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Sample records for active antibody-mediated rejection

  1. Activation of the transcription factor c-Jun in acute cellular and antibody-mediated rejection after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Takahashi, Takamune; Horita, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Izumi; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Teraoka, Satoshi; Tanabe, Kazunari; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Yutaka

    2010-12-01

    c-Jun is a transcription factor that belongs to the activator protein-1 family of proteins. In human kidney disease, c-Jun is activated in glomerular and tubular cells and plays a major role in renal pathophysiology. However, the contribution of this pathway to renal allograft rejection has not been determined. We investigated whether c-Jun is activated in acute allograft rejection. c-Jun activation was assessed with immunohistochemistry using phospho-specific c-Jun antibodies in control human renal tissue and renal tissue from patients with acute cellular rejection, acute antibody-mediated rejection, and no rejection in the month after transplantation. In patients with acute cellular rejection, c-Jun activation was observed primarily in infiltrated T cells associated with tubulitis, interstitial cell infiltration, and endarteritis. The number of infiltrated phosphorylated c-Jun-positive cells in the tubules and interstitium was correlated with the Banff classification "t" and "i" scores. In patients with acute antibody-mediated rejection, c-Jun activation was observed in injured endothelial cells as well as in infiltrated cells, including macrophages, in the glomerular and peritubular capillaries. Furthermore, the serum creatinine levels and changes in serum creatinine from the previous year were significantly correlated with the total tubulointerstitial phosphorylated c-Jun-positive score (representing the number of positive nuclei in the tubules, interstitium, and peritubular capillaries). In conclusion, c-Jun was activated in acute antibody-mediated rejection and acute cellular rejection and was associated with reduced graft function. These findings suggest that c-Jun plays a key role in pathological events and may represent a novel therapeutic target in acute renal allograft rejection.

  2. Antibody-Mediated Lung Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Hachem, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation remains enigmatic. However, emerging evidence over the past several years suggests that humoral immunity plays an important role in allograft rejection. Indeed, the development of donor-specific antibodies after transplantation has been identified as an independent risk factor for acute cellular rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Furthermore, cases of acute antibody-mediated rejection resulting in severe allograft dysfunction have been reported, and these demonstrate that antibodies can directly injure the allograft. However, the incidence and toll of antibody-mediated rejection are unknown because there is no widely accepted definition and some cases may be unrecognized. Clearly, humoral immunity has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:23002428

  3. Antibody-Mediated Rejection: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Garces, Jorge Carlos; Giusti, Sixto; Staffeld-Coit, Catherine; Bohorquez, Humberto; Cohen, Ari J.; Loss, George E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chronic antibody injury is a serious threat to allograft outcomes and is therefore the center of active research. In the continuum of allograft rejection, the development of antibodies plays a critical role. In recent years, an increased recognition of molecular and histologic changes has provided a better understanding of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), as well as potential therapeutic interventions. However, several pathways are still unknown, which accounts for the lack of efficacy of some of the currently available agents that are used to treat rejection. Methods: We review the current diagnostic criteria for AMR; AMR paradigms; and desensitization, treatment, and prevention strategies. Results: Chronic antibody-mediated endothelial injury results in transplant glomerulopathy, manifested as glomerular basement membrane duplication, double contouring, or splitting. Clinical manifestations of AMR include proteinuria and a rise in serum creatinine. Current strategies for the treatment of AMR include antibody depletion with plasmapheresis (PLEX), immunoadsorption (IA), immunomodulation with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and T cell– or B cell–depleting agents. Some treatment benefits have been found in using PLEX and IA, and some small nonrandomized trials have identified some benefits in using rituximab and the proteasome inhibitor-based therapy bortezomib. More recent histologic follow-ups of patients treated with bortezomib have not shown significant benefits in terms of allograft outcomes. Furthermore, no specific treatment approaches have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Other agents used for more difficult rejections include bortezomib and eculizumab (an anti-C5 monoclonal antibody). Conclusion: AMR is a fascinating field with ample opportunities for research and progress in the future. Despite the use of advanced techniques for the detection of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) or non-HLA donor-specific antibodies

  4. Phenotypes of antibody-mediated rejection in organ transplants.

    PubMed

    Mengel, Michael; Husain, Sufia; Hidalgo, Luis; Sis, Banu

    2012-06-01

    Antibody-mediated hyperacute rejection was the first rejection phenotype observed in human organ transplants. This devastating phenotype was eliminated by reliable crossmatch technologies. Since then, the focus was on T-cell-mediated rejection and de novo donor-specific antibodies were considered an epiphenomenon of cognate T-cell activation. The immune theory was that controlling the T-cell response would entail elimination of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). With modern immunosuppressive drugs, T-cell-mediated rejection is essentially treatable. However, this did not prevent ABMR from emerging as a significant phenotype in all types of organ transplants. It became obvious that both rejection types require distinct treatment and thus reliable diagnosis. This is the current challenge. ABMR, depending on stage, grade, time course, organ type or prior treatment, can present with a wide spectrum of phenotypes. This review summarizes the current diagnostic consensus for ABMR, describes unmet needs and challenges in diagnostics, and proposes new approaches for consideration. © 2012 The Authors. Transplant International © 2012 European Society for Organ Transplantation.

  5. Acute antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Davis, Scott; Cooper, James E

    2017-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has now been recognized as one of the most important causes of graft loss. Transplantation across HLA barriers and nonadherence can result in acute antibody-mediated rejection, which is associated with particularly worse graft outcomes. New technologies, including genomic studies and assays to detect and define donor-specific antibodies, have provided important insights into the pathophysiology and diagnosis of acute antibody-mediated rejection but have engendered many questions about the clinical application of these tests in the prognosis and prevention of this protean disease process. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of acute antibody-mediated rejection, the evolving diagnostic criteria, and specific challenges related to its prognosis, treatment, and prevention.

  6. Acute antibody-mediated rejection of cardiac transplants.

    PubMed

    Reed, Elaine F; Demetris, Anthony J; Hammond, Elizabeth; Itescu, Silviu; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Reinsmoen, Nancy L; Rodriguez, E Rene; Rose, Marlene; Stewart, Susan; Suciu-Foca, Nicole; Zeevi, Adriana; Fishbein, Michael C

    2006-02-01

    Under the direction of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation, a multidisciplinary review of the cardiac biopsy grading system was undertaken in 2004, with task forces examining the areas of histopathology of rejection, clinical issues, and research. An important new area addressed by the Immunopathology Task Force sub-committee was the clinical and diagnostic criteria for antibody-mediated rejection. This article is a companion paper to the revised working formulation for the standardization of nomenclature in the diagnosis of heart rejection and reviews the published literature documenting the serologic and morphologic evidence that antibody-mediated rejection is clinically significant and associated with graft loss, accelerated transplant-associated coronary artery disease, and death. This article also provides a more in-depth analysis of antibody-mediated rejection developed by the Immunopathology Task Force for revision of the 1990 working formulation for the standardization of nomenclature in the diagnosis of heart rejection.

  7. Platelets in Early Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Renal Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Hsiao-Hsuan; Fan, Ran; Dvorina, Nina; Chiesa-Vottero, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection is a major complication in renal transplantation. The pathologic manifestations of acute antibody-mediated rejection that has progressed to functional impairment of a renal transplant have been defined in clinical biopsy specimens. However, the initial stages of the process are difficult to resolve with the unavoidable variables of clinical studies. We devised a model of renal transplantation to elucidate the initial stages of humoral rejection. Kidneys were orthotopically allografted to immunodeficient mice. After perioperative inflammation subsided, donor-specific alloantibodies were passively transferred to the recipient. Within 1 hour after a single transfer of antibodies, C4d was deposited diffusely on capillaries, and von Willebrand factor released from endothelial cells coated intravascular platelet aggregates. Platelet-transported inflammatory mediators platelet factor 4 and serotonin accumulated in the graft at 100- to 1000-fold higher concentrations compared with other platelet-transported chemokines. Activated platelets that expressed P-selectin attached to vascular endothelium and macrophages. These intragraft inflammatory changes were accompanied by evidence of acute endothelial injury. Repeated transfers of alloantibodies over 1 week sustained high levels of platelet factor 4 and serotonin. Platelet depletion decreased platelet mediators and altered the accumulation of macrophages. These data indicate that platelets augment early inflammation in response to donor-specific antibodies and that platelet-derived mediators may be markers of evolving alloantibody responses. PMID:25145937

  8. The role of complement in antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stegall, Mark D; Chedid, Marcio F; Cornell, Lynn D

    2012-11-01

    Over the past decade, several studies have suggested that the complement system has an active role in both acute and chronic allograft rejection. These studies have been facilitated by improved techniques to detect antibody-mediated organ rejection, including immunohistological staining for C4d deposition in the allograft and solid-phase assays that identify donor-specific alloantibodies (DSAs) in the serum of transplant recipients. Studies with eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against complement component C5, have shown that activation of the terminal complement pathway is necessary for the development of acute antibody-mediated rejection in recipients of living-donor kidney allografts who have high levels of DSAs. The extent to which complement activation drives chronic antibody-mediated injury leading to organ rejection is less clear. In chronic antibody-mediated injury, early complement activation might facilitate chemotaxis of inflammatory cells into the allograft in a process that later becomes somewhat independent of DSA levels and complement factors. In this Review, we discuss the different roles that the complement system might have in antibody-mediated allograft rejection, with specific emphasis on renal transplantation.

  9. Diagnostic criteria of antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Mosquera Reboredo, J M; Vázquez Martul, E

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of anti-donor antibody-mediated rejection or humoral rejection (ABMR) is one of the main discussions at the moment in kidney transplantation. The search for histopathological markers that help us to diagnose ABMR has been more problematic, in contrast to the histological expression of cellular or tubulointerstitial rejection. Although the relationship between post-transplant anti-donor antibodies and the allograft's prognosis has been a topic of discussion for a long time, led in the main by P.Terasaki, it was not until the beginning of 1990s when P. Halloran studied the humoral mechanisms of rejection in greater depth. Feutch described the importance of C4d deposits as a marker that shows a humoral mechanism of allograft rejection in 1993. As a result of many studies carried out, the Banff consensus group established some diagnostic histopathological criteria of acute (ABMR) in 2003. These have been modified slightly in later meetings of the group. Furthermore, in 2005 this same working group looked at the physiopathological mechanisms causing chronic allograft failure in more detail and established the criteria defining chronic humoral rejection. In this review, we are trying to update any useful histopathological criteria for diagnosing acute and chronic ABMR.

  10. Reviewing the pathogenesis of antibody-mediated rejection and renal graft pathology after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Morozumi, Kunio; Takeda, Asami; Otsuka, Yasuhiro; Horike, Keiji; Gotoh, Norihiko; Narumi, Shunji; Watarai, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Takaaki

    2016-07-01

    The clinicopathological context of rejection after kidney transplantation was well recognized. Banff conferences greatly contributed to elucidate the pathogenesis and to establish the pathologic criteria of rejection after kidney transplantation. The most important current problem of renal transplantation is de novo donor-specific antibody (DSA) production leading chronic rejection and graft loss. Microvascular inflammation is considered as a reliable pathological marker for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in the presence of DSA. Electron microscopic study allowed us to evaluate early changes in peritubular capillaries in T-lymphocyte mediated rejection and transition to antibody-mediated rejection. Severe endothelial injuries with edema and activated lymphocyte invaded into subendothelial space with early multi-layering of peritubular capillary basement membrane suggest T-lymphocyte mediated rejection induce an unbounded chain of antibody-mediated rejection. The risk factors of AMR after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation are important issues. Anti-ABO blood type antibody titre of IgG excess 32-fold before transplant operation is the only predictable factor for acute AMR. Characteristics of chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (CAAMR) are one of the most important problems. Light microscopic findings and C4d stain of peritubular capillary and glomerular capillary are useful diagnostic criteria of CAAMR. Microvascular inflammation, double contour of glomerular capillary and thickening of peritubular capillary basement are good predictive factors of the presence of de novo DSA. C4d stain of linear glomerular capillary is a more sensitive marker for CAAMR than positive C4d of peritubular capillary. Early and sensitive diagnostic attempts of diagnosing CAAMR are pivotal to prevent chronic graft failure.

  11. Refinement of the criteria for ultrastructural peritubular capillary basement membrane multilayering in the diagnosis of chronic active/acute antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Go, Heounjeong; Shin, Sung; Kim, Young Hoon; Han, Duck Jong; Cho, Yong Mee

    2017-04-01

    Chronic active/acute antibody-mediated rejection (cABMR) is the main cause of late renal allograft loss. Severe peritubular capillary basement membrane multilayering (PTCML) assessed on electron microscopy is one diagnostic feature of cABMR according to the Banff 2013 classification. We aimed to refine the PTCML criteria for an earlier diagnosis of cABMR. We retrospectively investigated ultrastructural features of 159 consecutive renal allografts and 44 nonallografts. The presence of serum donor-specific antibodies at the time of biopsy of allografts was also examined. Forty-three patients (27.0%) fulfilled the criteria of cABMR, regardless of PTCML, and comprised the cABMR group. Forty-one patients (25.8%) did not exhibit cABMR features and comprised the non-cABMR allograft control group. In addition, 15 zero-day wedge resections and 29 native kidney biopsies comprised the nonallograft control group. When the diagnostic accuracies of various PTCML features were assessed using the cABMR and non-cABMR allograft control groups, ≥4 PTCML, either circumferential or partial, in ≥2 peritubular capillaries of the three most affected capillaries exhibited the highest AUC value (0.885), greater than the Banff 2013 classification (0.640). None of the nonallograft control groups exhibited PTCML features. We suggest that ≥4 PTCML in ≥2 peritubular capillaries of the three most affected cortical capillaries represents the proper cutoff for cABMR. © 2017 Steunstichting ESOT.

  12. Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Human Orthotopic Liver Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Demetris, A. Jake; Jaffe, Ron; Tzakis, A.; Ramsey, Glenn; Todo, S.; Belle, Steven; Esquivel, Carlos; Shapiro, Ron; Markus, Bernd; Mroczek, Elizabeth; Van Thiel, D. H.; Sysyn, Greg; Gordon, Robert; Makowka, Leonard; Starzl, Tom

    1988-01-01

    A clinicopathologic analysis of liver transplantation across major ABO blood group barriers was carried out 1) to determine if antibody-mediated (humoral) rejection was a cause of graft failure and if humoral rejection can be identified, 2) to propose criteria for establishing the diagnosis, and 3) to describe the clinical and pathologic features of humoral rejection. A total of 51 (24 primary) ABO-incompatible (ABO-I) liver grafts were transplanted into 49 recipients. There was a 46% graft failure rate during the first 30 days for primary ABO-I grafts compared with an 11% graft failure rate for primary ABO compatible (ABO-C), crossmatch negative, age, sex and priority-matched control patients (P < 0.02). A similarly high early graft failure rate (60%) was seen for nonprimary ABO-I grafts during the first 30 days. Clinically, the patients experienced a relentless rise in serum transaminases, hepatic failure, and coagulopathy during the first weeks after transplant. Pathologic examination of ABO-I grafts that failed early demonstrated widespread areas of geographic hemorrhagic necrosis with diffuse intraorgan coagulation. Prominent arterial deposition of antibody and complement components was demonstrated by immunoflourescent staining. Elution studies confirmed the presence of tissue-bound, donor-specific isoagglutinins within the grafts. No such deposition was seen in control cases. These studies confirm that antibody mediated rejection of the liver occurs and allows for the development of criteria for establishing the diagnosis. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:3046369

  13. Treatment Options and Strategies for Antibody Mediated Rejection after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Matthew H.

    2011-01-01

    Antibody mediated rejection is a significant clinical problem encountered in a subset of renal transplant recipients. This type of rejection has a variable pathogenesis from the presence of donor specific antibodies with no overt disease to immediate hyperacute rejection and many variations between. Antibody mediated rejection is more common in human leukocyte antigen sensitized patients. In general, transplant graft survival after antibody mediated rejection is jeopardized, with less than 50% graft survival 5 years after this diagnosis. A variety of agents have been utilized singly and in combinations to treat antibody mediated rejection with differing results and significant research efforts are being placed on developing new targets for intervention. These same agents have been used in desensitization protocols with some success. In this review, we describe the biology of antibody mediated rejection, review the available agents to treat this form of rejection, and highlight areas of ongoing and future research into this difficult clinical problem. PMID:21940179

  14. Expression of MMP-2 and TIMP-1 in Renal Tissue of Patients with Chronic Active Antibody-mediated Renal Graft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and tissue inhibitor of metallopropteinase-1 (TIMP-1) in the renal allografts of patients with chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), and to explore their role in the pathogenesis of AMR. Methods Immunohistochemistry assay and computer-assisted image analysis were used to detect the expression of MMP-2 and TIMP-1 in the renal allografts with interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA) in 46 transplant recipients and 15 normal renal tissue specimens as the controls. The association of the expression level of either MMP-2 or TIMP-1 with the pathological grade of IF/TA in AMR was analyzed. Results The expression of either MMP-2 or TIMP-1 was significantly increased in the renal allografts of the recipients as compared with the normal renal tissue (P < 0.05). MMP-2 expression tended to decrease, while TIMP-1 and serum creatinine increased along with the increase of pathological grade of IF/TA (P < 0.05). In IF/TA groups, the expression of TIMP-1 was positively correlated to serum creatinine level (r = 0.718, P < 0.05). Conclusions It is suggested by the results that abnormal expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-1 might play roles in the development of renal fibrosis in chronic AMR. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1128474926172838 PMID:23057632

  15. Acute antibody-mediated rejection after intestinal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Sheng; Cruz Jr, Ruy J; Cai, Jun-Chao

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the incidence, risk factors and clinical outcomes of acute antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) after intestinal transplantation (ITx). METHODS A retrospective single-center analysis was performed to identify cases of acute ABMR after ITx, based on the presence of donor-specific antibody (DSA), acute tissue damage, C4d deposition, and allograft dysfunction. RESULTS Acute ABMR was identified in 18 (10.3%) out of 175 intestinal allografts with an average occurrence of 10 d (range, 4-162) after ITx. All acute ABMR cases were presensitized to donor human leukocyte antigens class I and/or II antigens with a detectable DSA. A positive cross-match was seen in 14 (77.8%) cases and twelve of 18 patients (66.7%) produced newly-formed DSA following ITx. Histological characteristics of acute ABMR include endothelial C4d deposits, interstitial hemorrhage, and severe congestion with focal fibrin thrombin in the lamina propria capillaries. Multivariate analysis identified a liver-free graft and high level of panel reactive antibody as a significant independent risk factor. Despite initial improvement after therapy, eleven recipients (61.1%) lost transplant secondary to rejection. Of those, 9 (50%) underwent graft removal and 4 (22.2%) received second transplantation following acute ABMR. At an average follow-up of 32.3 mo (range, 13.3-76.4), 8 (44.4%) recipients died. CONCLUSION Our results indicate that acute ABMR is an important cause of intestine graft dysfunction, particularly in a liver-exclusive graft and survivors are at an increased risk of developing refractory acute rejection and chronic rejection. More effective strategies to prevent and manage acute ABMR are needed to improve outcomes. PMID:28058223

  16. Acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection in pediatric kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pape, Lars; Becker, Jan U; Immenschuh, Stephan; Ahlenstiel, Thurid

    2015-03-01

    Acute antibody-mediated rejection is a diagnostic challenge in renal transplantation medicine. However, it is an important diagnosis to make, since chronic antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) is the main cause of long-term graft loss. Antibody-mediated rejection is diagnosed by detecting donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) in the blood in combination with observing typical histomorphological signs in kidney biopsy, as described in the Banff classification. Therapy is based on the removal of DSAs by administering intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs), plasmapheresis, or immunoadsorption. Reoccurrence of antibodies is diminished by the use of rituximab, increased immunosuppression, and in some cases additional experimental substances. A combination of these techniques has been shown to be successful in the majority of cases of acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection. Routine DSA monitoring is warranted for early detection of antibody-mediated rejection.

  17. Alemtuzumab induction and antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Noureldeen, T; Albekioni, Z; Machado, L; Muddana, N; Marcus, R J; Hussain, S M; Sureshkumar, K K

    2014-12-01

    Induction therapy improves graft outcomes in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). We aimed to compare the incidences of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and acute cellular rejection (ACR) as well as graft and patient outcomes in KTRs who underwent induction with alemtuzumab versus rabbit-antithymocyte globulin (r-ATG). This was a single-center retrospective study involving patients who underwent kidney transplantation between January 2009 and December 2011 after receiving induction therapy with either alemtuzumab or r-ATG. Maintenance immunosuppression included tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil with early steroid withdrawal. Acute rejection was diagnosed using allograft biopsy. Among the 108 study patients, 68 received alemtuzumab and 40 got r-ATG. There was a significantly higher incidence of AMR (15% vs 2.5%; P = .008) and similar incidence of ACR (4.4% vs 10%; P = .69) for alemtuzumab versus r-ATG groups. One-year serum creatinine levels (l.68 ± 0.8 mg/dL vs 1.79 ± 1.8 mg/dL; P = .66) as well as graft (91.1 ± 3.5% vs 94.5 ± 3.8%; P = .48) and patient (93.8 ± 3.0% vs 96.4 ± 3.5%; P = .92) survivals were similar for the alemtuzumab versus the r-ATG groups. Our study showed a higher incidence of AMR and similar incidence of ACR in KTRs who underwent induction with alemtuzumab compared with those who received r-ATG and were maintained on tacrolimus and MMF. This was despite a lower HLA mismatch in the alemtuzumab group. One-year graft survival, patient survival, and allograft function were similar. Inadequate B-cell suppression by alemtuzumab as well as altered phenotypic and functional properties of repopulating B cells could be contributing to heightened risk of AMR in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Post-Transplant Membranous Nephropathy Associated with Chronic Active Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Hepatitis C Infection after Deceased Donor Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doke, Tomohito; Sato, Waichi; Takahashi, Kazuo; Hayashi, Hiroki; Koide, Sigehisa; Sasaki, Hitomi; Kusaka, Mamoru; Shiroki, Ryoichi; Hoshinaga, Kiyotaka; Takeda, Asami; Yuzawa, Yukio; Hasegawa, Midori

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman who had undergone deceased donor kidney transplantation twice, at 35 and 43 years of age, presented with renal impairment. She was infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The histology of the graft kidney revealed post-transplant membranous nephropathy (MN) with podocytic infolding and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). IgG subclass staining showed fine granular deposits of IgG1 and IgG3, but not IgG4, in the glomerular capillary walls. Panel reactive antibody scores for human leukocyte antigen class I and class II were 92.67% and 66.68%, respectively. Thus, this case of post-transplanted MN was considered to be associated with AMR and HCV infection.

  19. Successful rescue of refractory, severe antibody mediated rejection with splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Bruce; Gangemi, Antonio; Thielke, James; Oberholzer, José; Sankary, Howard; Benedetti, Enrico

    2007-01-15

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) commonly occurs after transplantation of ABO-incompatible and sensitized renal transplant. Treatment regimens commonly include a combination of plasmapheresis (PL) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). However, some cases of AMR remain refractory to treatment. We report a case series of four patients with AMR refractory to standard therapy (ST) who resolved after splenectomy. Four living donor kidney transplant recipients were diagnosed with AMR. Two patients were ABO incompatible, one was cross-match positive and one had no obvious predisposing factors. After failure of therapy with corticosteroids, PL, IVIG, Thymoglobulin, and Rituximab (three patients) or Campath (one patient), AMR was treated with laparoscopic splenectomy. After an average of 11 days of ST, laparoscopic splenectomy was performed for rescue. The urinary output improved immediately in all patients, serum creatinine levels decreased within 48 hr, and ABO titers fell in the ABO-incompatible patient and the cross-match became negative in the two sensitized patients. Splenectomy may play a role in the treatment of AMR refractory to ST.

  20. Identifying Subphenotypes of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplants.

    PubMed

    Halloran, P F; Merino Lopez, M; Barreto Pereira, A

    2016-03-01

    The key lesions in antibody-mediated kidney transplant rejection (ABMR) are microcirculation inflammation (peritubular capillaritis and/or glomerulitis lesions, abbreviated "pg") and glomerular double contours (cg lesions). We used these features to explore subphenotypes in 164 indication biopsies with ABMR-related diagnoses: 137 ABMR (109 pure and 28 mixed with T cell-mediated rejection [TCMR]) and 27 transplant glomerulopathy (TG), identified from prospective multicenter studies. The lesions indicated three ABMR subphenotypes: pgABMR, cgABMR, and pgcgABMR. Principal component analysis confirmed these subphenotypes and showed that TG can be reclassified as pgcgABMR (n = 17) or cgABMR (n = 10). ABMR-related biopsies included 45 pgABMR, 90 pgcgABMR, and 25 cgABMR, with four unclassifiable. Dominating all time intervals was the subphenotype pgcgABMR. The pgABMR subphenotype presented earliest (median <2 years), frequently mixed with TCMR, and was most associated with nonadherence. The cgABMR subphenotype presented late (median 9 years). Subphenotypes differed in their molecular changes, with pgABMR having the most histologic-molecular discrepancies (i.e. potential errors). Donor-specific antibody (DSA) was not identified in 29% of pgcgABMR and 46% of cgABMR, but failure rates and molecular findings were similar to cases where DSA was known to be positive. Thus, ABMR presents distinct subphenotypes, early pg-dominant, late cg-dominant, and combined pgcg phenotype, differing in time, molecular features, accompanying TCMR, HLA antibody, and probability of nonadherence.

  1. Molecular diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection in human kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Sellarés, J; Reeve, J; Loupy, A; Mengel, M; Sis, B; Skene, A; de Freitas, D G; Kreepala, C; Hidalgo, L G; Famulski, K S; Halloran, P F

    2013-04-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection is the major cause of kidney transplant failure, but the histology-based diagnostic system misses most cases due to its requirement for C4d positivity. We hypothesized that gene expression data could be used to test biopsies for the presence of antibody-mediated rejection. To develop a molecular test, we prospectively assigned diagnoses, including C4d-negative antibody-mediated rejection, to 403 indication biopsies from 315 patients, based on histology (microcirculation lesions) and donor-specific HLA antibody. We then used microarray data to develop classifiers that assigned antibody-mediated rejection scores to each biopsy. The transcripts distinguishing antibody-mediated rejection from other conditions were mostly expressed in endothelial cells or NK cells, or were IFNG-inducible. The scores correlated with the presence of microcirculation lesions and donor-specific antibody. Of 45 biopsies with scores>0.5, 39 had been diagnosed as antibody-mediated rejection on the basis of histology and donor-specific antibody. High scores were also associated with unanimity among pathologists that antibody-mediated rejection was present. The molecular score also strongly predicted future graft loss in Cox regression analysis. We conclude that microarray assessment of gene expression can assign a probability of ABMR to transplant biopsies without knowledge of HLA antibody status, histology, or C4d staining, and predicts future failure.

  2. Antibody-mediated rejection despite inhibition of terminal complement.

    PubMed

    Bentall, Andrew; Tyan, Dolly B; Sequeira, Flavia; Everly, Matthew J; Gandhi, Manish J; Cornell, Lynn D; Li, Han; Henderson, Nicole A; Raghavaiah, Suresh; Winters, Jeffrey L; Dean, Patrick G; Stegall, Mark D

    2014-12-01

    Terminal complement blockade has been shown to decrease the incidence of early acute antibody-mediated rejection (eAMR) in the first month after positive cross-match kidney transplant recipients, yet some patients still develop eAMR. The current study investigated possible mechanisms of eAMR despite eculizumab treatment. Of the 26 patients treated with eculizumab, two developed clinical eAMR and another patient developed histologic signs of eAMR without graft dysfunction ('subclinical eAMR'). Twenty-three did not have histologic injury on early surveillance biopsies. All 26 patients had therapeutic levels of eculizumab and showed complete blockade of complement in hemolytic assays. High levels of donor-specific alloantibody (DSA) including total IgG, IgG3, and C1q+ DSA were present in patients with and without eAMR, and none correlated well with eAMR. In contrast, IgM DSA was present in only four patients after transplantation: the two patients with clinical eAMR, one patient with subclinical AMR, and one patient without eAMR (P = 0.006 correlation with eAMR). Both clinical eAMR episodes were easily treated with plasma exchange which removed IgM more completely and rapidly than IgG, resulting in normalization of function and histology. These data suggest a possible role of antidonor IgM DSA in the pathogenesis of eAMR in patients treated with terminal complement blockade (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00670774). © 2014 Steunstichting ESOT.

  3. Soluble BAFF Cytokine Levels and Antibody-Mediated Rejection of the Kidney Allograft.

    PubMed

    Slavcev, Antonij; Brozova, Jitka; Slatinska, Janka; Sekerkova, Zuzana; Honsova, Eva; Skibova, Jelena; Striz, Ilja; Viklicky, Ondrej

    2016-12-01

    The B-cell activating factor (BAFF) cytokine has important functions for the survival and maturation of B lymphocytes, which implies that this cytokine might play a role in the development of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) after kidney transplantation. In our study, we compared the concentrations of the soluble BAFF cytokine in kidney graft recipients with AMR and patients without rejection with the goal of testing the hypothesis whether BAFF level measurement might be useful as a diagnostic marker of AMR. The study included a cohort of 19 high-risk patients with diagnosed AMR and 17 control patients free of rejection. BAFF was measured in all patients before transplantation, during the rejection episodes, and three months after transplantation in patients free of rejection using the Luminex technique. Before transplantation, the serum concentrations of BAFF in patients with AMR and kidney recipients without rejection did not significantly differ. After transplantation, however, BAFF levels were significantly lower in patients with AMR and also in patients with concurrent humoral and cellular rejection compared with patients without rejection (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). No correlation was found between BAFF and the production of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) before and after transplantation. Patients experiencing AMR and simultaneous cellular and AMR had significantly lower concentrations of BAFF in comparison with patients free of rejection.

  4. Quantifying renal allograft loss following early antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Orandi, B J; Chow, E H K; Hsu, A; Gupta, N; Van Arendonk, K J; Garonzik-Wang, J M; Montgomery, J R; Wickliffe, C; Lonze, B E; Bagnasco, S M; Alachkar, N; Kraus, E S; Jackson, A M; Montgomery, R A; Segev, D L

    2015-02-01

    Unlike antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) with clinical features, it remains unclear whether subclinical AMR should be treated, as its effect on allograft loss is unknown. It is also uncertain if AMR's effect is homogeneous across donor (deceased/live) and (HLA/ABO) antibody types. We compared 219 patients with AMR (77 subclinical, 142 clinical) to controls matched on HLA/ABO-compatibility, donor type, prior transplant, panel reactive antibody (PRA), age and year. One and 5-year graft survival in subclinical AMR was 95.9% and 75.7%, compared to 96.8% and 88.4% in matched controls (p = 0.0097). Subclinical AMR was independently associated with a 2.15-fold increased risk of graft loss (95% CI: 1.19-3.91; p = 0.012) compared to matched controls, but not different from clinical AMR (p = 0.13). Fifty three point two percent of subclinical AMR patients were treated with plasmapheresis within 3 days of their AMR-defining biopsy. Treated subclinical AMR patients had no difference in graft loss compared to matched controls (HR 1.73; 95% CI: 0.73-4.05; p = 0.21), but untreated subclinical AMR patients did (HR 3.34; 95% CI: 1.37-8.11; p = 0.008). AMR's effect on graft loss was heterogeneous when stratified by compatible deceased donor (HR = 4.73; 95% CI: 1.57-14.26; p = 0.006), HLA-incompatible deceased donor (HR = 2.39; 95% CI: 1.10-5.19; p = 0.028), compatible live donor (no AMR patients experienced graft loss), ABO-incompatible live donor (HR = 6.13; 95% CI: 0.55-67.70; p = 0.14) and HLA-incompatible live donor (HR = 6.29; 95% CI: 3.81-10.39; p < 0.001) transplant. Subclinical AMR substantially increases graft loss, and treatment seems warranted.

  5. Late Failing Heart Allografts: Pathology of Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy and Association With Antibody-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Loupy, A; Toquet, C; Rouvier, P; Beuscart, T; Bories, M C; Varnous, S; Guillemain, R; Pattier, S; Suberbielle, C; Leprince, P; Lefaucheur, C; Jouven, X; Bruneval, P; Duong Van Huyen, J P

    2016-01-01

    In heart transplantation, there is a lack of robust evidence of the specific causes of late allograft failure. We hypothesized that a substantial fraction of failing heart allografts may be associated with antibody-mediated injury and immune-mediated coronary arteriosclerosis. We included all patients undergoing a retransplantation for late terminal heart allograft failure in three referral centers. We performed an integrative strategy of heart allograft phenotyping by assessing the heart vascular tree including histopathology and immunohistochemistry together with circulating donor-specific antibodies. The main analysis included 40 explanted heart allografts patients and 402 endomyocardial biopsies performed before allograft loss. Overall, antibody-mediated rejection was observed in 19 (47.5%) failing heart allografts including 16 patients (40%) in whom unrecognized previous episodes of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection occurred 4.5 ± 3.5 years before allograft loss. Explanted allografts with evidence of antibody-mediated rejection demonstrated higher endothelitis and microvascular inflammation scores (0.89 ± 0.26 and 2.25 ± 0.28, respectively) compared with explanted allografts without antibody-mediated rejection (0.42 ± 0.11 and 0.36 ± 0.09, p = 0.046 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Antibody-mediated injury was observed in 62.1% of failing allografts with pure coronary arteriosclerosis and mixed (arteriosclerosis and atherosclerosis) pattern, while it was not observed in patients with pure coronary atherosclerosis (p = 0.0076). We demonstrate that antibody-mediated rejection is operating in a substantial fraction of failing heart allografts and is associated with severe coronary arteriosclerosis. Unrecognized subclinical antibody-mediated rejection episodes may be observed years before allograft failure.

  6. [Antibody-mediated rejection of renal allograft and the update Banff classification 2013].

    PubMed

    Honsová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The view on the role of donor-specific antibodies in organ transplantation has been changed during the last several decades. Today, it is considered that the majority of cases of the late renal allograft dysfunction and loss are caused by the presence of donor-specific antibodies to HLA antigens. The real breakthrough in the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection was represented by the discovery of C4d, which enabled the determination of the diagnostic criteria of acute and later chronic antibody-mediated rejection. Although detection of C4d has been the cornerstone in the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection for over 10 years, it has become clear that some cases with similar morphological and clinical features do not have detectable C4d. Outcomes of key studies concerning presence of donor specific antibodies and morphological features in the graft biopsy samples resulted in the modification of Banff classification of 2013, which includes integrating C4d negative antibody-mediated rejection and also that acute vascular rejection (v1, v2) can be a part of the antibody-mediated rejection.

  7. Bortezomib-based treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Li, X L; Xu, X G; Shi, B Y; Zhang, Z M; Li, Z L; Han, Y; Zhou, W Q; Chen, C Q; Cai, M; Zhang, X

    2015-12-22

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is an important factor affecting survival after renal transplantation. A highly selective proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, clears activated plasma cells from the body and has important therapeutic effect on AMR. We investigated the effects of bortezomib on AMR in a patient after a second renal transplant. Biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of mixed cellular rejection and AMR. Bortezomib was administered on day 1 (1.3 mg/m(2)), day 4 (1.0 mg/m(2)), and day 8 (1.0 mg/m(2)). On the same days, 250 mg methylprednisolone was administered once, and cyclosporine dose (5 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) was reduced by 50%. Oral mycophenolate mofetil and steroid were withdrawn on day 1 of bortezomib treatment. Intermittent double-filtration plasmapheresis was also performed. We monitored parameters, including T lymphocyte subsets, CD139 and CD19 expression, panel reactive antibody (PRA), and serum creatinine concentration. At follow-up 6 months after bortezomib treatment, we observed: 1) serum creatinine stabilized at 130 μM from a peak level of 337 μM; 2) PRA decreased from a maximum of 66.7 to 0%; 3) blood plasma cell percentage rebounded after significantly decreasing following the first dose of bortezomib; 4) in renal allograft biopsy, immunohistochemical staining for C4d shifted from strongly positive to negative, and cellular rejection shifted from type IIA to borderline; and 5) adverse effects such as platelet suppression, hypotension, and grade 3 peripheral neuropathy emerged. Bortezomib effectively treated antibody-mediated renal transplantation rejection in this case study, but clinical trials with large sample sizes are still needed to explore clinical safety and tolerability.

  8. Prevention trumps treatment of antibody-mediated transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Stuart J; Kwun, Jean; Iwakoshi, Neal

    2010-04-01

    Belying the spectacular success of solid organ transplantation and improvements in immunosuppressive therapy is the reality that long-term graft survival rates remain relatively unchanged, in large part due to chronic and insidious alloantibody-mediated graft injury. Half of heart transplant recipients develop chronic rejection within 10 years - a daunting statistic, particularly for young patients expecting to achieve longevity by enduring the rigors of a transplant. The current immunosuppressive pharmacopeia is relatively ineffective in preventing late alloantibody-associated chronic rejection. In this issue of the JCI, Kelishadi et al. report that preemptive deletion of B cells prior to heart transplantation in cynomolgus monkeys, in addition to conventional posttransplant immunosuppressive therapy with cyclosporine, markedly attenuated not only acute graft rejection but also alloantibody elaboration and chronic graft rejection. The success of this preemptive strike implies a central role for B cells in graft rejection, and this approach may help to delay or prevent chronic rejection after solid organ transplantation.

  9. B cells display an abnormal distribution and an impaired suppressive function in patients with chronic antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Nouël, Alexandre; Ségalen, Isabelle; Jamin, Christophe; Doucet, Laurent; Caillard, Sophie; Renaudineau, Yves; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Le Meur, Yannick; Hillion, Sophie

    2014-03-01

    In kidney transplantation, the composition of the B-cell compartment is increasingly identified as an important determinant for graft outcome. Whereas naive and transitional B cells have been associated with long-term allograft survival and operational tolerance, memory B cells have been linked to graft rejection and graft loss. Chronic antibody-mediated rejection now represents a major complication in transplantation and is a challenge in current therapeutics. Here, we show that patients with chronic antibody-mediated rejection display a unique B-cell phenotype with a reduced ratio of activated to memory B cells associated with an impaired immunosuppressive activity. The regulatory functions of the B cells depended on their maturation status. Thus, phenotypic and functional analyses of the B-cell compartment may be indicated for appropriate follow-up after transplantation and drive therapy in the establishment of transplant tolerance processes.

  10. Memory CD4 T Cells Induce Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Renal Allografts.

    PubMed

    Gorbacheva, Victoria; Fan, Ran; Fairchild, Robert L; Baldwin, William M; Valujskikh, Anna

    2016-11-01

    Despite advances in immunosuppression, antibody-mediated rejection is a serious threat to allograft survival. Alloreactive memory helper T cells can induce potent alloantibody responses and often associate with poor graft outcome. Nevertheless, the ability of memory T cells to elicit well characterized manifestations of antibody-mediated rejection has not been tested. We investigated helper functions of memory CD4 T cells in a mouse model of renal transplantation. Whereas the majority of unsensitized C57Bl/6 recipients spontaneously accepted fully MHC-mismatched A/J renal allografts, recipients containing donor-reactive memory CD4 T cells rapidly lost allograft function. Increased serum creatinine levels, high serum titers of donor-specific alloantibody, minimal T cell infiltration, and intense C4d deposition in the grafts of sensitized recipients fulfilled all diagnostic criteria for acute renal antibody-mediated rejection in humans. IFNγ neutralization did not prevent the renal allograft rejection induced by memory helper T cells, and CD8 T cell depletion at the time of transplantation or depletion of both CD4 and CD8 T cells also did not prevent the renal allograft rejection induced by memory helper T cells starting at day 4 after transplantation. However, B cell depletion inhibited alloantibody generation and significantly extended allograft survival, indicating that donor-specific alloantibodies (not T cells) were the critical effector mechanism of renal allograft rejection induced by memory CD4 T cells. Our studies provide direct evidence that recipient T cell sensitization may result in antibody-mediated rejection of renal allografts and introduce a physiologically relevant animal model with which to investigate mechanisms of antibody-mediated rejection and novel therapeutic approaches for its prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  11. Prevention trumps treatment of antibody-mediated transplant rejection

    PubMed Central

    Knechtle, Stuart J.; Kwun, Jean; Iwakoshi, Neal

    2010-01-01

    Belying the spectacular success of solid organ transplantation and improvements in immunosuppressive therapy is the reality that long-term graft survival rates remain relatively unchanged, in large part due to chronic and insidious alloantibody-mediated graft injury. Half of heart transplant recipients develop chronic rejection within 10 years — a daunting statistic, particularly for young patients expecting to achieve longevity by enduring the rigors of a transplant. The current immunosuppressive pharmacopeia is relatively ineffective in preventing late alloantibody-associated chronic rejection. In this issue of the JCI, Kelishadi et al. report that preemptive deletion of B cells prior to heart transplantation in cynomolgus monkeys, in addition to conventional posttransplant immunosuppressive therapy with cyclosporine, markedly attenuated not only acute graft rejection but also alloantibody elaboration and chronic graft rejection. The success of this preemptive strike implies a central role for B cells in graft rejection, and this approach may help to delay or prevent chronic rejection after solid organ transplantation. PMID:20335653

  12. Treatment of simultaneous acute antibody-mediated rejection and acute cellular rejection with alemtuzumab in kidney transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jirasiritham, S; Khunprakant, R; Techawathanawanna, N; Jirasiritham, Si; Mavichak, V

    2010-04-01

    This is a case report of a living related donor kidney transplantation using basiliximab induction and maintenance immunosuppression with cyclosporine, mycophenolate sodium, and steroid. On the second posttransplant day, the patient developed acute antibody-mediated rejection, which was treated with plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Five days later, the graft had still not responded to the treatment. Another biopsy revealed additional acute cellular rejection (Banff IIA). As alemtuzumab can rapidly deplete T and B lymphocytes, monocytes, and natural killer cells, the patient was treated with alemtuzumab (30 mg subcutaneously) together with methylprednisolone (500 mg) and two more plasmaphereses. The kidney graft responded within 48 hours, producing more than 4 L of urine per day. The total lymphocyte decreased from 530/microL to 50/microL remaining in the 50 to 220/microL range. The patient received valgancyclovir and cotrimoxazole as infection prophylaxis. The kidney graft responded well to the rescue treatment and the patient was discharged with a serum creatinine of 1.1 mg/mL and has been uneventfully followed in the outpatient clinic for 8 months. Today, with the potent, effective, and selective immunosuppressive regimens, the rate and severity of acute cellular rejection in kidney transplantation has decreased in most centers. However, the rate of acute antibody-mediated rejection has increased to levels greater than those of acute cellular rejection in many centers. Acute antibody-mediated rejection is more difficult and expensive to treat successfully. The treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection included plasmapheresis and IVIG. Herein we have reported a case of kidney transplantation simultaneously developing acute antibody-mediated and acute cellular rejection; the patient was successfully treated with alemtuzumab.

  13. Antibody-mediated rejection across solid organ transplants: manifestations, mechanisms, and therapies.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Nicole M; Reed, Elaine F

    2017-06-30

    Solid organ transplantation is a curative therapy for hundreds of thousands of patients with end-stage organ failure. However, long-term outcomes have not improved, and nearly half of transplant recipients will lose their allografts by 10 years after transplant. One of the major challenges facing clinical transplantation is antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) caused by anti-donor HLA antibodies. AMR is highly associated with graft loss, but unfortunately there are few efficacious therapies to prevent and reverse AMR. This Review describes the clinical and histological manifestations of AMR, and discusses the immunopathological mechanisms contributing to antibody-mediated allograft injury as well as current and emerging therapies.

  14. Antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation: a review of pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miae; Martin, Spencer T; Townsend, Keri R; Gabardi, Steven

    2014-07-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), also known as B-cell-mediated or humoral rejection, is a significant complication after kidney transplantation that carries a poor prognosis. Although fewer than 10% of kidney transplant patients experience AMR, as many as 30% of these patients experience graft loss as a consequence. Although AMR is mediated by antibodies against an allograft and results in histologic changes in allograft vasculature that differ from cellular rejection, it has not been recognized as a separate disease process until recently. With an improved understanding about the importance of the development of antibodies against allografts as well as complement activation, significant advances have occurred in the treatment of AMR. The standard of care for AMR includes plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin that remove and neutralize antibodies, respectively. Agents targeting B cells (rituximab and alemtuzumab), plasma cells (bortezomib), and the complement system (eculizumab) have also been used successfully to treat AMR in kidney transplant recipients. However, the high cost of these medications, their use for unlabeled indications, and a lack of prospective studies evaluating their efficacy and safety limit the routine use of these agents in the treatment of AMR in kidney transplant recipients.

  15. [Immunosuppressive treatment after kidney transplant: the frontier of chronic antibody-mediated rejection].

    PubMed

    Biancone, Luigi; Lavacca, Antonio; Beltramo, Silvia; Ariaudo, Claudia; Gallo, Ester; Segoloni, Giuseppe Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The recognition of antibody-mediated rejection as an important factor in the reduction of long-term renal graft survival represents a new challenge to the immunosuppressive strategies of recent years, which have been quite successful in reducing the acute rejection rates as well as the side effects of pharmacological immunosuppression. The search for an effective treatment of chronic anti-donor antibody disease has been pursued mostly through limited single-center experiences and therefore in a dispersed fashion, without leading to the definition of a consolidated approach. The most frequently used pharmacological approaches stem from the experience of antibody-mediated acute rejection. In this review we will critically analyze the results reported so far of various intervention strategies and we will discuss future pharmacological novelties targeting the humoral immune response.

  16. Complement inhibition as potential new therapy for antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Eskandary, Farsad; Wahrmann, Markus; Mühlbacher, Jakob; Böhmig, Georg A

    2016-04-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is a leading cause of kidney allograft failure. While the exact mechanisms contributing to donor-specific antibody (DSA)-triggered tissue injury are still incompletely understood, complement activation via the classical pathway is believed to be one of the key players. There is now growing interest in complement blockade as an antirejection treatment. One attractive strategy may be inhibition of terminal complex formation using anti-C5 antibody eculizumab. Anecdotal reports, case series, and a unique cohort of flow crossmatch-positive live donor kidney transplant recipients subjected to eculizumab-based desensitization have demonstrated successful prevention and reversal of acute clinical ABMR. Nevertheless, maybe due to complement activation steps proximal of C5 or even complement-independent mechanisms, subclinical rejection processes that might culminate in chronic injury were found to escape inhibition. Larger studies designed to clarify the actual clinical value of terminal complement inhibition as an antirejection treatment are currently underway. In addition, alternative concepts, such as therapies that target key component C1, are currently under development, and we will see in the near future whether new strategies in the pipeline will have the potential to beneficially impact clinical practice.

  17. A case of chronic antibody-mediated rejection in the making.

    PubMed

    Bravou, Vasiliki; Galliford, Jack; McLean, Adam; Willicombe, Michelle; Taube, David; Cook, Herbert T; Roufosse, Candice

    2013-10-01

    A kidney transplant recipient developed chronic antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) with clinically significant transplant glomerulopathy while under careful clinical monitoring. The patient developed a de novo donor-specific antibody (DSA) posttransplantation, and a protocol renal biopsy showed C4d deposition with no histological evidence of rejection. Subsequently he developed peritubular capillary basement membrane multilayering, with negative C4d and DSA. Finally, he developed proteinuria and transplant glomerulopathy, with reappearance of DSA and C4d. Despite having a de novo antibody and progressive antibody-mediated damage, this patient under close histological and serological surveillance did not fulfill Banff criteria for acute or chronic ABMR until his disease was advanced. This case illustrates the limitations of current Banff criteria in this setting, due to the fluctuating nature of DSA and C4d staining.

  18. Expanding the antibody-mediated component of plasma cell-rich acute rejection: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Uppin, M. S.; Gudithi, S.; Taduri, G.; Prayaga, A. K.; Raju, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Renal allograft rejection is mediated by T-cells (T-cell mediated rejection) or by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) (antibody mediated rejection, ABMR). Plasma cell-rich acute rejection (PCAR) is a unique entity due to its peculiar morphology and poor prognostic behavior. All allograft biopsies done at our center from January 2013 to October 2014 were reviewed, and seven were identified with a diagnosis of PCAR with antibody mediated rejection (ABMR). The allograft biopsies were classified as per the Banff 2007 schema. Immunohistochemistry with C4d, SV 40, CD3, CD20, CD138, kappa and lambda light chain was performed. Total 210 allograft biopsies were performed in the study period of which seven biopsies (3.3%) were diagnosed as PCAR with ABMR. All these were late ABMRs (more than 6 months) with median posttransplant duration of 17 months. The allograft biopsy showed features of PCAR along with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and positive C4d. DSA was positive in six patients. All the patients were treated with standard therapeutic measures of acute cellular rejection (ACR) and ABMR including steroids, plasma exchange, rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins. All the patients had persistent graft dysfunction or graft loss on follow-up. PMID:27194831

  19. Challenges inherent to the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection in lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Nicholas; Westall, Glen; Paraskeva, Miranda; Ciciulla, John; Cantwell, Linda; Snell, Greg

    2015-01-01

    A bilateral sequential lung transplant was performed on a young female with cystic fibrosis-related bronchiectasis. She had negative prospective T- and B-cell crossmatch, and no known donor-specific antibodies. Post-transplantation, she developed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates of uncertain etiology, compounded by persistent tachycardia and questionable medication adherence. Despite aggressive intervention for suspected cellular rejection with high-dose intravenous corticosteroid, immunoglobulin, and anti-thymocyte globulin, her condition deteriorated to ultimately require ventilatory support. The eventual discovery of eplet donor-recipient mismatches on related DQB1 alleles raised the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection. Before plasmapheresis could be instituted, the patient rapidly succumbed to respiratory failure. Postmortem examination confirmed features of atypical allograft rejection, without evidence of classic acute cellular rejection. This is an unconventional case of antibody-mediated lung allograft rejection – an entity that is currently a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Prevention of donor-specific antibodies by correct donor-recipient matching, and optimizing adherence post-transplantation are most important. PMID:25802749

  20. Bortezomib-containing regimen for primary treatment of early antibody-mediated cardiac allograft rejection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gazdic, Tomas; Svobodova, Eva; Kubanek, Milos; Kment, Martin; Pagacova, Libuse; Viklicky, Ondrej; Malek, Ivan; Kautzner, Josef

    2015-06-01

    Evidence regarding the use of bortezomib-containing schemes in primary treatment of antibody-mediated rejection in heart transplant recipients is scarce. This case report presents the clinical experience with upstream use of bortezomib in primary treatment of early antibody-mediated rejection in an adult heart transplant recipient. Two cycles of bortezomib together with methylprednisolone, immunoadsorption, rituximab, and supplementary doses of intravenous immunoglobulin G reversed signs of heart failure, production of donor-specific antibodies, and findings of antibody-mediated rejection in biopsy. This treatment regimen was tolerated with only mild hematologic toxicity and proved to be successful during a 12-month follow-up. Primary treatment with a bortezomib-containing regimen appears to be a new therapeutic option for severe antibody-mediated rejection in heart transplant recipients. However, the efficacy and safety of this treatment need to be tested in prospective trials.

  1. Better understanding of transplant glomerulopathy secondary to chronic antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Remport, Adam; Ivanyi, Bela; Mathe, Zoltan; Tinckam, Kathryn; Mucsi, Istvan; Molnar, Miklos Z

    2015-11-01

    Transplant glomerulopathy (TG) is generally accepted to result from repeated episodes of endothelial activation, injury and repair, leading to pathological abnormalities of double contouring or multi-layering of the glomerular basement membrane. TG is a major sequel of chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (cABMR), from pre-existing or de novo anti-HLA antibodies. Hepatitis C infection, thrombotic microangiopathy or other factors may also contribute to TG development. TG prevalence is 5-20% in most series, reaching 55%, in some high-risk cohorts, and is associated with worse allograft outcomes. Despite its prevalence and clinical significance, few well-studied treatment options have been proposed. Similar to desensitization protocols, plasmapheresis with or without immunoabsorption, high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, bortezomib and eculizumab have been proposed in the treatment of TG due to cABMR individually or in various combinations. Robust clinical trials are urgently needed to address this major cause of allograft loss. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the epidemiology, etiology, pathology, and the preventive and treatment options for TG secondary to cABMR.

  2. Endothelial Cells in Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Kidney Transplantation: Pathogenesis Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Wang, Jina; Yang, Cheng; Xu, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) has been identified as a main obstacle for stable immune tolerance and long survival of kidney allografts. In spite of new insights into the underlying mechanisms of AMR, accurate diagnosis and efficient treatment are still challenges in clinical practice. Endothelium is the first barrier between recipients' immune systems and grafts in vascularized organ transplants. Considering that endothelial cells express a number of antigens that can be attacked by various allo- and autoantibodies, endothelial cells act as main targets for the recipients' humoral immune responses. Importantly, emerging evidence has shown that endothelial cells in transplants could also initiate protective mechanisms in response to immune injuries. A better understanding of the role of endothelial cells during the pathogenesis of AMR might provide novel therapeutic targets. In the present review, we summarize the antigens expressed by endothelial cells and also discuss the activation and accommodation of endothelial cells as well as their clinical implications. Collectively, the progress discussed in this review indicates endothelial cells as promising targets to improve current diagnosis and therapeutic regimens for AMR. PMID:28255564

  3. Atypical HUS associated with severe, unexpected antibody-mediated rejection post kidney transplant.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Sarah; Mallett, Andrew; Oliver, Kimberley; Hyland, Valentine; Hawley, Carmel; Malmanche, Theo; Isbel, Nicole

    2014-04-01

    We present a case of an unsensitized patient with end-stage kidney disease secondary to atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) with mutations in CD46/MCP and CFH who developed severe, intractable antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) unresponsive to therapy post kidney transplantation. There were no haematological features of thrombotic microangiopathy. The patient received standard induction therapy and after an initial fall in serum creatinine, severe ABMR developed in the setting of urosepsis. Despite maximal therapy with thymoglobulin, plasma exchange and methylprednisolone, rapid graft loss resulted and transplant nephrectomy was performed. Luminex at 4 weeks showed a new DSA and when repeated after nephrectomy showed antibodies to each of the 5 mismatched antigens with high MFI. The rate of recurrence of disease in patients with aHUS referred for transplantation is 50% and is associated with a high rate of graft loss. It is dependent in part on the nature of the mutation with circulating factors CFH and CFI more likely to cause recurrent disease than MCP which is highly expressed in the kidney. There is increasing interest in the role of complement in the development and propagation of ABMR via terminal complement activation. This case suggesting that dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway within the transplant kidney may have contributed to the severe AMR. Very little is known about the impact of complement dysregulation and the development of anti HLA antibodies however the strength of HLA antibody formation was prominent in this case.

  4. Endothelial Cells in Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Kidney Transplantation: Pathogenesis Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Jina; Yang, Cheng; Xu, Ming; Rong, Ruiming; Zhu, Tongyu; Zhu, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) has been identified as a main obstacle for stable immune tolerance and long survival of kidney allografts. In spite of new insights into the underlying mechanisms of AMR, accurate diagnosis and efficient treatment are still challenges in clinical practice. Endothelium is the first barrier between recipients' immune systems and grafts in vascularized organ transplants. Considering that endothelial cells express a number of antigens that can be attacked by various allo- and autoantibodies, endothelial cells act as main targets for the recipients' humoral immune responses. Importantly, emerging evidence has shown that endothelial cells in transplants could also initiate protective mechanisms in response to immune injuries. A better understanding of the role of endothelial cells during the pathogenesis of AMR might provide novel therapeutic targets. In the present review, we summarize the antigens expressed by endothelial cells and also discuss the activation and accommodation of endothelial cells as well as their clinical implications. Collectively, the progress discussed in this review indicates endothelial cells as promising targets to improve current diagnosis and therapeutic regimens for AMR.

  5. Not All Antibodies Are Created Equal: Factors That Influence Antibody Mediated Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Carrie L.; Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Thomas, Kimberly A.

    2017-01-01

    Consistent with Dr. Paul Terasaki's “humoral theory of rejection” numerous studies have shown that HLA antibodies can cause acute and chronic antibody mediated rejection (AMR) and decreased graft survival. New evidence also supports a role for antibodies to non-HLA antigens in AMR and allograft injury. Despite the remarkable efforts by leaders in the field who pioneered single antigen bead technology for detection of donor specific antibodies, a considerable amount of work is still needed to better define the antibody attributes that are associated with AMR pathology. This review highlights what is currently known about the clinical context of pre and posttransplant antibodies, antibody characteristics that influence AMR, and the paths after donor specific antibody production (no rejection, subclinical rejection, and clinical dysfunction with AMR). PMID:28373996

  6. Effective therapy for acute antibody-mediated rejection with mild chronic changes: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gheith, Osama; Al-Otaibi, Torki; Nampoory, Narayanan; Halim, Medhat; Nair, Prasad; Saied, Tarek; Al-Waheeb, Salah; Muzeirei, Ibraheem; Ibraheim, Mona

    2012-08-01

    To reduce the long-term toxicities of immunosuppressant drugs, corticosteroid-sparing and calcineurin-inhibitor-sparing immunosuppression protocols have become increasingly popular in managing kidney transplant recipients. The most vexing clinical condition caused by antibodies in organ transplants is antibody-mediated rejection. Limitations of the current antibody-mediated rejection therapies include (1) antibody-mediated rejection reversal tends to be gradual rather than prompt, (2) expense, (3) rejection reversal rates below 80%, (4) common appearance of chronic rejection after antibody-mediated rejection treatment, and (5) long-term persistence of donor specific antibodies after therapy. Because these limitations may be due to a lack of effects on mature plasma cells, the effects of bortezomib on mature plasma cells may represent a quantum advance in antihumoral therapy. Our experiences represent the first clinical use of bortezomib as an antihumoral agent in renal allograft recipients in Kuwait. We present 2 cases with resistant-acute antibody-mediated rejection to the standard therapies that were managed successfully with bortezomib.

  7. CD256 can be found in antibody-mediated renal allograft rejection tissues.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haiyan; He, Xiaozhou; Zhao, Wei; Guo, Hui; Shi, Qianqian; Zhu, Yibei; Zhang, Xueguang

    2012-01-01

    CD256 and CD257 belong to the TNFSF (Tumor necrosis factor superfamily), share closest homology structure, and can form functional heterotrimers. They may be involved in the progression of SLE (Systemic lupus erythematosus), RA (Rheumatoid arthritis), and other autoimmune disorders. In this present study, CD256 and some related molecules were detected and were investigated regarding the potential role of the CD256 signal during the development of renal allograft rejection. In 2009, 46 cases of renal allografts were collected, excised for evaluation of dysfunction, and 10 renal protocol biopsies with normal renal function were controlled. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining was applied to detect CD256, CD257, C4d, CD138 and other related molecules. HistoQuest Analysis software and SPSS16.0 were used to read and analyse the results. Pathological diagnosis was made according to Banff 2005 guidelines: antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) 15 cases, T-cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) 16 cases, and 15 unknown aetiology cases (UAC). IHC results showed that CD256, CD257, and receptors for B cell activating factor receptor (BAFF-R), B cell maturation antigen (BCMA), and transmembrane activator calcium modulator, and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI) were expressed on the membrane/cytoplasm of renal tubular epithelial cells (RTEC) in the ABMR and TCMR group, while these molecules were not or weakly expressed in UAC and protocol biopsies. CD257 strong staining could be seen in ABMR, CD256 strong staining in both BCMR and TCMR, and there was statistical significance compared with other groups (p < 0.05). The receptors BAFF-R, BCMA, and TACI all strongly stained in ABMR, TACI also stained strongly in TCMR, and there was statistical significance compared with other groups (p < 0.05). The CD138+ molecule could be found in the renal interstitium and membrane/cytoplasm of RTEC, the CD138 mean expression in ABMR was statistically higher than other groups (p < 0.05). The correlation

  8. Complement Inhibition for Prevention and Treatment of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Renal Allograft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Jordan, S C; Choi, J; Kahwaji, J; Vo, A

    2016-04-01

    Therapeutic interventions aimed at the human complement system are recognized as potentially important strategies for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases because there is often evidence of complement-mediated injury according to pathologic assessments. In addition, there are a large number of potential targets, both soluble and cell bound, that might offer potential for new drug development, but progress in this area has met with significant challenges. Currently, 2 drugs are approved aimed at inhibition of complement activation. The first option is eculizumab (anti-C5), which is approved for the treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Eculizumab has also been studied in human transplantation for the treatment and prevention of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Initial data from uncontrolled studies suggested a significant benefit of eculizumab for the prevention of ABMR in highly HLA-sensitized patients, but a subsequent randomized, placebo-controlled trial failed to meet its primary endpoint. Anecdotal data, primarily from case studies, showed benefits in treating complement-mediated ABMR. A second approved complement-inhibiting therapy is C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), which is approved for use in patients with hereditary angioedema, a condition caused by mutations in the gene that codes for C1-INH. A recent placebo-controlled trial of C1-INH for prevention of ABMR in HLA-sensitized patients found that the drug was safe, with evidence for inhibition of systemic complement activation and complement-activating donor-specific antibodies. Other drugs are now under development.

  9. Gene Expression Profiling for the Identification and Classification of Antibody-Mediated Heart Rejection.

    PubMed

    Loupy, Alexandre; Duong Van Huyen, Jean Paul; Hidalgo, Luis; Reeve, Jeff; Racapé, Maud; Aubert, Olivier; Venner, Jeffery M; Falmuski, Konrad; Bories, Marie Cécile; Beuscart, Thibaut; Guillemain, Romain; François, Arnaud; Pattier, Sabine; Toquet, Claire; Gay, Arnaud; Rouvier, Philippe; Varnous, Shaida; Leprince, Pascal; Empana, Jean Philippe; Lefaucheur, Carmen; Bruneval, Patrick; Jouven, Xavier; Halloran, Philip F

    2017-03-07

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) contributes to heart allograft loss. However, an important knowledge gap remains in terms of the pathophysiology of AMR and how detection of immune activity, injury degree, and stage could be improved by intragraft gene expression profiling. We prospectively monitored 617 heart transplant recipients referred from 4 French transplant centers (January 1, 2006-January 1, 2011) for AMR. We compared patients with AMR (n=55) with a matched control group of 55 patients without AMR. We characterized all patients using histopathology (ISHLT [International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation] 2013 grades), immunostaining, and circulating anti-HLA donor-specific antibodies at the time of biopsy, together with systematic gene expression assessments of the allograft tissue, using microarrays. Effector cells were evaluated with in vitro human cell cultures. We studied a validation cohort of 98 heart recipients transplanted in Edmonton, AB, Canada, including 27 cases of AMR and 71 controls. A total of 240 heart transplant endomyocardial biopsies were assessed. AMR showed a distinct pattern of injury characterized by endothelial activation with microcirculatory inflammation by monocytes/macrophages and natural killer (NK) cells. We also observed selective changes in endothelial/angiogenesis and NK cell transcripts, including CD16A signaling and interferon-γ-inducible genes. The AMR-selective gene sets accurately discriminated patients with AMR from those without and included NK transcripts (area under the curve=0.87), endothelial activation transcripts (area under the curve=0.80), macrophage transcripts (area under the curve=0.86), and interferon-γ transcripts (area under the curve=0.84; P<0.0001 for all comparisons). These 4 gene sets showed increased expression with increasing pathological AMR (pAMR) International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation grade (P<0.001) and association with donor-specific antibody levels. The

  10. Acute antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation treated successfully with antigen-specific immunoadsorption.

    PubMed

    Just, Søren Andreas; Marcussen, Niels; Sprogøe, Ulrik; Koefoed-Nielsen, Pernille; Bistrup, Claus

    2010-01-01

    ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is possible after pre-treatment with rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin and basiliximab combined with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. We report on the first patient treated with this protocol who developed acute antibody-mediated rejection (Banff grade II with IgG deposits) caused by ABO antibodies (anti-B). Anti-rejection treatment with anti-B-specific immunoadsorption, intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone efficiently cleared deposited IgG from the kidney allograft and re-established normal kidney function. We suggest that ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation complicated by acute antibody-mediated rejection, caused by ABO antibodies, may successfully be treated with this regime.

  11. A severe Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia inducing an acute antibody-mediated pulmonary graft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Démir, Sarah; Saison, Julien; Sénéchal, Agathe; Mornex, Jean-Francois

    2017-01-01

    A 40-year-old cystic fibrosis woman with a history of double-lung transplantation 2 years previously was admitted for a progressive respiratory distress. Physical examination revealed fever (39°C) and diffuse bilateral lung crackles. Laboratory findings included severe hypoxemia and inflammatory syndrome. Bronchoalveolar lavage and serological test were positive for mycoplasma pneumonia. As the patient did not improve after 3 days of antibiotics and donor-specific HLA antibodies had been detected, an acute antibody-mediated graft rejection was treated with high-dose corticosteroids, plasma exchange, intravenous immunoglobulin, and rituximab. The patient rapidly improved. Unfortunately, 6 months after this episode, she developed a bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome with a dependence to noninvasive ventilator leading to the indication of retransplantation. This case illustrates the possible relationship between infection and humoral rejection. These two diagnoses should be promptly investigated and systematically treated in lung transplant recipients. PMID:28144069

  12. Polymorphisms in genes related to the complement system and antibody-mediated cardiac allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Marrón-Liñares, Grecia M; Núñez, Lucía; Crespo-Leiro, María G; Barge-Caballero, Eduardo; Pombo, Jorge; Paniagua-Martin, María Jesús; Suarez-Fuentetaja, Natalia; Cid, Javier; Grille-Cancela, Zulaika; Muñiz-Garcia, Javier; Tan, Carmela D; Rodríguez, E Rene; Vázquez-Rodríguez, José Manuel; Hermida-Prieto, Manuel

    2017-07-15

    Heart transplantation (HT) is a life-saving treatment for patients with end-stage heart failure. One of the main problems after HT is the humoral response termed antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Complement activation plays a key role in AMR contributing to graft damage. The aim of this study was to analyze genetic variants in genes related to the complement pathways that could be associated with the development of AMR. Analysis of 51 genes related to the complement pathway was performed by next-generation sequencing in 46 HT recipients, 23 with and 23 without AMR. Statistical analysis was performed with SNPstats and R. We identified 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms, 1 in the mannose-binding lectin 2 gene (p.Gly54Asp-MBL2) and 1 in the complement factor properdin gene (p.Asn428(p=)-CFP), that showed significant association with the absence and development of AMR, respectively. Moreover, the presence of the rare allele in p.Gly54Asp-MBL2 control patients correlated with an immunodeficiency of mannose-binding lectin (6.24 ng/ml vs 207.50 ng/ml, p < 0.01), whereas the presence of the rare allele p.Asn428(p=)-CFP in patients with AMR correlated with higher levels of properdin protein (14.65 μg/ml vs 10.77 μg/ml, p < 0.05). AMR is a complex phenotype affected by many recipient factors. Variants in p.Gly54Asp-MBL2 and p.Asn428(p=)-CFP genes, encoding mannose-binding lectin 2 and properdin, may influence the risk of AMR. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A type I interferon signature characterizes chronic antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rascio, Federica; Pontrelli, Paola; Accetturo, Matteo; Oranger, Annarita; Gigante, Margherita; Castellano, Giuseppe; Gigante, Maddalena; Zito, Anna; Zaza, Gianluigi; Lupo, Antonio; Ranieri, Elena; Stallone, Giovanni; Gesualdo, Loreto; Grandaliano, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Chronic antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) represents the main cause of kidney graft loss. To uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying this condition, we characterized the molecular signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and, separately, of CD4(+) T lymphocytes isolated from CAMR patients, compared to kidney transplant recipients with normal graft function and histology. We enrolled 29 patients with biopsy-proven CAMR, 29 stable transplant recipients (controls), and 8 transplant recipients with clinical and histological evidence of interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy. Messenger RNA and microRNA profiling of PBMCs and CD4(+) T lymphocytes was performed using Agilent microarrays in eight randomly selected patients per group from CAMR and control subjects. Results were evaluated statistically and by functional pathway analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) and validated in the remaining subjects. In PBMCs, 45 genes were differentially expressed between the two groups, most of which were up-regulated in CAMR and were involved in type I interferon signalling. In the same patients, 16 microRNAs were down-regulated in CAMR subjects compared to controls: four were predicted modulators of six mRNAs identified in the transcriptional analysis. In silico functional analysis supported the involvement of type I interferon signalling. To further confirm this result, we investigated the transcriptomic profiles of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in an independent group of patients, observing that the activation of type I interferon signalling was a specific hallmark of CAMR. In addition, in CAMR patients, we detected a reduction of circulating BDCA2(+) dendritic cells, the natural type I interferon-producing cells, and their recruitment into the graft along with increased expression of MXA, a type I interferon-induced protein, at the tubulointerstitial and vascular level. Finally, interferon alpha mRNA expression was significantly increased in CAMR compared to control

  14. Morphologic and immunohistochemical findings in antibody-mediated rejection of the cardiac allograft.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Gregory A; Fishbein, Michael C

    2012-12-01

    The recognition and acceptance of the entity of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of solid organs has been slow to develop. Greatest acceptance and most information relates to cardiac transplantation. AMR is thought to represent antibody/complement mediated injury to the microvasculature of the graft that can result in allograft dysfunction, allograft loss, accelerated graft vasculopathy, and increased mortality. The morphologic hallmark is microvascular injury with immunoglobulin and complement deposition in capillaries, accumulation of intravascular macrophages, and in more severe cases, microvascular hemorrhage and thrombosis, with inflammation and edema of the affected organ. Understanding of the pathogenesis of AMR, criteria and methods for diagnosis, and treatment strategies are still in evolution, and will be addressed in this review.

  15. Current and future challenges in therapy for antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Nair, Nandini; Ball, Timothy; Uber, Patricia A; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2011-06-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) continues to present a challenge for the survival of the cardiac allograft. AMR appears to be on the rise, likely secondary to changing trends in clinical practice, including selection of patients for transplantation on mechanical circulatory support and development of more effective combinations of immunosuppressive drugs against acute cellular rejection. Most current strategies are aimed at treating acute AMR, but the treatment of chronic AMR is still not well defined. Clinically, AMR can often be more severe than cellular rejection and more difficult to treat, often not responding to typical protocols of increased immunosuppression. Complex steps involved in the antibody response allows for several potential targets for therapeutic intervention, including suppression of T and B cells, elimination of circulating antibodies, and inhibition of residual antibodies. Existing evidence suggests a multiregimen approach is the best option. Sustenance of accommodation and induction of tolerance could be viewed as viable options if adequate immune surveillance can be achieved in this setting. This review discusses the challenges in treating AMR and provides a critical analysis of current and possible future therapies.

  16. Understanding the causes of kidney transplant failure: the dominant role of antibody-mediated rejection and nonadherence.

    PubMed

    Sellarés, J; de Freitas, D G; Mengel, M; Reeve, J; Einecke, G; Sis, B; Hidalgo, L G; Famulski, K; Matas, A; Halloran, P F

    2012-02-01

    We prospectively studied kidney transplants that progressed to failure after a biopsy for clinical indications, aiming to assign a cause to every failure. We followed 315 allograft recipients who underwent indication biopsies at 6 days to 32 years posttransplant. Sixty kidneys progressed to failure in the follow-up period (median 31.4 months). Failure was rare after T-cell-mediated rejection and acute kidney injury and common after antibody-mediated rejection or glomerulonephritis. We developed rules for using biopsy diagnoses, HLA antibody and clinical data to explain each failure. Excluding four with missing information, 56 failures were attributed to four causes: rejection 36 (64%), glomerulonephritis 10 (18%), polyoma virus nephropathy 4 (7%) and intercurrent events 6 (11%). Every rejection loss had evidence of antibody-mediated rejection by the time of failure. Among rejection losses, 17 of 36 (47%) had been independently identified as nonadherent by attending clinicians. Nonadherence was more frequent in patients who progressed to failure (32%) versus those who survived (3%). Pure T-cell-mediated rejection, acute kidney injury, drug toxicity and unexplained progressive fibrosis were not causes of loss. This prospective cohort indicates that many actual failures after indication biopsies manifest phenotypic features of antibody-mediated or mixed rejection and also underscores the major role of nonadherence.

  17. Disappearance of T Cell-Mediated Rejection Despite Continued Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Late Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Philip F; Chang, Jessica; Famulski, Konrad; Hidalgo, Luis G; Salazar, Israel D R; Merino Lopez, Maribel; Matas, Arthur; Picton, Michael; de Freitas, Declan; Bromberg, Jonathan; Serón, Daniel; Sellarés, Joana; Einecke, Gunilla; Reeve, Jeff

    2015-07-01

    The prevalent renal transplant population presents an opportunity to observe the adaptive changes in the alloimmune response over time, but such studies have been limited by uncertainties in the conventional biopsy diagnosis of T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) and antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). To circumvent these limitations, we used microarrays and conventional methods to investigate rejection in 703 unselected biopsies taken 3 days to 35 years post-transplant from North American and European centers. Using conventional methods, we diagnosed rejection in 205 biopsy specimens (28%): 67 pure TCMR, 110 pure ABMR, and 28 mixed (89 designated borderline). Using microarrays, we diagnosed rejection in 228 biopsy specimens (32%): 76 pure TCMR, 124 pure ABMR, and 28 mixed (no borderline). Molecular assessment confirmed most conventional diagnoses (agreement was 90% for TCMR and 83% for ABMR) but revealed some errors, particularly in mixed rejection, and improved prediction of failure. ABMR was strongly associated with increased graft loss, but TCMR was not. ABMR became common in biopsy specimens obtained >1 year post-transplant and continued to appear in all subsequent intervals. TCMR was common early but progressively disappeared over time. In 108 biopsy specimens obtained 10.2-35 years post-transplant, TCMR defined by molecular and conventional features was never observed. We conclude that the main cause of kidney transplant failure is ABMR, which can present even decades after transplantation. In contrast, TCMR disappears by 10 years post-transplant, implying that a state of partial adaptive tolerance emerges over time in the kidney transplant population.

  18. Successful Salvage Treatment of Resistant Acute Antibody-Mediated Kidney Transplant Rejection with Eculizumab.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saif A; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Riyami, Marwa; Al-Lawati, Nabil M

    2016-08-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) jeopardises short- and long-term transplant survival and remains a challenge in the field of organ transplantation. We report the first use of the anticomplement agent eculizumab in Oman in the treatment of a 61-year-old female patient with ABMR following a living unrelated kidney transplant. The patient was admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in 2013 on the eighth day post-transplantation with serum creatinine (Cr) levels of 400 µmol/L which continued to rise, necessitating haemodialysis. A biopsy indicated ABMR with acute cellular rejection. No improvement was observed following standard ABMR treatment and she continued to require dialysis. Five doses of eculizumab were administered over six weeks with a subsequent dramatic improvement in renal function. The patient became dialysis-free with serum Cr levels of 119 µmol/L within four months. This case report indicates that eculizumab is a promising agent in the treatment of ABMR.

  19. Microarray diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplant biopsies: an international prospective study (INTERCOM).

    PubMed

    Halloran, P F; Pereira, A B; Chang, J; Matas, A; Picton, M; De Freitas, D; Bromberg, J; Serón, D; Sellarés, J; Einecke, G; Reeve, J

    2013-11-01

    In a reference set of 403 kidney transplant biopsies, we recently developed a microarray-based test that diagnoses antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) by assigning an ABMR score. To validate the ABMR score and assess its potential impact on practice, we performed the present prospective INTERCOM study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01299168) in 300 new biopsies (264 patients) from six centers: Baltimore, Barcelona, Edmonton, Hannover, Manchester and Minneapolis. We assigned ABMR scores using the classifier created in the reference set and compared it to conventional assessment as documented in the pathology reports. INTERCOM documented uncertainty in conventional assessment: In 41% of biopsies where ABMR features were noted, the recorded diagnoses did not mention ABMR. The ABMR score correlated with ABMR histologic lesions and donor-specific antibodies, but not with T cell-mediated rejection lesions. The agreement between ABMR scores and conventional assessment was identical to that in the reference set (accuracy 85%). The ABMR score was more strongly associated with failure than conventional assessment, and when the ABMR score and conventional assessment disagreed, only the ABMR score was associated with early progression to failure. INTERCOM confirms the need to reduce uncertainty in the diagnosis of ABMR, and demonstrates the potential of the ABMR score to impact practice.

  20. Key role for CD4 T cells during mixed antibody mediated rejection of renal allografts

    PubMed Central

    Gaughan, A.; Wang, J.; Pelletier, R.P.; Nadasdy, T.; Brodsky, S.; Roy, S.; Lodder, M.; Bobek, D.; Mofatt-Bruce, S.; Fairchild, R.L.; Henry, M.L.; Hadley, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    We utilized mouse models to elucidate the immunologic mechanisms of functional graft loss during mixed antibody mediated rejection of renal allografts (mixed AMR), in which humoral and cellular responses to the graft occur concomitantly. Although the majority of T cells in the graft at the time of rejection were CD8 T cells with only a minor population of CD4 T cells, depletion of CD4 but not CD8 cells prevented acute graft loss during mixed AMR. CD4 depletion eliminated anti-donor alloantibodies and conferred protection from destruction of renal allografts. ELISPOT revealed that CD4 T effectors responded to donor alloantigens by both the direct and indirect pathways of allorecognition. In transfer studies, CD4 T effectors primed to donor alloantigens were highly effective at promoting acute graft dysfunction, and exhibited the attributes of effector T cells. Laser capture microdissection and confirmatory immunostaining studies revealed that CD4 T cells infiltrating the graft produced effector molecules with graft destructive potential. Bioluminescent imaging confirmed that CD4 T effectors traffic to the graft site in immune replete hosts. These data document that host CD4 T cells can promote acute dysfunction of renal allografts by directly mediating graft injury in addition to facilitating anti-donor alloantibody responses. PMID:24410909

  1. Characterization of transfusion-elicited acute antibody-mediated rejection in a rat model of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Huang, G; Wilson, N A; Reese, S R; Jacobson, L M; Zhong, W; Djamali, A

    2014-05-01

    Animal models of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) may provide important evidence supporting proof of concept. We elicited donor-specific antibodies (DSA) by transfusion of donor blood (Brown Norway RT1(n) ) into a complete mismatch recipient (Lewis RT1(l) ) 3 weeks prior to kidney transplantation. Sensitized recipients had increased anti-donor splenocyte IgG1, IgG2b and IgG2c DSA 1 week after transplantation. Histopathology was consistent with ABMR characterized by diffuse peritubular capillary C4d and moderate microvascular inflammation with peritubular capillaritis + glomerulitis > 2. Immunofluorescence studies of kidney allograft tissue demonstrated a greater CD68/CD3 ratio in sensitized animals, primarily of the M1 (pro-inflammatory) phenotype, consistent with cytokine gene analyses that demonstrated a predominant T helper (TH )1 (interferon-γ, IL-2) profile. Immunoblot analyses confirmed the activation of the M1 macrophage phenotype as interferon regulatory factor 5, inducible nitric oxide synthase and phagocytic NADPH oxidase 2 were significantly up-regulated. Clinical biopsy samples in sensitized patients with acute ABMR confirmed the dominance of M1 macrophage phenotype in humans. Despite the absence of tubulitis, we were unable to exclude the effects of T cell-mediated rejection. These studies suggest that M1 macrophages and TH 1 cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of acute mixed rejection in sensitized allograft recipients.

  2. ABO-compatible Liver Allograft Antibody-mediated Rejection: an update

    PubMed Central

    Demetris, Anthony J.; Zeevi, Adriana; O’Leary, Jacqueline G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Liver allograft antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) studies have lagged behind parallel efforts in kidney and heart because of a comparative inherent hepatic resistance to AMR. Three developments, however, have increased interest: 1) solid phase antibody testing enabled more precise antibody characterization; 2) increased expectations for long-term, morbidity-free survival; and 3) immunosuppression minimization trials. Recent Findings Two overlapping liver allograft AMR phenotypic expressions are beginning to emerge: acute and chronic AMR. Acute AMR usually occurs within the several weeks after transplantation and characterized clinically by DSA persistence, allograft dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, and hypocomplementemia. Acute AMR appears histopathologically similar to acute AMR in other organs: diffuse microvascular endothelial cell hypertrophy, C4d deposits, neutrophilic, eosinophilic, and macrophage-mediated microvasculitis/capillaritis, along with liver-specific ductular reaction, centrilobular hepatocyte swelling and hepatocanalicular cholestasis often combined with T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR). Chronic AMR is less well-defined, but strongly linked to serum class II DSA and associated with late-onset acute TCMR, fibrosis, chronic rejection and decreased survival. Unlike acute AMR, chronic AMR is a slowly evolving insult with a number of potential manifestations, but most commonly appears as low-grade lymphoplasmacytic portal and perivenular inflammation accompanied by unusual fibrosis patterns and variable microvascular C4d deposition; capillaritis is more difficult to identify than in acute AMR. Summary More precise DSA characterization, increasing expectations for long-term survival, and immunosuppression weaning precipitated a re-emergence of liver allograft AMR interest. Pathophysiological similarities exist between heart, kidney, and liver allografts, but liver-specific considerations may prove critical to our ultimate understanding of all

  3. Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplantation Without Evidence of Anti-HLA Antibodies?

    PubMed

    Irure, J; López-Hoyos, M; Rodrigo, E; Gómez-Román, J; Ruiz, J C; Arias, M; San Segundo, D

    2016-11-01

    The definition of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is based on serologic (presence and/or development of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies [DSAs]) and histologic (C4d deposition and endothelial damage) criteria. However, several cases of AMR have been described without C4d deposition, and other cases of histologic AMR without DSAs, which could be driven by other non-HLA alloantibodies such as anti-MICA or anti-angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R). Here we studied clinical and histologic humoral rejection in kidney transplant recipients without evidence of anti-HLA antibodies. Fifteen kidney transplant recipients with AMR defined as C4d(+) and/or histologic g+ptc without anti-HLA antibodies in screening test were studied. Sera at the moment of biopsy and 2 months earlier were studied for anti-HLA antibodies by Luminex, in neat, diluted 1/160, and sera after treatment with dithiothreitol (DTT) and confirmed by single-antigen test. The anti-AT1R was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A lack of anti-HLA and MICA antibodies was confirmed after anti-HLA screening test in all conditions (neat, diluted, and DTT-treated) and de novo development of AT1R antibodies was ruled out. Nevertheless, after single-antigen test, 3 patients were identified with a weak reaction against class I antigen and another 4 patients against class II antigen. Due to the lack of locus-C typing in the donors, the DSA assignment cannot be confirmed, whereas anti-HLA class II antigens were DSA. A low sensitivity in the screening of anti-HLA antibody testing was observed. Our results suggest performing single-antigen test in seronegative patients with clinical humoral rejection after screening to confirm the presence of DSA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Plasma C4d+ Endothelial Microvesicles Increase in Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Tower, Cindy M; Reyes, Morayma; Nelson, Karen; Leca, Nicolae; Kieran, Niamh; Muczynski, Kimberly; Jefferson, Jonathan A; Blosser, Christopher; Kukla, Aleksandra; Maurer, David; Chandler, Wayne; Najafian, Behzad

    2017-09-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is a major cause of kidney allograft loss. Currently, AMR diagnosis relies on biopsy which is an invasive procedure. A noninvasive biomarker of acute AMR could lead to early diagnosis and treatment of this condition and improve allograft outcome. Microvesicles are membrane-bound vesicles released from the cell surface after injury. We hypothesized that because AMR is associated with allograft endothelial injury and C4d deposition, plasma microvesicles positive for endothelial (CD144) marker and C4d are increased in this condition. We studied microvesicle concentration in the plasma of 95 kidney transplant patients with allograft dysfunction and compared with 23 healthy volunteers. Biopsy diagnosis and scoring was performed using Banff classification. In the 28 subjects with AMR, the density of C4d+/CD144+ microvesicles was on average 11-fold (P = 0.002) higher than transplant recipients with no AMR and 24-fold (P = 0.008) than healthy volunteers. Densities of C4d+ and C4d+/annexin V+ (C4d+/AVB+) microvesicles were also increased in AMR patients compared with no AMR and healthy subjects. C4d+/AVB+ microvesicles correlated with AMR biopsy severity. Nine patients with acute AMR that received treatment showed a mean 72% decrease (P = 0.01) in C4d+/CD144+ microvesicle concentration compared with pretreatment values. Quantification of plasma C4d+ microvesicles provides information about presence of AMR, its severity and response to treatment in transplant patients.

  5. Circulating angiotensin type II receptor: Possible marker for antibody mediated rejection after renal transplantation?

    PubMed

    Kimball, Pamela M; Gupta, Gaurav; McDougan, Felecia

    2017-06-11

    Presence of antibody [Ab] against angiotensin receptor [AT1R] indicates heightened risk for antibody mediated rejection [AMR] after transplantation but is insufficient as a marker. We speculated AT1R might be released systemically because of AMR and might be a useful biomarker. AT1R was measured in blood from 73 Normals and 72 renal patients pre- and post-transplantation. Patients were stratified as AMR-free [Gp1], AMR<1yr [Gp2] and AMR>1yr [Gp3]. AT1R was higher [13±26vs.367±537, p<0.01)] and more prevalent [20% vs. 92%, p<0.01] among renal patients than Normals. Pretransplant levels were similar [p=ns] between groups. One-year posttransplant levels approached [p<0.01] normalcy for Gps1+3 but spiked during AMR and remained elevated [155±58, p<0.01] for 50% Gp2 patients. One-year AT1R levels were higher among subsequent graft failures than surviving grafts [171±267vs. 38±50, p<0.01]. Pretransplant AT1R was abnormally elevated: possibly indicating ongoing tissue injury. Pretransplant AT1R didn't predict risk for AMR. However, AT1R spiked during early AMR and sustained elevations were associated with poorer outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. A Probabilistic Approach to Histologic Diagnosis of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplant Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Halloran, P F; Famulski, K S; Chang, J

    2017-01-01

    Histologic diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) in kidney transplant biopsies uses lesion score cutoffs such as 0 versus >0 rather than actual scores and requires donor-specific antibody (DSA); however, cutoffs lose information, and DSA is not always reliable. Using microarray-derived molecular ABMR scores as a histology-independent estimate of ABMR in 703 biopsies, we reassessed criteria for ABMR to determine relative importance of various lesions, the utility of equations using actual scores rather than cutoffs, and the potential for diagnosing ABMR when DSA is unknown or negative. We confirmed that the important features for ABMR diagnosis were peritubular capillaritis (ptc), glomerulitis (g), glomerular double contours, DSA and C4d staining, but we questioned some features: arterial fibrosis, vasculitis, acute tubular injury, and sum of ptc+g scores. Regression equations using lesion scores predicted molecular ABMR more accurately than score cutoffs (area under the curve 0.85-0.86 vs. 0.75). DSA positivity improved accuracy, but regression equations predicted ABMR with moderate accuracy when DSA was unknown. Some biopsies without detectable DSA had high probability of ABMR by regression, although most had HLA antibody. We concluded that regression equations using lesion scores plus DSA maximized diagnostic accuracy and can estimate probable ABMR when DSA is unknown or undetectable.

  7. Eculizumab to treat antibody-mediated rejection in a 7-year-old kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Chehade, Hassib; Rotman, Samuel; Matter, Maurice; Girardin, Eric; Aubert, Vincent; Pascual, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    We report on successful early eculizumab administration to treat acute antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) in a highly sensitized kidney transplant recipient. The recipient is a 7-year-old boy who received, 6 months after a desensitization protocol with monthly intravenous immunoglobulin infusion, a second kidney transplant in the presence of low donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). Both pretransplant lymphocytotoxic and flow cytometric crossmatch were negative. Allograft function recovered promptly, with excellent initial function. On postoperative day (POD) 4, the child developed significant proteinuria with an acute rise in serum creatinine. Allograft biopsy showed severe acute ABMR. Intravenous eculizumab (600 mg), preceded by a single session of plasmapheresis, was administered on POD 5 and 12 along with a 4-day thymoglobulin course. After the first dose of eculizumab, a strikingly rapid normalization of allograft function with a decrease in proteinuria occurred. However, because circulating DSA levels remained elevated, the child received 3 doses of intravenous immunoglobulin (POD 15, 16, and 17), with a significant subsequent decrease in DSA levels. At 9 months after transplant, the child continues to maintain excellent allograft function with undetectable circulating DSA levels. This unique case highlights the potential efficacy of using early eculizumab to rapidly reverse severe ABMR in pediatric transplantation, and therefore it suggests a novel therapeutic approach to treat acute ABMR.

  8. Asymptomatic Antibody-mediated Rejection After Heart Transplantation Predicts Poor Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Grace W.; Kobashigawa, Jon A.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Patel, Jignesh K.; Kittleson, Michelle M.; Reed, Elaine F.; Kiyosaki, Krista K.; Ardehali, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Background Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) has been associated with poor outcome after heart transplantation. The diagnosis of AMR usually includes endomyocardial biopsy findings of endothelial cell swelling, intravascular macrophages, C4d+ staining, and associated left ventricular dysfunction. The significance of AMR findings in biopsy specimens of asymptomatic heart transplant patients (normal cardiac function and no symptoms of heart failure) is unclear. Methods Between July 1997 and September 2001, AMR was found in the biopsy specimens of 43 patients. Patients were divided into 2 groups: asymptomatic AMR (AsAMR, n = 21) and treated AMR (TxAMR with associated left ventricular dysfunction, n = 22). For comparison, a control group of 86 contemporaneous patients, without AMR, was matched for age, gender, and time from transplant. Outcomes included 5-year actuarial survival and development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). Patients were considered to have AMR if they had ≥ 1 endomyocardial biopsy specimen positive for AMR. Results The 5-year actuarial survival for the AsAMR (86%), TxAMR (68%), and control groups (79%) was not significantly different (p = 0.41). Five-year freedom from CAV (≥ 30% stenosis in any vessel) was AsAMR, 52%; TxAMR, 68%; and control, 79%. Individually, freedom from CAV was significantly lower in the AsAMR group compared with the control group (p = 0.02). There was no significant difference between AsAMR vs TxAMR and TxAMR vs control for CAV. Conclusions Despite comparable 5-year survival with controls after heart transplantation, AsAMR rejection is associated with a greater risk of CAV. Trials to treat AsAMR to alter outcome are warranted. PMID:19416767

  9. Asymptomatic antibody-mediated rejection after heart transplantation predicts poor outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Grace W; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Fishbein, Michael C; Patel, Jignesh K; Kittleson, Michelle M; Reed, Elaine F; Kiyosaki, Krista K; Ardehali, Abbas

    2009-05-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) has been associated with poor outcome after heart transplantation. The diagnosis of AMR usually includes endomyocardial biopsy findings of endothelial cell swelling, intravascular macrophages, C4d+ staining, and associated left ventricular dysfunction. The significance of AMR findings in biopsy specimens of asymptomatic heart transplant patients (normal cardiac function and no symptoms of heart failure) is unclear. Between July 1997 and September 2001, AMR was found in the biopsy specimens of 43 patients. Patients were divided into 2 groups: asymptomatic AMR (AsAMR, n = 21) and treated AMR (TxAMR with associated left ventricular dysfunction, n = 22). For comparison, a control group of 86 contemporaneous patients, without AMR, was matched for age, gender, and time from transplant. Outcomes included 5-year actuarial survival and development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). Patients were considered to have AMR if they had > or = 1 endomyocardial biopsy specimen positive for AMR. The 5-year actuarial survival for the AsAMR (86%), TxAMR (68%), and control groups (79%) was not significantly different (p = 0.41). Five-year freedom from CAV (> or = 30% stenosis in any vessel) was AsAMR, 52%; TxAMR, 68%; and control, 79%. Individually, freedom from CAV was significantly lower in the AsAMR group compared with the control group (p = 0.02). There was no significant difference between AsAMR vs TxAMR and TxAMR vs control for CAV. Despite comparable 5-year survival with controls after heart transplantation, AsAMR rejection is associated with a greater risk of CAV. Trials to treat AsAMR to alter outcome are warranted.

  10. Histopathologic insights into the mechanism of anti-non-Gal antibody-mediated pig cardiac xenograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Guerard W; Azimzadeh, Agnes M; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Tazelaar, Henry D; Ekser, Burcin; Pierson, Richard N; Robson, Simon C; Cooper, David K C; McGregor, Christopher G A

    2013-01-01

    The histopathology of cardiac xenograft rejection has evolved over the last 20 yr with the development of new modalities for limiting antibody-mediated injury, advancing regimens for immune suppression, and an ever-widening variety of new donor genetics. These new technologies have helped us progress from what was once an overwhelming anti-Gal-mediated hyperacute rejection to a more protracted anti-Gal-mediated vascular rejection to what is now a more complex manifestation of non-Gal humoral rejection and coagulation dysregulation. This review summarizes the changing histopathology of Gal- and non-Gal-mediated cardiac xenograft rejection and discusses the contributions of immune-mediated injury, species-specific immune-independent factors, transplant and therapeutic procedures, and donor genetics to the overall mechanism(s) of cardiac xenograft rejection. PMID:25098626

  11. Plasma cell-rich rejection accompanied by acute antibody-mediated rejection in a patient with ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Maiko; Yamamoto, Izumi; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Sugano, Naoki; Tanno, Yudo; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Yokoo, Takashi

    2014-06-01

    We report a case of plasma cell-rich rejection accompanied by acute antibody-mediated rejection in a patient with ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. A 33-year-old man was admitted for an episode biopsy; he had a serum creatinine (S-Cr) level of 5.7 mg/dL 1 year following primary kidney transplantation. Histological features included two distinct entities: (1) a focal, aggressive tubulointerstitial inflammatory cell (predominantly plasma cells) infiltration with moderate tubulitis; and (2) inflammatory cell infiltration (including neutrophils) in peritubular capillaries. Substantial laboratory examination showed that the patient had donor-specific antibodies for DQ4 and DQ6. Considering both the histological and laboratory findings, we diagnosed him with plasma cell-rich rejection accompanied by acute antibody-mediated rejection. We started 3 days of consecutive steroid pulse therapy three times every 2 weeks for the former and plasma exchange with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for the latter histological feature. One month after treatment, a second allograft biopsy showed excellent responses to treatment for plasma cell-rich rejection, but moderate, acute antibody-mediated rejection remained. Therefore, we added plasma exchange with IVIG again. After treatment, allograft function was stable, with an S-Cr level of 2.8 mg/dL. This case report demonstrates the difficulty of the diagnosis of, and treatment for, plasma cell-rich rejection accompanied by acute antibody-mediated rejection in a patient with ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. We also include a review of the related literature.

  12. Eculizumab for Treatment of Refractory Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplant Patients: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Yelken, B; Arpalı, E; Görcin, S; Kocak, B; Karatas, C; Demiralp, E; Turkmen, A

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is responsible for up to 20%-30% of acute rejection episodes after kidney transplantation. In several cases, conventional therapies including plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and anti-CD20 therapy can resolve AMR successfully. But in some cases the load of immunoglobulins that can activate complement cascade may submerge the routine desensitization therapy and result in the formation of membrane attack complexes. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody against C5, was reported to be an option in cases with severe AMR that are resistant to conventional therapy. Here, we present 8 cases that were resistant to conventional therapy and in which eculizumab was given as a salvage treatment. Given the bad prognosis for renal transplants displaying acute injury progressing rapidly to cortical necrosis on the biopsy, the prompt use of eculizumab could have the advantage of immediate effects by stopping cellular injury. This can provide a therapeutic window to allow conventional treatment modalities to be effective and prevent early graft loss.

  13. 2016 Comprehensive Update of the Banff Working Group on Liver Allograft Pathology: Introduction of Antibody-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Demetris, A J; Bellamy, C; Hübscher, S G; O'Leary, J; Randhawa, P S; Feng, S; Neil, D; Colvin, R B; McCaughan, G; Fung, J J; Del Bello, A; Reinholt, F P; Haga, H; Adeyi, O; Czaja, A J; Schiano, T; Fiel, M I; Smith, M L; Sebagh, M; Tanigawa, R Y; Yilmaz, F; Alexander, G; Baiocchi, L; Balasubramanian, M; Batal, I; Bhan, A K; Bucuvalas, J; Cerski, C T S; Charlotte, F; de Vera, M E; ElMonayeri, M; Fontes, P; Furth, E E; Gouw, A S H; Hafezi-Bakhtiari, S; Hart, J; Honsova, E; Ismail, W; Itoh, T; Jhala, N C; Khettry, U; Klintmalm, G B; Knechtle, S; Koshiba, T; Kozlowski, T; Lassman, C R; Lerut, J; Levitsky, J; Licini, L; Liotta, R; Mazariegos, G; Minervini, M I; Misdraji, J; Mohanakumar, T; Mölne, J; Nasser, I; Neuberger, J; O'Neil, M; Pappo, O; Petrovic, L; Ruiz, P; Sağol, Ö; Sanchez Fueyo, A; Sasatomi, E; Shaked, A; Shiller, M; Shimizu, T; Sis, B; Sonzogni, A; Stevenson, H L; Thung, S N; Tisone, G; Tsamandas, A C; Wernerson, A; Wu, T; Zeevi, A; Zen, Y

    2016-06-07

    The Banff Working Group on Liver Allograft Pathology reviewed and discussed literature evidence regarding antibody-mediated liver allograft rejection at the 11th (Paris, France, June 5-10, 2011), 12th (Comandatuba, Brazil, August 19-23, 2013), and 13th (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, October 5-10, 2015) meetings of the Banff Conference on Allograft Pathology. Discussion continued online. The primary goal was to introduce guidelines and consensus criteria for the diagnosis of liver allograft antibody-mediated rejection and provide a comprehensive update of all Banff Schema recommendations. Included are new recommendations for complement component 4d tissue staining and interpretation, staging liver allograft fibrosis, and findings related to immunosuppression minimization. In an effort to create a single reference document, previous unchanged criteria are also included.

  14. Severe antibody-mediated rejection following IVIG infusion in a kidney transplant recipient with BK-virus nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Mainra, R; Xu, Q; Chibbar, R; Hassan, A; Shoker, A

    2013-06-01

    Intravenous immune-globulin (IVIG) use in renal transplantation has increased, with common uses including desensitization, treatment of antibody mediated rejection and adjunctive therapy for BK virus nephropathy. Although considered generally safe, potential side effects can occur in up to 23% of patients including acute kidney injury. We present a case of an unexpected cause of acute kidney injury in a renal transplant recipient following IVIG infusion. A 48-year-old nonsensitized female with end stage renal disease secondary to polycystic kidney disease received a deceased donor kidney transplant. The initial post-transplant period was unremarkable however at three years post-transplant the patient develops BK virus nephropathy. Despite a reduction in immunosuppression, graft function worsened and IVIG infusion was commenced. Immediately following the IVIG infusion, the patient develops anuric acute kidney injury necessitating hemodialysis. Renal transplant biopsy performed before and after the IVIG infusion revealed the de novo development of acute antibody mediated rejection and donor specific antibodies in the serum. Anti-HLA and donor-specific antibodies were also confirmed in a diluted sample of the IVIG preparation. We argue that the anti-HLA antibodies present in the IVIG caused an acute antibody mediated rejection in this previously nonsensitized female.

  15. Late antibody-mediated rejection after heart transplantation: Mortality, graft function, and fulminant cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Coutance, Guillaume; Ouldamar, Salima; Rouvier, Philippe; Saheb, Samir; Suberbielle, Caroline; Bréchot, Nicolas; Hariri, Sarah; Lebreton, Guillaume; Leprince, Pascal; Varnous, Shaida

    2015-08-01

    Late antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) after heart transplantation is suspected to be associated with a poor short-term prognosis. A retrospective single-center observational study was performed. Late AMR was defined as AMR occurring at least 1 year after heart transplantation. The study included all consecutive patients with proven and treated late acute AMR at the authors' institution between November 2006 and February 2013. The aim was to analyze the prognosis after late AMR, including mortality, recurrence of AMR, left ventricular ejection fraction, and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). Selected endomyocardial biopsy specimens obtained before AMR were also blindly reviewed to identify early histologic signs of AMR. The study included 20 patients treated for late AMR. Despite aggressive immunosuppressive therapies (100% of patients received intravenous methylprednisolone, 90% received intravenous immunoglobulin [IVIg],85% received plasmapheresis, 45% received rituximab), the prognosis remained poor. Survival after late AMR was 80% at 1 month, 60% at 3 months, and 50% at 1 year. All early deaths (<3 months, n = 8) were directly attributable to graft dysfunction or to complication of the intense immunosuppressive regimen. Among survivors at 3 months (n = 12), histologic persistence or recurrence of AMR, persistent left ventricular dysfunction, and fulminant CAV were common (33%, 33%, and 17% of patients). Microvascular inflammation was detected in at least 1 biopsy specimen obtained before AMR in 13 patients (65%). Prognosis after late AMR is poor despite aggressive immunosuppressive therapies. Fulminant CAV is a common condition in these patients. Microvascular inflammation is frequent in endomyocardial biopsy specimens before manifestation of symptomatic AMR. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatment of Antibody-Mediated Renal Allograft Rejection: Improving Step by Step

    PubMed Central

    Duerr, Michael; Schönemann, Constanze; Pruß, Axel; Budde, Klemens; Waiser, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Throughout the past years we stepwise modified our immunosuppressive treatment regimen for patients with antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Here, we describe three consecutive groups treated with different regimens. From 2005 until 2008, we treated all patients with biopsy-proven ABMR with rituximab (500 mg), low-dose (30 g) intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG), and plasmapheresis (PPH, 6x) (group RLP, n = 12). Between 2009 and June 2010, patients received bortezomib (1.3 mg/m2, 4x) together with low-dose IVIG and PPH (group BLP, n = 11). In July 2010, we increased the IVIG dose and treated all subsequent patients with bortezomib, high-dose IVIG (1.5 g/kg), and PPH (group BHP, n = 11). Graft survival at three years after treatment was 73% in group BHP as compared to 45% in group BLP and 25% in group RLP. At six months after treatment median serum creatinine was 2.1 mg/dL, 2.9 mg/dL, and 4.2 mg/dL in groups BHP, BLP, and RLP, respectively (p = 0.02). Following treatment, a significant decrease of donor-specific HLA antibody (DSA) mean fluorescence intensity from 8467 ± 6876 to 5221 ± 4711 (p = 0.01) was observed in group BHP, but not in the other groups. Our results indicate that graft survival, graft function, and DSA levels could be improved along with stepwise modifications to our treatment regimen, that is, the introduction of bortezomib and high-dose IVIG treatment. PMID:28255562

  17. Molecular Microscope Strategy to Improve Risk Stratification in Early Antibody-Mediated Kidney Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Loupy, Alexandre; Lefaucheur, Carmen; Vernerey, Dewi; Chang, Jessica; Hidalgo, Luis G.; Beuscart, Thibaut; Verine, Jerome; Aubert, Olivier; Dubleumortier, Sébastien; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Jouven, Xavier; Glotz, Denis; Legendre, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is the leading cause of kidney allograft loss. We investigated whether the addition of gene expression measurements to conventional methods could serve as a molecular microscope to identify kidneys with ABMR that are at high risk for failure. We studied 939 consecutive kidney recipients at Necker Hospital (2004–2010; principal cohort) and 321 kidney recipients at Saint Louis Hospital (2006–2010; validation cohort) and assessed patients with ABMR in the first 1 year post-transplant. In addition to conventional features, we assessed microarray-based gene expression in transplant biopsy specimens using relevant molecular measurements: the ABMR Molecular Score and endothelial donor-specific antibody-selective transcript set. The main outcomes were kidney transplant loss and progression to chronic transplant injury. We identified 74 patients with ABMR in the principal cohort and 54 patients with ABMR in the validation cohort. Conventional features independently associated with failure were donor age and humoral histologic score (g+ptc+v+cg+C4d). Adjusting for conventional features, ABMR Molecular Score (hazard ratio [HR], 2.22; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.37 to 3.58; P=0.001) and endothelial donor-specific antibody-selective transcripts (HR, 3.02; 95% CI, 1.00 to 9.16; P<0.05) independently associated with an increased risk of graft loss. The results were replicated in the independent validation group. Adding a gene expression assessment to a traditional risk model improved the stratification of patients at risk for graft failure (continuous net reclassification improvement, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.57 to 1.46; P<0.001; integrated discrimination improvement, 0.16; P<0.001). Compared with conventional assessment, the addition of gene expression measurement in kidney transplants with ABMR improves stratification of patients at high risk for graft loss. PMID:24700874

  18. Treatment of Acute Antibody-Mediated Renal Allograft Rejection With Cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Waiser, Johannes; Duerr, Michael; Budde, Klemens; Rudolph, Birgit; Wu, Kaiyin; Bachmann, Friederike; Halleck, Fabian; Schönemann, Constanze; Lachmann, Nils

    2017-10-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is a major risk for renal allograft survival. Throughout decades, cyclophosphamide treatment has been proven to be effective in patients with antibody-associated autoimmune diseases. We investigated whether cyclophosphamide combined with plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulins is an option for patients with AMR. Between March 2013 and November 2015, we initiated treatment of 13 consecutive patients with biopsy-proven acute AMR with intravenous cyclophosphamide pulses (15 mg/kg adapted to age and renal function) at 3-week intervals, PPH (6×), and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (1.5 g/kg). Treatment was completed after 6 cyclophosphamide pulses or in case of return to baseline serum creatinine together with reduction of donor-specific HLA antibodies (DSA) below 500 mean fluorescence intensity. Eleven of 13 patients completed treatment. Median follow-up was 18 (12-44) months. At the end of follow-up, graft survival was 77% (10/13). The 3 graft losses were caused at least in part by nonadherence and premature termination of treatment. Serum creatinine increased from 1.7±0.4 mg/dL at 3 months before diagnosis to 3.7±2.4 mg/dL at diagnosis (P = 0.01), and decreased to 2.1 ± 0.7 mg/dL at 3 months after diagnosis (P = 0.01). In 7 (64%) of 11 patients, who completed treatment, DSA decreased, in 4 (36%) of 11 DSA were below 500 mean fluorescence intensity after treatment. Dose reductions had to be performed in 3 of 13 patients for leukopenia. We observed 14 hospitalizations in 9 of 13 patients. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic report on cyclophosphamide-based treatment of acute AMR based on modern diagnostics. Treatment was effective and relatively safe. Future studies will show, whether cyclophosphamide proves to be a valuable alternative for the treatment of AMR.

  19. Report from a consensus conference on antibody-mediated rejection in heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kobashigawa, Jon; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G.; Ensminger, Stephan M.; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Angelini, Annalisa; Berry, Gerald; Burke, Margaret; Czer, Lawrence; Hiemann, Nicola; Kfoury, Abdallah G.; Mancini, Donna; Mohacsi, Paul; Patel, Jignesh; Pereira, Naveen; Platt, Jeffrey L.; Reed, Elaine F.; Reinsmoen, Nancy; Rodriguez, E. Rene; Rose, Marlene L.; Russell, Stuart D.; Starling, Randy; Suciu-Foca, Nicole; Tallaj, Jose; Taylor, David O.; Van Bakel, Adrian; West, Lori; Zeevi, Adriana; Zuckermann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The problem of AMR remains unsolved because standardized schemes for diagnosis and treatment remains contentious. Therefore, a consensus conference was organized to discuss the current status of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in heart transplantation. METHODS The conference included 83 participants (transplant cardiologists, surgeons, immunologists and pathologists) representing 67 heart transplant centers from North America, Europe, and Asia who all participated in smaller break-out sessions to discuss the various topics of AMR and attempt to achieve consensus. RESULTS A tentative pathology diagnosis of AMR was established, however, the pathologist felt that further discussion was needed prior to a formal recommendation for AMR diagnosis. One of the most important outcomes of this conference was that a clinical definition for AMR (cardiac dysfunction and/or circulating donor-specific antibody) was no longer believed to be required due to recent publications demonstrating that asymptomatic (no cardiac dysfunction) biopsy-proven AMR is associated with subsequent greater mortality and greater development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy. It was also noted that donor-specific antibody is not always detected during AMR episodes as the antibody may be adhered to the donor heart. Finally, recommendations were made for the timing for specific staining of endomyocardial biopsy specimens and the frequency by which circulating antibodies should be assessed. Recommendations for management and future clinical trials were also provided. CONCLUSIONS The AMR Consensus Conference brought together clinicians, pathologists and immunologists to further the understanding of AMR. Progress was made toward a pathology AMR grading scale and consensus was accomplished regarding several clinical issues. PMID:21300295

  20. Report from a consensus conference on antibody-mediated rejection in heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kobashigawa, Jon; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G; Ensminger, Stephan M; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Angelini, Annalisa; Berry, Gerald; Burke, Margaret; Czer, Lawrence; Hiemann, Nicola; Kfoury, Abdallah G; Mancini, Donna; Mohacsi, Paul; Patel, Jignesh; Pereira, Naveen; Platt, Jeffrey L; Reed, Elaine F; Reinsmoen, Nancy; Rodriguez, E Rene; Rose, Marlene L; Russell, Stuart D; Starling, Randy; Suciu-Foca, Nicole; Tallaj, Jose; Taylor, David O; Van Bakel, Adrian; West, Lori; Zeevi, Adriana; Zuckermann, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    The problem of AMR remains unsolved because standardized schemes for diagnosis and treatment remains contentious. Therefore, a consensus conference was organized to discuss the current status of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in heart transplantation. The conference included 83 participants (transplant cardiologists, surgeons, immunologists and pathologists) representing 67 heart transplant centers from North America, Europe, and Asia who all participated in smaller break-out sessions to discuss the various topics of AMR and attempt to achieve consensus. A tentative pathology diagnosis of AMR was established, however, the pathologist felt that further discussion was needed prior to a formal recommendation for AMR diagnosis. One of the most important outcomes of this conference was that a clinical definition for AMR (cardiac dysfunction and/or circulating donor-specific antibody) was no longer believed to be required due to recent publications demonstrating that asymptomatic (no cardiac dysfunction) biopsy-proven AMR is associated with subsequent greater mortality and greater development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy. It was also noted that donor-specific antibody is not always detected during AMR episodes as the antibody may be adhered to the donor heart. Finally, recommendations were made for the timing for specific staining of endomyocardial biopsy specimens and the frequency by which circulating antibodies should be assessed. Recommendations for management and future clinical trials were also provided. The AMR Consensus Conference brought together clinicians, pathologists and immunologists to further the understanding of AMR. Progress was made toward a pathology AMR grading scale and consensus was accomplished regarding several clinical issues. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. All rights reserved.

  1. Treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection using bortezomib: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yong-Hun; Kim, Yong-Jin; Oh, Joon Seok; Lee, Jin Ho; Kim, Seong Min; Kim, Joong Kyung

    2015-07-01

    Here we report the successful treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) with bortezomib. Bortezomib rescue treatment was administered after a 42-year-old woman failed to respond to steroid pulse and plasmapheresis with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). The patient underwent a second renal transplantation with a deceased donor kidney. She was treated pre-operatively with rituximab (200 mg/body) and underwent plasmapheresis twice (day-1 and operation day) because ELISA screening revealed that her pre-operative peak panel reactive antibody (PRA) composition was 100% class I and 100% class II and 15 times of cross-match positive history during the waiting period for transplantation. The patients received induction therapy with Simulect (an IL-2-blocking agent). A 1-hour protocol biopsy revealed C4d-positivity and mild peritubular capillary inflammation. This was suggestive of early AMR-associated changes. After transplantation, the patient underwent plasmaphereses (nine times) with low-dose IVIG (2 mg/kg). Despite this treatment regimen, serum creatinine levels increased to 3.4 mg/dL on post-transplant day 15. A second graft biopsy was performed, which showed overt AMR with glomerulitis, peritubular capillary inflammation and no C4d deposition. On post-operative day (POD) 22, treatment with four doses of bortezomib (1.3 mg/m(2) ) was initiated with the patient's consent. On POD 55, renal function had recovered and serum creatinine was 1.5 mg/dL. In summary, bortezomib was administered as a rescue treatment for a patient who developed AMR that was refractory to a combination of plasmaphereses with low-dose IVIG and preemptive administration of rituximab.

  2. Antibody-mediated rejection in pediatric kidney transplantation: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yolanda W; Singh, Manpreet; Sarwal, Minnie M

    2015-04-01

    Kidney transplant is the preferred treatment of pediatric end-stage renal disease. One of the most challenging aspects of pediatric kidney transplant is the prevention and treatment of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR), which is one of the main causes of graft dysfunction and early graft loss. Most challenges are similar to those faced in adult kidney transplants; however, factors unique to the pediatric realm include naivety of the immune system and the small number of studies and randomized controlled trials available when considering pharmacological treatment options. Here, we present a case of ABMR in a pediatric patient and a review of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of ABMR. ABMR in pediatric kidney transplant continues to be a frustrating condition to treat because (1) there still remain many unidentified potential antigens leading to ABMR, (2) children and adults are at different stages of their immune system development, and, thus, (3) the full pathophysiology of alloimmunity is still not completely understood, and (4) the efficacy and safety of treatment in adults may not be directly translated to children. As we continue to gain a better understanding towards the precise alloimmune mechanism that drives a particular ABMR, we can also improve pharmacotherapeutic choices. With continued research, they will become more precise in treating a particular mechanism versus using a broad scope of immunosuppression such as steroids. However, there is much more to be uncovered, such as identifying more non-human leukocyte antigens and their role in alloimmunity, determining the exact mechanism of adults achieving complete operational tolerance, and understanding the difference between pediatric and adult transplant recipients. Making strides towards a better understanding of these mechanisms will lead to continued efficacy and safety in treatment of pediatric ABMR.

  3. Molecular microscope strategy to improve risk stratification in early antibody-mediated kidney allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Loupy, Alexandre; Lefaucheur, Carmen; Vernerey, Dewi; Chang, Jessica; Hidalgo, Luis G; Beuscart, Thibaut; Verine, Jerome; Aubert, Olivier; Dubleumortier, Sébastien; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Jouven, Xavier; Glotz, Denis; Legendre, Christophe; Halloran, Philip F

    2014-10-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is the leading cause of kidney allograft loss. We investigated whether the addition of gene expression measurements to conventional methods could serve as a molecular microscope to identify kidneys with ABMR that are at high risk for failure. We studied 939 consecutive kidney recipients at Necker Hospital (2004-2010; principal cohort) and 321 kidney recipients at Saint Louis Hospital (2006-2010; validation cohort) and assessed patients with ABMR in the first 1 year post-transplant. In addition to conventional features, we assessed microarray-based gene expression in transplant biopsy specimens using relevant molecular measurements: the ABMR Molecular Score and endothelial donor-specific antibody-selective transcript set. The main outcomes were kidney transplant loss and progression to chronic transplant injury. We identified 74 patients with ABMR in the principal cohort and 54 patients with ABMR in the validation cohort. Conventional features independently associated with failure were donor age and humoral histologic score (g+ptc+v+cg+C4d). Adjusting for conventional features, ABMR Molecular Score (hazard ratio [HR], 2.22; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.37 to 3.58; P=0.001) and endothelial donor-specific antibody-selective transcripts (HR, 3.02; 95% CI, 1.00 to 9.16; P<0.05) independently associated with an increased risk of graft loss. The results were replicated in the independent validation group. Adding a gene expression assessment to a traditional risk model improved the stratification of patients at risk for graft failure (continuous net reclassification improvement, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.57 to 1.46; P<0.001; integrated discrimination improvement, 0.16; P<0.001). Compared with conventional assessment, the addition of gene expression measurement in kidney transplants with ABMR improves stratification of patients at high risk for graft loss.

  4. Presentation and Outcomes of C4d-Negative Antibody-Mediated Rejection After Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Orandi, B J; Alachkar, N; Kraus, E S; Naqvi, F; Lonze, B E; Lees, L; Van Arendonk, K J; Wickliffe, C; Bagnasco, S M; Zachary, A A; Segev, D L; Montgomery, R A

    2016-01-01

    The updated Banff classification allows for the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in the absence of peritubular capillary C4d staining. Our objective was to quantify allograft loss risk in patients with consistently C4d-negative AMR (n = 51) compared with C4d-positive AMR patients (n = 156) and matched control subjects without AMR. All first-year posttransplant biopsy results from January 2004 through June 2014 were reviewed and correlated with the presence of donor-specific antibody (DSA). C4d-negative AMR patients were not different from C4d-positive AMR patients on any baseline characteristics, including immunologic risk factors (panel reactive antibody, prior transplant, HLA mismatch, donor type, DSA class, and anti-HLA/ABO-incompatibility). C4d-positive AMR patients were significantly more likely to have a clinical presentation (85.3% vs. 54.9%, p < 0.001), and those patients presented substantially earlier posttransplantation (median 14 [interquartile range 8-32] days vs. 46 [interquartile range 20-191], p < 0.001) and were three times more common (7.8% vs 2.5%). One- and 2-year post-AMR-defining biopsy graft survival in C4d-negative AMR patients was 93.4% and 90.2% versus 86.8% and 82.6% in C4d-positive AMR patients, respectively (p = 0.4). C4d-negative AMR was associated with a 2.56-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.08-6.05, p = 0.033) increased risk of graft loss compared with AMR-free matched controls. No clinical characteristics were identified that reliably distinguished C4d-negative from C4d-positive AMR. However, both phenotypes are associated with increased graft loss and thus warrant consideration for intervention.

  5. Histological long-term outcomes from acute antibody-mediated rejection following ABO-compatible liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Del Bello, Arnaud; Danjoux, Marie; Congy-Jolivet, Nicolas; Lavayssière, Laurence; Esposito, Laure; Muscari, Fabrice; Kamar, Nassim

    2017-04-01

    Acute antibody-mediated rejection (aAMR) is an unusual complication after orthotopic ABO-compatible liver transplantation. To date, the clinical and histological long-term outcomes after aAMR are not well known. Herein, we describe nine cases of aAMR that occurred in our liver-transplant center between 2008 and 2016, with an initial and reevaluation liver biopsy available for reexamination. Two patients presented with aAMR at 10.5 (10, 11) days post-transplantation, caused by preformed donor-specific antibodies. Seven other recipients developed de novo donor-specific antibodies and aAMR at 11.2 (3-24) months post-transplantation. Eight of the nine patients received a B-cell targeting agent (rituximab, with or without plasma exchange), associated with polyclonal antibodies (three patients) or intravenous immunoglobulins (three patients). At the last follow up (i.e. 21 [4-90] months post-aAMR), seven patients were alive, including two patients with normal liver tests. Grafts' survival was 66%. A liver biopsy performed at 11.5 (5-48.5) months after the first biopsy showed no significant improvement in aAMR score (from 2 ± 1.3 to 1.6 ± 1.5, P = 0.6), a significant improvement in chronic AMR score (from 37 ± 9 to 25 ± 8, P = 0.003) and an increase in the Metavir score (1.2 ± 0.6 to 2.1 ± 0.9, P = 0.03). In this study, a B-cell-depleting agent seemed to improve the prognosis of aAMR in selected cases, but several patients kept active lesions antibody-mediated rejection. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Difference in outcomes after antibody-mediated rejection between abo-incompatible and positive cross-match transplantations.

    PubMed

    Couzi, Lionel; Manook, Miriam; Perera, Ranmith; Shaw, Olivia; Ahmed, Zubir; Kessaris, Nicos; Dorling, Anthony; Mamode, Nizam

    2015-10-01

    Graft survival seems to be worse in positive cross-match (HLAi) than in ABO-incompatible (ABOi) transplantation. However, it is not entirely clear why these differences exist. Sixty-nine ABOi, 27 HLAi and 10 combined ABOi+HLAi patients were included in this retrospective study, to determine whether the frequency, severity and the outcome of active antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) were different. Five-year death-censored graft survival was better in ABOi than in HLAi and ABOi+HLAi patients (99%, 69% and 64%, respectively, P = 0.0002). Features of AMR were found in 38%, 95% and 100% of ABOi, HLAi and ABOi+HLAi patients that had a biopsy, respectively (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.001). After active AMR, a declining eGFR and graft loss were observed more frequently in HLAi and HLAi+ABOi than in ABOi patients. The poorer prognosis after AMR in HLAi and ABOi+HLAi transplantations was not explained by a higher severity of histological lesions or by a less aggressive treatment. In conclusion, ABOi transplantation offers better results than HLAi transplantation, partly because AMR occurs less frequently but also because outcome after AMR is distinctly better. HLAi and combined ABOi+HLAi transplantations appear to have the same outcome, suggesting there is no synergistic effect between anti-A/B and anti-HLA antibodies.

  7. Complement-fixing antibodies against denatured HLA and MICA antigens are associated with antibody mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Cai, Junchao; Terasaki, Paul I; Zhu, Dong; Lachmann, Nils; Schönemann, Constanze; Everly, Matthew J; Qing, Xin

    2016-02-01

    We have found antibodies against denatured HLA class I antigens in the serum of allograft recipients which were not significantly associated with graft failure. It is unknown whether transplant recipients also have denatured HLA class II and MICA antibodies. The effects of denatured HLA class I, class II, and MICA antibodies on long-term graft outcome were further investigated based on their ability to fix complement c1q. In this 4-year retrospective cohort study, post-transplant sera from 975 kidney transplant recipients were tested for antibodies against denatured HLA/MICA antigens and these antibodies were further classified based on their ability to fix c1q. Thirty percent of patients had antibodies against denatured HLA class I, II, or MICA antigens. Among them, 8.5% and 21.5% of all patients had c1q-fixing and non c1q-fixing antibodies respectively. There was no significant difference on graft survival between patients with or without antibodies against denatured HLA/MICA. However, when these antibodies were further classified according to their ability to fix c1q, patients with c1q-fixing antibodies had a significantly lower graft survival rate than patients without antibodies or patients with non c1q-fixing antibodies (p=0.008). In 169 patients who lost renal grafts, 44% of them had c1q-fixing antibodies against denatured HLA/MICA antigens, which was significantly higher than that in patients with functioning renal transplants (25%, p<0.0001). C1q-fixing antibodies were more significantly associated with graft failure caused by AMR (72.73%) or mixed AMR/CMR (61.9%) as compared to failure due to CMR (35.3%) or other causes (39.2%) (p=0.026). Transplant recipients had antibodies against denatured HLA class I, II, and MICA antigens. However, only c1q-fixing antibodies were associated with graft failure which was related to antibody mediated rejection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Probable C4d-negative accelerated acute antibody-mediated rejection due to non-HLA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Niikura, Takahito; Yamamoto, Izumi; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Kamejima, Sahoko; Katsumata, Haruki; Yamakawa, Takafumi; Furuya, Maiko; Mafune, Aki; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Miki, Jun; Yamada, Hiroki; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    We report a case of probable C4d-negative accelerated acute antibody-mediated rejection due to non-HLA antibodies. A 44 year-old male was admitted to our hospital for a kidney transplant. The donor, his wife, was an ABO minor mismatch (blood type O to A) and had Gitelman syndrome. Graft function was delayed; his serum creatinine level was 10.1 mg/dL at 3 days after transplantation. Open biopsy was performed immediately; no venous thrombosis was observed during surgery. Histology revealed moderate peritubular capillaritis and mild glomerulitis without C4d immunoreactivity. Flow cytometric crossmatching was positive, but no panel-reactive antibodies against HLA or donor-specific antibodies (DSAbs) to major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) were detected. Taken together, we diagnosed him with probable C4d-negative accelerated antibody-mediated rejection due to non-HLA, non-MICA antibodies, the patient was treated with steroid pulse therapy (methylprednisolone 500 mg/day for 3 days), plasma exchange, intravenous immunoglobulin (40 g/body), and rituximab (200 mg/body) were performed. Biopsy at 58 days after transplantation, at which time S-Cr levels were 1.56 mg/dL, found no evidence of rejection. This case, presented with a review of relevant literature, demonstrates that probable C4d-negative accelerated acute AMR can result from non-HLA antibodies.

  9. Role of C1q complement fixing antibody assay in therapeutic plasma exchange management of pediatric cardiac antibody mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Onwuemene, Oluwatoyosi A; Heath, Deneen M; Hartman, Carol; Wong, Edward C C

    2017-08-01

    Pediatric cardiac transplant patients with antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) often undergo therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) to remove pathologic donor specific antibodies (DSA). In cases where DSA persist, it is unclear how long TPE should be continued. We report a case of a 17-year-old cardiac transplant patient with AMR where use of a C1q complement fixing antibody assay helped guide TPE cessation. This report adds to the existing literature that highlights the potential clinical significance of C1q antibodies in AMR management. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Intravenous immunoglobulins and rituximab therapy for severe transplant glomerulopathy in chronic antibody-mediated rejection: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bachelet, Thomas; Nodimar, Celine; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Lepreux, Sebastien; Moreau, Karine; Morel, Delphine; Guidicelli, Gwendaline; Couzi, Lionel; Merville, Pierre

    2015-05-01

    Outcome of patients with transplant glomerulopathy (TG) is poor. Using B-cell targeting molecules represent a rational strategy to treat TG during chronic antibody-mediated rejection. In this pilot study, 21 patients with this diagnosis received four doses of intravenous immunoglobulins and two doses of rituximab (IVIG/RTX group). They were retrospectively compared with a untreated control group of 10 patients. At 24 months post-biopsy, graft survival was similar and poor between the treated and the untreated group, 47% vs. 40%, respectively, p = 0.69. This absence of response of IVIG/RTX treatment was observed, regardless the phenotype of TG. Baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and decline in eGFR during the first six months after the treatment were risk factors associated with 24-month graft survival. The IVIG/RTX therapy had a modest effect on the kinetics of donor-specific alloantibodies at M24, compared to the untreated group, not associated with an improvement in graft survival. The mean number of adverse events per patient was higher in the IVIG/RTX group than in the control group (p = 0.03). Taken together, IVIG/RTX treatment for severe TG during chronic antibody-mediated rejection does not seem to change the natural history of TG and is associated with a high incidence of adverse events.

  11. The use of antibody to complement protein C5 for salvage treatment of severe antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Locke, J E; Magro, C M; Singer, A L; Segev, D L; Haas, M; Hillel, A T; King, K E; Kraus, E; Lees, L M; Melancon, J K; Stewart, Z A; Warren, D S; Zachary, A A; Montgomery, R A

    2009-01-01

    Desensitized patients are at high risk of developing acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). In most cases, the rejection episodes are mild and respond to a short course of plasmapheresis (PP) / low-dose IVIg treatment. However, a subset of patients experience severe AMR associated with sudden onset oliguria. We previously described the utility of emergent splenectomy in rescuing allografts in patients with this type of severe AMR. However, not all patients are good candidates for splenectomy. Here we present a single case in which eculizumab, a complement protein C5 antibody that inhibits the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), was used combined with PP/IVIg to salvage a kidney undergoing severe AMR. We show a marked decrease in C5b-C9 (MAC) complex deposition in the kidney after the administration of eculizumab.

  12. Clinical outcome in patients with chronic antibody-mediated rejection treated with and without rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulin combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Byung Ha; Kim, Yaeni; Jeong, Hyeong Seok; Hong, Yu Ah; Choi, Bum Soon; Park, Cheol Whee; Choi, Yeong Jin; Kim, Yong-Soo; Yang, Chul Woo

    2014-09-01

    We previously reported that rituximab (RTX) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) combination therapy (RIT) is effective in treating patients with chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR), and the proteinuria level can determine the response to RIT. However, the results were not compared to those of patients who did not receive RIT. Fifty-nine patients with CAMR were divided into 2 groups: an RIT treated group (n = 25) and a historic control (HC) group who had not received RIT (n = 29). The RIT group was treated with RTX (375 mg/m(2)) and IVIg (0.4 g/kg) for 4 days. We compared the decline in glomerular filtration rate/month (ΔeGFR), RIT-related complications, and allograft survival rate in both groups. We also compared the allograft survival rate between patients with high proteinuria (spot urine protein/creatinine [PC] ratio > 3.5 g/g) and low proteinuria (PC ratio < 3.5 g/g). ΔeGFR was significantly decreased in the RIT group compared with the HC group after 6 months (P < 0.05). No serious complications were associated with RIT, and only one case of herpes zoster infection developed. The overall allograft survival rate in the RIT group was significantly higher than in the HC group. In both groups, patients with low proteinuria survived better than patients with heavy proteinuria (P < 0.05). The allograft survival rate was greater in the high proteinuria RIT group than that in the HC group. RIT treatment is recommended for delaying the progression of CAMR without serious complications, and is not limited by the presence of heavy proteinuria.

  13. Postoperative rebound of antiblood type antibodies and antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible living-related kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hideki; Kondo, Tsunenori; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Nozaki, Taiji; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether postoperative antiblood type antibody rebound is attributed to kidney allograft rejection in ABO blood type-incompatible (ABO-I) living-related kidney transplantation (KTx). A total of 191 ABO-I recipients who received ABO-I living-related KTx between 2001 and 2013 were divided into two groups: Group 1 consisted of low rebound [(≦1:32), N = 170] and Group 2 consisted of high rebound [(≧1:64), N = 21], according to the levels of the rebounded antiblood type antibodies within 1 year after transplantation. No prophylactic treatment for rejection was administered for elevated antiblood type antibodies, regardless of the levels of the rebounded antibodies. Within 1 year after transplantation, T-cell-mediated rejection was observed in 13 of 170 recipients (13/170, 8%) in Group 1 and in 2 of 21 recipients (2/21, 10%) in Group 2 (Groups 1 vs. 2, P = 0.432). Antibody-mediated rejection was observed in 15 of 170 recipients (15/170, 9%) and 2 of 21 recipients (2/21, 10%) in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.898). In this study, we found no correlation between the postoperative antiblood type antibody rebound and the incidence of acute rejection. We concluded that no treatment is necessary for rebounded antiblood type antibodies.

  14. Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Nonhuman Primate Renal Allografts: Validation of Human Histological and Molecular Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Adam, B A; Smith, R N; Rosales, I A; Matsunami, M; Afzali, B; Oura, T; Cosimi, A B; Kawai, T; Colvin, R B; Mengel, M

    2017-04-26

    Molecular testing represents a promising adjunct for the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Here, we apply a novel gene expression platform in sequential formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples from nonhuman primate (NHP) renal transplants. We analyzed 34 previously described gene transcripts related to AMR in humans in 197 archival NHP samples, including 102 from recipients that developed chronic AMR, 80 from recipients without AMR, and 15 normal native nephrectomies. Three endothelial genes (VWF, DARC, and CAV1), derived from 10-fold cross-validation receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, demonstrated excellent discrimination between AMR and non-AMR samples (area under the curve = 0.92). This three-gene set correlated with classic features of AMR, including glomerulitis, capillaritis, glomerulopathy, C4d deposition, and DSAs (r = 0.39-0.63, p < 0.001). Principal component analysis confirmed the association between three-gene set expression and AMR and highlighted the ambiguity of v lesions and ptc lesions between AMR and T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR). Elevated three-gene set expression corresponded with the development of immunopathological evidence of rejection and often preceded it. Many recipients demonstrated mixed AMR and TCMR, suggesting that this represents the natural pattern of rejection. These data provide NHP animal model validation of recent updates to the Banff classification including the assessment of molecular markers for diagnosing AMR. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  15. The 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Working Formulation for the standardization of nomenclature in the pathologic diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection in heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Berry, Gerald J; Burke, Margaret M; Andersen, Claus; Bruneval, Patrick; Fedrigo, Marny; Fishbein, Michael C; Goddard, Martin; Hammond, Elizabeth H; Leone, Ornella; Marboe, Charles; Miller, Dylan; Neil, Desley; Rassl, Doris; Revelo, Monica P; Rice, Alexandra; Rene Rodriguez, E; Stewart, Susan; Tan, Carmela D; Winters, Gayle L; West, Lori; Mehra, Mandeep R; Angelini, Annalisa

    2013-12-01

    During the last 25 years, antibody-mediated rejection of the cardiac allograft has evolved from a relatively obscure concept to a recognized clinical complication in the management of heart transplant patients. Herein we report the consensus findings from a series of meetings held between 2010-2012 to develop a Working Formulation for the pathologic diagnosis, grading, and reporting of cardiac antibody-mediated rejection. The diagnostic criteria for its morphologic and immunopathologic components are enumerated, illustrated, and described in detail. Numerous challenges and unresolved clinical, immunologic, and pathologic questions remain to which a Working Formulation may facilitate answers. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular Assessment of Microcirculation Injury in Formalin-Fixed Human Cardiac Allograft Biopsies With Antibody-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Afzali, B; Chapman, E; Racapé, M; Adam, B; Bruneval, P; Gil, F; Kim, D; Hidalgo, L; Campbell, P; Sis, B; Duong Van Huyen, J P; Mengel, M

    2017-02-01

    Precise diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in cardiac allograft endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) remains challenging. This study assessed molecular diagnostics in human EMBs with AMR. A set of 34 endothelial, natural killer cell and inflammatory genes was quantified in 106 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded EMBs classified according to 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) criteria. The gene set expression was compared between ISHLT diagnoses and correlated with donor-specific antibody (DSA), endothelial injury by electron microscopy (EM) and prognosis. Findings were validated in an independent set of 57 EMBs. In the training set (n = 106), AMR cases (n = 70) showed higher gene set expression than acute cellular rejection (ACR; n = 21, p < 0.001) and controls (n = 15, p < 0.0001). Anti-HLA DSA positivity was associated with higher gene set expression (p = 0.01). Endothelial injury by electron microscopy strongly correlated with gene set expression, specifically in AMR cases (r = 0.62, p = 0.002). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for diagnosing AMR showed greater accuracy with gene set expression (area under the curve [AUC] = 79.88) than with DSA (AUC = 70.47) and C4d (AUC = 70.71). In AMR patients (n = 17) with sequential biopsies, increasing gene set expression was associated with inferior prognosis (p = 0.034). These findings were confirmed in the validation set. In conclusion, biopsy-based molecular assessment of antibody-mediated microcirculation injury has the potential to improve diagnosis of AMR in human cardiac transplants.

  17. [Effect of pre-transplant donor specific antibody on antibody-mediated rejection and graft dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Li, Wei; Zhang, Sheng

    2016-05-01

    目的:研究肾移植受者的术前供者特异性抗体(donor specific antibody,DSA)与其术后发生抗体介导的体液排斥反应(antibody-mediated rejection,AMR)及移植肾功能的关系。方法:选取符合要求的肾移植受者88例。术前采用Luminex流式法对肾移植受者进行DSA检测,并将受者分为DSA阳性组(n=20)与DSA阴性组(n=68)。随访时间为2年。术后参照Banff 2005标准对移植肾病理形态进行评估分级,并观察移植肾的情况。结果: DSA阳性组与阴性组AMR发生率分别为20.0%和1.5%,移植物丢失发生率分别为15.0%和1.5%,两组比较差异均有统计学意义(分别P<0.01,P<0.05);AMR受者最高DSA的荧光指数中值(mean fluorescence intensity,MFI)较非AMR受者差异明显(P<0.01);受试者工作特征(receiver operating characteristic,ROC)曲线显示肾移植术后受者发展为AMR的最高MFI阈值为7909.5。两组移植肾功能延迟回复的发生相比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论:肾移植术前检测DSA水平,可以预测AMR的发生风险和移植肾功能状态。最高DSA值的MFI截点(7909.5)能够预测AMR发生的风险。.

  18. Bortezomib in the treatment of antibody-mediated rejection in pediatric kidney transplant recipients: A multicenter Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium study.

    PubMed

    Kizilbash, Sarah; Claes, Donna; Ashoor, Isa; Chen, Ashton; Jandeska, Sara; Matar, Raed Bou; Misurac, Jason; Sherbotie, Joseph; Twombley, Katherine; Verghese, Priya

    2017-05-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection leads to allograft loss after kidney transplantation. Bortezomib has been used in adults for the reversal of antibody-mediated rejection; however, pediatric data are limited. This retrospective study was conducted in collaboration with the Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium. Pediatric kidney transplant recipients who received bortezomib for biopsy-proven antibody-mediated rejection between 2008 and 2015 were included. The objective was to characterize the use of bortezomib in pediatric kidney transplant recipients. Thirty-three patients received bortezomib for antibody-mediated rejection at nine pediatric kidney transplant centers. Ninety percent of patients received intravenous immunoglobulin, 78% received plasmapheresis, and 78% received rituximab. After a median follow-up of 15 months, 65% of patients had a functioning graft. The estimated glomerular filtration rate improved or stabilized in 61% and 36% of patients at 3 and 12 months post-bortezomib, respectively. The estimated glomerular filtration rate at diagnosis significantly predicted estimated glomerular filtration rate at 12 months after adjusting for chronic histologic changes (P .001). Fifty-six percent of patients showed an at least 25% reduction in the mean fluorescence intensity of the immune-dominant donor-specific antibody, 1-3 months after the first dose of bortezomib. Non-life-threatening side effects were documented in 21 of 33 patients. Pediatric kidney transplant recipients tolerated bortezomib without life-threatening side effects. Bortezomib may stabilize estimated glomerular filtration rate for 3-6 months in pediatric kidney transplant recipients with antibody-mediated rejection.

  19. Acute T cell-mediated rejection accompanied by C4d-negative acute antibody-mediated rejection and cell debris in tubulus: A case report.

    PubMed

    Takamura, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Izumi; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Katsumata, Haruki; Yamakawa, Takafumi; Furuya, Maiko; Mafune, Aki; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Miki, Jun; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Herein, we report a complicated case of acute T-cell-mediated rejection (ACR) accompanied by C4d-negative acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and cell debris in tubulus. A 32 year-old male was admitted for an episode biopsy with a serum creatinine (S-Cr) level of 1.83 mg/dL and pyuria (20-29 white blood cells per high power field) 49 days following kidney transplantation. Histological features included three distinct entities, mainly, in one of the three specimens: 1) focal aggressive tubulointerstitial inflammatory cell infiltration with moderate tubulitis, 2) inflammatory cell infiltration in peritubular capillaries (including neutrophils) and glomerular capillaries, and 3) cell debris consisting mainly of neutrophils in tubulus. Laboratory examination revealed evidence of non-human leukocyte antigen donor-specific antibodies. However, urinary culture and gram staining were negative. Considering both the histological and laboratory findings, the patient was diagnosed with ACR accompanied by C4d-negative AMR and suspicion of a urinary tract infection (UTI). The patient was treated for three consecutive days with steroid pulse therapy. The patient's S-Cr level decreased to ~1.5 mg/dL following treatment and did not increase thereafter. A second biopsy 133 days following kidney transplantation showed an excellent response to treatment and revealed no evidence of rejection. This case report demonstrates the difficulty in the diagnosis of, and therapy for, the complicated pathological findings of ACR, AMR and suspicion of a UTI.

  20. Antibody-mediated rejection of the lung: A consensus report of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Levine, Deborah J; Glanville, Allan R; Aboyoun, Christina; Belperio, John; Benden, Christian; Berry, Gerald J; Hachem, Ramsey; Hayes, Don; Neil, Desley; Reinsmoen, Nancy L; Snyder, Laurie D; Sweet, Stuart; Tyan, Dolly; Verleden, Geert; Westall, Glen; Yusen, Roger D; Zamora, Martin; Zeevi, Adriana

    2016-04-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is a recognized cause of allograft dysfunction in lung transplant recipients. Unlike AMR in other solid-organ transplant recipients, there are no standardized diagnostic criteria or an agreed-upon definition. Hence, a working group was created by the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation with the aim of determining criteria for pulmonary AMR and establishing a definition. Diagnostic criteria and a working consensus definition were established. Key diagnostic criteria include the presence of antibodies directed toward donor human leukocyte antigens and characteristic lung histology with or without evidence of complement 4d within the graft. Exclusion of other causes of allograft dysfunction increases confidence in the diagnosis but is not essential. Pulmonary AMR may be clinical (allograft dysfunction which can be asymptomatic) or sub-clinical (normal allograft function). This consensus definition will have clinical, therapeutic and research implications. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of ABO Incompatibility on the Development of Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplant Recipients Presensitized to HLA

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Byung Ha; Joo, Yu Young; Lee, Jaesin; Kim, Hyung Duk; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In Sung; Choi, Bum Soon; Oh, Eun-Jee; Park, Cheol Whee; Kim, Yong-Soo; Yang, Chul Woo

    2015-01-01

    Whether the coexistence of anti-A/B antibody and donor specific anti-HLA antibody (HLA-DSA) has a synergistic impact on the development of acute antibody-mediated rejection (AAMR) in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) is unclear. This study includes 92 KTRs who received a kidney from an ABO-incompatible (ABOi) donor or were presensitized to donor HLA (HLAs) and 292 controls (CONT). HLAs was defined as a crossmatch positivity or the presence of HLA-DSA. We compared the incidence of AAMR among ABOi (n = 58), ABOi+HLAs (n = 12), HLAs (n = 22), and CONT (n = 292) groups and evaluated the risk factors and antibody type (anti-A/B vs. HLA-DSA) responsible for AAMR. AAMR developed less frequently in ABOi and CONT than in the ABOi+HLAs or HLAs (P < 0.05 for all); however, there was no difference between the ABOi+HLAs and HLAs groups. AAMR developed more frequently with strong HLA-DSA at baseline; however, high baseline anti-A/B titer did not affect AAMR development. Strong baseline HLA-DSA was an independent predictor for AAMR, however the baseline anti-A/B titer was not. All four AAMR episodes in ABOi+HLAs were positive to HLA-DSA but not to anti-A/B. In conclusion, ABO incompatibility does not increase the risk for AAMR in HLAs KTRs. PMID:25897756

  2. Impact of ABO Incompatibility on the Development of Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplant Recipients Presensitized to HLA.

    PubMed

    Chung, Byung Ha; Joo, Yu Young; Lee, Jaesin; Kim, Hyung Duk; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In Sung; Choi, Bum Soon; Oh, Eun-Jee; Park, Cheol Whee; Kim, Yong-Soo; Yang, Chul Woo

    2015-01-01

    Whether the coexistence of anti-A/B antibody and donor specific anti-HLA antibody (HLA-DSA) has a synergistic impact on the development of acute antibody-mediated rejection (AAMR) in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) is unclear. This study includes 92 KTRs who received a kidney from an ABO-incompatible (ABOi) donor or were presensitized to donor HLA (HLAs) and 292 controls (CONT). HLAs was defined as a crossmatch positivity or the presence of HLA-DSA. We compared the incidence of AAMR among ABOi (n = 58), ABOi+HLAs (n = 12), HLAs (n = 22), and CONT (n = 292) groups and evaluated the risk factors and antibody type (anti-A/B vs. HLA-DSA) responsible for AAMR. AAMR developed less frequently in ABOi and CONT than in the ABOi+HLAs or HLAs (P < 0.05 for all); however, there was no difference between the ABOi+HLAs and HLAs groups. AAMR developed more frequently with strong HLA-DSA at baseline; however, high baseline anti-A/B titer did not affect AAMR development. Strong baseline HLA-DSA was an independent predictor for AAMR, however the baseline anti-A/B titer was not. All four AAMR episodes in ABOi+HLAs were positive to HLA-DSA but not to anti-A/B. In conclusion, ABO incompatibility does not increase the risk for AAMR in HLAs KTRs.

  3. Risk of antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplant recipients with anti-HLA-C donor-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Aubert, O; Bories, M-C; Suberbielle, C; Snanoudj, R; Anglicheau, D; Rabant, M; Martinez, F; Scemla, A; Legendre, C; Sberro-Soussan, R

    2014-06-01

    Anti-HLA donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) cause acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). However, the clinical relevance of anti-HLA-C antibodies remains unclear. We evaluated the clinical relevance of the presence of anti-HLA-C DSA at day 0 in renal transplant recipients. In this retrospective, case-controlled study, 608 patients who underwent kidney transplantation between August 2008 and March 2012 were screened for the presence of isolated anti-HLA-C DSA at day 0. A total of 22 renal transplant recipients were selected and followed for a period of 1 year. AMR was classified according to the Banff classification. The 22 patients were compared with 88 immunized patients. Acute AMR was diagnosed in six patients (27.3%). The median level of DSA at day 0 was 1179 (530-17,941). The mean fluorescence intensity in the anti-C group was 4966 (978-17,941) in the AMR group and 981 (530-8012) in the group of patients without AMR. Acute AMR was diagnosed less frequently in the 88 immunized individuals (9.1%) than in the DSA anti-C group (p = 0.033). The level of DSA at day 0 was predictive for AMR (p = 0.017). Patients with a high level of pretransplant anti-HLA-C DSAs are likely to develop acute AMR during the first year after transplantation.

  4. The molecular landscape of antibody-mediated kidney transplant rejection: evidence for NK involvement through CD16a Fc receptors.

    PubMed

    Venner, J M; Hidalgo, L G; Famulski, K S; Chang, J; Halloran, P F

    2015-05-01

    The recent recognition that antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is the major cause of kidney transplant loss creates strong interest in its pathogenesis. We used microarray analysis of kidney transplant biopsies to identify the changes in pure ABMR. We found that the ABMR transcript changes in the initial Discovery Set were strongly conserved in a subsequent Validation Set. In the Combined Set of 703 biopsies, 2603 transcripts were significantly changed (FDR < 0.05) in ABMR versus all other biopsies. In cultured cells, the transcripts strongly associated with ABMR were expressed in endothelial cells, e.g. cadherins CDH5 and CDH13; IFNG-treated endothelial cells, e.g. phospholipase PLA1A and chemokine CXCL11; or NK cells, e.g. cytotoxicity molecules granulysin (GNLY) and FGFBP2. Other ABMR transcripts were expressed in normal kidney but not cell lines, either increased e.g. Duffy chemokine receptor (DARC) or decreased e.g. sclerostin (SOST). Pathway analysis of ABMR transcripts identified angiogenesis, with roles for angiopoietin and vascular endothelial growth factors; leukocyte-endothelial interactions; and NK signaling, including evidence for CD16a Fc receptor signaling elements shared with T cells. These data support a model of ABMR involving injury-repair in the microcirculation induced by cognate recognition involving antibody and CD16a, triggering IFNG release and antibody-dependent NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  5. Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Arterialised Venous Allografts Is Inhibited by Immunosuppression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Martin; Oliverius, Martin; Kuhn, Stephanie; Feldbrügge, Linda; Krenzien, Felix; Hau, Hans-Michael; Wiltberger, Georg; Schmelzle, Moritz; Jonas, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Objectives and Design We determined in a rat model (1) the presence and dynamics of alloantibodies recognizing MHC complexes on quiescent Brown-Norway (BN) splenic cells in the sera of Lewis (LEW) recipients of Brown-Norway iliolumbar vein grafts under tacrolimus immunosuppression; and (2) the presence of immunoglobulins in the wall of acute rejected vein allografts. Materials and Methods Flow cytometry was used for the analysis of day 0, 14 and 30 sera obtained from Lewis recipients of isogeneic iliolumbar vein grafts (group A) or Brown-Norway grafts (group B, C) for the presence of donor specific anti-MHC class I and II antibodies. Tacrolimus 0.2 mg/kg daily was administered from day 1 to day 30 (group C). Histology was performed on day 30. Results Sera obtained preoperatively and on day 30 were compared in all groups. The statistically significant decrease of anti MHC class I and II antibody binding was observed only in allogenic non-immunosuppressed group B (splenocytes: MHC class I - day 0 (93%±7% ) vs day 30 (66%±7%), p = 0.02, MHC class II - day 0 (105%±3% ) vs day 30 (83%±5%), p = 0.003; B-cells: MHC class I - day 0 (83%±5%) vs day 30 (55%±6%), p = 0.003, MHC class II - day 0 (101%±1%) vs day 30 (79%±6%), p = 0.006; T-cells: MHC class I - day 0 (71%±7%) vs day 30 (49%±5%), p = 0.04). No free clusters of immunoglobulin G deposition were detected in any experimental group. Conclusion Arterialized venous allografts induce strong donor-specific anti-MHC class I and anti-MHC class II antibody production with subsequent immune-mediated destruction of these allografts with no evidence of immunoglobulin G deposition. Low-dose tacrolimus suppress the donor-specific antibody production. PMID:24618652

  6. Antibody-mediated rejection, T cell-mediated rejection, and the injury-repair response: new insights from the Genome Canada studies of kidney transplant biopsies.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Philip F; Reeve, Jeff P; Pereira, Andre B; Hidalgo, Luis G; Famulski, Konrad S

    2014-02-01

    Prospective studies of unselected indication biopsies from kidney transplants, combining conventional assessment with molecular analysis, have created a new understanding of transplant disease states and their outcomes. A large-scale Genome Canada grant permitted us to use conventional and molecular phenotypes to create a new disease classification. T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR), characterized histologically or molecularly, has little effect on outcomes. Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) manifests as microcirculation lesions and transcript changes reflecting endothelial injury, interferon-γ effects, and natural killer cells. ABMR is frequently C4d negative and has been greatly underestimated by conventional criteria. Indeed, ABMR, triggered in some cases by non-adherence, is the major disease causing failure. Progressive dysfunction is usually attributable to specific diseases, and pure calcineurin inhibitor toxicity rarely explains failure. The importance of ABMR argues against immunosuppressive drug minimization and stands as a barrier to tolerance induction. Microarrays also defined the transcripts induced by acute kidney injury (AKI), which correlate with reduced function, whereas histologic changes of acute tubular injury do not. AKI transcripts are induced in kidneys with late dysfunction, and are better predictors of failure than fibrosis and inflammation. Thus progression reflects ongoing parenchymal injury, usually from identifiable diseases such as ABMR, not destructive fibrosis.

  7. Natural killer cells play a critical role in mediating inflammation and graft failure during antibody-mediated rejection of kidney allografts

    PubMed Central

    Kohei, Naoki; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Masumori, Naoya; Dvorina, Nina; Valujskikh, Anna; Baldwin, William M.; Fairchild, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    While the incidence of antibody-mediated kidney graft rejection has increased, the key cellular and molecular participants underlying this graft injury remain unclear. Rejection of kidney allografts in mice lacking the chemokine receptor CCR5 is dependent on production of donor-specific antibody. Here we determine if cells expressing cytotoxic function contributed to antibody-mediated kidney allograft rejection in these recipients. Wild type C57BL/6, B6.CCR5−/− and B6.CD8−/−/CCR5−/− mice were transplanted with complete MHC mismatched A/J kidney grafts and intra-graft inflammatory components were followed to rejection. B6.CCR5−/− and B6.CD8−/−/CCR5−/− recipients rejected kidney allografts by day 35 whereas 65% of allografts in wild type recipients survived past day 80 post-transplant. Rejected allografts in wild-type C57BL/6, B6.CCR5−/− and B6.CD8−/−/CCR5−/− recipients expressed high levels of VCAM-1 and MMP7 mRNA that was associated with high serum titers of donor-specific antibody. High levels of perforin and granzyme B mRNA expression peaked on day 6 post-transplant in allografts in all recipients, but were absent in isografts. Depletion of natural killer cells in B6.CD8−/−/CCR5−/− recipients reduced this expression to background levels and promoted the long-term survival of 40% of the kidney allografts. Thus, natural killer cells have a role in increased inflammation during antibody-mediated kidney allograft injury and in rejection of the grafts. PMID:27165816

  8. Natural killer cells play a critical role in mediating inflammation and graft failure during antibody-mediated rejection of kidney allografts.

    PubMed

    Kohei, Naoki; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Masumori, Naoya; Dvorina, Nina; Valujskikh, Anna; Baldwin, William M; Fairchild, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    While the incidence of antibody-mediated kidney graft rejection has increased, the key cellular and molecular participants underlying this graft injury remain unclear. Rejection of kidney allografts in mice lacking the chemokine receptor CCR5 is dependent on production of donor-specific antibody. Here we determine if cells expressing cytotoxic function contributed to antibody-mediated kidney allograft rejection in these recipients. Wild-type C57BL/6, B6.CCR5(-/-), and B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) mice were transplanted with complete MHC-mismatched A/J kidney grafts, and intragraft inflammatory components were followed to rejection. B6.CCR5(-/-) and B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) recipients rejected kidney allografts by day 35, whereas 65% of allografts in wild-type recipients survived past day 80 post-transplant. Rejected allografts in wild-type C57BL/6, B6.CCR5(-/-), and B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) recipients expressed high levels of VCAM-1 and MMP7 mRNA that was associated with high serum titers of donor-specific antibody. High levels of perforin and granzyme B mRNA expression peaked on day 6 post-transplant in allografts in all recipients, but were absent in isografts. Depletion of natural killer cells in B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) recipients reduced this expression to background levels and promoted the long-term survival of 40% of the kidney allografts. Thus, natural killer cells have a role in increased inflammation during antibody-mediated kidney allograft injury and in rejection of the grafts.

  9. Rituximab in Combination With Bortezomib, Plasmapheresis, and High-Dose IVIG to Treat Antibody-Mediated Renal Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Waiser, Johannes; Duerr, Michael; Schönemann, Constanze; Rudolph, Birgit; Wu, Kaiyin; Halleck, Fabian; Budde, Klemens; Lachmann, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Background Current treatment strategies for antibody-mediated renal allograft rejection (AMR) are not sufficiently effective. In most centers, “standard of care” treatment includes plasmapheresis (PPH) and IVIG preparations. Since several years, modern therapeutics targeting B cells and plasma cells have become available. We investigated, whether combined administration of rituximab and bortezomib in addition to PPH and high-dose IVIG is useful. Methods Between November 2011 and January 2013, we treated 10 consecutive patients with biopsy-proven AMR with rituximab (500 mg), bortezomib (4× 1.3 mg/m2), PPH (6×), and high-dose IVIG (1.5 g/kg) (group A). This group was compared with a group of 11 consecutive patients treated with an identical regimen without rituximab between July 2010 and November 2011 (group B). Results Median follow-up was 41(33-46) months in group A and 55(47-63) months in group B. At 40 months after treatment, graft survival was 60% in group A and 64% in group B, respectively (P = 0.87). Before and after treatment, serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and proteinuria were not different between groups. A significant reduction in donor-specific HLA antibody mean fluorescence intensity was observed in group A (25.2%, P = 0.046) and B (38.3%, P = 0.01) at 3 months posttreatment. In group A, more patients suffered from side effects compared with group B (infections: 70% vs 18%, P = 0.02). Conclusions The addition of rituximab to bortezomib, PPH, and high-dose IVIG did not further improve graft survival. Instead, we observed an increase of side effects. Therefore, combined administration of bortezomib and rituximab in addition to PPH and IVIG should be regarded with caution. PMID:27819032

  10. Treatment of chronic antibody mediated rejection with intravenous immunoglobulins and rituximab: a multicenter, prospective, randomized, double blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Moreso, Francesc; Crespo, Marta; Ruiz, Juan C; Torres, Armando; Gutierrez-Dalmau, Alex; Osuna, Antonio; Perelló, Manel; Pascual, Julio; Torres, Irina B; Redondo-Pachón, Dolores; Rodrigo, Emilio; Lopez-Hoyos, Marcos; Seron, Daniel

    2017-09-26

    There are no approved treatments for chronic antibody mediated rejection (ABMR). We conducted a multicenter, prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind clinical trial to evaluate efficacy and safety of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) combined with rituximab (RTX) (EudraCT 2010-023746-67). Patients with transplant glomerulopathy and anti-HLA donor-specific antibodies (DSA) were eligible. Patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) < 20 mL/min/1.73m(2) and/or severe interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy were excluded. Patients were randomized to receive IVIG (4 doses of 0.5 g/kg) and RTX (375 mg/m(2) ) or a wrapped isovolumetric saline infusion. Primary efficacy variable was the decline of eGFR at one year. Secondary efficacy variables included evolution of proteinuria, renal lesions and DSA at one year. The planned sample size was 25 patients per group. During 2012-2015, twenty-five patients were randomized (13 to the treatment and 12 to the placebo group). The planned patient enrollment was not achieved because of budgetary constraints and slow patient recruitment. There were no differences between the treatment and placebo groups in eGFR decline (-4.2±14.4 vs. -6.6±12.0 mL/min/1.73 m(2,) p-value=0.475), increase of proteinuria (+0.9±2.1 vs. +0.9±2.1 g/day, p-value=0.378), Banff scores at one year and MFI of the immunodominant DSA. Safety was similar between groups. These data suggest that the combination of IVIG and RTX is not useful in patients displaying transplant glomerulopathy and DSA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Urinary C-X-C Motif Chemokine 10 Independently Improves the Noninvasive Diagnosis of Antibody-Mediated Kidney Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Rabant, Marion; Amrouche, Lucile; Lebreton, Xavier; Aulagnon, Florence; Benon, Aurélien; Sauvaget, Virginia; Bonifay, Raja; Morin, Lise; Scemla, Anne; Delville, Marianne; Martinez, Frank; Timsit, Marc Olivier; Duong Van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Legendre, Christophe; Terzi, Fabiola; Anglicheau, Dany

    2015-11-01

    Urinary levels of C-X-C motif chemokine 9 (CXCL9) and CXCL10 can noninvasively diagnose T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) of renal allografts. However, performance of these molecules as diagnostic/prognostic markers of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is unknown. We investigated urinary CXCL9 and CXCL10 levels in a highly sensitized cohort of 244 renal allograft recipients (67 with preformed donor-specific antibodies [DSAs]) with 281 indication biopsy samples. We assessed the benefit of adding these biomarkers to conventional models for diagnosing/prognosing ABMR. Urinary CXCL9 and CXCL10 levels, normalized to urine creatinine (Cr) levels (CXCL9:Cr and CXCL10:Cr) or not, correlated with the extent of tubulointerstitial (i+t score; all P<0.001) and microvascular (g+ptc score; all P<0.001) inflammation. CXCL10:Cr diagnosed TCMR (area under the curve [AUC]=0.80; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.68 to 0.92; P<0.001) and ABMR (AUC=0.76; 95% CI, 0.69 to 0.82; P<0.001) with high accuracy, even in the absence of tubulointerstitial inflammation (AUC=0.70; 95% CI, 0.61 to 0.79; P<0.001). Although mean fluorescence intensity of the immunodominant DSA diagnosed ABMR (AUC=0.75; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.82; P<0.001), combining urinary CXCL10:Cr with immunodominant DSA levels improved the diagnosis of ABMR (AUC=0.83; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.89; P<0.001). At the time of ABMR, urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio was independently associated with an increased risk of graft loss. In conclusion, urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio associates with tubulointerstitial and microvascular inflammation of the renal allograft. Combining the urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio with DSA monitoring significantly improves the noninvasive diagnosis of ABMR and the stratification of patients at high risk for graft loss.

  12. Antibody-Mediated Rejection Due to Preexisting versus De Novo Donor-Specific Antibodies in Kidney Allograft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Olivier; Loupy, Alexandre; Hidalgo, Luis; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Higgins, Sarah; Viglietti, Denis; Jouven, Xavier; Glotz, Denis; Legendre, Christophe; Lefaucheur, Carmen; Halloran, Philip F

    2017-03-02

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) can occur in patients with preexisting anti-HLA donor-specific antibodies (DSA) or in patients who develop de novo DSA. However, how these processes compare in terms of allograft injury and outcome has not been addressed. From a cohort of 771 kidney biopsy specimens from two North American and five European centers, we performed a systematic assessment of clinical and biologic parameters, histopathology, circulating DSA, and allograft gene expression for all patients with ABMR (n=205). Overall, 103 (50%) patients had preexisting DSA and 102 (50%) had de novo DSA. Compared with patients with preexisting DSA ABMR, patients with de novo DSA ABMR displayed increased proteinuria, more transplant glomerulopathy lesions, and lower glomerulitis, but similar levels of peritubular capillaritis and C4d deposition. De novo DSA ABMR was characterized by increased expression of IFNγ-inducible, natural killer cell, and T cell transcripts, but less expression of AKI transcripts compared with preexisting DSA ABMR. The preexisting DSA ABMR had superior graft survival compared with the de novo DSA ABMR (63% versus 34% at 8 years after rejection, respectively; P<0.001). After adjusting for clinical, histologic, and immunologic characteristics and treatment, we identified de novo DSA ABMR (hazard ratio [HR], 1.82 compared with preexisting DSA ABMR; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.07 to 3.08; P=0.03); low eGFR (<30 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) at diagnosis (HR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.48 to 7.23; P<0.001); ≥0.30 g/g urine protein-to-creatinine ratio (HR, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.47 to 4.09; P<0.001); and presence of cg lesions (HR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.34 to 3.79; P=0.002) as the main independent determinants of allograft loss. Our findings support the transplant of kidneys into highly sensitized patients and should encourage efforts to monitor patients for de novo DSA.

  13. Subclinical antibody-mediated rejection due to anti-human-leukocyte-antigen-DR53 antibody accompanied by plasma cell-rich acute rejection in a patient with cadaveric kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Katsuma, Ai; Yamamoto, Izumi; Komatsuzaki, Yo; Niikura, Takahito; Kawabe, Mayuko; Okabayashi, Yusuke; Yamakawa, Takafumi; Katsumata, Haruki; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Miki, Jun; Yamada, Hiroki; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    A 56-year-old man who had undergone cadaveric kidney transplantation 21 months earlier was admitted to our hospital for a protocol biopsy; he had a serum creatinine level of 1.2 mg/dL and no proteinuria. Histological features showed two distinct entities: (i) inflammatory cell infiltration, in the glomerular and peritubular capillaries and (ii) focal, aggressive tubulointerstitial inflammatory cell infiltration, predominantly plasma cells, with mild tubulitis (Banff 13 classification: i2, t1, g2, ptc2, v0, ci1, ct1, cg0, cv0). Immunohistological studies showed mildly positive C4d immunoreactivity in the peritubular capillaries. The patient had donor specific antibody to human-leucocyte-antigen-DR53. We diagnosed him with subclinical antibody-mediated rejection accompanied by plasma cell-rich acute rejection. Both antibody-mediated rejection due to anti- human-leucocyte-antigen -DR53 antibodies and plasma cell-rich acute rejection are known to be refractory and have a poor prognosis. Thus, we started plasma exchange with intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab for the former and 3 days of consecutive steroid pulse therapy for the latter. Three months after treatment, a follow-up allograft biopsy showed excellent responses to treatment for both histological features. This case report considers the importance of an early diagnosis and appropriate intervention for subclinical antibody-mediated rejection due to donor specific antibody to human-leucocyte-antigen-DR53 and plasma cell-rich acute rejection.

  14. Markers of Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition: Evidence for Antibody-Endothelium Interaction during Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Recipients.

    PubMed

    Xu-Dubois, Yi-Chun; Peltier, Julie; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Suberbielle-Boissel, Caroline; Djamali, Arjang; Reese, Shannon; Mooney, Nuala; Keuylian, Zela; Lion, Julien; Ouali, Nacéra; Levy, Pierre P; Jouanneau, Chantal; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is a leading cause of allograft loss. Treatment efficacy depends on accurate diagnosis at an early stage. However, sensitive and reliable markers of antibody-endothelium interaction during ABMR are not available for routine use. Using immunohistochemistry, we retrospectively studied the diagnostic value of three markers of endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT), fascin1, vimentin, and heat shock protein 47, for ABMR in 53 renal transplant biopsy specimens, including 20 ABMR specimens, 24 cell-mediated rejection specimens, and nine normal grafts. We validated our results in an independent set of 74 unselected biopsy specimens. Endothelial cells of the peritubular capillaries in grafts with ABMR expressed fascin1, vimentin, and heat shock protein 47 strongly, whereas those from normal renal grafts did not. The level of EndMT marker expression was significantly associated with current ABMR criteria, including capillaritis, glomerulitis, peritubular capillary C4d deposition, and donor-specific antibodies. These markers allowed us to identify C4d-negative ABMR and to predict late occurrence of disease. EndMT markers were more specific than capillaritis for the diagnosis and prognosis of ABMR and predicted late (up to 4 years after biopsy) renal graft dysfunction and proteinuria. In the independent set of 74 renal graft biopsy specimens, the EndMT markers for the diagnosis of ABMR had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 85%. Fascin1 expression in peritubular capillaries was also induced in a rat model of ABMR. In conclusion, EndMT markers are a sensitive and reliable diagnostic tool for detecting endothelial activation during ABMR and predicting late loss of allograft function.

  15. Consensus opinion from the antibody working group on the diagnosis, reporting, and risk assessment for antibody-mediated rejection and desensitization protocols.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Robert A; Hardy, Mark A; Jordan, Stanley C; Racusen, Lorraine C; Ratner, Lloyd E; Tyan, Dolly B; Zachary, Andrea A

    2004-07-27

    During the past few decades, much of the experimental and clinical effort in solid-organ transplantation has been directed toward ameliorating or abrogating T-cell-mediated responses. As a result, universally understood and accepted nomenclature and diagnostic criteria have evolved. Humoral immunity in transplantation has yet to undergo a similar renaissance. Readers of transplant journals regularly find it difficult and often impossible to interpret data on the diagnosis and management of antibody-mediated rejection. The Antibody Working Group was assembled in an attempt to provide guidelines for the standardization of nomenclature, diagnostic criteria, reporting, antibody profiling, and risk assessment.

  16. A refractory case of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection due to anti-HLA-DQ antibody in a kidney transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Toshinari; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Izumi; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Yamada, Hiroki; Miki, Jun; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    We herein report a refractory case of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) due to anti-HLA-DQ antibody in a kidney transplant patient. A 45-year-old man was admitted for a protocol biopsy; he had a serum creatinine (S-Cr) level of 1.8 mg/dL 3 years following primary kidney transplantation. Histological examination revealed moderate to severe inflammatory cell infiltration in the peritubular capillaries. Thorough laboratory examination showed that the patient had donor-specific antibodies (DSAbs) to DR9 and DQ9. Considering both the histological and laboratory findings, we diagnosed acute antibody-mediated rejection. The patient underwent 3 days of consecutive steroid pulse therapy, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and plasma exchange. We also administered rituximab (200 mg/body). Six months after the treatment, a second allograft biopsy revealed the progression of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and persistence of mild peritubular capillaritis. Further analysis showed that the anti-DR9 antibodies had disappeared, but that the mean fluorescence intensity value of the anti-DQ9 antibodies had increased. Therefore, we repeated the plasma exchange and IVIG. Allograft function was stable throughout the course of treatment, and the S-Cr level remained at 1.8 mg/dL. This case report demonstrates the difficulty of treating AMR due to the presence of anti-DQ DSAbs and the necessity for subsequent therapies in refractory cases.

  17. The Effect of Combination Therapy with Rituximab and Intravenous Immunoglobulin on the Progression of Chronic Antibody Mediated Rejection in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jintak; Khvan, Marina; Park, Cheol Whee; Choi, Yeong Jin; Kim, Yong-Soo; Yang, Chul Woo

    2014-01-01

    The treatment for chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) remains controversial. We investigated the efficacy of rituximab (RTX) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) for CAMR. Eighteen patients with CAMR were treated with RTX (375 mg/m2) and IVIg (0.4 g/kg) for 4 days. The efficacy of RTX/IVIg combination therapy (RIT) was assessed by decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate per month (ΔeGFR) before and after RIT. Patients were divided into responder and nonresponder groups based on decrease and no decrease in ΔeGFR, respectively, and their clinical and histological characteristics were compared. Response rate to RIT was 66.7% (12/18), and overall ΔeGFR decreased significantly to 0.4 ± 1.7 mL·min−1 ·1.73 m−2 per month 6 months after RIT compared to that observed 6 months before RIT (1.8 ± 1.0, P < 0.05). Clinical and histological features between the 12 responders and the 6 nonresponders were not significantly different, but nonresponders had a significantly higher proteinuria levels at the time of RIT (2.5 ± 2.5 versus 7.0 ± 3.5 protein/creatinine (g/g), P < 0.001). The effect of the RIT on ΔeGFR had dissipated in all patients by 1 year post-RIT. Thus, RIT delayed CAMR progression, and baseline proteinuria level was a prognostic factor for response to RIT. PMID:24741626

  18. Use of complement binding assays to assess the efficacy of antibody mediated rejection therapy and prediction of graft survival in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ramon, Daniel S; Huang, Yihung; Zhao, Lili; Rendulic, TrisAnn; Park, Jeong M; Sung, Randall S; Samaniego, Milagros

    2017-02-01

    The Luminex® single antigen bead assay (SAB) is the method of choice for monitoring the treatment for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). A ⩾50% reduction of the dominant donor-specific antibody (IgG-DSA) mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) has been associated with improved kidney allograft survival, and C1q-fixing DSA activity is associated with poor outcomes in patients with AMR. We aimed to investigate if C1q-DSA can be used as a reliable predictor of response to therapy and allograft survival in patients with biopsy-proven AMR. We tested pre- and post-treatment sera of 30 kidney transplant patients receiving plasmapheresis and low-dose IVIG for biopsy-proven AMR. IgG-DSA and C1q-DSA MFI were measured and correlated with graft loss or survival. Patients were classified as nonresponders (NR) when treatment resulted in <50% reduction in MFI of IgG-DSA and/or C1q-DSA was detectable following therapy. Differences in the percentage of patients deemed NR depended upon the end-point criterion (73% by reduction in IgG-DSA MFI vs. 50% by persistent C1q-DSA activity). None of the seven patients with <50% reduction of IgG-DSA but non-detectable C1q-DSA-fixing activity after therapy experienced graft loss, suggesting that C1q-DSA activity may better correlate with response. Reduction of C1q-DSA activity predicted graft survival better than IgG-DSA in the univariate Cox analysis (20.1% vs. 5.9% in NR; log-rank P-value=0.0147). A rapid reduction of DSA concentration below the threshold required for complement activation is associated with better graft survival, and C1q-DSA is a better predictor of outcomes than IgG-DSA MFI reduction. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Banff 2013 meeting report: inclusion of c4d-negative antibody-mediated rejection and antibody-associated arterial lesions.

    PubMed

    Haas, M; Sis, B; Racusen, L C; Solez, K; Glotz, D; Colvin, R B; Castro, M C R; David, D S R; David-Neto, E; Bagnasco, S M; Cendales, L C; Cornell, L D; Demetris, A J; Drachenberg, C B; Farver, C F; Farris, A B; Gibson, I W; Kraus, E; Liapis, H; Loupy, A; Nickeleit, V; Randhawa, P; Rodriguez, E R; Rush, D; Smith, R N; Tan, C D; Wallace, W D; Mengel, M

    2014-02-01

    The 12th Banff Conference on Allograft Pathology was held in Comandatuba, Brazil, from August 19-23, 2013, and was preceded by a 2-day Latin American Symposium on Transplant Immunobiology and Immunopathology. The meeting was highlighted by the presentation of the findings of several working groups formed at the 2009 and 2011 Banff meetings to: (1) establish consensus criteria for diagnosing antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) in the presence and absence of detectable C4d deposition; (2) develop consensus definitions and thresholds for glomerulitis (g score) and chronic glomerulopathy (cg score), associated with improved inter-observer agreement and correlation with clinical, molecular and serological data; (3) determine whether isolated lesions of intimal arteritis ("isolated v") represent acute rejection similar to intimal arteritis in the presence of tubulointerstitial inflammation; (4) compare different methodologies for evaluating interstitial fibrosis and for performing/evaluating implantation biopsies of renal allografts with regard to reproducibility and prediction of subsequent graft function; and (5) define clinically and prognostically significant morphologic criteria for subclassifying polyoma virus nephropathy. The key outcome of the 2013 conference is defining criteria for diagnosis of C4d-negative ABMR and respective modification of the Banff classification. In addition, three new Banff Working Groups were initiated.

  20. Serum Aberrant N-Glycan Profile as a Marker Associated with Early Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Patients Receiving a Living Donor Kidney Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Tobisawa, Yuki; Mori, Kazuyuki; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Koie, Takuya; Tanaka, Masakazu; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Sasaki, Hideo; Saito, Mitsuru; Harada, Hiroshi; Chikaraishi, Tatsuya; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Satoh, Shigeru; Ohyama, Chikara

    2017-01-01

    We determined if the serum N-glycan profile can be used as a diagnostic marker of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) in living donor kidney transplant (LKTx) recipients. Glycoblotting, combined with mass spectrometry, was used to retrospectively examine N-glycan levels in the postoperative sera of 197 LKTx recipients of whom 16 recipients had ABMR with or without T-cell-mediated rejection (TCMR), 40 recipients had TCMR, and 141 recipients had no adverse events. Multivariate discriminant analysis for prediction of ABMR was performed by inputting an ABMR event as an explanatory variable and sex, age, and serum N-glycan level as objective variables. The N-glycan score was calculated by multiplying the level of candidate objective variables by objective function values. The ABMR predictive performance of the N-glycan score was assessed by receiver operator characteristic curve and Kaplan–Meier curve analyses. The N-glycan score discriminated ABMR with 81.25% sensitivity, 87.85% specificity, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.892 that was far superior to that of preformed donor-specific antibody status (AUC, 0.761). Recipients with N-glycan-positive scores >0.8770 had significantly shorter ABMR survival than that of recipients with N-glycan-negative scores. Although the limitations of our study includ its small sample size and retrospective nature, the serum N-glycan score may contribute to prediction of ABMR. PMID:28786963

  1. Serum Aberrant N-Glycan Profile as a Marker Associated with Early Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Patients Receiving a Living Donor Kidney Transplant.

    PubMed

    Noro, Daisuke; Yoneyama, Tohru; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Tobisawa, Yuki; Mori, Kazuyuki; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Koie, Takuya; Tanaka, Masakazu; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Sasaki, Hideo; Saito, Mitsuru; Harada, Hiroshi; Chikaraishi, Tatsuya; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Satoh, Shigeru; Ohyama, Chikara

    2017-08-08

    We determined if the serum N-glycan profile can be used as a diagnostic marker of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) in living donor kidney transplant (LKTx) recipients. Glycoblotting, combined with mass spectrometry, was used to retrospectively examine N-glycan levels in the postoperative sera of 197 LKTx recipients of whom 16 recipients had ABMR with or without T-cell-mediated rejection (TCMR), 40 recipients had TCMR, and 141 recipients had no adverse events. Multivariate discriminant analysis for prediction of ABMR was performed by inputting an ABMR event as an explanatory variable and sex, age, and serum N-glycan level as objective variables. The N-glycan score was calculated by multiplying the level of candidate objective variables by objective function values. The ABMR predictive performance of the N-glycan score was assessed by receiver operator characteristic curve and Kaplan-Meier curve analyses. The N-glycan score discriminated ABMR with 81.25% sensitivity, 87.85% specificity, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.892 that was far superior to that of preformed donor-specific antibody status (AUC, 0.761). Recipients with N-glycan-positive scores >0.8770 had significantly shorter ABMR survival than that of recipients with N-glycan-negative scores. Although the limitations of our study includ its small sample size and retrospective nature, the serum N-glycan score may contribute to prediction of ABMR.

  2. Antibody-mediated rejection in heart transplant recipients: potential efficacy of B-cell depletion and antibody removal.

    PubMed

    Bierl, Charlene; Miller, Barry; Prak, Eline Luning; Gasiewski, Allison; Kearns, Jane; Tsai, Donald; Jessup, Mariell; Kamoun, Malek

    2006-01-01

    We present four patients with late AMR following cardiac transplantation, which was associated with de novo post-transplant anti-HLA class II antibody production. All patients had negative anti-HLA class I and class II antibodies prior to transplantation (as assessed by sensitive Flow PRA bead assays) and had a negative retrospective T- and B-cell flow cytometric cross-match. Upon presentation with late graft rejection due to AMR, all patients were treated with rituximab and serial plasmapheresis with IVIg plus triple-drug immunosuppression therapy. Despite initial responses to therapy, relapses occurred in all of the patients and necessitated prolonged or multiple hospital admissions and second transplants in two cases. Post-transplant serum antibody monitoring did not prove to be predictive of treatment success or failure. Serum anti-HLA antibodies should be monitored after heart transplantation. We recommend an assessment of anti-HLA antibodies following a decline in immunosuppressant drug levels or in the presence of heart failure symptoms. Anti-HLA antibody detection should be performed using very sensitive techniques such as microparticle-based assays.

  3. Early Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection of a Negative Flow Crossmatch 3rd Kidney Transplant with Exclusive Disparity at HLA-DP

    PubMed Central

    Mierzejewska, Beata; Schroder, Paul M.; Baum, Caitlin E.; Blair, Annette; Smith, Connie; Duquesnoy, Rene J.; Marrari, Marilyn; Gohara, Amira; Malhotra, Deepak; Kaw, Dinkar; Liwski, Robert; Rees, Michael A.; Stepkowski, Stanislaw

    2014-01-01

    Donor-specific alloantibodies (DSA) to HLA-DP may cause antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), especially in re-transplants. We describe the immunization history of a patient who received 3 kidney transplants; the 3rd kidney was completely matched except at DPA1 and DPB1. Prior to the 3rd transplant, single antigen bead analysis (SAB) showed DSA reactivity against DPA1 shared by the 1st and 3rd donors, but B and T flow crossmatch (FXM) results were negative. Within 11 days the 3rd transplant underwent acute C4d+ AMR which coincided with the presence of complement (C1q)-binding IgG1 DSA against donor DPA1 and DPB1. Using HLAMatchmaker and SAB, we provide evidence that eplet (epitope) spreading on DPA1 and eplet sharing on differing DPB1 alleles of the 1st and 3rd transplants was associated with AMR. Since weak DSA to DPA1/DPB1 may induce acute AMR with negative FXM, donor DPA1/DPB1 high resolution typing should be considered in sensitized patients with DP-directed DSA. PMID:24755353

  4. Early acute antibody-mediated rejection of a negative flow crossmatch 3rd kidney transplant with exclusive disparity at HLA-DP.

    PubMed

    Mierzejewska, Beata; Schroder, Paul M; Baum, Caitlin E; Blair, Annette; Smith, Connie; Duquesnoy, Rene J; Marrari, Marilyn; Gohara, Amira; Malhotra, Deepak; Kaw, Dinkar; Liwski, Robert; Rees, Michael A; Stepkowski, Stanislaw

    2014-08-01

    Donor-specific alloantibodies (DSA) to HLA-DP may cause antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), especially in re-transplants. We describe the immunization history of a patient who received 3 kidney transplants; the 3rd kidney was completely matched except at DPA1 and DPB1. Prior to the 3rd transplant, single antigen bead analysis (SAB) showed DSA reactivity against DPA1 shared by the 1st and 3rd donors, but B and T flow crossmatch (FXM) results were negative. Within 11 days the 3rd transplant underwent acute C4d+ AMR which coincided with the presence of complement (C1q)-binding IgG1 DSA against donor DPA1 and DPB1. Using HLAMatchmaker and SAB, we provide evidence that eplet (epitope) spreading on DPA1 and eplet sharing on differing DPB1 alleles of the 1st and 3rd transplants was associated with AMR. Since weak DSA to DPA1/DPB1 may induce acute AMR with negative FXM, donor DPA1/DPB1 high resolution typing should be considered in sensitized patients with DP-directed DSA.

  5. Plasma-Derived C1 Esterase Inhibitor for Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection Following Kidney Transplantation: Results of a Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, R A; Orandi, B J; Racusen, L; Jackson, A M; Garonzik-Wang, J M; Shah, T; Woodle, E S; Sommerer, C; Fitts, D; Rockich, K; Zhang, P; Uknis, M E

    2016-05-16

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is typically treated with plasmapheresis (PP) and intravenous immunoglobulin (standard of care; SOC); however, there is an unmet need for more effective therapy. We report a phase 2b, multicenter double-blind randomized placebo-controlled pilot study to evaluate the use of human plasma-derived C1 esterase inhibitor (C1 INH) as add-on therapy to SOC for AMR. Eighteen patients received 20 000 units of C1 INH or placebo (C1 INH n = 9, placebo n = 9) in divided doses every other day for 2 weeks. No discontinuations, graft losses, deaths, or study drug-related serious adverse events occurred. While the study's primary end point, a difference between groups in day 20 pathology or graft survival, was not achieved, the C1 INH group demonstrated a trend toward sustained improvement in renal function. Six-month biopsies performed in 14 subjects (C1 INH = 7, placebo = 7) showed no transplant glomerulopathy (TG) (PTC+cg≥1b) in the C1 INH group, whereas 3 of 7 placebo subjects had TG. Endogenous C1 INH measured before and after PP demonstrated decreased functional C1 INH serum concentration by 43.3% (p < 0.05) for both cohorts (C1 INH and placebo) associated with PP, although exogenous C1 INH-treated patients achieved supraphysiological levels throughout. This new finding suggests that C1 INH replacement may be useful in the treatment of AMR.

  6. Sex Related Differences in the Risk of Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Subsequent Allograft Vasculopathy Post-Heart Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Grupper, Avishay; Nestorovic, Emilija M.; Daly, Richard C.; Milic, Natasa M.; Joyce, Lyle D.; Stulak, John M.; Joyce, David L.; Edwards, Brooks S.; Pereira, Naveen L.; Kushwaha, Sudhir S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pregnancies may result in antibodies against HLA, a risk factor for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and subsequent cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) after heart transplantation (HTx). The aim of this study was to evaluate sex differences in the incidence of AMR events and subsequent risk of CAV among HTx recipients. Methods The study comprised 160 patients (51 [32%] women) who underwent HTx in 2008 to 2014. The cumulative effect of AMR events was calculated by AMR score (sum of myocardial biopsy grading divided by number of biopsies taken during 3 years post-HTx). Results Females had higher levels of anti-HLA I antibodies pre-HTx compared to males which was associated with a history of pregnancies, total number of children and with a higher AMR score at 6 months post-HTx (P < 0.05). Women demonstrated a significant increase in the total incidence of AMR events (27 vs. 7%, P = 0.001) and in AMR scores at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months post-HTx compared to men (P < 0.05). There were no differences in cellular rejection between the groups. A history of AMR events was associated with a significantly increased risk of severe CAV onset (hazard ratio, 7.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-31.5; P = 0.012). Conclusions Women are at higher risk for AMR post-HTx which subsequently increases their risk for CAV. Females recipients may benefit from closer surveillance to identify AMR at an earlier stage post-HTx, and targeted immunosuppressive therapy to attenuate the development of CAV. PMID:27795988

  7. Molecular Mechanism of Antibody-Mediated Activation of β-galactosidase

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R.; McMullan, Greg; Henderson, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Summary Binding of a single-chain Fv antibody to Escherichia coli β-galactosidase (β-gal) is known to stabilize the enzyme and activate several inactive point mutants, historically called antibody-mediated enzyme formation mutants. To understand the nature of this activation, we have determined by electron cryo-microscopy the structure of the complex between β-gal and the antibody scFv13R4. Our structure localizes the scFv13R4 binding site to the crevice between domains 1 and 3 in each β-gal subunit. The mutations that scFv13R4 counteracts are located between the antibody binding site and the active site of β-gal, at one end of the TIM-barrel that forms domain 3 where the substrate lactose is hydrolyzed. The mode of binding suggests how scFv stabilizes both the active site of β-gal and the tetrameric state. PMID:24613486

  8. Treatment of Biopsy-Proven Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection Using Thymoglobulin (ATG) Monotherapy and a Combination of Rituximab, Intravenous Immunoglobulin, and Plasmapheresis: Lesson Learned from Primary Experience.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jin; Xue, Wujun; Qing, Xin; Jing, Xin; Hou, Jun; Tian, Xiaohui; Guo, Qi; He, Xiaoli; Cai, Junchao

    2014-01-01

    Three strategies have been previously proposed to treat or prevent antibody-mediated rejection (AMR): (1) inhibition/depletion of antibody producing cells; (2) removal/blockage of antibodies; and, (3) inhibition of antibody-mediated tissue injury. Here we test the efficacy of lymphocyte-depleting agent antithymocyte globulin (ATG) and triple therapy of rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and plasmapheresis in treating AMR. Five biopsy-proven AMR patients were enrolled in this acute AMR treatment study. All patients received renal transplants from HLA highly mismatched donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors. Four patients received thymoglobulin (ATG) monotherapy at a dose of 75 mg/day for 5-8 days. One patient received a combination of rituximab (375 mg/m2), IVIG (50 g/day x2 days), and double filtration plasmapheresis (4x). Donor specific HLA antibodies (DSA), serum creatinine, and clinical signs and symptoms were used to determine the efficacy of anti-AMR treatment. All 5 patients developed AMR within 2 weeks after transplant. Two patients had class I DSA and 2 patients had class II DSA. One patient had both class I & II DSA. DSA in four patients (#1, 2, 4, 5) were pre-existing and the levels of these DSA surged significantly within a week following transplant. The only patient (#3) without pre-existing DSA developed de novo DSA within 2 weeks post-transplant that rose rapidly regardless of anti-rejection treatment. All patients had positive C4d staining in peritubular capillaries. The proportion of B cells in all patients increased significantly above baseline level when patients experienced AMR. Even though both ATG and rituximab therapies successfully reduced the B cell proportion one week post anti-AMR treatment, their effects on DSA were not ideal. Patient #1 with mild AMR responded well to ATG monotherapy and DSA level steadily decreased from 2 weeks post-ATG treatment and became negative in the last follow-up test. The DSA levels in patient #2

  9. The inferior impact of antibody-mediated rejection on the clinical outcome of kidney allografts that develop de novo thrombotic microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kaiyin; Budde, Klemens; Schmidt, Danilo; Neumayer, Hans-Hellmut; Lehner, Lukas; Bamoulid, Jamal; Rudolph, Birgit

    2016-02-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) can induce and develop thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) in renal allografts. A definitive AMR (dAMR) co-presents three diagnostic features. A suspicious AMR (sAMR) is designated when one of the three features is missing. Thirty-two TMA cases overlapping with AMR (AMR+ TMA) were studied, which involved 14 cases of sAMR+ TMA and 18 cases of dAMR+ TMA. Thirty TMA cases free of AMR features (AMR- TMA) were enrolled as control group. The ratio of complete response to treatment was similar between AMR- TMA and AMR+ TMA group (23.3% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.33), or between sAMR+ TMA and dAMR+ TMA group (14.3% vs. 11.1%, p = 0.79). At eight yr post-transplantation, the death-censored graft survival (DCGS) rate of AMR- TMA group was 62.8%, which was significantly higher than 28.0% of AMR+ TMA group (p = 0.01), but similar between sAMR+ TMA and dAMR+ TMA group (30.0% vs. 26.7%, p = 0.92). Overall, the intimal arteritis and the broad HLA (Human leukocyte antigens) mismatches were closely associated with over time renal allograft failure. The AMR+ TMA has inferior long-term graft survival, but grafts with sAMR+ TMA or dAMR+ TMA have similar characteristics and clinical courses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Factors Predicting Risk for Antibody-mediated Rejection and Graft Loss in Highly Human Leukocyte Antigen Sensitized Patients Transplanted After Desensitization.

    PubMed

    Vo, Ashley A; Sinha, Aditi; Haas, Mark; Choi, Jua; Mirocha, James; Kahwaji, Joseph; Peng, Alice; Villicana, Rafael; Jordan, Stanley C

    2015-07-01

    Desensitization with intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab (I+R) significantly improves transplant rates in highly sensitized patients, but antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) remains a concern. Between July 2006 and December 2012, 226 highly sensitized patients received transplants after desensitization. Most received alemtuzumab induction and standard immunosuppression. Two groups were examined: ABMR (n = 181) and ABMR (n = 45, 20%). Risk factors for ABMR, pathology, and outcomes were assessed. Significant risks for ABMR included previous transplants and pregnancies as sensitizing events, donor-specific antibody (DSA) relative intensity scores greater than 17, presence of both class I and II DSAs at transplant and time on waitlist. The ABMR showed a significant benefit for graft survival and glomerular filtration rate at 5 years (P < 0.0001). Banff pathology characteristics for ABMR patients with or without graft loss did not differ. C4d versus C4d ABMR did not predict graft loss (P = 0.086). Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) significantly predicted graft failure (P = 0.045). The ABMR episodes were treated with I+R (n = 25), or, in more severe ABMR, plasma exchange (PLEX)+I+R (n = 20). Graft survival for patients treated with I+R was superior (P = 0.028). Increased mortality was seen in ABMR patients experiencing graft loss after ABMR treatment (P = 0.004). The PLEX + Eculizumab improved graft survival for TMA patients (P = 0.036). Patients desensitized with I+R who remain ABMR have long-term graft and patient survival. The ABMR patients have significantly reduced graft survival and glomerular filtration rate at 5 years, especially TMA. Severe ABMR episodes benefit from treatment with PLEX + Eculizumab. The DSA-relative intensity scores at transplant was a strong predictor of ABMR. Donor-specific antibody avoidance and reduction strategies before transplantation are critical to avoiding ABMR and improving long-term outcomes.

  11. Analysis of preformed donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies characteristics for prediction of antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Malheiro, Jorge; Tafulo, Sandra; Dias, Leonídio; Martins, La Salete; Fonseca, Isabel; Beirão, Idalina; Castro-Henriques, António; Cabrita, António

    2015-03-01

    The relevance of preformed donor specific antibodies (DSA) detected by Luminex assays, with a negative complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) crossmatch, remains unsettled in kidney transplantation (KT). We aimed to analyze the impact of preformed DSA characteristics on kidney graft outcomes. In 462 patients that received a kidney graft in our unit, between 2007 and 2012, pre-transplant sera were analyzed by Luminex screening assay to determine the presence of anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies and single-antigen bead assay [positive if mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) ≥ 1000] to assign anti-HLA specificities. Anti-HLA antibodies were present in 95 patients (20.6%), but only 40 (8.7%) had DSA. Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) at 1-year was higher in patients with DSA (35.0%) than in those without them (0.9%) (P < 0.001). Only DSA with a MFI of >3000 were significantly associated with AMR occurrence. Receiver operator curves revealed that a MFI of >4900 in the highest DSA bead had a high sensitivity (85.7%) and that the sum of all DSA beads MFI > 11,000 had a high specificity (92.3%) for AMR prediction. Anti-thymocyte globulin versus basiliximab induction was more frequent in DSA+ AMR- (65.4%) versus DSA+ AMR+ (34.6%) patients (P = 0.072). Five-year censored graft survival was lower in DSA+ than in DSA- patients (respectively, 84.8% versus 94.9%, P = 0.006), although survival was only reduced in DSA+ AMR+ (68.8%) versus DSA+ AMR- (96.0%) patients (P = 0.038). Preformed DSA is associated with kidney graft loss, in relation with AMR occurrence. DSA strength may be used to improve immunological risk stratification of sensitized patients and their clinical management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Determining donor-specific antibody C1q-binding ability improves the prediction of antibody-mediated rejection in human leucocyte antigen-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Malheiro, Jorge; Tafulo, Sandra; Dias, Leonídio; Martins, La Salete; Fonseca, Isabel; Beirão, Idalina; Castro-Henriques, António; Cabrita, António

    2017-04-01

    Detrimental impact of preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) against human leucocyte antigens on outcomes after kidney transplantation are well documented, however, the value of their capacity to bind complement for predicting antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and graft survival still needs to be confirmed. We aimed to study DSA characteristics (strength and C1q binding) that might distinguish harmful DSA from clinically irrelevant ones. We retrospectively studied 60 kidney-transplanted patients with preformed DSA detected by single antigen bead (SAB) assays (IgG and C1q kits), from a cohort of 517 kidney graft recipients (124 with detectable anti-HLA antibodies). Patients were divided into DSA strength (MFI < vs. ≥ 15 000) and C1q-binding ability. AMR frequency was high (30%) and it increased with DSA strength (P = 0.002) and C1q+ DSA (P < 0.001). The performance of DSA C1q-binding ability as a predictor of AMR was better than DSA strength (diagnostic odds ratio 16.3 vs. 6.4, respectively). Furthermore, a multivariable logistic regression showed that C1q+ DSA was a risk factor for AMR (OR = 16.80, P = 0.001), while high MFI DSAs were not. Graft survival was lower in high MFI C1q+ DSA in comparison with patients with C1q- high or low MFI DSA (at 6 years, 38%, 83% and 80%, respectively; P = 0.001). Both DSA strength and C1q-binding ability assessment seem valuable for improving pretransplant risk assessment. Since DSA C1q-binding ability was a better predictor of AMR and correlated with graft survival, C1q-SAB may be a particularly useful tool.

  13. C1q binding is not an independent risk factor for kidney allograft loss after an acute antibody-mediated rejection episode: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Moktefi, Anissa; Parisot, Juliette; Desvaux, Dominique; Canoui-Poitrine, Florence; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Peltier, Julie; Audard, Vincent; Kofman, Tomek; Suberbielle, Caroline; Lang, Philippe; Rondeau, Eric; Grimbert, Philippe; Matignon, Marie

    2017-03-01

    After kidney transplantation, C4d is an incomplete marker of acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and C1q-binding donor-specific antibodies (DSA) have been associated with allograft survival. However, the impact on allograft survival of C1q+ DSA after clinical AMR has not been studied yet. We analysed retrospectively in clinical AMR C4d staining and C1q-binding impact on allograft survival. We compared clinical, histological and serological features of C4d- and C4d+ AMR, C1q+ and C1q- DSA AMR and analysed C4d and C1q-binding impact on allograft survival. Among 500 for-cause kidney allograft biopsies, 48 fulfilled AMR criteria. C4d+ AMR [N = 18 (37.5%)] have significantly higher number class I DSA (P = 0.02), higher microvascular score (P = 0.02) and more transplant glomerulopathy (P = 0.04). C1q+ AMR [N = 20 (44%)] presented with significantly more class I and class II DSA (P = 0.005 and 0.04) and C4d+ staining (P = 0.01). Graft losses were significantly higher in the C4d+ group (P = 0.04) but similar in C1q groups. C4d+ but not C1q+ binding was an independent risk factor for graft loss [HR = 2.65; (1.11-6.34); P = 0.028]. In our cohort of clinical AMR, C4d+ staining but not C1q+ binding is an independent risk factor for graft loss. Allograft loss and patient survival were similar in C1q+ and C1q- AMR.

  14. Different regulatory and cytotoxic CD4+ T lymphocyte profiles in renal transplants with antibody-mediated chronic rejection or long-term good graft function.

    PubMed

    Giaretta, Fulvia; Bussolino, Stefania; Beltramo, Silvia; Fop, Fabrizio; Rossetti, Maura; Messina, Maria; Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; Ranghino, Andrea; Basso, Elisa; Camussi, Giovanni; Segoloni, Giuseppe Paolo; Biancone, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the different subsets of CD4(+) T-lymphocytes may provide hints on the immunologic mechanisms operating in the long-term fate of a kidney transplant. We analyzed peripheral regulatory CD4(+) T cells (Tregs) and CD4(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in antibody-mediated chronic rejection (AMCR), in middle-term kidney transplants (2-4 years, MTKT) with good graft function and rejection-free history, in long-term kidney transplants (>15 years, LTKT) and in normal healthy subjects (NHS). Transplant groups with good prognosis (MTKT and LTKT) displayed a significant lower amount of CD4(+)CD25(high) T lymphocytes than NHS, with a trend of a higher percentage in AMCR than in MTKT and LTKT. However, CD4(+)CD25(high) Foxp3(+) cells were significantly higher in LTKT and MTKT than AMCR. Characterization of CD4(+)CD25(high) T cells showed a marked increase of intracellular CTLA-4 in the AMCR group in respect to the other transplant groups, while the expression of the surface molecule seemed to follow a reverse trend. In addition, CD27, a costimulatory receptor involved in long-term T cell survival and prevention of immune tolerance, is significantly reduced in CD4(+)CD25(high) and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells in the LTKT in respect to the other transplant groups. CD4(+)CD25(high)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)Foxp3(+)CD45RO(+) regulatory T cells with memory function were increased in LTKT compared to NHS and for the latter also in AMCR group. Finally, CD4(+)CTLs that were quantified on the basis of granzyme A expression, were more represented in AMCR patients in comparison to the other groups. Strikingly, CD27 in the CD4(+)CTLs was suppressed in LTKT and MTKT and markedly expressed in AMCR group. No significant differences in the expression of CD28 were observed among different groups. In conclusion, different profiles of Tregs and CD4(+)CTL populations correlate with different long-term conditions of kidney-transplanted patients, suggesting their role in the development

  15. Cell-Free DNA and Active Rejection in Kidney Allografts.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Roy D; Bromberg, Jonathan S; Poggio, Emilio D; Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Langone, Anthony J; Sood, Puneet; Matas, Arthur J; Mehta, Shikha; Mannon, Roslyn B; Sharfuddin, Asif; Fischbach, Bernard; Narayanan, Mohanram; Jordan, Stanley C; Cohen, David; Weir, Matthew R; Hiller, David; Prasad, Preethi; Woodward, Robert N; Grskovic, Marica; Sninsky, John J; Yee, James P; Brennan, Daniel C

    2017-07-01

    Histologic analysis of the allograft biopsy specimen is the standard method used to differentiate rejection from other injury in kidney transplants. Donor-derived cell-free DNA (dd-cfDNA) is a noninvasive test of allograft injury that may enable more frequent, quantitative, and safer assessment of allograft rejection and injury status. To investigate this possibility, we prospectively collected blood specimens at scheduled intervals and at the time of clinically indicated biopsies. In 102 kidney recipients, we measured plasma levels of dd-cfDNA and correlated the levels with allograft rejection status ascertained by histology in 107 biopsy specimens. The dd-cfDNA level discriminated between biopsy specimens showing any rejection (T cell-mediated rejection or antibody-mediated rejection [ABMR]) and controls (no rejection histologically), P<0.001 (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve [AUC], 0.74; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.61 to 0.86). Positive and negative predictive values for active rejection at a cutoff of 1.0% dd-cfDNA were 61% and 84%, respectively. The AUC for discriminating ABMR from samples without ABMR was 0.87 (95% CI, 0.75 to 0.97). Positive and negative predictive values for ABMR at a cutoff of 1.0% dd-cfDNA were 44% and 96%, respectively. Median dd-cfDNA was 2.9% (ABMR), 1.2% (T cell-mediated types ≥IB), 0.2% (T cell-mediated type IA), and 0.3% in controls (P=0.05 for T cell-mediated rejection types ≥IB versus controls). Thus, dd-cfDNA may be used to assess allograft rejection and injury; dd-cfDNA levels <1% reflect the absence of active rejection (T cell-mediated type ≥IB or ABMR) and levels >1% indicate a probability of active rejection. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  16. A ROLE FOR ANTIBODIES TO HLA, COLLAGEN-V AND K-α1-TUBULIN IN ANTIBODY MEDIATED REJECTION AND CARDIAC ALLOGRAFT VASCULOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Dilip S.; Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Bash, Haseeb Ilias; Phelan, Donna; Moazami, Nader; Ewald, Gregory A.; Mohanakumar, T.

    2013-01-01

    Background We determined role of donor specific antibodies (DSA) and antibodies (Abs) to self-antigens, collagen-V (Col-V) and K-α1-Tubulin (KAT) in pathogenesis of acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) following human heart transplantation (HTx). Methods 137 HTx recipients - 60 early period (≤ 12months) and 77 late period (> 12months) patients were enrolled. Circulating DSA was determined using LUMINEX. Abs against Col-I, II, IV, V and KAT were measured using ELISA. Frequency of CD4+T helper cells (CD4+Th) secreting IFN-γ, IL-5, IL-10 or IL-17 specific to self-antigens were determined using ELISPOT. Results A significant association between AMR and DSA was demonstrated. Development of DSA in AMR patients correlated well with the development of auto-Abs to Col-V(AMR(+): 383±72μg/mL, AMR(−): 172±49μg/mL, p=0.033) and KAT (AMR(+): 252±49μg/mL, AMR(−): 61±21μg/mL, p=0.014). Patients who developed AMR demonstrated increased frequencies of CD4+Th secreting IFN-γ and IL-5 with reduction in IL-10 specific for Col-V/KAT. Patients diagnosed with CAV also developed DSA and auto-Abs to Col-V (CAV(+): 835±142μg/mL, CAV(−): 242±68μg/mL, p=0.025) and KAT (CAV(+): 768±206μg/mL, CAV(−): 196±72μg/mL, p=0.001) with increased frequencies of CD4+Th secreting IL-17 with reduction in IL-10 specific for Col-V/KAT. Conclusions Development of Abs to HLA and self-antigens are associated with increases in CD4+Th secreting IFN-γ and IL-5 in AMR and IL-17 in CAV, with reduction in CD4+Th secreting IL-10 in both AMR and CAV. PMID:21383658

  17. Clinical Significance of HLA-DQ Antibodies in the Development of Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Allograft Failure in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Min, Ji Won; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Park, Ki-Hyun; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2016-03-01

    With the development of the single antigen beads assay, the role of donor specific alloantibody (DSA) against human leukocyte antigens in kidney transplantation (KT) has been highlighted. This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance of DQ-DSA detected at renal allograft biopsy. We evaluated 263 KT recipients who underwent allograft biopsy and DSA detection at the same time. Among them, 155 patients who were nonsensitized before transplantation were selected to investigate the role of de-novo DQ-DSA. Both the total and nonsensitized subgroup was categorized into 4 groups each according to DSA results as: DQ only, DQ + non-DQ, non-DQ, and no DSA. In the total patient group, post-KT DSA was positive in 79 (30.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was most prevalent (64.6%). In the nonsensitized subgroup, de-novo DSAs were detected in 45 (29.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was also most prevalent (73.3%). The DQ only group showed a significantly longer post-KT duration compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). The overall incidence of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) was 17.9%. B-DSA, DR-DSA, and DQ-DSA were associated with AMR (P < 0.05), but in the analysis for chronic AMR, only DQ-DSA showed significance in both the total and the nonsensitized subgroup (P < 0.05). On comparison of Banff scores among groups, those representing humoral immunity were significantly dominant in all DSA positive groups compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05), and higher scores of markers representing chronic tissue injury were more frequently detected in the groups with DQ-DSA. The worst postbiopsy survival was seen in the DQ + non-DQ group of the total patient group, and patients with de-novo DQ-DSA showed poorer graft survival in the nonsensitized subgroup compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, de-novo DQ-DSA was the only significant risk factor associated with late allograft failure (P < 0.05). Our study is the first to demonstrate

  18. MiR-142-5p and miR-486-5p as biomarkers for early detection of chronic antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kenta; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Inanaga, Yukiko; Hiramitsu, Takahisa; Miwa, Yuko; Murotani, Kenta; Narumi, Shuji; Watarai, Yoshihiko; Katayama, Akio; Uchida, Kazuharu; Kobayashi, Takaaki

    2017-02-01

    De novo donor-specific HLA antibody (DSA) would not necessarily contribute to chronic antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) in kidney transplantation. Here, we investigated whether PBMC miRNAs could be predictable biomarkers for CAMR. Microarray profiling of 435 mature miRNAs in pooled samples was conducted. Individual analysis revealed that miR-142-5p was significantly (p < 0.01) underexpressed in patients with DSA. After DSA production, miR-486-5p and its target PTEN/foxO3 mRNA were significantly overexpressed (p < 0.01) and underexpressed (p < 0.01), respectively, in patients with biopsy-proven CAMR, compared with non-CAMR. Our studies suggest that miRNA expression patterns may serve as noninvasive diagnostic biomarkers to evaluate immune response and kidney allograft status.

  19. Seroprevalence of Antibody-Mediated, Complement-Dependent Opsonophagocytic Activity against Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup B in England.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Holly E; Brookes, Charlotte; Allen, Lauren; Kuisma, Eeva; Gorringe, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    The correlate of protection for the licensure of meningococcal vaccines is serum bactericidal activity. However, evidence indicates that a complex situation and other mechanisms, such as antibody-mediated, complement-dependent opsonophagocytosis (OP), may play a role in protection and should be investigated in order to understand immunity to this disease. In this study, a high-throughput flow cytometric opsonophagocytic assay (OPA) was optimized. The assay measures the presence of killed fluorescently labeled Neisseria meningitidis within human granulocytes (differentiated HL60 cells) by flow cytometry, using IgG-depleted pooled human plasma as an exogenous source of complement. This method was found to be reliable and correlated with the results of an opsonophagocytic killing assay. The OPA was used to measure OP activity in 1,878 serum samples from individuals ranging from 0 to 99 years of age against N. meningitidis strain NZ98/254 (B:4:P1.7-2,4). The levels of OP activity in individual serum samples varied greatly. OP activity showed an initial peak in the 6- to 12-month age group corresponding to a peak in disease incidence. The OP activity dropped in childhood until the late teenage years, although there was still a higher percentage of individuals with OP activity than with protective bactericidal antibody titers. OP activity reached a peak in the 30- to 39-year age group and then declined. This later peak in OP activity did not coincide with the young adults in whom peak serum bactericidal activity and disease incidence occurred. The demonstration of OP activity when disease incidence is low and when protective bactericidal antibody titers are not detected may indicate a role for OP in protection from meningococcal disease in these age groups.

  20. Seroprevalence of Antibody-Mediated, Complement-Dependent Opsonophagocytic Activity against Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup B in England

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Charlotte; Allen, Lauren; Kuisma, Eeva; Gorringe, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The correlate of protection for the licensure of meningococcal vaccines is serum bactericidal activity. However, evidence indicates that a complex situation and other mechanisms, such as antibody-mediated, complement-dependent opsonophagocytosis (OP), may play a role in protection and should be investigated in order to understand immunity to this disease. In this study, a high-throughput flow cytometric opsonophagocytic assay (OPA) was optimized. The assay measures the presence of killed fluorescently labeled Neisseria meningitidis within human granulocytes (differentiated HL60 cells) by flow cytometry, using IgG-depleted pooled human plasma as an exogenous source of complement. This method was found to be reliable and correlated with the results of an opsonophagocytic killing assay. The OPA was used to measure OP activity in 1,878 serum samples from individuals ranging from 0 to 99 years of age against N. meningitidis strain NZ98/254 (B:4:P1.7-2,4). The levels of OP activity in individual serum samples varied greatly. OP activity showed an initial peak in the 6- to 12-month age group corresponding to a peak in disease incidence. The OP activity dropped in childhood until the late teenage years, although there was still a higher percentage of individuals with OP activity than with protective bactericidal antibody titers. OP activity reached a peak in the 30- to 39-year age group and then declined. This later peak in OP activity did not coincide with the young adults in whom peak serum bactericidal activity and disease incidence occurred. The demonstration of OP activity when disease incidence is low and when protective bactericidal antibody titers are not detected may indicate a role for OP in protection from meningococcal disease in these age groups. PMID:25739917

  1. ANTIBODY-MEDIATED ACTIVATION OF A DEFECTIVE β-D-GALACTOSIDASE

    PubMed Central

    Celada, Franco; Ellis, John; Bodlund, Kerstin; Rotman, Boris

    1971-01-01

    Two closely related protein antigens were used to study immunogenic competition. Namely, normal β-D-galactosidase of Escherichia coli (Z) and a genetically defective β-D-galactosidase (AMEF) which seems to differ from the normal in one amino acid substitution. A unique characteristic of this pair of antigens is that, although they are indistinguishable in precipitation and absorption tests with antibodies, the enzymatic activity of AMEF is specifically increased several-hundredfold in the presence of antibodies directed against Z. The following results show that Z and AMEF also differ in their immunogenic ability: (a) antibodies directed against Z activated AMEF; antibodies directed against AMEF did not activate, but competed specifically with activating antibodies. (b) Animals immunized with AMEF failed to produce activating antibodies when they were subsequently challenged with Z, although the presence of some cells primed to produce activating antibodies could be demonstrated by adoptive transfer. (c) Animals preimmunized with Z were stimulated in their production of activating antibodies by AMEF challenge, although not as efficiently as with Z. A model explaining these observations by competition for the immunogenic site among antigen-sensitive cells carrying cross-reacting receptors is presented. PMID:15776573

  2. Antibody-mediated sialidase activity in blood serum of patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bilyy, Rostyslav; Tomin, Andriy; Mahorivska, Iryna; Shalay, Olga; Lohinskyy, Volodymyr; Stoika, Rostyslav; Kit, Yuriy

    2011-01-01

    Cell surface sialylation is known to be tightly connected with tumorigenicity, invasiveness, metastatic potential, clearance of aged cells, while the sialylation of IgG molecules determines their anti-inflammatory properties. Four sialidases - hydrolytic enzymes responsible for cleavage of sialic residues - were described in different cellular compartments. However, sialidases activity in body fluids, and specifically in blood serum, remains poorly studied. Here, we characterize first known IgG antibodies possessing sialidase-like activity in blood serum of multiple myeloma (MM) patients. Ig fractions were precipitated with ammonium sulfate (50% of saturation) from blood serum of 12 healthy donors and 14 MM patients, and screened for the presence of sialidase activity by using 4-MUNA (2'-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-α-D-N-acetylneuraminic acid) as substrate. High level of sialidase activity was detected in the MM patients, but not in healthy donors. Subsequent antibody purification by protein-G affinity chromatography and HPLC size exclusion chromatography at acidic conditions demonstrated that sialidase activity was attributable to IgG molecules. Sialidase activity was also specific for (Fab)(2) fragment of IgG and blocked by sialidase inhibitor DANA. Sialidase activity of IgG molecule was also confirmed by in gel assay for cleavage of sialidase substrate. Kinetic parameters of the catalysis reaction were described by Michaelis-Menten equation with K(m)  = 44.4-108 µM and k(cat) = 2.7-23.1 min(-1). The action of IgG possessing sialidase-like activity towards human red blood cells resulted in a subsequent increase in their agglutination by the peanut agglutinin, that confirms their desialylation by the studied IgG. This is the first demonstration of the intrinsic sialidase activity of IgG isolated from blood serum of MM patients.

  3. Extended active disturbance rejection controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  4. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  5. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    PubMed

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  6. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  7. Antibody-Mediated Elimination of the Obligate Intracellular Bacterial Pathogen Ehrlichia chaffeensis during Active Infection

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Gary M.; Yager, Eric; Shilo, Konstantin; Volk, Erin; Reilly, Andrew; Chu, Frederick K.

    2000-01-01

    It is generally accepted that cellular, but not humoral immunity, plays an important role in host defense against intracellular bacteria. However, studies of some of these pathogens have provided evidence that antibodies can provide immunity if present during the initiation of infection. Here, we examined immunity against infection by Ehrlichia chaffeensis, an obligate intracellular bacterium that causes human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Studies with mice have demonstrated that immunocompetent strains are resistant to persistent infection but that SCID mice become persistently and fatally infected. Transfer of immune serum or antibodies obtained from immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice to C57BL/6 scid mice provided significant although transient protection from infection. Bacterial clearance was observed when administration occurred at the time of inoculation or well after infection was established. The effect was dose dependent, occurred within 2 days, and persisted for as long as 2 weeks. Weekly serum administration prolonged the survival of susceptible mice. Although cellular immunity is required for complete bacterial clearance, the data show that antibodies can play a significant role in the elimination of this obligate intracellular bacterium during active infection and thus challenge the paradigm that humoral responses are unimportant for immunity to such organisms. PMID:10722619

  8. Mechanisms involved in antibody- and complement-mediated allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has become critical clinically because this form of rejection is usually unresponsive to conventional anti-rejection therapy, and therefore, it has been recognized as a major cause of allograft loss. Our group developed experimental animal models of vascularized organ transplantation to study pathogenesis of antibody- and complement-mediated endothelial cell injury leading to graft rejection. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft rejection resulting from activation of complement by C1q- and MBL (mannose-binding lectin)-dependent pathways and interactions with a variety of effector cells, including macrophages and monocytes through Fcγ receptors and complement receptors. PMID:20135240

  9. Detection of anti-HLA antibodies in maternal blood in the second trimester to identify patients at risk for antibody-mediated maternal anti-fetal rejection and spontaneous preterm delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, JoonHo; Romero, Roberto; Xu, Yi; Miranda, Jezid; Yoo, Wonsuk; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Tarca, Adi L.; Korzeniewski, Steven J.; Hassan, Sonia S.; Than, Nandor Gabor; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Kim, Chong Jai

    2014-01-01

    Problem Maternal anti-fetal rejection is a mechanism of disease in spontaneous preterm labor. The objective of this study was to determine whether the presence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) panel-reactive antibodies (PRA) during the second trimester increases the risk for spontaneous preterm delivery. Methods of Study This longitudinal case-control study included pregnant women with spontaneous preterm deliveries (n=310) and control patients with normal term pregnancies (n=620), matched for maternal age and gravidity. Maternal plasma samples obtained at 14-16, 16-20, 20-24, and 24-28 weeks of gestation were analyzed for HLA Class I and Class II PRA positivity using flow cytometry. The fetal HLA genotype and maternal HLA alloantibody epitope were determined for a subset of patients with positive HLA PRA. Results 1) Patients with spontaneous preterm delivery were more likely to exhibit HLA Class I (adjusted OR=2.54, p<0.0001) and Class II (adjusted OR=1.98, p=0.002) PRA positivity than those delivering at term; 2) HLA Class I PRA positivity for patients with spontaneous preterm delivery between 28-34 weeks (adjusted OR=2.88; p=0.001) and after 34 weeks of gestation (adjusted OR=2.53; p<0.0001) was higher than for those delivering at term; 3) HLA Class II PRA positivity for patients with spontaneous preterm delivery after 34 weeks of gestation was higher than for those delivering at term (adjusted OR=2.04; p=0.002); 4) multiparous women were at higher risk for HLA Class I PRA positivity than nulliparous women (adjusted OR=0.097, p<0.0001 for nulliparity); 5) nulliparous women had a higher rate of HLA Class I PRA positivity with advancing gestational age (p=0.001); and 6) 78% of women whose fetuses were genotyped had allo-antibodies specific against fetal HLA class I antigens. Conclusions Pregnant women with positive HLA class I or class II PRA during the second trimester are at an increased risk for spontaneous preterm delivery due to antibody-mediated maternal

  10. Active disturbance rejection controller for chemical reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Both, Roxana; Dulf, Eva H.; Muresan, Cristina I.

    2015-03-10

    In the petrochemical industry, the synthesis of 2 ethyl-hexanol-oxo-alcohols (plasticizers alcohol) is of high importance, being achieved through hydrogenation of 2 ethyl-hexenal inside catalytic trickle bed three-phase reactors. For this type of processes the use of advanced control strategies is suitable due to their nonlinear behavior and extreme sensitivity to load changes and other disturbances. Due to the complexity of the mathematical model an approach was to use a simple linear model of the process in combination with an advanced control algorithm which takes into account the model uncertainties, the disturbances and command signal limitations like robust control. However the resulting controller is complex, involving cost effective hardware. This paper proposes a simple integer-order control scheme using a linear model of the process, based on active disturbance rejection method. By treating the model dynamics as a common disturbance and actively rejecting it, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) can achieve the desired response. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. Decreased Fc receptor expression on innate immune cells is associated with impaired antibody-mediated cellular phagocytic activity in chronically HIV-1 infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Tonelli, Andrew; Berger, Christoph T; Ackerman, Margaret E; Sciaranghella, Gaia; Liu, Qingquan; Sips, Magdalena; Toth, Ildiko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Ghebremichael, Musie; Alter, Galit

    2011-07-05

    In addition to neutralization, antibodies mediate other antiviral activities including antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), as well as complement deposition. While it is established that progressive HIV infection is associated with reduced ADCC and ADCP, the underlying mechanism for this loss of function is unknown. Here we report considerable changes in FcR expression over the course of HIV infection on both mDCs and monocytes, including elevated FcγRI expression in acute HIV infection and reduced expression of FcγRII and FcγRIIIa in chronic HIV infection. Furthermore, selective blockade of FcγRII alone was associated with a loss in ADCP activity, suggesting that FcγRII plays a central role in modulating ADCP. Overall, HIV infection is associated with a number of changes in FcR expression on phagocytic cells that are associated with changes in their ability to respond to antibody-opsonized targets, potentially contributing to a failure in viral clearance in progressive HIV-1 infection.

  12. Antibody-mediated activation of a defective beta-D-galactosidase: dimeric form of the activatable mutant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Conway de Macario, E; Ellis, J; Guzman, R; Rotman, B

    1978-02-01

    Sedimentation analyses of AMEF, an activatable mutant beta-D-galactosidase (beta-D-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.23), and the products of its reaction with Fab fragments of activating antibody show that this enzyme exists mainly as 10S dimers. Activation of AMEF by purified antibody resulted in formation of 16S tetramers. A unifying hypothesis postulating a dimer--tetramer equilibrium accounts for this observation as the counterpart of inactivation, which was shown to involve the breakdown of tetramers into inactive subunits [Roth, R. A. & Rotman, B. (1975) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 67, 1382--1390]. Conditions are described under which AMEF loses the specific antigenic determinant(s) responsible for binding activating antibody, allowing its subsequent use as an absorption to obtain immunologically purified activating antibody,

  13. Antibody-mediated activation of a defective beta-D-galactosidase: dimeric form of the activatable mutant enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    de Macario, E C; Ellis, J; Guzman, R; Rotman, B

    1978-01-01

    Sedimentation analyses of AMEF, an activatable mutant beta-D-galactosidase (beta-D-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.23), and the products of its reaction with Fab fragments of activating antibody show that this enzyme exists mainly as 10S dimers. Activation of AMEF by purified antibody resulted in formation of 16S tetramers. A unifying hypothesis postulating a dimer--tetramer equilibrium accounts for this observation as the counterpart of inactivation, which was shown to involve the breakdown of tetramers into inactive subunits [Roth, R. A. & Rotman, B. (1975) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 67, 1382--1390]. Conditions are described under which AMEF loses the specific antigenic determinant(s) responsible for binding activating antibody, allowing its subsequent use as an absorption to obtain immunologically purified activating antibody, PMID:416439

  14. Comparability of Antibody-Mediated Cell Killing Activity Between a Proposed Biosimilar RTXM83 and the Originator Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Cuello, Hector A; Segatori, Valeria I; Alberto, Marina; Pesce, Analía; Alonso, Daniel F; Gabri, Mariano R

    2016-06-01

    Biosimilars are described as biological products that resemble the structure of original biologic therapeutic products, with no clinically meaningful differences in terms of safety and effectiveness from the original. A wide range of biosimilars are under development or are already licensed in many countries. Biosimilars are earning acceptance and becoming a reality for immunotherapy treatments mainly based on the alternatives for the commercial anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab. The most important mechanism of action reported for this antibody is the induction of antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC), which is associated with the polymorphisms present at the 158 position in the IgG receptor FcγRIIIa. The aim of the study was to validate the functional comparability between the proposed rituximab biosimilar RTXM83 and the original product. To achieve this we assessed the binding capacity and ADCC induction of this biosimilar, taking into account the different FcγRIIIa-158 polymorphisms. Binding capacity was evaluated by flow cytometry using CD20 positive cells and a wide range of antibody concentrations. The FcγRIIIa-158 polymorphisms were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by allele-specific restriction enzyme digestion. ADCC was measured by a colorimetric lactate dehydrogenase-release assay, using effector cells from donors with different FcγRIIIa-158 polymorphisms. Binding capacity assay showed no differences between both products. Regarding ADCC, a similar relative potency was obtained between both antibodies, showing a higher response for the FcγRIIIa-158 valine/valine (V/V) polymorphism compared to the phenylalanine/phenylalanine (F/F), for both rituximab and RTXM83. Our data strongly suggest the biocomparability between the proposed biosimilar and the originator rituximab, in antibody recognition and ADCC activity. Additionally, our results suggest that donors with the FcγRIIIa-158V/V polymorphism induce a higher ADCC

  15. Plasma proteolytic activity in liver transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Scholz, T; Gallimore, M J; Bäckman, L; Mathisen, O; Bergan, A; Klintmalm, G B; Aasen, A O

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the role of proteolytic enzymes belonging to the coagulation, fibrinolytic, and plasma contact systems in the early postoperative phase after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Twenty-nine patients were studied at the time of OLT and during the first 2 postoperative weeks. Blood samples were collected daily after OLT and analyzed for kallikrein-like activity (KK), functional kallikrein inhibition (KKI), plasmin-like activity (PL), and alpha2-antiplasmin (AP). In addition, prekallikrein (PKK), prothrombin (PTH), antithrombin III (AT III), plasminogen (PLG), prothrombin/antithrombin III complexes (TAT), prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2), and plasmin/alpha2-antiplasmin complexes (PAP) were measured. Nineteen patients experienced biopsy-verified acute rejections (AR) and ten patients had uneventful courses and served as controls. Plasma analyses showed that the contact, coagulation, and fibrinolytic systems were activated during OLT. Following OLT, continuous thrombin and plasmin generation was observed, and these effects were more pronounced in the group having an uneventful course than in patients with AR. Factors that could possibly affect plasma proteolytic activity, such as blood product usage during and after OLT and cold ischemia time of the liver graft, did not differ between the groups, nor did the routine liver function tests, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST).

  16. Bortezomib for refractory antibody-mediated cardiac allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Peter M; Thorsgard, Marit; Maurer, David; Kim, Youngki; Alloway, Rita R; Woodle, E Steve

    2009-01-01

    This experience demonstrates that a bortezomib-based regimen provided effective therapy for late, refractory AMR in an adult heart transplant recipient and was well tolerated. This remarkably positive experience despite the refractory nature of the AMR episode argues strongly for continued evaluation of bortezomib use in this patient population.

  17. Antibody-mediated resistance against plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Safarnejad, Mohammad Reza; Jouzani, Gholamreza Salehi; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Tabatabaie, Meisam; Twyman, Richard M; Schillberg, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Plant diseases have a significant impact on the yield and quality of crops. Many strategies have been developed to combat plant diseases, including the transfer of resistance genes to crops by conventional breeding. However, resistance genes can only be introgressed from sexually-compatible species, so breeders need alternative measures to introduce resistance traits from more distant sources. In this context, genetic engineering provides an opportunity to exploit diverse and novel forms of resistance, e.g. the use of recombinant antibodies targeting plant pathogens. Native antibodies, as a part of the vertebrate adaptive immune system, can bind to foreign antigens and eliminate them from the body. The ectopic expression of antibodies in plants can also interfere with pathogen activity to confer disease resistance. With sufficient knowledge of the pathogen life cycle, it is possible to counter any disease by designing expression constructs so that pathogen-specific antibodies accumulate at high levels in appropriate sub-cellular compartments. Although first developed to tackle plant viruses and still used predominantly for this purpose, antibodies have been targeted against a diverse range of pathogens as well as proteins involved in plant-pathogen interactions. Here we comprehensively review the development and implementation of antibody-mediated disease resistance in plants.

  18. Active disturbance rejection control for fractional-order system.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingda; Li, Donghai; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Chunzhe

    2013-05-01

    Fractional-order proportional-integral (PI) and proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers are the most commonly used controllers in fractional-order systems. However, this paper proposes a simple integer-order control scheme for fractional-order system based on active disturbance rejection method. By treating the fractional-order dynamics as a common disturbance and actively rejecting it, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) can achieve the desired response. External disturbance, sensor noise, and parameter disturbance are also estimated using extended state observer. The ADRC stability of rational-order model is analyzed. Simulation results on three typical fractional-order systems are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Polymorphisms in the lectin pathway of complement activation influence the incidence of acute rejection and graft outcome after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Golshayan, Déla; Wójtowicz, Agnieszka; Bibert, Stéphanie; Pyndiah, Nitisha; Manuel, Oriol; Binet, Isabelle; Buhler, Leo H; Huynh-Do, Uyen; Mueller, Thomas; Steiger, Jürg; Pascual, Manuel; Meylan, Pascal; Bochud, Pierre-Yves

    2016-04-01

    There are conflicting data on the role of the lectin pathway of complement activation and its recognition molecules in acute rejection and outcome after transplantation. To help resolve this we analyzed polymorphisms and serum levels of lectin pathway components in 710 consecutive kidney transplant recipients enrolled in the nationwide Swiss Transplant Cohort Study, together with all biopsy-proven rejection episodes and 1-year graft and patient survival. Functional mannose-binding lectin (MBL) levels were determined in serum samples, and previously described MBL2, ficolin 2, and MBL-associated serine protease 2 polymorphisms were genotyped. Low MBL serum levels and deficient MBL2 diplotypes were associated with a higher incidence of acute cellular rejection during the first year, in particular in recipients of deceased-donor kidneys. This association remained significant (hazard ratio 1.75, 95% confidence interval 1.18-2.60) in a Cox regression model after adjustment for relevant covariates. In contrast, there was no significant association with rates of antibody-mediated rejection, patient death, early graft dysfunction or loss. Thus, results in a prospective multicenter contemporary cohort suggest that MBL2 polymorphisms result in low MBL serum levels and are associated with acute cellular rejection after kidney transplantation. Since MBL deficiency is a relatively frequent trait in the normal population, our findings may lead to individual risk stratification and customized immunosuppression.

  20. Rational clinical trial design for antibody mediated renal allograft injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandal, Shaifali; Zand, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody mediated renal allograft rejection is a significant cause of acute and chronic graft loss. Recent work has revealed that AMR is a complex processes, involving B and plasma cells, donor-specific antibodies, complement, vascular endothelial cells, NK cells, Fc receptors, cytokines and chemokines. These insights have led to the development of numerous new therapies, and adaptation of others originally developed for treatment of hemetologic malignancies, autoimmune and complement mediated conditions. Here we review emerging insights into the pathophysiology of AMR as well as current and emerging therapies for both acute and chronic AMR. Finally, we discuss rational clinical trial design in light of antibody and B cell immunobiology, as well as appropriate efficacy metrics to identify robust protocols and therapeutic agents. PMID:25553476

  1. Active disturbance rejection in large flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Sunkel, John W.

    1990-01-01

    The design of an active control law for the rejection of persistent disturbances, in large space structures is presented. The control system design approach is based on a deterministic model of the disturbances and it optimizes the magnitude of the disturbance that the structure can tolerate without violating certain predetermined constraints. In addition to closed-loop stability, the explicit treatment of state, control, and control rate constraints, such as structural displacement and control actuator effort, guarantees that the final design will exhibit desired performance characteristics. The technique is applied to a simple two-bay truss structure, and its response is compared with that obtained using a linear-quadratic-Gaussian/loop-transfer-recovery (LQG/LTR) compensator. Preliminary results indicate that the proposed control system can reject persistent disturbances of greater magnitude by utilizing most of the available control, while limiting the structural displacements to within desired tolerances.

  2. Modified active disturbance rejection control for time-delay systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shen; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2014-07-01

    Industrial processes are typically nonlinear, time-varying and uncertain, to which active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) has been shown to be an effective solution. The control design becomes even more challenging in the presence of time delay. In this paper, a novel modification of ADRC is proposed so that good disturbance rejection is achieved while maintaining system stability. The proposed design is shown to be more effective than the standard ADRC design for time-delay systems and is also a unified solution for stable, critical stable and unstable systems with time delay. Simulation and test results show the effectiveness and practicality of the proposed design. Linear matrix inequality (LMI) based stability analysis is provided as well.

  3. Dynamic positioning system based on active disturbance rejection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhengling; Guo, Chen; Fan, Yunsheng

    2015-08-01

    A dynamically positioned vessel, by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the certifying class societies (DNV, ABS, LR, etc.), is defined as a vessel that maintains its position and heading (fixed location or pre-determined track) exclusively by means of active thrusters. The development of control technology promotes the upgrading of dynamic positioning (DP) systems. Today there are two different DP systems solutions available on the market: DP system based on PID regulator and that based on model-based control. Both systems have limited disturbance rejection capability due to their design principle. In this paper, a new DP system solution is proposed based on Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC) technology. This technology is composed of Tracking-Differentiator (TD), Extended State Observer (ESO) and Nonlinear Feedback Combination. On one hand, both TD and ESO can act as filters and can be used in place of conventional filters; on the other hand, the total disturbance of the system can be estimated and compensated by ESO, which therefore enhances the system's disturbance rejection capability. This technology's advantages over other methods lie in two aspects: 1) This method itself can not only achieve control objectives but also filter noisy measurements without other specialized filters; 2) This method offers a new useful approach to suppress the ocean disturbance. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Antibody-mediated activation of a defective beta-D-galactosidase. II. Immunological relationship between the normal and the defective enzyme.

    PubMed

    Celada, F; Ellis, J; Bodlund, K; Rotman, B

    1971-09-01

    Two closely related protein antigens were used to study immunogenic competition. Namely, normal beta-D-galactosidase of Escherichia coli (Z) and a genetically defective beta-D-galactosidase (AMEF) which seems to differ from the normal in one amino acid substitution. A unique characteristic of this pair of antigens is that, although they are indistinguishable in precipitation and absorption tests with antibodies, the enzymatic activity of AMEF is specifically increased several-hundredfold in the presence of antibodies directed against Z. The following results show that Z and AMEF also differ in their immunogenic ability: (a) antibodies directed against Z activated AMEF; antibodies directed against AMEF did not activate, but competed specifically with activating antibodies. (b) Animals immunized with AMEF failed to produce activating antibodies when they were subsequently challenged with Z, although the presence of some cells primed to produce activating antibodies could be demonstrated by adoptive transfer. (c) Animals preimmunized with Z were stimulated in their production of activating antibodies by AMEF challenge, although not as efficiently as with Z. A model explaining these observations by competition for the immunogenic site among antigen-sensitive cells carrying cross-reacting receptors is presented.

  5. Active disturbance rejection control of temperature for ultrastable optical cavities.

    PubMed

    Pizzocaro, Marco; Calonico, Davide; Calosso, Claudio; Clivati, Cecilia; Costanzo, Giovanni A; Levi, Filippo; Mura, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes the application of a novel active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) to the stabilization of the temperature of two ultra-stable Fabry-Perot cavities. The cavities are 10 cm long and entirely made of ultralow- expansion glass. The control is based on a linear extended state observer that estimates and compensates the disturbance in the system in real time. The resulting control is inherently robust and easy to tune. A digital implementation of ADRC gives a temperature instability of 200 μK at one day of integration time.

  6. Active rejection of persistent disturbances in flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Cheng-Neng; Jayasuriya, Suhada; Parlos, Alexander G.; Sunkel, John W.

    1990-01-01

    A dynamic compensator for active rejection of persistent disturbances in flexible space structures is designed on the principle of the H(infinity)-optimization of the sensitivity transfer function matrix. A general state space solution is formulated to the multiinput multioutput H(infinity)-optimal control problem, allowing the use of the H(infinity)-optimal synthesis algorithm for the state-space models of space structures that result from model order reduction. Disturbances encountered in flexible space structures, such as shuttle docking, are investigated using the high-mode and the reduced-order models of a cantilevered two-bay truss, demonstrating the applicability of the H(infinity)-optimal approach.

  7. The Fc-region of a new class of intact bispecific antibody mediates activation of accessory cells and NK cells and induces direct phagocytosis of tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeidler, R; Mysliwietz, J; Csánady, M; Walz, A; Ziegler, I; Schmitt, B; Wollenberg, B; Lindhofer, H

    2000-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAb) are considered as promising tools for the elimination of disseminated tumour cells in a minimal residual disease situation. The bsAb-mediated recruitment of an immune effector cell in close vicinity of a tumour cell is thought to induce an antitumoural immune response. However, classical bispecific molecules activate only a single class of immune effector cell that may not yield optimal immune responses. We therefore constructed an intact bispecific antibody, BiUII (anti-CD3 × anti-EpCAM), that not only recognizes tumour cells and T lymphocytes with its two binding arms, but also binds and activates Fcγ-receptor positive accessory cells through its Fc-region. We have demonstrated recently that activated accessory cells contribute to the bsAb-induced antitumoural activity. We now analyse this stimulation in more detail and demonstrate here the BiUll-induced upregulation of activation markers like CD83 and CD95 on accessory cells and the induction of neopterin and biopterin synthesis. Experiments with pure cell subpopulations revealed binding of BiUll to CD64+ accessory cells and CD16+ NK cells, but not to CD32+ B lymphocytes. We provide further evidence for the importance of the Fc-region in that this bispecific molecule stimulates Fcγ-R-positive accessory cells to eliminate tumour cells in vitro by direct phagocytosis. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10901380

  8. HA Antibody-Mediated FcγRIIIa Activity Is Both Dependent on FcR Engagement and Interactions between HA and Sialic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Freek; Kwaks, Ted; Brandenburg, Boerries; Koldijk, Martin H.; Klaren, Vincent; Smal, Bastiaan; Korse, Hans J. W. M.; Geelen, Eric; Tettero, Lisanne; Zuijdgeest, David; Stoop, Esther J. M.; Saeland, Eirikur; Vogels, Ronald; Friesen, Robert H. E.; Koudstaal, Wouter; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    Interactions with receptors for the Fc region of IgG (FcγRs) have been shown to contribute to the in vivo protection against influenza A viruses provided by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) that bind to the viral hemagglutinin (HA) stem. In particular, Fc-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) has been shown to contribute to protection by stem-binding bnAbs. Fc-mediated effector functions appear not to contribute to protection provided by strain-specific HA head-binding antibodies. We used a panel of anti-stem and anti-head influenza A and B monoclonal antibodies with identical human IgG1 Fc domains and investigated their ability to mediate ADCC-associated FcγRIIIa activation. Antibodies which do not interfere with sialic acid binding of HA can mediate FcγRIIIa activation. However, the FcγRIIIa activation was inhibited when a mutant HA, unable to bind sialic acids, was used. Antibodies which block sialic acid receptor interactions of HA interfered with FcγRIIIa activation. The inhibition of FcγRIIIa activation by HA head-binding and sialic acid receptor-blocking antibodies was confirmed in plasma samples of H5N1 vaccinated human subjects. Together, these results suggest that in addition to Fc–FcγR binding, interactions between HA and sialic acids on immune cells are required for optimal Fc-mediated effector functions by anti-HA antibodies. PMID:27746785

  9. HIV-specific CD4-induced Antibodies Mediate Broad and Potent Antibody-dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Activity and are Commonly Detected in Plasma from HIV-infected Humans

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Katherine L.; Cortez, Valerie; Dingens, Adam S.; Gach, Johannes S.; Rainwater, Stephanie; Weis, Julie F.; Chen, Xuemin; Spearman, Paul; Forthal, Donald N.; Overbaugh, Julie

    2015-01-01

    HIV-specific antibodies (Abs) can reduce viral burden by blocking new rounds of infection or by destroying infected cells via activation of effector cells through Fc–FcR interaction. This latter process, referred to as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), has been associated with viral control and improved clinical outcome following both HIV and SIV infections. Here we describe an HIV viral-like particle (VLP)-based sorting strategy that led to identification of HIV-specific memory B cells encoding Abs that mediate ADCC from a subtype A-infected Kenyan woman at 914 days post-infection. Using this strategy, 12 HIV-envelope-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were isolated and three mediated potent ADCC activity when compared to well-characterized ADCC mAbs. The ADCC-mediating Abs also mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), which provides a net measure of Fc receptor-triggered effects against replicating virus. Two of the three ADCC-mediating Abs targeted a CD4-induced (CD4i) epitope also bound by the mAb C11; the third antibody targeted the N-terminus of V3. Both CD4i Abs identified here demonstrated strong cross-clade breadth with activity against 10 of 11 envelopes tested, including those from clades A, B, C, A/D and C/D, whereas the V3-specific antibody showed more limited breadth. Variants of these CD4i, C11-like mAbs engineered to interrupt binding to FcγRs inhibited a measurable percentage of the donor's ADCC activity starting as early as 189 days post-infection. C11-like antibodies also accounted for between 18–78% of ADCC activity in 9 chronically infected individuals from the same cohort study. Further, the two CD4i Abs originated from unique B cells, suggesting that antibodies targeting this epitope can be commonly produced. Taken together, these data provide strong evidence that CD4i, C11-like antibodies develop within the first 6 months of infection and they can arise from unique B-cell lineages in the

  10. Anti-DR5 monoclonal antibody-mediated DTIC-loaded nanoparticles combining chemotherapy and immunotherapy for malignant melanoma: target formulation development and in vitro anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Baoyue; Wu, Xin; Fan, Wei; Wu, Zhaoyong; Gao, Jing; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Lulu; Xiang, Wang; Zhu, Quangang; Liu, Jiyong; Ding, Xueying; Gao, Shen

    2011-01-01

    Background The increased incidence of malignant melanoma in recent decades, along with its high mortality rate and pronounced resistance to therapy pose an enormous challenge. Novel therapeutic strategies, such as immunotherapy and targeted therapy, are urgently needed for melanoma. In this study, a new active targeting drug delivery system was constructed to combine chemotherapy and active specific immunotherapy. Methods The chemotherapeutic drug, dacarbazine (DTIC), that induces apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway which typically responds to severe DNA damage, was used as a model drug to prepare DTIC-loaded polylactic acid (PLA) nanoparticles (DTIC-NPs), which were covalently conjugated to a highly specific targeting functional TRAIL-receptor 2 (DR5) monoclonal antibody (mAb) that can contribute directly to cancer cell apoptosis or growth inhibition through the extrinsic pathway. Results Our in vitro experiments demonstrated that DTIC-PLA-DR5 mAb nanoparticles (DTIC-NPs-DR5 mAb) are an active targeting drug delivery system which can specifically target DR5-overexpressing malignant melanoma cells and become efficiently internalized. Most strikingly, compared with conventional DTIC-NPs, DTIC-NPs-DR5 mAb showed significantly enhanced cytotoxicity and increased cell apoptosis in DR5-positive malignant melanoma cells. Conclusion The DTIC-NPs-DR5 mAb described in this paper might be a potential formulation for targeting chemotherapy and immunotherapy to DR5-overexpressing metastatic melanoma. PMID:21976975

  11. Anti-DR5 monoclonal antibody-mediated DTIC-loaded nanoparticles combining chemotherapy and immunotherapy for malignant melanoma: target formulation development and in vitro anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Ding, Baoyue; Wu, Xin; Fan, Wei; Wu, Zhaoyong; Gao, Jing; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Lulu; Xiang, Wang; Zhu, Quangang; Liu, Jiyong; Ding, Xueying; Gao, Shen

    2011-01-01

    The increased incidence of malignant melanoma in recent decades, along with its high mortality rate and pronounced resistance to therapy pose an enormous challenge. Novel therapeutic strategies, such as immunotherapy and targeted therapy, are urgently needed for melanoma. In this study, a new active targeting drug delivery system was constructed to combine chemotherapy and active specific immunotherapy. The chemotherapeutic drug, dacarbazine (DTIC), that induces apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway which typically responds to severe DNA damage, was used as a model drug to prepare DTIC-loaded polylactic acid (PLA) nanoparticles (DTIC-NPs), which were covalently conjugated to a highly specific targeting functional TRAIL-receptor 2 (DR5) monoclonal antibody (mAb) that can contribute directly to cancer cell apoptosis or growth inhibition through the extrinsic pathway. Our in vitro experiments demonstrated that DTIC-PLA-DR5 mAb nanoparticles (DTIC-NPs-DR5 mAb) are an active targeting drug delivery system which can specifically target DR5-overexpressing malignant melanoma cells and become efficiently internalized. Most strikingly, compared with conventional DTIC-NPs, DTIC-NPs-DR5 mAb showed significantly enhanced cytotoxicity and increased cell apoptosis in DR5-positive malignant melanoma cells. The DTIC-NPs-DR5 mAb described in this paper might be a potential formulation for targeting chemotherapy and immunotherapy to DR5-overexpressing metastatic melanoma.

  12. Antibody-mediated phagocytosis contributes to the anti-tumor activity of the therapeutic antibody daratumumab in lymphoma and multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Overdijk, Marije B; Verploegen, Sandra; Bögels, Marijn; van Egmond, Marjolein; Lammerts van Bueren, Jeroen J; Mutis, Tuna; Groen, Richard W J; Breij, Esther; Martens, Anton C M; Bleeker, Wim K; Parren, Paul W H I

    2015-01-01

    Daratumumab (DARA) is a human CD38-specific IgG1 antibody that is in clinical development for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). The potential for IgG1 antibodies to induce macrophage-mediated phagocytosis, in combination with the known presence of macrophages in the tumor microenvironment in MM and other hematological tumors, led us to investigate the contribution of antibody-dependent, macrophage-mediated phagocytosis to DARA's mechanism of action. Live cell imaging revealed that DARA efficiently induced macrophage-mediated phagocytosis, in which individual macrophages rapidly and sequentially engulfed multiple tumor cells. DARA-dependent phagocytosis by mouse and human macrophages was also observed in an in vitro flow cytometry assay, using a range of MM and Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines. Phagocytosis contributed to DARA's anti-tumor activity in vivo, in both a subcutaneous and an intravenous leukemic xenograft mouse model. Finally, DARA was shown to induce macrophage-mediated phagocytosis of MM cells isolated from 11 of 12 MM patients that showed variable levels of CD38 expression. In summary, we demonstrate that phagocytosis is a fast, potent and clinically relevant mechanism of action that may contribute to the therapeutic activity of DARA in multiple myeloma and potentially other hematological tumors.

  13. CD147 monoclonal antibody mediated by chitosan nanoparticles loaded with α-hederin enhances antineoplastic activity and cellular uptake in liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Rong; Zhang, Chun-ge; Liu, Yang; Yuan, Zhi-qiang; Chen, Wei-liang; Yang, Shu-di; Li, Ji-zhao; Zhu, Wen-jing; Zhou, Xiao-feng; You, Ben-gang; Zhang, Xue-nong

    2015-01-01

    An antibody that specifically interacts with an antigen could be applied to an active targeting delivery system. In this study, CD147 antibody was coupled with α-hed chitosan nanoparticles (α-Hed-CS-NPs). α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs were round and spherical in shape, with an average particle size of 148.23 ± 1.75 nm. The half-maximum inhibiting concentration (IC50) of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs in human liver cancer cell lines HepG2 and SMMC-7721 was lower than that of free α-Hed and α-Hed-CS-NPs. α-Hed-induced cell death was mainly triggered by apoptosis. The increase in intracellular accumulation of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs was also related to CD147-mediated internalization through the Caveolae-dependent pathway and lysosomal escape. The higher targeting antitumor efficacy of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs than that α-Hed-CS-NPs was attributed to its stronger fluorescence intensity in the tumor site in nude mice. PMID:26639052

  14. CD147 monoclonal antibody mediated by chitosan nanoparticles loaded with α-hederin enhances antineoplastic activity and cellular uptake in liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rong; Zhang, Chun-ge; Liu, Yang; Yuan, Zhi-qiang; Chen, Wei-liang; Yang, Shu-di; Li, Ji-zhao; Zhu, Wen-jing; Zhou, Xiao-feng; You, Ben-gang; Zhang, Xue-nong

    2015-12-07

    An antibody that specifically interacts with an antigen could be applied to an active targeting delivery system. In this study, CD147 antibody was coupled with α-hed chitosan nanoparticles (α-Hed-CS-NPs). α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs were round and spherical in shape, with an average particle size of 148.23 ± 1.75 nm. The half-maximum inhibiting concentration (IC50) of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs in human liver cancer cell lines HepG2 and SMMC-7721 was lower than that of free α-Hed and α-Hed-CS-NPs. α-Hed-induced cell death was mainly triggered by apoptosis. The increase in intracellular accumulation of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs was also related to CD147-mediated internalization through the Caveolae-dependent pathway and lysosomal escape. The higher targeting antitumor efficacy of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs than that α-Hed-CS-NPs was attributed to its stronger fluorescence intensity in the tumor site in nude mice.

  15. Cross-Neutralization Activity of Single-Chain Variable Fragment (scFv) Derived from Anti-V3 Monoclonal Antibodies Mediated by Post-Attachment Binding.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Yasuhiro; Kuwata, Takeo; Tanaka, Kazuki; Alam, Muntasir; Valdez, Kristel Paola Ramirez; Egami, Yoshika; Suwa, Yoshiaki; Morioka, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Shuzo

    2016-09-21

    The V3 loop in the envelope (Env) of HIV-1 is one of the major targets of neutralizing antibodies. However, this antigen is hidden inside the Env trimer in most isolates and is fully exposed only during CD4-gp120 interaction. Thus, primary HIV-1 isolates are relatively resistant to anti-V3 antibodies because IgG is too large to access the V3 loop. To overcome this obstacle, we constructed single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) from anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies 0.5γ, 5G2, and 16G6. Enhanced neutralization by 0.5γ and 5G2 scFvs was observed in strains resistant to their IgG counterparts. Neutralization coverage by 0.5γ scFv reached up to 90% of the tested viruses (tier 2 and 3 classes). The temperature-regulated neutralization assay revealed that extensive cross-neutralization of 0.5γ scFv can be explained by post-attachment neutralization. Neutralization assay involving viruses carrying an inter-subunit disulfide bond (SOS virus) showed that the neutralization-susceptible timeframe after attachment was 60 to 120 min. These results indicate that the scFvs efficiently access the V3 loop and subsequently neutralize HIV-1, even after virus attachment to the target cells. Based on its broad and potent neutralizing activity, further development of anti-V3 scFv for therapeutic and preventive strategies is warranted.

  16. Release of platelet activating factor in rabbits with antibody-mediated injury of the lung: the role of leukocytes and of pulmonary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Camussi, G; Pawlowski, I; Bussolino, F; Caldwell, P R; Brentjens, J; Andres, G

    1983-10-01

    This paper describes the release of platelet-activating factor (PAF) into the circulation of rabbits with acute pulmonary injury induced by antibody reacting with pulmonary endothelium. Eight rabbits were injected i.v. with 2 mg/kg of body weight of goat anti-rabbit lung angiotensin-converting enzyme gamma-globulin (GtARbACE). All animals developed acute pneumonitis, characterized by severe endothelial damage, accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and platelets (Plt) in the lumina of alveolar capillaries, and deposits of goat IgG and rabbit C3 along alveolar capillary walls. Six of the rabbits died from acute pulmonary edema. PAF was detected in the plasma of all animals within 5 min after injection of GtARbACE. Five other rabbits were depleted of leukocytes by nitrogen mustard and then injected with 2 mg/kg of body weight of GtARbACE. In three of these rabbits release of PAF was demonstrated, though in amounts smaller than in non-leukocyte-depleted rabbits; all three animals died from pulmonary edema. After injection of 0.03 mg/kg of body weight of GtARbACE in six additional rabbits, three of them leukocyte-depleted, small amounts of PAF were detected in the circulation. None of these six rabbits died of pulmonary edema. PAF release was not observed in ten rabbits injected i.v. with 2 or 0.03 mg/kg of body weight of normal goat gamma-globulin. In separate experiments in vitro, incubation of isolated lung or thoracic aorta with GtARbACE resulted in deposits of goat IgG along endothelia and significant release of PAF. PAF was also released from endothelial cells removed from thoracic aorta by cellulose acetate paper and then incubated with GtARbACE. When segments of thoracic aorta were stripped of endothelium and then incubated with GtARbACE, PAF release could not be shown. The data obtained are consistent with the interpretation that PAF released into the circulation after binding of GtARbACE to the endothelia of lung and aorta originates from

  17. Engineering Active IKKβ in T Cells Drives Tumor Rejection1

    PubMed Central

    Evaristo, César; Spranger, Stefani; Barnes, Sarah E.; Miller, Michelle L.; Molinero, Luciana L.; Locke, Frederick; Gajewski, Thomas F.; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Acquired dysfunction of tumor-reactive T cells is one mechanism by which tumors can evade the immune system. Identifying and correcting pathways that contribute to such dysfunction should enable novel anti-cancer therapy design. During cancer growth, T cells show reduced NF-κB activity, which is required for tumor rejection. Impaired T cell-NF-κB may create a vicious cycle conducive to tumor progression and further T cell dysfunction. We hypothesized that forcing T cell-NF-κB activation might break this cycle and induce tumor elimination. NF-κB was activated in T cells by inducing the expression of a constitutively active form of the upstream activator IKKβ. T cell-restricted caIKKβ augmented the frequency of functional tumor-specific CD8+ T cells and improved tumor control. Transfer of caIKKβ-transduced T cells also boosted endogenous T cell responses that controlled pre-established tumors. Our results demonstrate that driving T cell-NF-κB can result in tumor control, thus identifying a pathway with potential clinical applicability. PMID:26903482

  18. On Rejecting Emotional Lures Created by Phonological Neighborhood Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starns, Jeffrey J.; Cook, Gabriel I.; Hicks, Jason L.; Marsh, Richard L.

    2006-01-01

    The authors conducted 2 experiments to assess how phonologically related lures are rejected in a false memory paradigm. Some phonological lures were emotional (i.e., taboo) words, and others were not. The authors manipulated the presence of taboo items on the study list and reduced the ability to use controlled rejection strategies by dividing…

  19. Neuronal Surface Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Linnoila, Jenny J.; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, many autoimmune encephalitides have been identified, with specific clinical syndromes and associated antibodies against neuronal surface antigens. There is compelling evidence that many of these antibodies are pathogenic and most of these encephalitides are highly responsive to immunotherapies. The clinical spectra of some of these antibody-mediated syndromes, especially those reported in only a few patients, are evolving. Others, such as anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis, are well characterized. Diagnosis involves recognizing the specific syndromes and identifying the antibody in a patient’s cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and/or serum. These syndromes are associated with variable abnormalities in CSF, magnetic resonance imaging, and electroencephalography. Treatment is often multidisciplinary and should be focused upon neutralizing the effects of antibodies and eliminating their source. Overlapping disorders have been noted, with some patients having more than one neurologic autoimmune disease. In other patients, viral infections such as herpes simplex virus encephalitis trigger robust antineuronal autoimmune responses. PMID:25369441

  20. Monocyte procoagulant activity and plasminogen activator. Role in human renal allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.H.; Cardella, C.J.; Schulman, J.; Levy, G.A.

    1985-10-01

    Currently the mechanism of renal allograft rejection is not well understood. This study was designed to determine whether induction of monocyte procoagulant activity (MCPA) is important in the pathogenesis of renal allograft rejection. The MPCA assay was performed utilizing a one stage clotting assay both in normal and in factor-VII-deficient plasma. There was no increase in spontaneous MPCA in 20 patients with endstage renal failure and in 10 patients following abdominal or orthopedic operation, as compared with 20 normal controls. MPCA was assessed daily in 18 patients who had received renal allografts. Rejection episodes (RE) were predicted on the basis of persistent elevation in MPCA as compared with pretransplant levels. Rejection was diagnosed clinically and treated on the basis of standard criteria. Treated RE were compared with those predicted by elevated MPCA, and 3 patients were assessed as having no RE by MPCA and by standard criteria. In 8 RE, MPCA correlated temporally with RE (same day) when compared with standard criteria. In 12 RE, MPCA was predictive of rejection preceding standard criteria by at least 24 hr. There were 7 false-positive predictions on the basis of MPCA; however, there was only 1 false negative. MPCA was shown to be a prothrombinase by its dependence only on prothrombin and fibrinogen for full activity. MPCA may be important in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection, and additionally it may be a useful adjunct in the clinical management of this disease.

  1. Predictive active disturbance rejection control for processes with time delay.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qinling; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2014-07-01

    Active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) has been shown to be an effective tool in dealing with real world problems of dynamic uncertainties, disturbances, nonlinearities, etc. This paper addresses its existing limitations with plants that have a large transport delay. In particular, to overcome the delay, the extended state observer (ESO) in ADRC is modified to form a predictive ADRC, leading to significant improvements in the transient response and stability characteristics, as shown in extensive simulation studies and hardware-in-the-loop tests, as well as in the frequency response analysis. In this research, it is assumed that the amount of delay is approximately known, as is the approximated model of the plant. Even with such uncharacteristic assumptions for ADRC, the proposed method still exhibits significant improvements in both performance and robustness over the existing methods such as the dead-time compensator based on disturbance observer and the Filtered Smith Predictor, in the context of some well-known problems of chemical reactor and boiler control problems.

  2. Social exclusion in middle childhood: rejection events, slow-wave neural activity, and ostracism distress.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Michael J; Wu, Jia; Molfese, Peter J; Mayes, Linda C

    2010-01-01

    This study examined neural activity with event-related potentials (ERPs) in middle childhood during a computer-simulated ball-toss game, Cyberball. After experiencing fair play initially, children were ultimately excluded by the other players. We focused specifically on “not my turn” events within fair play and rejection events within social exclusion. Dense-array ERPs revealed that rejection events are perceived rapidly. Condition differences (“not my turn” vs. rejection) were evident in a posterior ERP peaking at 420 ms consistent, with a larger P3 effect for rejection events indicating that in middle childhood rejection events are differentiated in <500 ms. Condition differences were evident for slow-wave activity (500-900 ms) in the medial frontal cortical region and the posterior occipital-parietal region, with rejection events more negative frontally and more positive posteriorly. Distress from the rejection experience was associated with a more negative frontal slow wave and a larger late positive slow wave, but only for rejection events. Source modeling with Geosouce software suggested that slow-wave neural activity in cortical regions previously identified in functional imaging studies of ostracism, including subgenual cortex, ventral anterior cingulate cortex, and insula, was greater for rejection events vs. “not my turn” events.

  3. Greater positive schizotypy relates to reduced N100 activity during rejection scenes.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Preethi; Onwumere, Juliana; Wilson, Daniel; Sumich, Alexander; Castro, Antonio; Kumari, Veena; Kuipers, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    Social anxiety due to rejection sensitivity (RS) exacerbates psychosis-like experiences in the general population. While reduced dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) activity during social rejection in high schizotypy has suggested self-distancing from rejection, earlier stages of mental processing such as feature encoding could also contribute to psychosis-like experiences. This study aimed to determine the stage of mental processing of social rejection that relates to positive schizotypy. Forty-one healthy participants were assessed for schizotypy and RS. Event-related potential amplitudes (ERPs) were measured at frontal, temporal and parieto-occipital sites and their cortical sources (dACC, temporal pole and lingual gyrus) at early (N100) and late (P300 and late slow wave, LSW) timeframes during rejection, acceptance and neutral scenes. ERPs were compared between social interaction types. Correlations were performed between positive schizotypy (defined as the presence of perceptual aberrations, hallucinatory experiences and magical thinking), RS and ERPs during rejection. Amplitude was greater during rejection than acceptance or neutral conditions at the dACC-P300, parieto-occipital-P300, dACC-LSW and frontal-LSW. RS correlated positively with positive schizotypy. Reduced dACC N100 activity during rejection correlated with greater positive schizotypy and RS. Reduced dACC N100 activity and greater RS independently predicted positive schizotypy. An N100 deficit that indicates reduced feature encoding of rejection scenes increases with greater positive schizotypy and RS. Higher RS shows that a greater tendency to misattribute ambiguous social situations as rejecting also increases with positive schizotypy. These two processes, namely primary bottom-up sensory processing and secondary misattribution of rejection, combine to increase psychosis-like experiences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Generalized proportional integral control for periodic signals under active disturbance rejection approach.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Romero, John; Ramos, Germán A; Coral-Enriquez, Horacio

    2014-11-01

    Conventional repetitive control has proven to be an effective strategy to reject/track periodic signals with constant frequency; however, it shows poor performance in varying frequency applications. This paper proposes an active disturbance rejection methodology applied to a large class of uncertain flat systems for the tracking and rejection of periodic signals, in which the possibilities of the generalized proportional integral (GPI) observer-based control to address repetitive control problems are studied. In the proposed scheme, model uncertainties and external disturbances are lumped together in a general additive disturbance input that is estimated and rejected on-line. An illustrative case study of mechatronic nature is considered. Experimental results show that the proposed GPI observer-based control successfully rejects periodic disturbances even under varying speed conditions.

  5. Active disturbance rejection control in steering by wire haptic systems.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Angeles, A; Garcia-Antonio, J A

    2014-07-01

    This paper introduces a steering by wired haptic system based on disturbance rejection control techniques. High gain Generalized Proportional Integral (GPI) observers are considered for the estimation of tire and steering wheel dynamic disturbances. These disturbances are on line canceled to ensure tracking between the commanded steering wheel angle and the tire orientation angle. The estimated disturbances at the steering rack are feedback to the steering wheel to provide a haptic interface with the driver. The overall system behaves as a bilateral master-slave system. Very few sensors and minimum knowledge of the dynamic model are required. Experimental results are presented on a prototype platform that consists on: (1) half of the steering rack of a beetle VW vehicle, (2) a steering wheel.

  6. Decreased chronic cellular and antibody-mediated injury in the kidney following simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Taner, Timucin; Heimbach, Julie K; Rosen, Charles B; Nyberg, Scott L; Park, Walter D; Stegall, Mark D

    2016-04-01

    In simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation (SLK), the liver can protect the kidney from hyperacute rejection and may also decrease acute cellular rejection rates. Whether the liver protects against chronic injury is unknown. To answer this we studied renal allograft surveillance biopsies in 68 consecutive SLK recipients (14 with donor-specific alloantibodies at transplantation [DSA+], 54 with low or no DSA, [DSA-]). These were compared with biopsies of a matched cohort of kidney transplant alone (KTA) recipients (28 DSA+, 108 DSA-). Overall 5-year patient and graft survival was not different: 93.8% and 91.2% in SLK, and 91.9% and 77.1% in KTA. In DSA+ recipients, KTA had a significantly higher incidence of acute antibody-mediated rejection (46.4% vs. 7.1%) and chronic transplant glomerulopathy (53.6% vs. 0%). In DSA- recipients at 5 years, KTA had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of T cell-mediated rejection (clinical plus subclinical, 30.6% vs. 7.4%). By 5 years, DSA+ KTA had a 44% decline in mean GFR while DSA+SLK had stable GFR. In DSA- KTA, the incidence of a combined endpoint of renal allograft loss or over a 50% decline in GFR was significantly higher (20.4% vs. 7.4%). Simultaneously transplanted liver allograft was the most predictive factor for a significantly lower incidence of cellular (odds ratio 0.13, 95% confidence interval 0.06-0.27) and antibody-mediated injury (odds ratio 0.11, confidence interval 0.03-0.32), as well as graft functional decline (odds ratio 0.22, confidence interval 0.06-0.59). Thus, SLK is associated with reduced chronic cellular and antibody-mediated alloimmune injury in the kidney allograft.

  7. A novel active disturbance rejection based tracking design for laser system with quadrant photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manojlović, Stojadin M.; Barbarić, Žarko P.; Mitrović, Srđan T.

    2015-06-01

    A new tracking design for laser systems with different arrangements of a quadrant photodetector, based on the principle of active disturbance rejection control is suggested. The detailed models of quadrant photodetector with standard add-subtract, difference-over-sum and diagonal-difference-over-sum algorithms for displacement signals are included in the control loop. Target moving, non-linearity of a photodetector, parameter perturbations and exterior disturbances are treated as a total disturbance. Active disturbance rejection controllers with linear extended state observers for total disturbance estimation and rejection are designed. Proposed methods are analysed in frequency domain to quantify their stability characteristics and disturbance rejection performances. It is shown through simulations, that tracking errors are effectively compensated, providing the laser spot positioning in the area near the centre of quadrant photodetector where the mentioned algorithms have the highest sensitivity, which provides tracking of the manoeuvring targets with high accuracy.

  8. Gamma Interferon Is Required for Optimal Antibody-Mediated Immunity against Genital Chlamydia Infection

    PubMed Central

    Naglak, Elizabeth K.; Morrison, Sandra G.

    2016-01-01

    Defining the mechanisms of immunity conferred by the combination of antibody and CD4+ T cells is fundamental to designing an efficacious chlamydial vaccine. Using the Chlamydia muridarum genital infection model of mice, which replicates many features of human C. trachomatis infection and avoids the characteristic low virulence of C. trachomatis in the mouse, we previously demonstrated a significant role for antibody in immunity to chlamydial infection. We found that antibody alone was not protective. Instead, protection appeared to be conferred through an undefined antibody-cell interaction. Using gene knockout mice and in vivo cellular depletion methods, our data suggest that antibody-mediated protection is dependent on the activation of an effector cell population in genital tract tissues by CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, the CD4+ T cell-secreted cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was found to be a key component of the protective antibody response. The protective function of IFN-γ was not related to the immunoglobulin class or to the magnitude of the Chlamydia-specific antibody response or to recruitment of an effector cell population to genital tract tissue. Rather, IFN-γ appears to be necessary for activation of the effector cell population that functions in antibody-mediated chlamydial immunity. Our results confirm the central role of antibody in immunity to chlamydia reinfection and demonstrate a key function for IFN-γ in antibody-mediated protection. PMID:27600502

  9. Antibody-mediated immunity against tuberculosis: implications for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Achkar, Jacqueline M; Casadevall, Arturo

    2013-03-13

    There is an urgent need for new and better vaccines against tuberculosis (TB). Current vaccine design strategies are generally focused on the enhancement of cell-mediated immunity. Antibody-based approaches are not being considered, mostly due to the paradigm that humoral immunity plays little role in the protection against intracellular pathogens. Here, we reappraise and update the increasing evidence for antibody-mediated immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, discuss the complexity of antibody responses to mycobacteria, and address mechanism of protection. Based on these findings and discussions, we challenge the common belief that immunity against M. tuberculosis relies solely on cellular defense mechanisms, and posit that induction of antibody-mediated immunity should be included in TB vaccine development strategies.

  10. Haptoglobin activates innate immunity to enhance acute transplant rejection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua; Song, Yang; Colangelo, Christopher M.; Wu, Terence; Bruce, Can; Scabia, Gaia; Galan, Anjela; Maffei, Margherita; Goldstein, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Immune tolerance to transplanted organs is impaired when the innate immune system is activated in response to the tissue necrosis that occurs during harvesting and implantation procedures. A key molecule in this immune pathway is the intracellular TLR signal adaptor known as myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88). After transplantation, MyD88 induces DC maturation as well as the production of inflammatory mediators, such as IL-6 and TNF-α. However, upstream activators of MyD88 function in response to transplantation have not been identified. Here, we show that haptoglobin, an acute phase protein, is an initiator of this MyD88-dependent inflammatory process in a mouse model of skin transplantation. Necrotic lysates from transplanted skin elicited higher inflammatory responses in DCs than did nontransplanted lysates, suggesting DC-mediated responses are triggered by factors released during transplantation. Analysis of transplanted lysates identified haptoglobin as one of the proteins upregulated during transplantation. Expression of donor haptoglobin enhanced the onset of acute skin transplant rejection, whereas haptoglobin-deficient skin grafts showed delayed acute rejection and antidonor T cell priming in a MyD88-dependent graft rejection model. Thus, our results show that haptoglobin release following skin necrosis contributes to accelerated transplant rejection, with potential implications for the development of localized immunosuppressive therapies. PMID:22156194

  11. A shed NKG2D ligand that promotes natural killer cell activation and tumor rejection

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Weiwen; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Zhang, Li; Wang, Lin; Lau, Stephanie; Iannello, Alexandre; Xu, Jianfeng; Rovis, Tihana L.; Xiong, Na; Raulet, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells, recognize transformed cells and eliminate them in a process termed immunosurveillance. It is thought that tumor cells evade immunosurveillance by shedding membrane ligands that bind to the NKG2D activating receptor on NK cells and/or T cells, and desensitize these cells. In contrast, we show that in mice, shedding of MULT1, a high affinity NKG2D ligand, causes NK cell activation and tumor rejection. Recombinant soluble MULT1 stimulated tumor rejection in mice. Soluble MULT1 functions, at least in part, by competitively reversing a global desensitization of NK cells imposed by engagement of membrane NKG2D ligands on tumor-associated cells, such as myeloid cells. The results overturn conventional wisdom that soluble ligands are inhibitory, and suggest a new approach for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25745066

  12. Rejection sensitivity polarizes striatal-medial prefrontal activity when anticipating social feedback

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Katherine E.; Somerville, Leah H.; Kelley, William M.; Heatherton, Todd F.

    2014-01-01

    As a social species, humans are acutely aware of cues that signal inclusionary status. The present study characterizes behavioral and neural responses when individuals anticipate social feedback. Across two functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, participants (N = 42) made social judgments about supposed peers and then received feedback from those individuals. Of particular interest was the neural activity occurring when participants were awaiting social feedback. During this anticipatory period, increased neural activity was observed in the ventral striatum (VS), a central component of the brain’s reward circuitry, and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), a brain region implicated in mentalizing about others. Individuals high in rejection sensitivity exhibited greater responses in both the VS and dmPFC when anticipating positive feedback. These findings provide initial insight into the neural mechanisms involved in anticipating social evaluations, as well as the cognitive processes that underlie rejection sensitivity. PMID:23859650

  13. Pathogenesis and mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Flegel, Willy A

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinical consequences of antibodies to red blood cells (RBC) have been studied for a century. Most clinically relevant antibodies can be detected by sensitive in vitro assays. Several mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis are well understood. Such hemolysis following transfusion is reliably avoided in a donor/recipient pair, if one individual is negative for the cognate antigen to which the other has the antibody. Study design and results Mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis were reviewed based on a presentation at the Strategies to Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions Workshop addressing intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and ABO antibodies. The presented topics included the rates of intravascular and extravascular hemolysis; IgM and IgG isoagglutinins; auto- and alloantibodies; antibody specificity; A, B, A,B and A1 antigens; A1 versus A2 phenotypes; monocytes/macrophages, other immune cells and complement; monocyte monolayer assay (MMA); antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC); and transfusion reactions due to ABO and other antibodies. Conclusion Several clinically relevant questions remained unresolved, and diagnostic tools were lacking to routinely and reliably predict the clinical consequences of RBC antibodies. Most hemolytic transfusion reactions associated with IVIG were due to ABO antibodies. Reducing the titers of such antibodies in IVIG may lower the frequency of this kind of adverse event. The only way to stop these events is to have no anti-A or anti-B antibodies in the IVIG products. PMID:26174897

  14. Active disturbance rejection control for drag tracking in mars entry guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yuanqing; Chen, Rongfang; Pu, Fan; Dai, Li

    2014-03-01

    Future Mars missions will require precision landing capability, which motivates the need for entry closed-loop guidance schemes. A new tracking law - active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) - is presented in this paper. The ability of the ADRC tracking law to handle the atmospheric models and the vehicle’s aerodynamic errors is investigated. Monte Carlo simulations with dispersions in entry state variables, drag and lift coefficients, and atmospheric density show effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  15. Design of active disturbance rejection controller for the hydraulic APC system of the rolling mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruicheng; Chen, Zhikun

    2011-10-01

    Considering uncertain external disturbance, the model of automatic position control system is established. Then, according to the information of input and output, using extended states observer (ESO), a newer observer is proposed to observe and compensate this integrated disturbance, and a controller is designed based on active disturbance rejection control (ADRC). This controller has very strong robustness not only to external disturbance, but also to unpredictable plant parameter variations.

  16. Rejected applications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To review membership application materials (especially rejected applications) to the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) during its formative years (1947–1953). Methods: Detailed study of materials in the AAN Historical Collection. Results: The author identified 73 rejected applications. Rejected applicants (71 male, 2 female) lived in 25 states. The largest number was for the Associate membership category (49). These were individuals “in related fields who have made and are making contributions to the field of neurology.” By contrast, few applicants to Active membership or Fellowship status were rejected. The largest numbers of rejectees were neuropsychiatrists (19), neurosurgeons (16), and psychiatrists (14). Conclusion: The AAN, established in the late 1940s, was a small and politically vulnerable organization. A defining feature of the fledgling society was its inclusiveness; its membership was less restrictive than that of the older American Neurological Association. At the same time, the society needed to preserve its core as a neurologic society rather than one of psychiatry or neurosurgery. Hence, the balance between inclusiveness and exclusive identity was a difficult one to maintain. The Associate membership category, more than any other, was at the heart of this issue of self-definition. Associate members were largely practitioners of psychiatry or neurosurgery. Their membership was a source of consternation and was to be carefully been held in check during these critical formative years. PMID:24944256

  17. Human CD55 Expression Blocks Hyperacute Rejection and Restricts Complement Activation in Gal Knockout Cardiac Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Christopher G.A.; Ricci, Davide; Miyagi, Naoto; Stalboerger, Paul G.; Du, Zeji; Oehler, Elise A.; Tazelaar, Henry D.; Byrne, Guerard W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Transgenic expression of human complement regulatory proteins (hCRPs) reduces the frequency of hyperacute rejection (HAR) in Gal-positive cardiac xenotransplantation. In this study we examine the impact of human CD55 (hCD55) expression on a Gal knock-out (GTKO) background using pig-to-primate heterotopic cardiac xenotransplantation. Methods Cardiac xenotransplantation was performed with GTKO (Group 1; n=6) and GTKO.hCD55 (Group 2; n=5) donor pigs using similar immunosuppression. Cardiac biopsies were obtained 30 minutes after organ reperfusion. Rejection was characterized by histology and immunohistology. Intragraft gene expression, serum non-Gal antibody and antibody recovered from rejected hearts were analyzed. Results HAR of a GTKO heart was observed. Remaining grafts developed delayed xenograft rejection. Median survival was 21 and 28 days for Groups 1 and 2 respectively. Vascular antibody deposition was uniformly detected 30 minutes after organ reperfusion and at explant. A higher frequency of vascular C5b deposition was seen in GTKO organs at explant. Serum non-Gal antibody, antibody recovered from the graft and intragraft gene expression were similar between the groups. Conclusion HAR of GTKO hearts without hCD55 may occur. Expression of hCD55 appeared to restrict local complement activation, but did not improve graft survival. Chronic vascular antibody deposition with evidence of protracted endothelial cell activation was seen. These observations suggest that non-Gal antibody-induced chronic endothelial cell activation coupled to possible haemostatic incompatibilities may be the primary stimulus for DXR of GTKO hearts. To avoid possible HAR, future clinical studies should employ donors expressing hCRPs in the GTKO background. PMID:22391577

  18. Design of active disturbance rejection controller for space optical communication coarse tracking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jian; Ai, Yong

    2015-10-01

    In order to improve the dynamic tracking performance of coarse tracking system in space optical communication, a new control method based on active disturbance rejection controller (ADRC) is proposed. Firstly, based on the structure analysis of coarse tracking system, the simplified system model was obtained, and then the extended state observer was designed to calculate state variables and spot disturbance from the input and output signals. Finally, the ADRC controller of coarse tracking system is realized with the combination of nonlinear PID controller. The simulation experimental results show that compared with the PID method, this method can significantly reduce the step response overshoot and settling time. When the target angular velocity is120mrad/s, tracking error with ADRC method is 30μrad, which decreases 85% compared with the PID method. Meanwhile the disturbance rejection bandwidth is increased by 3 times with ADRC. This method can effectively improve the dynamic tracking performance of coarse tracking and disturbance rejection degree, with no need of hardware upgrade, and is of certain reference value to the wide range and high dynamic precision photoelectric tracking system.

  19. Elevated ST2 Distinguishes Incidences of Pediatric Heart and Small Bowel Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, L.R.; Lott, J. M.; Isse, K.; Lesniak, A.; Landsittel, D.; Demetris, A. J.; Sun, Y.; Mercer, D. F.; Webber, S. A.; Zeevi, A.; Fischer, R. T.; Feingold, B.; Turnquist, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated serum soluble (s) Suppressor of Tumorigenicity 2 (ST2) is observed during cardiovascular and inflammatory bowel diseases. To ascertain whether modulated ST2 levels signify heart (HTx) or small bowel transplant (SBTx) rejection, we quantified sST2 in serially obtained pediatric HTx (n=41) and SBTx recipient (n=18) sera. At times of biopsy-diagnosed HTx rejection (cellular and/or antibody-mediated), serum sST2 was elevated compared to rejection-free time points (1714±329 vs. 546.5±141.6 pg/ml; P=0.0002). SBTx recipients also displayed increased serum sST2 during incidences of rejection (7536±1561 vs. 2662±543.8 pg/ml; P=0.0347). Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that serum sST2>600 pg/ml could discriminate time points of HTx rejection and non-rejection (Area under the curve (AUC)=0.724±0.053; P=0.0003). ROC analysis of SBTx measures revealed a similar discriminative capacity (AUC=0.6921±0.0820; P=0.0349). Quantitative evaluation of both HTx and SBTx biopsies revealed rejection significantly increased allograft ST2 expression. Pathway and Network Analysis of biopsy data pinpointed ST2 in the dominant pathway modulated by rejection and predicted TNF-α and IL-1β as upstream activators. In total, our data indicate that alloimmune-associated pro-inflammatory cytokines increase ST2 during rejection. They also demonstrate that routine serum sST2 quantification, potentially combined with other biomarkers, should be investigated further to aid in the non-invasive diagnosis of rejection. PMID:26663613

  20. Antibody-Mediated Bacteriorhodopsin Orientation for Molecular Device Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Koichi; Yamaguchi, Naoto; Miyasaka, Tsutomu

    1994-08-01

    A rational method for constructing highly oriented films of purple membrane (PM) has been established by using two kinds of bispecific antibodies with different antigen-binding sites, one binding to a specific side of bacteriorhodopsin and the other to a phospholipid hapten. A hapten monolayer deposited on a metal electrode was treated with a bispecific antibody solution and incubated with a PM suspension to produce a highly oriented PM film, as confirmed by electron microscopy in which an immunogold labeling technique was used. This antibody-mediated PM monolayer was then used in the construction of a light-sensing photoelectric device. A comparison of the two incorporated PM monolayers showed that highly efficient photocurrents were produced by the PM monolayer whose unidirectionally oriented cytoplasmic surface faces the electrode.

  1. Antibody-mediated neutralization of flaviviruses: A reductionist view

    PubMed Central

    Dowd, Kimberly A.; Pierson, Theodore C.

    2011-01-01

    Flaviviruses are a group of ~70 small RNA viruses responsible for significant morbidity and mortality across the globe. Efforts to develop effective vaccines for several clinically important flaviviruses are underway. Antibodies are a significant component of the host’s protective response against flavivirus infection with the potential to contribute to immunity via several distinct mechanisms, including an ability to directly neutralize virus infection. Conversely, virus-reactive antibodies have been implicated in the increased risk of severe clinical manifestations following secondary dengue virus infection. In this review, we will discuss recent progress toward understanding the molecular basis of antibody-mediated neutralization of flaviviruses. Neutralization requires engagement of the virion with a stoichiometry that exceeds a required threshold. From this perspective, we will discuss viral and host factors that impact the number of antibody molecules bound to the virus particle and significantly modulate the potency of neutralizing antibodies. PMID:21255816

  2. Hyaluronan Contributes to Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome and Stimulates Lung Allograft Rejection through Activation of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingan; Sugimoto, Seichiro; Kennedy, Vanessa E.; Zhang, Helen L.; Pavlisko, Elizabeth N.; Kelly, Fran L.; Huang, Howard; Kreisel, Daniel; Palmer, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Although innate immunity is increasingly recognized to contribute to lung allograft rejection, the significance of endogenous innate ligands, such as hyaluronan (HA) fragments, in clinical or experimental lung transplantation is uncertain. Objectives: To determine if HA is associated with clinical bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) in lung transplant recipients, and evaluate the effect of low- or high-molecular-weight HA on experimental lung allograft rejection, including dependence on innate signaling pathways or effector cells. Methods: HA concentrations were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage and plasma samples from lung recipients with or without established BOS. BOS and normal lung tissues were assessed for HA localization and expression of HA synthases. Murine orthotopic lung recipients with established tolerance were treated with low- or high-molecular-weight HA under varied experimental conditions, including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2/4 and myeloid differentiation protein 88 deficiency and neutrophil depletion. Measurements and Main Results: HA localized within areas of intraluminal small airways fibrosis in BOS lung tissue. Moreover, transcripts for HA synthase enzymes were significantly elevated in BOS versus normal lung tissues and both lavage fluid and plasma HA concentrations were increased in recipients with BOS. Treatment with low-molecular-weight HA abrogated tolerance in murine orthotopic lung recipients in a TLR2/4- and myeloid differentiation protein 88–dependent fashion and drove expansion of alloantigen-specific T lymphocytes. Additionally, TLR-dependent signals stimulated neutrophilia that promoted rejection. In contrast, high-molecular-weight HA attenuated basal allograft inflammation. Conclusions: These data suggest that accumulation of HA could contribute to BOS by directly activating innate immune signaling pathways that promote allograft rejection and neutrophilia. PMID:24471427

  3. Factors associated with the rejection of active euthanasia: a survey among the general public in Austria.

    PubMed

    Stronegger, Willibald J; Burkert, Nathalie T; Grossschädl, Franziska; Freidl, Wolfgang

    2013-07-04

    In recent decades, the general public has become increasingly receptive toward a legislation that allows active voluntary euthanasia (AVE). The purpose of this study was to survey the current attitude towards AVE within the Austrian population and to identify explanatory factors in the areas of socio-demographics, personal experiences with care, and ideological orientation. A further objective was to examine differences depending on the type of problem formulation (abstract vs. situational) for the purpose of measuring attitude. A representative cross-sectional study was conducted across the Austrian population. Data were acquired from 1,000 individuals aged 16 years and over based on telephone interviews (CATI). For the purpose of measuring attitude toward AVE, two different problem formulations (abstract vs. situational) were juxtaposed. The abstract question about active voluntary euthanasia was answered negatively by 28.8%, while 71.2% opted in favour of AVE or were undecided. Regression analyses showed rejection of AVE was positively correlated with number of adults and children in the household, experience with care of seriously ill persons, a conservative worldview, and level of education. Mean or high family income was associated with lower levels of rejection. No independent correlations were found for variables such as sex, age, political orientation, self-rated health, and experiences with care of terminally ill patients. Correlation for the situational problem formulation was weaker and included fewer predictors than for the abstract question. Our results suggest that factors relating to an individual's interpersonal living situation and his/her cognitive convictions might be important determinants of the attitude toward AVE. If and to the extent that personal care experience plays a role, it is rather associated with rejection than with acceptance of AVE.

  4. Factors associated with the rejection of active euthanasia: a survey among the general public in Austria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent decades, the general public has become increasingly receptive toward a legislation that allows active voluntary euthanasia (AVE). The purpose of this study was to survey the current attitude towards AVE within the Austrian population and to identify explanatory factors in the areas of socio-demographics, personal experiences with care, and ideological orientation. A further objective was to examine differences depending on the type of problem formulation (abstract vs. situational) for the purpose of measuring attitude. Methods A representative cross-sectional study was conducted across the Austrian population. Data were acquired from 1,000 individuals aged 16 years and over based on telephone interviews (CATI). For the purpose of measuring attitude toward AVE, two different problem formulations (abstract vs. situational) were juxtaposed. Results The abstract question about active voluntary euthanasia was answered negatively by 28.8%, while 71.2% opted in favour of AVE or were undecided. Regression analyses showed rejection of AVE was positively correlated with number of adults and children in the household, experience with care of seriously ill persons, a conservative worldview, and level of education. Mean or high family income was associated with lower levels of rejection. No independent correlations were found for variables such as sex, age, political orientation, self-rated health, and experiences with care of terminally ill patients. Correlation for the situational problem formulation was weaker and included fewer predictors than for the abstract question. Conclusions Our results suggest that factors relating to an individual’s interpersonal living situation and his/her cognitive convictions might be important determinants of the attitude toward AVE. If and to the extent that personal care experience plays a role, it is rather associated with rejection than with acceptance of AVE. PMID:23826902

  5. Antibody-Mediated Protection Against SHIV Challenge Includes Systemic Clearance of Distal Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinyan; Ghneim, Khader; Sok, Devin; Bosche, William J.; Li, Yuan; Chipriano, Elizabeth; Berkemeier, Brian; Oswald, Kelli; Borducchi, Erica; Cabral, Crystal; Peter, Lauren; Brinkman, Amanda; Shetty, Mayuri; Jimenez, Jessica; Mondesir, Jade; Lee, Benjamin; Giglio, Patricia; Chandrashekar, Abishek; Abbink, Peter; Colantonio, Arnaud; Gittens, Courtney; Baker, Chantelle; Wagner, Wendeline; Lewis, Mark G.; Li, Wenjun; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Burton, Dennis R.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) can protect rhesus monkeys against simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. However, the site of antibody interception of virus and the mechanism of antibody-mediated protection remain unclear. We administered a fully protective dose of the bNAb PGT121 to rhesus monkeys and challenged them intravaginally with SHIV-SF162P3. In PGT121 treated animals, we detected low levels of viral RNA and viral DNA in distal tissues for several days following challenge. Viral RNA positive tissues showed transcriptomic changes indicative of innate immune activation, and cells from these tissues initiated infection following adoptive transfer into naïve hosts. These data demonstrate that bNAb mediated protection against a mucosal virus challenge can involve clearance of infectious virus in distal tissues. PMID:27540005

  6. Limit cycle analysis of active disturbance rejection control system with two nonlinearities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Chen, Ken

    2014-07-01

    Introduction of nonlinearities to active disturbance rejection control algorithm might have high control efficiency in some situations, but makes the systems with complex nonlinearity. Limit cycle is a typical phenomenon that can be observed in the nonlinear systems, usually causing failure or danger of the systems. This paper approaches the problem of the existence of limit cycles of a second-order fast tool servo system using active disturbance rejection control algorithm with two fal nonlinearities. A frequency domain approach is presented by using describing function technique and transfer function representation to characterize the nonlinear system. The derivations of the describing functions for fal nonlinearities and treatment of two nonlinearities connected in series are given to facilitate the limit cycles analysis. The effects of the parameters of both the nonlinearity and the controller on the limit cycles are presented, indicating that the limit cycles caused by the nonlinearities can be easily suppressed if the parameters are chosen carefully. Simulations in the time domain are performed to assess the prediction accuracy based on the describing function.

  7. A requirement for FcγR in antibody-mediated bacterial toxin neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Nareen; Chow, Siu-Kei; Saylor, Carolyn; Janda, Alena; Ravetch, Jeffery V.; Scharff, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    One important function of humoral immunity is toxin neutralization. The current view posits that neutralization results from antibody-mediated interference with the binding of toxins to their targets, a phenomenon viewed as dependent only on antibody specificity. To investigate the role of antibody constant region function in toxin neutralization, we generated IgG2a and IgG2b variants of the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen–binding IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) 19D9. These antibodies express identical variable regions and display the same specificity. The efficacy of antibody-mediated neutralization was IgG2a > IgG2b > IgG1, and neutralization activity required competent Fcγ receptor (FcγR). The IgG2a mAb prevented lethal toxin cell killing and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase cleavage more efficiently than the IgG1 mAb. Passive immunization with IgG1 and IgG2a mAb protected wild-type mice, but not FcγR-deficient mice, against B. anthracis infection. These results establish that constant region isotype influences toxin neutralization efficacy of certain antibodies through a mechanism that requires engagement of FcγR. These findings highlight a new parameter for evaluating vaccine responses and the possibility of harnessing optimal FcγR interactions in the design of passive immunization strategies. PMID:20921285

  8. IgG Donor-Specific Anti-Human HLA Antibody Subclasses and Kidney Allograft Antibody-Mediated Injury

    PubMed Central

    Viglietti, Denis; Bentlejewski, Carol; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Vernerey, Dewi; Aubert, Olivier; Verine, Jérôme; Jouven, Xavier; Legendre, Christophe; Glotz, Denis; Loupy, Alexandre; Zeevi, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies may have different pathogenicities according to IgG subclass. We investigated the association between IgG subclasses of circulating anti-human HLA antibodies and antibody-mediated kidney allograft injury. Among 635 consecutive kidney transplantations performed between 2008 and 2010, we enrolled 125 patients with donor-specific anti-human HLA antibodies (DSA) detected in the first year post-transplant. We assessed DSA characteristics, including specificity, HLA class specificity, mean fluorescence intensity (MFI), C1q-binding, and IgG subclass, and graft injury phenotype at the time of sera evaluation. Overall, 51 (40.8%) patients had acute antibody-mediated rejection (aABMR), 36 (28.8%) patients had subclinical ABMR (sABMR), and 38 (30.4%) patients were ABMR-free. The MFI of the immunodominant DSA (iDSA, the DSA with the highest MFI level) was 6724±464, and 41.6% of patients had iDSA showing C1q positivity. The distribution of iDSA IgG1–4 subclasses among the population was 75.2%, 44.0%, 28.0%, and 26.4%, respectively. An unsupervised principal component analysis integrating iDSA IgG subclasses revealed aABMR was mainly driven by IgG3 iDSA, whereas sABMR was driven by IgG4 iDSA. IgG3 iDSA was associated with a shorter time to rejection (P<0.001), increased microcirculation injury (P=0.002), and C4d capillary deposition (P<0.001). IgG4 iDSA was associated with later allograft injury with increased allograft glomerulopathy and interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy lesions (P<0.001 for all comparisons). Integrating iDSA HLA class specificity, MFI level, C1q-binding status, and IgG subclasses in a Cox survival model revealed IgG3 iDSA and C1q-binding iDSA were strongly and independently associated with allograft failure. These results suggest IgG iDSA subclasses identify distinct phenotypes of kidney allograft antibody-mediated injury. PMID:26293822

  9. IgG Donor-Specific Anti-Human HLA Antibody Subclasses and Kidney Allograft Antibody-Mediated Injury.

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, Carmen; Viglietti, Denis; Bentlejewski, Carol; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Vernerey, Dewi; Aubert, Olivier; Verine, Jérôme; Jouven, Xavier; Legendre, Christophe; Glotz, Denis; Loupy, Alexandre; Zeevi, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies may have different pathogenicities according to IgG subclass. We investigated the association between IgG subclasses of circulating anti-human HLA antibodies and antibody-mediated kidney allograft injury. Among 635 consecutive kidney transplantations performed between 2008 and 2010, we enrolled 125 patients with donor-specific anti-human HLA antibodies (DSA) detected in the first year post-transplant. We assessed DSA characteristics, including specificity, HLA class specificity, mean fluorescence intensity (MFI), C1q-binding, and IgG subclass, and graft injury phenotype at the time of sera evaluation. Overall, 51 (40.8%) patients had acute antibody-mediated rejection (aABMR), 36 (28.8%) patients had subclinical ABMR (sABMR), and 38 (30.4%) patients were ABMR-free. The MFI of the immunodominant DSA (iDSA, the DSA with the highest MFI level) was 6724±464, and 41.6% of patients had iDSA showing C1q positivity. The distribution of iDSA IgG1-4 subclasses among the population was 75.2%, 44.0%, 28.0%, and 26.4%, respectively. An unsupervised principal component analysis integrating iDSA IgG subclasses revealed aABMR was mainly driven by IgG3 iDSA, whereas sABMR was driven by IgG4 iDSA. IgG3 iDSA was associated with a shorter time to rejection (P<0.001), increased microcirculation injury (P=0.002), and C4d capillary deposition (P<0.001). IgG4 iDSA was associated with later allograft injury with increased allograft glomerulopathy and interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy lesions (P<0.001 for all comparisons). Integrating iDSA HLA class specificity, MFI level, C1q-binding status, and IgG subclasses in a Cox survival model revealed IgG3 iDSA and C1q-binding iDSA were strongly and independently associated with allograft failure. These results suggest IgG iDSA subclasses identify distinct phenotypes of kidney allograft antibody-mediated injury. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  10. JC polyomavirus mutants escape antibody-mediated neutralization.

    PubMed

    Ray, Upasana; Cinque, Paola; Gerevini, Simonetta; Longo, Valeria; Lazzarin, Adriano; Schippling, Sven; Martin, Roland; Buck, Christopher B; Pastrana, Diana V

    2015-09-23

    JC polyomavirus (JCV) persistently infects the urinary tract of most adults. Under conditions of immune impairment, JCV causes an opportunistic brain disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). JCV strains found in the cerebrospinal fluid of PML patients contain distinctive mutations in surface loops of the major capsid protein, VP1. We hypothesized that VP1 mutations might allow the virus to evade antibody-mediated neutralization. Consistent with this hypothesis, neutralization serology revealed that plasma samples from PML patients neutralized wild-type JCV strains but failed to neutralize patient-cognate PML-mutant JCV strains. This contrasted with serological results for healthy individuals, most of whom robustly cross-neutralized all tested JCV variants. Mice administered a JCV virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine initially showed neutralizing "blind spots" (akin to those observed in PML patients) that closed after booster immunization. A PML patient administered an experimental JCV VLP vaccine likewise showed markedly increased neutralizing titer against her cognate PML-mutant JCV. The results indicate that deficient humoral immunity is a common aspect of PML pathogenesis and that vaccination may overcome this humoral deficiency. Thus, vaccination with JCV VLPs might prevent the development of PML.

  11. Molecular Communication Modeling of Antibody-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Chahibi, Youssef; Akyildiz, Ian F; Balasubramaniam, Sasitharan; Koucheryavy, Yevgeni

    2015-07-01

    Antibody-mediated Drug Delivery Systems (ADDS) are emerging as one of the most encouraging therapeutic solutions for treating several diseases such as human cancers. ADDS use small molecules (antibodies) that propagate in the body and bind selectively to their corresponding receptors (antigens) expressed at the surface of the diseased cells. In this paper, the Molecular Communication (MC) paradigm, where information is conveyed through the concentration of molecules, is advocated for the engineering of ADDS and modeling their complex behavior, to provide a realistic model without the over-complication of system biology models, and the limitations of experimental approaches. The peculiarities of antibodies, including their anisotropic transport and complex electrochemical structure, are taken into account to develop an analytical model of the ADDS transport and antigen-binding kinetics. The end-to-end response of ADDS, from the drug injection to the drug absorption, is mathematically derived based on the geometry of the antibody molecule, the electrochemical structure of the antibody-antigen complex, and the physiology of the patient. The accuracy of the MC model is validated by finite-element (COMSOL) simulations. The implications of the complex interplay between the transport and kinetics parameters on the performance of ADDS are effectively captured by the proposed MC model. The MC model of ADDS will enable the discovery and optimization of drugs in a versatile, cost-efficient, and reliable manner.

  12. Analysis of leukocyte activation during acute rejection of pulmonary allografts in noninfected and cytomegalovirus-infected rats.

    PubMed

    Steinmüller, C; Steinhoff, G; Bauer, D; You, X M; Denzin, H; Franke-Ullmann, G; Hausen, B; Bruggemann, C; Wagner, T O; Lohmann-Matthes, M L; Emmendörffer, A

    1997-01-01

    After human lung transplantation acute rejection and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections may occur, probably contributing to the development of chronic rejection. We established a model of subacute allograft rejection in rats to analyze leukocyte activation and effects of a CMV infection. Histoincompatible lung transplants (BN/LEW) without immunosuppression (group A) and lungs of initially immunosuppressed animals (group B) were analyzed. The production of inflammatory mediators (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, nitric oxides) and the expression of MHC class II antigens by alveolar and lung tissue macrophages were significantly enhanced during the alloresponse. In recipients without immunosuppression (group A) allograft necrosis was detected by day 6, whereas group B allografts were fully rejected by day 25. In allografts of immunosuppressed, CMV-infected animals (group C) the CMV infection was clearly aggravated and the number of activated lung tissue macrophages was increased when compared with noninfected allografts or isografts. The subacute model provides the advantage of allowing us to study mechanisms of acute rejection without the effects of reperfusion injury. Furthermore these findings underline the role of inflammatory mediators produced by macrophages during rejection.

  13. IGE AND IGGA ANTIBODY-MEDIATED RELEASE OF HISTAMINE FROM RAT PERITONEAL CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Michael K.; Bloch, Kurt J.; Austen, K. Frank

    1971-01-01

    The optimum conditions for antigen-induced release of histamine in the rat IgE and IgGa antibody-mediated systems were studied in vitro. The IgE antibody-mediated reaction could be separated into two steps: preparation of target cells with antibody and challenge with antigen. The optimal conditions for these two steps were distinctly different. Release of histamine by IgGa antibody and antigen could not be separated into two steps, and the optimal conditions for the total reaction were identical to those of the antigen challenge step of the IgE antibody-mediated system. PMID:4100657

  14. Improved clipped periodic optimal control for semi-active harmonic disturbance rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couillard, Maxime; Micheau, Philippe; Masson, Patrice

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a new approach for harmonic disturbance rejection using semi-active vibration control. The approach is illustrated through application to the problem of maximizing the energy dissipated by a semi-active damper under harmonic excitation. In order to establish a baseline for the evaluation of the performance of the semi-active damper, the effectiveness of the optimal passive and active cases are first presented. The study then examines the ability of the clipped optimal control (or clipping control) approach to improve the energy dissipation capacity of the semi-active damper over the optimal passive damper. An approximate solution to the nonlinear dynamic problem, obtained using the method of averaging, and a time integration based numerical method indicate that this approach improves the energy dissipated by the semi-active damper over the optimal passive damper. The approach presented in this paper intends to further "improve", or "fine tune", the control parameters given by the clipped optimal control approach. This is done using an approximated solution of the problem and an appropriate optimization algorithm. Results clearly indicate that this new approach provides significant improvement on energy dissipation over the clipped optimal control approach for the semi-active damper.

  15. MicroRNAs as non-invasive biomarkers of heart transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Duong Van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Tible, Marion; Gay, Arnaud; Guillemain, Romain; Aubert, Olivier; Varnous, Shaida; Iserin, Franck; Rouvier, Philippe; François, Arnaud; Vernerey, Dewi; Loyer, Xavier; Leprince, Pascal; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Bruneval, Patrick; Loupy, Alexandre; Jouven, Xavier

    2014-12-01

    Rejection is one of the major causes of late cardiac allograft failure and at present can only be diagnosed by invasive endomyocardial biopsies. We sought to determine whether microRNA profiling could serve as a non-invasive biomarker of cardiac allograft rejection. We included 113 heart transplant recipients from four referral French institutions (test cohort, n = 60, validation cohort, n = 53). In the test cohort, we compared patients with acute biopsy-proven allograft rejection (n = 30) to matched control patients without rejection (n = 30), by assessing microRNAs expression in the heart allograft tissue and patients concomitant serum using RNA extraction and qPCR analysis. Fourteen miRNAs were selected on the basis of their implication in allograft rejection, endothelial activation, and inflammation and tissue specificity. We identified seven miRNAs that were differentially expressed between normal and rejecting heart allografts: miR-10a, miR-21, miR-31, miR-92a, miR-142-3p miR-155, and miR-451 (P < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Four out of seven miRNAs also showed differential serological expression (miR-10a, miR-31, miR-92a, and miR-155) with strong correlation with their tissular expression. The receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed that these four circulating miRNAs strongly discriminated patients with allograft rejection from patients without rejection: miR-10a (AUC = 0.975), miR-31 (AUC = 0.932), miR-92a (AUC = 0.989), and miR-155 (AUC = 0.998, P < 0.0001 for all comparisons). We confirmed in the external validation set that these four miRNAs highly discriminated patients with rejection from those without. The discrimination capability of the four miRNAs remained significant when stratified by rejection diagnosis (T-cell-mediated rejection or antibody-mediated rejection) and time post-transplant. This study demonstrates that a differential expression of miRNA occurs in rejecting allograft patients, not only at the tissue level but also in the

  16. Linear active disturbance rejection control of underactuated systems: the case of the Furuta pendulum.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Neria, M; Sira-Ramírez, H; Garrido-Moctezuma, R; Luviano-Juárez, A

    2014-07-01

    An Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC) scheme is proposed for a trajectory tracking problem defined on a nonfeedback linearizable Furuta Pendulum example. A desired rest to rest angular position reference trajectory is to be tracked by the horizontal arm while the unactuated vertical pendulum arm stays around its unstable vertical position without falling down during the entire maneuver and long after it concludes. A linear observer-based linear controller of the ADRC type is designed on the basis of the flat tangent linearization of the system around an arbitrary equilibrium. The advantageous combination of flatness and the ADRC method makes it possible to on-line estimate and cancels the undesirable effects of the higher order nonlinearities disregarded by the linearization. These effects are triggered by fast horizontal arm tracking maneuvers driving the pendulum substantially away from the initial equilibrium point. Convincing experimental results, including a comparative test with a sliding mode controller, are presented.

  17. Frequency domain stability analysis of nonlinear active disturbance rejection control system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Qi, Xiaohui; Xia, Yuanqing; Pu, Fan; Chang, Kai

    2015-05-01

    This paper applies three methods (i.e., root locus analysis, describing function method and extended circle criterion) to approach the frequency domain stability analysis of the fast tool servo system using nonlinear active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) algorithm. Root locus qualitative analysis shows that limit cycle is generated because the gain of the nonlinear function used in ADRC varies with its input. The parameters in the nonlinear function are adjustable to suppress limit cycle. In the process of root locus analysis, the nonlinear function is transformed based on the concept of equivalent gain. Then, frequency domain description of the nonlinear function via describing function is presented and limit cycle quantitative analysis including estimating prediction error is presented, which virtually and theoretically demonstrates that the describing function method cannot guarantee enough precision in this case. Furthermore, absolute stability analysis based on extended circle criterion is investigated as a complement.

  18. Active disturbance rejection control based human gait tracking for lower extremity rehabilitation exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Long, Yi; Du, Zhijiang; Cong, Lin; Wang, Weidong; Zhang, Zhiming; Dong, Wei

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents an active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based strategy, which is applied to track the human gait trajectory for a lower limb rehabilitation exoskeleton. The desired human gait trajectory is derived from the Clinical Gait Analysis (CGA). In ADRC, the total external disturbance can be estimated by the extended state observer (ESO) and canceled by the designed control law. The observer bandwidth and the controller bandwidth are determined by the practical principles. We simulated the proposed methodology in MATLAB. The numerical simulation shows the tracking error comparison and the estimated errors of the extended state observer. Two experimental tests were carried out to prove the performance of the algorithm presented in this paper. The experiment results show that the proposed ADRC behaves a better performance than the regular proportional integral derivative (PID) controller. With the proposed ADRC, the rehabilitation system is capable of tracking the target gait more accurately.

  19. Induction Motor Drive System Based on Linear Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liying; Zhang, Yongli; Yao, Qingmei

    It is difficult to establish an exact mathematical model for the induction motor and the robustness is poor of the vector control system using PI regulator. This paper adopts the linear active disturbance rejection controller (LADRC) to control inductor motor. LADRC doesn't need the exact mathematical model of motor and it can not only estimate but also compensate the general disturbance that includes the coupling items in model of motor and parameters perturbations by linear extended state observer (LESO), so the rotor flux and torque fully decouple. As a result, the performance is improved. To prove the above control scheme, the proposed control system has been simulated in MATLAB/SIMULINK, and the comparison was made with PID. Simulation results show that LADRC' has better performance and robustness than PID.

  20. Flatness-based active disturbance rejection control for linear systems with unknown time-varying coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Congzhi; Sira-Ramírez, Hebertt

    2015-12-01

    A flatness-based active disturbance rejection control approach is proposed to deal with the linear systems with unknown time-varying coefficients and external disturbances. By selecting appropriate nominal values for the parameters of the system, all the deviation between the nominal and actual dynamics of the controlled process, as well as all the external disturbances can be viewed as a total disturbance. Based on the accurately estimated total disturbance with the aid of the proposed extended state observer, a linear proportional derivative feedback control law taking into account the derivatives of the desired output is designed to eliminate the effect of the total disturbance on the system performance. Finally, the load frequency control problem of a single-area power system with non-reheated unit is employed as an illustrative example to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  1. CMOS common-mode rejection filter with floating active transformer operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Daisuke; Ikebe, Masayuki; Motohisa, Junichi; Sano, Eiichi; Kondou, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We propose an inductorless common-mode rejection filter with a gyrator-C network for common-mode-noise reduction. By adopting a gyrator-C network and ladder structure, high-order and small filter circuits with active transformer operation were fabricated. The filter was designed and fabricated in a Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) 0.18 µm CMOS process. This filter exhibited a CMRR of 80 dB, output noise voltage of 103 nV/Hz1/2, third-order input intercept point of 8.8 dBm at 1 MHz operation, and cutoff frequency of under 6 MHz. The total power consumption was 14.8 mW with a 2.5 V supply, and the chip area was 0.7 × 0.4 mm2.

  2. Performance analysis of active disturbance rejection tracking control for a class of uncertain LTI systems.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wenchao; Huang, Yi

    2015-09-01

    The paper considers the tracking problem for a class of uncertain linear time invariant (LTI) systems with both uncertain parameters and external disturbances. The active disturbance rejection tracking controller is designed and the resulting closed-loop system's characteristics are comprehensively studied. In the time-domain, it is proven that the output of closed-loop system can approach its ideal trajectory in the transient process against different kinds of uncertainties by tuning the bandwidth of extended state observer (ESO). In the frequency-domain, different kinds of parameters' influences on the phase margin and the crossover frequency of the resulting control system are illuminated. Finally, the effectiveness and robustness of the controller are verified through the actuator position control system with uncertain parameters and load disturbances in the simulations.

  3. On active disturbance rejection based control design for superconducting RF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, John; Morris, Dan; Usher, Nathan; Gao, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Shen; Nicoletti, Achille; Zheng, Qinling

    2011-07-01

    Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are key components of modern linear particle accelerators. The National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) is building a 3 MeV/u re-accelerator (ReA3) using SRF cavities. Lightly loaded SRF cavities have very small bandwidths (high Q) making them very sensitive to mechanical perturbations whether external or self-induced. Additionally, some cavity types exhibit mechanical responses to perturbations that lead to high-order non-stationary transfer functions resulting in very complex control problems. A control system that can adapt to the changing perturbing conditions and transfer functions of these systems would be ideal. This paper describes the application of a control technique known as "Active Disturbance Rejection Control" (ARDC) to this problem.

  4. Active Heat Rejection System on Mars Exploration Rover - Design Changes from Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathi, Gani B.; Birur, Gajanana C.; Tsuyuki, Glenn T.; McGrath, Paul L.; Patzold, Jack D.

    2003-01-01

    The active Heat Rejection System designed for Mars Pathfinder was modified for the Mars Exploration Rover (Mars '03) mission and will be used to remove excess heat from the Rover electronics during the cruise part of the mission. The Integrated Pump Assembly design from MPF remained essentially intact; changes were primarily made to reduce weight. However, the cooling loop was significantly redesigned to service totally different requirements for the MER rovers. In addition, the vent design was readdressed to alleviate potentially excessive nutation as was induced on the MPF spacecraft in the process of dumping the CFC-11 overboard prior to Entry/Descent/Landing. The current vent design was based on a better understanding of the flow characteristics during the blowdown process. This paper addresses some of the key design changes. This paper also addresses lessons learned from the performance testing, and potential changes to improve the HRS performance (e.g. temperature oscillations).

  5. Active disturbance rejection controller of fine tracking system for free space optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ning; Liu, Yang; Chen, Xinglin; Wang, Yan

    2013-08-01

    Free space optical communication is one of the best approaches in future communications. Laser beam's acquisition, pointing and tracking are crucial technologies of free space optical communication. Fine tracking system is important component of APT (acquisition, pointing and tracking) system. It cooperates with the coarse pointing system in executing the APT mission. Satellite platform vibration and disturbance, which reduce received optical power, increase bit error rate and affect seriously the natural performance of laser communication. For the characteristic of satellite platform, an active disturbance rejection controller was designed to reduce the vibration and disturbance. There are three major contributions in the paper. Firstly, the effects of vibration on the inter satellite optical communications were analyzed, and the reasons and characters of vibration of the satellite platform were summarized. The amplitude-frequency response of a filter was designed according to the power spectral density of platform vibration of SILEX (Semiconductor Inter-satellite Laser Experiment), and then the signals of platform vibration were generated by filtering white Gaussian noise using the filter. Secondly, the fast steering mirror is a key component of the fine tracking system for optical communication. The mechanical design and model analysis was made to the tip/tilt mirror driven by the piezoelectric actuator and transmitted by the flexure hinge. The transfer function of the fast steering mirror, camera, D/A data acquisition card was established, and the theory model of transfer function of this system was further obtained. Finally, an active disturbance rejection control method is developed, multiple parallel extended state observers were designed for estimation of unknown dynamics and external disturbance, and the estimated states were used for nonlinear feedback control and compensation to improve system performance. The simulation results show that the designed

  6. Active tracking of rejected dried blood samples in a large program in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Inalegwu, Auchi; Phillips, Sunny; Datir, Rawlings; Chime, Christopher; Ozumba, Petronilla; Peters, Samuel; Ogbanufe, Obinna; Mensah, Charles; Abimiku, Alash’Le; Dakum, Patrick; Ndembi, Nicaise

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the impact of rejection at different levels of health care by retrospectively reviewing records of dried blood spot samples received at the molecular laboratory for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) early infant diagnosis (EID) between January 2008 and December 2012. METHODS: The specimen rejection rate, reasons for rejection and the impact of rejection at different levels of health care was examined. The extracted data were cleaned and checked for consistency and then de-duplicated using the unique patient and clinic identifiers. The cleaned data were ciphered and exported to SPSS version 19 (SPSS 2010 IBM Corp, New York, United States) for statistical analyses. RESULTS: Sample rejection rate of 2.4% (n = 786/32552) and repeat rate of 8.8% (n = 69/786) were established. The mean age of infants presenting for first HIV molecular test among accepted valid samples was 17.83 wk (95%CI: 17.65-18.01) vs 20.30 wk (95%CI: 16.53-24.06) for repeated samples. HIV infection rate was 9.8% vs 15.9% for accepted and repeated samples. Compared to tertiary healthcare clinics, secondary and primary clinics had two-fold and three-fold higher likelihood of sample rejection, respectively (P < 0.05). We observed a significant increase in sample rejection rate with increasing number of EID clinics (r = 0.893, P = 0.041). The major reasons for rejection were improper sample collection (26.3%), improper labeling (16.4%) and insufficient blood (14.8%). CONCLUSION: Programs should monitor pre-analytical variables and incorporate continuous quality improvement interventions to reduce errors associated with sample rejection and improve patient retention. PMID:27175352

  7. The influence of natural organic matter and cations on the rejection of endocrine disrupting and pharmaceutically active compounds by nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Comerton, Anna M; Andrews, Robert C; Bagley, David M

    2009-02-01

    The impact of natural organic matter (NOM) and cations on the rejection of five endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) (acetaminophen, carbamazepine, estrone, gemfibrozil, oxybenzone) by nanofiltration (NF) was examined. The water matrices included membrane bioreactor (MBR) effluent, Lake Ontario water and laboratory-prepared waters modelled to represent the characteristics of the Lake Ontario water. The impact of cations in natural waters on compound rejection was also examined by doubling the natural cation concentration (calcium, magnesium, sodium) in both the Lake Ontario water and the MBR effluent. The presence of Suwannee River NOM spiked into laboratory-grade water was found to cause an increase in compound NF rejection. In addition, the presence of cations alone in laboratory-grade water did not have a significant impact on rejection with the exception of the polar compound gemfibrozil. However, when cation concentration in natural waters was increased, a significant decrease in the rejection of EDCs and PhACs was observed. This suggests that the presence of cations may result in a reduction in the association of EDCs and PhACs with NOM.

  8. Thiopurine methyltransferase activity and its relationship to the occurrence of rejection episodes in paediatric renal transplant recipients treated with azathioprine

    PubMed Central

    Dervieux, T; Médard, Y; Baudouin, V; Maisin, A; Zhang, D; Broly, F; Loirat, C; Jacqz-Aigrain, E

    1999-01-01

    Aims Azathioprine is a prodrug commonly used in combination therapy to prevent allograft rejection after renal transplantation. After conversion to 6-mercaptopurine, the drug is metabolized into 6-thioguanine nucleotides (6-TGN) and catabolized by thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT), an enzyme under monogenic control. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inter- and intraindividual variability of red blood cell thiopurine methyltransferase and 6-TGN concentrations and their relationship to the clinical effects of azathioprine in paediatric patients. Methods In the present study, the interand intraindividual variations in red blood cell TPMT activity and 6-TGN concentrations and their relationship to the actions of azathioprine were evaluated during the first year after renal transplantation in 22 paediatric patients. Results 6-TGN concentration reached steady-state values after 6 months and correlated negatively with TPMT activity (P=0.004). Initial TPMT activity (median: 20.8 nmol h−1 ml−1, range 7.8–34.6) and 6-TGN concentration at steady-state (median: 80 pmol 8×108–1 cells, range not detected to 366) were not related to the occurrence of rejection episodes during the period of the study. In contrast, TPMT activity and the percentage difference in TPMT activity from the day of transplantation determined at month 1 were higher in the patients with rejection episodes by comparison with those that did not reject during the first 3 months or the first year following transplantation (P<0.005). Conclusions We report a relationship between TPMT activity and occurrence of rejection in paediatric kidney transplant patients undergoing azathioprine therapy. These data suggest a link between high red blood cell TPMT activity and poor clinical outcome probably caused by rapid azathioprine catabolism. PMID:10594482

  9. Both associative activation and thematic extraction count, but thematic false memories are more easily rejected.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Paula; Garcia-Marques, Leonel; Fernandez, Angel; Albuquerque, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to analyse the roles played by associative activation and thematic extraction in the explanation of false memories using the Deese, Roediger, McDermott (DRM) paradigm. Associative lists with two different types of critical items (CIs) were used: one, the associative CI, corresponded to the word most strongly primed by the associates in the list and another, the thematic CI, was the word that best described the theme of the list. Following three different types of encoding instructions (standard, warning or strategic), false recognition for these two types of CIs was analysed in either self-paced or speeded response recognition tests. The results showed considerable levels of false memories for both types of CIs. Even without the quality of being "good themes", associative CIs produced high levels of false recognition, which suggests that associative activation plays a prominent role in false memory formation. More interestingly, thematic CIs were more prone to be edited out, reinforcing the argument that thematic identifiability has a major role in the rejection of false memories.

  10. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses

    PubMed Central

    McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T.; Dennison, S. Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Tomaras, Georgia D.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  11. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses.

    PubMed

    Tay, Matthew Zirui; Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D; McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T; Dennison, S Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Hope, Thomas J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  12. Role of Fc fragments in antibody-mediated recovery from ocular and subcutaneous herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, J E; Lausch, R N

    1981-01-01

    The contributions of the Fc fragment of virus-specific antibody in the resistance of mice to peripheral herpes simplex virus infection were investigated. Rabbit anti-herpes simplex virus-specific F(ab')2 fragments prepared by pepsin digestion of immune immunoglobulin G (IgG) were found to be inactive in complement-mediated cytolysis while retaining their capacity to neutralize virus infectivity in vitro. When F(ab')2 fragments were passively transferred either before or simultaneously with virus inoculation, they were as efficient as intact IgG was in protecting animals from virus challenge. However, if passive transfer was delayed until 8 h after herpes simplex virus infection, only IgG antibody was protective. The loss of protective activity could not be attributed to a rapid disappearance of F(ab')2 fragments, because comparable levels of F(ab')2 fragments and IgG antibody were maintained in the blood of recipients during the time that antibody mediated its protective effects. The inability of F(ab')2 subunits to activate complement was also not a factor, because complement-deficient A/J mice and complement-sufficient SJL/J mice recovered from herpes simplex virus infection after the passive transfer of IgG. We concluded that the Fc component of the antibody molecule is needed to resolve intracellular infection and that the mechanism by which antibody mediates recovery remains undefined but does not appear to involve virus neutralization or complement activation. PMID:6266961

  13. Interleukin-6, A Cytokine Critical to Mediation of Inflammation, Autoimmunity and Allograft Rejection: Therapeutic Implications of IL-6 Receptor Blockade.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Stanley C; Choi, Jua; Kim, Irene; Wu, Gordon; Toyoda, Mieko; Shin, Bonga; Vo, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    The success of kidney transplants is limited by the lack of robust improvements in long-term survival. It is now recognized that alloimmune responses are responsible for the majority of allograft failures. Development of novel therapies to decrease allosensitization is critical. The lack of new drug development in kidney transplantation necessitated repurposing drugs initially developed in oncology and autoimmunity. Among these is tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor [IL-6R]) which holds promise for modulating multiple immune pathways responsible for allograft injury and loss. Interleukin-6 is a cytokine critical to proinflammatory and immune regulatory cascades. Emerging data have identified important roles for IL-6 in innate immune responses and adaptive immunity. Excessive IL-6 production is associated with activation of T-helper 17 cell and inhibition of regulatory T cell with attendant inflammation. Plasmablast production of IL-6 is critical for initiation of T follicular helper cells and production of high-affinity IgG. Tocilizumab is the first-in-class drug developed to treat diseases mediated by IL-6. Data are emerging from animal and human studies indicating a critical role for IL-6 in mediation of cell-mediated rejection, antibody-mediated rejection, and chronic allograft vasculopathy. This suggests that anti-IL-6/IL-6R blockade could be effective in modifying T- and B-cell responses to allografts. Initial data from our group suggest anti-IL-6R therapy is of value in desensitization and prevention and treatment of antibody-mediated rejection. In addition, human trials have shown benefits in treatment of graft versus host disease in matched or mismatched stem cell transplants. Here, we explore the biology of IL-6/IL-6R interactions and the evidence for an important role of IL-6 in mediating allograft rejection.

  14. Active disturbance rejection control for output force creep characteristics of ionic polymer metal composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yan; Chen, Yang; Sun, Zhiyong; Hao, Lina; Dong, Jie

    2014-07-01

    Ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) are a type of electroactive polymer (EAP) that can be used as both sensors and actuators. An IPMC has enormous potential application in the field of biomimetic robotics, medical devices, and so on. However, an IPMC actuator has a great number of disadvantages, such as creep and time-variation, making it vulnerable to external disturbances. In addition, the complex actuation mechanism makes it difficult to model and the demand of the control algorithm is laborious to implement. In this paper, we obtain a creep model of the IPMC by means of model identification based on the method of creep operator linear superposition. Although the mathematical model is not approximate to the IPMC accurate model, it is accurate enough to be used in MATLAB to prove the control algorithm. A controller based on the active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) method is designed to solve the drawbacks previously given. Because the ADRC controller is separate from the mathematical model of the controlled plant, the control algorithm has the ability to complete disturbance estimation and compensation. Some factors, such as all external disturbances, uncertainty factors, the inaccuracy of the identification model and different kinds of IPMCs, have little effect on controlling the output block force of the IPMC. Furthermore, we use the particle swarm optimization algorithm to adjust ADRC parameters so that the IPMC actuator can approach the desired block force with unknown external disturbances. Simulations and experimental examples validate the effectiveness of the ADRC controller.

  15. Direct energy balance based active disturbance rejection control for coal-fired power plant.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Hua, Qingsong; Li, Donghai; Pan, Lei; Xue, Yali; Lee, Kwang Y

    2017-09-01

    The conventional direct energy balance (DEB) based PI control can fulfill the fundamental tracking requirements of the coal-fired power plant. However, it is challenging to deal with the cases when the coal quality variation is present. To this end, this paper introduces the active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) to the DEB structure, where the coal quality variation is deemed as a kind of unknown disturbance that can be estimated and mitigated promptly. Firstly, the nonlinearity of a recent power plant model is analyzed based on the gap metric, which provides guidance on how to set the pressure set-point in line with the power demand. Secondly, the approximate decoupling effect of the DEB structure is analyzed based on the relative gain analysis in frequency domain. Finally, the synthesis of the DEB based ADRC control system is carried out based on multi-objective optimization. The optimized ADRC results show that the integrated absolute error (IAE) indices of the tracking performances in both loops can be simultaneously improved, in comparison with the DEB based PI control and H∞ control system. The regulation performance in the presence of the coal quality variation is significantly improved under the ADRC control scheme. Moreover, the robustness of the proposed strategy is shown comparable with the H∞ control. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Renal allograft rejection: possible involvement of lymphokine-activated killer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, J A; Forsythe, J L; Proud, G; Taylor, R M

    1989-01-01

    Human renal allograft tissue was recovered at transplant nephrectomy from three patients with irreversible loss of graft function. This tissue was disaggregated and separated into two fractions on the basis of particle size. Fraction 1 contained glomeruli and developed a mixed outgrowth containing adherent epithelial and mesangial cells after a limited period of culture. Fraction 2 contained fragments of renal tubules and produced monolayers of tubular epithelial cells during culture. A population of lymphoid cells was observed to grow from the primary disaggregate into medium supplemented with recombinant human interleukin-2 (IL-2). After culture for 5 days these lymphoid cells were predominantly CD3-positive and carried both class II major histocompatibility antigens (MHC) and the CD25 IL-2 receptor. Culture of peripheral blood-derived mononuclear cells with IL-2 caused the generation of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells; these cells were able to lyse both glomerular and tubular cells grown from nephrectomy tissue without showing MHC antigen restriction. The lymphoid cells grown from renal allograft tissue showed a similar lytic potential for both renal cells prepared from the same nephrectomy specimen and from third party renal tissue. It is possible that any LAK cells formed within a renal allograft by the action of IL-2 may contribute to the tissue destruction observed during graft rejection. Images Figure 2 PMID:2661417

  17. Active disturbance rejection based trajectory linearization control for hypersonic reentry vehicle with bounded uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xingling; Wang, Honglun

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a novel compound control scheme combined with the advantages of trajectory linearization control (TLC) and alternative active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) for hypersonic reentry vehicle (HRV) attitude tracking system with bounded uncertainties. Firstly, in order to overcome actuator saturation problem, nonlinear tracking differentiator (TD) is applied in the attitude loop to achieve fewer control consumption. Then, linear extended state observers (LESO) are constructed to estimate the uncertainties acting on the LTV system in the attitude and angular rate loop. In addition, feedback linearization (FL) based controllers are designed using estimates of uncertainties generated by LESO in each loop, which enable the tracking error for closed-loop system in the presence of large uncertainties to converge to the residual set of the origin asymptotically. Finally, the compound controllers are derived by integrating with the nominal controller for open-loop nonlinear system and FL based controller. Also, comparisons and simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the control strategy.

  18. Predictive current control of permanent magnet synchronous motor based on linear active disturbance rejection control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kunpeng

    2017-01-01

    The compatibility problem between rapidity and overshooting in the traditional predictive current control structure is inevitable and difficult to solve by reason of using PI controller. A novel predictive current control (PCC) algorithm for permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) based on linear active disturbance rejection control (LADRC) is presented in this paper. In order to displace PI controller, the LADRC strategy which consisted of linear state error feedback (LSEF) control algorithm and linear extended state observer (LESO), is designed based on the mathematic model of PMSM. The purpose of LSEF is to make sure fast response to load mutation and system uncertainties, and LESO is designed to estimate the uncertain disturbances. The principal structures of the proposed system are speed outer loop based on LADRC and current inner loop based on predictive current control. Especially, the instruction value of qaxis current in inner loop is derived from the control quantity which is designed in speed outer loop. The simulation is carried out in Matlab/Simulink software, and the results illustrate that the dynamic and static performances of proposed system are satisfied. Moreover the robust against model parameters mismatch is enhanced obviously.

  19. Combined feedforward and model-assisted active disturbance rejection control for non-minimum phase system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Li, Donghai; Gao, Zhiqiang; Yang, Zhao; Zhao, Shen

    2016-09-01

    Control of the non-minimum phase (NMP) system is challenging, especially in the presence of modelling uncertainties and external disturbances. To this end, this paper presents a combined feedforward and model-assisted Active Disturbance Rejection Control (MADRC) strategy. Based on the nominal model, the feedforward controller is used to produce a tracking performance that has minimum settling time subject to a prescribed undershoot constraint. On the other hand, the unknown disturbances and uncertain dynamics beyond the nominal model are compensated by MADRC. Since the conventional Extended State Observer (ESO) is not suitable for the NMP system, a model-assisted ESO (MESO) is proposed based on the nominal observable canonical form. The convergence of MESO is proved in time domain. The stability, steady-state characteristics and robustness of the closed-loop system are analyzed in frequency domain. The proposed strategy has only one tuning parameter, i.e., the bandwidth of MESO, which can be readily determined with a prescribed robustness level. Some comparative examples are given to show the efficacy of the proposed method. This paper depicts a promising prospect of the model-assisted ADRC in dealing with complex systems.

  20. On active disturbance rejection in temperature regulation of the proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dazi; Li, Chong; Gao, Zhiqiang; Jin, Qibing

    2015-06-01

    Operating a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system to maintain the stack temperature stable is one of the key issues in PEMFC's normal electrochemical reaction process. Its temperature characteristic is easily affected by inlet gas humidity, external disturbances, and electrical load changes and so on. Because of the complexity and nonlinearity of the reaction process, it is hard to build a model totally consistent with the real characteristic of the process. If model uncertainty, external disturbances, parameters changes can be regarded as "total disturbance", which is then estimated and compensated, the accurate model is no longer required and the control design can be greatly simplified to meet the practical needs. Based on this idea, an active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) with a switching law is proposed for the problem of precise temperature regulation in PEMFC. Results of the work show that the proposed control system allows the PEMFC to operate successfully at the temperature of 343 K point in the presence of two different disturbances.

  1. Antidotes, antibody-mediated immunity and the future of pharmaceutical product development.

    PubMed

    Caoili, Salvador Eugenio C

    2013-02-01

    If new scientific knowledge is to be more efficiently generated and applied toward the advancement of health, human safety must be more effectively addressed in the conduct of research. Given the present difficulties of accurately predicting biological outcomes of novel interventions in vivo, the imperative of human safety suggests the development of novel pharmaceutical products in tandem with their prospective antidotes in anticipation of possible adverse events, to render the risks of initial clinical trials more acceptable from a regulatory standpoint. Antibody-mediated immunity provides a generally applicable mechanistic basis for developing antidotes to both biologicals and small-molecule drugs (such that antibodies may serve as antidotes to pharmaceutical agents as a class including other antibodies) and also for the control and prevention of both infectious and noninfectious diseases via passive or active immunization. Accordingly, the development of prophylactic or therapeutic passive-immunization strategies using antipeptide antibodies is a plausible prelude to the development of corresponding active-immunization strategies using peptide-based vaccines. In line with this scheme, global proliferation of antibody- and vaccine-production technologies, especially those that obviate dependence on the cold chain for storage and transport of finished products, could provide geographically distributed breakout capability against emerging and future health challenges.

  2. Design and Testing of an Active Heat Rejection Radiator with Digital Turn-Down Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunada, Eric; Birur, Gajanana C.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Miller, Jennifer; Berisford, Daniel; Stephan, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    NASA's proposed lunar lander, Altair, will be exposed to vastly different external environment temperatures. The challenges to the active thermal control system (ATCS) are compounded by unfavorable transients in the internal waste heat dissipation profile: the lowest heat load occurs in the coldest environment while peak loads coincide with the warmest environment. The current baseline for this fluid is a 50/50 inhibited propylene glycol/water mixture with a freeze temperature around -35 C. While the overall size of the radiator's heat rejection area is dictated by the worst case hot scenario, a turn-down feature is necessary to tolerate the worst case cold scenario. A radiator with digital turn-down capability is being designed as a robust means to maintain cabin environment and equipment temperatures while minimizing mass and power consumption. It utilizes active valving to isolate and render ineffective any number of parallel flow tubes which span across the ATCS radiator. Several options were assessed in a trade-study to accommodate flow tube isolation and how to deal with the stagnant fluid that would otherwise remain in the tube. Bread-board environmental tests were conducted for options to drain the fluid from a turned-down leg as well an option to allow a leg to freeze/thaw. Each drain option involved a positive displacement gear pump with different methods of providing a pressure head to feed it. Test results showed that a start-up heater used to generate vapor at the tube inlet held the most promise for tube evacuation. Based on these test results and conclusions drawn from the trade-study, a full-scale radiator design is being worked for the Altair mission profile.

  3. Design and Testing of an Active Heat Rejection Radiator with Digital Turn-Down Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunada, Eric; Birur, Gajanana C.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Miller, Jennifer; Berisford, Daniel; Stephan, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    NASA's proposed lunar lander, Altair, will be exposed to vastly different external environment temperatures. The challenges to the active thermal control system (ATCS) are compounded by unfavorable transients in the internal waste heat dissipation profile: the lowest heat load occurs in the coldest environment while peak loads coincide with the warmest environment. The current baseline for this fluid is a 50/50 inhibited propylene glycol/water mixture with a freeze temperature around -35 C. While the overall size of the radiator's heat rejection area is dictated by the worst case hot scenario, a turn-down feature is necessary to tolerate the worst case cold scenario. A radiator with digital turn-down capability is being designed as a robust means to maintain cabin environment and equipment temperatures while minimizing mass and power consumption. It utilizes active valving to isolate and render ineffective any number of parallel flow tubes which span across the ATCS radiator. Several options were assessed in a trade-study to accommodate flow tube isolation and how to deal with the stagnant fluid that would otherwise remain in the tube. Bread-board environmental tests were conducted for options to drain the fluid from a turned-down leg as well an option to allow a leg to freeze/thaw. Each drain option involved a positive displacement gear pump with different methods of providing a pressure head to feed it. Test results showed that a start-up heater used to generate vapor at the tube inlet held the most promise for tube evacuation. Based on these test results and conclusions drawn from the trade-study, a full-scale radiator design is being worked for the Altair mission profile.

  4. Preventing Rejection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications work best. These medications work in different phases of the immune response to minimize side effects ... effective immunosuppression. Clinical immunosuppression usually occurs in three phases: induction, maintenance and anti-rejection. Reference and Publication ...

  5. Prolonged ischemia elicits acute allograft rejection involved in CXCR3 activation in rat kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xun-feng; Song, Bin; Duan, Ji-hui; Hu, Zhan-dong; Cui, Zi-lin; Gu, Chuan

    2015-10-01

    Acute rejection is a major obstacle in patients with prolonged ischemia in deceased-donor renal transplantation. Chemokines and their receptors play a critical role in leukocyte trafficking, resulting in allograft rejection; therefore, the role of chemokine receptor CXCR3 in acute rejection induced by prolonged ischemia in rat kidney transplantation models was evaluated. Syngeneic and allogeneic renal transplantations were performed. For cold ischemia, grafts were stored in 4.0°C University of Wisconsin solution for 12 or 16 h. Serum and renal tissues were harvested 7.0 d after surgery and serum TNF-α, IL-6, and renal function were measured. Graft histology was stained with periodic acid-Schiff and immunohistochemical staining and further evaluated for signs of acute rejection. CXCR3 proteins were quantified by Western blot. The transplanted rats were divided into 4 groups as follows: iso-12-h = isogeneic transplant with 12-h CIT graft; iso-16-h = isogeneic kidney transplant with 16-h CIT graft; allo-12-h = allogeneic renal transplant with 12-h CIT graft; allo-16 h = allogeneic renal transplant with 16-h CIT graft; and 16 h+T = allogeneic 16-h CIT graft received tacrolimus. Prolonged cold ischemia time (CIT; 16 h) enhanced acute glomerular damage, interstitial inflammation, and tubulointerstitial cellular infiltration in allografts with and without immunosuppressant tacrolimus; but it was not apparent in the isografts. The expression of CXCR3 protein and the proportion of CXCR3-positive cells were significantly higher in the allo-16 h and 16 h +T groups than that in the allo-12 h group 7d post-surgery. CIT triggered acute rejection in allogeneic, but not in isogeneic, kidney transplants, accompanied by an elevation of leukocyte recruitment and damaged graft function. The upregulated expression of chemokine receptor CXCR3 promoted inflammatory infiltration and acute allograft rejection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. SARS CoV subunit vaccine: antibody-mediated neutralisation and enhancement.

    PubMed

    Jaume, M; Yip, M S; Kam, Y W; Cheung, C Y; Kien, F; Roberts, A; Li, P H; Dutry, I; Escriou, N; Daeron, M; Bruzzone, R; Subbarao, K; Peiris, J S M; Nal, B; Altmeyer, R

    2012-02-01

    1. A SARS vaccine was produced based on recombinant native full-length Spike-protein trimers (triSpike) and efficient establishment of a vaccination procedure in rodents. 2. Antibody-mediated enhancement of SARS-CoV infection with anti-SARS-CoV Spike immune-serum was observed in vitro. 3. Antibody-mediated infection of SARS-CoV triggers entry into human haematopoietic cells via an FcγR-dependent and ACE2-, pH-, cysteine-protease-independent pathways. 4. The antibody-mediated enhancement phenomenon is not a mandatory component of the humoral immune response elicited by SARS vaccines, as pure neutralising antibody only could be obtained. 5. Occurrence of immune-mediated enhancement of SARS-CoV infection raises safety concerns regarding the use of SARS-CoV vaccine in humans and enables new ways to investigate SARS pathogenesis (tropism and immune response deregulation).

  7. Effect of ultraviolet B irradiation on delayed-type hypersensitivity, cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity, and skin graft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, K.; Iijima, M.

    1989-02-01

    The influence of ultraviolet B irradiation on the induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to alloantigens by epidermal cells (EC), on the generation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity to alloantigens, and on skin graft rejection was studied. After the skin was irradiated with UVB in vitro, EC were obtained. The EC were injected subcutaneously, and the DTH reaction was compared with that induced by non-UVB-irradiated EC. A reduction in the DTH reaction was observed (from 62% to 99.1%). CTL activity in these mice was assessed after in vitro stimulation. CTL activity in mice sensitized with UVB-irradiated EC was significantly reduced. Furthermore, mice sensitized with UVB-irradiated EC did not reject a subsequent skin allograft in an accelerated fashion, whereas mice sensitized with non-UVB-irradiated EC did. The mechanism(s) of these reactions and the clinical application of the UVB irradiation prior to grafting are discussed.

  8. The 20S proteasome core, active within apoptotic exosome-like vesicles, induces autoantibody production and accelerates rejection.

    PubMed

    Dieudé, Mélanie; Bell, Christina; Turgeon, Julie; Beillevaire, Deborah; Pomerleau, Luc; Yang, Bing; Hamelin, Katia; Qi, Shijie; Pallet, Nicolas; Béland, Chanel; Dhahri, Wahiba; Cailhier, Jean-François; Rousseau, Matthieu; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Lévesque, Tania; Lau, Arthur; Rondeau, Christiane; Gingras, Diane; Muruve, Danie; Rivard, Alain; Cardinal, Héloise; Perreault, Claude; Desjardins, Michel; Boilard, Éric; Thibault, Pierre; Hébert, Marie-Josée

    2015-12-16

    Autoantibodies to components of apoptotic cells, such as anti-perlecan antibodies, contribute to rejection in organ transplant recipients. However, mechanisms of immunization to apoptotic components remain largely uncharacterized. We used large-scale proteomics, with validation by electron microscopy and biochemical methods, to compare the protein profiles of apoptotic bodies and apoptotic exosome-like vesicles, smaller extracellular vesicles released by endothelial cells downstream of caspase-3 activation. We identified apoptotic exosome-like vesicles as a central trigger for production of anti-perlecan antibodies and acceleration of rejection. Unlike apoptotic bodies, apoptotic exosome-like vesicles triggered the production of anti-perlecan antibodies in naïve mice and enhanced anti-perlecan antibody production and allograft inflammation in mice transplanted with an MHC (major histocompatibility complex)-incompatible aortic graft. The 20S proteasome core was active within apoptotic exosome-like vesicles and controlled their immunogenic activity. Finally, we showed that proteasome activity in circulating exosome-like vesicles increased after vascular injury in mice. These findings open new avenues for predicting and controlling maladaptive humoral responses to apoptotic cell components that enhance the risk of rejection after transplantation. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. It still hurts: altered endogenous opioid activity in the brain during social rejection and acceptance in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Hsu, D T; Sanford, B J; Meyers, K K; Love, T M; Hazlett, K E; Walker, S J; Mickey, B J; Koeppe, R A; Langenecker, S A; Zubieta, J-K

    2015-02-01

    The μ-opioid receptor (MOR) system, well known for dampening physical pain, is also hypothesized to dampen 'social pain.' We used positron emission tomography scanning with the selective MOR radioligand [(11)C]carfentanil to test the hypothesis that MOR system activation (reflecting endogenous opioid release) in response to social rejection and acceptance is altered in medication-free patients diagnosed with current major depressive disorder (MDD, n=17) compared with healthy controls (HCs, n=18). During rejection, MDD patients showed reduced endogenous opioid release in brain regions regulating stress, mood and motivation, and slower emotional recovery compared with HCs. During acceptance, only HCs showed increased social motivation, which was positively correlated with endogenous opioid release in the nucleus accumbens, a reward structure. Altered endogenous opioid activity in MDD may hinder emotional recovery from negative social interactions and decrease pleasure derived from positive interactions. Both effects may reinforce depression, trigger relapse and contribute to poor treatment outcomes.

  10. Antitumor immunity. A shed NKG2D ligand that promotes natural killer cell activation and tumor rejection.

    PubMed

    Deng, Weiwen; Gowen, Benjamin G; Zhang, Li; Wang, Lin; Lau, Stephanie; Iannello, Alexandre; Xu, Jianfeng; Rovis, Tihana L; Xiong, Na; Raulet, David H

    2015-04-03

    Immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells, recognize transformed cells and eliminate them in a process termed immunosurveillance. It is thought that tumor cells evade immunosurveillance by shedding membrane ligands that bind to the NKG2D-activating receptor on NK cells and/or T cells, and desensitize these cells. In contrast, we show that in mice, a shed form of MULT1, a high-affinity NKG2D ligand, causes NK cell activation and tumor rejection. Recombinant soluble MULT1 stimulated tumor rejection in mice. Soluble MULT1 functions, at least in part, by competitively reversing a global desensitization of NK cells imposed by engagement of membrane NKG2D ligands on tumor-associated cells, such as myeloid cells. The results overturn conventional wisdom that soluble ligands are always inhibitory and suggest a new approach for cancer immunotherapy. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. The active disturbance rejection control approach to stabilisation of coupled heat and ODE system subject to boundary control matched disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bao-Zhu; Liu, Jun-Jun; AL-Fhaid, A. S.; Younas, Arshad Mahmood M.; Asiri, Asim

    2015-08-01

    We consider stabilisation for a linear ordinary differential equation system with input dynamics governed by a heat equation, subject to boundary control matched disturbance. The active disturbance rejection control approach is applied to estimate, in real time, the disturbance with both constant high gain and time-varying high gain. The disturbance is cancelled in the feedback loop. The closed-loop systems with constant high gain and time-varying high gain are shown, respectively, to be practically stable and asymptotically stable.

  12. Immune response and histology of humoral rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    González-Molina, Miguel; Ruiz-Esteban, Pedro; Caballero, Abelardo; Burgos, Dolores; Cabello, Mercedes; Leon, Miriam; Fuentes, Laura; Hernandez, Domingo

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive immune response forms the basis of allograft rejection. Its weapons are direct cellular cytotoxicity, identified from the beginning of organ transplantation, and/or antibodies, limited to hyperacute rejection by preformed antibodies and not as an allogenic response. This resulted in allogenic response being thought for decades to have just a cellular origin. But the experimental studies by Gorer demonstrating tissue damage in allografts due to antibodies secreted by B lymphocytes activated against polymorphic molecules were disregarded. The special coexistence of binding and unbinding between antibodies and antigens of the endothelial cell membranes has been the cause of the delay in demonstrating the humoral allogenic response. The endothelium, the target tissue of antibodies, has a high turnover, and antigen-antibody binding is non-covalent. If endothelial cells are attacked by the humoral response, immunoglobulins are rapidly removed from their surface by shedding and/or internalization, as well as degrading the components of the complement system by the action of MCP, DAF and CD59. Thus, the presence of complement proteins in the membrane of endothelial cells is transient. In fact, the acute form of antibody-mediated rejection was not demonstrated until C4d complement fragment deposition was identified, which is the only component that binds covalently to endothelial cells. This review examines the relationship between humoral immune response and the types of acute and chronic histological lesion shown on biopsy of the transplanted organ. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. The Banff 2015 Kidney Meeting Report: Current Challenges in Rejection Classification and Prospects for Adopting Molecular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Loupy, A; Haas, M; Solez, K; Racusen, L; Glotz, D; Seron, D; Nankivell, B J; Colvin, R B; Afrouzian, M; Akalin, E; Alachkar, N; Bagnasco, S; Becker, J U; Cornell, L; Drachenberg, C; Dragun, D; de Kort, H; Gibson, I W; Kraus, E S; Lefaucheur, C; Legendre, C; Liapis, H; Muthukumar, T; Nickeleit, V; Orandi, B; Park, W; Rabant, M; Randhawa, P; Reed, E F; Roufosse, C; Seshan, S V; Sis, B; Singh, H K; Schinstock, C; Tambur, A; Zeevi, A; Mengel, M

    2017-01-01

    The XIII Banff meeting, held in conjunction the Canadian Society of Transplantation in Vancouver, Canada, reviewed the clinical impact of updates of C4d-negative antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) from the 2013 meeting, reports from active Banff Working Groups, the relationships of donor-specific antibody tests (anti-HLA and non-HLA) with transplant histopathology, and questions of molecular transplant diagnostics. The use of transcriptome gene sets, their resultant diagnostic classifiers, or common key genes to supplement the diagnosis and classification of rejection requires further consensus agreement and validation in biopsies. Newly introduced concepts include the i-IFTA score, comprising inflammation within areas of fibrosis and atrophy and acceptance of transplant arteriolopathy within the descriptions of chronic active T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) or chronic ABMR. The pattern of mixed TCMR and ABMR was increasingly recognized. This report also includes improved definitions of TCMR and ABMR in pancreas transplants with specification of vascular lesions and prospects for defining a vascularized composite allograft rejection classification. The goal of the Banff process is ongoing integration of advances in histologic, serologic, and molecular diagnostic techniques to produce a consensus-based reporting system that offers precise composite scores, accurate routine diagnostics, and applicability to next-generation clinical trials.

  14. A Novel Cardioprotective Agent in Cardiac Transplantation: Metformin Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Decreases Acute Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury and Chronic Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Jocelyn T.; Troke, Joshua J.; Kimura, Naoyuki; Itoh, Satoshi; Wang, Xi; Palmer, Owen P.; Robbins, Robert C.; Fischbein, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    The main cause of mortality after the first year from cardiac transplantation is cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV), which leads to chronic rejection of the heart. To improve long-term outcomes in cardiac transplantation, treatments to prevent or diminish CAV are actively being researched. Ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury has been shown to be the strongest alloantigen-independent factor in the development of CAV. Here, we investigate the use of metformin in murine cardiac transplantation models as a novel cardioprotective agent to limit acute I-R injury and subsequent chronic rejection. We show that metformin treatment activates AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) in vitro and in vivo. In the acute transplantation model, metformin activation of AMPK resulted in significantly decreased apoptosis in cardiac allografts on postoperative day (POD) 1 and 8. In the chronic transplantation model, metformin pretreatment of allografts led to significantly improved graft function and significantly decreased CAV, as measured on POD 52. Taken together, our results in the acute and chronic rejection studies suggest a potential cardioprotective mechanism for metformin; we demonstrate a correlation between metformin-induced decrease in acute I-R injury and metformin-related decrease in chronic rejection. Thus, one of the ways by which metformin and AMPK activation may protect the transplanted heart from chronic rejection is by decreasing initial I-R injury inherent in donor organ preservation and implantation. Our findings suggest novel therapeutic strategies for minimizing chronic cardiac rejection via the use of metformin- and AMPK-mediated pathways to suppress acute I-R injury. PMID:22180679

  15. A novel cardioprotective agent in cardiac transplantation: metformin activation of AMP-activated protein kinase decreases acute ischemia-reperfusion injury and chronic rejection.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jocelyn T; Troke, Joshua J; Kimura, Naoyuki; Itoh, Satoshi; Wang, Xi; Palmer, Owen P; Robbins, Robert C; Fischbein, Michael P

    2011-12-01

    The main cause of mortality after the first year from cardiac transplantation is cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV), which leads to chronic rejection of the heart. To improve long-term outcomes in cardiac transplantation, treatments to prevent or diminish CAV are actively being researched. Ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury has been shown to be the strongest alloantigen-independent factor in the development of CAV. Here, we investigate the use of metformin in murine cardiac transplantation models as a novel cardioprotective agent to limit acute I-R injury and subsequent chronic rejection. We show that metformin treatment activates AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) in vitro and in vivo. In the acute transplantation model, metformin activation of AMPK resulted in significantly decreased apoptosis in cardiac allografts on postoperative day (POD) 1 and 8. In the chronic transplantation model, metformin pretreatment of allografts led to significantly improved graft function and significantly decreased CAV, as measured on POD 52. Taken together, our results in the acute and chronic rejection studies suggest a potential cardioprotective mechanism for metformin; we demonstrate a correlation between metformin-induced decrease in acute I-R injury and metformin-related decrease in chronic rejection. Thus, one of the ways by which metformin and AMPK activation may protect the transplanted heart from chronic rejection is by decreasing initial I-R injury inherent in donor organ preservation and implantation. Our findings suggest novel therapeutic strategies for minimizing chronic cardiac rejection via the use of metformin- and AMPK-mediated pathways to suppress acute I-R injury.

  16. Input Shaping enhanced Active Disturbance Rejection Control for a twin rotor multi-input multi-output system (TRMS).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Cui, Jianwei; Lao, Dazhong; Li, Donghai; Chen, Junhui

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a composite control based on Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC) and Input Shaping is presented for TRMS with two degrees of freedom (DOF). The control tasks consist of accurately tracking desired trajectories and obtaining disturbance rejection in both horizontal and vertical planes. Due to un-measurable states as well as uncertainties stemming from modeling uncertainty and unknown disturbance torques, ADRC is employed, and feed-forward Input Shaping is used to improve the dynamical response. In the proposed approach, because the coupling effects are maintained in controller derivation, there is no requirement to decouple the TRMS into horizontal and vertical subsystems, which is usually performed in the literature. Finally, the proposed method is implemented on the TRMS platform, and the results are compared with those of PID and ADRC in a similar structure. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The operation of the controller allows for an excellent set-point tracking behavior and disturbance rejection with system nonlinearity and complex coupling conditions.

  17. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Prevents Murine Antibody-Mediated Acute Lung Injury at the Level of Neutrophil Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Production

    PubMed Central

    Semple, John W.; Kim, Michael; Hou, Jing; McVey, Mark; Lee, Young Jin; Tabuchi, Arata; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Chai, Zhong-Wei; Lazarus, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a leading cause of transfusion-associated mortality that can occur with any type of transfusion and is thought to be primarily due to donor antibodies activating pulmonary neutrophils in recipients. Recently, a large prospective case controlled clinical study of cardiac surgery patients demonstrated that despite implementation of male donors, a high incidence of TRALI still occurred and suggested a need for additional interventions in susceptible patient populations. To examine if intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) may be effective, a murine model of antibody-mediated acute lung injury that approximates human TRALI was examined. When BALB/c mice were injected with the anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibody 34-1-2s, mild shock (reduced rectal temperature) and respiratory distress (dyspnea) were observed and pre-treatment of the mice with 2 g/kg IVIg completely prevented these symptoms. To determine IVIg's usefulness to affect severe lung damage, SCID mice, previously shown to be hypersensitive to 34-1-2s were used. SCID mice treated with 34-1-2s underwent severe shock, lung damage (increased wet/dry ratios) and 40% mortality within 2 hours. Treatment with 2 g/kg IVIg 18 hours before 34-1-2s administration completely protected the mice from all adverse events. Treatment with IVIg after symptoms began also reduced lung damage and mortality. While the prophylactic IVIg administration did not affect 34-1-2s-induced pulmonary neutrophil accumulation, bone marrow-derived neutrophils from the IVIg-treated mice displayed no spontaneous ROS production nor could they be stimulated in vitro with fMLP or 34-1-2s. These results suggest that IVIg prevents murine antibody-mediated acute lung injury at the level of neutrophil ROS production and thus, alleviating tissue damage. PMID:22363629

  18. It still hurts: altered opioid activity in the brain during social rejection and acceptance in major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, David T; Sanford, Benjamin J; Meyers, Kortni K; Love, Tiffany M; Hazlett, Kathleen E; Walker, Sara J; Mickey, Brian J; Koeppe, Robert A; Langenecker, Scott A; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2015-01-01

    The μ-opioid receptor (MOR) system, well known for dampening physical pain, is also hypothesized to dampen “social pain.” We used positron emission tomography scanning with the selective MOR radioligand [11C]carfentanil to test the hypothesis that MOR system activation in response to social rejection and acceptance is altered in medication-free patients diagnosed with current major depressive disorder (MDD, n = 17) compared to healthy controls (HCs, n = 18). During rejection, MDD patients showed reduced MOR activation (e.g., reduced endogenous opioid release) in brain regions regulating stress, mood, and motivation, and slower emotional recovery compared to HCs. During acceptance, only HCs showed increased social motivation, which was positively correlated with MOR activation in the nucleus accumbens, a reward structure. Abnormal MOR function in MDD may hinder emotional recovery from negative social interactions and decrease pleasure derived from positive interactions. Both effects may reinforce depression, trigger relapse, and contribute to poor treatment outcomes. PMID:25600108

  19. Antibody mediated transduction of therapeutic proteins into living cells.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James E; Weisbart, Richard H; Nishimura, Robert N

    2005-09-16

    Protein therapy refers to the direct delivery of therapeutic proteins to cells and tissues with the goal of ameliorating or modifying a disease process. Current techniques for delivering proteins across cell membranes include taking advantage of receptor-mediated endocytosis or using protein transduction domains that penetrate directly into cells. The most commonly used protein transduction domains are small cell-penetrating peptides derived from such proteins as the HIV-1 Tat protein. A novel protein transduction domain developed as the single chain fragment (Fv) of a murine anti-DNA autoantibody, mAb 3E10, has recently been developed and used to deliver biologically active proteins to living cells in vitro. This review will provide a brief overview of the development of the Fv fragment and provide a summary of recent studies using Fv to deliver therapeutic peptides and proteins (such as a C-terminal p53 peptide, C-terminal p53 antibody fragment, full-length p53, and micro-dystrophin) to cells.

  20. Antibody-mediated delivery of therapeutics for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Parakh, Sagun; Parslow, Adam C; Gan, Hui K; Scott, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-conjugated therapies (ACTs) combine the specificity of monoclonal antibodies to target cancer cells directly with highly potent payloads, often resulting in superior efficacy and/or reduced toxicity. This represents a new approach to the treatment of cancer. There have been highly promising clinical trial results using this approach with improvements in linker and payload technology. The breadth of current trials examining ACTs in haematological malignancies and solid tumours indicate the potential for clinical impact. This review will provide an overview of ACTs currently in clinical development as well as the principles of antibody delivery and types of payloads used, including cytotoxic drugs, radiolabelled isotopes, nanoparticle-based siRNA particles and immunotoxins. The focus of much of the clinical activity in ACTs has, understandably, been on their use as a monotherapy or in combination with standard of care drugs. This will continue, as will the search for better targets, linkers and payloads. Increasingly, as these drugs enter routine clinical care, important questions will arise regarding how to optimise ACT treatment approaches, including investigation of resistance mechanisms, biomarker and patient selection strategies, understanding of the unique toxicities of these drugs, and combinatorial approaches with standard therapies as well as emerging therapeutic agents like immunotherapy.

  1. What is antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA)?

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Nicole

    2005-05-01

    Antibody (Ab)-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is an immunological pathology associated with the production of neutralizing Abs that inhibit the erythropoietic activity of endogenous erythropoietin (EPO) and recombinant erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). Although this disorder occurs very rarely, the number of reported cases has increased dramatically in recent years, predominantly in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD)-associated anaemia receiving subcutaneous (s.c.) injections of one particular formulation of recombinant epoetin-alpha. This disorder is differentiated from classic forms of PRCA that are caused by chemical toxaemia (i.e. erythroblastopenia induced by chemical compounds), lymphoproliferative neoplasms, thymoma, human parvovirus B19 and certain autoimmune disorders. Patients with Ab-mediated PRCA develop resistance to EPO and severe anaemia that follows a period of successful erythropoietic response, and exhibit characteristic decreases in blood haemoglobin (Hb) level and in the number of circulating reticulocytes. However, it is not yet possible to predict which patients will develop PRCA or when in the course of their treatments PRCA may develop. Laboratory confirmation of Ab-mediated PRCA requires bone marrow examination demonstrating few or no erythroid precursors and the presence of serum anti-EPO Abs using a validated assay. These neutralizing anti-EPO Abs recognize the protein core of the EPO molecule; carbohydrate groups on EPO can affect the binding of Abs but are themselves not immunological determinants. Animal models are being developed to increase further our understanding of the immunological mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of Ab-mediated PRCA.

  2. Patterns of De Novo Allo B Cells and Antibody Formation in Chronic Cardiac Allograft Rejection After Alemtuzumab Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kwun, J.; Oh, B. C.; Gibby, A. C.; Ruhil, R.; Lu, V. T.; Kim, D. W.; Page, E. K.; Bulut, O. P.; Song, M. Q.; Farris, A. B.; Kirk, A. D.; Knechtle, S. J.; Iwakoshi, N. N.

    2017-01-01

    Even though the etiology of chronic rejection (CR) is multifactorial, donor specific antibody (DSA) is considered to have a causal effect on CR development. Currently the antibody-mediated mechanisms during CR are poorly understood due to lack of proper animal models and tools. In a clinical setting, we previously demonstrated that induction therapy by lymphocyte depletion, using alemtuzumab (anti-human CD52), is associated with an increased incidence of serum alloantibody, C4d deposition and antibody-mediated rejection in human patients. In this study, the effects of T cell depletion in the development of antibody-mediated rejection were examined using human CD52 transgenic (CD52Tg) mice treated with alemtuzumab. Fully mismatched cardiac allografts were transplanted into alemtuzumab treated CD52Tg mice and showed no acute rejection while untreated recipients acutely rejected their grafts. However, approximately half of long-term recipients showed increased degree of vasculopathy, fibrosis and perivascular C3d depositions at posttransplant day 100. The development of CR correlated with DSA and C3d deposition in the graft. Using novel tracking tools to monitor donor-specific B cells, alloreactive B cells were shown to increase in accordance with DSA detection. The current animal model could provide a means of testing strategies to understand mechanisms and developing therapeutic approaches to prevent chronic rejection. PMID:22759336

  3. Active Metal Brazing and Adhesive Bonding of Titanium to C/C Composites for Heat Rejection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, Tarah; Cerny, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Robust assembly and integration technologies are critically needed for the manufacturing of heat rejection system (HRS) components for current and future space exploration missions. Active metal brazing and adhesive bonding technologies are being assessed for the bonding of titanium to high conductivity Carbon-Carbon composite sub components in various shapes and sizes. Currently a number of different silver and copper based active metal brazes and adhesive compositions are being evaluated. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Several mechanical tests have been employed to ascertain the effectiveness of different brazing and adhesive approaches in tension and in shear that are both simple and representative of the actual system and relatively straightforward in analysis. The results of these mechanical tests along with the fractographic analysis will be discussed. In addition, advantages, technical issues and concerns in using different bonding approaches will also be presented.

  4. Reduced-order model based active disturbance rejection control of hydraulic servo system with singular value perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengwen; Quan, Long; Zhang, Shijie; Meng, Hongjun; Lan, Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Hydraulic servomechanism is the typical mechanical/hydraulic double-dynamics coupling system with the high stiffness control and mismatched uncertainties input problems, which hinder direct applications of many advanced control approaches in the hydraulic servo fields. In this paper, by introducing the singular value perturbation theory, the original double-dynamics coupling model of the hydraulic servomechanism was reduced to a integral chain system. So that, the popular ADRC (active disturbance rejection control) technology could be directly applied to the reduced system. In addition, the high stiffness control and mismatched uncertainties input problems are avoided. The validity of the simplified model is analyzed and proven theoretically. The standard linear ADRC algorithm is then developed based on the obtained reduced-order model. Extensive comparative co-simulations and experiments are carried out to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. Active vibration control of Flexible Joint Manipulator using Input Shaping and Adaptive Parameter Auto Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. P.; Luo, B.; Huang, H.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a vibration control strategy for a two-link Flexible Joint Manipulator (FJM) with a Hexapod Active Manipulator (HAM). A dynamic model of the multi-body, rigid-flexible system composed of an FJM, a HAM and a spacecraft was built. A hybrid controller was proposed by combining the Input Shaping (IS) technique with an Adaptive-Parameter Auto Disturbance Rejection Controller (APADRC). The controller was used to suppress the vibration caused by external disturbances and input motions. Parameters of the APADRC were adaptively adjusted to ensure the characteristic of the closed loop system to be a given reference system, even if the configuration of the manipulator significantly changes during motion. Because precise parameters of the flexible manipulator are not required in the IS system, the operation of the controller was sufficiently robust to accommodate uncertainties in system parameters. Simulations results verified the effectiveness of the HAM scheme and controller in the vibration suppression of FJM during operation.

  6. Procedures for Sxs antigen detection by antibody-mediated cytotoxicity tests. A comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, A; Jiménez, R; Burgos, M; Díaz de la Guardia, R

    1994-11-01

    Biological reagents used in the serological detection of Sxs antigen by antibody-mediated cytotoxicity tests were compared in order to optimize the method. Our analyses showed that: (a) red cell-free spleen cells are the best target cells, (b) rabbit serum used as the complement source should be obtained from females, and absorbed with female spleen cells before use, (c) antiserum obtained by immunizing females with repeated injections of syngenic male spleen cells provides the highest anti-Sxs antibody titer, and (d) of the different biological fluids investigated, testis supernatant has highest concentration of Sxs antigen.

  7. Asymmetric frontal brain activity and parental rejection predict altruistic behavior: moderation of oxytocin effects.

    PubMed

    Huffmeijer, Renske; Alink, Lenneke R A; Tops, Mattie; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H

    2012-06-01

    Asymmetric frontal brain activity has been widely implicated in reactions to emotional stimuli and is thought to reflect individual differences in approach-withdrawal motivation. Here, we investigate whether asymmetric frontal activity, as a measure of approach-withdrawal motivation, also predicts charitable donations after a charity's (emotion-eliciting) promotional video showing a child in need is viewed, in a sample of 47 young adult women. In addition, we explore possibilities for mediation and moderation, by asymmetric frontal activity, of the effects of intranasally administered oxytocin and parental love withdrawal on charitable donations. Greater relative left frontal activity was related to larger donations. In addition, we found evidence of moderation: Low levels of parental love withdrawal predicted larger donations in the oxytocin condition for participants showing greater relative right frontal activity. We suggest that when approach motivation is high (reflected in greater relative left frontal activity), individuals are generally inclined to take action upon seeing someone in need and, thus, to donate money to actively help out. Only when approach motivation is low (reflected in less relative left/greater relative right activity) do empathic concerns affected by oxytocin and experiences of love withdrawal play an important part in deciding about donations.

  8. Modeling the effect of charge density in the active layers of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes on the rejection of arsenic(III) and potassium iodide.

    PubMed

    Coronell, Orlando; Mi, Baoxia; Mariñas, Benito J; Cahill, David G

    2013-01-02

    We used an extended solution-diffusion model that incorporates Donnan electrostatic exclusion of ions and unhindered advection due to imperfections, and measurements of charge density in the polyamide active layers of reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membranes, to predict the rejection of a strong electrolyte (i.e., potassium iodide) and a weak acid (i.e., arsenious acid) as a function of the pH of the feed aqueous solution. Predictions of solute rejection were in agreement with experimental data indicating that (i) the extended solution-diffusion model taking into account Donnan exclusion and unhindered advection due to imperfections satisfactorily describes the effect of pH on solute rejection by RO/NF membranes and (ii) measurement of charge density in active layers provides a valuable characterization of RO/NF membranes. Our results and analysis also indicate that independent ions, and not ion pairs, dominate the permeation of salts.

  9. A Critical Analysis of Rejection in Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation: Clinical, Cellular and Molecular Aspects, Current Challenges, and Novel Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Sarhane, Karim A.; Tuffaha, Sami H.; Broyles, Justin M.; Ibrahim, Amir E.; Khalifian, Saami; Baltodano, Pablo; Santiago, Gabriel F.; Alrakan, Mohammed; Ibrahim, Zuhaib

    2013-01-01

    Advances in microsurgical techniques and immunomodulatory protocols have contributed to the expansion of vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA) with very encouraging immunological, functional, and cosmetic results. Rejection remains however a major hurdle that portends serious threats to recipients. Rejection features in VCA have been described in a number of studies, and an international consensus on the classification of rejection was established. Unfortunately, current available diagnostic methods carry many shortcomings that, in certain cases, pose a great diagnostic challenge to physicians especially in borderline rejection cases. In this review, we revisit the features of acute skin rejection in hand and face transplantation at the clinical, cellular, and molecular levels. The multiple challenges in diagnosing rejection and in defining chronic and antibody-mediated rejection in VCA are then presented, and we finish by analyzing current research directions and novel concepts aiming at improving available diagnostic measures. PMID:24324470

  10. Iron as the Key Modulator of Hepcidin Expression in Erythroid Antibody-Mediated Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, J. C.; Garrido, P.; Ribeiro, S.; Rocha-Pereira, P.; Bronze-da-Rocha, E.; Belo, L.; Costa, E.; Reis, F.; Santos-Silva, A.

    2014-01-01

    Erythroid hypoplasia (EH) is a rare complication associated with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapies, due to development of anti-rHuEPO antibodies; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly clarified. Our aim was to manage a rat model of antibody-mediated EH induced by rHuEPO and study the impact on iron metabolism and erythropoiesis. Wistar rats treated during 9 weeks with a high rHuEPO dose (200 IU) developed EH, as shown by anemia, reduced erythroblasts, reticulocytopenia, and plasmatic anti-rHuEPO antibodies. Serum iron was increased and associated with mRNA overexpression of hepatic hepcidin and other iron regulatory mediators and downregulation of matriptase-2; overexpression of divalent metal transporter 1 and ferroportin was observed in duodenum and liver. Decreased EPO expression was observed in kidney and liver, while EPO receptor was overexpressed in liver. Endogenous EPO levels were normal, suggesting that anti-rHuEPO antibodies blunted EPO function. Our results suggest that anti-rHuEPO antibodies inhibit erythropoiesis causing anemia. This leads to a serum iron increase, which seems to stimulate hepcidin expression despite no evidence of inflammation, thus suggesting iron as the key modulator of hepcidin synthesis. These findings might contribute to improving new therapeutic strategies against rHuEPO resistance and/or development of antibody-mediated EH in patients under rHuEPO therapy. PMID:25580431

  11. MHC-derived allopeptide activates TCR-biased CD8+ Tregs and suppresses organ rejection

    PubMed Central

    Picarda, Elodie; Bézie, Séverine; Venturi, Vanessa; Echasserieau, Klara; Mérieau, Emmanuel; Delhumeau, Aurélie; Renaudin, Karine; Brouard, Sophie; Bernardeau, Karine; Anegon, Ignacio; Guillonneau, Carole

    2014-01-01

    In a rat heart allograft model, preventing T cell costimulation with CD40Ig leads to indefinite allograft survival, which is mediated by the induction of CD8+CD45RClo regulatory T cells (CD8+CD40Ig Tregs) interacting with plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). The role of TCR-MHC-peptide interaction in regulating Treg activity remains a topic of debate. Here, we identified a donor MHC class II–derived peptide (Du51) that is recognized by TCR-biased CD8+CD40Ig Tregs and activating CD8+CD40Ig Tregs in both its phenotype and suppression of antidonor alloreactive T cell responses. We generated a labeled tetramer (MHC-I RT1.Aa/Du51) to localize and quantify Du51-specific T cells within rat cardiac allografts and spleen. RT1.Aa/Du51-specific CD8+CD40Ig Tregs were the most suppressive subset of the total Treg population, were essential for in vivo tolerance induction, and expressed a biased, restricted Vβ11-TCR repertoire in the spleen and the graft. Finally, we demonstrated that treatment of transplant recipients with the Du51 peptide resulted in indefinite prolongation of allograft survival. These results show that CD8+CD40Ig Tregs recognize a dominant donor antigen, resulting in TCR repertoire alterations in the graft and periphery. Furthermore, this allopeptide has strong therapeutic activity and highlights the importance of TCR-peptide-MHC interaction for Treg generation and function. PMID:24789907

  12. Methodology to assess quality of estimated disturbances in active disturbance rejection control structure for mechanical system.

    PubMed

    Rosas, A David; Velazquez, V Karla; Olivares, F Luz; Camacho, T Adrian; Williams, Ivan

    2017-09-01

    A methodology to assess the quality of estimation of disturbances in mechanical systems, by state observers, in the control structure with active compensation of disturbances (ADRC) is presented. Evaluation is carried out by four performance indices that depend on the steady-state error between reference signals and output of the plant. These indices are related with the accuracy and precision of the closed loop system in the sense of norms L2 and L∞, for a set of reference signals representing the typical operating conditions of the mechanism. The effectiveness of the methodology is illustrated with the quality assessment of the estimated disturbance of five state observers to control of a simple pendulum and validated on a SCARA robot arm. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. MP-4 Contributes to Snake Venom Neutralization by Mucuna pruriens Seeds through an Indirect Antibody-mediated Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Gupta, Chitra; Nair, Deepak T; Salunke, Dinakar M

    2016-05-20

    Mortality due to snakebite is a serious public health problem, and available therapeutics are known to induce debilitating side effects. Traditional medicine suggests that seeds of Mucuna pruriens can provide protection against the effects of snakebite. Our aim is to identify the protein(s) that may be important for snake venom neutralization and elucidate its mechanism of action. To this end, we have identified and purified a protein from M. pruriens, which we have named MP-4. The full-length polypeptide sequence of MP-4 was obtained through N-terminal sequencing of peptide fragments. Sequence analysis suggested that the protein may belong to the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor family and therefore may potentially neutralize the proteases present in snake venom. Using various structural and biochemical tools coupled with in vivo assays, we are able to show that MP-4 does not afford direct protection against snake venom because it is actually a poor inhibitor of serine proteases. Further experiments showed that antibodies generated against MP-4 cross-react with the whole venom and provide protection to mice against Echis carinatus snake venom. This study shows that the MP-4 contributes significantly to the snake venom neutralization activity of M. pruriens seeds through an indirect antibody-mediated mechanism.

  14. Colostral antibody-mediated and cell-mediated immunity contributes to innate and antigen-specific immunity in piglets

    PubMed Central

    Bandrick, Meggan; Ariza-Nieto, Claudia; Baidoo, Samuel K.; Molitor, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins and immune cells are critical components of colostral immunity; however, their transfer to and function in the neonate, especially maternal lymphocytes, is unclear. Cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immunity in sow blood and colostrum and piglet blood before (PS) and after (AS) suckling were assessed to investigate transfer and function of maternal immunity in the piglet. CD4, CD8, and γδ lymphocytes were found in sow blood and colostrum and piglet blood PS and AS; each had a unique T lymphocyte profile. Immunoglobulins were detected in sow blood, colostrum, and in piglet blood AS; the immunoglobulin profile of piglet serum AS mimicked that of sow serum. These results suggest selectivity in lymphocyte concentration into colostrum and subsequent lymphocyte transfer into the neonate, but that immunoglobulin transfer is unimpeded. Assessment of colostral natural killer activity and antigen-specific proliferation revealed that colostral cells are capable of influencing the innate and specific immune response of neonatal pigs. PMID:24252519

  15. Antibody-mediated FOXP3 protein therapy induces apoptosis in cancer cells in vitro and inhibits metastasis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Heinze, Emil; Baldwin, Scott; Chan, Grace; Hansen, James; Song, Jason; Clements, Douglas; Aragon, Robert; Nishimura, Robert; Reeves, Mark; Weisbart, Richard

    2009-07-01

    In addition to its immune suppressive function in T-regulatory cells, the nuclear transcription factor, FOXP3, has been identified as a tumor suppressor. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3E10 Fv antibody-mediated FOXP3 protein therapy of cancer, the Fv-FOXP3 fusion protein produced in Pichia pastoris was tested on breast, ovarian, and colon cancer cells in vitro, and with colon cancer cells in vivo in a mouse model of colon cancer metastasis to liver. Treatment with Fv-FOXP3 resulted in dose-dependent cell death of cancer cells in vitro. Apoptosis was established as a mechanism of cell death by demonstrating increased production of the p17 activated fragment of caspase-3 by cancer cells in response to Fv-FOXP3 and inhibition of cell killing by the caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK. Fv-FOXP3 treatment resulted in clinically significant reduction in tumor burden in a syngeneic model of colon cancer metastasis to liver in Balb/c mice. These results represent the first demonstration of effective full-length FOXP3 protein therapy and emphasize the clinical potential of mAb 3E10 as an intracellular and intranuclear delivery vehicle of FOXP3 for prevention and treatment of cancer metastasis.

  16. An Fcγ receptor-dependent mechanism drives antibody-mediated target-receptor signaling in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Nicholas S; Yang, Becky; Yang, Annie; Loeser, Stefanie; Marsters, Scot; Lawrence, David; Li, Yun; Pitti, Robert; Totpal, Klara; Yee, Sharon; Ross, Sarajane; Vernes, Jean-Michel; Lu, Yanmei; Adams, Cam; Offringa, Rienk; Kelley, Bob; Hymowitz, Sarah; Daniel, Dylan; Meng, Gloria; Ashkenazi, Avi

    2011-01-18

    Antibodies to cell-surface antigens trigger activatory Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated retrograde signals in leukocytes to control immune effector functions. Here, we uncover an FcγR mechanism that drives antibody-dependent forward signaling in target cells. Agonistic antibodies to death receptor 5 (DR5) induce cancer-cell apoptosis and are in clinical trials; however, their mechanism of action in vivo is not fully defined. Interaction of the DR5-agonistic antibody drozitumab with leukocyte FcγRs promoted DR5-mediated tumor-cell apoptosis. Whereas the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab required activatory FcγRs for tumoricidal function, drozitumab was effective in the context of either activatory or inhibitory FcγRs. A CD40-agonistic antibody required similar FcγR interactions to stimulate nuclear factor-κB activity in B cells. Thus, FcγRs can drive antibody-mediated receptor signaling in target cells.

  17. Antibody-Mediated Phosphatidylserine Blockade Enhances the Antitumor Responses to CTLA-4 and PD-1 Antibodies in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Freimark, Bruce D; Gong, Jian; Ye, Dan; Gray, Michael J; Nguyen, Van; Yin, Shen; Hatch, Michaela M S; Hughes, Christopher C W; Schroit, Alan J; Hutchins, Jeff T; Brekken, Rolf A; Huang, Xianming

    2016-06-01

    In tumor-bearing animals, the membrane phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS) suppresses immune responses, suggesting that PS signaling could counteract the antitumor effect of antibody-driven immune checkpoint blockade. Here, we show that treating melanoma-bearing mice with a PS-targeting antibody enhances the antitumor activity of downstream checkpoint inhibition. Combining PS-targeting antibodies with CTLA-4 or PD-1 blockade resulted in significantly greater inhibition of tumor growth than did single-agent therapy. Moreover, combination therapy enhanced CD4(+) and CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte numbers; elevated the fraction of cells expressing the proinflammatory cytokines IL2, IFNγ, and TNFα; and increased the ratio of CD8 T cells to myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells in tumors. Similar changes in immune cell profiles were observed in splenocytes. Taken together, these data show that antibody-mediated PS blockade enhances the antitumor efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibition. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 531-40. ©2016 AACR.

  18. Serum Therapy for Tuberculosis Revisited: Reappraisal of the Role of Antibody-Mediated Immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Glatman-Freedman, Aharona; Casadevall, Arturo

    1998-01-01

    Fifty years after the introduction of the first effective antimicrobial agents against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, this pathogen continues to be a tremendous public health problem. The rise in the number of resistant strains and the difficulties involved in the therapy of tuberculosis in immunocompromised AIDS patients have renewed the interest in the development of effective vaccines. To evaluate whether a potential vaccine against tuberculosis could prevent infection by eliciting a protective antibody response, we reviewed the history of antibody-mediated immunity against tuberculosis. Review of the literature of the past 100 years demonstrates that there is sufficient evidence to conclude that antibody-mediated immunity can modify the course of infection in certain situations. Based on our findings and on what is known in other systems, we propose that the role of antibody-mediated immunity to M. tuberculosis be reexamined, using advanced technology. PMID:9665981

  19. Back-stepping active disturbance rejection control design for integrated missile guidance and control system via reduced-order ESO.

    PubMed

    Xingling, Shao; Honglun, Wang

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a novel composite integrated guidance and control (IGC) law for missile intercepting against unknown maneuvering target with multiple uncertainties and control constraint. First, by using back-stepping technique, the proposed IGC law design is separated into guidance loop and control loop. The unknown target maneuvers and variations of aerodynamics parameters in guidance and control loop are viewed as uncertainties, which are estimated and compensated by designed model-assisted reduced-order extended state observer (ESO). Second, based on the principle of active disturbance rejection control (ADRC), enhanced feedback linearization (FL) based control law is implemented for the IGC model using the estimates generated by reduced-order ESO. In addition, performance analysis and comparisons between ESO and reduced-order ESO are examined. Nonlinear tracking differentiator is employed to construct the derivative of virtual control command in the control loop. Third, the closed-loop stability for the considered system is established. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed IGC law in enhanced interception performance such as smooth interception course, improved robustness against multiple uncertainties as well as reduced control consumption during initial phase are demonstrated through simulations. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nonlinear fractional order proportion-integral-derivative active disturbance rejection control method design for hypersonic vehicle attitude control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jia; Wang, Lun; Cai, Guobiao; Qi, Xiaoqiang

    2015-06-01

    Near space hypersonic vehicle model is nonlinear, multivariable and couples in the reentry process, which are challenging for the controller design. In this paper, a nonlinear fractional order proportion integral derivative (NFOPIλDμ) active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) strategy based on a natural selection particle swarm (NSPSO) algorithm is proposed for the hypersonic vehicle flight control. The NFOPIλDμ ADRC method consists of a tracking-differentiator (TD), an NFOPIλDμ controller and an extended state observer (ESO). The NFOPIλDμ controller designed by combining an FOPIλDμ method and a nonlinear states error feedback control law (NLSEF) is to overcome concussion caused by the NLSEF and conversely compensate the insufficiency for relatively simple and rough signal processing caused by the FOPIλDμ method. The TD is applied to coordinate the contradiction between rapidity and overshoot. By attributing all uncertain factors to unknown disturbances, the ESO can achieve dynamic feedback compensation for these disturbances and thus reduce their effects. Simulation results show that the NFOPIλDμ ADRC method can make the hypersonic vehicle six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear model track desired nominal signals accurately and fast, has good stability, dynamic properties and strong robustness against external environmental disturbances.

  1. Shifts in Nitrification Kinetics and Microbial Community during Bioaugmentation of Activated Sludge with Nitrifiers Enriched on Sludge Reject Water

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lifang; Peng, Dangcong; Pan, Ruiling

    2012-01-01

    This study used two laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) to evaluate the shifts in nitrification kinetics and microbial communities of an activated sludge sewage treatment system (main stream) during bioaugmentation with nitrifiers cultivated on real sludge reject water (side stream). Although bioaugmentation exerted a strong influence on the microbial community and the nitrification kinetics in the main stream, there was 58% of maximum ammonia uptake rate (AUR) and 80% of maximum nitrite uptake rate (NUR) loss of the seed source after bioaugmentation. In addition, nitrite accumulation occurred during bioaugmentation due to the unequal and asynchronous increase of the AUR (from 2.88 to 13.36 mg N/L·h) and NUR (from 0.76 to 4.34 mg N/L·h). FISH results showed that ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was inclined to be washed out with effluent in contrast to nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB), and Nitrosococcus mobilis lineage was the dominant AOB, while the dominant NOB in the main stream gradually transferred from Nitrospira to Nitrobacter. Nitrospina and Nitrococcus which existed in the seed source could not be detected in the main stream. It can be inferred that nitrite accumulation occurred due to the mismatch of NOB structure but washed out with effluent. PMID:23091354

  2. Are you being rejected or excluded? Insights from neuroimaging studies using different rejection paradigms.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Preethi

    2012-12-01

    Rejection sensitivity is the heightened tendency to perceive or anxiously expect disengagement from others during social interaction. There has been a recent wave of neuroimaging studies of rejection. The aim of the current review was to determine key brain regions involved in social rejection by selectively reviewing neuroimaging studies that employed one of three paradigms of social rejection, namely social exclusion during a ball-tossing game, evaluating feedback about preference from peers and viewing scenes depicting rejection during social interaction. Across the different paradigms of social rejection, there was concordance in regions for experiencing rejection, namely dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), subgenual ACC and ventral ACC. Functional dissociation between the regions for experiencing rejection and those for emotion regulation, namely medial prefrontal cortex, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) and ventral striatum, was evident in the positive association between social distress and regions for experiencing rejection and the inverse association between social distress and the emotion regulation regions. The paradigms of social exclusion and scenes depicting rejection in social interaction were more adept at evoking rejection-specific neural responses. These responses were varyingly influenced by the amount of social distress during the task, social support received, self-esteem and social competence. Presenting rejection cues as scenes of people in social interaction showed high rejection sensitive or schizotypal individuals to under-activate the dorsal ACC and VLPFC, suggesting that such individuals who perceive rejection cues in others down-regulate their response to the perceived rejection by distancing themselves from the scene.

  3. Influence of IgG Subclass on Human Antimannan Antibody-Mediated Resistance to Hematogenously Disseminated Candidiasis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nishiya, Casey T; Boxx, Gayle M; Robison, Kerry; Itatani, Carol; Kozel, Thomas R; Zhang, Mason X

    2015-11-16

    Candida albicans is a yeast-like pathogen and can cause life-threatening systemic candidiasis. Its cell surface is enriched with mannan that is resistant to complement activation. Previously, we developed the recombinant human IgG1 antimannan antibody M1g1. M1g1 was found to promote complement activation and phagocytosis and protect mice from systemic candidiasis. Here, we evaluate the influence of IgG subclass on antimannan antibody-mediated protection. Three IgG subclass variants of M1g1 were constructed: M1g2, M1g3, and M1g4. The IgG subclass identity for each variant was confirmed with DNA sequence and subclass-specific antibodies. These variants contain identical M1 Fabs and exhibited similar binding affinities for C. albicans yeast and purified mannan. Yeast cells and hyphae recovered from the kidney of antibody-treated mice with systemic candidiasis showed uniform binding of each variant, indicating constitutive expression of the M1 epitope and antibody opsonization in the kidney. All variants promoted deposition of both murine and human C3 onto the yeast cell surface, with M1g4 showing delayed activation, as determined by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. M1g4-mediated complement activation was found to be associated with its M1 Fab that activates the alternative pathway in an Fc-independent manner. Treatment with each subclass variant extended the survival of mice with systemic candidiasis (P < 0.001). However, treatment with M1g1, M1g3, or M1g4, but not with M1g2, also reduced the kidney fungal burden (P < 0.001). Thus, the role of human antimannan antibody in host resistance to systemic candidiasis is influenced by its IgG subclass.

  4. Early eradication of persistent Salmonella infection primes antibody-mediated protective immunity to recurrent infection.

    PubMed

    Johanns, Tanner M; Law, Calvin Y; Kalekar, Lokeshchandra A; O'Donnell, Hope; Ertelt, James M; Rowe, Jared H; Way, Sing Sing

    2011-04-01

    Typhoid fever is a systemic, persistent infection caused by host-specific strains of Salmonella. Although the use of antibiotics has reduced the complications associated with primary infection, recurrent infection remains an important cause of ongoing human morbidity and mortality. Herein, we investigated the impacts of antibiotic eradication of primary infection on protection against secondary recurrent infection. Using a murine model of persistent Salmonella infection, we demonstrate protection against recurrent infection is sustained despite early eradication of primary infection. In this model, protection is not mediated by CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells because depletion of these cells either alone or in combination prior to rechallenge does not abrogate protection. Instead, infection followed by antibiotic-mediated clearance primes robust levels of Salmonella-specific antibody that can adoptively transfer protection to naïve mice. Thus, eradication of persistent Salmonella infection primes antibody-mediated protective immunity to recurrent infection.

  5. A game of numbers: the stoichiometry of antibody-mediated neutralization of flavivirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Theodore C.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The humoral response contributes to the protection against viral pathogens. Although antibodies have the potential to inhibit viral infections via several mechanisms, an ability to neutralize viruses directly may be particularly important. Neutralizing antibody titers are commonly used as predictors of protection from infection, especially in the context of vaccine responses and immunity. Despite the simplicity of the concept, how antibody binding results in virus inactivation is incompletely understood despite decades of research. Flaviviruses have been an attractive system in which to seek a structural and quantitative understanding of how antibody interactions with virions modulate infection because of the contribution of antibodies to both protection and pathogenesis. This review will present a stoichiometric model of antibody-mediated neutralization of flaviviruses and discuss how these concepts can inform the development of vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics. PMID:25595803

  6. Maternal antibody decay and antibody-mediated immune responses in chicken pullets fed prebiotics and synbiotics.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, M; Munyaka, P; Yitbarek, A; Echeverry, H; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C

    2017-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of yeast-derived carbohydrates (YDC), and a blend of probiotics and YDC (synbiotic, SNB) on serum IgG concentration, maternal-derived antibody (MDA) decay, and specific antibody-mediated immune response in chick pullets following immunization with T-cell dependent antigens. A total of 300 day-old pullet chicks were randomly assigned to 3 dietary treatments including: a basal diet (Control), and diets containing YDC, and SNB (Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. casei, Streptococcus faecium, and Bacillus subtilis, and YDC). In experiment one, on d 1 and wk 3, 4, 5, and 6, blood samples were collected and serum were analyzed by ELISA for total IgG (Y), and MDA against Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). The second experiment examined the specific antibody against infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) in pullet chicks following vaccination against IBV at d 1. Finally, in experiment 3, on d 21 and 28 posthatch, 10 birds per treatment were immunized intramuscularly with both sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), and 11 after immunization serum samples were analyzed by hemagglutination assay for antibody response to SRBC, and by ELISA for serum IgM and IgG response to BSA. The results demonstrated that diet containing SNB increased serum IgG at wk 3 posthatch. However, the decay rate of MDA against NDV and IBDV were not affected by dietary treatments. Birds fed YDC showed higher specific antibody response against IBV in wk 4, while both diets containing YDC and SNB decreased antibody response to IBV in wk 6. In addition, specific antibody response against SRBC and BSA was not affected by diets. In conclusion, supplementation of diet with SNB improved humoral immunity by increasing IgG concentration in serum, and modulated the adaptive antibody-mediated immune response against IBV. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  7. Novel mutations in Marburg virus glycoprotein associated with viral evasion from antibody mediated immune pressure.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Masahiro; Nakayama, Eri; Marzi, Andrea; Igarashi, Manabu; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2013-04-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) and Ebola virus, members of the family Filoviridae, cause lethal haemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. Although the outbreaks are concentrated mainly in Central Africa, these viruses are potential agents of imported infectious diseases and bioterrorism in non-African countries. Recent studies demonstrated that non-human primates passively immunized with virus-specific antibodies were successfully protected against fatal filovirus infection, highlighting the important role of antibodies in protective immunity for this disease. However, the mechanisms underlying potential evasion from antibody mediated immune pressure are not well understood. To analyse possible mutations involved in immune evasion in the MARV envelope glycoprotein (GP) which is the major target of protective antibodies, we selected escape mutants of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) expressing MARV GP (rVSVΔG/MARVGP) by using two GP-specific mAbs, AGP127-8 and MGP72-17, which have been previously shown to inhibit MARV budding. Interestingly, several rVSVΔG/MARVGP variants escaping from the mAb pressure-acquired amino acid substitutions in the furin-cleavage site rather than in the mAb-specific epitopes, suggesting that these epitopes are recessed, not exposed on the uncleaved GP molecule, and therefore inaccessible to the mAbs. More surprisingly, some variants escaping mAb MGP72-17 lacked a large proportion of the mucin-like region of GP, indicating that these mutants efficiently escaped the selective pressure by deleting the mucin-like region including the mAb-specific epitope. Our data demonstrate that MARV GP possesses the potential to evade antibody mediated immune pressure due to extraordinary structural flexibility and variability.

  8. Hierarchical change in antioxidant enzyme gene expression and activity in acute cardiac rejection: role of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Nilakantan, Vani; Zhou, Xianghua; Hilton, Gail; Roza, Allan M; Adams, Mark B; Johnson, Christopher P; Pieper, Galen M

    2005-02-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen may mediate inflammation injury, but the status of the antioxidant defense system that might influence this process is unknown. In the present study, we examined the expression profile of the antioxidant enzymes, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in acutely rejecting cardiac allografts and the potential role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in modulating antioxidant gene expression and activity. Donor hearts from Lewis (isograft) or Wistar-Furth (allograft) rats were transplanted into Lewis recipient rats. A subset of the allografts received L-N6-(1-imino-ethyl) lysine (L-NIL), a specific iNOS inhibitor, beginning the day of surgery until the day of harvesting. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) protein levels were significantly decreased by postoperative day 4 (POD4) and postoperative day 5 (POD5), respectively, in allografts compared to isografts. While CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZn SOD) levels were unchanged, there was a 50% decrease in MnSOD protein in allografts at postoperative day 6 (POD6). The sequential loss in antioxidant protein levels was not due to transcriptional regulation since there was no change in RNA levels for any of the genes tested. L-NIL did not alter catalase protein; however, the loss of MnSOD protein at POD6 was prevented by L-NIL. Consistent with a decrease in antioxidant protein levels, there was a sequential loss in enzyme activity for MnSOD, catalase and GPX. L-NIL however, restored MnSOD and GPX activities but not catalase activity. Treatment with CsA restored both protein and enzyme activities of GPX and MnSOD but not catalase. These results indicate that the loss in MnSOD and GPX protein and activity in allografts occurs via an iNOS-dependent mechanism whereas the decrease in catalase appears to be iNOS-independent. This suggests a differential role for iNOS in regulating post-translational modification of individual antioxidant enzymes

  9. Regression of melanoma metastases after immunotherapy is associated with activation of antigen presentation and interferon-mediated rejection genes

    PubMed Central

    Carretero, Rafael; Wang, Ena; Rodriguez, Ana I.; Reinboth, Jennifer; Ascierto, Maria L.; Engle, Alyson M.; Liu, Hui; Camacho, Francisco M.; Marincola, Francesco M.; Garrido, Federico; Cabrera, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a comparative gene expression analysis of 15 metastases (10 regressing and 5 progressing) obtained from 2 melanoma patients with mixed response following different forms of immunotherapy. Whole genome transcriptional analysis clearly indicate that regression of melanoma metastases is due to an acute immune rejection mediated by the upregulation of genes involved in antigen presentation and interferon mediated response (STAT-1/IRF-1) in all the regressing metastases from both patients. In contrast, progressing metastases showed low transcription levels of genes involved in these pathways. Histological analysis showed T cells and HLA-DR positive infiltrating cells in the regressing but not in the progressing metastases. Quantitative expression analysis of HLA-A, B and C genes on microdisected tumoral regions indicate higher HLA expression in regressing than in progressing metastases. The molecular signature obtained in melanoma rejection appeared to be similar to that observed in other forms of immune-mediated tissue-specific rejection such as allograft, pathogen clearance, graft versus host or autoimmune disease, supporting the immunological constant of rejection. We favor the idea that the major factor determining the success or failure of immunotherapy is the nature of HLA Class I alterations in tumor cells and not the type of immunotherapy used. If the molecular alteration is reversible by the immunotherapy, the HLA expression will be upregulated and the lesion will be recognized and rejected. In contrast, if the defect is structural the MHC Class I expression will remain unchanged and the lesion will progress. PMID:21964766

  10. Biopsy-proven acute cellular rejection as an efficacy endpoint of randomized trials in liver transplantation: a systematic review and critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Perálvarez, Manuel; Rico-Juri, Jose M; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel; Burra, Patrizia; De la Mata, Manuel; Lerut, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Biopsy-proven acute cellular rejection (ACR) is the primary efficacy endpoint in most randomized trials evaluating immunosuppression in liver transplantation. However, ACR is not a major cause of graft loss, and a certain grade of immune activation may be even beneficial for long-term graft acceptance. Validated criteria to select candidates for liver biopsy are lacking, and routine clinical practice relies on liver tests, which are inaccurate markers of ACR. Indeed, both the agreement among clinicians to select candidates for liver biopsy and the correlation between the clinical suspicion of ACR and histological findings are poor. In randomized trials evaluating immunosuppression protocols, this concern grows exponentially due to the open-label and multicenter nature of most studies. Therefore, biopsy-proven ACR is a suboptimal efficacy endpoint given its limited impact on prognosis and the heterogeneous diagnosis, which may increase the risk of bias. Chronic rejection and/or graft loss would be more appropriate endpoints, but would certainly require larger studies with prolonged surveillances. An objective method to select candidates for liver biopsy is therefore urgently needed, and only severe episodes of histological ACR should be considered as potentially harmful. Emerging surrogate markers of ACR and antibody-mediated rejection require further investigation to determine their clinical role. © 2015 Steunstichting ESOT.

  11. Colostral antibody-mediated and cell-mediated immunity contributes to innate and antigen-specific immunity in piglets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Immunoglobulins and immune cells are critical components of colostral immunity; however, their transfer to and function in the neonate, especially maternal lymphocytes, is unclear. Cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immunity in sow blood and colostrum and piglet blood before (PS) and after (AS) suc...

  12. Target deletion of complement component 9 attenuates antibody-mediated hemolysis and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute shock in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaoyan; Ju, Jiyu; Lin, Zhijuan; Xiao, Weiling; Li, Xiaofang; Zhuang, Baoxiang; Zhang, Tingting; Ma, Xiaojun; Li, Xiangyu; Ma, Chao; Su, Weiliang; Wang, Yuqi; Qin, Xuebin; Liang, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Terminal complement membrane attack complex (MAC) formation is induced initially by C5b, followed by the sequential condensation of the C6, C7, C8. Polymerization of C9 to the C5b-8 complex forms the C5b-9 (or MAC). The C5b-9 forms lytic or non lytic pores in the cell membrane destroys membrane integrity. The biological functionalities of MAC has been previously investigated by using either the mice deficient in C5 and C6, or MAC’s regulator CD59. However, there is no available C9 deficient mice (mC9−/−) for directly dissecting the role of C5b-9 in the pathogenesis of human diseases. Further, since C5b-7 and C5b-8 complexes form non lytic pore, it may also plays biological functionality. To better understand the role of terminal complement cascades, here we report a successful generation of mC9−/−. We demonstrated that lack of C9 attenuates anti-erythrocyte antibody-mediated hemolysis or LPS-induced acute shock. Further, the rescuing effect on the acute shock correlates with the less release of IL-1β in mC9−/−, which is associated with suppression of MAC-mediated inflammasome activation in mC9−/−. Taken together, these results not only confirm the critical role of C5b-9 in complement-mediated hemolysis and but also highlight the critical role of C5b-9 in inflammasome activation. PMID:27444648

  13. Interleukin-1α Activity in Necrotic Endothelial Cells Is Controlled by Caspase-1 Cleavage of Interleukin-1 Receptor-2: IMPLICATIONS FOR ALLOGRAFT REJECTION.

    PubMed

    Burzynski, Laura C; Humphry, Melanie; Bennett, Martin R; Clarke, Murray C H

    2015-10-09

    Inflammation is a key instigator of the immune responses that drive atherosclerosis and allograft rejection. IL-1α, a powerful cytokine that activates both innate and adaptive immunity, induces vessel inflammation after release from necrotic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Similarly, IL-1α released from endothelial cells (ECs) damaged during transplant drives allograft rejection. However, IL-1α requires cleavage for full cytokine activity, and what controls cleavage in necrotic ECs is currently unknown. We find that ECs have very low levels of IL-1α activity upon necrosis. However, TNFα or IL-1 induces significant levels of active IL-1α in EC necrotic lysates without alteration in protein levels. Increased activity requires cleavage of IL-1α by calpain to the more active mature form. Immunofluorescence and proximity ligation assays show that IL-1α associates with interleukin-1 receptor-2, and this association is decreased by TNFα or IL-1 and requires caspase activity. Thus, TNFα or IL-1 treatment of ECs leads to caspase proteolytic activity that cleaves interleukin-1 receptor-2, allowing IL-1α dissociation and subsequent processing by calpain. Importantly, ECs could be primed by IL-1α from adjacent damaged VSMCs, and necrotic ECs could activate neighboring normal ECs and VSMCs, causing them to release inflammatory cytokines and up-regulate adhesion molecules, thus amplifying inflammation. These data unravel the molecular mechanisms and interplay between damaged ECs and VSMCs that lead to activation of IL-1α and, thus, initiation of adaptive responses that cause graft rejection. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Antibody-mediated immunotoxicity in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Smits, J E; Bortolotti, G R

    2001-02-23

    Antibody-mediated immune function in adult and recently fledged (30 to 33 d old) American kestrels (Falco sparverius) was examined in birds exposed directly, or only in ovo, to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In 1998, 9 mature male and 9 female kestrels were fed PCBs, whereas 9 females and 10 males served as controls. A mixture of Aroclors 1248:1254:1260 suspended in safflower oil was injected into the kestrels' food items, while in control diets only the same volume of oil was added. The dosage of PCBs was approximately 7 mg/kg kestrel/d, beginning in March 1998 and continuing for 120 d. In 1998, the antibody-mediated immune response was stimulated by immunization and booster vaccinations of the kestrels using a nonpathogenic antigen, dinitrophenol-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (DNP-KLH). In 1999, offspring from three treatment groups based upon maternal exposure to PCBs were similarly tested for their antibody response. None of these mothers was vaccinated with DNP-KLH the previous year. The maternal groups were: (1) exposed to PCBs in 1998 for 120 d, (2) exposed in ovo in 1998 (i.e., mothers were produced by PCB-exposed parents), or (3) unexposed to PCBs. Serum antibody levels were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In 1998, PCB-exposed adult females had a significantly higher antibody response than did controls, whereas adult males exposed to PCBs had significantly suppressed antibody production. For the nestlings produced in 1999, maternal treatment significantly affected antibody response. Generally, the antibody response in the nestlings was much lower than that seen in adult kestrels. Yet both male and female offspring from mothers that had been fed PCBs the previous year had significantly higher postbooster anti-DNP-KLH titers than control and in ovo-exposed maternal groups, thus mimicking the response seen in the adult females the previous year. These sex-specific responses in PCB-exposed birds provide further evidence of the

  15. Incidence of erythropoietin antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia: the Prospective Immunogenicity Surveillance Registry (PRIMS)

    PubMed Central

    Macdougall, Iain C.; Casadevall, Nicole; Locatelli, Francesco; Combe, Christian; London, Gerard M.; Di Paolo, Salvatore; Kribben, Andreas; Fliser, Danilo; Messner, Hans; McNeil, John; Stevens, Paul; Santoro, Antonio; De Francisco, Angel L.M.; Percheson, Paul; Potamianou, Anna; Foucher, Arnaud; Fife, Daniel; Mérit, Véronique; Vercammen, Els

    2015-01-01

    Background Subcutaneous administration of Eprex® (epoetin alfa) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) was contraindicated in the European Union between 2002 and 2006 after increased reports of anti-erythropoietin antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA). The Prospective Immunogenicity Surveillance Registry (PRIMS) was conducted to estimate the incidence of antibody-mediated PRCA with subcutaneous administration of a new coated-stopper syringe presentation of Eprex® and to compare this with the PRCA incidence with subcutaneous NeoRecormon® (epoetin beta) and Aranesp® (darbepoetin alfa). Methods PRIMS was a multicentre, multinational, non-interventional, parallel-group, immunogenicity surveillance registry. Adults with CKD receiving or about to initiate subcutaneous Eprex®, NeoRecormon® or Aranesp® for anaemia were enrolled and followed for up to 3 years. Unexplained loss or lack of effect (LOE), including suspected PRCA, was reported, with antibody testing for confirmation of PRCA. Results Of the 15 333 patients enrolled, 5948 received Eprex® (8377 patient-years) and 9356 received NeoRecormon®/Aranesp® (14 286 patient-years). No treatment data were available for 29 patients. Among 23 patients with LOE, five cases of PRCA were confirmed (Eprex®, n = 3; NeoRecormon®, n = 1; Aranesp®, n = 1). Based on exposed time, PRCA incidence was 35.8/100 000 patient-years (95% CI 7.4–104.7) for Eprex® versus 14.0/100 000 patient-years (95% CI 1.7–50.6) for NeoRecormon®/Aranesp®. The incidence of PRCA with Eprex® was not significantly different versus comparator ESAs (rate ratio: 2.56; 95% CI 0.43–15.31). An analysis based on observed time produced similar findings. Conclusion This large, prospective registry demonstrates that PRCA is rare with subcutaneous administration of either the new coated-stopper syringe presentation of Eprex®, or NeoRecormon® or Aranesp®. PMID:25239637

  16. Effector Mechanisms of Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Aurélie; Varey, Emilie; Anegon, Ignacio; Cuturi, Maria-Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Organ transplantation appears today to be the best alternative to replace the loss of vital organs induced by various diseases. Transplants can, however, also be rejected by the recipient. In this review, we provide an overview of the mechanisms and the cells/molecules involved in acute and chronic rejections. T cells and B cells mainly control the antigen-specific rejection and act either as effector, regulatory, or memory cells. On the other hand, nonspecific cells such as endothelial cells, NK cells, macrophages, or polymorphonuclear cells are also crucial actors of transplant rejection. Last, beyond cells, the high contribution of antibodies, chemokines, and complement molecules in graft rejection is discussed in this article. The understanding of the different components involved in graft rejection is essential as some of them are used in the clinic as biomarkers to detect and quantify the level of rejection. PMID:24186491

  17. A rapid and quantitative assay for measuring antibody-mediated neutralization of West Nile virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, Theodore C. . E-mail: piersontc@mail.nih.gov; Sanchez, Melissa D.; Puffer, Bridget A.; Ahmed, Asim A.; Geiss, Brian J.; Valentine, Laura E.; Altamura, Louis A.; Diamond, Michael S.; Doms, Robert W. . E-mail: doms@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-03-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurotropic flavivirus within the Japanese encephalitis antigenic complex that is responsible for causing West Nile encephalitis in humans. The surface of WNV virions is covered by a highly ordered icosahedral array of envelope proteins that is responsible for mediating attachment and fusion with target cells. These envelope proteins are also primary targets for the generation of neutralizing antibodies in vivo. In this study, we describe a novel approach for measuring antibody-mediated neutralization of WNV infection using virus-like particles that measure infection as a function of reporter gene expression. These reporter virus particles (RVPs) are produced by complementation of a sub-genomic replicon with WNV structural proteins provided in trans using conventional DNA expression vectors. The precision and accuracy of this approach stem from an ability to measure the outcome of the interaction between antibody and viral antigens under conditions that satisfy the assumptions of the law of mass action as applied to virus neutralization. In addition to its quantitative strengths, this approach allows the production of WNV RVPs bearing the prM-E proteins of different WNV strains and mutants, offering considerable flexibility for the study of the humoral immune response to WNV in vitro. WNV RVPs are capable of only a single round of infection, can be used under BSL-2 conditions, and offer a rapid and quantitative approach for detecting virus entry and its inhibition by neutralizing antibody.

  18. Subclinical temporal EEG seizure pattern in LGI1-antibody-mediated encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Steriade, Claude; Mirsattari, Seyed M; Murray, Brian J; Wennberg, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Leucine-rich glioma inactived-1 (LGI1) antibodies are associated with limbic encephalitis and distinctive seizure types, which are typically immunotherapy-responsive. Although nonspecific electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities are commonly seen, specific EEG characteristics are not currently understood to be useful for suspecting the clinical diagnosis. Based on initial observations in two patients, we analyzed the clinical features and EEG recordings in a larger series of patients (n = 9) and describe a novel ictal pattern that can suggest the diagnosis of LGI1-antibody-mediated encephalitis, even in the absence of typical clinical features. As expected, psychiatric and cognitive symptoms were common, as were tonic seizures associated with EEG electrodecremental events (often with the so-called faciobrachial dystonic semiology). Remarkably, in five patients, a near absence of interictal epileptiform discharges contrasted with frequent subclinical temporal lobe seizures, at times triggered by hyperventilation. This latter EEG pattern may facilitate early diagnosis of this serious but potentially treatable condition. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  19. Antibody-mediated Impairment and Homeostatic Plasticity of Autonomic Ganglionic Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhengbei; Low, Phillip A.; Vernino, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Antibodies against ganglionic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) are implicated as the cause of autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG). To characterize ganglionic neurotransmission in an animal model of AAG, evoked and spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic potentials (EPSP) were recorded from neurons in isolated mouse superior cervical ganglia (SCG). In vitro exposure of ganglia to IgG from AAG patients progressively inhibited synaptic transmission. After passive transfer of antibody to mice, evoked EPSP amplitude decreased, and some neurons showed no synaptic responses. EPSP amplitude recovered by day seven despite persistence of ganglionic AChR antibody in the mouse serum. There was a more persistent (at least 14 day) reduction in miniature EPSP amplitude consistent with antibody-mediated reduction in post-synaptic AChR. Although the quantal size was reduced, a progressive increase in the frequency of spontaneous synaptic events occurred, suggesting a compensatory increase in presynaptic efficacy. The quantal size returned to baseline by 21 days while the frequency remained increased for at least four weeks. Ganglionic AChR antibodies cause an impairment of autonomic ganglionic synaptic transmission. Homeostatic plasticity in autonomic neurotransmission could help explain the spontaneous clinical recovery seen in some AAG patients and may also play an important role in regulating normal autonomic reflexes. PMID:20044994

  20. Structural insight into antibody-mediated antagonism of the Glucagon-like peptide-1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Hennen, Stephanie; Kodra, János T; Soroka, Vladyslav; Krogh, Berit O; Wu, Xiaoai; Kaastrup, Peter; Ørskov, Cathrine; Rønn, Sif G; Schluckebier, Gerd; Barbateskovic, Silvia; Gandhi, Prafull S; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-05-19

    The Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and a well-established target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of GLP-1R is important for GLP-1 binding and the crystal structure of the GLP-1/ECD complex was reported previously. The first structure of a class B GPCR transmembrane (TM) domain was solved recently, but the full length receptor structure is still not well understood. Here we describe the molecular details of antibody-mediated antagonism of the GLP-1R using both in vitro pharmacology and x-ray crystallography. We showed that the antibody Fab fragment (Fab 3F52) blocked the GLP-1 binding site of the ECD directly and thereby acts as a competitive antagonist of native GLP-1. Interestingly, Fab 3F52 also blocked a short peptide agonist believed to engage primarily the transmembrane and extracellular loop region of GLP-1R, whereas functionality of an allosteric small-molecule agonist was not inhibited. This study has implications for the structural understanding of the GLP-1R and related class B GPCRs, which is important for the development of new and improved therapeutics targeting these receptors.

  1. Structural insight into antibody-mediated antagonism of the Glucagon-like peptide-1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hennen, Stephanie; Kodra, János T.; Soroka, Vladyslav; Krogh, Berit O.; Wu, Xiaoai; Kaastrup, Peter; Ørskov, Cathrine; Rønn, Sif G.; Schluckebier, Gerd; Barbateskovic, Silvia; Gandhi, Prafull S.; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and a well-established target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of GLP-1R is important for GLP-1 binding and the crystal structure of the GLP-1/ECD complex was reported previously. The first structure of a class B GPCR transmembrane (TM) domain was solved recently, but the full length receptor structure is still not well understood. Here we describe the molecular details of antibody-mediated antagonism of the GLP-1R using both in vitro pharmacology and x-ray crystallography. We showed that the antibody Fab fragment (Fab 3F52) blocked the GLP-1 binding site of the ECD directly and thereby acts as a competitive antagonist of native GLP-1. Interestingly, Fab 3F52 also blocked a short peptide agonist believed to engage primarily the transmembrane and extracellular loop region of GLP-1R, whereas functionality of an allosteric small-molecule agonist was not inhibited. This study has implications for the structural understanding of the GLP-1R and related class B GPCRs, which is important for the development of new and improved therapeutics targeting these receptors. PMID:27196125

  2. Immunization with heat-killed Francisella tularensis LVS elicits protective antibody-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Lavine, Christy L; Clinton, Shawn R; Angelova-Fischer, Irena; Marion, Tony N; Bina, Xiaowen R; Bina, James E; Whitt, Michael A; Miller, Mark A

    2007-11-01

    Francisella tularensis (FT) has been classified by the CDC as a category A pathogen because of its high virulence and the high mortality rate associated with infection via the aerosol route. Because there is no licensed vaccine available for FT, development of prophylactic and therapeutic regimens for the prevention/treatment of infection is a high priority. In this report, heat-killed FT live vaccine strain (HKLVS) was employed as a vaccine immunogen, either alone or in combination with an adjuvant, and was found to elicit protective immunity against high-dose FT live vaccine strain (FTLVS) challenge. FT-specific antibodies produced in response to immunization with HKLVS alone were subsequently found to completely protect naive mice against high-dose FT challenge in both infection-interference and passive immunization experiments. Additional passive immunization trials employing serum collected from mice immunized with a heat-killed preparation of an O-antigen-deficient transposon mutant of FTLVS (HKLVS-OAg(neg)) yielded similar results. These findings demonstrated that FT-specific antibodies alone can confer immunity against high-dose FTLVS challenge, and they reveal that antibody-mediated protection is not dependent upon production of LPS-specific antibodies.

  3. Acute Rejection Phenotypes in the Current Era of Immunosuppression: A Single-Center Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wehmeier, Caroline; Amico, Patrizia; Hirt-Minkowski, Patricia; Georgalis, Argyrios; Höenger, Gideon; Menter, Thomas; Mihatsch, Michael; Burkhalter, Felix; Steiger, Juerg; Dickenmann, Michael; Hopfer, Helmut; Schaub, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background Besides ‘definitive rejection’, the Banff classification includes categories for ‘suspicious for rejection’ phenotypes. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and phenotypes of rejection episodes in 316 consecutive renal transplants from 2009 to 2014 grouped into patients without/with pretransplant HLA-DSA (ptDSAneg, n = 251; ptDSApos, n = 65). Methods All adequate indication (n = 125) and surveillance biopsies (n = 538) performed within the first year posttransplant were classified according to the current Banff criteria. Results ‘Suspicious for rejection’ phenotypes were 3 times more common than ‘definitive rejection’ phenotypes in biopsies from ptDSAneg patients (35% vs 11%) and equally common in biopsies from ptDSApos patients (25% vs 27%). In both groups, ‘suspicious for rejection’ phenotypes were more frequent in surveillance than in indication biopsies (28% vs 16% in ptDSAneg patients, and 37% vs 29% in ptDSApos patients). ‘Borderline changes: ‘Suspicious' for acute T-cell mediated rejection’ (91%) were the dominant ‘suspicious for rejection’ phenotype in ptDSAneg patients, whereas ‘borderline changes’ (58%) and ‘suspicious for acute/active antibody-mediated rejection’ (42%) were equally frequent in biopsies from ptDSApos patients. Inclusion of ‘suspicious for rejection’ phenotypes increased the 1-year incidence of clinical (ptDSAneg patients: 18% vs 8%, P = 0.0005; ptDSApos patients: 24% vs 18%, P = 0.31) and (sub)clinical rejection (ptDSAneg patients: 59% vs 22%, P < 0.0001; ptDSApos patients: 68% vs 40%, P = 0.004). Conclusions ‘Suspicious for rejection’ phenotypes are very common in the current era and outnumber the frequency of ‘definitive rejection’ within the first year posttransplant. PMID:28361120

  4. Escaping from Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Raymond J.; Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Those engaged in clinical transplantation and transplantation immunology have always taken as a central objective the elucidation of means to prevent graft rejection by the recipient immune system. Conceptually, such mechanisms stem from the concept of Paul Ehrlich that all organisms can selectively avoid autotoxicity; i.e. they exhibit horror autotoxicus. Some mechanisms of horror autotoxicus now understood. T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes recognize foreign antigens but not some auto-antigens. Clonal deletion generates lacunae in what is otherwise a virtually limitless potential to recognize antigens. We call this mechanism structural tolerance. Where imperfections in structural tolerance allow self-recognition, the full activation of lymphocytes and generation of effector activity depends on delivery of accessory signals generated by infection and/or injury. The absence of accessory signals prevents or even suppresses immunological responses. We call this dichotomy of responsiveness conditional tolerance. When, despite structural and conditional tolerance, effector activity perturbs autologous cells, metabolism changes in ways that protect against injury. We use the term accommodation to refer to this acquired protection against injury. Structural and conditional tolerance and accommodation overlap in such a way that potentially toxic products can be generated to control microorganisms and neutralize toxins without overly damaging adjacent cells. The central challenge in transplantation, then, should be the orchestration of structural and conditional tolerance and accommodation in such a way that toxic products can still be generated for defense while preserving graft function and survival. Since the earliest days of transplantation, immunobiologists have sought means by which to prevent recognition and rejection of foreign tissue. The goal of these strategies is the retention of recipient immune function while selectively avoiding graft injury. While

  5. Antibody-mediated p53 protein therapy prevents liver metastasis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James E; Fischer, Laurice K; Chan, Grace; Chang, Sophia S; Baldwin, Scott W; Aragon, Robert J; Carter, Jacqueline J; Lilly, Michael; Nishimura, Robert N; Weisbart, Richard H; Reeves, Mark E

    2007-02-15

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3E10 Fv antibody-mediated p53 protein therapy, an Fv-p53 fusion protein produced in Pichia pastoris was tested on CT26.CL25 colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo in a mouse model of colon cancer metastasis to the liver. In vitro experiments showed killing of CT26.CL25 cells by Fv-p53 but not Fv or p53 alone, and immunohistochemical staining confirmed that Fv was required for transport of p53 into cells. Prevention of liver metastasis in vivo was tested by splenic injection of 100 nmol/L Fv-p53 10 min and 1 week after injection of CT26.CL25 cancer cells into the portal vein of BALB/c mice. Mice were sacrificed 1 week after the second injection of Fv-p53 and assigned a quantitative metastasis score. Control mice had an average metastasis score of 3.3 +/- 1.3, whereas mice treated with Fv-p53 had an average metastasis score of 0.8 +/- 0.4 (P = 0.004). These results indicate that Fv-p53 treatment had a profound effect on liver metastasis and represent the first demonstration of effective full-length p53 protein therapy in vivo. mAb 3E10 Fv has significant clinical potential as a mediator of intracellular and intranuclear delivery of p53 for prevention and treatment of cancer metastasis.

  6. A reappraisal of humoral immunity based on mechanisms of antibody-mediated protection against intracellular pathogens.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2006-01-01

    Sometime in the mid to late twentieth century the study of antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) entered the doldrums, as many immunologists believed that the function of AMI was well understood, and was no longer deserving of intensive investigation. However, beginning in the 1990s studies using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) revealed new functions for antibodies, including direct antimicrobial effects and their ability to modify host inflammatory and cellular responses. Furthermore, the demonstration that mAbs to several intracellular bacterial and fungal pathogens were protective issued a serious challenge to the paradigm that host defense against such microbes was strictly governed by cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Hence, a new view of AMI is emerging. This view is based on the concept that a major function of antibody (Ab) is to amplify or subdue the inflammatory response to a microbe. In this regard, the "damage-response framework" of microbial pathogenesis provides a new conceptual viewpoint for understanding mechanisms of AMI. According to this view, the ability of an Ab to affect the outcome of a host-microbe interaction is a function of its capacity to modify the damage ensuing from such an interaction. In fact, it is increasingly apparent that the efficacy of an Ab cannot be defined either by immunoglobulin or epitope characteristics alone, but rather by a complex function of Ab variables, such as specificity, isotype, and amount, host variables, such as genetic background and immune status, and microbial variables, such as inoculum, mechanisms of avoiding host immune surveillance and pathogenic strategy. Consequently, far from being understood, recent findings in AMI imply a system with unfathomable complexity and the field is poised for a long overdue renaissance.

  7. Utilization of cholera toxin B as a mucosal adjuvant elicits antibody-mediated protection against S. pneumoniae infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wiedinger, Kari; Pinho, Daniel; Bitsaktsis, Constantine

    2017-01-01

    adoptive transfer passively protected animals against subsequent challenge while IFN-γ neutralization had no impact on the outcome of immunization, suggesting a primary role for antibody-mediated protection in the context of this immunization strategy. Conclusion: Mucosal immunization with CTB and PspA induced a local cellular immune response and systemic humoral immunity which resulted in effective reduction of pulmonary bacterial burden and complete protection against S. pneumoniae challenge. While induction of the pleiotropic cytokine IFN-γ likely contributes to control of infection through activation of effector pathways, it was not required for protection. Instead, immunization with PspA and CTB-induced S. pneumoniae-specific antibodies in the serum prior to infection that were sufficient to protect against mucosal challenge. PMID:28344805

  8. Regulation of anti-HLA antibody-dependent natural killer cell activation by immunosuppressive agents.

    PubMed

    Shin, Bong-Ha; Ge, Shili; Mirocha, James; Karasyov, Artur; Vo, Ashley; Jordan, Stanley C; Toyoda, Mieko

    2014-02-15

    It was demonstrated that human natural killer (NK) cells, via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC)-like mechanism, increase IFNγ production after exposure to alloantigens. This finding was associated with an increased risk for antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Although the effects of various immunosuppressive drugs on T cells and B cells have been extensively studied, their effects on NK cells are less clear. This study reports the effect of immunosuppressive agents on antibody-mediated NK cell activation in vitro. Whole blood from normal individuals was incubated with irradiated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) pretreated with anti-HLA antibody+ sera (in vitro ADCC), with or without immunosuppressive agents. The %IFNγ+ and CD107a+ (degranulation marker) in CD56+ NK cells were enumerated by flow cytometry. Cyclosporine A and tacrolimus significantly reduced IFNγ production in a dose-dependent manner (53%-83%), but showed minimal effect on degranulation (20%). Prednisone significantly reduced both IFNγ production and degranulation (50%-66% reduction at maximum therapeutic levels). Calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) in combination with prednisone additively suppressed IFNγ production and degranulation. The effect of sirolimus or mycophenolate mofetil on NK cells was minimal. These results suggest that potent suppressive effects of CNIs and prednisone on antibody-mediated NK cell activation may contribute to the reduction of ADCC in sensitized patients and possibly reduce the risk for ADCC-mediated ABMR. These further underscore the importance of medication compliance in prevention of ABMR and possibly chronic rejection, and suggest that ADCC-mediated injury may increase in strategies aimed at CNI or steroid minimization or avoidance.

  9. Antibody-mediated immunity in CFW mice infected with Mycobacterium lepraemurium. Humoral immune response in murine leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Espinosa, O; Casoluengo-Méndez, M; Díaz, G V

    1976-01-01

    A depression in antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) measured both in terms of circulating antibody and plaque-forming cells in the spleen was observed in CFW mice infected with M. lepraemurium when sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and human gammaglobulin (HGG) were used as antigens. The impairment in AMI was evident only after 75 days of infection thereafter the antibody response to SRBC antigen progressively decreased until the last day of experimentation (135 days). Within the first 60 days of infection no alteration in AMI was observed with the HGG antigen while the response to the SRBC antigen was significantly higher in the infected animals than in uninfected controls. PMID:795574

  10. Antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) on switching from darbepoetin alfa to epoetin beta: what are the implications?

    PubMed Central

    Assunção, José; Vinhas, José

    2008-01-01

    We report the development of antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) in a 63-year-old man with end-stage renal disease following a switch from darbepoetin alfa to epoetin beta. Haemoglobin levels began to decrease 6 months after the switch. Increasing the epoetin beta dose produced no response and regular blood transfusions were required; PRCA was confirmed and epoetin beta was discontinued. The patient responded positively to immunosuppression; after 2 months on prednisone and cyclophosphamide, haemoglobin levels stabilized and no further transfusions were required. This case highlights the difficulty in establishing a cause-effect relationship where more than one erythropoiesis-stimulating agent is involved. PMID:25983889

  11. Antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) on switching from darbepoetin alfa to epoetin beta: what are the implications?

    PubMed

    Assunção, José; Vinhas, José

    2008-08-01

    We report the development of antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) in a 63-year-old man with end-stage renal disease following a switch from darbepoetin alfa to epoetin beta. Haemoglobin levels began to decrease 6 months after the switch. Increasing the epoetin beta dose produced no response and regular blood transfusions were required; PRCA was confirmed and epoetin beta was discontinued. The patient responded positively to immunosuppression; after 2 months on prednisone and cyclophosphamide, haemoglobin levels stabilized and no further transfusions were required. This case highlights the difficulty in establishing a cause-effect relationship where more than one erythropoiesis-stimulating agent is involved.

  12. Structural Insights into the Mechanisms of Antibody-Mediated Neutralization of Flavivirus Infection: Implications for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Theodore C.; Fremont, Daved H.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Flaviviruses are a group of small RNA viruses that cause severe disease in humans worldwide and are the target of several vaccine development programs. A primary goal of these efforts is to elicit a protective humoral response directed against the envelope proteins arrayed on the surface of the flavivirus virion. Advances in the structural biology of these viruses has catalyzed rapid progress toward understanding the complexity of the flavivirus immunogen and the molecular basis of antibody-mediated neutralization. These insights have identified factors that govern the potency of neutralizing antibodies and will inform the design and evaluation of novel vaccines. PMID:18779049

  13. Analysis of Sera of Recipients with Allograft Rejection Indicates That Keratin 1 Is the Target of Anti-Endothelial Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xuli; Hu, Juan; Luo, Weiguang; Luo, Qizhi; Guo, Jing; Tian, Fang; Ming, Yingzi

    2017-01-01

    Anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECAs) are usually directed against the surface antigens on the vascular endothelial cells. Clinical studies suggest a pathogenic role for nonhuman leukocyte antigen in antibody-mediated rejection; however, the antigens on the donor vascular endothelium that serve as the first-line targets for an immune response during allograft rejection have not been fully identified. Here, we used immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to identify antigens from the sera of kidney transplant recipients who were experiencing antibody-mediated rejection. Keratin 1 (KRT1) was identified as a novel antigenic target expressed on endothelial cells. To validate our finding, we produced recombinant proteins representing the three most common alleles of KRT1. The serum used for immunoprecipitation showed a strong reaction to KRT1 recombinants in western blot and ELISA. In the kidney transplant cohort, more AECA-positive recipients than AECA-negative recipients had KRT1 antibodies (32.2% versus 11.9%, p = 0.002). Sera from 255 renal recipients were tested by ELISA. Of the 77 recipients with deteriorating graft function (serum creatinine > 120 μmol/L), 23 had anti-KRT1 antibodies. KRT1-IgG positivity was, therefore, associated with a higher risk of kidney transplant rejection (29.9% (23/77) versus 16.9% (30/178), p = 0.0187). A better understanding of this antigenic target will improve long-term allograft survival. PMID:28265584

  14. Transfusion-induced bone marrow transplant rejection due to minor histocompatibility antigens.

    PubMed

    Patel, Seema R; Zimring, James C

    2013-10-01

    Traditionally, alloimmunization to transfused blood products has focused exclusively on recipient antibodies recognizing donor alloantigens present on the cell surface. Accordingly, the immunologic sequelae of alloimmunization have been antibody mediated effects (ie, hemolytic transfusion reactions, platelet refractoriness, anti-HLA and anti-HNA effects, etc). However, in addition to the above sequelae, there is also a correlation between the number of antecedent transfusions in humans and the rate of bone marrow transplant (BMT) rejection-under reduced intensity conditioning with HLA-matched or HLA-identical marrow. Bone marrow transplant of this nature is the only existing cure for a series of nonmalignant hematologic diseases (eg, sickle cell disease, thalassemias, etc); however, rejection remains a clinical problem. It has been hypothesized that transfusion induces subsequent BMT rejection through immunization. Studies in animal models have observed the same effect and have demonstrated that transfusion-induced BMT rejection can occur in response to alloimmunization. However, unlike traditional antibody responses, sensitization in this case results in cellular immune effects, involving populations such as T cell or natural killer cells. In this case, rejection occurs in the absence of alloantibodies and would not be detected by existing immune-hematologic methods. We review human and animal studies in light of the hypothesis that, for distinct clinical populations, enhanced rejection of BMT may be an unappreciated adverse consequence of transfusion, which current blood bank methodologies are unable to detect. © 2013.

  15. Revisiting traditional risk factors for rejection and graft loss after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dunn, T B; Noreen, H; Gillingham, K; Maurer, D; Ozturk, O G; Pruett, T L; Bray, R A; Gebel, H M; Matas, A J

    2011-10-01

    Single-antigen bead (SAB) testing permits reassessment of immunologic risk for kidney transplantation. Traditionally, high panel reactive antibody (PRA), retransplant and deceased donor (DD) grafts have been associated with increased risk. We hypothesized that this risk was likely mediated by (unrecognized) donor-specific antibody (DSA). We grouped 587 kidney transplants using clinical history and single-antigen bead (SAB) testing of day of transplant serum as (1) unsensitized; PRA = 0 (n = 178), (2) third-party sensitized; no DSA (n = 363) or (3) donor sensitized; with DSA (n = 46), and studied rejection rates, death-censored graft survival (DCGS) and risk factors for rejection. Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) rates were increased with DSA (p < 0.0001), but not with panel reactive antibody (PRA) in the absence of DSA. Cell-mediated rejection (CMR) rates were increased with DSA (p < 0.005); with a trend to increased rates when PRA>0 in the absence of DSA (p = 0.08). Multivariate analyses showed risk factors for AMR were DSA, worse HLA matching, and female gender; for CMR: DSA, PRA>0 and worse HLA matching. AMR and CMR were associated with decreased DCGS. The presence of DSA is an important predictor of rejection risk, in contrast to traditional risk factors. Further development of immunosuppressive protocols will be facilitated by stratification of rejection risk by donor sensitization. ©2011 The Authors Journal compilation©2011 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  16. Revisiting Traditional Risk Factors for Rejection and Graft Loss after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, TB; Noreen, H; Gillingham, K; Maurer, D; Ozturk, O. Goruroglu; Pruett, TL; Bray, RA; Gebel, HM; Matas, AJ

    2011-01-01

    Single antigen bead (SAB) testing permits reassessment of immunologic risk for kidney transplantation. Traditionally, high panel reactive antibody (PRA), retransplant and deceased donor (DD) grafts have been associated with increased risk. We hypothesized that this risk was likely mediated by (unrecognized) donor-specific antibody (DSA). We grouped 587 kidney transplants using clinical history and SAB testing of day of transplant serum as 1) unsensitized; PRA=0 (n= 178), 2) 3rd party sensitized; no DSA (n=363), or 3) donor sensitized; with DSA (n=46), and studied rejection rates, death censored graft survival (DCGS), and risk factors for rejection. Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) rates were increased with DSA (p<0.0001), but not with PRA in the absence of DSA. Cell-mediated rejection (CMR) rates were increased with DSA (p<0.005); with a trend to increased rates when PRA>0 in the absence of DSA (p=0.08). Multivariate analyses showed risk factors for AMR were DSA, worse HLA matching, and female gender; for CMR: DSA, PRA>0 and worse HLA matching. AMR and CMR were associated with decreased DCGS. The presence of DSA is an important predictor of rejection risk, in contrast to traditional risk factors. Further development of immunosuppressive protocols will be facilitated by stratification of rejection risk by donor sensitization. PMID:21812918

  17. Transfusion Induced Bone Marrow Transplant Rejection Due to Minor Histocompatibility Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Seema R; Zimring, James C

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, alloimmunization to transfused blood products has focused exclusively upon recipient antibodies recognizing donor alloantigens present on the cell surface. Accordingly, the immunological sequelae of alloimmunization have been antibody mediated effects (i.e. hemolytic transfusion reactions, platelet refractoriness, anti-HLA and anti-HNA effects, etc.). However, in addition to the above sequelae, there is also a correlation between the number of antecedent transfusions in humans and the rate of bone marrow transplant (BMT) rejection - under reduced intensity conditioning with HLA matched or HLA identical marrow. BMT of this nature is the only existing cure for a series of non-malignant hematological diseases (e.g. sickle cell disease, thalassemias, etc.); however, rejection remains a clinical problem. It has been hypothesized that transfusion induces subsequent BMT rejection through immunization. Studies in animal models have observed the same effect and have demonstrated that transfusion induced BMT rejection can occur in response to alloimmunization. However, unlike traditional antibody responses, sensitization in this case results in cellular immune effects, involving populations such as T cell or NK cells. In this case, rejection occurs in the absence of alloantibodies, and would not be detected by existing immune-hematological methods. We review human and animal studies in light of the hypothesis that, for distinct clinical populations, enhanced rejection of BMT may be an unappreciated adverse consequence of transfusion which current blood bank methodologies are unable to detect. PMID:24090731

  18. Substitution of the precursor peptide prevents anti-prM antibody-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Si, Lu-Lu; Guo, Xiao-Lan; Cui, Guo-Hui; Fang, Dan-Yun; Zhou, Jun-Mei; Yan, Hui-Jun; Jiang, Li-Fang

    2017-02-02

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is currently considered as the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of severe dengue disease. Many studies have shown that precursor (pr) peptide-specific antibodies do not efficiently neutralize infection but potently promote ADE of dengue virus (DENV) infection. To explore the effect of pr peptide substitution on neutralization and ADE of DENV infection, the rabbit anti-prM polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) and anti-JEVpr/DENV-M pAbs were prepared, and the neutralization and ADE of these two pAbs were further compared. Here, we report that both anti-JEVpr/DENV-M and anti-prM pAbs exhibited broad cross-reactivity and only partial neutralization with four DENV serotypes and immature DENV. Rabbit anti-prM pAbs showed a significant enhancement in a broad range of serum dilutions. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the enhancing activity of rabbit anti-JEVpr/DENV-M pAbs at various levels of dilution. These results demonstrate that anti-prM antibody-mediated ADE can be prevented by JEV pr peptide replacement. The present study contribute further to research on the pathogenesis of DENV infection.

  19. Monoclonal antibody-mediated clean-up procedure for the high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of chloramphenicol in milk and eggs.

    PubMed

    van de Water, C; Tebbal, D; Haagsma, N

    1989-09-08

    A simple, rapid and specific sample preparation method based on antibody-mediated clean-up for the determination of chloramphenicol (CAP) in milk and eggs was developed. Skimmed milk and centrifuged egg homogenates were filtered and directly applied to immunoaffinity columns which were prepared by coupling monoclonal antibodies against CAP to a carbonyldiimidazole-activated support. Using a 0.2 M glycine, 0.5 M NaCl (pH 2.8) solution as an eluent, the immunoaffinity columns can be used more than 30 times without a decrease in column capacity. In subsequent high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis, no matrix interferences were observed. Good recoveries were obtained at spiking levels of 1-100 micrograms kg-1. Due to the high specificity of the clean-up procedure, the limit of detection can be lowered by increasing the test portion. Concerning milk, the limit of detection was successfully lowered to 20 ng kg-1 by increasing the test portion to 11 (recovery 99%). The method was applied to eggs produced by hens treated with CAP. The results are compared with those obtained by solid-phase extraction using silica gel.

  20. The Perfect Storm: HLA Antibodies, Complement, FcγRs and Endothelium in Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Kimberly A.; Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in solid organ transplants is multi-faceted and predominantly caused by antibodies directed against polymorphic donor human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Despite the clearly detrimental impact of HLA antibodies (HLA-Ab) on graft function and survival, the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of AMR remain a challenge. Histological manifestations of AMR reflect signatures of HLA-Ab-triggered injury, specifically endothelial changes, recipient leukocytic infiltrate, and complement deposition. We review the interconnected mechanisms of HLA-Ab-mediated injury that might synergize in a “perfect storm” of inflammation. Characterization of antibody features that are critical for effector functions may help identify HLA-Ab more likely to cause rejection. We also highlight recent advancements that may pave the way for new, more effective therapeutics. PMID:25801125

  1. Winter activity patterns of American martens (Martes americana): Rejection of the hypothesis of thermal-cost minimization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, Gary S.; Bissonette, John A.

    1997-01-01

    Despite their temperate to subarctic geographic range, American martens (Martes americana) possess a thermally inefficient morphology. The lack of morphological adaptations for reducing thermal costs suggests that marten may use behavioral strategies to optimize thermal budgets. During the winters of 1989–1990 and 1990–1991, we radio-collared and monitored the diel activity of 7 martens. A log-linear model suggested that the presence or absence of light was the only factor associated with marten activity patterns (p < 0.001). A regression of the percentage of active fixes on ambient temperature failed to detect an association (b = −4.45, p = 0.084, n = 12). Contents of marten scats suggested that their activity was consistent with the prey-vulnerability hypothesis. While martens must balance multiple life requisites, their activity patterns suggest that they accept increased thermal costs in order to increase foraging efficiency. However, the nocturnal activity of martens during winter was also consistent with the hypothesis that they may be able to limit their own exposure to predation risk. The nocturnal habits of Newfoundland martens in the winter were consistent with the hypothesis of avoidance of predation risk.

  2. REJECTION OF ASCITES TUMOR ALLOGRAFTS

    PubMed Central

    Berke, Gideon; Sullivan, Karen A.; Amos, Bernard

    1972-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate cells (PEC), obtained after the rejection of EL4 leukemia by BALB/c mice, are much more effective in the specific in vitro destruction of 51Cr-labeled EL4 cells than are spleen, thymus, lymph node, or peripheral blood lymphocytes. The presence of a large number of effector cells at the site of graft rejection is reflected in the potent cytolytic activity seen in vitro. Effector cells temporarily lose cytolytic reactivity when treated with trypsin but regain reactivity with time. This recovery occurs in normal as well as in immune serum. The destructive reactivity of PEC is increased when macrophages are removed. The remaining population of nonadherent PEC is composed primarily of small- to medium-sized lymphocytes. Complex tissue culture media are not needed, but there is a definite requirement for serum. The required serum component is heat stable, nondialyzable, and is not consumed during the reaction. The use of an ascites allograft system made these observations possible and permitted the isolation of those host cells intimately associated with rejection. PMID:5025438

  3. Benefit of immune monitoring in heart transplant patients using ATP production in activated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kobashigawa, Jon A; Kiyosaki, Krista K; Patel, Jignesh K; Kittleson, Michelle M; Kubak, Bernard M; Davis, Stephanie N; Kawano, Matt A; Ardehali, Abbas A

    2010-05-01

    Balancing immunosuppression to prevent rejection while minimizing infection or drug toxicity risk is a major challenge in heart transplantation. Therapeutic drug monitoring alone is inadequate to measure the immune response. An immune monitoring (IM) assay (ImmuKnow; Cylex, Columbia, MD) performed on peripheral blood measures adenosine triphosphatase (ATP) release from activated lymphocytes and may predict the immune state. Therefore, we sought to determine the utility of IM in heart transplant recipients. Between November 2005 and July 2008, 296 heart transplant recipients had a total of 864 IM assays performed at 2 weeks to 10 years post-transplant and were correlated with infection and rejection events that occurred within 1 month after IM testing. All patients received standard triple-drug immunosuppressive therapy with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and corticosteroids, without induction therapy. There were 38 infectious episodes and 8 rejection episodes. The average IM score was significantly lower during infection than steady state (187 vs 280 ng ATP/ml, p < 0.001). The average IM score was not significantly different during rejection when compared with steady state (327 vs 280 ng ATP/ml, p = 0.35). Interestingly, 3 of 8 rejection episodes were antibody-mediated rejections and had hemodynamic compromise and, for these, the mean IM score was significantly higher than for steady-state patients (491 vs 280 ng ATP/ml, p < 0.001). The non-invasive IM test appears to predict infectious risk in heart transplant patients. The association between high IM scores and rejection risk is inconclusive due to the small number of rejection episodes. Further studies with larger sample sizes for rejection episodes are required. Copyright (c) 2010 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A case of accelerated acute rejection after ABO-compatible living unrelated kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Nanae; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Yamamoto, Izumi; Mitome, Jun; Maruyama, Yukio; Hayakawa, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Yoichi; Utsunomiya, Yasunori; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Yutaka

    2009-08-01

    A 59-yr-old Japanese woman with chronic renal failure caused by IgA nephropathy and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-related glomerulonephritis underwent kidney transplantation from a living unrelated spousal donor. The blood type was compatible, while the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing showed a 5/6 locus mismatch. She had become pregnant twice by her donor and had never received blood transfusions. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity cross-match, flow cytometry cross-match (FCXM), and flow panel reactive antibody (PRA) were negative. She initially underwent one week of immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and double filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) immediately before transplantation to reduce the risk of antibody-mediated rejection. Induction therapy consisted of MMF, tacrolimus (TAC), methylprednisolone (MP), and basiliximab. The allograft function was excellent immediately after the operation. However, the urine output and platelet count declined rapidly on post-operative day (POD) 3, while the serum creatinine (sCr) and lactate dehydrogenase levels rose gradually. Subsequently, we could not detect the diastolic arterial flow on Doppler sonography. We diagnosed accelerated acute rejection and treated her with plasma exchange (PEX), intravenous MP pulse therapy, and rituximab. The first episode biopsy on POD 7 revealed acute vascular rejection and acute antibody-mediated rejection (Banff score AMR II). Her urinary excretion increased beginning on POD 13, while the sCr level decreased gradually and reached 0.9 mg/dL on POD 22. In our retrospective analysis, the LAB screen detected donor-specific antibody (DSA). This case suggested that, for successful kidney transplantation in highly sensitized recipients, such as husband-to-wife spousal kidney transplantation with a history of pregnancy, we should keep the risk of AMR in mind, even if the sensitive antibody detection tests are negative.

  5. "Science" Rejects Postmodernism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Pierre, Elizabeth Adams

    2002-01-01

    The National Research Council report, "Scientific Research in Education," claims to present an inclusive view of sciences in responding to federal attempts to legislate educational research. This article asserts that it narrowly defines science as positivism and methodology as quantitative, rejecting postmodernism and omitting other theories. Uses…

  6. Enhanced pyrite rejection in coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, D.P.; Lu, M.X.; Richardson, P.E.; Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.; Yoon, R.H.

    1994-12-31

    Difficulties in rejecting pyrite from coal by flotation primarily result from two mechanisms of particle recovery: attachment and middlings. Attachment of pyrite is the consequence of surface hydrophobicity induced by superficial oxidation; middlings that can float readily are caused by incomplete liberation of pyrite from coal. New flotation schemes have been developed to enhance pyrite rejection. They are referred to as Electrochemically-Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (EESR) and Polymer-Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (PESR) processes. In the EESR process, the formation of hydrophobic products is prevented by electrochemical techniques in which active metals are used as sacrificial anodes to cathodically protect pyrite from oxidation; in the PESR process, hydrophilic polymers is used to mask coal in middlings by specific adsorption on pyrite, and thus depress coal-pyrite middlings.

  7. Transforming growth factor-β activated long non-coding RNA ATB plays an important role in acute rejection of renal allografts and may impacts the postoperative pharmaceutical immunosuppression therapy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jiang; Chen, Yehui; Huang, Gang; Zhang, Zhi; Chen, Lizhong; Na, Ning

    2017-10-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are novel intracellular noncoding ribonucleotides regulating the genome and proteome. The lncRNA activated by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) (lncRNA-ATB) was discovered as a prognostic factor in hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric cancer, and colorectal cancer. However, little is known about the role of lncRNA-ATB in renal transplantation. This study aimed to assess lncRNA-ATB expression in renal transplant patients with acute kidney injury and explore its role in postoperative pharmaceutical immunosuppression therapy. We detected lncRNA-ATB expression in the kidney biopsies of a cohort of 72 patients with renal allograft rejection and 36 control transplant patients. lncRNA-ATB were overexpressed from lentiviral vectors in renal cells. We found that lncRNA-ATB was remarkably upregulated in patients with acute rejection compared with controls. Meanwhile, lncRNA-ATB could influence the kidney cell phenotypes and impact the nephrotoxicity of immunosuppressive drug. In conclusion, lncRNA-ATB are strongly altered in patients with acute rejection and may serve as a novel biomarker of acute kidney rejection, identifying patients with acute rejection and predicting loss of kidney function. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  8. The rapid rejection of allogeneic lymphocytes by a non-adaptive, cell-mediated mechanism (NK activity).

    PubMed Central

    Rolstad, B; Fossum, S; Bazin, H; Kimber, I; Marshall, J; Sparshott, S M; Ford, W L

    1985-01-01

    The fate of allogeneic lymphocytes (AO or DA) transferred to non-immune PVG recipients was studied in the light of previous evidence (Heslop & McNeilage, 1983; Rolstad & Ford, 1983) that allogeneic lymphocytes can be rapidly destroyed in certain strain combinations of rats and mice by a mechanism that is distinct from either T-cell mediated immunity or an alloantibody response. AO lymphocytes injected into PVG recipients were discriminated from syngeneic lymphocytes within 15-30 min of i.v. injection, as testified by the excess release of 51Cr into the lymph plasma of the recipient. The following experiments were intended to distinguish between natural antibody and natural killer (NK) cells as the mechanism responsible for the allogeneic lymphocyte cytotoxicity (ALC) displayed by PVG rats. Nude rats treated from birth with anti-mu chain serum and shown to be lacking B and T lymphocytes, as well as being profoundly deficient in immunoglobulin, displayed more aggressive ALC than did control nude rats which, in turn, showed stronger ALC than did euthymic rats. Serum from PVG nude rats exerted no inhibitory or destructive effect on allogeneic lymphocytes in an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity system, an assay of graft-versus-host activity, or when injected into 3-4-week-old PVG rats which had not yet developed ALC. Treatment of nude rats with anti-asialo GM 1 antiserum depressed ALC and NK activity in parallel, thus adding to a wide range of circumstances in which ALC and NK activity are closely correlated. In conclusion, ALC is implemented by a non-adaptive, cell-mediated mechanism independent of immunoglobulin, but the precise identity of the effector cell in the recipients' lymphatic tissues remains to be settled. Images Figure 2 PMID:3972430

  9. HLA-DQ Mismatches and Rejection in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Jeremy R.; Coates, Patrick T.; Lewis, Joshua R.; Russ, Graeme R.; Watson, Narelle; Holdsworth, Rhonda; Wong, Germaine

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives The current allocation algorithm for deceased donor kidney transplantation takes into consideration HLA mismatches at the ABDR loci but not HLA mismatches at other loci, including HLA-DQ. However, the independent effects of incompatibilities for the closely linked HLA-DQ antigens in the context of HLA-DR antigen matched and mismatched allografts are uncertain. We aimed to determine the effect of HLA-DQ mismatches on renal allograft outcomes. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Using data from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry, we examined the association between HLA-DQ mismatches and acute rejections in primary live and deceased donor kidney transplant recipients between 2004 and 2012 using adjusted Cox regression models. Results Of the 788 recipients followed for a median of 2.8 years (resulting in 2891 person-years), 321 (40.7%) and 467 (59.3%) received zero and one or two HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys, respectively. Compared with recipients who have received zero HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys, those who have received one or two HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys experienced greater numbers of any rejection (50 of 321 versus 117 of 467; P<0.01), late rejections (occurring >6 months post-transplant; 8 of 321 versus 27 of 467; P=0.03), and antibody-mediated rejections (AMRs; 12 of 321 versus 38 of 467; P=0.01). Compared with recipients of zero HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys, the adjusted hazard ratios for any and late rejections in recipients who had received one or two HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys were 1.54 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.08 to 2.19) and 2.85 (95% CI, 1.05 to 7.75), respectively. HLA-DR was an effect modifier between HLA-DQ mismatches and AMR (P value for interaction =0.02), such that the association between HLA-DQ mismatches and AMR was statistically significant in those who have received one or two HLA-DR mismatched kidneys, with adjusted hazard ratio of 2.50 (95% CI, 1.05 to 5.94). Conclusions HLA

  10. Soothing the Sting of Rejection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Joan Daniels

    1990-01-01

    Preventing rejection of a student by his/her peers and helping the child to cope with such rejection are ever-present challenges for teachers. Suggestions are given by teachers who have successfully dealt with students who were rejected by classmates. (IAH)

  11. Soothing the Sting of Rejection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Joan Daniels

    1990-01-01

    Preventing rejection of a student by his/her peers and helping the child to cope with such rejection are ever-present challenges for teachers. Suggestions are given by teachers who have successfully dealt with students who were rejected by classmates. (IAH)

  12. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol attenuates allogeneic host-versus-graft response and delays skin graft rejection through activation of cannabinoid receptor 1 and induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Sido, Jessica M.; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2015-01-01

    Immune cells have been shown to express cannabinoid receptors and to produce endogenous ligands. Moreover, activation of cannabinoid receptors on immune cells has been shown to trigger potent immunosuppression. Despite such studies, the role of cannabinoids in transplantation, specifically to prevent allograft rejection, has not, to our knowledge, been investigated previously. In the current study, we tested the effect of THC on the suppression of HvGD as well as rejection of skin allografts. To this end, we studied HvGD by injecting H-2k splenocytes into H-2b mice and analyzing the immune response in the draining ingLNs. THC treatment significantly reduced T cell proliferation and activation in draining LNs of the recipient mice and decreased early stage rejection-indicator cytokines, including IL-2 and IFN-γ. THC treatment also increased the allogeneic skin graft survival. THC treatment in HvGD mice led to induction of MDSCs. Using MDSC depletion studies as well as adoptive transfer experiments, we found that THC-induced MDSCs were necessary for attenuation of HvGD. Additionally, using pharmacological inhibitors of CB1 and CB2 receptors and CB1 and CB2 knockout mice, we found that THC was working preferentially through CB1. Together, our research shows, for the first time to our knowledge, that targeting cannabinoid receptors may provide a novel treatment modality to attenuate HvGD and prevent allograft rejection. PMID:26034207

  13. Δ⁹-Tetrahydrocannabinol attenuates allogeneic host-versus-graft response and delays skin graft rejection through activation of cannabinoid receptor 1 and induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Sido, Jessica M; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2015-09-01

    Immune cells have been shown to express cannabinoid receptors and to produce endogenous ligands. Moreover, activation of cannabinoid receptors on immune cells has been shown to trigger potent immunosuppression. Despite such studies, the role of cannabinoids in transplantation, specifically to prevent allograft rejection, has not, to our knowledge, been investigated previously. In the current study, we tested the effect of THC on the suppression of HvGD as well as rejection of skin allografts. To this end, we studied HvGD by injecting H-2(k) splenocytes into H-2(b) mice and analyzing the immune response in the draining ingLNs. THC treatment significantly reduced T cell proliferation and activation in draining LNs of the recipient mice and decreased early stage rejection-indicator cytokines, including IL-2 and IFN-γ. THC treatment also increased the allogeneic skin graft survival. THC treatment in HvGD mice led to induction of MDSCs. Using MDSC depletion studies as well as adoptive transfer experiments, we found that THC-induced MDSCs were necessary for attenuation of HvGD. Additionally, using pharmacological inhibitors of CB1 and CB2 receptors and CB1 and CB2 knockout mice, we found that THC was working preferentially through CB1. Together, our research shows, for the first time to our knowledge, that targeting cannabinoid receptors may provide a novel treatment modality to attenuate HvGD and prevent allograft rejection.

  14. Association of Local Intrapulmonary Production of Antibodies Specific to Donor Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I With the Progression of Chronic Rejection of Lung Allografts.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Ei; Motoyama, Hideki; Sato, Masaaki; Aoyama, Akihiro; Menju, Toshi; Shikuma, Kei; Sowa, Terumasa; Yoshizawa, Akihiko; Saito, Masao; Takahagi, Akihiro; Tanaka, Satona; Takahashi, Mamoru; Ohata, Keiji; Kondo, Takeshi; Hijiya, Kyoko; Chen-Yoshikawa, Toyofumi F; Date, Hiroshi

    2017-05-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection may lead to chronic lung allograft dysfunction, but antibody-mediated rejection may develop in the absence of detectable donor-specific antibody (DSA) in recipient serum. This study investigated whether humoral immune responses develop not only systemically but locally within rejected lung allografts, resulting in local production of DSA. Lewis rats received orthotopic left lung transplantation from Lewis (syngeneic control) or Brown-Norway (major histocompatibility complex-mismatched allogeneic) donor rats. Rats that underwent allogeneic lung transplantation were subsequently administered cyclosporine until day 14 (short immunosuppression) or day 35 (long immunosuppression). The lung grafts and spleens of recipient animals were tissue cultured for 4 days, and the titer of antibody against donor major histocompatibility complex molecules was assayed by flow cytometry. Explanted lung grafts were also evaluated pathologically. By day 98, DSA titers in supernatants of lung graft (P = 0.0074) and spleen (P = 0.0167) cultures, but not serum, from the short immunosuppression group were significantly higher than titers in syngeneic controls. Cultures and sera from the long immunosuppression group showed no production of DSA. Microscopically, the lung grafts from the short immunosuppression group showed severe bronchiole obliteration and parenchymal fibrosis, along with lymphoid aggregates containing T and B cells, accompanying plasma cells. These findings suggestive of local humoral immune response were not observed by days 28 and 63. DSA can be locally produced in chronically rejected lung allografts, along with intragraft immunocompetent cells. Clinical testing of DSA in serum samples alone may underestimate lung allograft dysfunction.

  15. Efficacy of Acute Cellular Rejection Treatment According to Banff Score in Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lamarche, Caroline; Côté, Jean-Maxime; Sénécal, Lynne; Cardinal, Héloïse

    2016-01-01

    Background The poor prognosis classically associated with Banff grade 2 acute cell-mediated rejection (CMR) may be due to unrecognized antibody-mediated damage. We thus performed a systematic review of the literature to determine the rate of response to treatment in kidney transplant recipients with pure CMR, stratified by Banff class. Methods In addition to a manual search, databases interrogated included Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) databases, Central, PubMed and CINAHL. Studies providing functional and/or histological response rates to the treatment of CMR rejection by Banff class (1997 or more recent) were included. Results Among the 746 articles identified, 5 articles were included in the final review. Two studies excluded some, and 2 excluded all features of antibody-mediated rejection, while providing data on functional recovery. The absence of functional recovery was reported in 4% of borderline, 15% for Banff grade 1A and IB pooled, 0% to 25% of Banff grade 1B alone, 11% to 20% of Banff grade 2A, and 38% of Banff grade 2B rejections. Conclusions The rate of functional recovery of pure Banff IIA CMR overlapped with that of Banff grade 1 CMR, whereas Banff grade 2B showed worse prognosis. There was important heterogeneity in the definition of response to treatment and paucity of data describing the histological response to treatment stratified by Banff class. There is a pressing need to standardize outcome metrics for the reversibility of rejection in kidney transplant recipients in order to design high-quality trials for novel therapeutic alternatives. PMID:27990480

  16. The Impact of HLA Class I-Specific Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors on Antibody-Dependent Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Organ Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Rajalingam, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play an important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during the developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self-HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation) or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation). NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR-binding self-HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR–HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants. PMID:28066408

  17. The Impact of HLA Class I-Specific Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors on Antibody-Dependent Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Organ Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Rajalingam, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play an important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during the developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self-HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation) or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation). NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR-binding self-HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR-HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants.

  18. Absence of Intragraft B Cells in Rejection Biopsies After Rituximab Induction Therapy: Consequences for Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    van den Hoogen, Martijn W.F.; Steenbergen, Eric J.; Baas, Marije C.; Florquin, Sandrine; Hilbrands, Luuk B.

    2017-01-01

    Background The pathophysiological role of intragraft B cells during renal allograft rejection is unclear. Methods We studied B-cell infiltration during acute rejection in 53 patients who participated in a clinical trial in which adult renal transplant patients were randomized between a single intraoperative dose of rituximab (375 mg/m2) or placebo as induction therapy. Two independent pathologists scored all biopsies in a blinded fashion according to the Banff classification and scored for the presence of B cells and plasma cells using CD79a and CD138 as markers. Results The majority of acute rejections were T cell–mediated. The proportion of acute rejections with an antibody-mediated component tended to be lower in rituximab-treated patients (4/23, 17.4%) than in placebo-treated patients (11/30, 36.7%; P = 0.14). Biopsies of rituximab-treated patients had significantly lower scores for B cells (0.00; range, 0.00-0.50 vs 1.70; range, 0.60-3.30; P < 0.0001) and plasma cells (0.10; range, 0.00-1.90 vs 0.40; range, 0.00-7.50; P = 0.006). During acute rejection, intragraft clusters of B cells were not observed after rituximab induction therapy. However, the depletion of intragraft B cells during acute rejection did not affect steroid resistance, proteinuria, graft function at 2 years follow-up, or patient and graft survival at a median follow-up of 4.1 years (range, 2.0-6.2 years). Conclusions These data do not support a harmful influence of intragraft B cells present during acute allograft rejection on the clinical course within the first few years after renal transplantation. PMID:28405599

  19. Heat rejection system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Gregory C.; Tokarz, Richard D.; Parry, Jr., Harvey L.; Braun, Daniel J.

    1980-01-01

    A cooling system for rejecting waste heat consists of a cooling tower incorporating a plurality of coolant tubes provided with cooling fins and each having a plurality of cooling channels therein, means for directing a heat exchange fluid from the power plant through less than the total number of cooling channels to cool the heat exchange fluid under normal ambient temperature conditions, means for directing water through the remaining cooling channels whenever the ambient temperature rises above the temperature at which dry cooling of the heat exchange fluid is sufficient and means for cooling the water.

  20. Banff schema for grading pancreas allograft rejection: working proposal by a multi-disciplinary international consensus panel.

    PubMed

    Drachenberg, C B; Odorico, J; Demetris, A J; Arend, L; Bajema, I M; Bruijn, J A; Cantarovich, D; Cathro, H P; Chapman, J; Dimosthenous, K; Fyfe-Kirschner, B; Gaber, L; Gaber, O; Goldberg, J; Honsová, E; Iskandar, S S; Klassen, D K; Nankivell, B; Papadimitriou, J C; Racusen, L C; Randhawa, P; Reinholt, F P; Renaudin, K; Revelo, P P; Ruiz, P; Torrealba, J R; Vazquez-Martul, E; Voska, L; Stratta, R; Bartlett, S T; Sutherland, D E R

    2008-06-01

    Accurate diagnosis and grading of rejection and other pathological processes are of paramount importance to guide therapeutic interventions in patients with pancreas allograft dysfunction. A multi-disciplinary panel of pathologists, surgeons and nephrologists was convened for the purpose of developing a consensus document delineating the histopathological features for diagnosis and grading of rejection in pancreas transplant biopsies. Based on the available published data and the collective experience, criteria for the diagnosis of acute cell-mediated allograft rejection (ACMR) were established. Three severity grades (I/mild, II/moderate and III/severe) were defined based on lesions known to be more or less responsive to treatment and associated with better- or worse-graft outcomes, respectively. The features of chronic rejection/graft sclerosis were reassessed, and three histological stages were established. Tentative criteria for the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection were also characterized, in anticipation of future studies that ought to provide more information on this process. Criteria for needle core biopsy adequacy and guidelines for pathology reporting were also defined. The availability of a simple, reproducible, clinically relevant and internationally accepted schema for grading rejection should improve the level of diagnostic accuracy and facilitate communication between all parties involved in the care of pancreas transplant recipients.

  1. CD8(+) effector memory T cells induce acute rejection of allogeneic heart retransplants in mice possibly through activating expression of inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Du, Gang; Yang, Nuo; Gong, Wenlin; Fang, Yuan; He, Jian; Zhou, Nuo; Lu, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effects of CD8(+) memory T (Tm) cells and CD8(+) effector memory T (Tem) cells on the results of allogeneic heart retransplantations performed in mice. A skin transplantation model was used to generate sensitized splenic CD8(+) Tem cells for infusion into BALB/c mice. One week after infusion, the BALB/c mice underwent allogeneic heart transplantation in the abdominal cavity. Cyclosporin A was administered via intraperitoneal injection starting one day prior to transplantation to arrest immunological rejection of the transplanted heart. The effects of sensitized CD8(+) Tem cells on allogeneic heart graft rejection were examined by monitoring survival of the transplanted hearts, the infiltration of effector memory CD8(+) T cells into myocardium, and expressions of inflammatory cytokines in blood serum. Adoptive transfer of sensitized CD8(+) Tem cells prior to transplantation induced an acute rejection response which decreased the survival of transplanted hearts. The rejection response was accompanied by an infiltration of CD8(+) Tem cells into the transplanted myocardial tissue. Additionally, infusion of sensitized CD8(+) Tem cells induced markedly increased expressions of IL-2 and IFN-γ, and decreased expression of TGF-β in the transplanted hearts, as well as higher levels of IFN-γ and CXCL-9 in blood serum. The infusion of sensitized CD8(+) Tem cells induced an acute graft rejection response and decreased the survival of grafted hearts by regulating the expressions of inflammatory cytokines including CXCL-9, IL-2, and INF-γ. Cyclosporin A had no therapeutic effect on the graft rejection response induced by sensitized CD8(+) Tem cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Decreased percentages of regulatory T cells are necessary to activate Th1-Th17-Th22 responses during acute rejection of the peripheral nerve xenotransplantation in mice.

    PubMed

    Chai, Huihui; Yang, Lujun; Gao, Lei; Guo, Yanwu; Li, Hui; Fan, Xulong; Wu, Bolin; Xue, Shan; Cai, Yingqian; Jiang, Xiaodan; Qin, Bing; Zhang, Shizhong; Ke, Yiquan

    2014-10-15

    T cells have major functions in the initiation and perpetuation of nerve graft rejection. Our study aimed to investigate the function of regulatory T cells (Treg)-Th1-Th17-Th22 cells in the rejection of peripheral nerve xenotransplantation. Adult male C57 BL/6 mice were used as the recipient for nerve xenotransplantation, and Sprague-Dawley rats were used as the donor. These nerve xenotransplanted mice were used as the experimental groups, and those that received autograft transplant were chosen as the control group. All of the animals were pretreated with interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-17, and IL-22 before the experiment was conducted. The percentages of spleen Treg-Th1-Th17-Th22 cells were evaluated by flow cytometry 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after transplantation. Serum levels of IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-22 were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Statistical analysis was performed by Wilcoxon rank sum and Spearman correlation test. During acute rejection, the percentages of Th1-Th17-Th22 cells in the spleen and serum IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-22 levels in the experimental group increased compared with those in the control group. By contrast, CD4CD25Foxp3 T cell level decreased. The rejection of xenograft was significantly prevented after the mice were treated with IL-17-neutralizing, IL-22-neutralizing, and IFN-γ-neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, the percentage of CD4CD25Foxp3 Treg was negatively correlated with the percentages of Th1-Th17-Th22 cells and levels of IL-17, IL-22, and IFN-γ. These results suggested that the Treg-Th1-Th17-Th22 cells involved in xenotransplant rejection and imbalance between Tregs and Th1-Th17-Th22 cells contribute to the acute rejection of peripheral nerve xenotransplant.

  3. Patterns of Early Rejection in Renal Retransplantation: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Cheng; Lin, Kailin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Guo, Hui; Chen, Song; Lin, Zhengbin; Chen, Zhishui

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that kidney retransplant patients had high rates of early acute rejection due to previous sensitization. In addition to the acute antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) that has received widespread attention, the early acute T-cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) may be another important issue in renal retransplantation. In the current single-center retrospective study, we included 33 retransplant patients and 90 first transplant patients with similar protocols of induction and maintenance therapy. Analysis focused particularly on the incidence and patterns of early acute rejection episodes, as well as one-year graft and patient survival. Excellent short-term clinical outcomes were obtained in both groups, with one-year graft and patient survival rates of 93.9%/100% in the retransplant group and 92.2%/95.6% in the first transplant group. Impressively, with our strict immunological selection and desensitization criteria, the retransplant patients had a very low incidence of early acute ABMR (6.1%), which was similar to that in the first transplant patients (4.4%). However, a much higher rate of early acute TCMR was observed in the retransplant group than in the first transplant group (30.3% versus 5.6%, P < 0.001). Acute TCMR that develops early after retransplantation should be monitored in order to obtain better transplant outcomes. PMID:28058265

  4. Antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer to NMDA NR1-containing neurons in rat neocortex by helper virus-free HSV-1 vector particles containing a chimeric HSV-1 glycoprotein C-staphylococcus A protein.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haiyan; Zhang, Guo-Rong; Geller, Alfred I

    2010-09-10

    Because of the heterogeneous cellular composition of the brain, and especially the forebrain, cell type-specific expression will benefit many potential applications of direct gene transfer. The two prevalent approaches for achieving cell type-specific expression are using a cell type-specific promoter or targeting gene transfer to a specific cell type. Targeted gene transfer with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors modifies glycoprotein C (gC) to replace the heparin binding domain, which binds to many cell types, with a binding activity for a specific cell surface protein. We previously reported targeted gene transfer to nigrostriatal neurons using chimeric gC-glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor or gC-brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein. Unfortunately, this approach is limited to cells that express the cognate receptor for either neurotrophic factor. Thus, a general strategy for targeting gene transfer to many different types of neurons is desirable. Antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer has been developed for targeting specific virus vectors to specific peripheral cell types; a specific vector particle protein is modified to contain the Staphylococcus A protein ZZ domain, which binds immunoglobulin (Ig) G. Here, we report antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer of HSV-1 vectors to a specific type of forebrain neuron. We constructed a chimeric gC-ZZ protein, and showed this protein is incorporated into vector particles and binds Ig G. Complexes of these vector particles and an antibody to the NMDA receptor NR1 subunit supported targeted gene transfer to NR1-containing neocortical neurons in the rat brain, with long-term (2 months) expression.

  5. Immune biomarker panel monitoring utilizing IDO enzyme activity and CD4 ATP levels: prediction of acute rejection versus viral replication events

    PubMed Central

    Dharnidharka, Vikas R.; Gupta, Sushil; Khasawneh, Eihab Al; Haafiz, Allah; Shuster, Jonathan J.; Theriaque, Douglas W.; Shahlaee, Amir H.; Garrett, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    Infections have become as important an event as acute rejection post-transplant for long-term allograft survival. Less invasive biomarkers tested so far predict risk for one event or the other, not both. We prospectively tested blood and urine monthly for twelve months post-transplant from children receiving a kidney transplant. The indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) enzyme pathway was assessed by mass spectrometry assays using the ratio of product L-kynurenine (kyn) to substrate tryptophan (trp). Kyn/trp ratios and blood CD4 T-cell ATP levels were correlated with acute rejection or major infection events or stable group (no events) in the next 30 days. The 25 subjects experienced 6 discrete episodes of acute rejection in 5 subjects and 16 discrete events of major infection in 14 subjects (7 BK viruria, 6 cytomegaloviremia, 1 Epstein-Barr and cytomegaloviremia, 2 transplant pyelonephritis). Mean serum kyn/trp ratios were significantly elevated in the group that experienced acute rejection (p = 0.02).Within-subject analyses revealed that over time, urine kyn/trp ratios showed an increase (p = 0.01) and blood CD4-ATP levels showed a decrease (p = 0.007) prior to a major infection event. These pilot results suggest that a panel of biomarkers together can predict over- or under-immunosuppression, but need independent validation. PMID:21492353

  6. Polyclonal antibodies mediated immobilization of a peroxidase from ammonium sulphate fractionated bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) proteins.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Aiman; Husain, Qayyum

    2007-06-01

    Polyclonal antibody bound Sepharose 4B support has been exploited for the immobilization of bitter gourd peroxidase directly from ammonium sulphate precipitated proteins. Immunoaffinity immobilized bitter gourd peroxidase exhibited high yield of immobilization. IgG-Sepharose 4B bound bitter gourd peroxidase showed a higher stability against heat, chaotropic agents (urea and guanidinium chloride), detergents (cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and Surf Excel), proteolytic enzyme (trypsin) and water-miscible organic solvents (propanol, THF and dioxane). The activity of immobilized bitter gourd peroxidase was significantly enhanced in the presence of cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and after treatment with trypsin as compared to soluble enzyme.

  7. Antibody-mediated neutralization of Ebola virus can occur by two distinct mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Shedlock, Devon J.; Bailey, Michael A.; Popernack, Paul M.; Cunningham, James M.; Burton, Dennis R.; Sullivan, Nancy J.

    2010-06-05

    Human Ebola virus causes severe hemorrhagic fever disease with high mortality and there is no vaccine or treatment. Antibodies in survivors occur early, are sustained, and can delay infection when transferred into nonhuman primates. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from survivors exhibit potent neutralizing activity in vitro and are protective in rodents. To better understand targets and mechanisms of neutralization, we investigated a panel of mAbs shown previously to react with the envelope glycoprotein (GP). While one non-neutralizing mAb recognized a GP epitope in the nonessential mucin-like domain, the rest were specific for GP1, were neutralizing, and could be further distinguished by reactivity with secreted GP. We show that survivor antibodies, human KZ52 and monkey JP3K11, were specific for conformation-dependent epitopes comprising residues in GP1 and GP2 and that neutralization occurred by two distinct mechanisms; KZ52 inhibited cathepsin cleavage of GP whereas JP3K11 recognized the cleaved, fusion-active form of GP.

  8. Complement and Antibody-mediated Enhancement of Red Blood Cell Invasion and Growth of Malaria Parasites.

    PubMed

    Biryukov, Sergei; Angov, Evelina; Landmesser, Mary E; Spring, Michele D; Ockenhouse, Christian F; Stoute, José A

    2016-07-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is a deadly pathogen. The invasion of red blood cells (RBCs) by merozoites is a target for vaccine development. Although anti-merozoite antibodies can block invasion in vitro, there is no efficacy in vivo. To explain this discrepancy we hypothesized that complement activation could enhance RBC invasion by binding to the complement receptor 1 (CR1). Here we show that a monoclonal antibody directed against the merozoite and human polyclonal IgG from merozoite vaccine recipients enhanced RBC invasion in a complement-dependent manner and that soluble CR1 inhibited this enhancement. Sialic acid-independent strains, that presumably are able to bind to CR1 via a native ligand, showed less complement-dependent enhancement of RBC invasion than sialic acid-dependent strains that do not utilize native CR1 ligands. Confocal fluorescent microscopy revealed that complement-dependent invasion resulted in aggregation of CR1 at the RBC surface in contact with the merozoite. Finally, total anti-P. berghei IgG enhanced parasite growth and C3 deficiency decreased parasite growth in mice. These results demonstrate, contrary to current views, that complement activation in conjunction with antibodies can paradoxically aid parasites invade RBCs and should be considered in future design and testing of merozoite vaccines. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Jet Transport Rejected Takeoffs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    r _ _ _ _ _ _ N AD—A05 6 032 FEDERAL AVIATIO N ADMINISTRATION WASHINGTON 0 C FLIGHT—ETC FIG 1/2 ~,JET TRANSPORT REJECTED TAKEOFFS • (U)FED 77 0 S...AF~~16O-77-2 FOR FURTHER IRAN JET TRANSPORT R&JECTED TAKEDFFS DAVID W. OSTROWSKILI~~ H c ,~ ~~~~ C ...) ~~~~ O~ —1 w DDU FEB~JARY 1977U... FINAL...Pag. .po ,t No. 2 C.o.,,nm.rr, A c c . s s on No . 3. R.c ,pr. ns s Cat alog No. AFS-16~~-77-2_ j

  10. Effect of cinnarizine on IgE antibody-mediated experimental allergic reactions in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Nagai, H; Yamada, H; Yakuo, I; Inagaki, N; Choi, S H; Koda, A; Daikoku, M

    1987-02-01

    The anti-allergic activity and mechanism of cinnarizine was investigated in guinea pigs. Nifedipine, a calcium antagonist, and tranilast, a potent, orally active anti-allergic agent, were used as comparative drugs. Cinnarizine protected against fatal systemic anaphylactic shock in guinea pigs passively sensitized with IgE antibody. Cinnarizine reduced many of the features of severe respiratory disorders. Nifedipine and tranilast showed similar effects. Cinnarizine and nifedipine inhibited the contractile response to antigen of sensitized tracheal smooth muscle when the challenge was carried out at low antigen concentrations. Tranilast showed a tendency to inhibit the antigen-induced contraction of tracheal smooth muscle. Cinnarizine and nifedipine inhibited Ca-induced contraction in potassium-depolarized tracheal smooth muscle, tranilast had no effect. Cinnarizine showed antagonistic action to the contraction by histamine or leukotriene D4 (LTD4) of tracheal muscle. Nifedipine showed similar antagonistic action, although its potency is lower than cinnarizine. Tranilast showed slight antagonistic action to LTD4. Antigen-induced release of histamine and slow reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A) from sensitized lung tissues was inhibited by nifedipine and tranilast but not by cinnarizine. The release of histamine and SRS-A from lung tissues by calcium ionophore A23187 was inhibited by nifedipine and tranilast but not by cinnarizine. These results suggest that the anti-allergic action of cinnarizine is mainly due to the antagonistic action to allergic mediators and not by interfering with the release of mediators. Cinnarizine's mechanism seems to be related to its antagonistic action to Ca in smooth muscle, but not to the transport of Ca in releasing the anaphylactic chemical mediators in mast cells and other target cells.

  11. Erythropoietin enhances nerve repair in anti-ganglioside antibody-mediated models of immune neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Lehmann, Helmar C; Bogdanova, Nataliia; Gao, Tong; Zhang, Jiangyang; Sheikh, Kazim A

    2011-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a monophasic immune neuropathic disorder in which a significant proportion of patients have incomplete recovery. The patients with incomplete recovery almost always have some degree of failure of axon regeneration and target reinnervation. Anti-ganglioside antibodies (Abs) are the most commonly recognized autoimmune markers in all forms of GBS and specific Abs are associated with the slow/poor recovery. We recently demonstrated that specific anti-ganglioside Abs inhibit axonal regeneration and nerve repair in preclinical models by activation of small GTPase RhoA and its downstream effectors. The objective of this study was to determine whether erythropoietin (EPO), a pleiotropic cytokine with neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, enhances nerve regeneration in preclinical cell culture and animal models of autoimmune neuropathy/nerve repair generated with monoclonal and patient derived Abs. Primary neuronal cultures and a standardized sciatic crush nerve model were used to assess the efficacy of EPO in reversing inhibitory effects of anti-ganglioside Abs on nerve repair. We found that EPO completely reversed the inhibitory effects of anti-ganglioside Abs on axon regeneration in cell culture models and significantly improved nerve regeneration/repair in an animal model. Moreover, EPO-induced proregenerative effects in nerve cells are through EPO receptors and Janus kinase 2/Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 pathway and not via early direct modulation of small GTPase RhoA. These preclinical studies indicate that EPO is a viable candidate drug to develop further for neuroprotection and enhancing nerve repair in patients with GBS.

  12. Development of a selective biopharmaceutical from Herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoproteins E and I for blocking antibody mediated neutralization of oncolytic viruses.

    PubMed

    Bucurescu, Septimiu

    2010-12-01

    Future cancer therapies will be molecular cures. They will correct, block or destroy cancer cells by targeting molecular changes that lead to carcinogenesis. Destroying cancer cells can be done using oncolytic viruses. By blocking antibody mediated neutralization of oncolytic viruses, Herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoproteins E and I could be used in the adjuvant treatment of cancer for improving the chances of oncolytic viruses to kill cancer cells in vivo.

  13. Antibody-mediated inhibition of Nogo-A signaling promotes neurite growth in PC-12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Iman K; Taghipour, Nima; Hmaidan, Sarah; Palomba, Roberto; Scaria, Shilpa; Munoz, Alvaro; Boone, Timothy B; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    The use of a monoclonal antibody to block the neurite outgrowth inhibitor Nogo-A has been of great interest for promoting axonal recovery as a treatment for spinal cord injury. While several cellular and non-cellular assays have been developed to quantify the bioactive effects of Nogo-A signaling, demand still exists for the development of a reliable approach to characterize the effectiveness of the anti-Nogo-A antibody. In this study, we developed and validated a novel cell-based approach to facilitate the biological quantification of a Nogo-A antibody using PC-12 cells as an in vitro neuronal cell model. Changes in the mRNA levels of the neuronal differentiation markers, growth-associated protein 43 and neurofilament light-polypeptide, suggest that activation of the Nogo-A pathway suppresses axonal growth and dendrite formation in the tested cell line. We found that application of anti-Nogo-A monoclonal antibody can significantly enhance the neuronal maturity of PC-12 cells by blocking the Nogo-A inhibitory effects, providing enhanced effects on neural maturity at the molecular level. No adverse effects were observed on cell viability. PMID:27027860

  14. Phagocytic cells contribute to the antibody-mediated elimination of pulmonary-infected SARS coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Fumihiko; Kohara, Michinori; Kitabatake, Masahiro; Nishiwaki, Tetsu; Fujii, Hideki; Tateno, Chise; Yoneda, Misako; Morita, Kouichi; Matsushima, Kouji; Koyasu, Shigeo; Kai, Chieko

    2014-04-01

    While the 2002-2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) resulted in 774 deaths, patients who were affected with mild pulmonary symptoms successfully recovered. The objective of the present work was to identify, using SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) mouse infection models, immune factors responsible for clearing of the virus. The elimination of pulmonary SARS-CoV infection required the activation of B cells by CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, passive immunization (post-infection) with homologous (murine) anti-SARS-CoV antiserum showed greater elimination efficacy against SARS-CoV than that with heterologous (rabbit) antiserum, despite the use of equivalent titers of neutralizing antibodies. This distinction was mediated by mouse phagocytic cells (monocyte-derived infiltrating macrophages and partially alveolar macrophages, but not neutrophils), as demonstrated both by adoptive transfer from donors and by immunological depletion of selected cell types. These results indicate that the cooperation of anti-SARS-CoV antibodies and phagocytic cells plays an important role in the elimination of SARS-CoV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Efficacy of anti-CD47 antibody-mediated phagocytosis with macrophages against primary effusion lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hiroki; Kojima, Yuki; Matsuda, Kouki; Kariya, Ryusho; Taura, Manabu; Kuwahara, Kazuhiko; Nagai, Hirokazu; Katano, Harutaka; Okada, Seiji

    2014-07-01

    Recently, the critical role of CD47 on the surface of resistant cancer cells has been proposed in their evasion of immunosurveillance. Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a subtype of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma that shows serous lymphomatous effusion in body cavities, especially in advanced acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). PEL is resistant to conventional chemotherapy and has a poor prognosis. In this study, we evaluated the effect of anti-CD47 antibody (Ab) on PEL in vitro and in vivo. Surface CD47 of PEL cell lines was examined by flow cytometry. Efficacy of knocking down CD47 or anti-CD47 Ab-mediated phagocytosis against PEL was evaluated using mouse peritoneal macrophages and human macrophages in vitro. Primary PEL cells were injected intraperitoneally into NOD/Rag-2/Jak3 double-deficient (NRJ) mice to establish a direct xenograft mouse model. Surface CD47 of PEL cell lines was highly expressed. Knocking down CD47 and anti-CD47 Ab promoted phagocytic activities of macrophages in a CD47 expression-dependent manner in vitro. Treatment with anti-CD47 Ab inhibited ascite formation and organ invasion completely in vivo compared with control IgG-treated mice. CD47 plays the pivotal role in the immune evasion of PEL cells in body cavities. Therapeutic antibody targeting of CD47 could be an effective therapy for PEL. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Antibodies mediate intracellular immunity through tripartite motif-containing 21 (TRIM21)

    PubMed Central

    McEwan, William A.; Bidgood, Susanna R.; Towers, Greg J.; Johnson, Chris M.; James, Leo C.

    2010-01-01

    Antibodies provide effective antiviral immunity despite the fact that viruses escape into cells when they infect. Here we show that antibodies remain attached to viruses after cell infection and mediate an intracellular immune response that disables virions in the cytosol. We have discovered that cells possess a cytosolic IgG receptor, tripartite motif-containing 21 (TRIM21), which binds to antibodies with a higher affinity than any other IgG receptor in the human body. TRIM21 rapidly recruits to incoming antibody-bound virus and targets it to the proteasome via its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Proteasomal targeting leads to rapid degradation of virions in the cytosol before translation of virally encoded genes. Infection experiments demonstrate that at physiological antibody concentrations TRIM21 neutralizes viral infection. These results reveal an intracellular arm of adaptive immunity in which the protection mediated by antibodies does not end at the cell membrane but continues inside the cell to provide a last line of defense against infection. PMID:21045130

  17. Antibody-mediated immunotherapy of macaques chronically infected with SHIV suppresses viraemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingai, Masashi; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Klein, Florian; Mouquet, Hugo; Donau, Olivia K.; Plishka, Ronald; Buckler-White, Alicia; Seaman, Michael; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Dimitrov, Dimiter; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Martin, Malcolm A.

    2013-11-01

    Neutralizing antibodies can confer immunity to primate lentiviruses by blocking infection in macaque models of AIDS. However, earlier studies of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies administered to infected individuals or humanized mice reported poor control of virus replication and the rapid emergence of resistant variants. A new generation of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies, possessing extraordinary potency and breadth of neutralizing activity, has recently been isolated from infected individuals. These neutralizing antibodies target different regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein including the CD4-binding site, glycans located in the V1/V2, V3 and V4 regions, and the membrane proximal external region of gp41 (refs 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14). Here we have examined two of the new antibodies, directed to the CD4-binding site and the V3 region (3BNC117 and 10-1074, respectively), for their ability to block infection and suppress viraemia in macaques infected with the R5 tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-AD8, which emulates many of the pathogenic and immunogenic properties of HIV-1 during infections of rhesus macaques. Either antibody alone can potently block virus acquisition. When administered individually to recently infected macaques, the 10-1074 antibody caused a rapid decline in virus load to undetectable levels for 4-7days, followed by virus rebound during which neutralization-resistant variants became detectable. When administered together, a single treatment rapidly suppressed plasma viraemia for 3-5weeks in some long-term chronically SHIV-infected animals with low CD4+ T-cell levels. A second cycle of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody therapy, administered to two previously treated animals, successfully controlled virus rebound. These results indicate that immunotherapy or a combination of immunotherapy plus conventional antiretroviral drugs might be useful as a treatment for chronically HIV-1-infected

  18. Evidence for antimuscarinic acetylcholine receptor antibody-mediated secretory dysfunction in nod mice.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, K H; Brayer, J; Cha, S; Diggs, S; Yasunari, U; Hilal, G; Peck, A B; Humphreys-Beher, M G

    2000-10-01

    Antibodies directed against general and specific target-organ autoantigens are present in the sera of human patients and animal models with autoimmune disease. The relevance of these autoantibodies to the disease process remains ambiguous in most cases. In autoimmune exocrinopathy (Sjögren's syndrome), autoantibodies to the intracellular nuclear proteins SSA/Ro and SSB/La, as well as the cell surface muscarinic cholinergic receptor (M3) are observed. To evaluate the potential role of these factors in the loss of secretory function of exocrine tissues, a panel of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies was developed for passive transfer into the NOD animal model. Monoclonal antibodies to mouse SSB/La, rat M3 receptor, and a rabbit polyclonal antiparotid secretory protein antibody were obtained for this study. These antibody reagents were subsequently infused into NOD-scid mice. Saliva flow rates were subsequently monitored over a 72-hour period. Submandibular gland lysates were examined by Western blotting for alteration of the distribution of the water channel protein aquaporin (AQP). Evaluation of the secretory response indicated that only antibodies directed toward the extracellular domains of the M3 receptor were capable of mediating the exocrine dysfunction aspect of the clinical pathology of the autoimmune disease. In vitro stimulation with a muscarinic agonist of submandibular gland cells isolated from mice treated with anti-M3 antibody, but not saline or the isotype control, failed to translocate AQP to the plasma membrane. These findings define a clear role for the humoral immune response and the targeting of the cell surface M3 signal transduction receptor as primary events in the development of clinical symptoms of autoimmune exocrinopathy. Furthermore, the anti-M3 receptor activity may negatively affect the secretory response through perturbation of normal signal transduction events, leading to translocation of the epithelial cell water channel.

  19. Protooncogene bcl-2 gene transfer abrogates Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated apoptosis of human malignant glioma cells and confers resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs and therapeutic irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Weller, M; Malipiero, U; Aguzzi, A; Reed, J C; Fontana, A

    1995-01-01

    The majority of human malignant glioma cells express Fas/APO-1 and are susceptible to Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated apoptosis in vitro. The sensitivity of Fas/APO-1-positive glioma cell lines to Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated killing correlates inversely with the constitutive expression of the antiapoptotic protooncogene bcl-2. Here we report that BCL-2 protein expression of human glial tumors in vivo correlates with malignant transformation in that BCL-2 immunoreactive glioma cells were more abundant in WHO grade III/IV gliomas than in grade I/II gliomas. Fas/APO-1 antibody-sensitive human glioma cell lines stably transfected with a murine bcl-2 cDNA acquired resistance to Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated apoptosis. Forced expression of bcl-2 also attenuated TNF alpha-mediated cytotoxicity of glioma cell lines in the presence of actinomycin D and cycloheximide and conferred partial protection from irradiation and the cancer chemotherapy drugs, cisplatin and BCNU. Preexposure of the glioma cell lines to the cytokines, IFN gamma and TNF alpha, which sensitize for Fas/APO-1-dependent killing, partially overcame bcl-2-mediated rescue from apoptosis, suggesting that multimodality immunotherapy involving cytokines and Fas/APO-1 targeting might eventually provide a promising approach to the treatment of human malignant gliomas. Images PMID:7539458

  20. Spontaneous rupture of atrioventricular valve tensor apparatus as late manifestation of anti-Ro/SSA antibody-mediated cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Cuneo, Bettina F; Fruitman, Deborah; Benson, D Woodrow; Ngan, Bo-Yee; Liske, Michael R; Wahren-Herlineus, Marie; Ho, S Yen; Jaeggi, Edgar

    2011-03-01

    Atrioventricular (AV) block and endocardial fibroelastosis associated with dilated cardiomyopathy are the most common clinical manifestations of anti-Ro/SSA-mediated fetal cardiac disease. Valvar dysfunction has not been a prominent feature of this disease; however, recent anecdotal cases have suggested an association between rupture of the AV valve tensor apparatus and maternal anti-Ro/SSA antibodies. In the present study, we have described the clinical and laboratory findings and reviewed the published data for infants of anti-Ro/SSA-positive pregnancies with AV valve insufficiency due to chordal rupture from the papillary muscles. The histopathologic features of the papillary muscle and ventricular free wall and septum biopsy specimens were examined and compared to the sections of AV leaflets from 6 autopsied fetuses with anti-Ro/SSA-mediated complete AV block without chordal disruption. Specific epitopes to the p200 region of Ro52, and Ro60 antibodies were evaluated in cases with chordal rupture. Severe AV valve insufficiency was detected prenatally (as early as 34 weeks of gestation) or postnatally (as late as 182 days) after areas of patchy echogenicity were noted in the papillary muscle at 19 to 22 weeks of gestation. Postnatally, urgent valve surgery was performed in 5 of 6 patients; 1 of 6 patients died preoperatively. All patients tested positive for Ro52. Valve leaflet tissue from the autopsy specimens was normal. The ventricular free wall and septum biopsy specimens from a patient with chordal rupture showed normal tissue; however, the papillary muscle biopsy specimens demonstrated severe atrophy with near total replacement of myocytes by fibrosis and dystrophic calcifications, and negative immunochemistry findings. In conclusion, these findings have defined an underappreciated complication of fetal antibody-mediated cardiac inflammation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Limitations of Murine Models for Assessment of Antibody-Mediated Therapies or Vaccine Candidates against Staphylococcus epidermidis Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    Cole, Leah E; Zhang, Jinrong; Kesselly, Augustus; Anosova, Natalie G; Lam, Hubert; Kleanthous, Harry; Yethon, Jeremy A

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is normally a commensal colonizer of human skin and mucus membranes, but, due to its ability to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices, it has emerged as a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Bacteremia or bloodstream infection is a frequent and costly complication resulting from biofilm fouling of medical devices. Our goal was to develop a murine model of S. epidermidis infection to identify potential vaccine targets for the prevention of S. epidermidis bacteremia. However, assessing the contribution of adaptive immunity to protection against S. epidermidis challenge was complicated by a highly efficacious innate immune response in mice. Naive mice rapidly cleared S. epidermidis infections from blood and solid organs, even when the animals were immunocompromised. Cyclophosphamide-mediated leukopenia reduced the size of the bacterial challenge dose required to cause lethality but did not impair clearance after a nonlethal challenge. Nonspecific innate immune stimulation, such as treatment with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist, enhanced bacterial clearance. TLR2 signaling was confirmed to accelerate the clearance of S. epidermidis bacteremia, but TLR2(-/-)mice could still resolve a bloodstream infection. Furthermore, TLR2 signaling played no role in the clearance of bacteria from the spleen. In conclusion, these data suggest that S. epidermidis bloodstream infection is cleared in a highly efficient manner that is mediated by both TLR2-dependent and -independent innate immune mechanisms. The inability to establish a persistent infection in mice, even in immunocompromised animals, rendered these murine models unsuitable for meaningful assessment of antibody-mediated therapies or vaccine candidates.

  2. Accepters and Rejecters of Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Harriett A.; Elton, Charles F.

    Personality differences between students who accept or reject proffered counseling assistance were investigated by comparing personality traits of 116 male students at the University of Kentucky who accepted or rejected letters of invitation to group counseling. Factor analysis of Omnibus Personality Inventory (OPI) scores to two groups of 60 and…

  3. Emotional responses to interpersonal rejection

    PubMed Central

    Leary, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    A great deal of human emotion arises in response to real, anticipated, remembered, or imagined rejection by other people. Because acceptance by other people improved evolutionary fitness, human beings developed biopsychological mechanisms to apprise them of threats to acceptance and belonging, along with emotional systems to deal with threats to acceptance. This article examines seven emotions that often arise when people perceive that their relational value to other people is low or in potential jeopardy, including hurt feelings, jealousy, loneliness, shame, guilt, social anxiety, and embarrassment. Other emotions, such as sadness and anger, may occur during rejection episodes, but are reactions to features of the situation other than low relational value. The article discusses the evolutionary functions of rejection-related emotions, neuroscience evidence regarding the brain regions that mediate reactions to rejection, and behavioral research from social, developmental, and clinical psychology regarding psychological and behavioral concomitants of interpersonal rejection. PMID:26869844

  4. Emotional responses to interpersonal rejection.

    PubMed

    Leary, Mark R

    2015-12-01

    A great deal of human emotion arises in response to real, anticipated, remembered, or imagined rejection by other people. Because acceptance by other people improved evolutionary fitness, human beings developed biopsychological mechanisms to apprise them of threats to acceptance and belonging, along with emotional systems to deal with threats to acceptance. This article examines seven emotions that often arise when people perceive that their relational value to other people is low or in potential jeopardy, including hurt feelings, jealousy, loneliness, shame, guilt, social anxiety, and embarrassment. Other emotions, such as sadness and anger, may occur during rejection episodes, but are reactions to features of the situation other than low relational value. The article discusses the evolutionary functions of rejection-related emotions, neuroscience evidence regarding the brain regions that mediate reactions to rejection, and behavioral research from social, developmental, and clinical psychology regarding psychological and behavioral concomitants of interpersonal rejection.

  5. Antibody-mediated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, W.D.; Lipsztein, R.; Dalton, J.F.

    1985-05-01

    Antibodies that react with antigens on the surface of tumor cells but not normal cells have great potential for cancer detection and therapy. If radiolabeled without loss of immunologic specificity, such antibodies may be able to deliver cytoxic amounts of radiation. Target- cell specificity and a high extraction coefficient are necessary with any radionuclide in order to minimize normal tissue irradiation. Tumor- cell-retention time and the rate of catabolized radionuclide will also influence ultimate applicability. Among the unanswered questions for choosing a radionuclide is the choice of particle emitter. Although classic beta emitters have been used in a number of clinical situations, they have not had a major impact on disease outcome except in diseases of the thyroid. Unfortunately, Auger emitters such as iodine 125 are cytotoxic only when localized within close proximity to the genome. On the other hand, alpha emitters such as astatine 211 eliminate the need for subcellular sequestration but not cell-specific localization. 34 references.

  6. Prolonged cardiac allograft survival in presensitized rats after a high activity Yunnan-cobra venom factor therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Chen, G; Guo, H; Wang, D W; Xie, L; Wang, S S; Wang, W Y; Xiong, Y L; Chen, S

    2006-12-01

    Complement-dependent antibody-mediated acute humoral rejection is the major obstacle of clinical transplantation across ABO incompatibility and human leukocyte antigen presensitization. We previously demonstrated that Yunnan-cobra venom factor (Y-CVF) could almost completely abrogate complement activity and successfully prevent hyperacute rejection in some xenotransplant models without any obvious toxicity. In this study we investigated whether depletion of complement by Y-CVF prevented acute humoral allograft rejection in presensitized rats thereby prolonging graft survival. Presensitization was achieved in Lewis rats by sequential grafting of three full-thickness skin pieces from Brown Norway rats. Serum cytotoxic alloantibody titers were determined by a modified in vitro complement-dependent microcytotoxicity assay. After presensitization, each Lewis rat received a heterotopic Brown Norway cardiac allograft. Fifteen recipients were divided into two groups: (1) no treatment control (n = 7); (2) Y-CVF therapy group (86 u/kg, IV, day -1) (n = 8). After cessation of the heart beat, allograft rejection was confirmed by pathologic as well as IgG and C3 immunohistochemical examinations. The mean graft survival time was significantly prolonged to 99.50 +/- 38.72 hours among rats that received Y-CVF vs 12.71 +/- 13.94 hours in nontreated controls (P < .001). Upon pathological and immunohistochemical examination, acute humoral rejection was mainly exhibited in the control group, whereas acute cellular rejection was mainly displayed in the Y-CVF therapy group. Our study demonstrated that complement depletion by Y-CVF significantly inhibited acute humoral allograft rejection in presensitized rats. As a therapeutic immunointervention tool for complement, Y-CVF has shown potential efficacy across ABO incompatible and positive cross-match barriers.

  7. Private Information and Insurance Rejections

    PubMed Central

    Hendren, Nathaniel

    2013-01-01

    Across a wide set of non-group insurance markets, applicants are rejected based on observable, often high-risk, characteristics. This paper argues that private information, held by the potential applicant pool, explains rejections. I formulate this argument by developing and testing a model in which agents may have private information about their risk. I first derive a new no-trade result that theoretically explains how private information could cause rejections. I then develop a new empirical methodology to test whether this no-trade condition can explain rejections. The methodology uses subjective probability elicitations as noisy measures of agents beliefs. I apply this approach to three non-group markets: long-term care, disability, and life insurance. Consistent with the predictions of the theory, in all three settings I find significant amounts of private information held by those who would be rejected; I find generally more private information for those who would be rejected relative to those who can purchase insurance; and I show it is enough private information to explain a complete absence of trade for those who would be rejected. The results suggest private information prevents the existence of large segments of these three major insurance markets. PMID:24187381

  8. Do Scientists Really Reject God?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Eugenie C.

    1998-01-01

    Suggests that the title of the recent Larson and Witham article in the journal Nature, "Leading Scientists Still Reject God", is premature and without reliable data upon which to base it. (Author/CCM)

  9. Do Scientists Really Reject God?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Eugenie C.

    1998-01-01

    Suggests that the title of the recent Larson and Witham article in the journal Nature, "Leading Scientists Still Reject God", is premature and without reliable data upon which to base it. (Author/CCM)

  10. Membrane rejection of nitrogen compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.; Lueptow, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    Rejection characteristics of nitrogen compounds were examined for reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, and low-pressure reverse osmosis membranes. The rejection of nitrogen compounds is explained by integrating experimental results with calculations using the extended Nernst-Planck model coupled with a steric hindrance model. The molecular weight and chemical structure of nitrogen compounds appear to be less important in determining rejection than electrostatic properties. The rejection is greatest when the Donnan potential exceeds 0.05 V or when the ratio of the solute radius to the pore radius is greater than 0.8. The transport of solute in the pore is dominated by diffusion, although convective transport is significant for organic nitrogen compounds. Electromigration contributes negligibly to the overall solute transport in the membrane. Urea, a small organic compound, has lower rejection than ionic compounds such as ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite, indicating the critical role of electrostatic interaction in rejection. This suggests that better treatment efficiency for organic nitrogen compounds can be obtained after ammonification of urea.

  11. Membrane rejection of nitrogen compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.; Lueptow, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    Rejection characteristics of nitrogen compounds were examined for reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, and low-pressure reverse osmosis membranes. The rejection of nitrogen compounds is explained by integrating experimental results with calculations using the extended Nernst-Planck model coupled with a steric hindrance model. The molecular weight and chemical structure of nitrogen compounds appear to be less important in determining rejection than electrostatic properties. The rejection is greatest when the Donnan potential exceeds 0.05 V or when the ratio of the solute radius to the pore radius is greater than 0.8. The transport of solute in the pore is dominated by diffusion, although convective transport is significant for organic nitrogen compounds. Electromigration contributes negligibly to the overall solute transport in the membrane. Urea, a small organic compound, has lower rejection than ionic compounds such as ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite, indicating the critical role of electrostatic interaction in rejection. This suggests that better treatment efficiency for organic nitrogen compounds can be obtained after ammonification of urea.

  12. Early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Tisdale, P.L.; Collier, B.D.; Kauffman, H.M.; Adams, M.B.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Rao, S.A.; Joestgen, T.; Krohn, L.

    1985-05-01

    A prospective evaluation of In-111 labeled autologous platelet scintigraphy for the early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection was undertaken. To date, 28 consecutive patients between 7 and 14 days post-op have been injected with 500..mu..Ci of In-111 platelets followed by imaging at 24 and 48 hours. Activity within the renal transplant exceeding activity in the adjacent iliac vessels was considered to be evidence of rejection, and both chemical evidence and clinical impression of rejection at 5 days after completion of imaging was accepted as proof of ongoing or incipient rejection at the time of scintigraphy. In addition, to visual inspection, independent quantitative analysis compared the area-normalized activity over the transplant with the adjacent iliac vessels (normal <1.0). For 5 patients, positive In-111 scintigraphy was present before convincing clinical evidence of rejection. In-111 platelet scintigraphy is useful not only to confirm the clinical diagnosis of rejection but also to establish the early, pre-clinical diagnosis of incipient acute postoperative renal transplant rejection.

  13. Kidney transplantation: evaluation and clinical outcome of 237 recipients at low, medium, high, or strong immunological risk of rejection.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, E; Fabreti de Oliveira, R A; Maciel, M D; Pereira, A B; das Mercêz de Lucas, F; Salomão-Filho, A; Pereira, W A; Moreira, J B; Vilaça, S S; de Castro Gontijo, R; Lasmar, M F; Vianna, H R; Magalhâes, A; Calazans, C A C; Simão-Filho, C; Vilela, B

    2014-01-01

    Donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) play a fundamental role in kidney transplantation. The identification of DSAs is an essential rejection parameter. We evaluated a protocol in 237 patients receiving kidneys from living (LDs) and deceased donors (DDs). Recipients were classified as being at low (LR), medium (MR), high (HR), or strong (SR) risk of rejection based on Luminex panel reactive antibody (PRA)-single antigen beads (SABs). Grafts that survived for 1 year were evaluated. Of the 237 transplanted patients, 129 (54.43%) received a kidney from an LD and 108 (45.57%) from a DD. Of 95 LR recipients receiving kidneys from LDs, 2 patients lost the graft due to non-immunological causes. Of 34 MR recipients, 13 had rejection episodes, and 2 lost the graft by AMR and one by cellular rejection (CR). Of 108 recipients receiving a kidney from a DD, 59 (54.63%) were LR, 31 (28.70%) MR, 11 (10.19%) HR, and 7 (6.48%) SR. Twenty of all transplanted recipients lost their grafts; 4 were due to clinical causes, 4 by cellular rejection, and 12 by antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) with PRA-SAB mean fluorescent intensity of 530 to 12,591. One-year graft survival for LD transplanted LR and MR patients was 97.6% and 94.1%, respectively (P = .004). In DD recipients, the LR vs MR SD was P = .011, and for LR vs HR + SR it was P = .001. For MR vs HR+SR no SD was found (P = .323). Rejections were detected in 51 patients (21.52%). Graft failure occurred in 16 patients (6.75%). A total of 218 (91.98%) recipients maintained good kidney function after 1 year. This protocol based on fluxogram risk assessment of AMR provided fast and precise immunological evaluation of recipients and donors and stratification by immunological risk of AMR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reject analysis in direct digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Eivind Richter; Jorde, Jannike; Taoussi, Nadia; Yaqoob, Sadia Halima; Konst, Bente; Seierstad, Therese

    2012-03-01

    Reject analysis can be used as a quality indicator, and is an important tool in localizing areas where optimization is required. Reducing number of rejects is important yielding reduced patient exposure and increased cost-effectiveness. To determine rejection rates and causes in direct digital radiography. Data were collected during a three-month period in spring 2010 at two direct digital laboratories in Norway. All X-ray examinations, types, numbers, and reasons for rejections were obtained using automatic reject analysis software. Thirteen causes for rejection could be selected. Out of the 27,284 acquired images, 3206 were rejected, yielding an overall rejection rate of 12%. Highest rejection rates were found for examination of knees, shoulders, and wrist. In all, 77% of the rejected images arose from positioning errors. An overall rejection rate of 12% indicates a need for optimizing radiographic practice in the department.

  15. Separate neural representations for physical pain and social rejection

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Choong-Wan; Koban, Leonie; Kross, Ethan; Lindquist, Martin A.; Banich, Marie T.; Ruzic, Luka; Andrews-Hanna, Jessica R.; Wager, Tor D.

    2014-01-01

    Current theories suggest that physical pain and social rejection share common neural mechanisms, largely by virtue of overlapping functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity. Here we challenge this notion by identifying distinct multivariate fMRI patterns unique to pain and rejection. Sixty participants experience painful heat and warmth and view photos of ex-partners and friends on separate trials. FMRI pattern classifiers discriminate pain and rejection from their respective control conditions in out-of-sample individuals with 92% and 80% accuracy. The rejection classifier performs at chance on pain, and vice versa. Pain-and rejection-related representations are uncorrelated within regions thought to encode pain affect (for example, dorsal anterior cingulate) and show distinct functional connectivity with other regions in a separate resting-state data set (N = 91). These findings demonstrate that separate representations underlie pain and rejection despite common fMRI activity at the gross anatomical level. Rather than co-opting pain circuitry, rejection involves distinct affective representations in humans. PMID:25400102

  16. Lunar Dust on Heat Rejection System Surfaces: Problems and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Jaworske, Donald A.

    2007-01-01

    Heat rejection from power systems will be necessary for human and robotic activity on the lunar surface. Functional operation of such heat rejection systems is at risk of degradation as a consequence of dust accumulation. The Apollo astronauts encountered marked degradation of performance in heat rejection systems for the lunar roving vehicle, science packages, and other components. Although ground testing of dust mitigation concepts in support of the Apollo mission identified mitigation tools, the brush concept adopted by the Apollo astronauts proved essentially ineffective. A better understanding of the issues associated with the impact of lunar dust on the functional performance of heat rejection systems and its removal is needed as planning gets underway for human and robotic missions to the Moon. Renewed emphasis must also be placed on ground testing of pristine and dust-covered heat rejection system surfaces to quantify degradation and address mitigation concepts. This paper presents a review of the degradation in performance of heat rejection systems encountered on the lunar surface to-date, and will discuss current activities underway to evaluate the durability of candidate heat rejection system surfaces and current dust mitigation concepts.

  17. Separate neural representations for physical pain and social rejection.

    PubMed

    Woo, Choong-Wan; Koban, Leonie; Kross, Ethan; Lindquist, Martin A; Banich, Marie T; Ruzic, Luka; Andrews-Hanna, Jessica R; Wager, Tor D

    2014-11-17

    Current theories suggest that physical pain and social rejection share common neural mechanisms, largely by virtue of overlapping functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity. Here we challenge this notion by identifying distinct multivariate fMRI patterns unique to pain and rejection. Sixty participants experience painful heat and warmth and view photos of ex-partners and friends on separate trials. FMRI pattern classifiers discriminate pain and rejection from their respective control conditions in out-of-sample individuals with 92% and 80% accuracy. The rejection classifier performs at chance on pain, and vice versa. Pain- and rejection-related representations are uncorrelated within regions thought to encode pain affect (for example, dorsal anterior cingulate) and show distinct functional connectivity with other regions in a separate resting-state data set (N = 91). These findings demonstrate that separate representations underlie pain and rejection despite common fMRI activity at the gross anatomical level. Rather than co-opting pain circuitry, rejection involves distinct affective representations in humans.

  18. Detection of cardiac transplant rejection with radiolabeled lymphocytes. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, S.R.; Lerch, R.A.; Carlson, E.M.; Saffitz, J.E.; Sobel, B.E.

    1982-03-01

    To determine whether rejections of cardiac transplants could be detected specifically and non-invasively by lymphocytes labeled with indium-111 (111In), we studied 36 allogeneic and 14 isogeneic heterotopic cardiac transplants in rats. Allogeneic grafts accumulated autologous 111In-lymphocytes, detectable scintigraphically 24 hours after i.v. injection of the labeled cells. At the time of peak histologic rejection, the allogeneic grafts accumulated 92. +/- 4.8 times more activity than the native hearts (determined by well counting). The tissue-to-blood ratio in the rejecting transplants was 3.7 +/- 2.2; total uptake by the graft was 2.9 +/- 2.1% of the injected dose. Autoradiography confirmed that graft radioactivity was associated with labeled lymphocytes. In contrast, isogeneic grafts showed no signs of rejection and did not accumulate radioactivity. Because conventionally isolated and labeled lymphocytes are often contaminated with platelets, we prepared both 111In-platelets and purified 111In-lymphocytes for use in additional experiments. Allogeneic grafts accumulated platelets and purified lymphocytes independently. Thus, deposition of immunologically active cells in the rejecting graft representing specific pathophysiologic events can be detected. The results suggest that rejection of cardiac transplants can be detected noninvasively, potentially facilitating objective early clinical detection of rejection and titration of antirejection therapy.

  19. Lunar Dust on Heat Rejection System Surfaces: Problems and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaier, James R.; Jaworske, Donald A.

    2007-01-01

    Heat rejection from power systems will be necessary for human and robotic activity on the lunar surface. Functional operation of such heat rejection systems is at risk of degradation as a consequence of dust accumulation. The Apollo astronauts encountered marked degradation of performance in heat rejection systems for the lunar roving vehicle, science packages, and other components. Although ground testing of dust mitigation concepts in support of the Apollo mission identified candidate mitigation tools, the brush concept adopted by the Apollo astronauts proved essentially ineffective. A better understanding of the issues associated with the impact of lunar dust on the functional performance of heat rejection systems and its removal is needed as planning gets underway for human and robotic missions to the Moon. Renewed emphasis must also be placed on ground testing of pristine and dust-covered heat rejection system surfaces to quantify degradation and address mitigation concepts. This paper presents a review of the degradation of heat rejection systems encountered on the lunar surface to-date, and discusses current activities underway to evaluate the durability of candidate heat rejection system surfaces and current dust mitigation concepts.

  20. Hypervigilance to Rejecting Stimuli in Rejection Sensitive Individuals: Behavioral and Neurocognitive Evidence.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Katherine B; Gerson, Sarah A; Vanderwert, Ross E; Cannon, Erin N; Fox, Nathan A

    2015-10-01

    Individuals who are high in rejection sensitivity are vigilant toward social cues that signal rejection, and they exhibit attention biases towards information that confirms expectations of rejection. Little is known, however, about the neural correlates of rejection sensitivity. The present study examined whether rejection sensitivity is associated with individuals' neural responses to rejection-relevant information. Female participants, classified as high or average in rejection sensitivity, completed a modified dot-probe task in which a neutral face was paired with either another neutral face or a gaze-averted ("rejecting") face while EEG was collected and ERP components were computed. Behavioral results indicated that average rejection sensitive participants showed an attention bias away from rejecting faces, while high rejection sensitive participants were equally vigilant to neutral and rejecting faces. High rejection sensitivity was associated with ERP components signaling elevated attention and arousal to faces. These findings suggest that rejection sensitivity shapes behavioral and neurocognitive responses to faces.

  1. Allorecognition by T Lymphocytes and Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Jose; Paster, Joshua; Benichou, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Recognition of donor antigens by recipient T cells in secondary lymphoid organs initiates the adaptive inflammatory immune response leading to the rejection of allogeneic transplants. Allospecific T cells become activated through interaction of their T cell receptors with intact allogeneic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules on donor cells (direct pathway) and/or donor peptides presented by self-MHC molecules on recipient antigen-presenting cells (APCs) (indirect pathway). In addition, recent studies show that alloreactive T cells can also be stimulated through recognition of allogeneic MHC molecules displayed on recipient APCs (MHC cross-dressing) after their transfer via cell–cell contact or through extracellular vesicles (semi-direct pathway). The specific allorecognition pathway used by T cells is dictated by intrinsic and extrinsic factors to the allograft and can influence the nature and magnitude of the alloresponse and rejection process. Consequently, various organs and tissues such as skin, cornea, and solid organ transplants are recognized differently by pro-inflammatory T cells through these distinct pathways, which may explain why these grafts are rejected in a different fashion. On the other hand, the mechanisms by which anti-inflammatory regulatory T cells (Tregs) recognize alloantigen and promote transplantation tolerance are still unclear. It is likely that thymic Tregs are activated through indirect allorecognition, while peripheral Tregs recognize alloantigens in a direct fashion. As we gain insights into the mechanisms underlying allorecognition by pro-inflammatory and Treg cells, novel strategies are being designed to prevent allograft rejection in the absence of ongoing immunosuppressive drug treatment in patients. PMID:28018349

  2. Antibody-mediated complement C3b/iC3b binding to group B Streptococcus in paired mother and baby serum samples in a refugee population on the Thailand-Myanmar border.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Jenny; Thomas, Stephen; Brookes, Charlotte; Turner, Claudia; Turner, Paul; Nosten, Francois; Le Doare, Kirsty; Hudson, Michael; Heath, Paul T; Gorringe, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) is the leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. In this study, we determined antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b onto the bacterial cell surface of GBS serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III, and V. This was determined for 520 mother and umbilical cord serum sample pairs obtained at the time of birth from a population on the Thailand-Myanmar border. Antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b was detected to at least one serotype in 91% of mothers, despite a known carriage rate in this population of only 12%. Antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition corresponded to known carriage rates, with the highest levels of complement deposition observed onto the most prevalent serotype (serotype II) followed by serotypes Ia, III, V, and Ib. Finally, neonates born to mothers carrying serotype II GBS at the time of birth showed higher antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against serotype II GBS than neonates born to mothers with no serotype II carriage. Assessment of antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against GBS may provide insights into the seroepidemiology of anti-GBS antibodies in mothers and infants in different populations.

  3. Antibody-Mediated Complement C3b/iC3b Binding to Group B Streptococcus in Paired Mother and Baby Serum Samples in a Refugee Population on the Thailand-Myanmar Border

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Jenny; Thomas, Stephen; Brookes, Charlotte; Turner, Claudia; Turner, Paul; Nosten, Francois; Le Doare, Kirsty; Hudson, Michael; Heath, Paul T.; Gorringe, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) is the leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. In this study, we determined antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b onto the bacterial cell surface of GBS serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III, and V. This was determined for 520 mother and umbilical cord serum sample pairs obtained at the time of birth from a population on the Thailand-Myanmar border. Antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b was detected to at least one serotype in 91% of mothers, despite a known carriage rate in this population of only 12%. Antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition corresponded to known carriage rates, with the highest levels of complement deposition observed onto the most prevalent serotype (serotype II) followed by serotypes Ia, III, V, and Ib. Finally, neonates born to mothers carrying serotype II GBS at the time of birth showed higher antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against serotype II GBS than neonates born to mothers with no serotype II carriage. Assessment of antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against GBS may provide insights into the seroepidemiology of anti-GBS antibodies in mothers and infants in different populations. PMID:25589553

  4. New Methods for Noninvasive Monitoring of Rejection after Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Reichenspumer, Hermann; Haberl, Ralph; Angermann, Christiane; Anthuber, Matthias; Osterholzer, Georg; Kemkes, Bemhard M.; Hammer, Claus; Gokel, Joachim M.; Reichart, Bruno

    1988-01-01

    Between August 1981 and February 1987, 67 orthotopic heart transplants and three heart-lung transplants were performed in 69 patients at the University of Munich Hospital. The immunosuppressive regimen consisted of cyclosporine A, azathioprine, and prednisone. The diagnosis of acute rejection was based on cytoimmunologic monitoring, frequency analysis of fast Fourier transformed surface electrocardiograms (FFT-ECGs), and two-dimensional echocardiography. The results of these diagnostic methods were compared to the findings provided by endomyocardial biopsies, which were performed simultaneously with the noninvasive studies. Seventy patients underwent cytoimmunologic monitoring. In 88% of all rejection episodes, this technique revealed activated lymphocytes and lymphoblasts in the mononuclear concentrate of the peripheral blood samples; the presence of such cells is known to be an extremely early sign of acute rejection. Twenty-six patients were monitored by means of FFT-ECG. In 20 of the 21 cases of rejection, this method disclosed significant changes in the frequency spectrum of the QRS complex in the 70- to 110-Hz range; in 12 cases, these changes were the earliest sign of acute rejection. Therefore, FFT-ECG had a sensitivity of 95%. All of the QRS changes were reversible with rejection therapy. Forty-five patients were subjected to two-dimensional echocardiography. In 31 of the 35 cases of rejection, the echocardiogram showed a significant increase in the left ventricular wall thickness and a decrease in the left ventricular cross-sectional area during mild rejection. Moderate or severe rejection was characterized by an increase in the diastolic area, as well as a decrease in the systolic area change and in the diastolic maximum velocity of area change. Thus, two-dimensional echocardiography had a sensitivity of 89%. In the recent cases, the diagnosis of rejection was based on noninvasive methods alone. After rejection therapy had been instituted, endomyocardial

  5. Characteristics of recursive backstepping algorithm and active damping of oscillations in feedback linearization for electromechanical system with extended stability analysis and perturbation rejection.

    PubMed

    Anand, V; Narendran, R

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a technique for estimation of state variables and control of a class of electromechanical system is proposed. Initially, an attempt is made on rudimentary pole placement technique for the control of rotor position and angular velocity profiles of Permanent Magnet Stepper Motor. Later, an alternative approach is analyzed using feedback linearization method to reduce the error in tracking performances. A damping control scheme was additionally incorporated into the feedback linearization system in order to nullify the persistent oscillations present in the system. Furthermore, a robust backstepping controller with high efficacy is put forth to enhance the overall performance and to carry out disturbance rejection. The predominant advantage of this control technique is that it does not require the DQ Transformation of the motor dynamics. A Lyapunov candidate was employed to ensure global asymptotical stability criterion. Also, a nonlinear observer is presented to estimate the unknown states namely load torque and rotor angular velocity, even under load uncertainty conditions. Finally, the performances of all the aforementioned control schemes and estimation techniques are compared and analyzed extensively through simulation.

  6. Antagonism of antiviral and allogeneic activity of a human public CTL clonotype by a single altered peptide ligand: implications for allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, Lauren K.; Green, Katherine J.; Beddoe, Travis; Clements, Craig S.; Miles, John J.; Bottomley, Stephen P.; Zernich, Danielle; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie; Burrows, Scott R.

    2010-06-30

    Alloreactive T lymphocytes are central mediators of graft-versus-host disease and allograft rejection. A public CTL clonotype with specificity for the alloantigens HLA-B*4402 and B*4405 is often expanded to large numbers in healthy HLA-B*0801{sup +} individuals, driven by cross-reactive stimulation with the common, persistent herpesvirus EBV. Since such alloreactive memory CTL expansions have the potential to influence transplantation outcome, altered peptide ligands (APLs) of the target HLA-B*0801-binding EBV peptide, FLRGRAYGL, were screened as specific antagonists for this immunodominant clonotype. One APL, FLRGRFYGL, exerted powerful antagonism of a prototypic T cell clone expressing this immunodominant TCR when costimulated with target cells presenting HLA-B*0801{sup FLRGRAYGL}. Significantly, this APL also reduced the lysis of allogeneic target cells expressing HLA-B*4402 by up to 99%. The affinities of the agonist and antagonist complexes for the public TCR, measured using solution and solid-phase assays, were 8 and 138 {micro}M, respectively. Surprisingly, the half-life of the agonist and antagonist complexes was similar, yet the association rate for the antagonist complex was significantly slower. These observations were further supported by structural studies that suggested a large conformational hurdle was required to ligate the immunodominant TCR to the HLA-B*0801 antagonist complex. By defining an antagonist APL against an immunodominant alloreactive TCR, these findings raise the prospect of exploiting such peptides to inhibit clinical alloreactivity, particularly against clonal T cell expansions that react with alloantigens.

  7. Hypervigilance to Rejecting Stimuli in Rejection Sensitive Individuals: Behavioral and Neurocognitive Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Katherine B.; Gerson, Sarah A.; Vanderwert, Ross E.; Cannon, Erin N.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals who are high in rejection sensitivity are vigilant toward social cues that signal rejection, and they exhibit attention biases towards information that confirms expectations of rejection. Little is known, however, about the neural correlates of rejection sensitivity. The present study examined whether rejection sensitivity is associated with individuals’ neural responses to rejection-relevant information. Female participants, classified as high or average in rejection sensitivity, completed a modified dot-probe task in which a neutral face was paired with either another neutral face or a gaze-averted (“rejecting”) face while EEG was collected and ERP components were computed. Behavioral results indicated that average rejection sensitive participants showed an attention bias away from rejecting faces, while high rejection sensitive participants were equally vigilant to neutral and rejecting faces. High rejection sensitivity was associated with ERP components signaling elevated attention and arousal to faces. These findings suggest that rejection sensitivity shapes behavioral and neurocognitive responses to faces. PMID:26213434

  8. IgE and IgGa antibody-mediated release of histamine from rat peritoneal cells. II. Interaction of IgGa and IgE at the targe cell.

    PubMed

    Bach, M K; Block, K J; Austen, K F

    1971-04-01

    IgGa, in contrast to IgE, antibodies mediated the antigen-induced release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells without a requirement for a latent period and without the capacity to bind firmly to the target cell. Nonetheless, IgGa anti-DNP antibody interfered with the capacity of rat anti-N. brasiliensis antiserum rich in IgE antibodies to prepare the target cells for histamine release by worm antigen. Further, interaction of IgE antibody-prepared cells with IgGa anti-DNP antibody and DNP-BSA at 0 degrees C so as to achieve sterile activation, or at 30 degrees C to permit histamine release, inactivated such cells as determined by the subsequent failure to release histamine upon challenge with worm antigen. Thus, although IgE and IgGa antibodies are immunochemically distinct homologous immunoglobulins and exhibit different functional characteristics, their interaction at the target cell involves a common receptor and at least one common point in the pathway to the release of pharmacologic agents from the cell.

  9. [Effect of Yunnan-cobra venom factor in overcoming acute humoral rejection after allograft cardiac transplantation in presensitized recipients: experiment with rats].

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Chen, Gang; Guo, Hui; Wang, Da-wei; Xie, Lin; Wang, Shu-sen; Wang, Wan-yu; Xiong, Yu-liang; Chen, Shi

    2006-06-06

    shorter than that of the experimental group (99.50 +/- 38.72 hours, with a range of 23 - 153 hours, P < 0.01). Pathological examination showed that the acute humoral rejection in the control group was mainly complement-dependent antibody-mediated humoral rejection characterized by intravascular thrombosis, and that in the experimental group was mainly cellular rejection, characterized by extensive infiltration of mononuclear cells. Immunohistochemistry showed that remarkable IgG deposition was seen in the cardiac muscle cells and vascular endothelial cells in both groups; however, C3 deposition in vascular endothelial cells could be seen only in the control group. Administration of CVF is effective in overcoming the acute humoral rejection after allograft cardiac transplantation in presensitized recipients.

  10. Augmented orbiter heat rejection study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    Spacecraft radiator concepts are presented that relieve attitude restrictions required by the shuttle orbiter space radiator for baseline and extended capability STS missions. Cost effective heat rejection kits are considered which add additional capability in the form of attached spacelab radiators or a deployable radiator module.

  11. Vascular rejection in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Miller, L W; Wesp, A; Jennison, S H; Graham, M A; Martin, T W; McBride, L R; Pennington, D G; Peigh, P

    1993-01-01

    Antibody medicated (vascular) rejection has recently been described in heart transplantation. We report our experience with vascular rejection in a series of 62 patients who did not receive perioperative lymphocyte antibody therapy. Sixty-five rejections were reported, of which 58 (89%) were pure cellular; five (8%) had both cellular and vascular components, and two (3%) had only vascular rejection. Vascular rejection was very common in patients in whom hemodynamic compromise developed, and hemodynamic compromise was significantly more common in vascular than cellular rejection. Treatment for vascular rejection included plasmapheresis, intravenous methylprednisolone, and cyclophosphamide. Only one death occurred in this series, and that occurred in a patient with vascular rejection where the diagnosis and initiation of therapy were delayed. The role of vascular rejection in patients with hemodynamic compromise is discussed.

  12. Does chronic classroom peer rejection predict the development of children's classroom participation during the grade school years?

    PubMed

    Ladd, Gary W; Herald-Brown, Sarah L; Reiser, Mark

    2008-01-01

    A sample of 398 children was followed up from ages 5 to 12 to investigate the relation between peer group rejection and classroom participation. The participation trajectories of individuals and groups of children who were rejected for differing periods of time were examined both during and after rejection using piecewise growth curve analyses. The results showed that whereas during periods of rejection, children exhibited negative or negligible growth in participation, when nonrejected, they manifested positive growth. These findings corroborated the hypothesis that (a) peer rejection creates constraints that inhibit children's classroom participation and (b) the cessation of rejection enables children to become more active and cooperative participants in classroom activities.

  13. Late acute humoral rejection in low-risk renal transplant recipients induced with an interleukin-2 receptor antagonist and maintained with standard therapy: preliminary communication.

    PubMed

    Morales, J; Contreras, L; Zehnder, C; Pinto, V; Elberg, M; Araneda, S; Herzog, C; Calabran, L; Aguiló, J; Ferrario, M; Buckel, E; Fierro, J A

    2011-01-01

    Low-risk renal transplant recipients treated with standard immunosuppressive therapy including interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) antagonist show a low incidence of early rejection episodes but few reports have examined the incidence and severity of late rejection processes. This study evaluated retrospectively cellular and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) among 42 recipients selected because they showed low panel-reactive-antibodies, short cold ischemia time, no delayed graft function, and therapy including basiliximab (Simulect) induction. The mean observation time was 6.6 years. Sixty-seven percent of donors were deceased. Ten-year patient and death-censored graft survivals were 81% and 78%, respectively. Seven patients lost their kidneys due to nonimmunologic events. The seven recipients who experienced cellular rejection episodes during the first posttransplant year had them reversed with steroids. Five patients displayed late acute AMR causing functional deterioration in four cases including 1 graft loss. De novo sensitization occurred in 48% of recipients including patients without clinical rejection. In conclusion, long-term follow-up of kidney transplant recipients selected by a low immunologic risk showed a persistent risk of de novo sensitization evolving to acute AMR in 11% of cases. Although immunologic events were related to late immunosuppressive reduction, most graft losses were due to nonimmunologic factors.

  14. The Effect of Cortex/Medulla Proportions on Molecular Diagnoses in Kidney Transplant Biopsies: Rejection and Injury Can Be Assessed in Medulla.

    PubMed

    Madill-Thomsen, K S; Wiggins, R C; Eskandary, F; Böhmig, G A; Halloran, P F

    2017-08-01

    Histologic assessment of kidney transplant biopsies relies on cortex rather than medulla, but for microarray studies, the proportion cortex in a biopsy is typically unknown and could affect the molecular readings. The present study aimed to develop a molecular estimate of proportion cortex in biopsies and examine its effect on molecular diagnoses. Microarrays from 26 kidney transplant biopsies divided into cortex and medulla components and processed separately showed that many of the most significant differences were in glomerular genes (e.g. NPHS2, NPHS1, CLIC5, PTPRO, PLA2R1, PLCE1, PODXL, and REN). Using NPHS2 (podocin) to estimate proportion cortex, we examined whether proportion cortex influenced molecular assessment in the molecular microscope diagnostic system. In 1190 unselected kidney transplant indication biopsies (Clinicaltrials.govNCT01299168), only 11% had <50% cortex. Molecular scores for antibody-mediated rejection, T cell-mediated rejection, and injury were independent of proportion cortex. Rejection was diagnosed in many biopsies that were mostly or all medulla. Agreement in molecular diagnoses in paired cortex/medulla samples (23/26) was similar to biological replicates (32/37). We conclude that NPHS2 expression can estimate proportion cortex; that proportion cortex has little influence on molecular diagnosis of rejection; and that, although histology cannot assess medulla, rejection does occur in medulla as well as cortex. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  15. Control of Immune Response to Allogeneic Embryonic Stem Cells by CD3 Antibody-Mediated Operational Tolerance Induction.

    PubMed

    Calderon, D; Prot, M; You, S; Marquet, C; Bellamy, V; Bruneval, P; Valette, F; de Almeida, P; Wu, J C; Pucéat, M; Menasché, P; Chatenoud, L

    2016-02-01

    Implantation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and their differentiated derivatives into allogeneic hosts triggers an immune response that represents a hurdle to clinical application. We established in autoimmunity and in transplantation that CD3 antibody therapy induces a state of immune tolerance. Promising results have been obtained with CD3 antibodies in the clinic. In this study, we tested whether this strategy can prolong the survival of undifferentiated ESCs and their differentiated derivatives in histoincompatible hosts. Recipients of either mouse ESC-derived embryoid bodies (EBs) or cardiac progenitors received a single short tolerogenic regimen of CD3 antibody. In immunocompetent mice, allogeneic EBs and cardiac progenitors were rejected within 20-25 days. Recipients treated with CD3 antibody showed long-term survival of implanted cardiac progenitors or EBs. In due course, EBs became teratomas, the growth of which was self-limited. Regulatory CD4(+)FoxP3(+) T cells and signaling through the PD1/PDL1 pathway played key roles in the CD3 antibody therapeutic effect. Gene profiling emphasized the importance of TGF-β and the inhibitory T cell coreceptor Tim3 to the observed effect. These results demonstrate that CD3 antibody administered alone promotes prolonged survival of allogeneic ESC derivatives and thus could prove useful for enhancing cell engraftment in the absence of chronic immunosuppression. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  16. Response to abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy in postmenopausal woman with anti-yo antibody mediated paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Amita; Bhushan, Bharat; Kasundra, Gaurav M; Shubhakaran, Khichar; Pujar, Guruprasad S; Banakar, Basavaraj

    2014-07-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is a rare neurological disorder characterized by a widespread loss of Purkinje cells associated with a progressive pancerebellar dysfunction. PCD often precedes the cancer diagnosis by months to years. Here, we report a case of 44-year old postmenopausal woman who presented with PCD symptoms and high levels of anti-Yo antibodies titer since 8 months. We failed to conclude any neoplastic focus after thorough laboratory and imaging study. She minimally responded to methylprednisolone and immunoglobulin therapies. Despite therapy she was severely disabled. Planned abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (AHBSO) was done, histology revealed grade IIA borderline serous papillary carcinoma of ovary. Her neurological deficit responded dramatically to AHBSO. It is first case report who emphasize the response of AHBSO with presentation of anti-Yo antibody-mediated PCD and hidden nidus in post menopausal women.

  17. A web-based pilot study of inter-pathologist reproducibility using the ISHLT 2004 working formulation for biopsy diagnosis of cardiac allograft rejection: the European experience.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Annalisa; Andersen, Claus Boegelund; Bartoloni, Giovanni; Black, Fiona; Bishop, Paul; Doran, Helen; Fedrigo, Marny; Fries, Jochen W U; Goddard, Martin; Goebel, Heike; Neil, Desley; Leone, Ornella; Marzullo, Andrea; Ortmann, Monika; Paraf, Francois; Rotman, Samuel; Turhan, Nesrin; Bruneval, Patrick; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Grigoletto, Francesco; Gasparetto, Alessio; Mencarelli, Roberto; Thiene, Gaetano; Burke, Margaret

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess, at the European level and using digital technology, the inter-pathologist reproducibility of the ISHLT 2004 system and to compare it with the 1990 system We also assessed the reproducibility of the morphologic criteria for diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection detailed in the 2004 grading system. The hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections of 20 sets of endomyocardial biopsies were pre-selected and graded by two pathologists (A.A. and M.B.) and digitized using a telepathology digital pathology system (Aperio ImageScope System; for details refer to http://aperio.com/). Their diagnoses were considered the index diagnoses, which covered all grades of acute cellular rejection (ACR), early ischemic lesions, Quilty lesions, late ischemic lesions and (in the 2005 system) antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Eighteen pathologists from 16 heart transplant centers in 7 European countries participated in the study. Inter-observer reproducibility was assessed using Fleiss's kappa and Krippendorff's alpha statistics. The combined kappa value of all grades diagnosed by all 18 pathologists was 0.31 for the 1990 grading system and 0.39 for the 2005 grading system, with alpha statistics at 0.57 and 0.55, respectively. Kappa values by grade for 1990/2005, respectively, were: 0 = 0.52/0.51; 1A/1R = 0.24/0.36; 1B = 0.15; 2 = 0.13; 3A/2R = 0.29/0.29; 3B/3R = 0.13/0.23; and 4 = 0.18. For the 2 cases of AMR, 6 of 18 pathologists correctly suspected AMR on the hematoxylin-eosin slides, whereas, in each of 17 of the 18 AMR-negative cases a small percentage of pathologists (range 5% to 33%) overinterpreted the findings as suggestive for AMR. Reproducibility studies of cardiac biopsies by pathologists in different centers at the international level were feasible using digitized slides rather than conventional histology glass slides. There was a small improvement in interobserver agreement between pathologists of different European centers when moving from the

  18. Evidence for Antibody-Mediated Enhancement of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Gag Antigen Processing and Cross Presentation in SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Villinger, Francois; Mayne, Ann E.; Bostik, Pavel; Mori, Kazuyasu; Jensen, Peter E.; Ahmed, Rafi; Ansari, Aftab A.

    2003-01-01

    By using the dominant simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag Mamu-A01 restricted major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitope p11CM, we demonstrate antibody-mediated enhanced MHC class I cross presentation of SIV Gag. In vitro restimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from SIV-infected rhesus macaques with recombinant full-length SIV Gag p55 plus p55 affinity-purified immunoglobulin G (p55 Gag/p55-IgG) led to the generation of markedly higher frequencies of p11CM specific precursor cytotoxic T lymphocytes (p-CTLs) compared with restimulation with (i) SIV Gag p55 alone or (ii) optimal concentrations of the p11CM peptide alone. These results, along with the finding that CD4 depletion abrogated the enhancement, suggest a prominent role for CD4+ T cells. Testing for p-CTLs against other Mamu-A01-restricted SIV Gag epitopes suggested that this mechanism favored recognition of the dominant p11CM peptide, potentially further skewing of the CTL response. The p-CTL enhancing effect was also decreased or abrogated by pepsin digestion of the p55-specific IgG or by the addition of monoclonal antibodies to Fc receptor (FcR) II/III, suggesting that the effect was dependent on FcR-mediated uptake of the immune-complexed antigen. Finally, incubation of antigen-presenting cells with SIV Gag p55 immune complexes in the presence of lactacystin or of bafilomycin indicated that the mechanism of antibody-mediated enhancement of cross presentation required both the proteasomal and the endosomal pathways. These data demonstrate for the first time the cross presentation of antigens via immune complexes in lentiviral infection and indicate a heretofore-unrecognized role for antibodies in modulating the magnitude and potentially also the breadth of MHC class I-restricted antigen processing and presentation and CTL responses. PMID:12477806

  19. Anti-Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated apoptosis of cultured human glioma cells. Induction and modulation of sensitivity by cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Weller, M; Frei, K; Groscurth, P; Krammer, P H; Yonekawa, Y; Fontana, A

    1994-01-01

    Fas/APO-1 is a transmembrane protein of the nerve growth factor/TNF alpha receptor family which signals apoptotic cell death in susceptible target cells. We have investigated the susceptibility of seven human malignant glioma cell lines to Fas/APO-1-dependent apoptosis. Sensitivity to Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated cell killing correlated with cell surface expression of Fas/APO-1. Expression of Fas/APO-1 as well as Fas/APO-1-dependent cytotoxicity were augmented by preexposure of human malignant glioma cells to IFN gamma and TNF alpha. Further, pretreatment with TGF beta 2, IL1 and IL8 enhanced Fas/APO-1 antibody-induced glioma cell apoptosis whereas other cytokines including TNF beta, IL6, macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IL10 and IL13 had no such effect. None of the human malignant glioma cell lines was susceptible to TNF alpha-induced cytotoxicity. Fas/APO-1 antibody-sensitive glioma cell lines (n = 5), but not Fas/APO-1 antibody-resistant glioma cell lines (n = 2), became sensitive to TNF alpha when co-treated with inhibitors of RNA and protein synthesis. Resistance of human glioma cells to Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated apoptosis was mainly related to low level expression of Fas/APO-1 and appeared not to be linked to overexpression of the anti-apoptotic protooncogene, bcl-2. Given the resistance of human malignant glioma to surgery, irradiation, chemotherapy and immunotherapy, we propose that Fas/APO-1 may be a promising target for a novel locoregionary approach to human malignant glioma. This strategy gains support from the demonstration of Fas/APO-1 expression in ex vivo human malignant glioma specimens and from the absence of Fas/APO-1 in normal human brain parenchyma. Images PMID:7521890

  20. A systematic study of the N-glycosylation sites of HIV-1 envelope protein on infectivity and antibody-mediated neutralization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenbo; Nie, Jianhui; Prochnow, Courtney; Truong, Carolyn; Jia, Zheng; Wang, Suting; Chen, Xiaojiang S; Wang, Youchun

    2013-02-06

    Glycans on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoprotein (Env) play an important role in viral infection and evasion of neutralization by antibodies. In this study, all 25 potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGS) on the HIV-1 CRF07_BC Env, FE, were mutated individually to study the effect of their removal on viral infectivity, virion production, and antibody-mediated neutralization. Removal of specific N-glycosylation sites has a significant effect on viral infectivity and antibody-mediated neutralization phenotype. Six of these glycosylation mutants located on the V1/V2 and C1/C2 domains lost infectivity. PNGS mutations located on V4/C4/V5 (except N392 on V4), were shown to increase viral infectivity. Furthermore, FE is much more dependent on specific glycans than clade B Env YU-2. On neutralization effect, PNGS mutations at N197 (C2), N301 (V3), N442 (C4) and N625 (gp41) rendered the virus more susceptible to neutralization by the monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize the CD4 binding site or gp41. Generally, mutations on V4/V5 loops, C2/C3/C4 regions and gp41 reduced the neutralization sensitivity to PG16. However, mutation of N289 (C2) made the virus more sensitive to both PG9 and PG16. Furthermore, we showed that mutations at N142 (V1), N355 (C3) and N463 (V5) conferred resistance to neutralization by anti-gp41 MAbs. We used the available structural information of HIV Env and homology modeling to provide a structural basis for the observed biological effects of these mutations. This report provides the first systematic experimental account of the biological role of the entire PNGS on an HIV-1 Env, which should provide valuable insights for understanding the function of Env in HIV infection cycle and for developing future anti-HIV strategies.

  1. GPS antenna multipath rejection performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinius, A. M.

    1995-08-01

    A GPS antenna multipath rejection performance evaluation was conducted. Ground reference station antennas and aviation patches were tested for their ability to reject a multipath signal. Different types of ground plane structures were used such as choke rings, ground planes, and mock sections of fuselage. Frequencies transmitted were L1 (1575 MHz), L2 (1227 MHz), and the median GLONASS frequency (1609 MHz). Receive amplitude and phase were measured on each antenna. Subsequently, these data were converted to absolute gain for a right hand and left hand circularly polarized signal as a function of satellite elevation angle. Two types of multipath signals were considered: ground bounce multipath and building or structure bounce multipath. Ground bounce multipath typically occurs at low satellite elevation angles while structure bounce multipath can occur at any satellite elevation angle. Separate analysis methods were used to assess an antenna's ability to reject either type of multipath. This report describes the data collection methods, data reduction and analysis, and the results.

  2. Two distinct pathways of immuno-modulation improve potency of p53 immunization in rejecting established tumors.

    PubMed

    Daftarian, Pirouz; Song, Guang-Yun; Ali, Saima; Faynsod, Moshe; Longmate, Jeff; Diamond, Don J; Ellenhorn, Joshua D I

    2004-08-01

    The p53 gene product is overexpressed by almost 50% of cancers, making it an ideal target for cancer immunotherapy. We previously demonstrated rejection of established p53-overexpressing tumors without stimulating autoimmunity by immunization with modified vaccinia Ankara-expressing murine p53 (MVAp53). Tumor rejection was enhanced through antibody-mediated CTL-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) blockade. We examined the role of synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing unmethylated cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) motifs (CpG ODN) in enhancing MVAp53-mediated tumor rejection. CpG ODN with MVAp53 resulted in tumor rejection in BALB/c mice bearing poorly immunogenic 11A-1 murine mammary carcinomas or Meth A sarcomas and C57Bl/6 mice bearing MC-38 colon carcinomas. The effect was similar to that seen in tumor-bearing mice treated with MVAp53 along with CTLA-4 blockade. Monoclonal antibody depletion experiments demonstrated that the adjuvant effects of CpG ODN and CTLA-4 blockades were CD8 dependent. CpG ODN were partially natural killer cell dependent and ineffective in Toll-like Receptor 9(-/-) and interleukin 6(-/-) mice, whereas CTLA-4 blockade was partially CD4 dependent and functional in Toll-like Receptor 9(-/-) and interleukin 6(-/-) mice. In addition, when administered with MVAp53, both adjuvants enhanced p53-specific cytotoxicity and demonstrated an additive effect when combined. The combination of CpG ODN and CTLA-4 blockade worked synergistically to reject palpable 11A-1 and MC-38 tumors. These experiments demonstrate the potential for augmenting MVAp53-mediated antitumor immunity using CpG ODN and CTLA-4 blockade. This cell-free immunotherapy approach is a candidate for evaluation in cancer patients.

  3. 7 CFR 58.136 - Rejected milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rejected milk. 58.136 Section 58.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Milk § 58.136 Rejected milk. A plant shall reject specific milk from a producer if the milk fails...

  4. On fiber rejection loss in flotation deinking

    Treesearch

    J.Y. Zhu; Freya Tan

    2005-04-01

    Reducing fiber rejection loss in flotation deinking is very important to conserve natural resources and reduce the cost of secondary fibers in paper recycling. This study examined two aspects of the problem, fiber consistency in the rejection stream and rate of Froth (or wet stream) rejection. Flotation experiments were conducted using both nylon and wood fibers in...

  5. Peer Group Rejection and Children's Outgroup Prejudice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesdale, Drew; Durkin, Kevin; Maass, Anne; Kiesner, Jeff; Griffiths, Judith; Daly, Josh; McKenzie, David

    2010-01-01

    Two simulation studies examined the effect of peer group rejection on 7 and 9 year old children's outgroup prejudice. In Study 1, children (n = 88) pretended that they were accepted or rejected by their assigned group, prior to competing with a lower status outgroup. Results indicated that rejected versus accepted children showed increased…

  6. Social Causes and Consequences of Rejection Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Bonita; Downey, Geraldine; Bonica, Cheryl; Paltin, Iris

    2007-01-01

    Predictions from the Rejection Sensitivity (RS) model concerning the social causes and consequences of RS were examined in a longitudinal study of 150 middle school students. Peer nominations of rejection, self-report measures of anxious and angry rejection expectations, and social anxiety, social withdrawal, and loneliness were assessed at two…

  7. Aggressive Rejected Children: Implications for School Psychologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waas, Gregory A.

    1987-01-01

    Used sociometric rating procedure to classify third and fifth grade boys (N=64) as peer-rejected. Standardized teacher ratings classified students as aggressive. Significant portion of rejected students were rated as highly aggressive. Aggressive rejected groups were rated as exhibiting lower achievement motivation and higher levels of hostile…

  8. 7 CFR 58.136 - Rejected milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rejected milk. 58.136 Section 58.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Milk § 58.136 Rejected milk. A plant shall reject specific milk from a producer if the milk fails to...

  9. 7 CFR 58.136 - Rejected milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rejected milk. 58.136 Section 58.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Milk § 58.136 Rejected milk. A plant shall reject specific milk from a producer if the milk fails to...

  10. 7 CFR 58.136 - Rejected milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rejected milk. 58.136 Section 58.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Milk § 58.136 Rejected milk. A plant shall reject specific milk from a producer if the milk fails to...

  11. 7 CFR 58.136 - Rejected milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rejected milk. 58.136 Section 58.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Milk § 58.136 Rejected milk. A plant shall reject specific milk from a producer if the milk fails...

  12. Study of Background Rejection Systems for the IXO Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Philippe; Limousin, O.; Tatischeff, V.

    2009-01-01

    The scientific performances of the IXO mission will necessitate a very low detector background level. This will imply thorough background simulations, and efficient background rejection systems. It necessitates also a very good knowledge of the detectors to be shielded. In APC, Paris, and CEA, Saclay, we got experience on these activities by conceiving and optimising in parallel the high energy detector and the active and passive background rejection system of the Simbol-X mission. Considering that this work may be naturally extended to other X-ray missions, we have initiated with CNES a R&D project on the study of background rejection systems mainly in view the IXO project. We will detail this activity in the poster.

  13. Mechanisms of rejection: role of complement.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Conrad A; Sacks, Steven H

    2014-02-01

    To provide the reader with an up-to-date comprehensive review of recent findings that highlight advances describing how proteins of the complement cascades contribute to the pathogenesis of solid organ rejection. The review is focussed mainly on renal transplantation. Of note are recent advances in elucidating the interactions between anaphylatoxins and their receptors in organ transplantation; there is evidence of direct engagement of C5aR on donor tubules and in addition, mechanisms by which the allostimulatory capacity of dendritic cells is modulated by complement are more fully understood. Activation of the lectin pathway is increasingly implicated in allograft rejection and the role of complement in modulating regulatory T cells is being vigorously investigated. As an alternative to systemic complement inhibition, there is continued focus on the design of targeted anti-complement therapies, directed to the donor organ. Complement has evolved as the first line of defence against pathogens, employing well defined effector mechanisms to rapidly remove infectious material. However, complement effector mechanisms are also triggered during inflammation associated with solid organ transplantation. Hence, complement has a significant role in mediating donor organ injury during both the initial ischaemia/reperfusion phase and the subsequent adaptive immune responses. Research on mechanisms of complement-mediated injury in transplantation provide a basis for the development of therapies that are aimed at transiently blocking complement activation at the site of injury, whereas leaving systemic anti-bacterial complement effector mechanisms intact.

  14. 48 CFR 19.505 - Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... activity (or designee) shall forward justification for its decision to the agency head. The contracting... representative is not assigned, see 19.402(a)) may appeal the contracting officer's rejection to the head of the contracting activity (or designee) within 2 working days after receiving the notice. The head of the...

  15. 48 CFR 19.505 - Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... activity (or designee) shall forward justification for its decision to the agency head. The contracting... representative is not assigned, see 19.402(a)) may appeal the contracting officer's rejection to the head of the contracting activity (or designee) within 2 working days after receiving the notice. The head of the...

  16. Bortezomib for antibody mediated rejection treatment: experience at the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Leyva, Sergio; Marino-Vázquez, Lluvia A; Reyes-Loaeza, Jorge A; Vega, Olynka; Uribe-Uribe, Norma; Alberú, Josefina; Morales-Buenrostro, Luis E

    2009-01-01

    The use of bortezomib as a treatment modality of AHR improved and stabilized graft function (clinical response) in the majority of patients. Its use in single dose, even combined with rituximab, does not seem to be useful to obtain a sustained clinical response neither to reduce HLAabs level. The use of 4 doses of bortezomib in days 1, 4, 7, and 10 (1.3 mg/m2 BSA each) plus plasmapheresis produced both a good clinical response and a reduction in DSA. Moving forward, it will necessary to define the long-term effectiveness of bortezomib and whether rituximab administration is indispensable to achieve this goal.

  17. The persistent elimination of B cells responding to blood group A carbohydrates by synthetic group A carbohydrates and B-1 cell differentiation blockade: novel concept in preventing antibody-mediated rejection in ABO-incompatible transplantation.

    PubMed

    Irei, Toshimitsu; Ohdan, Hideki; Zhou, Wendy; Ishiyama, Kohei; Tanaka, Yuka; Ide, Kentaro; Asahara, Toshimasa

    2007-12-15

    We demonstrated a novel strategy for specific and persistent inhibition of antibody (Ab) production against blood group A or B carbohydrate determinants necessary for successful ABO-incompatible transplantation. Similar to human blood group O or B individuals, mice have naturally occurring Abs against human blood group A carbohydrates in their sera. B cells with receptors for A carbohydrates in mice belonging to the CD5(+)CD11b(+)B-1a subset have phenotypic properties similar to those of human B cells. These cells could be temporarily eliminated by injecting synthetic A carbohydrates (GalNAcalpha1-3, Fucalpha1-2Gal) conjugated to bovine serum albumin (A-BSA) and anti-BSA Abs. In mice that received the injection of A-BSA/anti-BSA Abs, the serum levels of anti-A IgM were reduced, but immunization with human A erythrocytes resulted in increased serum levels of anti-A Abs. When combined with cyclosporin A (CsA) treatment, which blocks B-1a cell differentiation, and treatment with A-BSA/anti-BSA Abs, the serum levels of anti-A Abs were persistently undetectable in the mice even after the immunization. B cells with receptors for A carbohydrates were markedly reduced in these mice. These results are consistent with the hypotheses that treatment with A-BSA/anti-BSA Abs temporarily depletes B cells responding to A determinants, and CsA treatment prevents the replenishment of these cells.

  18. Histopathologic changes in anti-angiotensin II type 1 receptor antibody-positive kidney transplant recipients with acute rejection and no donor specific HLA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mary Ann; Palmer, Matthew; Trofe-Clark, Jennifer; Bloom, Roy D; Jackson, Annette; Philogene, Mary Carmelle; Kamoun, Malek

    2017-04-01

    To determine the association of antibodies against angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R Ab) and histopathologic changes seen in patients with kidney allograft rejection and negative donor specific HLA antibodies (DSA). Stored sera from 27 patients who had biopsy-proven rejection in the absence of DSA were tested for AT1R Ab. Biopsy slides of all patients were re-examined and classified according to Banff 2013 criteria. Histopathologic changes were compared between AT1R positive and negative patients. 75% of patients with positive pre-transplant AT1R Ab had antibody mediated rejection (AMR) compared to 37% of AT1R Ab-negative patients. A trend towards increased interstitial inflammation was observed in the AT1R Ab positive group (p=0.08). More patients in the AT1R Ab positive group had microcirculation inflammation (88% vs 58% with glomerulitis scores ≥1; 75% vs 58% with peritubular capillaritis scores ≥1). In kidney transplant recipients with rejection and no DSA, a higher incidence of AMR and worse inflammation scores are observed in the presence of positive pre-transplant AT1R antibodies. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Transient blockade of Delta-like Notch ligands prevents allograft rejection mediated by cellular and humoral mechanisms in a mouse model of heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Sherri; Feng, Jiane; Chung, Jooho; Radojcic, Vedran; Sandy, Ashley R.; Friedman, Ann; Shelton, Amy; Yan, Minhong; Siebel, Christian W.; Bishop, D. Keith; Maillard, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Rejection remains a major clinical challenge limiting allograft survival after solid organ transplantation. Both cellular and humoral immunity contribute to this complication, with increased recognition of antibody-mediated damage during acute and chronic rejection. Using a mouse model of MHC-mismatched heart transplantation, we report markedly protective effects of Notch inhibition, dampening both T cell and antibody-driven rejection. T cell-specific pan-Notch blockade prolonged heart allograft survival and decreased IFNγ and IL-4 production by alloreactive T cells, especially when combined with depletion of recipient CD8+ T cells. These effects were associated with decreased infiltration by conventional T cells and an increased proportion of regulatory T cells in the graft. Transient administration of neutralizing antibodies specific for Delta-like1/4 (Dll1/4) Notch ligands in the peri-transplant period led to prolonged acceptance of allogeneic hearts, with superior outcome over Notch inhibition only in T cells. Systemic Dll1/4 inhibition decreased T cell cytokines and graft infiltration, but also germinal center B cell and plasmablast numbers as well as production of donor-specific alloantibodies and complement deposition in the transplanted hearts. Dll1 or Dll4 inhibition alone provided partial protection. Thus, pathogenic signals delivered by Dll1/4 Notch ligands early after transplantation promote organ rejection through several complementary mechanisms. Transient interruption of theses signals represents a new attractive therapeutic strategy to enhance long-term allograft survival. PMID:25687759

  20. Development of PET Imaging to Visualize Activated Macrophages Accumulated in the Transplanted iPSc-Derived Cardiac Myocytes of Allogeneic Origin for Detecting the Immune Rejection of Allogeneic Cell Transplants in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kashiyama, Noriyuki; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Fukushima, Satsuki; Kawamura, Takuji; Kawamura, Ai; Yoshida, Shohei; Harada, Akima; Watabe, Tadashi; Kanai, Yasukazu; Toda, Koichi; Hatazawa, Jun; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic transplantation (Tx) of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is a promising tissue regeneration therapy. However, this inevitably induces macrophage-mediated immune response against the graft, limiting its therapeutic efficacy. Monitoring the magnitude of the immune response using imaging tools would be useful for prolonging graft survival and increasing the therapy longevity. Minimally invasive quantitative detection of activated macrophages by medical imaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET) imaging targets translocator protein (TSPO), which is highly expressed on mitochondrial membrane, especially in activated macrophage. N,N-diethyl-2-[4-(2-fluoroethoxy) phenyl]-5,7-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-3-acetamide (DPA-714) is known as a TSPO ligand used in clinical settings. We herein hypothesized that immune rejection of the transplanted iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) of allogeneic origin may be quantitated using 18F-DPA-714-PET imaging study. iPSC-CM cell-sheets of C57BL/6 mice origin were transplanted on the surface of the left ventricle (LV) of C57BL/6 mice as a syngeneic cell-transplant model (syngeneic Tx group), or Balb/c mice as an allogeneic model (allogeneic Tx group). 18F-DPA-714-PET was used to determine the uptake ratio, calculated as the maximum standardized uptake value in the anterior and septal wall of the LV. The uptake ratio was significantly higher in the allogeneic Tx group than in the syngeneic group or the sham group at days 7 and day 10 after the cell transplantation. In addition, the immunochemistry showed significant presence of CD68 and CD3-positive cells at day 7 and 10 in the transplanted graft of the allogeneic Tx group. The expression of TSPO, CD68, IL-1 beta, and MCP-1 was significantly higher in the allogeneic Tx group than in the syngeneic Tx and the sham groups at day 7. The 18F-DPA-714-PET imaging study enabled quantitative visualization of the macrophages-mediated immune rejection of

  1. Fate of articles rejected by Indian Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Pooja; Gupta, Piyush; Shah, Dheeraj

    2010-12-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the fate of manuscripts rejected by Indian Pediatrics (IP), and to identify the factors facilitating publication of a rejected manuscript elsewhere. Database (PubMed, IndMed) and Google searches were performed to trace the manuscripts published elsewhere any time after rejection by Indian Pediatrics in the year 2002. Eighteen per cent of the rejected submissions (62 out of 347) were eventually (till July 2009) published elsewhere. These manuscripts subsequently appeared in 33 different journals; Indian Journal of Pediatrics published the maximum numbers (n=22). Seventy four per cent of the rejected papers were published in journals with a impact factor lesser than Indian Pediatrics. Rejection before initiating peer-review, and rejection on the grounds of over-interpretation of results or poor statistical analysis diminished the chances of subsequent publication, whereas manuscripts rejected on grounds of poor originality or poor language had greater chances of being published elsewhere. Rejection of a manuscript by IP does not preclude publication, but rejected manuscripts are published more often in non-pediatric journals or journals with a lower impact factor, although the occasional exception exists.

  2. B Lymphocytes Differentially Influence Acute and Chronic Allograft Rejection in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    DiLillo, David J.; Griffiths, Robert; Seshan, Surya V.; Magro, Cynthia M.; Ruiz, Phillip; Coffman, Thomas M.; Tedder, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    The relative contributions of B lymphocytes and plasma cells during allograft rejection remain unclear. Therefore, the effects of B cell depletion on acute cardiac rejection, chronic renal rejection, and skin graft rejection were compared using CD20 or CD19 mAbs. Both CD20 and CD19 mAbs effectively depleted mature B cells, while CD19 mAb treatment depleted plasmablasts and some plasma cells. B cell depletion did not affect acute cardiac allograft rejection, although CD19 mAb treatment prevented allograft-specific IgG production. Strikingly, CD19 mAb treatment significantly reduced renal allograft rejection and abrogated allograft-specific IgG development, while CD20 mAb treatment did not. By contrast, B cell depletion exacerbated skin allograft rejection and augmented the proliferation of adoptively transferred alloantigen-specific CD4+ T cells, demonstrating that B cells can also negatively regulate allograft rejection. Thereby, B cells can either positively or negatively regulate allograft rejection depending on the nature of the allograft and the intensity of the rejection response. Moreover, CD19 mAb may represent a new approach for depleting both B cells and plasma cells to concomitantly impair T cell activation, inhibit the generation of new allograft-specific Abs, or reduce preexisting allograft-specific Ab levels in transplant patients. PMID:21248259

  3. Microarray analysis of tick-infested skin in resistant and susceptible cattle confirms the role of inflammatory pathways in immune activation and larval rejection.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Wanessa Araújo; Domingues, Robert; de Azevedo Prata, Marcia Cristina; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius G B; de Oliveira, Guilherme Corrêa; Guimarães, Simone Eliza Facioni; Machado, Marco Antônio

    2014-09-15

    Tick bites promote activation of an inflammatory process that is influenced by bovine genetic composition and its history of previous exposure. Taurine and indicine breeds are known to differ on its immune response development against Rhipicephalus microplus. Nevertheless, further investigation about the complex molecular pathways involved in the development of immune response to tick infestation in cattle presenting the same genetic background is mandatory. The aim of this work was to access the early immune response triggered by R. microplus larvae attachment in previously selected resistant and susceptible animals in a bovine F2 population derived from Gyr (Bos indicus)×Holstein (Bos taurus) crosses. Microarray data analysis of RNA samples from tick infested skin was used to evaluate the gene expression at 0, 24 and 48h after R. microplus larvae attachment. Our experimental design allowed us to deeply explore the immune response related to R. microplus infestation avoiding the innate differences between these breeds. The differentially expressed genes found reveal networks and pathways that suggest a key role of lipid metabolism in inflammation control and impairment of tick infestation in resistant animals. Acute phase response also seems to be impaired in susceptible animals. These results provide new insights about early immune response against ticks and raise the possibility of using immunomodulation processes to improve and develop novel tools for tick control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Electronically controlled rejections of spoof surface plasmons polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong Jin; Xiao, Qian Xun

    2017-03-01

    We have proposed and experimentally demonstrated a band-notched surface plasmonic filter, which is composed of an ultra-wide passband plasmonic filter with a simple C-shaped ring on the back of the substrate. Enhanced narrowband or broadband rejections of spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can be achieved with double C-shaped rings in the propagation or transverse direction. By mounting active components across the slit cut in the C-shaped ring, dynamic control of rejection of spoof SPPs can be accomplished. Both the rejection of spoof SPPs and the rejection bandwidth can be controlled when the Schottky barrier diode is forward-biased or reverse-biased. The frequency spectrum of the rejection band can be electronically adjusted by tuning the applied bias voltage across the varactor diode. Both simulated and measured results agree well and demonstrate dynamic control of propagation of spoof SPPs at the microwave frequencies. Such electronically controllable devices could find more applications in advanced plasmonic integrated functional circuits in microwave and terahertz frequencies.

  5. Renal allograft rejection: sonography and scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A.; Cohen, W.N.

    1980-07-01

    A total of 30 renal allograft patients who had sonographic B scanning and radionuclide studies of the transplant was studied as to whether: (1) the allograft rejection was associated with any consistent and reliable sonographic features and (2) the sonograms complemented the radionuclide studies. Focal areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistent sonographic finding in chymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistens sonographic finding in allograft rejection. This was observed in most of the patients exhibiting moderate or severe rejection, but was frequently absent with mild rejection. Areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were not seen during episodes of acute tubular necrosis. Therefore, sonography showing zones of decreased parenchymal echogenicity was complementary to radionuclide studies in the diagnosis of allograft rejection versus acute tubular necrosis. Corticomedullary demarcation was difficult to interpret because of technical variables, and was inconsistently related to rejection in this series.

  6. Renal graft irradiation in acute rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Pilepich, M.V.; Sicard, G.A.; Breaux, S.R.; Etheredge, E.E.; Blum, J.; Anderson, C.B.

    1983-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of graft irradiation in the treatment of acute rejection of renal transplants, a randomized study was conducted from 1978 to 1981. Patients with acute rejection were given standard medical management in the form of intravenous methylprednisolone, and were chosen randomly to receive either graft irradiation (175 rads every other day, to a total of 525 rads) or simulated (sham) irradiation. Eighty-three rejections occurring in 64 grafts were randomized to the protocol. Rejection reversal was recorded in 84.5% of control grafts and 75% of the irradiated grafts. Recurrent rejections were more frequent and graft survival was significantly lower in the irradiated group (22%) than in the control group (54%). Graft irradiation does not appear to be beneficial in the treatment of acute rejection of renal transplants when used in conjunction with high-dose steroids.

  7. Collagen Sponge Functionalized with Chimeric Anti-BMP-2 Monoclonal Antibody Mediates Repair of Critical-Size Mandibular Continuity Defects in a Nonhuman Primate Model

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yilin; Su, Yingying; Tang, Jianxia; Goh, Bee Tin; Saigo, Leonardo; Zhang, Chunmei; Wang, Jinsong; Khojasteh, Arash; Wang, Songlin

    2017-01-01

    Antibody-mediated osseous regeneration (AMOR) has been introduced by our research group as a tissue engineering approach to capture of endogenous growth factors through the application of specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) immobilized on a scaffold. Specifically, anti-Bone Morphogenetic Protein- (BMP-) 2 mAbs have been demonstrated to be efficacious in mediating bone repair in a number of bone defects. The present study sought to investigate the application of AMOR for repair of mandibular continuity defect in nonhuman primates. Critical-sized mandibular continuity defects were created in Macaca fascicularis locally implanted with absorbable collagen sponges (ACS) functionalized with chimeric anti-BMP-2 mAb or isotype control mAb. 2D and 3D analysis of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging demonstrated increased bone density and volume observed within mandibular continuity defects implanted with collagen scaffolds functionalized with anti-BMP-2 mAb, compared with isotype-matched control mAb. Both CBCT imaging and histologic examination demonstrated de novo bone formation that was in direct apposition to the margins of the resected bone. It is hypothesized that bone injury may be necessary for AMOR. This is evidenced by de novo bone formation adjacent to resected bone margins, which may be the source of endogenous BMPs captured by anti-BMP-2 mAb, in turn mediating bone repair. PMID:28401163

  8. A CD40 Kozak sequence polymorphism and susceptibility to antibody-mediated autoimmune conditions: the role of CD40 tissue-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, E M; Huber, A K; Akeno, N; Sivak, M; Li, C W; Concepcion, E; Ho, K; Tomer, Y

    2007-04-01

    Previously, we and others have demonstrated the association of a C/T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), in the Kozak sequence of CD40, with Graves' disease (GD). Here, using an expanded data set of patients, we confirm the association of the CD40 SNP with GD (n=210, P=0.002, odds ratio (OR)=1.8). Subset analysis of patients with persistently elevated thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and/or thyroglobulin (Tg) antibodies (Abs), (TPO/Tg Abs), after treatment (n=126), revealed a significantly stronger association of the SNP with disease (P=5.2 x 10(-5), OR=2.5) than in GD patients who were thyroid antibody-negative. However, the CD40 SNP was not associated with TPO/Tg Abs in healthy individuals. Next, we tested the CD40 SNP for association with Myasthenia Gravis (MG), which, like GD is an antibody-mediated autoimmune condition. Analysis of 81 MG patients found no association of the SNP with disease. Functional studies revealed significant expression of CD40 mRNA and protein in the thyroid (target tissue in GD) but not in skeletal muscle (target tissue in MG). Combined, our genetic and tissue expression data suggest that the CD40 Kozak SNP is specific for thyroid antibody production involved in the etiology of GD. Increased thyroidal expression of CD40 driven by the SNP may contribute to this disease specificity.

  9. [Tubulointerstitial rejection of renal allografts].

    PubMed

    Malušková, Jana; Honsová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Tubulo-intersticial rejection represents T-cell mediated rejection of kidney allografts with the morphology of immune-mediated interstitial nephritis. Diagnosis is dependent on the histopathological evaluation of a graft biopsy sample. The key morphological features are interstitial inflammatory infiltrate and damage to tubular epithelial cell which in severe cases can result in the ruptures of the tubular basement membranes. The differential diagnosis of tubulo-interstitial rejection includes acute interstitial nephritis and viral inflammatory kidney diseases, mainly polyomavirus nephropathy.

  10. Failure to diagnose cardiac treatment rejection with Tc99m-PYP images

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; McDougall, I.R.; Goris, M.L.; Mason, J.W.; Reitz, B.A.

    1981-08-01

    The possibility of diagnosing transplant rejection using Tc-99m-PYP imaging was examined in 12 cardiac transplant recipients. Two patients were studied on two occasions. The presence or absence of active rejection was established by endomyocardial biopsy. The intensity and pattern of myocardial uptake of the tracer did not differ significantly in the two patients studied at the time of rejection compared to the remainder. It is concluded that a single Tc-99m-PYP study cannot be used to diagnose cardiac transplant rejection.

  11. Applying rigor and reproducibility standards to assay donor-derived cell-free DNA as a non-invasive method for detection of acute rejection and graft injury after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Agbor-Enoh, Sean; Tunc, Ilker; De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Fideli, Ulgen; Davis, Andrew; Cuttin, Karen; Bhatti, Kenneth; Marishta, Argit; Solomon, Michael A; Jackson, Annette; Graninger, Grace; Harper, Bonnie; Luikart, Helen; Wylie, Jennifer; Wang, Xujing; Berry, Gerald; Marboe, Charles; Khush, Kiran; Zhu, Jun; Valantine, Hannah

    2017-09-01

    Use of new genomic techniques in clinical settings requires that such methods are rigorous and reproducible. Previous studies have shown that quantitation of donor-derived cell-free DNA (%ddcfDNA) by unbiased shotgun sequencing is a sensitive, non-invasive marker of acute rejection after heart transplantation. The primary goal of this study was to assess the reproducibility of %ddcfDNA measurements across technical replicates, manual vs automated platforms, and rejection phenotypes in distinct patient cohorts. After developing and validating the %ddcfDNA assay, we subjected the method to a rigorous test of its reproducibility. We measured %ddcfDNA in technical replicates performed by 2 independent laboratories and verified the reproducibility of %ddcfDNA patterns of 2 rejection phenotypes: acute cellular rejection and antibody-mediated rejection in distinct patient cohorts. We observed strong concordance of technical-replicate %ddcfDNA measurements across 2 independent laboratories (slope = 1.02, R(2) > 0.99, p < 10(-6)), as well as across manual and automated platforms (slope = 0.80, R(2) = 0.92, p < 0.001). The %ddcfDNA measurements in distinct heart transplant cohorts had similar baselines and error rates. The %ddcfDNA temporal patterns associated with rejection phenotypes were similar in both patient cohorts; however, the quantity of ddcfDNA was significantly higher in samples with severe vs mild histologic rejection grade (2.73% vs 0.14%, respectively; p < 0.001). The %ddcfDNA assay is precise and reproducible across laboratories and in samples from 2 distinct types of heart transplant rejection. These findings pave the way for larger studies to assess the clinical utility of %ddcfDNA as a marker of acute rejection after heart transplantation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Antibody-Mediated Targeting of Alpha PDGF Receptor to Inhibit the Progression of Skeletal Micro-Metastases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    derived growth factor receptor is a necessary intermediate in lysophosphatidic , acid 鄄 stimulated mitogenic activity in L cells [J]. Proc Natl...bisphosphonate Zoledronic Acid (ZA) and was able to prolong overall survival. Finally, we tested IMC-3G3 and ZA on the initial phase of bone...41] .  Zoledronic acid (ZA) shows a potent analgesic effect that  can significantly delay the time to SREs [42] . However, Qingxin Liu et al. PDGFR

  13. Solar collector apparatus having increased energy rejection during stagnation

    DOEpatents

    Moore, S.W.

    1981-01-16

    An active solar collector having increased energy rejection during stagnation is disclosed. The collector's glazing is brought into substantial contact with absorber during stagnation to increase re-emittance and thereby to maintan lower temperatures when the collector is not in operation.

  14. Solar collector apparatus having increased energy rejection during stagnation

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Stanley W.

    1983-07-12

    The disclosure relates to an active solar collector having increased energy rejection during stagnation. The collector's glazing is brought into substantial contact with absorber during stagnation to increase re-emittance and thereby to maintain lower temperatures when the collector is not in operation.

  15. Graft-infiltrating host dendritic cells play a key role in organ transplant rejection

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Quan; Liu, Quan; Divito, Sherrie J.; Zeng, Qiang; Yatim, Karim M.; Hughes, Andrew D.; Rojas-Canales, Darling M.; Nakao, A.; Shufesky, William J.; Williams, Amanda L.; Humar, Rishab; Hoffman, Rosemary A.; Shlomchik, Warren D.; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin H.; Lakkis, Fadi G.; Morelli, Adrian E.

    2016-01-01

    Successful engraftment of organ transplants has traditionally relied on preventing the activation of recipient (host) T cells. Once T-cell activation has occurred, however, stalling the rejection process becomes increasingly difficult, leading to graft failure. Here we demonstrate that graft-infiltrating, recipient (host) dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in driving the rejection of transplanted organs by activated (effector) T cells. We show that donor DCs that accompany heart or kidney grafts are rapidly replaced by recipient DCs. The DCs originate from non-classical monocytes and form stable, cognate interactions with effector T cells in the graft. Eliminating recipient DCs reduces the proliferation and survival of graft-infiltrating T cells and abrogates ongoing rejection or rejection mediated by transferred effector T cells. Therefore, host DCs that infiltrate transplanted organs sustain the alloimmune response after T-cell activation has already occurred. Targeting these cells provides a means for preventing or treating rejection. PMID:27554168

  16. Neural processing of social rejection: the role of schizotypal personality traits.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Preethi; Ettinger, Ulrich; Inchley-Mort, Sophie; Sumich, Alexander; Williams, Steven C R; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Kumari, Veena

    2012-03-01

    A fear of being rejected can cause perceptions of more insecurity and stress in close relationships. Healthy individuals activate the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) when experiencing social rejection, while those who are vulnerable to depression deactivate the dACC presumably to downregulate salience of rejection cues and minimize distress. Schizotypal individuals, characterized by unusual perceptual experiences and/or odd beliefs, are more rejection sensitive than normal. We tested the hypothesis, for the first time, that individuals with high schizotypy also have an altered dACC response to rejection stimuli. Twenty-six healthy individuals, 14 with low schizotypy (LS) and 12 with high schizotypy (HS), viewed depictions of rejection and acceptance and neutral scenes while undergoing functional MRI. Activation maps in LS and HS groups during each image type were compared using SPM5, and their relation to participant mood and subjective ratings of the images was examined. During rejection relative to neutral scenes, LS activated and HS deactivated the bilateral dACC, right superior frontal gyrus, and left ventral prefrontal cortex. Across both groups, a temporo-occipito-parieto-cerebellar network was active during rejection, and a left fronto-parietal network during acceptance, relative to neutral scenes, and the bilateral lingual gyrus during rejection relative to acceptance scenes. Our finding of dACC-dorso-ventral PFC activation in LS, but deactivation in HS individuals when perceiving social rejection scenes suggests that HS individuals attach less salience to and distance themselves from such stimuli. This may enable them to cope with their higher-than-normal sensitivity to rejection. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A genetic system for rhesus monkey rhadinovirus: use of recombinant virus to quantitate antibody-mediated neutralization.

    PubMed

    Bilello, John P; Morgan, Jennifer S; Damania, Blossom; Lang, Sabine M; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2006-02-01

    Rhesus monkey rhadinovirus (RRV), a simian gamma-2 herpesvirus closely related to the Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, replicates lytically in cultured rhesus monkey fibroblasts and establishes persistence in B cells. Overlapping cosmid clones were generated that encompass the entire 130-kilobase-pair genome of RRV strain 26-95, including the terminal repeat regions required for its replication. Cloned RRV that was produced by cotransfection of overlapping cosmids spanning the entire RRV26-95 genome replicated with growth kinetics and to titers similar to those of the parental, uncloned, wild-type RRV26-95. Expression cassettes for secreted-engineered alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) were inserted upstream of the R1 gene, and the cosmid-based system for RRV genome reconstitution was used to generate replication-competent, recombinant RRV that expressed either the SEAP or GFP reporter gene. Using the SEAP and GFP recombinant RRVs, assays were developed to monitor RRV infection, neutralization, and replication. Heat-inactivated sera from rhesus monkeys that were naturally or experimentally infected with RRV were assayed for their ability to neutralize RRV-SEAP and RRV-GFP infectivity using rhesus monkey fibroblasts. Sera from RRV-positive monkeys, but not RRV-negative monkeys, were consistently able to neutralize RRV infectivity when assayed by the production of SEAP activity or by the ability to express GFP. The neutralizing activity was present in the immunoglobulin fraction. Of the 17 rhesus monkeys tested, sera from rhesus monkey 26-95, i.e., the monkey that yielded the RRV 26-95 isolate, had the highest titer of neutralizing activity against RRV26-95. This cosmid-based genetic system and the reporter virus neutralization assay will facilitate study of the contribution of individual RRV glycoproteins to entry into different cell types, particularly fibroblasts and B cells.

  18. Annexin A2 is involved in antiphospholipid antibody-mediated pathogenic effects in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Romay-Penabad, Zurina; Montiel-Manzano, Maria Guadalupe; Shilagard, Tuya; Papalardo, Elizabeth; Vargas, Gracie; Deora, Arun B; Wang, Michael; Jacovina, Andrew T; Garcia-Latorre, Ethel; Reyes-Maldonado, Elba; Hajjar, Katherine A; Pierangeli, Silvia S

    2009-10-01

    Antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies recognize receptor-bound beta(2) glycoprotein I (beta(2)GPI) on target cells, and induce an intracellular signaling and a procoagulant/proinflammatory phenotype that leads to thrombosis. Evidence indicates that annexin A2 (A2), a receptor for tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen, binds beta(2)GPI on target cells. However, whether A2 mediates pathogenic effects of aPL antibodies in vivo is unknown. In this work, we studied the effects of human aPL antibodies in A2-deficient (A2(-/-)) mice. A2(-/-) and A2(+/+) mice were injected with immunoglobulin G (IgG) isolated from either a patient with antiphospholipid syndrome (IgG-APS), a healthy control subject (IgG-normal human serum), a monoclonal anti-beta(2)GPI antibody (4C5), an anti-A2 monoclonal antibody, or monoclonal antibody of irrelevant specificity as control. We found that, after IgG-APS or 4C5 injections and vascular injury, mean thrombus size was significantly smaller and tissue factor activity was significantly less in A2(-/-) mice compared with A2(+/+) mice. The expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 induced by IgG-APS or 4C5 in explanted A2(-/-) aorta was also significantly reduced compared with A2(+/+) mice. Interestingly, anti-A2 monoclonal antibody significantly decreased aPL-induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, E-selectin, and tissue factor activity on cultured endothelial cells. Together, these data indicate for the first time that A2 mediates the pathogenic effects of aPL antibodies in vivo and in vitro APS.

  19. CD40 agonist antibody mediated improvement of chronic Cryptosporidium infection in patients with X- linked hyper IgM syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiying; Upadhyaya, Bhaskar; Wu, Liming; Koh, Christopher; Santín-Durán, Mónica; Pittaluga, Stefania; Uzel, Gulbu; Kleiner, David; Williams, Ester; Ma, Chi A.; Bodansky, Aaron; Oliveira, Joao B.; Edmonds, Pamela; Hornung, Ronald; Wong, Duane W.; Fayer, Ronald; Fleisher, Tom; Heller, Theo; Prussin, Calman; Jain, Ashish

    2012-01-01

    X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome (XHM) is a combined immune deficiency disorder caused by mutations in CD40 ligand. We tested CP-870,893, a human CD40 agonist monoclonal antibody, in the treatment of two XHM patients with biliary Cryptosporidiosis. CP-870,893 activated B cells and APCs in vitro, restoring class switch recombination in XHM B cells and inducing cytokine secretion by monocytes. CP-870,893 infusions were well tolerated and showed significant activity in vivo, decreasing leukocyte concentration in peripheral blood. Although specific antibody responses were lacking, frequent dosing in one subject primed T cells to secrete IFN-g and suppressed oocyst shedding in the stool. Nevertheless, relapse occurred after discontinuation of therapy. The CD40 receptor was rapidly internalized following binding with CP-870,893, potentially explaining the limited capacity of CP-870,893 to mediate immune reconstitution. This study demonstrates that CP-870,893 suppressed oocysts shedding in XHM patients with biliary cryptosporidiosis. The continued study of CD40 agonists in XHM is warranted. PMID:22459705

  20. S100P antibody-mediated therapy as a new promising strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dakhel, S; Padilla, L; Adan, J; Masa, M; Martinez, J M; Roque, L; Coll, T; Hervas, R; Calvis, C; Messeguer, R; Mitjans, F; Hernández, J L

    2014-01-01

    Despite progresses in diagnosis and treatment, pancreatic cancer continues to have the worst prognosis of all solid malignant tumors. Recent evidences suggest that the metastasis-promoting protein S100P stimulates pancreatic tumor proliferation, survival, invasion and metastasis progression through extracellular functions. Moreover, its expression is strongly correlated with poor prognosis in patients with several types of cancer although the entire molecular mechanism responsible for the diverse biological functions is not fully understood. We showed that extracellular S100P stimulates pancreatic carcinoma BxPC3 cell line by promoting cell proliferation. We also demonstrated that S100P induces, in this cell line, the phosphorylation of IκBα and the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). In addition, treatment with S100P protected cells from injuries induced by the cytotoxic agent Gemcitabine. On the basis of these results, we developed function-blocking anti-S100P monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that abolished all of its in vitro activities. Furthermore, in vivo treatment with the candidate 2H8 antibody decreased tumor growth and liver metastasis formation in a subcutaneous and orthotopic BxPC3 tumor model. We conclude here that a therapeutic strategy blocking the extracellular activity of S100P by means of specific mAbs could be an attractive therapeutic approach as a single agent or in combination with target-directed or chemotherapeutic drugs to treat pancreatic cancer. PMID:24637492

  1. S100P antibody-mediated therapy as a new promising strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Dakhel, S; Padilla, L; Adan, J; Masa, M; Martinez, J M; Roque, L; Coll, T; Hervas, R; Calvis, C; Messeguer, R; Mitjans, F; Hernández, J L

    2014-03-17

    Despite progresses in diagnosis and treatment, pancreatic cancer continues to have the worst prognosis of all solid malignant tumors. Recent evidences suggest that the metastasis-promoting protein S100P stimulates pancreatic tumor proliferation, survival, invasion and metastasis progression through extracellular functions. Moreover, its expression is strongly correlated with poor prognosis in patients with several types of cancer although the entire molecular mechanism responsible for the diverse biological functions is not fully understood. We showed that extracellular S100P stimulates pancreatic carcinoma BxPC3 cell line by promoting cell proliferation. We also demonstrated that S100P induces, in this cell line, the phosphorylation of IκBα and the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). In addition, treatment with S100P protected cells from injuries induced by the cytotoxic agent Gemcitabine. On the basis of these results, we developed function-blocking anti-S100P monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that abolished all of its in vitro activities. Furthermore, in vivo treatment with the candidate 2H8 antibody decreased tumor growth and liver metastasis formation in a subcutaneous and orthotopic BxPC3 tumor model. We conclude here that a therapeutic strategy blocking the extracellular activity of S100P by means of specific mAbs could be an attractive therapeutic approach as a single agent or in combination with target-directed or chemotherapeutic drugs to treat pancreatic cancer.

  2. Analysis of the mechanism of allograft rejection and cell-mediated immunity. I. Accelerated rejection of tumour allografts without augmented cytotoxicity in the spleen cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nanishi, F; Nomoto, K; Taniguchi, K; Kubo, C

    1980-01-01

    While immunization with allogeneic spleen cells did not generate positive cytotoxic activity, it produced accelerated rejection of subsequent tumour grafts carrying the same H-2 antigen. No augmented generation of cytotoxicity was detectable by 51Cr-release assay in the host spleen cells, even in the presence of accelerated rejection of tumour allografts. However, augmented cytotoxicity was generated in mixed lymphocyte culture and in peritoneal lymphocytes after an intraperitoneal boost. These results indicate that while immunization with allogeneic spleen cells does not generate mature cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) detectable by the present assay, it may produce premature CTL that rapidly differentiate into mature CTL after direct contact with antigen at the site of graft rejection. The inability to generate a high degree of cytotoxicity in the spleen cells may be ascribed to the early development of CTL at the rejection site. The relationship between accelerated rejection of allogeneic tumour grafts and delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions is also discussed. PMID:7419243

  3. Antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer of helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors to rat neocortical neurons that contain either NMDA receptor 2B or 2A subunits.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haiyan; Zhang, Guo-rong; Geller, Alfred I

    2011-09-30

    Because of the numerous types of neurons in the brain, and particularly the forebrain, neuron type-specific expression will benefit many potential applications of direct gene transfer. The two most promising approaches for achieving neuron type-specific expression are targeted gene transfer to a specific type of neuron and using a neuron type-specific promoter. We previously developed antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors by modifying glycoprotein C (gC) to replace the heparin binding domain, which mediates the initial binding of HSV-1 particles to many cell types, with the Staphylococcus A protein ZZ domain, which binds immunoglobulin (Ig) G. We showed that a chimeric gC-ZZ protein is incorporated into vector particles and binds IgG. As a proof-of-principle for antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer, we isolated complexes of these vector particles and an anti-NMDA NR1 subunit antibody, and demonstrated targeted gene transfer to neocortical cells that contain NR1 subunits. However, because most forebrain neurons contain NR1, we obtained only a modest increase in the specificity of gene transfer, and this targeting specificity is of limited utility for physiological experiments. Here, we report efficient antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer to NMDA NR2B- or NR2A-containing cells in rat postrhinal cortex, and a neuron-specific promoter further restricted recombinant expression to neurons. Of note, because NR2A-containing neurons are relatively rare, these results show that antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer with HSV-1 vectors containing neuron type-specific promoters can restrict recombinant expression to specific types of forebrain neurons of physiological significance.

  4. The absence of IgE antibody-mediated augmentation of immune responses in CD23-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, H; Kikutani, H; Suematsu, S; Naka, T; Yoshida, K; Yoshida, K; Tanaka, T; Suemura, M; Matsumoto, N; Kojima, S

    1994-01-01

    The CD23 antigen, a low-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc epsilon RII), is a type II membrane-bound glycoprotein expressed on various cells, particularly mature B cells. A number of functions have been ascribed to CD23, including specific regulation of IgE production, IgE-mediated cytotoxicity and release of mediators, IgE-dependent antigen focusing, promotion of B-cell growth, prevention of germinal center B cells from apoptosis, proliferation of myeloid precursors, and maturation of early thymocytes. It is not clear whether these activities represent in vivo functions. To explore in vivo functions of CD23, we have produced CD23-deficient mice. These mice displayed normal lymphocyte differentiation and could mount normal antibody responses, including IgE responses upon immunization with T-dependent antigens and infection with Nippostrongyrus brasiliensis. Germinal center formation after immunization and in vitro proliferative response of B cells were not affected in mutant mice. However, antigen-specific IgE-mediated enhancement of antibody responses was severely impaired. Images PMID:8041705

  5. Blocking by anti-idiotypic antibodies of monoclonal antibody-mediated protection against lethal Semliki Forest virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Oosterlaken, T A; Harmsen, M; Kraaijeveld, C A; Snippe, H

    1990-02-01

    Semliki Forest virus-(SEV) neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), produced after fusion of spleen cells from BALB/c mice and myeloma cell line P3-X63-AG8. 653 or SP2/0, were used for anti-idiotypic immunization of female BALB/c mice. Two intracutaneous immunizations (2 x 40 micrograms per animal), 3 weeks apart, with keyhole limpet haemocyanin-conjugated MoAbs mixed with the saponin Quil A were sufficient to induce high levels of anti-idiotypic antibodies in the circulation of these mice with the capacity to block specifically in vitro MoAb-mediated virus neutralization. Anti-idiotypic antibodies against SFV-neutralizing MoAbs, either passively transferred or actively acquired by immunization, are also able to abrogate (specifically) passive immunity, mediated by critical protective doses of MoAb, in mice against infection with a lethal strain of SFV. Furthermore we confirmed by intervention with anti-idiotypic serum in vivo that an SFV-neutralizing MoAb exerts its greatest protective effect during the first 2 days of infection.

  6. Rejection and Depression: Prospective and Contemporaneous Analyses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefkowitz, Monroe M.; Tesiny, Edward P.

    1984-01-01

    Three studies explore the relationship between parental rejection during childhood and manifestations of depression both then and in young adulthood. With regard to rejection, findings support the general hypothesis that deprivation is an etiological factor in adult depression. (Author/RH)

  7. Who Doesn't Reject the Rejectee?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cockriel, Irwin W.; Fox, Randy J.

    1976-01-01

    This article reports on the utility of sociometrics for the teacher, particularly in determining who will not reject a generally rejected classmate. A study on teachers' ability to predict such students indicated teachers were not very good at predicting either rejectees, or accepting students. Implications and suggestions are discussed. (NG)

  8. PEER ACCEPTANCE-REJECTION AND PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SELLS, S.B.; AND OTHERS

    THIS REPORT PRESENTS THE RESULTS OF A 5-YEAR RESEARCH PROGRAM WHICH ANALYZED MANY OF THE CORRELATES OF PEER ACCEPTANCE-REJECTION IN A SERIES OF STUDIES INVOLVING 37,913 SCHOOL CHILDREN, AGES 9 TO 12 YEARS. PEER ACCEPTANCE-REJECTION WAS INVESTIGATED THROUGH THE USE OF A PEER RATING SCALE AND A TEACHER RATING SCALE. A NUMBER OF METHODOLOGICAL…

  9. Rejection and Depression: Prospective and Contemporaneous Analyses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefkowitz, Monroe M.; Tesiny, Edward P.

    1984-01-01

    Three studies explore the relationship between parental rejection during childhood and manifestations of depression both then and in young adulthood. With regard to rejection, findings support the general hypothesis that deprivation is an etiological factor in adult depression. (Author/RH)

  10. 21 CFR 1230.47 - Rejected containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rejected containers. 1230.47 Section 1230.47 Food... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Imports § 1230.47 Rejected containers. (a) In all cases where the containers... notification to the importer that the containers must be exported under customs supervision within 3...

  11. Sensitivity of scintigraphy with /sup 111/In-lymphocytes for detection of cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, S.B.; Eisen, H.J.; Sobel, B.E.; Bergmann, S.R.; Bolman, R.M. 3d.

    1988-12-01

    We recently demonstrated the feasibility of noninvasive detection of cardiac allograft rejection after administration of indium-111-labeled lymphocytes. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of the technique, as well as its value for delineating the severity of rejection, we studied 16 dogs with heterotopic thoracic cardiac allografts. Five animals were evaluated while exposed to immunosuppressive agents. Animals were scanned sequentially after administration of 100-400 microCi of indium-111-labeled autologous lymphocytes. Myocardial lymphocyte infiltration was expressed as the indium excess (IE), defined as the ratio of indium activity of the transplant or native heart compared with that in blood. Scintigraphic results were compared with characteristics of simultaneously obtained endomyocardial biopsies. Among 17 biopsy documented episodes of rejection, 16 were detected scintigraphically. Among 18 biopsies with no evidence of rejection, scintigraphy was uniformly negative. Thus, the sensitivity and specificity of scintigraphy were 94 and 100%, respectively. Biopsies graded as showing no rejection were associated with an IE of 0.3 +/- 0.5 (+/- SD); those graded as mild, 2.8 +/- 1.7; those as moderate, 10.7 +/- 7.2; and those graded as indicative of severe rejection, 14.2 +/- 4.5. Thus, scintigraphy with indium-111-labeled lymphocytes sensitively and specifically detects cardiac allograft rejection and delineates the intensity of the rejection process. It should be useful clinically for assessing potential allograft rejection noninvasively.

  12. Antibody-Mediated Inhibition of Tspan12 Ameliorates Vasoproliferative Retinopathy Through Suppression of β-Catenin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Felicitas; Zhang, Ding; Aguilar, Edith; Sakimoto, Susumu; Diaz-Aguilar, Sophia; Rosenfeld, Mauricio; Zha, Zhao; Zhang, Hongkai; Friedlander, Martin; Yea, Kyungmoo

    2017-07-11

    Anti-angiogenic biologicals represent an important concept for the treatment of vasoproliferative diseases. However, the need for continued treatment, the presence of nonresponders, and the risk of long-term side effects limit the success of existing therapeutic agents. Although Tspan12 has been shown to regulate retinal vascular development, nothing is known about its involvement in neovascular disease and its potential as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of vasoproliferative diseases. Rodent models of retinal neovascular disease, including the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy and the very low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mouse model were analyzed for Tspan/β-catenin regulation. Screening of a phage display of a human combinatorial antibody (Ab) library was used for the development of a high-affinity Ab against Tspan12. Therapeutic effects of the newly developed Ab on vascular endothelial cells were tested in vitro and in vivo in the oxygen-induced retinopathy and very low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mouse model. The newly developed anti-Tspan12 Ab exhibited potent inhibitory effects on endothelial cell migration and tube formation. Mechanistic studies confirmed that the Ab inhibited the interaction between Tspan12 and Frizzled-4 and effectively modulates β-catenin levels and target genes in vascular endothelial cells. Tspan12/β-catenin signaling was activated in response to acute and chronic stress in the oxygen-induced retinopathy and very low density lipoprotein receptor mouse model of proliferative retinopathy. Intravitreal application of the Ab showed significant therapeutic effects in both models without inducing negative side effects on retina function. Moreover, combined intravitreal injection of the Ab with a known vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor, Aflibercept, resulted in significant enhancement of the therapeutic efficacy of each monotherapy. Combination therapy with the Tspan12 blocking antibody

  13. An Evolutionary Perspective on Mate Rejection.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Ashleigh J; Dubbs, Shelli L; Barlow, Fiona Kate

    2016-01-01

    We argue that mate rejection and ex-partner relationships are important, multifaceted topics that have been underresearched in social and evolutionary psychology. Mate rejection and relationship dissolution are ubiquitous and form integral parts of the human experience. Both also carry with them potential risks and benefits to our fitness and survival. Hence, we expect that mate rejection would have given rise to evolved behavioral and psychological adaptations. Herein, we outline some of the many unanswered questions in evolutionary psychology on these topics, at each step presenting novel hypotheses about how men and women should behave when rejecting a mate or potential mate or in response to rejection. We intend these hypotheses and suggestions for future research to be used as a basis for enriching our understanding of human mating from an evolutionary perspective.

  14. Blocking MHC class II on human endothelium mitigates acute rejection

    PubMed Central

    Abrahimi, Parwiz; Qin, Lingfeng; Chang, William G.; Bothwell, Alfred L.M.; Tellides, George; Saltzman, W. Mark; Pober, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    Acute allograft rejection is mediated by host CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) targeting graft class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. In experimental rodent models, rejection requires differentiation of naive CD8+ T cells into alloreactive CTL within secondary lymphoid organs, whereas in humans, CTL may alternatively develop within the graft from circulating CD8+ effector memory T cells (TEM) that recognize class I MHC molecules on graft endothelial cells (EC). This latter pathway is poorly understood. Here, we show that host CD4+ TEM, activated by EC class II MHC molecules, provide critical help for this process. First, blocking HLA-DR on EC lining human artery grafts in immunodeficient mice reduces CD8+ CTL development within and acute rejection of the artery by adoptively transferred allogeneic human lymphocytes. Second, siRNA knockdown or CRISPR/Cas9 ablation of class II MHC molecules on EC prevents CD4+ TEM from helping CD8+ TEM to develop into CTL in vitro. Finally, implanted synthetic microvessels, formed from CRISPR/Cas9-modified EC lacking class II MHC molecules, are significantly protected from CD8+ T cell–mediated destruction in vivo. We conclude that human CD8+ TEM–mediated rejection targeting graft EC class I MHC molecules requires help from CD4+ TEM cells activated by recognition of class II MHC molecules. PMID:26900601

  15. Maternal Antibody-Mediated Disease Enhancement in Type I Interferon-Deficient Mice Leads to Lethal Disease Associated with Liver Damage.

    PubMed

    Martínez Gómez, Julia María; Ong, Li Ching; Lam, Jian Hang; Binte Aman, Siti Amanlina; Libau, Eshele Anak; Lee, Pei Xuan; St John, Ashley L; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-03-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported that most of the severe dengue cases occur upon a secondary heterologous infection. Furthermore, babies born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk of developing severe disease upon primary infection with a heterologous or homologous dengue virus (DENV) serotype when maternal antibodies reach sub-neutralizing concentrations. These observations have been explained by the antibody mediated disease enhancement (ADE) phenomenon whereby heterologous antibodies or sub-neutralizing homologous antibodies bind to but fail to neutralize DENV particles, allowing Fc-receptor mediated entry of the virus-antibody complexes into host cells. This eventually results in enhanced viral replication and heightened inflammatory responses. In an attempt to replicate this ADE phenomenon in a mouse model, we previously reported that upon DENV2 infection 5-week old type I and II interferon (IFN) receptors-deficient mice (AG129) born to DENV1-immune mothers displayed enhancement of disease severity characterized by increased virus titers and extensive vascular leakage which eventually led to the animals' death. However, as dengue occurs in immune competent individuals, we sought to reproduce this mouse model in a less immunocompromised background. Here, we report an ADE model that is mediated by maternal antibodies in type I IFN receptor-deficient A129 mice. We show that 5-week old A129 mice born to DENV1-immune mothers succumbed to a DENV2 infection within 4 days that was sub-lethal in mice born to naïve mothers. Clinical manifestations included extensive hepatocyte vacuolation, moderate vascular leakage, lymphopenia, and thrombocytopenia. Anti-TNFα therapy totally protected the mice and correlated with healthy hepatocytes. In contrast, blocking IL-6 did not impact the virus titers or disease outcome. This A129 mouse model of ADE may help dissecting the mechanisms involved in dengue pathogenesis and evaluate the efficacy of vaccine and

  16. Increased infectivity in human cells and resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization by truncation of the SIV gp41 cytoplasmic tail.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Takeo; Kaori, Takaki; Enomoto, Ikumi; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa; Matsushita, Shuzo

    2013-01-01

    The role of antibodies in protecting the host from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is of considerable interest, particularly because the RV144 trial results suggest that antibodies contribute to protection. Although infection of non-human primates with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is commonly used as an animal model of HIV-1 infection, the viral epitopes that elicit potent and broad neutralizing antibodies to SIV have not been identified. We isolated a monoclonal antibody (MAb) B404 that potently and broadly neutralizes various SIV strains. B404 targets a conformational epitope comprising the V3 and V4 loops of Env that intensely exposed when Env binds CD4. B404-resistant variants were obtained by passaging viruses in the presence of increasing concentration of B404 in PM1/CCR5 cells. Genetic analysis revealed that the Q733stop mutation, which truncates the cytoplasmic tail of gp41, was the first major substitution in Env during passage. The maximal inhibition by B404 and other MAbs were significantly decreased against a recombinant virus with a gp41 truncation compared with the parental SIVmac316. This indicates that the gp41 truncation was associated with resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization. The infectivities of the recombinant virus with the gp41 truncation were 7,900-, 1,000-, and 140-fold higher than those of SIVmac316 in PM1, PM1/CCR5, and TZM-bl cells, respectively. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the gp41 truncation enhanced the incorporation of Env into virions. The effect of the gp41 truncation on infectivity was not obvious in the HSC-F macaque cell line, although the resistance of viruses harboring the gp41 truncation to neutralization was maintained. These results suggest that viruses with a truncated gp41 cytoplasmic tail were selected by increased infectivity in human cells and by acquiring resistance to neutralizing antibody.

  17. The effect of daily co-trimoxazole prophylaxis on natural development of antibody-mediated immunity against P. falciparum malaria infection in HIV-exposed uninfected Malawian children.

    PubMed

    Longwe, Herbert; Jambo, Kondwani C; Phiri, Kamija S; Mbeye, Nyanyiwe; Gondwe, Thandile; Hall, Tom; Tetteh, Kevin K A; Drakeley, Chris; Mandala, Wilson L

    2015-01-01

    Co-trimoxazole prophylaxis, currently recommended in HIV-exposed, uninfected (HEU) children as protection against opportunistic infections, also has some anti-malarial efficacy. We determined whether daily co-trimoxazole prophylaxis affects the natural development of antibody-mediated immunity to blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we measured antibodies to 8 Plasmodium falciparum antigens (AMA-1, MSP-119, MSP-3, PfSE, EBA-175RII, GLURP R0, GLURP R2 and CSP) in serum samples from 33 HEU children and 31 HIV-unexposed, uninfected (HUU) children, collected at 6, 12 and 18 months of age. Compared to HIV-uninfected children, HEU children had significantly lower levels of specific IgG against AMA-1 at 6 months (p = 0.001), MSP-119 at 12 months (p = 0.041) and PfSE at 6 months (p = 0.038), 12 months (p = 0.0012) and 18 months (p = 0.0097). No differences in the IgG antibody responses against the rest of the antigens were observed between the two groups at all time points. The breadth of specificity of IgG response was reduced in HEU children compared to HUU children during the follow up period. Co-trimoxazole prophylaxis seems to reduce IgG antibody responses to P. falciparum blood stage antigens, which could be as a result of a reduction in exposure of those children under this regime. Although antibody responses were regarded as markers of exposure in this study, further studies are required to establish whether these responses are correlated in any way to clinical immunity to malaria.

  18. Maternal Antibody-Mediated Disease Enhancement in Type I Interferon-Deficient Mice Leads to Lethal Disease Associated with Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Jian Hang; Binte Aman, S