expand our study, here we examined the effects of prolonged seizure activity on ERK1/2 activity and synapsin I phosphorylation by using status epilepticus induced by kainic acid (KA-SE) in rats in vivo. In KA-SE, robust ERK1/2 activation was observed in the hippocampus, a representative limbic structure, with lesser activation in the parietal cortex, a representative non-limbic structure. In contrast, the phosphorylation level of synapsin I at ERK1/2-dependent phospho-site 4/5 was profoundly decreased, the extent of which was much larger in the hippocampus than in the parietal cortex. In addition, phosphorylation at other ERK1/2-independent phospho-sites in synapsin I also showed an even larger decrease. All these changes disappeared after recovery from KA-SE. These results indicate that the phosphorylation state of synapsin I is dynamically regulated by the balance between kinase and phosphatase activities. The contrasting features of robust ERK1/2 activation yet synapsin I dephosphorylation may be indicative of an irreversible pathological outcome of the epileptic state in vivo. PMID:26320550

  16. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes.

    PubMed

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2008-08-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a catalytic triad of ser-his-asp (S-H-D) amino acid residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that in ACAT1, S456, H460, and D400 were essential for activity. In ACAT2, H438 was required for enzymatic activity. However, mutation of D378 destabilized the enzyme. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any S mutations of ACAT2 that abolished catalytic activity. Moreover, ACAT2 was insensitive to serine-modifying reagents, whereas ACAT1 was not. Further studies indicated that tyrosine residues may be important for ACAT activity. Mutational analysis showed that the tyrosine residue of the highly conserved FYXDWWN motif was important for ACAT activity. Furthermore, Y518 was necessary for ACAT1 activity, whereas the analogous residue in ACAT2, Y496, was not. The available data suggest that the amino acid requirement for ACAT activity may be different for the two ACAT isozymes.

  17. Active Site Mutations as a Suitable Tool Contributing to Explain a Mechanism of Aristolochic Acid I Nitroreduction by Cytochromes P450 1A1, 1A2 and 1B1

    PubMed Central

    Milichovský, Jan; Bárta, František; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Arlt, Volker M.; Frei, Eva; Stiborová, Marie; Martínek, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Aristolochic acid I (AAI) is a plant drug found in Aristolochia species that causes aristolochic acid nephropathy, Balkan endemic nephropathy and their associated urothelial malignancies. AAI is activated via nitroreduction producing genotoxic N-hydroxyaristolactam, which forms DNA adducts. The major enzymes responsible for the reductive bioactivation of AAI are NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase and cytochromes P450 (CYP) 1A1 and 1A2. Using site-directed mutagenesis we investigated the possible mechanisms of CYP1A1/1A2/1B1-catalyzed AAI nitroreduction. Molecular modelling predicted that the hydroxyl groups of serine122/threonine124 (Ser122/Thr124) amino acids in the CYP1A1/1A2-AAI binary complexes located near to the nitro group of AAI, are mechanistically important as they provide the proton required for the stepwise reduction reaction. In contrast, the closely related CYP1B1 with no hydroxyl group containing residues in its active site is ineffective in catalyzing AAI nitroreduction. In order to construct an experimental model, mutant forms of CYP1A1 and 1A2 were prepared, where Ser122 and Thr124 were replaced by Ala (CYP1A1-S122A) and Val (CYP1A2-T124V), respectively. Similarly, a CYP1B1 mutant was prepared in which Ala133 was replaced by Ser (CYP1B1-A133S). Site-directed mutagenesis was performed using a quickchange approach. Wild and mutated forms of these enzymes were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and isolated enzymes characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy to verify correct protein folding. Their catalytic activity was confirmed with CYP1A1, 1A2 and 1B1 marker substrates. Using 32P-postlabelling we determined the efficiency of wild-type and mutant forms of CYP1A1, 1A2, and 1B1 reconstituted with NADPH:CYP oxidoreductase to bioactivate AAI to reactive intermediates forming covalent DNA adducts. The S122A and T124V mutations in CYP1A1 and 1A2, respectively, abolished the efficiency of CYP1A1 and 1A2 enzymes to generate AAI-DNA adducts. In contrast

  18. Adverse experiences with nitric acid at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, W.S.; Craig, D.K.; Vitacco, M.J.; McCormick, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Nitric acid is used routinely at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in many processes. However, the site has experienced a number of adverse situations in handling nitric acid. These have ranged from minor injuries to personnel to significant explosions. This document compiles many of these events and includes discussions of process upsets, fires, injuries, and toxic effects of nitric acid and its decomposition products. The purpose of the publication is to apprise those using the acid that it is a potentially dangerous material and can react in many ways as demonstrated by SRS experience. 10 refs.

  19. Active Site Dynamical Effects in the Hydrogen Transfer Rate-limiting Step in the Catalysis of Linoleic Acid by Soybean Lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1): Primary and Secondary Isotope Contributions.

    PubMed

    Phatak, Prasad; Venderley, Jordan; Debrota, John; Li, Junjie; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2015-07-30

    Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations that facilitate the treatment of rare events, we probe the active site participation in the rate-determining hydrogen transfer step in the catalytic oxidation of linoleic acid by soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1). The role of two different active site components is probed. (a) On the hydrogen atom acceptor side of the active site, the hydrogen bonding propensity between the acceptor side hydroxyl group, which is bound to the iron cofactor, and the backbone carboxyl group of isoleucine (residue number 839) is studied toward its role in promoting the hydrogen transfer event. Primary and secondary (H/D) isotope effects are also probed and a definite correlation with subtle secondary H/D isotope effects is found. With increasing average nuclear kinetic energy, the increase in transfer probability is enhanced due to the presence of the hydrogen bond between the backbone carbonyl of I839 and the acceptor oxygen. Further increase in average nuclear kinetic energy reduces the strength of this secondary hydrogen bond which leads to a deterioration in hydrogen transfer rates and finally embrances an Arrhenius-like behavior. (b) On the hydrogen atom donor side, the coupling between vibrational modes predominantly localized on the donor-side linoleic acid group and the reactive mode is probed. There appears to be a qualitative difference in the coupling between modes that belong to linoleic acid and the hydrogen transfer mode, for hydrogen and deuterium transfer. For example, the donor side secondary hydrogen atom is much more labile (by nearly a factor of 5) during deuterium transfer as compared to the case for hydrogen transfer. This appears to indicate a greater coupling between the modes belonging to the linoleic acid scaffold and the deuterium transfer mode and also provides a new rationalization for the abnormal (nonclassical) secondary isotope effect results obtained by Knapp, Rickert, and Klinman in J. Am. Chem. Soc

  20. Validated ligand mapping of ACE active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2005-08-01

    Crystal structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) complexed with three inhibitors (lisinopril, captopril, enalapril) provided experimental data for testing the validity of a prior active site model predicting the bound conformation of the inhibitors. The ACE active site model - predicted over 18 years ago using a series of potent ACE inhibitors of diverse chemical structure - was recreated using published data and commercial software. Comparison between the predicted structures of the three inhibitors bound to the active site of ACE and those determined experimentally yielded root mean square deviation (RMSD) values of 0.43-0.81 Å, among the distances defining the active site map. The bound conformations of the chemically relevant atoms were accurately deduced from the geometry of ligands, applying the assumption that the geometry of the active site groups responsible for binding and catalysis of amide hydrolysis was constrained. The mapping of bound inhibitors at the ACE active site was validated for known experimental compounds, so that the constrained conformational search methodology may be applied with confidence when no experimentally determined structure of the enzyme yet exists, but potent, diverse inhibitors are available.

  1. Active Sites of Reduced Epidermal Fluorescence1 (REF1) Isoforms Contain Amino Acid Substitutions That Are Different between Monocots and Dicots

    PubMed Central

    Missihoun, Tagnon D.; Kotchoni, Simeon O.; Bartels, Dorothea

    2016-01-01

    Plant aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) play important roles in cell wall biosynthesis, growth, development, and tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. The Reduced Epidermal Fluorescence1 is encoded by the subfamily 2C of ALDHs and was shown to oxidise coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde to ferulic acid and sinapic acid in the phenylpropanoid pathway, respectively. This knowledge has been gained from works in the dicotyledon model species Arabidopsis thaliana then used to functionally annotate ALDH2C isoforms in other species, based on the orthology principle. However, the extent to which the ALDH isoforms differ between monocotyledons and dicotyledons has rarely been accessed side-by-side. In this study, we used a phylogenetic approach to address this question. We have analysed the ALDH genes in Brachypodium distachyon, alongside those of other sequenced monocotyledon and dicotyledon species to examine traits supporting either a convergent or divergent evolution of the ALDH2C/REF1-type proteins. We found that B. distachyon, like other grasses, contains more ALDH2C/REF1 isoforms than A. thaliana and other dicotyledon species. Some amino acid residues in ALDH2C/REF1 isoforms were found as being conserved in dicotyledons but substituted by non-equivalent residues in monocotyledons. One example of those substitutions concerns a conserved phenylalanine and a conserved tyrosine in monocotyledons and dicotyledons, respectively. Protein structure modelling suggests that the presence of tyrosine would widen the substrate-binding pocket in the dicotyledons, and thereby influence substrate specificity. We discussed the importance of these findings as new hints to investigate why ferulic acid contents and cell wall digestibility differ between the dicotyledon and monocotyledon species. PMID:27798665

  2. Evolution of lactate dehydrogenase-A homologs of barracuda fishes (genus Sphyraena) from different thermal environments: differences in kinetic properties and thermal stability are due to amino acid substitutions outside the active site.

    PubMed

    Holland, L Z; McFall-Ngai, M; Somero, G N

    1997-03-18

    Orthologous homologs of lactate dehydrogenase-A (LDH-A) (EC 1.1.1.27; NAD+:lactate oxidoreductase) of six barracuda species (genus Sphyraena) display differences in Michaelis-Menten constants (apparent Km) for substrate (pyruvate) and cofactor (NADH) that reflect evolution at different habitat temperatures. Significant increases in Km with increasing measurement temperature occur for all homologs, yet Km at normal body temperatures is similar among species because of the inverse relationship between adaptation temperature and Km. Thermal stabilities of the homologs also differ. To determine the amino acid substitutions responsible for differences in Km and thermal stability, peptide mapping of the LDH-As of all six species was first performed. Then, the amino acid sequences of the three homologs having the most similar peptide maps, those of the north temperate species, S. argentea, the subtropical species, S. lucasana, and the south temperate species, S. idiastes, were deduced from the respective cDNA sequences. At most, there were four amino acid substitutions between any pair of species, none of which occurred in the loop or substrate binding sites of the enzymes. The sequence of LDH-A from S. lucasana differs from that of S. idiastes only at position 8. The homolog of S. argentea differs from the other two sequences at positions 8, 61, 68, and 223. We used a full-length cDNA clone of LDH-A of S. lucasana to test, by site-directed mutagenesis, the importance of these sequence changes in establishing the observed differences in kinetics and thermal stability. Differences in sequence at sites 61 and/or 68 appear to account for the differences in Km between the LDH-As of S. argentea and S. lucasana. Differences at position 8 appear to account for the difference in thermal stability between the homologs of S. argentea and S. lucasana. Evolutionary adaptation of proteins to temperature thus may be achieved by minor changes in sequence at locations outside of active

  3. Extended amino acid sequences around the active-site lysine residue of class-I fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases from rabbit muscle, sturgeon muscle, trout muscle and ox liver.

    PubMed Central

    Benfield, P A; Forcina, B G; Gibbons, I; Perham, R N

    1979-01-01

    1. Amino acid sequences covering the region between residues 173 and 248 [adopting the numbering system proposed by Lai, Nakai & Chang (1974) Science 183, 1204-1206] were derived for trout (Salmo trutta) muscle aldolase and for ox liver aldolase. A comparable sequence was derived for residues 180-248 of sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) muscle aldolase. The close homology with the rabbit muscle enzyme was used to align the peptides of the other aldolases from which the sequences were derived. The results also allowed a partial sequence for the N-terminal 39 residues for the ox liver enzyme to be deduced. 2. In the light of the strong homology evinced for these enzymes, a re-investigation of the amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle aldolase between residues 181 and 185 was undertaken. This indicated the presence of a hitherto unsuspected -Ile-Val-sequence between residues 181 and 182 and the need to invert the sequence -Glu-Val- to -Val-Glx- at positions 184 and 185. 3. Comparison of the available amino acid sequences of these enzymes suggested an early evolutionary divergence of the genes for muscle and liver aldolases. It was also consistent with other evidence that the central region of the primary structure of these enzymes (which includes the active-site lysine-227) forms part of a conserved folding domain in the protein subunit. 4. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences proposed has been deposited as Suy Lending Division, Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1978) 169, 5. PMID:534504

  4. Chromate reduction on humic acid derived from a peat soil--exploration of the activated sites on HAs for chromate removal.

    PubMed

    Huang, S W; Chiang, P N; Liu, J C; Hung, J T; Kuan, W H; Tzou, Y M; Wang, S L; Huang, J H; Chen, C C; Wang, M K; Loeppert, R H

    2012-05-01

    Humic substances are a major component of soil organic matter that influence the behavior and fate of heavy metals such as Cr(VI), a toxic and carcinogenic element. In the study, a repetitive extraction technique was used to fractionate humic acids (HAs) from a peat soil into three fractions (denoted as F1, F2, and F3), and the relative importance of O-containing aromatic and aliphatic domains in humic substances for scavenging Cr(VI) was addressed at pH 1. Spectroscopic analyses indicated that the concentrations of aromatic C and O-containing functional groups decreased with a progressive extraction as follows: F1>F2>F3. Cr(VI) removal by HA proceeded slowly, but it was enhanced when light was applied due to the production of efficient reductants, such as superoxide radical and H(2)O(2), for Cr(VI). Higher aromatic- and O-containing F1 fraction exhibited a greater efficiency for Cr(VI) reduction (with a removal rate of ca. 2.89 mmol g(-1) HA under illumination for 3 h). (13)C NMR and FTIR spectra further demonstrated that the carboxyl groups were primarily responsible for Cr(VI) reduction. This study implied the mobility and fate of Cr(VI) would be greatly inhibited in the environments containing such organic groups.

  5. Antiprotozoal activity of betulinic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Carmona, D B; Escalante-Erosa, F; García-Sosa, K; Ruiz-Pinell, G; Gutierrez-Yapu, D; Chan-Bacab, M J; Giménez-Turba, A; Peña-Rodríguez, L M

    2010-04-01

    Betulinic acid (1), isolated from the crude extract of the leaves of Pentalinon andrieuxii (Apocynaceae), together with betulinic acid acetate (2), betulonic acid (3), betulinic acid methyl ester (4), and betulin (5) were evaluated for their antiprotozoal activity. The results showed that modifying the C-3 position increases leishmanicidal activity while modification of the C-3 and C-28 positions decreases trypanocidal activity.

  6. Staphylococcal nuclease active-site amino acids: pH dependence of tyrosines and arginines by sup 13 C NMR and correlation with kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Grissom, C.G.; Markley, J.L. )

    1989-03-07

    The pH and temperature dependence of the kinetic parameters of staphylococcal nuclease have been examined with three p-nitrophenyl phosphate containing DNA analogues that vary as to 3'-substituent. With wild-type (Foggi variant) nuclease (nuclease wt) and the substrates thymidine 3'-phosphate 5'-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) (PNPdTp), thymidine 3'-methylphosphonate 5'-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) (PNPdTp Me), and thymidine 5'-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) (PNPdT), k{sub cat} remains nearly constant at 13 min{sup {minus}1}. However, k{sub cat}/k{sub m} with nuclease wt varies considerably. The data suggests that the inflection k{sub cat}/K{sub m} with pK{sub a} at 9.67 arises from ionization of tyrosine-85, which hydrogen bonds to the divalent 3'-phosphomonester of substrates with this substituent. The enthalpy of ionization of both deprotonation steps in the k{sub cat}/K{sub m} versus pH profile is 5 kcal/mol. {sup 13}C NMR has been used to determine the pK{sub a} values of the arginine and tyrosine residues. The results do not rule out arginine as a candidate for the acidic catalyst that protonates the 5'-ribose alkoxide prior to product release. The phenolic hydroxyl carbon of tyrosine-85 has been assigned by comparing the {sup 13}C NMR spectrum of nuclease wt and nuclease Y85F. This correlation between pK{sub a} values along with the absence of other candidates indicates that the ionization of tyrosine-85 is the pK{sub a} seen in the k{sub cat}/K{sub m} vs pH profile for substrates with a divalent 3'-phosphomonester. This conclusion is consistent with the proposed role of tyrosine-85 as a hydrogen-bond donor to the 3'-phosphomonoester of substrates poised for exonucleolytic hydrolysis.

  7. Site-selective Alkane Dehydrogenation of Fatty Acids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-14

    dehydrogenation of fatty acids Contract/Grant#: FA9550-10-1-0532 Final Reporting Period: 15 September 2011 to 14 September 2011...directly incorporate fatty acids into the ligand. The preparation of the acyl phosphines (1-5) was easily accomplished starting from the corresponding...AFOSR Final Report Final Report 
 The proposed research examines the site-selective dehydrogenation of alkanes. The alkanes employed were fatty

  8. Trimethylamine as a probe molecule to differentiate acid sites in Y-FAU zeolite: FTIR study.

    PubMed

    Sarria, Francisca Romero; Blasin-Aubé, Vanessa; Saussey, Jacques; Marie, Olivier; Daturi, Marco

    2006-07-06

    In heterogeneous catalysis acidity has a very important influence on activity and selectivity: correct determination of acidic properties is a base to improve industrial processes. The aim of this work was to study trimethylamine (TMA) as a probe molecule able to distinguish between the different Brønsted acid sites in zeolitic frameworks. Our work mainly focused on faujasite-type zeolites because the HY zeolite is one of the most used acidic catalysts in industrial processes. In this paper, typical IR bands assigned to TMA-protonated species (formed in supercages) are detected in the HY zeolite. TMA interacting by hydrogen bonding with the acid sites located in the sodalite units is also observed. The wavenumbers of some typical IR bands assigned to TMA-protonated species appear to depend on the acidic strength, and a complementary study with ZSM-5 and X-FAU samples confirms this proposition.

  9. Crystal structure of phospholipase A2 complex with the hydrolysis products of platelet activating factor: equilibrium binding of fatty acid and lysophospholipid-ether at the active site may be mutually exclusive.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying H; Yu, Bao-Zhu; Berg, Otto G; Jain, Mahendra K; Bahnson, Brian J

    2002-12-17

    We have solved the 1.55 A crystal structure of the anion-assisted dimer of porcine pancreatic group IB phospholipase A2 (PLA2), complexed with the products of hydrolysis of the substrate platelet activating factor. The dimer contains five coplanar phosphate anions bound at the contact surface between the two PLA2 subunits. This structure parallels a previously reported anion-assisted dimer that mimics the tetrahedral intermediate of PLA2 bound to a substrate interface [Pan, Y. H., et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 609-617]. The dimer structure has a molecule of the product acetate bound in subunit A and the other product 1-octadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (LPC-ether) to subunit B. Therefore, this structure is of the two individual product binary complexes and not of a ternary complex with both products in one active site of PLA2. Protein crystals with bound products were only obtained by cocrystallization starting from the initial substrate. In contrast, an alternate crystal form was obtained when PLA2 was cocrystallized with LPC-ether and succinate, and this crystal form did not contain bound products. The product bound structure has acetate positioned in the catalytic site of subunit A such that one of its oxygen atoms is located 3.5 A from the catalytic calcium. Likewise, a longer than typical Ca-to-Gly(32) carbonyl distance of 3.4 A results in a final Ca coordination that is four-coordinate and has distorted geometry. The other oxygen of acetate makes hydrogen bonds with N(delta)(1)-His(48), O(delta)(1)-Asp(49), and the catalytic assisting water (w7). In contrast, the glycerophosphocholine headgroup of LPC-ether in subunit B makes no contacts with calcium or with the catalytic residues His(48) or Asp(49). The tail of the LPC-ether is located near the active site pocket with the last nine carbons of the sn-1- acyl chain refined in two alternate conformations. The remaining atoms of the LPC-ether product have been modeled into the solvent channel but have their

  10. Antidiabetic Activity from Gallic Acid Encapsulated Nanochitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purbowatiningrum; Ngadiwiyana; Ismiyarto; Fachriyah, E.; Eviana, I.; Eldiana, O.; Amaliyah, N.; Sektianingrum, A. N.

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has become a health problem in the world because it causes death. One of the phenolic compounds that have antidiabetic activity is gallic acid. However, the use of this compound still provides unsatisfactory results due to its degradation during the absorption process. The solution offered to solve the problem is by encapsulated it within chitosan nanoparticles that serve to protect the bioactive compound from degradation, increases of solubility and delivery of a bioactive compound to the target site by using freeze-drying technique. The result of chitosan nanoparticle’s Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) showed that chitosan nanoparticle’s size is uniform and it is smaller than chitosan. The value of encapsulation efficiency (EE) of gallic acid which encapsulated within chitosan nanoparticles is about 50.76%. Inhibition test result showed that gallic acid-chitosan nanoparticles at 50 ppm could inhibite α-glucosidase activity in 28.87% with 54.94 in IC50. So it can be concluded that gallic acid can be encapsulated in nanoparticles of chitosan and proved that it could inhibit α-glucosidase.

  11. Bacterial Diversity at an Acid Mine Drainage Site in Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaynor, J.; Sawyer, T.; Riley, F. E.; Moulton, K. D.; Rothschild, L. J.; Duboise, S. M.

    2010-04-01

    Bacterial diversity in acidic mine drainage at a historic Maine iron mining site was investigated by isolation of environmental DNA, PCR amplification of the V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and DNA sequencing.

  12. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  13. Modeling lanthanide series binding sites on humic acid.

    PubMed

    Pourret, Olivier; Martinez, Raul E

    2009-02-01

    Lanthanide (Ln) binding to humic acid (HA) has been investigated by combining ultrafiltration and ICP-MS techniques. A Langmuir-sorption-isotherm metal-complexation model was used in conjunction with a linear programming method (LPM) to fit experimental data representing various experimental conditions both in HA/Ln ratio (varying between 5 and 20) and in pH range (from 2 to 10) with an ionic strength of 10(-3) mol L(-1). The LPM approach, not requiring prior knowledge of surface complexation parameters, was used to solve the existing discrepancies in LnHA binding constants and site densities. The application of the LPM to experimental data revealed the presence of two discrete metal binding sites at low humic acid concentrations (5 mg L(-1)), with log metal complexation constants (logK(S,j)) of 2.65+/-0.05 and 7.00 (depending on Ln). The corresponding site densities were 2.71+/-0.57x10(-8) and 0.58+/-0.32x10(-8) mol of Ln(3+)/mg of HA (depending on Ln). Total site densities of 3.28+/-0.28x10(-8), 4.99+/-0.02x10(-8), and 5.01+/-0.01x10(-8) mol mg(-1) were obtained by LPM for humic acid, for humic acid concentrations of 5, 10, and 20 mg L(-1), respectively. These results confirm that lanthanide binding occurs mainly at weak sites (i.e., ca. 80%) and second at strong sites (i.e., ca. 20%). The first group of discrete metal binding sites may be attributed to carboxylic groups (known to be the main binding sites of Ln in HA), and the second metal binding group to phenolic moieties. Moreover, this study evidences heterogeneity in the distribution of the binding sites among Ln. Eventually, the LPM approach produced feasible and reasonable results, but it was less sensitive to error and did not require an a priori assumption of the number and concentration of binding sites.

  14. Acid precipitation at 3 sites in the Klang Valley, Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, E.; Yap, S.K.; Azimi, S.

    1996-12-31

    A study which examined spatial variation, dust and chemical composition factors associated with precipitation pH in the Klang Valley had been conducted. Precipitation samples were collected on a monthly basis at 3 different locations during the periods of 1993-1995. These long term sites were situated at varying distance from the industrial zone of the Klang Valley. Data were collected on a monthly basis and where possible after every rainfall. This included the field pH, electrical conductivity (EC) and analysis of chemical components. To date, the general pH trend at these stations is decreasing towards the acid range. The site furthest from the industrial zone had the highest pH values while site closest to the industrial zone had the lowest pH. There appeared to be a correlation between the precipitation pH and electrical conductivity (EC), the EC readings increased with increased acidity. Variations in precipitation pH was closely associated with the changes in sulfate concentration. The pH of precipitation is determined not only by the anions, but also by the concentration of cations in the atmosphere which neutralized the acidity by forming salts. The main cause for the decrease in the pH values is the significant increase of acidic components and decrease of soil-oriented components (Mg and Ca) in the rain water.

  15. Corrosion Research And Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  16. Corrosion Research and Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  17. LIME TREATMENT LAGOONS TECHNOLOGY FOR TREATING ACID MINE DRAINAGE FROM TWO MINING SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Runoff and drainage from active and inactive mines are someof the most environmentally damaging land uses i the US. Acid Mine drainage (AMD) from mining sites across the country requires treatment because of high metal concentrations that exceed regulatory standards for safe disc...

  18. PHYSICAL SOLUTIONS FOR ACID ROCK DRAINAGE AT REMOTE SITES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program, Activity III, Project 42, Physical Solutions for Acid Rock Drainage at Remote Sites, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy. A...

  19. Vesicles protect activated acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Todd, Zoe R; House, Christopher H

    2014-10-01

    Abstract Methyl thioacetate, or activated acetic acid, has been proposed to be central to the origin of life and an important energy currency molecule in early cellular evolution. We have investigated the hydrolysis of methyl thioacetate under various conditions. Its uncatalyzed rate of hydrolysis is about 3 orders of magnitude faster (K=0.00663 s(-1); 100°C, pH 7.5, concentration=0.33 mM) than published rates for its catalyzed production, making it unlikely to accumulate under prebiotic conditions. However, our experiments showed that methyl thioacetate was protected from hydrolysis when inside its own hydrophobic droplets. Further, we found that methyl thioacetate protection from hydrolysis was also possible in droplets of hexane and in the membranes of nonanoic acid vesicles. Thus, the hydrophobic regions of prebiotic vesicles and early cell membranes could have offered a refuge for this energetic molecule, increasing its lifetime in close proximity to the reactions for which it would be needed. This model of early energy storage evokes an additional critical function for the earliest cell membranes.

  20. Acid activated montmorillonite as catalysts in methyl esterification reactions of lauric acid.

    PubMed

    Zatta, Leandro; Ramos, Luiz Pereira; Wypych, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The catalytic activity of acid activated montmorillonite in the esterification of free fatty acids (FFA) is reported. Standard Montmorillonite (MMT) type STx-1 provided by the Clay Mineral Society repository was activated using phosphoric, nitric and sulphuric acids under different conditions and the resulting materials were characterized and evaluated as catalysts in the methyl esterification of lauric acid. Blank reactions carried out in the absence of any added catalyst presented conversions of 32.64, 69.79 and 79.23%, for alcohol:lauric acid molar ratios of 60:1, 12:1 and 6:1, respectively. In the presence of the untreated clay and using molar ratios of 12:1 and 6:1 with 12% of catalyst, conversions of 70.92 and 82.30% were obtained, respectively. For the acid activated clays, conversions up to 93.08% of lauric acid to methyl laurate were obtained, much higher than those observed for the thermal conversion or using untreated montmorillonite. Relative good correlations were observed between the catalytic activity and the development of acid sites and textural properties of the resulting materials. Therefore, a simple acid activation was able to improve the catalytic activity and produce clay catalysts that are environmental friendly, cost effective, noncorrosive and reusable.

  1. Site-specific fatty acid-conjugation to prolong protein half-life in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Mizuta, Yukina; Takasu, Akinori; Hahn, Young S.; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic proteins are indispensable in treating numerous human diseases. However, therapeutic proteins often suffer short serum half-life. In order to extend the serum half-life, a natural albumin ligand (a fatty acid) has been conjugated to small therapeutic peptides resulting in a prolonged serum half-life via binding to patients' serum albumin in vivo. However, fatty acid-conjugation has limited applicability due to lack of site-specificity resulting in the heterogeneity of conjugated proteins and a significant loss in pharmaceutical activity. In order to address these issues, we exploited the site-specific fatty acid-conjugation to a permissive site of a protein, using copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition, by linking a fatty acid derivative to p-ethynylphenylalanine incorporated into a protein using an engineered pair of yeast tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA synthetase. As a proof-of-concept, we show that single palmitic acid conjugated to superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP) in a site-specific manner enhanced a protein's albumin-binding in vitro about 20 times and the serum half-life in vivo 5 times when compared to those of the unmodified sfGFP. Furthermore, the fatty acid conjugation did not cause a significant reduction in the fluorescence of sfGFP. Therefore, these results clearly indicate that the site-specific fatty acid-conjugation is a very promising strategy to prolong protein serum half-life in vivo without compromising its folded structure and activity. PMID:23735573

  2. Electrophysiological evidence for acidic, basic, and neutral amino acid olfactory receptor sites in the catfish

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Electrophysiological experiments indicate that olfactory receptors of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, contain different receptor sites for the acidic (A), basic (B), and neutral amino acids; further, at least two partially interacting neutral sites exist, one for the hydrophilic neutral amino acids containing short side chains (SCN), and the second for the hydrophobic amino acids containing long side chains (LCN). The extent of cross-adaptation was determined by comparing the electro-olfactogram (EOG) responses to 20 "test" amino acids during continuous bathing of the olfactory mucosa with water only (control) to those during each of the eight "adapting" amino acid regimes. Both the adapting and test amino acids were adjusted in concentrations to provide approximately equal response magnitudes in the unadapted state. Under all eight adapting regimes, the test EOG responses were reduced from those obtained in the unadapted state, but substantial quantitative differences resulted, depending upon the molecular structure of the adapting stimulus. Analyses of the patterns of EOG responses to the test stimuli identified and characterized the respective "transduction processes," a term used to describe membrane events initiated by a particular subset of amino acid stimuli that are intricately linked to the origin of the olfactory receptor potential. Only when the stimulus compounds interact with different transduction processes are the stimuli assumed to bind to different membrane "sites." Four relatively independent L-alpha-amino acid transduction processes (and thus at least four binding sites) identified in this report include: (a) the A process for aspartic and glutamic acids; (b) the B process for arginine and lysine; (c) the SCN process for glycine, alanine, serine, glutamine, and possibly cysteine; (d) the LCN process for methionine, ethionine, valine, norvaline, leucine, norleucine, glutamic acid-gamma-methyl ester, histidine, phenylalanine, and also

  3. Probing the promiscuous active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase using synthetic substrates, homology modeling, and active site modification.

    PubMed

    Daniellou, Richard; Zheng, Hongyan; Langill, David M; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2007-06-26

    The active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase (IDH, EC 1.1.1.18) from Bacillus subtilis recognizes a variety of mono- and disaccharides, as well as 1l-4-O-substituted inositol derivatives. It catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the axial alcohol of these substrates with comparable kinetic constants. We have found that 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol does not act as a substrate for IDH, in contrast to structurally similar compounds such as those bearing substituted benzyl substituents in the same position. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol and 4-O-(2-naphthyl)methyl-myo-inositol, which is a substrate for IDH, shows a distinct difference in the preferred conformation of the aryl substituent. Conformational analysis of known substrates of IDH suggests that this conformational difference may account for the difference in reactivity of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol in the presence of IDH. A sequence alignment of IDH with the homologous glucose-fructose oxidoreductase allowed the construction of an homology model of inositol dehydrogenase, to which NADH and 4-O-benzyl-scyllo-inosose were docked and the active site energy minimized. The active site model is consistent with all experimental results and suggests that a conserved tyrosine-glycine-tyrosine motif forms the hydrophobic pocket adjoining the site of inositol recognition. Y233F and Y235F retain activity, while Y233R and Y235R do not. A histidine-aspartate pair, H176 and D172, are proposed to act as a dyad in which H176 is the active site acid/base. The enzyme is inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate, and the mutants H176A and D172N show a marked loss of activity. Kinetic isotope effect experiments with D172N indicate that chemistry is rate-determining for this mutant.

  4. Acidity of edge surface sites of montmorillonite and kaolinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiandong; Lu, Xiancai; Sprik, Michiel; Cheng, Jun; Meijer, Evert Jan; Wang, Rucheng

    2013-09-01

    Acid-base chemistry of clay minerals is central to their interfacial properties, but up to now a quantitative understanding on the surface acidity is still lacking. In this study, with first principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) based vertical energy gap technique, we calculate the acidity constants of surface groups on (0 1 0)-type edges of montmorillonite and kaolinite, which are representatives of 2:1 and 1:1-type clay minerals, respectively. It shows that tbnd Si-OH and tbnd Al-OH2OH groups of kaolinite have pKas of 6.9 and 5.7 and those of montmorillonite have pKas of 7.0 and 8.3, respectively. For each mineral, the calculated pKas are consistent with the experimental ranges derived from fittings of titration curves, indicating that tbnd Si-OH and tbnd Al-OH2OH groups are the major acidic sites responsible to pH-dependent experimental observations. The effect of Mg substitution in montmorillonite is investigated and it is found that Mg substitution increases the pKas of the neighboring tbnd Si-OH and tbnd Si-OH2 groups by 2-3 pKa units. Furthermore, our calculation shows that the pKa of edge tbnd Mg-(OH2)2 is as high as 13.2, indicating the protonated state dominates under common pH. Together with previous adsorption experiments, our derived acidity constants suggest that tbnd Si-O- and tbnd Al-(OH)2 groups are the most probable edge sites for complexing heavy metal cations.

  5. Acid Rain: Activities for Science Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Seven complete secondary/college level acid rain activities are provided. Activities include overview; background information and societal implications; major concepts; student objectives; vocabulary/material lists; procedures; instructional strategies; and questions/discussion and extension suggestions. Activities consider effects of acid rain on…

  6. Inorganic Nitrogen Cycling in an Extreme Acid Mine Drainage Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnejais, L. H.; Smith, R. L.; Nordstrom, D. K.; Banfield, J. F.

    2006-12-01

    Weathering of the massive sulfide ore body at Iron Mountain, northern California has generated sulfuric acid solutions with pH values ranging from 0.5 to 1, temperatures up to 50°C and high concentrations of toxic metals. Communities of microorganisms catalyze the oxidation of iron and sulfur that generates this extreme environment. The nitrogen requirements of these organisms and the nitrogen cycling within these waters are not understood. By adapting the chemiluminescence detection method of Baeseman (2004) we have constrained the stability of nitrate and nitrite species in acidic, high ferrous iron solutions and have measured a time series of the nitrate concentrations at sites within Iron Mountain. The half-life of nitrite is less than an hour due to reactions with ferrous ions, while nitrate is found at concentrations of up to 10 μM within the mine. By coupling this information with geochemical and microbial community information at each site together with culture enrichment studies using various nitrogen sources we hope to gain insight into the pathways of nitrogen utilization in this extreme environment. References Baeseman, J.L. (2004) Denitrification in acid-impacted mountain stream sediments. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Colorado, Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering.

  7. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  8. Functional site profiling and electrostatic analysis of cysteines modifiable to cysteine sulfenic acid.

    PubMed

    Salsbury, Freddie R; Knutson, Stacy T; Poole, Leslie B; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S

    2008-02-01

    Cysteine sulfenic acid (Cys-SOH), a reversible modification, is a catalytic intermediate at enzyme active sites, a sensor for oxidative stress, a regulator of some transcription factors, and a redox-signaling intermediate. This post-translational modification is not random: specific features near the cysteine control its reactivity. To identify features responsible for the propensity of cysteines to be modified to sulfenic acid, a list of 47 proteins (containing 49 known Cys-SOH sites) was compiled. Modifiable cysteines are found in proteins from most structural classes and many functional classes, but have no propensity for any one type of protein secondary structure. To identify features affecting cysteine reactivity, these sites were analyzed using both functional site profiling and electrostatic analysis. Overall, the solvent exposure of modifiable cysteines is not different from the average cysteine. The combined sequence, structure, and electrostatic approaches reveal mechanistic determinants not obvious from overall sequence comparison, including: (1) pKaS of some modifiable cysteines are affected by backbone features only; (2) charged residues are underrepresented in the structure near modifiable sites; (3) threonine and other polar residues can exert a large influence on the cysteine pKa; and (4) hydrogen bonding patterns are suggested to be important. This compilation of Cys-SOH modification sites and their features provides a quantitative assessment of previous observations and a basis for further analysis and prediction of these sites. Agreement with known experimental data indicates the utility of this combined approach for identifying mechanistic determinants at protein functional sites.

  9. Binding sites of retinol and retinoic acid with serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Belatik, A; Hotchandani, S; Bariyanga, J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2012-02-01

    Retinoids are effectively transported in the bloodstream via serum albumins. We report the complexation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with retinol and retinoic acid at physiological conditions, using constant protein concentration and various retinoid contents. FTIR, CD and fluorescence spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling were used to analyze retinoid binding site, the binding constant and the effects of complexation on BSA stability and secondary structure. Structural analysis showed that retinoids bind BSA via hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions with overall binding constants of K(Ret)(-BSA) = 5.3 (±0.8) × 10(6) M(-1) and K(Retac-BSA) = 2.3 (±0.4) × 10(6) M(-1). The number of bound retinoid molecules (n) was 1.20 (±0.2) for retinol and 1.8 (±0.3) for retinoic acid. Molecular modeling showed the participation of several amino acids in retinoid-BSA complexes stabilized by H-bonding network. The retinoid binding altered BSA conformation with a major reduction of α-helix from 61% (free BSA) to 36% (retinol-BSA) and 26% (retinoic acid-BSA) with an increase in turn and random coil structures indicating a partial protein unfolding. The results indicate that serum albumins are capable of transporting retinoids in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Vitamin K epoxide reductase: homology, active site and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodstadt, Leo; Ponting, Chris P

    2004-06-01

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) recycles reduced vitamin K, which is used subsequently as a co-factor in the gamma-carboxylation of glutamic acid residues in blood coagulation enzymes. VKORC1, a subunit of the VKOR complex, has recently been shown to possess this activity. Here, we show that VKORC1 is a member of a large family of predicted enzymes that are present in vertebrates, Drosophila, plants, bacteria and archaea. Four cysteine residues and one residue, which is either serine or threonine, are identified as likely active-site residues. In some plant and bacterial homologues the VKORC1 homologous domain is fused with domains of the thioredoxin family of oxidoreductases. These might reduce disulfide bonds of VKORC1-like enzymes as a prerequisite for their catalytic activities.

  11. Differential activation of pregnane X receptor by carnosic acid, carnosol, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid.

    PubMed

    Seow, Chun Ling; Lau, Aik Jiang

    2017-03-10

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulates the expression of many genes, including those involved in drug metabolism and transport, and has been linked to various diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease. In the present study, we determined whether carnosic acid and other chemicals in rosemary extract (carnosol, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid) are PXR activators. As assessed in dual-luciferase reporter gene assays, carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, activated human PXR (hPXR) and mouse PXR (mPXR), whereas carnosol and ursolic acid, but not carnosic acid or rosmarinic acid, activated rat PXR (rPXR). Dose-response experiments indicated that carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid activated hPXR with EC50 values of 0.79, 2.22, and 10.77μM, respectively. Carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, transactivated the ligand-binding domain of hPXR and recruited steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1), SRC-2, and SRC-3 to the ligand-binding domain of hPXR. Carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, increased hPXR target gene expression, as shown by an increase in CYP3A4, UGT1A3, and ABCB1 mRNA expression in LS180 human colon adenocarcinoma cells. Rosmarinic acid did not attenuate the extent of hPXR activation by rifampicin, suggesting it is not an antagonist of hPXR. Overall, carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, are hPXR agonists, and carnosic acid shows species-dependent activation of hPXR and mPXR, but not rPXR. The findings provide new mechanistic insight on the effects of carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid on PXR-mediated biological effects.

  12. Activation of carboxylic acids in asymmetric organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Mattia Riccardo; Poladura, Belén; Diaz de Los Bernardos, Miriam; Leutzsch, Markus; Goddard, Richard; List, Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    Organocatalysis, catalysis using small organic molecules, has recently evolved into a general approach for asymmetric synthesis, complementing both metal catalysis and biocatalysis. Its success relies to a large extent upon the introduction of novel and generic activation modes. Remarkably though, while carboxylic acids have been used as catalyst directing groups in supramolecular transition-metal catalysis, a general and well-defined activation mode for this useful and abundant substance class is still lacking. Herein we propose the heterodimeric association of carboxylic acids with chiral phosphoric acid catalysts as a new activation principle for organocatalysis. This self-assembly increases both the acidity of the phosphoric acid catalyst and the reactivity of the carboxylic acid. To illustrate this principle, we apply our concept in a general and highly enantioselective catalytic aziridine-opening reaction with carboxylic acids as nucleophiles.

  13. Cellular Site in Bacillus subtilis of a Nuclease Which Preferentially Degrades Single-Stranded Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Birnboim, H. C.

    1966-01-01

    Birnboim, H. C. (Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, N.Y.). Cellular site in Bacillus subtilis of a nuclease which preferentially degrades single-stranded nucleic acids. J. Bacteriol. 91:1004–1011. 1966.—A nuclease, identified by a marked preference for single-stranded nucleic acids, has been demonstrated in extracts of Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme was associated with the cell wall-membrane fraction of mechanically disrupted cells and was released from cells which had been converted to protoplasts by lysozyme. The nuclease activity prepared by the latter procedure was found to be activated and solubilized by treatment with trypsin. The enzyme had about 2% activity on native deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) as compared with denatured DNA. By use of CsCl analytical density gradient ultracentrifugation, this preparation was shown to degrade denatured DNA selectively in mixtures of native and denatured DNA. PMID:4956329

  14. The relationship between the acidity and the hydrocarbon cracking activity of ultrastable H-Y zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehne, Mark Andrew

    Changes in the structural, acidic, and catalytic properties of H-USY (acidic ultrastable Y zeolite) that occur during steam dealumination were investigated. This study focused on three factors that previously have been suggested to cause the enhanced activity of H-USY: (1) increased Bronsted acid strength caused by nonframework Al; (2) increased Bronsted acid strength caused by decreased framework Al content; and (3) direct participation of Lewis acid sites in the cracking reaction. Acidity was characterized by microcalorimetry and FTIR of NH3 adsorption. The 2-methylpentane cracking activity of H-USY at 573 K was 35 times higher than that of H-Y that had not been steamed. With further steaming of H-USY, the cracking activity decreased, although the activity per strong Bronsted acid site remained essentially constant. H-USY, with both Bronsted and Lewis acid sites, had a heterogeneous acid strength and many acid sites with heat of NH3 adsorption >130 kJ/mol. In contrast, zeolites containing only Bronsted acid sites had a rather homogeneous acid strength. The heat of NH3 adsorption did not exceed 130 U/mol for (H,NH4)-USY, in which the strongly acidic Lewis acid sites were covered by NH3, but its activity was equal to that of H-USY. Thus, Lewis acid sites are inactive for hydrocarbon cracking. Dealumination by ammonium hexafluorosilicate, which produces very little nonframework Al, resulted in a zeolite with a low heat of NH3 adsorption equal to that of H-Y, and activity only three times higher than that of H-Y. The mechanism of coke deactivation in H-USY was studied. Coke caused a proportionally larger decrease in n-hexane cracking activity than in the number of acid sites, but did not cause pore blockage or reduced n-hexane diffusivity. The evidence is consistent with a site poisoning deactivation model for a diffusion-limited reaction. In conclusion, the enhanced cracking activity of USY is not caused by Lewis acid sites nor by Bronsted acid sites with a very

  15. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  16. Characterization of the active site of ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Munshi, C; Thiel, D J; Mathews, I I; Aarhus, R; Walseth, T F; Lee, H C

    1999-10-22

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase synthesizes two Ca(2+) messengers by cyclizing NAD to produce cyclic ADP-ribose and exchanging nicotinic acid with the nicotinamide group of NADP to produce nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Recombinant Aplysia cyclase was expressed in yeast and co-crystallized with a substrate, nicotinamide. x-ray crystallography showed that the nicotinamide was bound in a pocket formed in part by a conserved segment and was near the central cleft of the cyclase. Glu(98), Asn(107) and Trp(140) were within 3.5 A of the bound nicotinamide and appeared to coordinate it. Substituting Glu(98) with either Gln, Gly, Leu, or Asn reduced the cyclase activity by 16-222-fold, depending on the substitution. The mutant N107G exhibited only a 2-fold decrease in activity, while the activity of W140G was essentially eliminated. The base exchange activity of all mutants followed a similar pattern of reduction, suggesting that both reactions occur at the same active site. In addition to NAD, the wild-type cyclase also cyclizes nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide to cyclic GDP-ribose. All mutant enzymes had at least half of the GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity of the wild type, some even 2-3-fold higher, indicating that the three coordinating amino acids are responsible for positioning of the substrate but not absolutely critical for catalysis. To search for the catalytic residues, other amino acids in the binding pocket were mutagenized. E179G was totally devoid of GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity, and both its ADP-ribosyl cyclase and the base exchange activities were reduced by 10,000- and 18,000-fold, respectively. Substituting Glu(179) with either Asn, Leu, Asp, or Gln produced similar inactive enzymes, and so was the conversion of Trp(77) to Gly. However, both E179G and the double mutant E179G/W77G retained NAD-binding ability as shown by photoaffinity labeling with [(32)P]8-azido-NAD. These results indicate that both Glu(179) and Trp(77) are crucial for catalysis and

  17. Efficient solid acid catalyst containing Lewis and Brønsted Acid sites for the production of furfurals.

    PubMed

    Mazzotta, Michael G; Gupta, Dinesh; Saha, Basudeb; Patra, Astam K; Bhaumik, Asim; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2014-08-01

    Self-assembled nanoparticulates of porous sulfonated carbonaceous TiO2 material that contain Brønsted and Lewis acidic sites were prepared by a one-pot synthesis method. The material was characterized by XRD, FTIR spectroscopy, NH3 temperature-programmed desorption, pyridine FTIR spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, N2 -sorption, atomic absorbance spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The carbonaceous heterogeneous catalyst (Glu-TsOH-Ti) with a Brønsted-to-Lewis acid density ratio of 1.2 and more accessible acid sites was effective to produce 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and furfural from biomass-derived mono- and disaccharides and xylose in a biphasic solvent that comprised water and biorenewable methyltetrahydrofuran. The catalyst was recycled in four consecutive cycles with a total loss of only 3 % activity. Thus, Glu-TsOH-Ti, which contains isomerization and dehydration catalytic sites and is based on a cheap and biorenewable carbon support, is a sustainable catalyst for the production of furfurals, platform chemicals for biofuels and chemicals.

  18. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-04

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases.

  19. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases. PMID:22020126

  20. Active-site zinc ligands and activated H2O of zinc enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Vallee, B L; Auld, D S

    1990-01-01

    The x-ray crystallographic structures of 12 zinc enzymes have been chosen as standards of reference to identify the ligands to the catalytic and structural zinc atoms of other members of their respective enzyme families. Universally, H2O is a ligand and critical component of the catalytically active zinc sites. In addition, three protein side chains bind to the catalytic zinc atom, whereas four protein ligands bind to the structural zinc atom. The geometry and coordination number of zinc can vary greatly to accommodate particular ligands. Zinc forms complexes with nitrogen and oxygen just as readily as with sulfur, and this is reflected in catalytic zinc sites having a binding frequency of His much greater than Glu greater than Asp = Cys, three of which bind to the metal atom. The systematic spacing between the ligands is striking. For all catalytic zinc sites except the coenzyme-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase, the first two ligands are separated by a "short-spacer" consisting of 1 to 3 amino acids. These ligands are separated from the third ligand by a "long spacer" of approximately 20 to approximately 120 amino acids. The spacer enables formation of a primary bidentate zinc complex, whereas the long spacer contributes flexibility to the coordination sphere, which can poise the zinc for catalysis as well as bring other catalytic and substrate binding groups into apposition with the active site. The H2O is activated by ionization, polarization, or poised for displacement. Collectively, the data imply that the preferred mechanistic pathway for activating the water--e.g., zinc hydroxide or Lewis acid catalysis--will be determined by the identity of the other three ligands and their spacing. Images PMID:2104979

  1. Building biologically active nucleic acid nanocomplexes.

    PubMed

    Smith, C I Edvard; Lundin, Karin E; Simonson, Oscar E; Moreno, Pedro M D; Svahn, Mathias G; Wenska, Malgorzata; Strömberg, Roger

    2008-01-01

    The Bioplex technology allows the hybridization of functional entities to various forms of nucleic acids by the use of synthetic nucleic acid analogs. Such supramolecular assemblies can be made in a predetermined fashion and can confer new properties. The Zorro technology is based on a novel construct generated to simultaneously bind to both DNA strands. Such compounds may have gene silencing activity.

  2. LAT1 activity of carboxylic acid bioisosteres: Evaluation of hydroxamic acids as substrates.

    PubMed

    Zur, Arik A; Chien, Huan-Chieh; Augustyn, Evan; Flint, Andrew; Heeren, Nathan; Finke, Karissa; Hernandez, Christopher; Hansen, Logan; Miller, Sydney; Lin, Lawrence; Giacomini, Kathleen M; Colas, Claire; Schlessinger, Avner; Thomas, Allen A

    2016-10-15

    Large neutral amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is a solute carrier protein located primarily in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that offers the potential to deliver drugs to the brain. It is also up-regulated in cancer cells, as part of a tumor's increased metabolic demands. Previously, amino acid prodrugs have been shown to be transported by LAT1. Carboxylic acid bioisosteres may afford prodrugs with an altered physicochemical and pharmacokinetic profile than those derived from natural amino acids, allowing for higher brain or tumor levels of drug and/or lower toxicity. The effect of replacing phenylalanine's carboxylic acid with a tetrazole, acylsulfonamide and hydroxamic acid (HA) bioisostere was examined. Compounds were tested for their ability to be LAT1 substrates using both cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation cell assays. As HA-Phe demonstrated weak substrate activity, its structure-activity relationship (SAR) was further explored by synthesis and testing of HA derivatives of other LAT1 amino acid substrates (i.e., Tyr, Leu, Ile, and Met). The potential for a false positive in the trans-stimulation assay caused by parent amino acid was evaluated by conducting compound stability experiments for both HA-Leu and the corresponding methyl ester derivative. We concluded that HA's are transported by LAT1. In addition, our results lend support to a recent account that amino acid esters are LAT1 substrates, and that hydrogen bonding may be as important as charge for interaction with the transporter binding site.

  3. Metal-ion mutagenesis: conversion of a purple acid phosphatase from sweet potato to a neutral phosphatase with the formation of an unprecedented catalytically competent Mn(II)Mn(II) active site.

    PubMed

    Mitić, Natasa; Noble, Christopher J; Gahan, Lawrence R; Hanson, Graeme R; Schenk, Gerhard

    2009-06-17

    The currently accepted paradigm is that the purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) require a heterovalent, dinuclear metal-ion center for catalysis. It is believed that this is an essential feature for these enzymes in order for them to operate under acidic conditions. A PAP from sweet potato is unusual in that it appears to have a specific requirement for manganese, forming a unique Fe(III)-mu-(O)-Mn(II) center under catalytically optimal conditions (Schenk et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2005, 102, 273). Herein, we demonstrate, with detailed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic and kinetic studies, that in this enzyme the chromophoric Fe(III) can be replaced by Mn(II), forming a catalytically active, unprecedented antiferromagnetically coupled homodivalent Mn(II)-mu-(H)OH-mu-carboxylato-Mn(II) center in a PAP. However, although the enzyme is still active, it no longer functions as an acid phosphatase, having optimal activity at neutral pH. Thus, PAPs may have evolved from distantly related divalent dinuclear metallohydrolases that operate under pH neutral conditions by stabilization of a trivalent-divalent metal-ion core. The present Mn(II)-Mn(II) system models these distant relatives, and the results herein make a significant contribution to our understanding of the role of the chromophoric metal ion as an activator of the nucleophile. In addition, the detailed analysis of strain broadened EPR spectra from exchange-coupled dinuclear Mn(II)-Mn(II) centers described herein provides the basis for the full interpretation of the EPR spectra from other dinuclear Mn metalloenzymes.

  4. Thyroid peroxidase activity is inhibited by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, D P; Ferreira, A C; Coelho, S M; Moraes, J M; Camacho, M A; Rosenthal, D

    2000-03-01

    Normal in vitro thyroid peroxidase (TPO) iodide oxidation activity was completely inhibited by a hydrolyzed TPO preparation (0.15 mg/ml) or hydrolyzed bovine serum albumin (BSA, 0.2 mg/ml). A pancreatic hydrolysate of casein (trypticase peptone, 0.1 mg/ml) and some amino acids (cysteine, tryptophan and methionine, 50 microM each) also inhibited the TPO iodide oxidation reaction completely, whereas casamino acids (0.1 mg/ml), and tyrosine, phenylalanine and histidine (50 microM each) inhibited the TPO reaction by 54% or less. A pancreatic digest of gelatin (0.1 mg/ml) or any other amino acid (50 microM) tested did not significantly decrease TPO activity. The amino acids that impair iodide oxidation also inhibit the TPO albumin iodination activity. The inhibitory amino acids contain side chains with either sulfur atoms (cysteine and methionine) or aromatic rings (tyrosine, tryptophan, histidine and phenylalanine). Among the amino acids tested, only cysteine affected the TPO guaiacol oxidation reaction, producing a transient inhibition at 25 or 50 microM. The iodide oxidation inhibitory activity of cysteine, methionine and tryptophan was reversed by increasing iodide concentrations from 12 to 18 mM, while no such effect was observed when the cofactor (H2O2) concentration was increased. The inhibitory substances might interfere with the enzyme activity by competing with its normal substrates for their binding sites, binding to the free substrates or reducing their oxidized form.

  5. Zymographic detection of cinnamic acid decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Prim, Núria; Pastor, F I Javier; Diaz, Pilar

    2002-11-01

    The manuscript includes a concise description of a new, fast and simple method for detection of cinnamic acid decarboxylase activity. The method is based on a color shift caused a by pH change and may be an excellent procedure for large screenings of samples from natural sources, as it involves no complex sample processing or purification. The method developed can be used in preliminary approaches to biotransformation processes involving detection of hydroxycinnamic acid decarboxylase activity.

  6. Novel ionic liquid with both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites for Michael addition.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoyue; Ye, Weidong; Song, Xiaohua; Ma, Wenxin; Lao, Xuejun; Shen, Runpu

    2011-01-01

    Ionic liquid with both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites has been synthesized and its catalytic activities for Michael addition were carefully studied. The novel ionic liquid was stable to water and could be used in aqueous solution. The molar ratio of the Lewis and Brønsted acid sites could be adjusted to match different reactions. The results showed that the novel ionic liquid was very efficient for Michael addition with good to excellent yields within several min. Operational simplicity, high stability to water and air, small amount used, low cost of the catalyst used, high yields, chemoselectivity, applicability to large-scale reactions and reusability are the key features of this methodology, which indicated that this novel ionic liquid also holds great potential for environmentally friendly processes.

  7. 3-Nitropropionic Acid is a Suicide Inhibitor of MitochondrialRespiration that, Upon Oxidation by Complex II, Forms a Covalent AdductWith a Catalytic Base Arginine in the Active Site of the Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-shar; Sun, Gang; Cobessi, David; Wang, Andy C.; Shen,John T.; Tung, Eric Y.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-12-01

    We report three new structures of mitochondrial respiratory Complex II (succinate ubiquinone oxidoreductase, E.C. 1.3.5.1) at up to 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, with various inhibitors. The structures define the conformation of the bound inhibitors and suggest the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the dicarboxylate site. In particular they support the role of Arg297 as a general base catalyst accepting a proton in the dehydrogenation of succinate. The dicarboxylate ligand in oxaloacetate-containing crystals appears to be the same as that reported for Shewanella flavocytochrome c treated with fumarate. The plant and fungal toxin 3-nitropropionic acid, an irreversible inactivator of succinate dehydrogenase, forms a covalent adduct with the side chain of Arg297. The modification eliminates a trypsin cleavage site in the flavoprotein, and tandem mass spectroscopic analysis of the new fragment shows the mass of Arg 297 to be increased by 83 Da and to have potential of losing 44 Da, consistent with decarboxylation, during fragmentation.

  8. Proteome-wide analysis of nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations in active sites of human proteins.

    PubMed

    Dingerdissen, Hayley; Motwani, Mona; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2013-03-01

    An enzyme's active site is essential to normal protein activity such that any disruptions at this site may lead to dysfunction and disease. Nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations (nsSNVs), which alter the amino acid sequence, are one type of disruption that can alter the active site. When this occurs, it is assumed that enzyme activity will vary because of the criticality of the site to normal protein function. We integrate nsSNV data and active site annotations from curated resources to identify all active-site-impacting nsSNVs in the human genome and search for all pathways observed to be associated with this data set to assess the likely consequences. We find that there are 934 unique nsSNVs that occur at the active sites of 559 proteins. Analysis of the nsSNV data shows an over-representation of arginine and an under-representation of cysteine, phenylalanine and tyrosine when comparing the list of nsSNV-impacted active site residues with the list of all possible proteomic active site residues, implying a potential bias for or against variation of these residues at the active site. Clustering analysis shows an abundance of hydrolases and transferases. Pathway and functional analysis shows several pathways over- or under-represented in the data set, with the most significantly affected pathways involved in carbohydrate metabolism. We provide a table of 32 variation-substrate/product pairs that can be used in targeted metabolomics experiments to assay the effects of specific variations. In addition, we report the significant prevalence of aspartic acid to histidine variation in eight proteins associated with nine diseases including glycogen storage diseases, lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital syndrome, Parkinson's disease and several cancers.

  9. Site-Specific Characterization of d-Amino Acid Containing Peptide Epimers by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the d-amino acid containing peptide (DAACP) candidate can be discovered by observing the differences of biological activity and chromatographic retention time between the synthetic peptides and naturally occurring peptides. However, it is difficult to determine the exact position of d-amino acid in the DAACP candidates. Herein, we developed a novel site-specific strategy to rapidly and precisely localize d-amino acids in peptides by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) analysis of mass spectrometry (MS)-generated epimeric fragment ions. Briefly, the d/l-peptide epimers were separated by online reversed-phase liquid chromatography and fragmented by collision-induced dissociation (CID), followed by IMS analysis. The epimeric fragment ions resulting from d/l-peptide epimers exhibit conformational differences, thus showing different mobilities in IMS. The arrival time shift between the epimeric fragment ions was used as criteria to localize the d-amino acid substitution. The utility of this strategy was demonstrated by analysis of peptide epimers with different molecular sizes, [d-Trp]-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, [d-Ala]-deltorphin, [d-Phe]-achatin-I, and their counterparts that contain all-l amino acids. Furthermore, the crustacean hyperglycemia hormones (CHHs, 8.5 kDa) were isolated from the American lobster Homarus americanus and identified by integration of MS-based bottom-up and top-down sequencing approaches. The IMS data acquired using our novel site-specific strategy localized the site of isomerization of l- to d-Phe at the third residue of the CHHs from the N-terminus. Collectively, this study demonstrates a new method for discovery of DAACPs using IMS technique with the ability to localize d-amino acid residues. PMID:24328107

  10. The cytotoxic activity of ursolic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao-Mei; Cai, Shao-Qing; Cui, Jing-Rong; Wang, Rui-Qing; Tu, Peng-Fei; Hattori, Masao; Daneshtalab, Mohsen

    2005-06-01

    Ursolic acid and 2alpha-hydroxyursolic acid isolated from apple peels were found to show growth inhibitory activity against four tumor cell lines, HL-60, BGC, Bel-7402 and Hela. Structural modifications were performed on the C-3, C-28 and C-11 positions of ursolic acid and the cytotoxicity of the derivatives was evaluated. The SAR revealed that the triterpenes possessing two hydrogen-bond forming groups (an H-donor and a carbonyl group) at positions 3 and 28 exhibit cytotoxic activity. The configuration at C-3 was found to be important for the activity. Introduction of an amino group increased the cytotoxicity greatly. A 3beta-amino derivative was 20 times more potent than the parent ursolic acid. The 28-aminoalkyl dimer compounds showed selective cytotoxicity.

  11. Urease inhibitory activities of β-boswellic acid derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Boswellia carterii have been used in traditional medicine for many years for management different gastrointestinal disorders. In this study, we wish to report urease inhibitory activity of four isolated compound of boswellic acid derivative. Methods 4 pentacyclic triterpenoid acids were isolated from Boswellia carterii and identified by NMR and Mass spectroscopic analysis (compounds 1, 3-O-acetyl-9,11-dehydro-β-boswellic acid; 2, 3-O-acetyl-11-hydroxy-β-boswellic acid; 3. 3-O- acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid and 4, 11-keto-β-boswellic acid. Their inhibitory activity on Jack bean urease were evaluated. Docking and pharmacophore analysis using AutoDock 4.2 and Ligandscout 3.03 programs were also performed to explain possible mechanism of interaction between isolated compounds and urease enzyme. Results It was found that compound 1 has the strongest inhibitory activity against Jack bean urease (IC50 = 6.27 ± 0.03 μM), compared with thiourea as a standard inhibitor (IC50 = 21.1 ± 0.3 μM). Conclusion The inhibition potency is probably due to the formation of appropriate hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions between the investigated compounds and urease enzyme active site and confirms its traditional usage. PMID:23351363

  12. Remedial action at the Acid/Pueblo Canyon site, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1984-10-01

    The Acid/Pueblo Canyon site (TA-45) was designated in 1976 for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). During the period 1943 to 1964 untreated and treated liquid wastes generated by nuclear weapons research activities at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) were discharged into the two canyons. A survey of the site conducted by LASL in 1976 to 1977 identified two areas where radiological contamination exceeded criteria levels. The selected remedial action was based on extensive radiological characterization and comprehensive engineering assessments and comprised the excavation and disposal of 390 yd/sup 3/ of contaminated soil and rock. This document describes the background to the remedial action, the parties involved in administering and executing it, the chronology of the work, verification of the adequacy of the remedial action, and the cost incurred. 14 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  13. A Sialic Acid Binding Site in a Human Picornavirus

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Martin; Hähnlein-Schick, Irmgard; Ekström, Jens-Ola; Arnberg, Niklas; Stehle, Thilo

    2014-01-01

    The picornaviruses coxsackievirus A24 variant (CVA24v) and enterovirus 70 (EV70) cause continued outbreaks and pandemics of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC), a highly contagious eye disease against which neither vaccines nor antiviral drugs are currently available. Moreover, these viruses can cause symptoms in the cornea, upper respiratory tract, and neurological impairments such as acute flaccid paralysis. EV70 and CVA24v are both known to use 5-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) for cell attachment, thus providing a putative link between the glycan receptor specificity and cell tropism and disease. We report the structures of an intact human picornavirus in complex with a range of glycans terminating in Neu5Ac. We determined the structure of the CVA24v to 1.40 Å resolution, screened different glycans bearing Neu5Ac for CVA24v binding, and structurally characterized interactions with candidate glycan receptors. Biochemical studies verified the relevance of the binding site and demonstrated a preference of CVA24v for α2,6-linked glycans. This preference can be rationalized by molecular dynamics simulations that show that α2,6-linked glycans can establish more contacts with the viral capsid. Our results form an excellent platform for the design of antiviral compounds to prevent AHC. PMID:25329320

  14. Multiple site-selective insertions of non-canonical amino acids into sequence-repetitive polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Wu, I-Lin; Patterson, Melissa A.; Carpenter Desai, Holly E.; Mehl, Ryan A.; Giorgi, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    A simple and efficient method is described for introduction of non-canonical amino acids at multiple, structurally defined sites within recombinant polypeptide sequences. E. coli MRA30, a bacterial host strain with attenuated activity for release factor 1 (RF1), is assessed for its ability to support the incorporation of a diverse range of non-canonical amino acids in response to multiple encoded amber (TAG) codons within genetic templates derived from superfolder GFP and an elastin-mimetic protein polymer. Suppression efficiency and isolated protein yield were observed to depend on the identity of the orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair and the non-canonical amino acid substrate. This approach afforded elastin-mimetic protein polymers containing non-canonical amino acid derivatives at up to twenty-two positions within the repeat sequence with high levels of substitution. The identity and position of the variant residues was confirmed by mass spectrometric analysis of the full-length polypeptides and proteolytic cleavage fragments resulting from thermolysin digestion. The accumulated data suggest that this multi-site suppression approach permits the preparation of protein-based materials in which novel chemical functionality can be introduced at precisely defined positions within the polypeptide sequence. PMID:23625817

  15. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  16. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Fatty acid binding sites of human and bovine albumins: Differences observed by spin probe ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muravsky, Vladimir; Gurachevskaya, Tatjana; Berezenko, Stephen; Schnurr, Kerstin; Gurachevsky, Andrey

    2009-09-01

    Bovine and human serum albumins and recombinant human albumin, all non-covalently complexed with 5- and 16-doxyl stearic acids, were investigated by ESR spectroscopy in solution over a range of pH values (5.5-8.0) and temperatures (25-50 °C), with respect to the allocation and mobility of fatty acid (FA) molecules bound to the proteins and conformation of the binding sites. In all proteins bound FA undergo a permanent intra-albumin migration between the binding sites and inter-domain residence. Nature identity of the recombinant human albumin to its serum-derived analog was observed. However, the binding sites of bovine albumin appeared shorter in length and wider in diameter than those of human albumin. Presumably, less tightly folded domains in bovine albumin allow better penetration of water molecules in the interior of the globule that resulted in higher activation energy of FA dissociation from the binding site. Thus, the sensitive technique based on ESR non-covalent spin labeling allowed quantitative analysis and reliable comparison of the fine features of binding proteins.

  18. Methane activation and oxidation in sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Goeppert, Alain; Dinér, Peter; Ahlberg, Per; Sommer, Jean

    2002-07-15

    The H/D exchange observed when methane is contacted with D(2)SO(4) at 270-330 degrees C shows that the alkane behaves as a sigma base and undergoes rapid and reversible protonation at this temperature. DFT studies of the hydrogen exchange between a monomer and a dimer of sulfuric acid and methane show that the transition states involved in the exchange are bifunctional, that is one hydrogen atom is transferred from a hydroxy group in sulfuric acid to methane, while one hydrogen atom is abstracted from methane by a non-hydroxy oxygen atom in sulfuric acid. All the transition states include a CH(5) moiety, which shows similarities to the methanium ion CH(5) (+). The calculated potential activation energy of the hydrogen exchange for the monomer is 174 kJ mol(-1), which is close to the experimental value (176 kJ mol(-1)). Solvation of the monomer and the transition state of the monomer with an extra sulfuric acid molecule, decrease the potential activation energy by 6 kJ mol(-1). The acid-base process is in competition, however, with an oxidative process involving methane and sulfuric acid which leads to CO(2), SO(2), and water, and thus to a decrease of acidity and loss of reactivity of the medium.

  19. Synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups on the hydrolysis of cellulose over activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Foo, Guo Shiou; Sievers, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    The chemical oxidation of activated carbon by H2 O2 and H2 SO4 is investigated, structural and chemical modifications are characterized, and the materials are used as catalysts for the hydrolysis of cellulose. Treatment with H2 O2 enlarges the pore size and imparts functional groups such as phenols, lactones, and carboxylic acids. H2 SO4 treatment targets the edges of carbon sheets primarily, and this effect is more pronounced with a higher temperature. Adsorption isotherms demonstrate that the adsorption of oligomers on functionalized carbon is dominated by van der Waals forces. The materials treated chemically are active for the hydrolysis of cellulose despite the relative weakness of most of their acid sites. It is proposed that a synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups enhances the activity by inducing a conformational change in the glucan chains if they are adsorbed at defect sites. This activates the glycosidic bonds for hydrolysis by in-plane functional groups.

  20. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  1. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  2. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  3. Characterization of lysosomal acid lipase by site-directed mutagenesis and heterologous expression.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, S; Du, H; Grabowski, G A

    1995-11-17

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) is essential for the hydrolysis of cholesterol esters and triglycerides that are delivered to the lysosomes via the low density lipoprotein receptor system. The deficiency of LAL is associated with cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) and Wolman's disease (WD). We cloned the human LAL cDNA and expressed the active enzyme in the baculovirus system. Two molecular forms (M(r) approximately 41,000 and approximately 46,000) with different glycosylation were found intracellularly, and approximately 24% of the M(r) approximately 46,000 form was secreted into the medium. Tunicamycin treatment produced only an inactive M(r) approximately 41,000 form. This result implicates glycosylation occupancy in the proper folding for active-site function. Catalytic activity was greater toward cis- than trans-unsaturated fatty acid esters of 4-methylumbelliferone and toward esters with 7-carbon length acyl chains. LAL cleaved cholesterol esters and mono-, tri-, and diglycerides. Heparin had a biphasic effect on enzymatic activity with initial activation followed by inhibition. Inhibition of LAL activity by tetrahydrolipstatin and diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate suggested the presence of active serines in binding/catalytic domain(s) of the protein. Site-directed mutagenesis at two putative active centers, GXSXG, showed that Ser153 was important to catalytic activity, whereas Ser99 was not and neither was the catalytic nucleophile. Three reported mutations (L179P, L336P, and delta AG302 deletion) from CESD patients were created and expressed in the Sf9 cell system. None cleaved cholesterol esters, and L179P and L336P cleaved only triolein at approximately 4% of wild-type levels. These results suggest that mechanisms, in addition to LAL defects, may operate in the selective accumulation of cholesterol esters or triglycerides in CESD and WD patients.

  4. Nitrous Acid at Concordia (Inland Site) and Dumont d'Urville (Costal Site), East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerbrat, M.; Legrand, M.; Preunkert, S.; Gallée, H.; Kleffman, J.

    2012-04-01

    One of the most recent important finding made in Antarctica after the discovery of the appearance of the Antarctic ozone hole in the early 80's was the discovery of a very oxidizing canopy over the South Pole region in relation with unexpected high levels of NO. There is a strong need however to extend investigations of the oxidation capacity of the lower atmosphere at the scale of the whole Antarctic continent, and in particular, over East Antarctica. That motivated the OPALE (Oxidant Production over Antarctic Land and its Export) project. Indeed the limited data gained by using aircraft sampling during ANTCI 2003 suggest that over the East Antarctic plateau even higher NO emissions persist. Among several not yet resolved questions related to the high level of oxidants over Antarctica is the role of nitrous acid (HONO). During the austral summer 2010/2011 the levels of nitrous acid (HONO) were for the first time investigated at Concordia (75°06'S, 123°33'E) and Dumont D'Urville (66°40'S, 140°01'E), two stations located in East Antarctica. Also for the first time in Antarctica, HONO was measured by deploying a long path absorption photometer (LOPAP). At Concordia, from the end of December 2010 to mid January 2011 HONO mixing ratios at 1 m above the snow surface ranged between 5 and 60 pptv. Diurnal cycles were observed with levels peaking in the morning (06:30 to 07:30) and the evening (19:00 to 20:00). At Dumont d'Urville, background mixing ratios close to 2 pptv were observed in February 2011. No clear diurnal cycles were observed at that site but several events of air masses export from inland Antarctica were encountered with enhanced HONO levels reaching 10 pptv at night. These first HONO data gained in East Antarctica are discussed in terms of sources and sinks along with synoptic weather conditions.

  5. Characterization of the binding sites for dicarboxylic acids on bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Tonsgard, J H; Meredith, S C

    1991-01-01

    Dicarboxylic acids are prominent features of several diseases, including Reye's syndrome and inborn errors of mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. Moreover, dicarboxylic acids are potentially toxic to cellular processes. Previous studies [Tonsgard, Mendelson & Meredith (1988) J. Clin. Invest. 82, 1567-1573] demonstrated that long-chain dicarboxylic acids have a single high-affinity binding site and between one and three lower-affinity sites on albumin. Medium-chain-length dicarboxylic acids have a single low-affinity site. We further characterized dicarboxylic acid binding to albumin in order to understand the potential effects of drugs and other ligands on dicarboxylic acid binding and toxicity. Progesterone and oleate competitively inhibit octadecanedioic acid binding to the single high-affinity site. Octanoate inhibits binding to the low-affinity sites. Dansylated probes for subdomain 2AB inhibit dodecanedioic acid binding whereas probes for subdomain 3AB do not. In contrast, low concentrations of octadecanedioic acid inhibit the binding of dansylated probes to subdomain 3AB and 2AB. L-Tryptophan, which binds in subdomain 3AB, inhibits hexadecanedioic acid binding but has no effect on dodecanedioic acid. Bilirubin and acetylsalicylic acid, which bind in subdomain 2AB, inhibit the binding of medium-chain and long-chain dicarboxylic acids. Our results suggest that long-chain dicarboxylic acids bind in subdomains 2C, 3AB and 2AB. The single low-affinity binding site for medium-chain dicarboxylic acids is in subdomain 2AB. These studies suggest that dicarboxylic acids are likely to be unbound in disease states and may be potentially toxic. PMID:2064600

  6. Highly selective Lewis acid sites in desilicated MFI zeolites for dihydroxyacetone isomerization to lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Dapsens, Pierre Y; Mondelli, Cecilia; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2013-05-01

    Desilication of commercial MFI-type (ZSM-5) zeolites in solutions of alkali metal hydroxides is demonstrated to generate highly selective heterogeneous catalysts for the aqueous-phase isomerization of biobased dihydroxyacetone (DHA) to lactic acid (LA). The best hierarchical ZSM-5 sample attains a LA selectivity exceeding 90 %, which is comparable to that of the state-of-the-art catalyst (i.e., the Sn-beta zeolite); this optimized hierarchical catalyst is recyclable over three runs. The Lewis acid sites, which are created through desilication along with the introduction of mesoporosity, are shown to play a crucial role in the formation of the desired product; these cannot be achieved by using other post-synthetic methods, such as steaming or impregnation of aluminum species. Desilication of other metallosilicates, such as Ga-MFI, also leads to high LA selectivity. In the presence of a soluble aluminum source, such as aluminum nitrate, alkaline-assisted alumination can introduce these unique Lewis acid centers in all-silica MFI zeolites. These findings highlight the potential of zeolites in the field of biomass-to-chemical conversion, and expand the applicability of desilication for the generation of selective catalytic centers.

  7. Eicosapentaenoic Acid Modulates Trichomonas vaginalis Activity.

    PubMed

    Korosh, Travis; Jordan, Kelsey D; Wu, Ja-Shin; Yarlett, Nigel; Upmacis, Rita K

    2016-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a sexually transmitted parasite and, while it is often asymptomatic in males, the parasite is associated with disease in both sexes. Metronidazole is an effective treatment for trichomoniasis, but resistant strains have evolved and, thus, it has become necessary to investigate other possible therapies. In this study, we examined the effects of native and oxidized forms of the sodium salts of eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic, and arachidonic acids on T. vaginalis activity. Eicosapentaenoic acid was the most toxic with 190 and 380 μM causing approximately 90% cell death in Casu2 and ATCC 50142 strains, respectively. In contrast, oxidized eicosapentaenoic acid was the least toxic, requiring > 3 mM to inhibit activity, while low levels (10 μM) were associated with increased parasite density. Mass spectrometric analysis of oxidized eicosapentaenoic acid revealed C20 products containing one to six additional oxygen atoms and various degrees of bond saturation. These results indicate that eicosapentaenoic acid has different effects on T. vaginalis survival, depending on whether it is present in the native or oxidized form. A better understanding of lipid metabolism in T. vaginalis may facilitate the design of synthetic fatty acids that are effective for the treatment of metronidazole-resistant T. vaginalis.

  8. Site-specific PEGylation of lidamycin and its antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Shang, Boyang; Hu, Lei; Shao, Rongguang; Zhen, Yongsu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, N-terminal site-specific mono-PEGylation of the recombinant lidamycin apoprotein (rLDP) of lidamycin (LDM) was prepared using a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) derivative (Mw 20 kDa) through a reactive terminal aldehyde group under weak acidic conditions (pH 5.5). The biochemical properties of mPEG-rLDP-AE, an enediyne-integrated conjugate, were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, SEC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of mPEG-rLDP-AE was evaluated by MTT assays and in xenograft model. The results indicated that mPEG-rLDP-AE showed significant antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. After PEGylation, mPEG-rLDP still retained the binding capability to the enediyne AE and presented the physicochemical characteristics similar to that of native LDP. It is of interest that the PEGylation did not diminish the antitumor efficacy of LDM, implying the possibility that this derivative may function as a payload to deliver novel tumor-targeted drugs. PMID:26579455

  9. Perspective: On the active site model in computational catalyst screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Karsten; Plaisance, Craig P.; Oberhofer, Harald; Andersen, Mie

    2017-01-01

    First-principles screening approaches exploiting energy trends in surface adsorption represent an unparalleled success story in recent computational catalysis research. Here we argue that our still limited understanding of the structure of active sites is one of the major bottlenecks towards an ever extended and reliable use of such computational screening for catalyst discovery. For low-index transition metal surfaces, the prevalently chosen high-symmetry (terrace and step) sites offered by the nominal bulk-truncated crystal lattice might be justified. For more complex surfaces and composite catalyst materials, computational screening studies will need to actively embrace a considerable uncertainty with respect to what truly are the active sites. By systematically exploring the space of possible active site motifs, such studies might eventually contribute towards a targeted design of optimized sites in future catalysts.

  10. Diffusional correlations among multiple active sites in a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-04-07

    Simulations of the enzymatic dynamics of a model enzyme containing multiple substrate binding sites indicate the existence of diffusional correlations in the chemical reactivity of the active sites. A coarse-grain, particle-based, mesoscopic description of the system, comprising the enzyme, the substrate, the product and solvent, is constructed to study these effects. The reactive and non-reactive dynamics is followed using a hybrid scheme that combines molecular dynamics for the enzyme, substrate and product molecules with multiparticle collision dynamics for the solvent. It is found that the reactivity of an individual active site in the multiple-active-site enzyme is reduced substantially, and this effect is analyzed and attributed to diffusive competition for the substrate among the different active sites in the enzyme.

  11. Robotics at Savannah River site: activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.S.

    1984-09-01

    The objectives of the Robotics Technology Group at the Savannah River Laboratory are to employ modern industrial robots and to develop unique automation and robotic systems to enhance process operations at the Savannah River site (SRP and SRL). The incentives are to improve safety, reduce personnel radiation exposure, improve product quality and productivity, and to reduce operating costs. During the past year robotic systems have been installed to fill chemical dilution vials in a SRP laboratory at 772-F and remove radioactive waste materials in the SRL Californium Production Facility at 773-A. A robotic system to lubricate an extrusion press has been developed and demonstrated in the SRL robotics laboratory and is scheduled for installation at the 321-M fuel fabrication area. A mobile robot was employed by SRP for a radiation monitoring task at a waste tank top in H-Area. Several other robots are installed in the SRL robotics laboratories and application development programs are underway. The status of these applications is presented in this report.

  12. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  13. Identification of inhibitors against the potential ligandable sites in the active cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Aditi; Datta, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    The active cholera toxin responsible for the massive loss of water and ions in cholera patients via its ADP ribosylation activity is a heterodimer of the A1 subunit of the bacterial holotoxin and the human cytosolic ARF6 (ADP Ribosylation Factor 6). The active toxin is a potential target for the design of inhibitors against cholera. In this study we identified the potential ligandable sites of the active cholera toxin which can serve as binding sites for drug-like molecules. By employing an energy-based approach to identify ligand binding sites, and comparison with the results of computational solvent mapping, we identified two potential ligandable sites in the active toxin which can be targeted during structure-based drug design against cholera. Based on the probe affinities of the identified ligandable regions, docking-based virtual screening was employed to identify probable inhibitors against these sites. Several indole-based alkaloids and phosphates showed strong interactions to the important residues of the ligandable region at the A1 active site. On the other hand, 26 top scoring hits were identified against the ligandable region at the A1 ARF6 interface which showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions, including guanidines, phosphates, Leucopterin and Aristolochic acid VIa. This study has important implications in the application of hybrid structure-based and ligand-based methods against the identified ligandable sites using the identified inhibitors as reference ligands, for drug design against the active cholera toxin.

  14. A Variable Active Site Residue Influences the Kinetics of Response Regulator Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Immormino, Robert M; Silversmith, Ruth E; Bourret, Robert B

    2016-10-04

    Two-component regulatory systems, minimally composed of a sensor kinase and a response regulator protein, are common mediators of signal transduction in microorganisms. All response regulators contain a receiver domain with conserved active site residues that catalyze the signal activating and deactivating phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions. We explored the impact of variable active site position T+1 (one residue C-terminal to the conserved Thr/Ser) on reaction kinetics and signaling fidelity, using wild type and mutant Escherichia coli CheY, CheB, and NarL to represent the three major sequence classes observed across response regulators: Ala/Gly, Ser/Thr, and Val/Ile/Met, respectively, at T+1. Biochemical and structural data together suggested that different amino acids at T+1 impacted reaction kinetics by altering access to the active site while not perturbing overall protein structure. A given amino acid at position T+1 had similar effects on autodephosphorylation in each protein background tested, likely by modulating access of the attacking water molecule to the active site. Similarly, rate constants for CheY autophosphorylation with three different small molecule phosphodonors were consistent with the steric constraints on access to the phosphorylation site arising from combination of specific phosphodonors with particular amino acids at T+1. Because other variable active site residues also influence response regulator phosphorylation biochemistry, we began to explore how context (here, the amino acid at T+2) affected the influence of position T+1 on CheY autocatalytic reactions. Finally, position T+1 affected the fidelity and kinetics of phosphotransfer between sensor kinases and response regulators but was not a primary determinant of their interaction.

  15. A comparison of copper and acid site zeolites for the production of nitric oxide for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Russell, Samantha E; González Carballo, Juan María; Orellana-Tavra, Claudia; Fairen-Jimenez, David; Morris, Russell E

    2017-03-21

    Copper-exchanged and acidic zeolites are shown to produce nitric oxide (NO) from a nitrite source in biologically active (nanomolar) concentrations. Four zeolites were studied; mordenite, ferrierite, ZSM-5 and SSZ-13, which had varying pore size, channel systems and Si/Al ratios. ZSM-5 and SSZ-13 produced the highest amounts of NO in both the copper and acid form. The high activity and regeneration of the copper active sites makes them good candidates for long-term NO production. Initial cytotoxicity tests have shown at least one of the copper zeolites (Cu-SSZ-13) to be biocompatible, highlighting the potential usage within biomedical applications.

  16. Discovery of a novel activator of 5-lipoxygenase from an anacardic acid derived compound collection

    PubMed Central

    Wisastra, Rosalina; Kok, Petra A.M; Eleftheriadis, Nikolaos; Baumgartner, Matthew P.; Camacho, Carlos J.; Haisma, Hidde J.; Dekker, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) and cyclooxygenases (COXs) metabolize poly-unsaturated fatty acids into inflammatory signaling molecules. Modulation of the activity of these enzymes may provide new approaches for therapy of inflammatory diseases. In this study, we screened novel anacardic acid derivatives as modulators of human 5-LOX and COX-2 activity. Interestingly, a novel salicylate derivative 23a was identified as a surprisingly potent activator of human 5-LOX. This compound showed both non-competitive activation towards the human 5-LOX activator adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and non-essential mixed type activation against the substrate linoleic acid, while having no effect on the conversion of the substrate arachidonic acid. The kinetic analysis demonstrated a non-essential activation of the linoleic acid conversion with a KA of 8.65 μM, αKA of 0.38 μM and a β value of 1.76. It is also of interest that a comparable derivative 23d showed a mixed type inhibition for linoleic acid conversion. These observations indicate the presence of an allosteric binding site in human 5-LOX distinct from the ATP binding site. The activatory and inhibitory behavior of 23a and 23d on the conversion of linoleic compared to arachidonic acid are rationalized by docking studies, which suggest that the activator 23a stabilizes linoleic acid, whereas the larger inhibitor 23d blocks the enzyme active site. PMID:24231650

  17. Fatty acid composition differences between adipose depot sites in dairy and beef steer breeds.

    PubMed

    Liu, T; Lei, Z M; Wu, J P; Brown, M A

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study was to compare fatty acid composition of longissimus dorsi (LD) and kidney fat (KF) in Holstein steers (HS), Simmental steers (SS) and Chinese LongDong Yellow Cattle steers (CLD). All steers received the same nutrition and management but in different locations. Cattle were harvested at approximately 550 kg and fatty acid composition of longissimus dorsi and kidney fat was analyzed in samples taken after 3 days of aging. There was evidence (P < 0.05) that C18:3n6 was greater in KF than LD in CLD cattle but not in HS or SS cattle. Percentage C18:1n9, C18:2n6, C18:3n3, and n6 fatty acids were greater in LD than KF for all breeds (P < 0.05), but the difference between fat sources for n6 in CLD cattle was smaller than the other two breeds. The LD had greater percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), and a greater ratio of n6:n3 PUFAs compared to the KF in each breed (P < 0.05). The △(9)-desaturase catalytic activity index was greater in LD than in KF in each breed group (P < 0.05). Percentage cis-9, trans-11 CLA was greater in KF than LD in HS (P < 0.05) but not SS or CLD cattle. These results indicate fatty acid percentages generally differed between longissimus dorsi fat and kidney fat. Further, there was some indication that some of these differences between fatty acid deposition sites were not consistent across breed group.

  18. Methane to acetic acid over Cu-exchanged zeolites: mechanistic insights from a site-specific carbonylation reaction.

    PubMed

    Narsimhan, Karthik; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Mathies, Guinevere; Gunther, William R; Griffin, Robert G; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-02-11

    The selective low temperature oxidation of methane is an attractive yet challenging pathway to convert abundant natural gas into value added chemicals. Copper-exchanged ZSM-5 and mordenite (MOR) zeolites have received attention due to their ability to oxidize methane into methanol using molecular oxygen. In this work, the conversion of methane into acetic acid is demonstrated using Cu-MOR by coupling oxidation with carbonylation reactions. The carbonylation reaction, known to occur predominantly in the 8-membered ring (8MR) pockets of MOR, is used as a site-specific probe to gain insight into important mechanistic differences existing between Cu-MOR and Cu-ZSM-5 during methane oxidation. For the tandem reaction sequence, Cu-MOR generated drastically higher amounts of acetic acid when compared to Cu-ZSM-5 (22 vs 4 μmol/g). Preferential titration with sodium showed a direct correlation between the number of acid sites in the 8MR pockets in MOR and acetic acid yield, indicating that methoxy species present in the MOR side pockets undergo carbonylation. Coupled spectroscopic and reactivity measurements were used to identify the genesis of the oxidation sites and to validate the migration of methoxy species from the oxidation site to the carbonylation site. Our results indicate that the Cu(II)-O-Cu(II) sites previously associated with methane oxidation in both Cu-MOR and Cu-ZSM-5 are oxidation active but carbonylation inactive. In turn, combined UV-vis and EPR spectroscopic studies showed that a novel Cu(2+) site is formed at Cu/Al <0.2 in MOR. These sites oxidize methane and promote the migration of the product to a Brønsted acid site in the 8MR to undergo carbonylation.

  19. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA

    2011-12-06

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  20. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  1. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA

    2011-03-22

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  2. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2008-10-07

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  3. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2009-04-28

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  4. Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: why selenoproteins?

    PubMed

    Gromer, Stephan; Johansson, Linda; Bauer, Holger; Arscott, L David; Rauch, Susanne; Ballou, David P; Williams, Charles H; Schirmer, R Heiner; Arnér, Elias S J

    2003-10-28

    Selenium, an essential trace element for mammals, is incorporated into a selected class of selenoproteins as selenocysteine. All known isoenzymes of mammalian thioredoxin (Trx) reductases (TrxRs) employ selenium in the C-terminal redox center -Gly-Cys-Sec-Gly-COOH for reduction of Trx and other substrates, whereas the corresponding sequence in Drosophila melanogaster TrxR is -Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser-COOH. Surprisingly, the catalytic competence of these orthologous enzymes is similar, whereas direct Sec-to-Cys substitution of mammalian TrxR, or other selenoenzymes, yields almost inactive enzyme. TrxRs are therefore ideal for studying the biology of selenocysteine by comparative enzymology. Here we show that the serine residues flanking the C-terminal Cys residues of Drosophila TrxRs are responsible for activating the cysteines to match the catalytic efficiency of a selenocysteine-cysteine pair as in mammalian TrxR, obviating the need for selenium. This finding suggests that the occurrence of selenoenzymes, which implies that the organism is selenium-dependent, is not necessarily associated with improved enzyme efficiency. Our data suggest that the selective advantage of selenoenzymes is a broader range of substrates and a broader range of microenvironmental conditions in which enzyme activity is possible.

  5. The Structure and Density of Mo and Acid Sites in Mo-ExchangedH-ZSMZ Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Borry III, Richard W.; Kim, Young Ho; Huffsmith, Anne; Reimer,Jeffrey A.; Iglesia, Enrique

    1999-03-01

    Mo/H-ZSM5 (1.0-6.3 wt percent Mo; Mo/Al = 0.11-0.68) catalysts for CH4 aromatization were prepared from physical mixtures of MoO3 and H-ZSM5 (Si/Al= 14.3). X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis of physical mixtures treated in air indicate that MoOx species migrate onto the external ZSM5 surface at about 623 K. Between 773 and 973 K, MoOx species migrate inside zeolite channels via surface and gas phase transport, exchange at acid sites, and react to form H2O. The amount of H2O evolved during exchange and the amount of residual OH groups detected by isotopic equilibration with D2 showed that each Mo atom replaces one H+ during exchange. This stoichiometry and the requirement for charge compensation suggest that exchanged species consist of (Mo2O5)2+ditetrahedral structures interacting with two cation exchange sites. The proposed mechanism may provide a general framework to describe the exchange of multivalent cations onto Al sites in zeolites. As the Mo concentration exceeds that required to form a MoOx monolayer on the external zeolite surface ({approx}4 wt percent Mo for the H-ZSM5 used), Mo species sublime as (MoO3)n oligomers or extract Al from the zeolite framework to form inactive Al2(MoO4)3 domains detectable by 27Al NMR. These (Mo2O5)2+ species reduce to form the active MoCx species during the initial stages of CH4 conversion reactions. Optimum CH4 aromatization rates were obtained on catalysts with intermediate Mo contents ({approx}0.4Mo/Al), because both MoCx and acid sites are required to activate CH4 and to convert the initial C2H4 products into C6+ aromatics favored by thermodynamics.

  6. Fabrication of hydrophobic polymer foams with double acid sites on surface of macropore for conversion of carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jianming; Mao, Yanli; Gao, Heping; Xiong, Qingang; Qiu, Fengxian; Zhang, Tao; Niu, Xiangheng

    2016-06-05

    Herein we reported a simple and novel synthetic strategy for the fabrication of two kinds of hydrophobic polymer foam catalysts (i.e. Cr(3+)-HPFs-1-H(+) and HPFs-1-H(+)) with hierarchical porous structure, inhomogeneous acidic composition and Lewis-Brønsted double acid sites distributed on the surface, which was used to one-pot conversion of carbohydrate (such as cellulose, glucose and fructose) to a key chemical platform (i.e. 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, HMF). The water-in-oil (W/O) high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs), stabilized by both Span 80 and acidic prepolymers as analogous particles offered the acidic actives, were used as the template for simultaneous polymerization of oil phase in the presence of divinylbenzene (DVB) and styrene (St). After subsequent ion-exchange process, Lewis and Brønsted acid sites derived from exchanged Cr(3+) and H(+) ion were both fixed on the surface of cell of the catalysts. The HPFs-1-H(+) and Cr(3+)-HPFs-1-H(+) had similar hierarchical porous, hydrophobic surface and acid sites (HPFs-1-H(+) with macropores ranging from 0.1 μm to 20 μm, uniform mesopores in 14.4 nm, water contact angle of 122° and 0.614 mmolg(-1) of Brønsted acid sites, as well as Cr(3+)-HPFs-1-H(+) with macropores ranging from 0.1 μm to 20 μm, uniform mesopores in 13.3 nm, water contact angle of 136° and 0.638 mmolg(-1) of Lewis-Brønsted acid sites). It was confirmed that Lewis acid sites of catalyst had a slight influence on the HMF yield of fructose came from the function of Brønsted acid sites, and Lewis acid sites were in favor of improving the HMF yield from cellulose and glucose. This work opens up a simple and novel route to synthesize multifunctional polymeric catalysts for efficient one-pot conversion of carbohydrate to HMF.

  7. Microbial killing activity of peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Thamlikitkul, V; Trakulsomboon, S; Louisirirotchanakul, S; Chaiprasert, A; Foongladda, S; Thipsuvan, K; Arjratanakool, W; Kunyok, R; Wasi, C; Santiprasitkul, S; Danchaivijitr, S

    2001-10-01

    In vitro killing activity of peracetic acid (Perasafe) at a concentration of 0.26 per cent w/v was tested against Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Salmonella paratyphi A, Acinetobacter baumannii, Sternotrophomonas maltophilia, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Bacillus subtilis spore, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human immuno-deficiency virus type I. Exposure to Peracetic acid (0.26% w/v) for 10 minutes resulted in massive killing of all the aforementioned organisms and spore.

  8. Structural characterization of single nucleotide variants at ligand binding sites and enzyme active sites of human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kazunori D.; Nishi, Hafumi; Nakata, Junichi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    Functional sites on proteins play an important role in various molecular interactions and reactions between proteins and other molecules. Thus, mutations in functional sites can severely affect the overall phenotype. Progress of genome sequencing projects has yielded a wealth of information on single nucleotide variants (SNVs), especially those with less than 1% minor allele frequency (rare variants). To understand the functional influence of genetic variants at a protein level, we investigated the relationship between SNVs and protein functional sites in terms of minor allele frequency and the structural position of variants. As a result, we observed that SNVs were less abundant at ligand binding sites, which is consistent with a previous study on SNVs and protein interaction sites. Additionally, we found that non-rare variants tended to be located slightly apart from enzyme active sites. Examination of non-rare variants revealed that most of the mutations resulted in moderate changes of the physico-chemical properties of amino acids, suggesting the existence of functional constraints. In conclusion, this study shows that the mapping of genetic variants on protein structures could be a powerful approach to evaluate the functional impact of rare genetic variations. PMID:27924270

  9. Community Update on Site Activities, July 19, 2013

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In an effort to engage and inform community members interested in the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site cleanup, EPA will be issuing periodic topic-based fact sheets that will provide background information and updates about ongoing activities.

  10. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions.

  11. Elucidating the structure of surface acid sites on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

    SciTech Connect

    Chupas, P. J.; Chapman, K. W.; Halder, G. J.

    2011-05-12

    Differential pair distribution function analysis was applied to resolve, with crystallographic detail, the structure of catalytic sites on the surface of nanoscale {gamma}-Al{sup 2}O{sub 3}. The structure was determined for a basic probe molecule, monomethylamine (MMA), bound at the minority Lewis acid sites. These active sites were found to be five-coordinate, forming distorted octahedra upon MMA binding. This approach could be applied to study the interaction of molecules at surfaces in dye-sensitized solar cells, nanoparticles, sensors, materials for waste remediation, and catalysts.

  12. Pore architecture and ion sites in acid-sensing ion channels and P2X receptors.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Eric B; Kawate, Toshimitsu; Gouaux, Eric

    2009-07-30

    Acid-sensing ion channels are proton-activated, sodium-selective channels composed of three subunits, and are members of the superfamily of epithelial sodium channels, mechanosensitive and FMRF-amide peptide-gated ion channels. These ubiquitous eukaryotic ion channels have essential roles in biological activities as diverse as sodium homeostasis, taste and pain. Despite their crucial roles in biology and their unusual trimeric subunit stoichiometry, there is little knowledge of the structural and chemical principles underlying their ion channel architecture and ion-binding sites. Here we present the structure of a functional acid-sensing ion channel in a desensitized state at 3 A resolution, the location and composition of the approximately 8 A 'thick' desensitization gate, and the trigonal antiprism coordination of caesium ions bound in the extracellular vestibule. Comparison of the acid-sensing ion channel structure with the ATP-gated P2X(4) receptor reveals similarity in pore architecture and aqueous vestibules, suggesting that there are unanticipated yet common structural and mechanistic principles.

  13. NH3 adsorption on the Lewis and Bronsted acid sites of MoO3 (0 1 0) surface: A cluster DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Fan, Junyan; Zuo, Zhijun; Li, Zhe; Zhang, Jinshan

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption of NH3 on the Lewis and Bronsted acid sites of MoO3 (0 1 0) surface has been investigated based on the density functional theory (DFT) method using the clusters models. The calculated results indicate that NH3 could strongly adsorb on both the Lewis and Bronsted acid sites in the form of NH3 species and NH4+ respectively, whereas the adsorption on the Lewis acid site is found to be more favorable energetically than that on the Bronsted acid site. For the Lewis acid site Mulliken population analysis shows a donation of lone pairs from NH3 to the surface and activation of N-H bond. The overlaps of N-s, N-p and Mo-d orbitals suggest the strong interaction between N and Mo atoms. For the Bronsted acid site N-H bond is also activated by the formation of NH4+ species. The hybridizations between H and O atoms as well as N and H atoms are the major reasons for strong chemical adsorption of NH3 and the existence of NH4+ species, which partly attributed to the presence of N-H… O hydrogen bonds. Furthermore, the formation of a second Lewis acid site at adjacent or diagonal site results in slight changes of adsorption stability, structural changes and charge redistributions, suggesting its small influence on NH3 adsorption.

  14. Acidic Properties and Structure-Activity Correlations of Solid Acid Catalysts Revealed by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Li, Shenhui; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2016-04-19

    Solid acid materials with tunable structural and acidic properties are promising heterogeneous catalysts for manipulating and/or emulating the activity and selectivity of industrially important catalytic reactions. On the other hand, the performances of acid-catalyzed reactions are mostly dictated by the acidic features, namely, type (Brønsted vs Lewis acidity), amount, strength, and local environment of acid sites. The latter is relevant to their location (intra- vs extracrystalline), and possible confinement and Brønsted-Lewis acid synergy effects that may strongly affect the host-guest interactions, reaction mechanism, and shape selectivity of the catalytic system. This account aims to highlight some important applications of state-of-the-art solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques for exploring the structural and acidic properties of solid acid catalysts as well as their catalytic performances and relevant reaction pathway invoked. In addition, density functional theory (DFT) calculations may be exploited in conjunction with experimental SSNMR studies to verify the structure-activity correlations of the catalytic system at a microscopic scale. We describe in this Account the developments and applications of advanced ex situ and/or in situ SSNMR techniques, such as two-dimensional (2D) double-quantum magic-angle spinning (DQ MAS) homonuclear correlation spectroscopy for structural investigation of solid acids as well as study of their acidic properties. Moreover, the energies and electronic structures of the catalysts and detailed catalytic reaction processes, including the identification of reaction species, elucidation of reaction mechanism, and verification of structure-activity correlations, made available by DFT theoretical calculations were also discussed. Relevant discussions will focus primarily on results obtained from our laboratories in the past decade, including (i) quantitative and qualitative acidity characterization utilizing assorted probe molecules

  15. Interaction of metal ions with acid sites of biosorbents peat moss and Vaucheria and model substances alginic and humic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Crist, R.H.; Martin, J.R.; Crist, D.R.

    1999-07-01

    The interaction between added metal ions and acid sites of two biosorbents, peat moss and the alga Vaucheria, was studied. Results were interpreted in terms of two model substances, alginic acid, a copolymer of guluronic and mannuronic acids present in marine algae, and humic acid in peat moss. For peat moss and Vaucheria at pH 4--6, two protons were displaced per Cd sorbed, after correction for sorbed metals also displaced by the heavy metal. The frequent neglect of exchange of heavy metals for metals either sorbed on the native material or added for pH adjustment leads to erroneous conclusions about proton displacement stoichiometry. Proton displacement constants K{sub ex}{sup H} decreased logarithmically with pH and had similar slopes for alginic acid and biosorbents. This pH effect was interpreted as an electrostatic effect of increasing anionic charge making proton removal less favorable. The maximum number of exchangeable acid sites (capacity C{sub H}) decreased with pH for alginic acid but increased with pH for biosorbents. Consistent with titration behavior, this difference was explained in terms of more weak acid sites in the biosorbents.

  16. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  17. Locating the binding sites of folic acid with milk α- and β-caseins.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, P; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2012-01-12

    We located the binding sites of folic acid with milk α- and β-caseins at physiological conditions, using constant protein concentration and various folic acid contents. FTIR, UV-visible, and fluorescence spectroscopic methods as well as molecular modeling were used to analyze folic acid binding sites, the binding constant, and the effect of folic acid interaction on the stability and conformation of caseins. Structural analysis showed that folic acid binds caseins via both hydrophilic and hydrophobic contacts with overall binding constants of K(folic acid-α-caseins) = 4.8 (±0.6) × 10(4) M(-1) and K(folic acid-β-caseins) = 7.0 (±0.9) × 10(4) M(-1). The number of bound acid molecules per protein was 1.5 (±0.4) for α-casein and 1.4 (±0.3) for β-casein complexes. Molecular modeling showed different binding sites for folic acid on α- and β-caseins. The participation of several amino acids in folic acid-protein complexes was observed, which was stabilized by hydrogen bonding network and the free binding energy of -7.7 kcal/mol (acid-α-casein) and -8.1 kcal/mol (acid-β-casein). Folic acid complexation altered protein secondary structure by the reduction of α-helix from 35% (free α-casein) to 33% (acid-complex) and 32% (free β-casein) to 26% (acid-complex) indicating a partial protein destabilization. Caseins might act as carriers for transportation of folic acid to target molecules.

  18. Transportation impact analysis for the shipment of low specific activity nitric acid. Revisison 1

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.R.

    1995-05-16

    This is in support of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility Low Specific Activity (LSA) Nitric Acid Shipment Environmental Assessment. It analyzes potential toxicological and radiological risks associated with transportation of PUREX Facility LSA Nitric Acid from the Hanford Site to Portsmouth VA, Baltimore MD, and Port Elizabeth NJ.

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF INDIVIDUAL CHEMICAL REACTIONS CONSUMING ACID DURING NUCLEAR WASTE PROCESSING AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 136B

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Lambert, D.; Newell, J.; Stone, M.

    2009-09-02

    Conversion of legacy radioactive high-level waste at the Savannah River Site into a stable glass waste form involves a chemical pretreatment process to prepare the waste for vitrification. Waste slurry is treated with nitric and formic acids to achieve certain goals. The total quantity of acid added to a batch of waste slurry is constrained by the catalytic activity of trace noble metal fission products in the waste that can convert formic acid into hydrogen gas at many hundreds of times the radiolytic hydrogen generation rate. A large block of experimental process simulations were performed to characterize the chemical reactions that consume acid prior to hydrogen generation. The analysis led to a new equation for predicting the quantity of acid required to process a given volume of waste slurry.

  20. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  1. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide.

  2. Dynamic HypA zinc site is essential for acid viability and proper urease maturation in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ryan C.; Hu, Heidi Q.; Merrell, D. Scott; Maroney, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori requires urease activity in order to survive in the acid environment of the human stomach. Urease is regulated in part by nickelation, a process that requires the HypA protein, which is a putative nickel metallochaperone that is generally associated with hydrogenase maturation. However, in H. pylori, HypA plays a dual role. In addition to an N-terminal nickel binding site, HypA proteins also contain a structural zinc site that is coordinated by two rigorously conserved CXXC sequences, which in H. pylori are flanked by His residues. These structural Zn sites are known to be dynamic, converting from Zn(Cys)4 centers at pH 7.2 to Zn(Cys)2(His)2 centers at pH 6.3 in the presence of Ni(II) ions. In this study, mutant strains of H. pylori that express zinc site variants of the HypA protein are used to show that the structural changes in the zinc site are important for the acid viability of the bacterium, and that a reduction in acid viability in these variants can be traced in large measure to deficient urease activity. This in turn leads to a model that connects the Zn(Cys)4 coordination to urease maturation. PMID:25608738

  3. Antineoplastic activity of zoledronic acid and denosumab.

    PubMed

    Zwolak, Pawel; Dudek, Arkadiusz Z

    2013-08-01

    Cancer patients suffer from cancer-induced bone pain, hypercalcemia, and reduced quality of life caused by pathological fractures. Many of these complications related to cancer can be treated, or at least controlled, using new anticancer agents. Recently, two agents used initially to treat osteoporosis demonstrated direct and indirect anticancer activity. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about direct and indirect anticancer activity of zoledronic acid (a third-generation bisphosphonate), and denosumab antibody against RANKL. Zoledronic acid influences the proliferation and viability of tumor cells in vitro, and effectively reduces tumor burden, tumor-induced pain, and tumor growth in vivo. Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody preventing the binding of RANKL to its receptor on osteoclasts' membrane, and through this mechanism inhibits the resorption of the bone. Furthermore, this agent demonstrates direct anticancer activity through the RANKL signaling pathway. Because of these features both drugs may gain broader application for the treatment of cancer patients. However, further pre-clinical and clinical evaluation is needed for both agents to fully assess the antineoplastic mechanisms of activity of both agents.

  4. Evaluation Of Sludge Heel Dissolution Efficiency With Oxalic Acid Cleaning At Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Sudduth, Christie; Vitali, Jason; Keefer, Mark

    2014-01-08

    The chemical cleaning process baseline strategy at the Savannah River Site was revised to improve efficiency during future execution of the process based on lessons learned during previous bulk oxalic acid cleaning activities and to account for operational constraints imposed by safety basis requirements. These improvements were also intended to transcend the difficulties that arise from waste removal in higher rheological yield stress sludge tanks. Tank 12 implemented this improved strategy and the bulk oxalic acid cleaning efforts concluded in July 2013. The Tank 12 radiological removal results were similar to previous bulk oxalic acid cleaning campaigns despite the fact that Tank 12 contained higher rheological yield stress sludge that would make removal more difficult than the sludge treated in previous cleaning campaigns. No appreciable oxalate precipitation occurred during the cleaning process in Tank 12 compared to previous campaigns, which aided in the net volume reduction of 75-80%. Overall, the controls established for Tank 12 provide a template for an improved cleaning process.

  5. Site directed mutagenesis of StSUT1 reveals target amino acids of regulation and stability.

    PubMed

    Krügel, Undine; Wiederhold, Elena; Pustogowa, Jelena; Hackel, Aleksandra; Grimm, Bernhard; Kühn, Christina

    2013-11-01

    Plant sucrose transporters (SUTs) are functional as sucrose-proton-cotransporters with an optimal transport activity in the acidic pH range. Recently, the pH optimum of the Solanum tuberosum sucrose transporter StSUT1 was experimentally determined to range at an unexpectedly low pH of 3 or even below. Various research groups have confirmed these surprising findings independently and in different organisms. Here we provide further experimental evidence for a pH optimum at physiological extrema. Site directed mutagenesis provides information about functional amino acids, which are highly conserved and responsible for this extraordinary increase in transport capacity under extreme pH conditions. Redox-dependent dimerization of the StSUT1 protein was described earlier. Here the ability of StSUT1 to form homodimers was demonstrated by heterologous expression in Lactococcus lactis and Xenopus leavis using Western blots, and in plants by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Mutagenesis of highly conserved cysteine residues revealed their importance in protein stability. The accessibility of regulatory amino acid residues in the light of StSUT1's compartmentalization in membrane microdomains is discussed.

  6. Promoter-proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Pia K.; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites on transcription requires promoter proximity, as demonstrated using artificial constructs and supported by a genome-wide data set. Importantly, transcription down-regulation can be recapitulated in a gene context devoid of splice sites by placing a functional bona fide pA site/transcription terminator within ∼500 base pairs of the promoter. In contrast, promoter-proximal positioning of a pA site-independent histone gene terminator supports high transcription levels. We propose that optimal communication between a pA site-dependent gene terminator and its promoter critically depends on gene length and that short RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes use specialized termination mechanisms to maintain high transcription levels. PMID:23028143

  7. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  8. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  9. Active and regulatory sites of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Pesi, Rossana; Allegrini, Simone; Careddu, Maria Giovanna; Filoni, Daniela Nicole; Camici, Marcella; Tozzi, Maria Grazia

    2010-12-01

    Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II), which acts preferentially on 6-hydroxypurine nucleotides, is essential for the survival of several cell types. cN-II catalyses both the hydrolysis of nucleotides and transfer of their phosphate moiety to a nucleoside acceptor through formation of a covalent phospho-intermediate. Both activities are regulated by a number of phosphorylated compounds, such as diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap₄A), ADP, ATP, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) and phosphate. On the basis of a partial crystal structure of cN-II, we mutated two residues located in the active site, Y55 and T56. We ascertained that the ability to catalyse the transfer of phosphate depends on the presence of a bulky residue in the active site very close to the aspartate residue that forms the covalent phospho-intermediate. The molecular model indicates two possible sites at which adenylic compounds may interact. We mutated three residues that mediate interaction in the first activation site (R144, N154, I152) and three in the second (F127, M436 and H428), and found that Ap₄A and ADP interact with the same site, but the sites for ATP and BPG remain uncertain. The structural model indicates that cN-II is a homotetrameric protein that results from interaction through a specific interface B of two identical dimers that have arisen from interaction of two identical subunits through interface A. Point mutations in the two interfaces and gel-filtration experiments indicated that the dimer is the smallest active oligomerization state. Finally, gel-filtration and light-scattering experiments demonstrated that the native enzyme exists as a tetramer, and no further oligomerization is required for enzyme activation.

  10. One-dimensional alignment of strong Lewis acid sites in a porous coordination polymer.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Takashi; Higuchi, Masakazu; Yuasa, Akihiro; Higashimura, Hideyuki; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2013-11-18

    A new lanthanoid porous coordination polymer, La-BTTc (BTTc = benzene-1,3,5-tris(2-thiophene-5-carboxylate)), was synthesized and structurally characterized to have densely aligned one-dimensional open metal sites, which were found to act as strong Lewis acid sites after the removal of the coordinated solvent.

  11. BAX Activation is Initiated at a Novel Interaction Site

    PubMed Central

    Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Suzuki, Motoshi; Davis, Marguerite L.; Pitter, Kenneth; Bird, Gregory H.; Katz, Samuel G.; Tu, Ho-Chou; Kim, Hyungjin; Cheng, Emily H.-Y.; Tjandra, Nico; Walensky, Loren D.

    2008-01-01

    BAX is a pro-apoptotic protein of the BCL-2 family stationed in the cytosol until activated by a diversity of stress stimuli to induce cell death. Anti-apoptotic proteins such as BCL-2 counteract BAX-mediated cell death. Although an interaction site that confers survival functionality has been defined for anti-apoptotic proteins, an activation site has not been identified for BAX, rendering its explicit trigger mechanism unknown. We previously developed Stabilized Alpha-Helix of BCL-2 domains (SAHBs) that directly initiate BAX-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis. Here we demonstrate by NMR analysis that BIM SAHB binds BAX at an interaction site that is distinct from the canonical binding groove characterized for anti-apoptotic proteins. The specificity of the BIM SAHB-BAX interaction is highlighted by point mutagenesis that abrogates functional activity, confirming that BAX activation is initiated at this novel structural location. Thus, we have now defined a BAX interaction site for direct activation, establishing a new target for therapeutic modulation of apoptosis. PMID:18948948

  12. Predicting Protein–Protein Interaction Sites Using Sequence Descriptors and Site Propensity of Neighboring Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tzu-Hao; Li, Kuo-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Information about the interface sites of Protein–Protein Interactions (PPIs) is useful for many biological research works. However, despite the advancement of experimental techniques, the identification of PPI sites still remains as a challenging task. Using a statistical learning technique, we proposed a computational tool for predicting PPI interaction sites. As an alternative to similar approaches requiring structural information, the proposed method takes all of the input from protein sequences. In addition to typical sequence features, our method takes into consideration that interaction sites are not randomly distributed over the protein sequence. We characterized this positional preference using protein complexes with known structures, proposed a numerical index to estimate the propensity and then incorporated the index into a learning system. The resulting predictor, without using structural information, yields an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.675, recall of 0.597, precision of 0.311 and accuracy of 0.583 on a ten-fold cross-validation experiment. This performance is comparable to the previous approach in which structural information was used. Upon introducing the B-factor data to our predictor, we demonstrated that the AUC can be further improved to 0.750. The tool is accessible at http://bsaltools.ym.edu.tw/predppis. PMID:27792167

  13. Involvement of novel autophosphorylation sites in ATM activation.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Graham, Mark E; Peng, Cheng; Chen, Philip; Robinson, Phillip J; Lavin, Martin F

    2006-08-09

    ATM kinase plays a central role in signaling DNA double-strand breaks to cell cycle checkpoints and to the DNA repair machinery. Although the exact mechanism of ATM activation remains unknown, efficient activation requires the Mre11 complex, autophosphorylation on S1981 and the involvement of protein phosphatases and acetylases. We report here the identification of several additional phosphorylation sites on ATM in response to DNA damage, including autophosphorylation on pS367 and pS1893. ATM autophosphorylates all these sites in vitro in response to DNA damage. Antibodies against phosphoserine 1893 revealed rapid and persistent phosphorylation at this site after in vivo activation of ATM kinase by ionizing radiation, paralleling that observed for S1981 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation was dependent on functional ATM and on the Mre11 complex. All three autophosphorylation sites are physiologically important parts of the DNA damage response, as phosphorylation site mutants (S367A, S1893A and S1981A) were each defective in ATM signaling in vivo and each failed to correct radiosensitivity, genome instability and cell cycle checkpoint defects in ataxia-telangiectasia cells. We conclude that there are at least three functionally important radiation-induced autophosphorylation events in ATM.

  14. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  15. Mutation of active site residues in synthetic T4-lysozyme gene and their effect on lytic activity.

    PubMed

    Anand, N N; Stephen, E R; Narang, S A

    1988-06-16

    The active site amino acids (Glu11 and Asp20) in T4-lysozyme have been mutated to their isosteric residues Gln or Asn and/or acidic residues such as Glu----Asp or Asp----Glu by the oligonucleotide-replacement method. Out of eight mutants so generated the mutant T4-lysozyme obtained from pTLY.Asp11 retains maximum amount of activity (approximately 16%), pTLY.Asn20 the least (0.9%) whereas pTLY.Gln11 lost completely. A systematic study of the active and inactive mutants thus generated supports the important role of Glu11 and Asp20 in T4-lysozyme activity as predicted in earlier studies.

  16. Wobble Pairs of the HDV Ribozyme Play Specific Roles in Stabilization of Active Site Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sripathi, Kamali N.; Banáš, Pavel; Reblova, Kamila; Šponer, Jiři; Otyepka, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is the only known human pathogen whose genome contains a catalytic RNA motif (ribozyme). The overall architecture of the HDV ribozyme is that of a double-nested pseudoknot, with two GU pairs flanking the active site. Although extensive studies have shown that mutation of either wobble results in decreased catalytic activity, little work has focused on linking these mutations to specific structural effects on catalytic fitness. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations based on an activated structure to probe the active site dynamics as a result of wobble pair mutations. In both wild-type and mutant ribozymes, the in-line fitness of the active site (as a measure of catalytic proficiency) strongly depends on the presence of a C75(N3H3+)N1(O5′) hydrogen bond, which positions C75 as the general acid for the reaction. Our mutational analyses show that each GU wobble supports catalytically fit conformations in distinct ways; the reverse G25U20 wobble promotes high in-line fitness, high occupancy of the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) general-acid hydrogen bond and stabilization of the G1U37 wobble, while the G1U37 wobble acts more locally by stabilizing high in-line fitness and the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) hydrogen bond. We also find that stable type I A-minor and P1.1 hydrogen bonding above and below the active site, respectively, prevent local structural disorder from spreading and disrupting global conformation. Taken together, our results define specific, often redundant architectural roles for several structural motifs of the HDV ribozyme active site, expanding the known roles of these motifs within all HDV-like ribozymes and other structured RNAs. PMID:25631765

  17. Highly efficient one-step conversion of cyclohexane to adipic acid using single-site heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Raja, Robert; Thomas, John Meurig; Xu, Mingcan; Harris, Kenneth D M; Greenhill-Hooper, Michael; Quill, Kieran

    2006-01-28

    A solid source of 'active' oxygen (acetylperoxyborate, APB), when dissolved in aqueous solution in the presence of a single-site microporous catalyst containing redox centres (Fe(III)AlPO-31, Mn(III)AlPO-5, Fe(III)AlPO-5), converts cyclohexane with high efficiency (ca. 88%) and exceptionally high selectivity (ca. 81%) to adipic acid at 383 K; this procedure is also effective in converting styrene to styrene oxide and -pinene and (+)-limonene to their corresponding epoxides.

  18. Organic acids in cloud water and rainwater at a mountain site in acid rain areas of South China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao; Wang, Yan; Li, Haiyan; Yang, Xueqiao; Sun, Lei; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Tao; Wang, Wenxing

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the chemical characteristics of organic acids and to identify their source, cloud water and rainwater samples were collected at Mount Lu, a mountain site located in the acid rain-affected area of south China, from August to September of 2011 and March to May of 2012. The volume-weighted mean (VWM) concentration of organic acids in cloud water was 38.42 μeq/L, ranging from 7.45 to 111.46 μeq/L, contributing to 2.50 % of acidity. In rainwater samples, organic acid concentrations varied from 12.39 to 68.97 μeq/L (VWM of 33.39 μeq/L). Organic acids contributed significant acidity to rainwater, with a value of 17.66 %. Formic acid, acetic acid, and oxalic acid were the most common organic acids in both cloud water and rainwater. Organic acids had an obviously higher concentration in summer than in spring in cloud water, whereas there was much less discrimination in rainwater between the two seasons. The contribution of organic acids to acidity was lower during summer than during spring in both cloud water (2.20 % in summer vs 2.83 % in spring) and rainwater (12.24 % in summer vs 19.89 % in spring). The formic-to-acetic acid ratio (F/A) showed that organic acids were dominated by primary emissions in 71.31 % of the cloud water samples and whole rainwater samples. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis determined four factors as the sources of organic acids in cloud water, including biogenic emissions (61.8 %), anthropogenic emissions (15.28 %), marine emissions (15.07 %) and soil emissions (7.85 %). The findings from this study imply an indispensable role of organic acids in wet deposition, but organic acids may have a limited capacity to increase ecological risks in local environments.

  19. In silico analysis of Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase active site with toxic industrial dyes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nirmal K; Vindal, Vaibhav; Narayana, Siva Lakshmi; Ramakrishna, V; Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan; Srinivas, M

    2012-05-01

    Laccases belong to multicopper oxidases, a widespread class of enzymes implicated in many oxidative functions in various industrial oxidative processes like production of fine chemicals to bioremediation of contaminated soil and water. In order to understand the mechanisms of substrate binding and interaction between substrates and Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase, a homology model was generated. The resulted model was further validated and used for docking studies with toxic industrial dyes- acid blue 74, reactive black 5 and reactive blue 19. Interactions of chemical mediators with the laccase was also examined. The docking analysis showed that the active site always cannot accommodate the dye molecules, due to constricted nature of the active site pocket and steric hindrance of the residues whereas mediators are relatively small and can easily be accommodated into the active site pocket, which, thereafter leads to the productive binding. The binding properties of these compounds along with identification of critical active site residues can be used for further site-directed mutagenesis experiments in order to identify their role in activity and substrate specificity, ultimately leading to improved mutants for degradation of these toxic compounds.

  20. Triboelectrification of active pharmaceutical ingredients: week acids and their salts.

    PubMed

    Fujinuma, Kenta; Ishii, Yuji; Yashihashi, Yasuo; Yonemochi, Estuo; Sugano, Kiyohiko; Tarada, Katsuhide

    2015-09-30

    The effect of salt formulation on the electrostatic property of active pharmaceutical ingredients was investigated. The electrostatic property of weak acids (carboxylic acids and amide-enole type acid) and their sodium salts was evaluated by a suction-type Faraday cage meter. Free carboxylic acids showed negative chargeability, whereas their sodium salts showed more positive chargeability than the free acids. However, no such trend was observed for amide-enole type acids.

  1. Characterization of a domoic acid binding site from Pacific razor clam.

    PubMed

    Trainer, Vera L; Bill, Brian D

    2004-08-10

    The Pacific razor clam, Siliqua patula, is known to retain domoic acid, a water-soluble glutamate receptor agonist produced by diatoms of the genus Pseudo-nitzschia. The mechanism by which razor clams tolerate high levels of the toxin, domoic acid, in their tissues while still retaining normal nerve function is unknown. In our study, a domoic acid binding site was solubilized from razor clam siphon using a combination of Triton X-100 and digitonin. In a Scatchard analysis using [3H]kainic acid, the partially-purified membrane showed two distinct receptor sites, a high affinity, low capacity site with a KD (mean +/- S.E.) of 28 +/- 9.4 nM and a maximal binding capacity of 12 +/- 3.8 pmol/mg protein and a low affinity, high capacity site with a mM affinity for radiolabeled kainic acid, the latter site which was lost upon solubilization. Competition experiments showed that the rank order potency for competitive ligands in displacing [3H]kainate binding from the membrane-bound receptors was quisqualate > ibotenate > iodowillardiine = AMPA = fluorowillardiine > domoate > kainate > L-glutamate. At high micromolar concentrations, NBQX, NMDA and ATPA showed little or no ability to displace [3H]kainate. In contrast, Scatchard analysis using [3H]glutamate showed linearity, indicating the presence of a single binding site with a KD and Bmax of 500 +/- 50 nM and 14 +/- 0.8 pmol/mg protein, respectively. These results suggest that razor clam siphon contains both a high and low affinity receptor site for kainic acid and may contain more than one subtype of glutamate receptor, thereby allowing the clam to function normally in a marine environment that often contains high concentrations of domoic acid.

  2. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  3. Spectroscopic studies of the active site of galactose oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, P.F.; Brown, R.D. III; Koenig, S.H.

    1995-07-19

    X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopy have been used to probe the copper site structure in galactose oxidase at pH 4.5 and 7.0. the results suggest that there are no major differences in the structure of the tetragonal Cu(II) site at these pH values. Analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicates that four N,O scatterers are present at approximately 2 {Angstrom}; these are presumably the equatorial ligands. In addition, the EXAFS data establish that oxidative activation to produce the active-site tyrosine radical does not cause major changes in the copper coordination environment. Therefore results obtained on the one-electron reduced enzyme, containing Cu(II) but not the tyrosine radical, probably also apply to the catalytically active Cu(II)/tyrosine radical state. Solvent water exchange, inhibitor binding, and substrate binding have been probed via nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) measurements. The NMRD profile of galactose oxidase is quantitatively consistent with the rapid exchange of a single, equatorial water ligand with a Cu(II)-O separation of about 2.4 {Angstrom}. Azide and cyanide displace this coordinated water. The binding of azide and the substrate dihydroxyacetone produce very similar effects on the NMRD profile of galactose oxidase, indicating that substrates also bind to the active site Cu(II) in an equatorial position.

  4. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  5. Identification of active site residues of Fenugreek β-amylase: chemical modification and in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Garima; Singh, Vinay K; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2014-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of Fenugreek β-amylase is not available in protein data bank. Therefore, an attempt has been made to identify the catalytic amino acid residues of enzyme by employing studies of pH dependence of enzyme catalysis, chemical modification and bioinformatics. Treatment of purified Fenugreek β-amylase with EDAC in presence of glycine methyl ester and sulfhydryl group specific reagents (IAA, NEM and p-CMB), followed a pseudo first-order kinetics and resulted in effective inactivation of enzyme. The reaction with EDAC in presence of NTEE (3-nitro-l-tyrosine ethylester) resulted into modification of two carboxyl groups per molecule of enzyme and presence of one accessible sulfhydryl group at the active site, per molecule of enzyme was ascertained by titration with DTNB. The above results were supported by the prevention of inactivation of enzyme in presence of substrate. Based on MALDI-TOF analysis of purified Fenugreek β-amylase and MASCOT search, β-amylase of Medicago sativa was found to be the best match. To further confirm the amino acid involved in catalysis, homology modelling of β-amylase of M. sativa was performed. The sequence alignment, superimposition of template and target models, along with study of interactions involved in docking of sucrose and maltose at the active site, led to identification of Glu187, Glu381 and Cys344 as active site residues.

  6. Conformational Change in the Active Site of Streptococcal Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase Through Site-Directed Mutagenesis at Asp-115.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Yusuke; Oiki, Sayoko; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase (UGL) degrades unsaturated disaccharides generated from mammalian extracellular matrices, glycosaminoglycans, by polysaccharide lyases. Two Asp residues, Asp-115 and Asp-175 of Streptococcus agalactiae UGL (SagUGL), are completely conserved in other bacterial UGLs, one of which (Asp-175 of SagUGL) acts as a general acid and base catalyst. The other Asp (Asp-115 of SagUGL) also affects the enzyme activity, although its role in the enzyme reaction has not been well understood. Here, we show substitution of Asp-115 in SagUGL with Asn caused a conformational change in the active site. Tertiary structures of SagUGL mutants D115N and D115N/K370S with negligible enzyme activity were determined at 2.00 and 1.79 Å resolution, respectively, by X-ray crystallography. The side chain of Asn-115 is drastically shifted in both mutants owing to the interaction with several residues, including Asp-175, by formation of hydrogen bonds. This interaction between Asn-115 and Asp-175 probably prevents the mutants from triggering the enzyme reaction using Asp-175 as an acid catalyst.

  7. Site specific incorporation of heavy atom-containing unnatural amino acids into proteins for structure determination

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Jianming; Wang, Lei; Wu, Ning; Schultz, Peter G.

    2008-07-15

    Translation systems and other compositions including orthogonal aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases that preferentially charge an orthogonal tRNA with an iodinated or brominated amino acid are provided. Nucleic acids encoding such synthetases are also described, as are methods and kits for producing proteins including heavy atom-containing amino acids, e.g., brominated or iodinated amino acids. Methods of determining the structure of a protein, e.g., a protein into which a heavy atom has been site-specifically incorporated through use of an orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA-synthetase pair, are also described.

  8. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-06

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions.

  9. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C.; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F.; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W.; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa. Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  10. Active site proton delivery and the lyase activity of human CYP17A1

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Yogan; Gregory, Michael C.; Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2014-01-03

    equivalents and protons are funneled into non-productive pathways. This is similar to previous work with other P450 catalyzed hydroxylation. However, catalysis of carbon–carbon bond scission by the T306A mutant was largely unimpeded by disruption of the CYP17A1 acid-alcohol pair. The unique response of CYP17A1 lyase activity to mutation of Thr306 is consistent with a reactive intermediate formed independently of proton delivery in the active site, and supports involvement of a nucleophilic peroxo-anion rather than the traditional Compound I in catalysis.

  11. Oleic acid and linoleic acid from Tenebrio molitor larvae inhibit BACE1 activity in vitro: molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Youn, Kumju; Yun, Eun-Young; Lee, Jinhyuk; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Jeong, Woo-Sik; Jun, Mira

    2014-02-01

    In our ongoing research to find therapeutic compounds for Alzheimer's disease (AD) from natural resources, the inhibitory activity of the BACE1 enzyme by Tenebrio molitor larvae and its major compounds were evaluated. The T. molitor larvae extract and its fractions exhibited strong BACE1 suppression. The major components of hexane fraction possessing both high yield and strong BACE1 inhibition were determined by thin layer chromatography, gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. A remarkable composition of unsaturated long chain fatty acids, including oleic acid and linoleic acid, were identified. Oleic acid, in particular, noncompetitively attenuated BACE1 activity with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀) value of 61.31 μM and Ki value of 34.3 μM. Furthermore, the fatty acids were stably interacted with BACE1 at different allosteric sites of the enzyme bound with the OH of CYS319 and the NH₃ of TYR320 for oleic acid and with the C=O group of GLN304 for linoleic acid. Here, we first revealed novel pharmacophore features of oleic acids and linoleic acid to BACE1 by in silico docking studies. The present findings would clearly suggest potential guidelines for designing novel BACE1 selective inhibitors.

  12. The active site structure and mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    Arginine specific reagents showed irreversible inhibition of avian liver mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Potent protection against modification was elicited by CO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} in the presence of other substrates. Labeling of enzyme with (7-{sup 14}C) phenylglyoxal showed that 1 or 2 arginines are involved in CO{sub 2} binding and activation. Peptide map studies showed this active site arginine residues is located at position 289. Histidine specific reagents showed pseudo first order inhibition of avian mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity. The best protection against modification was elicited by IDP or IDP and Mn{sup +2}. One histidine residue is at or near the phosphoenolpyruvate binding site as demonstrated in the increased absorbance at 240 nm and proton relaxation rate studies. Circular dichroism studies reveal that enzyme structure was perturbed by diethylpyrocarbonate modification. Metal binding studies suggest that this enzyme has only one metal binding site. The putative binding sites from several GTP and phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes are observed in P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase from different species.

  13. A mutational analysis of the active site of human type II inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Futer, Olga; Sintchak, Michael D; Caron, Paul R; Nimmesgern, Elmar; DeCenzo, Maureen T; Livingston, David J; Raybuck, Scott A

    2002-01-31

    The oxidation of IMP to XMP is the rate-limiting step in the de novo synthesis of guanine ribonucleotides. This NAD-dependent reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). Based upon the recent structural determination of IMPDH complexed to oxidized IMP (XMP*) and the potent uncompetitive inhibitor mycophenolic acid (MPA), we have selected active site residues and prepared mutants of human type II IMPDH. The catalytic parameters of these mutants were determined. Mutations G326A, D364A, and the active site nucleophile C331A all abolish enzyme activity to less than 0.1% of wild type. These residues line the IMP binding pocket and are necessary for correct positioning of the substrate, Asp364 serving to anchor the ribose ring of the nucleotide. In the MPA/NAD binding site, significant loss of activity was seen by mutation of any residue of the triad Arg322, Asn303, Asp274 which form a hydrogen bonding network lining one side of this pocket. From a model of NAD bound to the active site consistent with the mutational data, we propose that these resides are important in binding the ribose ring of the nicotinamide substrate. Additionally, mutations in the pair Thr333, Gln441, which lies close to the xanthine ring, cause a significant drop in the catalytic activity of IMPDH. It is proposed that these residues serve to deliver the catalytic water molecule required for hydrolysis of the cysteine-bound XMP* intermediate formed after oxidation by NAD.

  14. Micelles Protect and Concentrate Activated Acetic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Zoe; House, C.

    2014-01-01

    As more and more exoplanets are discovered and the habitability of such planets is considered, one can turn to searching for the origin of life on Earth in order to better understand what makes a habitable planet. Activated acetic acid, or methyl thioacetate, has been proposed to be central to the origin of life on Earth, and also as an important energy currency molecule in early cellular evolution. We have investigated the hydrolysis of methyl thioacetate under various conditions. Its uncatalyzed rate of hydrolysis is about three orders of magnitude faster (K = 0.00663 s^-1; 100°C, pH 7.5, concentration = 0.33mM) than published rates for its catalyzed production making it unlikely to accumulate under prebiotic conditions. However, we also observed that methyl thioacetate was protected from hydrolysis when inside its own hydrophobic droplets. We found that methyl thioacetate protection from hydrolysis was also possible in droplets of hexane and in the membranes of nonanoic acid micelles. Thus, the hydrophobic regions of prebiotic micelles and early cell membranes could have offered a refuge for this energetic molecule increasing its lifetime in close proximity to the reactions for which it would be needed. Methyl thioacetate could thus be important for the origin of life on Earth and perhaps for better understanding the potential habitability of other planets.

  15. Kinetic and Spectroscopic Studies of Bicupin Oxalate Oxidase and Putative Active Site Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Moomaw, Ellen W.; Hoffer, Eric; Moussatche, Patricia; Salerno, John C.; Grant, Morgan; Immelman, Bridget; Uberto, Richard; Ozarowski, Andrew; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Ceriporiopsis subvermispora oxalate oxidase (CsOxOx) is the first bicupin enzyme identified that catalyzes manganese-dependent oxidation of oxalate. In previous work, we have shown that the dominant contribution to catalysis comes from the monoprotonated form of oxalate binding to a form of the enzyme in which an active site carboxylic acid residue must be unprotonated. CsOxOx shares greatest sequence homology with bicupin microbial oxalate decarboxylases (OxDC) and the 241-244DASN region of the N-terminal Mn binding domain of CsOxOx is analogous to the lid region of OxDC that has been shown to determine reaction specificity. We have prepared a series of CsOxOx mutants to probe this region and to identify the carboxylate residue implicated in catalysis. The pH profile of the D241A CsOxOx mutant suggests that the protonation state of aspartic acid 241 is mechanistically significant and that catalysis takes place at the N-terminal Mn binding site. The observation that the D241S CsOxOx mutation eliminates Mn binding to both the N- and C- terminal Mn binding sites suggests that both sites must be intact for Mn incorporation into either site. The introduction of a proton donor into the N-terminal Mn binding site (CsOxOx A242E mutant) does not affect reaction specificity. Mutation of conserved arginine residues further support that catalysis takes place at the N-terminal Mn binding site and that both sites must be intact for Mn incorporation into either site. PMID:23469254

  16. Site-directed mutagenesis of the toxin from the Chinese scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch (BmKAS): insight into sites related to analgesic activity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Song, Yong-Bo; Ma, Lin; Liu, Yan-Feng; Li, Guo-Dong; Wu, Chun-Fu; Zhang, Jing-Hai

    2010-10-01

    This study utilized the E. coli expression system to investigate the role of amino acid residues in toxin from the Chinese scorpion--Buthus martensii Karsch (BmKAS). To evaluate the extent to which residues of the toxin core contribute to its analgesic activity, ten mutants of BmKAS were obtained by PCR. Using site-directed mutagenesis, all of these residues were substituted with different amino acids. This study represents a thorough mapping and elucidation of the epitopes that form the molecular basis of the toxin's analgesic activity. Our results showed large mutant-dependent differences that emphasize the important roles of the studied residues.

  17. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulated benzodiazepine binding sites in bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lummis, S.C.R.; Johnston, G.A.R. ); Nicoletti, G. ); Holan, G. )

    1991-01-01

    Benzodiazepine binding sites, which were once considered to exist only in higher vertebrates, are here demonstrated in the bacteria E. coli. The bacterial ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding sites are modulated by GABA; the modulation is dose dependent and is reduced at high concentrations. The most potent competitors of E.Coli ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding are those that are active in displacing ({sup 3}H)benzodiazepines from vertebrate peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. These vertebrate sites are not modulated by GABA, in contrast to vertebrate neuronal benzodiazepine binding sites. The E.coli benzodiazepine binding sites therefore differ from both classes of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites; however the ligand spectrum and GABA-modulatory properties of the E.coli sites are similar to those found in insects. This intermediate type of receptor in lower species suggests a precursor for at least one class of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites may have existed.

  18. "JCE" Classroom Activity #109: My Acid Can Beat Up Your Acid!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putti, Alice

    2011-01-01

    In this guided-inquiry activity, students investigate the ionization of strong and weak acids. Bead models are used to study acid ionization on a particulate level. Students analyze seven strong and weak acid models and make generalizations about the relationship between acid strength and dissociation. (Contains 1 table and 2 figures.)

  19. Atmospheric geochemistry of formic and acetic acids at a mid-latitude temperate site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Beecher, K. M.; Harriss, R. C.; Cofer, R. W., III

    1988-01-01

    Tropospheric concentrations of formic and acetic acids in the gas, the aerosol, and the rainwater phases were determined in samples collected 1-2 m above ground level at an open field site in eastern Virginia. These acids were found to occur principally (98 percent or above) in the gas phase, with a marked annual seasonality, averaging 1890 ppt for formate and 1310 ppt for acetate during the growing season, as compared to 695 ppt and 700 ppt, respectively, over the nongrowing season. The data support the hypothesis that biogenic emissions from vegatation are important sources of atmospheric formic and acetic acid during the local growing season. The same time trends were observed for precipitation, although with less defined seasonality. The relative increase of the acetic acid/formic acid ratio during the nongrowing season points to the dominance of anthropogenic inputs of acetic acid from motor vehicles and biomass combustion in the wintertime.

  20. Binding of coumarins to site I of human serum albumin. Effect of the fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Zatón, A M; Ferrer, J M; Ruiz de Gordoa, J C; Marquínez, M A

    1995-07-14

    It is known that binding site I on human serum albumin (HSA) consists of a zone of two overlapping regions: the specific binding region represented by warfarin binding and the specific binding region represented by azapropazone and phenylbutazone binding. In this paper binding parameters to defatted HSA and to HSA with fatty acids (molar ratio of fatty acid/HSA = 4) were compared. High-affinity binding sites for warfarin, 4-chromanol, 4-hydroxycoumarin, coumarin, 3-acetylcoumarin and phenylbutazone (759,549 M-1 > Ka > 67,024 M-1) constitute binding site I on HSA. In this binding area defatted HSA can bind two molecules of warfarin, but the presence of fatty acids diminish the binding capacity of warfarin to HSA (2 > n > 1).

  1. Probing the active site tryptophan of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin with an analog

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Markus; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Wang, Yane-Shih; Eiler, Daniel; Söll, Dieter; Guo, Li-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded non-canonical amino acids are powerful tools of protein research and engineering; in particular they allow substitution of individual chemical groups or atoms in a protein of interest. One such amino acid is the tryptophan (Trp) analog 3-benzothienyl-l-alanine (Bta) with an imino-to-sulfur substitution in the five-membered ring. Unlike Trp, Bta is not capable of forming a hydrogen bond, but preserves other properties of a Trp residue. Here we present a pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase-derived, engineered enzyme BtaRS that enables efficient and site-specific Bta incorporation into proteins of interest in vivo. Furthermore, we report a 2.1 Å-resolution crystal structure of a BtaRS•Bta complex to show how BtaRS discriminates Bta from canonical amino acids, including Trp. To show utility in protein mutagenesis, we used BtaRS to introduce Bta to replace the Trp28 residue in the active site of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin. This experiment showed that not the hydrogen bond between residues Trp28 and Asp58, but the bulky aromatic side chain of Trp28 is important for active site maintenance. Collectively, our study provides a new and robust tool for checking the function of Trp in proteins. PMID:26582921

  2. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  3. Enhancement of Polymerase Activity of the Large Fragment in DNA Polymerase I from Geobacillus stearothermophilus by Site-Directed Mutagenesis at the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Zhang, Beilei; Wang, Meng; Ou, Yanghui

    2016-01-01

    The large fragment of DNA polymerase I from Geobacillus stearothermophilus GIM1.543 (Bst DNA polymerase) with 5′-3′ DNA polymerase activity while in absence of 5′-3′ exonuclease activity possesses high thermal stability and polymerase activity. Bst DNA polymerase was employed in isothermal multiple self-matching initiated amplification (IMSA) which amplified the interest sequence with high selectivity and was widely applied in the rapid detection of human epidemic diseases. However, the detailed information of commercial Bst DNA polymerase is unpublished and well protected by patents, which makes the high price of commercial kits. In this study, wild-type Bst DNA polymerase (WT) and substitution mutations for improving the efficiency of DNA polymerization were expressed and purified in E. coli. Site-directed substitutions of four conserved residues (Gly310, Arg412, Lys416, and Asp540) in the activity site of Bst DNA polymerase influenced efficiency of polymerizing dNTPs. The substitution of residue Gly310 by alanine or leucine and residue Asp540 by glutamic acid increased the efficiency of polymerase activity. All mutants with higher polymerizing efficiency were employed to complete the rapid detection of EV71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) by IMSA approach with relatively shorter period which is suitable for the primary diagnostics setting in rural and underdeveloped areas. PMID:27981047

  4. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Silicate Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts [1-3]. Nevertheless, among those structures K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. In this study, the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars were investigated in closer details. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. We give a potential explanation of the increased ice nucleation activity of K-feldspar. The ice nucleating sites are very much dependent on the alkali ion present by altering the water structure and the feldspar surface. The higher activity of K-feldspar can be attributed to the presence of potassium ions on the surface and surface bilayer. The alkali-ions have different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar. Chaotropic behavior of Calcium and Sodium ions are lowering the ice nucleation potential of the other feldspars, while kosmotropic Potassium has a neutral or even positive effect. Furthermore we investigated the influence of milling onto the ice nucleation of quartz particles. The ice nucleation activity can be increased by mechanical milling, by introducing more molecular, nucleation active defects to the particle surface. This effect is larger than expected by plane surface increase. [1] Atkinson et al. The Importance of Feldspar for Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust in Mixed-Phase Clouds. Nature 2013, 498, 355-358. [2] Yakobi-Hancock et al.. Feldspar Minerals as Efficient Deposition Ice Nuclei. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2013, 13, 11175-11185. [3] Zolles et al. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015 accepted.

  5. Systematic mutagenesis of the active site omega loop of TEM-1 beta-lactamase.

    PubMed Central

    Petrosino, J F; Palzkill, T

    1996-01-01

    Beta-Lactamase is a bacterial protein that provides resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. TEM-1 beta-lactamase is the most prevalent plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase in gram-negative bacteria. Normally, this enzyme has high levels of hydrolytic activity for penicillins, but mutant beta-lactamases have evolved with activity toward a variety of beta-lactam antibiotics. It has been shown that active site substitutions are responsible for changes in the substrate specificity. Since mutant beta-lactamases pose a serious threat to antimicrobial therapy, the mechanisms by which mutations can alter the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase are of interest. Previously, screens of random libraries encompassing 31 of 55 active site amino acid positions enabled the identification of the residues responsible for maintaining the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase. In addition to substitutions found in clinical isolates, many other specificity-altering mutations were also identified. Interestingly, many nonspecific substitutions in the N-terminal half of the active site omega loop were found to increase ceftazidime hydrolytic activity and decrease ampicillin hydrolytic activity. To complete the active sight study, eight additional random libraries were constructed and screened for specificity-altering mutations. All additional substitutions found to alter the substrate specificity were located in the C-terminal half of the active site loop. These mutants, much like the N-terminal omega loop mutants, appear to be less stable than the wild-type enzyme. Further analysis of a 165-YYG-167 triple mutant, selected for high levels of ceftazidime hydrolytic activity, provides an example of the correlation which exists between enzyme instability and increased ceftazidime hydrolytic activity in the ceftazidime-selected omega loop mutants. PMID:8606154

  6. A bidentate Lewis acid with a telluronium ion as an anion-binding site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haiyan; Gabbaï, François P.

    2010-11-01

    The search for receptors that can selectively capture small and potentially toxic anions in protic media has sparked a renewed interest in the synthesis and anion-binding properties of polydentate Lewis acids. Seeking new paradigms to enhance the anion affinities of such systems, we synthesized a bidentate Lewis acid that contains a boryl and a telluronium moiety as Lewis acidic sites. Anion-complexation studies indicate that this telluronium borane displays a high affinity for fluoride in methanol. Structural and computational studies show that the unusual fluoride affinity of this bidentate telluronium borane can be correlated with the formation of a B-F --> Te chelate motif supported by a strong lone-pair(F) --> σ*(Te-C) donor-acceptor interaction. These results, which illustrate the viability of heavier chalcogenium centres as anion-binding sites, allow us to introduce a novel strategy for the design of polydentate Lewis acids with enhanced anion affinities.

  7. A bidentate Lewis acid with a telluronium ion as an anion-binding site.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyan; Gabbaï, François P

    2010-11-01

    The search for receptors that can selectively capture small and potentially toxic anions in protic media has sparked a renewed interest in the synthesis and anion-binding properties of polydentate Lewis acids. Seeking new paradigms to enhance the anion affinities of such systems, we synthesized a bidentate Lewis acid that contains a boryl and a telluronium moiety as Lewis acidic sites. Anion-complexation studies indicate that this telluronium borane displays a high affinity for fluoride in methanol. Structural and computational studies show that the unusual fluoride affinity of this bidentate telluronium borane can be correlated with the formation of a B-F → Te chelate motif supported by a strong lone-pair(F) → σ*(Te-C) donor-acceptor interaction. These results, which illustrate the viability of heavier chalcogenium centres as anion-binding sites, allow us to introduce a novel strategy for the design of polydentate Lewis acids with enhanced anion affinities.

  8. Face the Edges: Catalytic Active Sites of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Edges are special sites in nanomaterials. The atoms residing on the edges have different environments compared to those in other parts of a nanomaterial and, therefore, they may have different properties. Here, recent progress in nanomaterial fields is summarized from the viewpoint of the edges. Typically, edge sites in MoS2 or metals, other than surface atoms, can perform as active centers for catalytic reactions, so the method to enhance performance lies in the optimization of the edge structures. The edges of multicomponent interfaces present even more possibilities to enhance the activities of nanomaterials. Nanoframes and ultrathin nanowires have similarities to conventional edges of nanoparticles, the application of which as catalysts can help to reduce the use of costly materials. Looking beyond this, the edge structures of graphene are also essential for their properties. In short, the edge structure can influence many properties of materials. PMID:27980960

  9. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  10. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  11. Acaricidal activity of usnic acid and sodium usnic acid against Psoroptes cuniculi in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xiaofei; Miao, Xiaolou; Lv, Huiping; Wang, Dongsheng; Zhang, Jiqin; He, Hua; Yang, Zhiqiang; Pan, Hu

    2014-06-01

    Usnic acid, a major active compound in lichens, was first isolated in 1884. Since then, usnic acid and its sodium salt (sodium usnic acid) have been used in medicine, perfumery, cosmetics, and other industries due to its extensive biological activities. However, its acaricidal activity has not been studied. In this paper, we investigated the acaricidal activity of usnic acid and sodium usnic acid against Psoroptes cuniculi in vitro. After evaluating the acaricidal activity and toxicity of usnic acid and sodium usnic acid in vitro, the results showed that at doses of 250, 125, and 62.5 mg/ml, usnic acid and sodium usnic acid can kill mites with 91.67, 85.00, and 55.00% and 100, 100, and 60.00% mortality after treatment 24 h. The LT50 values were 4.208, 8.249, and 16.950 h and 3.712, 7.339, and 15.773 h for usnic acid and sodium usnic acid, respectively. Sodium usnic acid has a higher acaricidal activity than usnic acid, which may be related to the difference in their structures.

  12. Kinetic and structural evaluation of selected active site mutants of the Aspergillus fumigatus KDNase (sialidase).

    PubMed

    Yeung, Juliana H F; Telford, Judith C; Shidmoossavee, Fahimeh S; Bennet, Andrew J; Taylor, Garry L; Moore, Margo M

    2013-12-23

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an airborne fungal pathogen. We previously cloned and characterized an exo-sialidase from A. fumigatus and showed that it preferred 2-keto-3-deoxynononic acid (KDN) as a substrate to N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac). The purpose of this study was to investigate the structure-function relationships of critical catalytic site residues. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to create three mutant recombinant enzymes: the catalytic nucleophile (Y358H), the general acid/base catalyst (D84A), and an enlargement of the binding pocket to attempt to accommodate the N-acetyl group of Neu5Ac (R171L). Crystal structures for all enzymes were determined. The D84A mutation had an effect in decreasing the activity of AfKDNase that was stronger than that of the same mutation in the structurally similar sialidase from the bacterium Micromonospora viridifaciens. These data suggest that the catalytic acid is more important in the reaction of AfKDNase and that catalysis is less dependent on nucleophilic or electrostatic stabilization of the developing positive charge at the transition state for hydrolysis. Removal of the catalytic nucleophile (Y358H) significantly lowered the activity of the enzyme, but this mutant remained a retaining glycosidase as demonstrated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis. This is a novel finding that has not been shown with other sialidases. Kinetic activity measured at pH 5.2 revealed that R171L had higher activity on a Neu5Ac-based substrate than wild-type KDNase; hence, leucine in place of arginine in the binding pocket improved catalysis toward Neu5Ac substrates. Hence, whether a sialidase is primarily a KDNase or a neuraminidase is due in part to the presence of an amino acid that creates a steric clash with the N-acetyl group.

  13. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  14. Nest predation increases with parental activity: separating nest site and parental activity effects.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T E; Scott, J; Menge, C

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection. PMID:11413645

  15. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  16. [Mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhihao

    2012-04-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) has been studied as a potential anti-cancer agent for inhibiting arginine-auxotrophic tumors (such as melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas) in phase III clinical trials. In this work, we studied the molecular mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutation sites, A128, H404 and 1410, were introduced into wild-type ADI gene by QuikChange site-directed mutagenesis method, and four ADI mutants M1 (A128T), M2 (H404R), M3 (I410L), and M4 (A128T, H404R) were obtained. The ADI mutants were individually expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the enzymatic properties of the purified mutant proteins were determined. The results show that both A128T and H404R had enhanced optimum pH, higher activity and stability of ADI under physiological condition (pH 7.4), as well as reduced K(m) value. This study provides an insight into the molecular mechanism of the ADI activity, and also the experimental evidence for the rational protein evolution in the future.

  17. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J.; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  18. MSK1 activity is controlled by multiple phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    McCOY, Claire E.; Campbell, David G.; Deak, Maria; Bloomberg, Graham B.; Arthur, J. Simon C.

    2004-01-01

    MSK1 (mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase) is a kinase activated in cells downstream of both the ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascades. In the present study, we show that, in addition to being phosphorylated on Thr-581 and Ser-360 by ERK1/2 or p38, MSK1 can autophosphorylate on at least six sites: Ser-212, Ser-376, Ser-381, Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758. Of these sites, the N-terminal T-loop residue Ser-212 and the ‘hydrophobic motif’ Ser-376 are phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain of MSK1, and their phosphorylation is essential for the catalytic activity of the N-terminal kinase domain of MSK1 and therefore for the phosphorylation of MSK1 substrates in vitro. Ser-381 is also phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain, and mutation of Ser-381 decreases MSK1 activity, probably through the inhibition of Ser-376 phosphorylation. Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758 are phosphorylated by the N-terminal kinase domain; however, their function is not known. The activation of MSK1 in cells therefore requires the activation of the ERK1/2 or p38 MAPK cascades and does not appear to require additional signalling inputs. This is in contrast with the closely related RSK (p90 ribosomal S6 kinase) proteins, whose activity requires phosphorylation by PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1) in addition to phosphorylation by ERK1/2. PMID:15568999

  19. Effect of sun elevation upon remote sensing of ocean color over an acid waste dump site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressette, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    Photographic flights were made over an ocean acid waste dump site while dumping was in progress. The flights resulted in wide angle, broadband, spectral radiance film exposure data between the wavelengths of 500 to 900 nanometers for sun elevation angles ranging from 26 to 42 degrees. It is shown from densitometer data that the spectral signature of acid waste discharged into ocean water can be observed photographically, the influence of sun elevation upon remotely sensed apparent color can be normalized by using a single spectral band ratioing technique, and photographic quantification and mapping of acid waste through its suspended iron precipitate appears possible.

  20. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved amino acids in the alpha subunit of toluene dioxygenase: potential mononuclear non-heme iron coordination sites.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, H; Parales, R E; Lynch, N A; Gibson, D T

    1996-01-01

    The terminal oxygenase component of toluene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida F1 is an iron-sulfur protein (ISP(TOL)) that requires mononuclear iron for enzyme activity. Alignment of all available predicted amino acid sequences for the large (alpha) subunits of terminal oxygenases showed a conserved cluster of potential mononuclear iron-binding residues. These were between amino acids 210 and 230 in the alpha subunit (TodC1) of ISP(TOL). The conserved amino acids, Glu-214, Asp-219, Tyr-221, His-222, and His-228, were each independently replaced with an alanine residue by site-directed mutagenesis. Tyr-266 in TodC1, which has been suggested as an iron ligand, was treated in an identical manner. To assay toluene dioxygenase activity in the presence of TodC1 and its mutant forms, conditions for the reconstitution of wild-type ISP(TOL) activity from TodC1 and purified TodC2 (beta subunit) were developed and optimized. A mutation at Glu-214, Asp-219, His-222, or His-228 completely abolished toluene dioxygenase activity. TodC1 with an alanine substitution at either Tyr-221 or Tyr-266 retained partial enzyme activity (42 and 12%, respectively). In experiments with [14C]toluene, the two Tyr-->Ala mutations caused a reduction in the amount of Cis-[14C]-toluene dihydrodiol formed, whereas a mutation at Glu-214, Asp-219, His-222, or His-228 eliminated cis-toluene dihydrodiol formation. The expression level of all of the mutated TWO proteins was equivalent to that of wild-type TodC1 as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot (immunoblot) analyses. These results, in conjunction with the predicted amino acid sequences of 22 oxygenase components, suggest that the conserved motif Glu-X3-4,-Asp-X2-His-X4-5-His is critical for catalytic function and the glutamate, aspartate, and histidine residues may act as mononuclear iron ligands at the site of oxygen activation. PMID:8655491

  1. In Situ Oxalic Acid Injection to Accelerate Arsenic Remediation at a Superfund Site in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Wovkulich, Karen; Stute, Martin; Mailloux, Brian J; Keimowitz, Alison R; Ross, James; Bostick, Benjamin; Sun, Jing; Chillrud, Steven N

    2014-09-25

    Arsenic is a prevalent contaminant at a large number of US Superfund sites; establishing techniques that accelerate As remediation could benefit many sites. Hundreds of tons of As were released into the environment by the Vineland Chemical Co. in southern New Jersey during its manufacturing lifetime (1949-1994), resulting in extensive contamination of surface and subsurface soils and sediments, groundwater, and the downstream watershed. Despite substantial intervention at this Superfund site, sufficient aquifer cleanup could require many decades if based on traditional pump and treat technologies only. Laboratory column experiments have suggested that oxalic acid addition to contaminated aquifer solids could promote significant As release from the solid phase. To evaluate the potential of chemical additions to increase As release in situ and boost treatment efficiency, a forced gradient pilot scale study was conducted on the Vineland site. During spring/summer 2009, oxalic acid and bromide tracer were injected into a small portion (~50 m(2)) of the site for 3 months. Groundwater samples indicate that introduction of oxalic acid led to increased As release. Between 2.9 and 3.6 kg of As were removed from the sampled wells as a result of the oxalic acid treatment during the 3-month injection. A comparison of As concentrations on sediment cores collected before and after treatment and analyzed using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy suggested reduction in As concentrations of ~36% (median difference) to 48% (mean difference). While further study is necessary, the addition of oxalic acid shows potential for accelerating treatment of a highly contaminated site and decreasing the As remediation time-scale.

  2. In Situ Oxalic Acid Injection to Accelerate Arsenic Remediation at a Superfund Site in New Jersey

    PubMed Central

    Wovkulich, Karen; Stute, Martin; Mailloux, Brian J.; Keimowitz, Alison R.; Ross, James; Bostick, Benjamin; Sun, Jing; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is a prevalent contaminant at a large number of US Superfund sites; establishing techniques that accelerate As remediation could benefit many sites. Hundreds of tons of As were released into the environment by the Vineland Chemical Co. in southern New Jersey during its manufacturing lifetime (1949–1994), resulting in extensive contamination of surface and subsurface soils and sediments, groundwater, and the downstream watershed. Despite substantial intervention at this Superfund site, sufficient aquifer cleanup could require many decades if based on traditional pump and treat technologies only. Laboratory column experiments have suggested that oxalic acid addition to contaminated aquifer solids could promote significant As release from the solid phase. To evaluate the potential of chemical additions to increase As release in situ and boost treatment efficiency, a forced gradient pilot scale study was conducted on the Vineland site. During spring/summer 2009, oxalic acid and bromide tracer were injected into a small portion (~50 m2) of the site for 3 months. Groundwater samples indicate that introduction of oxalic acid led to increased As release. Between 2.9 and 3.6 kg of As were removed from the sampled wells as a result of the oxalic acid treatment during the 3-month injection. A comparison of As concentrations on sediment cores collected before and after treatment and analyzed using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy suggested reduction in As concentrations of ~36% (median difference) to 48% (mean difference). While further study is necessary, the addition of oxalic acid shows potential for accelerating treatment of a highly contaminated site and decreasing the As remediation time-scale. PMID:25598701

  3. In situ fluorescence labelling of jasmonic acid binding sites in plant tissues with cadmium-free quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Liao, Qiumei; Yu, Ying; Cao, Yujuan; Lin, Bixia; Wei, Jingjing

    2015-02-01

    The fluorescence labelling of plant hormone binding sites is an important analytical technique in research on the molecular mechanisms of plant hormone activities. The authors synthesised a jasmonic acid (JA)-conjugated ZnS:Mn quantum dot (QD) probe, with a cubic structure and average hydrodynamic sizes of about 17.0 nm. The maximum fluorescence emission of the probe was recorded at about 585 nm. The probe was used for fluorescence labelling of JA binding sites in mung bean seedling tissues. Analysis revealed that the probe exhibited high selectivity to JA binding sites and good performance in eliminating interference from background fluorescence in plant tissues. In addition, the probe did not exhibit any apparent biotoxicity, and is much more suitable than probes constructed from CdTe QDs for the analysis of biological samples.

  4. Effective and site-specific phosphoramidation reaction for universally labeling nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Chih; Chen, Hsing-Yin; Ko, Ni Chien; Hwang, Chi-Ching; Wu, Min Hui; Wang, Li-Fang; Wang, Yun-Ming; Chang, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Eng-Chi; Wang, Tzu-Pin

    2014-03-15

    Here we report efficient and selective postsynthesis labeling strategies, based on an advanced phosphoramidation reaction, for nucleic acids of either synthetic or enzyme-catalyzed origin. The reactions provided phosphorimidazolide intermediates of DNA or RNA which, whether reacted in one pot (one-step) or purified (two-step), were directly or indirectly phosphoramidated with label molecules. The acquired fluorophore-labeled nucleic acids, prepared from the phosphoramidation reactions, demonstrated labeling efficacy by their F/N ratio values (number of fluorophores per molecule of nucleic acid) of 0.02-1.2 which are comparable or better than conventional postsynthesis fluorescent labeling methods for DNA and RNA. Yet, PCR and UV melting studies of the one-step phosphoramidation-prepared FITC-labeled DNA indicated that the reaction might facilitate nonspecific hybridization in nucleic acids. Intrinsic hybridization specificity of nucleic acids was, however, conserved in the two-step phosphoramidation reaction. The reaction of site-specific labeling nucleic acids at the 5'-end was supported by fluorescence quenching and UV melting studies of fluorophore-labeled DNA. The two-step phosphoramidation-based, effective, and site-specific labeling method has the potential to expedite critical research including visualization, quantification, structural determination, localization, and distribution of nucleic acids in vivo and in vitro.

  5. Flexibility Matters: Cooperative Active Sites in Covalent Organic Framework and Threaded Ionic Polymer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Aguila, Briana; Perman, Jason; Nguyen, Nicholas; Ma, Shengqian

    2016-12-07

    The combination of two or more reactive centers working in concert on a substrate to facilitate the reaction is now considered state of the art in catalysis, yet there still remains a tremendous challenge. Few heterogeneous systems of this sort have been exploited, as the active sites spatially separated within the rigid framework are usually difficult to cooperate. It is now shown that this roadblock can be surpassed. The underlying principle of the strategy presented here is the integration of catalytic components with excellent flexibility and porous heterogeneous catalysts, as demonstrated by the placement of linear ionic polymers in close proximity to surface Lewis acid active sites anchored on the walls of a covalent organic framework (COF). Using the cycloaddition of the epoxides and CO2 as a model reaction, dramatic activity improvements have been achieved for the composite catalysts in relation to the individual catalytic component. Furthermore, they also clearly outperform the benchmark catalytic systems formed by the combination of the molecular organocatalysts and heterogeneous Lewis acid catalysts, while affording additional recyclability. The extraordinary flexibility and enriched concentration of the catalytically active moieties on linear polymers facilitate the concerted catalysis, thus leading to superior catalytic performance. This work therefore uncovers an entirely new strategy for designing bifunctional catalysts with double-activation behavior and opens a new avenue in the design of multicapable systems that mimic biocatalysis.

  6. Absolute acidity of clay edge sites from ab-initio simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazi, Sami; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Salanne, Mathieu; Sprik, Michiel; Sulpizi, Marialore

    2012-10-01

    We provide a microscopic understanding of the solvation structure and reactivity of the edges of neutral clays. In particular we address the tendency to deprotonation of the different reactive groups on the (0 1 0) face of pyrophyllite. Such information cannot be inferred directly from titration experiments, which do not discriminate between different sites and whose interpretation resorts to macroscopic models. The determination of the corresponding pKa then usually relies on bond valence models, sometimes improved by incorporating some structural information from ab-initio simulations. Here we use density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations, combined with thermodynamic integration, to compute the free energy of the reactions of water with the different surface groups, leading to a deprotonated site and an aqueous hydronium ion. Our approach consistently describes the clay and water sides of the interface and includes naturally electronic polarization effects. It also allows to investigate the structure and solvation of all sites separately. We find that the most acidic group is SiOH, due to its ability to establish strong hydrogen bonds with adsorbed water, as it also happens on the quartz and amorphous silica surfaces. The acidity constant of AlOH2 is only 1 pKa unit larger. Finally, the pKa of AlOH is outside the possible range in water and this site should not deprotonate in aqueous solution. We show that the solvation of surface sites and hence their acidity is strongly affected by the proximity of other sites, in particular for AlOH and AlOH2 which share the same Al. We discuss the implications of our findings on the applicability of bond valence models to predict the acidity of edge sites of clays.

  7. A comprehensive search for calcium binding sites critical for TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Jason; Peters, Christian J; Wong, Xiu Ming; Cheng, Tong; Jan, Yuh Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh; Yang, Huanghe

    2014-01-01

    TMEM16A forms calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) that regulate physiological processes such as the secretions of airway epithelia and exocrine glands, the contraction of smooth muscles, and the excitability of neurons. Notwithstanding intense interest in the mechanism behind TMEM16A-CaCC calcium-dependent gating, comprehensive surveys to identify and characterize potential calcium sensors of this channel are still lacking. By aligning distantly related calcium-activated ion channels in the TMEM16 family and conducting systematic mutagenesis of all conserved acidic residues thought to be exposed to the cytoplasm, we identify four acidic amino acids as putative calcium-binding residues. Alterations of the charge, polarity, and size of amino acid side chains at these sites alter the ability of different divalent cations to activate the channel. Furthermore, TMEM16A mutant channels containing double cysteine substitutions at these residues are sensitive to the redox potential of the internal solution, providing evidence for their physical proximity and solvent accessibility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02772.001 PMID:24980701

  8. Are carboxyl groups the most acidic sites in amino acids? Gas-phase acidities, photoelectron spectra, and computations on tyrosine, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and their conjugate bases.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhixin; Wang, Xue-Bin; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Kass, Steven R

    2009-01-28

    Deprotonation of tyrosine in the gas phase was found to occur preferentially at the phenolic site, and the conjugate base consists of a 70:30 mixture of phenoxide and carboxylate anions at equilibrium. This result was established by developing a chemical probe for differentiating these two isomers, and the presence of both ions was confirmed by photoelectron spectroscopy. Equilibrium acidity measurements on tyrosine indicated that deltaG(acid)(o) = 332.5 +/- 1.5 kcal mol(-1) and deltaH(acid)(o) = 340.7 +/- 1.5 kcal mol(-1). Photoelectron spectra yielded adiabatic electron detachment energies of 2.70 +/- 0.05 and 3.55 +/- 0.10 eV for the phenoxide and carboxylate anions, respectively. The H/D exchange behavior of deprotonated tyrosine was examined using three different alcohols (CF3CH2OD, C6H5CH2OD, and CH3CH2OD), and incorporation of up to three deuterium atoms was observed. Two pathways are proposed to account for these results, and all of the experimental findings are supplemented with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ and G3B3 calculations. In addition, it was found that electrospray ionization of tyrosine from a 3:1 (v/v) CH3OH/H2O solution using a commercial source produces a deprotonated [M-H]- anion with the gas-phase equilibrium composition rather than the structure of the ion that exists in aqueous media. Electrospray ionization from acetonitrile, however, leads largely to the liquid-phase (carboxylate) structure. A control molecule, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, was found to behave in a similar manner. Thus, the electrospray conditions that are employed for the analysis of a compound can alter the isomeric composition of the resulting anion.

  9. Use of an Improved Matching Algorithm to Select Scaffolds for Enzyme Design Based on a Complex Active Site Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoqiang; Xue, Jing; Lin, Min; Zhu, Yushan

    2016-01-01

    Active site preorganization helps native enzymes electrostatically stabilize the transition state better than the ground state for their primary substrates and achieve significant rate enhancement. In this report, we hypothesize that a complex active site model for active site preorganization modeling should help to create preorganized active site design and afford higher starting activities towards target reactions. Our matching algorithm ProdaMatch was improved by invoking effective pruning strategies and the native active sites for ten scaffolds in a benchmark test set were reproduced. The root-mean squared deviations between the matched transition states and those in the crystal structures were < 1.0 Å for the ten scaffolds, and the repacking calculation results showed that 91% of the hydrogen bonds within the active sites are recovered, indicating that the active sites can be preorganized based on the predicted positions of transition states. The application of the complex active site model for de novo enzyme design was evaluated by scaffold selection using a classic catalytic triad motif for the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate. Eighty scaffolds were identified from a scaffold library with 1,491 proteins and four scaffolds were native esterase. Furthermore, enzyme design for complicated substrates was investigated for the hydrolysis of cephalexin using scaffold selection based on two different catalytic motifs. Only three scaffolds were identified from the scaffold library by virtue of the classic catalytic triad-based motif. In contrast, 40 scaffolds were identified using a more flexible, but still preorganized catalytic motif, where one scaffold corresponded to the α-amino acid ester hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis and synthesis of cephalexin. Thus, the complex active site modeling approach for de novo enzyme design with the aid of the improved ProdaMatch program is a promising approach for the creation of active sites with high catalytic

  10. Positive Darwinian selection at single amino acid sites conferring plant virus resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Explicit evaluation of the accuracy and power of Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian methods for detecting site-specific positive Darwinian selection presents a challenge because selective consequences of single amino acid changes are generally unknown. We exploit extensive molecular and functional cha...

  11. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  12. Brønsted acid sites based on penta-coordinated aluminum species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zichun; Jiang, Yijiao; Lafon, Olivier; Trébosc, Julien; Duk Kim, Kyung; Stampfl, Catherine; Baiker, Alfons; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Huang, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Zeolites and amorphous silica-alumina (ASA), which both provide Brønsted acid sites (BASs), are the most extensively used solid acid catalysts in the chemical industry. It is widely believed that BASs consist only of tetra-coordinated aluminum sites (AlIV) with bridging OH groups in zeolites or nearby silanols on ASA surfaces. Here we report the direct observation in ASA of a new type of BAS based on penta-coordinated aluminum species (AlV) by 27Al-{1H} dipolar-mediated correlation two-dimensional NMR experiments at high magnetic field under magic-angle spinning. Both BAS-AlIV and -AlV show a similar acidity to protonate probe molecular ammonia. The quantitative evaluation of 1H and 27Al sites demonstrates that BAS-AlV co-exists with BAS-AlIV rather than replaces it, which opens new avenues for strongly enhancing the acidity of these popular solid acids.

  13. Brønsted acid sites based on penta-coordinated aluminum species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zichun; Jiang, Yijiao; Lafon, Olivier; Trébosc, Julien; Duk Kim, Kyung; Stampfl, Catherine; Baiker, Alfons; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Huang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Zeolites and amorphous silica-alumina (ASA), which both provide Brønsted acid sites (BASs), are the most extensively used solid acid catalysts in the chemical industry. It is widely believed that BASs consist only of tetra-coordinated aluminum sites (AlIV) with bridging OH groups in zeolites or nearby silanols on ASA surfaces. Here we report the direct observation in ASA of a new type of BAS based on penta-coordinated aluminum species (AlV) by 27Al-{1H} dipolar-mediated correlation two-dimensional NMR experiments at high magnetic field under magic-angle spinning. Both BAS-AlIV and -AlV show a similar acidity to protonate probe molecular ammonia. The quantitative evaluation of 1H and 27Al sites demonstrates that BAS-AlV co-exists with BAS-AlIV rather than replaces it, which opens new avenues for strongly enhancing the acidity of these popular solid acids. PMID:27976673

  14. Experimental and Mechanistic Understanding of Aldehyde Hydrogenation Using Au25 Nanoclusters with Lewis Acids: Unique Sites for Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Gao; Abroshan, Hadi; Chen, Yuxiang; Jin, Rongchao; Kim, Hyung J

    2015-11-18

    The catalytic activity of Au25(SR)18 nanoclusters (R = C2H4Ph) for the aldehyde hydrogenation reaction in the presence of a base, e.g., ammonia or pyridine, and transition-metal ions M(z+), such as Cu(+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Co(2+), as a Lewis acid is studied. The addition of a Lewis acid is found to significantly promote the catalytic activity of Au25(SR)18/CeO2 in the hydrogenation of benzaldehyde and a number of its derivatives. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry in conjunction with UV-vis spectroscopy confirm the generation of new species, Au25-n(SR)18-n (n = 1-4), in the presence of a Lewis acid. The pathways for the speciation of Au24(SR)17 from its parent Au25(SR)18 nanocluster as well as its structure are investigated via the density functional theory (DFT) method. The adsorption of M(z+) onto a thiolate ligand "-SR-" of Au25(SR)18, followed by a stepwise detachment of "-SR-" and a gold atom bonded to "-SR-" (thus an "Au-SR" unit) is found to be the most likely mechanism for the Au24(SR)17 generation. This in turn exposes the Au13-core of Au24(SR)17 to reactants, providing an active site for the catalytic hydrogenation. DFT calculations indicate that M(z+) is also capable of adsorbing onto the Au13-core surface, producing a possible active metal site of a different kind to catalyze the aldehyde hydrogenation reaction. This study suggests, for the first time, that species with an open metal site like adducts [nanoparticle-M]((z-1)+) or fragments Au25-n(SR)18-n function as the catalysts rather than the intact Au25(SR)18.

  15. Motualevic Acids and Analogs: Synthesis and Antimicrobial Structure Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Cheruku, Pradeep; Keffer, Jessica L.; Dogo-Isonagie, Cajetan; Bewley, Carole A.

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of the marine natural products motualevic acids A, E, and analogs in which modifications have been made to the ω-brominated lipid (E)-14,14-dibromotetra-deca-2,13-dienoic acid or amino acid unit are reported, together with antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Enterococcus faecium, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. PMID:20538459

  16. Design of protease-resistant myelin basic protein-derived peptides by cleavage site directed amino acid substitutions.

    PubMed

    Burster, Timo; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Boehm, Bernhard O; Dunn, Shannon; Rotzschke, Olaf; Falk, Kirsten; Weber, Ekkehard; Verhelst, Steven H L; Kalbacher, Hubert; Driessen, Christoph

    2007-11-15

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is considered to be a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. An attractive strategy to prevent activation of autoaggressive T cells in MS, is the use of altered peptide ligands (APL), which bind to major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules. To be of clinical use, APL must be capable of resisting hostile environments including the proteolytic machinery of antigen presenting cells (APC). The current design of APL relies on cost- and labour-intensive strategies. To overcome these major drawbacks, we used a deductive approach which involved modifying proteolytic cleavage sites in APL. Cleavage site-directed amino acid substitution of the autoantigen myelin basic protein (MBP) resulted in lysosomal protease-resistant, high-affinity binding peptides. In addition, these peptides mitigated T cell activation in a similar fashion as conventional APL. The strategy outlined allows the development of protease-resistant APL and provides a universal design strategy to improve peptide-based immunotherapeutics.

  17. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites. PMID:26893379

  18. Multiple DNA binding activities of the novel site-specific recombinase, Piv, from Moraxella lacunata.

    PubMed

    Tobiason, D M; Lenich, A G; Glasgow, A C

    1999-04-02

    The recombinase, Piv, is essential for site-specific DNA inversion of the type IV pilin DNA segment in Moraxella lacunata and Moraxella bovis. Piv shows significant homology with the transposases of the IS110/IS492 family of insertion elements, but, surprisingly, Piv contains none of the conserved amino acid motifs of the lambda Int or Hin/Res families of site-specific recombinases. Therefore, Piv may mediate site-specific recombination by a novel mechanism. To begin to determine how Piv may assemble a synaptic nucleoprotein structure for DNA cleavage and strand exchange, we have characterized the interaction of Piv with the DNA inversion region of M. lacunata. Gel shift and nuclease/chemical protection assays, competition and dissociation rate analyses, and cooperativity studies indicate that Piv binds two distinct recognition sequences. One recognition sequence, found at multiple sites within and outside of the invertible segment, is bound by Piv protomers with high affinity. The second recognition sequence is located at the recombination cross-over sites at the ends of the invertible element; Piv interacts with this sequence as an oligomer with apparent low affinity. A model is proposed for the role of the different Piv binding sites of the M. lacunata inversion region in the formation of an active synaptosome.

  19. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kalamajski, Sebastian; Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W

    2016-04-08

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites.

  20. Molecular Design of a Chiral Brønsted Acid with Two Different Acidic Sites: Regio-, Diastereo-, and Enantioselective Hetero-Diels-Alder Reaction of Azopyridinecarboxylate with Amidodienes Catalyzed by Chiral Carboxylic Acid-Monophosphoric Acid.

    PubMed

    Momiyama, Norie; Tabuse, Hideaki; Noda, Hirofumi; Yamanaka, Masahiro; Fujinami, Takeshi; Yamanishi, Katsunori; Izumiseki, Atsuto; Funayama, Kosuke; Egawa, Fuyuki; Okada, Shino; Adachi, Hiroaki; Terada, Masahiro

    2016-09-07

    A chiral Brønsted acid containing two different acidic sites, chiral carboxylic acid-monophosphoric acid 1a, was designed to be a new and effective concept in catalytic asymmetric hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of azopyridinecarboxylate with amidodienes. The multipoint hydrogen-bonding interactions among the carboxylic acid, monophosphoric acid, azopyridinecarboxylate, and amidodiene achieved high catalytic and chiral efficiency, producing substituted 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridazines with excellent stereocontrol in a single step. This constitutes the first example of regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselective azo-hetero-Diels-Alder reactions by chiral Brønsted acid catalysis.

  1. Phytanic acid, a novel activator of uncoupling protein-1 gene transcription and brown adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, Agatha; Barberá, Maria José; Iglesias, Roser; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc

    2002-01-01

    Phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid) is a phytol-derived branched-chain fatty acid present in dietary products. Phytanic acid increased uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) mRNA expression in brown adipocytes differentiated in culture. Phytanic acid induced the expression of the UCP1 gene promoter, which was enhanced by co-transfection with a retinoid X receptor (RXR) expression vector but not with other expression vectors driving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha, PPARgamma or a form of RXR devoid of ligand-dependent sensitivity. The effect of phytanic acid on the UCP1 gene required the 5' enhancer region of the gene and the effects of phytanic acid were mediated in an additive manner by three binding sites for RXR. Moreover, phytanic acid activates brown adipocyte differentiation: long-term exposure of brown preadipocytes to phytanic acid promoted the acquisition of the brown adipocyte morphology and caused a co-ordinate induction of the mRNAs for gene markers of brown adipocyte differentiation, such as UCP1, adipocyte lipid-binding protein aP2, lipoprotein lipase, the glucose transporter GLUT4 or subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase. In conclusion, phytanic acid is a natural product of phytol metabolism that activates brown adipocyte thermogenic function. It constitutes a potential nutritional signal linking dietary status to adaptive thermogenesis. PMID:11829740

  2. Physiological activities of hydroxyl fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the search of value-added products from surplus soybean oil, we produced many new hydroxy fatty acids through microbial bioconversion. Hydroxy fatty acids are used in a wide range of industrial products, such as resins, waxes, nylons plastics, lubricants, cosmetics, and additives in coatings and...

  3. Active-site properties of Phrixotrix railroad worm green and red bioluminescence-eliciting luciferases.

    PubMed

    Viviani, V R; Arnoldi, F G C; Venkatesh, B; Neto, A J S; Ogawa, F G T; Oehlmeyer, A T L; Ohmiya, Y

    2006-10-01

    The luciferases of the railroad worm Phrixotrix (Coleoptera: Phengodidae) are the only beetle luciferases that naturally produce true red bioluminescence. Previously, we cloned the green- (PxGR) and red-emitting (PxRE) luciferases of railroad worms Phrixotrix viviani and P. hirtus[OLE1]. These luciferases were expressed and purified, and their active-site properties were determined. The red-emitting PxRE luciferase displays flash-like kinetics, whereas PxGR luciferase displays slow-type kinetics. The substrate affinities and catalytic efficiency of PxRE luciferase are also higher than those of PxGR luciferase. Fluorescence studies with 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid and 6-p-toluidino-2-naphthalene sulfonic acid showed that the PxRE luciferase luciferin-binding site is more polar than that of PxGR luciferase, and it is sensitive to guanidine. Mutagenesis and modelling studies suggest that several invariant residues in the putative luciferin-binding site of PxRE luciferase cannot interact with excited oxyluciferin. These results suggest that one portion of the luciferin-binding site of the red-emitting luciferase is tighter than that of PxGR luciferase, whereas the other portion could be more open and polar.

  4. Site-specific PEGylation of therapeutic proteins via optimization of both accessible reactive amino acid residues and PEG derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun; Yang, Xiao-lan; Yuan, Yong-hua; Pu, Jun; Liao, Fei

    2012-08-01

    Modification of accessible amino acid residues with poly(ethylene glycol) [PEG] is a widely used technique for formulating therapeutic proteins. In practice, site-specific PEGylation of all selected/engineered accessible nonessential reactive residues of therapeutic proteins with common activated PEG derivatives is a promising strategy to concomitantly improve pharmacokinetics, allow retention of activity, alleviate immunogenicity, and avoid modification isomers. Specifically, through molecular engineering of a therapeutic protein, accessible essential residues reactive to an activated PEG derivative are substituted with unreactive residues provided that protein activity is retained, and a limited number of accessible nonessential reactive residues with optimized distributions are selected/introduced. Subsequently, all accessible nonessential reactive residues are completely PEGylated with the activated PEG derivative in great excess. Branched PEG derivatives containing new PEG chains with negligible metabolic toxicity are more desirable for site-specific PEGylation. Accordingly, for the successful formulation of therapeutic proteins, optimization of the number and distributions of accessible nonessential reactive residues via molecular engineering can be integrated with the design of large-sized PEG derivatives to achieve site-specific PEGylation of all selected/engineered accessible reactive residues.

  5. Facile synthesis of PtAu alloy nanoparticles with high activity for formic acid oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Sheng; Shao, Yuyan; Yin, Geping; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-02-15

    We report the facile synthesis of carbon supported PtAu alloy nanoparticles with high electrocatalytic activity as the anode catalyst for direct formic acid fuel cells (DFAFCs). PtAu alloy nanopaticles are synthesized by co-reducing HAuCl4 and H2PtCl6 with NaBH4 in the presence of sodium citrate and then the nanoparticles are deposited on Vulcan XC-72R carbon support (PtAu/C). The obtained catalysts are characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), which reveal PtAu alloy formation with an average diameter of 4.6 nm. PtAu/C exhibits 8 times higher catalytic activity toward formic acid oxidation than Pt/C. The enhanced activity of PtAu/C catalyst is attributed to noncontinuous Pt sites formed in the presence of the neighbored Au sites, which promotes direct oxidation of formic acid by avoiding poison CO.

  6. Isotope geochemistry of waters affected by acid mine drainage in old labour sites (SE, Spain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen; Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Garcia-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Agudo, Ines; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel; Recio, Clemente

    2015-04-01

    The ore deposits of this zone have iron, lead and zinc as the main metal components. Iron is present in oxides, hydroxides, sulfides, sulfates, carbonates, and silicates; lead and zinc occur in sulfides (galena and sphalerite, respectively), carbonates, sulfates, and lead or zinc-bearing (manganese, iron) oxides. Mining started with the Romans and activity peaked in the second half of the 19th century and throughout the 20th century until the 1980's. From 1940 to 1957, mineral concentration was made by froth flotation and, prior to this, by gravimetric techniques. The mining wastes, or tailings, with a very fine particle size were deposited inland (tailings dams) and, since 1957, huge releases were made in directly the sea coast. The objective of this work was to evaluate processes affecting waters from abandoned mine sites by way of stable isotopic analysis, particularly H and O stable isotopes from water and S and O from dissolved sulfates. Several common chemical and physical processes, such as evaporation, water-rock interaction and mixing could alter water isotopic composition. Evaporation, which causes an enrichment in δD and δ18O in the residual water, is an important process in semiarid areas. The results obtained indicate that, for sites near the coast, waters are meteoric, and marine infiltration only takes place in the deepest layers near the shore or if water remains stagnated in sediments with low permeability. The main source of sulfate was the oxidation of sulfides, resulting in the liberation of acid, sulfate and metals. In order to assess the mechanism responsible for sulfide oxidation, the stoichiometric isotope balance model and the general isotope balance model were tested, suggesting that the oxidation via Fe3+ was predominant in the surface, and controlled by A. ferrooxidans, while at depth, sulfate reduction occurred.

  7. Long-Chain Fatty Acids Activate Calcium Channels in Ventricular Myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, James Min-Che; Xian, Hu; Bacaner, Marvin

    1992-07-01

    Nonesterified fatty acids accumulate at sites of tissue injury and necrosis. In cardiac tissue the concentrations of oleic acid, arachidonic acid, leukotrienes, and other fatty acids increase greatly during ischemia due to receptor or nonreceptor-mediated activation of phospholipases and/or diminished reacylation. In ischemic myocardium, the time course of increase in fatty acids and tissue calcium closely parallels irreversible cardiac damage. We postulated that fatty acids released from membrane phospholipids may be involved in the increase of intracellular calcium. We report here that low concentrations (3-30 μM) of each long-chain unsaturated (oleic, linoleic, linolenic, and arachidonic) and saturated (palmitic, stearic, and arachidic) fatty acid tested induced multifold increases in voltage-dependent calcium currents (ICa) in cardiac myocytes. In contrast, neither short-chain fatty acids (<12 carbons) or fatty acid esters (oleic and palmitic methyl esters) had any effect on ICa, indicating that activation of calcium channels depended on chain length and required a free carboxyl group. Inhibition of protein kinases C and A, G proteins, eicosanoid production, or nonenzymatic oxidation did not block the fatty acid-induced increase in ICa. Thus, long-chain fatty acids appear to directly activate ICa, possibly by acting at some lipid sites near the channels or directly on the channel protein itself. We suggest that the combined effects of fatty acids released during ischemia on ICa may contribute to ischemia-induced pathogenic events on the heart that involve calcium, such as arrhythmias, conduction disturbances, and myocardial damage due to cytotoxic calcium overload.

  8. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  9. Amino acid residues 201-205 in C-terminal acidic tail region plays a crucial role in antibacterial activity of HMGB1

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Antibacterial activity is a novel function of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). However, the functional site for this new effect is presently unknown. Methods and Results In this study, recombinant human HMGB1 A box and B box (rHMGB1 A box, rHMGB1 B box), recombinant human HMGB1 (rHMGB1) and the truncated C-terminal acidic tail mutant (tHMGB1) were prepared by the prokaryotic expression system. The C-terminal acidic tail (C peptide) was synthesized, which was composed of 30 amino acid residues. Antibacterial assays showed that both the full length rHMGB1 and the synthetic C peptide alone could efficiently inhibit bacteria proliferation, but rHMGB1 A box and B box, and tHMGB1 lacking the C-terminal acidic tail had no antibacterial function. These results suggest that C-terminal acidic tail is the key region for the antibacterial activity of HMGB1. Furthermore, we prepared eleven different deleted mutants lacking several amino acid residues in C-terminal acidic tail of HMGB1. Antibacterial assays of these mutants demonstrate that the amino acid residues 201-205 in C-terminal acidic tail region is the core functional site for the antibacterial activity of the molecule. Conclusion In sum, these results define the key region and the crucial site in HMGB1 for its antibacterial function, which is helpful to illustrating the antibacterial mechanisms of HMGB1. PMID:19751520

  10. Site-specific mutagenesis and functional analysis of active sites of sulfur oxygenase reductase from Gram-positive moderate thermophile Sulfobacillus acidophilus TPY.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijun; Guo, Wenbin; Xu, Changan; Zhou, Hongbo; Chen, Xinhua

    2013-12-14

    Sequence alignments revealed that the conserved motifs of SORSa which formed an independent branch between archaea and Gram-negative bacteria SORs according to the phylogenetic relationship were similar with the archaea and Gram-negative bacteria SORs. In order to investigate the active sites of SORSa, cysteines 31, 101 and 104 (C31, C101, C104), histidines 86 and 90 (H86 and H90) and glutamate 114 (E114) of SORSa were chosen as the target amino acid residues for site-specific mutagenesis. The wild type and six mutant SORs were expressed in E. coli BL21, purified and confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis. Enzyme activity determination revealed that the active sites of SORSa were identical with the archaea and Gram-negative bacteria SORs reported. Replacement of any cysteine residues reduced SOR activity by 53-100%, while the mutants of H86A, H90A and E114A lost their enzyme activities largely, only remaining 20%, 19% and 32% activity of the wild type SOR respectively. This study will enrich our awareness for active sites of SOR in a Gram-positive bacterium.

  11. Non-specific binding sites help to explain mixed inhibition in mushroom tyrosinase activities.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Sorour; Haghbeen, Kamahldin; Fazli, Mostafa

    2016-10-21

    Inhibition and activation studies of tyrosinase could prove beneficial to agricultural, food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. Although non-competitive and mixed-inhibition are frequent modes observed in kinetics studies on mushroom tyrosinase (MT) activities, the phenomena are left unexplained. In this study, dual effects of phthalic acid (PA) and cinnamic acid (CA) on MT during mono-phenolase activity were demonstrated. PA activated and inhibited MT at concentrations lower and higher than 150 μM, respectively. In contrast, CA inhibited and activated MT at concentrations lower and higher than 5 μM. The mode of inhibition for both effectors was mixed-type. Complex kinetics of MT in the presence of a modulator could partly be ascribed to its mixed-cooperativity. However, to explain mixed-inhibition mode, it is necessary to demonstrate how the ternary complex of substrate/enzyme/effector is formed. Therefore, we looked for possible non-specific binding sites using MT tropolone-bound PDB (2Y9X) in the computational studies. When tropolone was in MTPa (active site), PA and CA occupied different pockets (named MTPb and MTPc, respectively). The close Moldock scores of PA binding posed in MTPb and MTPa suggested that MTPb could be a secondary binding site for PA. Similar results were obtained for CA. Ensuing results from 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations for 2Y9X-effector complexes indicated that the structures were gradually stabilized during simulation. Tunnel analysis by using CAVER Analyst and CHEXVIS resulted in identifying two distinct channels that assumingly participate in exchanging the effectors when the direct channel to MTPa is not accessible.

  12. Minimized natural versions of fungal ribotoxins show improved active site plasticity.

    PubMed

    Maestro-López, Moisés; Olombrada, Miriam; García-Ortega, Lucía; Serrano-González, Daniel; Lacadena, Javier; Oñaderra, Mercedes; Gavilanes, José G; Martínez-Del-Pozo, Álvaro

    2017-04-01

    Fungal ribotoxins are highly specific extracellular RNases which cleave a single phosphodiester bond at the ribosomal sarcin-ricin loop, inhibiting protein biosynthesis by interfering with elongation factors. Most ribotoxins show high degree of conservation, with similar sizes and amino acid sequence identities above 85%. Only two exceptions are known: hirsutellin A and anisoplin, produced by the entomopathogenic fungi Hirsutella thompsonii and Metarhizium anisopliae, respectively. Both proteins are similar but smaller than the other known ribotoxins (130 vs 150 amino acids), displaying only about 25% sequence identity with them. They can be considered minimized natural versions of their larger counterparts, best represented by α-sarcin. The conserved α-sarcin active site residue Tyr48 has been replaced by the geometrically equivalent Asp, present in the minimized ribotoxins, to produce and characterize the corresponding mutant. As a control, the inverse anisoplin mutant (D43Y) has been also studied. The results show how the smaller versions of ribotoxins represent an optimum compromise among conformational freedom, stability, specificity, and active-site plasticity which allow these toxic proteins to accommodate the characteristic abilities of ribotoxins into a shorter amino acid sequence and more stable structure of intermediate size between that of other nontoxic fungal RNases and previously known larger ribotoxins.

  13. Purification and sequencing of the active site tryptic peptide from penicillin-binding protein 1b of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, R.A.; Suzuki, H.; Hirota, Y.; Strominger, J.L.

    1985-07-02

    This paper reports the sequence of the active site peptide of penicillin-binding protein 1b from Escherichia coli. Purified penicillin-binding protein 1b was labeled with (/sup 14/C)penicillin G, digested with trypsin, and partially purified by gel filtration. Upon further purification by high-pressure liquid chromatography, two radioactive peaks were observed, and the major peak, representing over 75% of the applied radioactivity, was submitted to amino acid analysis and sequencing. The sequence Ser-Ile-Gly-Ser-Leu-Ala-Lys was obtained. The active site nucleophile was identified by digesting the purified peptide with aminopeptidase M and separating the radioactive products on high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid analysis confirmed that the serine residue in the middle of the sequence was covalently bonded to the (/sup 14/C)penicilloyl moiety. A comparison of this sequence to active site sequences of other penicillin-binding proteins and beta-lactamases is presented.

  14. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  15. Aminoalcohols as Probes of the Two-subsite Active Site of Beta-D-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catalysis and inhibitor binding by the GH43 beta-xylosidase are governed by the protonation state of catalytic base (D14, pKa 5.0) and catalytic acid (E186, pKa 7.2) which reside in subsite -1 of the two-subsite active site. Cationic aminoalcohols are shown to bind exclusively to subsite -1 of the ...

  16. Transport and biological activities of bile acids.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, Brittnee L; Agellon, Luis B

    2013-07-01

    Bile acids have emerged as important biological molecules that support the solubilization of various lipids and lipid-soluble compounds in the gut, and the regulation of gene expression and cellular function. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and eventually released into the small intestine. The majority of bile acids are recovered in the distal end of the small intestine and then returned to the liver for reuse. The components of the mechanism responsible for the recycling of bile acids within the enterohepatic circulation have been identified whereas the mechanism for intracellular transport is less understood. Recently, the ileal lipid binding protein (ILBP; human gene symbol FABP6) was shown to be needed for the efficient transport of bile acids from the apical side to the basolateral side of enterocytes in the distal intestine. This review presents an overview of the transport of bile acids between the liver and the gut as well as within hepatocytes and enterocytes. A variety of pathologies is associated with the malfunction of the bile acid transport system.

  17. Ligand-binding specificity and promiscuity of the main lignocellulolytic enzyme families as revealed by active-site architecture analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Li; Liu, Shijia; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Lushan

    2016-01-01

    Biomass can be converted into sugars by a series of lignocellulolytic enzymes, which belong to the glycoside hydrolase (GH) families summarized in CAZy databases. Here, using a structural bioinformatics method, we analyzed the active site architecture of the main lignocellulolytic enzyme families. The aromatic amino acids Trp/Tyr and polar amino acids Glu/Asp/Asn/Gln/Arg occurred at higher frequencies in the active site architecture than in the whole enzyme structure. And the number of potential subsites was significantly different among different families. In the cellulase and xylanase families, the conserved amino acids in the active site architecture were mostly found at the −2 to +1 subsites, while in β-glucosidase they were mainly concentrated at the −1 subsite. Families with more conserved binding amino acid residues displayed strong selectivity for their ligands, while those with fewer conserved binding amino acid residues often exhibited promiscuity when recognizing ligands. Enzymes with different activities also tended to bind different hydroxyl oxygen atoms on the ligand. These results may help us to better understand the common and unique structural bases of enzyme-ligand recognition from different families and provide a theoretical basis for the functional evolution and rational design of major lignocellulolytic enzymes. PMID:27009476

  18. Extensive mutagenesis of a transcriptional activation domain identifies single hydrophobic and acidic amino acids important for activation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, M B; Goff, S A; Chandler, V L

    1997-01-01

    C1 is a transcriptional activator of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes of the maize anthocyanin pigment pathway. C1 has an amino terminus homologous to Myb DNA-binding domains and an acidic carboxyl terminus that is a transcriptional activation domain in maize and yeast cells. To identify amino acids critical for transcriptional activation, an extensive random mutagenesis of the C1 carboxyl terminus was done. The C1 activation domain is remarkably tolerant of amino acid substitutions, as changes at 34 residues had little or no effect on transcriptional activity. These changes include introduction of helix-incompatible amino acids throughout the C1 activation domain and alteration of most single acidic amino acids, suggesting that a previously postulated amphipathic alpha-helix is not required for activation. Substitutions at two positions revealed amino acids important for transcriptional activation. Replacement of leucine 253 with a proline or glutamine resulted in approximately 10% of wild-type transcriptional activation. Leucine 253 is in a region of C1 in which several hydrophobic residues align with residues important for transcriptional activation by the herpes simplex virus VP16 protein. However, changes at all other hydrophobic residues in C1 indicate that none are critical for C1 transcriptional activation. The other important amino acid in C1 is aspartate 262, as a change to valine resulted in only 24% of wild-type transcriptional activation. Comparison of our C1 results with those from VP16 reveal substantial differences in which amino acids are required for transcriptional activation in vivo by these two acidic activation domains. PMID:8972191

  19. Antifeedant activity of anticopalic acid isolated from Vitex hemsleyi.

    PubMed

    Villegas Gómez, Clarisa; Martínez-Vázquez, Mariano; Esquivel, Baldomero

    2009-01-01

    The known labdane-type diterpenoids anticopalic acid (1) and 3 beta-hydroxyanticopalic acid (2) were isolated from extracts of the aerial parts of Vitex hemsleyi Briq. (Labiatae). The acid 1 showed an antifeedant, dose-dependent activity against Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). To our knowledge this is the first report on the antifeedant activity of a labdane-type diterpene against S. frugiperda.

  20. A cluster DFT study of NH3 and NO adsorption on the (MoO2)2+/HZSM-5 surface: Lewis versus Brønsted acid sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Zuo, Zhijun; Li, Zhe; Zhang, Jinshan

    2014-12-01

    A systematic DFT study was carried out to investigate NH3 and NO adsorption on both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites of (MoO2)2+/HZSM-5 catalyst by using cluster models. The adsorption energy results indicate that NH3 could strongly adsorb on both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites in the form of coordinated NH3 and NH4+, respectively, whereas NO represents poorer adsorption ability. It is also found that Lewis and Brønsted acid sites are competitive energetically for NH3 adsorption. According to the difference in the proposed mechanisms for NH3 adsorption on different acid sites, particular attention has been focused on the first dissociation of coordinated NH3 for Lewis acid site and the effect of Mo site on the introduction of NO for Brønsted acid site. For the coordinated NH3 on Lewis acid site, the more electron donation from NH3 is, the greater its adsorption stability is and the higher active its H atoms are. In addition, DOS results show that stability of the H atoms is enhanced by interacting with framework oxygen and especially the H atoms chemical-bonded with framework oxygen. For the NH4+ on Brønsted acid site, reduced-state Mo5+ holds stronger reducibility and oxidizability than terminal oxygen, which is suggested to play a key role in adsorption and activation of NOx together with the adsorbed NH4+.

  1. Target-classification approach applied to active UXO sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, F.; Fernández, J. P.; Shamatava, Irma; Barrowes, B. E.; O'Neill, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study is designed to illustrate the discrimination performance at two UXO active sites (Oklahoma's Fort Sill and the Massachusetts Military Reservation) of a set of advanced electromagnetic induction (EMI) inversion/discrimination models which include the orthonormalized volume magnetic source (ONVMS), joint diagonalization (JD), and differential evolution (DE) approaches and whose power and flexibility greatly exceed those of the simple dipole model. The Fort Sill site is highly contaminated by a mix of the following types of munitions: 37-mm target practice tracers, 60-mm illumination mortars, 75-mm and 4.5'' projectiles, 3.5'', 2.36'', and LAAW rockets, antitank mine fuzes with and without hex nuts, practice MK2 and M67 grenades, 2.5'' ballistic windshields, M2A1-mines with/without bases, M19-14 time fuzes, and 40-mm practice grenades with/without cartridges. The site at the MMR site contains targets of yet different sizes. In this work we apply our models to EMI data collected using the MetalMapper (MM) and 2 × 2 TEMTADS sensors. The data for each anomaly are inverted to extract estimates of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters associated with each buried target. (The latter include the total volume magnetic source or NVMS, which relates to size, shape, and material properties; the former includes location, depth, and orientation). The estimated intrinsic parameters are then used for classification performed via library matching and the use of statistical classification algorithms; this process yielded prioritized dig-lists that were submitted to the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) for independent scoring. The models' classification performance is illustrated and assessed based on these independent evaluations.

  2. Three Dimensional Structure Prediction of Fatty Acid Binding Site on Human Transmembrane Receptor CD36.

    PubMed

    Tarhda, Zineb; Semlali, Oussama; Kettani, Anas; Moussa, Ahmed; Abumrad, Nada A; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2013-01-01

    CD36 is an integral membrane protein which is thought to have a hairpin-like structure with alpha-helices at the C and N terminals projecting through the membrane as well as a larger extracellular loop. This receptor interacts with a number of ligands including oxidized low density lipoprotein and long chain fatty acids (LCFAs). It is also implicated in lipid metabolism and heart diseases. It is therefore important to determine the 3D structure of the CD36 site involved in lipid binding. In this study, we predict the 3D structure of the fatty acid (FA) binding site [127-279 aa] of the CD36 receptor based on homology modeling with X-ray structure of Human Muscle Fatty Acid Binding Protein (PDB code: 1HMT). Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the resulting model suggests that this model was reliable and stable, taking in consideration over 97.8% of the residues in the most favored regions as well as the significant overall quality factor. Protein analysis, which relied on the secondary structure prediction of the target sequence and the comparison of 1HMT and CD36 [127-279 aa] secondary structures, led to the determination of the amino acid sequence consensus. These results also led to the identification of the functional sites on CD36 and revealed the presence of residues which may play a major role during ligand-protein interactions.

  3. Three Dimensional Structure Prediction of Fatty Acid Binding Site on Human Transmembrane Receptor CD36

    PubMed Central

    Tarhda, Zineb; Semlali, Oussama; Kettani, Anas; Moussa, Ahmed; Abumrad, Nada A.; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2013-01-01

    CD36 is an integral membrane protein which is thought to have a hairpin-like structure with alpha-helices at the C and N terminals projecting through the membrane as well as a larger extracellular loop. This receptor interacts with a number of ligands including oxidized low density lipoprotein and long chain fatty acids (LCFAs). It is also implicated in lipid metabolism and heart diseases. It is therefore important to determine the 3D structure of the CD36 site involved in lipid binding. In this study, we predict the 3D structure of the fatty acid (FA) binding site [127–279 aa] of the CD36 receptor based on homology modeling with X-ray structure of Human Muscle Fatty Acid Binding Protein (PDB code: 1HMT). Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the resulting model suggests that this model was reliable and stable, taking in consideration over 97.8% of the residues in the most favored regions as well as the significant overall quality factor. Protein analysis, which relied on the secondary structure prediction of the target sequence and the comparison of 1HMT and CD36 [127–279 aa] secondary structures, led to the determination of the amino acid sequence consensus. These results also led to the identification of the functional sites on CD36 and revealed the presence of residues which may play a major role during ligand-protein interactions. PMID:24348024

  4. Evidence of sulphur and nitrogen deposition signals at the United Kingdom Acid Waters Monitoring Network sites.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D M

    2005-09-01

    Some recent studies of trends in sulphate in surface waters have alluded to possible lag effects imposed by catchment soils, resulting in discrepancies between trends in deposition and run-off. To assess the extent of these possible effects in the UK, sulphate concentration data from the United Kingdom Acid Waters Monitoring Network (AWMN) sites are compared with estimates of sulphur deposition at each site. From these data, input-output budgets are computed at an annual time scale. The estimated budgets suggest a close association between catchment sulphur inputs and outputs at an annual scale, with well-balanced annual budgets at most sites, indicative of only minor lag effects. A similar analysis of the AWMN site nitrogen budget shows little evidence of an association between nitrogen inputs and outputs at this time scale.

  5. Lipid Classes and Fatty Acids in Ophryotrocha cyclops, a Dorvilleid from Newfoundland Aquaculture Sites.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Flora; Dufour, Suzanne C; Hamoutene, Dounia; Parrish, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    A new opportunistic annelid (Ophryotrocha cyclops) discovered on benthic substrates underneath finfish aquaculture sites in Newfoundland (NL) may be involved in the remediation of organic wastes. At those aquaculture sites, bacterial mats and O. cyclops often coexist and are used as indicators of organic enrichment. Little is known on the trophic strategies used by these annelids, including whether they might consume bacteria or other aquaculture-derived wastes. We studied the lipid and fatty acid composition of the annelids and their potential food sources (degraded flocculent organic matter, fresh fish pellets and bacterial mats) to investigate feeding relationships in these habitats and compared the lipid and fatty acid composition of annelids before and after starvation. Fish pellets were rich in lipids, mainly terrestrially derived C18 fatty acids (18:1ω9, 18:2ω6, 18:3ω3), while bacterial samples were mainly composed of ω7 fatty acids, and flocculent matter appeared to be a mixture of fresh and degrading fish pellets, feces and bacteria. Ophryotrocha cyclops did not appear to store excessive amounts of lipids (13%) but showed a high concentration of ω3 and ω6 fatty acids, as well as a high proportion of the main fatty acids contained in fresh fish pellets and bacterial mats. The dorvilleids and all potential food sources differed significantly in their lipid and fatty acid composition. Interestingly, while all food sources contained low proportions of 20:5ω3 and 20:2ω6, the annelids showed high concentrations of these two fatty acids, along with 20:4ω6. A starvation period of 13 days did not result in a major decrease in total lipid content; however, microscopic observations revealed that very few visible lipid droplets remained in the gut epithelium after three months of starvation. Ophryotrocha cyclops appears well adapted to extreme environments and may rely on lipid-rich organic matter for survival and dispersal in cold environments.

  6. Characterization of Naphthaleneacetic Acid Binding to Receptor Sites on Cellular Membranes of Maize Coleoptile Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Peter M.; Dohrmann, Ulrike; Hertel, Rainer

    1977-01-01

    Characteristics of and optimum conditions for saturable (“specific”) binding of [14C]naphthaleneacetic acid to sites located on membranous particles from maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptiles are described. Most, if not all, of the specific binding appears to be due to a single kinetic class of binding sites having a KD of 5 to 7 × 10−7m for naphthalene-1-acetic acid (NAA). Binding of NAA is insensitive to high monovalent salt concentrations, indicating that binding is not primarily ionic. However, specific binding is inhibited by Mg2+ or Ca2+ above 5 mm. Specific binding is improved by organic acids, especially citrate. Binding is heat-labile and is sensitive to agents that act either on proteins or on lipids. Specific binding is reversibly inactivated by reducing agents such as dithioerythritol; a reducible group, possibly a disulfide group, may be located at the binding site and required for its function. The affinity of the specific binding sites for auxins is modified by an unidentified dialyzable, heat-stable, apparently amphoteric, organic factor (“supernatant factor”) found in maize tissue. PMID:16659851

  7. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Altering Pollen Soluble Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Deborah J; Haque, Tamanna; Tudor, Richard L; Barron, Yoshimi; Zampronio, Cleidiane G; Cotton, Nicholas P J; de Graaf, Barend H J; White, Scott A; Cooper, Helen J; Franklin, F Christopher H; Harper, Jeffery F; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2017-03-01

    Protein phosphorylation regulates numerous cellular processes. Identifying the substrates and protein kinases involved is vital to understand how these important posttranslational modifications modulate biological function in eukaryotic cells. Pyrophosphatases catalyze the hydrolysis of inorganic phosphate (PPi) to inorganic phosphate Pi, driving biosynthetic reactions; they are essential for low cytosolic inorganic phosphate. It was suggested recently that posttranslational regulation of Family I soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases (sPPases) may affect their activity. We previously demonstrated that two pollen-expressed sPPases, Pr-p26.1a and Pr-p26.1b, from the flowering plant Papaver rhoeas were inhibited by phosphorylation. Despite the potential significance, there is a paucity of data on sPPase phosphorylation and regulation. Here, we used liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry to map phosphorylation sites to the otherwise divergent amino-terminal extensions on these pollen sPPases. Despite the absence of reports in the literature on mapping phosphorylation sites on sPPases, a database survey of various proteomes identified a number of examples, suggesting that phosphorylation may be a more widely used mechanism to regulate these enzymes. Phosphomimetic mutants of Pr-p26.1a/b significantly and differentially reduced PPase activities by up to 2.5-fold at pH 6.8 and 52% in the presence of Ca(2+) and hydrogen peroxide over unmodified proteins. This indicates that phosphoregulation of key sites can inhibit the catalytic responsiveness of these proteins in concert with key intracellular events. As sPPases are essential for many metabolic pathways in eukaryotic cells, our findings identify the phosphorylation of sPPases as a potential master regulatory mechanism that could be used to attenuate metabolism.

  8. Evidence for segmental mobility in the active site of pepsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, J.; Strop, P.; Senn, H.; Foundling, S.; Kostka, V.

    1986-05-01

    The low hydrolytic activity (k/sub cat/ < 0.001 s/sup -1/) of chicken pepsin (CP) towards tri- and tetrapeptides is enhanced at least 100 times by modification of its single sulfhydryl group of Cys-115, with little effect on K/sub m/-values. Modification thus simulates the effect of secondary substrate binding on pepsin catalysis. The rate of Cys-115 modification is substantially decreased in the presence of some competitive inhibitors, suggesting its active site location. Experiments with CP alkylated at Cys-115 with Acrylodan as a fluorescent probe or with N-iodoacetyl-(4-fluoro)-aniline as a /sup 19/F-nmr probe suggest conformation change around Cys-115 to occur on substrate or substrate analog binding. The difference /sup 1/H-nmr spectra (500 MHz) of unmodified free and inhibitor-complexed CP reveal chemical shifts almost exclusively in the aromatic region. The effects of Cu/sup + +/ on /sup 19/F- and /sup 1/H-nmr spectra have been studied. Examination of a computer graphics model of CP based on E. parasitica pepsin-inhibitor complex X-ray coordinates suggests that Cys-115 is located near the S/sub 3//S/sub 5/ binding site. The results are interpreted in favor of segmental mobility of this region important for pepsin substrate binding and catalysis.

  9. First Principles Computational Study of the Active Site of Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Ivaylo; Klien, Micheal

    2004-01-14

    Ab initio density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to investigate the structural features of the active site of the binuclear enzyme rat liver arginase. Special emphasis was placed on the crucial role of the second shell ligand interactions. These interactions were systematically studied by performing calculations on models of varying size. It was determined that a water molecule, and not hydroxide, is the bridging exogenous ligand. The carboxylate ligands facilitate the close approach of the Mn (II) ions by attenuating the metal-metal electrostatic repulsion. Of the two metals, MnA was shown to carry a larger positive charge. Analysis of the electronic properties of the active site revealed that orbitals involving the terminal Asp234 residue, as well as the flexible -1,1 bridging Asp232, lie at high energies, suggesting weaker coordination. This is reflected in certain structural variability present in our models and is also consistent with recent experimental findings. Finally, implications of our findings for the biological function of the enzyme are delineated.

  10. Natural cinnamic acids, synthetic derivatives and hybrids with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Juan David

    2014-11-25

    Antimicrobial natural preparations involving cinnamon, storax and propolis have been long used topically for treating infections. Cinnamic acids and related molecules are partly responsible for the therapeutic effects observed in these preparations. Most of the cinnamic acids, their esters, amides, aldehydes and alcohols, show significant growth inhibition against one or several bacterial and fungal species. Of particular interest is the potent antitubercular activity observed for some of these cinnamic derivatives, which may be amenable as future drugs for treating tuberculosis. This review intends to summarize the literature data on the antimicrobial activity of the natural cinnamic acids and related derivatives. In addition, selected hybrids between cinnamic acids and biologically active scaffolds with antimicrobial activity were also included. A comprehensive literature search was performed collating the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each cinnamic acid or derivative against the reported microorganisms. The MIC data allows the relative comparison between series of molecules and the derivation of structure-activity relationships.

  11. Zinc-induced oligomerization of zinc α2 glycoprotein reveals multiple fatty acid-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Henna; Miah, Layeque; Lau, Andy M; Brochard, Lea; Hati, Debolina; Bui, Tam T T; Drake, Alex F; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J; McDermott, Lindsay C

    2016-01-01

    Zinc α2 glycoprotein (ZAG) is an adipokine with a class I MHC protein fold and is associated with obesity and diabetes. Although its intrinsic ligand remains unknown, ZAG binds the dansylated C11 fatty acid 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA) in the groove between the α1 and α2 domains. The surface of ZAG has approximately 15 weak zinc-binding sites deemed responsible for precipitation from human plasma. In the present study the functional significance of these metal sites was investigated. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and CD showed that zinc, but not other divalent metals, causes ZAG to oligomerize in solution. Thus ZAG dimers and trimers were observed in the presence of 1 and 2 mM zinc. Molecular modelling of X-ray scattering curves and sedimentation coefficients indicated a progressive stacking of ZAG monomers, suggesting that the ZAG groove may be occluded in these. Using fluorescence-detected sedimentation velocity, these ZAG-zinc oligomers were again observed in the presence of the fluorescent boron dipyrromethene fatty acid C16-BODIPY (4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-hexadecanoic acid). Fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that ZAG binds C16-BODIPY. ZAG binding to C16-BODIPY, but not to DAUDA, was reduced by increased zinc concentrations. We conclude that the lipid-binding groove in ZAG contains at least two distinct fatty acid-binding sites for DAUDA and C16-BODIPY, similar to the multiple lipid binding seen in the structurally related immune protein CD1c. In addition, because high concentrations of zinc occur in the pancreas, the perturbation of these multiple lipid-binding sites by zinc may be significant in Type 2 diabetes where dysregulation of ZAG and zinc homoeostasis occurs.

  12. Structural evolution of luciferase activity in Zophobas mealworm AMP/CoA-ligase (protoluciferase) through site-directed mutagenesis of the luciferin binding site.

    PubMed

    Prado, R A; Barbosa, J A; Ohmiya, Y; Viviani, V R

    2011-07-01

    The structural origin and evolution of bioluminescent activity of beetle luciferases from AMP/CoA ligases remains a mystery. Previously we cloned the luciferase-like enzyme from Zophobas morio mealworm, a reasonable protoluciferase model that could shine light on this mystery. Kinetic characterization and studies with D- and L-luciferin and their adenylates showed that stereoselectivity constitutes a critical feature for the origin of luciferase activity in AMP/CoA ligases. Comparison of the primary structures and modeling studies of this protoluciferase and the three main families of beetle luciferases showed that the carboxylic acid substrate binding site of this enzyme is smaller and more hydrophobic than the luciferin binding site of beetle luciferases, showing several substitutions of otherwise conserved residues. Thus, here we performed a site-directed mutagenesis survey of the carboxylic binding site motifs of the protoluciferase by replacing their residues by the respective conserved ones found in beetle luciferases in order to identify the structural determinants of luciferase/oxygenase activity. Although most of the substitutions had negative impact on the luminescence activity of the protoluciferase, only the substitution I327T improved the luminescence activity, resulting in a broad and 15 nm blue-shifted luminescence spectrum. Such substitution indicates the importance of the loop motif 322YGMSEI327 (341YGLTETT347 in Photinus pyralis luciferase) for luciferase activity, and indicates a possible route for the evolution of bioluminescence function of beetle luciferases.

  13. Substrate conformational transitions in the active site of chorismate mutase: their role in the catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Cui, Q; Lipscomb, W N; Karplus, M

    2001-07-31

    Chorismate mutase acts at the first branch-point of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis and catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to prephenate. The results of molecular dynamics simulations of the substrate in solution and in the active site of chorismate mutase are reported. Two nonreactive conformers of chorismate are found to be more stable than the reactive pseudodiaxial chair conformer in solution. It is shown by QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations, which take into account the motions of the enzyme, that when these inactive conformers are bound to the active site, they are rapidly converted to the reactive chair conformer. This result suggests that one contribution of the enzyme is to bind the more prevalent nonreactive conformers and transform them into the active form in a step before the chemical reaction. The motion of the reactive chair conformer in the active site calculated by using the QM/MM potential generates transient structures that are closer to the transition state than is the stable CHAIR conformer.

  14. Effective treatment of PAH contaminated Superfund site soil with the peroxy-acid process.

    PubMed

    Scott Alderman, N; N'Guessan, Adeola L; Nyman, Marianne C

    2007-07-31

    Peroxy-organic acids are formed by the chemical reaction between organic acids and hydrogen peroxide. The peroxy-acid process was applied to two Superfund site soils provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Initial small-scale experiments applied ratios of 3:5:7 (v/v/v) or 3:3:9 (v/v/v) hydrogen peroxide:acetic acid:deionized (DI) water solution to 5g of Superfund site soil. The experiment using 3:5:7 (v/v/v) ratio resulted in an almost complete degradation of the 14 EPA regulated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Bedford LT soil during a 24-h reaction period, while the 3:3:9 (v/v/v) ratio resulted in no applicable degradation in Bedford LT lot 10 soil over the same reaction period. Specific Superfund site soil characteristics (e.g., pH, total organic carbon content and particle size distribution) were found to play an important role in the availability of the PAHs and the efficiency of the transformation during the peroxy-acid process. A scaled-up experiment followed treating 150g of Bedford LT lot 10 soil with and without mixing. The scaled-up processes applied a 3:3:9 (v/v/v) solution resulting in significant decrease in PAH contamination. These findings demonstrate the peroxy-acid process as a viable option for the treatment of PAH contaminated soils. Further work is necessary in order to elucidate the mechanisms of this process.

  15. C-H Activation on Co,O Sites: Isolated Surface Sites versus Molecular Analogs.

    PubMed

    Estes, Deven P; Siddiqi, Georges; Allouche, Florian; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Safonova, Olga V; Trigub, Alexander L; Koptyug, Igor V; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-11-16

    The activation and conversion of hydrocarbons is one of the most important challenges in chemistry. Transition-metal ions (V, Cr, Fe, Co, etc.) isolated on silica surfaces are known to catalyze such processes. The mechanisms of these processes are currently unknown but are thought to involve C-H activation as the rate-determining step. Here, we synthesize well-defined Co(II) ions on a silica surface using a metal siloxide precursor followed by thermal treatment under vacuum at 500 °C. We show that these isolated Co(II) sites are catalysts for a number of hydrocarbon conversion reactions, such as the dehydrogenation of propane, the hydrogenation of propene, and the trimerization of terminal alkynes. We then investigate the mechanisms of these processes using kinetics, kinetic isotope effects, isotopic labeling experiments, parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) NMR, and comparison with a molecular analog. The data are consistent with all of these reactions occurring by a common mechanism, involving heterolytic C-H or H-H activation via a 1,2 addition across a Co-O bond.

  16. Mutation-selection models of coding sequence evolution with site-heterogeneous amino acid fitness profiles

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigue, Nicolas; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Modeling the interplay between mutation and selection at the molecular level is key to evolutionary studies. To this end, codon-based evolutionary models have been proposed as pertinent means of studying long-range evolutionary patterns and are widely used. However, these approaches have not yet consolidated results from amino acid level phylogenetic studies showing that selection acting on proteins displays strong site-specific effects, which translate into heterogeneous amino acid propensities across the columns of alignments; related codon-level studies have instead focused on either modeling a single selective context for all codon columns, or a separate selective context for each codon column, with the former strategy deemed too simplistic and the latter deemed overparameterized. Here, we integrate recent developments in nonparametric statistical approaches to propose a probabilistic model that accounts for the heterogeneity of amino acid fitness profiles across the coding positions of a gene. We apply the model to a dozen real protein-coding gene alignments and find it to produce biologically plausible inferences, for instance, as pertaining to site-specific amino acid constraints, as well as distributions of scaled selection coefficients. In their account of mutational features as well as the heterogeneous regimes of selection at the amino acid level, the modeling approaches studied here can form a backdrop for several extensions, accounting for other selective features, for variable population size, or for subtleties of mutational features, all with parameterizations couched within population-genetic theory. PMID:20176949

  17. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  18. Moleculary imprinted polymers with metalloporphyrin-based molecular recognition sites coassembled with methacrylic acid.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Mukawa, T; Matsui, J; Higashi, M; Shimizu, K D

    2001-08-15

    A diastereoselective molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for (-)-cinchonidine, PPM(CD), was prepared by the combined use of methacrylic acid and vinyl-substituted zinc(II) porphyrin as functional monomers. Compared to MIPs using only methacrylic acid or zinc porphyrin as a functional monomer, PM(CD) and PP(CD), respectively, PPM(CD) showed higher binding ability for (-)-cinchonidine in chromatographic tests using the MIP-packed columns. Scatchard analysis gave a higher association constant of PPM(CD) for (-)-cinchonidine (1.14 x 10(7) M(-1)) than those of PP(CD) (1.45 x 10(6) M(-1)) and PM(CD) (6.78 x 10(6) M(-1)). The affinity distribution of binding sites estimated by affinity spectrum analysis showed a higher percentage of high-affinity sites and a lower percentage of low-affinity sites in PPM(CD). The MIPs containing a zinc(II) porphyrin in the binding sites, PPM(CD) and PP(CD), showed fluorescence quenching according to the binding of (-)-cinchonidine, and the quenching was significant in the low-concentration range, suggesting that the high-affinity binding sites contain the porphyrin residue. The correlation of the relative fluorescence intensity against log of (-)-cinchonidine concentrations showed a linear relationship. These results revealed that the MIP having highly specific binding sites was assembled by the two functional monomers, vinyl-substituted zinc(II) porphyrin and methacrylic acid, and they cooperatively worked to yield the specific binding. In addition, the zinc(II) porphyrin-based MIPs appeared to act as fluorescence sensor selectively responded by binding events of the template molecule.

  19. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  20. Human 15-LOX-1 active site mutations alter inhibitor binding and decrease potency.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Michelle; van Hoorebeke, Christopher; Horn, Thomas; Deschamps, Joshua; Freedman, J Cody; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Jacobson, Matthew P; Holman, Theodore

    2016-11-01

    Human 15-lipoxygenase-1 (h15-LOX-1 or h12/15-LOX) reacts with polyunsaturated fatty acids and produces bioactive lipid derivatives that are implicated in many important human diseases. One such disease is stroke, which is the fifth leading cause of death and the first leading cause of disability in America. The discovery of h15-LOX-1 inhibitors could potentially lead to novel therapeutics in the treatment of stroke, however, little is known about the inhibitor/active site interaction. This study utilizes site-directed mutagenesis, guided in part by molecular modeling, to gain a better structural understanding of inhibitor interactions within the active site. We have generated eight mutants (R402L, R404L, F414I, F414W, E356Q, Q547L, L407A, I417A) of h15-LOX-1 to determine whether these active site residues interact with two h15-LOX-1 inhibitors, ML351 and an ML094 derivative, compound 18. IC50 values and steady-state inhibition kinetics were determined for the eight mutants, with four of the mutants affecting inhibitor potency relative to wild type h15-LOX-1 (F414I, F414W, E356Q and L407A). The data indicate that ML351 and compound 18, bind in a similar manner in the active site to an aromatic pocket close to F414 but have subtle differences in their specific binding modes. This information establishes the binding mode for ML094 and ML351 and will be leveraged to develop next-generation inhibitors.

  1. Roles of key active-site residues in flavocytochrome P450 BM3.

    PubMed Central

    Noble, M A; Miles, C S; Chapman, S K; Lysek, D A; MacKay, A C; Reid, G A; Hanzlik, R P; Munro, A W

    1999-01-01

    The effects of mutation of key active-site residues (Arg-47, Tyr-51, Phe-42 and Phe-87) in Bacillus megaterium flavocytochrome P450 BM3 were investigated. Kinetic studies on the oxidation of laurate and arachidonate showed that the side chain of Arg-47 contributes more significantly to stabilization of the fatty acid carboxylate than does that of Tyr-51 (kinetic parameters for oxidation of laurate: R47A mutant, Km 859 microM, kcat 3960 min-1; Y51F mutant, Km 432 microM, kcat 6140 min-1; wild-type, Km 288 microM, kcat 5140 min-1). A slightly increased kcat for the Y51F-catalysed oxidation of laurate is probably due to decreased activation energy (DeltaG) resulting from a smaller DeltaG of substrate binding. The side chain of Phe-42 acts as a phenyl 'cap' over the mouth of the substrate-binding channel. With mutant F42A, Km is massively increased and kcat is decreased for oxidation of both laurate (Km 2. 08 mM, kcat 2450 min-1) and arachidonate (Km 34.9 microM, kcat 14620 min-1; compared with values of 4.7 microM and 17100 min-1 respectively for wild-type). Amino acid Phe-87 is critical for efficient catalysis. Mutants F87G and F87Y not only exhibit increased Km and decreased kcat values for fatty acid oxidation, but also undergo an irreversible conversion process from a 'fast' to a 'slow' rate of substrate turnover [for F87G (F87Y)-catalysed laurate oxidation: kcat 'fast', 760 (1620) min-1; kcat 'slow', 48.0 (44.6) min-1; kconv (rate of conversion from fast to slow form), 4.9 (23.8) min-1]. All mutants showed less than 10% uncoupling of NADPH oxidation from fatty acid oxidation. The rate of FMN-to-haem electron transfer was shown to become rate-limiting in all mutants analysed. For wild-type P450 BM3, the rate of FMN-to-haem electron transfer (8340 min-1) is twice the steady-state rate of oxidation (4100 min-1), indicating that other steps contribute to rate limitation. Active-site structures of the mutants were probed with the inhibitors 12-(imidazolyl

  2. Generation of Food-Grade Recombinant Lactic Acid Bacterium Strains by Site-Specific Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Martín, M. Cruz; Alonso, Juan C.; Suárez, Juan E.; Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2000-01-01

    The construction of a delivery and clearing system for the generation of food-grade recombinant lactic acid bacterium strains, based on the use of an integrase (Int) and a resolvo-invertase (β-recombinase) and their respective target sites (attP-attB and six, respectively) is reported. The delivery system contains a heterologous replication origin and antibiotic resistance markers surrounded by two directly oriented six sites, a multiple cloning site where passenger DNA could be inserted (e.g., the cI gene of bacteriophage A2), the int gene, and the attP site of phage A2. The clearing system provides a plasmid-borne gene encoding β-recombinase. The nonreplicative vector-borne delivery system was transformed into Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 and, by site-specific recombination, integrated as a single copy in an orientation- and Int-dependent manner into the attB site present in the genome of the host strain. The transfer of the clearing system into this strain, with the subsequent expression of the β-recombinase, led to site-specific DNA resolution of the non-food-grade DNA. These methods were validated by the construction of a stable food-grade L. casei ATCC 393-derived strain completely immune to phage A2 infection during milk fermentation. PMID:10831443

  3. Interaction of P-aminobenzoic acid with normal and sickel erythrocyte membrane: photoaffinity labelling of the binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Premachandra, B.R.

    1986-03-05

    Electron microscopic studies revealed that P-Amino benzoic acid (PABA) could prevent eichinocytosis of red cells in vitro. Equilibrium binding studies with right side out membrane vesicles (ROV) revealed a similar number of binding sites (1.2-1.4 ..mu..mol/mg) and Kd (1.4-1.6 mM) values for both normal and sickle cell membranes. /sup 14/C-Azide analogue of PABA was synthesized as a photoaffinity label to probe its sites of interaction on the erythrocyte membranes. Competitive binding studies of PABA with its azide indicated that both the compounds share common binding sites on the membrane surface since a 20 fold excess of azide inhibited PABA binding in a linear fashion. The azide was covalently incorporated into the membrane components only upon irradiation (52-35% of the label found in the proteins and the rest in lipids). Electrophoretic analysis of photolabelled ROV revealed that the azide interacts chiefly with Band 3 protein. PABA inhibited both high and low affinity calcium (Ca) binding sites situated on either surface of the membrane in a non-competitive manner; however, Ca binding stimulated by Mg-ATP was not affected. Ca transport into inside out vesicles was inhibited by PABA; but it did not affect the calcium ATP-ase activity. The authors studies suggest that the mechanism of action of PABA is mediated by its interaction with Band 3 protein (anion channel), calcium channel and calcium binding sites of erythrocyte membrane.

  4. The pepsin residue glycine-76 contributes to active-site loop flexibility and participates in catalysis.

    PubMed Central

    Okoniewska, M; Tanaka, T; Yada, R Y

    2000-01-01

    Glycine residues are known to contribute to conformational flexibility of polypeptide chains, and have been found to contribute to flexibility of some loops associated with enzymic catalysis. A comparison of porcine pepsin in zymogen, mature and inhibited forms revealed that a loop (a flap), consisting of residues 71--80, located near the active site changed its position upon substrate binding. The loop residue, glycine-76, has been implicated in the catalytic process and thought to participate in a hydrogen-bond network aligning the substrate. This study investigated the role of glycine-76 using site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutants, G76A, G76V and G76S, were constructed to increase conformational restriction of a polypeptide chain. In addition, the serine mutant introduced a hydrogen-bonding potential at position 76 similar to that observed in human renin. All the mutants, regardless of amino acid size and polarity, had lower catalytic efficiency and activated more slowly than the wild-type enzyme. The slower activation process was associated directly with altered proteolytic activity. Consequently, it was proposed that a proteolytic cleavage represents a limiting step of the activation process. Lower catalytic efficiency of the mutants was explained as a decrease in the flap flexibility and, therefore, a different pattern of hydrogen bonds responsible for substrate alignment and flap conformation. The results demonstrated that flap flexibility is essential for efficient catalytic and activation processes. PMID:10861225

  5. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  6. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  7. An active site water network in the plasminogen activator pla from Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-07-14

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 A. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  8. Method for enhancing amidohydrolase activity of fatty acid amide hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    John, George; Nagarajan, Subbiah; Chapman, Kent; Faure, Lionel; Koulen, Peter

    2016-10-25

    A method for enhancing amidohydrolase activity of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) is disclosed. The method comprising administering a phenoxyacylethanolamide that causes the enhanced activity. The enhanced activity can have numerous effects on biological organisms including, for example, enhancing the growth of certain seedlings. The subject matter disclosed herein relates to enhancers of amidohydrolase activity.

  9. Site-directed spin labeling studies on nucleic acid structure and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Glenna Z.; Qin, Peter Z.

    2009-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) uses electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to monitor the behavior of a stable nitroxide radical attached at specific locations within a macromolecule such as protein, DNA, or RNA. Parameters obtained from EPR measurements, such as internitroxide distances and descriptions of the rotational motion of a nitroxide, provide unique information on features near the labeling site. With recent advances in solid-phase synthesis of nucleic acids and developments in EPR methodologies, particularly pulsed EPR technologies, SDSL has been increasingly used to study the structure and dynamics of DNA and RNA at the level of the individual nucleotides. This chapter summarizes the current SDSL studies on nucleic acids, with discussions focusing on literature from the last decade. PMID:18929141

  10. Disulfide bridge regulates ligand-binding site selectivity in liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Clelia; Tomaselli, Simona; Assfalg, Michael; Pedò, Massimo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Zetta, Lucia; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Bile acid-binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones that play central roles in driving bile flow, as well as in the adaptation to various pathological conditions, contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Understanding the mode of binding of bile acids with their cytoplasmic transporters is a key issue in providing a model for the mechanism of their transfer from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, for delivery to nuclear receptors. A number of factors have been shown to modulate bile salt selectivity, stoichiometry, and affinity of binding to BABPs, e.g. chemistry of the ligand, protein plasticity and, possibly, the formation of disulfide bridges. Here, the effects of the presence of a naturally occurring disulfide bridge on liver BABP ligand-binding properties and backbone dynamics have been investigated by NMR. Interestingly, the disulfide bridge does not modify the protein-binding stoichiometry, but has a key role in modulating recognition at both sites, inducing site selectivity for glycocholic and glycochenodeoxycholic acid. Protein conformational changes following the introduction of a disulfide bridge are small and located around the inner binding site, whereas significant changes in backbone motions are observed for several residues distributed over the entire protein, both in the apo form and in the holo form. Site selectivity appears, therefore, to be dependent on protein mobility rather than being governed by steric factors. The detected properties further establish a parallelism with the behaviour of human ileal BABP, substantiating the proposal that BABPs have parallel functions in hepatocytes and enterocytes.

  11. Substrate-binding specificity of chitinase and chitosanase as revealed by active-site architecture analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shijia; Shao, Shangjin; Li, Linlin; Cheng, Zhi; Tian, Li; Gao, Peiji; Wang, Lushan

    2015-12-11

    Chitinases and chitosanases, referred to as chitinolytic enzymes, are two important categories of glycoside hydrolases (GH) that play a key role in degrading chitin and chitosan, two naturally abundant polysaccharides. Here, we investigate the active site architecture of the major chitosanase (GH8, GH46) and chitinase families (GH18, GH19). Both charged (Glu, His, Arg, Asp) and aromatic amino acids (Tyr, Trp, Phe) are observed with higher frequency within chitinolytic active sites as compared to elsewhere in the enzyme structure, indicating significant roles related to enzyme function. Hydrogen bonds between chitinolytic enzymes and the substrate C2 functional groups, i.e. amino groups and N-acetyl groups, drive substrate recognition, while non-specific CH-π interactions between aromatic residues and substrate mainly contribute to tighter binding and enhanced processivity evident in GH8 and GH18 enzymes. For different families of chitinolytic enzymes, the number, type, and position of substrate atoms bound in the active site vary, resulting in different substrate-binding specificities. The data presented here explain the synergistic action of multiple enzyme families at a molecular level and provide a more reasonable method for functional annotation, which can be further applied toward the practical engineering of chitinases and chitosanases.

  12. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  13. Synergistic transcriptional enhancement does not depend on the number of acidic activation domains bound to the promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Oliviero, S; Struhl, K

    1991-01-01

    Many eukaryotic transcriptional activator proteins contain a DNA-binding domain that interacts with specific promoter sequences and an acidic activation region that is required to stimulate transcription. Transcriptional enhancement by such activator proteins is often synergistic and promiscuous; promoters containing multiple binding sites for an individual protein or even for unrelated proteins can be 10-100 times more active than promoters with single sites. It has been suggested that such synergy reflects a nonlinear response of the basic transcription machinery to the number and/or quality of acidic activation regions. Here, we determine the transcriptional activity of Jun-Fos heterodimers containing one or two GCN4 acidic activation regions on promoters containing one or two Ap-1 target sites. Surprisingly, heterodimers with one or two acidic regions activate transcription with similar efficiency and are equally synergistic (10- to 15-fold) on promoters containing two target sites. Thus, transcriptional synergy does not depend on the number of acidic activation regions but rather on the number of proteins bound to the promoter. This suggests that synergy is mediated either by cooperative DNA binding or by alternative mechanisms in which the DNA-binding domain plays a more direct role in transcription (e.g., changes in DNA structure, nucleosome displacement, or direct interactions with the transcriptional machinery). Images PMID:1898773

  14. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 120-B-1, 105-B Battery Acid Sump, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-057

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. Dittmer

    2006-09-25

    The 120-B-1 waste site, located in the 100-BC-1 Operable Unit of the Hanford Site, consisted of a concrete battery acid sump that was used from 1944 to 1969 to neutralize the spent sulfuric acid from lead cell batteries of emergency power packs and the emergency lighting system. The battery acid sump was associated with the 105-B Reactor Building and was located adjacent to the building's northwest corner. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  15. Synergic Effect of Active Sites in Zinc-Modified ZSM-5 Zeolites as Revealed by High-Field Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qi, Guodong; Wang, Qiang; Xu, Jun; Trébosc, Julien; Lafon, Olivier; Wang, Chao; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Deng, Feng

    2016-12-19

    Understanding the nature of active sites in metal-supported catalysts is of great importance towards establishing their structure-property relationships. The outstanding catalytic performance of metal-supported catalysts is frequently ascribed to the synergic effect of different active sites, which is however not well spectroscopically characterized. Herein, we report the direct detection of surface Zn species and (1) H-(67) Zn internuclear interaction between Zn(2+) ions and Brønsted acid sites on Zn-modified ZSM-5 zeolites by high-field solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The observed promotion of C-H bond activation of methane is rationalized by the enhanced Brønsted acidity generated by synergic effects arising from the spatial proximity/interaction between Zn(2+) ions and Brønsted acidic protons. The concentration of synergic active sites is determined by (1) H-(67) Zn double-resonance solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

  16. Determination of the positions of aluminum atoms introduced into SSZ-35 and the catalytic properties of the generated Brønsted acid sites.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Akimitsu; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Shiga, Akinobu; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Nishitoba, Toshiki; Motokura, Ken; Baba, Toshihide

    2017-03-01

    The positions of aluminum (Al) atoms in SSZ-35 together with the characteristics of the generated protons were investigated by (27)Al multiple quantum magic-angle spinning (MQ-MAS), (29)Si MAS, and (1)H MAS NMR data analyses accompanied by a variable temperature (1)H MAS NMR analysis. The origin of the acidic -OH groups (Brønsted acid sites) generated by introducing Al atoms into the T sites was investigated and the T sites introduced into the Al atoms were revealed. To further determine the catalytic properties of the acidic protons generated in SSZ-35, the influence of the concentration of the Al atoms on the catalytic activity and selectivity during the transformation of toluene was examined.

  17. Mutations inducing an active-site aperture in Rhizobium sp. sucrose isomerase confer hydrolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Alexandra; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Robert, Xavier; Rhimi, Moez; Haser, Richard; Mattes, Ralf; Aghajari, Nushin

    2013-02-01

    Sucrose isomerase is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of sucrose isomers of high biotechnological and pharmaceutical interest. Owing to the complexity of the chemical synthesis of these isomers, isomaltulose and trehalulose, enzymatic conversion remains the preferred method for obtaining these products. Depending on the microbial source, the ratio of the sucrose-isomer products varies significantly. In studies aimed at understanding and explaining the underlying molecular mechanisms of these reactions, mutations obtained using a random-mutagenesis approach displayed a major hydrolytic activity. Two of these variants, R284C and F164L, of sucrose isomerase from Rhizobium sp. were therefore crystallized and their crystal structures were determined. The three-dimensional structures of these mutants allowed the identification of the molecular determinants that favour hydrolytic activity compared with transferase activity. Substantial conformational changes resulting in an active-site opening were observed, as were changes in the pattern of water molecules bordering the active-site region.

  18. Localization of the active site of an enzyme, bacterial luciferase, using two-quantum affinity modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benimetskaya, L. Z.; Gitelzon, I. I.; Kozionov, Andrew L.; Novozhilov, S. Y.; Petushkov, V. N.; Rodionova, N. S.; Stockman, Mark I.

    1991-11-01

    For the first time the method of two-quantum affinity modification has been employed to probe the structure of an enzyme, bacterial luciferase. Position of the flavin-binding site of this enzyme, which was previously unknown, has been established. The obtained data indicate that the flavin site is positioned on the (alpha) -subunit. The closest contact of the protein chain of the enzyme with the chromophoric group of the flavin takes place near 80 +/- 10 and 120 +/- 10 amino acid residues; the regions 50 +/- 10 and 215 +/- 10 are also close to the flavin. The established localization does not contradict suggestions on positions of the flavin and phosphate sites of the bacterial luciferase, which had earlier been made from the data on evolutionary stability of various luciferases. The present method can, in principle, be applied to a great number of enzymes, including all flavin-dependent enzymes. Enzymatic catalysis has high speed and specificity. Creation of a method of determination of the elements of the primary structure of a protein, making up the active site (in which substratum conversion occurs), could be a significant advance in clearing up mechanisms of enzymatic catalysis. It was proposed to localize active sites of the enzymes, whose substrata are chromophores, using this method of two-quantum affinity modification. An enzyme- substratum complex is irradiated with laser light of sufficiently long wavelength ((lambda) 300 nm) which is not directly absorbed by the enzyme. Two-quantum quasiresonant excitation of the substratum activates it to the state with energy 5-7 eV, which is then radiativelessly transferred to neighboring protein groups. This energy exceeds the energy of activation of peptide bond breakage. Therefore, the enzyme will be disrupted in the vicinity of its active site. In the present paper the above approach has been implemented for the first time. Information has been obtained about the position of the flavin-binding site of bacterial

  19. 4-Hydroxy cinnamic acid as mushroom preservation: Anti-tyrosinase activity kinetics and application.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong-Hua; Chen, Qing-Xi; Cui, Yi; Gao, Huan-Juan; Xu, Lian; Yu, Xin-Yuan; Wang, Ying; Yan, Chong-Ling; Wang, Qin

    2016-05-01

    Tyrosinase is a key enzyme in post-harvest browning of fruit and vegetable. To control and inhibit its activity is the most effective method for delaying the browning and extend the shelf life. In this paper, the inhibitory kinetics of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid on mushroom tyrosinase was investigated using the kinetics method of substrate reaction. The results showed that the inhibition of tyrosinase by 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid was a slow, reversible reaction with fractional remaining activity. The microscopic rate constants were determined for the reaction on 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid with tyrosinase. Furthermore, the molecular docking was used to simulate 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid dock with tyrosinase. The results showed that 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid interacted with the enzyme active site mainly through the hydroxy competed with the substrate hydroxy group. The cytotoxicity study of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid indicated that it had no effects on the proliferation of normal liver cells. Moreover, the results of effects of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid on the preservation of mushroom showed that it could delay the mushroom browning. These results provide a comprehensive underlying the inhibitory mechanisms of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid and its delaying post-harvest browning, that is beneficial for the application of this compound.

  20. Biochemical Evaluation of the Decarboxylation and Decarboxylation-Deamination Activities of Plant Aromatic Amino Acid Decarboxylases*

    PubMed Central

    Torrens-Spence, Michael P.; Liu, Pingyang; Ding, Haizhen; Harich, Kim; Gillaspy, Glenda; Li, Jianyong

    2013-01-01

    Plant aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD) enzymes are capable of catalyzing either decarboxylation or decarboxylation-deamination on various combinations of aromatic amino acid substrates. These two different activities result in the production of arylalkylamines and the formation of aromatic acetaldehydes, respectively. Variations in product formation enable individual enzymes to play different physiological functions. Despite these catalytic variations, arylalkylamine and aldehyde synthesizing AAADs are indistinguishable without protein expression and characterization. In this study, extensive biochemical characterization of plant AAADs was performed to identify residues responsible for differentiating decarboxylation AAADs from aldehyde synthase AAADs. Results demonstrated that a tyrosine residue located on a catalytic loop proximal to the active site of plant AAADs is primarily responsible for dictating typical decarboxylase activity, whereas a phenylalanine at the same position is primarily liable for aldehyde synthase activity. Mutagenesis of the active site phenylalanine to tyrosine in Arabidopsis thaliana and Petroselinum crispum aromatic acetaldehyde synthases primarily converts the enzymes activity from decarboxylation-deamination to decarboxylation. The mutation of the active site tyrosine to phenylalanine in the Catharanthus roseus and Papaver somniferum aromatic amino acid decarboxylases changes the enzymes decarboxylation activity to a primarily decarboxylation-deamination activity. Generation of these mutant enzymes enables the production of unusual AAAD enzyme products including indole-3-acetaldehyde, 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, and phenylethylamine. Our data indicates that the tyrosine and phenylalanine in the catalytic loop region could serve as a signature residue to reliably distinguish plant arylalkylamine and aldehyde synthesizing AAADs. Additionally, the resulting data enables further insights into the mechanistic roles of active site

  1. Chemical modification of serine at the active site of penicillin acylase from Kluyvera citrophila.

    PubMed Central

    Martín, J; Slade, A; Aitken, A; Arche, R; Virden, R

    1991-01-01

    The site of reaction of penicillin acylase from Kluyvera citrophila with the potent inhibitor phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride was investigated by incubating the inactivated enzyme with thioacetic acid to convert the side chain of the putative active-site serine residue to that of cysteine. The protein product contained one thiol group, which was reactive towards 2,2'-dipyridyl disulphide and iodoacetic acid. Carboxymethylcysteine was identified as the N-terminal residue of the beta-subunit of the carboxy[3H]methylthiol-protein. No significant changes in tertiary structure were detected in the modified penicillin acylase using near-u.v. c.d. spectroscopy. However, the catalytic activity (kcat) with either an anilide or an ester substrate was decreased in the thiol-protein by a factor of more than 10(4). A comparison of sequences of apparently related acylases shows no other extensive regions of conserved sequence containing an invariant serine residue. The side chain of this residue is proposed as a candidate nucleophile in the formation of an acyl-enzyme during catalysis. PMID:1764029

  2. Site Directed Mutagenesis of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Glutathione Synthetase Produces an Enzyme with Homoglutathione Synthetase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dworeck, Tamara; Zimmermann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Three different His-tagged, mutant forms of the fission yeast glutathione synthetase (GSH2) were derived by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in E. coli DH5α and affinity purified in a two-step procedure. Analysis of enzyme activity showed that it was possible to shift the substrate specificity of GSH2 from Gly (km 0,19; wild-type) to β-Ala or Ser. One mutation (substitution of Ile471, Cy472 to Met and Val and Ala 485 and Thr486 to Leu and Pro) increased the affinity of GSH2 for β-Ala (km 0,07) and lowered the affinity for Gly (km 0,83), which is a characteristic of the enzyme homoglutathione synthetase found in plants. Substitution of Ala485 and Thr486 to Leu and Pro only, increased instead the affinity of GSH2 for Ser (km 0,23) as a substrate, while affinity to Gly was preserved (km 0,12). This provides a new biosynthetic pathway for hydroxymethyl glutathione, which is known to be synthesized from glutathione and Ser in a reaction catalysed by carboxypeptidase Y. The reported findings provide further insight into how specific amino acids positioned in the GSH2 active site facilitate the recognition of different amino acid substrates, furthermore they support the evolutionary theory that homoglutathione synthetase evolved from glutathione synthetase by a single gene duplication event. PMID:23091597

  3. Surface-active properties of humic and sulfochlorohumic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabova, I.N.; Mustafina, G.A.; Akkulova, Z.G.; Satymbaeva, A.S.

    2009-10-15

    The surface tension of alkaline solutions of humic acids and their sulfochloroderivatives, which are synthesized by sulfonation of chlorohumic acids isolated from coal chlorinated by the electrochemical method, is investigated. It is established that humic compounds possess weak surface activity. Basic adsorption parameters are calculated.

  4. Allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a using Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside and its combination.

    PubMed

    Rani, Nidhi; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; P T V, Lakshmi; Arunachalam, Annamalai

    2016-08-01

    Recent crystallographic study revealed the involvement of allosteric site in active site inhibition of penicillin binding protein (PBP2a), where one molecule of Ceftaroline (Cef) binds to the allosteric site of PBP2a and paved way for the other molecule (Cef) to bind at the active site. Though Cef has the potency to inhibit the PBP2a, its adverse side effects are of major concern. Previous studies have reported the antibacterial property of Quercetin derivatives, a group of natural compounds. Hence, the present study aims to evaluate the effect of Quercetin 3-o-rutinoside (Rut) in allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a. The molecular docking studies between allosteric site and ligands (Rut, Que, and Cef) revealed a better binding efficiency (G-score) of Rut (-7.790318) and Cef (-6.194946) with respect to Que (-5.079284). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies showed significant changes at the active site in the presence of ligands (Rut and Cef) at allosteric site. Four different combinations of Rut and Cef were docked and their G-scores ranged between -6.320 and -8.623. MD studies revealed the stability of the key residue (Ser403) with Rut being at both sites, compared to other complexes. Morphological analysis through electron microscopy confirmed that combination of Rut and Cefixime was able to disturb the bacterial cell membrane in a similar fashion to that of Rut and Cefixime alone. The results of this study indicate that the affinity of Rut at both sites were equally good, with further validations Rut could be considered as an alternative for inhibiting MRSA growth.

  5. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 nitrogenase active site to increase photobiological hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Masukawa, Hajime; Inoue, Kazuhito; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Wolk, C Peter; Hausinger, Robert P

    2010-10-01

    Cyanobacteria use sunlight and water to produce hydrogen gas (H₂), which is potentially useful as a clean and renewable biofuel. Photobiological H₂ arises primarily as an inevitable by-product of N₂ fixation by nitrogenase, an oxygen-labile enzyme typically containing an iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) active site. In Anabaena sp. strain 7120, the enzyme is localized to the microaerobic environment of heterocysts, a highly differentiated subset of the filamentous cells. In an effort to increase H₂ production by this strain, six nitrogenase amino acid residues predicted to reside within 5 Å of the FeMo-co were mutated in an attempt to direct electron flow selectively toward proton reduction in the presence of N₂. Most of the 49 variants examined were deficient in N₂-fixing growth and exhibited decreases in their in vivo rates of acetylene reduction. Of greater interest, several variants examined under an N₂ atmosphere significantly increased their in vivo rates of H₂ production, approximating rates equivalent to those under an Ar atmosphere, and accumulated high levels of H₂ compared to the reference strains. These results demonstrate the feasibility of engineering cyanobacterial strains for enhanced photobiological production of H₂ in an aerobic, nitrogen-containing environment.

  6. Active-site titration analysis of surface influence on immobilized Candida antarctica Lipase B activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Matrix morphology and surface polarity effects were investigated for Candida antarctica lipase B immobilization. Measurements of the amount of lipase immobilized (bicinchoninic acid method) and the catalyst’s tributyrin hydrolysis activity, coupled with a determination of the lipase’s functional fr...

  7. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site

    PubMed Central

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called ‘catalytic residues’ are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06181.001 PMID:25902402

  8. A split active site couples cap recognition by Dcp2 to activation

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N.; Jones, Brittnee N.; Hernandez, Gail A.; Gross, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Decapping by Dcp2 is an essential step in 5′-3′ mRNA decay. In yeast, decapping requires an open-to-closed transition in Dcp2, though the link between closure and catalysis remains elusive. Here we show using NMR that cap binds conserved residues on both the catalytic and regulatory domains of Dcp2. Lesions in the cap-binding site on the regulatory domain reduce the catalytic step two orders of magnitude and block formation of the closed state whereas Dcp1 enhances the catalytic step by a factor of ten and promotes closure. We conclude that closure occurs during the rate-limiting catalytic step of decapping, juxtaposing the cap-binding region of each domain to form a composite active site. This work suggests a model for regulation of decapping, where coactivators trigger decapping by stabilizing a labile composite active site. PMID:20711189

  9. Microbial Communities in Biofilms of an Acid Mine Drainage Site Determined by Phospholipid Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Gupta, S.; Fang, J.

    2008-12-01

    Phospholipids were extracted to determine the microbial biomass and community structure of biofims from an acid mine drainage (AMD) at the Green Valley coal mine site (GVS) in western Indiana. The distribution of specific biomarkers indicated the presence of a variety of microorganisms. Phototrophic microeukaryotes, which include Euglena mutabilis, algae, and cyanobacteria were the most dominant organisms, as indicated by the presence of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The presence of terminally methyl branched fatty acids suggests the presence of Gram-positive bacteria, and the mid-methyl branched fatty acids indicates the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Fungi appear to also be an important part of the AMD microbial communities as suggested by the presence of 18:2 fatty acid. The acidophilic microeukaryotes Euglena dominated the biofilm microbial communities. These microorganisms appear to play a prominent role in the formation and preservation of stromatolites and in releasing oxygen to the atmosphere by oxygenic photosynthesis. Thus, the AMD environment comprises a host of microorganisms spreading out within the phylogenetic tree of life. Novel insights on the roles of microbial consortia in the formation and preservation of stromatolites and the production of oxygen through photosynthesis in AMD systems may have significance in the understanding of the interaction of Precambrian microbial communities in environments that produced microbially-mediated sedimentary structures and that caused oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere.

  10. Characterizing Surface Acidic Sites in Mesoporous-Silica-Supported Tungsten Oxide Catalysts Using Solid State NMR and Quantum Chemistry Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Wang, Yong; Hu, Mary Y.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Peden, Charles HF

    2011-10-18

    The acidic sites in dispersed tungsten oxide supported on SBA-15 mesoporous silica were investigated using a combination of pyridine titration, both fast-, and slow-MAS {sup 15}N NMR, static {sup 2}H NMR, and quantum chemistry calculations. It is found that the bridged acidic -OH groups in surface adsorbed tungsten dimers (i.e., W-OH-W) are the Broensted acid sites. The unusually strong acidity of these Broensted acid sites is confirmed by quantum chemistry calculations. In contrast, terminal W-OH sites are very stable and only weakly acidic as are terminal Si-OH sites. Furthermore, molecular interactions between pyridine molecules and the dimer Broensted and terminal W-OH sites for dispersed tungsten oxide species is strong. This results in restricted molecular motion for the interacting pyridine molecules even at room temperature, i.e., a reorientation mainly about the molecular 2-fold axis. This restricted reorientation makes it possible to estimate the relative ratio of the Broensted (tungsten dimer) to the weakly acidic terminal W-OH sites in the catalyst using the slow-MAS {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N CP PASS method.

  11. Benzoic acid and specific 2-oxo acids activate hepatic efflux of glutamate at OAT2.

    PubMed

    Pfennig, Till; Herrmann, Beate; Bauer, Tim; Schömig, Edgar; Gründemann, Dirk

    2013-02-01

    The liver is the principal source of glutamate in blood plasma. Recently we have discovered that efflux of glutamate from hepatocytes is catalyzed by the transporter OAT2 (human gene symbol SLC22A7). Organic anion transporter 2 (OAT2) is an integral membrane protein of the sinusoidal membrane domain; it is primarily expressed in liver and much less in kidney, both in rats and humans. Many years ago, Häussinger and coworkers have demonstrated in isolated perfused rat liver that benzoic acid or specific 2-oxo acid analogs of amino acids like e.g. 2-oxo-4-methyl-pentanoate ('2-oxo-leucine') strongly stimulate release of glutamate (up to 7-fold); '2-oxo-valine' and the corresponding amino acids were without effect. The molecular mechanism of efflux stimulation has remained unclear. In the present study, OAT2 from human and rat were heterologously expressed in 293 cells. Addition of 1 mmol/l benzoic acid to the external medium increased OAT2-specific efflux of glutamate up to 20-fold; '2-oxo-leucine' was also effective, but not '2-oxo-valine'. Similar effects were seen for efflux of radiolabeled orotic acid. Expression of OAT2 did not increase uptake of benzoic acid; thus, benzoic acid is no substrate, and trans-stimulation can be excluded. Instead, further experiments suggest that increased efflux of glutamate is caused by direct interaction of benzoic acid and specific 2-oxo acids with OAT2. We propose that stimulators bind to a distinct extracellular site and thereby accelerate relocation of the empty substrate binding site to the intracellular face. Increased glutamate efflux at OAT2 could be the main benefit of benzoate treatment in patients with urea cycle defects.

  12. Hydroxynonenal inactivates cathepsin B by forming Michael adducts with active site residues.

    PubMed

    Crabb, John W; O'Neil, June; Miyagi, Masaru; West, Karen; Hoff, Henry F

    2002-04-01

    Oxidation of plasma low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) generates the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2 nonenal (HNE) and also reduces proteolytic degradation of oxLDL and other proteins internalized by mouse peritoneal macrophages in culture. This leads to accumulation of undegraded material in lysosomes and formation of ceroid, a component of foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions. To explore the possibility that HNE contributes directly to the inactivation of proteases, structure-function studies of the lysosomal protease cathepsin B have been pursued. We found that treatment of mouse macrophages with HNE reduces degradation of internalized maleyl bovine serine albumin and cathepsin B activity. Purified bovine cathepsin B treated briefly with 15 microM HNE lost approximately 76% of its protease activity and also developed immunoreactivity with antibodies to HNE adducts in Western blot analysis. After stabilization of the potential Michael adducts by sodium borohydride reduction, modified amino acids were localized within the bovine cathepsin B protein structure by mass spectrometric analysis of tryptic peptides. Michael adducts were identified by tandem mass spectrometry at cathepsin B active site residues Cys 29 (mature A chain) and His 150 (mature B chain). Thus, covalent interaction between HNE and critical active site residues inactivates cathepsin B. These results support the hypothesis that the accumulation of undegraded macromolecules in lysosomes after oxidative damage are caused in part by direct protease inactivation by adduct formation with lipid peroxidation products such as HNE.

  13. Retroviral nucleocapsid proteins possess potent nucleic acid strand renaturation activity.

    PubMed Central

    Dib-Hajj, F.; Khan, R.; Giedroc, D. P.

    1993-01-01

    The nucleocapsid protein (NC) is the major genomic RNA binding protein that plays integral roles in the structure and replication of all animal retroviruses. In this report, select biochemical properties of recombinant Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV) and HIV-1 NCs are compared. Evidence is presented that two types of saturated Zn2 NC-polynucleotide complexes can be formed under conditions of low [NaCl] that differ in apparent site-size (n = 8 vs. n = 14). The formation of one or the other complex appears dependent on the molar ratio of NC to RNA nucleotide with the putative low site-size mode apparently predominating under conditions of protein excess. Both MPMV and HIV-1 NCs kinetically facilitate the renaturation of two complementary DNA strands, suggesting that this is a general property of retroviral NCs. NC proteins increase the second-order rate constant for renaturation of a 149-bp DNA fragment by more than four orders of magnitude over that obtained in the absence of protein at 37 degrees C. The protein-assisted rate is 100-200-fold faster than that obtained at 68 degrees C, 1 M NaCl, solution conditions considered to be optimal for strand renaturation. Provided that sufficient NC is present to coat all strands, the presence of 400-1,000-fold excess nonhomologous DNA does not greatly affect the reaction rate. The HIV-1 NC-mediated renaturation reaction functions stoichiometrically, requiring a saturated strand of DNA nucleotide:NC ratio of about 7-8, rather than 14. Under conditions of less protein, the rate acceleration is not realized. The finding of significant nucleic acid strand renaturation activity may have important implications for various events of reverse transcription particularly in initiation and cDNA strand transfer. PMID:8443601

  14. Synthesis and biological activity of glutamic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Receveur, J M; Guiramand, J; Récasens, M; Roumestant, M L; Viallefont, P; Martinez, J

    1998-01-20

    In order to develop new specific glutamate analogues at metabotropic glutamate receptors, Diels-Alder, 1-4 ionic and radical reactions were performed starting from (2S)-4-methyleneglutamic acid. Preliminary pharmacological evaluation by measuring IP accumulation using rat forebrain synaptoneurosomes has shown that (2S)-4-(2-phthalimidoethyl)glutamic acid (3a), (2S)-4-(4-phthalimidobutyl)glutamic acid (3b) and 1-[(S)-2-amino-2-carboxyethyl]-3,4-dimethylcyclohex-3-ene-1-carbox ylic acid (8) presented moderate antagonist activities.

  15. Synthesis and biological activity of alkynoic acids derivatives against mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Vilchèze, Catherine; Leung, Lawrence W.; Bittman, Robert; Jacobs, William R.

    2015-01-01

    2-alkynoic acids have bactericidal activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis but their activity fall sharply as the length of the carbon chain increased. In this study, derivatives of 2- alkynoic acids were synthesized and tested against fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria. Their activity was first evaluated in M. smegmatis against their parental 2-alkynoic acids, as well as isoniazid, a first-line antituberculosis drug. The introduction of additional unsaturation or heteroatoms into the carbon chain enhanced the antimycobacterial activity of longer chain alkynoic acids (more than 19 carbons long). In contrast, although the modification of the carboxylic group did not improve the antimycobacterial activity, it significantly reduced the toxicity of the compounds against eukaryotic cells. Importantly, 4-(alkylthio)but-2-ynoic acids, had better bactericidal activity than the parental 2-alkynoic acids and on a par with isoniazid against the slow-grower Mycobacterium bovis BCG. These compounds had also low toxicity against eukaryotic cells, suggesting that they could be potential therapeutic agents against other types of topical mycobacterial infections causing skin diseases including Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium ulcerans, and Mycobacterium leprae. Moreover, they provide a possible scaffold for future drug development. PMID:26256431

  16. Antiproliferative activity of synthetic fatty acid amides from renewable resources.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Daiane S; Piovesan, Luciana A; D'Oca, Caroline R Montes; Hack, Carolina R Lopes; Treptow, Tamara G M; Rodrigues, Marieli O; Vendramini-Costa, Débora B; Ruiz, Ana Lucia T G; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; D'Oca, Marcelo G Montes

    2015-01-15

    In the work, the in vitro antiproliferative activity of a series of synthetic fatty acid amides were investigated in seven cancer cell lines. The study revealed that most of the compounds showed antiproliferative activity against tested tumor cell lines, mainly on human glioma cells (U251) and human ovarian cancer cells with a multiple drug-resistant phenotype (NCI-ADR/RES). In addition, the fatty methyl benzylamide derived from ricinoleic acid (with the fatty acid obtained from castor oil, a renewable resource) showed a high selectivity with potent growth inhibition and cell death for the glioma cell line-the most aggressive CNS cancer.

  17. Antiprotozoal Activity of Triazole Derivatives of Dehydroabietic Acid and Oleanolic Acid.

    PubMed

    Pertino, Mariano Walter; Vega, Celeste; Rolón, Miriam; Coronel, Cathia; Rojas de Arias, Antonieta; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2017-02-28

    Tropical parasitic diseases such as Chagas disease and leishmaniasis are considered a major public health problem affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. As the drugs currently used to treat these diseases have several disadvantages and side effects, there is an urgent need for new drugs with better selectivity and less toxicity. Structural modifications of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds using click chemistry have enabled access to derivatives with promising antiparasitic activity. The antiprotozoal activity of the terpenes dehydroabietic acid, dehydroabietinol, oleanolic acid, and 34 synthetic derivatives were evaluated against epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi and promastigotes of Leishmaniabraziliensis and Leishmania infantum. The cytotoxicity of the compounds was assessed on NCTC-Clone 929 cells. The activity of the compounds was moderate and the antiparasitic effect was associated with the linker length between the diterpene and the triazole in dehydroabietinol derivatives. For the oleanolic acid derivatives, a free carboxylic acid function led to better antiparasitic activity.

  18. Synthesis, activity, and docking study of phenylthiazole acids as potential agonists of PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liang; Wang, Taijin; Shi, Min; Ye, Haoyu

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-mediated transcription factor playing key roles in glucose and lipid homeostasis, and PPARγ ligands possess therapeutic potential in these as well as other areas. In this study, a series of phenylthiazole acids have been synthesized and evaluated for agonistic activity by a convenient fluorescence polarization-based PPARγ ligand screening assay. Compound 4t, as a potential PPARγ agonist with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) 0.75±0.20 μM, exhibited in vitro potency comparable with a 0.83±0.14 μM of the positive control rosiglitazone. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations indicated that phenylthiazole acid 4t interacted with the amino acid residues of the active site of the PPARγ complex in a stable manner, consistent with the result of the in vitro ligand assay. PMID:27313447

  19. Identification of sites responsible for the potentiating effect of niflumic acid on ClC-Ka kidney chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Zifarelli, G; Liantonio, A; Gradogna, A; Picollo, A; Gramegna, G; De Bellis, M; Murgia, AR; Babini, E; Conte Camerino, D; Pusch, M

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: ClC-K kidney Cl− channels are important for renal and inner ear transepithelial Cl− transport, and are potentially interesting pharmacological targets. They are modulated by niflumic acid (NFA), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, in a biphasic way: NFA activates ClC-Ka at low concentrations, but blocks the channel above ∼1 mM. We attempted to identify the amino acids involved in the activation of ClC-Ka by NFA. Experimental approach: We used site-directed mutagenesis and two-electrode voltage clamp analysis of wild-type and mutant channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Guided by the crystal structure of a bacterial CLC homolog, we screened 97 ClC-Ka mutations for alterations of NFA effects. Key results: Mutations of five residues significantly reduced the potentiating effect of NFA. Two of these (G167A and F213A) drastically altered general gating properties and are unlikely to be involved in NFA binding. The three remaining mutants (L155A, G345S and A349E) severely impaired or abolished NFA potentiation. Conclusions and implications: The three key residues identified (L155, G345, A349) are localized in two different protein regions that, based on the crystal structure of bacterial CLC homologs, are expected to be exposed to the extracellular side of the channel, relatively close to each other, and are thus good candidates for being part of the potentiating NFA binding site. Alternatively, the protein region identified mediates conformational changes following NFA binding. Our results are an important step towards the development of ClC-Ka activators for treating Bartter syndrome types III and IV with residual channel activity. PMID:20649569

  20. Biological Activities of Oleanolic Acid Derivatives from Calendula officinalis Seeds.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Ahmed; Ashour, Ahmed; Mira, Amira; Kishikawa, Asuka; Nakagawa, Toshinori; Zhu, Qinchang; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Phytochemical examination of butanol fraction of Calendula officinalis seeds led to the isolation of two compounds identified as 28-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-oleanolic acid 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl (1→3)-β-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (CS1) and oleanolic acid 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl (1→3)-β-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (CS2). Biological evaluation was carried out for these two compounds such as melanin biosynthesis inhibitory, hyaluronic acid production activities, anti obesity using lipase inhibition and adipocyte differentiation as well as evaluation of the protective effect against hydrogen peroxide induced neurotoxicity in neuro-2A cells. The results showed that, compound CS2 has a melanin biosynthesis stimulatory activity; however, compound CS1 has a potent stimulatory effect for the production of hyaluronic acid on normal human dermal fibroblast from adult (NHDF-Ad). Both compounds did not show any inhibitory effect on both lipase and adipocyte differentiation. Compound CS2 could protect neuro-2A cells and increased cell viability against H2 O2 . These activities (melanin biosynthesis stimulatory and protective effect against H2 O2 of CS2 and hyaluronic acid productive activities of these triterpene derivatives) have been reported for the first time. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Characterization of the interactions between the active site of a protein tyrosine kinase and a divalent metal activator

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaofeng; Ayrapetov, Marina K; Sun, Gongqin

    2005-01-01

    Background Protein tyrosine kinases are important enzymes for cell signalling and key targets for anticancer drug discovery. The catalytic mechanisms of protein tyrosine kinase-catalysed phosphorylation are not fully understood. Protein tyrosine kinase Csk requires two Mg2+ cations for activity: one (M1) binds to ATP, and the other (M2) acts as an essential activator. Results Experiments in this communication characterize the interaction between M2 and Csk. Csk activity is sensitive to pH in the range of 6 to 7. Kinetic characterization indicates that the sensitivity is not due to altered substrate binding, but caused by the sensitivity of M2 binding to pH. Several residues in the active site with potential of binding M2 are mutated and the effect on metal activation studied. An active mutant of Asn319 is generated, and this mutation does not alter the metal binding characteristics. Mutations of Glu236 or Asp332 abolish the kinase activity, precluding a positive or negative conclusion on their role in M2 coordination. Finally, the ability of divalent metal cations to activate Csk correlates to a combination of ionic radius and the coordination number. Conclusion These studies demonstrate that M2 binding to Csk is sensitive to pH, which is mainly responsible for Csk activity change in the acidic arm of the pH response curve. They also demonstrate critical differences in the metal activator coordination sphere in protein tyrosine kinase Csk and a protein Ser/Thr kinase, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. They shed light on the physical interactions between a protein tyrosine kinase and a divalent metal activator. PMID:16305747

  2. Fatty acid alcohol ester-synthesizing activity of lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, T; Sumiyoshi, M; Okuda, H

    1999-12-01

    The fatty acid alcohol ester-synthesizing activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) was characterized using bovine milk LPL. Synthesizing activities were determined in an aqueous medium using oleic acid or trioleylglycerol as the acyl donor and equimolar amounts of long-chain alcohols as the acyl acceptor. When oleic acid and hexadecanol emulsified with gum arabic were incubated with LPL, palmityl oleate was synthesized, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Apo-very low density lipoprotein (apoVLDL) stimulated LPL-catalyzed palmityl oleate synthesis. The apparent equilibrium ratio of fatty acid alcohol ester/oleic acid was estimated using a high concentration of LPL and a long (20 h) incubation period. The equilibrium ratio was affected by the incubation pH and the alcohol chain length. When the incubation pH was below pH 7.0 and long chain fatty acyl alcohols were used as substrates, the fatty acid alcohol ester/free fatty acid equilibrium ratio favored ester formation, with an apparent equilibrium ratio of fatty acid alcohol ester/fatty acid of about 0.9/0.1. The equilibrium ratio decreased sharply at alkaline pH (above pH 8.0). The ratio also decreased when fatty alcohols with acyl chains shorter than dodecanol were used. When a trioleoylglycerol/fatty acyl alcohol emulsion was incubated with LPL, fatty acid alcohol esters were synthesized in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Fatty acid alcohol esters were easily synthesized from trioleoylglycerol when fatty alcohols with acyl chains longer than dodecanol were used, but synthesis was decreased with fatty alcohols with acyl chain lengths shorter than decanol, and little synthesizing activity was detected with shorter-chain fatty alcohols such as butanol or ethanol.

  3. Characterization of the S1 binding site of the glutamic acid-specific protease from Streptomyces griseus.

    PubMed Central

    Stennicke, H. R.; Birktoft, J. J.; Breddam, K.

    1996-01-01

    The glutamic acid-specific protease from Streptomyces griseus (SGPE) is an 18.4-kDa serine protease with a distinct preference for Glu in the P1 position. Other enzymes characterized by a strong preference for negatively charged residues in the P1 position, e.g., interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme (ICE), use Arg or Lys residues as counterions within the S1 binding site. However, in SGPE, this function is contributed by a His residue (His 213) and two Ser residues (Ser 192 and S216). It is demonstrated that proSGPE is activated autocatalytically and dependent on the presence of a Glu residue in the -1 position. Based on this observation, the importance of the individual S1 residues is evaluated considering that enzymes unable to recognize a Glu in the P1 position will not be activated. Among the residues constituting the S1 binding site, it is demonstrated that His 213 and Ser 192 are essential for recognition of Glu in the P1 position, whereas Ser 216 is less important for catalysis out has an influence on stabilization of the ground state. From the three-dimensional structure, it appears that His 213 is linked to two other His residues (His 199 and His 228), forming a His triad extending from the S1 binding site to the back of the enzyme. This hypothesis has been tested by substitution of His 199 and His 228 with other amino acid residues. The catalytic parameters obtained with the mutant enzymes, as well as the pH dependence, do not support this theory; rather, it appears that His 199 is responsible for orienting His 213 and that His 228 has no function associated with the recognition of Glu in P1. PMID:8931145

  4. Nanoencapsulation improves the in vitro antioxidant activity of lipoic acid.

    PubMed

    Külkamp, Irene C; Rabelo, Bruna D; Berlitz, Simone J; Isoppo, Mateus; Bianchin, Mariana D; Schaffazick, Scheila R; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Guterres, Sílvia S

    2011-08-01

    Lipoic acid is a widely studied substance, whose therapeutic effects are related to its antioxidant activity. Our objective was to develop lipoic acid-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules and evaluate their in vitro antioxidant effect against lipid peroxidation induced by ascorbyl free radicals, using soybean lecithin liposomes as the substrate. The nanocapsule suspensions were prepared by interfacial deposition of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) and characterized by particle size and polydispersion index (photon correlation spectroscopy), zeta potencial (eletrophoretic mobility), drug content and encapsulation efficiency (HPLC). The extent of lipid peroxidation was determined (TBARS). The nanostrucutures presented mean diameters of between 191 and 349 nm, zeta potential values from -14.1 +/- 4.5 to -10.4 +/- 0.6, and high lipoic acid encapsulation. A significant increase in the antioxidant activity of lipoic acid was achieved through nanoencapsulation or by increasing its concentration in the formulation. The protection results ranged from 48.9 +/- 3.4 to 57.4 +/- 9.1% for lipoic acid-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules. The lipoic acid release from nanostrucutures significantly decreased with increasing polymer concentration. Also, it was observed an increasing in the antioxidant activity as the lipoic acid release time decreased. The co-encapsulation of lipoic acid with melatonin in lipid-core nanocapsules did not improve the protection against lipid peroxidation. The results obtained demonstrate the optimal concentrations of polymer and lipoic acid in the formulations in terms of enhancing the antioxidant activity. Furthermore, by the strategy applied, it was verified that nanoencapsulation is an efficient alternative to increase the antioxidant effect of lipoic acid, representing a potential approach for therapeutic applications.

  5. New Ulvan-Degrading Polysaccharide Lyase Family: Structure and Catalytic Mechanism Suggests Convergent Evolution of Active Site Architecture.

    PubMed

    Ulaganathan, ThirumalaiSelvi; Boniecki, Michal T; Foran, Elizabeth; Buravenkov, Vitaliy; Mizrachi, Naama; Banin, Ehud; Helbert, William; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2017-03-23

    Ulvan is a complex sulfated polysaccharide biosynthesized by green seaweed and contains predominantly rhamnose, xylose, and uronic acid sugars. Ulvan-degrading enzymes have only recently been identified and added to the CAZy ( www.cazy.org ) database as family PL24, but neither their structure nor catalytic mechanism(s) are yet known. Several homologous, new ulvan lyases, have been discovered in Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain PLSV, Alteromonas LOR, and Nonlabens ulvanivorans, defining a new family PL25, with the lyase encoded by the gene PLSV_3936 being one of them. This enzyme cleaves the glycosidic bond between 3-sulfated rhamnose (R3S) and glucuronic acid (GlcA) or iduronic acid (IdoA) via a β-elimination mechanism. We report the crystal structure of PLSV_3936 and its complex with a tetrasaccharide substrate. PLSV_3936 folds into a seven-bladed β-propeller, with each blade consisting of four antiparallel β-strands. Sequence conservation analysis identified a highly conserved region lining at one end of a deep crevice on the protein surface. The putative active site was identified by mutagenesis and activity measurements. Crystal structure of the enzyme with a bound tetrasaccharide substrate confirmed the identity of base and acid residues and allowed determination of the catalytic mechanism and also the identification of residues neutralizing the uronic acid carboxylic group. The PLSV_3936 structure provides an example of a convergent evolution among polysaccharide lyases toward a common active site architecture embedded in distinct folds.

  6. Characterization of Active Site Residues of Nitroalkane Oxidase†

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Michael P.; Fenny, Nana S.; Ali, Shah R.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of primary and secondary nitrolkanes to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones plus nitrite. The structure of the enzyme shows that Serl71 forms a hydrogen bond to the flavin N5, suggesting that it plays a role in catalysis. Cys397 and Tyr398 were previously identified by chemical modification as potential active site residues. To more directly probe the roles of these residues, the S171A, S171V, S171T, C397S, and Y398F enzymes have been characterized with nitroethane as substrate. The C397S and Y398 enzymes were less stable than the wild-type enzyme, and the C397S enzyme routinely contained a substoichiometric amount of FAD. Analysis of the steady-state kinetic parameters for the mutant enzymes, including deuterium isotope effects, establishes that all of the mutations result in decreases in the rate constants for removal of the substrate proton by ~5-fold and decreases in the rate constant for product release of ~2-fold. Only the S171V and S171T mutations alter the rate constant for flavin oxidation. These results establish that these residues are not involved in catalysis, but rather are required for maintaining the protein structure. PMID:20056514

  7. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  8. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems.

  9. cDNA cloning of porcine brain prolyl endopeptidase and identification of the active-site seryl residue

    SciTech Connect

    Rennex, D.; Hemmings, B.A.; Hofsteenge, J.; Stone, S.R. )

    1991-02-26

    Prolyl endopeptidase is a cytoplasmic serine protease. The enzyme was purified from porcine kidney, and oligonucleotides based on peptide sequences from this protein were used to isolate a cDNA clone from a porcine brain library. This clone contained the complete coding sequence of prolyl endopeptidase and encoded a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 80751 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence of prolyl endopeptidase showed no sequence homology with other known serine proteases. ({sup 3}H)Diisopropyl fluorophosphate was used to identify the active-site serine of prolyl endopeptidase. One labeled peptide was isolated and sequenced. The sequence surrounding the active-site serine was Asn-Gly-Gly-Ser-Asn-Gly-Gly. This sequence is different from the active-site sequences of other known serine proteases. This difference and the lack of overall homology with the known families of serine proteases suggest that prolyl endopeptidase represents a new type of serine protease.

  10. Activity of earthworm in Latosol under simulated acid rain stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-En; Yu, Jiayu; Ouyang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Acid rain is still an issue of environmental concerns. This study investigated the impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) upon earthworm activity from the Latosol (acidic red soil). Laboratory experiment was performed by leaching the soil columns grown with earthworms (Eisenia fetida) at the SAR pH levels ranged from 2.0 to 6.5 over a 34-day period. Results showed that earthworms tended to escape from the soil and eventually died for the SAR at pH = 2.0 as a result of acid toxicity. The catalase activity in the earthworms decreased with the SAR pH levels, whereas the superoxide dismutases activity in the earthworms showed a fluctuate pattern: decreasing from pH 6.5 to 5.0 and increasing from pH 5.0 to 4.0. Results implied that the growth of earthworms was retarded at the SAR pH ≤ 3.0.

  11. Spectroscopic studies on the antioxidant activity of ellagic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Ismail; Yeşiloğlu, Yeşim; Bayrak, Yüksel

    2014-09-01

    Ellagic acid (EA, C14H6O8) is a natural dietary polyphenol whose benefits in a variety of diseases shown in epidemiological and experimental studies involve anti-inflammation, anti-proliferation, anti-angiogenesis, anticarcinogenesis and anti-oxidation properties. In vitro radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of EA were clarified using different analytical methodologies such as total antioxidant activity determination by ferric thiocyanate, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging, 2,2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activity and superoxide anion radical scavenging, ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activity and ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing ability. EA inhibited 71.2% lipid peroxidation of a linoleic acid emulsion at 45 μg/mL concentration. On the other hand, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid displayed 69.8%, 66.8%, 64.5% and 59.7% inhibition on the peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at the same concentration, respectively. In addition, EA had an effective DPPH• scavenging, ABTSrad + scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing power and ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activities. Also, those various antioxidant activities were compared to BHA, BHT, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid as references antioxidant compounds. These results suggested that EA can be used in the pharmacological, food industry and medicine because of these properties.

  12. Spectroscopic studies on the antioxidant activity of ellagic acid.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Ismail; Yeşiloğlu, Yeşim; Bayrak, Yüksel

    2014-09-15

    Ellagic acid (EA, C14H6O8) is a natural dietary polyphenol whose benefits in a variety of diseases shown in epidemiological and experimental studies involve anti-inflammation, anti-proliferation, anti-angiogenesis, anticarcinogenesis and anti-oxidation properties. In vitro radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of EA were clarified using different analytical methodologies such as total antioxidant activity determination by ferric thiocyanate, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activity and superoxide anion radical scavenging, ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activity and ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing ability. EA inhibited 71.2% lipid peroxidation of a linoleic acid emulsion at 45 μg/mL concentration. On the other hand, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid displayed 69.8%, 66.8%, 64.5% and 59.7% inhibition on the peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at the same concentration, respectively. In addition, EA had an effective DPPH• scavenging, ABTS+ scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing power and ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activities. Also, those various antioxidant activities were compared to BHA, BHT, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid as references antioxidant compounds. These results suggested that EA can be used in the pharmacological, food industry and medicine because of these properties.

  13. Mutational Studies on Resurrected Ancestral Proteins Reveal Conservation of Site-Specific Amino Acid Preferences throughout Evolutionary History

    PubMed Central

    Risso, Valeria A.; Manssour-Triedo, Fadia; Delgado-Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Barroso-delJesus, Alicia; Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Gavira, Jose A.; Gaucher, Eric A.; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Local protein interactions (“molecular context” effects) dictate amino acid replacements and can be described in terms of site-specific, energetic preferences for any different amino acid. It has been recently debated whether these preferences remain approximately constant during evolution or whether, due to coevolution of sites, they change strongly. Such research highlights an unresolved and fundamental issue with far-reaching implications for phylogenetic analysis and molecular evolution modeling. Here, we take advantage of the recent availability of phenotypically supported laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins and β-lactamases to experimentally address the change of site-specific amino acid preferences over long geological timescales. Extensive mutational analyses support the notion that evolutionary adjustment to a new amino acid may occur, but to a large extent this is insufficient to erase the primitive preference for amino acid replacements. Generally, site-specific amino acid preferences appear to remain conserved throughout evolutionary history despite local sequence divergence. We show such preference conservation to be readily understandable in molecular terms and we provide crystallographic evidence for an intriguing structural-switch mechanism: Energetic preference for an ancestral amino acid in a modern protein can be linked to reorganization upon mutation to the ancestral local structure around the mutated site. Finally, we point out that site-specific preference conservation naturally leads to one plausible evolutionary explanation for the existence of intragenic global suppressor mutations. PMID:25392342

  14. Chemical repair of base lesions, AP-sites, and strand breaks on plasmid DNA in dilute aqueous solution by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Kuniki; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •We report a novel mechanism of radiation protection of DNA by chemical activity of ascorbic acid. •The “chemical repair” of DNA damage was revealed using biochemical assay and chemical kinetics analysis. •We found that ascorbic acid significantly repairs precursors of nucleobase lesions and abasic sites. •However, ascorbic acid seldom repairs precursors of DNA-strand breaks. -- Abstract: We quantified the damage yields produced in plasmid DNA by γ-irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10–100 μM) of ascorbic acid, which is a major antioxidant in living systems, to clarify whether it chemically repairs radiation damage in DNA. The yield of DNA single strand breaks induced by irradiation was analyzed with agarose gel electrophoresis as conformational changes in closed circular plasmids. Base lesions and abasic sites were also observed as additional conformational changes by treating irradiated samples with glycosylase proteins. By comparing the suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, in addition to scavenging of the OH radicals derived from water radiolysis, it was found that ascorbic acid promotes the chemical repair of precursors of AP-sites and base lesions more effectively than those of single strand breaks. We estimated the efficiency of the chemical repair of each lesion using a kinetic model. Approximately 50–60% of base lesions and AP-sites were repaired by 10 μM ascorbic acid, although strand breaks were largely unrepaired by ascorbic acid at low concentrations. The methods in this study will provide a route to understanding the mechanistic aspects of antioxidant activity in living systems.

  15. In situ detection of salicylic acid binding sites in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Wen; Deng, Da-Yi; Yu, Ying; Liu, Fang-Fei; Lin, Bi-Xia; Cao, Yu-Juan; Hu, Xiao-Gang; Wu, Jian-Zhong

    2015-02-01

    The determination of hormone-binding sites in plants is essential in understanding the mechanisms behind hormone function. Salicylic acid (SA) is an important plant hormone that regulates responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In order to label SA-binding sites in plant tissues, a quantum dots (QDs) probe functionalized with a SA moiety was successfully synthesized by coupling CdSe QDs capped with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) to 4-amino-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (PAS), using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyllaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) as the coupling agent. The probe was then characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy, as well as UV/vis and fluorescence spectrophotometry. The results confirmed the successful conjugation of PAS to CdSe QDs and revealed that the conjugates maintained the properties of the original QDs, with small core diameters and adequate dispersal in solution. The PAS-CdSe QDs were used to detect SA-binding sites in mung bean and Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings in vitro and in vivo. The PAS-CdSe QDs were effectively transported into plant tissues and specifically bound to SA receptors in vivo. In addition, the effects of the PAS-CdSe QDs on cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in the tips of A. thaliana seedlings were investigated. Both SA and PAS-CdSe QDs had similar effects on the trend in cytosolic-free Ca(2+) concentrations, suggesting that the PAS-CdSe QDs maintained the bioactivity of SA. To summarize, PAS-CdSe QDs have high potential as a fluorescent probe for the in vitro/in vivo labeling and imaging of SA receptors in plants.

  16. Antimicrobial activity and phenolic content of natural site and micropropagated Limonium avei (De Not.) Brullo & Erben plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Nostro, Antonia; Filocamo, Angela; Giovannini, Annalisa; Catania, Stefania; Costa, Chiara; Marino, Andreana; Bisignano, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    This study reported the antimicrobial activity and phenolic content of natural site and micropropagated Limonium avei (De Not.) Brullo & Erben inflorescences. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of ethanolic extracts were determined according to the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Individual phenolic acids and flavonoids were detected by a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-DAD) method. The samples showed a comparable antimicrobial activity, although the natural site extract possessed the lower MIC values. The best activity was detected against Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin resistant strains (MIC and MBC values ranging from 7.81 to 62.50 µg mL(-1) and from 500 to 2000 µg mL(-1) respectively). In contrast, a low activity was found on Gram-negative bacteria and Candida albicans. The HPLC-DAD analysis revealed ten phenolic acids and four flavonoids with a major amount of m-coumaric acid, naringin and quercetin in the natural site extract.

  17. Metal Ion Interactions in the DNA Cleavage/Ligation Active Site of Human Topoisomerase IIα†

    PubMed Central

    Deweese, Joseph E.; Guengerich, F. Peter; Burgin, Alex B.; Osheroff, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Human topoisomerase IIα utilizes a two-metal-ion mechanism for DNA cleavage. One of the metal ions (M12+) is believed to make a critical interaction with the 3′-bridging atom of the scissile phosphate, while the other (M22+) is believed to interact with a non-bridging oxygen of the scissile phosphate. Based on structural and mutagenesis studies of prokaryotic nucleic acid enzymes, it has been proposed that the active site divalent metal ions interact with type II topoisomerases through a series of conserved acidic amino acid residues. The homologous residues in human topoisomerase IIα are E461, D541, D543, and D545. To address the validity of these assignments and to delineate interactions between individual amino acids and M12+ and M22+, we individually mutated each of these acidic amino acid residues in topoisomerase IIα to either cysteine or alanine. Mutant enzymes displayed a marked loss of catalytic and DNA cleavage activity as well as a reduced affinity for divalent metal ions. Additional experiments determined the ability of wild-type and mutant topoisomerase IIα enzymes to cleave an oligonucleotide substrate that contained a sulfur atom in place of the 3′-bridging oxygen of the scissile phosphate in the presence of Mg2+, Mn2+, or Ca2+. Based on the results of these studies, we conclude that the four acidic amino acid residues interact with metal ions in the DNA cleavage/ligation active site of topoisomerase IIα. Furthermore, we propose that M12+ interacts with E461, D543, and D545 and M22+ interacts with E461 and D541. PMID:19697956

  18. In situ electrochemical quantification of active sites in Fe–N/C non-precious metal catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Malko, Daniel; Kucernak, Anthony; Lopes, Thiago

    2016-01-01

    The economic viability of low temperature fuel cells as clean energy devices is enhanced by the development of inexpensive oxygen reduction reaction catalysts. Heat treated iron and nitrogen containing carbon based materials (Fe–N/C) have shown potential to replace expensive precious metals. Although significant improvements have recently been made, their activity and durability is still unsatisfactory. The further development and a rational design of these materials has stalled due to the lack of an in situ methodology to easily probe and quantify the active site. Here we demonstrate a protocol that allows the quantification of active centres, which operate under acidic conditions, by means of nitrite adsorption followed by reductive stripping, and show direct correlation to the catalytic activity. The method is demonstrated for two differently prepared materials. This approach may allow researchers to easily assess the active site density and turnover frequency of Fe–N/C catalysts. PMID:27796287

  19. In situ electrochemical quantification of active sites in Fe-N/C non-precious metal catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malko, Daniel; Kucernak, Anthony; Lopes, Thiago

    2016-10-01

    The economic viability of low temperature fuel cells as clean energy devices is enhanced by the development of inexpensive oxygen reduction reaction catalysts. Heat treated iron and nitrogen containing carbon based materials (Fe-N/C) have shown potential to replace expensive precious metals. Although significant improvements have recently been made, their activity and durability is still unsatisfactory. The further development and a rational design of these materials has stalled due to the lack of an in situ methodology to easily probe and quantify the active site. Here we demonstrate a protocol that allows the quantification of active centres, which operate under acidic conditions, by means of nitrite adsorption followed by reductive stripping, and show direct correlation to the catalytic activity. The method is demonstrated for two differently prepared materials. This approach may allow researchers to easily assess the active site density and turnover frequency of Fe-N/C catalysts.

  20. The species- and site-specific acid-base properties of penicillamine and its homodisulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzahosseini, Arash; Szilvay, András; Noszál, Béla

    2014-08-01

    Penicillamine, penicillamine disulfide and 4 related compounds were studied by 1H NMR-pH titrations and case-tailored evaluation methods. The resulting acid-base properties are quantified in terms of 14 macroscopic and 28 microscopic protonation constants and the concomitant 7 interactivity parameters. The species- and site-specific basicities are interpreted by means of inductive and shielding effects through various intra- and intermolecular comparisons. The thiolate basicities determined this way are key parameters and exclusive means for the prediction of thiolate oxidizabilities and chelate forming properties in order to understand and influence chelation therapy and oxidative stress at the molecular level.

  1. Site Specific Incorporation of Amino Acid Analogues into Proteins In Vivo

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-11

    Positions in CCR5 ( ) and rhodopsin ( ) subjected to site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids are indicated. Figure 15. Expression...of functional CCR5 mutants containing Acp or Bzp at positions 28, 96, or 260. HEK293T cells were transfected with plasmids carrying the genes for... CCR5 -wt or CCR5 mutant with an amber mutation at position I28, F96, or F260. Plasmids encoding Bst-Yam and E. coli TyrRS (AcpRS or BzpRS) were co

  2. Identification of active sites in amidase: Evolutionary relationship between amide bond- and peptide bond-cleaving enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Michihiko; Fujiwara, Yoshie; Goda, Masahiko; Komeda, Hidenobu; Shimizu, Sakayu

    1997-01-01

    Mainly based on various inhibitor studies previously performed, amidases came to be regarded as sulfhydryl enzymes. Not completely satisfied with this generally accepted interpretation, we performed a series of site-directed mutagenesis studies on one particular amidase of Rhodococcus rhodochrous J1 that was involved in its nitrile metabolism. For these experiments, the recombinant amidase was produced as the inclusion body in Escherichia coli to greatly facilitate its recovery and subsequent purification. With regard to the presumptive active site residue Cys203, a Cys203 → Ala mutant enzyme still retained 11.5% of the original specific activity. In sharp contrast, substitutions in certain other positions in the neighborhood of Cys203 had a far more dramatic effect on the amidase. Glutamic acid substitution of Asp191 reduced the specific activity of the mutant enzyme to 1.33% of the wild-type activity. Furthermore, Asp191 → Asn substitution as well as Ser195 → Ala substitution completely abolished the specific activity. It would thus appear that, among various conserved residues residing within the so-called signature sequence common to all amidases, the real active site residues are Asp191 and Ser195 rather than Cys203. Inasmuch as an amide bond (CO-NH2) in the amide substrate is not too far structurally removed from a peptide bond (CO-NH-), the signature sequences of various amidases were compared with the active site sequences of various types of proteases. It was found that aspartic acid and serine residues corresponding to Asp191 and Ser195 of the Rhodococcus amidase are present within the active site sequences of aspartic proteinases, thus suggesting the evolutionary relationship between the two. PMID:9342349

  3. REMOVING SLUDGE HEELS FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE TANKS BY OXALIC ACID DISSOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; David Herman, D; Fernando Fondeur, F; John Pareizs, J; Michael Hay, M; Bruce Wiersma, B; Kim Crapse, K; Thomas Peters, T; Samuel Fink, S; Donald Thaxton, D

    2009-03-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will remove sludge as part of waste tank closure operations. Typically the bulk sludge is removed by mixing it with supernate to produce a slurry, and transporting the slurry to a downstream tank for processing. Experience shows that a residual heel may remain in the tank that cannot be removed by this conventional technique. In the past, SRS used oxalic acid solutions to disperse or dissolve the sludge heel to complete the waste removal. To better understand the actual conditions of oxalic acid cleaning of waste from carbon steel tanks, the authors developed and conducted an experimental program to determine its effectiveness in dissolving sludge, the hydrogen generation rate, the generation rate of other gases, the carbon steel corrosion rate, the impact of mixing on chemical cleaning, the impact of temperature, and the types of precipitates formed during the neutralization process. The test samples included actual SRS sludge and simulated SRS sludge. The authors performed the simulated waste tests at 25, 50, and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge over seven days. They conducted the actual waste tests at 50 and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge as a single batch. Following the testing, SRS conducted chemical cleaning with oxalic acid in two waste tanks. In Tank 5F, the oxalic acid (8 wt %) addition occurred over seven days, followed by inhibited water to ensure the tank contained enough liquid to operate the mixer pumps. The tank temperature during oxalic acid addition and dissolution was approximately 45 C. The authors analyzed samples from the chemical cleaning process and compared it with test data. The conclusions from the work are: (1) Oxalic acid addition proved effective in dissolving sludge heels in the simulant demonstration, the actual waste demonstration, and in SRS Tank 5F. (2) The oxalic acid dissolved {approx} 100% of the uranium, {approx} 100% of the iron, and {approx} 40% of the manganese

  4. Amino acid composition predicts prion activity.

    PubMed

    Afsar Minhas, Fayyaz Ul Amir; Ross, Eric D; Ben-Hur, Asa

    2017-04-10

    Many prion-forming proteins contain glutamine/asparagine (Q/N) rich domains, and there are conflicting opinions as to the role of primary sequence in their conversion to the prion form: is this phenomenon driven primarily by amino acid composition, or, as a recent computational analysis suggested, dependent on the presence of short sequence elements with high amyloid-forming potential. The argument for the importance of short sequence elements hinged on the relatively-high accuracy obtained using a method that utilizes a collection of length-six sequence elements with known amyloid-forming potential. We weigh in on this question and demonstrate that when those sequence elements are permuted, even higher accuracy is obtained; we also propose a novel multiple-instance machine learning method that uses sequence composition alone, and achieves better accuracy than all existing prion prediction approaches. While we expect there to be elements of primary sequence that affect the process, our experiments suggest that sequence composition alone is sufficient for predicting protein sequences that are likely to form prions. A web-server for the proposed method is available at http://faculty.pieas.edu.pk/fayyaz/prank.html, and the code for reproducing our experiments is available at http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.167136.

  5. Characterization of the Adeno-Associated Virus 1 and 6 Sialic Acid Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Patel, Ami; Ng, Robert; Miller, Edward Blake; Halder, Sujata; McKenna, Robert; Asokan, Aravind

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The adeno-associated viruses (AAVs), which are being developed as gene delivery vectors, display differential cell surface glycan binding and subsequent tissue tropisms. For AAV serotype 1 (AAV1), the first viral vector approved as a gene therapy treatment, and its closely related AAV6, sialic acid (SIA) serves as their primary cellular surface receptor. Toward characterizing the SIA binding site(s), the structure of the AAV1-SIA complex was determined by X-ray crystallography to 3.0 Å. Density consistent with SIA was observed in a pocket located at the base of capsid protrusions surrounding icosahedral 3-fold axes. Site-directed mutagenesis substitution of the amino acids forming this pocket with structurally equivalent residues from AAV2, a heparan sulfate binding serotype, followed by cell binding and transduction assays, further mapped the critical residues conferring SIA binding to AAV1 and AAV6. For both viruses five of the six binding pocket residues mutated (N447S, V473D, N500E, T502S, and W503A) abolished SIA binding, whereas S472R increased binding. All six mutations abolished or decreased transduction by at least 50% in AAV1. Surprisingly, the T502S substitution did not affect transduction efficiency of wild-type AAV6. Furthermore, three of the AAV1 SIA binding site mutants—S472R, V473D, and N500E—escaped recognition by the anti-AAV1 capsid antibody ADK1a. These observations demonstrate that common key capsid surface residues dictate both virus binding and entry processes, as well as antigenic reactivity. This study identifies an important functional capsid surface “hot spot” dictating receptor attachment, transduction efficiency, and antigenicity which could prove useful for vector engineering. IMPORTANCE The adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector gene delivery system has shown promise in several clinical trials and an AAV1-based vector has been approved as the first gene therapy treatment. However, limitations still exist with respect

  6. Activation of the Glutamic Acid-Dependent Acid Resistance System in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Leads to Increase of the Fatty Acid Biotransformation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Ji-Min; Kim, Ji-Won; Song, Ji-Won; Blank, Lars M.; Park, Jin-Byung

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of carboxylic acids including fatty acids from biomass is central in envisaged biorefinery concepts. The productivities are often, however, low due to product toxicity that hamper whole-cell biocatalyst performance. Here, we have investigated factors that influence the tolerance of Escherichia coli to medium chain carboxylic acid (i.e., n-heptanoic acid)-induced stress. The metabolic and genomic responses of E. coli BL21(DE3) and MG1655 grown in the presence of n-heptanoic acid indicated that the GadA/B-based glutamic acid-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system might be critical for cellular tolerance. The GDAR system, which is responsible for scavenging intracellular protons by catalyzing decarboxylation of glutamic acid, was inactive in E. coli BL21(DE3). Activation of the GDAR system in this strain by overexpressing the rcsB and dsrA genes, of which the gene products are involved in the activation of GadE and RpoS, respectively, resulted in acid tolerance not only to HCl but also to n-heptanoic acid. Furthermore, activation of the GDAR system allowed the recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3) expressing the alcohol dehydrogenase of Micrococcus luteus and the Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida to reach 60% greater product concentration in the biotransformation of ricinoleic acid (i.e., 12-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid (1)) into n-heptanoic acid (5) and 11-hydroxyundec-9-enoic acid (4). This study may contribute to engineering E. coli-based biocatalysts for the production of carboxylic acids from renewable biomass. PMID:27681369

  7. Activation of the Glutamic Acid-Dependent Acid Resistance System in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Leads to Increase of the Fatty Acid Biotransformation Activity.

    PubMed

    Woo, Ji-Min; Kim, Ji-Won; Song, Ji-Won; Blank, Lars M; Park, Jin-Byung

    The biosynthesis of carboxylic acids including fatty acids from biomass is central in envisaged biorefinery concepts. The productivities are often, however, low due to product toxicity that hamper whole-cell biocatalyst performance. Here, we have investigated factors that influence the tolerance of Escherichia coli to medium chain carboxylic acid (i.e., n-heptanoic acid)-induced stress. The metabolic and genomic responses of E. coli BL21(DE3) and MG1655 grown in the presence of n-heptanoic acid indicated that the GadA/B-based glutamic acid-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system might be critical for cellular tolerance. The GDAR system, which is responsible for scavenging intracellular protons by catalyzing decarboxylation of glutamic acid, was inactive in E. coli BL21(DE3). Activation of the GDAR system in this strain by overexpressing the rcsB and dsrA genes, of which the gene products are involved in the activation of GadE and RpoS, respectively, resulted in acid tolerance not only to HCl but also to n-heptanoic acid. Furthermore, activation of the GDAR system allowed the recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3) expressing the alcohol dehydrogenase of Micrococcus luteus and the Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida to reach 60% greater product concentration in the biotransformation of ricinoleic acid (i.e., 12-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid (1)) into n-heptanoic acid (5) and 11-hydroxyundec-9-enoic acid (4). This study may contribute to engineering E. coli-based biocatalysts for the production of carboxylic acids from renewable biomass.

  8. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  9. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  10. The reaction mechanism for the SCR process on monomer V(5+) sites and the effect of modified Brønsted acidity.

    PubMed

    Arnarson, Logi; Falsig, Hanne; Rasmussen, Søren B; Lauritsen, Jeppe V; Moses, Poul Georg

    2016-06-22

    The energetics, structures and activity of a monomeric VO3H/TiO2(001) catalyst are investigated for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reaction by the use of density functional theory (DFT). Furthermore we study the influences of a dopant substitute in the TiO2 support and its effects on the known properties of the SCR system such as Brønsted acidity and reducibility of vanadium. We find for the reduction part of the SCR mechanism that it involves two Ti-O-V oxygen sites. One is a hydroxyl possessing Brønsted acidity which contributes to the formation of NH4(+), while the other accepts a proton which charge stabilizes the reduced active site. In the reduction the proton is donated to the latter due to a reaction between NH3 and NO that forms a H2NNO molecule which decomposes into N2(g) and H2O(g). A dopant substitution of 10 different dopants: Si, Ge, Se, Zr, Sn, Te, Hf, V, Mo and W at each of the sites, which participate in the reaction, modifies the energetics and therefore the SCR activity. We find that Brønsted acidity is a descriptor for the SCR activity at low temperatures. Based on this descriptor we find that Zr, Hf and Sn have a positive effect as they decrease the activation energy for the SCR reaction.

  11. Biological activity of silylated amino acid containing substance P analogues.

    PubMed

    Cavelier, F; Marchand, D; Martinez, J; Sagan, S

    2004-03-01

    The need to replace natural amino acids in peptides with nonproteinogenic counterparts to obtain new medicinal agents has stimulated a great deal of innovation on synthetic methods. Here, we report the incorporation of non-natural silylated amino acids in substance P (SP), the binding affinity for the two hNK-1 binding sites and, the potency to stimulate phospholipase C (PLC) and adenylate cyclase of the resulting peptide. We also assess the improvement of their stability towards enzyme degradation. Altogether, we found that replacing glycine with silaproline (Sip) in position 9 of SP leads to a potent analogue exhibiting an increased resistance to angiotensin-converting enzyme hydrolysis.

  12. The antimicrobial activities of the cinnamaldehyde adducts with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qing-Yi; Xiong, Jia-Jun; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Chao; Wen Ye

    2011-11-01

    Cinnamaldehyde is a well-established natural antimicrobial compound. It is probable for cinnamaldehyde to react with amino acid forming Schiff base adduct in real food system. In this paper, 9 such kind of adducts were prepared by the direct reaction of amino acids with cinnamaldehyde at room temperature. Their antimicrobial activities against Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were evaluated with benzoic acid as a reference. The adducts showed a dose-dependent activities against the three microbial strains. Both cinnamaldehyde and their adducts were more active against B. subtilis than on E. coli, and their antimicrobial activities were higher at lower pH. Both cinnamaldehyde and its adducts were more active than benzoic acid at the same conditions. The adduct compound A was non-toxic by primary oral acute toxicity study in mice. However, in situ effect of the adduct compound A against E. coli was a little lower than cinnamaldehyde in fish meat. This paper for the first time showed that the cinnamaldehyde adducts with amino acids had similar strong antimicrobial activities as cinnamaldehyde, which may provide alternatives to cinnamaldehyde in food to avoid the strong unacceptable odor of cinnamaldehyde.

  13. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  14. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  15. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  16. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  17. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  18. Robotics and Automation Activities at the Savannah River Site: A Site Report for SUBWOG 39F

    SciTech Connect

    Teese, G.D.

    1995-09-28

    The Savannah River Site has successfully used robots, teleoperators, and remote video to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, improve worker safety, and improve the quality of operations. Previous reports have described the use of mobile teleoperators in coping with a high level liquid waste spill, the removal of highly contaminated equipment, and the inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. This report will cover recent applications at the Savannah River, as well as systems which SRS has delivered to other DOE site customers.

  19. Loss and Gain of Human Acidic Mammalian Chitinase Activity by Nonsynonymous SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Okawa, Kazuaki; Ohno, Misa; Kashimura, Akinori; Kimura, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yuki; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Kamaya, Minori; Kino, Yoshihiro; Bauer, Peter O.; Oyama, Fumitaka

    2016-01-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) is implicated in asthma, allergic inflammation, and food processing. Little is known about genetic and evolutional regulation of chitinolytic activity of AMCase. Here, we relate human AMCase polymorphisms to the mouse AMCase, and show that the highly active variants encoded by nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) are consistent with the mouse AMCase sequence. The chitinolytic activity of the recombinant human AMCase was significantly lower than that of the mouse counterpart. By creating mouse-human chimeric AMCase protein we found that the presence of the N-terminal region of human AMCase containing conserved active site residues reduced the enzymatic activity of the molecule. We were able to significantly increase the activity of human AMCase by amino acid substitutions encoded by nsSNPs (N45, D47, and R61) with those conserved in the mouse homologue (D45, N47, and M61). For abolition of the mouse AMCase activity, introduction of M61R mutation was sufficient. M61 is conserved in most of primates other than human and orangutan as well as in other mammals. Orangutan has I61 substitution, which also markedly reduced the activity of the mouse AMCase, indicating that the M61 is a crucial residue for the chitinolytic activity. Altogether, our data suggest that human AMCase has lost its chitinolytic activity by integration of nsSNPs during evolution and that the enzyme can be reactivated by introducing amino acids conserved in the mouse counterpart. PMID:27702777

  20. Acid phosphatase activities during the germination of Glycine max seeds.

    PubMed

    dos Prazeres, Janaina Nicanuzia; Ferreira, Carmen Veríssima; Aoyama, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a study concerning the determination of some characteristics of soybean seedlings and the detection of acid phosphatase activities towards different substrates during the germination. Enzyme activities with p-nitrophenylphosphate (pNPP) and inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) as substrates were detected from the 5th and 7th days after germination, respectively. Acid phosphatase activities with tyrosine phosphate (TyrP), glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) and phosphoenol pyruvate (PEP) were also observed but to a lesser extent. Under the same conditions, no enzyme activity was detected with phytic acid (PhyAc) as substrate. The appearance of phosphatase activity was coincident with the decrease of inorganic phosphate content during germination; over the same period, the protein content increased up to the 5th day, decreased until the 8th day, and remained constant after this period. Relative to phosphatase activity in the cotyledons, the activities detected in the hypocotyl and roots were 82% and 38%, respectively. During storage the enzyme maintained about 63% of its activity for 3 months at 5 degrees C. The specificity constant (Vmax/Km) values for pNPP and PPi were 212 and 64 mu kat mM-1 mg-1, respectively. Amongst the substrates tested, PPi could be a potential physiological substrate for acid phosphatase during the germination of soybean seeds.

  1. GAS HYDRATES AT TWO SITES OF AN ACTIVE CONTINENTAL MARGIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart on the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m.

  2. Antileishmanial activity of diterpene acids in copaiba oil

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Adriana Oliveira; Izumi, Erika; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Dias-Filho, Benedito Prado; da Veiga-Júnior, Valdir Florêncio; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease. According to the World Health Organization, there are approximately 1.5-two million new cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis each year worldwide. Chemotherapy against leishmaniasis is based on pentavalent antimonials, which were developed more than a century ago. The goals of this study were to investigate the antileishmanial activity of diterpene acids in copaiba oil, as well as some possible targets of their action against Leishmania amazonensis. Methyl copalate and agathic, hydroxycopalic, kaurenoic, pinifolic and polyaltic acids isolated from Copaifera officinales oleoresins were utilised. Ultrastructural changes and the specific organelle targets of diterpenes were investigated with electron microscopy and flow cytometry, respectively. All compounds had some level of activity against L. amazonensis. Hydroxycopalic acid and methyl copalate demonstrated the most activity against promastigotes and had 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 2.5 and 6.0 µg/mL, respectively. However, pinifolic and kaurenoic acid demonstrated the most activity against axenic amastigote and had IC50 values of 3.5 and 4.0 µg/mL, respectively. Agathic, kaurenoic and pinifolic acid caused significant increases in plasma membrane permeability and mitochondrial membrane depolarisation of the protozoan. In conclusion, copaiba oil and its diterpene acids should be explored for the development of new antileishmanial drugs. PMID:23440116

  3. The Antimicrobial Activity of Liposomal Lauric Acids Against Propionibacterium acnes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Darren; Pornpattananangkul, Dissaya; Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Chan, Michael; Carson, Dennis; Huang, Chun-Ming; Zhang, Liangfang

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of lauric acid (LA) and its liposomal derivatives against Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), the bacterium that promotes inflammatory acne. First, the antimicrobial study of three free fatty acids (lauric acid, palmitic acid and oleic acid) demonstrated that LA gives the strongest bactericidal activity against P. acnes. However, a setback of using LA as a potential treatment for inflammatory acne is its poor water solubility. Then the LA was incorporated into a liposome formulation to aid its delivery to P. acnes. It's demonstrated that the antimicrobial activity of LA was not only well maintained in its liposomal derivatives but also enhanced at low LA concentration. In addition, the antimicrobial activity of LA-loaded liposomes (LipoLA) mainly depended on the LA loading concentration per single liposomes. Further study found that the LipoLA could fuse with the membranes of P. acnes and release the carried LA directly into the bacterial membranes, thereby killing the bacteria effectively. Since LA is a natural compound that is the main acid in coconut oil and also resides in human breast milk and liposomes have been successfully and widely applied as a drug delivery vehicle in the clinic, the LipoLA developed in this work holds great potential of becoming an innate, safe and effective therapeutic medication for acne vulgaris and other P. acnes associated diseases. PMID:19665786

  4. Characterization of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid binding site in U937 membranes using a novel radiolabeled agonist, 20-125i-14,15-epoxyeicosa-8(Z)-enoic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenqi; Tuniki, Venugopal Raju; Anjaiah, Siddam; Falck, J R; Hillard, Cecilia J; Campbell, William B

    2008-03-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are important regulators of vascular tone and homeostasis. Whether they initiate signaling through membrane receptors is unclear. We developed 20-iodo-14,15-epoxyeicosa-8(Z)-enoic acid (20-I-14,15-EE8ZE), a radiolabeled EET agonist, to characterize EET binding to membranes of U937 cells. 20-I-14,15-EE8ZE stimulated cAMP production in U937 cells with similar potency, but it decreased efficacy compared with 11,12-EET. Maximum cAMP production increased 4.2-fold, with an EC(50) value of 9 muM. Like 14,15-EET, 20-I-14,15-EE8ZE relaxed bovine coronary arteries, with a similar EC(50) value. Both 20-I-14,15-EE8ZE agonist activities were blocked by the EET antagonist 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)enoic acid (14,15-EE5ZE). Specific 20-(125)I-14,15-EE8ZE binding to U937 membranes reached equilibrium within 10 min and remained unchanged for 30 min at 4 degrees C. The binding was saturable, reversible, and exhibited K(D) and B(max) values of 11.8 +/- 1.1 nM and 5.8 +/- 0.2 pmol/mg protein, respectively. Pretreatment of the membranes with guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate reduced the B(max) in a concentration-related manner. 20-(125)I-14,15-EE8ZE binding was inhibited by eicosanoids with potency order of 11,12-EET >14,15-EE5ZE approximately 14,15-EET > 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid > 14,15-EET-thiirane >14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid. This order is in agreement with the efficacy and potency of cAMP production. In summary, 20-(125)I-14,15-EE8ZE is a radiolabeled EET agonist that is useful to study binding and metabolism. Using this radioligand, we have identified a specific high-affinity and high-abundance EET binding site in U937 cell membranes. This binding site could represent a specific EET receptor, which is probably a G protein-coupled receptor.

  5. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK CLEANING: CORROSION RATE FOR ONE VERSUS EIGHT PERCENT OXALIC ACID SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2011-01-20

    Until recently, the use of oxalic acid for chemically cleaning the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste tanks focused on using concentrated 4 and 8-wt% solutions. Recent testing and research on applicable dissolution mechanisms have concluded that under appropriate conditions, dilute solutions of oxalic acid (i.e., 1-wt%) may be more effective. Based on the need to maximize cleaning effectiveness, coupled with the need to minimize downstream impacts, SRS is now developing plans for using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution. A technology gap associated with using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution was a dearth of suitable corrosion data. Assuming oxalic acid's passivation of carbon steel was proportional to the free oxalate concentration, the general corrosion rate (CR) from a 1-wt% solution may not be bound by those from 8-wt%. Therefore, after developing the test strategy and plan, the corrosion testing was performed. Starting with the envisioned process specific baseline solvent, a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution, with sludge (limited to Purex type sludge-simulant for this initial effort) at 75 C and agitated, the corrosion rate (CR) was determined from the measured weight loss of the exposed coupon. Environmental variations tested were: (a) Inclusion of sludge in the test vessel or assuming a pure oxalic acid solution; (b) acid solution temperature maintained at 75 or 45 C; and (c) agitation of the acid solution or stagnant. Application of select electrochemical testing (EC) explored the impact of each variation on the passivation mechanisms and confirmed the CR. The 1-wt% results were then compared to those from the 8-wt%. The immersion coupons showed that the maximum time averaged CR for a 1-wt% solution with sludge was less than 25-mils/yr for all conditions. For an agitated 8-wt% solution with sludge, the maximum time averaged CR was about 30-mils/yr at 50 C, and 86-mils/yr at 75 C. Both the 1-wt% and the 8-wt% testing demonstrated that if the sludge was removed from

  6. The role of outer surface/inner bulk Brønsted acidic sites in the adsorption of a large basic molecule (simazine) on H-Y zeolite.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Filomena; Pansini, Michele; Marocco, Antonello; Bonelli, Barbara; Garrone, Edoardo; Esposito, Serena

    2015-11-21

    The simple means adopted for investigating H-Y zeolite acidity in water is the pH-dependence of the amount of a basic molecule adsorbed under isochoric conditions, a technique capable of yielding, under equilibrium conditions, an estimate of the pKa value of the involved acidic centres: the behaviour with temperature of adsorbed amounts yields instead some information on thermodynamics. Simazine (Sim, 2-chloro-4,6-bis(ethylamino)-s-triazine) was chosen as an adsorbate because its transverse dimension (7.5 Å) is close to the opening of the supercage in the faujasite structure of H-Y (7.4 Å). In short term measurements, Sim adsorption at 25 °C occurs only at the outer surface of H-Y particles. Two types of mildly acidic centres are present (with pKaca. 7 and ca. 8, respectively) and no strong one is observed. Previous adsorption of ammonia from the gas phase discriminates between the two. The former survives, and shows features common with the silanols of amorphous silica. The latter is suppressed: because of this and other features distinguishing this site from silanol species (e.g. the formation of dimeric Sim2H(+) species, favoured by coverage and unfavoured by temperatures of adsorption higher than ambient temperature) a candidate is an Al based site. We propose a Lewis centre coordinating a water molecule, exhibiting acidic properties. This acidic water molecule can be replaced by the stronger base ammonia, also depleting inner strong Brønsted sites. A mechanism for the generation of the two sites from surface Brønsted species is proposed. Long term adsorption measurements at 25 °C already show the onset of the interaction with inner strongly acidic Brønsted sites: because of its size, activation is required for Sim to pass the supercage openings and reach inner acidic sites. When adsorption is run at 40-50 °C, uptake is much larger and increases with temperature. Isochoric measurements suggest a pKa value of ca. 3 compatible with its marked acidic

  7. Lidar research activities and observations at NARL site, Gadanki, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellapragada, Bhavani Kumar

    2016-05-01

    The National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), a unit of Department of Space (DOS), located at Gadanki village (13.5°N, 79.2°E, 370 m AMSL) in India, is involved in the development of lidar remote sensing technologies for atmospheric research. Several advanced lidar technologies employing micropulse, polarization, Raman and scanning have been developed at this site and demonstrated for atmospheric studies during the period between 2008 and 2015. The technology of micropulse lidar, operates at 532 nm wavelength, was successfully transferred to an industry and the commercial version has been identified for Indian Lidar network (I-LINK) programme. Under this lidar network activity, several lidar units were installed at different locations in India to study tropospheric aerosols and clouds. The polarization sensitive lidar technology was realized using a set of mini photomultiplier tube (PMT) units and has the capability to operate during day and night without a pause. The lidar technology uses a compact flashlamp pumped Qswitched laser and employs biaxial configuration between the transmitter and receiver units. The lidar technology has been utilized for understanding the polarization characteristics of boundary layer aerosols during the mixed layer development. The demonstrated Raman lidar technology, uses the third harmonic wavelength of Nd:YAG laser, provides the altitude profiles of aerosol backscattering, extinction and water vapor covering the boundary layer range and allows operation during nocturnal periods. The Raman lidar derived height profiles of aerosol backscattering and extinction coefficient, lidar ratio, and watervapor mixing ratio inform the tropical boundary layer aerosol characteristics. The scanning lidar technology uses a near infrared laser wavelength for probing the lower atmosphere and has been utilized for high resolution cloud profiling during convective periods. The lidar technology is also used for rain rate measurement during

  8. Dynamically achieved active site precision in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Judith P

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The grand challenge in enzymology is to define and understand all of the parameters that contribute to enzymes' enormous rate accelerations. The property of hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions has moved the focus of research away from an exclusive focus on transition state stabilization toward the importance of the motions of the heavy atoms of the protein, a role for reduced barrier width in catalysis, and the sampling of a protein conformational landscape to achieve a family of protein substates that optimize enzyme-substrate interactions and beyond. This Account focuses on a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase for which the chemical step of hydride transfer is rate determining across a wide range of experimental conditions. The properties of the chemical coordinate have been probed using kinetic isotope effects, indicating a transition in behavior below 30 °C that distinguishes nonoptimal from optimal C-H activation. Further, the introduction of single site mutants has the impact of either enhancing or eliminating the temperature dependent transition in catalysis. Biophysical probes, which include time dependent hydrogen/deuterium exchange and fluorescent lifetimes and Stokes shifts, have also been pursued. These studies allow the correlation of spatially resolved transitions in protein motions with catalysis. It is now possible to define a long-range network of protein motions in ht-ADH that extends from a dimer interface to the substrate binding domain across to the cofactor binding domain, over a distance of ca. 30 Å. The ongoing challenge to obtaining spatial and temporal resolution of catalysis-linked protein motions is discussed.

  9. Enhanced concentrations of citric acid in spring aerosols collected at the Gosan background site in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jinsang; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2011-09-01

    In order to investigate water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in the aerosol samples under the Asian continent outflow, total suspended particle (TSP) samples ( n = 32) were collected at the Gosan site in Jeju Island over 2-5 days integration during 23 March-1 June 2007 and 16-24 April 2008. The samples were analyzed for water-soluble dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, and α-dicarbonyls using a capillary gas chromatography technique. We found elevated concentrations of atmospheric citric acid (range: 20-320 ng m -3) in the TSP samples during mid- to late April of 2007 and 2008. To specify the sources of citric acid, dicarboxylic acids and related compounds were measured in the pollen sample collected at the Gosan site (Pollen_Gosan), authentic pollen samples from Japanese cedar ( Cryptomeria) (Pollen_cedar) and Japanese cypress ( Chamaecyparis obtusa) (Pollen_cypress), and tangerine fruit produced from Jeju Island. Citric acid (2790 ng in unit mg of pollen mass) was found as most abundant species in the Pollen_Gosan, followed by oxalic acid (2390 ng mg -1). Although citric acid was not detected in the Pollen_cedar and Pollen_cypress as major species, it was found as a dominant species in the tangerine juice while malic acid was detected as major species in the tangerine peel, followed by oxalic and citric acids. Since Japanese cedar trees are planted around tangerine farms to prevent strong winds from the Pacific Ocean, citric acid that may be directly emitted from tangerine is likely adsorbed on pollens emitted from Japanese cedar and then transported to the Gosan site. Much lower malic/citric acid ratios obtained under cloudy condition than clear condition suggest that malic acid may rapidly decompose to lower molecular weight compounds such as oxalic and malonic acids (

  10. Nucleic acids as cofactors for factor XI and prekallikrein activation: Different roles for high-molecular-weight kininogen.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Ivan; Shakhawat, Ruhama; Sun, Mao-Fu; Dickeson, S Kent; Puy, Cristina; McCarty, Owen J T; Gruber, Andras; Matafonov, Anton; Gailani, David

    2017-04-03

    The plasma zymogens factor XI (fXI) and prekallikrein (PK) are activated by factor XIIa (fXIIa) during contact activation. Polyanions such as DNA and RNA may contribute to thrombosis and inflammation partly by enhancing PK and fXI activation. We examined PK and fXI activation in the presence of nucleic acids, and determine the effects of the cofactor high molecular weight kininogen (HK) on the reactions. In the absence of HK, DNA and RNA induced fXI autoactivation. Proteases known to activate fXI (fXIIa and thrombin) did not enhance this process appreciably. Nucleic acids had little effect on PK activation by fXIIa in the absence of HK. HK had significant but opposite effects on PK and fXI activation. HK enhanced fXIIa activation of PK in the presence of nucleic acids, but blocked fXI autoactivation. Thrombin and fXIIa could overcome the HK inhibitory effect on autoactivation, indicating these proteases are necessary for nucleic acid-induced fXI activation in an HK-rich environment such as plasma. In contrast to PK, which requires HK for optimal activation, fXI activation in the presence of nucleic acids depends on anion binding sites on the fXI molecule. The corresponding sites on PK are not necessary for PK activation. Our results indicate that HK functions as a cofactor for PK activation in the presence of nucleic acids in a manner consistent with classic models of contact activation. However, HK has, on balance, an inhibitory effect on nucleic acid-supported fXI activation and may function as a negative regulator of fXI activation.

  11. Isolation and properties of the acid site-specific endonuclease from mature eggs of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius

    SciTech Connect

    Sibirtsev, Yu.T.; Konechnyi, A.A.; Rasskazov, V.A.

    1986-01-10

    An acid site-specific endonuclease has been detected in mature sea urchin eggs and cells of embryos at early stages of differentiation. Fractionation with ammonium sulfate, followed by chromatography on columns with DEAE, phosphocellulose, and hydroxyapatite resulted in an 18,000-fold purification. The molecular weight of the enzyme was determined at approx. 29,000, the optimum pH 5.5. The activity of the enzyme does not depend on divalent metal ions, EDTA, ATP, and tRNA, but it is modulated to a substantial degree by NaCl. The maximum rate of cleavage of the DNA supercoil (form I) is observed at 100 mM NaCl. Increasing the NaCl concentration to 350 mM only slightly lowers the rate of cleavage of form I, yielding form II, but entirely suppresses the accumulation of form III. Restriction analysis of the products of enzymatic hydrolysis of Co1E1 and pBR322 DNA showed that at the early stages of hydrolysis the enzyme exhibits pronounced specificity for definite sites, the number of which is 12 for Co1 E1 DNA and 8 sites for pBR322 DNA.

  12. Probing the active site of cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 (Ll-CCRH1) from Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant; Patel, Krunal; Vishwakarma, Rishi Kishore; Srivastava, Sameer; Singh, Somesh; Gaikwad, Sushama; Khan, Bashir M

    2013-09-01

    Lack of three dimensional crystal structure of cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) limits its detailed active site characterization studies. Putative active site residues involved in the substrate/NADPH binding and catalysis for Leucaena leucocephala CCR (Ll-CCRH1; GenBank: DQ986907) were identified by amino acid sequence alignment and homology modeling. Putative active site residues and proximal H215 were subjected for site directed mutagenesis, and mutated enzymes were expressed, purified and assayed to confirm their functional roles. Mutagenesis of S136, Y170 and K174 showed complete loss of activity, indicating their pivotal roles in catalysis. Mutant S212G exhibited the catalytic efficiencies less than 10% of wild type, showing its indirect involvement in substrate binding or catalysis. R51G, D77G, F30V and I31N double mutants showed significant changes in Km values, specifying their roles in substrate binding. Finally, chemical modification and substrate protection studies corroborated the presence Ser, Tyr, Lys, Arg and carboxylate group at the active site of Ll-CCRH1.

  13. Activity and Stability of Biofilm Uricase of Lactobacillus plantarum for Uric Acid Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iswantini, Dyah; Rachmatia, Rescy; Diana, Novita Rose; Nurhidayat, Novik; Akhiruddin; Saprudin, Deden

    2016-01-01

    Research of uric acid biosensor used a Lactobacillus plantarum was successfully conducted. Lactobacillus plantarum could produce uricase that could be used as uric acid biosensor. Therefore, lifetime of bacteria were quite short that caused the bacteria could not detect uric acid for a long time. To avoid this problem, development of biofilm for uric acid biosensor is important. Biofilms is a structured community of bacterial cells, stick together and are able to maintain a bacteria in an extreme environments. The purpose of present study was to determine and compare the activity of uricase produced by L. plantarum, deposited whithin biofilm and planktonic bacteria on glassy carbon electrode (GCEb & GCE), also to determine the stability of biofilm. The optimization process was conducted by using temperature, pH, and substrate concentration as the parameters. It showed that the activity of uricase within biofilm was able to increase the oxidation current. GCEb and GCE yielded the oxidation current in the amount of 47.24 μA and 23.04 μA, respectively, under the same condition. Results indicated that the optimum condition for uric acid biosensor using biofilm were pH 10, temperature of 40 oC, and uric acid concentration of 5 mM. The stability of GCEb decreased after 10 hours used, with decreasing percentage over 86.33%. This low stability probably caused by the unprotected active site of the enzyme that the enzyme is easier to experience the denaturation.

  14. Synthesis and antimicrobial activities of new higher amino acid Schiff base derivatives of 6-aminopenicillanic acid and 7-aminocephalosporanic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir (nee Güngör), Özlem; Gürkan, Perihan; Özçelik, Berrin; Oyardı, Özlem

    2016-02-01

    Novel β-lactam derivatives (1c-3c) (1d-3d) were produced by using 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA), 7-aminocephalosporanic acid (7-ACA) and the higher amino acid Schiff bases. The synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H/13C NMR and UV-vis spectra. Antibacterial activities of all the higher amino acid Schiff bases (1a-3a) (1b-3b) and β-lactam derivatives were screened against three gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Acinetobacter baumannii RSKK 02026), three gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 07005, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633) and their drug-resistant isolates by using broth microdilution method. Two fungi (Candida albicans and Candida krusei) were used for antifungal activity.

  15. [Sorption of amino acids from aqueous solutions on activated charcoal].

    PubMed

    Nekliudov, A D; Tsibanov, V V

    1985-03-01

    Various methods for quantitative description of amino acid sorption from solutions for parenteral nutrition on activated charcoal were studied under dynamic and static conditions. With the use of the well-known Freindlich and Langmuir absorption isotherms it was shown to be possible to describe in a simplified way the complex multicomponent process of sorption of the amino acids and to estimate their loss at the filtration stage.

  16. Retinal pigment epithelial acid lipase activity and lipoprotein receptors: effects of dietary omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Elner, Victor M

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To show that fish oil-derived omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, delivered to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) by circulating low-density lipoproteins (LDL), enhance already considerable RPE lysosomal acid lipase activity, providing for more efficient hydrolysis of intralysosomal RPE lipids, an effect that may help prevent development of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). METHODS: Colorimetric biochemical and histochemical techniques were used to demonstrate RPE acid lipase in situ, in vitro, and after challenge with phagocytic stimuli. Receptor-mediated RPE uptake of fluorescently labeled native, aceto-acetylated, and oxidized LDL was studied in vitro and in vivo. LDL effects on RPE lysosomal enzymes were assessed. Lysosomal enzyme activity was compared in RPE cells from monkeys fed diets rich in fish oil to those from control animals and in cultured RPE cells exposed to sera from these monkeys. RESULTS: RPE acid lipase activity was substantial and comparable to that of mononuclear phagocytes. Acid lipase activity increased significantly following phagocytic challenge with photoreceptor outer segment (POS) membranes. Receptor-mediated RPE uptake of labeled lipoproteins was determined in vitro. Distinctive uptake of labeled lipoproteins occurred in RPE cells and mononuclear phagocytes in vivo. Native LDL enhanced RPE lysosomal enzyme activity. RPE lysosomal enzymes increased significantly in RPE cells from monkeys fed fish oil-rich diets and in cultured RPE cells exposed to their sera. CONCLUSIONS: RPE cells contain substantial acid lipase for efficient metabolism of lipids imbibed by POS phagocytosis and LDL uptake. Diets rich in fish oil-derived omega-3 fatty acids, by enhancing acid lipase, may reduce RPE lipofuscin accumulation, RPE oxidative damage, and the development of ARMD. PMID:12545699

  17. A Hydrophobic Pocket in the Active Site of Glycolytic Aldolase Mediates Interactions with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein

    SciTech Connect

    St-Jean,M.; Izard, T.; Sygusch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aldolase plays essential catalytic roles in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. However, aldolase is a highly abundant protein that is remarkably promiscuous in its interactions with other cellular proteins. In particular, aldolase binds to highly acidic amino acid sequences, including the C-terminus of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor. Here we report the crystal structure of tetrameric rabbit muscle aldolase in complex with a C-terminal peptide of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Aldolase recognizes a short, 4-residue DEWD motif (residues 498-501), which adopts a loose hairpin turn that folds about the central aromatic residue, enabling its tryptophan side chain to fit into a hydrophobic pocket in the active site of aldolase. The flanking acidic residues in this binding motif provide further interactions with conserved aldolase active site residues, Arg-42 and Arg-303, aligning their side chains and forming the sides of the hydrophobic pocket. The binding of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein to aldolase precludes intramolecular interactions of its C-terminus with its active site, and is competitive with substrate as well as with binding by actin and cortactin. Finally, based on this structure a novel naphthol phosphate-based inhibitor of aldolase was identified and its structure in complex with aldolase demonstrated mimicry of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-aldolase interaction. The data support a model whereby aldolase exists in distinct forms that regulate glycolysis or actin dynamics.

  18. Hatching success in salamanders and chorus frogs at two sites in Colorado, USA: Effects of acidic deposition and climate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, E.; Campbell, D.H.; Corn, P.S.

    2003-01-01

    The snowpack in the vicinity of the Mount Zirkel Wilderness Area is among the most acidic in the western United States. We analyzed water chemistry and examined hatching success in tiger salamanders and chorus frogs at ponds there and at nearby Rabbit Ears Pass (Dumont) to determine whether acid deposition affects amphibians or their breeding habitats at these potentially sensitive locations. We found a wide range of acid neutralizing capacity among ponds within sites; the minimum pH recorded during the experiment was 5.4 at one of 12 ponds with all others at pH ??? 5.7. At Dumont, hatching success for chorus frogs was greater in ponds with low acid neutralizing capacity; however, lowest pHs were >5.8. At current levels of acid deposition, weather and pond characteristics are likely more important than acidity in influencing hatching success in amphibian larvae at these sites.

  19. Recovery of rhenium from sulfuric acid solutions with activated coals

    SciTech Connect

    Troshkina, I.D.; Naing, K.Z.; Ushanova, O.N.; P'o, V.; Abdusalomov, A.A.

    2006-09-15

    Equilibrium and kinetic characteristics of rhenium sorption from sulfuric acid solutions (pH 2) by activated coals produced from coal raw materials (China) were studied. Constants of the Henry equation describing isotherms of rhenium sorption by activated coals were calculated. The effective diffusion coefficients of rhenium in the coals were determined. The dynamic characteristics of rhenium sorption and desorption were determined for the activated coal with the best capacity and kinetic characteristics.

  20. Pyrazinoic acid esters with broad spectrum in vitro antimycobacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Cynamon, M H; Gimi, R; Gyenes, F; Sharpe, C A; Bergmann, K E; Han, H J; Gregor, L B; Rapolu, R; Luciano, G; Welch, J T

    1995-09-29

    A series of substituted pyrazinoic acid esters has been prepared and examined for their in vitro activity against Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium kansasii as well as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Modification of both the pyrazine nucleus and the ester functionality have been very successful in expanding the activity of pyrazinamide to include M. avium and M. kansasii, organisms normally not susceptible to pyrazinamide. Several of these compounds have activities 100-1000-fold greater than that of pyrazinamide against M. tuberculosis.

  1. MERCURY-NITRITE-RHODIUM-RUTHENIUM INTERACTIONS IN NOBLE METAL CATALYZED HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM FORMIC ACID DURING NUCLEAR WASTE PROCESSING AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 136C

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Lambert, D.; Newell, J; Stone, M.

    2009-09-02

    Chemical pre-treatment of radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site is performed to prepare the waste for vitrification into a stable waste glass form. During pre-treatment, compounds in the waste become catalytically active. Mercury, rhodium, and palladium become active for nitrite destruction by formic acid, while rhodium and ruthenium become active for catalytic conversion of formic acid into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Nitrite ion is present during the maximum activity of rhodium, but is consumed prior to the activation of ruthenium. Catalytic hydrogen generation during pre-treatment can exceed radiolytic hydrogen generation by several orders of magnitude. Palladium and mercury impact the maximum catalytic hydrogen generation rates of rhodium and ruthenium by altering the kinetics of nitrite ion decomposition. New data are presented that illustrate the interactions of these various species.

  2. Bile acids potentiate proton-activated currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing human acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC1a).

    PubMed

    Ilyaskin, Alexandr V; Diakov, Alexei; Korbmacher, Christoph; Haerteis, Silke

    2017-02-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are nonvoltage-gated sodium channels transiently activated by extracellular protons and belong to the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)/Degenerin (DEG) family of ion channels. Bile acids have been shown to activate two members of this family, the bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) and ENaC. To investigate whether bile acids also modulate ASIC function, human ASIC1a was heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Exposing oocytes to tauro-conjugated cholic (t-CA), deoxycholic (t-DCA), and chenodeoxycholic (t-CDCA) acid at pH 7.4 did not activate ASIC1a-mediated whole-cell currents. However, in ASIC1a expressing oocytes the whole-cell currents elicited by pH 5.5 were significantly increased in the presence of these bile acids. Single-channel recordings in outside-out patches confirmed that t-DCA enhanced the stimulatory effect of pH 5.5 on ASIC1a channel activity. Interestingly, t-DCA reduced single-channel current amplitude by ~15% which suggests an interaction of t-DCA with a region close to the channel pore. Molecular docking predicted binding of bile acids to the pore region near the degenerin site (G433) in the open conformation of the channel. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the amino acid residue G433 is critically involved in the potentiating effect of bile acids on ASIC1a activation by protons.

  3. Multiple-site mutations of phage Bp7 endolysin improves its activities against target bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Can; Wang, Yuanchao; Sun, Huzhi; Ren, Huiying

    2015-10-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has caused serious drug resistance. Bacteria that were once easily treatable are now extremely difficult to treat. Endolysin can be used as an alternative to antibiotics for the treatment of drug-resistant bacteria. To analyze the antibacterial activity of the endolysin of phage Bp7 (Bp7e), a 489-bp DNA fragment of endolysin Bp7e was PCR-amplified from a phage Bp7 genome and cloned, and then a pET28a-Bp7e prokaryotic expression vector was constructed. Two amino acids were mutated (L99A, M102E) to construct pET28a-Bp7Δe, with pET28a-Bp7e as a template. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that BP7e belongs to a T4-like phage endolysin group. Bp7e and its mutant Bp7Δe were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) as soluble proteins. They were purified by affinity chromatography, and then their antibacterial activities were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the recombinant proteins Bp7e and Bp7Δe showed obvious antibacterial activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus but no activity against Staphylococcus aureus. In the presence of malic acid, Bp7e and Bp7Δe exhibited an effect on most E. coli strains which could be lysed by phage Bp7, but no effect on Salmonella paratyphi or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, Bp7Δe with double-site mutations showed stronger antibacterial activity and a broader lysis range than Bp7e.

  4. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia; Ohue, Ryuji; Nomura, Wataru; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Yu, Rina; Kitamura, Nahoko; Park, Si-Bum; Kishino, Shigenobu; Ogawa, Jun; Kawada, Teruo

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism.

  5. The yeast regulator of transcription protein Rtr1 lacks an active site and phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kehui; Manley, James L; Tong, Liang

    2012-07-10

    The activity of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is controlled in part by the phosphorylation state of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. Recent reports have suggested that yeast regulator of transcription protein, Rtr1, and its human homologue RPAP2, possess Pol II CTD Ser5 phosphatase activity. Here we report the crystal structure of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1, which reveals a new type of zinc finger protein and does not have any close structural homologues. Importantly, the structure does not show evidence of an active site, and extensive experiments to demonstrate its CTD phosphatase activity have been unsuccessful, suggesting that Rtr1 has a non-catalytic role in CTD dephosphorylation.

  6. Tertiary Contacts Distant from the Active Site Prime a Ribozyme for Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Minimal hammerhead ribozymes have been characterized extensively by static and time-resolved crystallography as well as numerous biochemical analyses, leading to mutually contradictory mechanistic explanations for catalysis. We present the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a full-length Schistosoma mansoni hammerhead ribozyme that permits us to explain the structural basis for its 1000-fold catalytic enhancement. The full-length hammerhead structure reveals how tertiary interactions occurring remotely from the active site prime this ribozyme for catalysis. G-12 and G-8 are positioned consistent with their previously suggested roles in acid-base catalysis, the nucleophile is aligned with a scissile phosphate positioned proximal to the A-9 phosphate, and previously unexplained roles of other conserved nucleotides become apparent within the context of a distinctly new fold that nonetheless accommodates the previous structural studies. These interactions permit us to explain the previously irreconcilable sets of experimental results in a unified, consistent, and unambiguous manner. PMID:16859740

  7. Photoaffinity ligands in the study of cytochrome p450 active site structure.

    PubMed

    Gartner, Carlos Augusto

    2003-04-01

    While photoaffinity ligands have been widely used to probe the structures of many receptors and nucleic acid binding proteins, their effective use in the study of cytochrome p450 structure is less established. Nevertheless, significant advances in this field have been made since the technique was first applied to p450cam in 1979. In several cases, especially studies involving p450s of the 1A and 2B families, peptides covalently modified with photoaffinity ligands have been isolated and characterized. Some of these peptides were predicted by molecular modeling to line substrate binding regions of the enzymes. Other data obtained from such studies were more difficult to reconcile with theory. This review addresses the status of photoaffinity labeling as a tool for studying cytochrome p450 structure. In addition, potential future directions in this field are discussed, including the development of heme-directed agents and validation of their effectiveness as photoaffinity ligands using sperm whale myoglobin as a test protein. The potential for hydroxyaromatic compounds to serve as photoactivated probes of active site nucleophiles is also discussed. This class of compounds and its derivatives has long been known in the fields of photochemistry and photophysics to be precursors of reactive radicals and quinone methides that are likely to serve as effective active site probes of the p450s.

  8. Multiple, Ligand-Dependent Routes from the Active Site of Cytochrome P450 2C9

    SciTech Connect

    Cojocaru, Vlad; Winn, Peter J.; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2012-02-13

    The active site of liver-specific, drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenases is deeply buried in the protein and is connected to the protein surface through multiple tunnels, many of which were found open in different CYP crystal structures. It has been shown that different tunnels could serve as ligand passage routes in different CYPs. However, it is not understood whether one CYP uses multiple routes for substrate access and product release and whether these routes depend on ligand properties. From 300 ns of molecular dynamics simulations of CYP2C9, the second most abundant CYP in the human liver we found four main ligand exit routes, the occurrence of each depending on the ligand type and the conformation of the F-G loop, which is likely to be affected by the CYP-membrane interaction. A non-helical F-G loop favored exit towards the putative membrane-embedded region. Important protein features that direct ligand exit include aromatic residues that divide the active site and whose motions control access to two pathways. The ligands interacted with positively charged residues on the protein surface through hydrogen bonds that appear to select for acidic substrates. The observation of multiple, ligand-dependent routes in a CYP aids understanding of how CYP mutations affect drug metabolism and provides new possibilities for CYP inhibition.

  9. Characterization of the Dielectric Constant in the Trichoderma reesei Cel7B Active Site.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiangfei; Wang, Yefei; Zhang, Shujun; Yan, Shihai; Li, Tong; Yao, Lishan

    2015-07-27

    An attempt is made to evaluate the dielectric constant of the Trichoderma reesei Cel7B active site. Through kinetic measurements, the pKa value of the catalytic acid E201 is determined. Mutations (away from E201) with net charge changes are introduced to perturb the E201 pKa. It is shown that the mutation with a +1 charge change (including G225R, G230R, and A335R) decreases the pKa of E201, whereas the mutation with a -1 charge change (including Q149E, A222D, G225D, and G230D) increases the pKa. This effect is consistent with the electrostatic interaction between the changed charge and the E201 side chain. The fitting of the experimental data yields an apparent dielectric constant of 25-80. Molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water molecules indicate that the high solvent accessibility of the active site contributes largely to the high dielectric constant. ONIOM calculations show that high dielectric constant benefits the catalysis through decreasing the energy of the transition state relative to that of the enzyme substrate complex.

  10. Distance between two active-site lysines of ribulosebis-phosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.H.; Hartman, F.C.

    1986-05-01

    Previous affinity labeling studies and comparative sequence analyses have identified two different lysines at the active site of the title enzyme (Lys-166 and Lys-329 in the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme and Lys-175 and Lys-334 in the spinach enzyme). Because the two lysines are mutually exclusive to various reagents, they appear to be in proximity. To challenge this postulate, the authors have explored the reactions of the R. rubrum enzyme (a homodimer) with chemical cross-linking agents. 4,4'-Diisothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonate stilbene, which spans 12 A, rapidly inactivates the enzyme with protection afforded by the competitive inhibitor 2-carboxyribitol-1,5-bisphosphate. The inactivated enzyme was subjected to gel filtration in the presence of urea to remove material arising from intersubunit or intermolecular cross-linking. The monomeric fraction was digested with trypsin; inspection of the digest by HPLC revealed that over-half of the incorporated reagent was associated with a single peptide. This peptide was purified by successive ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The amino acid composition and sequence of the purified peptide demonstrated that it is comprised of two chains, encompassing position 149-168 and 314-337 of the original protein subunit and connected by a cross-link between Lys-166 and Lys-329. Thus, the two active-site lysines can be juxtaposed only 12 A apart.

  11. [Aluminum coordination and active sites on aluminas, Y-zeolites and pillared layered silicates]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Fripiat, J.J.

    1994-02-01

    This report is organized in four sections. In the first the authors will outline structural features which are common to all fine grained alumina, as well as to non-framework alumina in zeolites. This section will be followed by a study of the surface vs. bulk coordination of aluminum. The third section will deal with measurement of the number of acid sites and the scaling of their strength. The fourth and last section will describe three model reactions: the isomerization of 1-butene and of 2 cis-butene; the isomerization and disproportionation of oxtho-xylene; and the transformation of trichloroethane into vinyl chloride followed by the polymerization of the vinyl chloride. The relationship between chemical activity and selectivity and what is known of the local structure of the active catalytic sites will be underlined. Other kinds of zeolites besides Y zeolite have been studied. Instead of the aluminum pillared silicates they found it more interesting to study the substitution of silicon by aluminum in a layered structure containing a permanent porosity (aluminated sepiolite).

  12. Active-site-mutagenesis study of rat liver betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    González, Beatriz; Campillo, Nuria; Garrido, Francisco; Gasset, María; Sanz-Aparicio, Juliana; Pajares, María A

    2003-03-15

    A site-directed-mutagenesis study of putative active-site residues in rat liver betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase has been carried out. Identification of these amino acids was based on data derived from a structural model of the enzyme. No alterations in the CD spectra or the gel-filtration chromatography elution pattern were observed with the mutants, thus suggesting no modification in the secondary structure content or in the association state of the proteins. All the mutants obtained showed a reduction of the enzyme activity, the most dramatic effect being that of Glu(159), followed by Tyr(77) and Asp(26). Changes in affinity for either of the substrates, homocysteine or betaine, were detected when substitutions were performed of Glu(21), Asp(26), Phe(74) and Cys(186). Interestingly, Asp(26), postulated to be involved in homocysteine binding, has a strong effect on affinity for betaine. The relevance of these results is discussed in the light of very recent structural data obtained for the human enzyme.

  13. Selectivity of fungal sesquiterpene synthases: role of the active site's H-1 alpha loop in catalysis.

    PubMed

    López-Gallego, Fernando; Wawrzyn, Grayson T; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2010-12-01

    Sesquiterpene synthases are responsible for the cyclization of farnesyl pyrophosphate into a myriad of structurally diverse compounds with various biological activities. We examine here the role of the conserved active site H-α1 loop in catalysis in three previously characterized fungal sesquiterpene synthases. The H-α1 loops of Cop3, Cop4, and Cop6 from Coprinus cinereus were altered by site-directed mutagenesis and the resultant product profiles were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared to the wild-type enzymes. In addition, we examine the effect of swapping the H-α1 loop from the promiscuous enzyme Cop4 with the more selective Cop6 and the effect of acidic or basic conditions on loop mutations in Cop4. Directed mutations of the H-α1 loop had a marked effect on the product profile of Cop3 and Cop4, while little to no change was shown in Cop6. Swapping of the Cop4 and Cop6 loops with one another was again shown to influence the product profile of Cop4, while the product profile of Cop6 remained identical to the wild-type enzyme. The loop mutations in Cop4 also implicate specific residues responsible for the pH sensitivity of the enzyme. These results affirm the role of the H-α1 loop in catalysis and provide a potential target to increase the product diversity of terpene synthases.

  14. Acid-Sensitive Sheddable PEGylated PLGA Nanoparticles Increase the Delivery of TNF-α siRNA in Chronic Inflammation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Aldayel, Abdulaziz M; Naguib, Youssef W; O'Mary, Hannah L; Li, Xu; Niu, Mengmeng; Ruwona, Tinashe B; Cui, Zhengrong

    2016-01-01

    There has been growing interest in utilizing small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific to pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α ( TNF-α), in chronic inflammation therapy. However, delivery systems that can increase the distribution of the siRNA in chronic inflammation sites after intravenous administration are needed. Herein we report that innovative functionalization of the surface of siRNA-incorporated poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles significantly increases the delivery of the siRNA in the chronic inflammation sites in a mouse model. The TNF-α siRNA incorporated PLGA nanoparticles were prepared by the standard double emulsion method, but using stearoyl-hydrazone-polyethylene glycol 2000, a unique acid-sensitive surface active agent, as the emulsifying agent, which renders (i) the nanoparticles PEGylated and (ii) the PEGylation sheddable in low pH environment such as that in chronic inflammation sites. In a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide-induced chronic inflammation, the acid-sensitive sheddable PEGylated PLGA nanoparticles showed significantly higher accumulation or distribution in chronic inflammation sites than PLGA nanoparticles prepared with an acid-insensitive emulsifying agent (i.e., stearoyl-amide-polyethylene glycol 2000) and significantly increased the distribution of the TNF-α siRNA incorporated into the nanoparticles in inflamed mouse foot. PMID:27434685

  15. Characteristics of fluoride in pore-water at accidental hydrofluoric acid spillage site, Gumi, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, E. H.; Lee, H. A.; Lee, J.; Kim, D.; Lee, S.; Yoon, H. O.

    2015-12-01

    A leakage accident of hydrofluoric acid (HF) occurred in Gumi, South Korea at Sep. 2012. The study site is located in the borderline between a large-scale industrial complex and a rural area. The HF plume was made immediately, and moved toward the rural area through air. After the accident, 212 ha of farm land were influenced and most of crops were withered. To recover the soil, CaO was applied after six months. Although several studies have done to estimate the extension and movement of HF plume in the air and to assess the impact on human health or plant after the incident, the long-term fate of fluoride (F) in the affected soils is not identified clearly. Thus, this study aimed to understand the behavior of F in the soil after HF releasing from accident site through chemical analysis and geochemical modeling. Within the radius of 1 km of accident site, 16 pore-water and soil samples were collected. The semi-quantitative soil composition (i.e., Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si, Ti), total F, total P, OM contents in soil, and soil pH have already been measured, and pore-water compositions are also identified. From these experimental and modeling data, we could be evaluate if impact of accident exists until now, and also could be select and identify existing form of fluoride in soil and pore-water.

  16. Effect of vanadium compounds on acid phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Vescina, C M; Sálice, V C; Cortizo, A M; Etcheverry, S B

    1996-01-01

    The direct effect of different vanadium compounds on acid phosphatase (ACP) activity was investigated. Vanadate and vanadyl but not pervanadate inhibited the wheat germ ACP activity. These vanadium derivatives did not alter the fibroblast Swiss 3T3 soluble fraction ACP activity. Using inhibitors of tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases), the wheat germ ACP was partially characterized as a PTPase. This study suggests that the inhibitory ability of different vanadium derivatives to modulate ACP activity seems to depend on the geometry around the vanadium atom more than on the oxidation state. Our results indicate a correlation between the PTPase activity and the sensitivity to vanadate and vanadyl cation.

  17. Simultaneous pore enlargement and introduction of highly dispersed Fe active sites in MSNs for enhanced catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Jinlou; Dong Xu; Elangovan, S.P.; Li Yongsheng; Zhao Wenru; Iijima, Toshio; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Shi Jianlin

    2012-02-15

    An effective post-hydrothermal treatment strategy has been developed to dope highly dispersed iron catalytical centers into the framework of mesoporous silica, to keep the particle size in nanometric scale, and in the meanwhile, to expand the pore size of the synthesized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). Characterization techniques such as XRD, BET, SEM and TEM support that the synthesized samples are long period ordered with particles size about 100 nm and a relatively large pore size of ca. 3.5 nm. UV-vis, XPS and EPR measurements demonstrate that the introduced iron active centers are highly dispersed in a coordinatively unsaturated status. NH{sub 3}-TPD verifies that the acid amount of iron-doped MSNs is quite high. The synthesized nanocatalysts show an excellent catalytic performance for benzylation of benzene by benzyl chloride, and they present relatively higher yield and selectivity to diphenylmethane with a lower iron content and much shorter reaction time. - Graphical abstract: Uniform MSNs with iron active centers and large pore size have been prepared by a newly developed strategy, which demonstrates enhanced catalytic performance for benzylation of benzene by benzyl chloride. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron species were introduced into the framework of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with uniform dispersion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The pore sizes of the synthesized nanocatalysts were expanded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acidic site quantities were quite high and the acidic centers were accessible. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nanocatalysts presented higher yield and selectivity to diphenylmethane with significantly lower Fe content.

  18. Characterization of quinol-dependent nitric oxide reductase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus: enzymatic activity and active site structure.

    PubMed

    Terasaka, Erina; Okada, Norihiro; Sato, Nozomi; Sako, Yoshihiko; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Tosha, Takehiko

    2014-07-01

    Nitric oxide reductase (NOR) catalyzes the reduction of nitric oxide to generate nitrous oxide. We recently reported on the crystal structure of a quinol-dependent NOR (qNOR) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus [Y. Matsumoto, T. Tosha, A.V. Pisliakov, T. Hino, H. Sugimoto, S. Nagano, Y. Sugita and Y. Shiro, Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 19 (2012) 238-246], and suggested that a water channel from the cytoplasm, which is not observed in cytochrome c-dependent NOR (cNOR), functions as a pathway transferring catalytic protons. Here, we further investigated the functional and structural properties of qNOR, and compared the findings with those for cNOR. The pH optimum for the enzymatic reaction of qNOR was in the alkaline range, whereas Pseudomonas aeruginosa cNOR showed a higher activity at an acidic pH. The considerably slower reduction rate, and a correlation of the pH dependence for enzymatic activity and the reduction rate suggest that the reduction process is the rate-determining step for the NO reduction by qNOR, while the reduction rate for cNOR was very fast and therefore is unlikely to be the rate-determining step. A close examination of the heme/non-heme iron binuclear center by resonance Raman spectroscopy indicated that qNOR has a more polar environment at the binuclear center compared with cNOR. It is plausible that a water channel enhances the accessibility of the active site to solvent water, creating a more polar environment in qNOR. This structural feature could control certain properties of the active site, such as redox potential, which could explain the different catalytic properties of the two NORs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference.

  19. The Immunomodulatory Activity of Jacaric Acid, a Conjugated Linolenic Acid Isomer, on Murine Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wai Nam; Leung, Kwok Nam

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at demonstrating the immunomodulatory property of jacaric acid, a conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA) isomer that is present in jacaranda seed oil, on murine peritoneal macrophages. Our results showed that jacaric acid exhibited no significant cytotoxicity on the thioglycollate-elicited murine peritoneal macrophages as revealed by the neutral red uptake assay, but markedly increased their cytostatic activity on the T-cell lymphoma MBL-2 cells as measured by the fluorometric CyQuant® NF Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that jacaric acid could enhance the endocytic activity of macrophages and elevated their intracellular production of superoxide anion. Moreover, jacaric acid-treated macrophages showed an increase in the production of nitric oxide which was accompanied by an increase in the expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase protein. In addition, the secretion of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interferon-γ, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, was up-regulated. Collectively, our results indicated that the naturally-occurring CLNA isomer, jacaric acid, could exhibit immunomodulating activity on the murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro, suggesting that this CLNA isomer may act as an immunopotentiator which can be exploited for the treatment of some immunological disorders with minimal toxicity and fewer side effects. PMID:26629697

  20. The Immunomodulatory Activity of Jacaric Acid, a Conjugated Linolenic Acid Isomer, on Murine Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wai Nam; Leung, Kwok Nam

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at demonstrating the immunomodulatory property of jacaric acid, a conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA) isomer that is present in jacaranda seed oil, on murine peritoneal macrophages. Our results showed that jacaric acid exhibited no significant cytotoxicity on the thioglycollate-elicited murine peritoneal macrophages as revealed by the neutral red uptake assay, but markedly increased their cytostatic activity on the T-cell lymphoma MBL-2 cells as measured by the fluorometric CyQuant® NF Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that jacaric acid could enhance the endocytic activity of macrophages and elevated their intracellular production of superoxide anion. Moreover, jacaric acid-treated macrophages showed an increase in the production of nitric oxide which was accompanied by an increase in the expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase protein. In addition, the secretion of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interferon-γ, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, was up-regulated. Collectively, our results indicated that the naturally-occurring CLNA isomer, jacaric acid, could exhibit immunomodulating activity on the murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro, suggesting that this CLNA isomer may act as an immunopotentiator which can be exploited for the treatment of some immunological disorders with minimal toxicity and fewer side effects.

  1. Acid activation of bentonites and polymer-clay nanocomposites.

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K. A.; Komadel, P.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Slovak Academy of Sciences

    2009-04-01

    Modified bentonites are of widespread technological importance. Common modifications include acid activation and organic treatment. Acid activation has been used for decades to prepare bleaching earths for adsorbing impurities from edible and industrial oils. Organic treatment has sparked an explosive interest in a class of materials called polymer-clay nanocomposites (PCNs). The most commonly used clay mineral in PCNs is montmorillonite, which is the main constituent of bentonite. PCN materials are used for structural reinforcement and mechanical strength, for gas permeability barriers, as flame retardants, and to minimize surface erosion (ablation). Other specialty applications include use as conducting nanocomposites and bionanocomposites.

  2. Magic-angle-spinning NMR studies of acid sites in zeolite H-ZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, E.; Ernst, H.; Freude, D.; Froehlich, T.; Hunger, M.; Pfeifer, H. )

    1991-01-01

    {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al, and {sup 29}Si magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR was used to elucidate the nature of the catalytic activity of zeolite H-ZSM-5. {sup 1}H MAS NMR of sealed samples after mild hydrothermal dealumination shows that the enhanced activity for n-hexane cracking is not due to an enhanced Bronstead acidity. The concentrations of the various OH groups and aluminous species suggest that the reason for the enhanced catalytic activity is the interaction of the n-hexane molecule with a bridging hydroxyl group and with extra-framework aluminium species, which give rise to the enhanced activity, cannot be easily removed from their positions, and are therefore immobilized by the zeolitic framework.

  3. Theoretical and experimental investigations on the structures of purified clay and acid-activated clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Li, Junfen; Yang, Liming

    2006-07-01

    The purified and acidified montmorillonite clay were characterized by XRD, BET and TPD. These results show that acidified clay is provided with more surface area and acid sites. For NH 3-TPD, molecular NH 3 desorption on purified clay and acidified clay occurs at temperatures with 873 and 1000 K, respectively. It is shown for the existence for strong acid sites. By two reactions of the tetrahydropyranylation of n-propanol and the esterification of cyclo-2-pentene with acetic acid, it is shown that the acidified clay displays better catalytic activity for above two organic reactions. By density-functional theory (DFT) method, we have analyzed the structures of different substituted montmorillonite and the effect sorption behavior of Na + in different montmorillonite models. The result shows that the process of substitution will occur apart from octahedral aluminums. The adsorption of NH 3 on clay surfaces have been investigated using TPD and DFT. This is shown that acid sites locate at round the octahedral aluminums, and substitution of Al 3+ for tetrahedral Si will be favorable to NH 3 adsorption.

  4. Role of Criegee Intermediates in Formation of Sulfuric Acid at BVOCs-rich Cape Corsica Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukui, A.; Dusanter, S.; Sauvage, S.; Gros, V.; Bourrianne, T.; Sellegri, K.; Wang, J.; Colomb, A.; Pichon, J. M.; Chen, H.; Kalogridis, C.; Zannoni, N.; Bonsang, B.; Michoud, V.; Locoge, N.; Leonardis, T.

    2015-12-01

    Oxidation of SO2 in reactions with stabilised Criegee Intermediates (sCI) was suggested as an additional source of gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) in the atmosphere, complementary to the conventional H2SO4 formation in reaction of SO2 with OH radicals. Evaluation of the importance of this additional source is complicated due to large uncertainty in the mechanism and rate constants for the reactions of different sCI with SO2, water vapor and other atmospheric species. Here we present an evaluation of the role of sCI in H2SO4 production at remote site on Cape Corsica near the North tip of Corsica Island (Ersa station, Western Mediterranean). In July 2013 comprehensive field observations including gas phase (OH and RO2 radicals, H2SO4, VOCs, NOx, SO2, others) and aerosol measurements were conducted at this site in the frame of ChArMEx project. During the field campaign the site was strongly influenced by local emissions of biogenic volatile compounds (BVOCs), including isoprene and terpenes, forming different sCI in reactions with ozone and, hence, presenting additional source of H2SO4 via sCI+SO2. However, this additional source of H2SO4 at the Ersa site was found to be insignificant. The observed concentrations of H2SO4 were found to be in good agreement with those estimated from the H2SO4 condensation sink and the production of H2SO4 only in the reaction of OH with SO2, without accounting for any additional H2SO4 source. Using the BVOCs observations we present estimation of the upper limit for the rate constants of H2SO4 production via reactions of different sCI with SO2.

  5. Putative binding sites for arachidonic acid on the human cardiac Kv1.5 channel

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jia‐Yu; Ding, Wei‐Guang; Kojima, Akiko; Seto, Tomoyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In human heart, the Kv1.5 channel contributes to repolarization of atrial action potentials. This study examined the electrophysiological and molecular mechanisms underlying arachidonic acid (AA)‐induced inhibition of the human Kv1.5 (hKv1.5) channel. Experimental Approach Site‐directed mutagenesis was conducted to mutate amino acids that reside within the pore domain of the hKv1.5 channel. Whole‐cell patch‐clamp method was used to record membrane currents through wild type and mutant hKv1.5 channels heterologously expressed in CHO cells. Computer docking simulation was conducted to predict the putative binding site(s) of AA in an open‐state model of the Kv1.5 channel. Key Results The hKv1.5 current was minimally affected at the onset of depolarization but was progressively reduced during depolarization by the presence of AA, suggesting that AA acts as an open‐channel blocker. AA itself affected the channel at extracellular sites independently of its metabolites and signalling pathways. The blocking effect of AA was attenuated at pH 8.0 but not at pH 6.4. The blocking action of AA developed rather rapidly by co‐expression of Kvβ1.3. The AA‐induced block was significantly attenuated in H463C, T480A, R487V, I502A, I508A, V512A and V516A, but not in T462C, A501V and L510A mutants of the hKv1.5 channel. Docking simulation predicted that H463, T480, R487, I508, V512 and V516 are potentially accessible for interaction with AA. Conclusions and Implications AA itself interacts with multiple amino acids located in the pore domain of the hKv1.5 channel. These findings may provide useful information for future development of selective blockers of hKv1.5 channels. PMID:26292661

  6. Antimicrobial activity of poly(acrylic acid) block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Gratzl, Günther; Paulik, Christian; Hild, Sabine; Guggenbichler, Josef P; Lackner, Maximilian

    2014-05-01

    The increasing number of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains has developed into a major health problem. In particular, biofilms are the main reason for hospital-acquired infections and diseases. Once formed, biofilms are difficult to remove as they have specific defense mechanisms against antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial surfaces must therefore kill or repel bacteria before they can settle to form a biofilm. In this study, we describe that poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) containing diblock copolymers can kill bacteria and prevent from biofilm formation. The PAA diblock copolymers with poly(styrene) and poly(methyl methacrylate) were synthesized via anionic polymerization of tert-butyl acrylate with styrene or methyl methacrylate and subsequent acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of the tert-butyl ester. The copolymers were characterized via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), elemental analysis, and acid-base titrations. Copolymer films with a variety of acrylic acid contents were produced by solvent casting, characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and tested for their antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antimicrobial activity of the acidic diblock copolymers increased with increasing acrylic acid content, independent of the copolymer-partner, the chain length and the nanostructure.

  7. Catalase evolved to concentrate H2O2 at its active site.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Laura; Sosa-Peinado, Alejandro; Hansberg, Wilhelm

    2010-08-01

    Catalase is a homo-tetrameric enzyme that has its heme active site deeply buried inside the protein. Its only substrate, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), reaches the heme through a 45 A-long channel. Large-subunit catalases, but not small-subunit catalases, have a loop (gate loop) that interrupts the major channel. Two accesses lead to a gate that opens the final section of the channel to the heme; gates from the R-related subunits are interconnected. Using molecular dynamic simulations of the Neurospora crassa catalase-1 tetramer in a box of water (48,600 molecules) or 6M H2O2, it is shown that the number of H2O2 molecules augments at the surface of the protein and in the accesses to the gate and the final section of the channel. Increase in H2O2 is due to the prevalence and distribution of amino acids that have an increased residency for H2O2 (mainly histidine, proline and charged residues), which are localized at the protein surface and the accesses to the gate. In the section of the channel from the heme to the gate, turnover rate of water molecules was faster than for H2O2 and increased residence sites for water and H2O2 were determined. In the presence of H2O2, the exclusion of water molecules from a specific site suggests a mechanism that could contend with the competing activity of water, allowing for catalase high kinetic efficiency.

  8. Structural and mechanistic analysis of trans-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pegan, Scott D.; Serrano, Hector; Whitman, Christian P.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2008-12-01

    The X-ray structure of a noncovalently modified trans-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase with a substrate-homolog acetate bound in the active site has been determined to 1.7 Å resolution. Elucidation of catalytically important water is reported and multiple conformations of the catalytic residue αGlu52 are observed. Trans-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (CaaD) is a critical enzyme in the trans-1, 3-dichloropropene (DCP) degradation pathway in Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170. This enzyme allows bacteria to use trans-DCP, a common component in commercially produced fumigants, as a carbon source. CaaD specifically catalyzes the fourth step of the pathway by cofactor-independent dehalogenation of a vinyl carbon–halogen bond. Previous studies have reported an X-ray structure of CaaD under acidic conditions with a covalent modification of the catalytic βPro1 residue. Here, the 1.7 Å resolution X-ray structure of CaaD under neutral (pH 6.5) conditions is reported without the presence of the covalent adduct. In this new structure, a substrate-like acetate molecule is bound within the active site in a position analogous to the putative substrate-binding site. Additionally, a catalytically important water molecule was identified, consistent with previously proposed reaction schemes. Finally, flexibility of the catalytically relevant side chain αGlu52 is observed in the structure, supporting its role in the catalytic mechanism.

  9. Potential anticancer activity of lichen secondary metabolite physodic acid.

    PubMed

    Cardile, V; Graziano, A C E; Avola, R; Piovano, M; Russo, A

    2017-02-01

    Secondary metabolites present in lichens, which comprise aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, aromatic and terpenic compounds, are unique with respect to those of higher plants and show interesting biological and pharmacological activities. However, only a few of these compounds, have been assessed for their effectiveness against various in vitro cancer models. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of three lichen secondary metabolites (atranorin, gyrophoric acid and physodic acid) on A375 melanoma cancer cell line. The tested compounds arise from different lichen species collected in different areas of Continental and Antarctic Chile. The obtained results confirm the major efficiency of depsidones. In fact, depsides atranorin and gyrophoric acid, showed a lower activity inhibiting the melanoma cancer cells only at more high concentrations. Whereas the depsidone physodic acid, showed a dose-response relationship in the range of 6.25-50 μM concentrations in A375 cells, activating an apoptotic process, that probably involves the reduction of Hsp70 expression. Although the molecular mechanism, by which apoptosis is induced by physodic acid remains unclear, and of course further studies are needed, the results here reported confirm the promising biological properties of depsidone compounds, and may offer a further impulse to the development of analogues with more powerful efficiency against melanoma cells.

  10. Nuclear Site Security in the Event of Terrorist Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, M.L.; Sims, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper, presented as a poster, identifies why ballistic protection should now be considered at nuclear sites to counter terrorist threats. A proven and flexible form of multi purpose protection is described in detail with identification of trial results that show its suitability for this role. (authors)

  11. Two active site divalent ions in the crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme bound to a transition state analogue

    DOE PAGES

    Mir, Aamir; Golden, Barbara L.

    2015-11-09

    The crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme bound to the pentavalent transition state analogue vanadate reveals significant rearrangements relative to the previously determined structures. The active site contracts, bringing G10.1 closer to the cleavage site and repositioning a divalent metal ion such that it could, ultimately, interact directly with the scissile phosphate. This ion could also position a water molecule to serve as a general acid in the cleavage reaction. A second divalent ion is observed coordinated to O6 of G12. This metal ion is well-placed to help tune the pKA of G12. Finally, on the basis of this crystalmore » structure as well as a wealth of biochemical studies, in this paper we propose a mechanism in which G12 serves as the general base and a magnesium-bound water serves as a general acid.« less

  12. Two active site divalent ions in the crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme bound to a transition state analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Mir, Aamir; Golden, Barbara L.

    2015-11-09

    The crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme bound to the pentavalent transition state analogue vanadate reveals significant rearrangements relative to the previously determined structures. The active site contracts, bringing G10.1 closer to the cleavage site and repositioning a divalent metal ion such that it could, ultimately, interact directly with the scissile phosphate. This ion could also position a water molecule to serve as a general acid in the cleavage reaction. A second divalent ion is observed coordinated to O6 of G12. This metal ion is well-placed to help tune the pKA of G12. Finally, on the basis of this crystal structure as well as a wealth of biochemical studies, in this paper we propose a mechanism in which G12 serves as the general base and a magnesium-bound water serves as a general acid.

  13. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  14. Pyrophosphate-condensing activity linked to nucleic acid synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Volloch, V Z; Rits, S; Tumerman, L

    1979-01-01

    In some preparations of DNA dependent RNA polymerase a new enzymatic activity has been found which catalyzes the condensation of two pyrophosphate molecules, liberated in the process of RNA synthesis, to one molecule of orthophosphate and one molecule of Mg (or Mn) - chelate complex with trimetaphosphate. This activity can also cooperate with DNA-polymerase, on condition that both enzymes originate from the same cells. These results point to two general conclusions. First, energy is conserved in the overall process of nucleic acid synthesis and turnover, so that the process does not require an energy influx from the cell's general resources. Second, the synthesis of nucleic acids is catalyzed by a complex enzyme system which contains at least two separate enzymes, one responsible for nucleic acid polymerization and the other for energy conservation via pyrophosphate condensation. Images PMID:88040

  15. 36C1 measurements and the hydrology of an acid injection site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vourvopoulos, G.; Brahana, J.V.; Nolte, E.; Korschinek, G.; Priller, A.; Dockhorn, B.

    1990-01-01

    In an area in western Tennessee (United States), an industrial firm is injecting acidic (pH = 0.1) iron chloride into permeable zones of carbonate rocks at depths ranging from 1000 to 2200 m below land surface. Overlying the injection zone at a depth of approximately 500 m below land surface is a regional fresh-water aquifer, the Knox aquifer. A study is currently underway to investigate whether the injection wells are hydraulically isolated from the fresh-water aquifer. Drilling of a test well that will reach a total depth of 2700 m has been initiated. The 36Cl content of 15 samples from the Knox aquifer, from monitor wells in the vicinity of the injection site, and from the test well have been analyzed. ?? 1990.

  16. BTX abatement using Chilean natural zeolite: the role of Brønsted acid sites.

    PubMed

    Alejandro, S; Valdés, H; Manero, M-H; Zaror, C A

    2012-01-01

    In wastewater treatment facilities, air quality is not only affected by conventional unpleasant odour compounds; toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are also found. In this study, the adsorptive capacity of Chilean natural zeolite toward VOC removal was evaluated. Moreover, the influence of zeolite chemical surface properties on VOC elimination was also investigated. Three modified zeolite samples were prepared from a natural Chilean zeolite (53% clinoptilolite, 40% mordenite and 7% quartz). Natural and modified zeolite samples were characterised by nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, elemental analyses and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Chemical modifications of natural zeolite showed the important role of Brønsted acid sites on the abatement of VOCs. The presence of humidity has a negative effect on zeolite adsorption capacity. Natural zeolites could be an interesting option for benzene, toluene and xylene vapour emission abatement.

  17. Site-Specific Pyrolysis Induced Cleavage at Aspartic Acid Residue in Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaofeng; Basile, Franco

    2011-01-01

    A simple and site-specific non-enzymatic method based on pyrolysis has been developed to cleave peptides and proteins. Pyrolytic cleavage was found to be specific and rapid as it induced a cleavage at the C-terminal side of aspartic acid in the temperature range of 220–250 °C in 10 seconds. Electrospray Ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem-MS (MS/MS) were used to characterize and identify pyrolysis cleavage products, confirming that sequence information is conserved after the pyrolysis process in both peptides and protein tested. This suggests that pyrolysis-induced cleavage at aspartyl residues can be used as a rapid protein digestion procedure for the generation of sequence specific protein biomarkers. PMID:17388620

  18. Activation of Hepatic Lipase Expression by Oleic Acid: Possible Involvement of USF1

    PubMed Central

    van Deursen, Diederik; van Leeuwen, Marije; Akdogan, Deniz; Adams, Hadie; Jansen, Hans; Verhoeven, Adrie J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids affect gene expression mainly through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs), but how monounsaturated fatty acids affect gene expression is poorly understood. In HepG2 cells, oleate supplementation has been shown to increase secretion of hepatic lipase (HL). We hypothesized that oleate affects HL gene expression at the transcriptional level. To test this, we studied the effect of oleate on HL promoter activity using HepG2 cells and the proximal HL promoter region (700 bp). Oleate increased HL expression and promoter activity 1.3–2.1 fold and reduced SREBP activity by 50%. Downregulation of SREBP activity by incubation with cholesterol+25-hydroxycholesterol had no effect on HL promoter activity. Overexpression of SREBP2, but not SREBP1, reduced HL promoter activity, which was effected mainly through the USF1 binding site at -307/-312. Oleate increased the nuclear abundance of USF1 protein 2.7 ± 0.6 fold, while USF1 levels were reduced by SREBP2 overexpression. We conclude that oleate increases HL gene expression via USF1. USF1 may be an additional fatty acid sensor in liver cells. PMID:22253973

  19. Revealing the nature of the active site on the carbon catalyst for C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, XiaoYing; Li, Bo; Su, Dangsheng

    2014-09-28

    A reactivity descriptor for the C-H bond activation on the nanostructured carbon catalyst is proposed. Furthermore the calculations reveal that the single ketone group can be an active site in ODH reaction.

  20. Cellular Active N-Hydroxyurea FEN1 Inhibitors Block Substrate Entry to the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Exell, Jack C.; Thompson, Mark J.; Finger, L. David; Shaw, Steven J.; Debreczeni, Judit; Ward, Thomas A.; McWhirter, Claire; Siöberg, Catrine L. B.; Martinez Molina, Daniel; Mark Abbott, W.; Jones, Clifford D.; Nissink, J. Willem M.; Durant, Stephen T.; Grasby, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    The structure-specific nuclease human flap endonuclease-1 (hFEN1) plays a key role in DNA replication and repair and may be of interest as an oncology target. We present the first crystal structure of inhibitor-bound hFEN1 and show a cyclic N-hydroxyurea bound in the active site coordinated to two magnesium ions. Three such compounds had similar IC50 values but differed subtly in mode of action. One had comparable affinity for protein and protein–substrate complex and prevented reaction by binding to active site catalytic metal ions, blocking the unpairing of substrate DNA necessary for reaction. Other compounds were more competitive with substrate. Cellular thermal shift data showed engagement of both inhibitor types with hFEN1 in cells with activation of the DNA damage response evident upon treatment. However, cellular EC50s were significantly higher than in vitro inhibition constants and the implications of this for exploitation of hFEN1 as a drug target are discussed. PMID:27526030

  1. Capture and Recycling of Sortase A through Site-Specific Labeling with Lithocholic Acid.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Christian B; Kwant, Richard L; MacDonald, James I; Rao, Meera; Francis, Matthew B

    2016-07-18

    Enzyme-mediated protein modification often requires large amounts of biocatalyst, adding significant costs to the process and limiting industrial applications. Herein, we demonstrate a scalable and straightforward strategy for the efficient capture and recycling of enzymes using a small-molecule affinity tag. A proline variant of an evolved sortase A (SrtA 7M) was N-terminally labeled with lithocholic acid (LA)-an inexpensive bile acid that exhibits strong binding to β-cyclodextrin (βCD). Capture and recycling of the LA-Pro-SrtA 7M conjugate was achieved using βCD-modified sepharose resin. The LA-Pro-SrtA 7M conjugate retained full enzymatic activity, even after multiple rounds of recycling.

  2. Active Layer and Moisture Measurements for Intensive Site 0 and 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    John Peterson

    2015-04-17

    These are measurements of Active Layer Thickness collected along several lines beginning in September, 2011 to the present. The data were collected at several time periods along the Site0 L2 Line, the Site1 AB Line, and an ERT Monitoring Line near Area A in Site1.

  3. Oxygenation of Organoboronic Acids by a Nonheme Iron(II) Complex: Mimicking Boronic Acid Monooxygenase Activity.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sayanti; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2015-10-19

    Phenolic compounds are important intermediates in the bacterial biodegradation of aromatic compounds in the soil. An Arthrobacter sp. strain has been shown to exhibit boronic acid monooxygenase activity through the conversion of different substituted phenylboronic acids to the corresponding phenols using dioxygen. While a number of methods have been reported to cleave the C-B bonds of organoboronic acids, there is no report on biomimetic iron complex exhibiting this activity using dioxygen as the oxidant. In that direction, we have investigated the reactivity of a nucleophilic iron-oxygen oxidant, generated upon oxidative decarboxylation of an iron(II)-benzilate complex [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(benzilate)] (Tp(Ph2) = hydrotris(3,5-diphenyl-pyrazol-1-yl)borate), toward organoboronic acids. The oxidant converts different aryl/alkylboronic acids to the corresponding oxygenated products with the incorporation of one oxygen atom from dioxygen. This method represents an efficient protocol for the oxygenation of boronic acids with dioxygen as the terminal oxidant.

  4. Are nest sites actively chosen? Testing a common assumption for three non-resource limited birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, A. E.; Elliot, S. L.; Hart, A. G.

    2009-09-01

    Many widely-accepted ecological concepts are simplified assumptions about complex situations that remain largely untested. One example is the assumption that nest-building species choose nest sites actively when they are not resource limited. This assumption has seen little direct empirical testing: most studies on nest-site selection simply assume that sites are chosen actively (and seek explanations for such behaviour) without considering that sites may be selected randomly. We used 15 years of data from a nestbox scheme in the UK to test the assumption of active nest-site choice in three cavity-nesting bird species that differ in breeding and migratory strategy: blue tit ( Cyanistes caeruleus), great tit ( Parus major) and pied flycatcher ( Ficedula hypoleuca). Nest-site selection was non-random (implying active nest-site choice) for blue and great tits, but not for pied flycatchers. We also considered the relative importance of year-specific and site-specific factors in determining occupation of nest sites. Site-specific factors were more important than year-specific factors for the tit species, while the reverse was true for pied flycatchers. Our results show that nest-site selection, in birds at least, is not always the result of active choice, such that choice should not be assumed automatically in studies of nesting behaviour. We use this example to highlight the need to test key ecological assumptions empirically, and the importance of doing so across taxa rather than for single "model" species.

  5. Oxalate decarboxylase and oxalate oxidase activities can be interchanged with a specificity switch of up to 282,000 by mutating an active site lid.

    PubMed

    Burrell, Matthew R; Just, Victoria J; Bowater, Laura; Fairhurst, Shirley A; Requena, Laura; Lawson, David M; Bornemann, Stephen

    2007-10-30

    Oxalate decarboxylases and oxalate oxidases are members of the cupin superfamily of proteins that have many common features: a manganese ion with a common ligand set, the substrate oxalate, and dioxygen (as either a unique cofactor or a substrate). We have hypothesized that these enzymes share common catalytic steps that diverge when a carboxylate radical intermediate becomes protonated. The Bacillus subtilis decarboxylase has two manganese binding sites, and we proposed that Glu162 on a flexible lid is the site 1 general acid. We now demonstrate that a decarboxylase can be converted into an oxidase by mutating amino acids of the lid that include Glu162 with specificity switches of 282,000 (SEN161-3DAS), 275,000 (SENS161-4DSSN), and 225,000 (SENS161-4DASN). The structure of the SENS161-4DSSN mutant showed that site 2 was not affected. The requirement for substitutions other than of Glu162 was, at least in part, due to the need to decrease the Km for dioxygen for the oxidase reaction. Reversion of decarboxylase activity could be achieved by reintroducing Glu162 to the SENS161-4DASN mutant to give a relative specificity switch of 25,600. This provides compelling evidence for the crucial role of Glu162 in the decarboxylase reaction consistent with it being the general acid, for the role of the lid in controlling the Km for dioxygen, and for site 1 being the sole catalytically active site. We also report the trapping of carboxylate radicals produced during turnover of the mutant with the highest oxidase activity. Such radicals were also observed with the wild-type decarboxylase.

  6. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2016-08-09

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  7. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2014-09-30

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  8. Teacher's Resource Guide on Acidic Precipitation with Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.

    The purpose of this teacher's resource guide is to help science teachers incorporate the topic of acidic precipitation into their curricula. A survey of recent junior high school science textbooks found a maximum of one paragraph devoted to the subject; in addition, none of these books had any related laboratory activities. It was on the basis of…

  9. Fungicidal Activities of Dihydroferulic Acid Alkyl Ester Analogues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural product dihydroferulic acid (DFA, 1) and the synthesized DFA methyl (4a), ethyl (4b), propyl (4c), hexyl (4d), octyl (4e), and decyl (4f) esters were examined for antifungal activity. Test fungi included Saccharomyces cerevisiae (wild type, and deletion mutants slt2delta and bck1delta), ...

  10. Fungicidal Activities of Dihydroferulic Acid Alkyl Ester Analogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural product dihydroferulic acid (DFA, 1) and the synthesized DFA methyl (4a), ethyl (4b), propyl (4c), hexyl (4d), octyl (4e), and decyl (4f) esters were examined for antifungal activity. Test fungi included Saccharomyces cerevisiae (wild type, and deletion mutants slt2' and bck1'), Aspergil...

  11. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2012-10-16

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  12. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2010-06-22

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  13. Pentagastrin gastroprotection against acid is related to H2 receptor activation but not acid secretion

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, S; Akiba, Y; Kaunitz, J

    1998-01-01

    Background—Pentagastrin enhances gastric mucosal defence mechanisms against acid and protects the gastric mucosa from experimental injury. 
Aims—To investigate whether this gastroprotection is mediated by histamine receptors or occurs as a secondary effect of acid secretion stimulation. 
Methods—The effects of omeprazole (100 µmol/kg), ranitidine (20 mg/kg), and pyrilamine (10 mg/kg) on pentagastrin (80 µg/kg/h) induced gastroprotection against acidified aspirin injury were examined in a luminal pH controlled model. The effects of these compounds on pentagastrin enhanced gastroprotective mechanisms were investigated using intravital microscopy, in which intracellular pH of gastric surface cells (pHi), mucus gel thickness, gastric mucosal blood flow, and acid output were measured simultaneously. 
Results—Pentagastrin protected rat gastric mucosa from acidified aspirin injury. This gastroprotection was abolished by ranitidine, but not omeprazole or pyrilamine. Pentagastrin induced a hyperaemic response to luminal acid challenge, increased mucus gel thickness, and elevated pHi during acid challenge. Ranitidine reversed these enhanced defence mechanisms, whereas omeprazole and pyrilamine preserved these effects. 
Conclusions—These data indicate that pentagastrin associated gastroprotection and enhanced defence mechanisms against acid result mainly from activation of histamine H2 receptors, and not as an effect of the stimulation of acid secretion. 

 Keywords: gastric injury; gastric defence mechanisms; omeprazole; pyrilamine; ranitidine; intracellular pH PMID:9863477

  14. Lewis Acid Pairs for the Activation of Biomass-derived Oxygenates in Aqueous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, Yuriy

    2015-09-14

    The objective of this project is to understand the mechanistic aspects behind the cooperative activation of oxygenates by catalytic pairs in aqueous media. Specifically, we will investigate how the reactivity of a solid Lewis acid can be modulated by pairing the active site with other catalytic sites at the molecular level, with the ultimate goal of enhancing activation of targeted functional groups. Although unusual catalytic properties have been attributed to the cooperative effects promoted by such catalytic pairs, virtually no studies exist detailing the use heterogeneous water-tolerant Lewis pairs. A main goal of this work is to devise rational pathways for the synthesis of porous heterogeneous catalysts featuring isolated Lewis pairs that are active in the transformation of biomass-derived oxygenates in the presence of bulk water. Achieving this technical goal will require closely linking advanced synthesis techniques; detailed kinetic and mechanistic investigations; strict thermodynamic arguments; and comprehensive characterization studies of both materials and reaction intermediates. For the last performance period (2014-2015), two technical aims were pursued: 1) C-C coupling using Lewis acid and base pairs in Lewis acidic zeolites. Tin-, zirconium-, and hafnium containing zeolites (e.g., Sn-, Zr-, and Hf-Beta) are versatile solid Lewis acids that selectively activate carbonyl functional groups. In this aim, we demonstrate that these zeolites catalyze the cross-aldol condensation of aromatic aldehydes with acetone under mild reaction conditions with near quantitative yields. NMR studies with isotopically labeled molecules confirm that acid-base pairs in the Si-O-M framework ensemble promote soft enolization through α-proton abstraction. The Lewis acidic zeolites maintain activity in the presence of water and, unlike traditional base catalysts, in acidic solutions. 2) One-pot synthesis of MWW zeolite nanosheets for activation of bulky substrates. Through

  15. Computer-aided active-site-directed modeling of the Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and human thymidine kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkers, Gerd; Trumpp-Kallmeyer, Susanne; Gutbrod, Oliver; Krickl, Sabine; Fetzer, Jürgen; Keil, Günther M.

    1991-10-01

    Thymidine kinase (TK), which is induced by Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV1), plays a key role in the antiviral activity of guanine derivatives such as aciclovir (ACV). In contrast, ACV shows only low affinity to the corresponding host cell enzyme. In order to define the differences in substrate binding of the two enzymes on molecular level, models for the three-dimensional (3-D) structures of the active sites of HSV1-TK and human TK were developed. The reconstruction of the active sites started from primary and secondary structure analysis of various kinases. The results were validated to homologous enzymes with known 3-D structures. The models predict that both enzymes consist of a central core β-sheet structure, connected by loops and α-helices very similar to the overall structure of other nucleotide binding enzymes. The phosphate binding is made up of a highly conserved glycine-rich loop at the N-terminus of the proteins and a conserved region at the C-terminus. The thymidine recognition site was found about 100 amino acids downstream from the phosphate binding loop. The differing substrate specificity of human and HSV1-TK can be explained by amino-acid substitutions in the homologous regions. To achieve a better understanding of the structure of the active site and how the thymidine kinase proteins interact with their substrates, the corresponding complexes of thymidine and dihydroxypropoxyguanine (DHPG) with HSV1 and human TK were built. For the docking of the guanine derivative, the X-ray structure of Elongation Factor Tu (EF-Tu), co-crystallized with guanosine diphosphate, was taken as reference. Fitting of thymidine into the active sites was done with respect to similar interactions found in thymidylate kinase. To complement the analysis of the 3-D structures of the two kinases and the substrate enzyme interactions, site-directed mutagenesis of the thymidine recognition site of HSV1-TK has been undertaken, changing Asp162 in the thymidine recognition site

  16. Heterogeneous ceria catalyst with water-tolerant Lewis acidic sites for one-pot synthesis of 1,3-diols via Prins condensation and hydrolysis reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yehong; Wang, Feng; Song, Qi; Xin, Qin; Xu, Shutao; Xu, Jie

    2013-01-30

    The use of a heterogeneous Lewis acid catalyst, which is insoluble and easily separable during the reaction, is a promising option for hydrolysis reactions from both environmental and practical viewpoints. In this study, ceria showed excellent catalytic activity in the hydrolysis of 4-methyl-1,3-dioxane to 1,3-butanediol in 95% yield and in the one-pot synthesis of 1,3-butanediol from propylene and formaldehyde via Prins condensation and hydrolysis reactions in an overall yield of 60%. In-depth investigations revealed that ceria is a water-tolerant Lewis acid catalyst, which has seldom been reported previously. The ceria catalysts showed rather unusual high activity in hydrolysis, with a turnover number (TON) of 260, which is rather high for bulk oxide catalysts, whose TONs are usually less than 100. Our conclusion that ceria functions as a Lewis acid catalyst in hydrolysis reactions is firmly supported by thorough characterizations with IR and Raman spectroscopy, acidity measurements with IR and (31)P magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy, Na(+)/H(+) exchange tests, analyses using the in situ active-site capping method, and isotope-labeling studies. A relationship between surface vacancy sites and catalytic activity has been established. CeO(2)(111) has been confirmed to be the catalytically active crystalline facet for hydrolysis. Water has been found to be associatively adsorbed on oxygen vacancy sites with medium strength, which does not lead to water dissociation to form stable hydroxides. This explains why the ceria catalyst is water-tolerant.

  17. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

  18. Site-specific acid-base properties of pholcodine and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Z; Hosztafi, S; Noszál, B

    2006-11-01

    The acid-base properties of pholcodine, a cough-depressant agent, and related compounds including metabolites were studied by 1H NMR-pH titrations, and are characterised in terms of macroscopic and microscopic protonation constants. New N-methylated derivatives were also synthesized in order to quantitate site- and nucleus-specific protonation shifts and to unravel microscopic acid-base equilibria. The piperidine nitrogen was found to be 38 and 400 times more basic than its morpholine counterpart in pholcodine and norpholcodine, respectively. The protonation data show that the molecule of pholcodine bears an average of positive charge of 1.07 at physiological pH, preventing it from entering the central nervous system, a plausible reason for its lack of analgesic or addictive properties. The protonation constants of pholcodine and its derivatives are interpreted by comparing with related molecules of pharmaceutical interest. The pH-dependent relative concentrations of the variously protonated forms of pholcodine and morphine are depicted in distribution diagrams.

  19. Two sulfhydryl groups near the active site of soybean beta-amylase.

    PubMed

    Mikami, B; Nomura, K; Morita, Y

    1994-01-01

    The less reactive SH groups of soybean beta-amylase, SH4, SH5, and SH6, were modified with p-chloromercuribenzoic acid or N-ethylmaleimide, after the reactive SH groups, SH1, SH2, and SH3, were blocked with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and cyanide. The enzyme activity decreased, accompanied by the modification of SH4. alpha-Cyclodextrin protected SH4 from the modification more effectively than maltose. The SH4-modified enzyme still bound to glucose, maltose, and alpha-cyclodextrin. SH4 was concerned with neither the catalysis nor substrate binding but its large substituent affected the substrate binding site. The sequencing of the 5-(iodoacetoamidoethyl)-aminoaphthalene-1-sulfonate-labeled peptides showed that SH4, SH5, and SH6 are Cys343, Cys82, and Cys208, respectively. Comparison of the primary structure of beta-amylases also showed that the sequence around SH4 (Cys343), as well as SH2 (Cys95), is strongly conserved between higher plant and bacterial beta-amylases. These results agree with the structure model deduced from X-ray crystallography of soybean beta-amylase.

  20. Analyzing the catalytic role of active site residues in the Fe-type nitrile hydratase from Comamonas testosteroni Ni1.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Salette; Wu, Rui; Krzywda, Karoline; Opalka, Veronika; Chan, Hei; Liu, Dali; Holz, Richard C

    2015-07-01

    A strictly conserved active site arginine residue (αR157) and two histidine residues (αH80 and αH81) located near the active site of the Fe-type nitrile hydratase from Comamonas testosteroni Ni1 (CtNHase), were mutated. These mutant enzymes were examined for their ability to bind iron and hydrate acrylonitrile. For the αR157A mutant, the residual activity (k cat = 10 ± 2 s(-1)) accounts for less than 1% of the wild-type activity (k cat = 1100 ± 30 s(-1)) while the K m value is nearly unchanged at 205 ± 10 mM. On the other hand, mutation of the active site pocket αH80 and αH81 residues to alanine resulted in enzymes with k cat values of 220 ± 40 and 77 ± 13 s(-1), respectively, and K m values of 187 ± 11 and 179 ± 18 mM. The double mutant (αH80A/αH81A) was also prepared and provided an enzyme with a k cat value of 132 ± 3 s(-1) and a K m value of 213 ± 61 mM. These data indicate that all three residues are catalytically important, but not essential. X-ray crystal structures of the αH80A/αH81A, αH80W/αH81W, and αR157A mutant CtNHase enzymes were solved to 2.0, 2.8, and 2.5 Å resolutions, respectively. In each mutant enzyme, hydrogen-bonding interactions crucial for the catalytic function of the αCys(104)-SOH ligand are disrupted. Disruption of these hydrogen bonding interactions likely alters the nucleophilicity of the sulfenic acid oxygen and the Lewis acidity of the active site Fe(III) ion.

  1. Lamellipodial actin mechanically links myosin activity with adhesion site formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannone, Gregory; Dubin-Thaler, Benjamin; Rossier, Olivier; Cai, Yunfei; Chaga, Oleg; Jiang, Guoying; Beaver, William; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Freund, Yoav; Borisy, Gary; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell motility proceeds by cycles of edge protrusion, adhesion and retraction. Whether these functions are coordinated by biochemical or biomechanical processes is unknown. We find that myosin II pulls the rear of the lamellipodial actin network, causing upward bending, edge retraction and initiation of new adhesion sites. The network then separates from the edge and condenses over the myosin. Protrusion resumes as lamellipodial actin regenerates from the front and extends rearward until it reaches newly assembled myosin, initiating the next cycle. Upward bending, observed by evanescence and electron microscopy, results in ruffle formation when adhesion strength is low. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy shows that the regenerating lamellipodium forms a cohesive, separable layer of actin above the lamellum. Thus, actin polymerization periodically builds a mechanical link, the lamellipodium, connecting myosin motors with the initiation of adhesion sites, suggesting that the major functions driving motility are coordinated by a biomechanical process. PMID:17289574

  2. Structure-guided inhibitor design for human FAAH by interspecies active site conversion.

    PubMed

    Mileni, Mauro; Johnson, Douglas S; Wang, Zhigang; Everdeen, Daniel S; Liimatta, Marya; Pabst, Brandon; Bhattacharya, Keshab; Nugent, Richard A; Kamtekar, Satwik; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Ahn, Kay; Stevens, Raymond C

    2008-09-02

    The integral membrane enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) hydrolyzes the endocannabinoid anandamide and related amidated signaling lipids. Genetic or pharmacological inactivation of FAAH produces analgesic, anxiolytic, and antiinflammatory phenotypes but not the undesirable side effects of direct cannabinoid receptor agonists, indicating that FAAH may be a promising therapeutic target. Structure-based inhibitor design has, however, been hampered by difficulties in expressing the human FAAH enzyme. Here, we address this problem by interconverting the active sites of rat and human FAAH using site-directed mutagenesis. The resulting humanized rat (h/r) FAAH protein exhibits the inhibitor sensitivity profiles of human FAAH but maintains the high-expression yield of the rat enzyme. We report a 2.75-A crystal structure of h/rFAAH complexed with an inhibitor, N-phenyl-4-(quinolin-3-ylmethyl)piperidine-1-carboxamide (PF-750), that shows strong preference for human FAAH. This structure offers compelling insights to explain the species selectivity of FAAH inhibitors, which should guide future drug design programs.

  3. Magnesium-Dependent Active-Site Conformational Selection in the Diels-Alderase Ribozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Berezniak, Tomasz; Zahran, Mai; Imhof, Petra; Jaeschke, Andres; Smith, Jeremy C

    2010-10-01

    The Diels-Alderase ribozyme, an in vitro-evolved ribonucleic acid enzyme, accelerates the formation of carbon-carbon bonds between an anthracene diene and a maleimide dienophile in a [4 + 2] cycloaddition, a reaction with broad application in organic chemistry. Here, the Diels-Alderase ribozyme is examined via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in both crystalline and aqueous solution environments. The simulations indicate that the catalytic pocket is highly dynamic. At low Mg(2+) ion concentrations, inactive states with the catalytic pocket closed dominate. Stabilization of the enzymatically active, open state of the catalytic pocket requires a high concentration of Mg(2+) ions (e.g., 54 mM), with cations binding to specific phosphate sites on the backbone of the residues bridging the opposite strands of the pocket. The free energy profile for pocket opening at high Mg(2+) cation concentration exhibits a double minimum, with a