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  1. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  2. Amino acid composition predicts prion activity.

    PubMed

    Afsar Minhas, Fayyaz Ul Amir; Ross, Eric D; Ben-Hur, Asa

    2017-04-10

    Many prion-forming proteins contain glutamine/asparagine (Q/N) rich domains, and there are conflicting opinions as to the role of primary sequence in their conversion to the prion form: is this phenomenon driven primarily by amino acid composition, or, as a recent computational analysis suggested, dependent on the presence of short sequence elements with high amyloid-forming potential. The argument for the importance of short sequence elements hinged on the relatively-high accuracy obtained using a method that utilizes a collection of length-six sequence elements with known amyloid-forming potential. We weigh in on this question and demonstrate that when those sequence elements are permuted, even higher accuracy is obtained; we also propose a novel multiple-instance machine learning method that uses sequence composition alone, and achieves better accuracy than all existing prion prediction approaches. While we expect there to be elements of primary sequence that affect the process, our experiments suggest that sequence composition alone is sufficient for predicting protein sequences that are likely to form prions. A web-server for the proposed method is available at http://faculty.pieas.edu.pk/fayyaz/prank.html, and the code for reproducing our experiments is available at http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.167136.

  3. [Sorption of amino acids from aqueous solutions on activated charcoal].

    PubMed

    Nekliudov, A D; Tsibanov, V V

    1985-03-01

    Various methods for quantitative description of amino acid sorption from solutions for parenteral nutrition on activated charcoal were studied under dynamic and static conditions. With the use of the well-known Freindlich and Langmuir absorption isotherms it was shown to be possible to describe in a simplified way the complex multicomponent process of sorption of the amino acids and to estimate their loss at the filtration stage.

  4. Thyroid peroxidase activity is inhibited by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, D P; Ferreira, A C; Coelho, S M; Moraes, J M; Camacho, M A; Rosenthal, D

    2000-03-01

    Normal in vitro thyroid peroxidase (TPO) iodide oxidation activity was completely inhibited by a hydrolyzed TPO preparation (0.15 mg/ml) or hydrolyzed bovine serum albumin (BSA, 0.2 mg/ml). A pancreatic hydrolysate of casein (trypticase peptone, 0.1 mg/ml) and some amino acids (cysteine, tryptophan and methionine, 50 microM each) also inhibited the TPO iodide oxidation reaction completely, whereas casamino acids (0.1 mg/ml), and tyrosine, phenylalanine and histidine (50 microM each) inhibited the TPO reaction by 54% or less. A pancreatic digest of gelatin (0.1 mg/ml) or any other amino acid (50 microM) tested did not significantly decrease TPO activity. The amino acids that impair iodide oxidation also inhibit the TPO albumin iodination activity. The inhibitory amino acids contain side chains with either sulfur atoms (cysteine and methionine) or aromatic rings (tyrosine, tryptophan, histidine and phenylalanine). Among the amino acids tested, only cysteine affected the TPO guaiacol oxidation reaction, producing a transient inhibition at 25 or 50 microM. The iodide oxidation inhibitory activity of cysteine, methionine and tryptophan was reversed by increasing iodide concentrations from 12 to 18 mM, while no such effect was observed when the cofactor (H2O2) concentration was increased. The inhibitory substances might interfere with the enzyme activity by competing with its normal substrates for their binding sites, binding to the free substrates or reducing their oxidized form.

  5. The antimicrobial activities of the cinnamaldehyde adducts with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qing-Yi; Xiong, Jia-Jun; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Chao; Wen Ye

    2011-11-01

    Cinnamaldehyde is a well-established natural antimicrobial compound. It is probable for cinnamaldehyde to react with amino acid forming Schiff base adduct in real food system. In this paper, 9 such kind of adducts were prepared by the direct reaction of amino acids with cinnamaldehyde at room temperature. Their antimicrobial activities against Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were evaluated with benzoic acid as a reference. The adducts showed a dose-dependent activities against the three microbial strains. Both cinnamaldehyde and their adducts were more active against B. subtilis than on E. coli, and their antimicrobial activities were higher at lower pH. Both cinnamaldehyde and its adducts were more active than benzoic acid at the same conditions. The adduct compound A was non-toxic by primary oral acute toxicity study in mice. However, in situ effect of the adduct compound A against E. coli was a little lower than cinnamaldehyde in fish meat. This paper for the first time showed that the cinnamaldehyde adducts with amino acids had similar strong antimicrobial activities as cinnamaldehyde, which may provide alternatives to cinnamaldehyde in food to avoid the strong unacceptable odor of cinnamaldehyde.

  6. Synthesis and biological activity of novel amino acid-(N'-benzoyl) hydrazide and amino acid-(N'-nicotinoyl) hydrazide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Khattab, Sherine N

    2005-09-30

    The coupling reaction of benzoic acid and nicotinic acid hydrazides with N- protected L-amino acids including valine, leucine, phenylalanine, glutamic acid and tyrosine is reported. The target compounds, N-Boc-amino acid-(N;-benzoyl)- and N- Boc-amino acid-(N;-nicotinoyl) hydrazides 5a-5e and 6a-6e were prepared in very high yields and purity using N-[(dimethylamino)-1H-1,2,3-triazolo[4,5-b]pyridin-1-yl- methylene]-N-methyl-methanaminium hexafluorophosphate N-oxide (HATU) as coupling reagent. The antimicrobial activity of the Cu and Cd complexes of the designed compounds was tested. The products were deprotected affording the corresponding amino acid-(N;-benzoyl) hydrazide hydrochloride salts (7a-7e) and amino acid-(N;- nicotinoyl) hydrazide hydrochloride salts (8a-8e). These compounds and their Cu and Cd complexes were also tested for their antimicrobial activity. Several compounds showed comparable activity to that of ampicillin against S. aureus and E. coli.

  7. How to build optically active alpha-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Calmes, M; Daunis, J

    1999-01-01

    Various methodologies published in the literature dealing with alpha-amino carboxylic acid asymmetric synthesis are presented in a digest form. In each case, only some recent or most typical works are mentioned.

  8. Carbobenzoxy amino acids: Structural requirements for cholecystokinin receptor antagonist activity

    SciTech Connect

    Maton, P.N.; Sutliff, V.E.; Jensen, R.T.; Gardner, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    The authors used dispersed acini prepared from guinea pig pancreas to examine 28 carbobenzoxy (CBZ) amino acids for their abilities to function as cholecystokinin receptor antagonists. All amino acid derivatives tested, except for CBZ-alanine, CBZ-glycine, and N alpha-CBZ- lysine, were able to inhibit the stimulation of amylase secretion caused by the C-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin. In general, there was a good correlation between the ability of a carbobenzoxy amino acid to inhibit stimulated amylase secretion and the ability of the amino acid derivative to inhibit binding of /sup 125/I-cholecystokinin. The inhibition of cholecystokinin-stimulated amylase secretion was competitive, fully reversible, and specific for those secretagogues that interact with the cholecystokinin receptor. The potencies with which the various carbobenzoxy amino acids inhibited the action of cholecystokinin varied 100-fold and CBZ-cystine was the most potent cholecystokinin receptor antagonist. This variation in potency was primarily but not exclusively a function of the hydrophobicity of the amino acid side chain.

  9. Active site amino acid sequence of human factor D.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1980-08-01

    Factor D was isolated from human plasma by chromatography on CM-Sephadex C50, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite. Digestion of reduced, S-carboxymethylated factor D with cyanogen bromide resulted in three peptides which were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex G-75 (superfine) equilibrated in 20% formic acid. NH2-Terminal sequences were determined by automated Edman degradation with a Beckman 890C sequencer using a 0.1 M Quadrol program. The smallest peptide (CNBr III) consisted of the NH2-terminal 14 amino acids. The other two peptides had molecular weights of 17,000 (CNBr I) and 7000 (CNBr II). Overlap of the NH2-terminal sequence of factor D with the NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr I established the order of the peptides. The NH2-terminal 53 residues of factor D are somewhat more homologous with the group-specific protease of rat intestine than with other serine proteases. The NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr II revealed the active site serine of factor D. The typical serine protease active site sequence (Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro was found at residues 12-17. The region surrounding the active site serine does not appear to be more highly homologous with any one of the other serine proteases. The structural data obtained point out the similarities between factor D and the other proteases. However, complete definition of the degree of relationship between factor D and other proteases will require determination of the remainder of the primary structure.

  10. Biological activity of silylated amino acid containing substance P analogues.

    PubMed

    Cavelier, F; Marchand, D; Martinez, J; Sagan, S

    2004-03-01

    The need to replace natural amino acids in peptides with nonproteinogenic counterparts to obtain new medicinal agents has stimulated a great deal of innovation on synthetic methods. Here, we report the incorporation of non-natural silylated amino acids in substance P (SP), the binding affinity for the two hNK-1 binding sites and, the potency to stimulate phospholipase C (PLC) and adenylate cyclase of the resulting peptide. We also assess the improvement of their stability towards enzyme degradation. Altogether, we found that replacing glycine with silaproline (Sip) in position 9 of SP leads to a potent analogue exhibiting an increased resistance to angiotensin-converting enzyme hydrolysis.

  11. Extensive mutagenesis of a transcriptional activation domain identifies single hydrophobic and acidic amino acids important for activation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, M B; Goff, S A; Chandler, V L

    1997-01-01

    C1 is a transcriptional activator of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes of the maize anthocyanin pigment pathway. C1 has an amino terminus homologous to Myb DNA-binding domains and an acidic carboxyl terminus that is a transcriptional activation domain in maize and yeast cells. To identify amino acids critical for transcriptional activation, an extensive random mutagenesis of the C1 carboxyl terminus was done. The C1 activation domain is remarkably tolerant of amino acid substitutions, as changes at 34 residues had little or no effect on transcriptional activity. These changes include introduction of helix-incompatible amino acids throughout the C1 activation domain and alteration of most single acidic amino acids, suggesting that a previously postulated amphipathic alpha-helix is not required for activation. Substitutions at two positions revealed amino acids important for transcriptional activation. Replacement of leucine 253 with a proline or glutamine resulted in approximately 10% of wild-type transcriptional activation. Leucine 253 is in a region of C1 in which several hydrophobic residues align with residues important for transcriptional activation by the herpes simplex virus VP16 protein. However, changes at all other hydrophobic residues in C1 indicate that none are critical for C1 transcriptional activation. The other important amino acid in C1 is aspartate 262, as a change to valine resulted in only 24% of wild-type transcriptional activation. Comparison of our C1 results with those from VP16 reveal substantial differences in which amino acids are required for transcriptional activation in vivo by these two acidic activation domains. PMID:8972191

  12. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  13. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta; Lital , Schultz; Peter G. , Zhang; Zhiwen

    2010-10-12

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  14. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2011-08-30

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  15. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital [San Diego, CA; Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Zhang, Zhiwen [San Diego, CA

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  16. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2009-02-24

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  17. Antioxidant activity of amino acids in soybean oil at frying temperature: structural effects and synergism with tocopherols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate amino acids as natural antioxidants for frying. Twenty amino acids were added to soybean oil heated to 180 ºC, and the effects of amino acid structure on the antioxidant activity were investigated. Amino acids containing a thiol, a thioether, or an extra ami...

  18. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly).

  19. A study of aliphatic amino acids using simulated vibrational circular dichroism and Raman optical activity spectra*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Aravindhan; Brunger, Michael J.; Wang, Feng

    2013-11-01

    Vibrational optical activity (VOA) spectra, such as vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra, of aliphatic amino acids are simulated using density functional theory (DFT) methods in both gas phase (neutral form) and solution (zwitterionic form), together with their respective infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of the amino acids. The DFT models, which are validated by excellent agreements with the available experimental Raman and ROA spectra of alanine in solution, are employed to study other aliphatic amino acids. The inferred (IR) intensive region (below 2000 cm-1) reveals the signature of alkyl side chains, whereas the Raman intensive region (above 3000 cm-1) contains the information of the functional groups in the amino acids. Furthermore, the chiral carbons of the amino acids (except for glycine) dominate the VCD and ROA spectra in the gas phase, but the methyl group vibrations produce stronger VCD and ROA signals in solution. The C-H related asymmetric vibrations dominate the VOA spectra (i.e., VCD and ROA) > 3000 cm-1 reflecting the side chain structures of the amino acids. Finally the carboxyl and the C(2)H modes of aliphatic amino acids, together with the side chain vibrations, are very active in the VCD/IR and ROA/Raman spectra, which makes such the vibrational spectroscopic methods a very attractive means to study biomolecules.

  20. Antimicrobial Peptides Containing Unnatural Amino Acid Exhibit Potent Bactericidal Activity against ESKAPE Pathogens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides containing unnatural amino acid exhibit potent bactericidal activity against ESKAPE pathogens R. P. Hicks a, J. J. Abercrombie...tic classes, membrane-disruptors and non -membrane-disrup- tors.30,31 Five different mechanisms have been proposed at one time or another to explain...DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Antimicrobial Peptides Containing Unnatural Amino Acid Exhibit Potent Bactericidal Activity Against

  1. A Unique Dual Activity Amino Acid Hydroxylase in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Gaskell, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Judith E.; Pinney, John W.; Westhead, Dave R.; McConkey, Glenn A.

    2009-01-01

    The genome of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii was found to contain two genes encoding tyrosine hydroxylase; that produces l-DOPA. The encoded enzymes metabolize phenylalanine as well as tyrosine with substrate preference for tyrosine. Thus the enzymes catabolize phenylalanine to tyrosine and tyrosine to l-DOPA. The catalytic domain descriptive of this class of enzymes is conserved with the parasite enzyme and exhibits similar kinetic properties to metazoan tyrosine hydroxylases, but contains a unique N-terminal extension with a signal sequence motif. One of the genes, TgAaaH1, is constitutively expressed while the other gene, TgAaaH2, is induced during formation of the bradyzoites of the cyst stages of the life cycle. This is the first description of an aromatic amino acid hydroxylase in an apicomplexan parasite. Extensive searching of apicomplexan genome sequences revealed an ortholog in Neospora caninum but not in Eimeria, Cryptosporidium, Theileria, or Plasmodium. Possible role(s) of these bi-functional enzymes during host infection are discussed. PMID:19277211

  2. Amino acid sequence of homologous rat atrial peptides: natriuretic activity of native and synthetic forms.

    PubMed Central

    Seidah, N G; Lazure, C; Chrétien, M; Thibault, G; Garcia, R; Cantin, M; Genest, J; Nutt, R F; Brady, S F; Lyle, T A

    1984-01-01

    A substance called atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), localized in secretory granules of atrial cardiocytes, was isolated as four homologous natriuretic peptides from homogenates of rat atria. The complete sequence of the longest form showed that it is composed of 33 amino acids. The three other shorter forms (2-33, 3-33, and 8-33) represent amino-terminally truncated versions of the 33 amino acid parent molecule as shown by analysis of sequence, amino acid composition, or both. The proposed primary structure agrees entirely with the amino acid composition and reveals no significant sequence homology with any known protein or segment of protein. The short form ANF-(8-33) was synthesized by a multi-fragment condensation approach and the synthetic product was shown to exhibit specific activity comparable to that of the natural ANF-(3-33). PMID:6232612

  3. Key mediators of intracellular amino acids signaling to mTORC1 activation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yehui; Li, Fengna; Tan, Kunrong; Liu, Hongnan; Li, Yinghui; Liu, Yingying; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tang, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2015-05-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is activated by amino acids to promote cell growth via protein synthesis. Specifically, Ras-related guanosine triphosphatases (Rag GTPases) are activated by amino acids, and then translocate mTORC1 to the surface of late endosomes and lysosomes. Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) resides on this surface and directly activates mTORC1. Apart from the presence of intracellular amino acids, Rag GTPases and Rheb, other mediators involved in intracellular amino acid signaling to mTORC1 activation include human vacuolar sorting protein-34 (hVps34) and mitogen-activating protein kinase kinase kinase kinase-3 (MAP4K3). Those molecular links between mTORC1 and its mediators form a complicate signaling network that controls cellular growth, proliferation, and metabolism. Moreover, it is speculated that amino acid signaling to mTORC1 may start from the lysosomal lumen. In this review, we discussed the function of these mediators in mTORC1 pathway and how these mediators are regulated by amino acids in details.

  4. Synthesis and antimicrobial activities of new higher amino acid Schiff base derivatives of 6-aminopenicillanic acid and 7-aminocephalosporanic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir (nee Güngör), Özlem; Gürkan, Perihan; Özçelik, Berrin; Oyardı, Özlem

    2016-02-01

    Novel β-lactam derivatives (1c-3c) (1d-3d) were produced by using 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA), 7-aminocephalosporanic acid (7-ACA) and the higher amino acid Schiff bases. The synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H/13C NMR and UV-vis spectra. Antibacterial activities of all the higher amino acid Schiff bases (1a-3a) (1b-3b) and β-lactam derivatives were screened against three gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Acinetobacter baumannii RSKK 02026), three gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 07005, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633) and their drug-resistant isolates by using broth microdilution method. Two fungi (Candida albicans and Candida krusei) were used for antifungal activity.

  5. Effect of maternal fasting on ovine fetal and maternal branched-chain amino acid transaminase activities.

    PubMed

    Liechty, E A; Barone, S; Nutt, M

    1987-01-01

    Activities of branched-chain amino acid transaminase were assayed in maternal skeletal muscle, liver and fetal skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, liver, kidney and placenta obtained from fed and 5-day-fasted late gestation ewes. Very high activities were found in placenta; fetal skeletal muscle also had high activity. Fetal brain had intermediate activity, followed by cardiac muscle and kidney. Fetal liver possessed negligible activity. Activities were low in both maternal liver and skeletal muscle. Trends were seen for fasting to increase activities in fetal placenta, skeletal muscle, brain, kidney, heart and maternal liver, but these changes were statistically significant only for fetal brain and placental tissue. Fetal skeletal muscle activity was 100 times that of maternal skeletal muscle. These data imply differences in the metabolism of the branched-chain amino acids by fetal and adult ruminants and expand the thesis that branched-chain amino acids are important to the metabolism of the ovine fetus.

  6. Active transport of amino acids by a guanidiniocarbonyl-pyrrole receptor.

    PubMed

    Urban, Christian; Schmuck, Carsten

    2010-08-16

    Herein we report the synthesis and characterization of a transporter 9 for N-acetylated amino acids. Transporter 9 is a conjugate of a guanidiniocarbonyl pyrrole cation, one of the most efficient carboxylate binding motifs reported so far, and a hydrophobic tris(dodecylbenzyl) group, which ensures solubility in organic solvents. In its protonated form, 9 binds N-acetylated amino acid carboxylates in wet organic solvents with association constants in the range of 10(4) M(-1) as estimated by extraction experiments. Aromatic amino acids are preferred due to additional cation-pi-interactions of the amino acid side chain with the guanidiniocarbonyl pyrrole moiety. U-tube experiments established efficient transport across a bulk liquid chloroform phase with fluxes approaching 10(-6) mol m(-2) s(-1). In experiments with single substrates, the release rate of the amino acid from the receptor-substrate complex at the interface with the receiving phase is rate determining. In contrast to this, in competition experiments with several substrates, the thermodynamic affinity to 9 becomes decisive. As 9 can only transport anions in its protonated form and has a pK(a) value of approximately 7, pH-driven active transport of amino acids is also possible. Transport occurs as a symport of the amino acid carboxylate and a proton.

  7. Factors influencing the rate of non-enzymatic activation of carboxylic and amino acids by ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The nonenzymatic formation of adenylate anhydrides of carboxylic and amino acids is discussed as a necessary step in the origin of the genetic code and protein biosynthesis. Results of studies are presented which have shown the rate of activation to depend on the pKa of the carboxyl group, the pH of the medium, temperature, the divalent metal ion catalyst, salt concentration, and the nature of the amino acid. In particular, it was found that of the various amino acids investigated, phenylalanine had the greatest affinity for the adenine derivatives adenosine and ATP. Results thus indicate that selective affinities between amino acids and nucleotides were important during prebiotic chemical evolution, and may have played a major role in the origin of protein synthesis and genetic coding.

  8. Light-activated amino acid transport in Halobacterium halobium envelope vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. E.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    Vesicles prepared from Halobacterium halobium cell envelopes accumulate amino acids in response to light-induced electrical and chemical gradients. Nineteen of 20 commonly occurring amino acids have been shown to be actively accumulated by these vesicles in response to illumination or in response to an artificially created Na+ gradient. On the basis of shared common carriers the transport systems can be divided into eight classes, each responsible for the transport of one or several amino acids: arginine, lysine, histidine; asparagine, glutamine; alanine, glycine, threonine, serine; leucine, valine, isoleucine, methionine; phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan; aspartate; glutamate; proline. Available evidence suggests that these carriers are symmetrical in that amino acids can be transported equally well in both directions across the vesicle membranes. A tentative working model to account for these observations is presented.

  9. Amino acids assisted hydrothermal synthesis of hierarchically structured ZnO with enhanced photocatalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanxia; Lin, Siwen; Li, Xuan; Liu, Yuping

    2016-10-01

    Novel hierarchically structured ZnO, including rose-like, dandelion-like and flower-like, have been synthesized through a simple hydrothermal process using different amino acids (glutamine, histidine and glycine) as structure-directing agents and urea as deposition agent, followed by subsequent calcination. Amino acids played a crucial role in the formation of hierarchically structured ZnO, and different amino acids could induce different exquisite shapes and assembly ways, as well as more oxygen defects. The prepared hierarchically structured ZnO exhibited excellent photocatalytic activities for the photodegradation of Rhodamine B, which was associated with their special hierarchical structures, large BET surface area and the existence of more oxygen defects. Amino acid-assisted growth mechanism of hierarchically structured ZnO was also discussed.

  10. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  11. The amino acid sensor GCN2 controls gut inflammation by inhibiting inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Helder I; Khan, Nooruddin; Ma, Hualing; Gama, Leonardo; Machiah, Deepa K; Lawson, Benton; Hakimpour, Paul; Wang, Yi-chong; Li, Shuzhao; Sharma, Prachi; Kaufman, Randal J; Martinez, Jennifer; Pulendran, Bali

    2016-01-01

    Summary The integrated stress response (ISR) is a homeostatic mechanism by which eukaryotic cells sense and respond to stress-inducing signals, such as amino acid starvation. General controlled nonrepressed (GCN2) kinase is a key orchestrator of the ISR, and modulates cellular metabolism in response to amino acid starvation. Here we demonstrate that GCN2 controls intestinal inflammation by suppressing inflammasome activation. Enhanced activation of ISR was observed in intestinal antigen presenting cells (APCs) and epithelial cells during amino acid starvation, or intestinal inflammation. Genetic deletion of GCN2 in CD11c+ APCs or intestinal epithelial cells resulted in enhanced intestinal inflammation and Th17 responses, due to enhanced inflammasome activation and IL-1β production. This was caused by reduced autophagy in GCN2−/− intestinal APCs and epithelial cells, leading to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), a potent activator of inflammasomes1. Thus, conditional ablation of Atg5 and Atg7 in intestinal APCs resulted in enhanced ROS and Th17 responses. Furthermore, in vivo blockade of ROS and IL-1β resulted in inhibition of Th17 responses and reduced inflammation in GCN2−/− mice. Importantly, acute amino acid starvation suppressed intestinal inflammation via a mechanism dependent on GCN2. These results reveal a mechanism that couples amino acid sensing with control of intestinal inflammation via GCN2. PMID:26982722

  12. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-03-10

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness.

  13. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness. PMID:28287411

  14. Amino-acid transporters in T-cell activation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ren, W; Liu, G; Yin, J; Tan, B; Wu, G; Bazer, F W; Peng, Y; Yin, Y

    2017-03-02

    T-cell-mediated immune responses aim to protect mammals against cancers and infections, and are also involved in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. Cellular uptake and the utilization of nutrients is closely related to the T-cell fate decision and function. Research in this area has yielded surprising findings in the importance of amino-acid transporters for T-cell development, homeostasis, activation, differentiation and memory. In this review, we present current information on amino-acid transporters, such as LAT1 (l-leucine transporter), ASCT2 (l-glutamine transporter) and GAT-1 (γ-aminobutyric acid transporter-1), which are critically important for mediating peripheral naive T-cell homeostasis, activation and differentiation, especially for Th1 and Th17 cells, and even memory T cells. Mechanically, the influence of amino-acid transporters on T-cell fate decision may largely depend on the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. These discoveries remarkably demonstrate the role of amino-acid transporters in T-cell fate determination, and strongly indicate that manipulation of the amino-acid transporter-mTORC1 axis could ameliorate many inflammatory or autoimmune diseases associated with T-cell-based immune responses.

  15. Active role of fatty acid amino acid conjugates in nitrogen metabolidm by Spodoptera litura larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since the first fatty acid amino acid conjugate (FAC) was isolated from regurgitant of Spodoptera exigua larvae in 1997 [volicitin: N-(17-hydroxylinolenoyl)- L-glutamine], their role as elicitors of induced responses in plants has been well documented. However, studies of the biosyntheses as well as...

  16. Further work on sodium montmorillonite as catalyst for the polymerization of activated amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eirich, F. R.; Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1986-01-01

    When the polycondensation of amino acid acylates was catalyzed with Na-montmorillonite, the polypeptides were consistently found to exhibit a distribution of discrete molecular weights, for as yet undiscovered reasons. One possible explanation was connected to the stepwise mode of monomer addition. New experiments have eliminated this possibility, so that there is the general assumption that this discreteness is the result of a preference of shorter oligomers to add to others of the same length, a feature that could be attributed to some structure of the platelet aggregates of the montmorillonite. The production of optical stereoisomers is anticipated when D,L-amino acids are polymerized on montmorillonite. Having used an optically active surface, the essence of the results lies not only in the occurrence of optically active oligomers and polymers, but also in the fact that the latter exhibit the same molecular weight characteristics as the D,L-polymers. Preparatory to work contemplated on a parallel synthesis of amino acid and nucleotide oligomers, studies were continued on the co-adsorption of amino acids, nucleotides, and amino acid-nucleotides on montmorillonite.

  17. Experiments on the origins of optical activity. [in amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.; Flores, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted concerning the asymmetric adsorption of phenylalanine enantiomers by kaolin. No preferential adsorption of either phenylalanine enantiomer could be detected and there was no resolution of the racemic phenylalanine by kaolin. The attempted asymmetric polymerization of aspartic acid by kaolin is also discussed along with a strontium-90 bremsstrahlung radiolysis of leucine.

  18. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... breaks the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this ... process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple ...

  19. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  20. Screening of Bothrops snake venoms for L-amino acid oxidase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pessati, M.L.; Fontana, J.D.; Guimaraes, M.F.

    1995-12-31

    Toxins, enzymes, and biologically active peptides are the main components of snake venoms from the genus Bothrops. Following the venom inoculation, the local effects are hemorrhage, edema, and myonecrosis. Nineteen different species of Brazilian Bothrops were screened for protein content and L-amino acid oxidase activity. B. cotiara, formerly found in the South of Brazil, is now threatened with extinction. Its venom contains a highly hemorrhagic fraction and, as expected from the deep yellow color of the corresponding lyophilized powder, a high L-amino acid oxidase (LAO) activity was also characterized. Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is its associate coenzyme. B. cotiara venom LAO catalyzed the oxidative deamination of several L-amino acids, and the best substrates were methionine, leucine, tryptophan, and phenylalanine, hence, its potential application for the use in biosensors for aspartame determination and for the removal of amino acids from plasma. High levels for LAO were also found in other species than B. cotiara. In addition, the technique of isoelectric focusing (IEF) was employed as a powerful tool to study the iso- or multi-enzyme distribution for LAO activity in the B. cotiara snake venom.

  1. Characterization of nutrients, amino acids, polyphenols and antioxidant activity of Ridge gourd (Luffa acutangula) peel.

    PubMed

    Swetha, M P; Muthukumar, S P

    2016-07-01

    Ridge gourd (Luffa acutangula) is consumed as a vegetable after peeling off the skin which is a domestic waste. Luffa acutangula peel (LAP) was observed to be a good source of fiber (20.6 %) and minerals (7.7 %). Amino acid analysis revealed presence of the highest content of Carnosine followed by aspartic acid and aminoadipic acid. Antioxidant activity of different extracts showed that ethyl acetate extract was more potent when compared to other solvent extractions. It exhibited a significant amount of phenolic acids like p-coumaric acid (68.64 mg/100 g of dry weight) followed by gallic acid (34.98 mg/100 g of dry weight), protocatechuic acid (30.52 mg/100 g of dry weight) in free form and ferulic acid (13.04 mg/100 g of dry weight) in bound form.

  2. Amino Acids and Chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  3. The Use of Gel Electrophoresis to Study the Reactions of Activated Amino Acids with Oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zieboll, Gerhard; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1994-01-01

    We have used gel electrophoresis to study the primary covalent addition of amino acids to oligonu-cleotides or their analogs and the subsequent addition of further molecules of the amino acids to generate peptides covalently linked to the oligonucleotides. We have surveyed the reactions of a variety of amino acids with the phosphoramidates derived from oligonucleotide 5 inches phosphates and ethylenediamine. We find that arginine and amino acids can interact with oligonucleotidesl through stacking interactions react most efficiently. D- and L-amino acids give indistinguishable families of products.

  4. Functional consequences of single amino acid substitutions in calmodulin-activated adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, P; Munier, H; Gilles, A M; Krin, E; Porumb, T; Bârzu, O; Sarfati, R; Pellecuer, C; Danchin, A

    1991-01-01

    Calmodulin-activated adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis and Bacillus anthracis are two cognate bacterial toxins. Three short regions of 13-24 amino acid residues in these proteins exhibit between 66 and 80% identity. Site-directed mutagenesis of four residues in B. pertussis adenylate cyclase situated in the second (Asp188, Asp190) and third (His298, Glu301) segments of identity were accompanied by important decrease, or total loss, of enzyme activity. The calmodulin-binding properties of mutated proteins showed no important differences when compared to the wild-type enzyme. Apart from the loss of enzymatic activity, the most important change accompanying replacement of Asp188 by other amino acids was a dramatic decrease in binding of 3'-anthraniloyl-2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate, a fluorescent analogue of ATP. From these results we concluded that the two neighbouring aspartic acid residues in B. pertussis adenylate cyclase, conserved in many other ATP-utilizing enzymes, are essential for binding the Mg(2+)-nucleotide complex, and for subsequent catalysis. Replacement of His298 and Glu301 by other amino acid residues affected the nucleotide-binding properties of adenylate cyclase to a lesser degree suggesting that they might be important in the mechanism of enzyme activation by calmodulin, rather than being involved directly in catalysis. PMID:2050107

  5. Amino acids-incorporated nanoflowers with an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhuo-Fu; Wang, Zhi; Zhang, Ye; Ma, Ya-Li; He, Cheng-Yan; Li, Heng; Chen, Lei; Huo, Qi-Sheng; Wang, Lei; Li, Zheng-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Functional molecules synthesized by self-assembly between inorganic salts and amino acids have attracted much attention in recent years. A simple method is reported here for fabricating hybrid organic–inorganic nanoflowers using copper (II) ions as the inorganic component and natural amino acids as the organic component. The results indicate that the interactions between amino acid and copper ions cause the growth of the nanoflowers composed by C, N, Cu, P and O elements. The Cu ions and Cu(AA)n complexes containing Cu-O bond are present in the nanoflowers. The nanoflowers have flower-like porous structure dominated by the R groups of amino acids with high surface-to-volume ratios, which is beneficial for exerting its peroxidase-like activity depending on Fenton-like reaction mechanism with ABTS and Rhodamine B as the substrates. It is expected that the nanoflowers hold great promise as enzyme mimics for application in the field of biosensor, bioanalysis and biocatalysis.

  6. Antimicrobial activity and stability of protonectin with D-amino acid substitutions.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shuai; Zhu, Ranran; Zhao, Yanyan; An, Xiaoping; Jia, Fengjing; Peng, Jinxiu; Ma, Zelin; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jiayi; Su, Jinhuan; Wang, Qingjun; Wang, Hailin; Li, Yuan; Wang, Kairong; Yan, Wenjin; Wang, Rui

    2017-03-16

    The misuse and overuse of antibiotics result in the emergence of resistant bacteria and fungi, which make an urgent need of the new antimicrobial agents. Nowadays, antimicrobial peptides have attracted great attention of researchers. However, the low physiological stability in biological system limits the application of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides as novel therapeutics. In the present study, we synthesized derivatives of protonectin by substituting all the amino acid residues or the cationic lysine residue with the corresponding D-amino acids. Both the D-enantiomer of protonectin (D-prt) and D-Lys-protonectin (D-Lys-prt) exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against bacteria and fungi. Moreover, D-prt showed strong stability against trypsin, chymotrypsin and the human serum, while D-Lys-prt only showed strong stability against trypsin. Circular dichroism analysis revealed that D-Lys-prt still kept typical α-helical structure in the membrane mimicking environment, while D-prt showed left hand α-helical structure. In addition, propidium iodide uptake assay and bacteria and fungi killing experiments indicated that all D-amino acid substitution or partially D-amino acid substitution analogs could disrupt the integrity of membrane and lead the cell death. In summary, these findings suggested that D-prt and D-Lys-prt might be promising candidate antibiotic agents for therapeutic application against resistant bacteria and fungi infection. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Amino acids-incorporated nanoflowers with an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhuo-Fu; Wang, Zhi; Zhang, Ye; Ma, Ya-Li; He, Cheng-Yan; Li, Heng; Chen, Lei; Huo, Qi-Sheng; Wang, Lei; Li, Zheng-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Functional molecules synthesized by self-assembly between inorganic salts and amino acids have attracted much attention in recent years. A simple method is reported here for fabricating hybrid organic–inorganic nanoflowers using copper (II) ions as the inorganic component and natural amino acids as the organic component. The results indicate that the interactions between amino acid and copper ions cause the growth of the nanoflowers composed by C, N, Cu, P and O elements. The Cu ions and Cu(AA)n complexes containing Cu-O bond are present in the nanoflowers. The nanoflowers have flower-like porous structure dominated by the R groups of amino acids with high surface-to-volume ratios, which is beneficial for exerting its peroxidase-like activity depending on Fenton-like reaction mechanism with ABTS and Rhodamine B as the substrates. It is expected that the nanoflowers hold great promise as enzyme mimics for application in the field of biosensor, bioanalysis and biocatalysis. PMID:26926099

  8. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity of Schiff base compounds of cinnamaldehyde and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Yuan, Haijian; Li, Shujun; Li, Zhuo; Jiang, Mingyue

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize hydrophilic cinnamaldehyde Schiff base compounds and investigate those bioactivity. A total of 24 Schiff base compounds were synthesized using a simple approach with 3 cinnamaldehyde derivates and 8 amino acids as raw materials. The structures of synthesized compounds were confirmed using FTIR, (1)HNMR, HRMS purity and melting point. The antimicrobial activities of new compounds were evaluated with fluconazole and ciprofloxacin as the control against Aspergillus niger, Penicillium citrinum, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Findings show that major compounds exhibited significant bioactivity. Results from the structure-activity relationship suggest that both -p-Cl on benzene ring of cinnamaldehyde and the number of -COOK of amino acid salts significantly contributed to antimicrobial activity.

  9. Antioxidant activity, anti-proliferative activity, and amino acid profiles of ethanolic extracts of edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Panthong, S; Boonsathorn, N; Chuchawankul, S

    2016-10-17

    Biological activities of various mushrooms have recently been discovered, particularly, immunomodulatory and antitumor activities. Herein, three edible mushrooms, Auricularia auricula-judae (AA), Pleurotus abalonus (PA) and Pleurotus sajor-caju (PS) extracted using Soxhlet ethanol extraction were evaluated for their antioxidative, anti-proliferative effects on leukemia cells. Using the Folin-Ciocalteau method and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay, phenolics and antioxidant activity were found in all sample mushrooms. Additionally, anti-proliferative activity of mushroom extracts against U937 leukemia cells was determined using a viability assay based on mitochondrial activity. PA (0.5 mg/mL) and AA (0.25-0.5 mg/mL) significantly reduced cell viability. Interestingly, PS caused a hormetic-like biphasic dose-response. Low doses (0-0.25 mg/L) of PS promoted cell proliferation up to 140% relative to control, whereas higher doses (0.50 mg/mL) inhibited cell proliferation. Against U937 cells, AA IC50 was 0.28 ± 0.04 mg/mL, which was lower than PS or PA IC50 (0.45 ± 0.01 and 0.49 ± 0.001 mg/mL, respectively). Furthermore, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage conferred cytotoxicity. PS and PA were not toxic to U937 cells at any tested concentration; AA (0.50 mg/mL) showed high LDH levels and caused 50% cytotoxicity. Additionally, UPLC-HRMS data indicated several phytochemicals known to support functional activities as either antioxidant or anti-proliferative. Glutamic acid was uniquely found in ethanolic extracts of AA, and was considered an anti-cancer amino acid with potent anti-proliferative effects on U937 cells. Collectively, all mushroom extracts exhibited antioxidant effects, but their anti-proliferative effects were dose-dependent. Nevertheless, the AA extract, with highest potency, is a promising candidate for future applications.

  10. Ontogenetic changes in digestive enzyme activities and the amino acid profile of starry flounder Platichthys stellatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhidong; Wang, Jiying; Qiao, Hongjin; Li, Peiyu; Zhang, Limin; Xia, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Ontogenetic changes in digestive enzyme activities and the amino acid (AA) profile of starry flounder, Platichthys stellatus, were investigated and limiting amino acids were estimated compared with the essential AA profile between larvae and live food to clarify starry flounder larval nutritional requirements. Larvae were collected at the egg stage and 0, 2, 4, 7, 12, 17, 24 days after hatching (DAH) for analysis. Larvae grew from 1.91 mm at hatching to 12.13 mm at 24 DAH. Trypsin and chymotrypsin activities changed slightly by 4 DAH and then increased significantly 4 DAH. Pepsin activity increased sharply beginning 17 DAH. Lipase activity increased significantly 4 DAH and increased progressively with larval growth. Amylase activity was also detected in newly hatched larvae and increased 7 DAH followed by a gradual decrease. High free amino acid (FAA) content was detected in starry flounder eggs (110.72 mg/g dry weight). Total FAA content dropped to 43.29 mg/g in 4-DAH larvae and then decreased gradually to 13.74 mg/g in 24-DAH larvae. Most FAAs (except lysine and methionine) decreased >50% in 4-DAH larvae compared with those in eggs and then decreased to the lowest values in 24-DAH larvae. Changes in the protein amino acid (PAA) profile were much milder than those observed for FAAs. Most PAAs increased gradually during larval development, except lysine and phenylalanine. The percentages of free threonine, valine, isoleucine, and leucine decreased until the end of the trial, whereas the protein forms of these four AAs followed the opposite trend. A comparison of the essential AA composition of live food (rotifers, Artemia nauplii, and Artemia metanauplii) and larvae suggested that methionine was potentially the first limiting AA. These results may help develop starry flounder larviculture methods by solving the AA imbalance in live food. Moreover, the increased digestive enzyme activities indicate the possibility of introducing artificial compound feed.

  11. Mechanisms contributing to muscle-wasting in acute uremia: activation of amino acid catabolism.

    PubMed

    Price, S R; Reaich, D; Marinovic, A C; England, B K; Bailey, J L; Caban, R; Mitch, W E; Maroni, B J

    1998-03-01

    Acute uremia (ARF) causes metabolic defects in glucose and protein metabolism that contribute to muscle wasting. To examine whether there are also defects in the metabolism of essential amino acids in ARF, we measured the activity of the rate-limiting enzyme for branched-chain amino acid catabolism, branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKAD), in rat muscles. Because chronic acidosis activates muscle BCKAD, we also evaluated the influence of acidosis by studying ARF rats given either NaCl (ARF-NaCl) or NaHCO3 (ARF-HCO3) to prevent acidosis, and sham-operated, control rats given NaHCO3. ARF-NaCl rats became progressively acidemic (serum [HCO3] = 21.3 +/- 0.7 mM within 18 h and 14.7 +/- 0.8 mM after 44 h; mean +/- SEM), but this was corrected with NaHCO3. Plasma valine was low in ARF-NaCl and ARF-HCO3 rats. Plasma isoleucine, but not leucine, was low in ARF-NaCl rats, and isoleucine tended to be lower in ARF-HCO3 rats. Basal BCKAD activity (a measure of active BCKAD in muscle) was increased more than 17-fold (P < 0.01) in ARF-NaCl rat muscles, and this response was partially suppressed by NaHCO3. Maximal BCKAD activity (an estimate of BCKAD content), subunit mRNA levels, and BCKAD protein content were not different in ARF and control rat muscles. Thus, ARF increases branched-chain amino acid catabolism by activating BCKAD by a mechanism that includes acidosis. Moreover, in a muscle-wasting condition such as ARF, there is a coordinated increase in protein and essential amino acid catabolism.

  12. Indications of human activity from amino acid and amino sugar analyses on Holocene sediments from lake Lonar, central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, P.; Gaye, B.; Wiesner, M.; Prasad, S.; Basavaiah, N.; Stebich, M.; Anoop, A.; Riedel, N.; Brauer, A.

    2012-04-01

    The DFG funded HIMPAC (Himalaya: Modern and Past Climates) programme aims to reconstruct Holocene Indian Monsoon climate using a multi-proxy and multi-archive approach. First investigations made on sediments from a ca. 10 m long core covering the whole Holocene taken from the lake Lonar in central India's state Maharashtra, Buldhana District, serve to identify changes in sedimentation, lake chemistry, local vegetation and regional to supra-regional climate patterns. Lake Lonar occupies the floor of an impact crater that formed on the ~ 65 Ma old basalt flows of the Deccan Traps. It covers an area of ca. 1 km2 and is situated in India's core monsoon area. The modern lake has a maximum depth of about 5 m, is highly alkaline, and hyposaline, grouped in the Na-Cl-CO3 subtype of saline lakes. No out-flowing stream is present and only three small streams feed the lake, resulting in a lake level highly sensitive to precipitation and evaporation. The lake is eutrophic and stratified throughout most of the year with sub- to anoxic waters below 2 m depth. In this study the core sediments were analysed for their total amino acid (AA) and amino sugar (AS) content, the amino acid bound C and N percentage of organic C and total N in the sediment and the distribution of individual amino acids. The results roughly show three zones within the core separated by distinct changes in their AA content and distribution. (i) The bottom part of the core from ca. 12000 cal a BP to 11400 cal a BP with very low AA and AS percentage indicating high lithogenic contribution, most probably related to dry conditions. (ii) From 11400 cal a BP to 1200 cal a BP the sediments show moderate AA and AS percentages and low values for the ratios of proteinogenic AAs to their non-proteinogenic degradation products (e.g. ASP/β-ALA; GLU/γ-ABA). (iii) The top part of the core (< 1200 cal a BP) is characterised by an intense increase in total AA and AS, AA-C/Corg and AA-N/Ntotas well as in the ratio of

  13. Molecular physiology of the insect K-activated amino acid transporter 1 (KAAT1) and cation-anion activated amino acid transporter/channel 1 (CAATCH1) in the light of the structure of the homologous protein LeuT.

    PubMed

    Castagna, M; Bossi, E; Sacchi, V F

    2009-06-01

    K-activated amino acid transporter 1 (KAAT1) and cation-anion-activated amino acid transporter/channel 1 (CAATCH1) are amino acid cotransporters, belonging to the Na/Cl-dependent neurotransmitter transporter family (also called SLC6/NSS), that have been cloned from Manduca sexta midgut. They have been thoroughly studied by expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and structure/function analyses have made it possible to identify the structural determinants of their cation and amino acid selectivity. About 40 mutants of these proteins have been studied by measuring amino acid uptake and current/voltage relationships. The results obtained since the cloning of KAAT1 and CAATCH1 are here discussed in the light of the 3D model of the first crystallized member of the family, the leucine transporter LeuT.

  14. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of acid-base bifunctional materials through protection of amino groups

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yanqiu; Liu, Heng; Yu, Xiaofang; Guan, Jingqi; Kan, Qiubin

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acid-base bifunctional material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized through protection of amino groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} catalyst containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties. -- Abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, transmission electron micrographs (TEM), back titration, {sup 13}C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR and {sup 29}Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR were employed to characterize the synthesized materials. The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation reaction between acetone and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde. Compared with monofunctional catalysts of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15 and SBA-15-NH{sub 2}, the bifunctional sample of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties, which make it possess high activity for the aldol condensation.

  15. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of Antimicrobial Peptides Developed Using an Amino Acid-Based Activity Prediction Method

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaozhe; Wang, Zhenling; Li, Xiaolu; Fan, Yingzi; He, Gu; Wan, Yang; Yu, Chaoheng; Tang, Jianying; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xian; Zhang, Hailong; Xiang, Rong; Pan, Ying; Liu, Yan; Lu, Lian

    2014-01-01

    To design and discover new antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with high levels of antimicrobial activity, a number of machine-learning methods and prediction methods have been developed. Here, we present a new prediction method that can identify novel AMPs that are highly similar in sequence to known peptides but offer improved antimicrobial activity along with lower host cytotoxicity. Using previously generated AMP amino acid substitution data, we developed an amino acid activity contribution matrix that contained an activity contribution value for each amino acid in each position of the model peptide. A series of AMPs were designed with this method. After evaluating the antimicrobial activities of these novel AMPs against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, DP7 was chosen for further analysis. Compared to the parent peptide HH2, this novel AMP showed broad-spectrum, improved antimicrobial activity, and in a cytotoxicity assay it showed lower toxicity against human cells. The in vivo antimicrobial activity of DP7 was tested in a Staphylococcus aureus infection murine model. When inoculated and treated via intraperitoneal injection, DP7 reduced the bacterial load in the peritoneal lavage solution. Electron microscope imaging and the results indicated disruption of the S. aureus outer membrane by DP7. Our new prediction method can therefore be employed to identify AMPs possessing minor amino acid differences with improved antimicrobial activities, potentially increasing the therapeutic agents available to combat multidrug-resistant infections. PMID:24982064

  16. In vitro and in vivo activities of antimicrobial peptides developed using an amino acid-based activity prediction method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaozhe; Wang, Zhenling; Li, Xiaolu; Fan, Yingzi; He, Gu; Wan, Yang; Yu, Chaoheng; Tang, Jianying; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xian; Zhang, Hailong; Xiang, Rong; Pan, Ying; Liu, Yan; Lu, Lian; Yang, Li

    2014-09-01

    To design and discover new antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with high levels of antimicrobial activity, a number of machine-learning methods and prediction methods have been developed. Here, we present a new prediction method that can identify novel AMPs that are highly similar in sequence to known peptides but offer improved antimicrobial activity along with lower host cytotoxicity. Using previously generated AMP amino acid substitution data, we developed an amino acid activity contribution matrix that contained an activity contribution value for each amino acid in each position of the model peptide. A series of AMPs were designed with this method. After evaluating the antimicrobial activities of these novel AMPs against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, DP7 was chosen for further analysis. Compared to the parent peptide HH2, this novel AMP showed broad-spectrum, improved antimicrobial activity, and in a cytotoxicity assay it showed lower toxicity against human cells. The in vivo antimicrobial activity of DP7 was tested in a Staphylococcus aureus infection murine model. When inoculated and treated via intraperitoneal injection, DP7 reduced the bacterial load in the peritoneal lavage solution. Electron microscope imaging and the results indicated disruption of the S. aureus outer membrane by DP7. Our new prediction method can therefore be employed to identify AMPs possessing minor amino acid differences with improved antimicrobial activities, potentially increasing the therapeutic agents available to combat multidrug-resistant infections.

  17. Epileptic Activity Increases Cerebral Amino Acid Transport Assessed by 18F-Fluoroethyl-l-Tyrosine Amino Acid PET: A Potential Brain Tumor Mimic.

    PubMed

    Hutterer, Markus; Ebner, Yvonne; Riemenschneider, Markus J; Willuweit, Antje; McCoy, Mark; Egger, Barbara; Schröder, Michael; Wendl, Christina; Hellwig, Dirk; Grosse, Jirka; Menhart, Karin; Proescholdt, Martin; Fritsch, Brita; Urbach, Horst; Stockhammer, Guenther; Roelcke, Ulrich; Galldiks, Norbert; Meyer, Philipp T; Langen, Karl-Josef; Hau, Peter; Trinka, Eugen

    2017-01-01

    O-(2-(18)F-fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine ((18)F-FET) PET is a well-established method increasingly used for diagnosis, treatment planning, and monitoring in gliomas. Epileptic activity, frequently occurring in glioma patients, can influence MRI findings. Whether seizures also affect (18)F-FET PET imaging is currently unknown. The aim of this retrospective analysis was to investigate the brain amino acid metabolism during epileptic seizures by (18)F-FET PET and to elucidate the pathophysiologic background.

  18. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins.

  19. Antioxidant activity of amino acids in soybean oil at frying temperature: Structural effects and synergism with tocopherols.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hong-Sik; Winkler-Moser, Jill K

    2017-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate amino acids as natural antioxidants for frying. Twenty amino acids were added to soybean oil heated to 180°C, and the effects of amino acid structure on the antioxidant activity were investigated. Amino acids containing a thiol, a thioether, or an extra amine group such as arginine, cysteine, lysine, methionine, and tryptophan had the strongest antioxidant activities. At 5.5mM, these amino acids had stronger antioxidant activities than 0.02% (1.1mM) tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ). A functional group such as an amide, carboxylic acid, imidazole, or phenol appeared to negatively affect amino acid antioxidant activity. Synergism between amino acids and tocopherols was demonstrated, and we found that this synergistic interaction may be mostly responsible for the antioxidant activity that was observed. In a frying study with potato cubes, 5.5mM l-methionine had significantly stronger antioxidant activity than 0.02% TBHQ.

  20. Biochemical Evaluation of the Decarboxylation and Decarboxylation-Deamination Activities of Plant Aromatic Amino Acid Decarboxylases*

    PubMed Central

    Torrens-Spence, Michael P.; Liu, Pingyang; Ding, Haizhen; Harich, Kim; Gillaspy, Glenda; Li, Jianyong

    2013-01-01

    Plant aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD) enzymes are capable of catalyzing either decarboxylation or decarboxylation-deamination on various combinations of aromatic amino acid substrates. These two different activities result in the production of arylalkylamines and the formation of aromatic acetaldehydes, respectively. Variations in product formation enable individual enzymes to play different physiological functions. Despite these catalytic variations, arylalkylamine and aldehyde synthesizing AAADs are indistinguishable without protein expression and characterization. In this study, extensive biochemical characterization of plant AAADs was performed to identify residues responsible for differentiating decarboxylation AAADs from aldehyde synthase AAADs. Results demonstrated that a tyrosine residue located on a catalytic loop proximal to the active site of plant AAADs is primarily responsible for dictating typical decarboxylase activity, whereas a phenylalanine at the same position is primarily liable for aldehyde synthase activity. Mutagenesis of the active site phenylalanine to tyrosine in Arabidopsis thaliana and Petroselinum crispum aromatic acetaldehyde synthases primarily converts the enzymes activity from decarboxylation-deamination to decarboxylation. The mutation of the active site tyrosine to phenylalanine in the Catharanthus roseus and Papaver somniferum aromatic amino acid decarboxylases changes the enzymes decarboxylation activity to a primarily decarboxylation-deamination activity. Generation of these mutant enzymes enables the production of unusual AAAD enzyme products including indole-3-acetaldehyde, 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, and phenylethylamine. Our data indicates that the tyrosine and phenylalanine in the catalytic loop region could serve as a signature residue to reliably distinguish plant arylalkylamine and aldehyde synthesizing AAADs. Additionally, the resulting data enables further insights into the mechanistic roles of active site

  1. Amino acids as antioxidants for frying oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amino acids, proteins and hydrolysates of proteins have been known to protect edible oils from oxidation. While amino acids and related materials have high potential as antioxidants for frying oil, effectiveness of each amino acid and mechanisms of their activities are not well understood yet. Propo...

  2. d-Amino Acid Position Influences the Anticancer Activity of Galaxamide Analogs: An Apoptotic Mechanism Study

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Defa; Yu, Siming; Zhong, Shenghui; Zhao, Bingxin; Qiu, Shaoling; Chen, Jianwei; Lunagariya, Jignesh; Liao, Xiaojian; Xu, Shihai

    2017-01-01

    Galaxamide, an extract from Galaxaura filamentosa, is a cyclic pentapeptide containing five l-leucines. Due to the particular cyclic structure and the excellent anticancer activity, synthesis of Galaxamide and its analogs and their subsequent bio-applications have attracted great attention. In the present work, we synthesized six Galaxamide analogs by replacing one of the l-leucines with phenylalanine and varying the d-amino acid position. The anticancer effect of the synthesized Galaxamide analogs was tested against four in vitro human cancer cell lines, human hepatocellular cells (HepG2), human breast cancer cell (MCF-7), human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MDA-MB-435) and a human cervical carcinoma cell line (Hela). Results showed that Galaxamide analogs with different d-amino acid positions displayed distinct anticancer potential. The Galaxamide analog containing d-amino acid at position 5 (Analog-6) presented the strongest anticancer activity. The mechanism study revealed that Analog-6 could cause the early apoptosis of HepG2 cells by inhibiting their growth in the sub-G1 stage of the cell cycle and induce the chromatin condensation and fragmentation, which can be seen as 68% of HepG2 cells inhibited in the sub-G1 stage. Moreover, a mitochondria-mediated pathway was found to be involved in the apoptotic process of Analog-6 on HepG2 cells. PMID:28287429

  3. d-Amino Acid Position Influences the Anticancer Activity of Galaxamide Analogs: An Apoptotic Mechanism Study.

    PubMed

    Bai, Defa; Yu, Siming; Zhong, Shenghui; Zhao, Bingxin; Qiu, Shaoling; Chen, Jianwei; Lunagariya, Jignesh; Liao, Xiaojian; Xu, Shihai

    2017-03-10

    Galaxamide, an extract from Galaxaura filamentosa, is a cyclic pentapeptide containing five l-leucines. Due to the particular cyclic structure and the excellent anticancer activity, synthesis of Galaxamide and its analogs and their subsequent bio-applications have attracted great attention. In the present work, we synthesized six Galaxamide analogs by replacing one of the l-leucines with phenylalanine and varying the d-amino acid position. The anticancer effect of the synthesized Galaxamide analogs was tested against four in vitro human cancer cell lines, human hepatocellular cells (HepG₂), human breast cancer cell (MCF-7), human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MDA-MB-435) and a human cervical carcinoma cell line (Hela). Results showed that Galaxamide analogs with different d-amino acid positions displayed distinct anticancer potential. The Galaxamide analog containing d-amino acid at position 5 (Analog-6) presented the strongest anticancer activity. The mechanism study revealed that Analog-6 could cause the early apoptosis of HepG₂ cells by inhibiting their growth in the sub-G1 stage of the cell cycle and induce the chromatin condensation and fragmentation, which can be seen as 68% of HepG₂ cells inhibited in the sub-G1 stage. Moreover, a mitochondria-mediated pathway was found to be involved in the apoptotic process of Analog-6 on HepG₂ cells.

  4. Importance of backbone angles versus amino acid configurations in peptide vibrational Raman optical activity spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Carmen; Ruud, Kenneth; Reiher, Markus

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we investigate whether the differential scattering of right- and left-circularly polarized light in peptide Raman optical activity spectra are uniquely dominated by the backbone conformation, or whether the configurations of the individual amino acid also play a significant role. This is achieved by calculating Raman optical activity spectra using density functional theory for four structurally related peptides with a common backbone conformation, but with different sequences of amino acid configurations. Furthermore, the ROA signals of the amide normal modes are decomposed into contributions from groups of individual atoms. It is found that the amino acid configuration has a considerable influence on the ROA peaks in the amide I, II, and III regions, although the local decomposition reveals that the side-chain atoms only contribute to those peaks directly in the case of the amide II vibrations. Furthermore, small changes in the amide normal modes may lead to large and irregular modifications in the ROA intensity differences, making it difficult to establish transferable ROA intensity differences even for structurally similar vibrations.

  5. On the reported optical activity of amino acids in the Murchison meteorite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bada, J.L.; Cronin, J.R.; Ho, M.-S.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Lawless, J.G.; Miller, S.L.; Oro, J.; Steinberg, S.

    1983-01-01

    In analyses of extracts from the Murchison meteorite (a carbonaceous chondrite), Engel and Nagy1 reported an excess of L-enantiomers for several protein amino acids but found that the non-protein amino acids were racemic. They suggested that the excess of L-isomers might have resulted from an asymmetric synthesis or decomposition. Their results disagree with those obtained previously2-4 and they claim this is due to improved methodology. In fact, their extraction method and analytical procedure (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, GC-MS) was similar to those used in the original report2 of amino acids in the Murchison meteorite except that they used specific ion monitoring in the GC-MS measurements. We found the results of Engel and Nagy odd in that likely contaminants (the protein amino acids ala, leu, glu, asp and pro) were nonracemic while unlikely contaminants (isovaline and ??-amino-n-butyric acid) were racemic. For example, Engel and Nagy report that the leucine is ???90% L-enantiomer in the water-extracted sample whereas isovaline (??-methyl-??-aminobutyric acid) is racemic. It would be most unusual for an abiotic stereoselective decomposition or synthesis of amino acids to occur with protein amino acids but not with non-protein amino acids. We now show here that the explanation of terrestrial contamination is consistent with their results and is much more probable. ?? 1983 Nature Publishing Group.

  6. Proteins with β-(thienopyrrolyl)alanines as alternative chromophores and pharmaceutically active amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Budisa, Nediljko; Alefelder, Stefan; Bae, Jae Hyun; Golbik, Ralph; Minks, Caroline; Huber, Robert; Moroder, Luis

    2001-01-01

    L-β-(Thieno[3,2-b]pyrrolyl)alanine and L-β-(thieno[2,3-b]pyrrolyl)alanine are mutually isosteric and pharmaceutically active amino acids that mimic tryptophan with the benzene ring in the indole moiety replaced by thiophene. Sulfur as a heteroatom causes physicochemical changes in these tryptophan surrogates that bring about completely new properties not found in the indole moiety. These synthetic amino acids were incorporated into recombinant proteins in response to the Trp UGG codons by fermentation in a Trp-auxotrophic Escherichia coli host strain using the selective pressure incorporation method. Related protein mutants expectedly retain the secondary structure of the native proteins but show significantly changed optical and thermodynamic properties. In this way, new spectral windows, fluorescence, polarity, thermodynamics, or pharmacological properties are inserted into proteins. Such an engineering approach by translational integration of synthetic amino acids with a priori defined properties, as shown in this study, proved to be a novel and useful tool for protein rational design. PMID:11420430

  7. Boron Stress Activates the General Amino Acid Control Mechanism and Inhibits Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Uluisik, Irem; Kaya, Alaattin; Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Karakaya, Huseyin C.; Carlson, Bradley A.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Koc, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, and it is beneficial for animals. However, at high concentrations boron is toxic to cells although the mechanism of this toxicity is not known. Atr1 has recently been identified as a boron efflux pump whose expression is upregulated in response to boron treatment. Here, we found that the expression of ATR1 is associated with expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. These mechanisms are strictly controlled by the transcription factor Gcn4 in response to boron treatment. Further analyses have shown that boron impaired protein synthesis by promoting phosphorylation of eIF2α in a Gcn2 kinase dependent manner. The uncharged tRNA binding domain (HisRS) of Gcn2 is necessary for the phosphorylation of eIF2α in the presence of boron. We postulate that boron exerts its toxic effect through activation of the general amino acid control system and inhibition of protein synthesis. Since the general amino acid control pathway is conserved among eukaryotes, this mechanism of boron toxicity may be of general importance. PMID:22114689

  8. The contribution of SNAT1 to system A amino acid transporter activity in human placental trophoblast

    SciTech Connect

    Desforges, M.; Greenwood, S.L.; Glazier, J.D.; Westwood, M.; Sibley, C.P.

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} mRNA levels for SNAT1 are higher than other system A subtype mRNAs in primary human cytotrophoblast. {yields} SNAT1 knockdown in cytotrophoblast cells significantly reduces system A activity. {yields} SNAT1 is a key contributor to system A-mediated amino acid transport in human placenta. -- Abstract: System A-mediated amino acid transport across the placenta is important for the supply of neutral amino acids needed for fetal growth. All three system A subtypes (SNAT1, 2, and 4) are expressed in human placental trophoblast suggesting there is an important biological role for each. Placental system A activity increases as pregnancy progresses, coinciding with increased fetal nutrient demands. We have previously shown SNAT4-mediated system A activity is higher in first trimester than at term, suggesting that SNAT1 and/or SNAT2 are responsible for the increased system A activity later in gestation. However, the relative contribution of each subtype to transporter activity in trophoblast at term has yet to be evaluated. The purpose of this study was to identify the predominant subtype of system A in cytotrophoblast cells isolated from term placenta, maintained in culture for 66 h, by: (1) measuring mRNA expression of the three subtypes and determining the Michaelis-Menten constants for uptake of the system A-specific substrate, {sup 14}C-MeAIB, (2) investigating the contribution of SNAT1 to total system A activity using siRNA. Results: mRNA expression was highest for the SNAT1 subtype of system A. Kinetic analysis of {sup 14}C-MeAIB uptake revealed two distinct transport systems; system 1: K{sub m} = 0.38 {+-} 0.12 mM, V{sub max} = 27.8 {+-} 9.0 pmol/mg protein/20 min, which resembles that reported for SNAT1 and SNAT2 in other cell types, and system 2: K{sub m} = 45.4 {+-} 25.0 mM, V{sub max} = 1190 {+-} 291 pmol/mg protein/20 min, which potentially represents SNAT4. Successful knockdown of SNAT1 mRNA using target-specific si

  9. Yeast allosteric chorismate mutase is locked in the activated state by a single amino acid substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidheini, T.; Moesch, H.U.; Braus, G. ); Evans, J.N.S. )

    1990-04-17

    Chorismate mutase, a branch-point enzyme in the aromatic amino acid pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and also a mutant chorismate mutase with a single amino acid substitution in the C-terminal part of the protein have been purified approximately 20-fold and 64-fold from overproducing strains, respectively. The wild-type enzyme is activated by tryptophan and subject to feedback inhibition by tyrosine, whereas the mutant enzyme does not respond to activation by tryptophan nor inhibition by tyrosine. Both enzymes are dimers consisting of two identical subunits of M{sub r} 30,000, each one capable of binding one substrate and one activator molecule. Each subunit of the wild-type enzyme also binds one inhibitor molecule, whereas the mutant enzyme lost this ability. The enzyme reaction was observed by {sup 1}H NMR and shows a direct and irreversible conversion of chorismate to prephenate without the accumulation of any enzyme-free intermediates. The kinetic data of the wild-type chorismate mutase show positive cooperativity toward the substrate with a Hill coefficient of 1.71 and a (S){sub 0.5} value of 4.0 mM. In the presence of the activator tryptophan, the cooperativity is lost. The enzyme has an (S){sub 0.5} value of 1.2 mM in the presence of 10 {mu}M tryptophan and an increased (S){sub 0.5} value of 8.6 mM in the presence of 300 {mu}M tyrosine. In the mutant enzyme, a loss of the cooperativity was observed, and (S){sub 0.5} was reduced to 1.0 mM. This enzyme is therefore locked in the activated state by a single amino acid substitution.

  10. Active Uptake of Amino Acids by Leaves of an Epiphytic Vascular Plant, Tillandsia paucifolia (Bromeliaceae) 1

    PubMed Central

    Nyman, Leslie Paul; Davis, James P.; O'Dell, Stephen J.; Arditti, Joseph; Stephens, Grover C.; Benzing, David H.

    1987-01-01

    Specialized epidermal trichomes on the leaves of the epiphyte, Tillandsia paucifolia (Bromeliaceae) accumulate amino acids from solution. Simultaneous net uptake of 17 amino acids was determined using high performance liquid chromatography. Uptake occurs against concentration gradients at least as high as 104. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:16665307

  11. Light-Activated Amino Acid Transport Systems in Halobacterium halobium Envelope Vesicles: Role of Chemical and Electrical Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDonald, Russell E.; Greene, Richard V.; Lanyi, Janos K.

    1977-01-01

    The accumulation of 20 commonly occurring L-amino acids by cell envelope vesicles of Halobacterium halobium, in response to light-induced membrane potential and an artificially created sodium gradient, has been studied. Nineteen of these amino acids are actively accumulated under either or both of these conditions. Glutamate is unique in that its uptake is driven only by a chemical gradient for sodium. Amino acid concentrations at half-maximal uptake rates (Km) and maximal transport rates (V(sub max) have been determined for the uptake of all 19 amino acids. The transport systems have been partially characterized with respect to groups of amino acids transported by common carriers, cation effects, and relative response to the electrical and chemical components of the sodium gradient, the driving forces for uptake. The data presented clearly show that the carrier systems, which are responsible for uptake of individual amino acids, are as variable in their properties as those found in other organisms, i. e., some are highly specific for individual amino acids, some transport several amino acids competitively, some are activated by a chemical gradient of sodium only, and some function also in the complete absence of such a gradient. For all amino acids, Na(+) and K(+) are both required for maximal rate of uptake. The carriers for L-leucine and L-histidine are symmetrical in that these amino acids are transported in both directions across the vesicle membrane. It is suggested that coupling of substrate transport to metabolic energy via transient ionic gradients may be a general phenomenon in procaryotes.

  12. From a marine neuropeptide to antimicrobial pseudopeptides containing aza-β(3)-amino acids: structure and activity

    PubMed Central

    Laurencin, Mathieu; Legrand, Baptiste; Duval, Emilie; Henry, Joël; Baudy-Floc'H, Michèle; Zatylny-Gaudin, Céline; Bondon, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    Incorporation of aza-β3-amino acids into endogenous neuropeptide from mollusks (ALSGDAFLRF-NH2) with weak antimicrobial activities allows us to design new AMPs sequences. We find that, depending on the nature of the substitution, these could result either in inactive pseudopeptides or in a drastic enhancement of the antimicrobial activity without high cytotoxicity resulted. Structural studies perform by NMR and circular dichroism on the pseudopeptides show the impact of aza-β3-amino acids on the peptide structures. We obtain the first three-dimensional structures of pseudopeptides containing aza-β3-amino acids in aqueous micellar SDS and demonstrate that hydrazino turn can be formed in aqueous solution. Overall, these results demonstrate the ability to modulate AMPs activities through structural modifications induced by the nature and the position of these amino acid analogs in the peptide sequences. PMID:22320306

  13. Activity of D-amino acid oxidase is widespread in the human central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Sasabe, Jumpei; Suzuki, Masataka; Imanishi, Nobuaki; Aiso, Sadakazu

    2014-01-01

    It has been proposed that D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) plays an essential role in degrading D-serine, an endogenous coagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors. DAO shows genetic association with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and schizophrenia, in whose pathophysiology aberrant metabolism of D-serine is implicated. Although the pathology of both essentially involves the forebrain, in rodents, enzymatic activity of DAO is hindbrain-shifted and absent in the region. Here, we show activity-based distribution of DAO in the central nervous system (CNS) of humans compared with that of mice. DAO activity in humans was generally higher than that in mice. In the human forebrain, DAO activity was distributed in the subcortical white matter and the posterior limb of internal capsule, while it was almost undetectable in those areas in mice. In the lower brain centers, DAO activity was detected in the gray and white matters in a coordinated fashion in both humans and mice. In humans, DAO activity was prominent along the corticospinal tract, rubrospinal tract, nigrostriatal system, ponto-/olivo-cerebellar fibers, and in the anterolateral system. In contrast, in mice, the reticulospinal tract and ponto-/olivo-cerebellar fibers were the major pathways showing strong DAO activity. In the human corticospinal tract, activity-based staining of DAO did not merge with a motoneuronal marker, but colocalized mostly with excitatory amino acid transporter 2 and in part with GFAP, suggesting that DAO activity-positive cells are astrocytes seen mainly in the motor pathway. These findings establish the distribution of DAO activity in cerebral white matter and the motor system in humans, providing evidence to support the involvement of DAO in schizophrenia and ALS. Our results raise further questions about the regulation of D-serine in DAO-rich regions as well as the physiological/pathological roles of DAO in white matter astrocytes. PMID:24959138

  14. Activity of D-amino acid oxidase is widespread in the human central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sasabe, Jumpei; Suzuki, Masataka; Imanishi, Nobuaki; Aiso, Sadakazu

    2014-01-01

    It has been proposed that D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) plays an essential role in degrading D-serine, an endogenous coagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors. DAO shows genetic association with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and schizophrenia, in whose pathophysiology aberrant metabolism of D-serine is implicated. Although the pathology of both essentially involves the forebrain, in rodents, enzymatic activity of DAO is hindbrain-shifted and absent in the region. Here, we show activity-based distribution of DAO in the central nervous system (CNS) of humans compared with that of mice. DAO activity in humans was generally higher than that in mice. In the human forebrain, DAO activity was distributed in the subcortical white matter and the posterior limb of internal capsule, while it was almost undetectable in those areas in mice. In the lower brain centers, DAO activity was detected in the gray and white matters in a coordinated fashion in both humans and mice. In humans, DAO activity was prominent along the corticospinal tract, rubrospinal tract, nigrostriatal system, ponto-/olivo-cerebellar fibers, and in the anterolateral system. In contrast, in mice, the reticulospinal tract and ponto-/olivo-cerebellar fibers were the major pathways showing strong DAO activity. In the human corticospinal tract, activity-based staining of DAO did not merge with a motoneuronal marker, but colocalized mostly with excitatory amino acid transporter 2 and in part with GFAP, suggesting that DAO activity-positive cells are astrocytes seen mainly in the motor pathway. These findings establish the distribution of DAO activity in cerebral white matter and the motor system in humans, providing evidence to support the involvement of DAO in schizophrenia and ALS. Our results raise further questions about the regulation of D-serine in DAO-rich regions as well as the physiological/pathological roles of DAO in white matter astrocytes.

  15. Dynamics of mTORC1 activation in response to amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Manifava, Maria; Smith, Matthew; Rotondo, Sergio; Walker, Simon; Niewczas, Izabella; Zoncu, Roberto; Clark, Jonathan; Ktistakis, Nicholas T

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are essential activators of mTORC1 via a complex containing RAG GTPases, RAGULATOR and the vacuolar ATPase. Sensing of amino acids causes translocation of mTORC1 to lysosomes, an obligate step for activation. To examine the spatial and temporal dynamics of this translocation, we used live imaging of the mTORC1 component RAPTOR and a cell permeant fluorescent analogue of di-leucine methyl ester. Translocation to lysosomes is a transient event, occurring within 2 min of aa addition and peaking within 5 min. It is temporally coupled with fluorescent leucine appearance in lysosomes and is sustained in comparison to aa stimulation. Sestrin2 and the vacuolar ATPase are negative and positive regulators of mTORC1 activity in our experimental system. Of note, phosphorylation of canonical mTORC1 targets is delayed compared to lysosomal translocation suggesting a dynamic and transient passage of mTORC1 from the lysosomal surface before targetting its substrates elsewhere. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19960.001 PMID:27725083

  16. Activation of mTORC1 by leucine is potentiated by branched-chain amino acids and even more so by essential amino acids following resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Moberg, Marcus; Apró, William; Ekblom, Björn; van Hall, Gerrit; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Blomstrand, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Protein synthesis is stimulated by resistance exercise and intake of amino acids, in particular leucine. Moreover, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling by leucine is potentiated by the presence of other essential amino acids (EAA). However, the contribution of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to this effect is yet unknown. Here we compare the stimulatory role of leucine, BCAA, and EAA ingestion on anabolic signaling following exercise. Accordingly, eight trained volunteers completed four sessions of resistance exercise during which they ingested either placebo, leucine, BCAA, or EAA (including the BCAA) in random order. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest, immediately after exercise, and following 90 and 180 min of recovery. Following 90 min of recovery the activity of S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) was greater than at rest in all four trials (Placebo

  17. Biological and surface-active properties of double-chain cationic amino acid-based surfactants.

    PubMed

    Greber, Katarzyna E; Dawgul, Małgorzata; Kamysz, Wojciech; Sawicki, Wiesław; Łukasiak, Jerzy

    2014-08-01

    Cationic amino acid-based surfactants were synthesized via solid phase peptide synthesis and terminal acylation of their α and ε positions with saturated fatty acids. Five new lipopeptides, N-α-acyl-N-ε-acyl lysine analogues, were obtained. Minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal (fungicidal) concentration were determined on reference strains of bacteria and fungi to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the lipopeptides. Toxicity to eukaryotic cells was examined via determination of the haemolytic activities. The surface-active properties of these compounds were evaluated by measuring the surface tension and formation of micelles as a function of concentration in aqueous solution. The cationic surfactants demonstrated diverse antibacterial activities dependent on the length of the fatty acid chain. Gram-negative bacteria and fungi showed a higher resistance than Gram-positive bacterial strains. It was found that the haemolytic activities were also chain length-dependent values. The surface-active properties showed a linear correlation between the alkyl chain length and the critical micelle concentration.

  18. Role of lysine and acidic amino acid residues on the insecticidal activity of Jackbean urease.

    PubMed

    Real-Guerra, Rafael; Carlini, Célia Regina; Stanisçuaski, Fernanda

    2013-09-01

    Canavalia ensiformis has three isoforms of urease: Jackbean urease (JBU), Jackbean urease II and canatoxin. These isoforms present several biological activities, independent from the enzymatic property, such as entomotoxicity and antifungal properties. The entomotoxic activity is a property of the whole protein, as well as of a 10 kDa peptide released by insect digestive enzymes. Here we have used chemical modification to observe the influence of lysines and acidic residues on JBU enzymatic and insecticidal activities. Chemical modification of lysine residues was performed with dimethylamine-borane complex and formaldehyde, and acidic residues were modified by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and ethylenediamine. Derivatized ureases, called JBU-Lys (lysine-modified) and JBU-Ac (acidic residues-modified), were assayed for their biochemical and insecticidal properties. Neither modification altered significantly the kinetic parameters analyzed, indicating that no residue critical for the enzyme activity was affected and that the modifications did not incur in any significant structural alteration. On the other hand, both modifications reduced the toxic activity of the native protein fed to Dysdercus peruvianus. The changes observed in the entomotoxic property of the derivatized proteins reflect alterations in different steps of JBU's toxicity towards insects. JBU-Ac is not susceptible to hydrolysis by insect digestive enzymes, hence impairing the release of toxic peptide(s), while JBU-Lys is processed as the native protein. On the other hand, the antidiuretic effect of JBU on Rhodnius prolixus is altered in JBU-Lys, but not in JBU-Ac. Altogether, these data emphasize the role of lysine and acidic residues on the insecticidal properties of ureases.

  19. Unnatural amino acids increase activity and specificity of synthetic substrates for human and malarial cathepsin C.

    PubMed

    Poreba, Marcin; Mihelic, Marko; Krai, Priscilla; Rajkovic, Jelena; Krezel, Artur; Pawelczak, Malgorzata; Klemba, Michael; Turk, Dusan; Turk, Boris; Latajka, Rafal; Drag, Marcin

    2014-04-01

    Mammalian cathepsin C is primarily responsible for the removal of N-terminal dipeptides and activation of several serine proteases in inflammatory or immune cells, while its malarial parasite ortholog dipeptidyl aminopeptidase 1 plays a crucial role in catabolizing the hemoglobin of its host erythrocyte. In this report, we describe the systematic substrate specificity analysis of three cathepsin C orthologs from Homo sapiens (human), Bos taurus (bovine) and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria parasite). Here, we present a new approach with a tailored fluorogenic substrate library designed and synthesized to probe the S1 and S2 pocket preferences of these enzymes with both natural and a broad range of unnatural amino acids. Our approach identified very efficiently hydrolyzed substrates containing unnatural amino acids, which resulted in the design of significantly better substrates than those previously known. Additionally, in this study significant differences in terms of the structures of optimal substrates for human and malarial orthologs are important from the therapeutic point of view. These data can be also used for the design of specific inhibitors or activity-based probes.

  20. The effect of feeding with a tryptophan-free amino acid mixture on rat liver magnesium ion-activated deoxyribonucleic acid-dependent ribonucleic acid polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, A. R.

    1970-01-01

    1. The Widnell & Tata (1966) assay method for Mg2+-activated DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was used for initial-velocity determinations of rat liver nuclear RNA polymerase. One unit (U) of RNA polymerase was defined as that amount of enzyme required for 1 mmol of [3H]GMP incorporation/min at 37°C. 2. Colony fed rats were found to have a mean RNA polymerase activity of 65.9μU/mg of DNA and 18h-starved rats had a mean activity of 53.2μU/mg of DNA. Longer periods of starvation did not significantly decrease RNA polymerase activity further. 3. Rats that had been starved for 18h were used for all feeding experiments. Complete and tryptophan-deficient amino acid mixtures were given by stomach tube and the animals were killed 15–120min later. The response of RNA polymerase to the feeding with the complete amino acid mixture was rapid and almost linear over the first hour of feeding, resulting in a doubling of activity. The activity was still elevated above the starvation value at 120min after feeding. The tryptophan-deficient amino acid mixture produced a much less vigorous response about 45min after the feeding, and the activity had returned to the starvation value by 120min after the feeding. 4. The response of RNA polymerase to the feeding with the complete amino acid mixture was shown to occur within a period of less than 5min to about 10min after the feeding. 5. Pretreatment of the animals with puromycin or cycloheximide was found to abolish the 15min RNA polymerase response to the feeding with the complete amino acid mixture, but the activity of the controls was unaffected. 6. The characteristics of the RNA polymerase from 18h-starved animals and animals fed with the complete or incomplete amino acid mixtures for 1h were examined. The effects of Mg2+ ions, pH, actinomycin D and nucleoside triphosphate omissions were determined. The [Mg2+]– and pH–activity profiles of the RNA polymerase from the animal fed with the complete mixture appeared to differ from

  1. The amino acid sequences and activities of synergistic hemolysins from Staphylococcus cohnii.

    PubMed

    Mak, Pawel; Maszewska, Agnieszka; Rozalska, Malgorzata

    2008-10-01

    Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. cohnii and S. cohnii ssp. urealyticus are a coagulase-negative staphylococci considered for a long time as unable to cause infections. This situation changed recently and pathogenic strains of these bacteria were isolated from hospital environments, patients and medical staff. Most of the isolated strains were resistant to many antibiotics. The present work describes isolation and characterization of several synergistic peptide hemolysins produced by these bacteria and acting as virulence factors responsible for hemolytic and cytotoxic activities. Amino acid sequences of respective hemolysins from S. cohnii ssp. cohnii (named as H1C, H2C and H3C) and S. cohnii ssp. urealyticus (H1U, H2U and H3U) were identical. Peptides H1 and H3 possessed significant amino acid homology to three synergistic hemolysins secreted by Staphylococcus lugdunensis and to putative antibacterial peptide produced by Staphylococcus saprophyticus ssp. saprophyticus. On the other hand, hemolysin H2 had a unique sequence. All isolated peptides lysed red cells from different mammalian species and exerted a cytotoxic effect on human fibroblasts.

  2. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-11-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids and quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (< 0.49 μm) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanic emissions.

  3. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-07-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids to quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (<0.49 μm) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanics.

  4. Synthesis of amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, J.W. Jr.

    1979-09-21

    A method is described for synthesizing amino acids preceding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R/sub 1/R/sub 2/C(OSOC1)CN, R/sub 1/R/sub 2/C(C1)CN and (R/sub 1/R/sub 2/C(CN)O)/sub 2/SO wherein R/sub 1/ and R/sub 2/ are each selected from hydrogen and monovalent hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 10 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art.

  5. Changes in the activity of the general amino acid permease from Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. ellipsoideus during fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lglesias, R; Ferreras, J M; Arias, F J; Muñoz, R; Girbès, T

    1990-10-20

    The evolution of the activity of the general amino acid permease and ethanol and glucose concentrations in the medium were studied in a mild fermentation process carried out by a wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. ellipsoideus isolated from grape musts in spontaneous fermentation. The cells displayed a reduction in the activity of the general amino acid permease parallel to the increase of ethanol in the medium. This ethanol increase was not enough to promote a substantial inhibition on the total polypeptide synthesis measured as polyuridylic-acid-directed polyphenylalanine synthesis.

  6. Newly identified essential amino acid residues affecting ^8-sphingolipid desaturase activity revealed by site-directed mutagenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to identify amino acid residues crucial for the enzymatic activity of ^8-sphingolipid desaturases, a sequence comparison was performed among ^8-sphingolipid desaturases and ^6-fatty acid desaturase from various plants. In addition to the known conserved cytb5 (cytochrome b5) HPGG motif and...

  7. Beyond lipids, pharmacological PPARalpha activation has important effects on amino acid metabolism as studied in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Kashif; Camejo, Germán; Lanne, Boel; Halvarsson, Torbjörn; Landergren, Marie Rydén; Oakes, Nicholas D

    2007-04-01

    PPARalpha agonists have been characterized largely in terms of their effects on lipids and glucose metabolism, whereas little has been reported about effects on amino acid metabolism. We studied responses to the PPARalpha agonist WY 14,643 (30 micromol x kg(-1) x day(-1) for 4 wk) in rats fed a saturated fat diet. Plasma and urine were analyzed with proton NMR. Plasma amino acids were measured using HPLC, and hepatic gene expression was assessed with DNA arrays. The high-fat diet elevated plasma levels of insulin and triglycerides (TG), and WY 14,643 treatment ameliorated this insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, lowering plasma insulin and TG levels. In addition, treatment decreased body weight gain, without altering cumulative food intake, and increased liver mass. WY 14,643 increased plasma levels of 12 of 22 amino acids, including glucogenic and some ketogenic amino acids, whereas arginine was significantly decreased. There was no alteration in branched-chain amino acid levels. Compared with the fat-fed control animals, WY 14,643-treated animals had raised plasma urea and ammonia levels as well as raised urine levels of N-methylnicotinamide and dimethylglycine. WY 14,643 induced changes in a number of key genes involved in amino acid metabolism in addition to expected effects on hepatic genes involved in lipid catabolism and ketone body formation. In conclusion, the present results suggest that, in rodents, effects of pharmacological PPARalpha activation extend beyond control of lipid metabolism to include important effects on whole body amino acid mobilization and hepatic amino acid metabolism.

  8. Identification of hydrophobic amino acids required for lipid activation of C. elegans CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Braker, Jay D; Hodel, Kevin J.; Mullins, David R.; Friesen, Jon A.

    2009-01-01

    CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT), critical for phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis, is activated by translocation to the membrane surface. The lipid activation region of Caenorhabditis elegans CCT is between residues 246 and 266 of the 347 amino acid polypeptide, a region proposed to form an amphipathic alpha helix. When leucine 246, tryptophan 249, isoleucine 256, isoleucine 257, or phenylalanine 260, on the hydrophobic face of the helix, were changed individually to serine low activity was observed in the absence of lipid vesicles, similar to wild-type CCT, while lipid stimulated activity was reduced compared to wild-type CCT. Mutational analysis of phenylalanine 260 implicated this residue as a contributor to auto-inhibition of CCT while mutation of L246, W249, I256, and I257 simultaneously to serine resulted in significantly higher activity in the absence of lipid vesicles and an enzyme that was not lipid activated. These results support a concerted mechanism of lipid activation that requires multiple residues on the hydrophobic face of the putative amphipathic alpha helix. PMID:19836342

  9. Amino acids in carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Peterson, E.

    1975-01-01

    Studies with the combined gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer were conducted to characterize further the amino acids found in extracts of the Murchison meteorite. With the exception of beta-aminoisobutyric acid, all of the amino acids which were found in previous studies of the Murchison meteorite and the Murray meteorite have been identified. The results obtained lend further support to the hypothesis that amino acids are present in the Murchison meteorite as the result of an extraterrestrial abiotic synthesis.

  10. A descriptor of amino acids: SVRG and its application to peptide quantitative structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Tong, J; Che, T; Li, Y; Wang, P; Xu, X; Chen, Y

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a descriptor, SVRG (principal component scores vector of radial distribution function descriptors and geometrical descriptors), was derived from principal component analysis (PCA) of a matrix of two structural variables of coded amino acids, including radial distribution function index (RDF) and geometrical index. SVRG scales were then applied in three panels of peptide quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) which were modelled by partial least squares regression (PLS). The obtained models with the correlation coefficient (R²(cum)), cross-validation correlation coefficient (Q²(LOO)) were 0.910 and 0.863 for 48 bitter-tasting dipeptides; 0.968 and 0.931 for 21 oxytocin analogues; and 0.992 and 0.954 for 20 thromboplastin inhibitors. Satisfactory results showed that SVRG contained much chemical information relating to bioactivities. The approach may be a useful structural expression methodology for studies on peptide QSAR.

  11. Antibacterial activity of Pd(II) complexes with salicylaldehyde-amino acids Schiff bases ligands.

    PubMed

    Rîmbu, Cristina; Danac, Ramona; Pui, Aurel

    2014-01-01

    Palladium(II) complexes with Schiff bases ligands derived from salicylaldehyde and amino acids (Ala, Gly, Met, Ser, Val) have been synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform (FT)-IR, UV-Vis and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. The electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) spectrometry confirms the formation of palladium(II) complexes in 1/2 (M/L) molar ratio. All the Pd(II) complexes 1, [Pd(SalAla)2]Cl2; 2, [Pd(SalGly)2]Cl2; 3, [Pd(SalMet)2]Cl2; 4, [Pd(SalSer)2]Cl2; 5, [Pd(SalVal)2]Cl2; have shown antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli.

  12. Functional properties of whey, whey components, and essential amino acids: mechanisms underlying health benefits for active people (review).

    PubMed

    Ha, Ewan; Zemel, Michael B

    2003-05-01

    Whey proteins and amino acid supplements have a strong position in the sports nutrition market based on the purported quality of proteins and amino acids they provide. Recent studies employing stable isotope methodology demonstrate the ability of whey proteins or amino acid mixtures of similar composition to promote whole body and muscle protein synthesis. Other developing avenues of research explore health benefits of whey that extend beyond protein and basic nutrition. Many bioactive components derived from whey are under study for their ability to offer specific health benefits. These functions are being investigated predominantly in tissue culture systems and animal models. The capacity of these compounds to modulate adiposity, and to enhance immune function and anti-oxidant activity presents new applications potentially suited to the needs of those individuals with active lifestyles. This paper will review the recent literature that describes functional properties of essential amino acids, whey proteins, whey-derived minerals and other compounds and the mechanisms by which they may confer benefits to active people in the context that exercise is a form of metabolic stress. The response to this stress can be positive, as with the accretion of more muscle and improved functionality or greater strength. However, overall benefits may be compromised if immune function or general health is challenged in response to the stress. From a mechanistic standpoint, whey proteins, their composite amino acids, and/or associated compounds may be able to provide substrate and bioactive components to extend the overall benefits of physical activity.

  13. Changes in growth, photosynthetic activities, biochemical parameters and amino acid profile of Thompson Seedless grapes (Vitis vinifera L.).

    PubMed

    Somkuwar, R G; Bahetwar, Anita; Khan, I; Satisha, J; Ramteke, S D; Itroutwar, Prerna; Bhongale, Aarti; Oulkar, Dashrath

    2014-11-01

    The study on photosynthetic activity and biochemical parameters in Thompson Seedless grapes grafted on Dog Ridge rootstock and its impact on growth, yield and amino acid profile at various stages of berry development was conducted during the year 2012-2013. Leaf and berry samples from ten year old vines of Thompson Seedless were collected at different growth and berry developmental stages. The analysis showed difference in photosynthetic activity, biochemical parameters and amino acid status with the changes in berry development stage. Higher photosynthetic rate of 17.39 umol cm(-2) s(-1) was recorded during 3-4mm berry size and the lowest (10.08 umol cm(-2) s(-1)) was recorded during the veraison stage. The photosynthetic activity showed gradual decrease with the onset of harvest while the different biochemical parameters showed increase and decrease from one stage to another in both berry and leaves. Changes in photosynthetic activity and biochemical parameters thereby affected the growth, yield and amino acid content of the berry. Positive correlation of leaf area and photosynthetic rate was recorded during the period of study. Reducing sugar (352.25 mg g(-1)) and total carbohydrate (132.52 mg g(-1)) was more in berries as compared to leaf. Amino acid profile showed variations in different stages of berry development. Marked variations in photosynthetic as well as biochemical and amino acid content at various berry development stages was recorded and thereby its cumulative effect on the development of fruit quality.

  14. Characterization of Amino Acid Profile and Enzymatic Activity in Adult Rat Astrocyte Cultures.

    PubMed

    Souza, Débora Guerini; Bellaver, Bruna; Hansel, Gisele; Arús, Bernardo Assein; Bellaver, Gabriela; Longoni, Aline; Kolling, Janaina; Wyse, Angela T S; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Quincozes-Santos, André

    2016-07-01

    Astrocytes are multitasking players in brain complexity, possessing several receptors and mechanisms to detect, participate and modulate neuronal communication. The functionality of astrocytes has been mainly unraveled through the study of primary astrocyte cultures, and recently our research group characterized a model of astrocyte cultures derived from adult Wistar rats. We, herein, aim to characterize other basal functions of these cells to explore the potential of this model for studying the adult brain. To characterize the astrocytic phenotype, we determined the presence of GFAP, GLAST and GLT 1 proteins in cells by immunofluorescence. Next, we determined the concentrations of thirteen amino acids, ATP, ADP, adenosine and calcium in astrocyte cultures, as well as the activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and acetylcholine esterase. Furthermore, we assessed the presence of the GABA transporter 1 (GAT 1) and cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB 1) in the astrocytes. Cells demonstrated the presence of glutamine, consistent with their role in the glutamate-glutamine cycle, as well as glutamate and D-serine, amino acids classically known to act as gliotransmitters. ATP was produced and released by the cells and ADP was consumed. Calcium levels were in agreement with those reported in the literature, as were the enzymatic activities measured. The presence of GAT 1 was detected, but the presence of CB 1 was not, suggesting a decreased neuroprotective capacity in adult astrocytes under in vitro conditions. Taken together, our results show cellular functionality regarding the astrocytic role in gliotransmission and neurotransmitter management since they are able to produce and release gliotransmitters and to modulate the cholinergic and GABAergic systems.

  15. Amino Acid Auxotrophy as Immunological Control Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cells of the immune system are auxotrophs for most amino acids, including non-essential ones. Arginine and tryptophan are used within the regulatory immune networks to control proliferation and function through pathways that deplete the amino acid, or create regulatory molecules such as nitric oxide or kynurenines. Strategies to harness amino acid auxotrophy to block cancerous lymphocyte growth have been attempted for decades, with limited success. How immune cells integrate information about external essential amino acids supplies and transfer signals to growth and activation pathways remains unclear, but has potential for pathway discovery. Emerging insights may lead to strategies to both degrade amino acids and to block the immunoregulatory pathways controlled by amino acids. PMID:26784254

  16. Requirement for lysosomal localization of mTOR for its activation differs between leucine and other amino acids.

    PubMed

    Averous, Julien; Lambert-Langlais, Sarah; Carraro, Valérie; Gourbeyre, Ophélie; Parry, Laurent; B'Chir, Wafa; Muranishi, Yuki; Jousse, Céline; Bruhat, Alain; Maurin, Anne-Catherine; Proud, Christopher G; Fafournoux, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of cell growth and metabolism. It controls many cell functions by integrating nutrient availability and growth factor signals. Amino acids, and in particular leucine, are among the main positive regulators of mTORC1 signaling. The current model for the regulation of mTORC1 by amino acids involves the movement of mTOR to the lysosome mediated by the Rag-GTPases. Here, we have examined the control of mTORC1 signaling and mTOR localization by amino acids and leucine in serum-fed cells, because both serum growth factors (or, e.g., insulin) and amino acids are required for full activation of mTORC1 signaling. We demonstrate that mTORC1 activity does not closely correlate with the lysosomal localization of mTOR. In particular, leucine controls mTORC1 activity without any detectable modification of the lysosomal localization of mTOR, indicating that the signal(s) exerted by leucine is likely distinct from those exerted by other amino acids. In addition, knock-down of the Rag-GTPases attenuated the inhibitory effect of amino acid- or leucine-starvation on the phosphorylation of mTORC1 targets. Furthermore, data from cells where Rag expression has been knocked down revealed that leucine can promote mTORC1 signaling independently of the lysosomal localization of mTOR. Our data complement existing models for the regulation of mTORC1 by amino acids and provide new insights into this important topic.

  17. A systems study reveals concurrent activation of AMPK and mTOR by amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Pezze, Piero Dalle; Ruf, Stefanie; Sonntag, Annika G.; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Hall, Philip; Heberle, Alexander M.; Navas, Patricia Razquin; van Eunen, Karen; Tölle, Regine C.; Schwarz, Jennifer J.; Wiese, Heike; Warscheid, Bettina; Deitersen, Jana; Stork, Björn; Fäßler, Erik; Schäuble, Sascha; Hahn, Udo; Horvatovich, Peter; Shanley, Daryl P.; Thedieck, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids (aa) are not only building blocks for proteins, but also signalling molecules, with the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) acting as a key mediator. However, little is known about whether aa, independently of mTORC1, activate other kinases of the mTOR signalling network. To delineate aa-stimulated mTOR network dynamics, we here combine a computational–experimental approach with text mining-enhanced quantitative proteomics. We report that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) are acutely activated by aa-readdition in an mTORC1-independent manner. AMPK activation by aa is mediated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ). In response, AMPK impinges on the autophagy regulators Unc-51-like kinase-1 (ULK1) and c-Jun. AMPK is widely recognized as an mTORC1 antagonist that is activated by starvation. We find that aa acutely activate AMPK concurrently with mTOR. We show that AMPK under aa sufficiency acts to sustain autophagy. This may be required to maintain protein homoeostasis and deliver metabolite intermediates for biosynthetic processes. PMID:27869123

  18. The complete amino acid sequence of prochymosin.

    PubMed Central

    Foltmann, B; Pedersen, V B; Jacobsen, H; Kauffman, D; Wybrandt, G

    1977-01-01

    The total sequence of 365 amino acid residues in bovine prochymosin is presented. Alignment with the amino acid sequence of porcine pepsinogen shows that 204 amino acid residues are common to the two zymogens. Further comparison and alignment with the amino acid sequence of penicillopepsin shows that 66 residues are located at identical positions in all three proteases. The three enzymes belong to a large group of proteases with two aspartate residues in the active center. This group forms a family derived from one common ancestor. PMID:329280

  19. Evidence that the amino acid residue Cys117 of chloroplastic monodehydroascorbate reductase is involved in its activity and structural stability.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Wu, Qing-Yun; Sun, Yan-Li; Ma, Na-Na; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2010-04-01

    Monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR; EC 1.6.5.4) is crucial for AsA regeneration and essential for maintaining the reduced pool of AsA. And the amino acid residue C117 of chloroplastic MDAR is the conserved cysteine residue in MDAR isoforms. A series mutation of conserved amino acid residue cysteine117 (C117) was constructed to investigate its role in MDAR structural stability and activity. Our study revealed that mutation in this conserved residue could cause pronounced loss of activity and conformational changes. Spectroscopic experiments indicated that these mutations influenced transition from the molten globule intermediate to the native state in folding process. These results suggested that amino acid residue C117 played a relatively important role in keeping MDAR structural stability and activity.

  20. Mechanism of chemical activation of sodium chloride in the presence of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Anja K K; Yaylayan, Varoujan A

    2015-01-01

    Sodium chloride has been shown to promote chlorination of glycerol during thermal processing. However, the detailed mechanism of this reaction is not well understood. Preliminary experiments have indicated that the reaction mixture should contain an amino acid and it should be dissolved thoroughly in water in order to induce chlorination. These observations are consistent with the process of dissociation of sodium chloride and its re-association with amino acid and eventual formation of the chlorinating agent in the form of the hydrochloride salt. Release of HCl from this salt can be manifested in chlorination and hydrolytic reactions occurring during thermal processing. The generation of HCl at room temperature from a mixture of sodium chloride and glycine was confirmed through spectrophotometric monitoring of the pH. Hydrolytic and chlorination reactions were demonstrated through monitoring of formation of HMF and chlorinated products under pyrolytic conditions using glucose or sucrose and amino acid mixtures.

  1. The effects of excitatory amino acids and their antagonists on the generation of motor activity in the isolated chick spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Barry, M J; O'Donovan, M J

    1987-12-01

    We have investigated the action of excitatory amino acids and their antagonists on spontaneous motor activity produced by an isolated preparation of the chick lumbosacral cord. Bath application of N-methyl-DL-aspartic acid (NMDA) or D-glutamate increased the occurrence and duration of spontaneous episodes of motor activity. Both NMDA-induced and spontaneous activity were reversibly inhibited by several excitatory amino acid antagonists including 2-amino-5-phosphono valeric acid and gamma-D-glutamyl glycine in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that motor activity in the chick spinal cord may be regulated by the release of endogenous excitatory amino acids from spinal interneurons.

  2. Effects of sex and site on amino acid metabolism enzyme gene expression and activity in rat white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Arriarán, Sofía; Agnelli, Silvia; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. White adipose tissue (WAT) shows marked sex- and diet-dependent differences. However, our metabolic knowledge of WAT, especially on amino acid metabolism, is considerably limited. In the present study, we compared the influence of sex on the amino acid metabolism profile of the four main WAT sites, focused on the paths related to ammonium handling and the urea cycle, as a way to estimate the extent of WAT implication on body amino-nitrogen metabolism. Experimental Design. Adult female and male rats were maintained, undisturbed, under standard conditions for one month. After killing them under isoflurane anesthesia. WAT sites were dissected and weighed. Subcutaneous, perigonadal, retroperitoneal and mesenteric WAT were analyzed for amino acid metabolism gene expression and enzyme activities. Results. There was a considerable stability of the urea cycle activities and expressions, irrespective of sex, and with only limited influence of site. Urea cycle was more resilient to change than other site-specialized metabolic pathways. The control of WAT urea cycle was probably related to the provision of arginine/citrulline, as deduced from the enzyme activity profiles. These data support a generalized role of WAT in overall amino-N handling. In contrast, sex markedly affected WAT ammonium-centered amino acid metabolism in a site-related way, with relatively higher emphasis in males’ subcutaneous WAT. Conclusions. We found that WAT has an active amino acid metabolism. Its gene expressions were lower than those of glucose-lipid interactions, but the differences were quantitatively less important than usually reported. The effects of sex on urea cycle enzymes expression and activity were limited, in contrast with the wider variations observed in other metabolic pathways. The results agree with a centralized control of urea cycle operation affecting the adipose organ as a whole. PMID:26587356

  3. TRPV1 temperature activation is specifically sensitive to strong decreases in amino acid hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Pagán, Jason O; Iversen, Edwin S; Grandl, Jörg

    2017-04-03

    Several transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels can be directly activated by hot or cold temperature with high sensitivity. However, the structures and molecular mechanism giving rise to their high temperature sensitivity are not fully understood. One hypothesized mechanism assumes that temperature activation is driven by the exposure of hydrophobic residues to solvent. This mechanism further predicts that residues are exposed to solvent in a coordinated fashion, but without necessarily being located in close proximity to each other. However, there is little experimental evidence supporting this mechanism in TRP channels. Here, we combined high-throughput mutagenesis, functional screening, and deep sequencing to identify mutations from a total of ~7,300 TRPV1 random mutant clones. We found that strong decreases in hydrophobicity of amino acids are better tolerated for activation by capsaicin than for activation by hot temperature, suggesting that strong hydrophobicity might be specifically required for temperature activation. Altogether, our work provides initial correlative support for a previously hypothesized temperature mechanism in TRP ion channels.

  4. Search for effect of longitudinally polarized protons on optically active amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemmon, R. M.; Conzett, H. E.; Bonner, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of irradiation by longitudinally polarized protons on the differential decomposition of amino acid is investigated in a test of the Vester Ulbricht hypothesis that L-amino acids were produced in preference to the D isomers on the primitive earth due to the effects of parity violation in beta decay. Samples of DL-leucine were irradiated with protons of both positive and negative longitudinal polarization, then analyzed by gas chromatography. Despite advantages of higher polarization, lower velocity and higher ionization density of protons with respect to electrons, proton irradation is found to lead to no detectable asymmetries in DL-leucine degradation, even at 50% gross degradation.

  5. Housefly larvae hydrolysate: orthogonal optimization of hydrolysis, antioxidant activity, amino acid composition and functional properties

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    C- 4°C and room temperature during the first 6 months of storage. Essential amino acids in the hydrolysate accounted for 43% of the total amino acids. Conclusions The results suggesting that hydrolysate could be added to food oils as an efficient antioxidant. It might be useful for food additives, diet nutrients and pharmaceutical agents. PMID:23683361

  6. Antiproliferative activity of king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Li Lee, Mui; Chung, Ivy; Yee Fung, Shin; Kanthimathi, M S; Hong Tan, Nget

    2014-04-01

    King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO), a heat-stable enzyme, is an extremely potent antiproliferative agent against cancer cells when compared with LAAO isolated from other snake venoms. King cobra venom LAAO was shown to exhibit very strong antiproliferative activities against MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma) and A549 (human lung adenocarcinoma) cells, with an IC50 value of 0.04±0.00 and 0.05±0.00 μg/mL, respectively, after 72-hr treatment. In comparison, its cytotoxicity was about 3-4 times lower when tested against human non-tumourigenic breast (184B5) and lung (NL 20) cells, suggesting selective antitumour activity. Furthermore, its potency in MCF-7 and A549 cell lines was greater than the effects of doxorubicin, a clinically established cancer chemotherapeutic agent, which showed an IC50 value of 0.18±0.03 and 0.63±0.21 μg/mL, respectively, against the two cell lines. The selective cytotoxic action of the LAAO was confirmed by phycoerythrin (PE) annexin V/7-amino-actinomycin (AAD) apoptotic assay, in which a significant increase in apoptotic cells was observed in LAAO-treated tumour cells than in their non-tumourigenic counterparts. The ability of LAAO to induce apoptosis in tumour cells was further demonstrated using caspase-3/7 and DNA fragmentation assays. We also determined that this enzyme may target oxidative stress in its killing of tumour cells, as its cytotoxicity was significantly reduced in the presence of catalase (a H2O2 scavenger). In view of its heat stability and selective and potent cytotoxic action on cancer cells, king cobra venom LAAO can be potentially developed for treating solid tumours.

  7. Probing Gαi1 Protein Activation at Single Amino Acid Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dawei; Maeda, Shoji; Matkovic, Milos; Mendieta, Sandro; Mayer, Daniel; Dawson, Roger; Schertler, Gebhard F.X.; Madan Babu, M.; Veprintsev, Dmitry B.

    2016-01-01

    We present comprehensive single amino acid resolution maps of the residues stabilising the human Gαi1 subunit in nucleotide- and receptor-bound states. We generated these maps by measuring the effects of alanine mutations on the stability of Gαi1 and of the rhodopsin-Gαi1 complex. We identified stabilization clusters in the GTPase and helical domains responsible for structural integrity and the conformational changes associated with activation. In activation cluster I, helices α1 and α5 pack against strands β1-3 to stabilize the nucleotide-bound states. In the receptor-bound state, these interactions are replaced by interactions between α5 and strands β4-6. Key residues in this cluster are Y320, crucial for the stabilization of the receptor-bound state, and F336, which stabilizes nucleotide-bound states. Destabilization of helix α1, caused by rearrangement of this activation cluster, leads to the weakening of the inter-domain interface and release of GDP. PMID:26258638

  8. Sulfur amino acid deficiency upregulates intestinal methionine cycle activity and suppresses epithelial growth in neonatal pigs.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We recently showed that the developing gut is a significant site of methionine transmethylation to homocysteine and transsulfuration to cysteine. We hypothesized that sulfur amino acid (SAA) deficiency would preferentially reduce mucosal growth and antioxidant function in neonatal pigs. Neonatal pi...

  9. On the reported optical activity of amino acids in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bada, J. L.; Cronin, J. R.; Ho, M.-S.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Lawless, J. G.; Miller, S. L.; Oro, J.; Steinberg, S.

    1983-02-01

    It is shown that the explanation of terrestrial contamination of the Murchison meteorite is consistent with the analysis of extracts from the meteorite reported by Engel and Nagy (EN) (1982) and is much more probable than their suggestion that the excess of L-enantiomers for several protein amino acids is due to asymmetric synthesis or decomposition. The low abundance of serine and threonine reported by EN may be due to their decomposition during the derivatization procedure, and the absence of methionine, tyrosine, and phenylalanine can be attributed to various causes. The amount of contamination in EN's extracts are estimated from a mass balance of the amino acid enantiomers, and it is found that the amino acids in the HCl could be due entirely to contamination while in the water extract the amount of contamination ranges from about 40 to 97 percent, depending on the amino acid. The argument that contaminants were preferentially extracted by EN's procedure cannot account for the failure to detect methionine, tyrosine, and phenylalanine.

  10. Ondansetron attenuates the activity of excitatory amino acid transporter type 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Hur, Wonseok; Lee, Mi Kyoung; Park, Hee-Pyeong; Kim, Chong-Sung; Yoon, Hea-Jo; Zuo, Zhiyi; Do, Sang-Hwan

    2014-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ondansetron on excitatory amino acid transporter type 3 (EAAT3) and to elucidate the roles of protein kinase C (PKC) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in the effect. EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes following the injection of rat EAAT3 mRNAs. Using the two-electrode voltage clamping method, the inward currents induced by L-glutamate were measured for 1 min in the presence and absence of ondansetron (1-1000 μM). Different concentrations of L-glutamate (3-300 μM) were used to determine the kinetic characteristics of EAAT3. To identify the involvement of PKC and PI3K in the effect, oocytes were exposed to a PKC activator and to PKC inhibitors and PI3K inhibitors, and L-glutamate-induced currents were recorded. Ondansetron decreased EAAT3 activity in a dose-dependent manner. In a kinetic study, ondansetron (10 μM for 3 min) reduced Vmax, but not Km compared with the control group. The PKC activator abolished the ondansetron-induced decrease in EAAT3 activity. The PKC inhibitors (staurosporine and chelerythrine) and ondansetron had not additive or synergistic effects on EAAT3 activity. The PI3K inhibitors (wortmannin and LY294002) decreased the EAAT3 response, although there were no differences among the groups comprising ondansetron, PI3K inhibitors, and PI3K inhibitors plus ondansetron. Our results demonstrate that ondansetron attenuates EAAT3 activity and this effect seems to be mediated by PKC and PI3K.

  11. Defined amino acids in the gag proteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 are functionally active during virus assembly.

    PubMed

    Kattenbeck, B; Rohrhofer, A; Niedrig, M; Wolf, H; Modrow, S

    1996-01-01

    A structurally highly ordered arrangement of the polyprotein precursor, Pr55gag is a necessary prerequisite for assembly, budding and maturation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In particular, distinct regions of the matrix protein (p17) and the capsid protein (p24) contained within Pr55gag are functionally active during these processes. In order to determine such regions we exchanged amino acid triplets within p17 (amino acids 46-61) and p24 (amino acids 341-352) for alanine residues and deleted the whole regions. Synthetic peptides derived from these regions had been shown previously to inhibit the production of infectious virus. The effect of the mutations on the release of viral particles was investigated by using recombinant baculoviruses for the expression of mutated Pr55gag as virus-like particles and by use of the respective HI proviruses for monitoring the production of infectious particles.

  12. Protein and amino acid nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy cow protein and amino acid nutrition have a significant role in sustainable dairying. Protein, amino acids, and nitrogen are inextricably linked through effects in the rumen, metabolism of the cow, and environmental nutrient management. Feeding systems have been making progress toward emphasiz...

  13. Chemical compositions, free amino acid contents and antioxidant activities of Hanwoo (Bos taurus coreanae) beef by cut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate chemical compositions, free amino acid contents, and antioxidant activities of different cuts of Hanwoo (Bos taurus coreanae) beef. Beef preferences and prices in the Korean market depend on cut. Therefore, comparisons were made between high-preference (gr...

  14. A single amino acid change humanizes long-chain fatty acid binding and activation of mouse peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Oswal, Dhawal P.; Alter, Gerald M.; Rider, S. Dean; Hostetler, Heather A.

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is an important regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism which functions through ligand binding. Despite high amino acid sequence identity (>90%), marked differences in PPARα ligand binding, activation and gene regulation have been noted across species. Similar to previous observations with synthetic agonists, we have recently reported differences in ligand affinities and extent of activation between human PPARα (hPPARα) and mouse PPARα (mPPARα) in response to long chain fatty acids (LCFA). The present study was aimed to determine if structural alterations could account for these differences. The binding of PPARα to LCFA was examined through in silico molecular modeling and docking simulations. Modeling suggested that variances at amino acid position 272 are likely to be responsible for differences in saturated LCFA binding to hPPARα and mPPARα. To confirm these results experimentally, LCFA binding, circular dichroism, and transactivation studies were performed using a F272I mutant form of mPPARα. Experimental data correlated with in silico docking simulations, further confirming the importance of amino acid 272 in LCFA binding. Although the driving force for evolution of species differences at this position are yet unidentified, this study enhances our understanding of ligand-induced regulation by PPARα and demonstrates the efficacy of molecular modeling and docking simulations. PMID:24858253

  15. Mutational analysis of amino acid residues involved in catalytic activity of a family 18 chitinase from tulip bulbs.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Keisuke; Yamagami, Takeshi; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kuhara, Satoru; Aso, Yoichi; Ishiguro, Masatsune

    2003-02-01

    We expressed chitinase-1 (TBC-1) from tulip bulbs (Tulipa bakeri) in E. coli cells and used site-directed mutagenesis to identify amino acid residues essential for catalytic activity. Mutations at Glu-125 and Trp-251 completely abolished enzyme activity, and activity decreased with mutations at Asp-123 and Trp-172 when glycolchitin was the substrate. Activity changed with the mutations of Trp-251 to one of several amino acids with side-chains of little hydrophobicity, suggesting that hydrophobic interaction of Trp-251 is important for the activity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation analysis with hevamine as the model compound showed that the distance between Asp-123 and Glu-125 was extended by mutation of Trp-251. Kinetic studies of Trp-251-mutated chitinases confirmed these various phenomena. The results suggested that Glu-125 and Trp-251 are essential for enzyme activity and that Trp-251 had a direct role in ligand binding.

  16. Lead detoxification activities of a class of novel DMSA--amino acid conjugates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanxia; Wang, Yuji; Wang, Ling; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Hu, Xiaomin; Hou, Baoguang; Peng, Li; Zheng, Meiqing; Wu, Jianhui; Peng, Shiqi

    2011-06-20

    The coupling of the 1-carboxyl of DMSA with l-amino acids led to a class of novel 1-(carbonyl-l-amino-acid)-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acids (DMSA--amino acid conjugates, DMSA-Gly, -Ser, -Val, -Leu, -Ile, -Asn, -Asp, -Gln, -Glu, -Met, -Phe, and -Trp). In the in vivo evaluation of Pb-loaded mice, 0.4 mmol/kg of the conjugates effectively decreased the Pb levels of the femur, brain, kidney, liver, and blood, greatly enhanced urination, and increased the Pb levels of both urine and feces, while causing no redistributions of Pb to the other organs, especially to the brain. With respect to lowering the bone and brain Pb, DMSA-Ile, -Asn, -Gln, and -Met were more effective than DMSA. This benefit was attributed to their high transmembrane ability. In contrast to Pb, the essential metals such as Fe, Cu, Zn, and Ca of the treated mice were not affected by the administration of the conjugates. Silico molecular modeling predicted that the conjugates had little hepatotoxicity, except possibly for DMSA-Phe.

  17. Identification of Critical Amino Acids within the Nucleoprotein of Tacaribe Virus Important for Anti-interferon Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Brooke; Kozina, Carol; Maar, Dianna; Carpenter, Timothy S.; Branda, Catherine S.; Negrete, Oscar A.; Carson, Bryan D.

    2013-01-01

    The arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) can suppress induction of type I interferon (IFN). This anti-IFN activity is thought to be shared by all arenaviruses with the exception of Tacaribe virus (TCRV). To identify the TCRV NP amino acid residues that prevent its IFN-countering ability, we created a series of NP chimeras between residues of TCRV NP and Pichinde virus (PICV) NP, an arenavirus NP with potent anti-IFN function. Chimera NP analysis revealed that a minimal four amino acid stretch derived from PICV NP could impart efficient anti-IFN activity to TCRV NP. Strikingly, the TCRV NP gene cloned and sequenced from viral stocks obtained through National Institutes of Health Biodefense and Emerging Infections (BEI) resources deviated from the reference sequence at this particular four-amino acid region, GPPT (GenBank KC329849) versus DLQL (GenBank NC004293), respectively at residues 389–392. When efficiently expressed in cells through codon-optimization, TCRV NP containing the GPPT residues rescued the antagonistic IFN function. Consistent with cell expression results, TCRV infection did not stimulate an IFNβ response early in infection in multiple cells types (e.g. A549, P388D1), and IRF-3 was not translocated to the nucleus in TCRV-infected A549 cells. Collectively, these data suggest that certain TCRV strain variants contain the important NP amino acids necessary for anti-IFN activity. PMID:23382389

  18. Synthesis and biological activity evaluation of novel amino acid derivatives as potential elicitors against Tomato yellow leaf curl virus.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yufang; He, Shun; Geng, Qianqian; Duan, Yongheng; Guo, Mingcheng; Li, Jianqiang; Cao, Yongsong

    2015-12-01

    Disease caused by Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) brings serious production losses of cultivated tomato worldwide. In our previous study, two novel amino acid derivatives exerted satisfactory antiviral activities against TYLCV. In this study, the variation of TYLCV, the transcriptional expression level of Ty-1 and the enzyme activities of POD and PPO in tomato were monitored after treatment with two amino acid derivatives to illustrate the antiviral mechanism. The results showed the symptom severity caused by TYLCV was reduced significantly by two compounds and was associated with the inhibition of viral DNA level at the early stage. Among three levels of concentration, the highest inhibition rate of CNBF-His was 40.66% at 1000 mg/L, for CNBF-Asn, the highest inhibition rate was 36.26% at 2000 mg/L 30 days post-inoculation. Two compounds could also enhance the activities of PPO and POD and the transcriptional expression level of Ty-1 which correlates with plant resistance in tomato. In the field test, two compounds increased the yields of tomato and the maximum increase of yield was 37.66%. This is the first report of novel amino acid derivatives inducing resistance in tomato plant against TYLCV. It is suggested that amino acid derivatives have the potential to be an effective approach against TYLCV in tomato plant.

  19. Gemini surfactants from natural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Lourdes; Pinazo, Aurora; Pons, Ramon; Infante, Mrosa

    2014-03-01

    In this review, we report the most important contributions in the structure, synthesis, physicochemical (surface adsorption, aggregation and phase behaviour) and biological properties (toxicity, antimicrobial activity and biodegradation) of Gemini natural amino acid-based surfactants, and some potential applications, with an emphasis on the use of these surfactants as non-viral delivery system agents. Gemini surfactants derived from basic (Arg, Lys), neutral (Ser, Ala, Sar), acid (Asp) and sulphur containing amino acids (Cys) as polar head groups, and Geminis with amino acids/peptides in the spacer chain are reviewed.

  20. Antiviral activity of Thiosemicarbazones derived from α-amino acids against Dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Padmapriya; Khaleefathullah, Sheriff; Kaveri, Krishansamy; Palani, Gunasekaran; Ramanathan, Giriprasath; Thennarasu, Sathiah; Tirichurapalli Sivagnanam, Uma

    2017-03-01

    The endemicity and seasonal outbreaks of Dengue disease in most tropical and subtropical countries underscores an urgent need to develop effective prevention and control measures. Development of a Dengue vaccine, which is complicated by the Antibody Dependent Enhancement effect (ADE), a viral inhibitor, seems prudent as it would inhibit the spread of the virus. In vitro methods such as MTT assay and plaque formation unit reduction assays were employed for screening the viral inhibitory property of α-amino acid based Thiosemicarbazides. The results elicits that at concentrations not exceeding the maximum non cytotoxic concentration (MNCC), these compounds completely prevented Dengue virus infection in vero cells as indicated by the absence of cytopathic effects in a dose-dependent manner. The high potency of Bz-Trp-TSC against all four types of Dengue virus infection elevates Thiosemicarbazide as a lead antiviral agent for Dengue disease. Screening small molecules for antiviral activity against the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease is being explored by several research groups. Our findings would help to augment the efforts to identify the lead compounds for antiviral therapy to combat the Dengue disease. J. Med. Virol. 89:546-552, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. 1. Appetite suppressant activity of supplemental dietary amino acids and subsequent compensatory growth of broilers.

    PubMed

    Acar, N; Patterson, P H; Barbato, G F

    2001-08-01

    This study was conducted to take advantage of the appetite-suppressant effect of excessive dietary amino acids in reducing feed intake and, in turn, restricting the early rapid growth of broilers to minimize metabolic disorders. Dietary amino acids were supplemented to a basal diet to yield a total of 1.57, 2.57, and 3.57% His; 2.7, 4.3, and 5.9% Lys; 1.36, 2.16, and 2.96% Met; 2.8, 3.8, and 4.8% Thr; and 1.27, 2.27, and 3.27% Trp and were fed to 408 chicks from 4 to 11 d of age. Fifteen dietary treatments of His, Lys, Met, Thr, and Trp were compared to the basal diet. Feed consumption was measured daily. Body weight measurements were taken at 0, 4, 7, 11, 14, and 21 d. At 21 d, pectoralis major and minor muscles, liver, and abdominal fat pad were weighed. High levels of Met and His caused the greatest depression in appetite from 4 to 11 d, and Thr, Trp, and Lys were found to be less potent. The exponential growth rate (EGR) of birds from 4 to 11 d of age was significantly reduced by the intermediate and high levels of the amino acid supplementation. From 11 to 14 d, EGR was greatest with high levels of Met or Trp, indicating more potential compensatory growth realized with these treatments. The high level of His decreased the percentage of pectoralis minor muscle yield, whereas the high level of Lys and Met increased the percentage of liver compared to those fed the basal diet. These results indicate that it is possible to use excessive individual amino acids in diets to suppress the appetite and early rapid growth to alleviate or minimize metabolic disorders.

  2. Isolation, structure determination, synthesis, and sensory activity of N-phenylpropenoyl-L-amino acids from cocoa (Theobroma cacao).

    PubMed

    Stark, Timo; Hofmann, Thomas

    2005-06-29

    Application of chromatographic separation and taste dilution analyses recently revealed besides procyanidins a series of N-phenylpropenoyl amino acids as the key contributors to the astringent taste of nonfermented cocoa beans as well as roasted cocoa nibs. Because these amides have as yet not been reported as key taste compounds, this paper presents the isolation, structure determination, and sensory activity of these amino acid amides. Besides the previously reported (-)-N-[3',4'-dihydroxy-(E)-cinnamoyl]-3-hydroxy-L-tyrosine (clovamide), (-)-N-[4'-hydroxy-(E)-cinnamoyl]-L-tyrosine (deoxyclovamide), and (-)-N-[3',4'-dihydroxy-(E)-cinnamoyl]-L-tyrosine, seven additional amides, namely, (+)-N-[3',4'-dihydroxy-(E)-cinnamoyl]-L-aspartic acid, (+)-N-[4'-hydroxy-(E)-cinnamoyl]-L-aspartic acid, (-)-N-[3',4'-dihydroxy-(E)-cinnamoyl]-L-glutamic acid, (-)-N-[4'-hydroxy-(E)-cinnamoyl]-L-glutamic acid, (-)-N-[4'-hydroxy-(E)-cinnamoyl]-3-hydroxy-L-tyrosine, (+)-N-[4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxy-(E)-cinnamoyl]-L-aspartic acid, and (+)-N-[(E)-cinnamoyl]-L-aspartic acid, were identified for the first time in cocoa products by means of LC-MS/MS, 1D/2D-NMR, UV-vis, CD spectroscopy, and polarimetry, as well as independent enantiopure synthesis. Using the recently developed half-tongue test, human recognition thresholds for the astringent and mouth-drying oral sensation were determined to be between 26 and 220 micromol/L (water) depending on the amino acid moiety. In addition, exposure to light rapidly converted these [E]-configured N-phenylpropenoyl amino acids into the corresponding [Z]-isomers, thus indicating that analysis of these compounds in food and plant materials needs to be performed very carefully in the absence of light to prevent artifact formation.

  3. Amino Acid Utilization in Seeds of Loblolly Pine during Germination and Early Seedling Growth (I. Arginine and Arginase Activity).

    PubMed Central

    King, J. E.; Gifford, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    The mobilization and utilization of the major storage proteins in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seeds following imbibition were investigated. Most of the seed protein reserves were contained within the megagametophyte. Breakdown of these proteins occurred primarily following radicle emergence and correlated with a substantial increase in the free amino acid pool in the seedling; the majority of this increase appeared to be the result of export from the megagametophyte. The megagametophyte was able to break down storage proteins and export free amino acids in the absence of the seedling. Arginine (Arg) was the most abundant amino acid among the principal storage proteins of the megagametophyte and was a major component of the free amino acid pools in both the seedling and the megagametophyte. The increase in free Arg coincided with a marked increase in arginase activity, mainly localized within the cotyledons and epicotyl of the seedling. Arginase activity was negligible in isolated seedlings. Experiments with phenylphosphorodiamidate, a urease inhibitor, supported the hypothesis that arginase participates in Arg metabolism in the seedling. The results of this study indicate that Arg could play an important role in the nutrition of loblolly pine during early seedling growth. PMID:12223664

  4. The amino acid sequence around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues, and the buried cysteine residue in ficin.

    PubMed

    Husain, S S; Lowe, G

    1970-04-01

    Ficin that had been prepared from the latex of Ficus glabrata by salt fractionation and chromatography on carboxymethylcellulose was completely and irreversibly inhibited with 1,3-dibromo[2-(14)C]acetone and then treated with N-(4-dimethylamino-3,5-dinitrophenyl)maleimide in 6m-guanidinium chloride. After reduction and carboxymethylation of the labelled protein, it was digested with trypsin and alpha-chymotrypsin. Two radioactive peptides and two coloured peptides were isolated chromatographically and their sequences determined. The radioactive peptides revealed the amino acid sequences around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues and showed a high degree of homology with the omino acid sequence around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues in papain. The coloured peptides allowed the amino acid sequence around the buried cysteine residue in ficin to be determined.

  5. Amino Acids from a Comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie Elisla

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 to Earth in January 2006. Examinations of the organic compounds in cometary samples can reveal information about the prebiotic organic inventory present on the early Earth and within the early Solar System, which may have contributed to the origin of life. Preliminary studies of Stardust material revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds (cometary- vs. terrestrial contamination) could not be identified. We have recently measured the carbon isotopic ratios of these amino acids to determine their origin, leading to the first detection of a coetary amino acid.

  6. Structure-activity relationship of ochratoxin A and synthesized derivatives: importance of amino acid and halogen moiety for cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Rottkord, Ulrike; Röhl, Christopher; Ferse, Ines; Schulz, Marie-Christin; Rückschloss, Uwe; Gekle, Michael; Schwerdt, Gerald; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2017-03-01

    The enigma why the mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA) impairs cell and organ function is still not solved. However, an interaction with target molecules is a prerequisite for any observed adverse effect. This interaction depends on characteristics of the target molecule as well as on the OTA molecule itself. OTA has different structural moieties which may be relevant for these interrelations including a halogen (chlorine) and an amino acid group (phenylalanine). To test their importance for the impact of OTA, detailed structure-activity studies with various OTA derivatives were performed. For this, 23 OTA derivatives were available, which were modified by either an exchange of the halogen moiety against another halogen (fluorine, iodine or bromine) or by the amino acid moiety against another one (tyrosine or alanine) or a combination of both. Additionally, the configuration of the 3R carbon atom was changed to 3S. These derivatives were tested in human renal cells for their ability to induce cell death (cytotoxicity, apoptosis, necrosis), their impact on collagen protein secretion and for their influence on gene expression. It turned out that the substitution of the amino acid moiety against tyrosine or alanine almost completely prevented the adverse effects of OTA. The exchange of the halogen moiety had minor effects and the inversion of the stereochemistry at C3 did not prevent the effects of OTA. Therefore, we conclude that the amino acid moiety of OTA is indispensable for the interaction of OTA with its target molecules.

  7. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 protein: Analysis of domain I and V amino acid interactions and membrane fusion activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Qianlong; Blissard, Gary W.; Liu, Tong-Xian; Li, Zhaofei

    2016-01-15

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. Although the post-fusion structure of GP64 has been solved, its pre-fusion structure and the detailed mechanism of conformational change are unknown. In GP64, domain V is predicted to interact with two domain I segments that flank fusion loop 2. To evaluate the significance of the amino acids involved in these interactions, we examined 24 amino acid positions that represent interacting and conserved residues within domains I and V. In several cases, substitution of a single amino acid involved in a predicted interaction disrupted membrane fusion activity, but no single amino acid pair appears to be absolutely required. We identified 4 critical residues in domain V (G438, W439, T452, and T456) that are important for membrane fusion, and two residues (G438 and W439) that appear to be important for formation or stability of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64. - Highlights: • The baculovirus envelope glycoprotein GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. • The detailed mechanism of conformational change of GP64 is unknown. • We analyzed 24 positions that might stabilize the post-fusion structure of GP64. • We identified 4 residues in domain V that were critical for membrane fusion. • Two residues are critical for formation of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64.

  8. Treatment of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... amino acid metabolism disorders Treatment of amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please fill ... This is an amino acid that helps remove ammonia from the blood. Babies with HCY may need ...

  9. Evaluation of antioxidant activity, polyphenolic compounds, amino acids and mineral elements of representative genotypes of Lonicera edulis.

    PubMed

    Sochor, Jiri; Jurikova, Tunde; Pohanka, Miroslav; Skutkova, Helena; Baron, Mojmir; Tomaskova, Lenka; Balla, Stefan; Klejdus, Borivoj; Pokluda, Robert; Mlcek, Jiri; Trojakova, Zuzana; Saloun, Jan

    2014-05-21

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioactive substances in 19 berry cultivars of edible honeysuckle (Lonicera edulis). A statistical evaluation was used to determine the relationship between the content of selected bioactive substances and individual cultivars. Regarding mineral elements, the content of sodium was measured using potentiometry and spectrophotometry. The content of selected polyphenolic compounds with high antioxidant activity was determined by a HPLC-UV/ED method. The total amount of polyphenols was determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method. The antioxidant activity was determined using five methods (DPPH, FRAP, ABTS, FR and DMPD) that differ in their principles. The content of 13 amino acids was determined by ion-exchange chromatography. The experimental results obtained for the different cultivars were evaluated and compared by statistical and bioinformatic methods. A unique feature of this study lies in the exhaustive analysis of the chosen parameters (amino acids, mineral elements, polyphenolic compounds and antioxidant activity) during one growing season.

  10. Unnatural amino acid-mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles and their antifungal activity against Candida species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Park, Hyun Ho

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the biocompatible unnatural amino acid, 3,4-dihydroxy- l-phenylalanine ( l-dopa), which is used in protein engineering, was employed in the facile synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band of the UV-Vis spectrum at 406 nm demonstrates the possibility of formation of smaller nanoparticles; the symmetrical shape of the band demonstrates a narrow size distribution of AgNPs, the formation of AgNPs, and the face-centered cubic (fcc) crystalline structure of nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Additionally, transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images revealed that these particles were spherical in shape with diameters of 2.7-12.2 nm (average = 8.7 nm). These nanoparticles exhibited antifungal activity against both planktonic and biofilm yeast cells of Candida albicans and C. dubliniensis. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFCs) were determined by microdilution assays. C. albicans were shown to be less susceptible than C. dubliniensis to AgNPs based on the MIC (ranging from 7.8 to 15.6 µg ml-1) and MFC (ranging from 31.2 to 62.5 µg ml-1). With regard to biomass quantification, AgNPs did not induce a significant reduction of the biomass of Candida species; however, treatment of biofilm with 500 µg/ml of AgNPs induced a 2.99-log10 ( P < 0.001) and 3.53-log10 ( P < 0.001) significant reduction in the number of culturable cells of CFUs when compared to control samples of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis, respectively. Thus, AgNPs-based antifungal agents would be an effective alternative to conventional drugs to overcome drug resistance in Candida-associated infections.

  11. Protein turnover, amino acid requirements and recommendations for athletes and active populations

    PubMed Central

    Poortmans, J.R.; Carpentier, A.; Pereira-Lancha, L.O.; Lancha, A.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the major deposit of protein molecules. As for any cell or tissue, total muscle protein reflects a dynamic turnover between net protein synthesis and degradation. Noninvasive and invasive techniques have been applied to determine amino acid catabolism and muscle protein building at rest, during exercise and during the recovery period after a single experiment or training sessions. Stable isotopic tracers (13C-lysine, 15N-glycine, 2H5-phenylalanine) and arteriovenous differences have been used in studies of skeletal muscle and collagen tissues under resting and exercise conditions. There are different fractional synthesis rates in skeletal muscle and tendon tissues, but there is no major difference between collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis. Strenuous exercise provokes increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis, the opposite occurring during the recovery period. Individuals who exercise respond differently when resistance and endurance types of contractions are compared. Endurance exercise induces a greater oxidative capacity (enzymes) compared to resistance exercise, which induces fiber hypertrophy (myofibrils). Nitrogen balance (difference between protein intake and protein degradation) for athletes is usually balanced when the intake of protein reaches 1.2 g·kg−1·day−1 compared to 0.8 g·kg−1·day−1 in resting individuals. Muscular activities promote a cascade of signals leading to the stimulation of eukaryotic initiation of myofibrillar protein synthesis. As suggested in several publications, a bolus of 15-20 g protein (from skimmed milk or whey proteins) and carbohydrate (± 30 g maltodextrine) drinks is needed immediately after stopping exercise to stimulate muscle protein and tendon collagen turnover within 1 h. PMID:22666780

  12. Amino acid residues 201-205 in C-terminal acidic tail region plays a crucial role in antibacterial activity of HMGB1

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Antibacterial activity is a novel function of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). However, the functional site for this new effect is presently unknown. Methods and Results In this study, recombinant human HMGB1 A box and B box (rHMGB1 A box, rHMGB1 B box), recombinant human HMGB1 (rHMGB1) and the truncated C-terminal acidic tail mutant (tHMGB1) were prepared by the prokaryotic expression system. The C-terminal acidic tail (C peptide) was synthesized, which was composed of 30 amino acid residues. Antibacterial assays showed that both the full length rHMGB1 and the synthetic C peptide alone could efficiently inhibit bacteria proliferation, but rHMGB1 A box and B box, and tHMGB1 lacking the C-terminal acidic tail had no antibacterial function. These results suggest that C-terminal acidic tail is the key region for the antibacterial activity of HMGB1. Furthermore, we prepared eleven different deleted mutants lacking several amino acid residues in C-terminal acidic tail of HMGB1. Antibacterial assays of these mutants demonstrate that the amino acid residues 201-205 in C-terminal acidic tail region is the core functional site for the antibacterial activity of the molecule. Conclusion In sum, these results define the key region and the crucial site in HMGB1 for its antibacterial function, which is helpful to illustrating the antibacterial mechanisms of HMGB1. PMID:19751520

  13. The cyanobacterial Fluorescence Recovery Protein has two distinct activities: Orange Carotenoid Protein amino acids involved in FRP interaction.

    PubMed

    Thurotte, Adrien; Bourcier de Carbon, Céline; Wilson, Adjélé; Talbot, Léa; Cot, Sandrine; López-Igual, Rocio; Kirilovsky, Diana

    2017-04-01

    To deal with fluctuating light condition, cyanobacteria have developed a photoprotective mechanism which, under high light conditions, decreases the energy arriving at the photochemical centers. It relies on a photoswitch, the Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP). Once photoactivated, OCP binds to the light harvesting antenna, the phycobilisome (PBS), and triggers the thermal dissipation of the excess energy absorbed. Deactivation of the photoprotective mechanism requires the intervention of a third partner, the Fluorescence Recovery Protein (FRP). FRP by interacting with the photoactivated OCP accelerates its conversion to the non-active form and its detachment from the phycobilisome. We have studied the interaction of FRP with free and phycobilisome-bound OCP. Several OCP variants were constructed and characterized. In this article we show that OCP amino acid F299 is essential and D220 important for OCP deactivation mediated by FRP. Mutations of these amino acids did not affect FRP activity as helper to detach OCP from phycobilisomes. In addition, while mutated R60L FRP is inactive on OCP deactivation, its activity on the detachment of the OCP from the phycobilisomes is not affected. Thus, our results demonstrate that FRP has two distinct activities: it accelerates OCP detachment from phycobilisomes and then it helps deactivation of the OCP. They also suggest that different OCP and FRP amino acids could be involved in these two activities.

  14. Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of Amino Acid Substitutions in Radiolabeled Neurotensin Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Mascarin, Alba; Valverde, Ibai E; Mindt, Thomas L

    2016-01-05

    Radiolabeled derivatives of the peptide neurotensin (NT) and its binding sequence NT(8-13) have been studied as potential imaging probes and therapeutics for NT-1-receptor-positive cancer. However, a direct comparison of reported NT analogues, even if radiolabeled with the same radionuclide, is difficult because different techniques and models have been used for preclinical evaluations. In an effort to identify a suitable derivative of NT(8-13) for radiotracer development, we herein report a side-by-side in vitro comparison of radiometallated NT derivatives bearing some of the most commonly reported amino acid substitutions in their sequence. Performed investigations include cell internalization experiments, determinations of receptor affinity, measurements of the distribution coefficient, and blood serum stability studies. Of the [(177)Lu]-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-labeled examples studied, analogues of NT(8-13) containing a short hydrophilic tetraethylene glycol (PEG4 ) spacer between the peptide and the radiometal complex, and a minimum number of substitutions of amino acid residues, exhibited the most promising properties in vitro.

  15. Plasma concentrations of amino acid and nicotinamide metabolites in rheumatoid arthritis--potential biomarkers of disease activity and drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Smolenska, Zaneta; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Zdrojewski, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate changes in plasma amino acid and nicotinamide metabolites concentrations in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a search for potential biomarkers of the disease activity and the effect treatment. Analysis of plasma metabolite patterns with liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry revealed specific changes in RA as well as correlations with clinical parameters. Combined concentration parameter calculated as [aspartic acid] + [threonine] + [tryptophan] - [histidine] - [phenylalanine] offered the strongest correlation (p < 0.001) with pain joint count, swollen joint count and DAS 28. Such analysis of amino acid and related metabolite pattern offers potential for diagnosis as well as for monitoring disease progression and therapy in RA.

  16. Synthesis and antimycobacterial activity of N-(2-aminopurin-6-yl) and N-(purin-6-yl) amino acids and dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Victor P; Vigorov, Alexey Yu; Musiyak, Vera V; Nizova, Irina A; Gruzdev, Dmitry A; Matveeva, Tatyana V; Levit, Galina L; Kravchenko, Marionella A; Skornyakov, Sergey N; Bekker, Olga B; Danilenko, Valery N; Charushin, Valery N

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic routes to novel N-(purin-6-yl)- and N-(2-aminopurin-6-yl) conjugates with amino acids and glycine-containing dipeptides were developed. In vitro testing of 42 new and known compounds made it possible to reveal a series of N-(purin-6-yl)- and N-(2-aminopurin-6-yl) conjugates exhibiting significant antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium terrae, and multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis strain isolated from tuberculosis patients in the Ural region (Russia). N-(2-Aminopurin-6-yl)- and N-(purin-6-yl)-glycyl-(S)-glutamic acids were the most active compounds.

  17. [A new SVRDF 3D-descriptor of amino acids and its application to peptide quantitative structure activity relationship].

    PubMed

    Tong, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Sheng-Wan; Cheng, Su-Li; Li, Gai-Xian

    2007-01-01

    To establish a new amino acid structure descriptor that can be applied to polypeptide quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) studies, a new descriptor, SVRDF, was derived from a principal components analysis of a matrix of 150 radial distribution function index of amino acids. The scale was then applied in three panels of peptide QSAR that were molded by partial least squares regression. The obtained models with the correlation coefficients (R2(cum)), cross-validation correlation coefficients (Q2(cum)) were 0.766 and 0.724 for 48 bitter tasting dipeptides; 0.941 and 0.811 for 21 oxytocin analogues; 0.996 and 0.919 for 20 thromboplastin inhibitors. Satisfactory results showed that information related to biological activity can be systemically expressed by SVRDF scales, which may be an useful structural expression methodology for the study of peptides QSAR.

  18. Amino acid odorants stimulate microvillar sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Lipschitz, David L; Michel, William C

    2002-03-01

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) of zebrafish is populated with ciliated and microvillar olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Whether distinct classes of odorants specifically activate either of these unique populations of OSNs is unknown. Previously we demonstrated that zebrafish OSNs could be labeled in an activity-dependent fashion by amino acid but not bile acid odorants. To determine which sensory neuron type was stimulated by amino acid odorants, we labeled OSNs using the ion channel permeant probe agmatine (AGB) and analyzed its distribution with conventional light- and electron-microscope immunocytochemical techniques. Approximately 7% of the sensory epithelium was labeled by AGB exposure alone. Following stimulation with one of the eight amino acids tested, the proportion of labeled epithelium increased from 9% for histidine to 19% for alanine; amino acid stimulated increases in labeling of 2-12% over control labeling. Only histidine failed to stimulate a significant increase in the proportion of labeled OSNs compared to control preparations. Most amino acid sensitive OSNs were located superficially in the epithelium and immuno-electron microscopy demonstrated that the labeled OSNs were predominantly microvillar. Large numbers of nanogold particles (20-60 per 1.5 microm(2)) were associated with microvillar olfactory sensory neurons (MSNs), while few such particles (<15 per 1.5 microm(2)) were observed over ciliated olfactory sensory neurons (CSNs), supporting cells (SCs) and areas without tissue, such as the lumen above the OE. Collectively, these findings indicate that microvillar sensory neurons are capable of detecting amino acid odorants.

  19. Purification and amino acid composition of a peptide with molt-inhibiting activity from the lobster, Homarus americanus.

    PubMed

    Chang, E S; Bruce, M J; Newcomb, R W

    1987-01-01

    A peptide was isolated and purified from sinus glands of the lobster, Homarus americanus, that was able to decrease circulating titers of ecdysteroids and increase the molt interval of eyestalk-ablated juvenile lobsters. This molt-inhibiting activity was demonstrated to consist of two very closely related peptides by means of high-performance liquid chromatography and gel electrophoresis. By means of amino acid analyses, a molecular weight of approximately 8700 was obtained.

  20. Requirement of extracellular Ca(2+) binding to specific amino acids for heat-evoked activation of TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Kurganov, Erkin; Saito, Shigeru; Saito, Claire T; Tominaga, Makoto

    2017-02-14

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a homotetrameric nonselective cation-permeable channel that has six transmembrane domains and cytoplasmic N- and C-termini. The N-terminus is characterized by an unusually large number of ankyrin repeats. Although the 3-dimensional structure of human TRPA1 has been determined, and TRPA1 channels from insects to birds are known to be activated by heat stimulus, the mechanism for temperature-dependent TRPA1 activation is unclear. We previously reported that extracellular Ca(2+) , but not intracellular Ca(2+) , plays an important role in heat-evoked TRPA1 activation in green anole lizards (gaTRPA1). Here we focus on extracellular Ca(2+) -dependent heat sensitivity of gaTRPA1 by comparing gaTRPA1 with heat-activated TRPA1 channels from rat snake (rsTRPA1) and chicken (chTRPA1). In the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) , rsTRPA1 and chTRPA1 are activated by heat and generate small inward currents. A comparison of extracellular amino acids in TRPA1 identified three negatively charged amino acid residues (glutamate and aspartate) near the outer pore vestibule that are involved in heat-evoked TRPA1 activation in the presence of extracellular Ca(2+) . These results suggest that neutralization of acidic amino acids by extracellular Ca(2+) is important for heat-evoked activation of gaTRPA1, chTRPA1, and rsTRPA1, which could clarify mechanisms of heat-evoked channel activation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Criteria for distinguishing biogenic and abiogenic amino acids - Preliminary considerations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1973-01-01

    Criteria to determine the mode of origin of amino acids can be established by consideration of their structure, enantiometric distribution, composition, and relative abundance. A population of dominantly protein amino acids with one enantiomeric configuration most likely had a biological origin. Biological amino acids do racemize, however, so the absence of optical activity would not rule out the possibility that the amino acids in a racemic mixture were originally synthesized biologically. For racemic amino acids, therefore, structure, composition and relative abundance become important in ascertaining the origin of these compounds. Abiotically synthesized amino acids have a population composed of both protein and nonprotein structures present as racemic mixtures.

  2. Production of amino acids by yogurt bacteria.

    PubMed

    Beshkova, D M; Simova, E D; Frengova, G I; Simov, Z I; Adilov, E F

    1998-01-01

    The dynamics of free amino acid production by the selected strains Streptococcus thermophilus 13a and Lactobacillus bulgaricus 2-11 were studied in pure and mixed cultivations during yogurt starter culture manufacture. L. bulgaricus 2-11 showed the highest activity for producing free amino acids with high individual concentrations over the first hour of growth (50% of the total amount). By the end of milk's full coagulation (4.5 h), 70% of the total amount of amino acids was released. S. thermophilus 13a showed poor proteolytic properties and consumed up to 70% of the free amino acids produced by L. bulgaricus 2-11 in the process of coagulation of milk with the mixed culture.

  3. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... acidemia? In ASA, the body can’t remove ammonia or a substance called argininosuccinic acid from the ... and children include: Breathing problems High levels of ammonia in the bloodIntense headache, especially after a high- ...

  4. Role of protein, amino acids, and enzyme activity on odor production from anaerobically digested and dewatered biosolids.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Matthew J; Adams, Gregory; Chen, Yen-Chih; Erdal, Zeynep; Forbes, Robert H; Glindemann, Dietmar; Hargreaves, J Ronald; McEwen, David; Murthy, Sudhir N; Novak, John T; Witherspoon, Jay

    2008-02-01

    The main objective of this research was to test the hypothesis that bioavailable protein and, more specifically, the sulfur-containing amino acids within the protein, can be degraded by proteolytic enzymes to produce odor-causing compounds--mainly volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs)--during biosolids storage. To achieve these objectives, samples of digester effluent and cake solids were collected at 11 different wastewater treatment plants in North America, and the samples were analyzed for protein and amino acid content and general protein-degrading enzyme activity. At the same time, cake samples were stored using headspace bottles, the concentration of VSCs were measured using gas chromatography, and olfactometry measurements were made by a trained odor panel. The results showed that the bound cake protein content and methionine content was well-correlated with VSC production and the detection threshold measured by the odor panel.

  5. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and....320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used as nutrients added to foods in... individual amino acids in the free, hydrated, or anhydrous form, or as the hydrochloride, sodium,...

  6. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used... consists of one or more of the following individual amino acids in the free, hydrated or anhydrous form...

  7. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and Drugs... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used... consists of one or more of the following individual amino acids in the free, hydrated or anhydrous form...

  8. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used... consists of one or more of the following individual amino acids in the free, hydrated or anhydrous form...

  9. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used... consists of one or more of the following individual amino acids in the free, hydrated or anhydrous form...

  10. Ursolic Acid Inhibits Na+/K+-ATPase Activity and Prevents TNF-α-Induced Gene Expression by Blocking Amino Acid Transport and Cellular Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yokomichi, Tomonobu; Morimoto, Kyoko; Oshima, Nana; Yamada, Yuriko; Fu, Liwei; Taketani, Shigeru; Ando, Masayoshi; Kataoka, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, induce the expression of a wide variety of genes, including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Ursolic acid (3β-hydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oic acid) was identified to inhibit the cell-surface ICAM-1 expression induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines in human lung carcinoma A549 cells. Ursolic acid was found to inhibit the TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 protein expression almost completely, whereas the TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 mRNA expression and NF-κB signaling pathway were decreased only partially by ursolic acid. In line with these findings, ursolic acid prevented cellular protein synthesis as well as amino acid uptake, but did not obviously affect nucleoside uptake and the subsequent DNA/RNA syntheses. This inhibitory profile of ursolic acid was similar to that of the Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitor, ouabain, but not the translation inhibitor, cycloheximide. Consistent with this notion, ursolic acid was found to inhibit the catalytic activity of Na+/K+-ATPase. Thus, our present study reveals a novel molecular mechanism in which ursolic acid inhibits Na+/K+-ATPase activity and prevents the TNF-α-induced gene expression by blocking amino acid transport and cellular protein synthesis. PMID:24970122

  11. GCN2 whets the appetite for amino acids.

    PubMed

    Dever, Thomas E; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2005-04-15

    In response to amino acid starvation, the kinase GCN2 in yeast activates amino acid biosynthesis. Two recent studies (Maurin et al., 2005; Hao et al., 2005) reveal that GCN2 in the brain of mice restricts intake of diets lacking essential amino acids.

  12. One-pot synthesis of amino acid precursors with insoluble organic matter in planetesimals with aqueous activity.

    PubMed

    Kebukawa, Yoko; Chan, Queenie H S; Tachibana, Shogo; Kobayashi, Kensei; Zolensky, Michael E

    2017-03-01

    The exogenous delivery of organic molecules could have played an important role in the emergence of life on the early Earth. Carbonaceous chondrites are known to contain indigenous amino acids as well as various organic compounds and complex macromolecular materials, such as the so-called insoluble organic matter (IOM), but the origins of the organic matter are still subject to debate. We report that the water-soluble amino acid precursors are synthesized from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia with the presence of liquid water, simultaneously with macromolecular organic solids similar to the chondritic IOM. Amino acid products from hydrothermal experiments after acid hydrolysis include α-, β-, and γ-amino acids up to five carbons, for which relative abundances are similar to those extracted from carbonaceous chondrites. One-pot aqueous processing from simple ubiquitous molecules can thus produce a wide variety of meteoritic organic matter from amino acid precursors to macromolecular IOM in chondrite parent bodies.

  13. One-pot synthesis of amino acid precursors with insoluble organic matter in planetesimals with aqueous activity

    PubMed Central

    Kebukawa, Yoko; Chan, Queenie H. S.; Tachibana, Shogo; Kobayashi, Kensei; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2017-01-01

    The exogenous delivery of organic molecules could have played an important role in the emergence of life on the early Earth. Carbonaceous chondrites are known to contain indigenous amino acids as well as various organic compounds and complex macromolecular materials, such as the so-called insoluble organic matter (IOM), but the origins of the organic matter are still subject to debate. We report that the water-soluble amino acid precursors are synthesized from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia with the presence of liquid water, simultaneously with macromolecular organic solids similar to the chondritic IOM. Amino acid products from hydrothermal experiments after acid hydrolysis include α-, β-, and γ-amino acids up to five carbons, for which relative abundances are similar to those extracted from carbonaceous chondrites. One-pot aqueous processing from simple ubiquitous molecules can thus produce a wide variety of meteoritic organic matter from amino acid precursors to macromolecular IOM in chondrite parent bodies. PMID:28345041

  14. Interaction of Adjacent Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen

    2008-02-01

    Ramachandran plots display the dihedral angles of a single protein residue. We here propose a crossed torsion angle plot called SSY-plot between two neighboring amino acids and demonstrate that a special coherence motion can exist between some very special amino acid pairs leading to spontaneous unusual structures. We also suggest that the existence of two domains corresponds to a bifurcation between two different protein structures and that the special pair is the key to producing these two structures. These are two different structures and are produced spontaneously without an external agent.

  15. Aromatic amino acid mutagenesis at the substrate binding pocket of Yarrowia lipolytica lipase Lip2 affects its activity and thermostability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guilong; Liu, Zimin; Xu, Li; Yan, Yunjun

    2014-01-01

    The lipase2 from Yarrowia lipolytica (YLLip2) is a yeast lipase exhibiting high homologous to filamentous fungal lipase family. Though its crystal structure has been resolved, its structure-function relationship has rarely been reported. By contrast, there are two amino acid residues (V94 and I100) with significant difference in the substrate binding pocket of YLLip2; they were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) to introduce aromatic amino acid mutations. Two mutants (V94W and I100F) were created. The enzymatic properties of the mutant lipases were detected and compared with the wild-type. The activities of mutant enzymes dropped to some extent towards p-nitrophenyl palmitate (pNPC16) and their optimum temperature was 35°C, which was 5°C lower than that of the wild-type. However, the thermostability of I100F increased 22.44% after incubation for 1 h at 40°C and its optimum substrate shifted from p-nitrophenyl laurate (pNPC12) to p-nitrophenyl caprate (pNPC10). The above results demonstrated that the two substituted amino acid residuals have close relationship with such enzymatic properties as thermostability and substrate selectivity.

  16. Amino acid auxotrophy as a system of immunological control nodes.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J

    2016-02-01

    Cells of the immune system are auxotrophs for most amino acids, including several nonessential ones. Arginine and tryptophan are used within the regulatory immune networks to control proliferation and function through pathways that actively deplete the amino acid from the microenvironment or that create regulatory molecules such as nitric oxide or kynurenines. How immune cells integrate information about essential amino acid supplies and then transfer these signals to growth and activation pathways remains unclear but has potential for pathway discovery about amino sensing. In applied research, strategies to harness amino acid auxotrophy so as to block cancerous lymphocyte growth have been attempted for decades with limited success. Emerging insights about amino acid metabolism may lead to new strategies in clinical medicine whereby both amino acid auxotrophy and the immunoregulatory pathways controlled by amino acids can be manipulated.

  17. The Amino Acid Specificity for Activation of Phenylalanine Hydroxylase Matches the Specificity for Stabilization of Regulatory Domain Dimers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengnan; Hinck, Andrew P; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2015-08-25

    Liver phenylalanine hydroxylase is allosterically activated by phenylalanine. The structural changes that accompany activation have not been identified, but recent studies of the effects of phenylalanine on the isolated regulatory domain of the enzyme support a model in which phenylalanine binding promotes regulatory domain dimerization. Such a model predicts that compounds that stabilize the regulatory domain dimer will also activate the enzyme. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation were used to determine the ability of different amino acids and phenylalanine analogues to stabilize the regulatory domain dimer. The abilities of these compounds to activate the enzyme were analyzed by measuring their effects on the fluorescence change that accompanies activation and on the activity directly. At concentrations of 10-50 mM, d-phenylalanine, l-methionine, l-norleucine, and (S)-2-amino-3-phenyl-1-propanol were able to activate the enzyme to the same extent as 1 mM l-phenylalanine. Lower levels of activation were seen with l-4-aminophenylalanine, l-leucine, l-isoleucine, and 3-phenylpropionate. The ability of these compounds to stabilize the regulatory domain dimer agreed with their ability to activate the enzyme. These results support a model in which allosteric activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase is linked to dimerization of regulatory domains.

  18. Activity of MMP1 and MMP13 and Amino Acid Metabolism in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Prystupa, Andrzej; Szpetnar, Maria; Boguszewska-Czubara, Anna; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Sak, Jarosław; Załuska, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcoholic liver disease remains one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease worldwide. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of metalloproteinases (MMP1 and MMP13) as diagnostic markers of alcoholic liver disease and to determine the changes in free amino acid profile in the patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis. Material/Methods Sixty patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis treated in various hospitals of the Lublin region were randomly enrolled. The control group consisted of 10 healthy individuals without liver disease, who did not drink alcohol. Additionally, a group of alcoholics (22 persons) without liver cirrhosis was included in the study. The activity of MMP-1 and MMP-13 in blood plasma of patients and controls was measured using the sandwich enzyme immunoassay technique with commercially available quantitative ELISA test kits. Amino acids were determined by automated ion-exchange chromatography. Results No significant differences were observed in the activity of MMP-1 in alcoholics with or without liver cirrhosis or in controls. Increased serum MMP-13 was found in patients with liver cirrhosis (stage A, B, C) compared to the control group. Patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis (stage A, B, C) demonstrated reduced concentrations of glutamic acid and glutamine compared to the control group. Plasma levels of valine, isoleucine, leucine, and tryptophan were significantly lower in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis (stage C) than in controls. Conclusions MMP-13 can be useful to confirm the diagnosis of alcoholic liver cirrhosis, but levels of MMP-1 are not significantly increased in patients with liver cirrhosis compared to controls. The serum branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) is markedly reduced in patients with stage C alcoholic liver cirrhosis. PMID:25863779

  19. Surface active molecules: preparation and properties of long chain n-acyl-l-alpha-amino-omega-guanidine alkyl acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Infante, R; Dominguez, J G; Erra, P; Julia, R; Prats, M

    1984-12-01

    Synopsis A new route for the synthesis of long chain N(alpha)-acyl-l-alpha-amino-omega-guamdine alkyl acid derivatives, with cationic or amphoteric character has been established. The general formula of these compounds is shown below. A physico-chemical and antimicrobial study of these products as a function of the alkyl ester or sodium salt (R), the straight chain length of the fatty acid residue (x) and the number of carbons between the omega-guanidine and omega-carboxyl group (n) has been investigated. The water solubility, surface tension, critical micelle concentration (c.m.c.) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (including Pseudomonas) has been determined. Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide has been used to condense fatty acids and alpha-amino-omega-guanidine alkyl acids. In these conditions protection of the omega-guanidine group is not necessary. The main characteristic of this synthetic procedure is the use of very mild experimental conditions (temperature, pH) to form the amide linkage which leads to pure optical compounds in high yield in the absence of electrolytes. The results show that some structural modifications, particularly the protection of the carboxyl group, promote variations of the surfactant and antimicrobial properties. Only those molecules with the blocked carboxyl group (cationic molecules, where R = Me, Et or Pr) showed a good surfactant and antimicrobial activity. When the carboxyl group was unprotected (amphoteric molecules, where R = Na(+)) the resulting compounds were inactive.

  20. Killing of Mycobacterium avium by Lactoferricin Peptides: Improved Activity of Arginine- and d-Amino-Acid-Containing Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tânia; Magalhães, Bárbara; Maia, Sílvia; Gomes, Paula; Nazmi, Kamran; Bolscher, Jan G. M.; Rodrigues, Pedro N.; Bastos, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium causes respiratory disease in susceptible individuals, as well as disseminated infections in immunocompromised hosts, being an important cause of morbidity and mortality among these populations. Current therapies consist of a combination of antibiotics taken for at least 6 months, with no more than 60% overall clinical success. Furthermore, mycobacterial antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide, urging the need to develop novel classes of antimicrobial drugs. One potential and interesting alternative strategy is the use of antimicrobial peptides (AMP). These are present in almost all living organisms as part of their immune system, acting as a first barrier against invading pathogens. In this context, we investigated the effect of several lactoferrin-derived AMP against M. avium. Short peptide sequences from both human and bovine lactoferricins, namely, hLFcin1-11 and LFcin17-30, as well as variants obtained by specific amino acid substitutions, were evaluated. All tested peptides significantly inhibited the axenic growth of M. avium, the bovine peptides being more active than the human. Arginine residues were found to be crucial for the display of antimycobacterial activity, whereas the all-d-amino-acid analogue of the bovine sequence displayed the highest mycobactericidal activity. These findings reveal the promising potential of lactoferricins against mycobacteria, thus opening the way for further research on their development and use as a new weapon against mycobacterial infections. PMID:24709266

  1. Amino acid-mediated synthesis of zinc oxide nanostructures and evaluation of their facet-dependent antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Meghana; Ponnusamy, S; Muthamizhchelvan, C; Marsili, Enrico

    2014-05-01

    ZnO nanostructures (ZnO-NSs) of different morphologies are synthesized with the amino acids L-alanine, L-threonine, and L-glutamine as capping agents. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows the formation of a crystalline wurtzite phase of ZnO-NSs. The surface modification of ZnO-NSs due to the capping agents is confirmed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals that the concentration of surface defects correlates positively with the number of polar facets in ZnO-NSs. The antimicrobial activity of the ZnO-NSs has been tested against Escherichia coli and the common pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Bacillus subtilis. Culture-based methods in rich medium show up to 90% growth inhibition, depending on the ZnO-NSs. Flow cytometry analyses indicate that the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by ZnO-NSs contribute mostly to the antibacterial activity. Control experiments in minimal medium show that amino acids and other reducing agents in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium quench ROS, thereby decreasing the antimicrobial activity of the ZnO-NSs.

  2. Amino acid uptake in rust fungi

    PubMed Central

    Struck, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The plant pathogenic rust fungi colonize leaf tissue and feed off their host plants without killing them. Certain economically important species of different genera such as Melampsora, Phakopsora, Puccinia, or Uromyces are extensively studied for resolving the mechanisms of the obligate biotrophy. As obligate parasites rust fungi only can complete their life cycle on living hosts where they grow through the leaf tissue by developing an extended network of intercellular hyphae from which intracellular haustoria are differentiated. Haustoria are involved in key functions of the obligate biotrophic lifestyle: suppressing host defense responses and acquiring nutrients. This review provides a survey of rust fungi nitrogen nutrition with special emphasis on amino acid uptake. A variety of sequences of amino acid transporter genes of rust fungi have been published; however, transport activity of only three in planta highly up-regulated amino acid permeases have been characterized. Functional and immunohistochemical investigations have shown the specificity and localization of these transporters. Sequence data of various genome projects allowed identification of numerous rust amino acid transporter genes. An in silico analysis reveals that these genes can be classified into different transporter families. In addition, genetic and molecular data of amino acid transporters have provided new insights in the corresponding metabolic pathways. PMID:25699068

  3. Amino acid pools in cultured muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Low, R B; Stirewalt, W S; Rittling, S R; Woodworth, R C

    1984-01-01

    Compartmentalization of cellular amino acid pools occurs in cultures of cardiac and skeletal muscle cells, but the factors involved in this are not clear. We have further defined this problem by analyzing the intracellular free leucine and the transfer-RNA-(tRNA)-bound leucine pool in cultures of skeletal and cardiac muscle incubated with 3H-leucine in the presence and absence of serum and amino acids. Withdrawal of nitrogen substrates caused substantial changes in leucine pool relationships--in particular, a change in the degree to which intracellular free leucine and tRNA-leucine were derived from the culture medium. In separate experiments, the validity of our tRNA measurements was confirmed by measurements of the specific activity of newly synthesized ferritin after iron induction. We discuss the implications of these findings with regard to factors involved in the control of amino acid flux through the cell, as well as with regard to design of experiments using isotopic amino acids to measure rates of amino acid utilization.

  4. Biodegradable polymers derived from amino acids.

    PubMed

    Khan, Wahid; Muthupandian, Saravanan; Farah, Shady; Kumar, Neeraj; Domb, Abraham J

    2011-12-08

    In the past three decades, the use of polymeric materials has increased dramatically for biomedical applications. Many α-amino acids derived biodegradable polymers have also been intensely developed with the main goal to obtain bio-mimicking functional biomaterials. Polymers derived from α-amino acids may offer many advantages, as these polymers: (a) can be modified further to introduce new functions such as imaging, molecular targeting and drugs can be conjugated chemically to these polymers, (b) can improve on better biological properties like cell migration, adhesion and biodegradability, (c) can improve on mechanical and thermal properties and (d) their degradation products are expected to be non-toxic and readily metabolized/excreted from the body. This manuscript focuses on biodegradable polymers derived from natural amino acids, their synthesis, biocompatibility and biomedical applications. It is observed that polymers derived from α-amino acids constitute a promising family of biodegradable materials. These provide innovative multifunctional polymers possessing amino acid side groups with biological activity and with innumerous potential applications.

  5. Toward Sustainable Amino Acid Production.

    PubMed

    Usuda, Yoshihiro; Hara, Yoshihiko; Kojima, Hiroyuki

    2016-11-22

    Because the global amino acid production industry has been growing steadily and is expected to grow even more in the future, efficient production by fermentation is of great importance from economic and sustainability viewpoints. Many systems biology technologies, such as genome breeding, omics analysis, metabolic flux analysis, and metabolic simulation, have been employed for the improvement of amino acid-producing strains of bacteria. Synthetic biological approaches have recently been applied to strain development. It is also important to use sustainable carbon sources, such as glycerol or pyrolytic sugars from cellulosic biomass, instead of conventional carbon sources, such as glucose or sucrose, which can be used as food. Furthermore, reduction of sub-raw substrates has been shown to lead to reduction of environmental burdens and cost. Recently, a new fermentation system for glutamate production under acidic pH was developed to decrease the amount of one sub-raw material, ammonium, for maintenance of culture pH. At the same time, the utilization of fermentation coproducts, such as cells, ammonium sulfate, and fermentation broth, is a useful approach to decrease waste. In this chapter, further perspectives for future amino acid fermentation from one-carbon compounds are described.

  6. Changes in free amino acid content and activities of amination and transamination enzymes in yeasts grown on different inorganic nitrogen sources, including hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Norkrans, B; Tunblad-Johansson, I

    1981-01-01

    This study concerns inter- and intraspecific differences between yeasts at assimilation of different nitrogen sources. Alterations in the content of free amino acids in cells and media as well as in the related enzyme activities during growth were studied. The hydroxylamine (HA)-tolerant Endomycopsis lipolytica was examined and compared with the nitrate-reducing Cryptococcus albidus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, requiring fully reduced nitrogen for growth. Special attention was paid to alanine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid, the amino acids closely related to the Krebs cycle keto acids. The amino acids were analyzed as their n-propyl N-acetyl esters by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC). The composition of the amino acid pool was similar for the three yeasts. Glutamic acid was predominant; in early log-phase cells of E. lipolytica contents of 200-234 micromol . g(-1) dry weight were found. A positive correlation between the specific growth rate and the size of the amino acid pool was observed. The assimilation of ammonia was mediated by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). The NADP-GDH was the dominating enzyme in all three yeasts showing the highest specific activity in Cr. albidus grown on nitrate (6980 nmol . (min(-1)).(mg protein(-1)). Glutamine synthetase (GS) displayed a high specific activity in S. cerevisiae, which also had a high amount of glutamine. The assimilation of HA did not differ greatly from the assimilation of ammonium in E. lipolytica. The existing differences could rather be explained as provoked by the concentration of available nitrogen.

  7. Effect of acidic amino acids engineered into the active site cleft of Thermopolyspora flexuosa GH11 xylanase.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Turunen, Ossi

    2015-01-01

    Thermopolyspora flexuosa GH11 xylanase (XYN11A) shows optimal activity at pH 6-7 and 75-80 °C. We studied how mutation to aspartic acid (N46D and V48D) in the vicinity of the catalytic acid/base affects the pH activity of highly thermophilic GH11 xylanase. Both mutations shifted the pH activity profile toward acidic pH. In general, the Km values were lower at pH 4-5 than at pH 6, and in line with this, the rate of hydrolysis of xylotetraose was slightly faster at pH 4 than at pH 6. The N46D mutation and also lower pH in XYN11A increased the hydrolysis of xylotriose. The Km value increased remarkably (from 2.5 to 11.6 mg/mL) because of V48D, which indicates the weakening of binding affinity of the substrate to the active site. Xylotetraose functioned well as a substrate for other enzymes, but with lowered reaction rate for V48D. Both N46D and V48D increased the enzyme inactivation by ionic liquid [emim]OAc. In conclusion, the pH activity profile could be shifted to acidic pH due to an effect from two different directions, but the tightly packed GH11 active site can cause steric problems for the mutations.

  8. Nonprotein Amino Acids in the Murchison Meteorite

    PubMed Central

    Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Lawless, James G.; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1971-01-01

    Twelve nonprotein amino acids appear to be present in the Murchison meteorite. The identity of eight of them has been conclusively established as N-methylglycine, β-alanine, 2-methylalanine, α-amino-n-butyric acid, β-amino-n-butyric acid, γ-amino-n-butyric acid, isovaline, and pipecolic acid. Tentative evidence is presented for the presence of N-methylalanine, N-ethylglycine, β-aminoisobutyric acid, and norvaline. These amino acids appear to be extraterrestrial in origin and may provide new evidence for the hypothesis of chemical evolution. PMID:16591908

  9. Synergistic interplay of a non-heme iron catalyst and amino acid coligands in H2 O2 activation for asymmetric epoxidation of α-alkyl-substituted styrenes.

    PubMed

    Cussó, Olaf; Ribas, Xavi; Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Costas, Miquel

    2015-02-23

    Highly enantioselective epoxidation of α-substituted styrenes with aqueous H2 O2 is described by using a chiral iron complex as the catalyst and N-protected amino acids (AAs) as coligands. The amino acids synergistically cooperate with the iron center in promoting an efficient activation of H2 O2 to catalyze epoxidation of this challenging class of substrates with good yields and stereoselectivities (up to 97%ee) in short reaction times.

  10. Economic aspects of amino acids production.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Udo; Huebner, Susanna

    2003-01-01

    Amino acids represent basic elements of proteins, which as a main source of nutrition themselves serve as a major reserve for maintaining essential functions of humans as well as animals. Taking the recent state of scientific knowledge into account, the industrial sector of amino acids is a priori "suitable" to a specific kind of an ecologically sound way of production, which is based on biotechnology. The following article may point out characteristics of this particular industrial sector and illustrates the applicability of the latest economic methods, founded on development of the discipline of bionics in order to describe economic aspects of amino acids markets. The several biochemical and technological fields of application of amino acids lead to specific market structures in high developed and permanently evolving systems. The Harvard tradition of industrial economics explains how market structures mould the behaviour of the participants and influences market results beyond that. A global increase in intensity of competition confirms the notion that the supply-side is characterised by asymmetric information in contrast to Kantzenbachs concept of "narrow oligopoly" with symmetrical shared knowledge about market information. Departing from this point, certain strategies of companies in this market form shall be derived. The importance of Research and Development increases rapidly and leads to innovative manufacturing methods which replace more polluting manufacturing processes like acid hydrolysis. In addition to these modifications within the production processes the article deals furthermore with the pricing based on product life cycle concept and introduces specific applications of tools like activity based costing and target costing to the field of amino acid production. The authors come to the conclusion that based on a good transferability of latest findings in bionics and ecological compatibility competitors in amino acids manufacturing are well advised

  11. Sediment amino acids as indicators of anthropogenic activities and potential environmental risk in Erhai Lake, Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhaokui; Wang, Shengrui; Zhang, Mianmian

    2016-05-01

    Total hydrolysable amino acids (THAAs) constitute the most important fraction of labile nitrogen. Anthropogenic activities directly influence various biogeochemical cycles and then accelerate lake ecosystem deterioration. This is the first study that has established the relationship between sediment THAAs and anthropogenic activities using dated sediment cores, and evaluated the possibility of THAAs release at the sediment interface based on changes in environmental conditions in Erhai Lake. The results showed that historical distribution and fractions of THAAs could be divided into three stages: a stable period before the 1970s, a clear increasing period from the 1970s to 1990s, and a gradually steady period that started after the 1990s. The chemical fraction, aromatic and sulfur amino acids (AAs) accounted for only ≤3% of THAAs. Basic AAs accounted for 5-17% of THAAs, and remained at a relatively stable level. However, acidic and neutral AAs, which accounted for 19-44% and 35-69% of THAAs, respectively, were the predominant factors causing THAAs to increase due to rapid agricultural intensification and intensification of contemporary sedimentation of phytoplankton or macrophytes since the 1970s. These trends were closely related to both anthropogenic activities and natural processes, which implied that sediment THAAs could act as an effective indicator that reflects anthropogenic activities and aquatic environmental characteristics. The current contributions of sediment THAAs on TN and TOC were <5% and 1.5%, respectively. However, the dramatic increase in THAAs in the sediment cores indicated that there was a huge potential source of labile nitrogen for the overlying water under certain environmental conditions. Correlation analysis suggested that the release of THAAs was negatively correlated with pH, whereas positively correlated with bacterial number and degree of OM mineralization, which particularly depend on the stability of HFOM. Therefore, the risk of

  12. Dissolved amino acids in oceanic basaltic basement fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huei-Ting; Amend, Jan P.; LaRowe, Douglas E.; Bingham, Jon-Paul; Cowen, James P.

    2015-09-01

    The oceanic basaltic basement contains the largest aquifer on Earth and potentially plays an important role in the global carbon cycle as a net sink for dissolved organic carbon (DOC). However, few details of the organic matter cycling in the subsurface are known because great water depths and thick sediments typically hinder direct access to this environment. In an effort to examine the role of water-rock-microorganism interaction on organic matter cycling in the oceanic basaltic crust, basement fluid samples collected from three borehole observatories installed on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge were analyzed for dissolved amino acids. Our data show that dissolved free amino acids (1-13 nM) and dissolved hydrolyzable amino acids (43-89 nM) are present in the basement. The amino acid concentrations in the ridge-flank basement fluids are at the low end of all submarine hydrothermal fluids reported in the literature and are similar to those in deep seawater. Amino acids in recharging deep seawater, in situ amino acid production, and diffusional input from overlying sediments are potential sources of amino acids in the basement fluids. Thermodynamic modeling shows that amino acid synthesis in the basement can be sustained by energy supplied from inorganic substrates via chemolithotrophic metabolisms. Furthermore, an analysis of amino acid concentrations and compositions in basement fluids support the notion that heterotrophic activity is ongoing. Similarly, the enrichment of acidic amino acids and depletion of hydrophobic ones relative to sedimentary particulate organic matter suggests that surface sorption and desorption also alters amino acids in the basaltic basement. In summary, although the oceanic basement aquifer is a net sink for deep seawater DOC, similar amino acid concentrations in basement aquifer and deep seawater suggest that DOC is preferentially removed in the basement over dissolved amino acids. Our data also suggest that organic carbon

  13. Inadequacy of prebiotic synthesis as origin of proteinous amino acids.

    PubMed

    Wong, J T; Bronskill, P M

    1979-07-18

    The production of some nonproteinous, and lack of production of other proteinous, amino acids in model prebiotic synthesis, along with the instability of glutamine and asparagine, suggest that not all of the 20 present day proteinous amino acids gained entry into proteins directly from the primordial soup. Instead, a process of active co-evolution of the genetic code and its constituent amino acids would have to precede the final selection of these proteinous amono acids.

  14. Amino acid analyses of Apollo 14 samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, C. W.; Zumwalt, R. W.; Kuo, K.; Aue, W. A.; Stalling, D. L.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    Detection limits were between 300 pg and 1 ng for different amino acids, in an analysis by gas-liquid chromatography of water extracts from Apollo 14 lunar fines in which amino acids were converted to their N-trifluoro-acetyl-n-butyl esters. Initial analyses of water and HCl extracts of sample 14240 and 14298 samples showed no amino acids above background levels.

  15. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T Ashton; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, J Christopher; Schultz, Peter G

    2011-02-15

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  16. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, Ashton T; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, Christopher J; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-21

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  17. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-08-09

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNAsyn-thetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  18. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2014-08-26

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  19. Stimulation of nonselective amino acid export by glutamine dumper proteins.

    PubMed

    Pratelli, Réjane; Voll, Lars M; Horst, Robin J; Frommer, Wolf B; Pilot, Guillaume

    2010-02-01

    Phloem and xylem transport of amino acids involves two steps: export from one cell type to the apoplasm, and subsequent import into adjacent cells. High-affinity import is mediated by proton/amino acid cotransporters, while the mechanism of export remains unclear. Enhanced expression of the plant-specific type I membrane protein Glutamine Dumper1 (GDU1) has previously been shown to induce the secretion of glutamine from hydathodes and increased amino acid content in leaf apoplasm and xylem sap. In this work, tolerance to low concentrations of amino acids and transport analyses using radiolabeled amino acids demonstrate that net amino acid uptake is reduced in the glutamine-secreting GDU1 overexpressor gdu1-1D. The net uptake rate of phenylalanine decreased over time, and amino acid net efflux was increased in gdu1-1D compared with the wild type, indicating increased amino acid export from cells. Independence of the export from proton gradients and ATP suggests that overexpression of GDU1 affects a passive export system. Each of the seven Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GDU genes led to similar phenotypes, including increased efflux of a wide spectrum of amino acids. Differences in expression profiles and functional properties suggested that the GDU genes fulfill different roles in roots, vasculature, and reproductive organs. Taken together, the GDUs appear to stimulate amino acid export by activating nonselective amino acid facilitators.

  20. MALDI TOF/TOF-Based Approach for the Identification of d- Amino Acids in Biologically Active Peptides and Proteins.

    PubMed

    Koehbach, Johannes; Gruber, Christian W; Becker, Christian; Kreil, David P; Jilek, Alexander

    2016-05-06

    Several biologically active peptides contain a d- amino acid in a well-defined position, which is position 2 in all peptide epimers isolated to date from vertebrates and also some from invertebrates. The detection of such D- residues by standard analytical techniques is challenging. In tandem mass spectrometric (MS) analysis, although fragment masses are the same for all stereoisomers, peak intensities are known to depend on chirality. Here, we observe that the effect of a d- amino acid in the second N-terminal position on the fragmentation pattern in matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) strongly depends on the peptide sequence. Stereosensitive fragmentation (SF) is correlated to a neighborhood effect, but the d- residue also exerts an overall effect influencing distant bonds. In a fingerprint analysis, multiple peaks can thus serve to identify the chirality of a sample in short time and potentially high throughput. Problematic variations between individual spots could be successfully suppressed by cospotting deuterated analogues of the epimers. By identifying the [d-Leu2] isomer of the predicted peptide GH-2 (gene derived bombininH) in skin secretions of the toad Bombina orientalis, we demonstrated the analytical power of SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF measurements. In conclusion, SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS combines high sensitivity, versatility, and the ability to complement other methods.

  1. Effects of Activating Mutations on EGFR Cellular Protein Turnover and Amino Acid Recycling Determined Using SILAC Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Greig, Michael J; Niessen, Sherry; Weinrich, Scott L; Feng, Jun Li; Shi, Manli; Johnson, Ted O

    2015-01-01

    Rapid mutations of proteins that are targeted in cancer therapy often lead to drug resistance. Often, the mutation directly affects a drug's binding site, effectively blocking binding of the drug, but these mutations can have other effects such as changing the protein turnover half-life. Utilizing SILAC MS, we measured the cellular turnover rates of an important non-small cell lung cancer target, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Wild-type (WT) EGFR, EGFR with a single activating mutant (Del 746-750 or L858R), and the drug-resistant double mutant (L858R/T790M) EGFR were analyzed. In non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, EGFR turnover rates ranged from 28 hours in A431 cells (WT) to 7.5 hours in the PC-9 cells (Del 746-750 mutant). The measurement of EGFR turnover rate in PC-9 cells dosed with irreversible inhibitors has additional complexity due to inhibitor effects on cell viability and results were reported as a range. Finally, essential amino acid recycling (K and R) was measured in different cell lines. The recycling was different in each cell line, but the overall inclusion of the effect of amino acid recycling on calculating EGFR turnover rates resulted in a 10-20% reduction in rates.

  2. MALDI TOF/TOF-Based Approach for the Identification of d- Amino Acids in Biologically Active Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Several biologically active peptides contain a d- amino acid in a well-defined position, which is position 2 in all peptide epimers isolated to date from vertebrates and also some from invertebrates. The detection of such D- residues by standard analytical techniques is challenging. In tandem mass spectrometric (MS) analysis, although fragment masses are the same for all stereoisomers, peak intensities are known to depend on chirality. Here, we observe that the effect of a d- amino acid in the second N-terminal position on the fragmentation pattern in matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) strongly depends on the peptide sequence. Stereosensitive fragmentation (SF) is correlated to a neighborhood effect, but the d- residue also exerts an overall effect influencing distant bonds. In a fingerprint analysis, multiple peaks can thus serve to identify the chirality of a sample in short time and potentially high throughput. Problematic variations between individual spots could be successfully suppressed by cospotting deuterated analogues of the epimers. By identifying the [d-Leu2] isomer of the predicted peptide GH-2 (gene derived bombininH) in skin secretions of the toad Bombina orientalis, we demonstrated the analytical power of SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF measurements. In conclusion, SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS combines high sensitivity, versatility, and the ability to complement other methods. PMID:26985971

  3. A single amino acid substitution in ORF1 dramatically decreases L1 retrotransposition and provides insight into nucleic acid chaperone activity

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Sandra L.; Bushman, Diane; Wang, Fei; Li, Patrick Wai-Lun; Walker, Ann; Cummiskey, Jessica; Branciforte, Dan; Williams, Mark C.

    2008-01-01

    L1 is a ubiquitous interspersed repeated sequence in mammals that achieved its high copy number by autonomous retrotransposition. Individual L1 elements within a genome differ in sequence and retrotransposition activity. Retrotransposition requires two L1-encoded proteins, ORF1p and ORF2p. Chimeric elements were used to map a 15-fold difference in retrotransposition efficiency between two L1 variants from the mouse genome, TFC and TFspa, to a single amino acid substitution in ORF1p, D159H. The steady-state levels of L1 RNA and protein do not differ significantly between these two elements, yet new insertions are detected earlier and at higher frequency in TFC, indicating that it converts expressed L1 intermediates more effectively into new insertions. The two ORF1 proteins were purified and their nucleic acid binding and chaperone activities were examined in vitro. Although the RNA and DNA oligonucleotide binding affinities of these two ORF1 proteins were largely indistinguishable, D159 was significantly more effective as a nucleic acid chaperone than H159. These findings support a requirement for ORF1p nucleic acid chaperone activity at a late step during L1 retrotransposition, extend the region of ORF1p that is known to be critical for its functional interactions with nucleic acids, and enhance understanding of nucleic acid chaperone activity. PMID:18790804

  4. Conformational transition of FGFR kinase activation revealed by site-specific unnatural amino acid reporter and single molecule FRET

    PubMed Central

    Perdios, Louis; Lowe, Alan R.; Saladino, Giorgio; Bunney, Tom D.; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M. W.; Chin, Jason W.; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Tate, Edward W.; Katan, Matilda

    2017-01-01

    Protein kinases share significant structural similarity; however, structural features alone are insufficient to explain their diverse functions. Thus, bridging the gap between static structure and function requires a more detailed understanding of their dynamic properties. For example, kinase activation may occur via a switch-like mechanism or by shifting a dynamic equilibrium between inactive and active states. Here, we utilize a combination of FRET and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to probe the activation mechanism of the kinase domain of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR). Using genetically-encoded, site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids in regions essential for activation, followed by specific labeling with fluorescent moieties, we generated a novel class of FRET-based reporter to monitor conformational differences corresponding to states sampled by non phosphorylated/inactive and phosphorylated/active forms of the kinase. Single molecule FRET analysis in vitro, combined with MD simulations, shows that for FGFR kinase, there are populations of inactive and active states separated by a high free energy barrier resulting in switch-like activation. Compared to recent studies, these findings support diversity in features of kinases that impact on their activation mechanisms. The properties of these FRET-based constructs will also allow further studies of kinase dynamics as well as applications in vivo. PMID:28045057

  5. Conformational transition of FGFR kinase activation revealed by site-specific unnatural amino acid reporter and single molecule FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdios, Louis; Lowe, Alan R.; Saladino, Giorgio; Bunney, Tom D.; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M. W.; Chin, Jason W.; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Tate, Edward W.; Katan, Matilda

    2017-01-01

    Protein kinases share significant structural similarity; however, structural features alone are insufficient to explain their diverse functions. Thus, bridging the gap between static structure and function requires a more detailed understanding of their dynamic properties. For example, kinase activation may occur via a switch-like mechanism or by shifting a dynamic equilibrium between inactive and active states. Here, we utilize a combination of FRET and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to probe the activation mechanism of the kinase domain of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR). Using genetically-encoded, site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids in regions essential for activation, followed by specific labeling with fluorescent moieties, we generated a novel class of FRET-based reporter to monitor conformational differences corresponding to states sampled by non phosphorylated/inactive and phosphorylated/active forms of the kinase. Single molecule FRET analysis in vitro, combined with MD simulations, shows that for FGFR kinase, there are populations of inactive and active states separated by a high free energy barrier resulting in switch-like activation. Compared to recent studies, these findings support diversity in features of kinases that impact on their activation mechanisms. The properties of these FRET-based constructs will also allow further studies of kinase dynamics as well as applications in vivo.

  6. Current topics in the biotechnological production of essential amino acids, functional amino acids, and dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Satoshi

    2014-04-01

    Amino acids play important roles in both human and animal nutrition and in the maintenance of health. Here, amino acids are classified into three groups: first, essential amino acids, which are essential to nutrition; second, functional amino acids, recently found to be important in the promotion of physiological functions; and third, dipeptides, which are used to resolve problematic features of specific free amino acids, such as their instability or insolubility. This review focusses on recent researches concerning the microbial production of essential amino acids (lysine and methionine), functional amino acids (histidine and ornithine), and a dipeptide (L-alanyl-L-glutamine).

  7. The enzymatic activities of the Escherichia coli basic aliphatic amino acid decarboxylases exhibit a pH zone of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kanjee, Usheer; Gutsche, Irina; Ramachandran, Shaliny; Houry, Walid A

    2011-11-01

    The stringent response regulator ppGpp has recently been shown by our group to inhibit the Escherichia coli inducible lysine decarboxylase, LdcI. As a follow-up to this observation, we examined the mechanisms that regulate the activities of the other four E. coli enzymes paralogous to LdcI: the constitutive lysine decarboxylase LdcC, the inducible arginine decarboxylase AdiA, the inducible ornithine decarboxylase SpeF, and the constitutive ornithine decarboxylase SpeC. LdcC and SpeC are involved in cellular polyamine biosynthesis, while LdcI, AdiA, and SpeF are involved in the acid stress response. Multiple mechanisms of regulation were found for these enzymes. In addition to LdcI, LdcC and SpeC were found to be inhibited by ppGpp; AdiA activity was found to be regulated by changes in oligomerization, while SpeF and SpeC activities were regulated by GTP. These findings indicate the presence of multiple mechanisms regulating the activity of this important family of decarboxylases. When the enzyme inhibition profiles are analyzed in parallel, a "zone of inhibition" between pH 6 and pH 8 is observed. Hence, the data suggest that E. coli utilizes multiple mechanisms to ensure that these decarboxylases remain inactive around neutral pH possibly to reduce the consumption of amino acids at this pH.

  8. Catalytic hydrogenation of amino acids to amino alcohols with complete retention of configuration.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masazumi; Tamura, Riku; Takeda, Yasuyuki; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2014-06-25

    Rh-MoOx/SiO2 is an effective heterogeneous catalyst for selective hydrogenation of amino acids to amino alcohols in a water solvent. MoOx modification of Rh drastically enhanced the activity and improved the selectivity and ee. Various amino alcohols were obtained in high yields (90-94%) with complete retention of configuration.

  9. Computational Identification of Amino-Acid Mutations that Further Improve the Activity of a Chalcone–Flavonone Isomerase from Glycine max

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hui; Wu, Jiaqi; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Jiakuan; Zhong, Yang; Huang, Qiang; Nan, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Protein design for improving enzymatic activity remains a challenge in biochemistry, especially to identify target amino-acid sites for mutagenesis and to design beneficial mutations for those sites. Here, we employ a computational approach that combines multiple sequence alignment, positive selection detection, and molecular docking to identify and design beneficial amino-acid mutations that further improve the intramolecular-cyclization activity of a chalcone–flavonone isomerase from Glycine max (GmCHI). By this approach, two GmCHI mutants with higher activities were predicted and verified. The results demonstrate that this approach could determine the beneficial amino-acid mutations for improving the enzymatic activity, and may find more applications in engineering of enzymes. PMID:28286513

  10. Riluzole attenuates excitatory amino acid transporter type 3 activity in Xenopus oocytes via protein kinase C inhibition.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Seok; Ryu, Jung-Hee; Zuo, Zhiyi; Yang, Seong-Mi; Chang, Hye-Won; Do, Sang-Hwan

    2013-08-05

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of riluzole on the activity of excitatory amino acid transporter type 3 (EAAT3), a neuronal glutamate transporter, and to investigate the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in this effect. EAAT3 expression was induced in Xenopus oocytes by injecting EAAT3 mRNA. Using the two-electrode voltage clamping method, membrane currents were recorded before, during, and after applying l-glutamate (30 μM) in the absence and presence of prior incubation with riluzole (0.3-100 μM). To study the effect of PKC on the riluzole-induced change in EAAT3 activity, oocytes were preincubated with 100 μM phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), a PKC activator, or PKC inhibitors (2 µM staurosporine and 100 µM chelerythrine) before the recording. Responses were quantified by integrating current traces and are reported in microCoulombs (μC). Riluzole reduced EAAT3 activity in a concentration-dependent manner (0.3-100 μM). Treatment of oocytes with PMA significantly increased the baseline and riluzole-reduced EAAT activity (P<0.05). In addition, treatment of oocytes with PKC inhibitors reduced basal transporter currents, but did not show a further significant decrease in the riluzole-reduced EAAT3 activity. These results suggest that riluzole reduces EAAT3 activity through PKC inhibition.

  11. Amino acid contents of infant foods.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Lourdes; Alegría, Amparo; Farré, Rosaura

    2006-01-01

    The protein quality of three milk-cereal-based infant foods (paps) was evaluated by determining their amino acid contents and calculating the amino acid score. Proteins were subjected to acid hydrolysis, prior to which cysteine and methionine were oxidized with performic acid. Amino acids were determined by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection with a prior derivatization with 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate. Tryptophan was determined by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection after basic hydrolysis. Glutamic acid, proline and leucine were the most abundant amino acids, whereas tryptophan and cysteine had the lowest contents. Tryptophan was the limiting amino acid in the analyzed infant foods. A pap serving (250 ml) contributes significantly to fulfillment of the recommended dietary allowances of essential and semi-essential amino acids for infants (7-12 months old) and young children (1-3 years old).

  12. Transport of Aromatic Amino Acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kay, W. W.; Gronlund, Audrey F.

    1971-01-01

    Kinetic studies of the transport of aromatic amino acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa revealed the existence of two high-affinity transport systems which recognized the three aromatic amino acids. From competition data and studies on the exchange of preformed aromatic amino acid pools, the first transport system was found to be functional with phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan (in order of decreasing activity), whereas the second system was active with tryptophan, phenylalanine, and tyrosine. The two systems also transported a number of aromatic amino acid analogues but not other amino acids. Mutants defective in each of the two and in both transport systems were isolated and described. When the amino acids were added at low external concentrations to cells growing logarithmically in glucose minimal medium, the tryptophan pool very quickly became saturated. Under identical conditions, phenylalanine and tyrosine each accumulated in the intracellular pool of P. aeruginosa at a concentration which was 10 times greater than that of tryptophan. PMID:4994029

  13. Plasma sulfur amino acids and stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity in two Caucasian populations.

    PubMed

    Vinknes, K J; Dekker, J M; Drevon, C A; Refsum, H; Nurk, E; Nijpels, G; Stehouwer, C D A; Teerlink, T; Tell, G S; Nygård, O; Vollset, S E; Ueland, P M; Elshorbagy, A K

    2013-10-01

    In rats, dietary restriction of the cysteine precursor methionine suppresses hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD)-1 expression and activity, whereas cysteine supplementation reverses these effects. In 2 independent cohorts: Hordaland Health Study (HUSK; N=2021, aged 71-74y), Norway, and Hoorn study (N=686, aged 50-87y), Netherlands, we examined the cross-sectional associations of plasma sulfur-containing compounds (SCC; methionine, S-adenosylmethionine, S-adenosylhomocysteine, homocysteine, cystathionine, total cysteine (tCys), glutathione and cysteinylglycine) with SCD-16 index (16:1n-7/16:0), estimated from fatty acid profiles of total plasma or serum lipids. Only tCys was consistently associated with SCD-16 index after adjustments for sex and age (HUSK: partial r=0.14; Hoorn: partial r=0.11, P<0.001 for both), and after further adjustments for other SCC, body fat, diet, exercise and plasma lipids (HUSK: partial r=0.07, P=0.004; Hoorn: partial r=0.12, P=0.013). Together with animal data showing an effect of dietary cysteine on SCD1, our results suggest a role for cysteine in SCD1 regulation in humans.

  14. Microbial production of amino acids in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, H

    2000-01-01

    The microbial biotechnology of amino acids production which was developed and industrialized in Japan have been summarized. The amino acids include L-glutamic acid, L-lysine, L-threonine, L-aspartic acid, L-alanine, L-cysteine, L-dihydroxyphenylalanine, D-p-hydroxyphenyl-glycine, and hydroxy-L-proline.

  15. Terrestrial evolution of polymerization of amino acids - Heat to ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Nakashima, T.

    1981-01-01

    Sets of amino acids containing sufficient trifunctional monomer are thermally polymerized at temperatures such as 65 deg; the amino acids order themselves. Various polymers have diverse catalytic activities. The polymers aggregate, in aqueous solution, to cell-like structures having those activities plus emergent properties, e.g. proliferatability. Polyamino acids containing sufficient lysine catalyze conversion of free amino acids, by ATP, to small peptides and a high molecular weight fraction. The lysine-rich proteinoid is active in solution, within suspensions of cell-like particles, or in other particles composed of lysine-rich proteinoid and homopolyribonucleotide. Selectivities are observed. An archaic polyamino acid prelude to coded protein synthesis is indicated.

  16. Functional analysis of amino acid residues essential for activity in the Na+/H+ exchanger of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Dibrov, P; Young, P G; Fliegel, L

    1998-06-09

    We identified amino acid residues important for activity of sod2, the Na+/H+ antiporter of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We mutated all eight His residues of sod2 into Arg. Only His367-->Arg affected function and resulted in complete inability of sod2 to allow growth of S. pombe in LiCl-containing medium. Mutant S. pombe (H367R) could not expel sodium in acidic (pH 4.0) medium and were defective in their ability to alkalinize external medium. When His367 was replaced by Asp, sodium export of S. pombe was suppressed at acidic pH while the sodium-dependent proton influx at pH 6.1 was increased compared to wild type. We also mutated three residues conserved in putative membrane regions of various eukaryotic and prokaryotic Na+/H+ exchangers. S. pombe containing Asp241-->Asn and Asp266, 267-->Asn mutations had greatly impaired growth in LiCl-containing medium. In addition, sodium-dependent proton influx at external pH 6. 1 was impaired. Sodium export from S. pombe cells at external pH 4.0 was also almost completely abolished by the D266,267N mutation; however, the D241N mutant protein retained almost normal Na+ export. The results demonstrate that His367, Asp241, and Asp266,267 are important in the function of the eukaryotic Na+/H+ exchanger sod2.

  17. Amino and fatty acids in carbonaceous meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1974-01-01

    Analyses of two carbonaceous meteorites have provided much of the latest evidence which seems to support Oparin's theory on the origin of life. The meteorites involved are the Murray meteorite, which fell in 1950, and the Murchison meteorite, which fell in 1969. The amino acids in the two meteorites are similar in composition. Eight of the twenty amino acids found belong to amino acids present in proteins. A number of monocarboxylic and dicarboxylic fatty acids were also found in the meteorites.

  18. A single amino acid substitution confers enhanced methylation activity of mammalian Dnmt3b on chromatin DNA.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li; Gao, Ge; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, He; Ye, Zhiqiang; Huang, Shichao; Huang, Jinyan; Kang, Jiuhong

    2010-10-01

    Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b are paralogous enzymes responsible for de novo DNA methylation but with distinguished biological functions. In mice, disruption of Dnmt3b but not Dnmt3a causes global DNA hypomethylation, especially in repetitive sequences, which comprise the large majority of methylated DNA in the genome. By measuring DNA methylation activity of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b homologues from five species, we found that mammalian Dnmt3b possessed significantly higher methylation activity on chromatin DNA than Dnmt3a and non-mammalian Dnmt3b. Sequence comparison and mutagenesis experiments identified a single amino acid substitution (I662N) in mammalian Dnmt3b as being crucial for its high chromatin DNA methylation activity. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated this substitution markedly enhanced the binding of Dnmt3b to nucleosomes and hence increased the chromatin DNA methylation activity. Moreover, this substitution was crucial for Dnmt3b to efficiently methylate repetitive sequences, which increased dramatically in mammalian genomes. Consistent with our observation that Dnmt3b evolved more rapidly than Dnmt3a during the emergence of mammals, these results demonstrated that the I662N substitution in mammalian Dnmt3b conferred enhanced chromatin DNA methylation activity and contributed to functional adaptation in the epigenetic system.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of pleurocidin is retained in Plc-2, a C-terminal 12-amino acid fragment.

    PubMed

    Souza, Andre L A; Díaz-Dellavalle, Paola; Cabrera, Andrea; Larrañaga, Patricia; Dalla-Rizza, Marco; De-Simone, Salvatore G

    2013-07-01

    An analysis of a series of five peptides composed of various portions of the pleurocidin (Plc) sequence identified a l2-amino acid fragment from the C-terminus of Plc, designated Plc-2, as the smallest fragment that retained a antimicrobial activity comparable to that of the parent compound. MIC tests in vitro with low-ionic-strength medium showed that Plc-2 has potent activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus but not against Enterococcus faecalis. The antifungal activity of the synthetic peptides against phytopathogenic fungi, such as Fusarium oxysporum, Colletotrichum sp., Aspergillus niger and Alternaria sp., also identified Plc-2 as a biologically active peptide. Microscopy studies of fluorescently stained fungi treated with Plc-2 demonstrated that cytoplasmic and nuclear membranes were compromised in all strains of phytopathogenic fungi tested. Together, these results identify Plc-2 as a potential antimicrobial agent with similar properties to its parent compound, pleurocidin. In addition, it demonstrated that the KHVGKAALTHYL residues are critical for the antimicrobial activity described for pleurocidin.

  20. Modulating NMDA Receptor Function with D-Amino Acid Oxidase Inhibitors: Understanding Functional Activity in PCP-Treated Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Sershen, Henry; Hashim, Audrey; Dunlop, David S.; Suckow, Raymond F.; Cooper, Tom B.; Javitt, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function are increasingly linked to persistent negative symptoms and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Accordingly, clinical studies have been targeting the modulatory site of the NMDA receptor, based on the decreased function of NMDA receptor, to see whether increasing NMDA function can potentially help treat the negative and cognitive deficits seen in the disease. Glycine and D-serine are endogenous ligands to the NMDA modulatory site, but since high doses are needed to affect brain levels, related compounds are being developed, for example glycine transport (GlyT) inhibitors to potentially elevate brain glycine or targeting enzymes, such as D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) to slow the breakdown and increase the brain level of D-serine. In the present study we further evaluated the effect of DAAO inhibitors 5-chloro-benzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol (CBIO) and sodium benzoate (NaB) in a phencyclidine (PCP) rodent mouse model to see if the inhibitors affect PCP-induced locomotor activity, alter brain D-serine level, and thereby potentially enhance D-serine responses. D-Serine dose-dependently reduced the PCP-induced locomotor activity at doses above 1000 mg/kg. Acute CBIO (30 mg/kg) did not affect PCP-induced locomotor activity, but appeared to reduce locomotor activity when given with D-serine (600 mg/kg); a dose that by itself did not have an effect. However, the effect was also present when the vehicle (Trappsol®) was tested with D-serine, suggesting that the reduction in locomotor activity was not related to DAAO inhibition, but possibly reflected enhanced bioavailability of D-serine across the blood brain barrier related to the vehicle. With this acute dose of CBIO, D-serine level in brain and plasma were not increased. Another weaker DAAO inhibitor sodium benzoate (NaB) (400 mg/kg), and NaB plus D-serine also significantly reduced PCP-induced locomotor activity, but without affecting plasma or brain D-serine level

  1. Effect of L-azetidine 2-carboxilic acid on the activity of the general amino-acid permease from Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. ellipsoideus.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, R; Ferreras, J M; Arias, F J; Muñoz, R; Rojo, M A; Girbés, T

    1991-01-01

    Addition of the L-proline analogue L-azetidine 2-carboxylic acid to growing cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. ellipsoideus promoted fast deactivation of the general aminoacid permease, measured as L-valine uptake, without an immediate decrease in the growth rate. Cells preincubated with the analogue for 3 h were unable to restore either growth ability or general aminoacid permease activity in analogue-free medium. Eadie-Hofstee plots of L-valine uptake in the presence of the analogue are consistent with a strong reduction in the number of active molecules of the general amino-acid permease located in the plasma membrane. Inhibitory effects on protein synthesis were seen after preincubations of the yeast with the analogue for 3 h although a 30 min preincubation had no effect.

  2. The abundance and activation of mTORC1 regulators in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs are modulated by insulin, amino acids, and age

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously we demonstrated that the insulin (INS) and amino acid (AA) -induced activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is developmentally regulated in neonatal pigs. This study aimed to determine the effects of the post-prandial rise in INS and AA on the activation and abu...

  3. Amino-acid contamination of aqueous hydrochloric acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolman, Y.; Miller, S. L.

    1971-01-01

    Considerable amino-acid contamination in commercially available analytical grade hydrochloric acid (37% HCl) was found. One bottle contained 8,300 nmol of amino-acids per liter. A bottle from another supplier contained 6,700 nmol per liter. The contaminants were mostly protein amino-acids and several unknowns. Data on the volatility of the amino-acids during HCl distillation were also obtained.

  4. Volume-activated amino acid efflux from term human placental tissue: stimulation of efflux via a pathway sensitive to anion transport inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shennan, D B; McNeillie, S A

    1995-04-01

    The effect of a hyposmotic challenge and hence cell-swelling upon the efflux of a variety of solutes from isolated human placental tissue has been examined. A hyposmotic shock increased the fractional release of taurine, the most abundant free amino acid in placental tissue, via a pathway sensitive to niflumic acid, DIDS (4,4'-Diisothiocyanatostilbene-2',2'-disulphonic acid,) NPPB (5-Nitro-2(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid) and DIOA (R(+)[2-n-butyl-6,7-dichloro-2-cyclopentyl-2,3-dihydro-1-oxo-1H-inden -5-y) oxy] acetic acid). In contrast, tamoxifen was without effect. The cell-swelling induced efflux of taurine was attenuated (40 per cent) by replacing external Cl- with NO3-. The efflux of glutamic acid was also markedly increased by a hyposmotic challenge. Niflumic acid inhibited both basal and volume-activated glutamic acid efflux. A hyposmotic shock also increased alpha-aminoisobutyric acid efflux but not that of 3-O-methylglucose and SO4(2)-. The results suggest that the human placenta can respond to cell-swelling by releasing organic osmolytes such as amino acids via a pathway which is sensitive to anion transport inhibitors. However, it appears that the volume-activated amino acid transport system is independent from the placental anion-exchange pathways. The efflux of these compounds may act with K+ and Cl- efflux to effect a regulatory volume decrease in placental tissue. In addition, volume-activated transport may play a role in transplacental amino acid transfer.

  5. Indigenous amino acids in primitive CR meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Z.; Alexander, C. M. O. D.; Orzechowska, G. E.; Fogel, M. L.; Ehrenfreund, P.

    CR chondrites are among the most primitive meteorites. In this paper, we report the first measurements of amino acids in Antarctic CR meteorites. Three CRs, Elephant Moraine (EET) 92042, Graves Nunataks (GRA) 95229, and Grosvenor Mountains (GRO) 95577, were analyzed for their amino acid content using high-performance liquid chromatography with UV fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Our data show that EET 92042 and GRA 95229 are the most amino acid-rich chondrites ever analyzed, with total amino acid concentrations ranging from 180 ppm to 249 ppm. The most abundant amino acids present in the EET 92042 and GRA 95229 meteorites are the α-amino acids glycine, isovaline, α-aminoisobutyric acid (α-AIB), and alanine, with δ13C values ranging from +31.6‰ to +50.5‰. The carbon isotope results together with racemic enantiomeric ratios determined for most amino acids strongly indicate an extraterrestrial origin for these compounds. Compared to Elephant Moraine (EET) 92042 and GRA 95229, the more aqueously altered GRO 95577 is depleted in amino acids. In both CRs and CMs, the absolute amino acid abundances appear to be related to the degree of aqueous alteration in their parent bodies. In addition, the relative abundances of α-AIB and β-alanine in the Antarctic CRs also appear to depend on the degree of aqueous alteration.

  6. Amino acid residues Leu135 and Tyr236 are required for RNA binding activity of CFIm25 in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Ospina-Villa, Juan David; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom; Lopez-Camarillo, Cesar; Castañon-Sanchez, Carlos A; Soto-Sanchez, Jacqueline; Ramirez-Moreno, Esther; Marchat, Laurence A

    2015-08-01

    Pre-mRNA 3' end processing in the nucleus is essential for mRNA stability, efficient nuclear transport, and translation in eukaryotic cells. In Human, the cleavage/polyadenylation machinery contains the 25 kDa subunit of the Cleavage Factor Im (CFIm25), which specifically recognizes two UGUA elements and regulates the assembly of polyadenylation factors, poly(A) site selection and polyadenylation. In Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan parasite responsible for human amoebiasis, EhCFIm25 has been reported as a RNA binding protein that interacts with the Poly(A) Polymerase. Here, we follow-up with the study of EhCFIm25 to characterize its interaction with RNA. Using in silico strategy, we identified Leu135 and Tyr236 in EhCFIm25 as conserved amino acids among CFIm25 homologues. We therefore generated mutant EhCFIm25 proteins to investigate the role of these residues for RNA interaction. Results showed that RNA binding activity was totally abrogated when Leu135 and Tyr236 were replaced with Ala residue, and Tyr236 was changed for Phe. In contrast, RNA binding activity was less affected when Leu135 was substituted by Thr. Our data revealed for the first time -until we know-the functional relevance of the conserved Leu135 and Tyr236 in EhCFIm25 for RNA binding activity. They also gave some insights about the possible chemical groups that could be interacting with the RNA molecule.

  7. Amino acids in the Tagish Lake Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kminek, G.; Botta, O.; Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) based amino acid analysis of a Tagish Lake meteorite sample recovered 3 months after the meteorite fell to Earth have revealed that the amino acid composition of Tagish Lake is strikingly different from that of the CM and CI carbonaceous chondrites. We found that the Tagish Lake meteorite contains only trace levels of amino acids (total abundance = 880 ppb), which is much lower than the total abundance of amino acids in the CI Orgueil (4100 ppb) and the CM Murchison (16 900 ppb). Because most of the same amino acids found in the Tagish Lake meteorite are also present in the Tagish Lake ice melt water, we conclude that the amino acids detected in the meteorite are terrestrial contamination. We found that the exposure of a sample of Murchison to cold water lead to a substantial reduction over a period of several weeks in the amount of amino acids that are not strongly bound to the meteorite matrix. However, strongly bound amino acids that are extracted by direct HCl hydrolysis are not affected by the leaching process. Thus even if there had been leaching of amino acids from our Tagish Lake meteorite sample during its 3 month residence in Tagish Lake ice and melt water, a Murchison type abundance of endogenous amino acids in the meteorite would have still been readily detectable. The low amino acid content of Tagish Lake indicates that this meteorite originated fiom a different type of parent body than the CM and CI chondrites. The parent body was apparently devoid of the reagents such as aldehyldes/ketones, HCN and ammonia needed for the effective abiotic synthesis of amino acids. Based on reflectance spectral measurements, Tagish Lake has been associated with P- or D-type asteroids. If the Tagish Lake meteorite was indeed derived fiom these types of parent bodies, our understanding of these primitive asteroids needs to be reevaluated with respect to their potential inventory of biologically important organic compounds.

  8. Amino acids precursors in lunar finds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.; Hinsch, G.; Mueller, G.

    1975-01-01

    The consistent pattern is discussed of amino acids found in lunar dust from Apollo missions. The evidence indicates that compounds yielding amino acids were implanted into the surface of the moon by the solar wind, and the kind and amounts of amino acids found on the moon are closely similar to those found in meteorites. It is concluded that there is a common cosmochemical pattern for the moom and meteorites, and this offers evidence of a common course of cosmochemical reactions for carbon.

  9. Synthesis, structural elucidation, biological, antioxidant and nuclease activities of some 5-Fluorouracil-amino acid mixed ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobana, Sutha; Subramaniam, Perumal; Mitu, Liviu; Dharmaraja, Jeyaprakash; Arvind Narayan, Sundaram

    2015-01-01

    Some biologically active mixed ligand complexes (1-9) have been synthesized from 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU; A) and amino acids (B) such as glycine (gly), L-alanine (ala) and L-valine (val) with Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions. The synthesized mixed ligand complexes (1-9) were characterized by various physico-chemical, spectral, thermal and morphological studies. 5-Fluorouracil and its mixed ligand complexes have been tested for their in vitro biological activities against some pathogenic bacterial and fungal species by the agar well diffusion method. The in vitro antioxidant activities of 5-Fluorouracil and its complexes have also been investigated by using the DPPH assay method. The results demonstrate that Cu(II) mixed ligand complexes (4-6) exhibit potent biological as well as antioxidant activities compared to 5-Fluorouracil and Ni(II) (1-3) and Zn(II) (7-9) mixed ligand complexes. Further, the cleaving activities of CT DNA under aerobic conditions show moderate activity with the synthesized Cu(II) and Ni(II) mixed ligand complexes (1-6) while no activity is seen with Zn(II) complexes (7-9). Binding studies of CT DNA with these complexes show a decrease in intensity of the charge transfer band to the extent of 5-15% along with a minor red shift. The free energy change values (Δ‡G) calculated from intrinsic binding constants indicate that the interaction between mixed ligand complex and DNA is spontaneous.

  10. Synthesis, structural elucidation, biological, antioxidant and nuclease activities of some 5-Fluorouracil-amino acid mixed ligand complexes.

    PubMed

    Shobana, Sutha; Subramaniam, Perumal; Mitu, Liviu; Dharmaraja, Jeyaprakash; Arvind Narayan, Sundaram

    2015-01-05

    Some biologically active mixed ligand complexes (1-9) have been synthesized from 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU; A) and amino acids (B) such as glycine (gly), L-alanine (ala) and L-valine (val) with Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions. The synthesized mixed ligand complexes (1-9) were characterized by various physico-chemical, spectral, thermal and morphological studies. 5-Fluorouracil and its mixed ligand complexes have been tested for their in vitro biological activities against some pathogenic bacterial and fungal species by the agar well diffusion method. The in vitro antioxidant activities of 5-Fluorouracil and its complexes have also been investigated by using the DPPH assay method. The results demonstrate that Cu(II) mixed ligand complexes (4-6) exhibit potent biological as well as antioxidant activities compared to 5-Fluorouracil and Ni(II) (1-3) and Zn(II) (7-9) mixed ligand complexes. Further, the cleaving activities of CT DNA under aerobic conditions show moderate activity with the synthesized Cu(II) and Ni(II) mixed ligand complexes (1-6) while no activity is seen with Zn(II) complexes (7-9). Binding studies of CT DNA with these complexes show a decrease in intensity of the charge transfer band to the extent of 5-15% along with a minor red shift. The free energy change values (Δ(‡)G) calculated from intrinsic binding constants indicate that the interaction between mixed ligand complex and DNA is spontaneous.

  11. Amino acid composition of some Mexican foods.

    PubMed

    Morales de León, Josefina; Camacho, M Elena; Bourges, Héctor

    2005-06-01

    Knowledge of the amino acid composition of foods is essential to calculate their chemical score, which is used to predict protein quality of foods and diets. Though amino acid composition of many foods is reasonably well established, better knowledge is needed on native foods consumed in different regions and countries. This paper presents the amino acid composition of different presentations of raw and processed foods produced and consumed in Mexico. The amino acid composition was determined using Beckman amino acid analyzers (models 116 and 6300). Tryptophan was determined using the Spies and Chambers method. Of the different foods analyzed, some comments are made on native or basic foods in Mexico: Spirulin, where lysine is the limiting amino acid, with a chemical score of 67%, is a good source of tryptophan (1.16g/16 gN); amaranth contains high levels of sulphur amino acids (4.09 to 5.34 g/16gN), with a protein content of 15 g/100g; and pulque, a Pre-Hispanic beverage that contains high levels of tryptophan (2.58 g/16 gN) and sulphur amino acids (2.72 g/16 gN). Finally, insects are good sources of sulphur amino acids and lysine.

  12. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of some new non-proteinogenic amino acids containing thiazole residues.

    PubMed

    Stanchev, M; Pajpanova, T; Golovinsky, E

    2000-01-01

    Some new thioamides and thiazoles have been synthesized using canavanine, S-cysteine, homo-S-cysteinesulfonamides and their N-omega aminoethylated derivatives as adducts in order to investigate the structure-antimicrobial activity relationships. The compounds showed substantial antibacterial activity in vitro against various gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus etc.) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris etc.) bacteria. These findings indicate that the presence of the thiazole residue is an essential factor for the antibacterial effect.

  13. [Detection of amino acids based on terahertz spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhong-feng; Lin, Hai-tao; Chen, Xiao-wei; Zhang, Zeng-fang

    2009-09-01

    Terahertz (THz) is the frequency region ranging from 0.1 to 2.0 THz, which lies in the far-infrared region. Compared to Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), terahertz time-domain spectra (THz-TDS) has low energy, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and is non-ionizing radiation. Low-frequency vibrational modes of some amino acids, such as torsional and collective vibrational modes and hydrogen-bond modes, exist in the THz region. Amino acids are important organic compounds and are the fundamental components of proteins. Amino acids can exist with a highly ordered crystal structure linked by hydrogen intermolecular bonds in the solid phase. The absorption spectra of amino acids in the THz region show marked differences while mid-infrared absorption spectra usually show very little difference. Up to now, absorption spectra of twenty kinds of amino acids have been studied by many researchers using THz technique; the quantitative analysis of amino acids by THZ-TDS is also included. Investigation of THz spectra of amino acids are of fundamental interests, and will lead to further understanding of low-frequency vibrations of protein/DNA and relevant biological reactions and activities. In the present paper, the latest progress in absorption spectra of amino acids determined by THz spectroscopy is reviewed and a database is built. Some brief remarks on future developments in and prospects for THz application in amino acids are also provided.

  14. Using the Amino Acid Network to Modulate the Hydrolytic Activity of β-Glycosidases

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Diorge P.; Souza, Valquiria P.; Ikegami, Cecilia M.; Farah, Chuck S.; Marana, Sandro R.

    2016-01-01

    The active site residues in GH1 β-glycosidases are compartmentalized into 3 functional regions, involved in catalysis or binding of glycone and aglycone motifs from substrate. However, it still remains unclear how residues outside the active site modulate the enzymatic activity. To tackle this question, we solved the crystal structure of the GH1 β-glycosidase from Spodoptera frugiperda (Sfβgly) to systematically map its residue contact network and correlate effects of mutations within and outside the active site. External mutations neighbouring the functional residues involved in catalysis and glycone-binding are deleterious, whereas mutations neighbouring the aglycone-binding site are less detrimental or even beneficial. The large dataset of new and previously characterized Sfβgly mutants supports that external perturbations are coherently transmitted to active site residues possibly through contacts and specifically disturb functional regions they interact to, reproducing the effects observed for direct mutations of functional residues. This allowed us to suggest that positions related to the aglycone-binding site are preferential targets for introduction of mutations aiming to further improve the hydrolytic activity of β–glycosidases. PMID:27936116

  15. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion. PMID:25915115

  16. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-04-23

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion.

  17. FKBP12.6 activates RyR1: investigating the amino acid residues critical for channel modulation.

    PubMed

    Venturi, Elisa; Galfré, Elena; O'Brien, Fiona; Pitt, Samantha J; Bellamy, Stuart; Sessions, Richard B; Sitsapesan, Rebecca

    2014-02-18

    We have previously shown that FKBP12 associates with RyR2 in cardiac muscle and that it modulates RyR2 function differently to FKBP12.6. We now investigate how these proteins affect the single-channel behavior of RyR1 derived from rabbit skeletal muscle. Our results show that FKBP12.6 activates and FKBP12 inhibits RyR1. It is likely that both proteins compete for the same binding sites on RyR1 because channels that are preactivated by FKBP12.6 cannot be subsequently inhibited by FKBP12. We produced a mutant FKBP12 molecule (FKBP12E31Q/D32N/W59F) where the residues Glu(31), Asp(32), and Trp(59) were converted to the corresponding residues in FKBP12.6. With respect to the functional regulation of RyR1 and RyR2, the FKBP12E31Q/D32N/W59F mutant lost all ability to behave like FKBP12 and instead behaved like FKBP12.6. FKBP12E31Q/D32N/W59F activated RyR1 but was not capable of activating RyR2. In conclusion, FKBP12.6 activates RyR1, whereas FKBP12 activates RyR2 and this selective activator phenotype is determined within the amino acid residues Glu(31), Asp(32), and Trp(59) in FKBP12 and Gln(31), Asn(32), and Phe(59) in FKBP12.6. The opposing but different effects of FKBP12 and FKBP12.6 on RyR1 and RyR2 channel gating provide scope for diversity of regulation in different tissues.

  18. Effect of domoic acid on brain amino acid levels.

    PubMed

    Durán, R; Arufe, M C; Arias, B; Alfonso, M

    1995-03-01

    The administration of Domoic Acid (Dom) in a 0.2 mg/kg i.p. dose induces changes in the levels of amino acids of neurochemical interest (Asp, Glu, Gly, Tau, Ala, GABA) in different rat brain regions (hypothalamus, hippocampus, amygdala, striatum, cortex and midbrain). The most affected amino acid is the GABA, the main inhibitory amino acid neurotransmitter, whereas glutamate, the main excitatory amino acid, is not affected. The rat brain regions that seem to be the main target of the Dom action belong to the limbic system (hippocampus, amygdala). The possible implication of the amino acids in the actions of Dom is also discussed.

  19. Biphalin analogs containing β(3)-homo-amino acids at the 4,4' positions: Synthesis and opioid activity profiles.

    PubMed

    Frączak, Oliwia; Lasota, Anika; Kosson, Piotr; Leśniak, Anna; Muchowska, Adriana; Lipkowski, Andrzej W; Olma, Aleksandra

    2015-04-01

    Biphalin, a synthetic opioid octapeptide with a palindromic sequence has high analgesic activity. Biphalin displays a strong affinity for μ and δ-opioid receptors, and a significant to κ-receptor. The paper reports the synthesis of novel analogs of biphalin containing β(3)-homo-amino acid residues at the 4,4' positions and a hydrazine or 1,2-phenylenediamine linker. The potency and selectivity of the peptides were evaluated by a competitive receptor-binding assay in rat brain homogenate using [(3)H]DAMGO (a μ ligand) and [(3)H]DELT (a δ ligand). Analogs with β(3)-h-p-NO2Phe in positions 4 and 4' are the most active compounds. Selectivity depends on the degree of freedom between the two pharmacophore moieties. Analogs with a hydrazine linker show noticeable binding selectivity to μ receptors (IC50(μ)=0.72nM; IC50(δ)=4.66nM), while the peptides with a 1,2-phenylenediamine linker show slight δ selectivity (IC50(μ)=10.97nM; IC50(δ)=1.99nM). Tyr-d-Ala-Gly-β(3)-h-p-NO2PheNHNH-β(3)-h-p-NO2Phe (1) and (Tyr-d-Ala-Gly-β(3)-h-p-NO2PheNH)2 (2) produced greater antinociceptive effect compared to morphine after i.t. administration.

  20. Polymerization of beta-amino acids in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have compared carbonyl diimidazole (CDI) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as activating agents for the oligomerization of negatively-charged alpha- and beta-amino acids in homogeneous aqueous solution. alpha-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using CDI, but not by EDAC. beta-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using EDAC, but not by CDI. Aspartic acid, an alpha- and beta-dicarboxylic acid is oligomerized efficiently by both reagents. These results are explained in terms of the mechanisms of the reactions, and their relevance to prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  1. Abundance of amino acid transporters involved in mTORC1 activation in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs is developmentally regulated

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously we demonstrated that the insulinand amino acid-induced activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is developmentally regulated in neonatal pigs. Recent studies have indicated that members of the System A transporter (SNAT2), the System N transporter (SNAT3), the Sy...

  2. An Amino Acid in the Stalk Domain of N1 Neuraminidase Is Critical for Enzymatic Activity.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Mark; Duan, Susu; Wong, Sook-San; Kumar, Gyanendra; Baviskar, Pradyumna; Collin, Emily; Russell, Charles; Barman, Subrata; Hause, Benjamin; Webby, Richard

    2017-01-15

    Neuraminidase (NA) is a sialidase expressed on the surface of influenza A viruses that releases progeny viruses from the surface of infected cells and prevents viruses becoming trapped in mucus. It is a homotetramer, with each monomer consisting of a transmembrane region, a stalk, and a globular head with sialidase activity. We recently characterized two swine viruses of the pandemic H1N1 lineage, A/swine/Virginia/1814-1/2012 (pH1N1low-1) and A/swine/Virginia/1814-2/2012 (pH1N1low-2), with almost undetectable NA enzymatic activity compared to that of the highly homologous A/swine/Pennsylvania/2436/2012 (pH1N1-1) and A/swine/Minnesota/2499/2012 (pH1N1-2) viruses. pH1N1-1 transmitted to aerosol contact ferrets, but pH1N1low-1 did not. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular determinants associated with low NA activity as potential markers of aerosol transmission. We identified the shared unique substitutions M19V, A232V, D248N, and I436V (N1 numbering) in pH1N1low-1 and pH1N1low-2. pH1N1low-1 also had the unique Y66D substitution in the stalk domain, where 66Y was highly conserved in N1 NAs. Restoration of 66Y was critical for the NA activity of pH1N1low-1 NA, although 19M or 248D in conjunction with 66Y was required to recover the level of activity to that of pH1N1 viruses. Studies of NA stability and molecular modeling revealed that 66Y likely stabilized the NA homotetramer. Therefore, 66Y in the stalk domain of N1 NA was critical for the stability of the NA tetramer and, subsequently, for NA enzymatic activity.

  3. Reaction of 3-Amino-1,2,4-Triazole with Diethyl Phosphite and Triethyl Orthoformate: Acid-Base Properties and Antiosteoporotic Activities of the Products.

    PubMed

    Miszczyk, Patrycja; Wieczorek, Dorota; Gałęzowska, Joanna; Dziuk, Błażej; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Chmielewska, Ewa

    2017-02-08

    The reaction of diethyl phosphite with triethyl orthoformate and a primary amine followed by hydrolysis is presented, and the reaction was suitable for the preparation of (aminomethylene)bisphosphonates. 3-Amino-1,2,4-triazole was chosen as an interesting substrate for this reaction because it possesses multiple groups that can serve as the amino component in the reaction-namely, the side-chain and triazole amines. This substrate readily forms 1,2,4-triazolyl-3-yl-aminomethylenebisphosphonic acid (compound 1) as a major product, along with N-ethylated bisphosphonates as side products. The in vitro antiproliferative effects of the synthesized aminomethylenebisphosphonic acids against J774E macrophages were determined. These compounds exhibit similar activity to zoledronic acid and higher activity than incadronic acid.

  4. Research for amino acids in lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, C. W.; Zumwalt, R. W.; Kuo, K.; Rash, J. J.; Aue , W. A.; Stalling, D. L.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    The study was primarily directed toward the examination of Apollo 14 lunar fines for indigenous amino acids or materials which could be converted to amino acids on hydrolysis with 6 N hydrochloric acid. Initial experiments were conducted to confirm the integrity of the derivatization reactions and reagents, and to optimize the gas-liquid chromatographic (GLC) instrumental and chromatographic system for the separation and flame ionization detection of the amino acid derivatives. In studies on the recovery of amino acids added to lunar fines, low recoveries were obtained when 10 ng of each amino acid were added to 50 mg of virgin fines, but the subsequent addition of 50 ng of each to the previously extracted sample resulted in much higher recoveries.

  5. Amino Acid Uptake in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Whiteside, Matthew D.; Garcia, Maria O.; Treseder, Kathleen K.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the extent to which arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi root improved the acquisition of simple organic nitrogen (ON) compounds by their host plants. In a greenhouse-based study, we used quantum dots (fluorescent nanoparticles) to assess uptake of each of the 20 proteinaceous amino acids by AM-colonized versus uncolonized plants. We found that AM colonization increased uptake of phenylalanine, lysine, asparagine, arginine, histidine, methionine, tryptophan, and cysteine; and reduced uptake of aspartic acid. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization had the greatest effect on uptake of amino acids that are relatively rare in proteins. In addition, AM fungi facilitated uptake of neutral and positively-charged amino acids more than negatively-charged amino acids. Overall, the AM fungi used in this study appeared to improve access by plants to a number of amino acids, but not necessarily those that are common or negatively-charged. PMID:23094070

  6. Potent complement C3a receptor agonists derived from oxazole amino acids: Structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranee; Reed, Anthony N; Chu, Peifei; Scully, Conor C G; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Suen, Jacky Y; Durek, Thomas; Reid, Robert C; Fairlie, David P

    2015-12-01

    Potent ligands for the human complement C3a receptor (C3aR) were developed from the almost inactive tripeptide Leu-Ala-Arg corresponding to the three C-terminal residues of the endogenous peptide agonist C3a. The analogous Leu-Ser-Arg was modified by condensing the serine side chain with the leucine carbonyl with elimination of water to form leucine-oxazole-arginine. Subsequent elaboration with a variety of N-terminal amide capping groups produced agonists as potent as human C3a itself in stimulating Ca(2+) release from human macrophages. Structure-activity relationships are discussed.

  7. Analysis of Active-Site Amino-Acid Residues of Human Serum Paraoxonase Using Competitive Substrates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    inhibitor Paraoxonase activity was determined using 0.26-2.6 mM of paraoxon hydrolysis by H115W, competitive inhi- paraoxon (diethyl p- nitrophenyl phosphate ...simultaneously,Tel: +1 410 436 1338 E-mail: douglas.cerasoli@us.army.mil phenyl acetate competitively inhibits paraoxon hydrolysis by HI 15W. Con- versely...has no effect on the ability of F222Y to catalyze the doi:10.1 111/i.1742-4658.2005.04646.x hydrolysis of phenyl acetate, suggesting that the F222Y

  8. Fmoc/Trt-amino acids: comparison to Fmoc/tBu-amino acids in peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Barlos, K; Gatos, D; Koutsogianni, S

    1998-03-01

    Model peptides containing the nucleophilic amino acids Trp and Met have been synthesized with the application of Fmoc/Trt- and Fmoc/tBu-amino acids, for comparison. The deprotection of the peptides synthesized using Fmoc/Trt-amino acids in all cases leads to crude peptides of higher purity than that of the same peptides synthesized using Fmoc/tBu-amino acids.

  9. The E3 ubiquitin ligase ZNRF2 is a substrate of mTORC1 and regulates its activation by amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Hoxhaj, Gerta; Caddye, Edward; Najafov, Ayaz; Houde, Vanessa P; Johnson, Catherine; Dissanayake, Kumara; Toth, Rachel; Campbell, David G; Prescott, Alan R; MacKintosh, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic Target of Rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) senses intracellular amino acid levels through an intricate machinery, which includes the Rag GTPases, Ragulator and vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase). The membrane-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase ZNRF2 is released into the cytosol upon its phosphorylation by Akt. In this study, we show that ZNRF2 interacts with mTOR on membranes, promoting the amino acid-stimulated translocation of mTORC1 to lysosomes and its activation in human cells. ZNRF2 also interacts with the V-ATPase and preserves lysosomal acidity. Moreover, knockdown of ZNRF2 decreases cell size and cell proliferation. Upon growth factor and amino acid stimulation, mTORC1 phosphorylates ZNRF2 on Ser145, and this phosphosite is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 6. Ser145 phosphorylation stimulates vesicle-to-cytosol translocation of ZNRF2 and forms a novel negative feedback on mTORC1. Our findings uncover ZNRF2 as a component of the amino acid sensing machinery that acts upstream of Rag-GTPases and the V-ATPase to activate mTORC1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12278.001 PMID:27244671

  10. Spectral characterization, cyclic voltammetry, morphology, biological activities and DNA cleaving studies of amino acid Schiff base metal(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Neelakantan, M A; Rusalraj, F; Dharmaraja, J; Johnsonraja, S; Jeyakumar, T; Sankaranarayana Pillai, M

    2008-12-15

    Metal complexes are synthesized with Schiff bases derived from o-phthalaldehyde (opa) and amino acids viz., glycine (gly) l-alanine (ala), l-phenylalanine (pal). Metal ions coordinate in a tetradentate or hexadentate manner with these N(2)O(2) donor ligands, which are characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic moments, IR, electronic, (1)H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The elemental analysis suggests the stoichiometry to be 1:1 (metal:ligand). Based on EPR studies, spin-Hamiltonian and bonding parameters have been calculated. The g-values calculated for copper complexes at 300K and in frozen DMSO (77K) indicate the presence of the unpaired electron in the dx2-y2 orbital. The evaluated metal-ligand bonding parameters showed strong in-plane sigma- and pi-bonding. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron micrography (SEM) analysis provide the crystalline nature and the morphology of the metal complexes. The cyclic voltammograms of the Cu(II)/Mn(II)/VO(II) complexes investigated in DMSO solution exhibit metal centered electroactivity in the potential range -1.5 to +1.5V. The electrochemical data obtained for Cu(II) complexes explains the change of structural arrangement of the ligand around Cu(II) ions. The biological activity of the complexes has been tested on eight bacteria and three fungi. Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes show an increased activity in comparison to the controls. The metal complexes of opapal Schiff base were evaluated for their DNA cleaving activities with calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) under aerobic conditions. Cu(II) and VO(II) complexes show more pronounced activity in presence of the oxidant.

  11. Spectral characterization, cyclic voltammetry, morphology, biological activities and DNA cleaving studies of amino acid Schiff base metal(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelakantan, M. A.; Rusalraj, F.; Dharmaraja, J.; Johnsonraja, S.; Jeyakumar, T.; Sankaranarayana Pillai, M.

    2008-12-01

    Metal complexes are synthesized with Schiff bases derived from o-phthalaldehyde (opa) and amino acids viz., glycine (gly) L-alanine (ala), L-phenylalanine (pal). Metal ions coordinate in a tetradentate or hexadentate manner with these N 2O 2 donor ligands, which are characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic moments, IR, electronic, 1H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The elemental analysis suggests the stoichiometry to be 1:1 (metal:ligand). Based on EPR studies, spin-Hamiltonian and bonding parameters have been calculated. The g-values calculated for copper complexes at 300 K and in frozen DMSO (77 K) indicate the presence of the unpaired electron in the d orbital. The evaluated metal-ligand bonding parameters showed strong in-plane σ- and π-bonding. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron micrography (SEM) analysis provide the crystalline nature and the morphology of the metal complexes. The cyclic voltammograms of the Cu(II)/Mn(II)/VO(II) complexes investigated in DMSO solution exhibit metal centered electroactivity in the potential range -1.5 to +1.5 V. The electrochemical data obtained for Cu(II) complexes explains the change of structural arrangement of the ligand around Cu(II) ions. The biological activity of the complexes has been tested on eight bacteria and three fungi. Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes show an increased activity in comparison to the controls. The metal complexes of opapal Schiff base were evaluated for their DNA cleaving activities with calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) under aerobic conditions. Cu(II) and VO(II) complexes show more pronounced activity in presence of the oxidant.

  12. Amino acid regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Fafournoux, P; Bruhat, A; Jousse, C

    2000-01-01

    The impact of nutrients on gene expression in mammals has become an important area of research. Nevertheless, the current understanding of the amino acid-dependent control of gene expression is limited. Because amino acids have multiple and important functions, their homoeostasis has to be finely maintained. However, amino-acidaemia can be affected by certain nutritional conditions or various forms of stress. It follows that mammals have to adjust several of their physiological functions involved in the adaptation to amino acid availability by regulating the expression of numerous genes. The aim of the present review is to examine the role of amino acids in regulating mammalian gene expression and protein turnover. It has been reported that some genes involved in the control of growth or amino acid metabolism are regulated by amino acid availability. For instance, limitation of several amino acids greatly increases the expression of the genes encoding insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein, where C/EBP is CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and asparagine synthetase. Elevated mRNA levels result from both an increase in the rate of transcription and an increase in mRNA stability. Several observations suggest that the amino acid regulation of gene expression observed in mammalian cells and the general control process described in yeast share common features. Moreover, amino acid response elements have been characterized in the promoters of the CHOP and asparagine synthetase genes. Taken together, the results discussed in the present review demonstrate that amino acids, by themselves, can, in concert with hormones, play an important role in the control of gene expression. PMID:10998343

  13. Amino Acid and Peptide Immobilization on Oxidized Nanocellulose: Spectroscopic Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Barazzouk, Saïd; Daneault, Claude

    2012-01-01

    In this work, oxidized nanocellulose (ONC) was synthesized and chemically coupled with amino acids and peptides using a two step coupling method at room temperature. First, ONC was activated by N-ethyl-N’-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride, forming a stable active ester in the presence of N-hydroxysuccinimide. Second, the active ester was reacted with the amino group of the amino acid or peptide, forming an amide bond between ONC and the grafted molecule. Using this method, the intermolecular interaction of amino acids and peptides was avoided and uniform coupling of these molecules on ONC was achieved. The coupling reaction was very fast in mild conditions and without alteration of the polysaccharide. The coupling products (ONC-amino acids and ONC-peptides) were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by the absorption, emission, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectroscopic techniques.

  14. Expression of the surface antigen 4F2hc affects system-L-like neutral-amino-acid-transport activity in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bröer, S; Bröer, A; Hamprecht, B

    1997-01-01

    Mammalian cells possess a variety of amino acid-transport systems with overlapping substrate specificity. System L is one of the major amino acid-transport systems of non-epithelial cells. By expression cloning we have recently demonstrated that the surface antigen 4F2hc (CD98) is a necessary component for expression of system-L-like amino acid-transport activity in C6-BU-1 rat glioma cells [Bröer, Bröer and Hamprecht (1995) Biochem. J. 312, 863-870]. 4F2hc mRNA was detected in CHO cells, COS cells, activated lymphocytes isolated from mouse spleen and primary cultures of astrocytes. In all these cell types, Na+-independent isoleucine transport was mediated by system L. No contribution of system y+L to isoleucine or arginine transport was detected in C6-BU-1 cells. In lymphocytes, both system-L-like amino acid-transport activity and 4F2hc mRNA levels increased after treatment with phorbol ester plus ionomycin. Antisense oligonucleotides caused modest inhibition of Na+-independent isoleucine transport in C6-BU-1 cells and primary cultures of astroglial cells, whereas arginine transport was unaffected. Overexpression of 4F2hc cDNA in CHO cells resulted in an increase in Na+-independent isoleucine transport. PMID:9182715

  15. Active-Site Engineering of ω-Transaminase for Production of Unnatural Amino Acids Carrying a Side Chain Bulkier than an Ethyl Substituent

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang-Woo; Park, Eul-Soo; Dong, Joo-Young

    2015-01-01

    ω-Transaminase (ω-TA) is a promising enzyme for use in the production of unnatural amino acids from keto acids using cheap amino donors such as isopropylamine. The small substrate-binding pocket of most ω-TAs permits entry of substituents no larger than an ethyl group, which presents a significant challenge to the preparation of structurally diverse unnatural amino acids. Here we report on the engineering of an (S)-selective ω-TA from Ochrobactrum anthropi (OATA) to reduce the steric constraint and thereby allow the small pocket to readily accept bulky substituents. On the basis of a docking model in which l-alanine was used as a ligand, nine active-site residues were selected for alanine scanning mutagenesis. Among the resulting variants, an L57A variant showed dramatic activity improvements in activity for α-keto acids and α-amino acids carrying substituents whose bulk is up to that of an n-butyl substituent (e.g., 48- and 56-fold increases in activity for 2-oxopentanoic acid and l-norvaline, respectively). An L57G mutation also relieved the steric constraint but did so much less than the L57A mutation did. In contrast, an L57V substitution failed to induce the improvements in activity for bulky substrates. Molecular modeling suggested that the alanine substitution of L57, located in a large pocket, induces an altered binding orientation of an α-carboxyl group and thereby provides more room to the small pocket. The synthetic utility of the L57A variant was demonstrated by carrying out the production of optically pure l- and d-norvaline (i.e., enantiomeric excess [ee] > 99%) by asymmetric amination of 2-oxopantanoic acid and kinetic resolution of racemic norvaline, respectively. PMID:26231640

  16. 6th Amino Acid Assessment Workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of the 6th workshop is on lysine, arginine, and related amino acids. Functions, metabolic pathways, clinical uses, and upper tolerance intakes are emphasized in the articles that follow. Lysine is arguably the most deficient amino acid in the food supply of countries where poverty exists, ...

  17. The Apollo Program and Amino Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sidney W.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the determination of hydrolyzable amino acid precursors and a group of six amino acids in the returned lunar samples of the Apollo programs. Indicates that molecular evolution is arrested at the precursor stage on the Moon because of lack of water. (CC)

  18. Amino acid sequence around the active-site serine residue in the acyltransferase domain of goat mammary fatty acid synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, J; Højrup, P; Rasmussen, M M; Roepstorff, P; Knudsen, J

    1985-01-01

    Goat mammary fatty acid synthetase was labelled in the acyltransferase domain by formation of O-ester intermediates by incubation with [1-14C]acetyl-CoA and [2-14C]malonyl-CoA. Tryptic-digest and CNBr-cleavage peptides were isolated and purified by high-performance reverse-phase and ion-exchange liquid chromatography. The sequences of the malonyl- and acetyl-labelled peptides were shown to be identical. The results confirm the hypothesis that both acetyl and malonyl groups are transferred to the mammalian fatty acid synthetase complex by the same transferase. The sequence is compared with those of other fatty acid synthetase transferases. PMID:3922356

  19. Control of mammalian gene expression by amino acids, especially glutamine.

    PubMed

    Brasse-Lagnel, Carole; Lavoinne, Alain; Husson, Annie

    2009-04-01

    Molecular data rapidly accumulating on the regulation of gene expression by amino acids in mammalian cells highlight the large variety of mechanisms that are involved. Transcription factors, such as the basic-leucine zipper factors, activating transcription factors and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein, as well as specific regulatory sequences, such as amino acid response element and nutrient-sensing response element, have been shown to mediate the inhibitory effect of some amino acids. Moreover, amino acids exert a wide range of effects via the activation of different signalling pathways and various transcription factors, and a number of cis elements distinct from amino acid response element/nutrient-sensing response element sequences were shown to respond to changes in amino acid concentration. Particular attention has been paid to the effects of glutamine, the most abundant amino acid, which at appropriate concentrations enhances a great number of cell functions via the activation of various transcription factors. The glutamine-responsive genes and the transcription factors involved correspond tightly to the specific effects of the amino acid in the inflammatory response, cell proliferation, differentiation and survival, and metabolic functions. Indeed, in addition to the major role played by nuclear factor-kappaB in the anti-inflammatory action of glutamine, the stimulatory role of activating protein-1 and the inhibitory role of C/EBP homology binding protein in growth-promotion, and the role of c-myc in cell survival, many other transcription factors are also involved in the action of glutamine to regulate apoptosis and intermediary metabolism in different cell types and tissues. The signalling pathways leading to the activation of transcription factors suggest that several kinases are involved, particularly mitogen-activated protein kinases. In most cases, however, the precise pathways from the entrance of the amino acid into the cell to the activation of gene

  20. Differential distribution of amino acids in plants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Sharma, Anket; Kaur, Ravdeep; Thukral, Ashwani Kumar; Bhardwaj, Renu; Ahmad, Parvaiz

    2017-05-01

    Plants are a rich source of amino acids and their individual abundance in plants is of great significance especially in terms of food. Therefore, it is of utmost necessity to create a database of the relative amino acid contents in plants as reported in literature. Since in most of the cases complete analysis of profiles of amino acids in plants was not reported, the units used and the methods applied and the plant parts used were different, amino acid contents were converted into relative units with respect to lysine for statistical analysis. The most abundant amino acids in plants are glutamic acid and aspartic acid. Pearson's correlation analysis among different amino acids showed that there were no negative correlations between the amino acids. Cluster analysis (CA) applied to relative amino acid contents of different families. Alismataceae, Cyperaceae, Capparaceae and Cactaceae families had close proximity with each other on the basis of their relative amino acid contents. First three components of principal component analysis (PCA) explained 79.5% of the total variance. Factor analysis (FA) explained four main underlying factors for amino acid analysis. Factor-1 accounted for 29.4% of the total variance and had maximum loadings on glycine, isoleucine, leucine, threonine and valine. Factor-2 explained 25.8% of the total variance and had maximum loadings on alanine, aspartic acid, serine and tyrosine. 14.2% of the total variance was explained by factor-3 and had maximum loadings on arginine and histidine. Factor-4 accounted 8.3% of the total variance and had maximum loading on the proline amino acid. The relative content of different amino acids presented in this paper is alanine (1.4), arginine (1.8), asparagine (0.7), aspartic acid (2.4), cysteine (0.5), glutamic acid (2.8), glutamine (0.6), glycine (1.0), histidine (0.5), isoleucine (0.9), leucine (1.7), lysine (1.0), methionine (0.4), phenylalanine (0.9), proline (1.1), serine (1.0), threonine (1

  1. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla.

    PubMed

    Glavin, D P; Bada, J L; Brinton, K L; McDonald, G D

    1999-08-03

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, beta-alanine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (gamma-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the D/L ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth.

  2. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.; Brinton, K. L.; McDonald, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, beta-alanine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (gamma-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the D/L ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth.

  3. Amino Acids in the Martian Meteorite Nakhla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Brinton, Karen L. F.; McDonald, Gene D.

    1999-08-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, β -alanine, and γ -amino-n-butyric acid (γ -ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the D/L ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth.

  4. Exogenous amino acids as fuel in shock.

    PubMed

    Daniel, A M; Kapadia, B; MacLean, L D

    1982-01-01

    It has been suggested that in shock branched-chain amino acids are preferentially oxidized resulting in continued proteolysis and stimulated gluconeogenesis. To determine if exogenous amino acids could be used as fuel in shock, dogs rendered hypotensive by controlled cardiac tamponade and normotensive controls were infused with amino acid mixtures and individual amino acids. When Nephramine, a mixture rich in branched-chain amino acids, was infused, plasma alpha-amino nitrogen levels rose but urea output did not increase in either the control state or in shock, suggesting that these amino acids were not rapidly deaminated to serve as fuels. Travasol, which in addition contained large amounts of alanine and glycine, tripled urea output in the controls and doubled it in shock. The limit of urea production was reached in both groups at 35 mumoles urea/minute/kg. In the Travasol-infused animals plasma alpha-amino nitrogen levels were maintained in normotension but rose sharply in shock. When glycine alone was infused into five dogs in shock urea production rate was 30.6 + 2.1 mumoles/minute/kg; with alanine the same value was 22.5 + 2.2 mumoles/minute/kg. In both cases plasma alpha-amino nitrogen levels were high, suggesting that transport of these amino acids into the cell was slow in shock. In four dogs in shock glycine-14C was added to the glycine infusate as a tracer. At radioactive equilibrium 28% of the label infused appeared in CO2; another 22% appeared in glucose. It is concluded that of all the amino acids tested only glycine and alanine are deaminated rapidly enough to serve as exogenous fuels in shock.

  5. The external amino acid signaling pathway promotes activation of Stp1 and Uga35/Dal81 transcription factors for induction of the AGP1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Sater, Fadi; Iraqui, Ismaïl; Urrestarazu, Antonio; André, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    Yeast cells respond to the presence of amino acids in their environment by inducing transcription of several amino acid permease genes including AGP1, BAP2, and BAP3. The signaling pathway responsible for this induction involves Ssy1, a permease-like sensor of external amino acids, and culminates with proteolytic cleavage and translocation to the nucleus of the zinc-finger proteins Stp1 and Stp2, the lack of which abolishes induction of BAP2 and BAP3. Here we show that Stp1-but not Stp2-plays an important role in AGP1 induction, although significant induction of AGP1 by amino acids persists in stp1 and stp1 stp2 mutants. This residual induction depends on the Uga35/Dal81 transcription factor, indicating that the external amino acid signaling pathway activates not only Stp1 and Stp2, but also another Uga35/Dal81-dependent transcriptional circuit. Analysis of the AGP1 gene's upstream region revealed that Stp1 and Uga35/Dal81 act synergistically through a 21-bp cis-acting sequence similar to the UAS(AA) element previously found in the BAP2 and BAP3 upstream regions. Although cells growing under poor nitrogen-supply conditions display much higher induction of AGP1 expression than cells growing under good nitrogen-supply conditions, the UAS(AA) itself is totally insensitive to nitrogen availability. Nitrogen-source control of AGP1 induction is mediated by the GATA factor Gln3, likely acting through adjacent 5'-GATA-3' sequences, to amplify the positive effect of UAS(AA). Our data indicate that Stp1 may act in combination with distinct sets of transcription factors, according to the gene context, to promote induction of transcription in response to external amino acids. The data also suggest that Uga35/Dal81 is yet another transcription factor under the control of the external amino acid sensing pathway. Finally, the data show that the TOR pathway mediating global nitrogen control of transcription does not interfere with the external amino acid signaling pathway. PMID

  6. Transaminases for the synthesis of enantiopure beta-amino acids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Optically pure β-amino acids constitute interesting building blocks for peptidomimetics and a great variety of pharmaceutically important compounds. Their efficient synthesis still poses a major challenge. Transaminases (also known as aminotransferases) possess a great potential for the synthesis of optically pure β-amino acids. These pyridoxal 5'-dependent enzymes catalyze the transfer of an amino group from a donor substrate to an acceptor, thus enabling the synthesis of a wide variety of chiral amines and amino acids. Transaminases can be applied either for the kinetic resolution of racemic compounds or the asymmetric synthesis starting from a prochiral substrate. This review gives an overview over microbial transaminases with activity towards β-amino acids and their substrate spectra. It also outlines current strategies for the screening of new biocatalysts. Particular emphasis is placed on activity assays which are applicable to high-throughput screening. PMID:22293122

  7. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shoup, Timothy

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  8. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shoup, Timothy

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  9. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  10. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  11. Amino acid transporters: roles in amino acid sensing and signalling in animal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Russell; Taylor, Peter M; Hundal, Harinder S

    2003-01-01

    Amino acid availability regulates cellular physiology by modulating gene expression and signal transduction pathways. However, although the signalling intermediates between nutrient availability and altered gene expression have become increasingly well documented, how eukaryotic cells sense the presence of either a nutritionally rich or deprived medium is still uncertain. From recent studies it appears that the intracellular amino acid pool size is particularly important in regulating translational effectors, thus, regulated transport of amino acids across the plasma membrane represents a means by which the cellular response to amino acids could be controlled. Furthermore, evidence from studies with transportable amino acid analogues has demonstrated that flux through amino acid transporters may act as an initiator of nutritional signalling. This evidence, coupled with the substrate selectivity and sensitivity to nutrient availability classically associated with amino acid transporters, plus the recent discovery of transporter-associated signalling proteins, demonstrates a potential role for nutrient transporters as initiators of cellular nutrient signalling. Here, we review the evidence supporting the idea that distinct amino acid "receptors" function to detect and transmit certain nutrient stimuli in higher eukaryotes. In particular, we focus on the role that amino acid transporters may play in the sensing of amino acid levels, both directly as initiators of nutrient signalling and indirectly as regulators of external amino acid access to intracellular receptor/signalling mechanisms. PMID:12879880

  12. Extending enzyme molecular recognition with an expanded amino acid alphabet

    PubMed Central

    Windle, Claire L.; Simmons, Katie J.; Ault, James R.; Trinh, Chi H.; Nelson, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Natural enzymes are constructed from the 20 proteogenic amino acids, which may then require posttranslational modification or the recruitment of coenzymes or metal ions to achieve catalytic function. Here, we demonstrate that expansion of the alphabet of amino acids can also enable the properties of enzymes to be extended. A chemical mutagenesis strategy allowed a wide range of noncanonical amino acids to be systematically incorporated throughout an active site to alter enzymic substrate specificity. Specifically, 13 different noncanonical side chains were incorporated at 12 different positions within the active site of N-acetylneuraminic acid lyase (NAL), and the resulting chemically modified enzymes were screened for activity with a range of aldehyde substrates. A modified enzyme containing a 2,3-dihydroxypropyl cysteine at position 190 was identified that had significantly increased activity for the aldol reaction of erythrose with pyruvate compared with the wild-type enzyme. Kinetic investigation of a saturation library of the canonical amino acids at the same position showed that this increased activity was not achievable with any of the 20 proteogenic amino acids. Structural and modeling studies revealed that the unique shape and functionality of the noncanonical side chain enabled the active site to be remodeled to enable more efficient stabilization of the transition state of the reaction. The ability to exploit an expanded amino acid alphabet can thus heighten the ambitions of protein engineers wishing to develop enzymes with new catalytic properties. PMID:28196894

  13. Lead detoxification activities and ADMET hepatotoxicities of a class of novel 5-(1-carbonyl-L-amino-acid)-2,2-dimethyl-[1,3]dithiolane-4-carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanxia; Wang, Yuji; Zhao, Ming; Hou, Baoguang; Peng, Li; Zheng, Meiqing; Wu, Jianhui; Peng, Shiqi

    2011-03-15

    By linking the mercapto groups with isopropyl and introducing L-amino acid into the 5-carboxyl of DMSA a class of novel 5-(1-carbonyl-L-amino-acid)-2,2- dimethyl-[1,3]dithiolane-4-carboxylic acids were prepared. Their in vivo activities were evaluated on lead loaded mice at the dose of 0.4 mmol/kg. The results showed that the lead levels of the livers, kidneys, femurs and brains in particular could be efficiently decreased by 0.4 mmol/kg of 5-(1-carbonyl-L-amino-acid)-2,2-dimethyl-[1,3]dithiolane-4-carboxylic acids. The benefit of 5-(1-carbonyl-L-amino-acid)-2,2-dimethyl-[1,3]dithiolane-4-carboxylic acids to the detoxification of the brain lead was attributed to their transmembrane ability. Compared with the lead detoxification efficacy, they did not affect the essential metals such as Fe, Cu, Zn, and Ca of the treated mice. Silico molecular modeling predicted that 5-(1-carbonyl-L-amino-acid)-2,2-dimethyl-[1,3]dithiolane-4-carboxylic acids had no hepatotoxicity.

  14. Amino Acid Detection in Cometary Matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierhenrich, U. J.; Munoz Caro, G. M.; Thiemann, W.; Goesmann, F.; Rosenbauer, H.

    2003-04-01

    The recent identification of amino acid structures in interstellar ice analogues [1, 2] strongly supports the assumption that amino acids are abundant in cometary matter too. Cometary matter is assumed to be built up of aggregates of interstellar dust particles. Amino acids are the molecular building blocks of proteins in living organisms. These results amplified the scientific interest in the ESA cometary mission Rosetta. The Rosetta Lander includes the Cosac experiment dedicated to the identification of chiral organic molecules in cometary matter itshape in situ \\upshape by multi column gas chromatography coupled with a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. However, the envisaged itshape in situ \\upshape amino acid analysis on the cometary surface requires special technical emphasis of the COSAC instrumentation. The context in which the amino acid identification in cometary matter is of interest will be outlined and the analytical solutions that make amino acids accessible to the COSAC instrument will be presented. A succesful identification of amino acid structures in cometary matter would help to understand the beginnings of the biomolecular evolution and the origin of the biomolecular asymmetry. [1] G.M. Muñoz Caro, U.J. Meierhenrich, W.A. Schutte, B. Barbier, A. Arcones Sergovia, H. Rosenbauer, W.H.-P. Thiemann, A. Brack, J.M. Greenberg: itshape Nature \\upshape 416 (2002), 403-406. [2] M.P. Bernstein, J.P. Dworkin, S.A. Sandford, G.W. Cooper, L.J. Allamandola: itshape Nature \\upshape 416 (2002), 401-403.

  15. Enantiomer-specific selection of amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xueying; Tellez, Luis A; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2013-01-01

    Dietary intake of L-amino acids impacts on several physiological functions, including the control of gastrointestinal motility, pancreatic secretion, and appetite. However, the biological mechanisms regulating behavioral predilections for certain amino acid types remain poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that, in mice, the potency with which a given glucogenic amino acid increases glucose utilization reflects its rewarding properties. We have found that: 1. During long-, but not short-, term preference tests, L-alanine and L-serine were preferred over their D-enantiomer counterparts, while no such effect was observed for L-threonine vs. D-threonine; 2. These behavioral patterns were closely associated with the ability of L-amino acids to promote increases in respiratory exchange ratios such that those, and only those, L-amino acids able to promote increases in respiratory exchange ratios were preferred over their D-isomers; 3. These behavioral preferences were independent of gustatory influences, since taste-deficient Trpm5 knockout mice displayed ingestive responses very similar to those of their wild-type counterparts. We conclude that the ability to promote increases in respiratory exchange ratios enhances the reward value of nutritionally relevant amino acids, and suggest a mechanistic link between substrate utilization and amino acid preferences. PMID:24072505

  16. Distribution of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Noble, S. K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most eagerly studied questions upon initial return of lunar samples was whether significant amounts of organic compounds, including amino acids, were present. Analyses during the 1970s produced only tentative and inconclusive identifications of indigenous amino acids. Those analyses were hampered by analytical difficulties including relative insensitivity to certain compounds, the inability to separate chiral enantiomers, and the lack of compound-specific isotopic measurements, which made it impossible to determine whether the detected amino acids were indigenous to the lunar samples or the results of contamination. Numerous advances have been made in instrumentation and methodology for amino acid characterization in extraterrestrial samples in the intervening years, yet the origin of amino acids in lunar regolith samples has been revisited only once for a single lunar sample, (3) and remains unclear. Here, we present initial data from the analyses of amino acid abundances in 12 lunar regolith samples. We discuss these abundances in the context of four potential amino acid sources: (1) terrestrial biological contamination; (2) contamination from lunar module (LM) exhaust; (3) derivation from solar windimplanted precursors; and (4) exogenous delivery from meteorites.

  17. Amino Acid Stability in the Early Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. T.; Brinton, K. L.; Burton, A. S.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    It is likely that a variety of amino acids existed in the early oceans of the Earth at the time of the origin and early evolution of life. "Primordial soup", hydrothermal vent, and meteorite based processes could have contributed to such an inventory. Several "protein" amino acids were likely present, however, based on prebiotic synthesis experiments and carbonaceous meteorite studies, non-protein amino acids, which are rare on Earth today, were likely the most abundant. An important uncertainty is the length of time these amino acids could have persisted before their destruction by abiotic and biotic processes. Prior to life, amino acid concentrations in the oceans were likely regulated by circulation through hydro-thermal vents. Today, the entire ocean circulates through vent systems every 10(exp 7) years. On the early Earth, this value was likely smaller due to higher heat flow and thus marine amino acid life-time would have been shorter. After life, amino acids in the oceans could have been assimilated by primitive organisms.

  18. Soil Bacteria Take Up D-Amino Acids, Protect Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H. J.; Zhang, G.

    2011-12-01

    Recently, many groups reported D-amino acid uptake by plant roots, raising the question of whether soil D-amino acids represent a source of nitrogen or a source of toxicity. The discussion needs to be placed in the context of competition with rhizosphere bacteria. To provide this context, we followed the concentrations of D- and L-enantiomers of alanine, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and leucine after they were added to soils in the laboratory. In all cases, the uptake of L-enantiomer began immediately and proceeded rapidly until exhausted. In contrast, the uptake of D-enantiomer required induction: an initial period of inactivity followed by rapid consumption comparable in rate to L-enantiomer. The induced nature of the D activity was confirmed by the addition of rifampicin, an mRNA synthesis inhibitor. Preventing the synthesis of new enzymes abolished soil flora's ability to consume D-amino acids, but not L-amino acids. These results suggest that inducible special racemase enzymes, which can convert D-amino acids back to their native L-forms, are widespread among soil microorganisms. This finding does not rule out the possibility that some plants may out-compete microorganisms and be able to access D-amino acids. It does suggest, however, that rhizosphere bacteria can shield plants from the toxic effect of D-amino acids.

  19. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein: nucleotide sequence of mRNA, identification of cleavage activation site and amino acid sequence of N-terminus of F1 subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Elango, N; Satake, M; Coligan, J E; Norrby, E; Camargo, E; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein (Fo) was deduced from the sequence of a partial cDNA clone of mRNA and from the 5' mRNA sequence obtained by primer extension and dideoxysequencing. The encoded protein of 574 amino acids is extremely hydrophobic and has a molecular weight of 63371 daltons. The site of proteolytic cleavage within this protein was accurately mapped by determining a partial amino acid sequence of the N-terminus of the larger subunit (F1) purified by radioimmunoprecipitation using monoclonal antibodies. Alignment of the N-terminus of the F1 subunit within the deduced amino acid sequence of Fo permitted us to identify a sequence of lys-lys-arg-lys-arg-arg at the C-terminus of the smaller N-terminal F2 subunit that appears to represent the cleavage/activation domain. Five potential sites of glycosylation, four within the F2 subunit, were also identified. Three extremely hydrophobic domains are present in the protein; a) the N-terminal signal sequence, b) the N-terminus of the F1 subunit that is analogous to the N-terminus of the paramyxovirus F1 subunit and the HA2 subunit of influenza virus hemagglutinin, and c) the putative membrane anchorage domain near the C-terminus of F1. Images PMID:2987829

  20. Amino Acid Degradation after Meteoritic Impact Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertrand, M.; Westall, F.; vanderGaast, S.; Vilas, F.; Hoerz, F.; Barnes, G.; Chabin, A.; Brack, A.

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most important prebiotic molecules as it is from these precursors that the building blocks of life were formed [1]. Although organic molecules were among the components of the planetesimals making up the terrestrial planets, large amounts of primitive organic precursor molecules are believed to be exogenous in origin and to have been imported to the Earth via micrometeorites, carbonaceous meteorites and comets, especially during the early stages of the formation of the Solar System [1,2]. Our study concerns the hypothesis that prebiotic organic matter, present on Earth, was synthesized in the interstellar environment, and then imported to Earth by meteorites or micrometeorites. We are particularly concerned with the formation and fate of amino acids. We have already shown that amino acid synthesis is possible inside cometary grains under interstellar environment conditions [3]. We are now interested in the effects of space conditions and meteoritic impact on these amino acids [4-6]. Most of the extraterrestrial organic molecules known today have been identified in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites [7]. One of the components of these meteorites is a clay with a composition close to that of saponite, used in our experiments. Two American teams have studied the effects of impact on various amino acids [8,9]. [8] investigated amino acids in saturated solution in water with pressure ranges between 5.1 and 21 GPa and temperature ranges between 412 and 870 K. [9] studied amino acids in solid form associated with and without minerals (Murchison and Allende meteorite extracts) and pressure ranges between 3 and 30 GPa. In these two experiments, the amino acids survived up to 15 GPa. At higher pressure, the quantity of preserved amino acids decreases quickly. Some secondary products such as dipeptides and diketopiperazins were identified in the [8] experiment.

  1. Osmotolerance in Escherichia coli is improved by activation of copper efflux genes or supplementation with sulfur containing amino acids.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Mengyong; Zhu, Xinna; Fan, Feiyu; Xu, Hongtao; Tang, Jinlei; Qin, Ying; Ma, Yanhe; Zhang, Xueli

    2017-01-23

    Improvement in the osmotolerance of Escherichia coli is essential for the production of high titers of various bioproducts. In this work, a cusS mutation identified in the previously constructed high succinate-producing E. coli strain HX024 was investigated for its effect on osmotolerance. CusS is part of the two-component system CusSR that protects cell from Ag(I) and Cu(I) toxicity. Changing cusS from strain HX024 back to its original sequence led to a 24% decrease in cell mass and succinate titer under osmotic stress (12% glucose). When cultivated with a high initial glucose concentration (12%), introduction of the cusS mutation into parental strain Suc-T110 led to a 21% increase in cell mass and 40% increase in succinate titer. When the medium was supplemented with 30 g/L disodium succinate, the cusS mutation led to a 120% increase in cell mass and 492% increase in succinate titer. Introducing the cusS mutation into the wild-type strain ATCC 8739 led to increases in cell mass of 87% with 20% glucose and 36% using 30 g/L disodium succinate. The cusS mutation increased expression of cusCFBA, and gene expression levels were found to be positively related to osmotolerance abilities. Because high osmotic stress has been associated with deleterious accumulation of Cu(I) in the periplasm, activation of CusCFBA might alleviate this effect by transporting Cu(I) out of the cells. This hypothesis was confirmed by supplementing sulfur-containing amino acids that could chelate Cu(I). Adding methionine or cysteine to the medium increased the osmotolerance of E. coli under anaerobic conditions.

  2. Halogenated ligands and their interactions with amino acids: implications for structure-activity and structure-toxicity relationships.

    PubMed

    Kortagere, Sandhya; Ekins, Sean; Welsh, William J

    2008-09-01

    The properties of chemicals are rooted in their molecular structure. It follows that structural analysis of specific interactions between ligands and biomolecules at the molecular level is invaluable for defining structure-activity relationships (SARs) and structure-toxicity relationships (STRs). This study has elucidated the structural and molecular basis of interactions of biomolecules with alkyl and aryl halides that are extensively used as components in many commercial pesticides, disinfectants, and drugs. We analyzed the protein structures deposited in Protein Data Bank (PDB) for structural information associated with interactions between halogenated ligands and proteins. This analysis revealed distinct patterns with respect to the nature and structural characteristics of halogen interactions with specific types of atoms and groups in proteins. Fluorine had the highest propensity of interactions for glycine, while chlorine for leucine, bromine for arginine, and iodine for lysine. Chlorine, bromine and iodine had the lowest propensity of interactions for cysteine, while fluorine had a lowest propensity for proline. These trends for highest propensity shifted towards the hydrophobic residues for all the halogens when only interactions with the side chain were considered. Halogens had equal propensities of interaction for the halogen bonding partners (nitrogen and oxygen atoms), albeit with different geometries. The optimal angle for interactions with halogens was approximately 120 degrees for oxygen atoms, and approximately 96 degrees for nitrogen atoms. The distance distributions of halogens with various amino acids were mostly bimodal, and the angle distributions were unimodal. Insights gained from this study have implications for the rational design of safer drugs and commercially important chemicals.

  3. Characterization of a Chinese hamster-human hybrid cell line with increased system L amino acid transport activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lobaton, C D; Moreno, A; Oxender, D L

    1984-01-01

    We have studied leucine transport in several Chinese hamster-human hybrid cell lines obtained by fusion of a temperature-sensitive line of Chinese hamster ovary cells, ts025C1, and normal human leukocytes. A hybrid cell line exhibiting a twofold increase in L-leucine uptake over that in the parental cell line was found. This hybrid cell line, 158CnpT-1, was temperature resistant, whereas the parental Chinese hamster ovary mutant, ts025C1, contained a temperature-sensitive leucyl-tRNA synthetase mutation. An examination of the different amino acid transport systems in this hybrid cell line revealed a specific increase of system L activity with no significant changes in systems A and ASC. The Vmax for L-leucine uptake exhibited by the hybrid 158CnpT-1 was twice that in the CHO parental mutant, ts025C1. Cytogenetic analysis showed that the hybrid 158CnpT-1 contains four complete human chromosomes (numbers 4, 5, 10, and 21) and three interspecific chromosomal translocations in a total complement of 34 chromosomes. Biochemical and cytogenetic analysis of segregant clones obtained from hybrid 158CnpT-1 showed that the primary temperature resistance and high system L transport phenotypes can be segregated from this hybrid independently. The loss of the primary temperature resistance was associated with the loss of the human chromosome 5, as previously reported by other laboratories, whereas the loss of the high leucine transport phenotype, which is associated with a lesser degree of temperature resistance, was correlated with the loss of human chromosome 20. Images PMID:6717430

  4. Characterization of a Chinese hamster-human hybrid cell line with increased system L amino acid transport activity.

    PubMed

    Lobaton, C D; Moreno, A; Oxender, D L

    1984-03-01

    We have studied leucine transport in several Chinese hamster-human hybrid cell lines obtained by fusion of a temperature-sensitive line of Chinese hamster ovary cells, ts025C1, and normal human leukocytes. A hybrid cell line exhibiting a twofold increase in L-leucine uptake over that in the parental cell line was found. This hybrid cell line, 158CnpT-1, was temperature resistant, whereas the parental Chinese hamster ovary mutant, ts025C1, contained a temperature-sensitive leucyl-tRNA synthetase mutation. An examination of the different amino acid transport systems in this hybrid cell line revealed a specific increase of system L activity with no significant changes in systems A and ASC. The Vmax for L-leucine uptake exhibited by the hybrid 158CnpT-1 was twice that in the CHO parental mutant, ts025C1. Cytogenetic analysis showed that the hybrid 158CnpT-1 contains four complete human chromosomes (numbers 4, 5, 10, and 21) and three interspecific chromosomal translocations in a total complement of 34 chromosomes. Biochemical and cytogenetic analysis of segregant clones obtained from hybrid 158CnpT-1 showed that the primary temperature resistance and high system L transport phenotypes can be segregated from this hybrid independently. The loss of the primary temperature resistance was associated with the loss of the human chromosome 5, as previously reported by other laboratories, whereas the loss of the high leucine transport phenotype, which is associated with a lesser degree of temperature resistance, was correlated with the loss of human chromosome 20.

  5. Free amino acid content and metabolic activities of setting and aborting soybean ovaries. [Glycine max (L. ) Merr

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiasi, H.; Paech, C.; Dybing, C.D.

    1987-09-01

    Fruits of soybean (glycine max (L.) Merr.) that are destined to abscise shortly after anthesis grow more slowly than fruits that will be retained. In this work, amino acid composition, protein metabolism, and nucleic acid metabolism were studied in setting and abscising soybean ovaries from anthesis to 6 days after anthesis. Principal free amino acids were asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and glutamine. Percent aspartate and glutamate declined as the ovaries grew, with aspartate declining more in abscising and glutamate more in setting ovaries. Percent glutamate was positively correlated to percent abscission throughout the period. Proline, serine, and leucine were positively correlated to abscission from 0 to 2 days after anthesis, whereas significant negative correlations were observed at these ages for ethanolamine and arginine. /sup 75/Se fed as selenate and /sup 14/C fed as sucrose, glycine, and alanine were readily incorporated into soluble and insoluble proteins in a 24-hour in vitro incubation. Radioactivity of total proteins, expressed on a per-ovary basis, was negatively correlated with percent abscission and positively correlated with ovary weight. (/sup 14/C)Glutamine and serine followed the opposite pattern, with greater protein labeling in abscising than in setting ovaries. When data were expressed as disintegrations per minute per milligram ovary fresh weight, protein labeling from alanine was seen to be significantly greater in abscising ovaries at anthesis and throughout the sampling period. Nucleic acid labeling from uridine was highly correlated to ovary weight; labeling from thymidine was greater in setting than abscising ovaries at anthesis and in abscising ovaries at later stages of development.

  6. Amino acid analysis for pharmacopoeial purposes.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Oliver; Holzgrabe, Ulrike

    2016-07-01

    The impurity profile of amino acids depends strongly on the production process. Since there are many different production methods (e.g. fermentation, protein hydrolysis or chemical synthesis) universal, state of the art methods are required to determine the impurity profile of amino acids produced by all relevant competitors. At the moment TLC tests provided by the Ph. Eur. are being replaced by a very specific amino acid analysis procedure possibly missing out on currently unknown process related impurities. Production methods and possible impurities as well as separation and detection methods suitable for said impurities are subject to this review.

  7. ANTIGENICITY OF POLYPEPTIDES (POLY ALPHA AMINO ACIDS)

    PubMed Central

    Pinchuck, Paul; Maurer, Paul H.

    1965-01-01

    The response of mice to synthetic linear polypeptides of known composition but random sequence has been studied. Neither Swiss mice nor a number of inbred strains could respond to copolymers of only 2 amino acids (G60L40, G60A40, G90T10). Upon introduction of as little as 4 mole per cent of a third amino acid, good immune responses were obtained, regardless of the nature of the third amino acid. The level of the immune response to a series of glu-lys-ala polymers increased with increasing alanine content of the polymer. PMID:5849232

  8. Amino Acid Transport in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Yabu, Kunihiko

    1970-01-01

    The transport of d-alanine, d-glutamic acid, and d-valine in Mycobacterium smegmatis was compared quantitatively with that of their l-isomers. It appeared that the uptake of d-alanine was mediated by an active process displaying saturation kinetics characteristic of enzyme function, whereas the uptake of d-glutamic acid was accomplished by a passive process showing diffusion kinetics. Both processes were involved in the uptake of l-alanine, l-glutamic acid, d-valine, and l-valine. d-Valine competed with l-valine for entry into the cell through a single active process. d-Alanine and l-alanine also utilized the same active process, but the d-isomer could not enter the cell through the passive process. The passive process exhibited characteristics of diffusion, but was sensitive to sulfhydryl-blocking reagents and showed competition among structurally related amino acids. These last findings suggested that the passive process is a facilitated diffusion. PMID:5437732

  9. Regulation of the plasma amino acid profile by leucine via the system L amino acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Hongmin; Nakamura, Koichi; Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Kadota, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuya; Kondo, Yusuke; Xu, Minjun; Shimomura, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of amino acids reflect the intracellular amino acid pool in mammals. However, the regulatory mechanism requires clarification. In this study, we examined the effect of leucine administration on plasma amino acid profiles in mice with and without the treatment of 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) or rapamycin as an inhibitor of system L or mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1, respectively. The elevation of plasma leucine concentration after leucine administration was associated with a significant decrease in the plasma concentrations of isoleucine, valine, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine; BCH treatment almost completely blocked the leucine-induced decrease in plasma amino acid concentrations. Rapamycin treatment had much less effects on the actions of leucine than BCH treatment. These results suggest that leucine regulates the plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine, and that system L amino acid transporters are involved in the leucine action.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is an inherited disorder that ...

  11. Discovery and History of Amino Acid Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shin-Ichi

    2016-12-02

    There has been a strong demand in Japan and East Asia for L-glutamic acid as a seasoning since monosodium glutamate was found to present umami taste in 1907. The discovery of glutamate fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum in 1956 enabled abundant and low-cost production of the amino acid, creating a large market. The discovery also prompted researchers to develop fermentative production processes for other L-amino acids, such as lysine. Currently, the amino acid fermentation industry is so huge that more than 5 million metric tons of amino acids are manufactured annually all over the world, and this number continues to grow. Research on amino acid fermentation fostered the notion and skills of metabolic engineering which has been applied for the production of other compounds from renewable resources. The discovery of glutamate fermentation has had revolutionary impacts on both the industry and science. In this chapter, the history and development of glutamate fermentation, including the very early stage of fermentation of other amino acids, are reviewed.

  12. Anionic Amino Acids near the Pro-α-defensin N Terminus Mediate Inhibition of Bactericidal Activity in Mouse Pro-cryptdin-4*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Figueredo, Sharel M.; Weeks, Colby S.; Young, Steven K.; Ouellette, André J.

    2009-01-01

    In mouse Paneth cells, α-defensins, termed cryptdins (Crps), are activated by matrix metalloproteinase-7-mediated proteolysis of inactive precursors (pro-Crps) to bactericidal forms. The activating cleavage step at Ser43 ↓ Ile44 in mouse pro-Crp4-(20–92) removes nine acidic amino acids that collectively block the membrane-disruptive behavior of the Crp4 moiety of the proform. This inhibitory mechanism has been investigated further to identify whether specific cluster(s) of electronegative amino acids in pro-Crp4-(20–43) are responsible for blocking bactericidal activity and membrane disruption. To test whether specific cluster(s) of electronegative amino acids in pro-Crp4-(20–43) have specific positional effects that block bactericidal peptide activity and membrane disruption, acidic residues positioned at the distal (Asp20, Asp26, Glu27, and Glu28), mid (Glu32 and Glu33), and proximal (Glu37, Glu38, and Asp39) clusters in pro-Crp4-(20–92) were mutagenized, and variants were assayed for differential effects of mutagenesis on bactericidal peptide activity. Substitution of the mid and proximal Asp and Glu clusters with Gly produced additive effects with respect to the induction of both bactericidal activity and membrane permeabilization of live Escherichia coli ML35 cells. In contrast, substitution of distal Glu and Asp residues with Gly or their deletion resulted in pro-Crp4-(20–92) variants with bactericidal and membrane-disruptive activities equal to or greater than that of fully mature Crp4. These findings support the conclusion that the most distal N-terminal anionic residues of pro-Crp4-(20–92) are primarily responsible for blocking Crp4-mediated membrane disruption in the precursor. PMID:19106102

  13. Amino Acid Sensing in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Moro, Tatiana; Ebert, Scott M; Adams, Christopher M; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2016-11-01

    Aging impairs skeletal muscle protein synthesis, leading to muscle weakness and atrophy. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we review evidence that mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-mediated and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4)-mediated amino acid (AA) sensing pathways, triggered by impaired AA delivery to aged skeletal muscle, may play important roles in skeletal muscle aging. Interventions that alleviate age-related impairments in muscle protein synthesis, strength, and/or muscle mass appear to do so by reversing age-related changes in skeletal muscle AA delivery, mTORC1 activity, and/or ATF4 activity. An improved understanding of the mechanisms and roles of AA sensing pathways in skeletal muscle may lead to evidence-based strategies to attenuate sarcopenia.

  14. Recombinant thiopeptides containing noncanonical amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaozhou; Zambaldo, Claudio; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Yuhan; Xuan, Weimin; Wang, Chen; Reed, Sean A.; Yang, Peng-Yu; Wang, Rongsheng E.; Javahishvili, Tsotne; Schultz, Peter G.; Young, Travis S.

    2016-01-01

    Thiopeptides are a subclass of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs) with complex molecular architectures and an array of biological activities, including potent antimicrobial activity. Here we report the generation of thiopeptides containing noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) by introducing orthogonal amber suppressor aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA pairs into a thiocillin producer strain of Bacillus cereus. We demonstrate that thiopeptide variants containing ncAAs with bioorthogonal chemical reactivity can be further postbiosynthetically modified with biophysical probes, including fluorophores and photo-cross-linkers. This work allows the site-specific incorporation of ncAAs into thiopeptides to increase their structural diversity and probe their biological activity; similar approaches can likely be applied to other classes of RiPPs. PMID:26976568

  15. Enantioenrichment in sublimed amino acid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Viedma, Cristóbal; Ortiz, José E; de Torres, Trinidad; Cintas, Pedro

    2012-04-14

    A real amplification of an initial enantiomeric excess can be detected when two amino acids are sublimed at high temperature, even if one of the components is a racemic compound that does not convert into a conglomerate by sublimation.

  16. Amino Acid Biosynthesis Pathways in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Bromke, Mariusz A.

    2013-01-01

    Amino acids are not only building blocks for proteins but serve as precursors for the synthesis of many metabolites with multiple functions in growth and other biological processes of a living organism. The biosynthesis of amino acids is tightly connected with central carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism. Recent publication of genome sequences for two diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum created an opportunity for extensive studies on the structure of these metabolic pathways. Based on sequence homology found in the analyzed diatomal genes, the biosynthesis of amino acids in diatoms seems to be similar to higher plants. However, one of the most striking differences between the pathways in plants and in diatomas is that the latter possess and utilize the urea cycle. It serves as an important anaplerotic pathway for carbon fixation into amino acids and other N-containing compounds, which are essential for diatom growth and contribute to their high productivity. PMID:24957993

  17. Genetically encoded fluorescent coumarin amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun [San Diego, CA; Xie, Jianming [San Diego, CA; Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA

    2012-06-05

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the coumarin unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal synthetases, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine and related translation systems.

  18. Genetically encoded fluorescent coumarin amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Xie, Jianming; Schultz, Peter G.

    2010-10-05

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the coumarin unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl) ethylglycine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal synthetases, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine and related translation systems.

  19. Amino acid transport by prosthecae of Asticcacaulis biprosthecum: evidence for a broad-range transport system.

    PubMed

    Tam, E; Pate, J L

    1985-10-01

    Prosthecae purified from cells of Asticcaulis biprosthecum possess active transport systems that transport all 20 amino acids tested. Using ascorbate-reduced phenazine methosulphate in the presence of oxygen, all 20 amino acids are accumulated against a concentration gradient by isolated prosthecae. Results of experiments testing the inhibition of transport of one amino acid by another, and of experiments testing the exchange of exogenous amino acids with those preloaded in prosthecae, along with characteristics of mutants defective in amino acid transport, suggest the presence in prosthecae of three amino acid transport systems. One, the general or G system, transports at least 18 of the 20 amino acids tested. Another system, referred to as the proline or P system, transports seven amino acids (including proline) that are also transported by the G system. The third system transports only glutamate and aspartate, and is referred to as the acidic amino acid transport system or A system.

  20. Substitution of a single amino acid (aspartic acid for histidine) converts the functional activity of human complement C4B to C4A.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, M C; Fathallah, D M; Bergamaschini, L; Alicot, E M; Isenman, D E

    1990-01-01

    The C4B isotype of the fourth component of human complement (C4) displays 3- to 4-fold greater hemolytic activity than does its other isotype C4A. This correlates with differences in their covalent binding efficiencies to erythrocytes coated with antibody and complement C1. C4A binds to a greater extent when C1 is on IgG immune aggregates. The differences in covalent binding properties correlate only with amino acid changes between residues 1101 and 1106 (pro-C4 numbering)--namely, Pro-1101, Cys-1102, Leu-1105, and Asp-1106 in C4A and Leu-1101, Ser-1102, Ile-1105, and His-1106 in C4B, which are located in the C4d region of the alpha chain. To more precisely identify the residues that are important for the functional differences, C4A-C4B hybrid proteins were constructed by using recombinant DNA techniques. Comparison of these by hemolytic assay and binding to IgG aggregates showed that the single substitution of aspartic acid for histidine at position 1106 largely accounted for the change in functional activity and nature of the chemical bond formed (ester vs. amide). Surprisingly, substitution of a neutral residue, alanine, for histidine at position 1106 resulted in an increase in binding to immune aggregates without subsequent reduction in the hemolytic activity. This result strongly suggests that position 1106 is not "catalytic" as previously proposed but interacts sterically/electrostatically with potential acceptor sites and serves to "select" binding sites on potential acceptor molecules. Images PMID:2395880

  1. Nonprotein Amino Acids from Spark Discharges and Their Comparison with the Murchison Meteorite Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Wolman, Yecheskel; Haverland, William J.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    All the nonprotein amino acids found in the Murchison meteorite are products of the action of electric discharge on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia. These amino acids include α-amino-n-butyric acid, α-aminoisobutyric acid, norvaline, isovaline, pipecolic acid, β-alanine, β-amino-n-butyric acid, β-aminoisobutyric acid, γ-aminobutyric acid, sarcosine, N-ethylglycine, and N-methylalanine. In addition, norleucine, alloisoleucine, N-propylglycine, N-isopropylglycine, N-methyl-β-alanine, N-ethyl-β-alanine α,β-diaminopropionic acid, isoserine, α,γ-diaminobutyric acid, and α-hydroxy-γ-aminobutyric acid are produced by the electric discharge, but have not been found in the meteorite. PMID:16591973

  2. Free amino acids: an innovative treatment for ocular surface disease.

    PubMed

    Rusciano, Dario; Roszkowska, Anna Maria; Gagliano, Caterina; Pezzino, Salvatore

    2016-09-15

    Amino acids are the basic constituents of living organisms, and have both a structural and an active dynamic role in tissue and cell physiology. Human tears contain 23 amino acids, the relative proportion of which may change with the different physiological states of the eye surface. In this review, we present a collection of data from the published literature that indicate an active role of amino acids in the maintenance of eye surface homeostasis. Moreover, another series of published clinical data indicate that supplementation of amino acids, either as food supplements or as a topical treatment in enriched eye drops, is beneficial to the eye surface, and may improve its healing in cases of eye surface disease due to different causes.

  3. Evaluation of amino acids as turfgrass nematicides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Luc, John E; Crow, William T

    2010-12-01

    Laboratory experiments revealed that DL-methionine, sodium methionate, potassium methionate, and methionine hydroxyl analog at rates of 224 and 448 kg amino acid/ha reduced the number of Belonolaimus longicaudatus mixed life-stages and Meloidogyne incognita J2 in soil, whereas L-threonine and lysine were not effective in reducing the number of either nematode. Futhermore, greenhouse experiments demonstrated that DL-methionine, sodium methionate, potassium methionate, and methionine hydroxyl analog were equally effective against B. longicaudatus at rates of 112, 224, and 448 kg amino acid/ha, and the highest rate (448 kg amino acid/ha) of all amino acids was more effective in reducing the number of B. longicaudatus than the lower rate. However, phytotoxicity was observed on creeping bentgrass (Agrostis palustris) treated with 448 kg amino acid/ha of methionine hydroxyl analog and DL methionine. In addition, in one of two field experiments on bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon × C. transvaalensis) turf percentage green cover was increased and the number of B. longicaudatus was reduced by 224 kg amino acid/ha of DL-methionine and potassium methionate compared to untreated controls in one of two trials.

  4. Mild reductions in cytosolic NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity result in lower amino acid contents and pigmentation without impacting growth

    PubMed Central

    Sulpice, Ronan; Sienkiewicz-Porzucek, Agata; Osorio, Sonia; Krahnert, Ina; Stitt, Mark; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants were generated targeting the cytosolic NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (SlICDH1) via the RNA interference approach. The resultant transformants displayed a relatively mild reduction in the expression and activity of the target enzyme in the leaves. However, biochemical analyses revealed that the transgenic lines displayed a considerable shift in metabolism, being characterized by decreases in the levels of the TCA cycle intermediates, total amino acids, photosynthetic pigments, starch and NAD(P)H. The plants showed little change in photosynthesis with the exception of a minor decrease in maximum photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm), and a small decrease in growth compared to the wild type. These results reveal that even small changes in cytosolic NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity lead to noticeable alterations in the activities of enzymes involved in primary nitrate assimilation and in the synthesis of 2-oxoglutarate derived amino acids. These data are discussed within the context of current models for the role of the various isoforms of isocitrate dehydrogenase within plant amino acid metabolism. PMID:20473773

  5. Mild reductions in cytosolic NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity result in lower amino acid contents and pigmentation without impacting growth.

    PubMed

    Sulpice, Ronan; Sienkiewicz-Porzucek, Agata; Osorio, Sonia; Krahnert, Ina; Stitt, Mark; Fernie, Alisdair R; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano

    2010-10-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants were generated targeting the cytosolic NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (SlICDH1) via the RNA interference approach. The resultant transformants displayed a relatively mild reduction in the expression and activity of the target enzyme in the leaves. However, biochemical analyses revealed that the transgenic lines displayed a considerable shift in metabolism, being characterized by decreases in the levels of the TCA cycle intermediates, total amino acids, photosynthetic pigments, starch and NAD(P)H. The plants showed little change in photosynthesis with the exception of a minor decrease in maximum photosynthetic efficiency (F (v)/F (m)), and a small decrease in growth compared to the wild type. These results reveal that even small changes in cytosolic NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity lead to noticeable alterations in the activities of enzymes involved in primary nitrate assimilation and in the synthesis of 2-oxoglutarate derived amino acids. These data are discussed within the context of current models for the role of the various isoforms of isocitrate dehydrogenase within plant amino acid metabolism.

  6. Amino acid composition and amino acid-metabolic network in supragingival plaque.

    PubMed

    Washio, Jumpei; Ogawa, Tamaki; Suzuki, Keisuke; Tsukiboshi, Yosuke; Watanabe, Motohiro; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Dental plaque metabolizes both carbohydrates and amino acids. The former can be degraded to acids mainly, while the latter can be degraded to various metabolites, including ammonia, acids and amines, and associated with acid-neutralization, oral malodor and tissue inflammation. However, amino acid metabolism in dental plaque is still unclear. This study aimed to elucidate what kinds of amino acids are available as metabolic substrates and how the amino acids are metabolized in supragingival plaque, by a metabolome analysis. Amino acids and the related metabolites in supragingival plaque were extracted and quantified comprehensively by CE-TOFMS. Plaque samples were also incubated with amino acids, and the amounts of ammonia and amino acid-related metabolites were measured. The concentration of glutamate was the highest in supragingival plaque, while the ammonia-production was the highest from glutamine. The obtained metabolome profile revealed that amino acids are degraded through various metabolic pathways, including deamination, decarboxylation and transamination and that these metabolic systems may link each other, as well as with carbohydrate metabolic pathways in dental plaque ecosystem. Moreover, glutamine and glutamate might be the main source of ammonia production, as well as arginine, and contribute to pH-homeostasis and counteraction to acid-induced demineralization in supragingival plaque.

  7. Critical Role for an acidic amino acid region in platelet signaling by the HemITAM (hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif) containing receptor CLEC-2 (C-type lectin receptor-2).

    PubMed

    Hughes, Craig E; Sinha, Uma; Pandey, Anjali; Eble, Johannes A; O'Callaghan, Christopher A; Watson, Steve P

    2013-02-15

    CLEC-2 is a member of new family of C-type lectin receptors characterized by a cytosolic YXXL downstream of three acidic amino acids in a sequence known as a hemITAM (hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif). Dimerization of two phosphorylated CLEC-2 molecules leads to recruitment of the tyrosine kinase Syk via its tandem SH2 domains and initiation of a downstream signaling cascade. Using Syk-deficient and Zap-70-deficient cell lines we show that hemITAM signaling is restricted to Syk and that the upstream triacidic amino acid sequence is required for signaling. Using surface plasmon resonance and phosphorylation studies, we demonstrate that the triacidic amino acids are required for phosphorylation of the YXXL. These results further emphasize the distinct nature of the proximal events in signaling by hemITAM relative to ITAM receptors.

  8. Polypeptide having an amino acid replaced with N-benzylglycine

    DOEpatents

    Mitchell, Alexander R.; Young, Janis D.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to one or more polypeptides having useful biological activity in a mammal, which comprise: a polypeptide related to bradykinin of four to ten amino acid residues wherein one or more specific amino acids in the polypeptide chain are replaced with achiral N-benzylglycine. These polypeptide analogues have useful potent agonist or antagonist pharmacological properties depending upon the structure. A preferred polypeptide is (N-benzylglycine.sup.7)-bradykinin.

  9. Amino acid metabolism in tumour-bearing mice.

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, S; Azcón-Bieto, J; López-Soriano, F J; Miralpeix, M; Argilés, J M

    1988-01-01

    Mice bearing the Lewis lung carcinoma showed a high tumour glutaminase activity and significantly higher concentrations of most amino acids than in both the liver and the skeletal muscle of the host. Tumour tissue slices showed a marked preference for glutamine, especially for oxidation of its skeleton to CO2. It is proposed that the metabolism of this particular carcinoma is focused on amino acid degradation, glutamine being its preferred substrate. PMID:3342022

  10. [Studies on interaction of acid-treated nanotube titanic acid and amino acids].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huqin; Chen, Xuemei; Jin, Zhensheng; Liao, Guangxi; Wu, Xiaoming; Du, Jianqiang; Cao, Xiang

    2010-06-01

    Nanotube titanic acid (NTA) has distinct optical and electrical character, and has photocatalysis character. In accordance with these qualities, NTA was treated with acid so as to enhance its surface activity. Surface structures and surface groups of acid-treated NTA were characterized and analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FT-IR). The interaction between acid-treated NTA and amino acids was investigated. Analysis results showed that the lengths of acid-treated NTA became obviously shorter. The diameters of nanotube bundles did not change obviously with acid-treating. Meanwhile, the surface of acid-treated NTA was cross-linked with carboxyl or esterfunction. In addition, acid-treated NTA can catch amino acid residues easily, and then form close combination.

  11. Effects of free amino acids on cytokine secretion and proliferative activity of feline T cells in an in vitro study using the cell line MYA-1.

    PubMed

    Paßlack, Nadine; Doherr, Marcus G; Zentek, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    In vitro studies might be an interesting screening method for targeted in vivo studies in the field of immunonutrition and help to reduce and refine animal studies. As the role of amino acids for immune function of cats has not been evaluated in detail so far, the present study aimed at investigating the effects of eight different amino acids (arginine, leucine, isoleucine, valine, glutamine, lysine, threonine and tryptophan) in six concentrations each (0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 and 8x the cat blood level) on cytokine secretion and proliferative activity of feline T cells (MYA-1) in vitro. The results demonstrated that high doses of arginine increased IL-4, IL-10 and TNF-α secretion of T cells, while increasing concentrations of lysine increased IL-10 secretion and proliferative activity of the T cells. High doses of leucine enhanced GM-CSF and IL-10 secretion, while concentrations of threonine in the cell culture media greater than blood concentration also increased GM-CSF and additionally TNF-α secretion of the cells. The effects of glutamine and isoleucine on T cell function were only small. In conclusion, the present in vitro study could evaluate the immunomodulating potential of specific amino acids for feline T cell function. High doses of arginine, lysine, leucine and threonine had a significant impact on cytokine secretion and proliferative activity of the T cells. Targeted in vivo studies should investigate the clinical relevance of dietary supplementation of those amino acids in healthy and diseased cats as a next step.

  12. Metal based pharmacologically active agents: Synthesis, structural characterization, molecular modeling, CT-DNA binding studies and in vitro antimicrobial screening of iron(II) bromosalicylidene amino acid chelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.; Ismael, Mohamed; Seleem, Amin Abdou

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, great interest has been focused on Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes as cytotoxic and antitumor drugs. Thus a series of new iron(II) complexes based on Schiff bases amino acids ligands have been designed and synthesized from condensation of 5-bromosalicylaldehyde (bs) and α-amino acids (L-alanine (ala), L-phenylalanine (phala), L-aspartic acid (aspa), L-histidine (his) and L-arginine (arg)). The structure of the investigated iron(II) complexes was elucidated using elemental analyses, infrared, ultraviolet-visible, thermogravimetric analysis, as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Moreover, the stoichiometry and the stability constants of the prepared complexes have been determined spectrophotometrically. The results suggest that 5-bromosalicylaldehyde amino acid Schiff bases (bs:aa) behave as dibasic tridentate ONO ligands and coordinate to Fe(II) in octahedral geometry according to the general formula [Fe(bs:aa)2]ṡnH2O. The conductivity values between 37 and 64 ohm-1 mol-1 cm2 in ethanol imply the presence of nonelectrolyte species. The structure of the complexes was validated using quantum mechanics calculations based on accurate DFT methods. Geometry optimization of the Fe-Schiff base amino acid complexes showed that all complexes had octahedral coordination. In addition, the interaction of these complexes with (CT-DNA) was investigated at pH = 7.2, by using UV-vis absorption, viscosity and agarose gel electrophoresis measurements. Results indicated that the investigated complexes strongly bind to calf thymus DNA via intercalative mode and showed a different DNA binding according to the sequence: bsari > bshi > bsali > bsasi > bsphali. Moreover, the prepared compounds are screened for their in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity against three types of bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus and three types of anti fungal cultures, Penicillium purpurogenium, Aspergillus

  13. Microbial products trigger amino acid exudation from plant roots.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Donald A; Fox, Tama C; King, Maria D; Bhuvaneswari, T V; Teuber, Larry R

    2004-09-01

    Plants naturally cycle amino acids across root cell plasma membranes, and any net efflux is termed exudation. The dominant ecological view is that microorganisms and roots passively compete for amino acids in the soil solution, yet the innate capacity of roots to recover amino acids present in ecologically relevant concentrations is unknown. We find that, in the absence of culturable microorganisms, the influx rates of 16 amino acids (each supplied at 2.5 microm) exceed efflux rates by 5% to 545% in roots of alfalfa (Medicago sativa), Medicago truncatula, maize (Zea mays), and wheat (Triticum aestivum). Several microbial products, which are produced by common soil microorganisms such as Pseudomonas bacteria and Fusarium fungi, significantly enhanced the net efflux (i.e. exudation) of amino acids from roots of these four plant species. In alfalfa, treating roots with 200 microm phenazine, 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, or zearalenone increased total net efflux of 16 amino acids 200% to 2,600% in 3 h. Data from (15)N tests suggest that 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol blocks amino acid uptake, whereas zearalenone enhances efflux. Thus, amino acid exudation under normal conditions is a phenomenon that probably reflects both active manipulation and passive uptake by microorganisms, as well as diffusion and adsorption to soil, all of which help overcome the innate capacity of plant roots to reabsorb amino acids. The importance of identifying potential enhancers of root exudation lies in understanding that such compounds may represent regulatory linkages between the larger soil food web and the internal carbon metabolism of the plant.

  14. Evidence of Selection for Low Cognate Amino Acid Bias in Amino Acid Biosynthetic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Rui; Savageau, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Summary If the enzymes responsible for biosynthesis of a given amino acid are repressed and the cognate amino acid pool suddenly depleted, then derepression of these enzymes and replenishment of the pool would be problematic, if the enzymes were largely composed of the cognate amino acid. In the proverbial ‘Catch 22’, cells would lack the necessary enzymes to make the amino acid, and they would lack the necessary amino acid to make the needed enzymes. Based on this scenario, we hypothesize that evolution would lead to the selection of amino acid biosynthetic enzymes that have a relatively low content of their cognate amino acid. We call this the ‘cognate bias hypothesis’. Here we test several implications of this hypothesis directly using data from the proteome of Escherichia coli. Several lines of evidence show that low cognate bias is evident in 15 of the 20 amino acid biosynthetic pathways. Comparison with closely related Salmonella typhimurium shows similar results. Comparison with more distantly related Bacillus subtilis shows general similarities as well as significant differences in the detailed profiles of cognate bias. Thus, selection for low cognate bias plays a significant role in shaping the amino acid composition for a large class of cellular proteins. PMID:15853887

  15. The contribution of a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) conductance to amino-acid-induced inward current responses of ciliated olfactory neurons of the rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Suzuki, N

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether amino-acid-induced inward currents of ciliated olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) include a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) conductance, we first studied changes in reversal potential and the current/voltage relationships of the responses of ORNs to an amino acid mixture (l-alanine, l-arginine, l-glutamate and l-norvaline; all 10 mmol l(-)(1)) with different concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) in the perfusion and recording pipette solutions. We also examined the effects of six different Cl(-) channel blockers on the responses of ORNs using a conventional whole-cell voltage-clamp technique. The amino acid mixture and one blocker were applied focally to the cilia of ORNs using a double-barrelled micropipette and a pressure ejection system. The expected shifts in reversal potential, indicating the contribution of the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) conductance, occurred in both positive and negative directions depending on the external and internal Na(+) and Cl(-) concentrations. Niflumic acid, flufenamic acid, NPPB [5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzonate] and DCDPC (3', 5-dichlorodiphenylamine-2-carboxylate), at 0.5 mmol l(-)(1), reversibly blocked both the amino-acid-induced inward currents and the background activity in most ORNs. The effectiveness of these blocking agents varied from 77 to 91 % for ORNs perfused externally with standard Ringer's solution. SITS (4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonate), at 5.0 mmol l(-)(1), irreversibly inhibited the physiological response (100 % inhibition), whereas DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2, 2'-disulphonate), at 5.0 mmol l(-)(1), had the smallest effect (45 %) of the inhibitors tested. The dose of niflumic acid inducing 50 % inhibition (IC(50)), determined specifically for the current component of the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels, was 70 micromol l(-)(1). Our results suggest that these blockers are not specific for Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels and that

  16. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  1. Comparative analysis of amino acid composition in the active site of nirk gene encoding copper-containing nitrite reductase (CuNiR) in bacterial spp.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Utpal Kumar; Rahman, M Mizanur

    2017-04-01

    The nirk gene encoding the copper-containing nitrite reductase (CuNiR), a key catalytic enzyme in the environmental denitrification process that helps to produce nitric oxide from nitrite. The molecular mechanism of denitrification process is definitely complex and in this case a theoretical investigation has been conducted to know the sequence information and amino acid composition of the active site of CuNiR enzyme using various Bioinformatics tools. 10 Fasta formatted sequences were retrieved from the NCBI database and the domain and disordered regions identification and phylogenetic analyses were done on these sequences. The comparative modeling of protein was performed through Modeller 9v14 program and visualized by PyMOL tools. Validated protein models were deposited in the Protein Model Database (PMDB) (PMDB id: PM0080150 to PM0080159). Active sites of nirk encoding CuNiR enzyme were identified by Castp server. The PROCHECK showed significant scores for four protein models in the most favored regions of the Ramachandran plot. Active sites and cavities prediction exhibited that the amino acid, namely Glycine, Alanine, Histidine, Aspartic acid, Glutamic acid, Threonine, and Glutamine were common in four predicted protein models. The present in silico study anticipates that active site analyses result will pave the way for further research on the complex denitrification mechanism of the selected species in the experimental laboratory.

  2. [A DNA study of rat liver oligonucleosomes enriched by transcriptionally active genes during induction due to the administration of an amino acid mixture].

    PubMed

    Vardevanian, P O; Davtian, A M; Tiratsuian, S G; Vardevanian, A O

    1990-01-01

    A highly active fraction of rat liver oligonucleosome DNA has been isolated and studied by means of thermal denaturation after induction by amino acid mixture or hydrocortisone. A considerable redistribution of DNA content has been shown in sucrose gradient fractions during these forms of induction. The changes are revealed in melting temperature, differential melting profile of DNA, isolated from actively transcribed chromatine fractions. Analysis of melting profiles shows changes of GC content of oligonucleosome DNA, suggesting that there are differences in activation during two studied forms of induction.

  3. Structure-activity relationship studies on a Trp dendrimer with dual activities against HIV and enterovirus A71. Modifications on the amino acid.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gualda, Belén; Sun, Liang; Rivero-Buceta, Eva; Flores, Aida; Quesada, Ernesto; Balzarini, Jan; Noppen, Sam; Liekens, Sandra; Schols, Dominique; Neyts, Johan; Leyssen, Pieter; Mirabelli, Carmen; Camarasa, María-José; San-Félix, Ana

    2017-03-01

    We have recently described a new class of dendrimers with tryptophan (Trp) on the surface that show dual antiviral activities against HIV and EV71 enterovirus. The prototype compound of this family is a pentaerythritol derivative with 12 Trps on the periphery. Here we complete the structure-activity relationship studies of this family to identify key features that might be significant for the antiviral activity. With this aim, novel dendrimers containing different amino acids (aromatic and non-aromatic), tryptamine (a "decarboxylated" analogue of Trp) and N-methyl Trp on the periphery have been prepared. Dendrimer with N-Methyl Trp was the most active against HIV-1 and HIV-2 while dendrimer with tyrosine was endowed with the most potent antiviral activity against EV71. This tyrosine dendrimer proved to inhibit a large panel of EV71 clinical isolates (belonging to different clusters) in the low nanomolar/high picomolar range. In addition, a new synthetic procedure (convergent approach) has been developed for the synthesis of the prototype and some other dendrimers. This convergent approach proved more efficient (higher yields, easier purification) than the divergent approach previously reported.

  4. Amino Acid Transport into Cultured Tobacco Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, H. Michael; Henke, Randolph R.

    1981-01-01

    Lysine transport into suspension-cultured Wisconsin-38 tobacco cells was observed. Uptake was linear (up to 90 minutes) with respect to time and amount of tissue only after 4 to 6 hours preincubation in calcium-containing medium. The observed cellular accumulation of lysine was against a concentration gradient and not due to exchange diffusion. Transport was stimulated by low pH and characterized by a biphasic uptake isotherm with two Km values for lysine. System I (Km ≃ 5 × 10−6 molar; Vmax ≃ 180 nanomoles per gram fresh weight per hour) and system II (Km ≃ 10−4 molar; Vmax ≃ 1900 nanomoles per gram fresh weight per hour) were inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and a variety of respiratory inhibitors. This inhibition was not due to increased efflux. In antagonism experiments, system I was inhibited most effectively by basic amino acids, followed by the sulfur amino acids. System I was only slightly inhibited by the neutral and aromatic amino acids and was not inhibited by the acidic amino acids aspartic and glutamic acids. Transport by system II was inhibited by all of the tested amino acids (including aspartic and glutamic acids) and analogs; however, this system was not inhibited by d-arginine. Neither system was strongly inhibited by d-lysine or the lysine analog S-2-aminoethyl-l-cysteine. Arginine was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of both systems with values for Ki similar to the respective Km values. These studies suggest the presence of at least two amino acid permeases in W-38 tobacco cells. PMID:16661678

  5. Amino acids derived from Titan tholins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, B. N.; Sagan, C.; Ogino, H.; Nagy, B.; Er, C.; Schram, K. H.; Arakawa, E. T.

    1986-01-01

    An organic heteropolymer (Titan tholin) was produced by continuous dc discharge through a 0.9 N2/0.1 CH4 gas mixture at 0.2 mbar pressure, roughly simulating the cloudtop atmosphere of Titan. Treatment of this tholin with 6N HCl yielded 16 amino acids by gas chromatography after derivatization of N-trifluroacetyl isopropyl esters on two different capillary columns. Identifications were confirmed by GC/MS. Glycine, aspartic acid, and alpha- and beta-alanine were produced in greatest abundance; the total yield of amino acids was approximately 10(-2), approximately equal to the yield of urea. The presence of "nonbiological" amino acids, the absence of serine, and the fact that the amino acids are racemic within experimental error together indicate that these molecules are not due to microbial or other contamination, but are derived from the tholin. In addition to the HCN, HC2CN, and (CN)2 found by Voyager, nitriles and aminonitriles should be sought in the Titanian atmosphere and, eventually, amino acids on the surface. These results suggest that episodes of liquid water in the past or future of Titan might lead to major further steps in prebiological organic chemistry on that body.

  6. Amino acids in modern and fossil woods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C.; Bada, J. L.; Peterson, E.

    1976-01-01

    The amino acid composition and the extent of racemization in several modern and fossil woods are reported. The method of analysis is described, and data are presented on the total amino acid concentration, the amino acid ratios, and the enantiomeric ratios in each sample. It is found that the amino acid concentration per gram of dry wood decreases with age of the sample, that the extent of racemization increases with increasing age, and that the amounts of aspartic acid, threonine, and serine decrease relative to valine with increasing age. The relative racemization rates of amino acids in wood, bone, and aqueous solution are compared, and it is shown that racemization in wood is much slower than in bone or aqueous solution. Racemization results for woods from the Kalambo Falls area of Zambia are used to calculate a minimum age of 110,000 years for the transition between the Sangoan and Acheulian industries at that site. This result is shown to be consistent with numerous radiometric dates for older Acheulian sites in Africa and to compare well with geologically inferred dates for the beginning of the Eemian and the end of the Acheulian industry in southern Africa.

  7. Amino acid isotopic analysis in agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A relatively new approach to stable isotopic analysis—referred to as compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA)—has emerged, centering on the measurement of 15N:14N ratios in amino acids (glutamic acid and phenylalanine). CSIA has recently been used to generate trophic position estimates among anima...

  8. [Dependence of metabolic fecal amino acids on the amino acid content of the feed. 1. Metabolic fecal amino acids of rats fed with maize].

    PubMed

    Krawielitzki, K; Schadereit, R; Völker, T; Reichel, K

    1981-07-01

    The amount of metabolic fecal amino acids (MFAA) in dependence on the amino acid intake was determined for graded maize rations with 15N-labelled rats and the quota of labelled endogenous amino acids in faeces was calculated according to the isotope dilution method. The excretion of amino acids and MFAA in faeces are described as functions of the amino acid intake for 17 amino acids and regressively calculated. For all 17 amino acids investigated, there was a more or less steep increase of MFAA according to an increasing amino acid intake. In contrast to MFAA in N-free feeding, MFAA in feeding with pure maize (16.5% crude protein) increase to the 2- to 4.5-fold value. The thesis of the constancy of the excretion of MFAA can consequently be no longer maintained. The true digestibility according to the conventional method is, on an average of all amino acids, 7.3 units below the one ascertained according to the 15N-isotope method. For the limiting amino acids lysine and threonine the difference is biggest (23 resp. 17 units). Tryptophane as first limiting amino acid could not be determined. The true digestibility of nearly all amino acids ascertained for maize according to the isotope method is above 90%. For the limiting amino acids the expenditure resp. the loss of endogenous amino acids is biggest.

  9. Differences in activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptors of white sturgeon relative to lake sturgeon are predicted by identities of key amino acids in the ligand binding domain.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Farmahin, Reza; Wiseman, Steve; Beitel, Shawn C; Kennedy, Sean W; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2015-04-07

    Dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) are pollutants of global environmental concern. DLCs elicit their adverse outcomes through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). However, there is limited understanding of the mechanisms that result in differences in sensitivity to DLCs among different species of fishes. Understanding these mechanisms is critical for protection of the diversity of fishes exposed to DLCs, including endangered species. This study investigated specific mechanisms that drive responses of two endangered fishes, white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) to DLCs. It determined whether differences in sensitivity to activation of AhRs (AhR1 and AhR2) can be predicted based on identities of key amino acids in the ligand binding domain (LBD). White sturgeon were 3- to 30-fold more sensitive than lake sturgeon to exposure to 5 different DLCs based on activation of AhR2. There were no differences in sensitivity between white sturgeon and lake sturgeon based on activation of AhR1. Adverse outcomes as a result of exposure to DLCs have been shown to be mediated through activation of AhR2, but not AhR1, in all fishes studied to date. This indicates that white sturgeon are likely to have greater sensitivity in vivo relative to lake sturgeon. Homology modeling and in silico mutagenesis suggests that differences in sensitivity to activation of AhR2 result from differences in key amino acids at position 388 in the LBD of AhR2 of white sturgeon (Ala-388) and lake sturgeon (Thr-388). This indicates that identities of key amino acids in the LBD of AhR2 could be predictive of both in vitro activation by DLCs and in vivo sensitivity to DLCs in these, and potentially other, fishes.

  10. Analysis of amino acids by miniaturised isotachophoresis.

    PubMed

    Prest, Jeff E; Baldock, Sara J; Fielden, Peter R; Goddard, Nicholas J; Brown, Bernard J Treves

    2004-10-08

    A method allowing the miniaturised isotachophoretic analysis of amino acids has been developed. To overcome the problems of carbonate contamination which occur when performing separations at alkaline pH levels glycolate was used as the leading ion. Addition of magnesium to the leading electrolyte as a counter species was found to improve the separations. The method has been used on a poly(methyl methacrylate) microdevice with integrated on-column conductivity detectors. The behaviour of a range of common amino acids was investigated and successful separations of up to seven amino acids were made. Good linearity was observed with calibration curves for aspartic acid and phenylalanine over the range 0.063-1.0 mM. Limits of detection for these two species were calculated to be 0.060 and 0.018 mM, respectively.

  11. Amino acids in the Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimoyama, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Yanai, K.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of amino acids of extraterrestrial origin in the Antarctic Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite is presented. Hydrolyzed and nonhydrolyzed water-extracted amino acid samples from exterior, middle and interior portions of the meteorite were analyzed by an amino acid analyzer and by gas chromatography of N-TFA-isopropyl amino acid derivatives. Nine protein and six nonprotein amino acids were detected in the meteorite at abundances between 34 and less than one nmole/g, with equal amounts in interior and exterior portions. Nearly equal abundances of the D and L enantiomers of alanine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid were found, indicating the abiotic, therefore extraterrestrial, origin of the amino acids. The Antarctic environment and the uniformity of protein amino acid abundances are discussed as evidence against the racemization of terrestrially acquired amino acids, and similarities between Yamato amino acid compositions and the amino acid compositions of the Murchison and Murray type II carbonaceous chrondrites are indicated.

  12. D-Amino Acids in the Nervous and Endocrine Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kiriyama, Yoshimitsu

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important components for peptides and proteins and act as signal transmitters. Only L-amino acids have been considered necessary in mammals, including humans. However, diverse D-amino acids, such as D-serine, D-aspartate, D-alanine, and D-cysteine, are found in mammals. Physiological roles of these D-amino acids not only in the nervous system but also in the endocrine system are being gradually revealed. N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are associated with learning and memory. D-Serine, D-aspartate, and D-alanine can all bind to NMDA receptors. H2S generated from D-cysteine reduces disulfide bonds in receptors and potentiates their activity. Aberrant receptor activity is related to diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), such as Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and schizophrenia. Furthermore, D-amino acids are detected in parts of the endocrine system, such as the pineal gland, hypothalamus, pituitary gland, pancreas, adrenal gland, and testis. D-Aspartate is being investigated for the regulation of hormone release from various endocrine organs. Here we focused on recent findings regarding the synthesis and physiological functions of D-amino acids in the nervous and endocrine systems. PMID:28053803

  13. Intermolecular Vibrations of Hydrophobic Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Michael Roy Casselman

    Hydrophobic amino acids interact with their chemical environment through a combination of electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, dipole, induced dipole, and dispersion forces. These interactions all have their own characteristic energy scale and distance dependence. The low-frequency (0.1-5 THz, 5-150 cm-1) vibrational modes of amino acids in the solid state are a direct indicator of the interactions between the molecules, which include interactions between an amino acid functional group and its surroundings. This information is central to understanding the dynamics and morphology of proteins. The alpha-carbon is a chiral center for all of the hydrophobic amino acids, meaning that they exist in two forms, traditionally referred to as L- and D-enantiomers. This nomenclature indicates which direction the molecule rotates plane-polarized visible light (levorotory and dextrorotory). Chiral a-amino acids in proteins are exclusively the L-variety In the solid state, the crystal lattice of the pure L-enantiomer is the mirror image of the D-enantiomer crystal lattice. These solids are energetically identical. Enantiomers also have identical spectroscopic properties except when the measurement is polarization sensitive. A mixture of equal amounts D- and L-amino acid enantiomers can crystallize into a racemic (DL-) structure that is different from that of the pure enantiomers. Whether a solution of both enantiomers will crystallize into a racemic form or spontaneously resolve into a mixture of separate D- and L-crystals largely depends on the interactions between molecules available in the various possible configurations. This is an active area of research. Low-frequency vibrations with intermolecular character are very sensitive to changes in lattice geometry, and consequently the vibrational spectra of racemic crystals are usually quite distinct from the spectra of the crystals of the corresponding pure enantiomers in the far-infrared (far-IR). THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz

  14. Detection of non-protein amino acids in the presence of protein amino acids. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapshak, P.; Okaji, M.

    1972-01-01

    Studies conducted with the JEOL 5AH amino acid analyzer are described. This instrument makes possible the programming of the chromatographic process. Data are presented showing the separations of seventeen non-protein amino acids in the presence of eighteen protein amino acids. It is pointed out that distinct separations could be obtained in the case of a number of chemically similar compounds, such as ornithine and lysine, N-amidino alanine and arginine, and iminodiacetic acid and S-carboxymethyl cysteine and aspartic acid.

  15. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  16. Conformations of amino acids in proteins.

    PubMed

    Hovmöller, Sven; Zhou, Tuping; Ohlson, Tomas

    2002-05-01

    The main-chain conformations of 237 384 amino acids in 1042 protein subunits from the PDB were analyzed with Ramachandran plots. The populated areas of the empirical Ramachandran plot differed markedly from the classical plot in all regions. All amino acids in alpha-helices are found within a very narrow range of phi, psi angles. As many as 40% of all amino acids are found in this most populated region, covering only 2% of the Ramachandran plot. The beta-sheet region is clearly subdivided into two distinct regions. These do not arise from the parallel and antiparallel beta-strands, which have quite similar conformations. One beta region is mainly from amino acids in random coil. The third and smallest populated area of the Ramachandran plot, often denoted left-handed alpha-helix, has a different position than that originally suggested by Ramachandran. Each of the 20 amino acids has its own very characteristic Ramachandran plot. Most of the glycines have conformations that were considered to be less favoured. These results may be useful for checking secondary-structure assignments in the PDB and for predicting protein folding.

  17. Amino Acids Profiles in Biological Media

    SciTech Connect

    Iordache, A.; Horj, E.; Morar, S.; Cozar, O.; Culea, M.; Ani, A. R.; Mesaros, C.

    2010-08-04

    An accurate analytical method was developed to determine amino acids in some biological specimens by GC/MS technique. Stable isotopes provide useful tools for a variety of studies, offering ideal internal standards in quantitative information. Isotopic dilution gas chromatography--mass spectrometry (ID-GC/MS) is the techniques used for quantitative analysis of compounds labeled with stable isotopes. A Trace DSQ Thermo Finnigan quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled with a Trace GC was used. Amino acids were separated on a Rtx-5 MS capillary column, 30 mx0.25 mm, 0.25 {mu}m film thickness, using a temperature program from 50 deg. C, 1 min, 6 deg. C/min at 100 deg. C, 4 deg. C/min at 200 deg. C, 20 deg. C/min at 300 deg. C, (3 min). The transfer line temperature was 250 deg. C, the injector temperature 200 deg. C and ion source temperature 250 deg. C; splitter: 10:1. Electron energy was 70 eV and emission current, 100 {mu}A. The amino acids were purified on a Dowex 50W-W8 exchange resin and were derivatized in a procedure following two steps to obtain trifluoroacetyl butyl esters. The identification of amino acids was obtained by using NIST library but also by using amino acid standards.

  18. Amino acids 473V and 598P of PB1 from an avian-origin influenza A virus contribute to polymerase activity, especially in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Hu, Wei-Bin; Xu, Ke; He, Yun-Xia; Wang, Tong-Yan; Chen, Ze; Li, Tian-Xian; Liu, Jin-Hua; Buchy, Philippe; Sun, Bing

    2012-03-01

    It has been reported that the avian-origin influenza A virus PB1 protein (avian PB1) enhances influenza A virus polymerase activity in mammalian cells when it replaces the human-origin PB1 protein (human PB1). Characterization of the amino acid residues that contribute to this enhancement is needed. In this study, it was found that PB1 from an avian-origin influenza A virus [A/Cambodia/P0322095/2005, H5N1 (Cam)] could enhance the polymerase activity of an attenuated human isolated virus, A/WSN/33, carrying the PB2 K627E mutation (WSN627E) in vitro. Furthermore, 473V and 598P in the Cam PB1 were identified as the residues responsible for this enhanced activity. The results from recombinant virus experiments demonstrated the contribution of PB1 amino acids 473V and 598P to polymerase activity in mammalian cells and in mice. Interestingly, 473V is conserved in pH1N1 viruses from the 2009 pandemic. Substitution of 473V by leucine in pH1N1 PB1 led to a decreased viral polymerase activity and a lower growth rate in mammalian cells, suggesting that the PB1 473V also plays a role in maintaining efficient virus replication of the pH1N1 virus. Thus, it was concluded that two amino acids in avian-origin PB1, 473V and 598P, contribute to the polymerase activity of the H5N1 virus, especially in mammalian cells, and that 473V in PB1 also contributes to efficient replication of the pH1N1 strain.

  19. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. III - Seven carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, John R.; Pizzarello, Sandra

    1986-01-01

    All of the eighteen possible seven-carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids have been positively identified in a hot-water extract of the Murchison meteorite by the combined use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, ion exchange chromatography and reversed-phase chromatography. None of these amino acids has previously been found in meteorites or in any other natural material. They range in concentration from less than or equal to 0.5 to 5.3 nmol/g. Configuration assignments were made for 2-amino-3,4-dimethylpentanoic acid and allo-2-amino-3,4-dimethylpentanoic acid and the diasteromer ratio was determined. Fifty-five amino acids have now been positively identified in the Murchison meteorite, 36 of which are unknown in terrestrial materials. This unique suite of amino acids is characterized by the occurrence of all structural isomers within the two major classes of amino acids represented, by the predominance of branched chain isomers, and by an exponential decline in amount with increasing carbon chain length within homologous series. These characteristics of the Murchison amino acids are suggestive of synthesis before incorporation into a parent body.

  20. The metabolism of "surplus" amino acids.

    PubMed

    Bender, David A

    2012-08-01

    For an adult in N balance, apart from small amounts of amino acids required for the synthesis of neurotransmitters, hormones, etc, an amount of amino acids almost equal to that absorbed from the diet can be considered to be "surplus" in that it will be catabolized. The higher diet-induced thermogenesis from protein than from carbohydrate or fat has generally been assumed to be due to increased protein synthesis, which is ATP expensive. To this must be added the ATP cost of protein catabolism through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Amino acid catabolism will add to thermogenesis. Deamination results in net ATP formation except when serine and threonine deaminases are used, but there is the energy cost of synthesizing glutamine in extra-hepatic tissues. The synthesis of urea has a net cost of only 1·5 × ATP when the ATP yield from fumarate metabolism is offset against the ATP cost of the urea cycle, but this offset is thermogenic. In fasting and on a low carbohydrate diet as much of the amino acid carbon as possible will be used for gluconeogenesis - an ATP-expensive, and hence thermogenic, process. Complete oxidation of most amino acid carbon skeletons also involves a number of thermogenic steps in which ATP (or GTP) or reduced coenzymes are utilized. There are no such thermogenic steps in the metabolism of pyruvate, acetyl CoA or acetoacetate, but for amino acids that are metabolized by way of the citric acid cycle intermediates there is thermogenesis ranging from 1 up to 7 × ATP equivalent per mol.

  1. Differential regulation of placental amino acid transport by saturated and unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Lager, Susanne; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2014-10-15

    Fatty acids are critical for normal fetal development but may also influence placental function. We have previously reported that oleic acid (OA) stimulates amino acid transport in primary human trophoblasts (PHTs). In other tissues, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids have distinct effects on cellular signaling, for instance, palmitic acid (PA) but not OA reduces IκBα expression. We hypothesized that saturated and unsaturated fatty acids differentially affect trophoblast amino acid transport and cellular signaling. To test this hypothesis, PHTs were cultured in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 50 μM), OA (100 μM), or PA (100 μM). DHA and OA were also combined to test whether DHA could counteract the OA stimulatory effect on amino acid transport. The effects of fatty acids were compared against a vehicle control. Amino acid transport was measured by isotope-labeled tracers. Activation of inflammatory-related signaling pathways and the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway were determined by Western blot analysis. Exposure of PHTs to DHA for 24 h reduced amino acid transport and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, STAT3, mTOR, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1, and ribosomal protein (rp)S6. In contrast, OA increased amino acid transport and phosphorylation of ERK, mTOR, S6 kinase 1, and rpS6. The combination of DHA with OA increased amino acid transport and rpS6 phosphorylation. PA did not affect amino acid transport but reduced IκBα expression. In conclusion, these fatty acids differentially regulated placental amino acid transport and cellular signaling. Taken together, these findings suggest that dietary fatty acids could alter the intrauterine environment by modifying placental function, thereby having long-lasting effects on the developing fetus.

  2. Anti-inflammation activities of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) in response to UV radiation suggest potential anti-skin aging activity.

    PubMed

    Suh, Sung-Suk; Hwang, Jinik; Park, Mirye; Seo, Hyo Hyun; Kim, Hyoung-Shik; Lee, Jeong Hun; Moh, Sang Hyun; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2014-10-14

    Certain photosynthetic marine organisms have evolved mechanisms to counteract UV-radiation by synthesizing UV-absorbing compounds, such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs). In this study, MAAs were separated from the extracts of marine green alga Chlamydomonas hedleyi using HPLC and were identified as porphyra-334, shinorine, and mycosporine-glycine (mycosporine-Gly), based on their retention times and maximum absorption wavelengths. Furthermore, their structures were confirmed by triple quadrupole MS/MS. Their roles as UV-absorbing compounds were investigated in the human fibroblast cell line HaCaT by analyzing the expression levels of genes associated with antioxidant activity, inflammation, and skin aging in response to UV irradiation. The mycosporine-Gly extract, but not the other MAAs, had strong antioxidant activity in the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. Furthermore, treatment with mycosporine-Gly resulted in a significant decrease in COX-2 mRNA levels, which are typically increased in response to inflammation in the skin, in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, in the presence of MAAs, the UV-suppressed genes, procollagen C proteinase enhancer (PCOLCE) and elastin, which are related to skin aging, had increased expression levels equal to those in UV-mock treated cells. Interestingly, the increased expression of involucrin after UV exposure was suppressed by treatment with the MAAs mycosporine-Gly and shinorine, but not porphyra-334. This is the first report investigating the biological activities of microalgae-derived MAAs in human cells.

  3. Amino acid composition of human milk is not unique.

    PubMed

    Davis, T A; Nguyen, H V; Garcia-Bravo, R; Fiorotto, M L; Jackson, E M; Lewis, D S; Lee, D R; Reeds, P J

    1994-07-01

    To determine whether the amino acid pattern of human milk is unique, we compared the amino acid pattern of human milk with the amino acid patterns of the milks of great apes (chimpanzee and gorilla), lower primates (baboon and rhesus monkey) and nonprimates (cow, goat, sheep, llama, pig, horse, elephant, cat and rat). Amino acid pattern was defined as the relative proportion of each amino acid (protein-bound plus free) (in mg) to the total amino acids (in g). Total amino acid concentration was lower in primate milk than in nonprimate milk. There were commonalities in the overall amino acid pattern of the milks of all species sampled; the most abundant amino acids were glutamate (plus glutamine, 20%), proline (10%) and leucine (10%). Essential amino acids were 40%, branched-chain amino acids 20%, and sulfur amino acids 4% of the total amino acids. The amino acid pattern of human milk was more similar to those of great apes than to those of lower primates. For example, cystine was higher and methionine was lower in primate milks than in nonprimate milks, and in great ape and human milks than in lower primate milks. Because the milk amino acid patterns of the human and elephant, both slow-growing species, were dissimilar, the amino acid pattern of human milk seems unrelated to growth rate.

  4. Excitatory amino acid transporters tonically restrain nTS synaptic and neuronal activity to modulate cardiorespiratory function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) is the initial central termination site for visceral afferents and is important for modulation and integration of multiple reflexes including cardiorespiratory reflexes. Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the nTS and is removed from the extracellular milieu by excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs). The goal of this study was to elucidate the role of EAATs in the nTS on basal synaptic and neuronal function and cardiorespiratory regulation. The majority of glutamate clearance in the central nervous system is believed to be mediated by astrocytic EAAT 1 and 2. We confirmed the presence of EAAT 1 and 2 within the nTS and their colocalization with astrocytic markers. EAAT blockade with dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA) produced a concentration-related depolarization, increased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) frequency, and enhanced action potential discharge in nTS neurons. Solitary tract-evoked EPSCs were significantly reduced by EAAT blockade. Microinjection of TBOA into the nTS of anesthetized rats induced apneic, sympathoinhibitory, depressor, and bradycardic responses. These effects mimicked the response to microinjection of exogenous glutamate, and glutamate responses were enhanced by EAAT blockade. Together these data indicate that EAATs tonically restrain nTS excitability to modulate cardiorespiratory function. PMID:26719090

  5. Probing the Active Site of MIO-dependent Aminomutases, Key Catalysts in the Biosynthesis of amino Acids Incorporated in Secondary Metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, H.; Bruner, S

    2010-01-01

    The tyrosine aminomutase SgTAM produces (S)-{beta}-tyrosine from L-tyrosine in the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027. This conversion is promoted by the methylideneimidazole-5-one (MIO) prosthetic group. MIO was first identified in the homologous family of ammonia lyases, which deaminate aromatic amino acids to form {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carboxylates. Studies of substrate specificity have been described for lyases but there have been limited reports in altering the substrate specificity of aminomutases. Furthermore, it remains unclear as to what structural properties are responsible for catalyzing the presumed readdition of the amino group into the {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated intermediates to form {beta}-amino acids. Attempts to elucidate specificity and mechanistic determinants of SgTAM have also proved to be difficult as it is recalcitrant to perturbations to the active site via mutagenesis. An X-ray cocrystal structure of the SgTAM mutant of the catalytic base with L-tyrosine verified important substrate binding residues as well as the enzymatic base. Further mutagenesis revealed that removal of these crucial interactions renders the enzyme inactive. Proposed structural determinants for mutase activity probed via mutagenesis, time-point assays and X-ray crystallography revealed a complicated role for these residues in maintaining key quaternary structure properties that aid in catalysis.

  6. Changes in urinary amino acids excretion in relationship with muscle activity markers over a professional cycling stage race: in search of fatigue markers.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Roberto; Barassi, Alessandra; Perego, Silvia; Sansoni, Veronica; Rossi, Alessandra; Damele, Clara Anna Linda; Melzi D'Eril, Gianlodovico; Banfi, Giuseppe; Lombardi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the relationship between metabolic effort, muscular damage/activity indices, and urinary amino acids profile over the course of a strenuous prolonged endurance activity, as a cycling stage race is, in order to identify possible fatigue markers. Nine professional cyclists belonging to a single team, competing in the Giro d'Italia cycling stage race, were anthropometrically characterized and sampled for blood and urine the day before the race started, and on days 12 and 23 of the race. Diet was kept the same over the race, and power output and energy expenditure were recorded. Sera were assayed for muscle markers (lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatine kinase activities, and blood urea nitrogen), and creatinine, all corrected for plasma volume changes. Urines were profiled for amino acid concentrations, normalized on creatinine excretion. Renal function, in terms of glomerular filtration rate, was monitored by MDRD equation corrected on body surface area. Creatine kinase activity and blood urea were increased during the race as did serum creatinine while kidney function remained stable. Among the amino acids, taurine, glycine, cysteine, leucine, carnosine, 1-methyl histidine, and 3-methyl histidine showed a net decreased, while homocysteine was increased. Taurine and the dipeptide carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) were significantly correlated with the muscle activity markers and the indices of effort. In conclusion, the metabolic profile is modified strikingly due to the effort. Urinary taurine and carnosine seem useful tools to evaluate the muscle damage and possibly the fatigue status on a long-term basis.

  7. Cometary Amino Acids from the STARDUST Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie Elsila

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned samples from comet 81 P/WiId 2 to Earth in January 2006. Examinations of the organic compounds in cometary samples can reveal information about the prebiotic organic inventory present on the early Earth and within the early Solar System, which may have contributed to the origin of life. Preliminary studies of Stardust material revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds (cometary vs. terrestrial contamination) could not be identified. We have recently measured the carbon isotopic ratios of these amino acids to determine their origin, leading to the first detection of a cometary amino acid.

  8. Marine Planktonic Archaea Take Up Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ouverney, Cleber C.; Fuhrman, Jed A.

    2000-01-01

    Archaea are traditionally thought of as “extremophiles,” but recent studies have shown that marine planktonic Archaea make up a surprisingly large percentage of ocean midwater microbial communities, up to 60% of the total prokaryotes. However, the basic physiology and contribution of Archaea to community microbial activity remain unknown. We have studied Archaea from 200-m depths of the northwest Mediterranean Sea and the Pacific Ocean near California, measuring the archaeal activity under simulated natural conditions (8 to 17°C, dark and anaerobic) by means of a method called substrate tracking autoradiography fluorescence in situ hybridization (STARFISH) that simultaneously detects specific cell types by 16S rRNA probe binding and activity by microautoradiography. In the 200-m-deep Mediterranean and Pacific samples, cells binding the archaeal probes made up about 43 and 14% of the total countable cells, respectively. Our results showed that the Archaea are active in the uptake of dissolved amino acids from natural concentrations (nanomolar) with about 60% of the individuals in the archaeal communities showing measurable uptake. Bacteria showed a similar proportion of active cells. We concluded that a portion of these Archaea is heterotrophic and also appears to coexist successfully with Bacteria in the same water. PMID:11055931

  9. Inhibited muscle amino acid uptake in sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Hasselgren, P O; James, J H; Fischer, J E

    1986-01-01

    Amino acid uptake in vivo was determined in soleus (SOL) muscle, diaphragm, heart, and liver following intravenous injection of [3H]-alpha-amino-isobutyric acid ([3H]-AIB) in rats made septic by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and in sham-operated controls. Muscle amino acid transport was also measured in vitro by determining uptake of [3H]-AIB in incubated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and SOL muscles. Results were expressed as distribution ratio between [3H]-AIB in intracellular and extracellular fluid. AIB uptake in vivo was reduced by 90% in SOL and cardiac muscle and by 45% in diaphragm 16 hours after CLP. In contrast, AIB uptake by liver was almost four times higher in septic than in control animals. AIB uptake in vitro was reduced by 18% in EDL 8 hours after CLP but was not significantly altered in SOL at the same time point. Sixteen hours after CLP, AIB uptake was significantly reduced in both muscles, i.e., by 17% in EDL and by 65% in SOL. When muscles from untreated rats were incubated in the presence of plasma from septic animals (16 hours CLP) or from animals injected with endotoxin (2 mg/kg body weight), AIB uptake was reduced. Addition of endotoxin in vitro (2-200 micrograms/ml) to incubated muscles did not affect AIB uptake. The results suggest that sepsis leads to marked impairment of amino acid transport system A in muscle and that this impairment is mediated by a circulating factor that is not endotoxin. Reduced uptake of amino acids by skeletal muscle during sepsis may divert amino acids to the liver for increased gluconeogenesis and protein synthesis. PMID:3963895

  10. Microbial degradation of poly(amino acid)s.

    PubMed

    Obst, Martin; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Natural poly(amino acid)s are a group of poly(ionic) molecules (ionomers) with various biological functions and putative technical applications and play, therefore, an important role both in nature and in human life. Because of their biocompatibility and their synthesis from renewable resources, poly(amino acid)s may be employed for many different purposes covering a broad spectrum of medical, pharmaceutical, and personal care applications as well as the domains of agriculture and of environmental applications. Biodegradability is one important advantage of naturally occurring poly(amino acid)s over many synthetic polymers. The intention of this review is to give an overview about the enzyme systems catalyzing the initial steps in poly(amino acid) degradation. The focus is on the naturally occurring poly(amino acid)s cyanophycin, poly(epsilon-L-lysine) and poly(gamma-glutamic acid); but biodegradation of structurally related synthetic polyamides such as poly(aspartic acid) and nylons, which are known from various technical applications, is also included.

  11. Effect of amino acid sequence variations at position 149 on the fusogenic activity of the subtype B avian metapneumovirus fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Yun, Bingling; Gao, Yanni; Liu, Yongzhen; Guan, Xiaolu; Wang, Yongqiang; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Honglei; Liu, Changjun; Cui, Hongyu; Zhang, Yanping; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2015-10-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into host cells requires the fusion of viral and cell membranes. These membrane fusion reactions are mediated by virus-encoded glycoproteins. In the case of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), the fusion (F) protein alone can mediate virus entry and induce syncytium formation in vitro. To investigate the fusogenic activity of the aMPV F protein, we compared the fusogenic activities of three subtypes of aMPV F proteins using a TCSD50 assay developed in this study. Interestingly, we found that the F protein of aMPV subtype B (aMPV/B) strain VCO3/60616 (aMPV/vB) was hyperfusogenic when compared with F proteins of aMPV/B strain aMPV/f (aMPV/fB), aMPV subtype A (aMPV/A), and aMPV subtype C (aMPV/C). We then further demonstrated that the amino acid (aa) residue 149F contributed to the hyperfusogenic activity of the aMPV/vB F protein. Moreover, we revealed that residue 149F had no effect on the fusogenic activities of aMPV/A, aMPV/C, and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) F proteins. Collectively, we provide the first evidence that the amino acid at position 149 affects the fusogenic activity of the aMPV/B F protein, and our findings will provide new insights into the fusogenic mechanism of this protein.

  12. Effect of selectively introducing arginine and D-amino acids on the antimicrobial activity and salt sensitivity in analogs of human beta-defensins.

    PubMed

    Olli, Sudar; Rangaraj, Nandini; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    We have examined the antimicrobial activity of C-terminal analogs of human β-defensins HBD-1 and-3 wherein lysines have been selectively replaced by L- and D-arginines and L-isoleucine substituted with its D-enantiomer. The analogs exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities. Physiological concentration of NaCl did not attenuate the activity of the peptides against Gram-negative bacteria considerably, while some attenuation of activity was observed against S. aureus. Variable attenuation of activity was observed in the presence of Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺. Introduction of D-amino acids abrogated the need for a disulfide bridge for exhibiting activity. Confocal images of carboxyfluorescein (CF) labeled peptides indicated initial localization on the membrane and subsequent translocation into the cell. Analogs corresponding to cationic rich segments of human defensins substituted with L- and D-arginine, could be attractive candidates for development as future therapeutic drugs.

  13. New Insight into Quinoa Seed Quality under Salinity: Changes in Proteomic and Amino Acid Profiles, Phenolic Content, and Antioxidant Activity of Protein Extracts.

    PubMed

    Aloisi, Iris; Parrotta, Luigi; Ruiz, Karina B; Landi, Claudia; Bini, Luca; Cai, Giampiero; Biondi, Stefania; Del Duca, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd) is an ancient Andean seed-producing crop well known for its exceptional nutritional properties and resistance to adverse environmental conditions, such as salinity and drought. Seed storage proteins, amino acid composition, and bioactive compounds play a crucial role in determining the nutritional value of quinoa. Seeds harvested from three Chilean landraces of quinoa, one belonging to the salares ecotype (R49) and two to the coastal-lowlands ecotype, VI-1 and Villarrica (VR), exposed to two levels of salinity (100 and 300 mM NaCl) were used to conduct a sequential extraction of storage proteins in order to obtain fractions enriched in albumins/globulins, 11S globulin and in prolamin-like proteins. The composition of the resulting protein fractions was analyzed by one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results confirmed a high polymorphism in seed storage proteins; the two most representative genotype-specific bands of the albumin/globulin fraction were the 30- and 32-kDa bands, while the 11S globulin showed genotype-specific polymorphism for the 40- and 42-kDa bands. Spot analysis by mass spectrometry followed by in silico analyses were conducted to identify the proteins whose expression changed most significantly in response to salinity in VR. Proteins belonging to several functional categories (i.e., stress protein, metabolism, and storage) were affected by salinity. Other nutritional and functional properties, namely amino acid profiles, total polyphenol (TPC) and flavonoid (TFC) contents, and antioxidant activity (AA) of protein extracts were also analyzed. With the exception of Ala and Met in R49, all amino acids derived from protein hydrolysis were diminished in seeds from salt-treated plants, especially in landrace VI-1. By contrast, several free amino acids were unchanged or increased by salinity in R49 as compared with VR and VI-1, suggesting a greater tolerance in the salares landrace. VR had the

  14. New Insight into Quinoa Seed Quality under Salinity: Changes in Proteomic and Amino Acid Profiles, Phenolic Content, and Antioxidant Activity of Protein Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Aloisi, Iris; Parrotta, Luigi; Ruiz, Karina B.; Landi, Claudia; Bini, Luca; Cai, Giampiero; Biondi, Stefania; Del Duca, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd) is an ancient Andean seed-producing crop well known for its exceptional nutritional properties and resistance to adverse environmental conditions, such as salinity and drought. Seed storage proteins, amino acid composition, and bioactive compounds play a crucial role in determining the nutritional value of quinoa. Seeds harvested from three Chilean landraces of quinoa, one belonging to the salares ecotype (R49) and two to the coastal-lowlands ecotype, VI-1 and Villarrica (VR), exposed to two levels of salinity (100 and 300 mM NaCl) were used to conduct a sequential extraction of storage proteins in order to obtain fractions enriched in albumins/globulins, 11S globulin and in prolamin-like proteins. The composition of the resulting protein fractions was analyzed by one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results confirmed a high polymorphism in seed storage proteins; the two most representative genotype-specific bands of the albumin/globulin fraction were the 30- and 32-kDa bands, while the 11S globulin showed genotype-specific polymorphism for the 40- and 42-kDa bands. Spot analysis by mass spectrometry followed by in silico analyses were conducted to identify the proteins whose expression changed most significantly in response to salinity in VR. Proteins belonging to several functional categories (i.e., stress protein, metabolism, and storage) were affected by salinity. Other nutritional and functional properties, namely amino acid profiles, total polyphenol (TPC) and flavonoid (TFC) contents, and antioxidant activity (AA) of protein extracts were also analyzed. With the exception of Ala and Met in R49, all amino acids derived from protein hydrolysis were diminished in seeds from salt-treated plants, especially in landrace VI-1. By contrast, several free amino acids were unchanged or increased by salinity in R49 as compared with VR and VI-1, suggesting a greater tolerance in the salares landrace. VR had the

  15. Aromatic amino acids are utilized and protein synthesis is stimulated during amino acid infusion in the ovine fetus.

    PubMed

    Liechty, E A; Boyle, D W; Moorehead, H; Auble, L; Denne, S C

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the ovine fetus is capable of increased disposal of an amino acid load; if so, would it respond by increased protein synthesis, amino acid catabolism or both? A further purpose of the study was to determine whether the pathways of aromatic amino acid catabolism are functional in the fetus. Late gestation ovine fetuses of well-nourished ewes received an infusion of Aminosyn PF alone (APF), and Aminosyn PF + glycyl-L-tyrosine (APF+GT) at rates estimated to double the intake of these amino acids. The initial study, using APF, was performed at 126 +/- 1.4 d; the APF+GT study was performed at 132 +/- 1.7 d (term = 150 d). Phenylalanine and tyrosine kinetics were determined using both stable and radioactive isotopes. Plasma concentrations of most amino acids, but not tyrosine, increased during both studies; tyrosine concentration increased only during the APF+GT study. Phenylalanine rate of appearance and phenylalanine hydroxylation increased during both studies. Tyrosine rate of appearance increased only during the APF+GT study; tyrosine oxidation did not increase during either study. Fetal protein synthesis increased significantly during both studies, producing a significant increase in fetal protein accretion. Fetal proteolysis was unchanged in response to either amino acid infusion. These results indicate that the fetus responds to an acute increase in amino acid supply primarily by increasing protein synthesis and accretion, with a smaller but significant increase in amino acid catabolism also. Both phenylalanine hydroxylation and tyrosine oxidation are active in the fetus, and the fetus is able to increase phenylalanine hydroxylation rapidly in response to increased supply.

  16. Bismuth(III) complexes derived from α-amino acids: the impact of hydrolysis and oxido-cluster formation on their activity against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Busse, Madleen; Border, Emily; Junk, Peter C; Ferrero, Richard L; Andrews, Philip C

    2014-12-28

    Eight bismuth(III) complexes derived from a variety of α-amino acids covering a range of physico-chemical properties (L-phenylalanine (Phe), L-proline (Pro), L-methionine (Met), L-cysteine (Cys), D,L-serine (Ser), L-tyrosine (Tyr), l-aspartic acid (Asp) and L-glutamic acid (Glu)) have been synthesised, characterised, and evaluated for their activity against Helicobacter pylori. The optimal synthetic procedure utilises [Bi(O(t)Bu)3], giving the complexes [BiL3] (L = Phe 1, Pro 2, Met 3, Ser 5, Tyr 6) and [Bi2L3] (L = Cys 4, Asp 7, Glu 8) cleanly and in good yield. However, the synthesis is sensitive to both temperature and moisture. The solubility and stability of the bismuth(III) complexes was investigated using ESI-MS. Almost all compounds (except for [Bi(Phe)3] and [Bi(Pro)3]) were found to be partially or completely soluble in aqueous solution giving a pH 2.5-5.0, indicating the presence of free α-amino acid and hydrolysis of the bismuth(III) complexes to polynuclear bismuth oxido-clusters. The results of the bactericidal studies against Helicobacter pylori demonstrate that this hydrolysis process impacts significantly on the observed Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MICs) which are increased substantially, often by many orders of magnitude, when the complexes are initially prepared in water rather than DMSO.

  17. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activation is required for the stimulation of human skeletal muscle protein synthesis by essential amino acids.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Jared M; Fry, Christopher S; Drummond, Micah J; Gundermann, David M; Walker, Dillon K; Glynn, Erin L; Timmerman, Kyle L; Dhanani, Shaheen; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2011-05-01

    The relationship between mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and muscle protein synthesis during instances of amino acid surplus in humans is based solely on correlational data. Therefore, the goal of this study was to use a mechanistic approach specifically designed to determine whether increased mTORC1 activation is requisite for the stimulation of muscle protein synthesis following L-essential amino acid (EAA) ingestion in humans. Examination of muscle protein synthesis and signaling were performed on vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained from 8 young (25 ± 2 y) individuals who were studied prior to and following ingestion of 10 g of EAA during 2 separate trials in a randomized, counterbalanced design. The trials were identical except during 1 trial, participants were administered a single oral dose of a potent mTORC1 inhibitor (rapamycin) prior to EAA ingestion. In response to EAA ingestion, an ~60% increase in muscle protein synthesis was observed during the control trial, concomitant with increased phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser(2448)), ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (Thr(389)), and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (Thr(37/46)). In contrast, prior administration of rapamycin completely blocked the increase in muscle protein synthesis and blocked or attenuated activation of mTORC1-signaling proteins. The inhibition of muscle protein synthesis and signaling was not due to differences in either extracellular or intracellular amino acid availability, because these variables were similar between trials. These data support a fundamental role for mTORC1 activation as a key regulator of human muscle protein synthesis in response to increased EAA availability. This information will be useful in the development of evidence-based nutritional therapies targeting mTORC1 to counteract muscle wasting associated with numerous clinical conditions.

  18. Exploring DNA binding and nucleolytic activity of few 4-aminoantipyrine based amino acid Schiff base complexes: A comparative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Sakthivel, A.; Pravin, N.

    A series of novel Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized from Schiff base(s), obtained by the condensation of 4-aminoantipyrine with furfural and amino acid (glycine(L1)/alanine(L2)/valine(L3)) and respective metal(II) chloride. Their structural features and other properties were explored from the analytical and spectral methods. The binding behaviors of the complexes to calf thymus DNA were investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The intrinsic binding constants for the above synthesized complexes are found to be in the order of 102 to 105 indicating that most of the synthesized complexes are good intercalators. The binding constant values (Kb) clearly indicate that valine Schiff-base complexes have more intercalating ability than alanine and glycine Schiff-base complexes. The results indicate that the complexes bind to DNA through intercalation and act as efficient cleaving agents. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal assay indicates that these complexes are good antimicrobial agents against various pathogens. The IC50 values of [Ni(L1)2] and [Zn(L1)2] complexes imply that these complexes have preferable ability to scavenge hydroxyl radical.

  19. Exploring DNA binding and nucleolytic activity of few 4-aminoantipyrine based amino acid Schiff base complexes: a comparative approach.

    PubMed

    Raman, N; Sakthivel, A; Pravin, N

    2014-05-05

    A series of novel Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized from Schiff base(s), obtained by the condensation of 4-aminoantipyrine with furfural and amino acid (glycine(L1)/alanine(L2)/valine(L3)) and respective metal(II) chloride. Their structural features and other properties were explored from the analytical and spectral methods. The binding behaviors of the complexes to calf thymus DNA were investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The intrinsic binding constants for the above synthesized complexes are found to be in the order of 10(2) to 10(5) indicating that most of the synthesized complexes are good intercalators. The binding constant values (Kb) clearly indicate that valine Schiff-base complexes have more intercalating ability than alanine and glycine Schiff-base complexes. The results indicate that the complexes bind to DNA through intercalation and act as efficient cleaving agents. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal assay indicates that these complexes are good antimicrobial agents against various pathogens. The IC50 values of [Ni(L1)2] and [Zn(L1)2] complexes imply that these complexes have preferable ability to scavenge hydroxyl radical.

  20. Polymerization of amino acids containing nucleotide bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben Cheikh, Azzouz; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1990-01-01

    The nucleoamino acids 1-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)uracil (3) and 9-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)adenine (4) have been prepared as (L)-en-antiomers and as racemic mixtures. When 3 or 4 is suspended in water and treated with N,N'-carbon-yldiimidazole, peptides are formed in good yield. The products formed from the (L)-enantiomers are hydrolyzed to the monomeric amino acids by pronase. Attempts to improve the efficiency of these oligomerizations by including a polyuridylate template in the reaction mixture were not successful. Similarly, oligomers derived from the (L)-enantiomer of 3 did not act as templates to facilitate the oligomerization of 4.

  1. Identification of L-amino acid oxidase (Mb-LAAO) with antibacterial activity in the venom of Montivipera bornmuelleri, a viper from Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Rima, Mohamad; Accary, Claudine; Haddad, Katia; Sadek, Riyad; Hraoui-Bloquet, Souad; Desfontis, Jean C; Fajloun, Ziad

    2013-10-01

    The L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO) is a multifunctional enzyme, able to partake in different activities including antibacterial activity. In this study, a novel LAAO (Mb-LAAO) was isolated from the venom of M. bornmuelleri snake using size exclusion chromatography followed by RP-HPLC and partially characterized. However, the molecular weight of the Mb-LAAO determined by ESI-MS and SDS-PAGE was 59 960.4 Da. Once the enzymatic activity test confirming the enzyme's identity (transformation of L-leucine) was done, the Mb-LAAO was evaluated for its antibacterial activity against Gram-negative bacteria. It showed a remarkable effect against M. morganii and K. pneumoniae. Moreover, no cytotoxic activity was observed for Mb-LAAO against human erythrocytes arguing for an exploration of its pharmaceutical interest.

  2. Intestinal metabolism of sulfur amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a metabolically significant site of sulfur amino acid (SAA) metabolism in the body and metabolizes approx. 20% of the dietary methionine intake that is mainly transmethylated to homocysteine and transsulfurated to cysteine. The GIT accounts for approx. 25% of the ...

  3. Amino Acid Formation on Interstellar Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierhenrich, U. J.; Munoz Caro, G. M.; Barbier, B.; Brack, A.; Thiemann, W.; Goesmann, F.; Rosenbauer, H.

    2003-04-01

    In the dense interstellar medium dust particles accrete ice layers of known molecular composition. In the diffuse interstellar medium these ice layers are subjected to energetic UV-irradiation. Here, photoreactions form complex organic molecules. The interstellar processes were recently successfully simulated in two laboratories. At NASA Ames Research Center three amino acids were detected in interstellar ice analogues [1], contemporaneously, our European team reported on the identification of 16 amino acids therein [2]. Amino acids are the molecular building blocks of proteins in living organisms. The identification of amino acids on the simulated icy surface of interstellar dust particles strongly supports the assumption that the precursor molecules of life were delivered from interstellar and interplanetary space via (micro-) meteorites and/or comets to the earyl Earth. The results shall be verified by the COSAC experiment onboard the ESA cometary mission Rosetta [3]. [1] M.P. Bernstein, J.P. Dworkin, S.A. Sandford, G.W. Cooper, L.J. Allamandola: itshape Nature \\upshape 416 (2002), 401-403. [2] G.M. Muñoz Caro, U.J. Meierhenrich, W.A. Schutte, B. Barbier, A. Arcones Sergovia, H. Rosenbauer, W.H.-P. Thiemann, A. Brack, J.M. Greenberg: itshape Nature \\upshape 416 (2002), 403-406. [3] U. Meierhenrich, W.H.-P. Thiemann, H. Rosenbauer: itshape Chirality \\upshape 11 (1999), 575-582.

  4. Multiple amino acid sensing inputs to mTORC1

    PubMed Central

    Shimobayashi, Mitsugu; Hall, Michael N

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is a master regulator of cell growth and metabolism. In mammals, growth factors and cellular energy stimulate mTORC1 activity through inhibition of the TSC complex (TSC1-TSC2-TBC1D7), a negative regulator of mTORC1. Amino acids signal to mTORC1 independently of the TSC complex. Here, we review recently identified regulators that link amino acid sufficiency to mTORC1 activity and how mutations affecting these regulators cause human disease. PMID:26658722

  5. Amino acid residues 1101-1105 of the isotypic region of human C4B is important to the covalent binding activity of complement component C4.

    PubMed

    Reilly, B D; Levine, R P; Skanes, V M

    1991-11-01

    The C4A and C4B isotypes of human C4 show certain functional differences that stem from their relative preference for transacylation to amino (-NH2) vs hydroxyl (-OH) nucleophiles, respectively, on complement-activating surfaces. Comparison of amino acid sequences of the alpha-chain fragment of C4, C4d, has shown C4A- and C4B-specific sequences at residues 1101-1106 are the only consistent structural difference between isotype, i.e., Pro, Cys, Pro, Val, Leu, Asp in C4A and Leu, Ser, Pro, Val Ile, His in C4B. These residues may be responsible either in part or entirely for properties associated with isotype. To examine the functional role of residues 1101-1106 in C4B-mediated hemolysis, whole serum or immunopurified human C4 with allotypes, A3B1, A3, B2B1, or B1 were preincubated in the presence or absence of an antipeptide mAb (BII-1) specific for amino acid residues 1101-1105 of C4B. Sensitized sheep E and C4-deficient guinea pig serum was then added and lysis measured by absorbance at 415 nm. Our results show lysis of antibody-sensitized sheep E is inhibited by antibody and C4B2B1, C4B1, or C4A3B1 but not antibody and C4A3. The interference of hemolysis by BII-1 could not be explained by inhibition of activation of C4B or inhibition of C3 or C5 convertase activity. Furthermore, results from uptake experiments show that BII-1 interferes with the covalent binding activity of C4B, indicating residues 1101-1105 play a role in the covalent binding reaction of C4B to the target E-antibody complex.

  6. Activity of ceftazidime/avibactam against isogenic strains of Escherichia coli containing KPC and SHV β-lactamases with single amino acid substitutions in the Ω-loop

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Marisa L.; Papp-Wallace, Krisztina M.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to explore the activity of ceftazidime and ceftazidime/avibactam against a collection of isogenic strains of Escherichia coli DH10B possessing SHV and KPC β-lactamases containing single amino acid substitutions in the Ω-loop (residues 164–179). Methods Ceftazidime and ceftazidime/avibactam MICs were determined by the agar dilution method for a panel of isogenic E. coli strains expressing SHV-1 and KPC-2 with amino acid substitutions at positions 164, 167, 169 or 179. Two KPC-2 β-lactamase variants that possessed elevated MICs of ceftazidime/avibactam were selected for further biochemical analyses. Results Avibactam restored susceptibility to ceftazidime for all Ω-loop variants of SHV-1 with MICs <8 mg/L. In contrast, several of the Arg164 and Asp179 variants of KPC-2 demonstrated MICs of ceftazidime/avibactam >8 mg/L. β-Lactamase kinetics showed that the Asp179Asn variant of KPC-2 demonstrated enhanced kinetic properties against ceftazidime. The Ki app, k2/K and koff of the Arg164Ala and Asp179Asn variant KPC-2 β-lactamases indicated that avibactam effectively inhibited these enzymes. Conclusions Several KPC-2 variants demonstrating ceftazidime resistance as a result of single amino acid substitutions in the Ω-loop were not susceptible to ceftazidime/avibactam (MICs >8 mg/L). We hypothesize that this observation is due to the stabilizing interactions (e.g. hydrogen bonds) of ceftazidime within the active site of variant β-lactamases that prevent avibactam from binding to and inhibiting the β-lactamase. As ceftazidime/avibactam is introduced into the clinic, monitoring for new KPC-2 variants that may exhibit increased ceftazidime kinetics as well as resistance to this novel antibiotic combination will be important. PMID:25957381

  7. Brain amino acid metabolism and ketosis.

    PubMed

    Yudkoff, M; Daikhin, Y; Nissim, I; Lazarow, A; Nissim, I

    2001-10-15

    The relationship between ketosis and brain amino acid metabolism was studied in mice that consumed a ketogenic diet (>90% of calories as lipid). After 3 days on the diet the blood concentration of 3-OH-butyrate was approximately 5 mmol/l (control = 0.06-0.1 mmol/l). In forebrain and cerebellum the concentration of 3-OH-butyrate was approximately 10-fold higher than control. Brain [citrate] and [lactate] were greater in the ketotic animals. The concentration of whole brain free coenzyme A was lower in ketotic mice. Brain [aspartate] was reduced in forebrain and cerebellum, but [glutamate] and [glutamine] were unchanged. When [(15)N]leucine was administered to follow N metabolism, this labeled amino acid accumulated to a greater extent in the blood and brain of ketotic mice. Total brain aspartate ((14)N + (15)N) was reduced in the ketotic group. The [(15)N]aspartate/[(15)N]glutamate ratio was lower in ketotic animals, consistent with a shift in the equilibrium of the aspartate aminotransferase reaction away from aspartate. Label in [(15)N]GABA and total [(15)N]GABA was increased in ketotic animals. When the ketotic animals were injected with glucose, there was a partial blunting of ketoacidemia within 40 min as well as an increase of brain [aspartate], which was similar to control. When [U-(13)C(6)]glucose was injected, the (13)C label appeared rapidly in brain lactate and in amino acids. Label in brain [U-(13)C(3)]lactate was greater in the ketotic group. The ratio of brain (13)C-amino acid/(13)C-lactate, which reflects the fraction of amino acid carbon that is derived from glucose, was much lower in ketosis, indicating that another carbon source, i.e., ketone bodies, were precursor to aspartate, glutamate, glutamine and GABA.

  8. Present Global Situation of Amino Acids in Industry.

    PubMed

    Tonouchi, Naoto; Ito, Hisao

    2016-11-11

    At present, amino acids are widely produced and utilized industrially. Initially, monosodium glutamate (MSG) was produced by extraction from a gluten hydrolysate. The amino acid industry started using the residual of the lysate. The discovery of the functions of amino acids has led to the expansion of their field of use. In addition to seasoning and other food use, amino acids are used in many fields such as animal nutrients, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. On the other hand, the invention of the glutamate fermentation process, followed by the development of fermentation methods for many other amino acids, is no less important. The supply of these amino acids at a low price is very essential for their industrial use. Most amino acids are now produced by fermentation. The consumption of many amino acids such as MSG or feed-use amino acids is still rapidly increasing.

  9. D-Amino Acids in Living Higher Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Noriko

    2002-04-01

    The homochirality of biological amino acids (L-amino acids) and of the RNA/DNA backbone (D-ribose) might have become established before the origin of life. It has been considered that D-amino acids and L-sugars were eliminated on the primitive Earth. Therefore, the presence and function of D-amino acids in living organisms have not been studied except for D-amino acids in the cell walls of microorganisms. However, D-amino acids were recently found in various living higher organisms in the form of free amino acids, peptides, and proteins. Free D-aspartate and D-serine are present and may have important physiological functions in mammals. D-amino acids in peptides are well known as opioid peptides and neuropeptides. In protein, D-aspartate residues increase during aging. This review deals with recent advances in the study of D-amino acids in higher organisms.

  10. Docking and quantitative structure-activity relationship studies for sulfonyl hydrazides as inhibitors of cytosolic human branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Julio; Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Fernández, Michael; Coll, Deysma

    2009-11-01

    We have performed the docking of sulfonyl hydrazides complexed with cytosolic branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase (BCATc) to study the orientations and preferred active conformations of these inhibitors. The study was conducted on a selected set of 20 compounds with variation in structure and activity. In addition, the predicted inhibitor concentration (IC(50)) of the sulfonyl hydrazides as BCAT inhibitors were obtained by a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method using three-dimensional (3D) vectors. We found that three-dimensional molecule representation of structures based on electron diffraction (3D-MoRSE) scheme contains the most relevant information related to the studied activity. The statistical parameters [cross-validate correlation coefficient (Q(2) = 0.796) and fitted correlation coefficient (R(2) = 0.899)] validated the quality of the 3D-MoRSE predictive model for 16 compounds. Additionally, this model adequately predicted four compounds that were not included in the training set.

  11. How Amino Acids and Peptides Shaped the RNA World

    PubMed Central

    van der Gulik, Peter T.S.; Speijer, Dave

    2015-01-01

    The “RNA world” hypothesis is seen as one of the main contenders for a viable theory on the origin of life. Relatively small RNAs have catalytic power, RNA is everywhere in present-day life, the ribosome is seen as a ribozyme, and rRNA and tRNA are crucial for modern protein synthesis. However, this view is incomplete at best. The modern protein-RNA ribosome most probably is not a distorted form of a “pure RNA ribosome” evolution started out with. Though the oldest center of the ribosome seems “RNA only”, we cannot conclude from this that it ever functioned in an environment without amino acids and/or peptides. Very small RNAs (versatile and stable due to basepairing) and amino acids, as well as dipeptides, coevolved. Remember, it is the amino group of aminoacylated tRNA that attacks peptidyl-tRNA, destroying the bond between peptide and tRNA. This activity of the amino acid part of aminoacyl-tRNA illustrates the centrality of amino acids in life. With the rise of the “RNA world” view of early life, the pendulum seems to have swung too much towards the ribozymatic part of early biochemistry. The necessary presence and activity of amino acids and peptides is in need of highlighting. In this article, we try to bring the role of the peptide component of early life back into focus. We argue that an RNA world completely independent of amino acids never existed. PMID:25607813

  12. Increased incorporation of an infused labelled amino acid into plasma proteins as a means of assessing the severity of injury or activity of disease in surgical patients

    SciTech Connect

    Clague, M.B.; Carmichael, M.J.; Keir, M.J.; Rogaly, E.; Wright, P.D.; Johnston, I.D.

    1982-07-01

    Following injury there is increased synthesis of several plasma proteins. During a constant rate infusion of 1-(1-/sup 14/C) leucine some of the labeled amino acid became incorporated into plasma proteins, the amount being readily determined after precipitation with perchloric acid. This value was correlated with the clinical state of the patient to see if an index of severity of injury could be derived. Before operation 6.7 +/- 0.5% (mean +/- SD, n . 16) of the infused labeled amino acid was incorporated in asymptomatic patients, irrespective of their dietary intakes, while in the presence of symptomatology this value rose, correlating with tumor staging in patients with colorectal neoplasia (r . 0.988, p . 0.001). It returned to normal following tumor resection, but was elevated in the presence of recurrence or residual disease. After operation it also rose, being maximal in the early postoperative period and following the more major surgical procedures, the increase correlating with the change in cortisol level in patients following cholecystectomy (r . 0.84, p less than 0.01; n . 8). The pattern of distribution of the label among the plasma proteins did not change with increased incorporation. The increase in incorporation of 1-(1-14C) leucine into plasma proteins would appear to offer a good index for severity of injury of activity of a disease state.

  13. A new mouse model of mild ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (spf-j) displays cerebral amino acid perturbations at baseline and upon systemic immune activation.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, Tatyana N; Rosas, Odrick R; Singh, Larry N; Kristaponis, Kara; Vernon, Hilary; McGuire, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD, OMIM# 311250) is an inherited X-linked urea cycle disorder that is characterized by hyperammonemia and orotic aciduria. In this report, we describe a new animal model of OTCD caused by a spontaneous mutation in the mouse Otc gene (c.240T>A, p.K80N). This transversion in exon 3 of ornithine transcarbamylase leads to normal levels of mRNA with low levels of mature protein and is homologous to a mutation that has also been described in a single patient affected with late-onset OTCD. With higher residual enzyme activity, spf-J were found to have normal plasma ammonia and orotate. Baseline plasma amino acid profiles were consistent with mild OTCD: elevated glutamine, and lower citrulline and arginine. In contrast to WT, spf-J displayed baseline elevations in cerebral amino acids with depletion following immune challenge with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid. Our results indicate that the mild spf-J mutation constitutes a new mouse model that is suitable for mechanistic studies of mild OTCD and the exploration of cerebral pathophysiology during acute decompensation that characterizes proximal urea cycle dysfunction in humans.

  14. Dietary back-calculation using stable isotopes: can activities of enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism be used to improve estimates of trophic shifts in fish?

    PubMed

    Gaye-Siessegger, Julia; Focken, Ulfert; Abel, Hansjörg; Becker, Klaus

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was (1) to assess the effects of dietary protein content and feeding level on trophic shifts of C and N isotopes (Delta delta(13)C(tissue-diet) and Delta delta(15)N(tissue-diet)) and (2) to test whether the measurement of the activities of two enzymes involved in the metabolism of amino acids could improve the accuracy of estimation of the trophic shifts of C and N isotopes. For this, 36 Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were kept under controlled conditions for 8 weeks and fed at three different levels (2, 4 and 8 g kg(-0.8) d(-1)) with three diets differing in their protein content only (20, 29 and 39 %). For each fish, food to fish body trophic shifts of C and N isotopes were measured as well as the hepatic activities of aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). The feeding level affected the activities of ASAT and GDH as well as the trophic shifts of C and N isotopes significantly but the dietary protein content had no significant effect except on the specific activity of ASAT. Fish fed at the lowest level had significantly higher trophic shifts of C and N isotopes than fish fed at higher levels. The trophic shifts were significantly lower in fish with a high protein utilisation. Values of the 'goodness-of-fit' for linear regressions between enzyme activities and trophic shifts were low. Thus, activities of ASAT and GDH are not suitable for predicting estimates of trophic shifts in situations where the amount of food consumed or the dietary protein content is not known. In further studies, activities of enzymes involved in the metabolism of amino acids combined with measurements of the activities of other enzymes should be used to try and improve the accuracy of estimates of trophic shifts.

  15. Severing of a hydrogen bond disrupts amino acid networks in the catalytically active state of the alpha subunit of tryptophan synthase

    PubMed Central

    Axe, Jennifer M; O'Rourke, Kathleen F; Kerstetter, Nicole E; Yezdimer, Eric M; Chan, Yan M; Chasin, Alexander; Boehr, David D

    2015-01-01

    Conformational changes in the β2α2 and β6α6 loops in the alpha subunit of tryptophan synthase (αTS) are important for enzyme catalysis and coordinating substrate channeling with the beta subunit (βTS). It was previously shown that disrupting the hydrogen bond interactions between these loops through the T183V substitution on the β6α6 loop decreases catalytic efficiency and impairs substrate channeling. Results presented here also indicate that the T183V substitution decreases catalytic efficiency in Escherchia coli αTS in the absence of the βTS subunit. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments indicate that the T183V substitution leads to local changes in the structural dynamics of the β2α2 and β6α6 loops. We have also used NMR chemical shift covariance analyses (CHESCA) to map amino acid networks in the presence and absence of the T183V substitution. Under conditions of active catalytic turnover, the T183V substitution disrupts long-range networks connecting the catalytic residue Glu49 to the αTS-βTS binding interface, which might be important in the coordination of catalytic activities in the tryptophan synthase complex. The approach that we have developed here will likely find general utility in understanding long-range impacts on protein structure and dynamics of amino acid substitutions generated through protein engineering and directed evolution approaches, and provide insight into disease and drug-resistance mutations. PMID:25377949

  16. G protein-coupled receptor Gpr4 senses amino acids and activates the cAMP-PKA pathway in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chaoyang; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Cox, Gary M; Heitman, Joseph

    2006-02-01

    The Galpha protein Gpa1 governs the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway and plays a central role in virulence and differentiation in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, but the signals and receptors that trigger this pathway were unknown. We identified seven putative proteins that share identity with known G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). One protein, Gpr4, shares limited sequence identity with the Dictyostelium discoideum cAMP receptor cAR1 and the Aspergillus nidulans GPCR protein GprH and also shares structural similarity with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae receptor Gpr1. gpr4 mutants exhibited reduced capsule production and mating defects, similar to gpa1 mutants, and exogenous cAMP suppressed both gpr4 mutant phenotypes. Epistasis analysis provides further evidence that Gpr4 functions upstream of the Galpha subunit Gpa1. Gpr4-Gpr4 homomeric interactions were observed in the yeast two-hybrid assay, and Gpr4 was shown to physically interact with Gpa1 in the split-ubiquitin system. A Gpr4::DsRED fusion protein was localized to the plasma membrane and methionine was found to trigger receptor internalization. The analysis of intracellular cAMP levels showed that gpr4 mutants still respond to glucose but not to certain amino acids, such as methionine. Amino acids might serve as ligands for Gpr4 and could contribute to engage the cAMP-PKA pathway. Activation of the cAMP-PKA pathway by glucose and amino acids represents a nutrient coincidence detection system shared in other pathogenic fungi.

  17. Nature's starships. I. Observed abundances and relative frequencies of amino acids in meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, Alyssa K.; Pudritz, Ralph E. E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2014-03-10

    The class of meteorites called carbonaceous chondrites are examples of material from the solar system which have been relatively unchanged from the time of their initial formation. These meteorites have been classified according to the temperatures and physical conditions of their parent planetesimals. We collate available data on amino acid abundance in these meteorites and plot the concentrations of different amino acids for each meteorite within various meteorite subclasses. We plot average concentrations for various amino acids across meteorites separated by subclass and petrologic type. We see a predominance in the abundance and variety of amino acids in CM2 and CR2 meteorites. The range in temperature corresponding to these subclasses indicates high degrees of aqueous alteration, suggesting aqueous synthesis of amino acids. Within the CM2 and CR2 subclasses, we identify trends in relative frequencies of amino acids to investigate how common amino acids are as a function of their chemical complexity. These two trends (total abundance and relative frequencies) can be used to constrain formation parameters of amino acids within planetesimals. Our organization of the data supports an onion shell model for the temperature structure of planetesimals. The least altered meteorites (type 3) and their amino acids originated near cooler surface regions. The most active amino acid synthesis likely took place at intermediate depths (type 2). The most altered materials (type 1) originated furthest toward parent body cores. This region is likely too hot to either favor amino acid synthesis or for amino acids to be retained after synthesis.

  18. Permeability of membranes to amino acids and modified amino acids: mechanisms involved in translocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Deamer, D. W. (Principal Investigator); Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The amino acid permeability of membranes is of interest because they are one of the key solutes involved in cell function. Membrane permeability coefficients (P) for amino acid classes, including neutral, polar, hydrophobic, and charged species, have been measured and compared using a variety of techniques. Decreasing lipid chain length increased permeability slightly (5-fold), while variations in pH had only minor effects on the permeability coefficients of the amino acids tested in liposomes. Increasing the membrane surface charge increased the permeability of amino acids of the opposite charge, while increasing the cholesterol content decreased membrane permeability. The permeability coefficients for most amino acids tested were surprisingly similar to those previously measured for monovalent cations such as sodium and potassium (approximately 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1). This observation suggests that the permeation rates for the neutral, polar and charged amino acids are controlled by bilayer fluctuations and transient defects, rather than partition coefficients and Born energy barriers. Hydrophobic amino acids were 10(2) more permeable than the hydrophilic forms, reflecting their increased partition coefficient values. External pH had dramatic effects on the permeation rates for the modified amino acid lysine methyl ester in response to transmembrane pH gradients. It was established that lysine methyl ester and other modified short peptides permeate rapidly (P = 10(-2) cm s-1) as neutral (deprotonated) molecules. It was also shown that charge distributions dramatically alter permeation rates for modified di-peptides. These results may relate to the movement of peptides through membranes during protein translocation and to the origin of cellular membrane transport on the early Earth.

  19. Composition of antioxidants and amino acids in Stevia leaf infusions.

    PubMed

    Periche, Angela; Koutsidis, Georgios; Escriche, Isabel

    2014-03-01

    Stevia, a non-caloric natural sweetener with beneficial properties and considerable antioxidants and amino acids, is increasingly consumed as an infusion. This work evaluates the influence of the conditions (temperature: 50, 70 or 90 °C and time: 1, 5, 20 or 40 min) applied to obtain Stevia infusions, on antioxidants (total phenols, flavonoids and antioxidant activity) and amino acids. The total concentration of the eleven amino acids found was 11.70 mg/g in dried leaves and from 6.84 to 9.11 mg/g per gram of Stevia in infusions. However, infusions showed higher levels of certain amino acids (alanine, asparagine, leucine and proline), and greater values of the three antioxidant parameters in comparison with dry leaves. Temperature had more influence (minimum values at 50 °C and maximum at 90 °C) than time in the case of antioxidants. At 90 °C there were no important increases in the extraction of antioxidant compounds after 5 min; each gram of Stevia had 117 mg trolox (total antioxidant activity), 90 mg gallic acid (total phenols) and 56 mg catechin equivalents (flavonoids). Varying the temperature and time conditions no notable differences were observed in the concentrations of the majority of amino acids. However, the infusion treatment at 90 °C for 5 min was the best, as it gave the highest yield of 8 of the 11 amino acids. Therefore, with respect to the compounds analyzed in this study, the best way to obtain Stevia leaf infusions is the same as the domestic process, almost boiling water for a short time.

  20. Non-coding nucleotides and amino acids near the active site regulate peptide deformylase expression and inhibitor susceptibility in Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiaofeng; Pachikara, Niseema D.; Oey, Christopher B.; Balakrishnan, Amit; Westblade, Lars F.; Tan, Ming; Chase, Theodore; Nickels, Bryce E.

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis, an obligate intracellular bacterium, is a highly prevalent human pathogen. Hydroxamic-acid-based matrix metalloprotease inhibitors can effectively inhibit the pathogen both in vitro and in vivo, and have exhibited therapeutic potential. Here, we provide genome sequencing data indicating that peptide deformylase (PDF) is the sole target of the inhibitors in this organism. We further report molecular mechanisms that control chlamydial PDF (cPDF) expression and inhibition efficiency. In particular, we identify the σ66-dependent promoter that controls cPDF gene expression and demonstrate that point mutations in this promoter lead to resistance by increasing cPDF transcription. Furthermore, we show that substitution of two amino acids near the active site of the enzyme alters enzyme kinetics and protein stability. PMID:21719536

  1. Microbial Production of Amino Acid-Related Compounds.

    PubMed

    Wendisch, Volker F

    2016-11-22

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is the workhorse of the production of proteinogenic amino acids used in food and feed biotechnology. After more than 50 years of safe amino acid production, C. glutamicum has recently also been engineered for the production of amino acid-derived compounds, which find various applications, e.g., as synthons for the chemical industry in several markets including the polymer market. The amino acid-derived compounds such as non-proteinogenic ω-amino acids, α,ω-diamines, and cyclic or hydroxylated amino acids have similar carbon backbones and functional groups as their amino acid precursors. Decarboxylation of amino acids may yield ω-amino acids such as β-alanine, γ-aminobutyrate, and δ-aminovalerate as well as α,ω-diamines such as putrescine and cadaverine. Since transamination is the final step in several amino acid biosynthesis pathways, 2-keto acids as immediate amino acid precursors are also amenable to production using recombinant C. glutamicum strains. Approaches for metabolic engineering of C. glutamicum for production of amino acid-derived compounds will be described, and where applicable, production from alternative carbon sources or use of genome streamline will be referred to. The excellent large-scale fermentation experience with C. glutamicum offers the possibility that these amino acid-derived speciality products may enter large-volume markets.

  2. An active twenty-amino-acid-residue peptide derived from the inhibitor protein of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, H C; van Patten, S M; Smith, A J; Walsh, D A

    1985-01-01

    Digestion with Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase of the inhibitor protein of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase results in the sequential formation of three active inhibitory peptides. The smallest active peptide has the sequence Thr-Thr-Tyr-Ala-Asp-Phe-Ile-Ala-Ser-Gly-Arg-Thr-Gly-Arg-Arg-Asn-Ala-Ile- His-Asp . This 20-amino-acid-residue peptide has 20-40% of the activity of the native molecule and a Ki of 0.2 nM. Inhibition, as a minimum, appears to be based upon the inhibitor protein containing the recognition sequences that dictate protein-substrate-specificity. This inhibitory peptide also has sequence homology with the phosphorylation site for a protein kinase other than the cyclic AMP-dependent enzyme. PMID:3000357

  3. Regulation of amino acid metabolic enzymes and transporters in plants.

    PubMed

    Pratelli, Réjane; Pilot, Guillaume

    2014-10-01

    Amino acids play several critical roles in plants, from providing the building blocks of proteins to being essential metabolites interacting with many branches of metabolism. They are also important molecules that shuttle organic nitrogen through the plant. Because of this central role in nitrogen metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, degradation, and transport are tightly regulated to meet demand in response to nitrogen and carbon availability. While much is known about the feedback regulation of the branched biosynthesis pathways by the amino acids themselves, the regulation mechanisms at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and protein levels remain to be identified. This review focuses mainly on the current state of our understanding of the regulation of the enzymes and transporters at the transcript level. Current results describing the effect of transcription factors and protein modifications lead to a fragmental picture that hints at multiple, complex levels of regulation that control and coordinate transport and enzyme activities. It also appears that amino acid metabolism, amino acid transport, and stress signal integration can influence each other in a so-far unpredictable fashion.

  4. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. I - Six carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Gandy, W. E.; Pizzarello, S.

    1981-01-01

    Six of the seven chain isomers of six-carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids (leucine isomers) have been either identified or confirmed in hot-water extracts of the Murchison meteorite using combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion exchange chromatography. 2-Amino-2-ethylbutyric acid, 2-amino-2,3-dimethylbutyric acid, pseudoleucine, and 2-methylnorvaline were positively identified by GC-MS. These amino acids have not been previously reported to occur in natural materials and may be uniquely meteoritic in origin. The presence of leucine and isoleucine (including the diastereoisomer, alloisoleucine) was confirmed. Peaks corresponding to norleucine were seen by ion-exchange and gas chromatography but characteristic mass spectra were not obtained. The alpha-branched chain isomers in this series are quantitatively the most significant. These results are compared with literature data on amino acid synthesis by electrical discharge and Fischer-Tropsch-type catalysis. Neither model system produces an amino acid suite that is completely comparable to that found in the Murchison meteorite.

  5. Amino acids regulate the intracellular trafficking of the general amino acid permease of Saccharomycescerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Esther J; Kaiser, Chris A

    2002-11-12

    The delivery to the plasma membrane of the general amino acid permease, Gap1p, of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by the quality of the nitrogen source in the growth medium. In an effort to define how different nitrogen sources control Gap1p sorting, we find that mutations in GDH1 and GLN1 that decrease the flux through the glutamate and glutamine synthesis pathways result in increased Gap1p sorting to the plasma membrane. Conversely, deletion of MKS1, which increases glutamate and glutamine synthesis, decreases Gap1p sorting to the plasma membrane. Glutamate and glutamine are not unusual in their ability to regulate Gap1p sorting, because the addition of all natural amino acids and many amino acid analogs to the growth medium results in increased Gap1p sorting to the vacuole. Importantly, amino acids have the capacity to signal Gap1p sorting to the vacuole regardless of whether they can be used as a source of nitrogen. Finally, we show that rapamycin does not affect Gap1p sorting, indicating that Gap1p sorting is not directly influenced by the TOR pathway. Together, these data show that amino acids are a signal for sorting Gap1p to the vacuole and imply that the nitrogen-regulated Gap1p sorting machinery responds to amino acid-like compounds rather than to the overall nutritional status associated with growth on a particular nitrogen source.

  6. Roles of phytochemicals in amino acid nutrition.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangfeng; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yinlong

    2011-01-01

    Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) is often used as dietary supplements to maintain good health in animals and humans. Here, we review the current knowledge about effects of CHM (including ultra-fine Chinese herbal powder, Acanthopanax senticosus extracts, Astragalus polysaccharide, and glycyrrhetinic acid) as dietary additives on physiological and biochemical parameters in pigs, chickens and rodents. Additionally, we propose possible mechanisms for the beneficial effects of CHM on the animals. These mechanisms include (a) increased digestion and absorption of dietary amino acids; (b) altered catabolism of amino acids in the small intestine and other tissues; (c) enhanced synthesis of functional amino acids (e.g., arginine, glutamine and proline) and polyamines; and (d) improved metabolic control of nutrient utilization through cell signaling. Notably, some phytochemicals and glucocorticoids share similarities in structure and physiological actions. New research findings provide a scientific and clinical basis for the use of CHM to improve well-being in livestock species and poultry, while enhancing the efficiency of protein accretion. Results obtained from animal studies also have important implications for human nutrition and health.

  7. Recent advances in amino acid production by microbial cells.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Amino acids have been utilized for the production of foods, animal feeds and pharmaceuticals. After the discovery of the glutamic acid-producing bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum by Japanese researchers, the production of amino acids, which are primary metabolites, has been achieved using various microbial cells as hosts. Recently, metabolic engineering studies on the rational design of amino acid-producing microbial cells have been successfully conducted. Moreover, the technology of systems biology has been applied to metabolic engineering for the creation of amino acid-producing microbial cells. Currently, new technologies including synthetic biology, single-cell analysis, and evolutionary engineering have been utilized to create amino acid-producing microbial cells. In addition, useful compounds from amino acids have been produced by microbial cells. Here, current researches into the metabolic engineering of microbial cells toward production of amino acids and amino acid-related compounds are reviewed.

  8. Nonconventional techniques for separation of biosynthetic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Kloetzer, Lenuţa; Poştaru, Mădălina; Cheptea, Corina; Caşcaval, D; Galaction, Anca-Irina

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids can be obtained by biosynthesis, by protein hydrolysis or by extraction from natural sources. The most efficient methods are the first two, but the separation of amino acids from fermentation broths or protein hydrolysates is rather difficult. Amino acids dissociate in aqueous solutions, forming characteristic ionic species depending on the solution pH-value. These properties make amino acids to be hydrophilic at any pH-value. This paper presents a review of the separation studies of some amino acids by nonconventional methods, namely individual or selective reactive extraction. Separation of some amino acids from their mixture obtained either by fermentation or protein hydrolysis by reactive extraction with different extractants indicated the possibility of the amino acids selective separation as a function of the pH-value of aqueous solution correlated with the acidic or basic character of each amino acid.

  9. Exploring the role of putative active site amino acids and pro-region motif of recombinant falcipain-2: a principal hemoglobinase of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Dasaradhi, P V N; Chauhan, Virander S; Malhotra, Pawan

    2004-04-23

    Falcipain-2 is one of the principal hemoglobinases of Plasmodium falciparum, a human malaria parasite. It has a typical papain family cysteine protease structural organization, a large pro-domain, a mature domain with conserved active site amino acids. Pro-domain of falcipain-2 also contains two important conserved motifs, "GNFD" and "ERFNIN." The "GNFD" motif has been shown to be responsible for correct folding and stability in case of many papain family proteases. In the present study, we carried out site-directed mutagenesis to assess the roles of active site residues and pro-domain residues for the activity of falcipain-2. Our results showed that substitutions of putative active site residues; Q36, C42, H174, and N204 resulted in complete loss of falcipain-2 activity, while W206 and D155 mutants retained partial/complete activity in comparison to the wild type falcipain-2. Homology modeling data also corroborate the results of mutagenesis; Q36, C42, H174, N204, and W206 residues form the active site loop of the enzyme and D155 lie outside the active pocket. Substitutions in the pro-region did not affect the activity of falcipain-2. This implies that falcipain-2 shares active site residues with other members of papain family, however pro-region of falcipain-2 does not play any role in the activity of enzyme.

  10. BIOACTIVE PROTEINS, PEPTIDES, AND AMINO ACIDS FROM MACROALGAE(1).

    PubMed

    Harnedy, Pádraigín A; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2011-04-01

    Macroalgae are a diverse group of marine organisms that have developed complex and unique metabolic pathways to ensure survival in highly competitive marine environments. As a result, these organisms have been targeted for mining of natural biologically active components. The exploration of marine organisms has revealed numerous bioactive compounds that are proteinaceous in nature. These include proteins, linear peptides, cyclic peptides and depsipeptides, peptide derivatives, amino acids, and amino acid-like components. Furthermore, some species of macroalgae have been shown to contain significant levels of protein. While some protein-derived bioactive peptides have been characterized from macroalgae, macroalgal proteins currently still represent good candidate raw materials for biofunctional peptide mining. This review will provide an overview of the important bioactive amino-acid-containing compounds that have been identified in macroalgae. Moreover, the potential of macroalgal proteins as substrates for the generation of biofunctional peptides for utilization as functional foods to provide specific health benefits will be discussed.

  11. Interactive Hangman teaches amino acid structures and abbreviations.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Britney O; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying structures, hints to the answers were written in "amino acid sentences" for the students to translate. Students were required to draw the structure of the corresponding letter they wished to guess on a whiteboard. Each student received a reference sheet of the structures and abbreviations, but was required to draw from memory when guessing a letter. Preassessments and postassessments revealed a drastic improvement in the students' ability to recognize and draw structures from memory. This activity provides a fun, educational game to play in biochemistry discussion sections or during long incubations in biochemistry laboratories.

  12. Using Unnatural Amino Acids to Probe the Energetics of Oxyanion Hole Hydrogen Bonds in the Ketosteroid Isomerase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds are ubiquitous in enzyme active sites, providing binding interactions and stabilizing charge rearrangements on substrate groups over the course of a reaction. But understanding the origin and magnitude of their catalytic contributions relative to hydrogen bonds made in aqueous solution remains difficult, in part because of complexities encountered in energetic interpretation of traditional site-directed mutagenesis experiments. It has been proposed for ketosteroid isomerase and other enzymes that active site hydrogen bonding groups provide energetic stabilization via “short, strong” or “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds that are formed due to matching of their pKa or proton affinity to that of the transition state. It has also been proposed that the ketosteroid isomerase and other enzyme active sites provide electrostatic environments that result in larger energetic responses (i.e., greater “sensitivity”) to ground-state to transition-state charge rearrangement, relative to aqueous solution, thereby providing catalysis relative to the corresponding reaction in water. To test these models, we substituted tyrosine with fluorotyrosines (F-Tyr’s) in the ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) oxyanion hole to systematically vary the proton affinity of an active site hydrogen bond donor while minimizing steric or structural effects. We found that a 40-fold increase in intrinsic F-Tyr acidity caused no significant change in activity for reactions with three different substrates. F-Tyr substitution did not change the solvent or primary kinetic isotope effect for proton abstraction, consistent with no change in mechanism arising from these substitutions. The observed shallow dependence of activity on the pKa of the substituted Tyr residues suggests that the KSI oxyanion hole does not provide catalysis by forming an energetically exceptional pKa-matched hydrogen bond. In addition, the shallow dependence provides no indication of an active site electrostatic

  13. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates diversification in Lepidopteran caterpillars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acid amino acid conjugates (FACs) have been found in Noctuid as well as Sphingid caterpillar oral secretions and especially volicitin [N-(17-hydroxylinolenoyl)-L-Glutamine] and its biochemical precursor, N-linolenoyl-L-glutamine, are known elicitors of induced volatile emissions in corn plants...

  14. Electronic coupling through natural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Berstis, Laura; Beckham, Gregg T. E-mail: gregg.beckham@nrel.gov; Crowley, Michael F. E-mail: gregg.beckham@nrel.gov

    2015-12-14

    Myriad scientific domains concern themselves with biological electron transfer (ET) events that span across vast scales of rate and efficiency through a remarkably fine-tuned integration of amino acid (AA) sequences, electronic structure, dynamics, and environment interactions. Within this intricate scheme, many questions persist as to how proteins modulate electron-tunneling properties. To help elucidate these principles, we develop a model set of peptides representing the common α-helix and β-strand motifs including all natural AAs within implicit protein-environment solvation. Using an effective Hamiltonian strategy with density functional theory, we characterize the electronic coupling through these peptides, furthermore considering side-chain dynamics. For both motifs, predictions consistently show that backbone-mediated electronic coupling is distinctly sensitive to AA type (aliphatic, polar, aromatic, negatively charged and positively charged), and to side-chain orientation. The unique properties of these residues may be employed to design activated, deactivated, or switch-like superexchange pathways. Electronic structure calculations and Green’s function analyses indicate that localized shifts in the electron density along the peptide play a role in modulating these pathways, and further substantiate the experimentally observed behavior of proline residues as superbridges. The distinct sensitivities of tunneling pathways to sequence and conformation revealed in this electronic coupling database help improve our fundamental understanding of the broad diversity of ET reactivity and provide guiding principles for peptide design.

  15. Roles of basic amino acid residues in the activity of μ-conotoxin GIIIA and GIIIB, peptide blockers of muscle sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuki; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Ishida, Yukisato; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2015-04-01

    To study in detail the roles of basic amino acid residues in the activity of μ-conotoxin GIIIA (μ-GIIIA) and GIIIB (μ-GIIIB), specific blockers of muscle sodium channels, seven analogs of μ-GIIIA, and two analogs of μ-GIIIB were synthesized. μ-GIIIA analogs were synthesized by replacing systematically the three Arg residues (Arg1, Arg13, and Arg19) with one, two, and three Lys residues. μ-GIIIB analogs were synthesized by replacing simultaneously all four Lys residues (Lys9, Lys11, Lys16, and Lys19) with Arg residues and further replacement of acidic Asp residues with neutral Ala residues. Circular dichroism spectra of the synthesized analogs suggested that the replacement did not affect the three dimensional structure. The inhibitory effects on the twitch contractions of the rat diaphragm showed that the side chain guanidino group of Arg13 of μ-GIIIA was important for the activity, whereas that of Arg19 had little role for biological activity. Although [Arg9,11,16,19]μ-GIIIB showed higher activity than native μ-GIIIB, highly basic [Ala2,12, Arg9,11,16,19]μ-GIIIB showed lower activity, suggesting that there was an appropriate molecular basicity for the maximum activity.

  16. Ionic liquid crystals derived from amino acids.

    PubMed

    Mansueto, Markus; Frey, Wolfgang; Laschat, Sabine

    2013-11-18

    Novel chiral amino acid derived ionic liquid crystals with amine and amide moieties as spacers between the imidazolium head group and the alkyl chain were synthesised. The key step in the synthesis utilised the relatively uncommon SO3 leaving group in a microwave-assisted reaction. The mesomorphic properties of the mesogens were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polarising optical microscopy (POM) and X-ray diffraction. All liquid crystalline salts exhibit a smectic A mesophase geometry with strongly interdigitated bilayer structures. An increase of the steric bulk of the stereogenic centre hindered the formation of mesophases. In case of phenylalanine-derived derivatives a mesomorphic behaviour was observed for shorter alkyl chains as compared to other amino acid derivatives indicating an additional stabilising effect by the phenyl moiety.

  17. AMINO ACID CROSS RESISTANCE IN AGROBACTERIUM TUMEFACIENS

    PubMed Central

    Beardsley, Robert E.

    1962-01-01

    Beardsley, Robert E. (Manhattan College, New York, N. Y.). Amino acid cross resistance in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. J. Bacteriol. 84:1237–1240. 1962.—Resistant clones selected on medium supplemented with glycine were also resistant to d-methionine, d-valine, dl-norleucine, and dl-serine. Cross resistance was similarly exhibited by clones selected on d-methionine, d-valine, or dl-norleucine. Two types of resistant organisms were observed. One produced colonies containing normal rods on selection medium. The other produced translucent colonies containing L forms. Both grew as typical rods in unsupplemented medium. Some resistant clones did not produce a temperate phage carried by the parental strain, but these retained immunity to homologous phage. The toxicity of d-methionine and d-valine for nonresistant bacteria is not reversed by the l isomers. The lethal effects of toxic amino acids are additive. PMID:13969951

  18. Amino acids and autophagy: cross-talk and co-operation to control cellular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Bernadette; Korolchuk, Viktor I; Sarkar, Sovan

    2015-10-01

    Maintenance of amino acid homeostasis is important for healthy cellular function, metabolism and growth. Intracellular amino acid concentrations are dynamic; the high demand for protein synthesis must be met with constant dietary intake, followed by cellular influx, utilization and recycling of nutrients. Autophagy is a catabolic process via which superfluous or damaged proteins and organelles are delivered to the lysosome and degraded to release free amino acids into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, autophagy is specifically activated in response to amino acid starvation via two key signaling cascades: the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) and the general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) pathways. These pathways are key regulators of the integration between anabolic (amino acid depleting) and catabolic (such as autophagy which is amino acid replenishing) processes to ensure intracellular amino acid homeostasis. Here, we discuss the key roles that amino acids, along with energy (ATP, glucose) and oxygen, are playing in cellular growth and proliferation. We further explore how sophisticated methods are employed by cells to sense intracellular amino acid concentrations, how amino acids can act as a switch to dictate the temporal and spatial activation of anabolic and catabolic processes and how autophagy contributes to the replenishment of free amino acids, all to ensure cell survival. Relevance of these molecular processes to cellular and organismal physiology and pathology is also discussed.

  19. Proton-assisted amino acid transporter PAT1 complexes with Rag GTPases and activates TORC1 on late endosomal and lysosomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Ögmundsdóttir, Margrét H; Heublein, Sabine; Kazi, Shubana; Reynolds, Bruno; Visvalingam, Shivanthy M; Shaw, Michael K; Goberdhan, Deborah C I

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is activated by growth factor-regulated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/Rheb signalling and extracellular amino acids (AAs) to promote growth and proliferation. These AAs induce translocation of mTOR to late endosomes and lysosomes (LELs), subsequent activation via mechanisms involving the presence of intralumenal AAs, and interaction between mTORC1 and a multiprotein assembly containing Rag GTPases and the heterotrimeric Ragulator complex. However, the mechanisms by which AAs control these different aspects of mTORC1 activation are not well understood. We have recently shown that intracellular Proton-assisted Amino acid Transporter 1 (PAT1)/SLC36A1 is an essential mediator of AA-dependent mTORC1 activation. Here we demonstrate in Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells that PAT1 is primarily located on LELs, physically interacts with the Rag GTPases and is required for normal AA-dependent mTOR relocalisation. We also use the powerful in vivo genetic methodologies available in Drosophila to investigate the regulation of the PAT1/Rag/Ragulator complex. We show that GFP-tagged PATs reside at both the cell surface and LELs in vivo, mirroring PAT1 distribution in several normal mammalian cell types. Elevated PI3K/Akt/Rheb signalling increases intracellular levels of PATs and synergistically enhances PAT-induced growth via a mechanism requiring endocytosis. In light of the recent identification of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase as another Rag-interacting component, we propose a model in which PATs function as part of an AA-sensing engine that drives mTORC1 activation from LEL compartments.

  20. Isolation, Amino Acid Sequence and Biological Activities of Novel Long-Chain Polyamine-Associated Peptide Toxins from the Sponge Axinyssa aculeata

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Satoko; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Gill, Martin B.; Lash-Van Wyhe, L. Leanne; Murata, Michio; Nonomura, Ken’ichi; Swanson, Geoffrey T.

    2012-01-01

    A novel family of functionalized peptide toxins, aculeines (ACUs), was isolated from the marine sponge Axinyssa aculeate. ACUs are polypeptides with N-terminal residues that are modified by the addition of long-chain polyamines (LCPA). Aculeines were present in the sponge extract as a complex mixture with differing polyamine chain lengths and peptide structures. ACU-A and B, which were purified in this study, share a common polypeptide chain but differ in their N-terminal residue modifications. The amino acid sequence of the polypeptide portion of ACU-A and B was deduced from 3′ and 5′ RACE, and supported by Edman degradation and mass spectral analysis of peptide fragments. ACU induced convulsions upon intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection in mice, and disrupted neuronal membrane integrity in electrophysiological assays. ACU also lysed erythrocytes with a potency that differed between animal species. Here we describe the isolation, amino acid sequence, and biological activity of this new group of cytotoxic sponge peptides. PMID:21830292

  1. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, diazotized, (3-aminophenyl)phosphonic acid and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized,...

  2. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, diazotized, (3-aminophenyl)phosphonic acid and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized,...

  3. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, diazotized, (3-aminophenyl)phosphonic acid and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized,...

  4. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, diazotized, (3-aminophenyl)phosphonic acid and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized,...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, diazotized, (3-aminophenyl)phosphonic acid and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized,...

  6. Alterations of amino Acid level in depressed rat brain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei; Li, Xuechun; Ni, Jian; Tian, Jingchen; Jing, Fu; Qu, Changhai; Lin, Longfei; Zhang, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Amino-acid neurotransmitter system dysfunction plays a major role in the pathophysiology of depression. Several studies have demonstrated the potential of amino acids as a source of neuro-specific biomarkers could be used in future diagnosis of depression. Only partial amino acids such as glycine and asparagine were determined from certain parts of rats' brain included hippocampi and cerebral cortex in previous studies. However, according to systematic biology, amino acids in different area of brain are interacted and interrelated. Hence, the determination of 34 amino acids through entire rats' brain was conducted in this study in order to demonstrate more possibilities for biomarkers of depression by discovering other potential amino acids in more areas of rats' brain. As a result, 4 amino acids (L-aspartic acid, L-glutamine, taurine and γ-amino-n-butyric acid) among 34 were typically identified as potentially primary biomarkers of depression by data statistics. Meanwhile, an antidepressant called Fluoxetine was employed to verify other potential amino acids which were not identified by data statistics. Eventually, we found L-α-amino-adipic acid could also become a new potentially secondary biomarker of depression after drug validation. In conclusion, we suggested that L-aspartic acid, L-glutamine, taurine, γ-amino-n-butyric acid and L-α-amino-adipic acid might become potential biomarkers for future diagnosis of depression and development of antidepressant.

  7. Rotational Study of Natural Amino Acid Glutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, Marcelino; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Recent improvements in laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (LA-MB-FTMW) have allowed the investigation of glutamine (COOH-CH(NH2)-CH2-CH2-CONH2), a natural amino acid with a long polar side chain. One dominant structure has been detected in the rotational spectrum. The nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure of two 14N nuclei has been totally resolved allowing the conclusive identification of the observed species.

  8. Amino acid analyses of R and CK chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; McLain, Hannah; Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Davidson, Jemma; Miller, Kelly E.; Andronikov, Alexander V.; Lauretta, Dante; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2015-03-01

    Exogenous delivery of amino acids and other organic molecules to planetary surfaces may have played an important role in the origins of life on Earth and other solar system bodies. Previous studies have revealed the presence of indigenous amino acids in a wide range of carbon-rich meteorites, with the abundances and structural distributions differing significantly depending on parent body mineralogy and alteration conditions. Here we report on the amino acid abundances of seven type 3-6 CK chondrites and two Rumuruti (R) chondrites. Amino acid measurements were made on hot water extracts from these meteorites by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Of the nine meteorites analyzed, four were depleted in amino acids, and one had experienced significant amino acid contamination by terrestrial biology. The remaining four, comprised of two R and two CK chondrites, contained low levels of amino acids that were predominantly the straight chain, amino-terminal (n-ω-amino) acids β-alanine, and γ-amino-n-butyric acid. This amino acid distribution is similar to what we reported previously for thermally altered ureilites and CV and CO chondrites, and these n-ω-amino acids appear to be indigenous to the meteorites and not the result of terrestrial contamination. The amino acids may have been formed by Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions, although this hypothesis needs further testing.

  9. Alimentary proteins, amino acids and cholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Blachier, François; Lancha, Antonio H; Boutry, Claire; Tomé, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Numerous data from both epidemiological and experimental origins indicate that some alimentary proteins and amino acids in supplements can modify the blood LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and total cholesterol. After an initial approval of the health claim for soy protein consumption for the prevention of coronary heart disease, more recently it has been concluded from an overall analysis of literature that isolated soy protein with isoflavones only slightly decrease LDL and total cholesterol. Other plant extracts and also some proteins from animal origin have been reported to exert a lowering effect on blood cholesterol when compared with a reference protein (often casein). The underlying mechanisms are still little understood. Individual amino acids and mixture of amino acids have also been tested (mostly in animal studies) for their effects on cholesterol parameters and on cholesterol metabolism. Methionine, lysine, cystine, leucine, aspartate and glutamate have been tested individually and in combination in different models of either normo or hypercholesterolemic animals and found to be able to modify blood cholesterol and/or LDL cholesterol and/or HDL cholesterol. It is however not known if these results are relevant to human nutrition.

  10. Chlorpromazine oligomer is a potentially active substance that inhibits human D-amino acid oxidase, product of a susceptibility gene for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Iwana, Sanae; Kawazoe, Tomoya; Park, Hwan Ki; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Ono, Koji; Yorita, Kazuko; Sakai, Takashi; Kusumi, Takenori; Fukui, Kiyoshi

    2008-12-01

    D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), a potential risk factor for schizophrenia, has been proposed to be involved in the decreased glutamatergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia. Here we show the inhibitory effect of an antipsychotic drug, chlorpromazine, on human DAO, which is consistent with previous reports using porcine DAO, although human DAO was inhibited to a lesser degree (K(i) = 0.7 mM) than porcine DAO. Since chlorpromazine is known to induce phototoxic or photoallergic reactions and also to be transformed into various metabolites, we examined the effects of white light-irradiated chlorpromazine on the enzymatic activity. Analytical methods including high-resolution mass spectrometry revealed that irradiation triggered the oligomerization of chlorpromazine molecules. The oligomerized chlorpromazine showed a mixed type inhibition with inhibition constants of low micromolar range, indicative of enhanced inhibition. Taken together, these results suggest that oligomerized chlorpromazine could act as an active substance that might contribute to the therapeutic effects of this drug.

  11. A colorimetric assay for the determination of acetyl xylan esterase or cephalosporin C acetyl esterase activities using 7-amino cephalosporanic acid, cephalosporin C, or acetylated xylan as substrate.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Irene; Montoro-García, Silvia; Lozada-Ramírez, José Daniel; Sánchez-Ferrer, Alvaro; García-Carmona, Francisco

    2007-10-15

    A bromothymol blue-based colorimetric assay has been devised to screen for acetyl xylan esterase or cephalosporin C (CPC) deacetylase activities using 7-amino cephalosporanic acid (7-ACA), CPC, or acetylated xylan as substrate. These enzymes are not screened with their natural substrates because of the tedious procedures available previously. Acetyl xylan esterase from Bacillus pumilus CECT 5072 was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3), and characterized using this assay. Similar K(M) values for 7-ACA and CPC were obtained when compared with those described using HPLC methods. The assay is easy to perform and can be carried out in robotic high-throughput colorimetric devices normally used in directed evolution experiments. The assay allowed us to detect improvements in activity at a minimum of twofold with a very low coefficient of variance in 96-well plates. This method is significantly faster and more convenient to use than are known HPLC and pH-stat procedures.

  12. Loratadine and analogues: discovery and preliminary structure-activity relationship of inhibitors of the amino acid transporter B(0)AT2.

    PubMed

    Cuboni, Serena; Devigny, Christian; Hoogeland, Bastiaan; Strasser, Andrea; Pomplun, Sebastian; Hauger, Barbara; Höfner, Georg; Wanner, Klaus T; Eder, Matthias; Buschauer, Armin; Holsboer, Florian; Hausch, Felix

    2014-11-26

    B(0)AT2, encoded by the SLC6A15 gene, is a transporter for neutral amino acids that has recently been implicated in mood and metabolic disorders. It is predominantly expressed in the brain, but little is otherwise known about its function. To identify inhibitors for this transporter, we screened a library of 3133 different bioactive compounds. Loratadine, a clinically used histamine H1 receptor antagonist, was identified as a selective inhibitor of B(0)AT2 with an IC50 of 4 μM while being less active or inactive against several other members of the SLC6 family. Reversible inhibition of B(0)AT2 was confirmed by electrophysiology. A series of loratadine analogues were synthesized to gain insight into the structure-activity relationships. Our studies provide the first chemical tool for B(0)AT2.

  13. Allied Health Chemistry Laboratory: Amino Acids, Insulin, Proteins, and Skin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, David F.

    1975-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment specifically designed for allied health students. The students construct molecular models of amino acids, extract amino acids from their skin with hot water, and chromatographically analyze the skin extract and hydrolyzed insulin. (MLH)

  14. Amino acid sequence of mouse submaxillary gland renin.

    PubMed Central

    Misono, K S; Chang, J J; Inagami, T

    1982-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequences of the heavy chain and light chain of mouse submaxillary gland renin have been determined. The heavy chain consists of 288 amino acid residues having a Mr of 31,036 calculated from the sequence. The light chain contains 48 amino acid residues with a Mr of 5,458. The sequence of the heavy chain was determined by automated Edman degradations of the cyanogen bromide peptides and tryptic peptides generated after citraconylation, as well as other peptides generated therefrom. The sequence of the light chain was derived from sequence analyses of the peptides generated by cyanogen bromide cleavage or by digestion with Staphylococcus aureus protease. The sequences in the active site regions in renin containing two catalytically essential aspartyl residues 32 and 215 were found identical with those in pepsin, chymosin, and penicillopepsin. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of renin with that of porcine pepsin indicated a 42% sequence identity of the heavy chain with the amino-terminal and middle regions and a 46% identity of the light chain with the carboxyl-terminal region of the porcine pepsin sequence. Residues identical in renin and pepsin are distributed throughout the length of the molecules, suggesting a similarity in their overall structures. PMID:6812055

  15. LRRC8A protein is indispensable for swelling-activated and ATP-induced release of excitatory amino acids in rat astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hyzinski-García, María C; Rudkouskaya, Alena; Mongin, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, cellular swelling activates release of small organic osmolytes, including the excitatory amino acids (EAA) glutamate and aspartate, via a ubiquitously expressed volume-regulated chloride/anion channel (VRAC). Pharmacological evidence suggests that VRAC plays plural physiological and pathological roles, including excitotoxic release of glutamate in stroke. However, the molecular identity of this pathway was unknown. Two recent studies discovered that LRRC8 gene family members encode heteromeric VRAC composed of LRRC8A plus LRRC8B-E, which mediate swelling-activated Cl− currents and taurine release in human non-neural cells (Z. Qiu et al. Cell 157: 447, 2014; F.K. Voss et al. Science 344: 634, 2014). Here, we tested the contribution of LRRC8A to the EAA release in brain glia. We detected and quantified expression levels of LRRC8A-E in primary rat astrocytes with quantitative RT-PCR and then downregulated LRRC8A with gene-specific siRNAs. In astrocytes exposed to hypo-osmotic media, LRRC8A knockdown dramatically reduced swelling-activated release of the EAA tracer d-[3H]aspartate. In parallel HPLC assays, LRRC8A siRNA prevented hypo-osmotic media-induced loss of the endogenous intracellular l-glutamate and taurine. Furthermore, downregulation of LRRC8A completely ablated the ATP-stimulated release of d-[3H]aspartate and [14C]taurine from non-swollen astrocytes. Overall, these data indicate that LRRC8A is an indispensable component of a permeability pathway that mediates both swelling-activated and agonist-induced amino acid release in brain glial cells. PMID:25172945

  16. The Synthesis and Evaluation of Arctigenin Amino Acid Ester Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Cai, En-Bo; Yang, Li-Min; Jia, Cai-Xia; Zhang, Wei-Yuan; Zhao, Yan; Li, Wei; Song, Xing-Zhuo; Zheng, Man-Ling

    2016-10-01

    The use of arctigenin (ARG), a traditional medicine with many pharmacological activities, has been restricted due to its poor solubility in water. Five amino acid derivatives of ARG have been synthesized using glycine, o-alanine, valine, leucine, and isoleucine, which have t-butyloxy carbonyl (BOC) as a protective group. In this study, we examined the effects of removing these protective groups. The results showed that the amino acid derivatives have better solubility and nitrite-clearing ability than ARG. Among the compounds tested, the amino acid derivatives without protective group were the best. Based on these results, ARG and its two amino acid derivatives without protective group (ARG8, ARG10) were selected to evaluate their anti-tumor activity in vivo at a dosage of 40 mg/kg. The results indicated that ARG8 and ARG10 both exhibit more anti-tumor activity than ARG in H22 tumor-bearing mice. The tumor inhibition rates of ARG8 and ARG10 were 69.27 and 43.58%, which was much higher than ARG. Furthermore, the mice treated with these compounds exhibited less damage to the liver, kidney and immune organs compared with the positive group. Furthermore, ARG8 and ARG10 improved the serum cytokine levels significantly compared to ARG. In brief, this study provides a method to improve the water solubility of drugs, and we also provide a reference basis for new drug development.

  17. Insights into the Activity and Substrate Binding of Xylella fastidiosa Polygalacturonase by Modification of a Unique QMK Amino Acid Motif Using Protein Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jeremy G.; Lincoln, James E.; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C.

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonases (EC 3.2.1.15) catalyze the random hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. Xylella fastidiosa possesses a single polygalacturonase gene, pglA (PD1485), and X. fastidiosa mutants deficient in the production of polygalacturonase are non-pathogenic and show a compromised ability to systemically infect grapevines. These results suggested that grapevines expressing sufficient amounts of an inhibitor of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase might be protected from disease. Previous work in our laboratory and others have tried without success to produce soluble active X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase for use in inhibition assays. In this study, we created two enzymatically active X. fastidiosa / A. vitis polygalacturonase chimeras, AX1A and AX2A to explore the functionality of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase in vitro. The AX1A chimera was constructed to specifically test if recombinant chimeric protein, produced in Escherichia coli, is soluble and if the X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase catalytic amino acids are able to hydrolyze polygalacturonic acid. The AX2A chimera was constructed to evaluate the ability of a unique QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase, most polygalacturonases have a R(I/L)K motif, to bind to and allow the hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid. Furthermore, the AX2A chimera was also used to explore what effect modification of the QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase to a conserved RIK motif has on enzymatic activity. These experiments showed that both the AX1A and AX2A polygalacturonase chimeras were soluble and able to hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid substrate. Additionally, the modification of the QMK motif to the conserved RIK motif eliminated hydrolytic activity, suggesting that the QMK motif is important for the activity of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase. This result suggests X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase may preferentially hydrolyze a different pectic substrate or

  18. Insights into the Activity and Substrate Binding of Xylella fastidiosa Polygalacturonase by Modification of a Unique QMK Amino Acid Motif Using Protein Chimeras.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jeremy G; Lincoln, James E; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonases (EC 3.2.1.15) catalyze the random hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. Xylella fastidiosa possesses a single polygalacturonase gene, pglA (PD1485), and X. fastidiosa mutants deficient in the production of polygalacturonase are non-pathogenic and show a compromised ability to systemically infect grapevines. These results suggested that grapevines expressing sufficient amounts of an inhibitor of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase might be protected from disease. Previous work in our laboratory and others have tried without success to produce soluble active X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase for use in inhibition assays. In this study, we created two enzymatically active X. fastidiosa / A. vitis polygalacturonase chimeras, AX1A and AX2A to explore the functionality of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase in vitro. The AX1A chimera was constructed to specifically test if recombinant chimeric protein, produced in Escherichia coli, is soluble and if the X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase catalytic amino acids are able to hydrolyze polygalacturonic acid. The AX2A chimera was constructed to evaluate the ability of a unique QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase, most polygalacturonases have a R(I/L)K motif, to bind to and allow the hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid. Furthermore, the AX2A chimera was also used to explore what effect modification of the QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase to a conserved RIK motif has on enzymatic activity. These experiments showed that both the AX1A and AX2A polygalacturonase chimeras were soluble and able to hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid substrate. Additionally, the modification of the QMK motif to the conserved RIK motif eliminated hydrolytic activity, suggesting that the QMK motif is important for the activity of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase. This result suggests X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase may preferentially hydrolyze a different pectic substrate or

  19. Biosynthesis, glycosylation, and partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of the T-cell-activating protein TAP.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, H; Coligan, J; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1987-01-01

    We have characterized the TAP molecule, an Ly-6 linked T-cell-activating glycoprotein. The three TAP bands that are precipitated from metabolically labeled cells display a common migration pattern in isoelectric focusing/NaDodSO4/PAGE gels and have common N-terminal sequences. This sequence is rich in cysteine and is homologous to that previously reported for the Ly-6.1E antigen. We, therefore, compared TAP and Ly-6.1E biochemically and found them to be structurally distinct. Given the role of TAP in T-cell activation, we further studied whether the molecule was phosphorylated. We have not found evidence for phosphorylation of the TAP protein. The carbohydrates present on the TAP molecule are resistant to peptide N-glycosidase F in vitro and tunicamycin in vivo. The upper band of the TAP triplet is susceptible to treatment with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid and thus seems to be of the O-linked rather than of the N-linked variety. The biosynthetic processing of TAP was studied in pulse-chase experiments. The middle band of the TAP triplet appears to be the earliest detectable species. Its conversion to the O-linked high molecular weight species can be blocked by monensin. Images PMID:3033645

  20. Biosynthesis, glycosylation, and partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of the T-cell-activating protein TAP

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, H.; Coligan, J.; Benacerraf, B.; Rock, K.L.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have characterized the TAP molecule, an Ly-6 linked T-cell-activating glycoprotein. The three TAP bands that are precipitated from metabolically labeled cells display a common migration pattern in isoelectric focusing/NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE gels and have common N-terminal sequences. This sequence is rich in cysteine and is homologous to that previously reported for the Ly-6.1E antigen. They therefore, compared TAP and Ly-6.1E biochemically and found them to be structurally distinct. Given the role of TAP in T-cell activation, they further studied whether the molecule was phosphorylated. We have not found evidence for phosphorylation of the TAP protein. The carbohydrates present on the TAP molecule are resistant to peptide N-glycosidase F in vitro and tunicamycin in vivo. The upper band of the TAP triplet is susceptible to treatment with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid and thus seems to be of the O-linked rather than of the N-linked variety. The biosynthetic processing of TAP was studied in pulse-chase experiments. The middle band of the TAP triplet appears to be the earliest detectable species. Its conversion to the O-linked high molecular weight species can be blocked by monensin.

  1. Activation of the erythropoietin receptor by the gp55-P viral envelope protein is determined by a single amino acid in its transmembrane domain.

    PubMed Central

    Constantinescu, S N; Liu, X; Beyer, W; Fallon, A; Shekar, S; Henis, Y I; Smith, S O; Lodish, H F

    1999-01-01

    The spleen focus forming virus (SFFV) gp55-P envelope glycoprotein specifically binds to and activates murine erythropoietin receptors (EpoRs) coexpressed in the same cell, triggering proliferation of erythroid progenitors and inducing erythroleukemia. Here we demonstrate specific interactions between the single transmembrane domains of the two proteins that are essential for receptor activation. The human EpoR is not activated by gp55-P but by mutation of a single amino acid, L238, in its transmembrane sequence to its murine counterpart serine, resulting in its ability to be activated. The converse mutation in the murine EpoR (S238L) abolishes activation by gp55-P. Computational searches of interactions between the membrane-spanning segments of murine EpoR and gp55-P provide a possible explanation: the face of the EpoR transmembrane domain containing S238 is predicted to interact specifically with gp55-P but not gp55-A, a variant which is much less effective in activating the murine EpoR. Mutational studies on gp55-P M390, which is predicted to interact with S238, provide additional support for this model. Mutation of M390 to isoleucine, the corresponding residue in gp55-A, abolishes activation, but the gp55-P M390L mutation is fully functional. gp55-P is thought to activate signaling by the EpoR by inducing receptor oligomerization through interactions involving specific transmembrane residues. PMID:10369674

  2. Nutritional and medicinal aspects of D-amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes a method for determining the nutritional value of D-amino acids, D-peptides, and amino acid derivatives using a growth assay in mice fed a synthetic all-amino acid diet. A large number of experiments were carried out in which a molar equivalent of the test compound replaced a nu...

  3. Origin, Microbiology, Nutrition, and Pharmacology of D-Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure of food proteins to certain processing conditions induces two major chemical changes: racemization of all L-amino acids (LAA) to D-amino acids (DAA) and concurrent formation of crosslinked amino acids such as lysinoalanine (LAL). The diet contains both processing-induced and naturally-form...

  4. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584... Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823; CAS No....

  5. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. (a) Chemical... as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo- (PMN P-95-86) is subject to reporting...

  6. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584... Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823; CAS No....

  7. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. (a) Chemical... as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo- (PMN P-95-86) is subject to reporting...

  8. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. (a) Chemical... as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo- (PMN P-95-86) is subject to reporting...

  9. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. (a) Chemical... as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo- (PMN P-95-86) is subject to reporting...

  10. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. (a) Chemical... as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo- (PMN P-95-86) is subject to reporting...

  11. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584... Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823; CAS No....

  12. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584... Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823; CAS No....

  13. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584... Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823; CAS No....

  14. Leads for development of new naphthalenesulfonate derivatives with enhanced antiangiogenic activity: crystal structure of acidic fibroblast growth factor in complex with 5-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; Lozano, Rosa M; Redondo-Horcajo, Mariano; Gómez, Ana M; López, José C; Quesada, Ernesto; Uriel, Clara; Valverde, Serafín; Cuevas, Pedro; Romero, Antonio; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2003-06-13

    Inhibition of angiogenesis-promoting factors such as fibroblast growth factors is considered to be a potential procedure for inhibiting solid tumor growth. Although several peptide-based inhibitors are currently under study, the development of antiangiogenic compounds of small molecular size is a pharmacological goal of considerable interest. We have already shown that certain naphthalene sulfonates constitute minimal functional substitutes of the antiangiogenic compounds of the suramin and suradista family. Using those data as a lead, we have carried out a rational search for new angiogenesis inhibitors that could provide new pharmacological insights for the development of antiangiogenic treatments. The results of the study strongly underline the relevance of the stereochemistry for an efficient inhibition of acidic fibroblast growth factor mitogenic activity by the naphthalene sulfonate family and allow us to formulate rules to aid in searching for new inhibitors and pharmaceutical developments. To provide further leads for such developments and acquire a detailed insight into the basis of the inhibitory activity of the naphthalene sulfonate derivatives, we solved the three-dimensional structure of acidic fibroblast growth factor complexed to 5-amino-2-naphthalenesulfonate, the most pharmacologically promising of the identified inhibitors. The structure shows that binding of this compound would hamper the interaction of acidic fibroblast growth factor with the different components of the cell membrane mitogenesis-triggering complex.

  15. Computational model of abiogenic amino acid condensation to obtain a polar amino acid profile.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Buhse, Thomas; Samaniego, José Lino; Castañón González, Jorge Alberto; Arias Estrada, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    In accordance with the second law of thermodynamics, the Universe as a whole tends to higher entropy. However, the sequence of far-from-equilibrium events that led to the emergence of life on Earth could have imposed order and complexity during the course of chemical reactions in the so-called primordial soup of life. Hence, we may expect to find characteristic profiles or biases in the prebiotic product mixtures, as for instance among the first amino acids. Seeking to shed light on this hypothesis, we have designed a high performance computer program that simulates the spontaneous formation of the amino acid monomers in closed environments. The program was designed in reference to a prebiotic scenario proposed by Sydney W. Fox. The amino acid abundances and their polarities as the two principal biases were also taken into consideration. We regarded the computational model as exhaustive since 200,000 amino acid dimers were formed by simulation, subsequently expressed in a vector and compared with the corresponding amino acid dimers that were experimentally obtained by Fox. We found a very high similarity between the experimental results and our simulations.

  16. Effect of amino acid intake on brush-border membrane uptake of sulfur amino acids.

    PubMed

    Chesney, R W; Gusowski, N; Padilla, M; Lippincott, S

    1986-07-01

    Alterations in the intake of sulfur amino acids (SAA) changes the rat renal brush-border membrane uptake of the beta-amino acid, taurine. A low-SAA diet enhances and a high-taurine diet reduces uptake (Chesney et al., Kidney Int. 24: 588-594, 1983). Neither the low-SAA diet nor the high-taurine diet alters the time course or concentration-dependent accumulation of the sulfur amino acids methionine and cystine or of inorganic sulfate. By contrast the uptake of beta-alanine, another beta-amino acid that competes with taurine, is greater in animals on the low-SAA diet. The high-taurine diet does not change beta-alanine uptake. The plasma levels of taurine are altered by dietary change, but not the values for methionine and cystine. This study indicates that renal adaptation is expressed for beta-alanine, a nonsulfur-containing beta-amino acid. By contrast, methionine, cystine, and sulfate, which participate in a variety of synthetic and conjugative processes, are not conserved by the renal brush-border surface following ingestion of either a low-methionine and -cystine diet or high-taurine diet.

  17. Identify the key amino acid of BAFF binding with TACI.

    PubMed

    Wang, Renxi; Wang, Ru; Ma, Ning; Guo, Yueling; Xiao, He; Chen, Guojiang; Han, Gencheng; Hou, Chunmei; Shen, Beifen; Feng, Jiannan; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) has been used as a therapeutic target. To develop BAFF-specific small molecular inhibitors, it is necessary to know the key amino acid in the BAFF binding with its receptor. The key binding amino acid of BAFF interacting with its receptor TACI (trans-membrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor) was analyzed based on the computer-guided molecular modeling method. According to theoretical prediction, a series of key amino acid mutants of BAFF, including M204 (Lys(204) to Ala), M208 (Met(208) to Ala), M209 (Gly(209) to Ala), M210 (His(210) to Ala), M234 (Gln(234) to Ala), M236 (Met(236) to Ala), and M237 (Pro(237) to Ala) were designed and evaluated with biological experiments. The results show that M208, M209, M236, and M237 of BAFF were the key amino acids and in accord with the theoretical results. The results highlight clues for the further development of BAFF-specific small molecular inhibitors.

  18. Amino acid determinants conferring stable sialidase activity at low pH for H5N1 influenza A virus neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Nidom, Chairul A; Quynh Le, Mai Thi; Suzuki, Takashi; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Avian influenza A viruses (IAVs) and human 1918, 1957, and 1968 pandemic IAVs all have neuraminidases (NAs) that are stable at low pH sialidase activity, yet most human epidemic IAVs do not. We examined the pH stability of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian IAV (HPAI) NAs and identified amino acids responsible for conferring stability at low pH. We found that, unlike other avian viruses, most H5N1 IAVs isolated since 2003 had NAs that were unstable at low pH, similar to human epidemic IAVs. These H5N1 viruses are thus already human virus-like and, therefore, have the frequent infections of humans.

  19. Extracellular acidic sulfur-containing amino acids and gamma-glutamyl peptides in global ischemia: postischemic recovery of neuronal activity is paralleled by a tetrodotoxin-sensitive increase in cysteine sulfinate in the CA1 of the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Andiné, P; Orwar, O; Jacobson, I; Sandberg, M; Hagberg, H

    1991-07-01

    An excessive activation of the excitatory amino acid system has been proposed as one possible mediator of the ischemia-induced delayed death of CA1 pyramidal cells in the hippocampus. Using dialytrodes in the CA1 of the rat, we have investigated multiple-unit activity and extracellular changes in acidic sulfur-containing amino acids and gamma-glutamyl peptides during ischemia (20-min, four-vessel occlusion) and during 8 h of reflow. Multiple-unit activity was abolished during ischemia and for the following 1 h, but then recovered, gradually reaching preischemic levels after 8 h of reflow. Extracellular cysteate, cysteine sulfinate, and gamma-glutamyltaurine increased (1.5- to threefold) during ischemia, and extracellular glutathione and gamma-glutamylaspartate plus gamma-glutamylglutamine increased during early reflow (two- to threefold). The recovery of neuronal activity at 4-8 h was paralleled by an increase in extracellular cysteine sulfinate (2.5-fold at 8 h of reflow). Perfusion with 10 microM tetrodotoxin at 8 h of reflow abolished the multiple-unit activity and reduced extracellular cysteine sulfinate. Considering the glutamate-like properties of cysteine sulfinate, the observed postischemic increase may be involved in the development of the delayed neuronal death.

  20. The CP2 domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase is crucial for amino acid activation and post-transfer editing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Long; Zhu, Bin; Wang, En-Duo

    2008-12-26

    Leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) has an insertion domain, called connective peptide 2 (CP2), either directly preceding or following the editing domain (CP1 domain), depending on the species. The global structures of the CP2 domains from all LeuRSs are similar. Although the CP1 domain has been extensively explored to be responsible for hydrolysis of mischarged tRNALeu, the role of the CP2 domain remains undefined. In the present work, deletion of the CP2 domain of Giardia lamblia LeuRS (GlLeuRS) showed that the CP2 domain is indispensable for amino acid activation and post-transfer editing and that it contributes to LeuRS-tRNALeu binding affinity. In addition, its functions are conserved in both eukaryotic/archaeal and prokaryotic LeuRSs from G. lamblia, Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhLeuRS), and Escherichia coli (EcLeuRS). Alanine scanning and site-directed mutagenesis assays of the CP2 domain identified several residues that are crucial for its various functions. Data from the chimeric mutants, which replaced the CP2 domain of GlLeuRS with either PhLeuRS or EcLeuRS, showed that the CP2 domain of PhLeuRS but not that of EcLeuRS can partially restore amino acid activation and post-transfer editing functions, suggesting that the functions of the CP2 domain are dependent on its location in the primary sequence of LeuRS.

  1. Dependence of intestinal amino acid uptake on dietary protein or amino acid levels

    SciTech Connect

    Karasov, W.H.; Solberg, D.H.; Diamond, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    To understand how intestinal amino acid (AA) transport is regulated by dietary substrate levels, the authors measured uptake of seven radioactively-labelled AAs and glucose across the jejunal brush-border membrane of mice kept on one of three isocaloric rations differing in nitrogen content. In the high-protein ration, uptake increased by 77-81% for the nonessential, less toxic AAs, proline, and aspartate but only by 32-61% for the more toxic essential AAs tested. In the nitrogen-deficient ration, uptake decreased for the nonessential aspartate and proline but stayed constant or increased for essential AAs and for the nonessential alanine. These patterns imply independent regulation of the intestine's various AA transporters. With decreasing dietary AA (or protein), the imino acid and acidic AA private transporters are repressed, while activities of the basic AA transporter and the neutral AA public transporter decrease to an asymptote or else go through a minimum. These regulatory patterns can be understood as a compromise among conflicting constraints imposed by protein's multiple roles as a source of calories, nitrogen, and essential AAs and by the toxicity of essential AAs at high concentrations.

  2. Synthesis of new kojic acid based unnatural α-amino acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Balakrishna, C; Payili, Nagaraju; Yennam, Satyanarayana; Devi, P Uma; Behera, Manoranjan

    2015-11-01

    An efficient method for the preparation of kojic acid based α-amino acid derivatives by alkylation of glycinate schiff base with bromokojic acids have been described. Using this method, mono as well as di alkylated kojic acid-amino acid conjugates have been prepared. This is the first synthesis of C-linked kojic acid-amino acid conjugate where kojic acid is directly linked to amino acid through a C-C bond.

  3. [Bound amino acids in local strains of Trichomonas vaginalis].

    PubMed

    Tsvetkova, A; Osinovski, E; Vasilevska, M

    1990-01-01

    Amino acid composition of water-soluble and water-insoluble proteins of 8 strains of Tr. vaginalis is studied. 17 amino acids are found in both protein hydrolyzates. Despite the complete coincidence of their qualitative compositions there are reliable differences in the quantitative contents of some amino acids. Differences in the contents of main amino acids of water-soluble proteins of different strains reflect the belonging of the latter to different sero-groups. No reliable differences in the quantitative contents of amino acids of both water-soluble and water-insoluble proteins in strains belonging to one sero-group are recognised.

  4. Free Amino-acid Concentrations in Fetal Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, F.; Robins, S. P.; Forfar, J. O.

    1970-01-01

    The pattern of free amino-acid concentrations in maternal venous plasma, fetal umbilical arterial plasma, fetal urine, and amniotic fluid at 15 to 20 weeks' gestation has been determined. Free amino-acid concentrations were greater in fetal plasma than in maternal plasma, amniotic fluid, or fetal urine. The ratios of amino-acid concentrations in fetal umbilical arterial plasma and urine indicate that the fetal kidney can effectively conserve amino-acids, possibly reaching an adult level of competence in this respect. There was little correlation between amino-acid concentrations in the fluids analysed with the exception of that between amniotic fluid and fetal urine. PMID:5472758

  5. Amino acids from the late Precambrian Thule group, Greenland.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, M; Shimoyama, A; Ponnamperuma, C

    1982-06-01

    Amino acids were recovered at concentration level of 10-9 M/g from the interior of chert and dolomite of the Late Precambrian Thule Group. Examination of the stability of amino acids in chert under dry-heating conditions suggests that these amino acids have been preserved with a predominance of L-enantiomers in the precambrian chert. Enantiomer analysis of amino acids in dolomite showed a thermal effect resulting from a late precambrian igneous intrusion. This evidence indicates that the amino acids isolated from the Thule samples were chemical fossils and not recent contaminants.

  6. Computational Modeling of the Optical Rotation of Amino Acids: An "in Silico" Experiment for Physical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Scott; Autschbach, Jochen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates the optical activity of the amino acid valine has been developed for an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Hybrid density functional theory calculations were carried out for valine to confirm the rule that adding a strong acid to a solution of an amino acid in the l…

  7. Synthesis and comparative anti-phlogistic potency of new proteinogenic amino acid conjugates of 2-[2,6-dichlorophenyl-1-amino]phenyl acetic acid "diclofenac".

    PubMed

    Shalaby, A M; Abo-Ghalia, A M; el-Araky, W I; Awad, H M

    1998-01-01

    New proteinogenic amino acids conjugates of 2-[2,6-dichlorophenyl-1-amino]phenyl acetic acid "Diclofenac", [I] were synthesized. Glycine methyl ester and L-methionine ethyl ester were coupled with [I] via the active ester method to give the corresponding 2-[2,6-dichlorophenyl-1-amino]benzyl carboxy N-amino acid ester of the type [IIa, b], respectively, which were hydrolyzed in alkaline medium to yield the free amino acids [IIIa, b]. Condensation of IIIa with glycine methyl ester using a modified classical carbodiimide (DCCI) method gave the corresponding, "Diclofenac" glycylglycine methyl ester [IVa]. Hydrolysis of compounds IVa gives the corresponding acid Va. Thionation of compounds IIb and IVa by reaction with Lewesson's Reagent (LR), afforded the corresponding thio-analogues (VIa and IVb). Interestingly, while retaining considerable comparative anti-phlogistic activity (anti-inflammatory and analgesic), the synthesized candidates proved to be practically nonulcerogenic in rats.

  8. Theophylline-7-acetic acid derivatives with amino acids as anti-tuberculosis agents.

    PubMed

    Voynikov, Yulian; Valcheva, Violeta; Momekov, Georgi; Peikov, Plamen; Stavrakov, Georgi

    2014-07-15

    A series of amides were synthesized by condensation of theophylline-7-acetic acid and eight commercially available amino acid methyl ester hydrochlorides. Consecutive hydrolysis of six of the amido-esters resulted in the formation of corresponding amido-acids. The newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vitro activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. The activity varied depending on the amino acid fragments and in seven cases exerted excellent values with MICs 0.46-0.26 μM. Assessment of the cytotoxicity revealed that the compounds were not cytotoxic against the human embryonal kidney cell line HEK-293T. The theophylline-7-acetamides containing amino acid moieties appear to be promising lead compounds for the development of antimycobacterial agents.

  9. Amino Acids Regulate mTORC1 by an Obligate Two-step Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dyachok, Julia; Earnest, Svetlana; Iturraran, Erica N; Cobb, Melanie H; Ross, Elliott M

    2016-10-21

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) coordinates cell growth with its nutritional, hormonal, energy, and stress status. Amino acids are critical regulators of mTORC1 that permit other inputs to mTORC1 activity. However, the roles of individual amino acids and their interactions in mTORC1 activation are not well understood. Here we demonstrate that activation of mTORC1 by amino acids includes two discrete and separable steps: priming and activation. Sensitizing mTORC1 activation by priming amino acids is a prerequisite for subsequent stimulation of mTORC1 by activating amino acids. Priming is achieved by a group of amino acids that includes l-asparagine, l-glutamine, l-threonine, l-arginine, l-glycine, l-proline, l-serine, l-alanine, and l-glutamic acid. The group of activating amino acids is dominated by l-leucine but also includes l-methionine, l-isoleucine, and l-valine. l-Cysteine predominantly inhibits priming but not the activating step. Priming and activating steps differ in their requirements for amino acid concentration and duration of treatment. Priming and activating amino acids use mechanisms that are distinct both from each other and from growth factor signaling. Neither step requires intact tuberous sclerosis complex of proteins to activate mTORC1. Concerted action of priming and activating amino acids is required to localize mTORC1 to lysosomes and achieve its activation.

  10. Organic geochemistry of amino acids: Precambrian to recent

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, M.H.; Macko, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Since the discovery of amino acids in fossils (Abelson, 1954), considerable effort has been made to elucidate the origin and distribution of amino acids in geologic materials. Racemization and decomposition reactions of amino acids and peptides derived via the natural hydrolysis of protein constituents of organisms have been extensively studied. While the ubiquity of amino acids presents a challenge for discerning their indigeneity in geologic samples, careful analyses have resulted in successful applications of amino acid racemization and decomposition reactions for investigations of geochronologic, paleoclimatic, stratigraphic, diagenetic and chemotaxonomic problems for Quaternary age samples. An investigation of amino acids in sediments from Baffin Island fjords indicates that their distribution may also provide data with respect to the relative contributions of marine and terrigenous organic matter to recent sediments. While the absence of unstable amino acids and the presence of racemic amino acids in a sample may preclude very recent contamination, the possibility of retardation of amino acid racemization rates subsequent to geopolymer formation must also be considered. Studies of amino acids in Paleozoic, Mesozoic and early Cenozoic age samples are limited. Precambrian samples, however, have received much attention, given the potential (however slight) for isolating compounds representative of the earliest living systems. A future approach for elucidating the origin(s) of amino acids in ancient samples may be analyses of their individual stable isotopic compositions.

  11. Characterization of amino acids using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Amanda L.; Larsen, Richard A.; Williams, Timothy B.

    2005-05-01

    A key process in the development of new drugs is elucidation of the interaction between the drug molecule and the target protein. Such knowledge then makes it possible to make systematic structural modifications of the drug molecule to optimize the interaction. Many analytical techniques can be applied to proteins in solution such as circular dichroism, ultraviolet, and fluorescence spectroscopy but these all have limitations. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using relatively simple, visible light Raman spectroscopic methods to investigate amino acids and related biopolymers.

  12. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Jr., Jefferson W.

    1983-01-01

    A method for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(OSOCl)CN, R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(Cl)CN and [R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(CN)O].sub.2 SO wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 12 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art.

  13. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Jr., Jefferson W.

    1983-01-01

    A method for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(OSOCl)CN, R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(Cl)CN and [R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(CN)O].sub.2 SO wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 10 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the snythesis methods of the prior art.

  14. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Jr., Jefferson W.

    1983-01-01

    A method for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceeding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(OSOCl)CN, R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(Cl)CN and [R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(CN)O].sub.2 SO wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 12 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art.

  15. Food safety and amino acid balance in processed cassava "Cossettes".

    PubMed

    Diasolua Ngudi, Delphin; Kuo, Yu Haey; Lambein, Fernand

    2002-05-08

    Processed cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) roots provide more than 60% of the daily energy intake for the population of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Insufficiently processed cassava roots in a diet deficient in sulfur amino acid have been reported to cause the irreversible paralytic disease konzo, afflicting thousands of women and children in the remote rural areas of Bandundu Province. "Cossettes" (processed cassava roots) purchased in several markets of Kinshasa were analyzed for their content of cyanogens, free amino acids, and total protein amino acids. Residual cyanogen levels were below the safe limit recommended by the codex FAO/WHO for cassava flour (10 mg kg(-1)). The amino acid score was evaluated. Lysine and leucine were the limiting amino acids. Methionine content was very low and contributed about 13% of the total sulfur amino acids. Dietary requirements for sulfur amino acids need to be adjusted for the loss caused by cyanogen detoxification.

  16. Plasma amino acids changes in complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Guillermo M; Reichenberger, Erin; Peterlin, B Lee; Perreault, Marielle J; Grothusen, John R; Schwartzman, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a severe chronic pain condition that most often develops following trauma. Blood samples were collected from 220 individuals, 160 CRPS subjects, and 60 healthy pain-free controls. Plasma amino acid levels were compared and contrasted between groups. L-Aspartate, L-glutamate, and L-ornithine were significantly increased, whereas L-tryptophan and L-arginine were significantly decreased in CRPS subjects as compared to controls. In addition, the L-kynurenine to L-tryptophan ratio demonstrated a significant increase, whereas the global arginine bioavailability ratio (GABR) was significantly decreased in the CRPS subjects. The CRPS subjects demonstrated a significant correlation between overall pain and the plasma levels of L-glutamate and the L-kynurenine to L-tryptophan ratio. CRPS subjects also showed a correlation between the decrease in plasma L-tryptophan and disease duration. This study shows that CRPS subjects exhibit significant changes in plasma levels of amino acids involved in glutamate receptor activation and in amino acids associated with immune function as compared to healthy pain-free controls. A better understanding of the role plasma amino acids play in the pathophysiology of CRPS may lead to novel treatments for this crippling condition.

  17. A mutation in the COX5 gene of the yeast Scheffersomyces stipitis alters utilization of amino acids as carbon source, ethanol formation and activity of cyanide insensitive respiration.

    PubMed

    Freese, Stefan; Passoth, Volkmar; Klinner, Ulrich

    2011-04-01

    Scheffersomyces stipitis PJH was mutagenized by random integrative mutagenesis and the integrants were screened for lacking the ability to grow with glutamate as sole carbon source. One of the two isolated mutants was damaged in the COX5 gene, which encodes a subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase. BLAST searches in the genome of Sc. stipitis revealed that only one singular COX5 gene exists in Sc. stipitis, in contrast to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where two homologous genes are present. Mutant cells had lost the ability to grow with the amino acids glutamate, proline or aspartate and other non-fermentable carbon sources, such as acetic acid and ethanol, as sole carbon sources. Biomass formation of the mutant cells in medium containing glucose or xylose as carbon source was lower compared with the wild-type cells. However, yields and specific ethanol formation of the mutant were much higher, especially under conditions of higher aeration. The mutant cells lacked both cytochrome c oxidase activity and cyanide-sensitive respiration, whereas ADH and PDC activities were distinctly enhanced. SHAM-sensitive respiration was obviously essential for the fermentative metabolism, because SHAM completely abolished growth of the mutant cells with both glucose or xylose as carbon source.

  18. Extraterrestrial amino acids in the Almahata Sitta meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Jenniskens, Peter; Shaddad, Muawia H.

    2010-10-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC3 called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sample analysis consortium. LC-FD/ToF-MS analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to seven-carbon aliphatic amino acids and one- to three-carbon amines with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, β-amino-n-butyric acid, 2-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (norvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L ˜ 1), indicating that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not terrestrial contaminants. Several other nonprotein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including α-aminoisobutyric acid (α-AIB), 4-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid, 4-amino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. The total abundances of isovaline and α-AIB in Almahata Sitta are approximately 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous chondrite Murchison. The extremely low abundances and unusual distribution of five-carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to CI, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites may reflect extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent asteroid by partial melting during formation or subsequent impact shock heating. It is also possible that amino acids were synthesized by catalytic reactions on the parent body after asteroid 2008 TC3 cooled to lower temperatures, or introduced as a contaminant from unrelated meteorite clasts and chemically altered by α-decarboxylation.

  19. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC3 called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sample analysis consortium. LC-FD/ToF-MS analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to seven-carbon aliphatic amino acids and one- to three-carbon amines with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, R-amino-n-butyric acid (beta-ABA), 2-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (norvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L approximately 1), indicating that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not terrestrial contaminants. Several other non-protein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), 4-amino-2- methylbutanoic acid, 4-amino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. The total abundances of isovaline and alpha-AIB in Almahata Sitta are 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous chondrite Murchison. The extremely low abundances and unusual distribution of five carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites may reflect extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent asteroid by partial melting during formation or subsequent impact shock heating. It is also possible that amino acids were synthesized by catalytic reactions on the parent body after asteroid 2008 TC3 cooled to lower temperatures.

  20. Evolutionary systems biology of amino acid biosynthetic cost in yeast.

    PubMed

    Barton, Michael D; Delneri, Daniela; Oliver, Stephen G; Rattray, Magnus; Bergman, Casey M

    2010-08-17

    Every protein has a biosynthetic cost to the cell based on the synthesis of its constituent amino acids. In order to optimise growth and reproduction, natural selection is expected, where possible, to favour the use of proteins whose constituents are cheaper to produce, as reduced biosynthetic cost may confer a fitness advantage to the organism. Quantifying the cost of amino acid biosynthesis presents challenges, since energetic requirements may change across different cellular and environmental conditions. We developed a systems biology approach to estimate the cost of amino acid synthesis based on genome-scale metabolic models and investigated the effects of the cost of amino acid synthesis on Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression and protein evolution. First, we used our two new and six previously reported measures of amino acid cost in conjunction with codon usage bias, tRNA gene number and atomic composition to identify which of these factors best predict transcript and protein levels. Second, we compared amino acid cost with rates of amino acid substitution across four species in the genus Saccharomyces. Regardless of which cost measure is used, amino acid biosynthetic cost is weakly associated with transcript and protein levels. In contrast, we find that biosynthetic cost and amino acid substitution rates show a negative correlation, but for only a subset of cost measures. In the economy of the yeast cell, we find that the cost of amino acid synthesis plays a limited role in shaping transcript and protein expression levels compared to that of translational optimisation. Biosynthetic cost does, however, appear to affect rates of amino acid evolution in Saccharomyces, suggesting that expensive amino acids may only be used when they have specific structural or functional roles in protein sequences. However, as there appears to be no single currency to compute the cost of amino acid synthesis across all cellular and environmental conditions, we conclude that

  1. Formation of Amino Acid Thioesters for Prebiotic Peptide Synthesis: Catalysis By Amino Acid Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The origin of life can be described as a series of events in which a prebiotic chemical process came increasingly under the control of its catalytic products. In our search for this prebiotic process that yielded catalytic takeover products (such as polypeptides), we have been investigating a reaction system that generates peptide-forming amino acid thioesters from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia in the presence of thiols. As shown below, this model process begins by aldol condensation of formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde to give trioses and releases. These sugars then undergo beta-dehydration yielding their respective alpha-ketoaldehydes. Addition of ammonia to the alpha-ketoaldehydes yields imines which can either: (a) rearrange in the presence of thesis to give amino acid thioesters or (be react with another molecule of aldehyde to give imidazoles. This 'one-pot' reaction system operates under mild aqueous conditions, and like modem amino acid biosynthesis, uses sugar intermediates which are converted to products by energy-yielding redox reactions. Recently, we discovered that amino acids, such as the alanine reaction product, catalyze the first and second steps of the process. In the presence of ammonia the process also generates other synthetically useful products, like the important biochemical -- pyruvic acid.

  2. Α-amino-β-fluorocyclopropanecarboxylic acids as a new tool for drug development: synthesis of glutamic acid analogs and agonist activity towards metabotropic glutamate receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Lemonnier, Gérald; Lion, Cédric; Quirion, Jean-Charles; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Goudet, Cyril; Jubault, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    Herein we describe the diastereoselective synthesis of glutamic acid analogs and the evaluation of their agonist activity towards metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 (mGluR4). These analogs are based on a monofluorinated cyclopropane core substituted with an α-aminoacid function. The potential of this new building block as a tool for the development of a novel class of drugs is demonstrated with racemic analog 11a that displayed the best agonist activity with an EC50 of 340 nM.

  3. Probing the Specificity Determinants of Amino Acid Recognition by Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Shishova, E.; Di Costanzo, L; Emig, F; Ash, D; Christianson, D

    2009-01-01

    Arginase is a binuclear manganese metalloenzyme that serves as a therapeutic target for the treatment of asthma, erectile dysfunction, and atherosclerosis. In order to better understand the molecular basis of inhibitor affinity, we have employed site-directed mutagenesis, enzyme kinetics, and X-ray crystallography to probe the molecular recognition of the amino acid moiety (i.e., the ?-amino and ?-carboxylate groups) of substrate l-arginine and inhibitors in the active site of arginase I. Specifically, we focus on (1) a water-mediated hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and T135, (2) a direct hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and N130, and (3) a direct charged hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-amino group and D183. Amino acid substitutions for T135, N130, and D183 generally compromise substrate affinity as reflected by increased KM values but have less pronounced effects on catalytic function as reflected by minimal variations of kcat. As with substrate KM values, inhibitor Kd values increase for binding to enzyme mutants and suggest that the relative contribution of intermolecular interactions to amino acid affinity in the arginase active site is water-mediated hydrogen bond < direct hydrogen bond < direct charged hydrogen bond. Structural comparisons of arginase with the related binuclear manganese metalloenzymes agmatinase and proclavaminic acid amidinohydrolase suggest that the evolution of substrate recognition in the arginase fold occurs by mutation of residues contained in specificity loops flanking the mouth of the active site (especially loops 4 and 5), thereby allowing diverse guanidinium substrates to be accommodated for catalysis.

  4. Effects of alkali or acid treatment on the isomerization of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ohmori, Taketo; Mutaguchi, Yuta; Doi, Katsumi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2012-10-01

    The effect of alkali treatment on the isomerization of amino acids was investigated. The 100×D/(D+L) values of amino acids from peptide increased with increase in the number of constituent amino acid residues. Furthermore, the N-terminal amino acid of a dipeptide was isomerized to a greater extent than the C-terminal residue.

  5. Accumulated analyses of amino acid precursors in returned lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    Six amino acids (glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine) obtained by hydrolysis of extracts have been quantitatively determined in ten collections of fines from five Apollo missions. Although the amounts found, 7-45 ng/g, are small, the lunar amino acid/carbon ratios are comparable to those of the carbonaceous chondrites, Murchison and Murray, as analyzed by the same procedures. Since both the ratios of amino acid to carbon, and the four or five most common types of proteinous amino acid found, are comparable for the two extraterrestrial sources despite different cosmophysical histories of the moon and meteorites, common cosmochemical processes are suggested.

  6. Identification of Amino Acid Residues Critical for the Anti-Interferon Activity of the Nucleoprotein of the Prototypic Arenavirus Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Emonet, Sébastien; Giannakas, Panagiotis; Cubitt, Beatrice; García-Sastre, Adolfo; de la Torre, Juan C.

    2009-01-01

    Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCVM) nucleoprotein (NP) counteracts the host type I interferon (IFN) response by inhibiting activation of the IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). In this study, we have mapped the regions and specific amino acid residues within NP involved in its anti-IFN activity. We identified a region spanning residues 382 to 386 as playing a critical role in the IFN-counteracting activity of NP. Alanine substitutions at several positions within this region resulted in NP mutants that lacked the IFN-counteracting activity but retained their functions in virus RNA synthesis and assembly of infectious particles. We used reverse genetics to rescue a recombinant LCMV strain carrying mutation D382A in its NP [rLCMV/NP*(D382A)]. Compared to wild-type (WT) LCMV, rLCMV/NP*(D382A) exhibited a higher level of attenuation in IFN-competent than IFN-deficient cells. In addition, A549 cells infected with rLCMV/NP*(D382A), but not with WT LCMV, produced IFN and failed to rescue replication of the IFN-sensitive Newcastle disease virus. PMID:19710144

  7. Beneficial Effects of the Amino Acid Glycine.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Torres, Israel; Zuniga-Munoz, Alejandra María; Guarner-Lans, Veronica

    2017-01-01

    Glycine is the smallest non-essential, neutral and metabolically inert amino acid, with a carbon atom bound to two hydrogen atoms, and to an amino and a carboxyl group. This amino acid is an essential substrate for the synthesis of several biologically important biomolecules and compounds. It participates in the synthesis of proteins, of the tripeptide glutathione and in detoxification reactions. It has a broad spectrum of anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective and immunomodulatory properties. To exert its actions, glycine binds to different receptors. The GlyR anion channel is the most studied receptor for glycine. However, there are GlyR-independent mechanisms for glycine cytoprotection and other possible binding molecules of glycine are the NMDA receptor and receptors GlyT1 and GlyT2. Although, in humans, the normal serum level of glycine is approximately 300 μM, increasing glycine intake can lead to blood levels of more than 900 μM that increase its benefic actions without having harmful side effects. The herbal pesticide glyphosate might disrupt glycine homeostasis. Many in vitro studies involving different cell types have demonstrated beneficial effects of the addition of glycine. Glycine also improved conditions of isolated perfused or stored organs. In vivo studies in experimental animals have also tested glycine as a protector molecule and some studies on the beneficial effects of glycine after its clinical application have been done. Although at high-doses, glycine may cause toxic effects, further studies are needed to investigate the safe range of usage of this aminoacid and to test the diverse routes of administration.

  8. Amino acids in healthy aging skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Emily S; Stipanuk, Martha H; Thalacker-Mercer, Anna E

    2016-01-01

    Life expectancy in the U.S. and globally continues to increase. Despite increased life expectancy quality of life is not enhanced, and older adults often experience chronic age-related disease and functional disability, including frailty. Additionally, changes in body composition such as the involuntary loss of skeletal muscle mass (i.e. sarcopenia) and subsequent increases in adipose tissue can augment disease and disability in this population. Furthermore, increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant concentrations may also lead to metabolic dysfunction in older adults. Specific amino acids, including leucine, cysteine and its derivative taurine, and arginine can play various roles in healthy aging, especially in regards to skeletal muscle health. Leucine and arginine play important roles in muscle protein synthesis and cell growth while cysteine and arginine play important roles in quenching oxidative stress. Evidence suggests that supplemental doses of each of these amino acids may improve the aging phenotype. However, additional research is required to establish the doses required to achieve positive outcomes in humans.

  9. Conformational properties of oxazoline-amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staś, Monika; Broda, Małgorzata A.; Siodłak, Dawid

    2016-04-01

    Oxazoline-amino acids (Xaa-Ozn) occur in natural peptides of potentially important bioactivity. The conformations of the model compounds: Ac-(S)-Ala-Ozn(4R-Me), Ac-(S)-Ala-Ozn(4S-Me), and (gauche+, gauche-, anti) Ac-(S)-Val-Ozn(4R-Me) were studied at meta-hybrid M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) method including solvent effect. Boc-L-Ala-L-Ozn-4-COOMe and Boc-L-Val-L-Ozn-4-COOMe were synthesized and studied by FT-IR and NMR-NOE methods. The conformations in crystal state were gathered from the Cambridge Structural Data Base. The main conformational feature of the oxazoline amino acids is the conformation β2 (ϕ,ψ ∼ -161°, -6°), which predominates in weakly polar environment and still is accessible in polar surrounding. The changes of the conformational preferences towards the conformations αR (ϕ,ψ ∼ -70°, -15°) and then β (ϕ,ψ ∼ -57°, -155°) are observed with increase of the environment polarity.

  10. Amino acid export in plants: a missing link in nitrogen cycling.

    PubMed

    Okumoto, Sakiko; Pilot, Guillaume

    2011-05-01

    The export of nutrients from source organs to parts of the body where they are required (e.g. sink organs) is a fundamental biological process. Export of amino acids, one of the most abundant nitrogen species in plant long-distance transport tissues (i.e. xylem and phloem), is an essential process for the proper distribution of nitrogen in the plant. Physiological studies have detected the presence of multiple amino acid export systems in plant cell membranes. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the molecular identity of amino acid exporters, partially due to the technical difficulties hampering the identification of exporter proteins. In this short review, we will summarize our current knowledge about amino acid export systems in plants. Several studies have described plant amino acid transporters capable of bi-directional, facilitative transport, reminiscent of activities identified by earlier physiological studies. Moreover, recent expansion in the number of available amino acid transporter sequences have revealed evolutionary relationships between amino acid exporters from other organisms with a number of uncharacterized plant proteins, some of which might also function as amino acid exporters. In addition, genes that may regulate export of amino acids have been discovered. Studies of these putative transporter and regulator proteins may help in understanding the elusive molecular mechanisms of amino acid export in plants.

  11. Formation and transformation of amino acids and amino acid precursors by high-velocity impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, T.; Kobayashi, K.; Yamori, A.

    A wide variety of organic compounds have been found in extraterrestrial bodies such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites. It is plausible that these extraterrestrial bodies carried organic compounds such as amino acids or their precursors to the early Earth. It is claimed, however, that these extraterrestrial organics were destroyed during impacts to the Earth. We therefore examined possible transformation of amino acids and their precursors during high-velocity impacts by using a rail gun "HYPAC" in ISAS. Starting materials used in the impact experiments were (i) aqueous solution of glycine (10 mM or 1.0 M), and (ii) a mixture of ammonia, methanol and water. The target materials were sealed in stainless steel capsules, and shocked by impact with a polycarbonate projectile accelerated with "HYPAC" to the velocities of 2.5 - 7.0 km/s. A part of the products was acid-hydrolyzed. Both hydrolyzed an unhydrolyzed products were analyzed by mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis and chromatography. When an aqueous solution containing ammonia, methanol and water was shocked by impact at the velocity of 6.4 km/s, a number of amino acids (e.g., serine and glycine) were detected after hydrolysis. The present results suggest that amino acid precursors could be formed during cometary impacts. When glycine solution was used as a starting material, about 40 % of glycine was recovered even after 6 km/s impact. Methylamine and ammonia, which are known as pyrolytic products of glycine, were detected, besides them, diketopiperazine and an unidentified product whose molecular weight was 134, were detected, while no glycine peptides were identified in them. It was shown that the impact processes resulted in the formation of amino acid condensates. Thermal stability of glycine precursor is comparable with glycine. The present results suggest that organic material could survive and/or formed during an impact process. Most of organic

  12. Pharmacology of the inhibitory glycine receptor: agonist and antagonist actions of amino acids and piperidine carboxylic acid compounds.

    PubMed

    Schmieden, V; Betz, H

    1995-11-01

    To define structure-activity relations for ligands binding to the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR), the agonistic and antagonistic properties of alpha- and beta-amino acids were analyzed at the recombinant human alpha 1 GlyR expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The agonistic activity of alpha-amino acids exhibited a marked stereoselectivity and was highly susceptible to substitutions at the C alpha-atom. In contrast, alpha-amino acid antagonism was not enantiomer dependent and was influenced little by C alpha-atom substitutions. The beta-amino acids taurine, beta-aminobutyric acid (beta-ABA), and beta-aminoisobutyric acid (beta-AIBA) are partial agonists at the GlyR. Low concentrations of these compounds competitively inhibited glycine responses, whereas higher concentrations elicited a significant membrane current. Nipecotic acid, which contains a trans-beta-amino acid configuration, behaved as purely competitive GlyR antagonist. Our data are consistent with the existence of a common binding site for all amino acid agonists and antagonists, at which the functional consequences of binding depend on the particular conformation a given ligand adopts within the binding pocket. In the case of beta-amino acids, the trans conformation appears to mediate antagonistic receptor binding, and the cis conformation appears to mediate agonistic receptor binding. This led us to propose that the partial agonist activity of a given beta-amino acid is determined by the relative mole fractions of the respective cis/trans conformers.

  13. Prebiotic Synthesis of Hydrophobic and Protein Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ring, David; Wolman, Yecheskel; Friedmann, Nadav; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    The formation of amino acids by the action of electric discharges on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia was studied in detail. The presence of glycine, alanine, α-amino-n-butyric acid, α-aminoisobutyric acid, valine, norvaline, isovaline, leucine, isoleucine, alloisoleucine, norleucine, proline, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, threonine, allothreonine, α-hydroxy-γ-aminobutyric acid, and α,γ-diaminobutyric acid was confirmed by ion-exchange chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All of the primary α-amino acids found in the Murchison Meteorite have been synthesized by this electric discharge experiment. PMID:4501592

  14. Beta-secretase cleavage at amino acid residue 34 in the amyloid beta peptide is dependent upon gamma-secretase activity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-Ping; Tugusheva, Katherine; Bruce, James E; Lucka, Adam; Wu, Guo-Xin; Chen-Dodson, Elizabeth; Price, Eric; Li, Yueming; Xu, Min; Huang, Qian; Sardana, Mohinder K; Hazuda, Daria J

    2003-06-06

    The amyloid beta peptides (Abeta) are the major components of the senile plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease. Abeta peptides are generated from the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by beta- and gamma-secretases. Beta-secretase (BACE), a type-I transmembrane aspartyl protease, cleaves APP first to generate a 99-amino acid membrane-associated fragment (CT99) containing the N terminus of Abeta peptides. Gamma-secretase, a multi-protein complex, then cleaves within the transmembrane region of CT99 to generate the C termini of Abeta peptides. The production of Abeta peptides is, therefore, dependent on the activities of both BACE and gamma-secretase. The cleavage of APP by BACE is believed to be a prerequisite for gamma-secretase-mediated processing. In the present study, we provide evidence both in vitro and in cells that BACE-mediated cleavage between amino acid residues 34 and 35 (Abeta-34 site) in the Abeta region is dependent on gamma-secretase activity. In vitro, the Abeta-34 site is processed specifically by BACE1 and BACE2, but not by cathepsin D, a closely related aspartyl protease. Moreover, the cleavage of the Abeta-34 site by BACE1 or BACE2 occurred only when Abeta 1- 40 peptide, a gamma-secretase cleavage product, was used as substrate, not the non-cleaved CT99. In cells, overexpression of BACE1 or BACE2 dramatically increased the production of the Abeta 1-34 species. More importantly, the cellular production of Abeta 1-34 species induced by overexpression of BACE1 or BACE2 was blocked by a number of known gamma-secretase inhibitors in a concentration-dependent manner. These gamma-secretase inhibitors had no effect on enzymatic activity of BACE1 or BACE2 in vitro. Our data thus suggest that gamma-secretase cleavage of CT99 is a prerequisite for BACE-mediated processing at Abeta-34 site. Therefore, BACE and gamma-secretase activity can be mutually dependent.

  15. The fate of amino acids adsorbed on mineral matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Jean-François; Stievano, Lorenzo; Lopes, Irène; Gharsallah, Marwen; Piao, Lingyu

    2009-04-01

    We present here selected results recently obtained on the molecular characterization of amino acids adsorption on oxide minerals and their further polymerization by thermal activation, in the general frame of assessing Bernal's hypothesis on the origin of biopolymers on mineral surfaces. Adsorption mechanisms may be identified by a combination of vibrational spectroscopy, 13C solid-state NMR, and molecular modeling. Depending on a particular amino acid, the oxide surface investigated, and the water activity during adsorption (i.e., whether it is carried out from the gas phase or from an aqueous solution), contributions from electrostatic adsorption, outer-sphere and inner-sphere (coordination) complexes may be observed. These mechanisms result in significant adsorption selectivities from equimolar mixtures of different amino acids. Upon thermal activation at moderate temperatures (150-160 °C), clean polymerization events occur and can easily be observed by thermogravimetric analysis. There are some hints of selectivity in this step too. The water activity during thermal treatment plays an important role for the thermodynamics of polymerization.

  16. Experimental evolution of a green fluorescent protein composed of 19 unique amino acids without tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Kawahara-Kobayashi, Akio; Hitotsuyanagi, Mitsuhiro; Amikura, Kazuaki; Kiga, Daisuke

    2014-04-01

    At some stage of evolution, genes of organisms may have encoded proteins that were synthesized using fewer than 20 unique amino acids. Similar to evolution of the natural 19-amino-acid proteins GroEL/ES, proteins composed of 19 unique amino acids would have been able to evolve by accumulating beneficial mutations within the 19-amino-acid repertoire encoded in an ancestral genetic code. Because Trp is thought to be the last amino acid included in the canonical 20-amino-acid repertoire, this late stage of protein evolution could be mimicked by experimental evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins without tryptophan (Trp). To further understand the evolution of proteins, we tried to mimic the evolution of a 19-amino-acid protein involving the accumulation of beneficial mutations using directed evolution by random mutagenesis on the whole targeted gene sequence. We created active 19-amino-acid green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) without Trp from a poorly fluorescent 19-amino-acid mutant, S1-W57F, by using directed evolution with two rounds of mutagenesis and selection. The N105I and S205T mutations showed beneficial effects on the S1-W57F mutant. When these two mutations were combined on S1-W57F, we observed an additive effect on the fluorescence intensity. In contrast, these mutations showed no clear improvement individually or in combination on GFPS1, which is the parental GFP mutant composed of 20 amino acids. Our results provide an additional example for the experimental evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins without Trp, and would help understand the mechanisms underlying the evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins. (236 words).

  17. Experimental Evolution of a Green Fluorescent Protein Composed of 19 Unique Amino Acids without Tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara-Kobayashi, Akio; Hitotsuyanagi, Mitsuhiro; Amikura, Kazuaki; Kiga, Daisuke

    2014-04-01

    At some stage of evolution, genes of organisms may have encoded proteins that were synthesized using fewer than 20 unique amino acids. Similar to evolution of the natural 19-amino-acid proteins GroEL/ES, proteins composed of 19 unique amino acids would have been able to evolve by accumulating beneficial mutations within the 19-amino-acid repertoire encoded in an ancestral genetic code. Because Trp is thought to be the last amino acid included in the canonical 20-amino-acid repertoire, this late stage of protein evolution could be mimicked by experimental evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins without tryptophan (Trp). To further understand the evolution of proteins, we tried to mimic the evolution of a 19-amino-acid protein involving the accumulation of beneficial mutations using directed evolution by random mutagenesis on the whole targeted gene sequence. We created active 19-amino-acid green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) without Trp from a poorly fluorescent 19-amino-acid mutant, S1-W57F, by using directed evolution with two rounds of mutagenesis and selection. The N105I and S205T mutations showed beneficial effects on the S1-W57F mutant. When these two mutations were combined on S1-W57F, we observed an additive effect on the fluorescence intensity. In contrast, these mutations showed no clear improvement individually or in combination on GFPS1, which is the parental GFP mutant composed of 20 amino acids. Our results provide an additional example for the experimental evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins without Trp, and would help understand the mechanisms underlying the evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins. (236 words)

  18. Relative Amino Acid Composition Signatures of Organisms and Environments

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Alexandra; Savageau, Michael A.; Alves, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Background Identifying organism-environment interactions at the molecular level is crucial to understanding how organisms adapt to and change the chemical and molecular landscape of their habitats. In this work we investigated whether relative amino acid compositions could be used as a molecular signature of an environment and whether such a signature could also be observed at the level of the cellular amino acid composition of the microorganisms that inhabit that environment. Methodologies/Principal Findings To address these questions we collected and analyzed environmental amino acid determinations from the literature, and estimated from complete genomic sequences the global relative amino acid abundances of organisms that are cognate to the different types of environment. Environmental relative amino acid abundances clustered into broad groups (ocean waters, host-associated environments, grass land environments, sandy soils and sediments, and forest soils), indicating the presence of amino acid signatures specific for each environment. These signatures correlate to those found in organisms. Nevertheless, relative amino acid abundance of organisms was more influenced by GC content than habitat or phylogeny. Conclusions Our results suggest that relative amino acid composition can be used as a signature of an environment. In addition, we observed that the relative amino acid composition of organisms is not highly determined by environment, reinforcing previous studies that find GC content to be the major factor correlating to amino acid composition in living organisms. PMID:24204807

  19. A reexamination of amino acids in lunar soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinton, K. L. F.; Bada, J. L.; Arnold, J. R.

    1993-03-01

    Amino acids in lunar soils provide an important indicator of the level of prebiotic organic compounds on the moon. The results provide insight into the chemistry of amino acid precursors, and furthermore, given the flux of carbonaceous material to the moon, we can evaluate the survival of organics upon impact. The amino acid contents of both hydrolyzed and unhydrolyzed hot-water extracts of Apollo 17 lunar soil were determined using ophthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl cysteine (OPA/NAC) derivatization followed by HPLC analysis. Previous studies of lunar amino acids were inconclusive, as the technique used (derivatization with ninhydrin followed by HPLC analysis) was unable to discriminate between cosmogenic amino acids and terrestrial contaminants. Cosmogenic amino acids are racemic, and many of the amino acids found in carbonaceous meteorites such as Murchison, i.e., alpha-amino-i-butyric acid (aib), are extremely rare on Earth. The ninhydrin method does not distinguish amino acid enantiomers, nor does it detect alpha-alkyl amino acids such as aib, whereas the OPA/NAC technique does both.

  20. A reexamination of amino acids in lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinton, K. L. F.; Bada, J. L.; Arnold, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    Amino acids in lunar soils provide an important indicator of the level of prebiotic organic compounds on the moon. The results provide insight into the chemistry of amino acid precursors, and furthermore, given the flux of carbonaceous material to the moon, we can evaluate the survival of organics upon impact. The amino acid contents of both hydrolyzed and unhydrolyzed hot-water extracts of Apollo 17 lunar soil were determined using ophthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl cysteine (OPA/NAC) derivatization followed by HPLC analysis. Previous studies of lunar amino acids were inconclusive, as the technique used (derivatization with ninhydrin followed by HPLC analysis) was unable to discriminate between cosmogenic amino acids and terrestrial contaminants. Cosmogenic amino acids are racemic, and many of the amino acids found in carbonaceous meteorites such as Murchison, i.e., alpha-amino-i-butyric acid (aib), are extremely rare on Earth. The ninhydrin method does not distinguish amino acid enantiomers, nor does it detect alpha-alkyl amino acids such as aib, whereas the OPA/NAC technique does both.

  1. ANTIGENICITY OF POLYPEPTIDES (POLY ALPHA AMINO ACIDS)

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Paul H.; Gerulat, Bernard F.; Pinchuck, Paul

    1964-01-01

    A new group of synthetic random polymers of α-L-amino acids has been studied for immunogenicity. With the glutamic acid and alanine copolymers, those consisting of almost equimolar amounts of the two (G60A40 and G40A60) were effective antigens in rabbits whereas those with higher glutamic acid contents (G75A25, G90A10) were poor antigens. The substitution of alanine by valine or leucine (G75V25 and G80Leu20) produced copolymers which were poor antigens in rabbits but effective in guinea pigs. L70A30, although capable of "non-specifically" precipitating serum proteins, was shown not to be antigenic in either rabbits or guinea pigs. The introduction of alanine into glutamic acid and lysine polymers (GLA series) enhanced the immunogenicity of the terpolymers, i.e., GLA30 > GLA20 > GLA10 > GL. The mechanism by which this may be accomplished is discussed as possibly being related to the reduction of the interactions between glutamyl and lysyl residues which allows the carboxyl groups to act as strong immunogenic determinants. PMID:14176288

  2. Quantitative structure-activity relationship and molecular docking studies of a series of quinazolinonyl analogues as inhibitors of gamma amino butyric acid aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Abdulfatai, Usman; Uzairu, Adamu; Uba, Sani

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship and molecular docking studies were carried out on a series of quinazolinonyl analogues as anticonvulsant inhibitors. Density Functional Theory (DFT) quantum chemical calculation method was used to find the optimized geometry of the anticonvulsants inhibitors. Four types of molecular descriptors were used to derive a quantitative relation between anticonvulsant activity and structural properties. The relevant molecular descriptors were selected by Genetic Function Algorithm (GFA). The best model was validated and found to be statistically significant with squared correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.934, adjusted squared correlation coefficient (R(2)adj) value of 0.912, Leave one out (LOO) cross validation coefficient (Q(2)) value of 0.8695 and the external validation (R(2)pred) of 0.72. Docking analysis revealed that the best compound with the docking scores of -9.5 kcal/mol formed hydrophobic interaction and H-bonding with amino acid residues of gamma aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABAAT). This research has shown that the binding affinity generated was found to be better than the commercially sold anti-epilepsy drug, vigabatrin. Also, it was found to be better than the one reported by other researcher. Our QSAR model and molecular docking results corroborate with each other and propose the directions for the design of new inhibitors with better activity against GABAAT. The present study will help in rational drug design and synthesis of new selective GABAAT inhibitors with predetermined affinity and activity and provides valuable information for the understanding of interactions between GABAAT and the anticonvulsants inhibitors.

  3. Effects of glutathione depletion by 2-cyclohexen-1-one on excitatory amino acids-induced enhancement of activator protein-1 DNA binding in murine hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ogita, K; Kitayama, T; Okuda, H; Yoneda, Y

    2001-03-01

    We have investigated the role of glutathione in mechanisms associated with excitatory amino acid signaling to the nuclear transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP1) in the brain using mice depleted of endogenous glutathione by prior treatment with 2-cyclohexen-1-one (CHX). In the hippocampus of animals treated with CHX 2 h before, a significant increase was seen in enhancement of AP1 DNA binding when determined 2 h after the injection of kainic acid (KA) at low doses. The sensitization to KA was not seen in animals injected with CHX 24 h before, in coincidence with the recovery of glutathione contents to the normal levels. By contrast, CHX did not significantly affect the potentiation by NMDA of AP1 binding under any experimental conditions. Prior treatment with CHX resulted in facilitation of behavioral changes induced by KA without affecting those induced by NMDA. These results suggest that endogenous glutathione may be at least in part involved in molecular mechanisms underlying transcriptional control by KA, but not by NMDA, signals of cellular functions.

  4. Discovery of novel histidine-derived lipo-amino acids: applied in the synthesis of ultra-short antimicrobial peptidomimetics having potent antimicrobial activity, salt resistance and protease stability.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Mija; Murugan, Ravichandran N; Jacob, Binu; Hyun, Jae-Kyung; Cheong, Chaejoon; Hwang, Eunha; Park, Hyo-Nam; Seo, Ji-Hyung; Srinivasrao, G; Lee, Kyung S; Shin, Song Yub; Bang, Jeong Kyu

    2013-10-01

    Here we report for the first time the synthesis of Histidine (His) derived lipo-amino acids having pendant lipid tails at N(τ)- and N(π)-positions on imidazole group of His and applied it into synthesis of lipo-peptides. The attachment of His-derived lipo-amino acid into the very short inactive cationic peptides endows potent antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria without hemolytic activity. Furthermore, our designed His-derived lipo-peptidomimetics (HDLPs) consisting of two or three residues displayed strong anti-MRSA activity and protease stability as well as retained potent antimicrobial activity under high salt concentration. Our results demonstrate that the novel lipo-amino acid is highly flexible to synthesize and carry out the extensive structure-activity relationship (SAR) on lipo-antimicrobial peptidomimetics and represents a unique amenable platform for modifying parameters important for antimicrobial activity. Through this study, we proved that the discovery of His-derived lipo-amino acid and the corresponding HDLPs are an excellent candidate as a lead compound for the development of novel antimicrobial agents.

  5. Amino acid sequence of porcine spleen cathepsin D.

    PubMed Central

    Shewale, J G; Tang, J

    1984-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of porcine spleen cathepsin D heavy chain has been determined and, hence, the complete structure of this enzyme is now known. The sequence of heavy chain was constructed by aligning the structures of peptides generated by cyanogen bromide, trypsin, and endo-proteinase Lys C cleavages. The structure of the light chain has been published previously. The cathepsin D molecule contains 339 amino acid residues in two polypeptide chains: a 97-residue light chain and a 242-residue heavy chain, with a combined Mr of 36,779 (without carbohydrate). There are two carbohydrate units linked to asparagine residues 70 and 192. The disulfide bond arrangement in cathepsin D is probably similar to that of pepsin, because the positions of six half-cystine residues are conserved. The active site aspartyl residues, corresponding to aspartic acid-32 and -215 of pepsin, are located at residues 33 and 224 in the cathepsin D molecule. The amino acid sequence around these aspartyl residues is strongly conserved. Cathepsin D shows a strong homology with other acid proteases. When the sequence of cathepsin D, renin, and pepsin are aligned, 32.7% of the residues are identical. The homology is observed throughout the length of the molecules, indicating that three-dimensional structures of all three molecules are similar. PMID:6587385

  6. Abiotic Racemization Kinetics of Amino Acids in Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Andrew D.; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Lomstein, Bente Aa.

    2013-01-01

    The ratios of d- versus l-amino acids can be used to infer the sources and composition of sedimentary organic matter. Such inferences, however, rely on knowing the rates at which amino acids in sedimentary organic matter racemize abiotically between the d- and the l-forms. Based on a heating experiment, we report kinetic parameters for racemization of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and alanine in bulk sediment from Aarhus Bay, Denmark, taken from the surface, 30 cm, and 340 cm depth below seafloor. Extrapolation to a typical cold deep sea sediment temperature of 3°C suggests racemization rate constants of 0.50×10−5–11×10−5 yr−1. These results can be used in conjunction with measurements of sediment age to predict the ratio of d:l amino acids due solely to abiotic racemization of the source material, deviations from which can indicate the abundance and turnover of active microbial populations. PMID:23951211

  7. Novel L-amino acid oxidase with antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from epidermal mucus of the flounder Platichthys stellatus.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Kosuke; Ishikawa, Takashi; Komata, Takafumi; Fukuchi, Kaori; Chiba, Mitsuru; Nozaka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Toshiya; Sato, Tatsusuke; Miura, Tomisato

    2010-01-01

    Fish produce mucus substances as a defensive outer barrier against environmental xenobiotics and predators. Recently, we found a bioactive protein in the mucus layer of the flounder Platichthys stellatus, which showed antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus. In this study, we isolated and identified the antibacterial protein from the mucus components of P. stellatus using a series of column chromatography steps. We then performed gel electrophoresis and cDNA cloning to characterize the protein. The antibacterial protein in the mucus had a molecular mass of approximately 52 kDa with an isoelectric point of 5.3, and cDNA sequencing showed that it corresponded completely with the peptide sequence of antibacterial protein from the gill. A BLAST search suggested that the cDNA encoded an antibacterial protein sharing identity with a number of L-amino acid oxidases (LAAOs) and possessing several conserved motifs found in flavoproteins. RT-PCR using a specific primer, and immunohistochemical analysis with anti-LAAO IgG, demonstrated tissue-specific expression and localization in the gill. Moreover, the anti-LAAO IgG was able to neutralize the antibacterial activity of the protein against methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Thus, we demonstrated that this antibacterial protein, identified from P. stellatus-derived epidermal mucus, is a novel LAAO-like protein with antibacterial activity, similar to snake LAAOs.

  8. Short communication: Measuring the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of an 8-amino acid (8mer) fragment of the C12 antihypertensive peptide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An eight amino acid fragment (PFPEVFGK) of a known milk protein-derived antihypertensive peptide was synthesized by microwave-assisted solid phase peptide synthesis and purified by reverse phase HPLC. Its ability to inhibit the angiotensin-converting enzyme was assessed and compared to that of the ...

  9. Limiting amino acids in bengal gram (Cicer arietinum) as determined from blood amino acid levels and amino acid supplementation studies in the rat.

    PubMed

    Khader, V; Rao, S V

    1982-01-01

    The limiting amino acids of Bengal gram (Cicer arietinum) were determined from plasma amino acid score and ratio and growth response of weanling rats to supplements of amino acids. The results indicated that methionine, threonine and tryptophan are the most limiting amino acids. Protein efficiency ratio of raw and cooked Bengal gram fed at a dietary level of 10% protein increased from 2.7 to 3.7 and 2.4 to 3.4, respectively, on supplementing the diets with methionine, threonine and tryptophan. Plasma levels of lysine, methionine, threonine and tryptophan were similar in rats fed raw or cooked Bengal gram, indicating that the trypsin or other inhibitors that may be present in the raw gram do not affect the biological availability of these amino acids.

  10. Fatty acid production from amino acids and alpha-keto acids by Brevibacterium linens BL2.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Balasubramanian; Seefeldt, Kimberly; Weimer, Bart C

    2004-11-01

    Low concentrations of branched-chain fatty acids, such as isobutyric and isovaleric acids, develop during the ripening of hard cheeses and contribute to the beneficial flavor profile. Catabolism of amino acids, such as branched-chain amino acids, by bacteria via aminotransferase reactions and alpha-keto acids is one mechanism to generate these flavorful compounds; however, metabolism of alpha-keto acids to flavor-associated compounds is controversial. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of Brevibacterium linens BL2 to produce fatty acids from amino acids and alpha-keto acids and determine the occurrence of the likely genes in the draft genome sequence. BL2 catabolized amino acids to fatty acids only under carbohydrate starvation conditions. The primary fatty acid end products from leucine were isovaleric acid, acetic acid, and propionic acid. In contrast, logarithmic-phase cells of BL2 produced fatty acids from alpha-keto acids only. BL2 also converted alpha-keto acids to branched-chain fatty acids after carbohydrate starvation was achieved. At least 100 genes are potentially involved in five different metabolic pathways. The genome of B. linens ATCC 9174 contained these genes for production and degradation of fatty acids. These data indicate that brevibacteria have the ability to produce fatty acids from amino and alpha-keto acids and that carbon metabolism is important in regulating this event.

  11. Transfer of Asymmetry between Proteinogenic Amino Acids under Harsh Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Vives, Thomas; Snytnikov, Valeriy N.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    2017-03-01

    The heating above 400 °C of serine, cysteine, selenocysteine and threonine leads to a complete decomposition of the amino acids and to the formation in low yields of alanine for the three formers and of 2-aminobutyric acid for the latter. At higher temperature, this amino acid is observed only when sublimable α-alkyl-α-amino acids are present, and with an enantiomeric excess dependent on several parameters. Enantiopure or enantioenriched Ser, Cys, Sel or Thr is not able to transmit its enantiomeric excess to the amino acid formed during its decomposition. The presence during the sublimation-decomposition of enantioenriched valine or isoleucine leads to the enantioenrichment of all sublimable amino acids independently of the presence of many decomposition products coming from the unstable derivative. All these studies give information on a potentially prebiotic key-reaction of abiotic transformations between α-amino acids and their evolution to homochirality.

  12. Transfer of Asymmetry between Proteinogenic Amino Acids under Harsh Conditions.

    PubMed

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V; Vives, Thomas; Snytnikov, Valeriy N; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    2017-03-31

    The heating above 400 °C of serine, cysteine, selenocysteine and threonine leads to a complete decomposition of the amino acids and to the formation in low yields of alanine for the three formers and of 2-aminobutyric acid for the latter. At higher temperature, this amino acid is observed only when sublimable α-alkyl-α-amino acids are present, and with an enantiomeric excess dependent on several parameters. Enantiopure or enantioenriched Ser, Cys, Sel or Thr is not able to transmit its enantiomeric excess to the amino acid formed during its decomposition. The presence during the sublimation-decomposition of enantioenriched valine or isoleucine leads to the enantioenrichment of all sublimable amino acids independently of the presence of many decomposition products coming from the unstable derivative. All these studies give information on a potentially prebiotic key-reaction of abiotic transformations between α-amino acids and their evolution to homochirality.

  13. Structural gene and complete amino acid sequence of Vibrio alginolyticus collagenase.

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, H; Shibano, Y; Morihara, K; Fukushima, J; Inami, S; Keil, B; Gilles, A M; Kawamoto, S; Okuda, K

    1992-01-01

    The DNA encoding the collagenase of Vibrio alginolyticus was cloned, and its complete nucleotide sequence was determined. When the cloned gene was ligated to pUC18, the Escherichia coli expression vector, bacteria carrying the gene exhibited both collagenase antigen and collagenase activity. The open reading frame from the ATG initiation codon was 2442 bp in length for the collagenase structural gene. The amino acid sequence, deduced from the nucleotide sequence, revealed that the mature collagenase consists of 739 amino acids with an Mr of 81875. The amino acid sequences of 20 polypeptide fragments were completely identical with the deduced amino acid sequences of the collagenase gene. The amino acid composition predicted from the DNA sequence was similar to the chemically determined composition of purified collagenase reported previously. The analyses of both the DNA and amino acid sequences of the collagenase gene were rigorously performed, but we could not detect any significant sequence similarity to other collagenases. Images Fig. 2. PMID:1311172

  14. High concentration of branched-chain amino acids promotes oxidative stress, inflammation and migration of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells via mTORC1 activation.

    PubMed

    Zhenyukh, Olha; Civantos, Esther; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Sánchez, Maria Soledad; Vázquez, Clotilde; Peiró, Concepción; Egido, Jesús; Mas, Sebastián

    2017-03-01

    Leucine, isoleucine and valine are essential aminoacids termed branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) due to its aliphatic side-chain. In several pathological and physiological conditions increased BCAA plasma concentrations have been described. Elevated BCAA levels predict insulin resistance development. Moreover, BCAA levels higher than 2mmol/L are neurotoxic by inducing microglial activation in maple syrup urine disease. However, there are no studies about the direct effects of BCAA in circulating cells. We have explored whether BCAA could promote oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory status in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from healthy donors. In cultured PBMCs, 10mmol/L BCAA increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via both NADPH oxidase and the mitochondria, and activated Akt-mTOR signalling. By using several inhibitors and activators of these molecular pathways we have described that mTOR activation by BCAA is linked to ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction. BCAA stimulated the activation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-κB, which resulted in the release of pro-inflammatory molecules, such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 or CD40L, and the migration of PBMCs. In conclusion, elevated BCAA blood levels can promote the activation of circulating PBMCs, by a mechanism that involving ROS production and NF-κB pathway activation. These data suggest that high concentrations of BCAA could exert deleterious effects on circulating blood cells and therefore contribute to the pro-inflammatory and oxidative status observed in several pathophysiological conditions.

  15. Conformational study reveals amino acid residues essential for hemagglutinating and anti-proliferative activities of Clematis montana lectin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bangmin; Zhang, Bin; Qi, Wei; Zhu, Yanan; Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Nan; Sun, Rong; Bao, Jinku; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-11-01

    Clematis montana lectin (CML), a novel mannose-binding lectin purified from C. montana Buch.-Ham stem (Ranunculaceae), has been proved to have hemagglutinating activity in rabbit erythrocytes and apoptosis-inducing activity in tumor cells. However, the biochemical properties of CML have not revealed and its structural information still needs to be elucidated. In this study, it was found that CML possessed quite good thermostability and alkaline resistance, and its hemagglutinating activity was bivalent metal cation dependent. In addition, hemagglutination test and fluorescence spectroscopy proved that GuHCl, urea, and sodium dodecyl sulfate could change the conformation of CML and further caused the loss of hemagglutination activity. Moreover, the changes of fluorescence spectrum indicated that the tryptophan (Trp) microenvironment conversion might be related to the conformation and bioactivities of CML. In addition, it was also found that Trp residues, arginine (Arg) residues, and sulfhydryl were important for the hemagglutinating activity of CML, but only Trp was proved to be crucial for the CML conformation. Furthermore, the Trp, Arg, and sulfhydryl-modified CML exhibited 97.17%, 76.99%, and 49.64% loss of its anti-proliferative activity, respectively, which was consistent with the alterations of its hemagglutinating activity. Given these findings, Trp residues on the surface of CML are essential for the active center to form substrate-accessible conformation and suitable environment for carbohydrate binding.

  16. Thermal copoly/amino acids/ as inhibitors of glyoxalase I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Syren, R. M.; Windsor, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    A number of copoly(alpha-amino acids) have been prepared thermally; some have been found to function as inhibitors of glyoxalase I, an enzyme which occupies a central position in Szent-Gyorgyi's theory of tumour genesis. These polymers are also of interest in the search for synthetic peptides having carcinostatic activity, since many natural peptides are active. The way in which the inhibitory activity varies with composition of the synthetic polymers has been investigated. Various properties (hydrophobicity, molecular weight, UV absorption, kinetic type) have been examined in a search for correlates of inhibitory activity.

  17. Uniquely Localized Intra-Molecular Amino Acid Concentrations at the Glycolytic Enzyme Catalytic/Active Centers of Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota are Associated with Their Proposed Temporal Appearances on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, J. Dennis; Gerard, David; Pearl, Dennis K.

    2013-04-01

    The distributions of amino acids at most-conserved sites nearest catalytic/active centers (C/AC) in 4,645 sequences of ten enzymes of the glycolytic Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway in Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota are similar to the proposed temporal order of their appearance on Earth. Glycine, isoleucine, leucine, valine, glutamic acid and possibly lysine often described as prebiotic, i.e., existing or occurring before the emergence of life, were localized in positional and conservational defined aggregations in all enzymes of all Domains. The distributions of all 20 biologic amino acids in most-conserved sites nearest their C/ACs were quite different either from distributions in sites less-conserved and further from their C/ACs or from all amino acids regardless of their position or conservation. The major concentrations of glycine, e.g., perhaps the earliest prebiotic amino acid, occupies ≈16 % of all the most-conserved sites within a volume of ≈7-8 Å radius from their C/ACs and decreases linearly towards the molecule's peripheries. Spatially localized major concentrations of isoleucine, leucine and valine are in the mid-conserved and mid-distant sites from their C/ACs in protein interiors. Lysine and glutamic acid comprise ≈25-30 % of all amino acids within an irregular volume bounded by ≈24-28 Å radii from their C/ACs at the most-distant least-conserved sites. The unreported characteristics of these amino acids: their spatially and conservationally identified concentrations in Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota, suggest some common structural organization of glycolytic enzymes that may be relevant to their evolution and that of other proteins. We discuss our data in relation to enzyme evolution, their reported prebiotic putative temporal appearances on Earth, abundances, biological "cost", neighbor-sequence preferences or "ordering" and some thermodynamic parameters.

  18. Uniquely localized intra-molecular amino acid concentrations at the glycolytic enzyme catalytic/active centers of Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota are associated with their proposed temporal appearances on earth.

    PubMed

    Pollack, J Dennis; Gerard, David; Pearl, Dennis K

    2013-04-01

    The distributions of amino acids at most-conserved sites nearest catalytic/active centers (C/AC) in 4,645 sequences of ten enzymes of the glycolytic Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway in Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota are similar to the proposed temporal order of their appearance on Earth. Glycine, isoleucine, leucine, valine, glutamic acid and possibly lysine often described as prebiotic, i.e., existing or occurring before the emergence of life, were localized in positional and conservational defined aggregations in all enzymes of all Domains. The distributions of all 20 biologic amino acids in most-conserved sites nearest their C/ACs were quite different either from distributions in sites less-conserved and further from their C/ACs or from all amino acids regardless of their position or conservation. The major concentrations of glycine, e.g., perhaps the earliest prebiotic amino acid, occupies ≈ 16 % of all the most-conserved sites within a volume of ≈ 7-8 Å radius from their C/ACs and decreases linearly towards the molecule's peripheries. Spatially localized major concentrations of isoleucine, leucine and valine are in the mid-conserved and mid-distant sites from their C/ACs in protein interiors. Lysine and glutamic acid comprise ≈ 25-30 % of all amino acids within an irregular volume bounded by ≈ 24-28 Å radii from their C/ACs at the most-distant least-conserved sites. The unreported characteristics of these amino acids: their spatially and conservationally identified concentrations in Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota, suggest some common structural organization of glycolytic enzymes that may be relevant to their evolution and that of other proteins. We discuss our data in relation to enzyme evolution, their reported prebiotic putative temporal appearances on Earth, abundances, biological "cost", neighbor-sequence preferences or "ordering" and some thermodynamic parameters.

  19. Investigation of free