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Sample records for active anticancer agents

  1. Salinomycin: a novel anti-cancer agent with known anti-coccidial activities.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuang; Wang, Fengfei; Wong, Eric T; Fonkem, Ekokobe; Hsieh, Tze-Chen; Wu, Joseph M; Wu, Erxi

    2013-01-01

    Salinomycin, traditionally used as an anti-coccidial drug, has recently been shown to possess anti-cancer and anti-cancer stem cell (CSC) effects, as well as activities to overcome multi-drug resistance based on studies using human cancer cell lines, xenograft mice, and in case reports involving cancer patients in pilot clinical trials. Therefore, salinomycin may be considered as a promising novel anti-cancer agent despite its largely unknown mechanism of action. This review summarizes the pharmacologic effects of salinomycin and presents possible mechanisms by which salinomycin exerts its anti-tumorigenic activities. Recent advances and potential complications that might limit the utilization of salinomycin as an anti-cancer and anti-CSC agent are also presented and discussed.

  2. New Pt-NNSO core anticancer agents: Structural optimization and investigation of their anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Chong, Shu Xian; Jin, Yinxue; Au-Yeung, Steve Chik Fun; To, Kenneth Kin Wah

    2017-02-12

    A series of new platinum Pt(II) compounds possessing a bidentate leaving ligand modified from oxaliplatin has been synthesized, with one of the oxygen ligating atom substituted for a sulphur atom (resulting in a Pt-NNSO coordination core structure). The general structures are R,R-diaminocyclohexane (DACH)-Pt-(methylthio)acetic acid (K4) and DACH-Pt-(thiophenylacetic acid) (K4 derivatives). Substitution of an electron donating or withdrawing group at the ortho or para position on the phenyl ring of K4 derivatives was found to affect the complexes' stability, reactivity with the biological molecules (5'-guanosine monophosphate (5'-GMP) and L-methionine (L-Met)) and anticancer activity. (1)H NMR experiments demonstrated that Pt-NNSO complexes formed a mixture of mono- and diadduct with 5'-GMP in various ratios, which are different from the classical Pt drugs (forming mainly diadduct). In addition, all of the K4 derivatives with improved lipophilicity are less deactivated by L-Met in comparison to cisplatin (CDDP) and oxaliplatin. Biological assessments showed that all Pt-NNSO complexes are less toxic than CDDP in normal porcine kidney cells and are minimally affected by drug resistance. Some of the new compounds also displayed comparable anticancer activity to CDDP or better than carboplatin in a few cancer cell lines. The lower reactivity of the Pt-NNSO compounds than CDDP towards thiol molecules, presumably leading to less efflux in resistant cancer cells, and the ability to inhibit autophagy were believed to allow the new compounds to be less affected by Pt resistance.

  3. Hormetic Effect of Berberine Attenuates the Anticancer Activity of Chemotherapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jiaolin; Huang, Borong; Zou, Lidi; Chen, Shenghui; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Meiwan; Wan, Jian-Bo; Su, Huanxing; Wang, Yitao; He, Chengwei

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of biphasic dose response characterized by exhibiting stimulatory or beneficial effects at low doses and inhibitory or toxic effects at high doses. Increasing numbers of chemicals of various types have been shown to induce apparent hormetic effect on cancer cells. However, the underlying significance and mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Berberine, one of the major active components of Rhizoma coptidis, has been manifested with notable anticancer activities. This study aims to investigate the hormetic effect of berberine and its influence on the anticancer activities of chemotherapeutic agents. Our results demonstrated that berberine at low dose range (1.25 ~ 5 μM) promoted cell proliferation to 112% ~170% of the untreated control in various cancer cells, while berberine at high dose rage (10 ~ 80 μM) inhibited cell proliferation. Further, we observed that co-treatment with low dose berberine could significantly attenuate the anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic agents, including fluorouracil (5-FU), camptothecin (CPT), and paclitaxel (TAX). The hormetic effect and thereby the attenuated anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic drugs by berberine may attributable to the activated protective stress response in cancer cells triggered by berberine, as evidenced by up-regulated MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. These results provided important information to understand the potential side effects of hormesis, and suggested cautious application of natural compounds and relevant herbs in adjuvant treatment of cancer.

  4. Design, synthesis, and anticancer activity of novel berberine derivatives prepared via CuAAC "click" chemistry as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Yan, Tian-Hua; Yan, Lan; Li, Qian; Wang, Rui-Lian; Hu, Zhen-Lin; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Sun, Qing-Yan; Cao, Yong-Bing

    2014-01-01

    A series of novel derivatives of phenyl-substituted berberine triazolyls has been designed and synthesized via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition click chemistry in an attempt to develop antitumor agents. All of the compounds were evaluated for anticancer activity against a panel of three human cancer cell lines, including MCF-7 (breast), SW-1990 (pancreatic), and SMMC-7721 (liver) and the noncancerous human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) cell lines. The results indicated that most of the compounds displayed notable anticancer activities against the MCF-7 cells compared with berberine. Among these derivatives, compound 16 showed the most potent inhibitory activity against the SW-1990 and SMMC-7721 cell lines, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 8.54±1.97 μM and 11.87±1.83 μM, respectively. Compound 36 exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity against the MCF-7 cell line, with an IC50 value of 12.57±1.96 μM. Compound 16 and compound 36 exhibited low cytotoxicity in the HUVEC cell line, with IC50 values of 25.49±3.24 μM and 30.47±3.47 μM. Furthermore, compounds 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 32, and 36 exhibited much better selectivity than berberine toward the normal cell line HUVEC.

  5. The application of click chemistry in the synthesis of agents with anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Nan; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Bing-Xin; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between alkynes and azides (click chemistry) to form 1,2,3-triazoles is the most popular reaction due to its reliability, specificity, and biocompatibility. This reaction has the potential to shorten procedures, and render more efficient lead identification and optimization procedures in medicinal chemistry, which is a powerful modular synthetic approach toward the assembly of new molecular entities and has been applied in anticancer drugs discovery increasingly. The present review focuses mainly on the applications of this reaction in the field of synthesis of agents with anticancer activity, which are divided into four groups: topoisomerase II inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and antimicrotubule agents. PMID:25792812

  6. The application of click chemistry in the synthesis of agents with anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Nan; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Bing-Xin; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between alkynes and azides (click chemistry) to form 1,2,3-triazoles is the most popular reaction due to its reliability, specificity, and biocompatibility. This reaction has the potential to shorten procedures, and render more efficient lead identification and optimization procedures in medicinal chemistry, which is a powerful modular synthetic approach toward the assembly of new molecular entities and has been applied in anticancer drugs discovery increasingly. The present review focuses mainly on the applications of this reaction in the field of synthesis of agents with anticancer activity, which are divided into four groups: topoisomerase II inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and antimicrotubule agents.

  7. Pro-oxidant activity of dietary chemopreventive agents: an under-appreciated anti-cancer property.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Asfar S; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Hadi, S M

    2013-01-01

    " Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food" was quoted by Hippocrates more than two thousand years ago and since ancient times the health benefits of different natural agents have been exploited. In modern research, the disease preventive benefits of many such natural agents, particularly dietary compounds and their derivatives, has been attributed to their well recognized activity as the regulators of redox state of the cell. Nevertheless, most of these studies have focused on their antioxidant activity. A large body of evidence indicates that a major fraction of these agents can elicit pro-oxidant (radical generating) behavior which has been linked to their anti-cancer effects. This editorial provides an overview of the under-appreciated pro-oxidant activity of natural products, with a special focus on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species in the presence of transition metal ions, and discusses their possible use as cancer chemotherapeutic agents.

  8. Structure-Activity Relationships of Orotidine-5′-Monophosphate Decarboxylase Inhibitors as Anticancer Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Bello, A.; Konforte, D; Poduch, E; Furlonger, C; Wei, L; Liu, Y; Lewis, M; Pai, E; Paige, C; Kotra, L

    2009-01-01

    A series of 6-substituted and 5-fluoro-6-substituted uridine derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their potential as anticancer agents. The designed molecules were synthesized from either fully protected uridine or the corresponding 5-fluorouridine derivatives. The mononucleotide derivatives were used for enzyme inhibition investigations against ODCase. Anticancer activities of all the synthesized derivatives were evaluated using the nucleoside forms of the inhibitors. 5-Fluoro-UMP was a very weak inhibitor of ODCase. 6-Azido-5-fluoro and 5-fluoro-6-iodo derivatives are covalent inhibitors of ODCase, and the active site Lys145 residue covalently binds to the ligand after the elimination of the 6-substitution. Among the synthesized nucleoside derivatives, 6-azido-5-fluoro, 6-amino-5-fluoro, and 6-carbaldehyde-5-fluoro derivatives showed potent anticancer activities in cell-based assays against various leukemia cell lines. On the basis of the overall profile, 6-azido-5-fluoro and 6-amino-5-fluoro uridine derivatives exhibited potential for further investigations.

  9. 2-Sulfonylpyrimidines: Mild alkylating agents with anticancer activity toward p53-compromised cells

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Matthias R.; Joerger, Andreas C.; Fersht, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 has the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Many of p53’s oncogenic mutants are just destabilized and rapidly aggregate, and are targets for stabilization by drugs. We found certain 2-sulfonylpyrimidines, including one named PK11007, to be mild thiol alkylators with anticancer activity in several cell lines, especially those with mutationally compromised p53. PK11007 acted by two routes: p53 dependent and p53 independent. PK11007 stabilized p53 in vitro via selective alkylation of two surface-exposed cysteines without compromising its DNA binding activity. Unstable p53 was reactivated by PK11007 in some cancer cell lines, leading to up-regulation of p53 target genes such as p21 and PUMA. More generally, there was cell death that was independent of p53 but dependent on glutathione depletion and associated with highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as also found for the anticancer agent PRIMA-1MET(APR-246). PK11007 may be a lead for anticancer drugs that target cells with nonfunctional p53 or impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification in a wide variety of mutant p53 cells. PMID:27551077

  10. 2-Sulfonylpyrimidines: Mild alkylating agents with anticancer activity toward p53-compromised cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Matthias R; Joerger, Andreas C; Fersht, Alan R

    2016-09-06

    The tumor suppressor p53 has the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Many of p53's oncogenic mutants are just destabilized and rapidly aggregate, and are targets for stabilization by drugs. We found certain 2-sulfonylpyrimidines, including one named PK11007, to be mild thiol alkylators with anticancer activity in several cell lines, especially those with mutationally compromised p53. PK11007 acted by two routes: p53 dependent and p53 independent. PK11007 stabilized p53 in vitro via selective alkylation of two surface-exposed cysteines without compromising its DNA binding activity. Unstable p53 was reactivated by PK11007 in some cancer cell lines, leading to up-regulation of p53 target genes such as p21 and PUMA. More generally, there was cell death that was independent of p53 but dependent on glutathione depletion and associated with highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as also found for the anticancer agent PRIMA-1(MET)(APR-246). PK11007 may be a lead for anticancer drugs that target cells with nonfunctional p53 or impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification in a wide variety of mutant p53 cells.

  11. Nrf2 activity as a potential biomarker for the pan-epigenetic anticancer agent, RRx-001

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Shoucheng; Sekar, Thillai Veerapazham; Scicinski, Jan; Oronsky, Bryan; Peehl, Donna M.; Knox, Susan J.; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a master regulatory transcription factor that plays an important role in the antioxidant response pathway against anticancer drug-induced cytotoxic effects. RRx-001 is a new anticancer agent that generates reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and leads to epigenetic alterations in cancer cells. Here we report the RRx-001 mediated nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and the activation of expression of its downstream enzymes HO-1 and NQO1 in tumor cells. Inhibition of intrinsic Nrf2 expression by Nrf2-specific siRNA increased cell sensitivity to RRx-001. Molecular imaging of tumor cells co-expressing pARE-Firefly luciferase and pCMV-Renilla luciferase-mRFP in vitro and in vivo in mice revealed that RRx-001 significantly increased ARE-FLUC signal in cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, suggesting that RRx-001 is an effective activator of the Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway. The pre-treatment level of ARE-FLUC signal in cells, reflecting basal activity of Nrf2, negatively correlated with the tumor response to RRx-001. The results support the concept that RRx-001 activates Nrf2-ARE antioxidant signaling pathways in tumor cells. Hence measurement of Nrf2-mediated activation of downstream target genes through ARE signaling may constitute a useful molecular biomarker for the early prediction of response to RRx-001 treatment, and thereby guide therapeutic decision-making. PMID:26280276

  12. Structure-activity analysis of 2'-modified cinnamaldehyde analogues as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Gan, Fei Fei; Chua, Yee Shin; Scarmagnani, Silvia; Palaniappan, Puvithira; Franks, Mark; Poobalasingam, Thurka; Bradshaw, Tracey D; Westwell, Andrew D; Hagen, Thilo

    2009-10-02

    The natural product 2'-hydroxycinnamaldehyde (HCA) and its analogue, 2'-benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde (BCA), have been previously shown to have antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in vitro and inhibit tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we use structure-activity analysis to define structural features that are important for the activity of cinnamaldehyde analogues. Our results emphasize an important role for both the propenal group as well as the modification at the 2'-position. Further studies were aimed to characterize the mechanism of action of BCA. Exposure to BCA induced cell death via caspase-dependent and -independent pathways. Cell death was not due to autophagy or necrosis as a result of energy depletion or induction of reactive oxygen species. Our findings have important implications for future drug design and highlight the importance of defining molecular drug targets for this promising class of potential anticancer agents.

  13. Novel anticancer agent, SQAP, binds to focal adhesion kinase and modulates its activity

    PubMed Central

    Izaguirre-Carbonell, Jesus; Kawakubo, Hirofumi; Murata, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Toshifumi; Kusayanagi, Tomoe; Tsukuda, Senko; Hirakawa, Takeshi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Ohta, Keisuke; Miura, Masahiko; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Sahara, Hiroeki; Kamisuki, Shinji; Sugawara, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    SQAP is a novel and promising anticancer agent that was obtained by structural modifications from a natural compound. SQAP inhibits angiogenesis in vivo resulting in increased hypoxia and reduced tumor volume. In this study, the mechanism by which SQAP modifies the tumor microenvironment was revealed through the application of a T7 phage display screening. This approach identified five SQAP-binding proteins including sterol carrier protein 2, multifunctional enzyme type 2, proteasomal ubiquitin receptor, UV excision repair protein and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). All the interactions were confirmed by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Since FAK plays an important role in cell turnover and angiogenesis, the influence of SQAP on FAK was the principal goal of this study. SQAP decreased FAK phosphorylation and cell migration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and A549 cancer cells. These findings suggest that inhibition of FAK phosphorylation works as the mechanism for the anti-angiogenesis activity of SQAP. PMID:26456697

  14. Isatin Derived Spirocyclic Analogues with α-Methylene-γ-butyrolactone as Anticancer Agents: A Structure-Activity Relationship Study.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sandeep; Blowers, Elizabeth C; Tebbe, Calvin; Contreras, Jacob I; Radhakrishnan, Prakash; Kizhake, Smitha; Zhou, Tian; Rajule, Rajkumar N; Arnst, Jamie L; Munkarah, Adnan R; Rattan, Ramandeep; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2016-05-26

    Design, synthesis, and evaluation of α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone analogues and their evaluation as anticancer agents is described. SAR identified a spirocyclic analogue 19 that inhibited TNFα-induced NF-κB activity, cancer cell growth and tumor growth in an ovarian cancer model. A second iteration of synthesis and screening identified 29 which inhibited cancer cell growth with low-μM potency. Our data suggest that an isatin-derived spirocyclic α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone is a suitable core for optimization to identify novel anticancer agents.

  15. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. It also possesses anticancer activity. So the transportation and metabolism of glutamine are also discussed for better understanding the role of glutamic acid. Glutamates are the carboxylate anions and salts of glutamic acid. Here the roles of various enzymes required for the metabolism of glutamates are also discussed.

  16. Safety Pharmacology of Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Martin, Pauline L

    2015-01-01

    The safety pharmacology testing for anticancer agents has historically differed for small molecule pharmaceutical drugs versus large-molecule biopharmaceuticals. For pharmaceutical drugs, dedicated safety pharmacology studies have been conducted according to the ICH M3 (R2), ICH 7A, and ICH S7B guidance documents. For biopharmaceuticals, safety pharmacology endpoints have been incorporated into the repeated-dose toxicology studies according to ICHS6 (R1). However, the introduction of the ICH S9 guidance document for the nonclinical evaluation for anticancer pharmaceuticals has allowed for a streamlined approach for both types of molecules to facilitate access of new potential therapeutics to cancer patients and to reduce the number of animal studies. Examples of the testing strategies that have previously been employed for some representative anticancer agents are provided, and their predictivity to adverse events noted in the clinic is discussed.

  17. Sesterterpenoids with Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Evidente, Antonio; Kornienko, Alexander; Lefranc, Florence; Cimmino, Alessio; Dasari, Ramesh; Evidente, Marco; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Terpenes have received a great deal of attention in the scientific literature due to complex, synthetically challenging structures and diverse biological activities associated with this class of natural products. Based on the number of C5 isoprene units they are generated from, terpenes are classified as hemi- (C5), mono- (C10), sesqui- (C15), di- (C20), sester- (C25), tri (C30), and tetraterpenes (C40). Among these, sesterterpenes and their derivatives known as sesterterpenoids, are ubiquitous secondary metabolites in fungi, marine organisms, and plants. Their structural diversity encompasses carbotricyclic ophiobolanes, polycyclic anthracenones, polycyclic furan-2-ones, polycyclic hydroquinones, among many other carbon skeletons. Furthermore, many of them possess promising biological activities including cytotoxicity and the associated potential as anticancer agents. This review discusses the natural sources that produce sesterterpenoids, provides sesterterpenoid names and their chemical structures, biological properties with the focus on anticancer activities and literature references associated with these metabolites. A critical summary of the potential of various sesterterpenoids as anticancer agents concludes the review. PMID:26295461

  18. Development of anticancer agents: wizardry with osmium.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Babak, Maria V; Hartinger, Christian G

    2014-10-01

    Platinum compounds are one of the pillars of modern cancer chemotherapy. The apparent disadvantages of existing chemotherapeutics have led to the development of novel anticancer agents with alternative modes of action. Many complexes of the heavy metal osmium (Os) are potent growth inhibitors of human cancer cells and are active in vivo, often superior or comparable to cisplatin, as the benchmark metal-based anticancer agent, or clinically tested ruthenium (Ru) drug candidates. Depending on the choice of ligand system, osmium compounds exhibit diverse modes of action, including redox activation, DNA targeting or inhibition of protein kinases. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the development of osmium anticancer drug candidates and discuss their cellular mechanisms of action.

  19. Agents from amphibians with anticancer properties.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chuang-Xin; Nan, Ke-Jun; Lei, Yan

    2008-11-01

    Amphibians have been found to be a source of agents with anticancer properties. Bufalin, for example, is an anticancer agent that may induce apoptosis by its interaction with other genes and cellular components. Certain peptides with anticancer activities have been found in amphibian skin; they include magainins, aureins, citropin 1.1 and gaegurins. These peptides may exert a cytotoxic effect on human cancer cells through various mechanisms. Onconase, amphinase, cSBL (sialic acid-binding lectin purified from Rana catesbeiana eggs) and jSBL (sialic acid-binding lectin purified from Rana japonica eggs), which belong to the RNase A family, were purified from the oocyte cells and eggs of three amphibians, and they induce cytotoxicity by degrading cellular RNA. This paper discusses the medical and pharmaceutical significance of products derived from amphibians.

  20. Design, synthesis, and anticancer activity of novel berberine derivatives prepared via CuAAC “click” chemistry as potential anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Yan, Tian-Hua; Yan, Lan; Li, Qian; Wang, Rui-Lian; Hu, Zhen-Lin; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Sun, Qing-Yan; Cao, Yong-Bing

    2014-01-01

    A series of novel derivatives of phenyl-substituted berberine triazolyls has been designed and synthesized via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition click chemistry in an attempt to develop antitumor agents. All of the compounds were evaluated for anticancer activity against a panel of three human cancer cell lines, including MCF-7 (breast), SW-1990 (pancreatic), and SMMC-7721 (liver) and the noncancerous human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) cell lines. The results indicated that most of the compounds displayed notable anticancer activities against the MCF-7 cells compared with berberine. Among these derivatives, compound 16 showed the most potent inhibitory activity against the SW-1990 and SMMC-7721 cell lines, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 8.54±1.97 μM and 11.87±1.83 μM, respectively. Compound 36 exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity against the MCF-7 cell line, with an IC50 value of 12.57±1.96 μM. Compound 16 and compound 36 exhibited low cytotoxicity in the HUVEC cell line, with IC50 values of 25.49±3.24 μM and 30.47±3.47 μM. Furthermore, compounds 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 32, and 36 exhibited much better selectivity than berberine toward the normal cell line HUVEC. PMID:25120353

  1. Discovery and Development of Topoisomerase Inhibitors as Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Kathiravan, Muthu K; Kale, Anuj N; Nilewar, Shrikant

    2016-01-01

    As one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide, cancer is posing threat despite efforts being taken to develop effective anticancer drugs. There is an increase in number of chemotherapy treatments due to growing number of manifestations causing increasing toxicities of cytotoxic agents. Almost all the anticancer agents available till date have one or the other side effects. Topoisomerases are the attractive targets to develop effective anticancer agents. There has been development of many topoisomerase inhibitors till date and has shown good anticancer activity but their side effects outnumber their anticancer potential. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapeutic agents with fewer side effects. This review deals with design and development aspect of topoisomerase inhibitors as exciting novel anticancer agents. The emphasis has been laid in particular on the new potential heterocyles as TOP inhibitors in the field of medicinal chemistry. The review discusses about the topoisomerase poisons, TOP1 suppressors, TOP inhibitors and Dual TOP 1/2 inhibitors.

  2. Bacteriocins as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sumanpreet; Kaur, Sukhraj

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide, despite advances in its treatment and detection. The conventional chemotherapeutic agents used for the treatment of cancer have non-specific toxicity toward normal body cells that cause various side effects. Secondly, cancer cells are known to develop chemotherapy resistance in due course of treatment. Thus, the demand for novel anti-cancer agents is increasing day by day. Some of the experimental studies have reported the therapeutic potential of bacteriocins against various types of cancer cell lines. Bacteriocins are ribosomally-synthesized cationic peptides secreted by almost all groups of bacteria. Some bacteriocins have shown selective cytotoxicity toward cancer cells as compared to normal cells. This makes them promising candidates for further investigation and clinical trials. In this review article, we present the overview of the various cancer cell-specific cytotoxic bacteriocins, their mode of action and efficacies. PMID:26617524

  3. Novel antibodies as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Zafir-Lavie, I; Michaeli, Y; Reiter, Y

    2007-05-28

    In recent years antibodies, whether generated by traditional hybridoma technology or by recombinant DNA strategies, have evolved from Paul Ehrlich's 'magic bullets' to a modern age 'guided missile'. In the recent years of immunologic research, we are witnessing development in the fields of antigen screening and protein engineering in order to create specific anticancer remedies. The developments in the field of recombinant DNA, protein engineering and cancer biology have let us gain insight into many cancer-related mechanisms. Moreover, novel techniques have facilitated tools allowing unique distinction between malignantly transformed cells, and regular ones. This understanding has paved the way for the rational design of a new age of pharmaceuticals: monoclonal antibodies and their fragments. Antibodies can select antigens on both a specific and a high-affinity account, and further implementation of these qualities is used to target cancer cells by specifically identifying exogenous antigens of cancer cell populations. The structure of the antibody provides plasticity resonating from its functional sites. This review will screen some of the many novel antibodies and antibody-based approaches that are being currently developed for clinical applications as the new generation of anticancer agents.

  4. Synthesis and Structure–Activity Relationship Study of 1-Phenyl-1-(quinazolin-4-yl)ethanols as Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A quinazoline derivative PVHD121 (1a) was shown to have strong antiproliferative activity against various tumor-derived cell lines, including A549 (lung), NCI-H460 (lung), HCT116 (colon), MCF7 (breast), PC3 (prostate), and HeLa (cervical) cells with IC50 values from 0.1 to 0.3 μM. A structure–activity relationship (SAR) study at the 2- and 4-position of the quinazoline core lead to the discovery of more potent anticancer agents (14, 16, 17, 19, 24, and 31). The results of an in vitro tubulin polymerization assay and fluorescent-based colchicine site competition assay with purified tubulin indicated that 1a inhibits tubulin polymerization by binding to the colchicine site. PMID:25815147

  5. Farnesyl transferase inhibitors as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Haluska, P; Dy, G K; Adjei, A A

    2002-09-01

    Protein farnesylation catalysed by the enzyme farnesyl protein transferase involves the addition of a 15-carbon farnesyl group to conserved amino acid residues at the carboxyl terminus of certain proteins. Protein substrates of farnesyl transferase include several G-proteins, which are critical intermediates of cell signalling and cytoskeletal organisation such as Ras, Rho, PxF and lamins A and B. Activated Ras proteins trigger a cascade of phosphorylation events through sequential activation of the PI3 kinase/AKT pathway, which is critical for cell survival, and the Raf/Mek/Erk kinase pathway that has been implicated in cell proliferation. Ras mutations which encode for constitutively activated proteins are found in 30% of human cancers. Because farnesylation of Ras is required for its transforming and proliferative activity, the farnesyl protein transferase inhibitors were designed as anticancer agents to abrogate Ras function. However, current evidence suggests that the anticancer activity of the farnesyl transferase inhibitors may not be simply due to Ras inhibition. This review will discuss available clinical data on three of these agents that are currently undergoing clinical trials.

  6. New pyrrole derivatives with potent tubulin polymerization inhibiting activity as anticancer agents including hedgehog-dependent cancer.

    PubMed

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-08-14

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

  7. New Pyrrole Derivatives with Potent Tubulin Polymerization Inhibiting Activity As Anticancer Agents Including Hedgehog-Dependent Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:25025991

  8. Graphene oxide as a nanocarrier for controlled release and targeted delivery of an anticancer active agent, chlorogenic acid.

    PubMed

    Barahuie, Farahnaz; Saifullah, Bullo; Dorniani, Dena; Fakurazi, Sharida; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Elfghi, Fawzi M

    2017-05-01

    We have synthesized graphene oxide using improved Hummer's method in order to explore the potential use of the resulting graphene oxide as a nanocarrier for an active anticancer agent, chlorogenic acid (CA). The synthesized graphene oxide and chlorogenic acid-graphene oxide nanocomposite (CAGO) were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and differential thermogravimetry analysis, Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), UV-vis spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. The successful conjugation of chlorogenic acid onto graphene oxide through hydrogen bonding and π-π interaction was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, FTIR analysis and X-ray diffraction patterns. The loading of CA in the nanohybrid was estimated to be around 13.1% by UV-vis spectroscopy. The release profiles showed favourable, sustained and pH-dependent release of CA from CAGO nanocomposite and conformed well to the pseudo-second order kinetic model. Furthermore, the designed anticancer nanohybrid was thermally more stable than its counterpart. The in vitro cytotoxicity results revealed insignificant toxicity effect towards normal cell line, with a viability of >80% even at higher concentration of 50μg/mL. Contrarily, CAGO nanocomposite revealed enhanced toxic effect towards evaluated cancer cell lines (HepG2 human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, A549 human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line, and HeLa human cervical cancer cell line) compared to its free form.

  9. Design, modeling, synthesis and biological activity evaluation of camptothecin-linked platinum anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Cincinelli, Raffaella; Musso, Loana; Dallavalle, Sabrina; Artali, Roberto; Tinelli, Stella; Colangelo, Donato; Zunino, Franco; De Cesare, Michelandrea; Beretta, Giovanni Luca; Zaffaroni, Nadia

    2013-05-01

    The design, modeling, synthesis and biological activity evaluation of two hybrid agents formed by 7-oxyiminomethylcamptothecin derivatives and diaminedichloro-platinum (II) complex are reported. The compounds showed growth inhibitory activity against a panel of human tumor cell lines, including sublines resistant to topotecan and platinum compounds. The derivatives were active in all the tested cell lines, and compound 1b, the most active one, was able to overcome cisplatin resistance in the osteosarcoma U2OS/Pt cell line. Platinum-containing camptothecins produced platinum-DNA adducts and topoisomerase I-mediated DNA damage with cleavage pattern and persistence similar to SN38, the active principle of irinotecan. Compound 1b exhibited an appreciable antitumor activity in vivo against human H460 tumor xenograft, comparable to that of irinotecan at lower well-tolerated dose levels and superior to cisplatin. The results support the interpretation that the diaminedichloro-platinum (II) complex conjugated via an oxyiminomethyl linker at the 7-position of the camptothecin resulted in a new class of effective antitumor compounds.

  10. Designed TPR Modules as Novel Anticancer Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Cortajarena,A.; Yi, F.; Regan, L.

    2008-01-01

    Molecules specifically designed to modulate protein-protein interactions have tremendous potential as novel therapeutic agents. One important anticancer target is the chaperone Hsp90, whose activity is essential for the folding of many oncogenic proteins, including HER2, IGFIR, AKT, RAF-1, and FLT-3. Here we report the design and characterization of new tetratricopeptide repeat modules, which bind to the C-terminus of Hsp90 with higher affinity and with greater specificity than natural Hsp90-binding co-chaperones. Thus, when these modules are introduced into the cell, they out-compete endogenous co-chaperones for binding, thereby inhibiting Hsp90 function. The effect of Hsp90 inhibition in this fashion is dramatic; HER2 levels are substantially decreased and BT474 HER2 positive breast cancer cells are killed. Our designs thus provide new tools with which to dissect the mechanism of Hsp90-mediated protein folding and also open the door to the development of an entirely new class of anticancer agents.

  11. Plant Antimicrobial Peptides as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Rodríguez, Jaquelina Julia; López-Gómez, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are part of the innate immune defense mechanism of many organisms and are promising candidates to treat infections caused by pathogenic bacteria to animals and humans. AMPs also display anticancer activities because of their ability to inactivate a wide range of cancer cells. Cancer remains a cause of high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Therefore, the development of methods for its control is desirable. Attractive alternatives include plant AMP thionins, defensins, and cyclotides, which have anticancer activities. Here, we provide an overview of plant AMPs anticancer activities, with an emphasis on their mode of action, their selectivity, and their efficacy. PMID:25815333

  12. Tetrazole Derivatives as Promising Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Popova, Elena A; Protas, Aleksandra V; Trifonov, Rostislav E

    2017-03-27

    Tetrazole cycle is a promising pharmacophore fragment frequently used in the development of novel drugs. This moiety is a stable, practically non-metabolized bioisosteric analog of carboxylic, cis-amide, and other functional groups. Over recent 10-15 years, various isomeric forms of tetrazole (NH-unsubstituted, 1H-1-substituted, and 2H-2-substituted tetrazoles) have been successfully used in the design of promising anticancer drugs. Coordination compounds of transition metals containing tetrazoles as ligands, semisynthetic tetrazolyl derivatives of natural compounds (biogenic acids, peptides, steroids, combretastatin, etc.), 5-oxo and 5-thiotetrazoles, and some other related compounds have been recognized as promising antineoplastic agents. This review presents a comprehensive analysis of modern approaches to synthesis of these tetrazole derivatives as well as their biological (anticancer) properties. The most promising structure types of tetrazoles to be used as anticancer agents have been picked out.

  13. Fungal metabolites with anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Evidente, Antonio; Kornienko, Alexander; Cimmino, Alessio; Andolfi, Anna; Lefranc, Florence; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Covering: 1964 to 2013. Natural products from bacteria and plants have played a leading role in cancer drug discovery resulting in a large number of clinically useful agents. In contrast, the investigations of fungal metabolites and their derivatives have not led to a clinical cancer drug in spite of significant research efforts revealing a large number of fungi-derived natural products with promising anticancer activity. Many of these natural products have displayed notable in vitro growth-inhibitory properties in human cancer cell lines and select compounds have been demonstrated to provide therapeutic benefits in mouse models of human cancer. Many of these compounds are expected to enter human clinical trials in the near future. The present review discusses the reported sources, structures and biochemical studies aimed at the elucidation of the anticancer potential of these promising fungal metabolites.

  14. Advances in chalcones with anticancer activities.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Moorthy, Narayana S H Narayana; Ramasamy, Sakthivel; Vanam, Uma; Manivannan, Elangovan; Karunagaran, Devarajan; Trivedi, Piyush

    2015-01-01

    Chalcones are naturally occurring compounds exhibiting broad spectrum biological activities including anticancer activity through multiple mechanisms. Literature on anticancer chalcones highlights the employment of three pronged strategies, namely; structural manipulation of both aryl rings, replacement of aryl rings with heteroaryl scaffolds, molecular hybridization through conjugation with other pharmacologically interesting scaffolds for enhancement of anticancer properties. Methoxy substitutions on both the aryl rings (A and B) of the chalcones, depending upon their positions in the aryl rings appear to influence anticancer and other activities. Similarly, heterocyclic rings either as ring A or B in chalcones, also influence the anticancer activity shown by this class of compounds. Hybrid chalcones formulated by chemically linking chalcones to other prominent anticancer scaffolds such as pyrrol[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepines, benzothiazoles, imidazolones have demonstrated synergistic or additive pharmacological activities. The successful application of these three pronged strategies for discovering novel anticancer agents based on chalcone scaffold has resulted in many novel and chemically diverse chalcones with potential therapeutic application for many types of cancer. This review summarizes the concerted efforts expended on the design and development of anticancer chalcones recorded in recent literature and also provides an overview of the patents published in this area between 2007 and 2014 (WO2013022951, WO201201745 & US2012029489).

  15. Advances in cobalt complexes as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Catherine R; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan

    2015-08-21

    The evolution of resistance to traditional platinum-based anticancer drugs has compelled researchers to investigate the cytostatic properties of alternative transition metal-based compounds. The anticancer potential of cobalt complexes has been extensively studied over the last three decades, and much time has been devoted to understanding their mechanisms of action. This perspective catalogues the development of antiproliferative cobalt complexes, and provides an in depth analysis of their mode of action. Early studies on simple cobalt coordination complexes, Schiff base complexes, and cobalt-carbonyl clusters will be documented. The physiologically relevant redox properties of cobalt will be highlighted and the role this plays in the preparation of hypoxia selective prodrugs and imaging agents will be discussed. The use of cobalt-containing cobalamin as a cancer specific delivery agent for cytotoxins will also be described. The work summarised in this perspective shows that the biochemical and biophysical properties of cobalt-containing compounds can be fine-tuned to produce new generations of anticancer agents with clinically relevant efficacies.

  16. The quinolone family: from antibacterial to anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Sissi, Claudia; Palumbo, Manlio

    2003-11-01

    The present review focuses on the structural modifications responsible for the transformation of an antibacterial into an anticancer agent. Indeed, a distinctive feature of drugs based on the quinolone structure is their remarkable ability to target different type II topoisomerase enzymes. In particular, some congeners of this drug family display high activity not only against bacterial topoisomerases, but also against eukaryotic topoisomerases and are toxic to cultured mammalian cells and in vivo tumor models. Hence, these cytotoxic quinolones represent an exploitable source of new anticancer agents, which might also help addressing side-toxicity and resistance phenomena. Their ability to bind metal ion co-factors represents an additional means of modulating their pharmacological response(s). Moreover, quinolones link antibacterial and anticancer chemotherapy together and provide an opportunity to clarify drug mechanism across divergent species.

  17. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs): multitargeted anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Ververis, Katherine; Hiong, Alison; Karagiannis, Tom C; Licciardi, Paul V

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are an emerging class of therapeutics with potential as anticancer drugs. The rationale for developing HDAC inhibitors (and other chromatin-modifying agents) as anticancer therapies arose from the understanding that in addition to genetic mutations, epigenetic changes such as dysregulation of HDAC enzymes can alter phenotype and gene expression, disturb homeostasis, and contribute to neoplastic growth. The family of HDAC inhibitors is large and diverse. It includes a range of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds that differ in terms of structure, function, and specificity. HDAC inhibitors have multiple cell type-specific effects in vitro and in vivo, such as growth arrest, cell differentiation, and apoptosis in malignant cells. HDAC inhibitors have the potential to be used as monotherapies or in combination with other anticancer therapies. Currently, there are two HDAC inhibitors that have received approval from the US FDA for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, Zolinza) and depsipeptide (romidepsin, Istodax). More recently, depsipeptide has also gained FDA approval for the treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Many more clinical trials assessing the effects of various HDAC inhibitors on hematological and solid malignancies are currently being conducted. Despite the proven anticancer effects of particular HDAC inhibitors against certain cancers, many aspects of HDAC enzymes and HDAC inhibitors are still not fully understood. Increasing our understanding of the effects of HDAC inhibitors, their targets and mechanisms of action will be critical for the advancement of these drugs, especially to facilitate the rational design of HDAC inhibitors that are effective as antineoplastic agents. This review will discuss the use of HDAC inhibitors as multitargeted therapies for malignancy. Further, we outline the pharmacology and mechanisms of action of HDAC inhibitors while

  18. Taxane anticancer agents: a patent perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ojima, Iwao; Lichtenthal, Brendan; Lee, Siyeon; Wang, Changwei; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paclitaxel and docetaxel were two epoch-making anticancer drugs and have been successfully used in chemotherapy for a variety of cancer types. In 2010, a new taxane, cabazitaxel, was approved by FDA for use in combination with prednisone for the treatment of metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab™-paclitaxel; abraxane) nanodroplet formulation was another notable invention (FDA approval 2005 for refractory, metastatic, or relapsed breast cancer). Abraxane in combination with gemcitabine for the treatment of pancreatic cancer was approved by FDA in 2013. Accordingly, there have been a huge number of patent applications dealing with taxane anticancer agents in the last five years. Thus, it is a good time to review the progress in this area and find the next wave for new developments. Area covered This review article covers the patent literature from 2010 to early 2015 on various aspects of taxane-based chemotherapies and drug developments. Expert opinion Three FDA-approved taxane anticancer drugs will continue to expand their therapeutic applications, especially through drug combinations and new formulations. Inspired by the success of abraxane, new nano-formulations are emerging. Highly potent new-generation taxanes will play a key role in the development of efficacious tumor-targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:26651178

  19. Synthesis, anticancer activity and molecular docking studies on a series of heterocyclic trans-cyanocombretastatin analogues as antitubulin agents

    PubMed Central

    Penthala, Narsimha Reddy; Zong, Hongliang; Ketkar, Amit; Madadi, Nikhil Reddy; Janganati, Venumadav; Eoff, Robert L.; Guzman, Monica L.; Crooks, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    A series of heterocyclic combretastatin analogues have been synthesized and evaluated for their anticancer activity against a panel of 60 human cancer cell lines. The most potent compounds were two 3,4,5-trimethoxy phenyl analogues containing either an (Z)-indol-2-yl (8) or (Z)-benzo[b]furan-2-yl (12) moiety; these compounds exhibited GI50 values of <10 nM against 74% and 70%, respectively, of the human cancer cell lines in the 60-cell panel. Compounds 8, and 12 and two previously reported compounds in the same structural class, i.e. 29 and 31, also showed potent anti-leukemic activity against leukemia MV4-11 cell lines with LD50 values = 44 nM, 47 nM, 18 nM, and 180 nM, respectively. From the NCI anti-cancer screening results and the data from the in vitro toxicity screening on cultured AML cells, seven compounds: 8, 12, 21, 23, 25, 29 and 31 were screened for their in vitro inhibitory activity on tubulin polymerization in MV4-11 AML cells; at 50 nM, 8 and 29 inhibited polymerization of tubulin by >50%. The binding modes of the three most active compounds (8, 12 and 29) to tubulin were also investigated utilizing molecular docking studies. All three molecules were observed to bind in the same hydrophobic pocket at the interface of α- and β-tubulin that is occupied by colchicine, and were stablized by van der Waals’ interactions with surrounding tubulin residues. The results from the tubulin polymerization and molecular docking studies indicate that compounds 8 and 29 are the most potent anti-leukemic compounds in this structural class, and are considered lead compounds for further development as anti-leukemic drugs. PMID:25557492

  20. Discovery of Potent Anticancer Agent HJC0416, an Orally Bioavailable Small Molecule Inhibitor of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haijun; Yang, Zhengduo; Ding, Chunyong; Xiong, Ailian; Wild, Christopher; Wang, Lili; Ye, Na; Cai, Guoshuai; Flores, Rudolfo M.; Ding, Ye; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2014-01-01

    In a continuing effort to develop orally bioavailable small-molecule STAT3 inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents for human cancer, a series of novel diversified analogues based on our identified lead compound HJC0149 (1) (5-chloro-N-(1,1-dioxo-1H-1λ6-benzo[b]thiophen-6-yl)-2-hydroxybenzamide, Eur. J. Med. Chem. 2013, 62, 498–507) have been rationally designed, synthesized, and pharmacologically evaluated. Molecular docking studies and biological characterization supported our earlier findings that the O-alkylamino-tethered side chain on the hydroxyl group is an effective and essential structural determinant for improving biological activities and druglike properties of these molecules. Compounds with such modifications exhibited potent antiproliferative effects against breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines with IC50 values from low micromolar to nanomolar range. Among them, the newly discovered STAT3 inhibitor 12 (HJC0416) displayed an intriguing anticancer profile both in vitro and in vivo (i.p. & p.o.). More importantly, HJC0416 is an orally bioavailable anticancer agent as a promising candidate for further development. PMID:24904966

  1. Redesigning the DNA-Targeted Chromophore in Platinum–Acridine Anticancer Agents: A Structure–Activity Relationship Study

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Amanda J.; Liu, Fang; Bartenstein, Thomas F.; Haines, Laura G.; Levine, Keith E.; Kucera, Gregory L.; Bierbach, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Platinum–acridine hybrid agents show low-nanomolar potency in chemoresistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but high systemic toxicity in vivo. To reduce the promiscuous genotoxicity of these agents and improve their pharmacological properties, a modular build–click–screen approach was used to evaluate a small library of twenty hybrid agents containing truncated and extended chromophores of varying basicities. Selected derivatives were resynthesized and tested in five NSCLC cell lines representing large cell, squamous cell, and adenocarcinomas. 7-Aminobenz[c]acridine was identified as a promising scaffold in a hybrid agent (P1–B1) that maintained submicromolar activity in several of the DNA-repair proficient and p53-mutant cancer models, while showing improved tolerability in mice by 32-fold compared to the parent platinum–acridine (P1–A1). The distribution and DNA/RNA adduct levels produced by the acridine- and benz[c]acridine-based analogues in NCI-H460 cells (confocal microscopy, ICP-MS), and their ability to bind G-quadruplex forming DNA sequences (CD spectroscopy, HR-ESMS) were studied. P1–B1 emerges as a less genotoxic, more tolerable, and potentially more target-selective hybrid agent than P1–A1. PMID:25302716

  2. Transcription of the protein kinase C-δ gene is activated by JNK through c-Jun and ATF2 in response to the anticancer agent doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byong Wook; Kim, Chang Gun; Ko, Jesang; Lim, Yoongho

    2008-01-01

    Expression of protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) is up-regulated by apoptosis-inducing stimuli. However, very little is known about the signaling pathways that control PKCδ gene transcription. In the present study, we demonstrate that JNK stimulates PKCδ gene expression via c-Jun and ATF2 in response to the anticancer agent doxorubicin (DXR) in mouse lymphocytic leukemia L1210 cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that DXR-induced activation of the PKCδ promoter was enhanced by ectopic expression of JNK1, c-Jun, or ATF2, whereas it was strongly reduced by expression of dominant negative JNK1 or by treatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Furthermore, point mutations in the core sequence of the c-Jun/ATF2 binding site suppressed DXR-induced activation of the PKCδ promoter. Our results suggest an additional role for a JNK signaling cascade in DXR-induced PKCδ gene expression. PMID:19116455

  3. Anticancer Activity of Stilbene-based Derivatives.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Barbara; Ammazzalorso, Alessandra; Fantacuzzi, Marialuigia; Giampietro, Letizia; Maccallini, Cristina; Amoroso, Rosa

    2017-03-07

    Anticancer Activity of Stilbene-based Derivatives Barbara De Filippis,* Alessandra Ammazzalorso, Marialuigia Fantacuzzi, Letizia Giampietro, Cristina Maccallini, Rosa Amoroso Dipartimento di Farmacia, Università "G. d'Annunzio", via dei Vestini 31, 66100 Chieti, Italy; * E-mail: barbara.defilippis@unich.it Stilbene is a very present structural scaffold in nature and stilbene-based compounds are largely described for their biological activity such as cardioprotective, potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer agents. Starting from their potent chemotherapeutic activity against a wide variety of cancers, stilbene scaffold of resveratrol has been subjected to synthetic manipulations with the aim to obtaining new resveratrol analogues with improved anticancer activity and better bioavailability. In the last decade, majority of new synthetic stilbenoids demonstrated significant anticancer activity against a large number of cancer cell lines employed, depending on the type and position of substituents on stilbene skeleton. Given the importance of this topic and the vast therapeutic potential, especially in the field of cancer research, in the last years, some reviews have been published focusing on general pharmacological activity or, more recently, on the usefulness of hybrid molecule containing stilbene scaffold. The present review article focuses on the pharmacological profile of the key compounds containing stilbene scaffold and classify them on the type of structural modifications in stilbene skeleton.

  4. Discovery of new anticancer agents from higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Chai, Hee-Byung; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2012-01-01

    1. ABSTRACT Small organic molecules derived from higher plants have been one of the mainstays of cancer chemotherapy for approximately the past half a century. In the present review, selected single chemical entity natural products of plant origin and their semi-synthetic derivatives currently in clinical trials are featured as examples of new cancer chemotherapeutic drug candidates. Several more recently isolated compounds obtained from plants showing promising in vivo biological activity are also discussed in terms of their potential as anticancer agents, with many of these obtained from species that grow in tropical regions. Since extracts of only a relatively small proportion of the ca. 300,000 higher plants on earth have been screened biologically to date, bioactive compounds from plants should play an important role in future anticancer drug discovery efforts. PMID:22202049

  5. Coumarin: a promising scaffold for anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manjinder; Kohli, Swarandeep; Sandhu, Sonali; Bansal, Yogita; Bansal, Gulshan

    2015-01-01

    Coumarin enjoys an important place in drug discovery process due to its presence in diversity of biologically active compounds. Many compounds of plant origin are derivatives of coumarin. Taking these natural products as lead, research groups across the globe have designed and synthesized numerous coumarin analogues for treatment of varied diseases. Cancer is one of the dreadful chronic diseases, and many drugs are available for its treatment. However, due to heterogeneity of cancer, the search is still on to develop drugs for specific types of cancers. The present review is an attempt to study various coumarin derivatives of natural as well as synthetic origins, which are identified or developed for the treatment of different types of cancers. Herein, we have classified various anticancer coumarin derivatives on the basis of their origin as well as substitution around it. These are discussed under the headings of natural, semi-synthetic and synthetic coumarin derivatives. The synthetic coumarin derivatives are further classified as mono-, di- and poly-substituted and fused coumarin derivatives. Of the six positions available for substituents on coumarin nucleus, only three positions (C-3, C-4 and C-7) are exploited for the selection of functional groups appropriate for anticancer activity. The other positions (C-5, C-6 and C-8) are either unexplored or very less exploited. The present review is expected to provide the medicinal chemists a guide to choose new functional groups for substitution at different positions of coumarin nucleus for development of novel compounds for the treatment of a specific type of cancer.

  6. Current developments of coumarin-based anti-cancer agents in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Emami, Saeed; Dadashpour, Sakineh

    2015-09-18

    Cancer is one of the leading health hazards and the prominent cause of death in the world. A number of anticancer agents are currently in clinical practice and used for treatment of various kinds of cancers. There is no doubt that the existing arsenal of anticancer agents is insufficient due to the high incidence of side effects and multidrug resistance. In the efforts to develop suitable anticancer drugs, medicinal chemists have focused on coumarin derivatives. Coumarin is a naturally occurring compound and a versatile synthetic scaffold possessing wide spectrum of biological effects including potential anticancer activity. This review article covers the current developments of coumarin-based anticancer agents and also discusses the structure-activity relationship of the most potent compounds.

  7. Natural compounds as anticancer agents: Experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiao; Jiang, Yang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer prevention research has drawn much attention worldwide. It is believed that some types of cancer can be prevented by following a healthy life style. Cancer chemoprevention by either natural or synthetic agents is a promising route towards lowering cancer incidence. In recent years, the concept of cancer chemoprevention has evolved greatly. Experimental studies in animal models demonstrate that the reversal or suppression of premalignant lesions by chemopreventive agents is achievable. Natural occurring agents such as dietary phytochemicals, tea polyphenols and resveratrol show chemopreventive activity in animal models. Moreover, clinical trials for testing the safety and efficacy of a variety of natural agents in preventing or treating human malignancy have been ongoing. Here, we summarize experimental data on the chemopreventive or tumor suppressive effects of several natural compounds including curcumin, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, resveratrol, indole-3-carbinol, and vitamin D. PMID:24520533

  8. Discovery of Anticancer Agents of Diverse Natural Origin

    PubMed Central

    KINGHORN, A. DOUGLAS; CARCACHE DE BLANCO, ESPERANZA J.; LUCAS, DAVID M.; RAKOTONDRAIBE, H. LIVA; ORJALA, JIMMY; SOEJARTO, D. DOEL; OBERLIES, NICHOLAS H.; PEARCE, CEDRIC J.; WANI, MANSUKH C.; STOCKWELL, BRENT R.; BURDETTE, JOANNA E.; SWANSON, STEVEN M.; FUCHS, JAMES R.; PHELPS, MITCHELL A.; XU, LIHUI; ZHANG, XIAOLI; SHEN, YOUNG YONGCHUN

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress is described in an ongoing collaborative multidisciplinary research project directed towards the purification, structural characterization, chemical modification, and biological evaluation of new potential natural product anticancer agents obtained from a diverse group of organisms, comprising tropical plants, aquatic and terrestrial cyanobacteria, and filamentous fungi. Information is provided on how these organisms are collected and processed. The types of bioassays are indicated in which initial extracts, chromatographic fractions, and purified isolated compounds of these acquisitions are tested. Several promising biologically active lead compounds from each major organism major class investigated are described, and these may be seen to be representative of very wide chemical diversity. PMID:27793884

  9. Quinolones in the Search for New Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Pedro Netto; Vieira de Souza, Maria Cecília Bastos; Peña-Cabrera, Eduardo; Cruz, David Cruz; da Costa Santos Boechat, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Quinolones have a large bio-dynamicity. Although they are well known as antibacterials, another important activity has been investigated - quinolones are able to inhibit cancer cell proliferation. In view of the great versatility associated with the synthesis of quinolones, many researchers have spent time and resources on the development of new structurally diversified quinolone derivatives with the purpose of finding new possibilities for cancer treatment. In this review some of the most recent advances in the search for new quinolone anticancer agents are highlighted, with focus on naturally occurring substances, bioactive metal complexes, molecular hybrids, photosensitizers and heterocycle condensed quinolones.

  10. Efficient synthesis of benzamide riboside, a potential anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Bonnac, Laurent F; Gao, Guang-Yao; Chen, Liqiang; Patterson, Steven E; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N; Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W

    2007-01-01

    An efficient five step synthesis of benzamide riboside (BR) amenable for a large scale synthesis has been developed. It allows for extensive pre-clinical studies of BR as a potential anticancer agent.

  11. Mechanistic studies of cancer cell mitochondria- and NQO1-mediated redox activation of beta-lapachone, a potentially novel anticancer agent

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jason Z.; Ke, Yuebin; Misra, Hara P.; Trush, Michael A.; Li, Y. Robert; Zhu, Hong; Jia, Zhenquan

    2014-12-15

    Beta-lapachone (beta-Lp) derived from the Lapacho tree is a potentially novel anticancer agent currently under clinical trials. Previous studies suggested that redox activation of beta-Lp catalyzed by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) accounted for its killing of cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. Using chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping techniques, this study for the first time demonstrated the real-time formation of ROS in the redox activation of beta-lapachone from cancer cells mediated by mitochondria and NQO1 in melanoma B16–F10 and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cancer cells. ES936, a highly selective NQO1 inhibitor, and rotenone, a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) complex I were found to significantly block beta-Lp meditated redox activation in B16–F10 cells. In HepG2 cells ES936 inhibited beta-Lp-mediated oxygen radical formation by ∼ 80% while rotenone exerted no significant effect. These results revealed the differential contribution of METC and NQO1 to beta-lapachone-induced ROS formation and cancer cell killing. In melanoma B16–F10 cells that do not express high NQO1 activity, both NOQ1 and METC play a critical role in beta-Lp redox activation. In contrast, in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells expressing extremely high NQO1 activity, redox activation of beta-Lp is primarily mediated by NQO1 (METC plays a minor role). These findings will contribute to our understanding of how cancer cells are selectively killed by beta-lapachone and increase our ability to devise strategies to enhance the anticancer efficacy of this potentially novel drug while minimizing its possible adverse effects on normal cells. - Highlights: • Both isolated mitochondria and purified NQO1 are able to generate ROS by beta-Lp. • The differential roles of mitochondria and NQO1 in mediating redox activation of beta-Lp • In cancer cells with

  12. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel diphenylthiazole-based cyclooxygenase inhibitors as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Abdelazeem, Ahmed H; Gouda, Ahmed M; Omar, Hany A; Tolba, Mai F

    2014-12-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most widely used medications as analgesics and antipyretics. Currently, there is a growing interest in their antitumor activity and their ability to reduce the risk and mortality of several cancers. While several studies revealed the ability of NSAIDs to induce apoptosis and inhibit angiogenesis in cancer cells, their exact anticancer mechanism is not fully understood. However, both cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent and -independent pathways were reported to have a role. In an attempt to develop new anticancer agents, a series of diphenylthiazole substituted thiazolidinone derivatives was synthesized and evaluated for their anticancer activity against a panel of cancer cell lines. Additionally, the inhibitory activity of the synthesized derivatives against COX enzymes was investigated as a potential mechanism for the anticancer activity. Cytotoxicity assay results showed that compounds 15b and 16b were the most potent anticancer agents with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) between 8.88 and 19.25μM against five different human cancer cell lines. Interestingly, COX inhibition assay results were in agreement with that of the cytotoxicity assays where the most potent anticancer compounds showed good COX-2 inhibition comparable to that of celecoxib. Further support to our results were gained by the docking studies which suggested the ability of compound 15b to bind into COX-2 enzyme with low energy scores. Collectively, these results demonstrated the promising activity of the newly designed compounds as leads for subsequent development into potential anticancer agents.

  13. Naturally occurring anti-cancer agents targeting EZH2.

    PubMed

    Shahabipour, Fahimeh; Caraglia, Michele; Majeed, Muhammed; Derosa, Giuseppe; Maffioli, Pamela; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-03-18

    Natural products are considered as promising tools for the prevention and treatment of cancer. The enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is a histone methyltransferase unit of polycomb repressor complexes such as PRC2 complex that has oncogenic roles through interference with growth and metastatic potential. Several agents targeting EZH2 has been discovered but they often induce side effects in clinical trials. Recently, EZH2 has emerged as a potential target of natural products with documented anti-cancer effects and this discloses a new scenario for the development of EZH2 inhibitory strategies with agents with low cytotoxic detrimental effects. In fact, several natural products such as curcumin, triptolide, ursolic acid, sulforaphane, davidiin, tanshindiols, gambogic acid, berberine and Alcea rosea have been shown to serve as EZH2 modulators. Mechanisms like inhibition of histone H3K4, H3K27 and H3K36 trimethylation, down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase expression, competitive binding to the S-adenosylmethionine binding site of EZH2 and modulation of tumor-suppressive microRNAs have been demonstrated to mediate the EZH2-inhibitory activity of the mentioned natural products. This review summarizes the pathways that are regulated by various natural products resulting in the suppression of EZH2, and provides a plausible molecular mechanism for the putative anti-cancer effects of these compounds.

  14. Comprehensive Review on Betulin as a Potent Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Kiełbus, Michał; Stepulak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Numerous plant-derived substances, and their derivatives, are effective antitumour and chemopreventive agents. Yet, there are also a plethora of tumour types that do not respond, or become resistant, to these natural substances. This requires the discovery of new active compounds. Betulin (BE) is a pentacyclic triterpene and secondary metabolite of plants abundantly found in the outer bark of the birch tree Betulaceae sp. BE displays a broad spectrum of biological and pharmacological properties, among which the anticancer and chemopreventive activity attract most of the attention. In this vein, BE and its natural and synthetic derivatives act specifically on cancer cells with low cytotoxicity towards normal cells. Although the antineoplastic mechanism of action of BE is not well understood yet, several interesting aspects of BE's interactions are coming to light. This review will summarize the anticancer and chemopreventive potential of BE in vitro and in vivo by carefully dissecting and comparing the doses and tumour lines used in previous studies, as well as focusing on mechanisms underlying its activity at cellular and molecular level, and discuss future prospects. PMID:25866796

  15. Comprehensive review on betulin as a potent anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Król, Sylwia Katarzyna; Kiełbus, Michał; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo; Stepulak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Numerous plant-derived substances, and their derivatives, are effective antitumour and chemopreventive agents. Yet, there are also a plethora of tumour types that do not respond, or become resistant, to these natural substances. This requires the discovery of new active compounds. Betulin (BE) is a pentacyclic triterpene and secondary metabolite of plants abundantly found in the outer bark of the birch tree Betulaceae sp. BE displays a broad spectrum of biological and pharmacological properties, among which the anticancer and chemopreventive activity attract most of the attention. In this vein, BE and its natural and synthetic derivatives act specifically on cancer cells with low cytotoxicity towards normal cells. Although the antineoplastic mechanism of action of BE is not well understood yet, several interesting aspects of BE's interactions are coming to light. This review will summarize the anticancer and chemopreventive potential of BE in vitro and in vivo by carefully dissecting and comparing the doses and tumour lines used in previous studies, as well as focusing on mechanisms underlying its activity at cellular and molecular level, and discuss future prospects.

  16. New gold carbene complexes as candidate anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Pratesi, Alessandro; Cirri, Damiano; Đurović, Mirjana D; Pillozzi, Serena; Petroni, Giulia; Bugarčić, Živadin D; Messori, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    Three structurally related gold(I) carbene complexes with bulky hydrophobic ligands i.e. 1-3 were investigated in solution for further consideration as candidate anticancer agents. Cytotoxic assays were subsequently conducted on bone marrow-derived preosteoclast cell line of human origin (FLG 29.1) and human colon cancer cells (HCT-116). A far greater cytotoxic activity was measured for compound 1 against HCT-116 cells compared to 2 and 3; conversely, all compounds were highly and similarly active against FLG 29.1 cells. Results obtained for the reaction of complexes 1 and 2 with RNase A documented the occurrence of a weak interaction with this model protein and the formation of a tiny amount of the corresponding adduct. Moreover, a certain reactivity of the complex 2 was also detected toward GSH. The general implications of the obtained results are discussed.

  17. Monofunctional and Higher-Valent Platinum Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Timothy C.; Wilson, Justin J.

    2013-01-01

    Platinum compounds represent one of the great success stories of metals in medicine. Following the serendipitous discovery of the anticancer activity of cisplatin by Rosenberg, a large number of cisplatin variants have been prepared and tested for their ability to kill cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth. These efforts continue today with increased realization that new strategies are needed to overcome issues of toxicity and resistance inherent to treatment by the approved platinum anticancer agents. One approach has been the use of so-called “non-traditional” platinum(II) and platinum(IV) compounds that violate the structure-activity relationships that governed platinum drug-development research for many years. Another is the use of specialized drug delivery strategies. Here we describe recent developments from our laboratory involving monofunctional platinum(II) complexes together with an historical account of the manner by which we came to investigate these compounds and their relationship to previously studied molecules. We also discuss work carried out using platinum(IV) prodrugs and the development of nanoconstructs designed to deliver them in vivo. PMID:23738524

  18. Design and synthesis of 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives as anti-cancer agent.

    PubMed

    Viradiya, Denish; Mirza, Sheefa; Shaikh, Faraz; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Rathod, Anand; Jain, Nayan; Rawal, Rakesh; Shah, Anamik

    2016-12-06

    A series of 1,4-dihydropyridine based compounds bearing benzylpyridinium moiety have been designed and evaluated for in vitro anticancer activity against glioblastoma U87MG, lung cancer A549 and colorectal adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cell lines using the MTT assay. Among these compounds, 7b, 7d, 7e, and 7f exhibited potent anticancer activity against the cell lines tested. The cytotoxicity of the synthesized derivatives was compared to standard drugs (carboplatin, gemcitabine, and daunorubicin). Thus, synthesized 1,4-dihydropyridines can be considered as the encouraging molecules for further drug development as anticancer agents.

  19. Azaindenoisoquinolines as Topoisomerase I Inhibitors and Potential Anticancer Agents: A Systematic Study of Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Kiselev, Evgeny; Agama, Keli; Pommier, Yves; Cushman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive study of a series of azaindenoisoquinoline topoisomerase I (Top1) inhibitors is reported. The synthetic pathways have been developed to prepare 7-, 8-, 9-, and 10-azaindenoisoquinolines. The present study shows that 7-azaindenoisoquinolines possess the greatest Top1 inhibitory activity and cytotoxicity. Additionally, the introduction of a methoxy group into the D-ring of 7-azaindenoisoquinolines improved their biological activities, leading to new lead molecules for further development. A series of QM calculations were performed on the model “sandwich” complexes of azaindenoisoquinolines with flanking DNA base pairs from the Drug–Top1–DNA ternary complex. The results of these calculations demonstrate how changes in two forces contributing to the π–π stacking, dispersion and charge-transfer interactions, affect the binding of the drug to the Top1–DNA cleavage complex and thus modulate the drug’s Top1 inhibitory activity. PMID:22329436

  20. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug activated gene-1 (NAG-1) modulators from natural products as anti-cancer agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural products are rich source of gene modulators for prevention and treatment of cancer. In recent days, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) activated gene-1 (NAG-1) has been focused as a new target of diverse cancers like colorectal, pancreatic, prostate, and breast. A variety of natural...

  1. Antioxidant activity and chemical components as potential anticancer agents in the olive leaf (Olea europaea L. cv Leccino.) decoction.

    PubMed

    De Marino, Simona; Festa, Carmen; Zollo, Franco; Nini, Antonella; Antenucci, Lina; Raimo, Gennaro; Iorizzi, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that a reduced risk of chronic diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases is correlated with a regular consumption of fruits and vegetable, many of which are rich in polyphenols. The additive and synergistic effect of phytochemicals in fruits and vegetables may reduce chronic diseases related to oxidative stress in human body. Olea europaea L. leaf are rich in phenolic components, which have been proposed to play a role in cancer prevention. The purpose of this study was to identify the main components in the Olea europaea L. leaf (cv. Leccino) preserved during the decoction preparation, in order to delineate the antioxidant activities of the crude extracts and its isolated compounds by using different in vitro assays including DPPH radicalscavenging capacity, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory effect and the ability to delay the linoleic acid peroxidation process (ALP). The aqueous decoction was partitioned obtaining four extracts and the n-butanol extract showed the highest antioxidant activity and the highest total phenolic content. Phytochemical investigation leads to the isolation of thirteen secondary metabolites including simple phenolics, flavonoids, secoiridoids whose structures were elucidated by spectroscopic data (1D and 2D NMR) and spectrometric techniques. A significant free radical scavenging effect against DPPH has been evidenced in fraxamoside (1) (EC50 62.6 µM) and taxifolin (5) (EC50 50.0 µM), isolated for the first time from the water decoction. The most active compound in the TAC evaluation, was the 3,4 dihydro-phenyl glycol (8) (0.90 caffeic acid equiv.) while taxifolin and fraxamoside resulted as the most efficient inhibitors of XO activity (IC50 2.7 and 5.2 µM, respectively). Secoxyloganin (4), oleuropein (2) and tyrosol (6) showed the highest ALP activity. This study adds to the growing body of data supporting the bioactivities of phytochemicals and their

  2. Nanovectors for anticancer agents based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Douziech-Eyrolles, Laurence; Marchais, Hervé; Hervé, Katel; Munnier, Emilie; Soucé, Martin; Linassier, Claude; Dubois, Pierre; Chourpa, Igor

    2007-01-01

    During the last decade, the application of nanotechnologies for anticancer drug delivery has been extensively explored, hoping to improve the efficacy and to reduce side effects of chemotherapy. The present review is dedicated to a certain kind of anticancer drug nanovectors developed to target tumors with the help of an external magnetic field. More particularly, this work treats anticancer drug nanoformulations based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with biocompatible polymers. The major purpose is to focus on the specific requirements and technological difficulties related to controlled delivery of antitumoral agents. We attempt to state the problem and its possible perspectives by considering the three major constituents of the magnetic therapeutic vectors: iron oxide nanoparticles, polymeric coating and anticancer drug. PMID:18203422

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of cytotoxic activity of Some Pyrroles and Fused Pyrroles Running Title: Fused pyrroles as Novel Anti-Cancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Fatahala, Samar S; Mohamed, Mosaad S; Youns, Mahmoud; Abd-El Hameed, Rania H

    2017-01-02

    Pyrrole derivatives represent a very interesting class as biologically active compounds. The objective of our study was to investigate the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects and antioxidant activity of the newly synthesized pyrrole derivatives. A series of novel pyrroles and fused pyrroles (tetrahydroindoles, pyrrolopyrimidines, pyrrolopyridines and pyrrolotriazines) were synthesized and characterized using IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, MS and elemental analysis techniques. The antiproliferative activity of our synthesized compounds and their modulatory effect apoptotic pathway were investigated. The effect on cellular proliferation and viability was monitored by resazurin assay. Apoptotic effect was evaluated by caspase glo 3/7 assay. Synthesized compounds are then tested for their anticancer activities against three different cell lines representing three different tumor types, namely; the HepG-2 (Human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line), the human MCF-7 cell line (breast cancer) and the pancreatic resistant Panc-1 cells .Compounds Ia-e, IIe, and IXc,d showed a promising anti-cancer activity on all tested cell lines. Antioxidant and wound healing invasion assays were examined for promising anticancer candidate compounds.

  4. Insight into the reactive form of the anticancer agent iproplatin.

    PubMed

    Volckova, Erika; Weaver, Evelyne; Bose, Rathindra N

    2008-05-01

    The reaction of iproplatin with reduced glutathione at different mole ratios yielded cis-di(isopropylamine)chloro-glutathionatoplatinum(II), not the expected cis-dichloro- species, indicating a mode of action of this anticancer agent that is different from that of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II).

  5. Alkaloids Isolated from Natural Herbs as the Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin-Jian; Bao, Jiao-Lin; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Huang, Min; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2012-01-01

    Alkaloids are important chemical compounds that serve as a rich reservoir for drug discovery. Several alkaloids isolated from natural herbs exhibit antiproliferation and antimetastasis effects on various types of cancers both in vitro and in vivo. Alkaloids, such as camptothecin and vinblastine, have already been successfully developed into anticancer drugs. This paper focuses on the naturally derived alkaloids with prospective anticancer properties, such as berberine, evodiamine, matrine, piperine, sanguinarine, and tetrandrine, and summarizes the mechanisms of action of these compounds. Based on the information in the literature that is summarized in this paper, the use of alkaloids as anticancer agents is very promising, but more research and clinical trials are necessary before final recommendations on specific alkaloids can be made. PMID:22988474

  6. A novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent with high selectivity for cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Huan; Li, Dong-Wei; Yang, Li-Yun; Fu, Li; Zhu, Xun-Jin; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have recently emerged as novel targets for cancer therapy due to its important roles in fundamental cellular function. Discovery of new chemotherapeutic agents that allow for simultaneous treatment and visualization of cancer is urgent. Herein, we demonstrate a novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent (FPB), exhibiting both imaging capability and anticancer activity. It can selectively accumulate in mitochondria and induce cell apoptosis. Notably, it results in much higher toxicity toward cancer cells owing to much higher uptake by cancer cells. These features make it highly attractive in cancer imaging and treatment. PMID:26337336

  7. Carfilzomib is an effective anticancer agent in anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Amit; Zhang, Lisa; Boufraqech, Myriem; Zhang, Yaqin; Patel, Dhaval; Shen, Min; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-06-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies. Currently, there is no standard or effective therapy for ATC. Drug repurposing for cancer treatment is an emerging approach for identifying compounds that may have antineoplastic effects. The aim of this study was to use high-throughput drug library screening to identify and subsequently validate novel therapeutic agents with anticancer effects in ATC. We performed quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) in ATC cell lines (SW-1736, 8505C, and C-643), using a compound library of 3282 drugs. qHTS identified 100 compounds that were active in all three ATC cell lines. Proteasome inhibitors were one of the most active drug categories according to enrichment analysis. Of the three proteasome inhibitors screened, a second-generation proteasome inhibitor, carfilzomib, was the most active. Treatment of ATC cells with carfilzomib significantly inhibited cellular proliferation and induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Mechanistically, carfilzomib increased expression of p27 (CDKN1B) and decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein ATF4. Pretreatment with carfilzomib reduced in vivo metastases (lung, bone, liver, and kidney) and disease progression, and decreased N-cadherin expression. Carfilzomib treatment of mice with established, widely metastatic disease significantly increased their survival, without significant toxicity. Our findings support the use or clinical study of carfilzomib as a therapeutic option in patients with advanced and metastatic ATC.

  8. Diaryl Urea: A Privileged Structure in Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Garuti, Laura; Roberti, Marinella; Bottegoni, Giovanni; Ferraro, Mariarosaria

    2016-01-01

    The diaryl urea is an important fragment/pharmacophore in constructing anticancer molecules due to its near-perfect binding with certain acceptors. The urea NH moiety is a favorable hydrogen bond donor, while the urea oxygen atom is regarded as an excellent acceptor. Many novel compounds have been synthesized and evaluated for their antitumor activity with the successful development of sorafenib. Moreover, this structure is used to link alkylating pharmacophores with high affinity DNA binders. In addition, the diaryl urea is present in several kinase inhibitors, such as RAF, KDR and Aurora kinases. Above all, this moiety is used in the type II inhibitors: it usually forms one or two hydrogen bonds with a conserved glutamic acid and one with the backbone amide of the aspartic acid in the DFG motif. In addition, some diaryl urea derivatives act as Hedgehog (Hh) ligands, binding and inhibiting proteins involved in the homonymous Hh signaling pathway. In this review we provide some of the methodologies adopted for the synthesis of diaryl ureas and a description of the most representative antitumor agents bearing the diaryl urea moiety, focusing on their mechanisms bound to the receptors and structure-activity relationships (SAR). An increased knowledge of these derivatives could prompt the search to find new and more potent compounds.

  9. Synthesis, quantitative structure-activity relationship and biological evaluation of 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives possessing diphenylamine moiety as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Abdel Rahman, Doaa Ezzat

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis of 2,5-disubstituted-1,3,4-oxadiazole (2a-c), 3-substituted aminomethyl-5-substituted-1,3,4-oxadiazole-2(3H)-thione (4a-m) and 2-substituted thio-5-substituted-1,3,4-oxadiazole (5a, b) had been described. All the synthesized derivatives were screened for anticancer activity against HT29 and MCF7 cancer cell lines using Sulfo-Rodamine B (SRB) standard method. Most of the tested compounds exploited potent antiproliferative activity against HT29 cancer cell line rather than MCF7 cancer cell line. Compounds 2a-c, 4f and 5a exhibited potent cytotoxicity (IC(50) 1.3-2.0 µM) and selectivity against HT29 cancer cell line. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study was applied to find a correlation between the experimental antiproliferative activities of the newly synthesized oxadiazole derivatives with their physicochemical parameter and topological index.

  10. Ligands for cannabinoid receptors, promising anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Nikan, Marjan; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Manayi, Azadeh

    2016-02-01

    Cannabinoid compounds are unique to cannabis and provide some interesting biological properties. These compounds along with endocannabinoids, a group of neuromodulator compounds in the body especially in brain, express their effects by activation of G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. There are several physiological properties attributed to the endocannabinoids including pain relief, enhancement of appetite, blood pressure lowering during shock, embryonic development, and blocking of working memory. On the other hand, activation of endocannabinoid system may be suppresses evolution and progression of several types of cancer. According to the results of recent studies, CB receptors are over-expressed in cancer cell lines and application of multiple cannabinoid or cannabis-derived compounds reduce tumor size through decrease of cell proliferation or induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis along with desirable effect on decrease of tumor-evoked pain. Therefore, modulation of endocannabinoid system by inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme, which metabolized endocannabinoids, or application of multiple cannabinoid or cannabis-derived compounds, may be appropriate for the treatment of several cancer subtypes. This review focuses on how cannabinoid affect different types of cancers.

  11. Ferrocene Functionalized Endocrine Modulators as Anticancer Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillard, Elizabeth A.; Vessières, Anne; Jaouen, Gerard

    We present here some of our studies on the synthesis and behaviour of ferrocenyl selective endocrine receptor modulators against cancer cells, particularly breast and prostate cancers. The proliferative/anti-proliferative effects of compounds based on steroidal and non-steroidal endocrine modulators have been extensively explored in vitro. Structure-activity relationship studies of such molecules, particularly the hydroxyferrocifens and ferrocene phenols, have shown the effect of (1) the presence and the length of the N,N-dimethylamino side chain, (2) the presence and position of the phenol group, (3) the role of the ferrocenyl moiety, (4) that of conjugation, (5) phenyl functionalisation and (6) the placement of the phenyl group. Compounds possessing a ferrocene moiety linked to a p-phenol by a conjugated π-system are among the most potent of the series, with IC50 values ranging from 0.090 to 0.6µM on hormone independent breast cancer cells. Based on the SAR data and electrochemical studies, we have proposed an original mechanism to explain the unusual behaviour of these bioorganometallic species and coin the term "kronatropic" to qualify this effect, involving ROS production and bio-oxidation. In addition, the importance of formulation is underlined. We also discuss the behaviour of ferrocenyl androgens and anti-androgens for possible use against prostate cancers. In sum, ferrocene has proven to be a fascinating substituent due to its vast potential for oncology.

  12. Recent development in [1,4]benzodiazepines as potent anticancer agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Gill, Rupinder Kaur; Kaushik, Shiv Om; Chugh, Jasreen; Bansal, Sumit; Shah, Anamik; Bariwal, Jitender

    2014-01-01

    The [1,4]benzodiazepine is an important class of heterocyclic compounds and clinically used for many ailments in humans. The [1,4]benzodiazepine has unique structure that mimics the peptide linkage. This interesting observation completely shifted the interest of medicinal chemist for [1,4]benzodiazepine from CNS acting drugs to anticancer agents. During last few decades, a large number of reports have appeared in the literature highlighting the anticancer activity of [1,4]benzodiazepines. Here, in this article, we have discussed the brief synthesis, origin of [1,4]benzodiazepines as anticancer agent, their mechanism of action and latest developments in this field. We have compiled the most important literature reports from last few decades till date.

  13. Recent developments of C-4 substituted coumarin derivatives as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Dandriyal, Jyoti; Singla, Ramit; Kumar, Manvendra; Jaitak, Vikas

    2016-08-25

    Cancer is a prominent cause of death in global. Currently, the numbers of drugs that are in clinical practice are having a high prevalence of side effect and multidrug resistance. Researchers have made an attempt to expand a suitable anticancer drug that has no MDR and side effect. Coumarin scaffold became an attractive subject due to their broad spectrum of pharmacological activities. Coumarin derivatives extensively explored for anticancer activities as it possesses minimum side effect along with multi-drug reversal activity. Coumarin derivatives can act by various mechanisms on different tumor cell lines depending on substitution pattern of the core structure of coumarin. Substitution on coumarin nucleus leads to the search for more potent compounds. In this review, we have made an effort to give a synthetic strategy for the preparation of C-4 substituted coumarin derivatives as anticancer agents based on their mechanism of action and also discuss the SAR of the most active compound.

  14. Recent advances in oral anticancer agents for colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Raj Kumar

    2013-12-01

    To provide therapeutic alternatives to intravenous colon chemotherapy major recent research is focusing on the development of oral chemotherapeutic agents with the intention to improve the quality of life of patients. Initially 5-fluorouracil was most commonly used for the treatment of colorectal cancer but currently oxaliplatin and irinotecan are also available. The majority of these new drugs are pyrimidines and their analogs. The rationale for using oral anticancer agents is discussed and new drugs, such as farnesyl protein transferase inhibitor S-1, rubitecan, ZD9331, MMI-166, eflornithine, sulindac, and oral camptothecin analogs, among others, are presented with the results of their preclinical and clinical developments. This article focuses on the advancement of clinical development and also discusses the relative merits and demerits of these agents. The accelerated approval of these agents by regulatory authorities is supported by survival benefit, response rate and time to progression.

  15. Oxidative phosphorylation-dependent regulation of cancer cell apoptosis in response to anticancer agents

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, N.; Kumar, S.; Marlowe, T.; Chaudhary, A. K.; Kumar, R.; Wang, J.; O'Malley, J.; Boland, P. M.; Jayanthi, S.; Kumar, T. K. S.; Yadava, N.; Chandra, D.

    2015-11-05

    Cancer cells tend to develop resistance to various types of anticancer agents, whether they adopt similar or distinct mechanisms to evade cell death in response to a broad spectrum of cancer therapeutics is not fully defined. Current study concludes that DNA-damaging agents (etoposide and doxorubicin), ER stressor (thapsigargin), and histone deacetylase inhibitor (apicidin) target oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for apoptosis induction, whereas other anticancer agents including staurosporine, taxol, and sorafenib induce apoptosis in an OXPHOS-independent manner. DNA-damaging agents promoted mitochondrial biogenesis accompanied by increased accumulation of cellular and mitochondrial ROS, mitochondrial protein-folding machinery, and mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis occurred in a caspase activation-independent mechanism but was reduced by autophagy inhibition and p53-deficiency. Abrogation of complex-I blocked DNA-damage-induced caspase activation and apoptosis, whereas inhibition of complex-II or a combined deficiency of OXPHOS complexes I, III, IV, and V due to impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis did not modulate caspase activity. Mechanistic analysis revealed that inhibition of caspase activation in response to anticancer agents associates with decreased release of mitochondrial cytochrome c in complex-I-deficient cells compared with wild type (WT) cells. Gross OXPHOS deficiencies promoted increased release of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria compared with WT or complex-I-deficient cells, suggesting that cells harboring defective OXPHOS trigger caspase-dependent as well as caspase-independent apoptosis in response to anticancer agents. Interestingly, DNA-damaging agent doxorubicin showed strong binding to mitochondria, which was disrupted by complex-I-deficiency but not by complex-II-deficiency. Thapsigargin-induced caspase activation was reduced upon abrogation of complex-I or gross OXPHOS deficiency

  16. Oxidative phosphorylation-dependent regulation of cancer cell apoptosis in response to anticancer agents

    DOE PAGES

    Yadav, N.; Kumar, S.; Marlowe, T.; ...

    2015-11-05

    Cancer cells tend to develop resistance to various types of anticancer agents, whether they adopt similar or distinct mechanisms to evade cell death in response to a broad spectrum of cancer therapeutics is not fully defined. Current study concludes that DNA-damaging agents (etoposide and doxorubicin), ER stressor (thapsigargin), and histone deacetylase inhibitor (apicidin) target oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for apoptosis induction, whereas other anticancer agents including staurosporine, taxol, and sorafenib induce apoptosis in an OXPHOS-independent manner. DNA-damaging agents promoted mitochondrial biogenesis accompanied by increased accumulation of cellular and mitochondrial ROS, mitochondrial protein-folding machinery, and mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Induction of mitochondrialmore » biogenesis occurred in a caspase activation-independent mechanism but was reduced by autophagy inhibition and p53-deficiency. Abrogation of complex-I blocked DNA-damage-induced caspase activation and apoptosis, whereas inhibition of complex-II or a combined deficiency of OXPHOS complexes I, III, IV, and V due to impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis did not modulate caspase activity. Mechanistic analysis revealed that inhibition of caspase activation in response to anticancer agents associates with decreased release of mitochondrial cytochrome c in complex-I-deficient cells compared with wild type (WT) cells. Gross OXPHOS deficiencies promoted increased release of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria compared with WT or complex-I-deficient cells, suggesting that cells harboring defective OXPHOS trigger caspase-dependent as well as caspase-independent apoptosis in response to anticancer agents. Interestingly, DNA-damaging agent doxorubicin showed strong binding to mitochondria, which was disrupted by complex-I-deficiency but not by complex-II-deficiency. Thapsigargin-induced caspase activation was reduced upon abrogation of complex-I or gross OXPHOS

  17. Oxidative phosphorylation-dependent regulation of cancer cell apoptosis in response to anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, N; Kumar, S; Marlowe, T; Chaudhary, A K; Kumar, R; Wang, J; O'Malley, J; Boland, P M; Jayanthi, S; Kumar, T K S; Yadava, N; Chandra, D

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells tend to develop resistance to various types of anticancer agents, whether they adopt similar or distinct mechanisms to evade cell death in response to a broad spectrum of cancer therapeutics is not fully defined. Current study concludes that DNA-damaging agents (etoposide and doxorubicin), ER stressor (thapsigargin), and histone deacetylase inhibitor (apicidin) target oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for apoptosis induction, whereas other anticancer agents including staurosporine, taxol, and sorafenib induce apoptosis in an OXPHOS-independent manner. DNA-damaging agents promoted mitochondrial biogenesis accompanied by increased accumulation of cellular and mitochondrial ROS, mitochondrial protein-folding machinery, and mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis occurred in a caspase activation-independent mechanism but was reduced by autophagy inhibition and p53-deficiency. Abrogation of complex-I blocked DNA-damage-induced caspase activation and apoptosis, whereas inhibition of complex-II or a combined deficiency of OXPHOS complexes I, III, IV, and V due to impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis did not modulate caspase activity. Mechanistic analysis revealed that inhibition of caspase activation in response to anticancer agents associates with decreased release of mitochondrial cytochrome c in complex-I-deficient cells compared with wild type (WT) cells. Gross OXPHOS deficiencies promoted increased release of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria compared with WT or complex-I-deficient cells, suggesting that cells harboring defective OXPHOS trigger caspase-dependent as well as caspase-independent apoptosis in response to anticancer agents. Interestingly, DNA-damaging agent doxorubicin showed strong binding to mitochondria, which was disrupted by complex-I-deficiency but not by complex-II-deficiency. Thapsigargin-induced caspase activation was reduced upon abrogation of complex-I or gross OXPHOS deficiency

  18. Expression of sulfotransferase SULT1A1 in cancer cells predicts susceptibility to the novel anticancer agent NSC-743380.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao; Cao, Mengru; Wang, Li; Wu, Shuhong; Liu, Xiaoying; Li, Hongyu; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Rui-Yu; Sun, Xiaoping; Wei, Caimiao; Baggerly, Keith A; Roth, Jack A; Wang, Michael; Swisher, Stephen G; Fang, Bingliang

    2015-01-01

    The small molecule anticancer agent NSC-743380 modulates functions of multiple cancer-related pathways and is highly active in a subset of cancer cell lines in the NCI-60 cell line panel. It also has promising in vivo anticancer activity. However, the mechanisms underlying NSC-743380's selective anticancer activity remain uncharacterized. To determine biomarkers that may be used to identify responders to this novel anticancer agent, we performed correlation analysis on NSC-743380's anticancer activity and the gene expression levels in NCI-60 cell lines and characterized the functions of the top associated genes in NSC-743380-mediated anticancer activity. We found sulfotransferase SULT1A1 is causally associated with NSC-743380's anticancer activity. SULT1A1 was expressed in NSC-743380-sensitive cell lines but was undetectable in resistant cancer cells. Ectopic expression of SULT1A1 in NSC743380 resistant cancer cells dramatically sensitized the resistant cells to NSC-743380. Knockdown of the SULT1A1 in the NSC-743380 sensitive cancer cell line rendered it resistance to NSC-743380. The SULT1A1 protein levels in cell lysates from 18 leukemia cell lines reliably predicted the susceptibility of the cell lines to NSC-743380. Thus, expression of SULT1A1 in cancer cells is required for NSC-743380's anticancer activity and can be used as a biomarker for identification of NSC-743380 responders.

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of 3-ylideneoxindole acetamides as potent anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Chun-Tang; Lee, Wei-Chun; Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Cheng, Jing-Jy; Lin, Lie-Chwen; Chen, Chih-Yu; Song, Jen-Shin; Wu, Ming-Hsien; Shia, Kak-Shan; Li, Wen-Tai

    2015-06-15

    Indirubin, an active component in the traditional Chinese medicine formula Danggui Longhui Wan, shows promising anticancer effects. Meisoindigo is an analog derived from indirubin, which is less toxic and appears to be even more potent against cancer. In considering meisoindigo as a structural template for the development of new drugs, we designed and synthesized a series of 3-ylideneoxindole acetamides as novel anticancer agents. The acetamides were then evaluated for in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities. The 3-ylideneoxindole acetamides were found to have better anticancer activity than was indirubin-3'-oxime in several cancer cell lines and also displayed a spectrum of activity similar to that of the drug candidate roscovitine, a CDK inhibitor. Among the 3-ylideneoxindole acetamides, compound 10 showed particularly good efficacy. Cell cycle analysis further revealed that compound 10 arrested cells in the G1 phase and caused an increase in the sub-G1 population, indicating that the apoptosis pathway had been induced. In addition, exposure of cells to compound 10 led to the upregulation of the cell-cycle regulator cyclin D1, which was sustained at a high level. In contrast, the same compound induced a short-term elevation in the level of cyclin E, which was followed by a rapid decrease and the attenuation of Rb phosphorylation. Furthermore, a docking model suggests that compound 10 binds to the active site of CDK4. In testing the therapeutic potency of compound 10 on CT26-xenografted BALB/c mice, a significant reduction in tumor size comparable to that of cisplatin was found when administrated via the i.p. route. The mice presented no loss of body weight, indicating that this compound possesses low toxicity. In the future, we are planning in vivo investigations of these new active anticancer agents to better elucidate active mechanisms at the cellular level and thus benefit the development of anticancer therapies.

  20. Anticancer activity assessment of two novel binuclear platinum (II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Shahsavani, Mohammad Bagher; Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Aseman, Marzieh Dadkhah; Nabavizadeh, S Masoud; Rashidi, Mehdi; Asadi, Zahra; Erfani, Nasrollah; Ghasemi, Atiyeh; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Niazi, Ali; Bahaoddini, Aminollah; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, two binuclear Pt (II) complexes, containing cis, cis-[Me2Pt (μ-NN) (μ-dppm) PtMe2] (1), and cis,cis-[Me2Pt(μ-NN)(μ dppm) Pt((CH2)4)] (2) in which NN=phthalazine and dppm=bis (diphenylphosphino) methane were evaluated for their anticancer activities and DNA/purine nucleotide binding properties. These Pt (II) complexes, with the non-classical structures, demonstrated a significant anticancer activity against Jurkat and MCF-7 cancer cell lines. The results of ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining and Caspase-III activity suggest that these complexes were capable to stimulate an apoptotic mechanism of cell death in the cancer cells. Using different biophysical techniques and docking simulation analysis, we indicated that these complexes were also capable to interact efficiently with DNA via a non-intercalative mechanism. According to our results, substitution of cyclopentane (in complex 2) with two methyl groups (in complex 1) results in significant improvement of the complex ability to interact with DNA and subsequently to induce the anticancer activity. Overall, these binuclear Pt (II) complexes are promising group of the non-classical potential anticancer agents which can be considered as molecular templates in designing of highly efficient platinum anticancer drugs.

  1. Anticancer activity of sea cucumber triterpene glycosides.

    PubMed

    Aminin, Dmitry L; Menchinskaya, Ekaterina S; Pisliagin, Evgeny A; Silchenko, Alexandra S; Avilov, Sergey A; Kalinin, Vladimir I

    2015-03-06

    Triterpene glycosides are characteristic secondary metabolites of sea cucumbers (Holothurioidea, Echinodermata). They have hemolytic, cytotoxic, antifungal, and other biological activities caused by membranotropic action. These natural products suppress the proliferation of various human tumor cell lines in vitro and, more importantly, intraperitoneal administration in rodents of solutions of some sea cucumber triterpene glycosides significantly reduces both tumor burden and metastasis. The anticancer molecular mechanisms include the induction of tumor cell apoptosis through the activation of intracellular caspase cell death pathways, arrest of the cell cycle at S or G2/M phases, influence on nuclear factors, NF-κB, and up-down regulation of certain cellular receptors and enzymes participating in cancerogenesis, such as EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), Akt (protein kinase B), ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinases), FAK (focal adhesion kinase), MMP-9 (matrix metalloproteinase-9) and others. Administration of some glycosides leads to a reduction of cancer cell adhesion, suppression of cell migration and tube formation in those cells, suppression of angiogenesis, inhibition of cell proliferation, colony formation and tumor invasion. As a result, marked growth inhibition of tumors occurs in vitro and in vivo. Some holothurian triterpene glycosides have the potential to be used as P-gp mediated MDR reversal agents in combined therapy with standard cytostatics.

  2. Anticancer Activity of Sea Cucumber Triterpene Glycosides

    PubMed Central

    Aminin, Dmitry L.; Menchinskaya, Ekaterina S.; Pisliagin, Evgeny A.; Silchenko, Alexandra S.; Avilov, Sergey A.; Kalinin, Vladimir I.

    2015-01-01

    Triterpene glycosides are characteristic secondary metabolites of sea cucumbers (Holothurioidea, Echinodermata). They have hemolytic, cytotoxic, antifungal, and other biological activities caused by membranotropic action. These natural products suppress the proliferation of various human tumor cell lines in vitro and, more importantly, intraperitoneal administration in rodents of solutions of some sea cucumber triterpene glycosides significantly reduces both tumor burden and metastasis. The anticancer molecular mechanisms include the induction of tumor cell apoptosis through the activation of intracellular caspase cell death pathways, arrest of the cell cycle at S or G2/M phases, influence on nuclear factors, NF-κB, and up-down regulation of certain cellular receptors and enzymes participating in cancerogenesis, such as EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), Akt (protein kinase B), ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinases), FAK (focal adhesion kinase), MMP-9 (matrix metalloproteinase-9) and others. Administration of some glycosides leads to a reduction of cancer cell adhesion, suppression of cell migration and tube formation in those cells, suppression of angiogenesis, inhibition of cell proliferation, colony formation and tumor invasion. As a result, marked growth inhibition of tumors occurs in vitro and in vivo. Some holothurian triterpene glycosides have the potential to be used as P-gp mediated MDR reversal agents in combined therapy with standard cytostatics. PMID:25756523

  3. Repurposing the Clinically Efficacious Antifungal Agent Itraconazole as an Anticancer Chemotherapeutic.

    PubMed

    Pace, Jennifer R; DeBerardinis, Albert M; Sail, Vibhavari; Tacheva-Grigorova, Silvia K; Chan, Kelly A; Tran, Raymond; Raccuia, Daniel S; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Hadden, M Kyle

    2016-04-28

    Itraconazole (ITZ) is an FDA-approved member of the triazole class of antifungal agents. Two recent drug repurposing screens identified ITZ as a promising anticancer chemotherapeutic that inhibits both the angiogenesis and hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathways. We have synthesized and evaluated first- and second-generation ITZ analogues for their anti-Hh and antiangiogenic activities to probe more fully the structural requirements for these anticancer properties. Our overall results suggest that the triazole functionality is required for ITZ-mediated inhibition of angiogenesis but that it is not essential for inhibition of Hh signaling. The synthesis and evaluation of stereochemically defined des-triazole ITZ analogues also provides key information as to the optimal configuration around the dioxolane ring of the ITZ scaffold. Finally, the results from our studies suggest that two distinct cellular mechanisms of action govern the anticancer properties of the ITZ scaffold.

  4. Antidiabetic and anticancer activities of Mangifera indica cv. Okrong leaves

    PubMed Central

    Ganogpichayagrai, Aunyachulee; Palanuvej, Chanida; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes and cancer are a major global public health problem. Plant-derived agents with undesirable side-effects were required. This study aimed to evaluate antidiabetic and anticancer activities of the ethanolic leaf extract of Mangifera indica cv. Okrong and its active phytochemical compound, mangiferin. Antidiabetic activities against yeast α-glucosidase and rat intestinal α-glucosidase were determined using 1 mM of p-nitro phenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside as substrate. Inhibitory activity against porcine pancreatic α-amylase was performed using 1 mM of 2-chloro-4 nitrophenol-α-D-maltotroside-3 as substrate. Nitrophenol product was spectrophotometrically measured at 405 nm. Anticancer activity was evaluated against five human cancer cell lines compared to two human normal cell lines using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Mango leaf extract and mangiferin exhibited dose-dependent inhibition against yeast α-glucosidase with the IC50 of 0.0503 and 0.5813 mg/ml, respectively, against rat α-glucosidase with the IC50 of 1.4528 and 0.4333 mg/ml, respectively, compared to acarbose with the IC50 of 11.9285 and 0.4493 mg/ml, respectively. For anticancer activity, mango leaf extract, at ≥200 μg/ml showed cytotoxic potential against all tested cancer cell lines. In conclusion, mango leaf possessed antidiabetic and anticancer potential in vitro. PMID:28217550

  5. Antidiabetic and anticancer activities of Mangifera indica cv. Okrong leaves.

    PubMed

    Ganogpichayagrai, Aunyachulee; Palanuvej, Chanida; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes and cancer are a major global public health problem. Plant-derived agents with undesirable side-effects were required. This study aimed to evaluate antidiabetic and anticancer activities of the ethanolic leaf extract of Mangifera indica cv. Okrong and its active phytochemical compound, mangiferin. Antidiabetic activities against yeast α-glucosidase and rat intestinal α-glucosidase were determined using 1 mM of p-nitro phenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside as substrate. Inhibitory activity against porcine pancreatic α-amylase was performed using 1 mM of 2-chloro-4 nitrophenol-α-D-maltotroside-3 as substrate. Nitrophenol product was spectrophotometrically measured at 405 nm. Anticancer activity was evaluated against five human cancer cell lines compared to two human normal cell lines using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Mango leaf extract and mangiferin exhibited dose-dependent inhibition against yeast α-glucosidase with the IC50 of 0.0503 and 0.5813 mg/ml, respectively, against rat α-glucosidase with the IC50 of 1.4528 and 0.4333 mg/ml, respectively, compared to acarbose with the IC50 of 11.9285 and 0.4493 mg/ml, respectively. For anticancer activity, mango leaf extract, at ≥200 μg/ml showed cytotoxic potential against all tested cancer cell lines. In conclusion, mango leaf possessed antidiabetic and anticancer potential in vitro.

  6. Non-covalent carriage of anticancer agents by humanized antibody trastuzumab.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Arpita; Sharma, Sweta; Yadav, Veejendra Kumar

    2016-05-01

    This article explores the internalization and non-covalent carriage of small molecule anticancer agents like vinca alkaloids by humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. Such carriage is marked by significant reduction in side effects and increased therapeutic value of these anticancer agents. This study is coherent with few clinical observations of enhanced efficiency of these anticancer agents when co-administered with therapeutic antibodies. This study will also serve as the foundation for screening a database of anticancer agents for possible compounds that may be co-delivered alongwith the antibody. Based on this study vincristine conformation inside antibody and its charge environment may be used as descriptors for screening purposes.

  7. Benzimidazole clubbed with triazolo-thiadiazoles and triazolo-thiadiazines: new anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Husain, Asif; Rashid, Mohd; Shaharyar, M; Siddiqui, Anees A; Mishra, Ravinesh

    2013-04-01

    Two series of Benzimidazole clubbed with triazolo-thiadiazoles (5a-q, 5r, 5s and 5x-a(1)) and triazolo-thiadiazines (5t-w) were synthesized with an aim to produce promising anticancer agents. In vitro anticancer activities of synthesized compounds were investigated at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) against NCI 60 cell line panel; results showed good to remarkable broad-spectrum anticancer activity. Among them, the compound 5h (NCS: 760452, 1-(1H-benzo [d] imidazol-2-yl)-3-(6-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]thiadiazol-3-yl) propan-1-one) exhibited significant growth inhibition with GI50 values ranging from 0.20 to 2.58 μM and found superior selectivity for the leukemia cell lines and further screened at 10-fold dilutions of five different concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μM). The 5h may possibly be used as lead compound for developing new anticancer agents.

  8. Nanomicellar carriers for targeted delivery of anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Huang, Yixian; Li, Song

    2014-01-01

    Clinical application of anticancer drugs is limited by problems such as low water solubility, lack of tissue-specificity and toxicity. Formulation development represents an important approach to these problems. Among the many delivery systems studied, polymeric micelles have gained considerable attention owing to ease in preparation, small sizes (10–100 nm), and ability to solubilize water-insoluble anticancer drugs and accumulate specifically at the tumors. This article provides a brief review of several promising micellar systems and their applications in tumor therapy. The emphasis is placed on the discussion of the authors’ recent work on several nanomicellar systems that have both a delivery function and antitumor activity, named dual-function drug carriers. PMID:24341817

  9. Anticancer activity of Carica papaya: a review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao T T; Shaw, Paul N; Parat, Marie-Odile; Hewavitharana, Amitha K

    2013-01-01

    Carica papaya is widely cultivated in tropical and subtropical countries and is used as food as well as traditional medicine to treat a range of diseases. Increasing anecdotal reports of its effects in cancer treatment and prevention, with many successful cases, have warranted that these pharmacological properties be scientifically validated. A bibliographic search was conducted using the key words "papaya", "anticancer", and "antitumor" along with cross-referencing. No clinical or animal cancer studies were identified and only seven in vitro cell-culture-based studies were reported; these indicate that C. papaya extracts may alter the growth of several types of cancer cell lines. However, many studies focused on specific compounds in papaya and reported bioactivity including anticancer effects. This review summarizes the results of extract-based or specific compound-based investigations and emphasizes the aspects that warrant future research to explore the bioactives in C. papaya for their anticancer activities.

  10. Pharmacophore modeling and in silico toxicity assessment of potential anticancer agents from African medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Simoben, Conrad Veranso; Karaman, Berin; Ngwa, Valery Fuh; Judson, Philip Neville; Sippl, Wolfgang; Mbaze, Luc Meva’a

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling has been employed in the search for lead compounds of chemotherapy to fight cancer. In this study, pharmacophore models have been generated and validated for use in virtual screening protocols for eight known anticancer drug targets, including tyrosine kinase, protein kinase B β, cyclin-dependent kinase, protein farnesyltransferase, human protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1. Pharmacophore models were validated through receiver operating characteristic and Güner–Henry scoring methods, indicating that several of the models generated could be useful for the identification of potential anticancer agents from natural product databases. The validated pharmacophore models were used as three-dimensional search queries for virtual screening of the newly developed AfroCancer database (~400 compounds from African medicinal plants), along with the Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anticancer Compound-Activity-Target dataset (comprising ~1,500 published naturally occurring plant-based compounds from around the world). Additionally, an in silico assessment of toxicity of the two datasets was carried out by the use of 88 toxicity end points predicted by the Lhasa’s expert knowledge-based system (Derek), showing that only an insignificant proportion of the promising anticancer agents would be likely showing high toxicity profiles. A diversity study of the two datasets, carried out using the analysis of principal components from the most important physicochemical properties often used to access drug-likeness of compound datasets, showed that the two datasets do not occupy the same chemical space. PMID:27445461

  11. Pharmacophore modeling and in silico toxicity assessment of potential anticancer agents from African medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Simoben, Conrad Veranso; Karaman, Berin; Ngwa, Valery Fuh; Judson, Philip Neville; Sippl, Wolfgang; Mbaze, Luc Meva'a

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling has been employed in the search for lead compounds of chemotherapy to fight cancer. In this study, pharmacophore models have been generated and validated for use in virtual screening protocols for eight known anticancer drug targets, including tyrosine kinase, protein kinase B β, cyclin-dependent kinase, protein farnesyltransferase, human protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1. Pharmacophore models were validated through receiver operating characteristic and Güner-Henry scoring methods, indicating that several of the models generated could be useful for the identification of potential anticancer agents from natural product databases. The validated pharmacophore models were used as three-dimensional search queries for virtual screening of the newly developed AfroCancer database (~400 compounds from African medicinal plants), along with the Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anticancer Compound-Activity-Target dataset (comprising ~1,500 published naturally occurring plant-based compounds from around the world). Additionally, an in silico assessment of toxicity of the two datasets was carried out by the use of 88 toxicity end points predicted by the Lhasa's expert knowledge-based system (Derek), showing that only an insignificant proportion of the promising anticancer agents would be likely showing high toxicity profiles. A diversity study of the two datasets, carried out using the analysis of principal components from the most important physicochemical properties often used to access drug-likeness of compound datasets, showed that the two datasets do not occupy the same chemical space.

  12. Discovery and development of natural product oridonin-inspired anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ye; Ding, Chunyong; Ye, Na; Liu, Zhiqing; Wold, Eric A; Chen, Haiying; Wild, Christopher; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2016-10-21

    Natural products have historically been, and continue to be, an invaluable source for the discovery of various therapeutic agents. Oridonin, a natural diterpenoid widely applied in traditional Chinese medicines, exhibits a broad range of biological effects including anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. To further improve its potency, aqueous solubility and bioavailability, the oridonin template serves as an exciting platform for drug discovery to yield better candidates with unique targets and enhanced drug properties. A number of oridonin derivatives (e.g. HAO472) have been designed and synthesized, and have contributed to substantial progress in the identification of new agents and relevant molecular mechanistic studies toward the treatment of human cancers and other diseases. This review summarizes the recent advances in medicinal chemistry on the explorations of novel oridonin analogues as potential anticancer therapeutics, and provides a detailed discussion of future directions for the development and progression of this class of molecules into the clinic.

  13. Antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activity of 3 Umbilicaria species.

    PubMed

    Kosanić, Marijana; Ranković, Branislav; Stanojković, Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activity of the acetone extracts of the lichens Umbilicaria crustulosa, U. cylindrica, and U. polyphylla. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by 5 separate methods: free radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, reducing power, determination of total phenolic compounds, and determination of total flavonoid content. Of the lichens tested, U. polyphylla had largest free radical scavenging activity (72.79% inhibition at a concentration of 1 mg/mL), which was similar as standard antioxidants in the same concentration. Moreover, the tested extracts had effective reducing power and superoxide anion radical scavenging. Total content of phenol and flavonoid in extracts was determined as pyrocatechol equivalent, and as rutin equivalent, respectively. The strong relationships between total phenolic and flavonoid contents and the antioxidant effect of tested extracts were observed. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method. The most active was extract of U. polyphylla with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 1.56 to 12.5 mg/mL. Anticancer activity was tested against FemX (human melanoma) and LS174 (human colon carcinoma) cell lines using MTT method. All extracts were found to be strong anticancer activity toward both cell lines with IC₅₀ values ranging from 28.45 to 97.82 μg/mL. The present study shows that tested lichen extracts demonstrated a strong antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer effects. That suggests that lichens may be used as possible natural antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer agents.

  14. Plant Anticancer Agents XXXIII. Constituents of Passerina vulgaris1.

    PubMed

    Ji-Xian, G; Handa, S S; Pezzuto, J M; Kinghorn, A D; Farnsworth, N R

    1984-06-01

    Two lignans of known structure, (+)-syringaresinol, a cytotoxic agent, and (+)-nortrachelogenin, a compound with demonstrated antileukemic activity, were isolated from a biologically active extract of the stems of PASSERINA VULGARIS.

  15. T-oligo as an anticancer agent in colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wojdyla, Luke; Stone, Amanda L.; Sethakorn, Nan; Uppada, Srijayaprakash B.; Devito, Joseph T.; Bissonnette, Marc; Puri, Neelu

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • T-oligo induces cell cycle arrest, senescence, apoptosis, and differentiation in CRC. • Treatment with T-oligo downregulates telomere-associated proteins. • T-oligo combined with an EGFR-TKI additively inhibits cellular proliferation. • T-oligo has potential as an effective therapeutic agent for CRC. - Abstract: In the United States, there will be an estimated 96,830 new cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) and 50,310 deaths in 2014. CRC is often detected at late stages of the disease, at which point there is no effective chemotherapy. Thus, there is an urgent need for effective novel therapies that have minimal effects on normal cells. T-oligo, an oligonucleotide homologous to the 3′-telomere overhang, induces potent DNA damage responses in multiple malignant cell types, however, its efficacy in CRC has not been studied. This is the first investigation demonstrating T-oligo-induced anticancer effects in two CRC cell lines, HT-29 and LoVo, which are highly resistant to conventional chemotherapies. In this investigation, we show that T-oligo may mediate its DNA damage responses through the p53/p73 pathway, thereby inhibiting cellular proliferation and inducing apoptosis or senescence. Additionally, upregulation of downstream DNA damage response proteins, including E2F1, p53 or p73, was observed. In LoVo cells, T-oligo induced senescence, decreased clonogenicity, and increased expression of senescence associated proteins p21, p27, and p53. In addition, downregulation of POT1 and TRF2, two components of the shelterin protein complex which protects telomeric ends, was observed. Moreover, we studied the antiproliferative effects of T-oligo in combination with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Gefitinib, which resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation. Collectively, these data provide evidence that T-oligo alone, or in combination with other molecularly targeted therapies, has potential as an anti-cancer agent in CRC.

  16. Can Some Marine-Derived Fungal Metabolites Become Actual Anticancer Agents?

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Nelson G. M.; Lefranc, Florence; Kijjoa, Anake; Kiss, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Marine fungi are known to produce structurally unique secondary metabolites, and more than 1000 marine fungal-derived metabolites have already been reported. Despite the absence of marine fungal-derived metabolites in the current clinical pipeline, dozens of them have been classified as potential chemotherapy candidates because of their anticancer activity. Over the last decade, several comprehensive reviews have covered the potential anticancer activity of marine fungal-derived metabolites. However, these reviews consider the term “cytotoxicity” to be synonymous with “anticancer agent”, which is not actually true. Indeed, a cytotoxic compound is by definition a poisonous compound. To become a potential anticancer agent, a cytotoxic compound must at least display (i) selectivity between normal and cancer cells (ii) activity against multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells; and (iii) a preferentially non-apoptotic cell death mechanism, as it is now well known that a high proportion of cancer cells that resist chemotherapy are in fact apoptosis-resistant cancer cells against which pro-apoptotic drugs have more than limited efficacy. The present review thus focuses on the cytotoxic marine fungal-derived metabolites whose ability to kill cancer cells has been reported in the literature. Particular attention is paid to the compounds that kill cancer cells through non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms. PMID:26090846

  17. Synthesis and Anticancer Activity of Epipolythiodiketopiperazine Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Nicolas; Morrison, Karen C.; Kim, Justin; Hergenrother, Paul J.; Movassaghi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    The epipolythiodiketopiperazine (ETP) alkaloids are a highly complex class of natural products with potent anticancer activity. Herein, we report the application of a flexible and scalable synthesis, allowing the construction of dozens of ETP derivatives. The evaluation of these compounds against cancer cell lines in culture allows for the first expansive structure–activity relationship (SAR) to be defined for monomeric and dimeric ETP-containing natural products and their synthetic cognates. Many ETP derivatives demonstrate potent anticancer activity across a broad range of cancer cell lines, and kill cancer cellsviainduction of apoptosis. Several traits thatbode well for the translational potential of the ETP class of natural products includeconcise and efficient synthetic access, potent induction of apoptotic cell death, activity against a wide range of cancer types, and a broad tolerance for modifications at multiple sitesthat should facilitate small-molecule drug development, mechanistic studies, and evaluation in vivo. PMID:23914293

  18. (-)-Arctigenin as a lead compound for anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gui-Rong; Li, Hong-Fu; Dou, De-Qiang; Xu, Yu-Bin; Jiang, Hong-Shuai; Li, Fu-Rui; Kang, Ting-Guo

    2013-01-01

    (-)-Arctigenin, an important active constituent of the traditional Chinese herb Fructus Arctii, was found to exhibit various bioactivities, so it can be used as a good lead compound for further structure modification in order to find a safer and more potent medicine. (-)-Arctigenin derivatives 1-5 of (-)-arctingen were obtained by modifying with ammonolysis at the lactone ring and sulphonylation at C (6') and C (6″) and O-demethylation at CH3O-C (3'), CH3O-C (3″) and CH3O-C (4″), and their anticancer bioactivities were examined.

  19. Quinonaphthothiazines, syntheses, structures and anticancer activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeleń, M.; Pluta, K.; Suwińska, K.; Morak-Młodawska, B.; Latocha, M.; Shkurenko, A.

    2015-11-01

    Two new types of pentacyclic azaphenothiazines being quinonaphthothiazines were obtaining from the reactions of dichlorodiquinolinyl disulfide with 1- and 2-naphthylamines. As the reactions could proceed in many ways, the proper structure elucidation was crucial. The structure determination was based on the 2D NMR spectra (NOESY, HSQC and HMBC) of the methyl derivatives. The final structure evidences came from X-ray analysis of the monocrystals. The new quinonaphthothiazines represent angularly fused pentacyclic ring systems which is folded along the N-S axis. The parent NH-compounds were transformed into the N-derivatives. Some quinonaphthothiazines exhibited promising anticancer activity against glioblastoma SNB-19, melanoma C-32 and human ductal breast epithelial tumor T47D cell lines. The anticancer activity dependent on the nature of the substituents and the ring fusion between the thiazine and naphthalene moieties. Two compounds were more active than the reference drug, cisplatin.

  20. Chrysin-benzothiazole conjugates as antioxidant and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Bhupendra M; Patel, Rahul V; Keum, Young-Soo; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2015-12-01

    7-(4-Bromobutoxy)-5-hydroxy-2-phenyl-4H-chromen-4-one, obtained from chrysin with 1,4-dibromobutane, was combined with a wide range of 6-substituted 2-aminobenzthiazoles, which had been prepared from the corresponding anilines with potassium thiocyanate. Free radical scavenging efficacies of newer analogues were measured using DPPH and ABTS assays, in addition to the assessment of their anticancer activity against cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa and CaSki) and ovarian cancer cell line (SK-OV-3) implementing the SRB assay. Cytotoxicity of titled compounds was checked using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) non-cancer cell line. Overall, 6a-r indicated remarkable antioxidant power as DPPH and ABTS(+) scavengers; particularly the presence of halogen(s) (6g, 6h, 6j-6l) was favourable with IC50 values comparable to the control ascorbic acid. Unsubstituted benzothiazole ring favored the activity of resultant compounds (6a and 6r) against HeLa cell line, whereas presence of chlorine (6g) or a di-fluoro group (6k) was a key to exert strong action against CaSki. Moreover, a mono-fluoro (6j) and a ketonic functionality (6o) were beneficial to display anticipated anticancer effects against ovarian cancer cell line SK-OV-3. The structural assignments of the new products were done on the basis of IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis.

  1. Novel, Broad Spectrum Anticancer Agents Containing the Tricyclic 5:7:5-Fused Diimidazodiazepine Ring System

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of a series of novel, broad spectrum anticancer agents containing the tricyclic 5:7:5-fused diimidazo[4,5-d:4′,5′-f][1,3]diazepine ring system is reported. Compounds 1, 2, 8, 11, and 12 in the series show promising in vitro antitumor activity with low micromolar IC50 values against prostate, lung, breast, and ovarian cancer cell lines. Some notions about structure−activity relationships and a possible mechanism of biological activity are presented. Also presented are preliminary in vivo toxicity studies of 1 using SCID mice. PMID:21572541

  2. Discovery of a novel anticancer agent with both anti-topoisomerase I and II activities in hepatocellular carcinoma SK-Hep-1 cells in vitro and in vivo: Cinnamomum verum component 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Perng, Daw-Shyong; Tsai, Yu-Hsin; Cherng, Jonathan; Wang, Jeng-Shing; Chou, Kuo-Shen; Shih, Chia-Wen; Cherng, Jaw-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamomum verum is used to make the spice cinnamon and has been used as a traditional Chinese herbal medicine for various applications. We evaluated the anticancer effect of 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde (2-MCA), a constituent of the bark of the plant, and its underlying molecular biomarkers associated with carcinogenesis in human hepatocellular carcinoma SK-Hep-1 cell line. The results show that 2-MCA suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis as indicated by mitochondrial membrane potential loss, activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, increase in the DNA content in sub-G1, and morphological characteristics of apoptosis, including blebbing of plasma membrane, nuclear condensation, fragmentation, apoptotic body formation, and long comet tail. In addition, 2-MCA also induced lysosomal vacuolation with increased volume of acidic compartments, suppressions of nuclear transcription factors NF-κB, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and both topoisomerase I and II activities in a dose-dependent manner. Further study reveals the growth-inhibitory effect of 2-MCA was also evident in a nude mice model. Taken together, the data suggest that the growth-inhibitory effect of 2-MCA against SK-Hep-1 cells is accompanied by downregulations of NF-κB-binding activity, inflammatory responses involving cyclooxygenase-2 and PGE2, and proliferative control involving apoptosis, both topoisomerase I and II activities, together with an upregulation of lysosomal vacuolation and volume of acidic compartments. Similar effects (including all of the above-mentioned effects) were found in other tested cell lines, including human hepatocellular carcinoma Hep 3B, lung adenocarcinoma A549, squamous cell carcinoma NCI-H520, colorectal adenocarcinoma COLO 205, and T-lymphoblastic MOLT-3 (results not shown). Our data suggest that 2-MCA could be a potential agent for anticancer therapy. PMID:26792981

  3. Synthesis of (-)-arctigenin derivatives and their anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Gui-Rong, Chen; Li-Ping, Cai; De-Qiang, Dou; Ting-Guo, Kang; Hong-Fu, Li; Fu-Rui, Li; Ning, Jiang

    2012-01-01

    The natural dibenzylbutyrolactone type lignanolide (-)-arctigenin, which was prepared from fructus arctii, showed obvious anticancer activity. The synthesis of four new (-)-arctigenin derivatives and their anticancer bioactivities were examined. The structures of the four new synthetic derivatives were elucidated.

  4. Phytochemicals and Biogenic Metallic Nanoparticles as Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Pasupuleti Visweswara; Nallappan, Devi; Madhavi, Kondeti; Rahman, Shafiqur; Jun Wei, Lim; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Several classes of drugs are available to treat different types of cancer. Currently, researchers are paying significant attention to the development of drugs at the nanoscale level to increase their target specificity and to reduce their concentrations. Nanotechnology is a promising and growing field with multiple subdisciplines, such as nanostructures, nanomaterials, and nanoparticles. These materials have gained prominence in science due to their size, shape, and potential efficacy. Nanomedicine is an important field involving the use of various types of nanoparticles to treat cancer and cancerous cells. Synthesis of nanoparticles targeting biological pathways has become tremendously prominent due to the higher efficacy and fewer side effects of nanodrugs compared to other commercial cancer drugs. In this review, different medicinal plants and their active compounds, as well as green-synthesized metallic nanoparticles from medicinal plants, are discussed in relation to their anticancer activities. PMID:27057273

  5. Anticancer activity of Nigella sativa (black seed) - a review.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Mohammad Akram; Alghamdi, Mastour Safar

    2011-01-01

    Nigella sativa (N. sativa) seed has been an important nutritional flavoring agent and natural remedy for many ailments for centuries in ancient systems of medicine, e.g. Unani, Ayurveda, Chinese and Arabic Medicines. Many active components have been isolated from N. sativa, including thymoquinone, thymohydroquinone, dithymoquinone, thymol, carvacrol, nigellimine-N-oxide, nigellicine, nigellidine and alpha-hederin. In addition, quite a few pharmacological effects of N. sativa seed, its oil, various extracts and active components have been identified to include immune stimulation, anti-inflammation, hypoglycemic, antihypertensive, antiasthmatic, antimicrobial, antiparasitic, antioxidant and anticancer effects. Only a few authors have reviewed the medicinal properties of N. sativa and given some description of the anticancer effects. A literature search has revealed that a lot more studies have been recently carried out related to the anticancer activities of N. sativa and some of its active compounds, such as thymoquinone and alpha-hederin. Acute and chronic toxicity studies have recently confirmed the safety of N. sativa oil and its most abundant active component, thymoquinone, particularly when given orally. The present work is aimed at summarizing the extremely valuable work done by various investigators on the effects of N. sativa seed, its extracts and active principles against cancer. Those related to the underlying mechanism of action, derivatives of thymoquinone, nano thymoquinone and combinations of thymoquinone with the currently used cytotoxic drugs are of particular interest. We hope this review will encourage interested researchers to conduct further preclinical and clinical studies to evaluate the anticancer activities of N. sativa, its active constituents and their derivatives.

  6. Discovery and Evaluation of PRL Trimer Disruptors for Novel Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yunpeng; Yu, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of PRL phosphatases (PRL1, PRL2, and PRL3) has been found in a variety of late-stage tumors and their distant metastatic sites. Therefore, the oncogenic PRL phosphatases represent intriguing targets for cancer therapy. There is considerable interest in identifying small molecule inhibitors targeting PRLs as novel anticancer agents. However, it has been difficult to acquire phosphatase activity-based PRL inhibitors due to the unusual wide and shallow catalytic pockets of PRLs revealed by crystal structure studies. Here, we present a novel method to identify PRL1 inhibitors by targeting the PRL1 trimer interface and the procedure to characterize their biochemical and cellular activity.

  7. Evolution in Medicinal Chemistry of Ursolic Acid Derivatives as Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haijun; Gao, Yu; Wang, Ailan; Zhou, Xiaobin; Zheng, Yunquan; Zhou, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is a renewed interest in common dietaries and plant-based traditional medicines for the prevention and treatment of cancer. In the search for potential anticancer agents from natural sources, ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpenoid widely found in various medicinal herbs and fruits, exhibits powerful biological effects including its attractive anticancer activity against various types of cancer cells. However, the limited solubility, rapid metabolism and poor bioavailability of UA restricted its further clinical applications. In the past decade, with substantial progress toward the development of new chemical entities for the treatment of cancer, numerous UA derivatives have been designed and prepared to overcome its disadvantages. Despite extensive effort, discovery of effective UA derivatives has so far met with only limited success. This review summarizes the current status of the structural diversity and evolution in medicinal chemistry of UA analogues and provides a detailed discussion of future direction for further research in the chemical modifications of UA. PMID:25617694

  8. Evolution in medicinal chemistry of ursolic acid derivatives as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haijun; Gao, Yu; Wang, Ailan; Zhou, Xiaobin; Zheng, Yunquan; Zhou, Jia

    2015-03-06

    Currently, there is a renewed interest in common dietaries and plant-based traditional medicines for the prevention and treatment of cancer. In the search for potential anticancer agents from natural sources, ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpenoid widely found in various medicinal herbs and fruits, exhibits powerful biological effects including its attractive anticancer activity against various types of cancer cells. However, the limited solubility, rapid metabolism and poor bioavailability of UA restricted its further clinical applications. In the past decade, with substantial progress toward the development of new chemical entities for the treatment of cancer, numerous UA derivatives have been designed and prepared to overcome its disadvantages. Despite extensive effort, discovery of effective UA derivatives has so far met with only limited success. This review summarizes the current status of the structural diversity and evolution in medicinal chemistry of UA analogues and provides a detailed discussion of future direction for further research in the chemical modifications of UA.

  9. Essential Oils and Their Constituents as Anticancer Agents: A Mechanistic View

    PubMed Central

    Mantha, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Exploring natural plant products as an option to find new chemical entities as anticancer agents is one of the fastest growing areas of research. Recently, in the last decade, essential oils (EOs) have been under study for their use in cancer therapy and the present review is an attempt to collect and document the available studies indicating EOs and their constituents as anticancer agents. This review enlists nearly 130 studies of EOs from various plant species and their constituents that have been studied so far for their anticancer potential and these studies have been classified as in vitro and in vivo studies for EOs and their constituents. This review also highlights in-depth various mechanisms of action of different EOs and their constituents reported in the treatment strategies for different types of cancer. The current review indicates that EOs and their constituents act by multiple pathways and mechanisms involving apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, antimetastatic and antiangiogenic, increased levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS), DNA repair modulation, and others to demonstrate their antiproliferative activity in the cancer cell. The effect of EOs and their constituents on tumour suppressor proteins (p53 and Akt), transcription factors (NF-κB and AP-1), MAPK-pathway, and detoxification enzymes like SOD, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase has also been discussed. PMID:25003106

  10. Pegylated arginine deiminase: a novel anticancer enzyme agent

    PubMed Central

    Feun, Lynn; Savaraj, Niramol

    2011-01-01

    Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20) is a novel anticancer enzyme that produces depletion of arginine, which is a nonessential amino acid in humans. Certain tumours, such as malignant melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma, are auxotrophic for arginine. These tumours that are sensitive to arginine depletion do not express argininosuccinate synthetase, a key enzyme in the synthesis of arginine from citrulline. ADI-PEG20 inhibits human melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas in vitro and in vivo. Phase I – II trials in patients with melanoma and hepatocellular carcinomas have shown the drug to have antitumour activity and tolerable side effects. Large Phase II trials and randomised, controlled Phase III trials are needed to determine its overall efficacy in the treatment of these malignancies and others. PMID:16787144

  11. Selective anti-cancer agents as anti-aging drugs.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-12-01

    Recent groundbreaking discoveries have revealed that IGF-1, Ras, MEK, AMPK, TSC1/2, FOXO, PI3K, mTOR, S6K, and NFκB are involved in the aging process. This is remarkable because the same signaling molecules, oncoproteins and tumor suppressors, are well-known targets for cancer therapy. Furthermore, anti-cancer drugs aimed at some of these targets have been already developed. This arsenal could be potentially employed for anti-aging interventions (given that similar signaling molecules are involved in both cancer and aging). In cancer, intrinsic and acquired resistance, tumor heterogeneity, adaptation, and genetic instability of cancer cells all hinder cancer-directed therapy. But for anti-aging applications, these hurdles are irrelevant. For example, since anti-aging interventions should be aimed at normal postmitotic cells, no selection for resistance is expected. At low doses, certain agents may decelerate aging and age-related diseases. Importantly, deceleration of aging can in turn postpone cancer, which is an age-related disease.

  12. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) Extract as a Potential Complementary Agent in Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    González-Vallinas, Margarita; Reglero, Guillermo; Ramírez de Molina, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains an important cause of mortality nowadays and, therefore, new therapeutic approaches are still needed. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) has been reported to possess antitumor activities both in vitro and in animal studies. Some of these activities were attributed to its major components, such as carnosic acid, carnosol, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid. Initially, the antitumor effects of rosemary were attributed to its antioxidant activity. However, in recent years, a lack of correlation between antioxidant and antitumor effects exerted by rosemary was reported, and different molecular mechanisms were related to its tumor inhibitory properties. Moreover, supported by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Food and Safety Authority, specific compositions of rosemary extract were demonstrated to be safe for human health and used as antioxidant additive in foods, suggesting the potential easy application of this agent as a complementary approach in cancer therapy. In this review, we aim to summarize the reported anticancer effects of rosemary, the demonstrated molecular mechanisms related to these effects and the interactions between rosemary and currently used anticancer agents. The possibility of using rosemary extract as a complementary agent in cancer therapy in comparison with its isolated components is discussed.

  13. Benzimidazole bearing oxadiazole and triazolo-thiadiazoles nucleus: design and synthesis as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Husain, Asif; Rashid, Mohd; Mishra, Ravinesh; Parveen, Shama; Shin, Dong-Soo; Kumar, Deepak

    2012-09-01

    Two new series of benzimidazole bearing oxadiazole[1-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-3-(5-substituted-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)propan-1-ones (4a-l)] and triazolo-thiadiazoles[1-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-3-(6-(substituted)-[1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]thiadiazol-3-yl)propan-1-one (7a-e)] have been synthesized successfully from 4-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-4-oxobutanehydrazide (3) with an aim to produce promising anticancer agents. In vitro anticancer activities of synthesized compounds were screened at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), USA, according to their applied protocol against full NCI 60 human cell lines panel; results showed good to remarkable anticancer activity. Among them, compound (4j, NCS: 761980) exhibited significant growth inhibition and further screened at 10-fold dilutions of five different concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μM) with GI(50) values ranging from 0.49 to 48.0 μM and found superior for the non-small cell lung cancer cell lines like HOP-92 (GI(50) 0.49, TGI 19.9,LC(50) >100 and Log(10)GI(50) -6.30, Log(10)TGI -4.70, Log(10)LC(50) >-4.00).

  14. The anti-cancer activity of noscapine: a review.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudian, Massoud; Rahimi-Moghaddam, Parvaneh

    2009-01-01

    Noscapine is an isoqiunoline alkaloid found in opium latex. Unlike most other alkaloids obtained from opium latex, noscapine is not sedative and has been used as antitussive drug in various countries. Recently, it has been introduced as an anti-mitotic agent. This drug can be used orally. When the resistance to other anti-cancer drugs such as paclitaxel manifests, noscapine might be effective. Therefore, noscapine and its analogs have great potential as novel anti-cancer agents.

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of pyrazole derivatives containing thiourea skeleton as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Lv, Peng-Cheng; Li, Huan-Qiu; Sun, Juan; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2010-07-01

    Two series of pyrazole derivatives designing for potential EGFR kinase inhibitors have been discovered. Some of them exhibited significant EGFR inhibitory activity. Compound 3-(3,4-dimethylphenyl)-5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-1-carbothioamide (C5) displayed the most potent EGFR inhibitory activity with IC₅₀ of 0.07 μM, which was comparable to the positive control erlotinib. Docking simulation was performed to position compound C5 into the EGFR active site to determine the probable binding model. Antiproliferative assay results indicating that some of the pyrazole derivatives own high antiproliferative activity against MCF-7. Compound C5 showed significant antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 with IC₅₀ of 0.08 μM. Therefore, compound C5 with potent inhibitory activity in tumor growth inhibition would be a potential anticancer agent.

  16. Synthesis and Evaluation of Aminothiazole-Paeonol Derivatives as Potential Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Ying; Kapoor, Mohit; Huang, Ying-Pei; Lin, Hui-Hsien; Liang, Yu-Chuan; Lin, Yu-Ling; Huang, Su-Chin; Liao, Wei-Neng; Chen, Jen-Kun; Huang, Jer-Shing; Hsu, Ming-Hua

    2016-01-26

    In this study, novel aminothiazole-paeonol derivatives were synthesized and characterized using ¹H-NMR, (13)C-NMR, IR, mass spectroscopy, and high performance liquid chromatography. All the new synthesized compounds were evaluated according to their anticancer effect on seven cancer cell lines. The experimental results indicated that these compounds possess high anticancer potential regarding human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS cells) and human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29 cells). Among these compounds, N-[4-(2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)thiazol-2-yl]-4-methoxybenzenesulfonamide (13c) had the most potent inhibitory activity, with IC50 values of 4.0 µM to AGS, 4.4 µM to HT-29 cells and 5.8 µM to HeLa cells. The 4-fluoro-N-[4-(2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)thiazol-2-yl]benzenesulfonamide (13d) was the second potent compound, showing IC50 values of 7.2, 11.2 and 13.8 µM to AGS , HT-29 and HeLa cells, respectively. These compounds are superior to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for relatively higher potency against AGS and HT-29 human cancer cell lines along with lower cytotoxicity to fibroblasts. Novel aminothiazole-paeonol derivatives in this work might be a series of promising lead compounds to develop anticancer agents for treating gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma.

  17. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70–90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2–3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of

  18. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70-90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2-3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of breast

  19. Natural anti-cancer agents: Implications in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Marasini, Bishal; Sahu, Ravi P

    2017-03-15

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancy accounting for the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Among several explored anti-cancer agents, Gemcitabine, a nucleoside analogue remained a front line chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, gemcitabine exerts a low response rate with limited progression free survival in cancer patients due to cellular resistance of pancreatic tumors to this therapy. Several chemotherapeutic agents have been explored in combination with gemcitabine against pancreatic cancer with overall mixed responses and survival rates. Naturally occurring dietary agents possess promising anti-cancer properties and have been shown to target various oncogenic signaling pathways in in-vitro and in-vivo pancreatic cancer models. Multiple studies using natural compounds have shown increased therapeutic efficacy of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer models. This review is focused on recent updates on preclinical and clinical studies utilizing natural anti-cancer agents with gemcitabine against pancreatic cancer.

  20. Syntheses, cytotoxic activity evaluation and HQSAR study of 1,2,3-triazole-linked isosteviol derivatives as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong-Jun; Liu, Yan-Ping; Yu, Shu-Ling; Dai, Xing-Jie; Zhang, Tao; Tao, Jing-Chao

    2016-11-15

    A series of novel 1,2,3-triazole-linked isosteviol derivatives were designed and synthesized via Huisgen-click reaction. Their cytotoxicities in vitro against HCT-116 and JEKO-1 cells were screened. The preliminary bioassays indicated that most of the title compounds exhibited noteworthy cytotoxic activities. Particularly, the compound 10b revealed the most potent inhibitory activities against HCT-116 cells with IC50 value of 2.987±0.098μM, which was better than that (3.906±0.261μM) of positive control cisplatin. On the basis of these bioactivity data, hologram quantitative structure-activity relationship (HQSAR) was performed, and a statistically reliable model with good predictive power (r(2)=0.848, q(2)=0.544 and R(2)pred=0.982) was achieved. Additionally, the contribution maps derived from the optimal model explained the individual atomic contributions to the activity for each molecule.

  1. Mefloquine-oxazolidine derivatives: a new class of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Felipe A R; Bomfim, Igor da S; Cavalcanti, Bruno C; Pessoa, Claudia; Goncalves, Raoni S B; Wardell, James L; Wardell, Solange M S V; de Souza, Marcus V N

    2014-01-01

    A series of 23 racemic mefloquine-oxazolidine derivatives, 4-[3-(aryl)hexahydro[1,3]oxazolo[3,4-a]pyridin-1-yl]-2,8-bis(trifluoromethyl)quinolines, derived from (R*, S*)-(±)-mefloquine and arenealdehydes, have been evaluated for their activity against four cancer cell lines (HCT-8, OVCAR-8, HL-60, and SF-295). Good cytotoxicities have been determined with IC50 values ranging from 0.59 to 4.79 μg/mL. In general compounds with aryl groups having strong electron-releasing substituents, such as HO and MeO, or electron-rich heteroaryl groups, for example imidazol-2-y-l, are active. However, other factors such as steric effects may play a role. As both the active and non-active conformations of the mefloquine-oxazolidine derivatives are similar, it is concluded that molecular conformations do not play a significant role either. This study is the first to evaluate mefloquine derivatives as antitumor agents. The mefloquine-oxazolidine derivatives are considered to be useful leads for the rational design of new antitumor agents.

  2. Peptides with Dual Antimicrobial and Anticancer Activities

    PubMed Central

    Felício, Mário R.; Silva, Osmar N.; Gonçalves, Sônia; Santos, Nuno C.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the number of people suffering from cancer and multi-resistant infections has increased, such that both diseases are already seen as current and future major causes of death. Moreover, chronic infections are one of the main causes of cancer, due to the instability in the immune system that allows cancer cells to proliferate. Likewise, the physical debility associated with cancer or with anticancer therapy itself often paves the way for opportunistic infections. It is urgent to develop new therapeutic methods, with higher efficiency and lower side effects. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found in the innate immune system of a wide range of organisms. Identified as the most promising alternative to conventional molecules used nowadays against infections, some of them have been shown to have dual activity, both as antimicrobial and anticancer peptides (ACPs). Highly cationic and amphipathic, they have demonstrated efficacy against both conditions, with the number of nature-driven or synthetically designed peptides increasing year by year. With similar properties, AMPs that can also act as ACPs are viewed as future chemotherapeutic drugs, with the advantage of low propensity to resistance, which started this paradigm in the pharmaceutical market. These peptides have already been described as molecules presenting killing mechanisms at the membrane level, but also acting toward intracellular targets, which increases their success compartively to one-target specific drugs. This review will approach the desirable characteristics of small peptides that demonstrated dual activity against microbial infections and cancer, as well as the peptides engaged in clinical trials. PMID:28271058

  3. Novel C6-substituted 1,3,4-oxadiazinones as potential anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yujin; Yun, Hye Jeong; Min, Hye-Young; Lee, Ho Jin; Pham, Phuong Chi; Moon, Jayoung; Kwon, Dah In; Lim, Bumhee; Suh, Young-Ger; Lee, Jeeyeon; Lee, Ho-Young

    2015-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a membrane receptor tyrosine kinase over-expressed in a number of tumors. However, combating resistance is one of the main challenges in the currently available IGF-1R inhibitor-based cancer therapies. Increased Src activation has been reported to confer resistance to anti-IGF-1R therapeutics in various tumor cells. An urgent unmet need for IGF-1R inhibitors is to suppress Src rephosphorylation induced by current anti-IGF-1R regimens. In efforts to develop effective anticancer agents targeting the IGF-1R signaling pathway, we explored 2-aryl-1,3,4-oxadiazin-5-ones as a novel scaffold that is structurally unrelated to current tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The compound, LL-2003, exhibited promising antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo; it effectively suppressed IGF-1R and Src and induced apoptosis in various non-small cell lung cancer cells. Further optimizations for enhanced potency in cellular assays need to be followed, but our strategy to identify novel IGF-1R/Src inhibitors may open a new avenue to develop more efficient anticancer agents. PMID:26515601

  4. The interactions of anticancer agents with tea catechins: current evidence from preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Shang, Weihu; Lu, Weidong; Han, Mei; Qiao, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    Tea catechins exhibit a broad range of pharmacological activities that impart beneficial effects on human health. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), one of the major tea catechins, has been widely associated with cancer prevention and treatment. In addition, tea catechins in combination with anticancer drugs are being evaluated as a new cancer treatment strategy. However, the interactions of anticancer drugs with tea catechins are largely unknown. Accumulated data indicate significant interactions between anticancer drugs and tea catechins, such as synergistic tumor inhibition or antagonist activity. Therefore, it is critical to understand comprehensively the effects of tea catechins on anticancer drugs. Focusing on evidence from preclinical studies, this paper will review the interactions between anticancer drugs and tea catechins, including pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics effects. We hope that by detailing the interactions between anticancer drugs and tea catechins, more attention will be directed to this important therapeutic combination in the future.

  5. ER maleate is a novel anticancer agent in oral cancer: implications for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Guodong; Somasundaram, Raj Thani; Jessa, Fatima; Srivastava, Gunjan; MacMillan, Christina; Witterick, Ian; Walfish, Paul G.; Ralhan, Ranju

    2016-01-01

    ER maleate [10-(3-Aminopropyl)-3, 4-dimethyl-9(10H)-acridinone maleate] identified in a kinome screen was investigated as a novel anticancer agent for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Our aim was to demonstrate its anticancer effects, identify putative molecular targets and determine their clinical relevance and investigate its chemosensitization potential for platinum drugs to aid in OSCC management. Biologic effects of ER maleate were determined using oral cancer cell lines in vitro and oral tumor xenografts in vivo. mRNA profiling, real time PCR and western blot revealed ER maleate modulated the expression of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). Their clinical significance was determined in oral SCC patients by immunohistochemistry and correlated with prognosis by Kaplan-Meier survival and multivariate Cox regression analyses. ER maleate induced cell apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in oral cancer cells. Imagestream analysis revealed cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and increased polyploidy, unravelling deregulation of cell division and cell death. Mechanistically, ER maleate decreased expression of PLK1 and Syk, induced cleavage of PARP, caspase9 and caspase3, and increased chemosensitivity to carboplatin; significantly suppressed tumor growth and increased antitumor activity of carboplatin in tumor xenografts. ER maleate treated tumor xenografts showed reduced PLK1 and Syk expression. Clinical investigations revealed overexpression of PLK1 and Syk in oral SCC patients that correlated with disease prognosis. Our in vitro and in vivo findings provide a strong rationale for pre-clinical efficacy of ER maleate as a novel anticancer agent and chemosensitizer of platinum drugs for OSCC. PMID:26934445

  6. Investigation of Vietnamese plants for potential anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Lynette Bueno; Still, Patrick C.; Naman, C. Benjamin; Ren, Yulin; Pan, Li; Chai, Hee-Byung; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J.; Ninh, Tran Ngoc; Van Thanh, Bui; Swanson, Steven M.; Soejarto, Djaja D.

    2014-01-01

    Higher plants continue to afford humankind with many new drugs, for a variety of disease types. In this review, recent phytochemical and biological progress is presented for part of a collaborative multi-institutional project directed towards the discovery of new antitumor agents. The specific focus is on bioactive natural products isolated and characterized structurally from tropical plants collected in Vietnam. The plant collection, identification, and processing steps are described, and the natural products isolated from these species are summarized with their biological activities. PMID:25395897

  7. Improved Total Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Potent Apratoxin S4 Based Anticancer Agents with Differential Stability and Further Enhanced Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Apratoxins are cytotoxic natural products originally isolated from marine cyanobacteria that act by preventing cotranslational translocation early in the secretory pathway to downregulate receptor levels and inhibit growth factor secretion, leading to potent antiproliferative activity. Through rational design and total synthesis of an apratoxin A/E hybrid, apratoxin S4 (1a), we have previously improved the antitumor activity and tolerability in vivo. Compound 1a and newly designed analogues apratoxins S7–S9 (1b–d), with various degrees of methylation at C34 (1b,c) or epimeric configuration at C30 (1d), were efficiently synthesized utilizing improved procedures. Optimizations have been applied to the synthesis of key intermediate aldehyde 7 and further include the application of Leighton’s silanes and modifications of Kelly’s methods to induce thiazoline ring formation in other crucial steps of the apratoxin synthesis. Apratoxin S9 (1d) exhibited increased activity with subnanomolar potency. Apratoxin S8 (1c) lacks the propensity to be deactivated by dehydration and showed efficacy in a human HCT116 xenograft mouse model. PMID:24660812

  8. Anticancer Activity of Polyether Ionophore-Salinomycin.

    PubMed

    Antoszczak, Michał; Huczyński, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of unusual anti-tumor activity of natural polyether antibiotic - Salinomycin, this compound, along with its derivatives, has been intensively studied against different human cancer cells, both in vivo and in vitro. Salinomycin has shown strong inhibition activity against the proliferation process of many different cancer cells, including multi-drug resistance (MDR) cancer cells, as well as cancer stem cells (CSCs), i.e. leukemic stem cells, colon carcinoma stem cells, prostate cancer stem cells and many others. Additionally, the application of Salinomycin has been proved to enhance the anti-cancer effect of radio- and chemotherapy. Preliminary clinical studies have shown tumor regression and only transient acute side effects after application of Salinomycin. Up to now, major efforts have been devoted to elucidate the biological mechanisms of anti-tumor activity of Salinomycin and it is expected that the results may provide new therapeutic strategies based on biological modulation of Salinomycin activity. This review is focused on and describes the possible role of Salinomycin in cancer therapy and gives an overview of its properties.

  9. Anticancer activity of Aristolochia ringens Vahl. (Aristolochiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Akindele, Abidemi James; Wani, Zahoor; Mahajan, Girish; Sharma, Sadhana; Aigbe, Flora Ruth; Satti, Naresh; Adeyemi, Olufunmilayo Olaide; Mondhe, Dilip Manikrao

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and sustained focus is on the discovery and development of newer and better tolerated anticancer drugs especially from plants. The sulforhodamine B (SRB) in vitro cytotoxicity assay, sarcoma-180 (S-180) ascites and solid tumor, and L1210 lymphoid leukemia in vivo models were used to investigate the anticancer activity of root extracts of Aristolochia ringens Vahl. (Aristolochiaceae; 馬兜鈴 mǎ dōu líng). AR-A001 (IC50 values of 20 μg/mL, 22 μg/mL, 3 μg/mL, and 24 μg/mL for A549, HCT-116, PC3, and THP-1 cell lines, respectively), and AR-A004 (IC50 values of 26 μg/mL, 19.5 μg/mL, 12 μg/mL, 28 μg/mL, 30 μg/mL, and 22 μg/mL for A549, HCT-116, PC3, A431, HeLa, and THP-1, respectively), were observed to be significantly active in vitro. Potency was highest with AR-A001 and AR-A004 for PC3 with IC50 values of 3 μg/mL and 12 μg/mL, respectively. AR-A001 and AR-A004 produced significant (p < 0.05–0.001) dose-dependent inhibition of tumor growth in the S-180 ascites model with peak effects produced at the highest dose of 120 mg/kg. Inhibition values were 79.51% and 89.98% for AR-A001 and AR-A004, respectively. In the S-180 solid tumor model, the inhibition of tumor growth was 29.45% and 50.50% for AR-A001 (120 mg/kg) and AR-A004 (110 mg/kg), respectively, compared to 50.18% for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; 20 mg/kg). AR-A001 and AR-A004 were also significantly active in the leukemia model with 211.11% and 155.56% increase in mean survival time (MST) compared to a value of 211.11% for 5-FU. In conclusion, the ethanolic (AR-A001) and dichloromethane:methanol (AR-A004) root extracts of AR possess significant anticancer activities in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26151007

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibitors: understanding a new wave of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Villar-Garea, Ana; Esteller, Manel

    2004-11-01

    Cancer is as much an epigenetic disease as it is a genetic and cytogenetic disease. The discovery that drastic changes in DNA methylation and histone modifications are commonly found in human tumors has inspired various laboratories and pharmaceutical companies to develop and study epigenetic drugs. One of the most promising groups of agents is the inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs), which have different biochemical and biologic properties but have a single common activity: induction of acetylation in histones, the key proteins in nucleosome and chromatin structure. One of the main mechanisms of action of HDAC inhibitors is the transcriptional reactivation of dormant tumor-suppressor genes, such as p21WAF1. However, their pleiotropic nature leaves open the possibility that their well-known differentiation, cell-cycle arrest and apoptotic properties are also involved in other functions associated with HDAC inhibition. Many phase I clinical trials indicate that HDAC inhibitors appear to be well-tolerated drugs. Thus, the field is ready for rigorous biologic and clinical scrutiny to validate the therapeutic potential of these drugs. Our current data indicate that the use of HDAC inhibitors, probably in association with classical chemotherapy drugs or in combination with DNA-demethylating agents, could be promising for cancer patients.

  11. Fenugreek: a naturally occurring edible spice as an anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Shabbeer, Shabana; Sobolewski, Michelle; Anchoori, Ravi Kumar; Kachhap, Sushant; Hidalgo, Manuel; Jimeno, Antonio; Davidson, Nancy; Carducci, Michael A; Khan, Saeed R

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, various dietary components that can potentially be used for the prevention and treatment of cancer have been identified. In this study, we demonstrate that extract (FE) from the seeds of the plant Trigonella foenum graecum, commonly called fenugreek, are cytotoxic in vitro to a panel of cancer but not normal cells. Treatment with 10-15 ug/mL of FE for 72 h was growth inhibitory to breast, pancreatic and prostate cancer cell lines (PCa). When tested at higher doses (15-20 ug/mL), FE continued to be growth inhibitory to PCa cell lines but not to either primary prostate or hTert-immortalized prostate cells. At least part of the growth inhibition is due to induction of cell death, as seen by incorporation of Ethidium Bromide III into cancer cells exposed to FE. Molecular changes induced in PCa cells are: in DU-145 cells: downregulation of mutant p53, and in PC-3 cells upregulation of p21 and inhibition of TGFbeta induced phosphorylation of Akt. The surprising finding of our studies is that death of cancer cells occurs despite growth stimulatory pathways being simultaneously upregulated (phosphorylated) by FE. Thus, these studies add another biologically active agent to our armamentarium of naturally occurring agents with therapeutic potential.

  12. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Erlotinib–NSAID Conjugates as More Comprehensive Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel anticancer agents were designed and synthesized based on coupling of different nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with the epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, erlotinib. Both the antiproliferative and pharmacokinetic activity of the target compounds were evaluated using HCC827 and A431 tumor cell lines. Among the derivatives made, compounds 10a, 10c, and 21g showed superb potency, comparable to that of erlotinib. Furthermore, preliminary SAR analysis showed that when the NSAIDs were conjugated via linkage to C-6 OH versus linkage to C-7 OH of the quinazoline nucleus, superior anticancer activity was achieved. Finally, the in vitro pharmacokinetic profile of several conjugates demonstrated the desired dissociation kinetics as the coupled molecules were effectively hydrolyzed, releasing both erlotinib and the specific NSAID in a time-dependent manner. The conjugation strategy represents a unique and simplified approach toward combination therapy, particularly for the treatment of cancers where both EGFR overexpression and inflammation play a direct role in disease progression. PMID:26487917

  13. Evaluation of anticancer activity of celastrol liposomes in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wolfram, Joy; Suri, Krishna; Huang, Yi; Molinaro, Roberto; Borsoi, Carlotta; Scott, Bronwyn; Boom, Kathryn; Paolino, Donatella; Fresta, Massimo; Wang, Jianghua; Ferrari, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Context Celastrol, a natural compound derived from the herb Tripterygium wilfordii, is known to have anticancer activity, but is not soluble in water. Objective Formation of celastrol liposomes, to avoid the use of toxic solubilizing agents. Materials and methods Two different formulations of pegylated celastrol liposomes were fabricated. Liposomal characteristics and serum stability were determined using dynamic light scattering. Drug entrapment efficacy and drug release were measured spectrophotometrically. Cellular internalization and anticancer activity was measured in prostate cancer cells. Results Liposomal celastrol displayed efficient serum stability, cellular internalization and anticancer activity, comparable to that of the free drug reconstituted in dimethyl sulfoxide. Discussion and conclusion Liposomal celastrol can decrease the viability of prostate cancer cells, while eliminating the need for toxic solubilizing agents. PMID:24654943

  14. Possible Anticancer Mechanisms of Some Costus speciosus Active Ingredients Concerning Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    El-Far, Ali H.; Badria, Faried A.; Shaheen, Hazem M.

    2016-01-01

    Costus speciosus is native to South East Asia, especially found in India, Srilanka, Indonesia and Malaysia. C. speciosus have numerous therapeutic potentials against a wide variety of complains. The therapeutic properties of C. speciosus are attributed to the presence of various ingredients such as alkaloids, flavonoids, glycosides, phenols, saponins, sterols and sesquiterpenes. This review presented the past, present, and the future status of C. speciosus active ingredients to propose a future use as a potential anticancer agent. All possible up-regulation of cellular apoptotic molecules as p53, p21, p27, caspases, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and others attribute to the anticancer activity of C. speciosus along the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic agents such as Akt, Bcl2, NFκB, STAT3, JAK, MMPs, actin, surviving and vimentin. Eventually, we recommend further investigation of different C. speciosus extracts, using some active ingredients and evaluate the anticancer effect of these chemicals against different cancers. PMID:27515456

  15. Anticancer activity of selected Colocasia gigantia fractions.

    PubMed

    Pornprasertpol, Apichai; Sereemaspun, Amornpun; Sooklert, Kanidta; Satirapipatkul, Chutimon; Sukrong, Suchada

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the anticancer potential of the extract of Colocasia gigantea C. gigantea), a plant member of the Araceae family. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxic activity of C. gigantea extract on cervical cancer (Hela) and human white blood cells (WBC) in vitro. The authors then identified the bioactive ingredients that demonstrated cytotoxicity on tested cells and evaluated those bioactive ingredients using the bioassay-guided fractionation method. The results showed that not all parts of C. gigantea promote cytotoxic activity. The dichloromethane leaf fraction showed significant cell proliferation effect on Hela cells, but not on WBCs. Only the n-hexane tuber fraction (Fr. 1T) exhibited significant cytotoxicity on Hela cells (IC50 = 585 μg/ml) and encouraged WBC cell proliferation. From GC-Mass spectrometry, 4,22-Stigmastadiene-3-one, Diazoprogesterone, 9-Octadecenoic acid (Z)-, hexyl ester and Oleic Acid were the components of Fr 1T that demonstrated cytotoxic potential. In conclusion, C. gigantea's Fr 1T shows potential for cervical cancer treatment.

  16. The role of human cytochrome P450 enzymes in the metabolism of anticancer agents: implications for drug interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Kivistö, K T; Kroemer, H K; Eichelbaum, M

    1995-01-01

    1. Little information is available about the pharmacokinetic interactions of anticancer drugs in man. However, clinically significant drug interactions do occur in cancer chemotherapy, and it is likely that important interactions have not been recognized. 2. Specific cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes have been recently shown to be involved in the metabolism of several essential anticancer agents. In particular, enzymes of the CYP3A subfamily play a role in the metabolism of many anticancer drugs, including epipodophyllotoxins, ifosphamide, tamoxifen, taxol and vinca alkaloids. CYP3A4 has been shown to catalyse the activation of the prodrug ifosphamide, raising the possibility that ifosphamide could be activated in tumour tissues containing this enzyme. 3. As examples of recently found, clinically significant interactions, cyclosporin considerably increases plasma doxorubicin and etoposide concentrations. Although cyclosporin and calcium channel blockers may influence the pharmacokinetics of certain anticancer agents by inhibiting their CYP3A mediated metabolism, it is more likely that these P-glycoprotein inhibitors inhibit P-glycoprotein mediated drug elimination. 4. Appropriate caution should be exercised when combining P-glycoprotein inhibitors and potential CYP3A inhibitors with cancer chemotherapy. PMID:8703657

  17. A Theoretical Model for the Hormetic Dose-response Curve for Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Yoshimasu, Tatsuya; Ohashi, Takuya; Oura, Shoji; Kokawa, Yozo; Kawago, Mitsumasa; Hirai, Yoshimitsu; Miyasaka, Miwako; Nishiguchi, Haruka; Kawashima, Sayoko; Yata, Yumi; Honda, Mariko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Okamura, Yoshitaka

    2015-11-01

    In the present article, we quantitatively evaluated the dose-response relationship of hormetic reactions of anticancer agents in vitro. Serial dilutions of gemcitabine, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, vinorelbine, and paclitaxel were administered to the A549 non-small-cell lung cancer cell line. The bi-phasic sigmoidal curve with hormetic and cytotoxic effects is given by the formula y=(a-b/(1+exp(c(*)log(x)-d)))/(1+exp(e(*)log(x)-f)), that was used to perform a non-linear least square regression. The dose-responses of the five anticancer agents were fitted to this equation. Gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil, which had the lowest ED50 for their hormetic reaction, had the most pronounced promotive effects out of the five anticancer agents tested. The hormetic reaction progressed exponentially with culturing time. Our theoretical model will be useful in predicting how hormetic reactions affect patients with malignant tumors.

  18. Dietary polyphenols as antioxidants and anticancer agents: more questions than answers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Miao-Lin

    2011-01-01

    High intake of fruit and vegetables is believed to be beneficial to human health. Fruit, vegetables and some beverages, such as tea and coffee, are particularly rich in dietary polyphenols. Various studies have suggested (but not proven) that dietary polyphenols may protect against cardiovasucalar diseases, neurodegenerative diseases and some forms of cancer. Dietary polyphenols may exert their anticancer effects through several possible mechanisms, such as removal of carcinogenic agents, modulation of cancer cell signaling and antioxidant enzymatic activities, and induction of apoptosis as well as cell cycle arrest. Some of these effects may be related, at least partly, to their antioxidant activities. In recent years, a new concept of the antioxidant effects of dietary polyphenols has emerged, i.e., direct scavenging activity toward reactive species and indirect antioxidant activity; the latter activity is thought to arise primarily via the activation of nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 which stimulates the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase, catalase, NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1), and/or phase II enzymes. The direct antioxidant activity of dietary polyphenols in vivo is probably limited because of their low concentrations in vivo, except in the gastrointestinal tract where they are present in high concentrations. Paradoxically, the pro-oxidant effect of dietary polyphenols may contribute to the activation of antioxidant enzymes and protective proteins in cultured cells and animal models because of the adaptation of cells and tissues to mild/moderate oxidative stress. Despite a plethora of in vitro studies on dietary polyphenols, many questions remain to be answered, such as: (1) How relevant are the direct and indirect antioxidant activities of dietary polyphenols in vivo? (2) How important are these activities in the anticancer effects of dietary polyphenols? (3) Do the pro

  19. Targets of 3-bromopyruvate, a new, energy depleting, anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Dell'Antone, Paolo

    2009-11-01

    3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), a pyruvate analog recently proposed as a possible anticancer drug, was investigated in relation to its capacity to inhibit energy production in fractions obtained from normal cells (rat hepatocytes) and in isolated rat thymocytes . Findings were that main targets of the drug were glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and not hexokinase as suggested for hepatoma cells, and succinate -driven ATP synthesis. Consistently with the above findings, in the normal cells studied (thymocytes ) the drug elicited an important fall in ATP levels. The significance of the present findings in concern with a possible therapeutic usefulness of the drug is discussed.

  20. Inhibition of Mitochondrial Complex II by the Anticancer Agent Lonidamine*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lili; Shestov, Alexander A.; Worth, Andrew J.; Nath, Kavindra; Nelson, David S.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Glickson, Jerry D.; Blair, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    The antitumor agent lonidamine (LND; 1-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxylic acid) is known to interfere with energy-yielding processes in cancer cells. However, the effect of LND on central energy metabolism has never been fully characterized. In this study, we report that a significant amount of succinate is accumulated in LND-treated cells. LND inhibits the formation of fumarate and malate and suppresses succinate-induced respiration of isolated mitochondria. Utilizing biochemical assays, we determined that LND inhibits the succinate-ubiquinone reductase activity of respiratory complex II without fully blocking succinate dehydrogenase activity. LND also induces cellular reactive oxygen species through complex II, which reduced the viability of the DB-1 melanoma cell line. The ability of LND to promote cell death was potentiated by its suppression of the pentose phosphate pathway, which resulted in inhibition of NADPH and glutathione generation. Using stable isotope tracers in combination with isotopologue analysis, we showed that LND increased glutaminolysis but decreased reductive carboxylation of glutamine-derived α-ketoglutarate. Our findings on the previously uncharacterized effects of LND may provide potential combinational therapeutic approaches for targeting cancer metabolism. PMID:26521302

  1. Hyperglycaemia Induced by Novel Anticancer Agents: An Undesirable Complication or a Potential Therapeutic Opportunity?

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi R

    2017-03-01

    Signalling pathways involving protein kinase, insulin-like growth factor 1, insulin receptors and the phosphoinositide 3 kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) system are critical in promoting oncogenesis. The use of anticancer agents that inhibit these pathways frequently results in hyperglycaemia, an on-target effect of these drugs. Hyperglycaemia induced by these agents denotes optimal inhibition of the desired pharmacological target. As hyperglycaemia can be treated successfully and effectively with metformin, managing this complication by reducing the dose of or discontinuing the anticancer drug may be counterproductive, especially if it is otherwise effective and clinically tolerated. The use of metformin to treat hyperglycaemia induced by anticancer drugs provides a valuable therapeutic opportunity of potentiating their clinical anticancer effects. Although evidence from randomised controlled trials is awaited, extensive preclinical evidence and clinical observational studies suggest that metformin has anticancer properties that improve overall survival in patients with diabetes and a variety of cancers. Metformin has also been reported to reverse resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-inhibiting tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This review summarises briefly the role of the above signalling pathways in oncogenesis, the causal association between inhibition of these pathways and hyperglycaemia, and the effect of metformin on clinical outcomes resulting from its anticancer properties. The evidence reviewed herein, albeit almost exclusively from observational studies, provides support for a greater use of metformin not only in patients with cancer and diabetes or drug-induced hyperglycaemia but also potentially as an anticancer drug. However, prospective randomised controlled studies are needed in all these settings to better assess the effect on clinical outcomes of adding metformin to ongoing anticancer therapy.

  2. Anticancer and antimetastatic effects of cordycepin, an active component of Cordyceps sinensis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazuki; Shinozuka, Kazumasa; Yoshikawa, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    Cordyceps sinensis, a fungus that parasitizes on the larva of Lepidoptera, has been used as a valued traditional Chinese medicine. We investigated the effects of water extracts of Cordyceps sinensis (WECS), and particularly focused on its anticancer and antimetastatic actions. Based on in vitro studies, we report that WECS showed an anticancer action, and this action was antagonized by an adenosine A3 receptor antagonist. Moreover, this anticancer action of WECS was promoted by an adenosine deaminase inhibitor. These results suggest that one of the components of WECS with an anticancer action might be an adenosine or its derivatives. Therefore, we focused on cordycepin (3'-deoxyadenosine) as one of the active ingredients of WECS. According to our experiments, cordycepin showed an anticancer effect through the stimulation of adenosine A3 receptor, followed by glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β activation and cyclin D1 suppression. Cordycepin also showed an antimetastatic action through inhibiting platelet aggregation induced by cancer cells and suppressing the invasiveness of cancer cells via inhibiting the activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, and accelerating the secretion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2 from cancer cells. In conclusion, cordycepin, an active component of WECS, might be a candidate anticancer and antimetastatic agent.

  3. Bacterial biosynthesis and maturation of the didemnin anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Kersten, Roland D.; Nam, Sang-Jip; Lu, Liang; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz M.; Zheng, Huajun; Fenical, William; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2012-01-01

    The antineoplastic agent didemnin B from the Caribbean tunicate Trididemnum solidum was the first marine drug to be clinically tested in humans. Because of its limited supply and its complex cyclic depsipeptide structure, considerable challenges were encountered during didemnin B's development that continue to limit aplidine (dehydrodidemnin B), which is currently being evaluated in numerous clinical trials. Herein we show that the didemnins are bacterial products produced by the marine α-proteobacteria Tistrella mobilis and Tistrella bauzanensis via a unique post-assembly line maturation process. Complete genome sequence analysis of the 6,513,401 bp T. mobilis strain KA081020-065 with its five circular replicons revealed the putative didemnin biosynthetic gene cluster (did) on the 1,126,962 bp megaplasmid pTM3. The did locus encodes a 13-module hybrid nonribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase enzyme complex organized in a co-linear arrangement for the synthesis of the fatty acylglutamine ester derivatives didemnins X and Y rather than didemnin B as first anticipated. Imaging mass spectrometry of T. mobilis bacterial colonies captured the time-dependent extracellular conversion of the didemnin X and Y precursors to didemnin B in support of an unusual post-synthetase activation mechanism. Significantly, the discovery of the didemnin biosynthetic gene cluster may provide a long-term solution to the supply problem that presently hinders this group of marine natural products and pave the way for the genetic engineering of new didemnin congeners. PMID:22458477

  4. C5-Modified nucleosides exhibiting anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Suk; Park, Sun Min; Kim, Hwan Mook; Park, Song-Kyu; Lee, Kiho; Lee, Chang Woo; Kim, Byeang Hyean

    2009-08-15

    We describe (i) a simple method for the synthesis of C5-modified nucleosides from 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine and (ii) their activity against six types of human cancer cell lines (HCT15, MM231, NCI-H23, NUGC-3, PC-3, ACHN). We generated nitrile oxides in situ from oximes using a commercial bleaching agent; their cycloadditions with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine yielded isoxazole derivatives possessing activity against the cancer cell lines. We synthesized several azides from benzylic bromides and their click reactions with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine provided triazole derivatives.

  5. Novel glyoxalase-I inhibitors possessing a “zinc-binding feature” as potential anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Al-Balas, Qosay A; Hassan, Mohammad A; Al-Shar’i, Nizar A; Mhaidat, Nizar M; Almaaytah, Ammar M; Al-Mahasneh, Fatima M; Isawi, Israa H

    2016-01-01

    Background The glyoxalase system including two thiol-dependent enzymes, glyoxalase I (Glo-I) and glyoxalase II, plays an important role in a ubiquitous metabolic pathway involved in cellular detoxification of cytotoxic 2-oxoaldehydes. Tumor cells have high glycolytic activity, leading to increased cellular levels of these toxic metabolites. The increased activity of the detoxification system in cancerous cells makes this pathway a viable target for developing novel anticancer agents. In this study, we examined the potential utility of non-glutathione-based inhibitors of the Glo-I enzyme as novel anticancer drugs. Methods Computer-aided drug design techniques, such as customized pharmacophoric features, virtual screening, and flexible docking, were used to achieve the project goals. Retrieved hits were extensively filtered and subsequently docked into the active site of the enzyme. The biological activities of retrieved hits were assessed using an in vitro assay against Glo-I. Results Since Glo-I is a zinc metalloenzyme, a customized Zn-binding pharmacophoric feature was used to search for selective inhibitors via virtual screening of a small-molecule database. Seven hits were selected, purchased, and biologically evaluated. Three of the seven hits inhibited Glo-I activity, the most effective of which exerted 76.4% inhibition at a concentration of 25 µM. Conclusion We successfully identified a potential Glo-I inhibitor that can serve as a lead compound for further optimization. Moreover, our in silico and experimental results were highly correlated. Hence, the docking protocol adopted in this study may be efficiently employed in future optimization steps. PMID:27574401

  6. Novel walnut peptide–selenium hybrids with enhanced anticancer synergism: facile synthesis and mechanistic investigation of anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wenzhen; Zhang, Rong; Dong, Chenbo; Yu, Zhiqiang; Ren, Jiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    This contribution reports a facile synthesis of degreased walnut peptides (WP1)-functionalized selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) hybrids with enhanced anticancer activity and a detailed mechanistic evaluation of its superior anticancer activity. Structural and chemical characterizations proved that SeNPs are effectively capped with WP1 via physical absorption, resulting in a stable hybrid structure with an average diameter of 89.22 nm. A panel of selected human cancer cell lines demonstrated high susceptibility toward WP1-SeNPs and displayed significantly reduced proliferative behavior. The as-synthesized WP1-SeNPs exhibited excellent selectivity between cancer cells and normal cells. The targeted induction of apoptosis in human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7) was confirmed by the accumulation of arrested S-phase cells, nuclear condensation, and DNA breakage. Careful investigations revealed that an extrinsic apoptotic pathway can be attributed to the cell apoptosis and the same was confirmed by activation of the Fas-associated with death domain protein and caspases 3, 8, and 9. In addition, it was also understood that intrinsic apoptotic pathways including reactive oxygen species generation, as well as the reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, are also involved in the WP1-SeNP-induced apoptosis. This suggested the involvement of multiple apoptosis pathways in the anticancer activity. Our results indicated that WP1-SeNP hybrids with Se core encapsulated in a WP1 shell could be a highly effective method to achieve anticancer synergism. Moreover, the great potential exhibited by WP1-SeNPs could make them an ideal candidate as a chemotherapeutic agent for human cancers, especially for breast cancer. PMID:27143875

  7. Development of anticancer agents targeting the Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangqian; Tian, Ye; Yang, Yanling; Hao, Jijun

    2017-03-17

    Hedgehog signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway which is essential in embryonic and postnatal development as well as adult organ homeostasis. Abnormal regulation of Hedgehog signaling is implicated in many diseases including cancer. Consequently, substantial efforts have made in the past to develop potential therapeutic agents that specifically target the Hedgehog signaling for cancer treatment. Here, we review the therapeutic agents for inhibition of the Hedgehog signaling and their clinical advances in cancer treatment.

  8. Macromolecular Drug Targets in Cancer Treatment and Thiosemicarbazides as Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Küçükgüzel, Ş Güniz; Coşkun, Göknil P

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is known as abnormal cell division and consisting of a group of diseases on various organ tissues. Many therapies are available in cancer treatment such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy etc. Without damaging normal tissue, there is a huge need for specified anticancer drugs which have effect only on abnormal cancer cells. Therefore, advances in anticancer drug discovery in treating cancer in the recent years, directed towards to the macromolecular targets. Heterocyclic molecules, such as fluconazole, acetazolamide, etc., have a significant role in health care and pharmaceutical drug design. Thiosemicarbazides (NH2-NH-CSNH2) are the simplest hydrazine derivatives of thiocarbamic acid and are not only transition compounds, but they are also very effective organic compounds. Thiosemicarbazides possess an amide and amine protons, carbonyl and thione carbons. These structures have attracted the attention of the researchers in the development of novel compounds with anticonvulsant, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antimycobacterial, antifungal, antioxidant and anticancer activities. Recently, a number of thiosemicarbazides are available commercially as anticancer drugs for novel anticancer drug discovery. Antineoplastic or anticancer drugs prevent or inhibit the maturation and proliferation of neoplasms. These observations have been guiding the researchers for the development of new thiosemicarbazides that possess anticancer activity.

  9. Parthenium hysterophorus: A Probable Source of Anticancer, Antioxidant and Anti-HIV Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shashank; Chashoo, Gousia; Saxena, Ajit K.; Pandey, Abhay K.

    2013-01-01

    The present work reports the anticancer, antioxidant, lipo-protective, and anti-HIV activities of phytoconstituents present in P. hysterophorus leaf. Dried leaf samples were sequentially extracted with nonpolar and polar solvents. Ethanol fraction showed noticeable cytotoxic activity (81–85%) in SRB assay against MCF-7 and THP-1 cancer cell lines at 100 μg/ml concentration, while lower activity was observed with DU-145 cell line. The same extract exhibited 17–98% growth inhibition of HL-60 cancer cell lines in MTT assay, showing concentration dependent response. Ethanol extract caused 12% reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and 10% increment in sub G1 population of HL-60 cell lines. Several leaf fractions, namely, ethyl acetate, ethanol, and aqueous fractions exhibited considerable reducing capability at higher concentrations. Most of the extracts demonstrated appreciable (>75%) metal ion chelating and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities at 200 µg/ml. All the extracts except aqueous fraction accounted for about 70–80% inhibition of lipid peroxidation in rat liver homogenate indicating protective response against membrane damage. About 40% inhibition of reverse transcriptase (RT) activity was observed in hexane fraction in anti-HIV assay at 6.0 µg/ml concentration. The study showed that phytochemicals present in P. hysterophorus leaf have considerable potential as cytotoxic and antioxidant agents with low to moderate anti-HIV activity. PMID:24350290

  10. Anti-cancer activity of bromelain nanoparticles by oral administration.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Patnaik, Soma; Srivastava, Amit K; Mudiam, Mohan K R; Shukla, Yogeshwer; Panda, Amulya K; Pant, Aditya B; Kumar, Pradeep; Gupta, Kailash C

    2014-12-01

    Oral administration of anti-cancer drugs is an effective alternative to improve their efficacy and reduce undesired toxicity. Bromelain (BL) is known as an effective anti-cancer phyto-therapeutic agent, however, its activity is reduced upon oral administration. In addressing the issue, BL was encapsulated in Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) to formulate nanoparticles (NPs). Further, the NPs were coated with Eudragit L30D polymer to introduce stability against the gastric acidic conditions. The resultant coated NPs were characterized for BL entrapment, proteolytic activity and mean particle size. The stability and release pattern of NPs were evaluated under simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) pH conditions. Cytotoxicity studies carried out in human cell lines of diverse origin have shown significant dose advantage (-7-10 folds) with NPs in reducing the IC50 values compared with free BL. The cellular uptake of NPs in MCF-7, HeLa and Caco-2 cells monolayer was significantly enhanced several folds as compared to free BL. Altered expression of marker proteins associated with apoptosis and cell death (P53, P21, Bcl2, Bax) also confirmed the enhanced anti-carcinogenic potential of formulated NPs. Oral administration of NPs reduced the tumor burden of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) in Swiss albino mice and also increased their life-span (160.0 ± 5.8%) when compared with free BL (24 ± 3.2%). The generation of reactive oxygen species, induction of apoptosis and impaired mitochondrial membrane potential in EAC cells treated with NPs confirmed the suitability of Eudragit coated BL-NPs as a promising candidate for oral chemotherapy.

  11. Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes as mitochondria-targeted two-photon photodynamic anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangping; Chen, Yu; Li, Guanying; Zhang, Pingyu; Jin, Chengzhi; Zeng, Leli; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-07-01

    Clinical acceptance of photodynamic therapy is currently hindered by poor depth efficacy and inefficient activation of the cell death machinery in cancer cells during treatment. To address these issues, photoactivation using two-photon absorption (TPA) is currently being examined. Mitochondria-targeted therapy represents a promising approach to target tumors selectively and may overcome the resistance in current anticancer therapies. Herein, four ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes (RuL1-RuL4) have been designed and developed to act as mitochondria-targeted two-photon photodynamic anticancer agents. These complexes exhibit very high singlet oxygen quantum yields in methanol (0.74-0.81), significant TPA cross sections (124-198 GM), remarkable mitochondrial accumulation, and deep penetration depth. Thus, RuL1-RuL4 were utilized as one-photon and two-photon absorbing photosensitizers in both monolayer cells and 3D multicellular spheroids (MCSs). These Ru(II) complexes were almost nontoxic towards cells and 3D MCSs in the dark and generate sufficient singlet oxygen under one- and two-photon irradiation to trigger cell death. Remarkably, RuL4 exhibited an IC50 value as low as 9.6 μM in one-photon PDT (λirr = 450 nm, 12 J cm(-2)) and 1.9 μM in two-photon PDT (λirr = 830 nm, 800 J cm(-2)) of 3D MCSs; moreover, RuL4 is an order of magnitude more toxic than cisplatin in the latter test system. The combination of mitochondria-targeting and two-photon activation provides a valuable paradigm to develop ruthenium(II) complexes for PDT applications.

  12. Double layered hydroxides as potential anti-cancer drug delivery agents.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Ufana; Ashraf, S M

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology has changed the scenario of the medical world by revolutionizing the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of cancer. This nanotechnology has been proved miraculous in detecting cancer cells, delivering chemotherapeutic agents and monitoring treatment from non-specific to highly targeted killing of tumor cells. In the past few decades, a number of inorganic materials have been investigated such as calcium phosphate, gold, carbon materials, silicon oxide, iron oxide, and layered double hydroxide (LDH) for examining their efficacy in targeting drug delivery. The reason behind the selection of these inorganic materials was their versatile and unique features efficient in drug delivery, such as wide availability, rich surface functionality, good biocompatibility, potential for target delivery, and controlled release of the drug from these inorganic nanomaterials. Although, the drug-LDH hybrids are found to be quite instrumental because of their application as advanced anti-cancer drug delivery systems, there has not been much research on them. This mini review is set to highlight the advancement made in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as anti-cancer drug delivery agents. Along with the advantages of LDHs as anti-cancer drug delivery agents, the process of interaction of some of the common anti-cancer drugs with LDH has also been discussed.

  13. Development of anticancer agents targeting the Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangqian; Hao, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays indispensable roles in both embryonic development and adult homeostasis. Abnormal regulation of this pathway is implicated in many types of cancer. Consequently, substantial efforts have made to develop therapeutic agents as anticancer drugs by specifically targeting the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Here we systematically review the potential therapeutic agents that have been developed to date for inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin cascade as well as current status of clinical trials of some of these agents. PMID:26396911

  14. Synthesis, crystallographic characterization and electrochemical property of a copper(II) complex of the anticancer agent elesclomol.

    PubMed

    Vo, Nha Huu; Xia, Zhiqiang; Hanko, Jason; Yun, Tong; Bloom, Steve; Shen, Jianhua; Koya, Keizo; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Shoujun

    2014-01-01

    Elesclomol is a novel anticancer agent that has been evaluated in a number of late stage clinical trials. A new and convenient synthesis of elesclomol and its copper complex is described. X-ray crystallographic characterization and the electrochemical properties of the elesclomol copper(II) complex are discussed. The copper(II) cation is coordinated in a highly distorted square-planar geometry to each of the sulphur and amide nitrogen atoms of elesclomol. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the complex undergoes a reversible one-electron reduction at biologically accessible potentials. In contrast the free elesclomol is found electrochemically inactive. This evidence is in strong support of the mechanism of action we proposed for the anticancer activity of elesclomol.

  15. Claudin-4 binder C-CPE 194 enhances effects of anticancer agents on pancreatic cancer cell lines via a MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Kono, Tsuyoshi; Kondoh, Masuo; Kyuno, Daisuke; Ito, Tatsuya; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Imamura, Masafumi; Kohno, Takayuki; Konno, Takumi; Furuhata, Tomohisa; Sawada, Norimasa; Hirata, Koichi; Kojima, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    The C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE) modulates the tight junction protein claudin and disrupts the tight junctional barrier. It also can enhance the effectiveness of anticancer agents. However, the detailed mechanisms of the effects of C-CPE remain unclear in both normal and cancerous cells. The C-CPE mutant called C-CPE 194 binds only to claudin-4, but the C-CPE 194 mutant called C-CPE m19 binds not only to claudin-4 but also to claudin-1. In the present study, to investigate the mechanisms of the effects of C-CPE on claudin expression, the tight junctional functions and the cytotoxicity of anticancer agents, human pancreatic cancer cells, and normal human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (HPDEs) were treated with C-CPE 194 and C-CPE m19. In well-differentiated cells of the pancreatic cancer cell line HPAC, C-CPE 194 and C-CPE m19 disrupted both the barrier and fence functions without changes in expression of claudin-1 and -4, together with an increase of MAPK phosphorylation. C-CPE 194, but not C-CPE m19, enhanced the cytotoxicity of the anticancer agents gemcitabine and S-1. In poorly differentiated pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1, C-CPE 194, but not C-CPE m19, decreased claudin-4 expression and enhanced MAPK activity and the cytotoxicity of the anticancer agents. In normal HPDEs, C-CPE 194 and C-CPE m19 decreased claudin-4 expression and enhanced the MAPK activity, whereas they did not affect the cytotoxicity of the anticancer agents. Our findings suggest that the claudin-4 binder C-CPE 194 enhances effects of anticancer agents on pancreatic cancer cell lines via a MAPK pathway.

  16. Anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity of mulberry (Morus alba L.) root bark

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Root bark of mulberry (Morus alba L.) has been used in herbal medicine as anti-phlogistic, liver protective, kidney protective, hypotensive, diuretic, anti-cough and analgesic agent. However, the anti-cancer activity and the potential anti-cancer mechanisms of mulberry root bark have not been elucidated. We performed in vitro study to investigate whether mulberry root bark extract (MRBE) shows anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. Methods In anti-inflammatory activity, NO was measured using the griess method. iNOS and proteins regulating NF-κB and ERK1/2 signaling were analyzed by Western blot. In anti-cancer activity, cell growth was measured by MTT assay. Cleaved PARP, ATF3 and cyclin D1 were analyzed by Western blot. Results In anti-inflammatory effect, MRBE blocked NO production via suppressing iNOS over-expression in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, MRBE inhibited NF-κB activation through p65 nuclear translocation via blocking IκB-α degradation and ERK1/2 activation via its hyper-phosphorylation. In anti-cancer activity, MRBE deos-dependently induced cell growth arrest and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells, SW480. MRBE treatment to SW480 cells activated ATF3 expression and down-regulated cyclin D1 level. We also observed that MRBE-induced ATF3 expression was dependent on ROS and GSK3β. Moreover, MRBE-induced cyclin D1 down-regulation was mediated from cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation, which was dependent on ROS. Conclusions These findings suggest that mulberry root bark exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. PMID:24962785

  17. Molecular mechanism of action of microtubule-stabilizing anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Prota, Andrea E; Bargsten, Katja; Zurwerra, Didier; Field, Jessica J; Díaz, José Fernando; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2013-02-01

    Microtubule-stabilizing agents (MSAs) are efficacious chemotherapeutic drugs widely used for the treatment of cancer. Despite the importance of MSAs for medical applications and basic research, their molecular mechanisms of action on tubulin and microtubules remain elusive. We determined high-resolution crystal structures of αβ-tubulin in complex with two unrelated MSAs, zampanolide and epothilone A. Both compounds were bound to the taxane pocket of β-tubulin and used their respective side chains to induce structuring of the M-loop into a short helix. Because the M-loop establishes lateral tubulin contacts in microtubules, these findings explain how taxane-site MSAs promote microtubule assembly and stability. Further, our results offer fundamental structural insights into the control mechanisms of microtubule dynamics.

  18. 1-Piperazinylphthalazines as potential VEGFR-2 inhibitors and anticancer agents: Synthesis and in vitro biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Abou-Seri, Sahar M; Eldehna, Wagdy M; Ali, Mamdouh M; Abou El Ella, Dalal A

    2016-01-01

    In our endeavor towards the development of effective VEGFR-2 inhibitors, three novel series of phthalazine derivatives based on 1-piperazinyl-4-arylphthalazine scaffold were synthesized. All the newly prepared phthalazines 16a-k, 18a-e and 21a-g were evaluated in vitro for their inhibitory activity against VEGFR-2. In particular, compounds 16k and 21d potently inhibited VEGFR-2 at sub-micromolar IC50 values 0.35 ± 0.03 and 0.40 ± 0.04 μM, respectively. Moreover, seventeen selected compounds 16c-e, 16g, 16h, 16j, 16k, 18c-e and 21a-g were evaluated for their in vitro anticancer activity according to US-NCI protocol, where compounds 16k and 21d proved to be the most potent anticancer agents. While, compound 16k exhibited potent broad spectrum anticancer activity with full panel GI50 (MG-MID) value of 3.62 μM, compound 21d showed high selectivity toward leukemia and prostate cancer subpanels [subpanel GI50 (MG-MID) 3.51 and 5.15 μM, respectively]. Molecular docking of compounds16k and 21d into VEGFR-2 active site was performed to explore their potential binding mode.

  19. Liposomal squalenoyl-gemcitabine: formulation, characterization and anticancer activity evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pili, Barbara; ReddyCurrent Address: Sanofi-Aventis, 13 Quai Jules-Guesdes, 94403, Vitry-Sur-Seine, France., L. Harivardhan; Bourgaux, Claudie; Lepêtre-Mouelhi, Sinda; Desmaële, Didier; Couvreur, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    A new prodrug of gemcitabine, based on the covalent coupling of squalene to gemcitabine (GemSQ), has been designed to enhance the anticancer activity of gemcitabine, a nucleoside analogue active against a wide variety of tumors. In the present study, the feasibility of encapsulating GemSQ into liposomes either PEGylated or non-PEGylated has been investigated. The in vivo anticancer activity of these formulations has been tested on subcutaneous grafted L1210wt leukemia model and compared to that of free gemcitabine. The liposomal GemSQ appears to be a potential delivery system for the effective treatment of tumors.

  20. Liposomal squalenoyl-gemcitabine: formulation, characterization and anticancer activity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pili, Barbara; Reddy, L Harivardhan; Bourgaux, Claudie; Lepêtre-Mouelhi, Sinda; Desmaële, Didier; Couvreur, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    A new prodrug of gemcitabine, based on the covalent coupling of squalene to gemcitabine (GemSQ), has been designed to enhance the anticancer activity of gemcitabine, a nucleoside analogue active against a wide variety of tumors. In the present study, the feasibility of encapsulating GemSQ into liposomes either PEGylated or non-PEGylated has been investigated. The in vivo anticancer activity of these formulations has been tested on subcutaneous grafted L1210wt leukemia model and compared to that of free gemcitabine. The liposomal GemSQ appears to be a potential delivery system for the effective treatment of tumors.

  1. Potential anticancer agents. IV. Constituents of Jacaranda caucana Pittier (Bignoniaceae).

    PubMed

    Ogura, M; Cordell, G A; Farnsworth, R

    1977-01-01

    An aqueous ethanol extract of Jacaranda caucana Pittier (Bignoniaceae) showed in vivo antitumor activity against the P-388 lymphocytic leukemia system. Fractionation, accompanied by monitoring for biological activity, afforded a novel phytoquinoid derivative jacaranone, which exhibited both in vivo antitumor and in vitro cytotoxic activity. beta-Sitosterol, betulinic acid, ursolic acid, 2alpha-hydroxyursolic acid, 2alpha,3alpha-dihydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid and a new triterpene acid, jacarandic acid, were also isolated. The structure elucidation of jacarandic acid is described.

  2. Evaluation of Degradation Properties of Polyglycolide and Its Potential as Delivery Vehicle for Anticancer Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Noorsal, K.; Ghani, S. M.; Yunos, D. M.; Mohamed, M. S. W.; Yahya, A. F.

    2010-03-11

    Biodegradable polymers offer a unique combination of properties that can be tailored to suit nearly any controlled drug delivery application. The most common biodegradable polymers used for biomedical applications are semicrystalline polyesters and polyethers which possess good mechanical properties and have been used in many controlled release applications. Drug release from these polymers may be controlled by several mechanisms and these include diffusion of drug through a matrix, dissolution of polymer matrix and degradation of the polymer. This study aims to investigate the degradation and drug release properties of polyglycolide (1.03 dL/g), in which, cis platin, an anticancer agent was used as the model drug. The degradation behaviour of the chosen polymer is thought to largely govern the release of the anticancer agent in vitro.

  3. [Phase I clinical trial design of anticancer agents--a Fibonacci and a modified Fibonacci sequence].

    PubMed

    Kusaba, H; Tamura, T

    2000-05-01

    A Phase I clinical trial of an anticancer agent is the first evaluation in humans, and it is an important step in drug development. From the ethical point of view, the goal is to escalate to the maximum tolerated dose quickly, yet safely, to minimize the likelihood of treating patients at doses that are too low or high. It is expected that the contradictions between safety and efficacy in the Phase I clinical trials will be solved by developing methods. The modified Fibonacci sequence has been generally adopted for dose escalation, although it includes some problems. It is necessary to recognize that the method used for Phase I clinical trials for anticancer agents remains unsatisfactory, and that it is also necessary to develop more ethical and scientific methods.

  4. Rationale and clinical use of multitargeting anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Melisi, Davide; Piro, Geny; Tamburrino, Anna; Carbone, Carmine; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2013-08-01

    Human solid tumors contain genetically distinct subpopulations of tumor cells that can be enriched under selective pressure of specific treatments. This heterogeneous nature reflects the dynamism of drug response and it represents a fundamental driver of resistance. Moreover, the complexity of cancer disease is increased by the activity of cross-talking, redundant signaling pathways, escape pathways and compensatory events, which triggers activation of secondary growth and survival. Broad multi-targeted approaches are requested to overcome a complex, heterogeneous, and dynamic disease such as cancer.

  5. Anticancer Activity of Key Lime, Citrus aurantifolia

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Nithithep; Jiraungkoorskul, Wannee

    2016-01-01

    Citrus aurantifolia (family: Rutaceae) is mainly used in daily consumption, in many cultural cuisines, and in juice production. It is widely used because of its antibacterial, anticancer, antidiabetic, antifungal, anti-hypertensive, anti-inflammation, anti-lipidemia, and antioxidant properties; moreover, it can protect heart, liver, bone, and prevent urinary diseases. Its secondary metabolites are alkaloids, carotenoids, coumarins, essential oils, flavonoids, phenolic acids, and triterpenoids. The other important constituents are apigenin, hesperetin, kaempferol, limonoids, quercetin, naringenin, nobiletin, and rutin, all of these contribute to its remedial properties. The scientific searching platforms were used for publications from 1990 to present. The abstracts and titles were screened, and the full-text articles were selected. The present review is up-to-date of the phytochemical property of C. aurantifolia to provide a reference for further study. PMID:28082795

  6. Synthesis of Dipyridyl Ketone Isonicotinoyl Hydrazone Copper(II) Complex: Structure, Anticancer Activity and Anticancer Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Deng, JunGang; Chen, Wei; Deng, Hang

    2016-11-01

    In an effort to better understand the biological efficacy of the tridentate aroyl hydrazone Cu(II) complexes, the Cu(II) complex of di-2-pyridyl ketone isonicotinoyl hydrazone ligand (HL), {[Cu(L)(H2O)]·H2O·NO3}n (C1) was synthesized and characterized. Single crystal X-ray study reveals that complex C1 forms 1D zigzag chains in solid state. In water, the hydrolysis of the 1D zigzag chains was observed, and finally formation of monomeric species. In vitro studies revealed that complex C1 showed significantly more anticancer activity than the ligand alone. Investigation of the anticancer mechanisms of C1, confirmed that the Cu(II) complex exhibit a strong capacity to promote productions of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death.

  7. Reprogramming urokinase into an antibody-recruiting anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Jakobsche, Charles E; McEnaney, Patrick J; Zhang, Andrew X; Spiegel, David A

    2012-02-17

    Synthetic compounds for controlling or creating human immunity have the potential to revolutionize disease treatment. Motivated by challenges in this arena, we report herein a strategy to target metastatic cancer cells for immune-mediated destruction by targeting the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and uPAR are overexpressed on the surfaces of a wide range of invasive cancer cells and are believed to contribute substantially to the migratory propensities of these cells. The key component of our approach is an antibody-recruiting molecule that targets the urokinase receptor (ARM-U). This bifunctional construct is formed by selectively, covalently attaching an antibody-binding small molecule to the active site of the urokinase enzyme. We demonstrate that ARM-U is capable of directing antibodies to the surfaces of target cancer cells and mediating both antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against multiple human cancer cell lines. We believe that the reported strategy has the potential to inform novel treatment options for a variety of deadly, invasive cancers.

  8. In vitro evaluation of a combination treatment involving anticancer agents and an aurora kinase B inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Senna; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Nakayama, Yoshifumi; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Harada, Yoshikazu; Koi, Chiho; Kurata, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Yasuo

    2016-11-01

    Aurora kinase B (AURKB) inhibitors are regarded as potential molecular-targeting drugs for cancer therapy. The present study evaluated the cytotoxic effect of a combination of AZD1152-hQPA, an AURKB inhibitor, and various anticancer agents on the HeLa human cervical cancer cell line, as well as its cisplatin-resistant equivalent HCP4 cell line. It was demonstrated that AZD1152-hQPA had an antagonistic effect on the cytotoxicity of cisplatin, etoposide and doxorubicin, but had a synergistic effect on that of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), Am80 and TAC-101, when tested on HeLa cells. Cisplatin, etoposide and doxorubicin were shown to increase the cellular expression of AURKB, while ATRA, Am80 and TAC-101 downregulated its expression. These results suggested that AURKB expression is regulated by these anticancer agents at the transcriptional level, and that the level of expression of AURKB may influence the cytotoxic effect of AZD1152-hQPA. Therefore, when using anticancer agents, decreasing the expression of AURKB using a molecular-targeting drug may be an optimal therapeutic strategy.

  9. In vitro evaluation of a combination treatment involving anticancer agents and an aurora kinase B inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Senna; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Nakayama, Yoshifumi; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Harada, Yoshikazu; Koi, Chiho; Kurata, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Aurora kinase B (AURKB) inhibitors are regarded as potential molecular-targeting drugs for cancer therapy. The present study evaluated the cytotoxic effect of a combination of AZD1152-hQPA, an AURKB inhibitor, and various anticancer agents on the HeLa human cervical cancer cell line, as well as its cisplatin-resistant equivalent HCP4 cell line. It was demonstrated that AZD1152-hQPA had an antagonistic effect on the cytotoxicity of cisplatin, etoposide and doxorubicin, but had a synergistic effect on that of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), Am80 and TAC-101, when tested on HeLa cells. Cisplatin, etoposide and doxorubicin were shown to increase the cellular expression of AURKB, while ATRA, Am80 and TAC-101 downregulated its expression. These results suggested that AURKB expression is regulated by these anticancer agents at the transcriptional level, and that the level of expression of AURKB may influence the cytotoxic effect of AZD1152-hQPA. Therefore, when using anticancer agents, decreasing the expression of AURKB using a molecular-targeting drug may be an optimal therapeutic strategy. PMID:27895801

  10. Endophytic fungi with antitumor activities: Their occurrence and anticancer compounds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Zhang, Qiao-Yan; Jia, Min; Ming, Qian-Liang; Yue, Wei; Rahman, Khalid; Qin, Lu-Ping; Han, Ting

    2016-05-01

    Plant endophytic fungi have been recognized as an important and novel resource of natural bioactive products, especially in anticancer application. This review mainly deals with the research progress on the production of anticancer compounds by endophytic fungi between 1990 and 2013. Anticancer activity is generally associated with the cytotoxicity of the compounds present in the endophytic fungi. All strains of endophytes producing antitumor chemicals were classified taxonomically and the genera of Pestalotiopsis and Aspergillus as well as the taxol producing endophytes were focused on. Classification of endophytic fungi producing antitumor compounds has received more attention from mycologists, and it can also lead to the discovery of novel compounds with antitumor activity due to phylogenetic relationships. In this review, the structures of the anticancer compounds isolated from the newly reported endophytes between 2010 and 2013 are discussed including strategies for the efficient production of the desired compounds. The purpose of this review is to provide new directions in endophytic fungi research including integrated information relating to its anticancer compounds.

  11. Anticancer activities of bovine and human lactoferricin-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Arias, Mauricio; Hilchie, Ashley L; Haney, Evan F; Bolscher, Jan G M; Hyndman, M Eric; Hancock, Robert E W; Vogel, Hans J

    2017-02-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a mammalian host defense glycoprotein with diverse biological activities. Peptides derived from the cationic region of LF possess cytotoxic activity against cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Bovine lactoferricin (LFcinB), a peptide derived from bovine LF (bLF), exhibits broad-spectrum anticancer activity, while a similar peptide derived from human LF (hLF) is not as active. In this work, several peptides derived from the N-terminal regions of bLF and hLF were studied for their anticancer activities against leukemia and breast-cancer cells, as well as normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The cyclized LFcinB-CLICK peptide, which possesses a stable triazole linkage, showed improved anticancer activity, while short peptides hLF11 and bLF10 were not cytotoxic to cancer cells. Interestingly, hLF11 can act as a cell-penetrating peptide; when combined with the antimicrobial core sequence of LFcinB (RRWQWR) through either a Pro or Gly-Gly linker, toxicity to Jurkat cells increased. Together, our work extends the library of LF-derived peptides tested for anticancer activity, and identified new chimeric peptides with high cytotoxicity towards cancerous cells. Additionally, these results support the notion that short cell-penetrating peptides and antimicrobial peptides can be combined to create new adducts with increased potency.

  12. Enhanced anti-cancer and antimicrobial activities of curcumin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Adahoun, Mo'ath Ahmad; Al-Akhras, Mohammed-Ali Hassan; Jaafar, Mohamad Suhaimi; Bououdina, Mohamed

    2017-02-01

    curcumin and nanocurcumin. In conclusion, all these findings not only indicate that nanocurcumin safe compound has a potent ability as anti-cancer and antimicrobial activities, but also well justify the avail of using nanocurcumin as prostate cells PC3 anti-cancer, and antimicrobial agent for nanocurcumin are markedly improved by decreasing particle size to the nano-scale regime.

  13. Evaluation of bishexadecyltrimethyl ammonium palladium tetrachloride based dual functional colloidal carrier as an antimicrobial and anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Kumar, Sandeep; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Kaur, Baljinder; Kant, Ravi; Guru, Santosh Kumar; Bhushan, Shashi; Jaglan, Sundeep

    2016-04-21

    We have developed a dual function carrier using bishexadecyltrimethyl ammonium palladium tetrachloride, which has anticancer as well as antibacterial activity, using a ligand insertion method with a simple and easy work procedure. The complex is prepared by a simple and cost effective method using hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium chloride and palladium chloride under controlled stoichiometry. Herein, we report the aggregation (self assembly) of the metallosurfactant having palladium as a counter ion, in aqueous medium along with its binding affinity with bovine serum albumin. The palladium surfactant has exhibited excellent antimicrobial efficacy against fungus and bacteria (both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria). Cytotoxicity of palladium surfactant against cancerous (Human leukemia HL-60, pancreatic MIA-Pa-Ca-2 and prostate cancer PC-3) and healthy cells (fR2 human breast epithelial cells) was also evaluated using MTT assay. The present dual functional moiety shows a low IC50 value and has potential to be used as an anticancer agent. Our dual function carrier which itself possesses antimicrobial and anticancer activity represents a simple and effective system and can also be utilized as a drug carrier in the future.

  14. Alkyne-substituted diminazene as G-quadruplex binders with anticancer activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhao; Carter-Cooper, Brandon; Du, Yixuan; Zhou, Jie; Saeed, Musabbir A; Liu, Jinbing; Guo, Min; Roembke, Benjamin; Mikek, Clinton; Lewis, Edwin A; Lapidus, Rena G; Sintim, Herman O

    2016-08-08

    G-quadruplex ligands have been touted as potential anticancer agents, however, none of the reported G-quadruplex-interactive small molecules have gone past phase II clinical trials. Recently it was revealed that diminazene (berenil, DMZ) actually binds to G-quadruplexes 1000 times better than DNA duplexes, with dissociation constants approaching 1 nM. DMZ however does not have strong anticancer activities. In this paper, using a panel of biophysical tools, including NMR, FRET melting assay and FRET competition assay, we discovered that monoamidine analogues of DMZ bearing alkyne substitutes selectively bind to G-quadruplexes. The lead DMZ analogues were shown to be able to target c-MYC G-quadruplex both in vitro and in vivo. Alkyne DMZ analogues display respectable anticancer activities (single digit micromolar GI50) against ovarian (OVCAR-3), prostate (PC-3) and triple negative breast (MDA-MB-231) cancer cell lines and represent interesting new leads to develop anticancer agents.

  15. Marine Invertebrate Metabolites with Anticancer Activities: Solutions to the “Supply Problem”

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Nelson G. M.; Dasari, Ramesh; Chandra, Sunena; Kiss, Robert; Kornienko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Marine invertebrates provide a rich source of metabolites with anticancer activities and several marine-derived agents have been approved for the treatment of cancer. However, the limited supply of promising anticancer metabolites from their natural sources is a major hurdle to their preclinical and clinical development. Thus, the lack of a sustainable large-scale supply has been an important challenge facing chemists and biologists involved in marine-based drug discovery. In the current review we describe the main strategies aimed to overcome the supply problem. These include: marine invertebrate aquaculture, invertebrate and symbiont cell culture, culture-independent strategies, total chemical synthesis, semi-synthesis, and a number of hybrid strategies. We provide examples illustrating the application of these strategies for the supply of marine invertebrate-derived anticancer agents. Finally, we encourage the scientific community to develop scalable methods to obtain selected metabolites, which in the authors’ opinion should be pursued due to their most promising anticancer activities. PMID:27213412

  16. Fanconi anemia D2 protein confers chemoresistance in response to the anticancer agent, irofulven.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutian; Wiltshire, Timothy; Senft, Jamie; Wenger, Sharon L; Reed, Eddie; Wang, Weixin

    2006-12-01

    The Fanconi anemia-BRCA pathway of genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically repressed in human cancer. The proteins of this pathway play pivotal roles in DNA damage signaling and repair. Irofulven is one of a new class of anticancer agents that are analogues of mushroom-derived illudin toxins. Preclinical studies and clinical trials have shown that irofulven is effective against several tumor cell types. The exact nature of irofulven-induced DNA damage is not completely understood. Previously, we have shown that irofulven activates ATM and its targets, NBS1, SMC1, CHK2, and p53. In this study, we hypothesize that irofulven induces DNA double-strand breaks and FANCD2 may play an important role in modulating cellular responses and chemosensitivity in response to irofulven treatment. By using cells that are proficient or deficient for FANCD2, ATR, or ATM, we showed that irofulven induces FANCD2 monoubiquitination and nuclear foci formation. ATR is important in mediating irofulven-induced FANCD2 monoubiquitination. Furthermore, we showed that FANCD2 plays a critical role in maintaining chromosome integrity and modulating chemosensitivity in response to irofulven-induced DNA damage. Therefore, this study suggests that it might be clinically significant to target irofulven therapy to cancers defective for proteins of the Fanconi anemia-BRCA pathway.

  17. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)—diclofenac as an anti-cancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Pantziarka, Pan; Sukhatme, Vidula; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2016-01-01

    Diclofenac (DCF) is a well-known and widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), with a range of actions which are of interest in an oncological context. While there has long been an interest in the use of NSAIDs in chemoprevention, there is now emerging evidence that such drugs may have activity in a treatment setting. DCF, which is a potent inhibitor of COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 synthesis, displays a range of effects on the immune system, the angiogenic cascade, chemo- and radio-sensitivity and tumour metabolism. Both pre-clinical and clinical evidence of these effects, in multiple cancer types, is assessed and summarised and relevant mechanisms of action outlined. Based on this evidence the case is made for further clinical investigation of the anticancer effects of DCF, particularly in combination with other agents - with a range of possible multi-drug and multi-modality combinations outlined in the supplementary materials accompanying the main paper. PMID:26823679

  18. Mechanistic and Pharmacological Issues of Aspirin as an Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Dovizio, Melania; Tacconelli, Stefania; Sostres, Carlos; Ricciotti, Emanuela; Patrignani, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings have shown that aspirin, taken for several years, reduces the long-term risk of some cancers, particularly colorectal cancer. The result that aspirin benefit is detectable at daily low-doses (at least 75mg), the same used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, positions the antiplatelet action of aspirin at the center of its antitumor efficacy. At low-doses given every 24 h, aspirin is acting by a complete and persistent inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 in platelets (in the pre-systemic circulation) while causing a limited and rapidly reversible inhibitory effect on COX-2 and/or COX-1 expressed in nucleated cells. Aspirin has a short half-life in human circulation (approximately 20 min); nucleated cells have the ability to resynthesize the acetylated COX-isozymes within a few hours, while platelets do not. COX-independent mechanisms of aspirin, such as the inhibition of Wnt/ β-catenin and NF-kB signaling and the acetylation of extra-COX proteins, have been suggested to play a role in its chemo-preventive effects, but their relevance remains to be demonstrated in vivo at clinical doses. In conclusion, the results of clinical pharmacology and the analysis of randomized and epidemiological studies suggest that colorectal cancer and atherothrombosis share a common mechanism of disease, i.e. enhanced platelet activation in response to injury at distinct sites. PMID:24281340

  19. Oncolytic Measles Virus Strains as Novel Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Msaouel, Pavlos; Opyrchal, Mateusz; Domingo Musibay, Evidio; Galanis, Evanthia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Replication-competent oncolytic measles virus (MV) strains preferentially infect and destroy a wide variety of cancer tissues. Clinical translation of engineered attenuated MV vaccine derivatives is demonstrating the therapeutic potential and negligible pathogenicity of these strains in humans. Areas covered The present review summarizes the mechanisms of MV tumor selectivity and cytopathic activity as well as the current data on the oncolytic efficacy and preclinical testing of MV strains. Investigational strategies to reprogram MV selectivity, escape antiviral immunity and modulate the immune system to enhance viral delivery and tumor oncolysis are also discussed. Expert Opinion Clinical viral kinetic data derived from non-invasive monitoring of reporter transgene expression will guide future protocols to enhance oncolytic MV efficacy. Anti-measles immunity is a major challenge of measles-based therapeutics and various strategies are being investigated to modulate immunity. These include the combination of MV therapy with immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclophosphamide, the use of cell carriers and the introduction of immunomodulatory transgenes and wild-type virulence genes. Available MV retargeting technologies can address safety considerations that may arise as more potent oncolytic MV vectors are being developed. PMID:23289598

  20. Recent Advances in Anticancer Activities and Drug Delivery Systems of Tannins.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuee; Zhang, Jinming; Chen, Nelson G; Shi, Zhi; Qiu, Jiange; He, Chengwei; Chen, Meiwan

    2016-12-22

    Tannins, polyphenols in medicinal plants, have been divided into two groups of hydrolysable and condensed tannins, including gallotannins, ellagitannins, and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Potent anticancer activities have been observed in tannins (especially EGCG) with multiple mechanisms, such as apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and inhibition of invasion and metastases. Furthermore, the combinational effects of tannins and anticancer drugs have been demonstrated in this review, including chemoprotective, chemosensitive, and antagonizing effects accompanying with anticancer effect. However, the applications of tannins have been hindered due to their poor liposolubility, low bioavailability, off-taste, and shorter half-life time in human body, such as EGCG, gallic acid, and ellagic acid. To tackle these obstacles, novel drug delivery systems have been employed to deliver tannins with the aim of improving their applications, such as gelatin nanoparticles, micelles, nanogold, liposomes, and so on. In this review, the chemical characteristics, anticancer properties, and drug delivery systems of tannins were discussed with an attempt to provide a systemic reference to promote the development of tannins as anticancer agents.

  1. Anticancer Activity of Metal Complexes: Involvement of Redox Processes

    PubMed Central

    Jungwirth, Ute; Kowol, Christian R.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Hartinger, Christian G.; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Cells require tight regulation of the intracellular redox balance and consequently of reactive oxygen species for proper redox signaling and maintenance of metal (e.g., of iron and copper) homeostasis. In several diseases, including cancer, this balance is disturbed. Therefore, anticancer drugs targeting the redox systems, for example, glutathione and thioredoxin, have entered focus of interest. Anticancer metal complexes (platinum, gold, arsenic, ruthenium, rhodium, copper, vanadium, cobalt, manganese, gadolinium, and molybdenum) have been shown to strongly interact with or even disturb cellular redox homeostasis. In this context, especially the hypothesis of “activation by reduction” as well as the “hard and soft acids and bases” theory with respect to coordination of metal ions to cellular ligands represent important concepts to understand the molecular modes of action of anticancer metal drugs. The aim of this review is to highlight specific interactions of metal-based anticancer drugs with the cellular redox homeostasis and to explain this behavior by considering chemical properties of the respective anticancer metal complexes currently either in (pre)clinical development or in daily clinical routine in oncology. PMID:21275772

  2. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Genistein Analogues as Anti-Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Pahoua; Wang, Rubing; Zhang, Xiaojie; Torre, Eduardo DeLa; Leon, Francisco; Zhang, Qiang; Zheng, Shilong; Wang, Guangdi; Chen, Qiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a bioactive isoflavone derived from soybeans. The tie-in between the intake of genistein and the decreased incidence of some solid tumors (including prostate cancer) has been demonstrated by epidemiological studies. The potential of genistein in treating prostate cancer has also been displayed by in vitro cell-based and in vivo animal experiments. Genistein has entered clinical trials for both chemoprevention and potential treatment of prostate cancer. Even though the low oral bioavailability has presented the major challenges to genistein’s further clinical development, chemical modulation of genistein holds the promise to generate potential anti-prostate cancer agents with enhanced potency and/or better pharmacokinetic profiles than genistein. As part of our ongoing project to develop natural products-based anti-prostate cancer agents, the current study was undertaken to synthesize eight genistein analogues for cytotoxic evaluation in three prostate cancer cell lines (PC-3, DU-145, LNCaP; both androgen-sensitive and androgen-refractory cell lines), as well as one aggressive cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). Eight genistein analogues have been successfully synthesized with Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction as a key step. Their in vitro anti-cancer potential was evaluated by trypan blue exclusion assay and WST-1 cell proliferation assay against a panel of four human cancer cell lines. The acquired data suggest i) that the C-5 and C-7 hydroxyl groups in genistein are very important for the cytotoxicity and anti-proliferative activity; and ii) that 1-alkyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl and pyridine-3-yl might act as good bioisosteres for the 4'-hydroxyphenyl moiety in genistein. PMID:25991428

  3. Combining immunotherapy and anticancer agents: the right path to achieve cancer cure?

    PubMed

    Apetoh, L; Ladoire, S; Coukos, G; Ghiringhelli, F

    2015-09-01

    Recent clinical trials revealed the impressive efficacy of immunological checkpoint blockade in different types of metastatic cancers. Such data underscore that immunotherapy is one of the most promising strategies for cancer treatment. In addition, preclinical studies provide evidence that some cytotoxic drugs have the ability to stimulate the immune system, resulting in anti-tumor immune responses that contribute to clinical efficacy of these agents. These observations raise the hypothesis that the next step for cancer treatment is the combination of cytotoxic agents and immunotherapies. The present review aims to summarize the immune-mediated effects of chemotherapeutic agents and their clinical relevance, the biological and clinical features of immune checkpoint blockers and finally, the preclinical and clinical rationale for novel therapeutic strategies combining anticancer agents and immune checkpoint blockers.

  4. Molecular designing and in silico evaluation of darunavir derivatives as anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Mahto, Manoj kumar; Yellapu, Nanda Kumar; Kilaru, Ravendra Babu; Chamarthi, Naga Raju; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2014-01-01

    Darunavir is a synthetic nonpeptidic protease inhibitor which has been tested for anticancer properties. To deduce and enhance the anticancer activity of the Darunavir, we have modified its reactive moiety in an effective way. We designed 9 analogues in ChemBioOffice 2010 and minimized using the LigPrep tool of Schrödinger 2011. These analogues can obstruct the activity of other signalling pathways which are implicated in many tumors. Results of the QikProp showed that all the analogues lied in the specified range of all the pharmacokinetic (ADMET) properties required to become the successful drug. Docking study was performed to test its anticancer activity against the biomarkers of the five main types of cancers i.e. bone, brain, breast, colon and skin cancer. Grid was generated for each oncoproteins by specifying the active site amino acids. The binding model of best scoring analogue with each protein was assessed from their G-scores and disclosed by docking analysis using the XP visualizer tool. An analysis of the receptor-ligand interaction studies revealed that these nine Darunavir analogues are active against all cancer biomarkers and have the features to prove themselves as anticancer drugs, further to be synthesized and tested against the cell lines. PMID:24966524

  5. Synthesis and anticancer activity of (E)-2-benzothiazole hydrazones.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Eric B; de Brito, Monique A; Vasconcelos, Thatyana R A; de Moraes, Manuel O; Montenegro, Raquel C; Yoneda, Julliane D; Leal, Kátia Z

    2014-10-30

    Benzothiazole hydrazones have been synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro antiproliferative activity against three human cancer cell lines: HL-60 (leukemia), MDAMB-435 (breast) and HCT-8 (colon). The good cytotoxicity for the three cancer cell lines and theoretical profile of compounds 3o and 3p pointed them as promising lead molecules for anticancer drug design.

  6. Carnosol: A promising anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory agent

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeremy J.

    2011-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet and more specifically certain meats, fruits, vegetables, and olive oil found in certain parts of the Mediterranean region have been associated with a decreased cardiovascular and diabetes risk. More recently, several population based studies have observed with these lifestyle choices have reported an overall reduced risk for several cancers. One study in particular observed an inverse relationship between consumption of Mediterranean herbs such as rosemary, sage, parsley, and oregano with lung cancer. In light of these findings there is a need to explore and identify the anti-cancer properties of these medicincal herbs and to identify the phytochemicals therein. One agent in particular, carnosol, has been evaluated for anti-cancer property in prostate, breast, skin, leukemia, and colon cancer with promising results. These studies have provided evidence that carnosol targets multiple deregulated pathways associated with inflammation and cancer that include nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), apoptotic related proteins, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3 K)/Akt, androgen and estrogen receptors, as well as molecular targets. In addition, carnosol appears to be well tolerated in that it has a selective toxicity towards cancer cells versus non-tumorigenic cells and is well tolerated when administered to animals. This mini-review reports on the pre-clinical studies that have been performed to date with carnosol describing mechanistic, efficacy, and safety/tolerability studies as a cancer chemoprevention and anti-cancer agent. PMID:21382660

  7. Anticancer and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of a Standardized Dichloromethane Extract from Piper umbellatum L. Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Leilane Hespporte; Vendramini-Costa, Débora Barbosa; Monteiro, Paula Araújo; Ruiz, Ana Lúcia Tasca Gois; Sousa, Ilza Maria de Oliveira; Foglio, Mary Ann; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; Rodrigues, Rodney Alexandre Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advances in anticancer drug discovery field, the worldwide cancer incidence is remarkable, highlighting the need for new therapies focusing on both cancer cell and its microenvironment. The tumor microenvironment offers multiple targets for cancer therapy, including inflammation. Nowadays, almost 75% of the anticancer agents used in chemotherapy are derived from natural products, and plants are an important source of new promising therapies. Continuing our research on Piper umbellatum species, here we describe the anticancer (in vitro antiproliferative activity and in vivo Ehrlich solid tumor model) and anti-inflammatory (carrageenan-induced paw edema and peritonitis models) activities of a standardized dichloromethane extract (SDE) from P. umbellatum leaves, containing 23.9% of 4-nerolidylcatechol. SDE showed in vitro and in vivo antiproliferative activity, reducing Ehrlich solid tumor growth by 38.7 and 52.2% when doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg, respectively, were administered daily by oral route. Daily treatments did not produce signals of toxicity. SDE also reduced paw edema and leukocyte migration on carrageenan-induced inflammation models, suggesting that the anticancer activity of SDE from Piper umbellatum leaves could involve antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory effects. These findings highlight P. umbellatum as a source of compounds against cancer and inflammation. PMID:25713595

  8. Anticancer and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of a Standardized Dichloromethane Extract from Piper umbellatum L. Leaves.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Leilane Hespporte; Vendramini-Costa, Débora Barbosa; Monteiro, Paula Araújo; Ruiz, Ana Lúcia Tasca Gois; Sousa, Ilza Maria de Oliveira; Foglio, Mary Ann; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; Rodrigues, Rodney Alexandre Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advances in anticancer drug discovery field, the worldwide cancer incidence is remarkable, highlighting the need for new therapies focusing on both cancer cell and its microenvironment. The tumor microenvironment offers multiple targets for cancer therapy, including inflammation. Nowadays, almost 75% of the anticancer agents used in chemotherapy are derived from natural products, and plants are an important source of new promising therapies. Continuing our research on Piper umbellatum species, here we describe the anticancer (in vitro antiproliferative activity and in vivo Ehrlich solid tumor model) and anti-inflammatory (carrageenan-induced paw edema and peritonitis models) activities of a standardized dichloromethane extract (SDE) from P. umbellatum leaves, containing 23.9% of 4-nerolidylcatechol. SDE showed in vitro and in vivo antiproliferative activity, reducing Ehrlich solid tumor growth by 38.7 and 52.2% when doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg, respectively, were administered daily by oral route. Daily treatments did not produce signals of toxicity. SDE also reduced paw edema and leukocyte migration on carrageenan-induced inflammation models, suggesting that the anticancer activity of SDE from Piper umbellatum leaves could involve antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory effects. These findings highlight P. umbellatum as a source of compounds against cancer and inflammation.

  9. Characterization, catalyzed water oxidation and anticancer activities of a NIR BODIPY-Mn polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ya-Quan; Xiao, Ke-Jing; Wu, Yun-Jie; Chen, Qiu-Yun

    2017-04-01

    To obtain near-IR absorbing biomaterials as fluorescence cellular imaging and anticancer agents for hypoxic cancer cell, a nano NIR fluorescence Mn(III/IV) polymer (PMnD) was spectroscopically characterized. The PMnD shows strong emission at 661 nm when excited with 643 nm. Furthermore, PMnD can catalyze water oxidation to generate dioxygen when irradiated by red LED light (10 W). In particular, the PMnD can enter into HepG-2 cells and mitochondria. Both anticancer activity and the inhibition of the expression of HIF-1α for PMnD were concentration dependent. Our results demonstrate that PMnD can be developed as mitochondria targeted imaging agents and new inhibitors for HIF-1 in hypoxic cancer cells.

  10. Pharmacokinetic Properties of Anticancer Agents for the Treatment of CNS Tumors: Update of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jacus, Megan O.; Daryani, Vinay M.; Harstead, K. Elaine; Patel, Yogesh T.; Throm, Stacy L.; Stewart, Clinton F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant improvement in outcomes for patients with hematological malignancies and solid tumors over the past 10 years, patients with primary or metastatic brain tumors continue to have a poor prognosis. A primary reason for this is the inability of many chemotherapeutic drugs to penetrate into the brain and brain tumors at concentrations high enough to exert an antitumor effect due to unique barriers and efflux transporters. Several studies have been published recently examining the CNS pharmacokinetics of various anticancer drugs in patients with primary and metastatic brain tumors. To summarize recent advances in the field, this review will critically present studies published within the last 9 years examining brain and cerebrospinal fluid penetration of clinically available anticancer agents for patients with CNS tumors. PMID:26293618

  11. Anti-cancer activities of ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi; Qian, Steven Y

    2014-01-01

    The ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are two major families of PUFAs present as essential cellular components which possess diverse bioactivities. The ω-3s, mainly found in seafood, are associated with many beneficial effects on human health, while the ω-6s are more abundant in our daily diet and could be implicated in many pathological processes including cancer development. Increasing evidence suggests that the adverse effects of ω-6s may be largely attributed to arachidonic acid (AA, a downstream ω-6) and the metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) that stems from its cyclooxygenase (COX)-catalyzed lipid peroxidation. On the other hand, two of AA's upstream ω-6s, γ-linolenic acid (GLA) and dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA), are shown to possess certain anti-cancer activities, including inducing cell apoptosis and inhibiting cell proliferation. In this paper, we review the documented anti-cancer activities of ω-6 PUFAs, including the recent findings regarding the anti-cancer effects of free radical-mediated DGLA peroxidation. The possible mechanisms and applications of DGLA (and other ω-6s) in inducing anti-cancer activity are also discussed. Considering the wide availability of ω-6s in our daily diet, the study of the potential beneficial effect of ω-6 PUFAs may guide us to develop an ω-6-based diet care strategy for cancer prevention and treatment.

  12. Impact of Apparent Antagonism of Estrogen Receptor β by Fulvestrant on Anticancer Activity of 2-Methoxyestradiol.

    PubMed

    Gorska, Magdalena; Wyszkowska, Roksana Maja; Kuban-Jankowska, Alicja; Wozniak, Michal

    2016-05-01

    Osteosarcoma is one of the most malignant bone tumors of childhood and adolescence. Interestingly, the presence of estrogen receptors α and β has been reported in human bone cells, including osteosarcoma. Thus, inhibitors of estrogens such as fulvestrant, are considered candidates for novel endocrine therapy in treatment of osteosarcoma. Another anticancer agent that seems to be very effective in treatment of osteosarcoma is a derivative of 17β-estradiol, 2-methoxyestradiol. The aim of this study was to determine the anticancer activities of pure anti-estrogen, fulvestrant and combined treatment of fulvestrant and 2-methoxyestradiol towards highly metastatic osteosarcoma 143B cells. 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay was used in order to determine the antiproliferative potential of the compounds, and western blotting for estrogen receptors α and β. Flow cytometry was used in order to determine induction of cell death, cell-cycle arrest, mitochondrial depolarization, and DNA damage. Herein, we showed that fulvestrant has anticancer activity only at high concentrations. We were able to find and expression of estrogen receptor β, while we did not detect estrogen receptor α in osteosarcoma 143B cells. Moreover, fulvestrant down-regulated the expression of estrogen receptor β, and this effect was reversed by 2-methoxyestradiol. Thus, the obtained data suggest that 2-methoxyestradiol may exert part of its anticancer activity through modulation of expression of estrogen receptor β.

  13. Anticancer activities of epigallocatechin-3-gallate against cholangiocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Tae Won; Park, Su Bum; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Jeong, Young-IL; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is an antioxidant agent derived from green tea. Because it has chemopreventive and anti-invasive effect against various cancer cells, EGCG can be used to inhibit proliferation and invasion of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) cells. Methods The anticancer effects of EGCG were studied using human CCA cells (HuCC-T1). Apoptosis was analyzed by Western blotting. Invasion and migration of cancer cells were assessed with Matrigel® and wound healing assays. An animal tumor xenograft model of HuCC-T1 was used to study the in vivo antitumor activities of EGCG. Results EGCG effectively inhibited the growth of HuCC-T1 cells with no adverse effects on the viability of 293T cells. EGCG induced apoptotic cell death at 5 µg/mL concentration. It inhibited the expression of mutant p53 and induced apoptotic molecular signals such as Bax/Bcl-2, Caspase, and cytochrome C. Furthermore, EGCG dose-dependently inhibited the activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/9, invasion, and migration. In the animal tumor xenograft model of HuCC-T1 cells, EGCG was subcutaneously administered beside the tumor for local treatment. EGCG efficiently inhibited growth of the tumor and suppressed carcinogenic molecular signals such as Notch1, MMP-2/9, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Conclusion EGCG induced apoptosis of cancer cells without adverse effects on normal cells. EGCG inhibited growth, invasion, and migration of HuCC-T1 cells. We suggest EGCG as a promising candidate for local treatment of CCA. PMID:28053547

  14. Preclinical Investigations of PM01183 (Lurbinectedin) as a Single Agent or in Combination with Other Anticancer Agents for Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ryoko; Mabuchi, Seiji; Kawano, Mahiru; Sasano, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Yuri; Kuroda, Hiromasa; Kozasa, Katsumi; Hashimoto, Kae; Sawada, Kenjiro; Kimura, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the antitumor effects of lurbinectedin as a single agent or in combination with existing anticancer agents for clear cell carcinoma (CCC) of the ovary, which is regarded as an aggressive, chemoresistant, histological subtype. Methods Using human ovarian CCC cell lines, the antitumor effects of lurbinectedin, SN-38, doxorubicin, cisplatin, and paclitaxel as single agents were assessed using the MTS assay. Then, the antitumor effects of combination therapies involving lurbinectedin and 1 of the other 4 agents were evaluated using isobologram analysis to examine whether these combinations displayed synergistic effects. The antitumor activity of each treatment was also examined using cisplatin-resistant and paclitaxel-resistant CCC sublines. Finally, we determined the effects of mTORC1 inhibition on the antitumor activity of lurbinectedin-based chemotherapy. Results Lurbinectedin exhibited significant antitumor activity toward chemosensitive and chemoresistant CCC cells in vitro. An examination of mouse CCC cell xenografts revealed that lurbinectedin significantly inhibits tumor growth. Among the tested combinations, lurbinectedin plus SN-38 resulted in a significant synergistic effect. This combination also had strong synergistic effects on both the cisplatin-resistant and paclitaxel-resistant CCC cell lines. Everolimus significantly enhanced the antitumor activity of lurbinectedin-based chemotherapies. Conclusions Lurbinectedin, a new agent that targets active transcription, exhibits antitumor activity in CCC when used as a single agent and has synergistic antitumor effects when combined with irinotecan. Our results indicate that lurbinectedin is a promising agent for treating ovarian CCC, both as a first-line treatment and as a salvage treatment for recurrent lesions that develop after platinum-based or paclitaxel treatment. PMID:26986199

  15. Tanshinones: Sources, Pharmacokinetics and Anti-Cancer Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Jiang, Peixin; Ye, Min; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Jiang, Cheng; Lü, Junxuan

    2012-01-01

    Tanshinones are a class of abietane diterpene compound isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza (Danshen or Tanshen in Chinese), a well-known herb in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Since they were first identified in the 1930s, more than 40 lipophilic tanshinones and structurally related compounds have been isolated from Danshen. In recent decades, numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the isolation, identification, synthesis and pharmacology of tanshinones. In addition to the well-studied cardiovascular activities, tanshinones have been investigated more recently for their anti-cancer activities in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we update the herbal and alternative sources of tanshinones, and the pharmacokinetics of selected tanshinones. We discuss anti-cancer properties and identify critical issues for future research. Whereas previous studies have suggested anti-cancer potential of tanshinones affecting multiple cellular processes and molecular targets in cell culture models, data from in vivo potency assessment experiments in preclinical models vary greatly due to lack of uniformity of solvent vehicles and routes of administration. Chemical modifications and novel formulations had been made to address the poor oral bioavailability of tanshinones. So far, human clinical trials have been far from ideal in their design and execution for the purpose of supporting an anti-cancer indication of tanshinones. PMID:23202971

  16. Tuning the metabolism of the anticancer drug cisplatin with chemoprotective agents to improve its safety and efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Sooriyaarachchi, Melani; George, Graham N.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Narendran, Aru

    2016-01-01

    Numerous in vivo studies have shown that the severe toxic side-effects of intravenously administered cisplatin can be significantly reduced by the co-administration of sulfur-containing ‘chemoprotective agents’. Using a metallomics approach, a likely biochemical basis for these potentially useful observations was only recently uncovered and appears to involve the reaction of chemoprotective agents with cisplatin-derived Pt-species in human plasma to form novel platinum–sulfur complexes (PSC's). We here reveal aspects of the structure of two PSC's and establish the identification of an optimal chemoprotective agent to ameliorate the toxic side-effects of cisplatin, while leaving its antineoplastic activity largely intact, as a feasible research strategy to transform cisplatin into a safer and more effective anticancer drug. PMID:27722429

  17. 1,3,4-Oxadiazoles: An emerging scaffold to target growth factors, enzymes and kinases as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Shalini; Asati, Vivek; Singh, Jagadish; Roy, Partha Pratim

    2015-06-05

    Five member heterocyclic 1,3,4-oxadiazole nucleus find unique place in medicinal chemistry and plays significant role in producing anticancer activity. The small and simple 1,3,4-oxadiazole nucleus is present in various compounds involved in research aimed at evaluating new products that posses interesting pharmacological properties such as antitumour activity. Mono and 2,5-di-substituted-1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives have attracted considerable attention owing to their effective biological activity and extensive use. The important mechanism involved during its tumour suppression is related with the inhibition of different growth factors, enzymes and kinases including telomerase enzyme, histone deacetylase (HDAC), methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP), thymidylate synthase (TS), glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK), epidermal growth factor (EGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). The focused criteria of this review is to highlights the targeted inhibitory activity of 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives and their structure activity relationship to generate potential anticancer agents.

  18. Inner conflict in patients receiving oral anticancer agents: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Hiroko; Takahashi, Tsunehiro

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the experiences of patients receiving oral anticancer agents. Design A qualitative study using semistructured interviews with a grounded theory approach. Setting A university hospital in Japan. Participants 14 patients with gastric cancer who managed their cancer with oral anticancer agents. Results Patients with cancer experienced inner conflict between rational belief and emotional resistance to taking medication due to confrontation with cancer, doubt regarding efficacy and concerns over potential harm attached to use of the agent. Although they perceived themselves as being adherent to medication, they reported partial non-adherent behaviours. The patients reassessed their lives through the experience of inner conflict and, ultimately, they recognised their role in medication therapy. Conclusions Patients with cancer experienced inner conflict, in which considerable emotional resistance to taking their medication affected their occasional non-adherent behaviours. In patient-centred care, it is imperative that healthcare providers understand patients’ inner conflict and inconsistency between their subjective view and behaviour to support patient adherence. PMID:25872938

  19. An overview of anticancer activity of Garcinia and Hypericum.

    PubMed

    Brito, Lavínia de C; Rangel Berenger, Ana Luiza; Figueiredo, Maria Raquel

    2017-03-28

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide (approximately 8.2 million cases/year) and, over the next two decades, a 70% increase in new cancer cases is expected. Through analysis of the available drugs between the years of 1930 and 2014, it was found that 48% were either natural products or their derivatives. This proportion increased to 66% when semi-synthetic products were included. The family Clusiaceae Juss. (Malpighiales) includes approximately 1000 species distributed throughout all tropical and temperate regions. The phytochemical profile of this family includes many chemicals with interesting pharmacological activities, including anticancer activities. This study includes an overview of the in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity of secondary metabolites from Garcinia and Hypericum and the mechanisms involved in this activity. Hypericum no longer belong to Clusiaceae family, but was considered in the past by taxonomists, due to similarities with this family. Research in the area has shown that several compounds belonging to different chemical classes exhibit activity in several tumor cell lines in different experimental models. This review shows the significant antineoplasic activity of these compounds, in particular of these two genera and validates the importance of natural products in the search for anticancer drugs.

  20. Role of glycosylation in the anticancer activity of antibacterial peptides against breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Yang-Yang; Liu, Hong-Yan; Han, Dong-Ju; Zong, Xi-Cui; Zhang, Shuang-Quan; Chen, Yu-Qing

    2013-11-01

    Antibacterial peptides (ABPs) with cancer-selective toxicity have received much more attention as alternative chemotherapeutic agents in recent years. However, the basis of their anticancer activity remains unclear. The modification of cell surface glycosylation is a characteristic of cancer cells. The present study investigated the effect of glycosylation, in particular sialic acid, on the anticancer activity of ABPs. We showed that aurein 1.2, buforin IIb and BMAP-28m exhibited selective cytotoxicity toward MX-1 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The binding activity, cytotoxicity and apoptotic activity of ABPs were enhanced by the presence of O-, N-glycoproteins, gangliosides and sialic acid on the surface of breast cancer cells. Among N-, O-glycoproteins and ganglioside, O-glycoproteins almost had the strongest effect on the binding and cytotoxicity of the three peptides. Further, up-regulation of hST6Gal1 in CHO-K1 cells enhanced the susceptibility of cells to these peptides. Finally, the growth of MX-1 xenograft tumors in mice was significantly suppressed by buforin IIb treatment, which was associated with induction of apoptosis and inhibition of vascularization. These data demonstrate that the three peptides bind to breast cancer cells via an interaction with surface O-, N-glycoproteins and gangliosides. Sialic acids act as key glycan binding sites for cationic ABP binding to glycoproteins and gangliosides. Therefore, glycosylation in breast cancer cells plays an important role in the anticancer activity of ABPs, which may partly explain their cancer-selective toxicity. Anticancer ABPs with cancer-selective cytotoxicity will be promising candidates for anticancer therapy in the future.

  1. [Quod medicina aliis, aliis est acre venenum**--venoms as a source of anticancer agents].

    PubMed

    Kucińska, Małgorzata; Ruciński, Piotr; Murias, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Natural product derived from plants and animals were used in folk medicine for centuries. The venoms produced by animals for hunting of self-defence are rich in bioactive compounds with broad spectrum of biological activity. The papers presents the most promising compounds isolated from venoms of snakes, scorpions and toads. For these compounds both: mechanism of anticancer activity as well as possibilities of clinical use are presented.

  2. Genetic and epigenetic studies for determining molecular targets of natural product anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujiong; Li, Yong; Liu, Xiaoming; Cho, William C S

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is a disease caused by a series of genetic and epigenetic alterations. Therefore, agents targeting the genetic and/or epigenetic machinery offer potential for the development of anticancer drugs. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that some common natural products [such as epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), curcumin, genistein, sulforaphane (SFN) and resveratrol] have anticancer properties through the mechanisms of altering epigenetic processes [including DNA methylation, histone modification, chromatin remodeling, microRNA (miRNA) regulation] and targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs). These bioactive compounds are able to revert epigenetic alterations in a variety of cancers in vitro and in vivo. They exert anticancer effects by targeting various signaling pathways related to the initiation, progression and metastasis of cancer. It appears that natural products hold great promise for cancer prevention and treatment by altering various epigenetic modifications. This review aims to discuss our current understanding of genetic and epigenetic targets of natural products and the effects of some common natural products on cancer chemoprevention and treatment.

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Anti-cancer Activities of β-elemene: Targeting Hallmarks of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shiyu; Ling, Chunhua; Li, Wei; Jiang, Hongxin; Zhi, Qiaoming; Jiang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Increasing knowledge on the hallmark characteristics of cancer and tumor pharmacology has promoted the introduction of phytochemicals, such as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in cancer therapy, which modulate numerous molecular targets and exert anticancer activities. β-elemene, an active and non-toxic compound isolated from the Chinese medicinal herb Rhizoma Zedoariae, has been explored as a potent anti-cancer agent against multiple cancers in extensive clinical trials and experimental research in vivo and in vitro. β-elemene exerts therapeutic potential via modulation of core hallmark capabilities of cancer by suppressing proliferative signaling, such as MAPK and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, inducing cell death, up-regulating growth suppressors, deactivating invasion and metastasis and interacting replicative immortality and attenuating angiogenesis. Recent studies have significantly improved our understanding of anti-cancer activities and underlying molecular mechanisms of this Chinese medicine. This review presents these novel findings regarding the unique properties of β-elemene as an agent for cancer treatment, with an emphasis on multi-targeting biological and molecular regulation.

  4. Anticancer activity of Arkeshwara Rasa - A herbo-metallic preparation

    PubMed Central

    Nafiujjaman, Md; Nurunnabi, Md; Saha, Samir Kumar; Jahan, Rownak; Lee, Yong-kyu; Rahmatullah, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Though metal based drugs have been prescribed in Ayurveda for centuries to treat various diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and cancer, toxicity of these drugs containing heavy metal is a great drawback for practical application. So, proper scientific validation of herbo-metallic drugs like Arkeshwara Rasa (AR) have become one of the focused research arena of new drugs against cancers. Aim: To investigate the in vitro anticancer effects of AR. Materials and Methods: Anticancer activity of AR was investigated on two human cancer cell lines, which represent two different tissues (pancreas and skin). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay for enzyme activity and trypan blue assay for cell morphology were performed for further confirmation. Results: AR showed potent activity against pancreatic cancer cells (MIA-PaCa-2). LDH activity confirmed that AR was active against pancreatic cancer cells. Finally, it was observed that AR exhibited significant effects on cancer cells due to synergistic effects of different compounds of AR. Conclusion: The study strongly suggests that AR has the potential to be an anticancer drug against pancreatic cancer. PMID:27313425

  5. Indole-fused benzooxazepines: a new structural class of anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashok K; Raj, Vinit; Rai, Amit; Keshari, Amit K; Saha, Sudipta

    2017-01-01

    Aim: A new series of compounds (1a–16a) bearing indole-fused benzooxazepine was synthesized, characterized and evaluated for anticancer activity. Materials & methods: In this study, all the synthesized compounds were screened via in vitro anticancer testing on Hep-G2 cancer cell line. A computational study was carried out on cancer-related targets including IL-2, IL-6, COX-2 Caspase-3 and Caspase-8. Results: Some of the synthesized compounds effectively controlled the growth of cancerous cells. Conclusion: The most active compounds – 6a, 10a, 13a, 14a and 15a – exemplify notable anticancer profile with GI50 <10 μg/ml. Preliminary structure–activity relationship among the tested compounds can produce an assumption that the electronegative groups at phenyl ring attached with indole-fused benzooxazepine are instrumental for the activity. Molecular docking study showed crucial hydrogen bond and π–π stacking interactions, with good ADMET profiling and molecular dynamic simulation. PMID:28344831

  6. ANTI-CANCER ACTIVITY OF NIGELLA SATIVA

    PubMed Central

    Salomi, M.J.; Panikkar, K.R.; Kesavan, M.; Donata, K.; Rajagopalan, K.

    1989-01-01

    An extract of Smilax china, Hemidesmus indicus and Nigella Sativa on the ratio 3:2:1, prepared by boiling in water and concentrated could completely cure cases of oral canger diagnosed by modern methods. Cytotoxic studies with the three components showed activity in Nigella sativa at a concentration of 25 microgram equivalent of the dry powder against Dalton's lymphoma ascites cells. Animal experiments indicated the retarded growth of ascites as compared to the controls with a longivity of 90%. PMID:22557660

  7. [Sensitivity of esophageal cancer to anticancer agents and supplementary chemotherapy combined with surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Masaki, Y; Ishigami, K; Oka, M; Matsumoto, N; Honma, K; Uchiyama, T

    1986-04-01

    The authors examined the sensitivities of esophageal cancer to Bleomycin (BLM), Peplomycin (PEP), Cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-FU by the INAS method using 3H-thymidine or 14C-formate as labeled precursors, and determined the concentrations of anticancer agents in cancer lesions by the Band Culture method. On the other hand, the authors investigated the superiority or inferiority of various methods of BLM administration by observing the prevention effect of BLM on the development of experimental esophageal cancer in rats. Forty-three cases out of 76, 57%, showed a sensitivity to BLM, 60% to PEP, 38% to CDDP and 56% to 5-FU. As to the types of roentgenological findings, the superficial and tumorous types showed a high sensitivity rate. As to the types of macroscopical findings, the protruded and superficial types showed a high sensitivity rate. As to the types of histological findings, well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma showed a high sensitivity rate. Sensitivity was higher in metastatic lymph nodes than in main cancer lesions. Tumor tissues which had undergone previous hyperthermic management (at 42 degrees C) showed a higher sensitivity than those which had not. PEP at a half dose brought about the same grade of anticancer effect as BLM. The sensitivities of esophageal cancer to various anticancer agents showed individual differences among clinical cases. Therefore, combination chemotherapy for esophageal cancer was thought to be an effective administration method. The divided administration of small doses of BLM was thought to be more superior than the one-shot administration of a large dose for esophageal cancer. The results of the INAS sensitivity test were perfectly coincident with the effects of chemotherapy in clinical cases of esophageal cancer.

  8. The prince and the pauper. A tale of anticancer targeted agents

    PubMed Central

    Dueñas-González, Alfonso; García-López, Patricia; Herrera, Luis Alonso; Medina-Franco, Jose Luis; González-Fierro, Aurora; Candelaria, Myrna

    2008-01-01

    Cancer rates are set to increase at an alarming rate, from 10 million new cases globally in 2000 to 15 million in 2020. Regarding the pharmacological treatment of cancer, we currently are in the interphase of two treatment eras. The so-called pregenomic therapy which names the traditional cancer drugs, mainly cytotoxic drug types, and post-genomic era-type drugs referring to rationally-based designed. Although there are successful examples of this newer drug discovery approach, most target-specific agents only provide small gains in symptom control and/or survival, whereas others have consistently failed in the clinical testing. There is however, a characteristic shared by these agents: -their high cost-. This is expected as drug discovery and development is generally carried out within the commercial rather than the academic realm. Given the extraordinarily high therapeutic drug discovery-associated costs and risks, it is highly unlikely that any single public-sector research group will see a novel chemical "probe" become a "drug". An alternative drug development strategy is the exploitation of established drugs that have already been approved for treatment of non-cancerous diseases and whose cancer target has already been discovered. This strategy is also denominated drug repositioning, drug repurposing, or indication switch. Although traditionally development of these drugs was unlikely to be pursued by Big Pharma due to their limited commercial value, biopharmaceutical companies attempting to increase productivity at present are pursuing drug repositioning. More and more companies are scanning the existing pharmacopoeia for repositioning candidates, and the number of repositioning success stories is increasing. Here we provide noteworthy examples of known drugs whose potential anticancer activities have been highlighted, to encourage further research on these known drugs as a means to foster their translation into clinical trials utilizing the more limited

  9. The Conyza triloba Extracts with High Chlorophyll Content and Free Radical Scavenging Activity Had Anticancer Activity in Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Wael M.; Hussin, Warda A.; Mahmoud, Ahmed A.; AlFredan, Mohamed A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of anticancer agents paradigm has been shifted to natural resources to overcome the toxicity of many synthetic agents at early clinical stages. In the present study, the antimutagenic, anticancer, phytochemistry, and free radical scavenging activities of five extracts of Conyza triloba were investigated. Extracts II (water : methanol), III (methylene chloride), and IV (methylene chloride : methanol) had the highest chlorophyll content and the highest superoxide scavenging, and metal chelating activities comparable to that of trolox. They also showed DPPH• scavenging activities better than that of α-tocopherol. Virtually all extracts exerted a strong (>40% reduction) antimutagenic activity against sodium azide and benzopyrene. Extracts II, III, and IV showed a remarkable growth inhibition profile with GI50 of 0.07–0.87 μg for Hepa1c1c7 and H4IIE1, A549, HT29, and PC3 cell lines and totally abated the growth of all cell lines, except for the breast cells, at 0.3–7.0 μg. The present study found a strong correlation between the chlorophyll content of Conyza extracts and their DDPH scavenging, metal chelating, and in vitro cytotoxic and cytostatic activities most probably through triggering apoptosis. This study could offer a platform for future studies and help selecting the vital features that identify the extract with potential anticancer activities. PMID:23781512

  10. Highly Adaptable Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells as a Functional Model for Testing Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Balraj; Shamsnia, Anna; Raythatha, Milan R.; Milligan, Ryan D.; Cady, Amanda M.; Madan, Simran; Lucci, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    A major obstacle in developing effective therapies against solid tumors stems from an inability to adequately model the rare subpopulation of panresistant cancer cells that may often drive the disease. We describe a strategy for optimally modeling highly abnormal and highly adaptable human triple-negative breast cancer cells, and evaluating therapies for their ability to eradicate such cells. To overcome the shortcomings often associated with cell culture models, we incorporated several features in our model including a selection of highly adaptable cancer cells based on their ability to survive a metabolic challenge. We have previously shown that metabolically adaptable cancer cells efficiently metastasize to multiple organs in nude mice. Here we show that the cancer cells modeled in our system feature an embryo-like gene expression and amplification of the fat mass and obesity associated gene FTO. We also provide evidence of upregulation of ZEB1 and downregulation of GRHL2 indicating increased epithelial to mesenchymal transition in metabolically adaptable cancer cells. Our results obtained with a variety of anticancer agents support the validity of the model of realistic panresistance and suggest that it could be used for developing anticancer agents that would overcome panresistance. PMID:25279830

  11. The cancer preventative agent resveratrol is converted to the anticancer agent piceatannol by the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP1B1

    PubMed Central

    Potter, G A; Patterson, L H; Wanogho, E; Perry, P J; Butler, P C; Ijaz, T; Ruparelia, K C; Lamb, J H; Farmer, P B; Stanley, L A; Burke, M D

    2002-01-01

    Resveratrol is a cancer preventative agent that is found in red wine. Piceatannol is a closely related stilbene that has antileukaemic activity and is also a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Piceatannol differs from resveratrol by having an additional aromatic hydroxy group. The enzyme CYP1B1 is overexpressed in a wide variety of human tumours and catalyses aromatic hydroxylation reactions. We report here that the cancer preventative agent resveratrol undergoes metabolism by the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP1B1 to give a metabolite which has been identified as the known antileukaemic agent piceatannol. The metabolite was identified by high performance liquid chromatography analysis using fluorescence detection and the identity of the metabolite was further confirmed by derivatisation followed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry studies using authentic piceatannol for comparison. This observation provides a novel explanation for the cancer preventative properties of resveratrol. It demonstrates that a natural dietary cancer preventative agent can be converted to a compound with known anticancer activity by an enzyme that is found in human tumours. Importantly this result gives insight into the functional role of CYP1B1 and provides evidence for the concept that CYP1B1 in tumours may be functioning as a growth suppressor enzyme. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 774–778. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600197 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11875742

  12. Anticancer activity of osmium metalla-rectangles.

    PubMed

    Barry, Nicolas P E; Edafe, Fabio; Dyson, Paul J; Therrien, Bruno

    2010-03-21

    A series of cationic metalla-rectangles of the general formula [(p-cymene)(4)Os(4)(OO[intersection]OO)(2)(N[intersection]N)(2)](4+) have been obtained in methanol from the dinuclear arene osmium precursors [(p-cymene)(2)Os(2)(OO[intersection]OO)(2)Cl(2)] (OO[intersection]OO = 2,5-dioxydo-1,4-benzoquinonato (dhbq), 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinonato (dcbq)) by reaction with bipyridine linkers (N[intersection]N = 4,4'-bipyridine, 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene) in the presence of AgCF(3)SO(3). All complexes were isolated as triflate salts and characterised by NMR, IR and UV-visible spectroscopy. The cytotoxicities of the dinuclear and tetranuclear osmium complexes were established using ovarian A2780 cancer cell lines. The most active metalla-rectangle, [(p-cymene)(4)Os(4)(dhbq)(2)(4,4'-bipyridine)(2)](4+), shows an IC(50) value of 5.7 microM (comparable to cisplatin) against A2780 cancer cells and 7.5 microM against the cisplatin resistant A2780cisR cells.

  13. Anticancer activity of flavane gallates isolated from Plicosepalus curviflorus

    PubMed Central

    Fawzy, Ghada Ahmed; Al-Taweel, Areej Mohammad; Perveen, Shagufta

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous investigation of the methanol extract of Plicosepalus curviflorus leaves led to the isolation of two new flavane gallates (1, 2), together with other compounds including quercetin (3). The stems of P. curviflorus are used traditionally for the treatment of cancer in Yemen. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the anticancer activity of the plant methanol extract as well as isolated compounds (1-3). Materials and Methods: The human cancer cell lines used were; MCF-7, HepG-2, HCT-116, Hep-2, HeLa and normal, Vero cell line using the Crystal Violet Staining method (CVS). Results: Quercetin (3) possessed the highest anticancer effect against all five cell lines (IC50 ranging from 3.6 to 16.2 μg/ml). It was followed by 2S, 3R-3, 3′, 4′, 5, 7-pentahydroxyflavane-5-O-gallate (1), with IC50 ranging from 11.6 to 38.8 μg/ml. The weakest anticancer activity was given by 2S, 3R-3,3′,4′,5,5′,7-hexahydroxyflavane-3′,5-di-O-gallate (2) with IC50 ranging from 39.8 to above 50 μg/ml, compared to vinblastine sulphate as reference drug. Colon, liver and breast cell lines seemed to be more sensitive to the tested compounds than the cervical and laryngeal cell lines. Concerning the cytotoxic effect on Vero cell line, the pentahydroxyflavane-5-O-gallate (1) showed the highest IC50 ( 138.2 μg/ml), while quercetin exhibited the lowest IC50 to Vero cells (30.5 μg/ml), compared to vinblastine sulphate as reference drug (IC50: 39.7 μg/ml). Conclusion: The results suggest the possible use of compounds 1 and 3 as anticancer drugs especially against colon and liver cancers. PMID:25298669

  14. Neem Limonoids as Anticancer Agents: Modulation of Cancer Hallmarks and Oncogenic Signaling.

    PubMed

    Nagini, Siddavaram

    2014-01-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) is one of the most versatile medicinal plants, widely distributed in the Indian subcontinent. Neem is a rich source of limonoids that are endowed with potent medicinal properties predominantly antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities. Azadirachtin, gedunin, and nimbolide are more extensively investigated relative to other neem limonoids. Accumulating evidence indicates that the anticancer effects of neem limonoids are mediated through the inhibition of hallmark capabilities of cancer such as cell proliferation, apoptosis evasion, inflammation, invasion, and angiogenesis. The neem limonoids have been demonstrated to target oncogenic signaling kinases and transcription factors chiefly, NF-κB, Wnt/β-catenin, PI3K/Akt, MAPK, and JAK/STAT signaling pathways. Neem limonoids that target multiple pathways that are aberrant in cancer are ideal candidates for cancer chemoprevention and therapy.

  15. Characterization of human adenovirus serotypes 5, 6, 11, and 35 as anticancer agents

    SciTech Connect

    Shashkova, Elena V.; May, Shannon M.; Barry, Michael A.

    2009-11-25

    Human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) has been the most popular platform for the development of oncolytic Ads. Alternative Ad serotypes with low seroprevalence might allow for improved anticancer efficacy in Ad5-immune patients. We studied the safety and efficacy of rare serotypes Ad6, Ad11 and Ad35. In vitro cytotoxicity of the Ads correlated with expression of CAR and CD46 in most but not all cell lines. Among CAR-binding viruses, Ad5 was often more active than Ad6, among CD46-binding viruses Ad35 was generally more cytotoxic than Ad11 in cell culture studies. Ad5, Ad6, and Ad11 demonstrated similar anticancer activity in vivo, whereas Ad35 was not efficacious. Hepatotoxicity developed only in Ad5-injected mice. Predosing with Ad11 and Ad35 did not increase infection of hepatocytes with Ad5-based vector demonstrating different interaction of these Ads with Kupffer cells. Data obtained in this study suggest developing Ad6 and Ad11 as alternative Ads for anticancer treatment.

  16. Physicochemical investigations of biogenic chitosan-silver nanocomposite as antimicrobial and anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, Nithya; Kumari, Henry Linda Jeeva; Singaravelu, Chandra Mohan; Kandasamy, Ruckmani; Kandasamy, Jothivenkatachalam

    2016-11-01

    Chitosan (CS), a seaweed polysaccharide is a natural macromolecule which is widely being used in medical applications because of its distinctive antimicrobial and anticancer properties. Silver, a noble metal, is also receiving wide attention for its potential usage in antimicrobial and anticancer therapeutics. In this study, an effective way of reduction of silver using chitosan at varying reaction temperatures and an optimised concentration of silver were performed. The optical, structural, spectral, morphological and elemental studies of the biosynthesized chitosan-silver (CS-Ag) nanocomposites were characterized by several techniques. The synthesized CS-Ag nanocomposites exhibit particle size around 20nm and were further exploited for potent biological applications in nanomedicine due to their nanometric sizes and biocompatibility of chitosan. The antimicrobial activity of the biosynthesized CS-Ag nanocomposites exhibits zone of inhibition ranged between 09.666±0.577 and 19.000±1.000 (mm). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were from 8 to 128μgmL(-1) and 16 to 256μgmL(-1) respectively, with the highest antimicrobial activity shown against Gram-negative Salmonella sp. The synergistic effect of chitosan and silver as a composite in nanometric size revealed significant IC50 value of 29.35μgmL(-1) and a maximum of 95.56% inhibition at 100μgmL(-1) against A549 lung cancer cell line, resulting in potent anticancer effect.

  17. In vitro anticancer activity of extracts of Mentha Spp. against human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Hussain, Shabir; Gupta, Moni; Saxena, Ajit Kumar

    2014-10-01

    In vitro anticancer potential of methanolic and aqueous extracts of whole plants of Mentha arvensis, M. longifolia, M. spicata and M. viridis at concentration of 100 μg/ml was evaluated against eight human cancer cell lines--A-549, COLO-205, HCT-116, MCF-7, NCI-H322, PC-3, THP-1 and U-87MG from six different origins (breast, colon, glioblastoma, lung, leukemia and prostate) using sulphorhodamine blue (SRB) assay. Methanolic extracts of above-mentioned Mentha Spp. displayed anti-proliferative effect in the range of 70-97% against four human cancer cell lines, namely COLO-205, MCF-7, NCI-H322 and THP-1; however, aqueous extracts were found to be active against HCT-116 and PC-3. The results indicate that Mentha Spp. contain certain constituents with cytotoxic properties which may find use in developing anticancer agents.

  18. Synthesis of Succinimide-Containing Chromones, Naphthoquinones, and Xanthones under Rh(III) Catalysis: Evaluation of Anticancer Activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, Saegun; De, Umasankar; Mishra, Neeraj Kumar; Park, Jihye; Sharma, Satyasheel; Kwak, Jong Hwan; Han, Sangil; Kim, Hyung Sik; Kim, In Su

    2016-12-16

    The weakly coordinating ketone group directed C-H functionalizations of chromones, 1,4-naphthoquinones, and xanthones with various maleimides under rhodium(III) catalysis are described. These protocols efficiently provide a range of succinimide-containing chromones, naphthoquinones, and xanthones with excellent site selectivity and functional group compatibility. All synthetic compounds were screened for in vitro anticancer activity against human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines (MCF-7). In particular, compounds 7aa and 7ca with a naphthoquinone scaffold were found to be highly cytotoxic, with an activity competitive with anticancer agent doxorubicin.

  19. Insights into the importance for designing curcumin-inspired anticancer agents by a prooxidant strategy: The case of diarylpentanoids.

    PubMed

    Dai, Fang; Liu, Guo-Yun; Li, Yan; Yan, Wen-Jing; Wang, Qi; Yang, Jie; Lu, Dong-Liang; Ding, De-Jun; Lin, Dong; Zhou, Bo

    2015-08-01

    Developing anticancer agents by a prooxidant strategy has attracted increasing attention in recent years, although it is not conventional in medicinal chemistry and is completely opposite to antioxidant therapy. In this work, a panel of diarylpentanoids as the curcumin mono-carbonyl analogs were designed and synthesized, and their cytotoxic and proapoptotic mechanisms against human lung cancer A549 cells were investigated at the frontiers of chemistry and biology. It was found that compared with curcumin, the compounds (A1, B1, and C1) bearing two ortho substituents on the aromatic rings, especially A1, exhibit significantly increased cytotoxic and proapoptotic activities through a Michael acceptor unit-dependent prooxidant-mediated mechanism. The prooxidative ability is governed not only by their electrophilicity but also by their geometry, cellular uptake and metabolic stability, and TrxR-inhibitory activity. Mechanistic investigation reveals that the compound A1 could effectively and irreversibly modify the TrxR by virtue of the above optimal biochemical parameters, and convert this antioxidant enzyme into a reactive oxygen species (ROS) promoter, resulting in a burst of the intracellular ROS including H2O2 and O2(-)•. The ROS generation is associated with falling apart in the redox buffering system, and subsequently induces increases in Ca(2+) influx and oxidative stress, collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, ultimately leading to cell apoptosis. This work highlights the feasibility in designing curcumin-inspired anticancer agents by a prooxidant strategy, and gives us useful information on how to design them.

  20. Curcumin-albumin conjugates as an effective anti-cancer agent with immunomodulatory properties.

    PubMed

    Aravind, S R; Krishnan, Lissy K

    2016-05-01

    the drug form has the potential to be used as an anticancer agent in affected human subjects.

  1. The Anticancer Agent Chaetocin Is a Competitive Substrate and Inhibitor of Thioredoxin Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Tibodeau, Jennifer D.; Benson, Linda M.; Isham, Crescent R.; Owen, Whyte G.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We recently reported that the antineoplastic thiodioxopiperazine natural product chaetocin potently induces cellular oxidative stress, thus selectively killing cancer cells. In pursuit of underlying molecular mechanisms, we now report that chaetocin is a competitive and selective substrate for the oxidative stress mitigation enzyme thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) with lower Km than the TrxR1 native substrate thioredoxin (Trx; chaetocin Km = 4.6 ± 0.6 μM, Trx Km = 104.7 ± 26 μM), thereby attenuating reduction of the critical downstream ROS remediation substrate Trx at achieved intracellular concentrations. Consistent with a role for TrxR1 targeting in the anticancer effects of chaetocin, overexpression of the TrxR1 downstream effector Trx in HeLa cells conferred resistance to chaetocin-induced, but not to doxorubicin-induced, cytotoxicity. As the TrxR/Trx pathway is of central importance in limiting cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS)—and as chaetocin exerts its selective anticancer effects via ROS imposition—the inhibition of TrxR1 by chaetocin has potential to explain its selective anticancer effects. These observations have important implications not just with regard to the mechanism of action and clinical development of chaetocin and related thiodioxopiperazines, but also with regard to the utility of molecular targets within the thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin pathway in the development of novel candidate antineoplastic agents. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 1097–1106. PMID:18999987

  2. Seeking new anti-cancer agents from autophagy-regulating natural products.

    PubMed

    Hua, Fang; Shang, Shuang; Hu, Zhuo-Wei

    2017-04-01

    Natural products are an important original source of many widely used drugs, including anti-cancer drugs. Early research efforts for seeking anti-cancer therapy from the natural products are mainly focused on the compounds with cytotoxicity capability. The good examples include vinblastine, vincristine, the camptothecin derivatives; topotecan, irinotecan, epipodophyllotoxin derivatives and paclitaxel. In a recent decade, the fundamental progression has been made in the understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms regarding tumor initiation, metastasis, therapeutic resistance, immune escape, and relapse, which provide a great opportunity for the development of new mechanism-based anticancer drugs, especially drugs against new molecular and cellular targets. Autophagy, a critical cell homeostasis mechanism and promising drug target involved in a verity of human diseases including cancer, can be modulated by many compounds derived from natural products. In this review, we'll give a short introduction of autophagy and discuss the roles of autophagy in the tumorigenesis and progression. And then, we summarize the accumulated evidences to show the anti-tumor effects of several compounds derived from natural products through modulation of autophagy activity.

  3. Discovery of Pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine TTK Inhibitors: CFI-402257 is a Potent, Selective, Bioavailable Anticancer Agent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Laufer, Radoslaw; Patel, Narendra Kumar; Ng, Grace; Sampson, Peter B; Li, Sze-Wan; Lang, Yunhui; Feher, Miklos; Brokx, Richard; Beletskaya, Irina; Hodgson, Richard; Plotnikova, Olga; Awrey, Donald E; Qiu, Wei; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y; Mason, Jacqueline M; Wei, Xin; Lin, Dan Chi-Chia; Che, Yi; Kiarash, Reza; Fletcher, Graham C; Mak, Tak W; Bray, Mark R; Pauls, Henry W

    2016-07-14

    This work describes a scaffold hopping exercise that begins with known imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazines, briefly explores pyrazolo[1,5-a][1,3,5]triazines, and ultimately yields pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines as a novel class of potent TTK inhibitors. An X-ray structure of a representative compound is consistent with 1(1)/2 type inhibition and provides structural insight to aid subsequent optimization of in vitro activity and physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. Incorporation of polar moieties in the hydrophobic and solvent accessible regions modulates physicochemical properties while maintaining potency. Compounds with enhanced oral exposure were identified for xenograft studies. The work culminates in the identification of a potent (TTK K i = 0.1 nM), highly selective, orally bioavailable anticancer agent (CFI-402257) for IND enabling studies.

  4. Engineering of bacteria for the visualization of targeted delivery of a cytolytic anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Sheng-Nan; Park, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Hee Jung; Zheng, Jin Hai; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Bom, Hee-Seung; Hong, Yeongjin; Szardenings, Michael; Shin, Myung Geun; Kim, Sun-Chang; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2013-11-01

    A number of recent reports have demonstrated that attenuated Salmonella typhimurium are capable of targeting both primary and metastatic tumors. The use of bacteria as a vehicle for the delivery of anticancer drugs requires a mechanism that precisely regulates and visualizes gene expression to ensure the appropriate timing and location of drug production. To integrate these functions into bacteria, we used a repressor-regulated tetracycline efflux system, in which the expression of a therapeutic gene and an imaging reporter gene were controlled by divergent promoters (tetAP and tetRP) in response to extracellular tetracycline. Attenuated S. typhimurium was transformed with the expression plasmids encoding cytolysin A, a therapeutic gene, and renilla luciferase variant 8, an imaging reporter gene, and administered intravenously to tumor-bearing mice. The engineered Salmonella successfully localized to tumor tissue and gene expression was dependent on the concentration of inducer, indicating the feasibility of peripheral control of bacterial gene expression. The bioluminescence signal permitted the localization of gene expression from the bacteria. The engineered bacteria significantly suppressed both primary and metastatic tumors and prolonged survival in mice. Therefore, engineered bacteria that carry a therapeutic and an imaging reporter gene for targeted anticancer therapy can be designed as a theranostic agent.

  5. Natural Product-Derived Spirooxindole Fragments Serve as Privileged Substructures for Discovery of New Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bin; Zheng, Yi-Chao; Shi, Xiao-Jing; Qi, Ping-Ping; Liu, Hong-Min

    2016-01-01

    The utility of natural products for identifying anticancer agents has been highly pursued in the last decades and over 100 drug molecules in clinic are natural products or natural product-derived compounds. Natural products are believed to be able to cover unexplored chemical space that is normally not occupied by commercially available molecule libraries. However, the low abundance and synthetic intractability of natural products have limited their applications in drug discovery. Recently, the identification of biologically relevant fragments derived from biologically validated natural products has been recognized as a powerful strategy in searching new biological probes and drugs. The spirocyclic oxindoles, as privileged structural scaffolds, have shown their potential in designing new drugs. Several anticancer drug candidates such as SAR405838, RO8994, CFI-400945 and their bioisosteres are undergoing clinical trials or preclinical studies. To highlight the significant progress, we focus on illustrating the discovery of SAR405838, RO8994, CFI-400945 and their bioisosteres for cancer therapy using substructure-based strategies and discussing modes of action, binding models and preclinical data.

  6. Withaferin-A--A Natural Anticancer Agent with Pleitropic Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Chul; Choi, Bu Young

    2016-03-04

    Cancer, being the second leading cause of mortality, exists as a formidable health challenge. In spite of our enormous efforts, the emerging complexities in the molecular nature of disease progression limit the real success in finding an effective cancer cure. It is now conceivable that cancer is, in fact, a progressive illness, and the morbidity and mortality from cancer can be reduced by interfering with various oncogenic signaling pathways. A wide variety of structurally diverse classes of bioactive phytochemicals have been shown to exert anticancer effects in a large number of preclinical studies. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that withaferin-A can prevent the development of cancers of various histotypes. Accumulating data from different rodent models and cell culture experiments have revealed that withaferin-A suppresses experimentally induced carcinogenesis, largely by virtue of its potent anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing properties. Moreover, withaferin-A sensitizes resistant cancer cells to existing chemotherapeutic agents. The purpose of this review is to highlight the mechanistic aspects underlying anticancer effects of withaferin-A.

  7. Organogold(III) compounds as experimental anticancer agents: chemical and biological profiles.

    PubMed

    Massai, Lara; Cirri, Damiano; Michelucci, Elena; Bartoli, Gianluca; Guerri, Annalisa; Cinellu, Maria A; Cocco, Fabio; Gabbiani, Chiara; Messori, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    In the last few years gold(III) complexes have attracted growing attention in the medicinal chemistry community as candidate anticancer agents. In particular some organogold(III) compounds manifested quite attractive pharmacological behaviors in preclinical studies. Here we compare the chemical and biological properties of the novel organogold(III) complex [Au(bipy(dmb)-H)(NH(CO)CH3)][PF6] (Aubipy(aa)) with those of its parent compounds [Au(bipy(dmb)-H)(OH)][PF6] (Aubipy(c)) and [Au2(bipy(dmb)-H)2)(μ-O)][PF6]2 (Au2bipy(c)), previously synthesized and characterized. The three study compounds were comparatively assessed for their antiproliferative actions against HCT-116 cancer cells, revealing moderate cytotoxic effects. Proapoptotic and cell cycle effects were also monitored. Afterward, to gain additional mechanistic insight, the three gold compounds were challenged against the model proteins HEWL, RNase A and cytochrome c and reactions investigated through UV-Vis and ESI-MS analysis. A peculiar and roughly invariant protein metalation profile emerges in the three cases consisting of protein binding of {Au(bipy(dmb)-H)} moieties. The implications of these results are discussed in the frame of current knowledge on anticancer gold compounds.

  8. A potential photocatalytic, antimicrobial and anticancer activity of chitosan-copper nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, Nithya; Singaravelu, Chandra Mohan; Kulanthaivel, Jeganathan; Kandasamy, Jothivenkatachalam

    2017-03-04

    In this study, chitosan-copper (CS-Cu) nanocomposite was synthesized without the aid of any external chemical reducing agents. The optical, structural, spectral, thermal and morphological analyses were carried out by several techniques. The prepared nanocomposite acts as a photocatalyst for the removal of Rhodamine B (RhB) and Conge red (CR) dyes under visible light irradiation. The pseudo first order kinetics was derived according to Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) model. The nanocomposite also proved to be an excellent antimicrobial agent against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; and also show activity against fungus. The advanced material was used for the major research areas which include photocatalytic materials for waste water treatment; biological applications in the development of drug resistant antimicrobials and anticancer agents.

  9. HB-EGF inhibition in combination with various anticancer agents enhances its antitumor effects in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sanui, Ayako; Yotsumoto, Fusanori; Tsujioka, Hiroshi; Fukami, Tatsuya; Horiuchi, Shinji; Shirota, Kyoko; Yoshizato, Toshiyuki; Kawarabayashi, Tatsuhiko; Kuroki, Masahide; Miyamoto, Shingo

    2010-08-01

    Advanced gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most lethal malignancies. Although many anticancer agents exist for the treatment of GC, its prognosis remains extremely poor. Therefore, further development of targeted therapies is required for patients with GC. To assess the role of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) as a target for GC therapy, the expression of EGF receptor ligands in GC cell lines, and the antitumor effects of an HB-EGF inhibitor (CRM197) as a single agent and in combination with other anticancer agents was assessed in GC cells. HB-EGF was the predominantly expressed ligand among EGF receptor ligands in all the cells. CRM197 induced significant cell apoptosis. Anticancer agents augmented the secretion of HB-EGF into the medium and simultaneously induced cell apoptosis. Combination of CRM197 with other anticancer agents significantly enhanced cell apoptosis. Additionally, co-administration of CRM197 and paclitaxel resulted in synergistic antitumor effects. These results suggested that HB-EGF is a rational target for GC therapy.

  10. Dapson in heterocyclic chemistry, part VIII: synthesis, molecular docking and anticancer activity of some novel sulfonylbiscompounds carrying biologically active 1,3-dihydropyridine, chromene and chromenopyridine moieties

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Several new sulfonebiscompounds having a biologically active 1,2-dihydropyridine-2-one 3–19, acrylamide 20, chromene 21, 22 and chromenopyridine 23, 24 moieties were synthesized and evaluated as potential anticancer agents. The structures of the products were confirmed via elemental analyses and spectral data. The screening tests showed that many of the biscompounds obtained exhibited good anticancer activity against human breast cell line (MCF7) comparable to doxorubicin which was used as reference drug. Compounds 11, 17 and 24 showed IC50 values 35.40 μM, 29.86 μM and 30.99 μM, respectively. In order to elucidate the mechanism of action of the synthesized compounds as anticancer agents, docking on the active site of farnesyltransferase and arginine methyltransferase was also performed and good results were obtained. PMID:22748424

  11. Dapson in heterocyclic chemistry, part VIII: synthesis, molecular docking and anticancer activity of some novel sulfonylbiscompounds carrying biologically active 1,3-dihydropyridine, chromene and chromenopyridine moieties.

    PubMed

    Al-Said, Mansour S; Ghorab, Mostafa M; Nissan, Yassin M

    2012-07-02

    Several new sulfonebiscompounds having a biologically active 1,2-dihydropyridine-2-one 3-19, acrylamide 20, chromene 21, 22 and chromenopyridine 23, 24 moieties were synthesized and evaluated as potential anticancer agents. The structures of the products were confirmed via elemental analyses and spectral data. The screening tests showed that many of the biscompounds obtained exhibited good anticancer activity against human breast cell line (MCF7) comparable to doxorubicin which was used as reference drug. Compounds 11, 17 and 24 showed IC50 values 35.40 μM, 29.86 μM and 30.99 μM, respectively. In order to elucidate the mechanism of action of the synthesized compounds as anticancer agents, docking on the active site of farnesyltransferase and arginine methyltransferase was also performed and good results were obtained.

  12. Potential anticancer activity of carvone in N2a neuroblastoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Elanur; Türkez, Hasan; Keleş, Mevlüt Sait

    2015-08-01

    Carvone (CVN) is a monocyclic monoterpene found in the essential oils of Mentha spicata var. crispa (Lamiaceae) and Carum carvi L. (Apiaceae) plants and has been reported to have antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticonvulsant, and antitumor activities. The beneficial health properties of CVN have encouraged us to look into its anticancer activity. To the best of our knowledge, reports are not available on the anticancer activity of CVN in cultured primary rat neuron and N2a neuroblastoma (NB) cells. Therefore, the present study is an attempt toward exploring the potential anticancer activity of CVN, if any, in cultured primary rat neuron and N2a NB cells. Our results indicated that CVN (only at 25 mg/L) treatment led to an increase in the total antioxidant capacity levels in cultured primary rat neuron cells compared with control cells. Also, CVN (at concentrations higher than 100 mg/L) treatment led to an increase in the total oxidative stress levels in both cell types. The mean values of the total scores of cells showing DNA damage (for comet assay) were not found to be significantly different from the control values in both cells (p > 0.05). On the other hand, after 24 h treatment with CVN, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that CVN application significantly reduced the cell viability rates in both cell types at concentrations higher than 100 mg/L. Summarizing, our data suggest that CVN represents little potential for promising anticancer agent to improve brain tumors therapy.

  13. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)—Propranolol as an anti-cancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Pantziarka, Pan; Bouche, Gauthier; Sukhatme, Vidula; Meheus, Lydie; Rooman, Ilse; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2016-01-01

    Propranolol (PRO) is a well-known and widely used non-selective beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist (beta-blocker), with a range of actions which are of interest in an oncological context. PRO displays effects on cellular proliferation and invasion, on the immune system, on the angiogenic cascade, and on tumour cell sensitivity to existing treatments. Both pre-clinical and clinical evidence of these effects, in multiple cancer types, is assessed and summarised and relevant mechanisms of action outlined. In particular there is evidence that PRO is effective at multiple points in the metastatic cascade, particularly in the context of the post-surgical wound response. Based on this evidence the case is made for further clinical investigation of the anticancer effects of PRO, particularly in combination with other agents. A number of trials are on-going, in different treatment settings for various cancers. PMID:27899953

  14. Drug-induced interstitial lung diseases associated with molecular-targeted anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Gemma, Akihiko

    2009-02-01

    Little was known about drug-induced interstitial lung disease (ILD) when acute ILD-type events developed in several Japanese patients treated with gefitinib. A better understanding of drug-induced ILD is required, including more reliable data about the incidence of events associated with different treatments and identification of the risk factors for this type of ILD. Recent advances in imaging, molecular examination, and pathology have been used in postmarketing surveillance studies designed and conducted by an independent academic team to define the risk and to increase the amount of evidence about ILD related to various molecularly targeted anticancer agents. These studies may shed light on the underlying mechanisms of drug-induced ILD and appropriate evidence-based strategies that can be used to prevent or manage these events.

  15. Investigation of Degradation Properties of Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) Matrix for Anticancer Agent Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Ghani, S. M.; Mohamed, M. S. W.; Yahya, A. F.; Noorsal, K.

    2010-03-11

    Poly(lactide-co-glycolide)(PLA{sub 50}GA{sub 50}) is a biodegradable and biocompatible polymer. It offers tremendous potential as a basis for drug delivery, either as drug delivery system alone or in conjugate with a medical device. The PLA{sub 50}GA{sub 50} is the material of choice for relatively shorter-duration applications, while the homopolymer PLA (poly-L-lactide) and PGA (polyglycolide) are preferred for longer term delivery of drugs. This paper discusses the degradation properties of poly(lactide-co-glycolide)(PLA{sub 50}GA{sub 50}) at inherent viscosity of 0.89 dL/g as preliminary studies for anticancer agent delivery.

  16. Molecular Basis for the Inhibition of Human NMPRTase, a Novel Target for Anticancer Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Khan,J.; Tao, X.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NMPRTase) has a crucial role in the salvage pathway of NAD{sup +} biosynthesis, and a potent inhibitor of NMPRTase, FK866, can reduce cellular NAD+ levels and induce apoptosis in tumors. We have determined the crystal structures at up to 2.1-Angstroms resolution of human and murine NMPRTase, alone and in complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide or the inhibitor FK866. The structures suggest that Asp219 is a determinant of substrate specificity of NMPRTase, which is confirmed by our mutagenesis studies. FK866 is bound in a tunnel at the interface of the NMPRTase dimer, and mutations in this binding site can abolish the inhibition by FK866. Contrary to current knowledge, the structures show that FK866 should compete directly with the nicotinamide substrate. Our structural and biochemical studies provide a starting point for the development of new anticancer agents.

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of tetracyclic fluoroquinolones as antibacterial and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Al-Trawneh, Salah A; Zahra, Jalal A; Kamal, Marwan R; El-Abadelah, Mustafa M; Zani, Franca; Incerti, Matteo; Cavazzoni, Andrea; Alfieri, Roberta R; Petronini, Pier G; Vicini, Paola

    2010-08-15

    A simple and efficient synthesis of 6-fluoro-4-oxopyrido[2,3-a]carbazole-3-carboxylic acids (13a-e) and a structurally related 6-fluoro-4-oxothieno[2',3':4,5]pyrrolo[3,2-h]quinoline (13f) was achieved via Stille arylation of 7-chloro-6-fluoro-8-nitro-4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxylate and a subsequent microwave-assisted phosphite-mediated Cadogan reaction. The new compounds were tested for their in vitro antimicrobial and antiproliferative activity. The ability of 13a-f to inhibit the activity of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV was also investigated. The thieno isostere (13f) emerged as the most active antibacterial, while the 9-fluoro derivative (13e) was the most potent against multidrug-resistant staphylococci. Compounds 13a, 13c-f displayed growth inhibition against MCF-7 breast tumor and A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells coupled with an absence of cytotoxicity toward normal human-derm fibroblasts (HuDe). Compound 13e was the most active anticancer against MCF-7 cells, with greater potency than ellipticine (IC(50) 0.8 and 1.6muM, respectively). The most active compounds in this series show promise as dual acting anticancer and antibacterial chemotherapeutics.

  18. Importance of influx and efflux systems and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in intratumoral disposition of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Rochat, B

    2009-08-01

    In this review, intratumoral drug disposition will be integrated into the wide range of resistance mechanisms to anticancer agents with particular emphasis on targeted protein kinase inhibitors. Six rules will be established: 1. There is a high variability of extracellular/intracellular drug level ratios; 2. There are three main systems involved in intratumoral drug disposition that are composed of SLC, ABC and XME enzymes; 3. There is a synergistic interplay between these three systems; 4. In cancer subclones, there is a strong genomic instability that leads to a highly variable expression of SLC, ABC or XME enzymes; 5. Tumor-expressed metabolizing enzymes play a role in tumor-specific ADME and cell survival and 6. These three systems are involved in the appearance of resistance (transient event) or in the resistance itself. In addition, this article will investigate whether the overexpression of some ABC and XME systems in cancer cells is just a random consequence of DNA/chromosomal instability, hypo- or hypermethylation and microRNA deregulation, or a more organized modification induced by transposable elements. Experiments will also have to establish if these tumor-expressed enzymes participate in cell metabolism or in tumor-specific ADME or if they are only markers of clonal evolution and genomic deregulation. Eventually, the review will underline that the fate of anticancer agents in cancer cells should be more thoroughly investigated from drug discovery to clinical studies. Indeed, inhibition of tumor expressed metabolizing enzymes could strongly increase drug disposition, specifically in the target cells resulting in more efficient therapies.

  19. DRDE-07 and its analogues as promising cytoprotectants to nitrogen mustard (HN-2)--an alkylating anticancer and chemical warfare agent.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manoj; Vijayaraghavan, R; Gautam, Anshoo

    2009-08-10

    Nitrogen mustard (HN-2), also known as mechlorethamine, is an alkylating anticancer agent as well as blister inducing chemical warfare agent. We evaluated the cytoprotective efficacy of amifostine, DRDE-07 and their analogues, and other antidotes of mustard agents against HN-2. Administration of 1 LD(50) of HN-2 (20mg/kg) percutaneously, decreased WBC count from 24h onwards. Liver glutathione (GSH) level decreased prominently and the maximum depletion was observed on 7th day post-HN-2 administration. Oxidised glutathione (GSSG) level increased significantly at 24h post-administration and subsequently showed a progressive decrease. Hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) level and percent DNA damage increased progressively following HN-2 administration. The spleen weight decreased progressively and reached a minimum on 3-4 days with subsequent increase. The antidotes were administered repeatedly for 4 and 8 days after percutaneous administration of single sublethal dose (0.5 and 0.25 LD(50)) of HN-2. Treatment with DRDE-07, DRDE-30 and DRDE-35 significantly protected the changes in spleen weight, WBC count, GSH, GSSG, MDA and DNA damage following HN-2 administration (0.5 and 0.25 LD(50)). There was no alteration in the transaminases (AST and ALT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities, neither with HN-2 nor with antidotes. The present study shows that HN-2 is highly toxic by percutaneous route and DRDE-07, DRDE-30 and DRDE-35 can partially protect it.

  20. Organofluorine Isoselenocyanate Analogues of Sulforaphane: Synthesis and Anticancer Activity.

    PubMed

    Cierpiał, Tomasz; Łuczak, Jerzy; Kwiatkowska, Małgorzata; Kiełbasiński, Piotr; Mielczarek, Lidia; Wiktorska, Katarzyna; Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław; Milczarek, Małgorzata; Karwowska, Katarzyna

    2016-10-07

    A series of previously unknown sulforaphane analogues with organofluorine substituents bonded to the sulfinyl sulfur atom, an isoselenocyanate moiety in place of the isothiocyanate group, the central sulfur atom in various oxidation states, and different numbers of methylene groups in the central alkyl chain were synthesized and fully characterized. All new compounds were tested for their biological properties in vitro and demonstrated much higher anticancer activity against two breast cancer cell lines than that shown by native sulforaphane; at the same time, the compounds were less toxic for normal cells. The influence of the particular structural changes in the molecules on the cytotoxicity is discussed.

  1. Synthesis and biological evaluation of some novel tetrahydroquinolines as anticancer and antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Faidallah, Hassan M; Saqer, Alaa A; Alamry, Khalid A; Khan, Khalid A; Asiri, Abdullah M

    2014-06-01

    This study reports the synthesis of a series of new 2-amino-3-cyano-8-methyl-4-substituted-5,6,7,8-tetrahydroquinolines along with some derived fused-ring systems. Ten compounds have shown remarkable cytotoxic activity against human colon carcinoma HT29, hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and Caucasian breast adenocarcinoma MCF7 cell lines. Six compounds showed considerable broad-spectrum cytotoxic activity among which two proved to be the most active derivatives. Likewise, seven compounds from the series were found to exhibit significant antimicrobial activity and three of them proved to be the most active candidates. Two alkylthio-pyrimido quinolines are suggested as possible antimicrobial and anticancer candidates in the present series.

  2. [Visualization and analysis of adverse reactions of molecularly targeted anticancer agents using the self-organizing map (SOM)].

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Tomoyuki; Serizawa, Ayaka; Ohtsuki, Kaori; Kawakami, Junko; Sato, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Molecularly targeted anticancer agents cause a variety of adverse reactions compared with conventional anticancer agents because of their unique mechanisms of action. Sources of drug information such as package inserts (PIs) provide primarily document-based and numerical information. Therefore it is not easy to obtain a complete picture of drugs with similar effects, or to understand differences among drugs. In this study we used the self-organizing map (SOM) technique to visualize the adverse reactions indicated on PIs of 23 molecularly targeted anticancer agents as of March 2013. In both the presence/absence version and the frequency version, SOM was divided into domains according to mechanism of action, antibody drug or low-molecular weight drug, and molecular target. The component planes of the 753 adverse reaction items in the frequency version enabled us to grasp all available information and differences among the drugs. In some component planes in the presence/absence version, an adverse reaction that had not been reported for a drug but had already been reported for its proximally positioned drug(s) as of March 2013, was found to be reported thereafter by the Drug Safety Update (DSU) or the Adverse Event Report Search System "CzeekV," which is based on FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). Our results suggest that visualization of the adverse reactions of molecularly targeted anticancer agents by the SOM technique is useful not only to acquire all available information and differences among drugs, but also to predict the appearance of adverse reactions.

  3. Preclinical pharmacology of BA-TPQ, a novel synthetic iminoquinone anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Ezell, Scharri J; Li, Haibo; Xu, Hongxia; Zhang, Xiangrong; Gurpinar, Evrim; Zhang, Xu; Rayburn, Elizabeth R; Sommers, Charnell I; Yang, Xinyi; Velu, Sadanandan E; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2010-07-13

    Marine natural products and their synthetic derivatives represent a major source of novel candidate anti-cancer compounds. We have recently tested the anti-cancer activity of more than forty novel compounds based on an iminoquinone makaluvamine scaffold, and have found that many of the compounds exert potent cytotoxic activity against human cancer cell lines. One of the most potent compounds, BA-TPQ [(11,12),7-(benzylamino)-1,3,4,8-tetrahydropyrrolo[4,3,2-de]quinolin-8(1H)-one], was active against a variety of human cancer cell lines, and inhibited the growth of breast and prostate xenograft tumors in mice. However, there was some toxicity noted in the mice following administration of the compound. In order to further the development of BA-TPQ, and in a search for potential sites of accumulation that might underlie the observed toxicity of the compound, we accomplished preclinical pharmacological studies of the compound. We herein report the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties of BA-TPQ, including its stability in plasma, plasma protein binding, metabolism by S9 enzymes, and plasma and tissue distribution. We believe these studies will be useful for further investigations, and may be useful for other investigators examining the use of similar compounds for cancer therapy.

  4. Methylsulfonyl benzothiazoles (MSBT) derivatives: Search for new potential antimicrobial and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Lad, Nitin P; Manohar, Yogesh; Mascarenhas, Malcolm; Pandit, Yashwant B; Kulkarni, Mahesh R; Sharma, Rajiv; Salkar, Kavita; Suthar, Ashish; Pandit, Shivaji S

    2017-03-01

    A series of novel 4 and 5-substituted methylsulfonyl benzothiazole (MSBT) compounds having amide, alkoxy, sulfonamide, nitro and amine functionality were synthesized from sequential reactions on 5-ethoxy-2-(methylsulfonyl)benzo[d]thiazole such as nitration, reduction, sulfonation, dealkylation, etc. All synthesized compounds were screened against antimicrobial and selected screened for anticancer activity. Antimicrobial activities studies reveled that among all compounds screened, out of MSBT-07, MSBT-11, MSBT-12, MSBT-14, MSBT-19, and MSBT-27 were found to have promising antimicrobial activity at MIC range of 4-50μg/ml against selected bacterial as well as fungal species. Compounds having good antimicrobial activity were screened for cervical cancer (HeLA cell lines). Of these MSBT-07 and MSBT-12 significantly reduced the cell growth. Consequently their calculated GI50 values were found to be 0.1 or <0.1μM.

  5. Design, synthesis and in vitro evaluation of novel dehydroabietic acid derivatives containing a dipeptide moiety as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Chao; Jin, Le; Wang, Meng; Liang, Dong; Chen, Zhen-Feng; Zhang, Ye; Pan, Ying-Ming; Wang, Heng-Shan

    2015-01-07

    A series of novel dehydroabietic acid (DHA) chiral dipeptide derivatives were designed and synthesized as potent antitumor agents. The inhibitory activities of these compounds against NCI-H460 (lung), HeLa (epithelial cervical) and MGC-803 (gastric) human cancer cell lines were estimated by MTT assay in vitro. The antitumor activities screening indicated that many compounds showed moderate to high levels of antitumor activities against these three cancer cell lines and most of these compounds displayed more potent inhibitory activities compared with commercial anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The induction of apoptosis and affects on the cell cycle distribution with compound 8k were investigated by acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, Hoechst 33258 staining, JC-1 mitochondrial membrane potential staining, TUNEL assay, flow cytometry and the activities of caspase-3 and -9 assay in Hela cells, which exhibited that the compound could induce cell apoptosis in Hela cells. In addition, further investigation showed that apoptosis were associated with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, enhancement of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and intracellular ROS production, elevation of Bax expression, down-regulation of Bcl-2, and the activation of caspase-9 and -3.

  6. From body art to anticancer activities: perspectives on medicinal properties of henna.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Rohan; Dandawate, Prasad; Vyas, Alok; Padhye, Subhash; Biersack, Bernhard; Schobert, Rainer; Ahmad, Aamir; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2012-12-01

    Nature has been a rich source of therapeutic agents for thousands of years and an impressive number of modern drugs have been isolated from natural sources based on the uses of these plants in traditional medicine. Henna is one such plant commonly known as Persian Henna or Lawsonia inermis, a bushy, flowering tree, commonly found in Australia, Asia and along the Mediterranean coasts of Africa. Paste made from the leaves of Henna plant has been used since the Bronze Age to dye skin, hairs and fingernails especially at the times of festivals. In recent times henna paste has been used for body art paintings and designs in western countries. Despite such widespread use in dyeing and body art painting, Henna extracts and constituents possess numerous biological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and anticancer activities. The active coloring and biologically active principle of Henna is found to be Lawsone (2- hydroxy-1, 4-naphthoquinone) which can serve as a starting building block for synthesizing large number of therapeutically useful compounds including Atovaquone, Lapachol and Dichloroallyl lawsone which have been shown to possess potent anticancer activities. Some other analogs of Lawsone have been found to exhibit other beneficial biological properties such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antitubercular and antimalarial. The ability of Lawsone to undergo the redox cycling and chelation of trace metal ions has been thought to be partially responsible for some of its biological activities. Despite such diverse biological properties and potent anticancer activities the compound has remained largely unexplored and hence in the present review we have summarized the chemistry and biological activities of Lawsone along with its analogs and metal complexes.

  7. Anticancer activity of BIM-46174, a new inhibitor of the heterotrimeric Galpha/Gbetagamma protein complex.

    PubMed

    Prévost, Grégoire P; Lonchampt, Marie O; Holbeck, Susan; Attoub, Samir; Zaharevitz, Daniel; Alley, Mike; Wright, John; Brezak, Marie C; Coulomb, Hélène; Savola, Ann; Huchet, Marion; Chaumeron, Sophie; Nguyen, Quang-Dé; Forgez, Patricia; Bruyneel, Erik; Bracke, Mark; Ferrandis, Eric; Roubert, Pierre; Demarquay, Danièle; Gespach, Christian; Kasprzyk, Philip G

    2006-09-15

    A large number of hormones and local agonists activating guanine-binding protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) play a major role in cancer progression. Here, we characterize the new imidazo-pyrazine derivative BIM-46174, which acts as a selective inhibitor of heterotrimeric G-protein complex. BIM-46174 prevents the heterotrimeric G-protein signaling linked to several GPCRs mediating (a) cyclic AMP generation (Galphas), (b) calcium release (Galphaq), and (c) cancer cell invasion by Wnt-2 frizzled receptors and high-affinity neurotensin receptors (Galphao/i and Galphaq). BIM-46174 inhibits the growth of a large panel of human cancer cell lines, including anticancer drug-resistant cells. Exposure of cancer cells to BIM-46174 leads to caspase-3-dependent apoptosis and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. National Cancer Institute COMPARE analysis for BIM-46174 supports its novel pharmacologic profile compared with 12,000 anticancer agents. The growth rate of human tumor xenografts in athymic mice is significantly reduced after administration of BIM-46174 combined with either cisplatin, farnesyltransferase inhibitor, or topoisomerase inhibitors. Our data validate the feasibility of targeting heterotrimeric G-protein functions downstream the GPCRs to improve anticancer chemotherapy.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and anticancer activity of kaempferol-zinc(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Tu, Lv-Ying; Pi, Jiang; Jin, Hua; Cai, Ji-Ye; Deng, Sui-Ping

    2016-06-01

    According to the previous studies, the anticancer activity of flavonoids could be enhanced when they are coordinated with transition metal ions. In this work, kaempferol-zinc(II) complex (kaempferol-Zn) was synthesized and its chemical properties were characterized by UV-VIS, FT-IR, (1)H NMR, elemental analysis, electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) and fluorescence spectroscopy, which showed that the synthesized complex was coordinated with a Zn(II) ion via the 3-OH and 4-oxo groups. The anticancer effects of kaempferol-Zn and free kaempferol on human oesophageal cancer cell line (EC9706) were compared. MTT results demonstrated that the killing effect of kaempferol-Zn was two times higher than that of free kaempferol. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed the morphological and ultrastructural changes of cellular membrane induced by kaempferol-Zn at subcellular or nanometer level. Moreover, flow cytometric analysis indicated that kaempferol-Zn could induce apoptosis in EC9706 cells by regulating intracellular calcium ions. Collectively, all the data showed that kaempferol-Zn might be served as a kind of potential anticancer agent.

  9. New triarylpyrazoles as broad-spectrum anticancer agents: design, synthesis, and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    El-Gamal, Mohammed I; Park, Yi Seul; Chi, Dae Yoon; Yoo, Kyung Ho; Oh, Chang-Hyun

    2013-07-01

    A new series of diarylureas and diarylamides possessing 1,3,4-triarylpyrazole scaffold was designed and synthesized. Their in vitro antiproliferative activities against NCI-60 cell line panel were tested. Most of the compounds showed strong and broad-spectrum antiproliferative activities. Compound 18 exerted sub-micromolar IC50 values over all the subpanels of nine different cancer types. Its IC50 value over MDA-MB-435 melanoma cell line was 27 nM. Compounds 10-13, 22, and 23 possessing urea spacer exerted lethal effect over the NCI-60 panel with mean %inhibitions more than 100% in single-dose testing. Compounds 13 and 23 with urea linker and 3',5'-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl terminal ring showed the highest mean %inhibition over the NCI-60 panel in single-dose testing, and showed high potencies and broad-spectrum anticancer activities in five-dose testing.

  10. "Ziziphus jujuba": A red fruit with promising anticancer activities.

    PubMed

    Tahergorabi, Zoya; Abedini, Mohammad Reza; Mitra, Moodi; Fard, Mohammad Hassanpour; Beydokhti, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Ziziphus jujuba Mill. (Z. jujuba) is a traditional herb with a long history of use for nutrition and the treatment of a broad spectrum of diseases. It grows mostly in South and East Asia, as well as in Australia and Europe. Mounting evidence shows the health benefits of Z. jujuba, including anticancer, anti-inflammation, antiobesity, antioxidant, and hepato- and gastrointestinal protective properties, which are due to its bioactive compounds. Chemotherapy, such as with cis-diamminedichloroplatinium (CDDP, cisplatin) and its derivatives, is widely used in cancer treatment. It is an effective treatment for human cancers, including ovarian cancer; however, drug resistance is a major obstacle to successful treatment. A better understanding of the mechanisms and strategies for overcoming chemoresistance can greatly improve therapeutic outcomes for patients. In this review article, the bioactive compounds present in Z. jujuba are explained. The high prevalence of many different cancers worldwide has recently attracted the attention of many researchers. This is why our research group focused on studying the anticancer activity of Z. jujuba as well as its impact on chemoresistance both in vivo and in vitro. We hope that these studies can lead to a promising future for cancer patients.

  11. Anticancer activities of selected species of North American lichen extracts.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Gajendra; El-Naggar, Atif M; St Clair, Larry L; O'Neill, Kim L

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of human deaths in the USA. Despite continuous efforts to treat cancer over the past 50 years, human mortality rates have not decreased significantly. Natural products, such as lichens, have been good sources of anticancer drugs. This study reports the cytotoxic activity of crude extracts of 17 lichen species against Burkitt's lymphoma (Raji) cells. Out of the 17 lichen species, extracts from 14 species showed cytotoxicity against Raji cells. On the basis of IC50 values, we selected Xanthoparmelia chlorochroa and Tuckermannopsis ciliaris to study the mechanism of cell death. Viability of normal lymphocytes was not affected by the extracts of X. chlorochroa and T. ciliaris. We found that extracts from both lichens decreased proliferation, accumulated cells at the G0 /G1 stage, and caused apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Both lichen extracts also caused upregulation of p53. The T. ciliaris extract upregulated the expression of TK1 but X. chlorochroa did not. We also found that usnic, salazinic, constictic, and norstictic acids were present in the extract of X. chlorochroa, whereas protolichesterinic acid in T. ciliaris extracts. Our data demonstrate that lichen extracts merit further research as a potential source of anticancer drugs.

  12. Evaluation on the inhibition of pyrrol-2-yl ethanone derivatives to lactate dehydrogenase and anticancer activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Na-Na; Weng, Zhao-Yue; Chen, Qiu-Yun; Boison, Daniel; Xiao, Xin-Xin; Gao, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A) is a potentially important metabolic target for the inhibition of the highly activated glycolysis pathway in cancer cells. In order to develop bifunctional compounds as inhibitor of LDH-A and anticancer agents, two pyrrol-2-yl methanone (or ethanone) derivatives (PM1 and PM2) were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of LDH-A based on the enzyme assay and cell assay by spectroscopy analysis. Fluorescence and CD spectra results demonstrated that both the change of second structure of LDH-A and the affinity interaction for compounds to LDH-A gave great effect on the activity of LDH-A. In particular, low concentration of compounds (1 μμ-25 μμ) could change the level of pyruvate in cancer cells. Moreover, the in vitro assay results demonstrated that pyrrol-2-yl ethanone derivatives can inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells. Therefore, pyrrol-2-yl ethanone derivatives (PM2) can be both LDH-A inhibitor and anticancer agents.

  13. Anticancer activity of CX-3543: a direct inhibitor of rRNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Drygin, Denis; Siddiqui-Jain, Adam; O'Brien, Sean; Schwaebe, Michael; Lin, Amy; Bliesath, Josh; Ho, Caroline B; Proffitt, Chris; Trent, Katy; Whitten, Jeffrey P; Lim, John K C; Von Hoff, Daniel; Anderes, Kenna; Rice, William G

    2009-10-01

    Hallmark deregulated signaling in cancer cells drives excessive ribosome biogenesis within the nucleolus, which elicits unbridled cell growth and proliferation. The rate-limiting step of ribosome biogenesis is synthesis of rRNA (building blocks of ribosomes) by RNA Polymerase I (Pol I). Numerous kinase pathways and products of proto-oncogenes can up-regulate Pol I, whereas tumor suppressor proteins can inhibit rRNA synthesis. In tumorigenesis, activating mutations in certain cancer-associated kinases and loss-of-function mutations in tumor suppressors lead to deregulated signaling that stimulates Pol I transcription with resultant increases in ribosome biogenesis, protein synthesis, cell growth, and proliferation. Certain anticancer therapeutics, such as cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, reportedly exert, at least partially, their activity through disruption of ribosome biogenesis, yet many prime targets for anticancer drugs within the ribosome synthetic machinery of the nucleolus remain largely unexploited. Herein, we describe CX-3543, a small molecule nucleolus-targeting agent that selectively disrupts nucleolin/rDNA G-quadruplex complexes in the nucleolus, thereby inhibiting Pol I transcription and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. CX-3543 is the first G-quadruplex interactive agent to enter human clinical trials, and it is currently under evaluation against carcinoid/neuroendocrine tumors in a phase II clinical trial.

  14. Comparative Evaluation of Nimesulide-Loaded Nanoparticles for Anticancer Activity Against Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Sengel-Turk, Ceyda Tuba; Hascicek, Canan; Bakar, Filiz; Simsek, Elif

    2017-02-01

    Recent clinical and epidemiological researches have declared that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents may display as antineoplastic agents and indicate pro-apoptotic and antiproliferative effects on cancer cells. The major purpose of this research was to develop a novel poly(ethyleneglycol)-block-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PEG-b-PCL) nano-sized particles encapsulated with nimesulide (NMS), a selective COX-2 inhibitor, and to evaluate its anticancer activity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells. NMS-encapsulated PEG-b-PCL nanoparticles were fabricated using three different production techniques: (i) by emulsion-solvent evaporation using a high shear homogenizer, (ii) by emulsion-solvent evaporation using an ultrasonicator, and (iii) by nanoprecipitation. Nanoparticles were evaluated with respect to the entrapment efficiency, size characteristics, drug release rates, thermal behavior, cell viability assays, and apoptosis. The resulting nanoparticles were found to be spherical shapes with negative surface charges. The average diameter of all nanoparticles ranged between 148.5 and 307.2 nm. In vitro release profiles showed that all nanoparticles exhibited a biphasic release pattern. NMS-loaded PEG-b-PCL nanoparticles demonstrated significant anticancer activity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner, and the effects of nanoparticles on cell proliferation were significantly affected by the preparation techniques. The nanoparticles developed in this work displayed higher potential for the NMS delivery against breast cancer treatment for the future.

  15. Cardenolides from the Apocynaceae family and their anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shiyuan; Chen, Yanyan; Lu, Yunfang; Wang, Yuefei; Ding, Liqin; Jiang, Miaomiao

    2016-07-01

    Cardenolides, as a group of natural products that can bind to Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase with an inhibiting activity, are traditionally used to treat congestive heart failure. Recent studies have demonstrated that the strong tumor cytotoxicities of cardenolides are mainly due to inducing the tumor cells apoptosis through different expression and cellular location of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α-subunits. The leaves, flesh, seeds and juices of numerous plants from the genera of Nerium, Thevetia, Cerbera, Apocynum and Strophanthus in Apocynaceae family, are the major sources of natural cardenolides. So far, 109 cardenolides have been isolated and identified from this family, and about a quarter of them are reported to exhibit the capability to regulate cancer cell survival and death through multiple signaling pathways. In this review, we compile the phytochemical characteristics and anticancer activity of the cardenolides from this family.

  16. Effect of Cellular Location of Human Carboxylesterase 2 on CPT-11 Hydrolysis and Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yuan-Ting; Lin, Hsuan-Pei; Chen, Bing-Mae; Huang, Ping-Ting; Roffler, Steve R.

    2015-01-01

    CPT-11 is an anticancer prodrug that is clinically used for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Hydrolysis of CPT-11 by human carboxylesterase 2 (CE2) generates SN-38, a topoisomerase I inhibitor that is the active anti-tumor agent. Expression of CE2 in cancer cells is under investigation for the tumor-localized activation of CPT-11. CE2 is normally expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells but can be engineered to direct expression of active enzyme on the plasma membrane or as a secreted form. Although previous studies have investigated different locations of CE2 expression in cancer cells, it remains unclear if CE2 cellular location affects CPT-11 anticancer activity. In the present study, we directly compared the influence of CE2 cellular location on substrate hydrolysis and CPT-11 cytotoxicity. We linked expression of CE2 and enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) via a foot-and-mouth disease virus 2A (F2A) peptide to facilitate fluorescence-activated cell sorting to achieve similar expression levels of ER-located, secreted or membrane-anchored CE2. Soluble CE2 was detected in the medium of cells that expressed secreted and membrane-anchored CE2, but not in cells that expressed ER-retained CE2. Cancer cells that expressed all three forms of CE2 were more sensitive to CPT-11 as compared to unmodified cancer cells, but the membrane-anchored and ER-retained forms of CE2 were consistently more effective than secreted CE2. We conclude that expression of CE2 in the ER or on the membrane of cancer cells is suitable for enhancing CPT-11 anticancer activity. PMID:26509550

  17. Ester-Modified Cyclometalated Iridium(III) Complexes as Mitochondria-Targeting Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang-Xin; Chen, Mu-He; Hu, Xiao-Ying; Ye, Rui-Rong; Tan, Cai-Ping; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Organometallic iridium complexes are potent anticancer candidates which act through different mechanisms from cisplatin-based chemotherapy regimens. Here, ten phosphorescent cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes containing 2,2′-bipyridine-4,4′-dicarboxylic acid and its diester derivatives as ligands are designed and synthesized. The modification by ester group, which can be hydrolysed by esterase, facilitates the adjustment of drug-like properties. The quantum yields and emission lifetimes are influenced by variation of the ester substituents on the Ir(III) complexes. The cytotoxicity of these Ir(III) complexes is correlated with the length of their ester groups. Among them, 4a and 4b are found to be highly active against a panel of cancer cells screened, including cisplatin-resistant cancer cells. Mechanism studies in vitro indicate that they undergo hydrolysis of ester bonds, accumulate in mitochondria, and induce a series of cell-death related events mediated by mitochondria. Furthermore, 4a and 4b can induce pro-death autophagy and apoptosis simultaneously. Our study indicates that ester modification is a simple and feasible strategy to enhance the anticancer potency of Ir(III) complexes. PMID:27958338

  18. Synthesis and characterization of 2-substituted benzimidazoles and their evaluation as anticancer agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, Mohammad; Khan, Azmat Ali; Al-Resayes, Saud I.; Islam, Mohammad Shahidul; Saxena, Ajit Kumar; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Musarrat, Javed; Trzesowska-Kruszynska, Agata; Kruszynski, Rafal

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we report a series of benzimidazole derivatives synthesized from benzene-1,2-diamine and aryl-aldehydes at room temperature. The synthesized compounds have been characterized on the basis of elemental analysis and various spectroscopic studies viz., IR, 1H- and 13C-NMR, ESI-MS as well by X-ray single X-ray crystallographic study. Interaction of these compounds with CT-DNA has been examined with fluorescence experiments and showed significant binding ability. All the synthesized compounds have been screened for their antitumor activities against various human cancer cell lines viz., Human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7), Human leukemia cell line (THP-1), Human prostate cancer cell lines (PC-3) and adenocarcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial cell lines (A-549). Interestingly, all the compounds showed significant anticancer activity.

  19. Library construction and biological evaluation of enmein-type diterpenoid analogues as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Dahong; Xu, Shengtao; Cai, Hao; Pei, Lingling; Wang, Lei; Wu, Xiaoming; Yao, Hequan; Jiang, Jieyun; Sun, Yijun; Xu, Jinyi

    2013-05-01

    A library of promising enmein-type 14-O-diterpenoid derivatives was constructed from a commercially available kaurene-type oridonin by practical and efficient synthetic methods. These synthetic derivatives were evaluated for their antiproliferative activities against a set of four human cancer cell lines. The IC50 values are similar to or improved over those of the parent molecule and paclitaxel, the latter of which was used as a positive control. Compound 29 was further investigated for its apoptotic properties against human hepatocarcinoma Bel-7402 cells to better understand its mode of action. Moreover, compound 29 was shown to have potent antitumor activity in vivo in studies with a murine model of gastric cancer (MGC-803 mice). These results warrant further preclinical investigations of these diterpenoid-based analogues as potential novel anticancer chemotherapeutics.

  20. Anticancer agent xanthohumol inhibits IL-2 induced signaling pathways involved in T cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongbo; Gao, Xiaohua; Deeb, Dorrah; Arbab, Ali S.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Gautam, Subhash C.

    2013-01-01

    Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated chalcone present in hops exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer activity. In the present study we show that XN inhibits the proliferation of mouse lymphoma cells and IL-2 induced proliferation and cell cycle progression in mouse splenic T cells. The suppression of T cell proliferation by XN was due to the inhibition of IL-2 induced Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/STAT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) signaling pathways. XN also inhibited proliferation-related cellular proteins such as c-Myc, c-Fos and NF-κB and cyclin D1. Thus, understanding of IL-2 induced cell signaling pathways in normal T cells, which are constitutively turned on in T cell lymphomas may facilitate development of XN for the treatment of hematologic cancers. PMID:22946339

  1. Characterization of the Phytochemical Constituents of Taif Rose and Its Antioxidant and Anticancer Activities

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Hameed, El-Sayed S.; Bazaid, Salih A.; Salman, Mahmood S.

    2013-01-01

    Ward Taifi (Taif rose) is considered one of the most important economic products of Taif, Saudi Arabia. In this study both fresh and dry Taif rose were biologically and phytochemically investigated. The 80% methanol extracts and n-butanol fractions of dry and fresh Taif rose had high radical scavenging activity toward artificial 1,1-diphenyl picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)• radical with SC50 values range 5.86−12.24 µg/ml whereas the aqueous fractions showed weak activity. All samples had in vitro anticancer activity toward HepG2 with IC50 < 20 µg/ml which fall within the criteria of the American Cancer Institute. High positive correlation appeared between the antioxidant activity and total phenolics whereas there is no correlation between total phenolics and anticancer activity. The LC-ESI(− ve)-MS analysis of all extracts indicate the presence of phenolic compounds belonging to hydrolysable tannins and flavonol glycosides. In conclusion, the presence of this is considered to be the first phytochemical report that identifies the major compounds in dry and fresh roses using HPLC-ESI-MS. The methanol extracts and its n-butanol and aqueous fractions for both fresh and dry Taif rose could be used as preventive and therapeutic effective natural agents for diseases in which free radicals involved after more in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:24282813

  2. Multi-platinum anti-cancer agents. Substitution-inert compounds for tumor selectivity and new targets.

    PubMed

    Farrell, N P

    2015-12-21

    This tutorial review summarizes chemical, biophysical and cellular biological properties of formally substitution-inert "non-covalent" polynuclear platinum complexes (PPCs). We demonstrate how modulation of the pharmacological factors affecting platinum compound cytotoxicity such as cellular accumulation, reactivity toward extracellular and intracellular sulfur-ligand nucleophiles and consequences of DNA binding is achieved to afford a profile of biological activity distinct from that of covalently-binding agents. The DNA binding of substitution-inert complexes is achieved by molecular recognition through minor groove spanning and backbone tracking of the phosphate clamp. In this situation, the square-planar tetra-am(m)ine Pt(ii) coordination units hydrogen bond to phosphate oxygen OP atoms to form bidentate N-O-N motifs. The modular nature of the polynuclear compounds results in high-affinity binding to DNA and very efficient nuclear condensation. These combined effects distinguish the phosphate clamp as a third mode of ligand-DNA binding, discrete from intercalation and minor-groove binding. The cellular consequences mirror those of the biophysical studies and a significant portion of nuclear DNA is compacted, a unique effect different from mitosis, senescence or apoptosis. Substitution-inert PPCs display cytotoxicity similar to cisplatin in a wide range of cell lines, and sensitivity is indifferent to p53 status. Cellular accumulation is mediated through binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) allowing for possibilities of tumor selectivity as well as disruption of HSPG function, opening new targets for platinum antitumor agents. The combined properties show that covalently-binding chemotypes are not the unique arbiters of cytotoxicity and antitumor activity and meaningful antitumor profiles can be achieved even in the absence of Pt-DNA bond formation. These dual properties make the substitution-inert compounds a unique class of inherently dual

  3. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, and Anticancer Activities of Biosynthesized Silver Nanoparticles Using Marine Algae Ecklonia cava

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Kim, Se-Kwon; Shim, Min Suk

    2016-01-01

    Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) has gained great interest as a simple and eco-friendly alternative to conventional chemical methods. In this study, AgNPs were synthesized by using extracts of marine algae Ecklonia cava as reducing and capping agents. The formation of AgNPs using aqueous extract of Ecklonia cava was confirmed visually by color change and their surface plasmon resonance peak at 418 nm, measured by UV-visible spectroscopy. The size, shape, and morphology of the biosynthesized AgNPs were observed by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis. The biosynthesized AgNPs were nearly spherical in shape with an average size around 43 nm. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis confirmed the presence of phenolic compounds in the aqueous extract of Ecklonia cava as reducing and capping agents. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was also carried out to demonstrate the crystalline nature of the biosynthesized AgNPs. Antimicrobial results determined by an agar well diffusion assay demonstrated a significant antibacterial activity of the AgNPs against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Antioxidant results determined by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging assay revealed an efficient antioxidant activity of the biosynthesized AgNPs. The biosynthesized AgNPs also exhibited a strong apoptotic anticancer activity against human cervical cancer cells. Our findings demonstrate that aqueous extract of Ecklonia cava is an effective reducing agent for green synthesis of AgNPs with efficient antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities. PMID:28335363

  4. Lappaol F, a novel anticancer agent isolated from plant arctium Lappa L.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qing; Liu, Kanglun; Shen, Xiaoling; Jin, Weixin; Jiang, Lingyan; Sheikh, M Saeed; Hu, Yingjie; Huang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to search for new cancer-fighting therapeutics, we identified a novel anticancer constituent, Lappaol F, from plant Arctium Lappa L. Lappaol F suppressed cancer cell growth in a time- and dose-dependent manner in human cancer cell lines of various tissue types. We found that Lappaol F induced G(1) and G(2) cell-cycle arrest, which was associated with strong induction of p21 and p27 and reduction of cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). Depletion of p21 via genetic knockout or short hairpin RNA (shRNA) approaches significantly abrogated Lappaol F-mediated G(2) arrest and CDK1 and cyclin B1 suppression. These results suggest that p21 seems to play a crucial role in Lappaol F-mediated regulation of CDK1 and cyclin B1 and G(2) arrest. Lappaol F-mediated p21 induction was found to occur at the mRNA level and involved p21 promoter activation. Lappaol F was also found to induce cell death in several cancer cell lines and to activate caspases. In contrast with its strong growth inhibitory effects on tumor cells, Lappaol F had minimal cytotoxic effects on nontumorigenic epithelial cells tested. Importantly, our data also demonstrate that Lappaol F exhibited strong growth inhibition of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Lappaol F was well tolerated in treated animals without significant toxicity. Taken together, our results, for the first time, demonstrate that Lappaol F exhibits antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo and has strong potential to be developed as an anticancer therapeutic.

  5. D-ring substituted 1,2,3-triazolyl 20-keto pregnenanes as potential anticancer agents: Synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Banday, Abid H; Shameem, Shameem A; Gupta, B D; Kumar, H M Sampath

    2010-12-01

    A facile synthesis of 21-triazolyl derivatives of pregnenolone and their potential antitumour activity is reported. The scheme involves the transformation of the starting pregnenolone acetate into pregnenolone, conversion of pregnenolone to 21-bromo pregnenolone and finally the one-pot, two-step in situ conversion of the bromo derivative to the 21-triazolyl pregnenolone using the 'click chemistry' approach. These derivatives were screened for their anticancer activity against seven human cancer cell lines. The compounds especially 5a, 5b, 5c, 5e, 5g and 5h exhibited significant anticancer activity with compound 5e as the most active in this study.

  6. Synthesis of novel anticancer agents through opening of spiroacetal ring of diosgenin.

    PubMed

    Hamid, A A; Hasanain, Mohammad; Singh, Arjun; Bhukya, Balakishan; Omprakash; Vasudev, Prema G; Sarkar, Jayanta; Chanda, Debabrata; Khan, Feroz; Aiyelaagbe, O O; Negi, Arvind S

    2014-09-01

    Diosgenin has been modified to furostane derivatives after opening the F-spiroacetal ring. The aldehyde group at C26 in derivative 8 was unexpectedly transformed to the ketone 9. The structure of ketone 9 was confirmed by spectroscopy and finally by X-ray crystallography. Five of the diosgenin derivatives showed significant anticancer activity against human cancer cell lines. The most potent molecule of this series i.e. compound 7, inhibited cellular growth by arresting the population at G0/G1 phase of cell division cycle. Cells undergo apoptosis after exposure to the derivative 7 which was evident by increase in sub G0 population in cell cycle analysis. Docking experiments showed caspase-3 and caspase-9 as possible molecular targets for these compounds. This was further validated by cleavage of PARP, a caspase target in apoptotic pathway. Compound 7 was found non-toxic up to 1000mg/kg dose in acute oral toxicity in Swiss albino mice.

  7. Rescuing chemotaxis of the anticancer agent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium VNP20009.

    PubMed

    Broadway, Katherine M; Denson, Elizabeth A P; Jensen, Roderick V; Scharf, Birgit E

    2015-10-10

    The role of chemotaxis and motility in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium tumor colonization remains unclear. We determined through swim plate assays that the well-established anticancer agent S. Typhimurium VNP20009 is deficient in chemotaxis, and that this phenotype is suppressible. Through genome sequencing, we revealed that VNP20009 and four selected suppressor mutants had a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in cheY causing a mutation in the conserved proline residue at position 110. CheY is the response regulator that interacts with the flagellar motor-switch complex and modulates rotational bias. The four suppressor mutants additionally carried non-synonymous SNPs in fliM encoding a flagellar switch protein. The CheY-P110S mutation in VNP20009 likely rendered the protein unable to interact with FliM, a phenotype that could be suppressed by mutations in FliM. We replaced the mutated cheY in VNP20009 with the wild-type copy and chemotaxis was partially restored. The swim ring of the rescued strain, VNP20009 cheY(+), was 46% the size of the parental strain 14028 swim ring. When tested in capillary assays, VNP20009 cheY(+) was 69% efficient in chemotaxis towards the attractant aspartate as compared to 14028. Potential reasons for the lack of complete restoration and implications for bacterial tumor colonization will be discussed.

  8. Microencapsulation of lectin anti-cancer agent and controlled release by alginate beads, biosafety approach.

    PubMed

    El-Aassar, M R; Hafez, Elsayed E; El-Deeb, Nehal M; Fouda, Moustafa M G

    2014-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered as one of the most aggressive cancer worldwide. In Egypt, the prevalence of HCC is increasing during last years. Recently, drug-loaded microparticles were used to improve the efficiency of various medical treatments. This study is designed to evaluate the anticancer potentialities of lectins against HCC while hinting to its safety usage. The aim is also extended to encapsulate lectins in alginate microbeads for oral drug delivery purposes. The extracted lectins showed anti-proliferative effect against HCC with a percentage of 60.76% by using its nontoxic dose with an up-regulation of P53 gene expression. Concerning the handling of lectin alginate microbeads for oral drug delivery, the prepared lectin alginate beads were ∼100μm in diameter. The efficiency of the microcapsules was checked by scanning electron microscopy, the SEM showed the change on the alginate beads surface revealing the successful lectin encapsulation. The release of lectins from the microbeads depended on a variety of factors as the microbeads forming carriers and the amount-encapsulated lectins. The Pisum sativum extracted lectins may be considered as a promising agent in controlling HCC and this solid dosage form could be suitable for oral administration complemented with/or without the standard HCC drugs.

  9. The flavonoid fisetin as an anticancer agent targeting the growth signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Rengarajan, Thamaraiselvan; Yaacob, Nik Soriani

    2016-10-15

    Epidemiological studies show that consumption of diets rich in fruits and vegetables is associated with lower risks of cancer. This evidence has kindled interest into research on bioactive food components and has till date resulted in the identification of many compounds with cancer preventive and therapeutic potential. Among such compounds is fisetin (3,7,3,4-tetrahydroxyflavone), a flavonol that is commonly found in many fruits and vegetables such as apples, persimmons, grapes, kiwis, strawberries, onions and cucumbers. Fisetin has been shown to inhibit or retard the growth of various cancer cells in culture and implanted tumors in vivo. Fisetin targets many components of intracellular signaling pathways including regulators of cell survival and apoptosis, tumor angiogenic and metastatic switches by modulating a distinct set of upstream kinases, transcription factors and their regulators. Current evidence supports the idea that fisetin is a promising agent for cancer treatment. This review summarizes reported anticancer effects of fisetin, and re-emphasizes its potential therapeutic role in the treatment of cancer.

  10. Treatment Strategies that Enhance the Efficacy and Selectivity of Mitochondria-Targeted Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Modica-Napolitano, Josephine S.; Weissig, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Nearly a century has passed since Otto Warburg first observed high rates of aerobic glycolysis in a variety of tumor cell types and suggested that this phenomenon might be due to an impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity in these cells. Subsequently, much has been written about the role of mitochondria in the initiation and/or progression of various forms of cancer, and the possibility of exploiting differences in mitochondrial structure and function between normal and malignant cells as targets for cancer chemotherapy. A number of mitochondria-targeted compounds have shown efficacy in selective cancer cell killing in pre-clinical and early clinical testing, including those that induce mitochondria permeability transition and apoptosis, metabolic inhibitors, and ROS regulators. To date, however, none has exhibited the standards for high selectivity and efficacy and low toxicity necessary to progress beyond phase III clinical trials and be used as a viable, single modality treatment option for human cancers. This review explores alternative treatment strategies that have been shown to enhance the efficacy and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents in vitro and in vivo, and may yet fulfill the clinical promise of exploiting the mitochondrion as a target for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:26230693

  11. Synergistic Anticancer Effect of Tocotrienol Combined with Chemotherapeutic Agents or Dietary Components: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Eitsuka, Takahiro; Tatewaki, Naoto; Nishida, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2016-01-01

    Tocotrienol (T3), unsaturated vitamin E, is gaining a lot of attention owing to its potent anticancer effect, since its efficacy is much greater than that of tocopherol (Toc). Various factors are known to be involved in such antitumor action, including cell cycle arrest, apoptosis induction, antiangiogenesis, anti-metastasis, nuclear factor-κB suppression, and telomerase inhibition. Owing to a difference in the affinity of T3 and Toc for the α-tocopherol transfer protein, the bioavailability of orally ingested T3 is lower than that of Toc. Furthermore, cellular uptake of T3 is interrupted by coadministration of α-Toc in vitro and in vivo. Based on this, several studies are in progress to screen for molecules that can synergize with T3 in order to augment its potency. Combinations of T3 with chemotherapeutic drugs (e.g., statins, celecoxib, and gefitinib) or dietary components (e.g., polyphenols, sesamin, and ferulic acid) exhibit synergistic actions on cancer cell growth and signaling pathways. In this review, we summarize the current status of synergistic effects of T3 and an array of agents on cancer cells, and discuss their molecular mechanisms of action. These combination strategies would encourage further investigation and application in cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:27669218

  12. Recent developments in L-asparaginase discovery and its potential as anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Abhinav; Khan, Abdul Arif; Khurshid, Mohsin; Kalam, Mohd Abul; Jain, Sudhir K; Singhal, Pradeep K

    2016-04-01

    L-Asparaginase (EC3.5.1.1) is an enzyme, which is used for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and other related blood cancers from a long time. This enzyme selectively hydrolyzes the extracellular amino acid L-asparagine into L-aspartate and ammonia, leading to nutritional deficiencies, protein synthesis inhibition, and ultimately death of lymphoblastic cells by apoptosis. Currently, bacterial asparaginases are used for treatment purpose but offers scepticism due to a number of toxicities, including thrombosis, pancreatitis, hyperglycemia, and hepatotoxicity. Resistance towards bacterial asparaginase is another major disadvantage during cancer management. This situation attracted attention of researchers towards alternative sources of L-asparaginase, including plants and fungi. Present article discusses about potential of L-asparaginase as an anticancer agent, its mechanism of action, and adverse effects related to current asparaginase formulations. This article also provides an outlook for recent developments in L-asparaginase discovery from alternative sources and their potential as a less toxic alternative to current formulations.

  13. Bridging academic science and clinical research in the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Matter, Alex

    2015-01-01

    This review starts with a brief history of drug discovery & development, and the place of Asia in this worldwide effort discussed. The conditions and constraints of a successful translational R&D involving academic basic research and clinical research are discussed and the Singapore model for pursuit of open R&D described. The importance of well-characterized, validated drug targets for the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents is emphasized, as well as a structured, high quality translational R&D. Furthermore, the characteristics of an attractive preclinical development drug candidate are discussed laying the foundation of a successful preclinical development. The most frequent sources of failures are described and risk management at every stage is highly recommended. Organizational factors are also considered to play an important role. The factors to consider before starting a new drug discovery & development project are described, and an example is given of a successful clinical project that has had its roots in local universities and was carried through preclinical development into phase I clinical trials. PMID:26779369

  14. In Vitro Anticancer Activity of a Nonpolar Fraction from Gynostemma pentaphyllum (Thunb.) Makino

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yantao; Huang, Jiajun; Lin, Wanjun; Yuan, Zhongwen; Feng, Senling; Xie, Ying; Ma, Wenzhe

    2016-01-01

    Gynostemma pentaphyllum (Thunb.) Makino (GpM) has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for the treatment of various diseases including cancer. Most previous studies have focused primarily on polar fractions of GpM for anticancer activities. In this study, a nonpolar fraction EA1.3A from GpM showed potent growth inhibitory activities against four cancer cell lines with IC50 ranging from 31.62 μg/mL to 38.02 μg/mL. Furthermore, EA1.3A also inhibited the growth of breast cancer cell MDA-MB-453 time-dependently, as well as its colony formation ability. EA1.3A induced apoptosis on MDA-MB-453 cells both dose-dependently and time-dependently as analyzed by flow cytometry and verified by western blotting analysis of apoptosis marker cleaved nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (cPARP). Additionally, EA1.3A induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. Chemical components analysis of EA1.3A by GC-MS revealed that this nonpolar fraction from GpM contains 10 compounds including four alkaloids, three organic esters, two terpenes, and one catechol substance, and all these compounds have not been reported in GpM. In summary, the nonpolar fraction EA1.3A from GpM inhibited cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and regulation of cell cycle progression. Our study shed light on new chemical bases for the anticancer activities of GpM and feasibilities to develop new anticancer agents from this widely used medicinal plant. PMID:27034692

  15. Anti-cancer activity of curcumin loaded nanoparticles in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yallapu, Murali M.; Khan, Sheema; Maher, Diane M.; Ebeling, Mara C.; Sundram, Vasudha; Chauhan, Neeraj; Ganju, Aditya; Balakrishna, Swati; Gupta, Brij K.; Zafar, Nadeem; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer disease in men in the Unites States and its management remains challenge in everyday oncology practice. Thus, advanced therapeutic strategies are required to treat prostate cancer patients. Curcumin (CUR) is a promising anticancer agent for various cancer types. The objective of this study was to evaluate therapeutic potential of novel poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)- CUR nanoparticles (PLGA-CUR NPs) for prostate cancer treatment. Our results indicate that PLGA-CUR NPs efficiently internalize in prostate cancer cells and release biologically active CUR in cytosolic compartment of cells for effective therapeutic activity. Cell proliferation (MTS), clonogenic, and Western blot analyses reveal that PLGA-CUR NPs can effectively inhibit proliferation and colony formation ability of prostate cancer cells than free CUR. PLGA-CUR NPs showed superior tumor regression compared to CUR in xenograft mice. Further investigations reveal that PLGA-CUR NPs inhibit nuclear β-catenin and AR expression in cells and in tumor xenograft tissues. It also suppresses STAT3 and AKT phosphorylation and leads to apoptosis via inhibition of key anti-apoptotic proteins, MCL-1, Bcl-xL and caused induction of PARP cleavage. Additionally, PLGA-CUR NPs significant downregulation of oncogenic miR21 and up-regulation of miR-205 was observed with PLGA-CUR NPs treatment as determined by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization analyses. A superior anti-cancer potential was attained with PSMA antibody conjugated PLGA-CUR NPs in prostate cancer cells and a significant tumor targeting of 131I labelled PSMA antibody was achieved with PLGA-CUR NPs in prostate cancer xenograft mice model. In conclusion, PLGA-CUR NPs can significantly accumulate and exhibit superior anticancer activity in prostate cancer. PMID:25028336

  16. Screening of anticancer activity from agarwood essential oil

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Yumi Zuhanis Has-Yun; Phirdaous, Abbas; Azura, Amid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Agarwood is a priceless non-timber forest product from Aquilaria species belonging to the Thymelaeaceae family. As a result of a defence mechanism to fend off pathogens, Aquilaria species develop agarwood or resin which can be used for incense, perfumery, and traditional medicines. Evidences from ethnopharmacological practices showed that Aquilaria spp. have been traditionally used in the Ayurvedic practice and Chinese medicine to treat various diseases particularly the inflammatory-associated diseases. There have been no reports on traditional use of agarwood towards cancer treatment. However, this is most probably due to the fact that cancer nomenclature is used in modern medicine to describe the diseases associated with unregulated cell growth in which inflammation and body pain are involved. Objective: The aim of this current study was therefore to investigate the potential anticancer properties of agarwood essential oil obtained from distillation of agarwood (resin) towards MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Materials and Methods: The essential oil was subjected to screening assays namely cell viability, cell attachment and sulforhodamine B (SRB)-based cytotoxicity assay to determine the IC50 value. Results: The agarwood essential oil caused reduction of the cell number in both the cell viability and attachment assay suggesting a cumulative effect of the cell killing, inhibition of the cell attachment and or causing cells to detach. The agarwood essential oil showed IC50 value of 900 μg/ml towards the cancer cells. Conclusion: The agarwood essential oil exhibited anticancer activity which supports the traditional use against the inflammatory-associated diseases. This warrants further investigation towards the development of alternative remedy towards cancer. PMID:25002797

  17. Synthesis and anti-cancer activities of new sulfonamides 4-substituted-triazolyl nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Alaoui, Soukaina; Dufies, Maeva; Driowya, Mohsine; Demange, Luc; Bougrin, Khalid; Robert, Guillaume; Auberger, Patrick; Pagès, Gilles; Benhida, Rachid

    2017-03-09

    Nucleoside analogues are among the most known drugs commonly used in antiviral and anticancer chemotherapies. Among them, those featuring a five-membered ring nucleobase are of utmost interest such as the anti-cancer agent AICAR or the anti-viral drug ribavirin. Despite its low activity in vitro in different cell lines, AICAR is under clinical development for several pathologies, thanks to its original mode of action. Indeed, AICAR induced autophagy cell death and is able, following this mechanism, to circumvent resistance to apoptotic drugs including kinase inhibitors currently on the market. To improve the activity of AICAR, we report herein an efficient synthesis of new series of sulfonamide-4-substituted-1,2,3-triazolyl nucleosides using a Cu-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. All these molecules have been fully characterized and evaluated against two aggressive tumor cell lines, RCC4 and MDA-MB-231. Among them, nucleoside analogue 5i belonging to the ribose series was found to be 19 to 66-fold more active than AICAR. Western blot analyses on RCC4 cells showed that 5i displayed an interesting mode of action by inducing both apoptosis and autophagy cell death, making therefore this class of molecules highly promising for further hit-to-lead optimization.

  18. Tea nanoparticle, a safe and biocompatible nanocarrier, greatly potentiates the anticancer activity of doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Jun; Huang, Yujian; Anreddy, Nagaraju; Zhang, Guan-Nan; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Xie, Meina; Lin, Derrick; Yang, Dong-Hua; Zhang, Mingjun; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    An infusion-dialysis based procedure has been developed as an approach to isolate organic nanoparticles from green tea. Tea nanoparticle (TNP) can effectively load doxorubicin (DOX) via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. We established an ABCB1 overexpressing tumor xenograft mouse model to investigate whether TNP can effectively deliver DOX into tumors and bypass the efflux function of the ABCB1 transporter, thereby increasing the intratumoral accumulation of DOX and potentiating the anticancer activity of DOX. MTT assays suggested that DOX-TNP showed higher cytotoxicity toward CCD-18Co, SW620 and SW620/Ad300 cells than DOX. Animal study revealed that DOX-TNP resulted in greater inhibitory effects on the growth of SW620 and SW620/Ad300 tumors than DOX. In pharmacokinetics study, DOX-TNP greatly increased the SW620 and SW620/Ad300 intratumoral concentrations of DOX. But DOX-TNP had no effect on the plasma concentrations of DOX. Furthermore, TNP is a safe nanocarrier with excellent biocompatibility and minimal toxicity. Ex vivo IHC analysis of SW620 and SW620/Ad300 tumor sections revealed evidence of prominent antitumor activity of DOX-TNP. In conclusion, our findings suggested that natural nanomaterials could be useful in combating multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells and potentiating the anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic agents in cancer treatment. PMID:26716507

  19. Rational design of biaryl pharmacophore inserted noscapine derivatives as potent tubulin binding anticancer agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoshi, Seneha; Manchukonda, Naresh Kumar; Suri, Charu; Sharma, Manya; Sridhar, Balasubramanian; Joseph, Silja; Lopus, Manu; Kantevari, Srinivas; Baitharu, Iswar; Naik, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-03-01

    evaluation. Treatment of mice with a daily dose of 300 mg/kg and a single dose of 600 mg/kg indicates that the compound does not induce detectable pathological abnormalities in normal tissues. Also there were no significant differences in hematological parameters between the treated and untreated groups. Hence, the newly designed noscapinoid, 5e is an orally bioavailable, safe and effective anticancer agent with a potential for the treatment of cancer and might be a candidate for clinical evaluation.

  20. Immune mechanisms regulating pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of PEGylated liposomal anticancer agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gina

    integrated approaches, we were able to identify the immunological mechanisms at the molecular, tissue, and clinical levels that may contribute to inter-individual variability in PK and PD of PLD. This dissertation research has a potential to make an impact on development of future NP-based anticancer therapeutics as well as on clinical use of PLD (DoxilRTM) and other PEGylated liposomal anticancer agents.

  1. Rational design of biaryl pharmacophore inserted noscapine derivatives as potent tubulin binding anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Santoshi, Seneha; Manchukonda, Naresh Kumar; Suri, Charu; Sharma, Manya; Sridhar, Balasubramanian; Joseph, Silja; Lopus, Manu; Kantevari, Srinivas; Baitharu, Iswar; Naik, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-03-01

    toxicological evaluation. Treatment of mice with a daily dose of 300 mg/kg and a single dose of 600 mg/kg indicates that the compound does not induce detectable pathological abnormalities in normal tissues. Also there were no significant differences in hematological parameters between the treated and untreated groups. Hence, the newly designed noscapinoid, 5e is an orally bioavailable, safe and effective anticancer agent with a potential for the treatment of cancer and might be a candidate for clinical evaluation.

  2. A transesterification reaction is implicated in the covalent binding of benzo[b]acronycine anticancer agents with DNA and glutathion.

    PubMed

    David-Cordonnier, Marie Hélène; Laine, William; Kouach, Mostafa; Briand, Gilbert; Vezin, Hervé; Gaslonde, Thomas; Michel, Sylvie; Doan Thi Mai, Huong; Tillequin, Francois; Koch, Michel; Léonce, Stéphane; Pierré, Alain; Bailly, Christian

    2004-01-02

    The benzo[b]acronycine derivative S23906-1 has been recently identified as a promising antitumor agent, showing remarkable in vivo activities against a panel of solid tumors. The anticancer activity is attributed to the capacity of the drug to alkylate DNA, selectively at the exocyclic 2-amino group of guanine residues. Hydrolysis of the C-1 and C-2 acetate groups of S23906-1 provides the diol compound S28907-1 which is inactive whereas the intermediate C-2 monoacetate derivative S28687-1 is both highly reactive toward DNA and cytotoxic. The reactivity of this later compound S28687-1 toward two bionucleophiles, DNA and the tripeptide glutathion, has been investigated by mass spectrometry to identify the nature of the (type II) covalent adducts characterized by the loss of the acetate group at position 2. On the basis of NMR and molecular modeling analyses, the reaction mechanism is explained by a transesterification process where the acetate leaving group is transferred from position C-2 to C-1. Altogether, the study validates the reaction scheme of benzo[b]acronycine derivative with its target.

  3. Thymoquinone as an anticancer agent: evidence from inhibition of cancer cells viability and invasion in vitro and tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Attoub, Samir; Sperandio, Olivier; Raza, Haider; Arafat, Kholoud; Al-Salam, Suhail; Al Sultan, Mahmood Ahmed; Al Safi, Maha; Takahashi, Takashi; Adem, Abdu

    2013-10-01

    Phytochemical compounds are emerging as a new generation of anticancer agents with limited toxicity in cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential impact of thymoquinone (TQ), the major constituent of black seed, on survival, invasion of cancer cells in vitro, and tumor growth in vivo. Exposure of cells derived from lung (LNM35), liver (HepG2), colon (HT29), melanoma (MDA-MB-435), and breast (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) tumors to increasing TQ concentrations resulted in a significant inhibition of viability through the inhibition of Akt phosphorylation leading to DNA damage and activation of the mitochondrial-signaling proapoptotic pathway. We provide evidence that TQ at non-toxic concentrations inhibited the invasive potential of LNM35, MDA-MB-231, and MDA-MB231-1833 cancer cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that TQ synergizes with DNA-damaging agent cisplatin to inhibit cellular viability. The anticancer activity of thymoquinone was also investigated in athymic mice inoculated with the LNM35 lung cells. Administration of TQ (10 mg/kg/i.p.) for 18 days inhibited the LNM35 tumor growth by 39% (P < 0.05). Tumor growth inhibition was associated with significant increase in the activated caspase-3. The in silico target identification suggests several potential targets of TQ mainly HDAC2 proteins and the 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase. In this context, we demonstrated that TQ treatment resulted in a significant inhibition of HDAC2 proteins. In view of the available experimental findings, we contend that thymoquinone and/or its analogues may have clinical potential as an anticancer agent alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin.

  4. Exploring the Anti-Cancer Activity of Novel Thiosemicarbazones Generated through the Combination of Retro-Fragments: Dissection of Critical Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Rasko, Nathalie; Potůčková, Eliška; Mrozek-Wilczkiewicz, Anna; Musiol, Robert; Małecki, Jan G.; Sajewicz, Mieczysław; Ratuszna, Alicja; Muchowicz, Angelika; Gołąb, Jakub; Šimůnek, Tomáš; Richardson, Des R.; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Thiosemicarbazones (TSCs) are an interesting class of ligands that show a diverse range of biological activity, including anti-fungal, anti-viral and anti-cancer effects. Our previous studies have demonstrated the potent in vivo anti-tumor activity of novel TSCs and their ability to overcome resistance to clinically used chemotherapeutics. In the current study, 35 novel TSCs of 6 different classes were designed using a combination of retro-fragments that appear in other TSCs. Additionally, di-substitution at the terminal N4 atom, which was previously identified to be critical for potent anti-cancer activity, was preserved through the incorporation of an N4-based piperazine or morpholine ring. The anti-proliferative activity of the novel TSCs were examined in a variety of cancer and normal cell-types. In particular, compounds 1d and 3c demonstrated the greatest promise as anti-cancer agents with potent and selective anti-proliferative activity. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that the chelators that utilized “soft” donor atoms, such as nitrogen and sulfur, resulted in potent anti-cancer activity. Indeed, the N,N,S donor atom set was crucial for the formation of redox active iron complexes that were able to mediate the oxidation of ascorbate. This further highlights the important role of reactive oxygen species generation in mediating potent anti-cancer activity. Significantly, this study identified the potent and selective anti-cancer activity of 1d and 3c that warrants further examination. PMID:25329549

  5. The comparison of anticancer activity of thymoquinone and nanothymoquinone on human breast adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Hossein; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Entezari, Maliheh; Mohsenifar, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is one of the main causes of mortality in the world which is created by the effect of enviromental physico-chemical mutagen and carcinogen agents. The identification of new cytotoxic drugs with low side effects on immune system has developed as important area in new studies of pharmacology. Thymoquinone (TQ), derived from the medicinal spice Nigella sativa (also calledt black cumin) exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. In this study we employed nanogel-based nanoparticle approach to improve upon its effectiveness. Myristic acid-chitosan (MA-chitosan) nanogels were prepared by the technique of self-assembly. Thymoquinone was loaded into the nanogels. The surface morphology of the prepared nanoparticles was determined using SEM and TEM. The other objective of this study was to examine the in-vitro cytotoxic activity of cell death of Thymoquinone and nanothymoquinone on human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF7). Cytotoxicity and viability of Thymoquinone and nanothymoquinone were assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and dye exclusion assay. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the particle diameter was between 150 to 200 nm. Proliferation of MCF7 cells was significantly inhibited by Thymoquinone and nanothymoquinone in a concentration-dependent manner in defined times. There were significant differences in IC50 Thymoquinone and nanothymoquinone. TQ-loaded nanoparticles proved more effective compared to TQ solution. The high drug-targeting potential and efficiency demonstrates the significant role of the anticancer properties of TQ-loaded nanoparticles.

  6. Systematic Repurposing Screening in Xenograft Models Identifies Approved Drugs with Novel Anti-Cancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Roix, Jeffrey J.; Harrison, S. D.; Rainbolt, Elizabeth A.; Meshaw, Kathryn R.; McMurry, Avery S.; Cheung, Peter; Saha, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Approved drugs target approximately 400 different mechanisms of action, of which as few as 60 are currently used as anti-cancer therapies. Given that on average it takes 10–15 years for a new cancer therapeutic to be approved, and the recent success of drug repurposing for agents such as thalidomide, we hypothesized that effective, safe cancer treatments may be found by testing approved drugs in new therapeutic settings. Here, we report in-vivo testing of a broad compound collection in cancer xenograft models. Using 182 compounds that target 125 unique target mechanisms, we identified 3 drugs that displayed reproducible activity in combination with the chemotherapeutic temozolomide. Candidate drugs appear effective at dose equivalents that exceed current prescription levels, suggesting that additional pre-clinical efforts will be needed before these drugs can be tested for efficacy in clinical trials. In total, we suggest drug repurposing is a relatively resource-intensive method that can identify approved medicines with a narrow margin of anti-cancer activity. PMID:25093583

  7. Synthesis, crystal structure, superoxide scavenging activity, anticancer and docking studies of novel adamantyl nitroxide derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiao-he; Sun, Jin; Wang, Shan; Bu, Wei; Yao, Min-na; Gao, Kai; Song, Ying; Zhao, Jin-yi; Lu, Cheng-tao; Zhang, En-hu; Yang, Zhi-fu; Wen, Ai-dong

    2016-03-01

    A novel adamantyl nitroxide derivatives has been synthesized and characterized by IR, ESI-MS and elemental analysis. Quantum chemical calculations have also been performed to calculate the molecular geometry using density functional theory (B3LYP) with the 6-31G (d,p) basis set. The calculated results showed that the optimized geometry can well reproduce the crystal structure. The antioxidant and antiproliferative activity were evaluated by superoxide (NBT) and MTT assay. The adamantyl nitroxide derivatives exhibited stronger scavenging ability towards O2· - radicals when compared to Vitamin C, and demonstrated a remarked anticancer activity against all the tested cell lines, especially Bel-7404 cells with IC50 of 43.3 μM, compared to the positive control Sorafenib (IC50 = 92.0 μM). The results of molecular docking within EGFR using AutoDock confirmed that the titled compound favorably fitted into the ATP binding site of EGFR and would be a potential anticancer agent.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and derivation of an anticancer dosing regimen for the novel anti-cancer agent isobutyl-deoxynyboquinone (IB-DNQ), a NQO1 bioactivatable molecule, in the domestic felid species.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Alycen P; Francis, Joshua M; Pajak, Malgorzata; Parkinson, Elizabeth I; Wycislo, Kathryn L; Rosol, Thomas J; Brown, Megan E; London, Cheryl A; Dirikolu, Levent; Hergenrother, Paul J; Fan, Timothy M

    2016-12-14

    Isobutyl-deoxynyboquinone (IB-DNQ) is a selective substrate for NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), an enzyme overexpressed in many solid tumors. Following activation by NQO1, IB-DNQ participates in a catalytic futile reduction/reoxidation cycle with consequent toxic reactive oxygen species generation within the tumor microenvironment. To elucidate the potential of IB-DNQ to serve as a novel anticancer agent, in vitro studies coupled with in vivo pharmacokinetic and toxicologic investigations in the domestic felid species were conducted to investigate the tractability of IB-DNQ as a translationally applicable anticancer agent. First, using feline oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) as a comparative cancer model, expressions of NQO1 were characterized in not only human, but also feline OSCC tissue microarrays. Second, IB-DNQ mediated cytotoxicity in three immortalized feline OSCC cell lines were studied under dose-dependent and sequential exposure conditions. Third, the feasibility of administering IB-DNQ at doses predicted to achieve cytotoxic plasma concentrations and biologically relevant durations of exposure were investigated through pharmacokinetic and tolerability studies in healthy research felines. Intravenous administration of IB-DNQ at 1.0-2.0 mg/kg achieved peak plasma concentrations and durations of exposure reaching or exceeding predicted in vitro cytotoxic concentrations. Clinical adverse side effects including ptyalism and tachypnea exhibited during and post-IV infusion of IB-DNQ were transient and tolerable. Additionally, IB-DNQ administration did not produce acute or delayed-onset unacceptable hematologic, non-hematologic, or off-target oxidative toxicities. Collectively, the findings reported here within provide important safety and pharmacokinetic data to support the continued development of IB-DNQ as a novel anticancer strategy for NQO1 expressing cancers.

  9. Application of computer assisted combinatorial chemistry in antivirial, antimalarial and anticancer agents design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burello, E.; Bologa, C.; Frecer, V.; Miertus, S.

    Combinatorial chemistry and technologies have been developed to a stage where synthetic schemes are available for generation of a large variety of organic molecules. The innovative concept of combinatorial design assumes that screening of a large and diverse library of compounds will increase the probability of finding an active analogue among the compounds tested. Since the rate at which libraries are screened for activity currently constitutes a limitation to the use of combinatorial technologies, it is important to be selective about the number of compounds to be synthesized. Early experience with combinatorial chemistry indicated that chemical diversity alone did not result in a significant increase in the number of generated lead compounds. Emphasis has therefore been increasingly put on the use of computer assisted combinatorial chemical techniques. Computational methods are valuable in the design of virtual libraries of molecular models. Selection strategies based on computed physicochemical properties of the models or of a target compound are introduced to reduce the time and costs of library synthesis and screening. In addition, computational structure-based library focusing methods can be used to perform in silico screening of the activity of compounds against a target receptor by docking the ligands into the receptor model. Three case studies are discussed dealing with the design of targeted combinatorial libraries of inhibitors of HIV-1 protease, P. falciparum plasmepsin and human urokinase as potential antivirial, antimalarial and anticancer drugs. These illustrate library focusing strategies.

  10. Targeted Delivery of Anticancer Agents via a Dual Function Nanocarrier with an Interfacial Drug-Interactive Motif

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a dual-function drug carrier, polyethylene glycol (PEG)-derivatized farnesylthiosalicylate (FTS). Here we report that incorporation of a drug-interactive motif (Fmoc) into PEG5k–FTS2 led to further improvement in both drug loading capacity and formulation stability. Doxorubicin (DOX) formulated in PEG5k–Fmoc–FTS2 showed sustained release kinetics slower than those of DOX loaded in PEG5k–FTS2. The maximum tolerated dose of DOX- or paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded PEG5k–Fmoc–FTS2 was significantly higher than that of the free drug. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies showed that DOX/PEG5k–Fmoc–FTS2 mixed micelles were able to retain DOX in the bloodstream for a significant amount of time and efficiently deliver the drug to tumor sites. More importantly, drug (DOX or PTX)-loaded PEG5k–Fmoc–FTS2 led to superior antitumor activity over other treatments including drugs formulated in PEG5k–FTS2 in breast cancer and prostate cancer models. Our improved dual function carrier with a built-in drug-interactive motif represents a simple and effective system for targeted delivery of anticancer agents. PMID:25325795

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of glycopolymeric decorated gold nanoparticles functionalized with gold-triphenyl phosphine as anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Adokoh, Christian K; Quan, Stephen; Hitt, Mary; Darkwa, James; Kumar, Piyush; Narain, Ravin

    2014-10-13

    In this study, statistical glyco-dithiocarbamate (DTC) copolymers were synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT) and subsequently used to prepare glyconanoparticles and conjugated glyconanoparticles with the anticancer drug, gold(I) triphenylphosphine. These glyconanoparticles and the corresponding conjugates were then tested for their in vitro cytotoxicity in both normal and cancer cell lines using Neutral Red assay. The glyconanoparticles and their Au(I)PPh3 conjugates were all active against MCF7 and HepG2 cells, but galactose-functionalized glyconanoparticles {P(GMA-EDAdtc(AuPPh3)-st-LAEMA)AuNP} were found to be the most cytotoxic to HepG2 cells (IC50 ∼ 4.13 ± 0.73 μg/mL). The p(GMA-EDAdtc(AuPPh3)-st-LAEMA)AuNP was found to be a 4-fold more potent antitumor agent in HepG2 cells, and the overexpressed asialoglycoprotein (ASGPR) receptors revealed to play an important role in the cytotoxicity, presumably by the enhanced uptake. In addition, the glyconanoparticles Au(I) conjugates are found to be significantly more toxic as compared to the standard chemotherapeutic reagents such as cisplatin and cytarabine.

  12. Anticancer activity of new coumarin substituted hydrazide-hydrazone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Tamer; Bondock, Samir; Youns, Mahmoud

    2014-04-09

    Drug resistance is a major impediment for cancer treatment, to overcome it we designed and synthesized sixteen coumarins bearing hydrazide-hydrazone moiety and evaluated them against human drug-resistant pancreatic carcinoma (Panc-1) cells and drug-sensitive (hepatic carcinoma; Hep-G2 and leukemia; CCRF) cell lines in vitro. The 6-brominated coumarin hydrazide-hydrazone derivatives (BCHHD) 7c, 8c and 10c were more potent than doxorubicin (DOX) against resistant Panc-1 cells. BCHHD 7c showed significant cytotoxicity against all tested cells (IC50: 3.60-6.50 μM) on comparison with all other coumarin hydrazide-hydrazone derivatives (CHHD), whereas BCHHD's 8c and 10c showed significant antiproliferative activity only against resistant Panc-1 cells with IC50 of 2.02 μM and 2.15 μM, respectively. All the investigated BCHHD's were able to activate caspases 3/7 and they could induce apoptosis in resistant Panc-1 cells. Microarray analysis showed that BCHHD 7c induced the expression of apoptotic- and cell cycle arrest (G2/M)- genes in resistant Panc-1 cells. Moreover, BCHHD 7c induced the up-regulation of CDKN1A, DDIT4, GDF-15 and down-regulation of CDC2, CDC20, CDK2 genes. Based on our results, we conclude that 7c could be a potent anticancer drug to overcome drug resistance in cancer and it could be highly beneficial for patients in the clinic.

  13. Plant-derived anticancer agents: a promising treatment for bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Juárez, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a very frequent complication of advanced cancer, and it remains an incurable disease. Current therapies that have been approved for the treatment of bone metastases delay the occurrence of skeletal-related events and can extend the patient's lifespan by a few years. However, they will not cure or cause the regression of established bone metastases, and new side effects are emerging after prolonged treatment. Thus, new therapies are severely needed. There are compelling evidences from in vitro and in vivo preclinical studies that support the use of compounds derived from plants to treat several forms of cancers including bone metastasis. More than 25% of the drugs used during the past 20 years were directly derived from plants, whereas another 25% are chemically altered natural products. Still, only 5–15% of the ∼250 000 higher plants have ever been investigated for bioactive compounds. There is a growing interest for the study of anticancer drugs with relatively low side effects that target specific key signaling pathways that control the establishment and progression of the cancer metastasis. Therefore, further studies are needed to identify new natural compounds with high efficiency in cancer prevention and treatment. Extensive reviews about plant-derived agents and their use in cancer have been published, but none when it comes to the treatment of bone metastases. Only a few of these compounds have been evaluated for the treatment of bone metastasis; here we describe some of the most prominent ones that are having the potential to reach the clinic soon. PMID:28243436

  14. Anticancer activity of Morinda citrifolia (Noni) fruit: a review.

    PubMed

    Brown, Amy C

    2012-10-01

    anticancer activity. The isolation of the active component warrants further research.

  15. Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular docking of aryl hydrazines and hydrazides for anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Gohil, Vikrantsinh M; Agrawal, Satyam K; Saxena, Ajit K; Garg, Divita; Gopimohan, C; Bhutani, Kamlesh K

    2010-03-01

    Aryl hydrazine and hydrazide analogues were synthesized based on p-tolyl hydrazine, isolated as a breakdown product of a secondary metabolite from the mushroom, Agaricus bisporus, and tested to be highly active molecule than 5-fluorouracil in in vitro anticancer studies. The synthesized analogues were tested for anticancer activity using NCI protocol. Anolgues 12 and 15 emerged as molecules with significant in vitro anticancer activity. Molecular docking study revealed the binding orientations of aryl hydrazines and hydrazides analogues in the active sites of thymidylate synthase.

  16. The Use of 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 as an Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkowska, Ewa; Wallace, Graham R.; Brown, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    The notion that vitamin D can influence the incidence of cancer arose from epidemiological studies. The major source of vitamin D in the organism is skin production upon exposure to ultra violet-B. The very first observation of an inverse correlation between exposure of individuals to the sun and the likelihood of cancer was reported as early as 1941. In 1980, Garland and Garland hypothesised, from findings from epidemiological studies of patients in the US with colon cancer, that vitamin D produced in response to sun exposure is protective against cancer as opposed to sunlight per se. Later studies revealed inverse correlations between sun exposure and the occurrence of prostate and breast cancers. These observations prompted laboratory investigation of whether or not vitamin D had an effect on cancer cells. Vitamin D is not active against cancer cells, but the most active metabolite 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) has profound biological effects. Here, we review the anticancer action of 1,25D, clinical trials of 1,25D to date and the prospects of the future therapeutic use of new and low calcaemic analogues. PMID:27187375

  17. Synthesis of xanthohumol analogues and discovery of potent thioredoxin reductase inhibitor as potential anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baoxin; Duan, Dongzhu; Ge, Chunpo; Yao, Juan; Liu, Yaping; Li, Xinming; Fang, Jianguo

    2015-02-26

    The selenoprotein thioredoxin reductases (TrxRs) are attractive targets for anticancer drugs development. Xanthohumol (Xn), a naturally occurring polyphenol chalcone from hops, has received increasing attention because of its multiple pharmacological activities. We synthesized Xn and its 43 analogues and discovered that compound 13n displayed the highest cytotoxicity toward HeLa cells (IC50 = 1.4 μM). Structure-activity relationship study indicates that the prenyl group is not necessary for cytotoxicity, and introducing electron-withdrawing group, especially on the meta-position, is favored. In addition, methylation of the phenoxyl groups generally improves the potency. Mechanistic study revealed that 13n selectively inhibits TrxR and induces reactive oxygen species and apoptosis in HeLa cells. Cells overexpressing TrxR are resistant to 13n insult, while knockdown of TrxR sensitizes cells to 13n treatment, highlighting the physiological significance of targeting TrxR by 13n. The clarification of the structural determinants for the potency would guide the design of novel potent molecules for future development.

  18. Resveratrol-salicylate derivatives as selective DNMT3 inhibitors and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Aldawsari, Fahad S; Aguayo-Ortiz, Rodrigo; Kapilashrami, Kanishk; Yoo, Jakyung; Luo, Minkui; Medina-Franco, José L; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A

    2016-10-01

    Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol with plethora of biological activities. Resveratrol has previously shown to decrease DNA-methyltransferase (DNMT) enzymes expression and to reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes. Currently, it seems that no resveratrol analogs have been developed as DNMT inhibitors. Recently, we reported the synthesis of resveratrol-salicylate derivatives and by examining the chemical structure of these analogs, we proposed that these compounds could exhibit DNMT inhibition especially that they resembled NSC 14778, a compound we previously identified as a DNMT inhibitor by virtual screening. Indeed, using in vitro DNMT inhibition assay, some of the resveratrol-salicylate analogs we screened in this work that showed selective inhibition against DNMT3 enzymes which were greater than resveratrol. A molecular docking study revealed key binding interactions with DNMT3A and DNMT3B enzymes. In addition, the most active analog, 10 showed considerable cytotoxicity against three human cancer cells; HT-29, HepG2 and SK-BR-3, which was greater than resveratrol. Further studies are needed to understand the anticancer mechanisms of these derivatives.

  19. Novel Anticancer Agents Based on Targeting the Trimer Interface of the PRL Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yunpeng; Yu, Zhi-Hong; Liu, Sijiu; Zhang, Lujuan; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Zeng, Li-Fan; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2016-08-15

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) oncoproteins are phosphatases overexpressed in numerous types of human cancer. Elevated levels of PRL associate with metastasis and poor clinical outcomes. In principle, PRL phosphatases offer appealing therapeutic targets, but they remain underexplored due to the lack of specific chemical probes. In this study, we address this issue by exploiting a unique property of PRL phosphatases, namely, that they may function as homotrimers. Starting from a sequential structure-based virtual screening and medicinal chemistry strategy, we identified Cmpd-43 and several analogs that disrupt PRL1 trimerization. Biochemical and structural analyses demonstrate that Cmpd-43 and its close analogs directly bind the PRL1 trimer interface and obstruct PRL1 trimerization. Cmpd-43 also specifically blocks the PRL1-induced cell proliferation and migration through attenuation of both ERK1/2 and Akt activity. Importantly, Cmpd-43 exerted potent anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo in a murine xenograft model of melanoma. Our results validate a trimerization-dependent signaling mechanism for PRL and offer proof of concept for trimerization inhibitors as candidate therapeutics to treat PRL-driven cancers. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4805-15. ©2016 AACR.

  20. CRM1 is a direct cellular target of the natural anti-cancer agent plumbagin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejiao; Niu, Mingshan; Xu, Xiaoyu; Cai, Wei; Zeng, Lingyu; Zhou, Xiuping; Yu, Rutong; Xu, Kailin

    2014-01-01

    Plumbagin, a naphthoquinone derived from the medicinal plant Plumbago zeylanica, has been shown to exert anti-cancer and anti-proliferative activities in vitro as well as in animal tumor models. However, the mechanism underlying its anti-tumor action still remains unclear. CRM1 is a nuclear export receptor involved in the active transport of tumor suppressors whose function is altered in cancer due to increased expression and overactive transport. We showed that CRM1 is a direct cellular target of plumbagin. The nuclei of cells incubated with plumbagin accumulated tumor-suppressor proteins and inhibited the interactions between CRM1 and these proteins. Particularly, we demonstrated that plumbagin could specifically react with the conserved Cys(528) of CRM1 but not with a Cys(528) mutant peptide through Mass spectrometric analysis. More importantly, cancer cells that are transfected with mutant CRM1 (C528S) are resistant to the inhibitory effects of plumbagin, demonstrating that the inhibition is through direct interaction with Cys(528) of CRM1. The inhibition of nuclear traffic by plumbagin may account for its therapeutic properties in cancer and inflammatory diseases. Our findings could contribute to the development of a new class of CRM1 inhibitors.

  1. Explorative study on the anticancer activity, selectivity and metabolic stability of related analogs of aminosteroid RM-133.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Martin; Maltais, René; Dutour, Raphaël; Poirier, Donald

    2016-11-01

    RM-133 is a key representative of a new family of aminosteroids reported as potent anticancer agents. Although RM-133 produced interesting results in 4 mouse xenograft cancer models when injected subcutaneously, it needs to be improved to increase its in vivo potency. Thus, to obtain an analog of RM-133 with a better drug potential, a structure-activity relationship study was conducted by synthesizing eleven RM-133-related compounds and addressing their antiproliferative activity on 3 human cancer cells (HL-60, OVCAR-3 and PANC-1) and 3 human normal cell lines (primary ovary, pancreas and renal proximal tubule) as well as their metabolic stability in human liver microsomes. When the 2β-tertiary amine of RM-133 was transformed into a salt or moved to position 3β, the anticancer activity was lost. Modifying the orientation of the side chain of RM-133 increased anticancer activity and selectivity, but led to a drastic loss of stability. The protection of the 3α-hydroxyl of RM-133 by the formation of an ester or a carbamate stabilized the molecule against the phase I metabolic enzymes without affecting its anticancer activity. In comparison to RM-133, the 3-dimethylcarbamate derivative 3 is more selective for cancer cells over normal cells and is much more stable in liver microsomes. Those results support the use of a pro-drug strategy targeting the 3α-hydroxyl of RM-133 as an approach to improve its drug properties. The work presented will enable the development of an optimized anticancer drug of the aminosteroid family that is suitable for a future phase I clinical trial.

  2. Anticancer activity of botanical alkyl hydroquinones attributed to topoisomerase II poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.-P.; Fang, W.-H.; Lin, L.-I.; Chiou, Robin Y.; Kan, L.-S.; Chi, N.-H.; Chen, Y.-R.; Lin, T.-Y.; Lin, S.-B.

    2008-03-15

    Cytotoxic alkyl hydroquinone compounds have been isolated from many plants. We previously isolated 3 structurally similar cytotoxic alkyl hydroquinone compounds from the sap of the lacquer tree Rhus succedanea L. belonging to the sumac family, which have a long history of medicinal use in Asia. Each has an unsaturated alkyl chain attached to the 2-position of a hydroquinone ring. One of these isolates, 10'(Z),13'(E),15'(E)-heptadecatrienylhydroquinone [HQ17(3)], being the most cytotoxic, was chosen for studying the anticancer mechanism of these compounds. We found that HQ17(3) was a topoisomerase (Topo) II poison. It irreversibly inhibited Topo II{alpha} activity through the accumulation of Topo II-DNA cleavable complexes. A cell-based assay showed that HQ17(3) inhibited the growth of leukemia HL-60 cells with an EC{sub 50} of 0.9 {mu}M, inhibited the topoisomerase-II-deficient cells HL-60/MX2 with an EC{sub 50} of 9.6 {mu}M, and exerted no effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells at concentrations up to 50 {mu}M. These results suggest that Topo II is the cellular drug target. In HL-60 cells, HQ17(3) promptly inhibited DNA synthesis, induced chromosomal breakage, and led to cell death with an EC{sub 50} about one-tenth that of hydroquinone. Pretreatment of the cells with N-acetylcysteine could not attenuate the cytotoxicity and DNA damage induced by HQ17(3). However, N-acetylcysteine did significantly reduce the cytotoxicity of hydroquinone. In F344 rats, intraperitoneal injection of HQ17(3) for 28 days induced no clinical signs of toxicity. These results indicated that HQ17(3) is a potential anticancer agent, and its structural features could be a model for anticancer drug design.

  3. Novel quinolone substituted thiazolidin-4-ones as anti-inflammatory, anticancer agents: design, synthesis and biological screening.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Sharad Kumar; Jaiswal, Varun; Lohan, Sandeep; Bansal, Sumit; Chaudhary, Anil; Tiwari, Amit; Alex, Angel Treasa; Joesph, Alex

    2013-05-01

    Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) has been reported to regulate various genes involved in cancer and inflammation. Accordingly, drugs suppressing or inhibiting NF-κB may possess both anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. A library of quinolone substituted thiazolidin-4-ones was docked into the active site of NF-κB and the top-ranked 31 compounds were synthesized and evaluated for anti-inflammatory and anticancer activity. The best-ranked compound 6b showed highest anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan-induced paw edema model. In vitro anticancer studies revealed 1a and 16a as most active compounds against BT-549, HeLa, COLO-205 and ACHN human cancer cell lines. Compounds 1a and 16a exhibited NF-κB dependent anticancer properties and apoptosis mediated cell death. In vivo Ehrlich ascites carcinoma study further confirmed the antitumor activity of 1a and 16a.

  4. Evaluation of anticancer activity of dehydrocostuslactone in vitro.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun J; Kim, Gun-Hee

    2010-01-01

    Dehydrocostuslactone is a sesquiterpene lactone derived from Saussurea lappa, a plant used in traditional herbal medicines. The anti-proliferative activity of dehydrocostuslactone was investigated in human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-453 and SK-BR-3) and ovarian cancer (SK-OV-3 and OVCAR3) cell lines using the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. In the cells, exposure to dehydrocostuslactone resulted in a dose-dependent decline in cell proliferation. The IC50 value was found to be 21.5, 43.2, 25.6, 15.9 and 10.8 µM in MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-453, SK-BR-3, SK-OV-3 and OVCAR3 cells, respectively. Dehydrocostuslactone exerted its antiproliferative effects by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were analyzed using flow cytometry in cell lines exposed to 10 µM dehydrocostuslactone for 48 h. Compared to the controls, exposure to dehydrocostuslactone resulted in accumulation in the G2/M phase and a marked increase in the apoptotic cell population. These results suggest that dehydrocostuslactone has potential anticancer properties.

  5. Anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities of some dietary cucurbits.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Dhara; Rawat, Indu; Goel, H C

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we investigated few dietary cucurbits for anticancer activity by monitoring cytotoxic (MTT and LDH assays), apoptotic (caspase-3 and annexin-V assays), and also their anti-inflammatory effects by IL-8 cytokine assay. Aqua-alcoholic (50:50) whole extracts of cucurbits [Lagenaria siceraria (Ls), Luffa cylindrica (Lc) and Cucurbita pepo (Cp)] were evaluated in colon cancer cells (HT-29 and HCT-15) and were compared with isolated biomolecule, cucurbitacin-B (Cbit-B). MTT and LDH assays revealed that the cucurbit extracts and Cbit-B, in a concentration dependent manner, decreased the viability of HT-29 and HCT-15 cells substantially. The viability of lymphocytes was, however, only marginally decreased, yielding a potential advantage over the tumor cells. Caspase-3 assay revealed maximum apoptosis with Ls while annexin V assay demonstrated maximum efficacy of Lc in this context. These cucurbits have also shown decreased secretion of IL-8, thereby revealing their anti-inflammatory capability. The results have demonstrated the therapeutic potential of dietary cucurbits in inhibiting cancer and inflammatory cytokine.

  6. Eco-friendly approach for nanoparticles synthesis and mechanism behind antibacterial activity of silver and anticancer activity of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Patil, Maheshkumar Prakash; Kim, Gun-Do

    2017-01-01

    This review covers general information about the eco-friendly process for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) and gold nanoparticles (AuNP) and focuses on mechanism of the antibacterial activity of AgNPs and the anticancer activity of AuNPs. Biomolecules in the plant extract are involved in reduction of metal ions to nanoparticle in a one-step and eco-friendly synthesis process. Natural plant extracts contain wide range of metabolites including carbohydrates, alkaloids, terpenoids, phenolic compounds, and enzymes. A variety of plant species and plant parts have been successfully extracted and utilized for AgNP and AuNP syntheses. Green-synthesized nanoparticles eliminate the need for a stabilizing and capping agent and show shape and size-dependent biological activities. Here, we describe some of the plant extracts involved in nanoparticle synthesis, characterization methods, and biological applications. Nanoparticles are important in the field of pharmaceuticals for their strong antibacterial and anticancer activity. Considering the importance and uniqueness of this concept, the synthesis, characterization, and application of AgNPs and AuNPs are discussed in this review.

  7. Progress Toward the Development of Noscapine and Derivatives as Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    DeBono, Aaron; Capuano, Ben; Scammells, Peter J

    2015-08-13

    Many nitrogen-moiety containing alkaloids derived from plant origins are bioactive and play a significant role in human health and emerging medicine. Noscapine, a phthalideisoquinoline alkaloid derived from Papaver somniferum, has been used as a cough suppressant since the mid 1950s, illustrating a good safety profile. Noscapine has since been discovered to arrest cells at mitosis, albeit with moderately weak activity. Immunofluorescence staining of microtubules after 24 h of noscapine exposure at 20 μM elucidated chromosomal abnormalities and the inability of chromosomes to complete congression to the equatorial plane for proper mitotic separation ( Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 1998 , 95 , 1601 - 1606 ). A number of noscapine analogues possessing various modifications have been described within the literature and have shown significantly improved antiprolific profiles for a large variety of cancer cell lines. Several semisynthetic antimitotic alkaloids are emerging as possible candidates as novel anticancer therapies. This perspective discusses the advancing understanding of noscapine and related analogues in the fight against malignant disease.

  8. Synthesis and anticancer activities of novel 1,2,4-triazolo[3,4-a]phthalazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Xue, Deng-Qi; Zhang, Xu-Yao; Wang, Chao-Jie; Ma, Li-Ying; Zhu, Nan; He, Peng; Shao, Kun-Peng; Chen, Peng-Ju; Gu, Yi-Fei; Zhang, Xiao-Song; Wang, Cai-Feng; Ji, Cong-Hui; Zhang, Qiu-Rong; Liu, Hong-Min

    2014-10-06

    Trying to develop potent and selective anticancer agents, two series of novel 1,2,4-triazolo[3,4-a]phthalazine derivatives were designed and synthesized. Their antitumor activities were evaluated by MTT method against four selected human cancer cell lines (MGC-803, EC-9706, HeLa and MCF-7). Our results showed that compound 11h exhibited good anticancer activities compared to 5-fluorouracil against the four tested cell lines, with IC50 values ranging from 2.0 to 4.5 μM. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that compound 11h induced the cellular early apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase in EC-9706.

  9. Anticancer Activity of Estradiol Derivatives: A Quantitative Structure--Activity Relationship Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muranaka, Ken

    2001-10-01

    Commercial packages to implement modern QSAR (quantitative structure-activity relationship) techniques are highly priced; however, the essence of QSAR can be taught without them. Microsoft Excel was used to analyze published data on anticancer activities of estradiol analogs by a QSAR approach. The resulting QSAR equations highly correlate the structural features and physicochemical properties of the analogs with the observed biological activities by multiple linear regression.

  10. Phosphorescent iridium(III)-bis-N-heterocyclic carbene complexes as mitochondria-targeted theranostic and photodynamic anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Tan, Cai-Ping; Zhang, Wei; He, Liang; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria-targeted compounds represent a promising approach to target tumors selectively and overcome resistance to current anticancer therapies. In this work, three cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes (1-3) containing bis-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands have been explored as theranostic and photodynamic agents targeting mitochondria. These complexes display rich photophysical properties, which greatly facilitates the study of their intracellular fate. All three complexes are more cytotoxic than cisplatin against the cancer cells screened. 1-3 can penetrate into human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells quickly and efficiently, and they can carry out theranostic functions by simultaneously inducing and monitoring the morphological changes in mitochondria. Mechanism studies show that these complexes exert their anticancer efficacy by initiating a cascade of events related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, they display up to 3 orders of magnitude higher cytotoxicity upon irradiation at 365 nm, which is so far the highest photocytotoxic responses reported for iridium complexes.

  11. Smac Mimetic SM-164 Potentiates APO2L/TRAIL- and Doxorubicin-Mediated Anticancer Activity in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuijun; Li, Gongquan; Zhao, Yongfu; Liu, Guangzhi; Wang, Yu; Ma, Xiuxian; Li, Dexu; Wu, Yang; Lu, Jianfeng

    2012-01-01

    Background The members of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) family are key negative regulators of apoptosis. Overexpression of IAPs are found in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and can contribute to chemotherapy resistance and recurrence of HCC. Small-molecule Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac) mimetics have recently emerged as novel anticancer drugs through targeting IAPs. The specific aims of this study were to 1) examine the anticancer activity of Smac mimetics as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy in HCC cells, and 2) investigate the mechanism of anticancer action of Smac mimetics. Methods Four HCC cell lines, including SMMC-7721, BEL-7402, HepG2 and Hep3B, and 12 primary HCC cells were used in this study. Smac mimetic SM-164 was used to treat HCC cells. Cell viability, cell death induction and clonal formation assays were used to evaluate the anticancer activity. Western blotting analysis and a pancaspase inhibitor were used to investigate the mechanisms. Results Although SM-164 induced complete cIAP-1 degradation, it displayed weak inhibitory effects on the viability of HCC cells. Nevertheless, SM-164 considerably potentiated Apo2 ligand or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (APO2L/TRAIL)- and Doxorubicin-mediated anticancer activity in HCC cells. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that SM-164 in combination with chemotherapeutic agents resulted in enhanced activation of caspases-9, -3 and cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), and also led to decreased AKT activation. Conclusions Smac mimetics can enhance chemotherapeutic-mediated anticancer activity by enhancing apoptosis signaling and suppressing survival signaling in HCC cells. This study suggests Smac mimetics are potential therapeutic agents for HCC. PMID:23240027

  12. Organometallic Palladium Complexes with a Water-Soluble Iminophosphorane Ligand as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Monica; Calvo-Sanjuán, Rubén; Sanaú, Mercedes; Marzo, Isabel; Contel, María

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a new water-soluble iminophosphorane ligand TPA=N-C(O)-2BrC6H4 (C,N-IM; TPA = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane) 1 is reported. Oxidative addition of 1 to Pd2(dba)3 affords the orthopalladated dimer [Pd(μ-Br){C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}]2 (2) as a mixture of cis and trans isomers (1:1 molar ratio) where the iminophosphorane moeity behaves as a C,N-pincer ligand. By addition of different neutral or monoanionic ligands to 2, the bridging bromide can be cleaved and a variety of hydrophilic or water-soluble mononuclear organometallic palladium(II) complexes of the type [Pd{C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}(L-L)] (L-L = acac (3); S2CNMe2 (4); 4,7-Diphenyl-1,10-phenanthrolinedisulfonic acid disodium salt C12H6N2(C6H4SO3Na)2 (5)); [Pd{C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}(L)Br] (L = P(mC6H4SO3Na)3 (6); P(3-Pyridyl)3 (7)) and, [Pd(C6H4(C(O)N=TPA)-2}(TPA)2Br] (8) are obtained as single isomers. All new complexes were tested as potential anticancer agents and their cytotoxicity properties were evaluated in vitro against human Jurkat-T acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, normal T-lymphocytes (PBMC) and DU-145 human prostate cancer cells. Compounds [Pd(μ-Br){C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}]2 (2) and [Pd{C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}(acac)] 3 (which has been crystallographically characterized) display the higher cytotoxicity against the above mentioned cancer cell lines while being less toxic to normal T-lymphocytes (peripheral blood mononuclear cells: PBMC). In addition, 3 is very toxic to cisplatin resistant Jurkat shBak indicating a cell death pathway that may be different to that of cisplatin. The interaction of 2 and 3 with plasmid (pBR322) DNA is much weaker than that of cisplatin pointing to an alternative biomolecular target for these cytotoxic compounds. All the compounds show an interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) faster than that of cisplatin. PMID:23066172

  13. Dihydroartemisinin Exerts Its Anticancer Activity through Depleting Cellular Iron via Transferrin Receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Ba, Qian; Zhou, Naiyuan; Duan, Juan; Chen, Tao; Hao, Miao; Yang, Xinying; Li, Junyang; Yin, Jun; Chu, Ruiai; Wang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Artemisinin and its main active metabolite dihydroartemisinin, clinically used antimalarial agents with low host toxicity, have recently shown potent anticancer activities in a variety of human cancer models. Although iron mediated oxidative damage is involved, the mechanisms underlying these activities remain unclear. In the current study, we found that dihydroartemisinin caused cellular iron depletion in time- and concentration-dependent manners. It decreased iron uptake and disturbed iron homeostasis in cancer cells, which were independent of oxidative damage. Moreover, dihydroartemisinin reduced the level of transferrin receptor-1 associated with cell membrane. The regulation of dihydroartemisinin to transferrin receptor-1 could be reversed by nystatin, a cholesterol-sequestering agent but not the inhibitor of clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Dihydroartemisinin also induced transferrin receptor-1 palmitoylation and colocalization with caveolin-1, suggesting a lipid rafts mediated internalization pathway was involved in the process. Also, nystatin reversed the influences of dihydroartemisinin on cell cycle and apoptosis related genes and the siRNA induced downregulation of transferrin receptor-1 decreased the sensitivity to dihydroartemisinin efficiently in the cells. These results indicate that dihydroartemisinin can counteract cancer through regulating cell-surface transferrin receptor-1 in a non-classical endocytic pathway, which may be a new action mechanism of DHA independently of oxidative damage. PMID:22900042

  14. Anticancer activities of artemisinin and its bioactive derivatives.

    PubMed

    Firestone, Gary L; Sundar, Shyam N

    2009-10-30

    Artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone derived from the sweet wormwood plant Artemisia annua, and its bioactive derivatives exhibit potent anticancer effects in a variety of human cancer cell model systems. The pleiotropic response in cancer cells includes growth inhibition by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, inhibition of angiogenesis, disruption of cell migration, and modulation of nuclear receptor responsiveness. These effects of artemisinin and its derivatives result from perturbations of many cellular signalling pathways. This review provides a comprehensive discussion of these cellular responses, and considers the ramifications for the potential development of artemisinin-based compounds in anticancer therapeutic and preventative strategies.

  15. Green and rapid synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Borago officinalis leaf extract: anticancer and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hina; Du, Juan; Yi, Tae-Hoo

    2016-09-06

    This study highlights the facile, reliable, cost effective, and ecofriendly synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using Borago officinalis leaves extract efficiently. The biosynthesis of AgNPs was verified by UV-Vis spectrum which showed the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 422 nm. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis revealed that the particles were spherical, hexagonal, and irregular in shape and had size ranging from 30 to 80 nm. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and elemental mapping have displayed the purity and maximum distribution of silver in the AgNPs. The crystalline nature of AgNPs had been identified using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selected area diffraction pattern (SAED). The particle size analysis revealed that the Z-average diameter of the AgNPs was 50.86 nm with polydispersity index (PDI) 0.136. Zeta potential analysis displayed the colloidal stability of AgNPs. This work also showed the efficacy of AgNPs against lung cancer cell lines (A549) and cervical cancer cell line (HeLa), in vitro. The AgNPs showed cytotoxicity to the A549 and HeLa cancer cell line at the concentrations 5 and 2 μg/ml. The AgNPs were also explored for the antibacterial activity including biofilm inhibition against pathogenic bacteria. The B. officinalis leaves extract can be used efficiently for green synthesis AgNPs. The biosynthesized AgNPs demonstrated potentials as anticancer and antibacterial agents. This work provides helpful insight into the development of new anticancer and antimicrobial agents.

  16. Potential anti-cancer activities and mechanisms of costunolide and dehydrocostuslactone.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xuejing; Peng, Zhangxiao; Su, Changqing

    2015-05-13

    Costunolide (CE) and dehydrocostuslactone (DE) are derived from many species of medicinal plants, such as Saussurea lappa Decne and Laurus nobilis L. They have been reported for their wide spectrum of biological effects, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, antimicrobial, antifungal, antioxidant, antidiabetic, antiulcer, and anthelmintic activities. In recent years, they have caused extensive interest in researchers due to their potential anti-cancer activities for various types of cancer, and their anti-cancer mechanisms, including causing cell cycle arrest, inducing apoptosis and differentiation, promoting the aggregation of microtubule protein, inhibiting the activity of telomerase, inhibiting metastasis and invasion, reversing multidrug resistance, restraining angiogenesis has been studied. This review will summarize anti-cancer activities and associated molecular mechanisms of these two compounds for the purpose of promoting their research and application.

  17. Potential Anti-Cancer Activities and Mechanisms of Costunolide and Dehydrocostuslactone

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xuejing; Peng, Zhangxiao; Su, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Costunolide (CE) and dehydrocostuslactone (DE) are derived from many species of medicinal plants, such as Saussurea lappa Decne and Laurus nobilis L. They have been reported for their wide spectrum of biological effects, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, antimicrobial, antifungal, antioxidant, antidiabetic, antiulcer, and anthelmintic activities. In recent years, they have caused extensive interest in researchers due to their potential anti-cancer activities for various types of cancer, and their anti-cancer mechanisms, including causing cell cycle arrest, inducing apoptosis and differentiation, promoting the aggregation of microtubule protein, inhibiting the activity of telomerase, inhibiting metastasis and invasion, reversing multidrug resistance, restraining angiogenesis has been studied. This review will summarize anti-cancer activities and associated molecular mechanisms of these two compounds for the purpose of promoting their research and application. PMID:25984608

  18. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of New Carbohydrate-Substituted Indenoisoquinoline Topoisomerase I Inhibitors and Improved Syntheses of the Experimental Anticancer Agents Indotecan (LMP400) and Indimitecan (LMP776)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate moieties were strategically transported from the indolocarbazole topoisomerase I (Top1) inhibitor class to the indenoisoquinoline system in search of structurally novel and potent Top1 inhibitors. The syntheses and biological evaluation of 20 new indenoisoquinolines glycosylated with linear and cyclic sugar moieties are reported. Aromatic ring substitution with 2,3-dimethoxy-8,9-methylenedioxy or 3-nitro groups exerted strong effects on antiproliferative and Top1 inhibitory activities. While the length of the carbohydrate side chain clearly correlated with antiproliferative activity, the relationship between stereochemistry and biological activity was less clearly defined. Twelve of the new indenoisoquinolines exhibit Top1 inhibitory activity equal to or better than that of camptothecin. An advanced synthetic intermediate from this study was also used to efficiently prepare indotecan (LMP400) and indimitecan (LMP776), two anticancer agents currently under investigation in a Phase I clinical trial at the National Institutes of Health. PMID:24517248

  19. Biological Activities of Fusarochromanone: a Potent Anti-cancer Agent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-03

    anti-angiogenic properties of FC101, we used the MS1 mouse microvascular endo- thelial cell line, which was selected for its high VEGFR2 expression...and Physics , LSU Shreveport, One University Place, Shreveport, LA 71115, USA. 2Department of Biological Science, LSU Shreveport, Shreveport, USA

  20. Anti-cancer activities of Brassica juncea leaves in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Youngeun; Lee, Jungjae; Ju, Jihyeung

    2016-01-01

    Mustard (Brassica juncea) leaves are commonly consumed in different Asian and African countries. Cancer is a major burden of disease worldwide, and the colorectal and lung cancers are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among cancers. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the effects of ethanol extract of mustard leaf (MLE) on the growth, angiogenic, and metastatic potentials of HCT116 colorectal carcinoma and H1299 non-small cell lung carcinoma cells in vitro. Treatment of HCT116 and H1299 cells with MLE inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner (in the range of 175-700 µg/ml, by 39-86 %) and anchorage-independent colonization (at 700 µg/ml, by 56-86 %). Induction of apoptosis by MLE was evidenced by heterogeneous and condensed nucleus morphology, increased 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride staining intensity, and elevated sub-G1 cell population. In both HCT116 and H1299 cells, treatment with MLE markedly suppressed the secretion of key pro-angiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial cell growth factor (by >92 %) and basic fibroblast growth factor (by 73-94 %). MLE was also effective in inhibiting critical events during metastasis, such as invasion (by 18-33 % in HCT116 and H1299), migration (45-82 % in H1299), and adhesion (by 17-45 % in HCT116 and H1299). These results indicate that MLE possesses in vitro anti-cancer activities against colon and lung cancers. It needs to be verified whether similar effects are reproduced in vivo. PMID:28337101

  1. Zampanolide and dactylolide: cytotoxic tubulin-assembly agents and promising anticancer leads

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Covering: through January 2014 Zampanolide is a marine natural macrolide and a recent addition to the family of microtubule-stabilizing cytotoxic agents. Zampanolide exhibits unique effects on tubulin assembly and is more potent than paclitaxel against several multi-drug resistant cancer cell lines. A high-resolution crystal structure of αβ-tubulin in complex with zampanolide explains how taxane-site microtubule-stabilizing agents promote microtubule assemble and stability. This review provides an overview of current developments of zampanolide and its related but less potent analogue dactylolide, covering their natural sources and isolation, structure and conformation, cytotoxic potential, structure–activity studies, mechanism of action, and syntheses. PMID:24945566

  2. Retaspimycin hydrochloride (IPI-504): a novel heat shock protein inhibitor as an anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Britt Erika; Vesole, David H

    2009-09-01

    Heat shock proteins are vital to cell survival under conditions of stress. They bind client proteins to assist in protein stabilization, translocation of polypeptides across cell membranes and recovery of proteins from aggregates. Heat shock protein inhibitors are a diverse group of novel agents that have been demonstrated to have pro-apoptotic effects on malignant cells through inhibition of ATP binding on the ATP/ADP-binding pocket of the heat shock protein. Initial development of heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, geldanamycin and 17-AAG, were limited by hepatotoxicity and the need for solvent carrying agents. In contrast, retaspimycin, or IPI-504, a derivative of geldanamycin and 17-AAG, is highly soluble in water and generally well tolerated. In Phase I/II trials, retaspimycin has shown activity in NSCLC and gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The most promising activity was observed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Phase I/II trials are currently underway to evaluate the dosing schedules and activity of IPI-504 in breast cancer. Given the in vitro activity in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, melanoma, leukemia and pancreatic cancer, current and future trials are of clinical interest. This article reviews IPI-504 and its utility in a wide variety of cancer phenotypes.

  3. Anticancer and antimicrobial metallopharmaceutical agents based on palladium, gold, and silver N-heterocyclic carbene complexes.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sriparna; Mohan, Renu; Singh, Jay K; Samantaray, Manoja K; Shaikh, Mobin M; Panda, Dulal; Ghosh, Prasenjit

    2007-12-05

    Complete synthetic, structural, and biomedical studies of two Pd complexes as well as Au and Ag complexes of 1-benzyl-3-tert-butylimidazol-2-ylidene are reported. Specifically, trans-[1-benzyl-3-tert-butylimidazol-2-ylidene]Pd(pyridine)Cl2 (1a) was synthesized from the reaction of 1-benzyl-3-tert-butylimidazolium chloride (1) with PdCl2 in the presence of K2CO3 as a base. The other palladium complex, [1-benzyl-3-tert-butylimidazol-2-ylidene]2PdCl2 (1b), and a gold complex, [1-benzyl-3-tert-butylimidazol-2-ylidene]AuCl (1c), were synthesized by following a transmetallation route from the silver complex, [1-benzyl-3-tert-butylimidazol-2-ylidene]AgCl (1d), by treatment with (COD)PdCl2 and (SMe2)AuCl, respectively. The silver complex 1d in turn was synthesized by the reaction of 1 with Ag2O. The molecular structures of 1a-d have been determined by X-ray diffraction studies. Biomedical studies revealed that, while the palladium complexes 1a and 1b displayed potent anticancer activity, the gold (1c) and silver (1d) complexes exhibited significant antimicrobial properties. Specifically, 1b showed strong antiproliferative activity against three types of human tumor cells, namely, cervical cancer (HeLa), breast cancer (MCF-7), and colon adenocarcinoma (HCT 116), in culture. The antiproliferative activity of 1b was found to be considerably stronger than that of cisplatin. The 1b complex inhibited tumor cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle progression at the G2 phase, preventing the mitotic entry of the cell. We present evidence suggesting that the treated cells underwent programmed cell death through a p53-dependent pathway. Though both the gold (1c) and silver (1d) complexes showed antimicrobial activity toward Bacillus subtilis, 1c was found to be ca. 2 times more potent than 1d.

  4. Phytochemical composition and anticancer activity of germinated wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed germination is a natural method to increase bioactive components that have beneficial effects on human health. Germinated wheat flour samples of a hard red wheat cultivar (Rampart) were prepared after germination of three and five days and investigated for phytochemical composition and anticanc...

  5. [Response of Pharmaceutical Companies to the Crisis of Post-Marketing Clinical Trials of Anti-Cancer Agents -- Results of Questionnaires to Pharmaceutical Companies].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Toshifusa

    2016-04-01

    Investigator-oriented post-marketing clinical trials of anti-cancer agents are faced to financial crisis due to drastic decrease in research-funds from pharmaceutical companies caused by a scandal in 2013. In order to assess the balance of research funds between 2012 and 2014, we made queries to 26 companies manufacturing anti-cancer agents, and only 10 of 26 responded to our queries. Decrease in the fund was observed in 5 of 10, no change in 1, increase in 3 and no answer in 1. Companies showed passive attitude to carry out doctor-oriented clinical trials of off-patent drugs or unapproved drugs according to advanced medical care B program, though some companies answered to proceed approved routines of these drugs if clinical trials showed good results. Most companies declined to make comments on the activity of Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED), but some insisted to produce good corroboration between AMED and pharmaceutical companies in order to improve the quality of trials. Further corroboration must be necessary for this purpose among researchers, governmental administrative organs, pharmaceutical companies, patients' groups, and mass-media.

  6. The anticancer agent 3-bromopyruvate: a simple but powerful molecule taken from the lab to the bedside.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Silva, J; Queirós, O; Baltazar, F; Ułaszewski, S; Goffeau, A; Ko, Y H; Pedersen, P L; Preto, A; Casal, M

    2016-08-01

    At the beginning of the twenty-first century, 3-bromopyruvate (3BP), a simple alkylating chemical compound was presented to the scientific community as a potent anticancer agent, able to cause rapid toxicity to cancer cells without bystander effects on normal tissues. The altered metabolism of cancers, an essential hallmark for their progression, also became their Achilles heel by facilitating 3BP's selective entry and specific targeting. Treatment with 3BP has been administered in several cancer type models both in vitro and in vivo, either alone or in combination with other anticancer therapeutic approaches. These studies clearly demonstrate 3BP's broad action against multiple cancer types. Clinical trials using 3BP are needed to further support its anticancer efficacy against multiple cancer types thus making it available to more than 30 million patients living with cancer worldwide. This review discusses current knowledge about 3BP related to cancer and discusses also the possibility of its use in future clinical applications as it relates to safety and treatment issues.

  7. Bidirectional functions of arsenic as a carcinogen and an anti-cancer agent in human squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Thang, Nguyen Dinh; Yajima, Ichiro; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Kato, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Bidirectional cancer-promoting and anti-cancer effects of arsenic for cancer cells have been revealed in previous studies. However, each of these effects (cancer-promoting or anti-cancer) was found in different cells at different treated-concentration of arsenic. In this study, we for the first time indicated that arsenic at concentration of 3 µM, equal to average concentration in drinking water in cancer-prone areas in Bangladesh, simultaneously expressed its bidirectional effects on human squamous cell carcinoma HSC5 cells with distinct pathways. Treatment with 3 µM of arsenic promoted cell invasion via upregulation of expression of MT1-MMP and downregulation of expression of p14ARF and simultaneously induced cell apoptosis through inhibition of expression of N-cadherin and increase of expression of p21(WAF1/CIP1) at both transcript and protein levels in HSC5 cells. We also showed that inhibition of MT1-MMP expression by NSC405020 resulted in decrease of arsenic-mediated invasion of HSC5 cells involving decrease in phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (pERK). Taken together, our biological and biochemical findings suggested that arsenic expressed bidirectional effects as a carcinogen and an anti-cancer agent in human squamous cell carcinoma HSC5 cells with distinct pathways. Our results might play an important scientific evident for further studies to find out a better way in treatment of arsenic-induced cancers, especially in squamous cell carcinoma.

  8. Synthesis and in vitro anticancer activity of 6,7-methylenedioxy (or 5-hydroxy-6-methoxy)-2-(substituted selenophenyl)quinolin-4-one analogs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Ting; Hsu, Mei-Hua; Cheng, Yung-Yi; Liu, Chin-Yu; Chou, Li-Chen; Huang, Li-Jiau; Wu, Tian-Shung; Yang, Xiaoming; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Kuo, Sheng-Chu

    2011-12-01

    6,7-Methylenedioxy (or 5-hydroxy-6-methoxy)-2-(substituted selenophenyl)quinolin-4-ones and their isosteric compounds were synthesized and evaluated for anticancer activity. Structure-activity relationships (SAR) of these compounds were established. Among all tested compounds, 6,7-methylenedioxy-2-(5-methylselenophen-2-yl)quinolin-4-one (4d) was found to be the most promising anticancer agent. In screening against NCI's 60 human tumor cell line panel, 4d exhibited highly selective and potent inhibitory activity against MDA-MB-435 melanoma. Furthermore, the results of COMPARE analysis suggested that 4d is an antimitotic agent with a different mechanism of action from the conventional antimitotic agents, such as colchicine, vinca alkaloids and paclitaxel. Therefore, 4d was identified as a new lead compound that merits further optimization.

  9. Mechanism of Degradation of an α-Keto-Epoxide, a Model for the Warhead for Various Proteasome Inhibitor Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Phizackerley, Kirsten M; Jumaa, Mouhannad; Lopalco, Antonio; Wolfe, Bradley H; Ablan, Christopher D; Stella, Valentino J

    2016-12-20

    The anticancer agent, carfilzomib, has a unique α-keto-epoxide warhead. The model α-keto-epoxide, N-((S)-1-((R)-2-methyloxiran-2-yl)-1-oxo-3-phenylpropan-2-yl)pivalamide (1), along with a few of its degradation products was synthesized and studied. The kinetics of hydrolysis and identification of some of the degradation products of 1 were performed at pH values 2, 4, 5, 7, and 8 at 25°C, 40°C, and 60°C and followed by HPLC and liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy, respectively. 1 degraded independent of pH between pH values 4-7 but showed some acid catalysis at pH 2 and base catalysis at pH 8. Energy of activation, Ea, values progressed from 16.8 ± 0.1 at pH 2 to 20.3 ± 0.1 kcal/mole at pH 8. The major initial degradation products in the pH range 4-5 were the S,R diol (hydrolysis of the epoxide), and S,R chlorohydrin (in the presence of chloride ions). At pH 7-8, the major products were the R,R diastereomer and the S,R and R,R diols. At pH 2, additional unidentified products were seen with relative retention times of 0.28, 0.30, 0.33, and 0.35 and masses equivalent to the diols. The study of 1 provides insight into the degradation of future drugs that use an α-keto-epoxide functional group.

  10. Methylselenocysteine - a Promising Antiangiogenic Agent for Overcoming Drug Delivery Barriers in Solid Malignancies for Therapeutic Synergy with Anticancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Arup

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Despite progress, chemotherapeutic response in solid malignancies has remained limited. While initial results of the use of antiangiogenic agents in combination chemotherapy indicated an enhanced therapeutic response, recent data indicates that the surviving cancer is not only able to surmount therapy, but is actually able to adapt a more aggressive metastatic phenotype. Thus, selecting an antiangiogenic agent that is less likely to lead to tumor resurgence is a key to future therapeutic success of antiangiogenic agents, in a combinatorial setting. Areas covered Against the broad spectrum of currently used antiangiogenic agents in the clinic, the putative benefits of the use of organo selenium (Se) compounds, such as methylselenocysteine (MSC), are discussed in this reiew. Expert opinion MSC, being part of the mammalian physiology, is a well tolerated, versatile and economical antiangiogenic agent. It down regulates multiple key upstream tumor survival markers, and enhances tumor drug delivery, at a given systemic dose of an anticancer agent, while protecting normal tissue from cytotoxic adverse effects. Further clinical trials, especially in poorly differentiated cancers, are warranted. PMID:21473705

  11. In Vitro Evaluation of Oxoplatin: An Oral Platinum(IV) Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Olszewski, Ulrike; Ach, Florian; Ulsperger, Ernst; Baumgartner, Gerhard; Zeillinger, Robert; Bednarski, Patrick; Hamilton, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Platinum(IV) compounds like oxoplatin (cis, cis, trans-diammine-dichlorido-dihydroxido-platinum(IV)) show increased stability and therefore can be applied orally. In a panel of 38 human cancer cell lines this drug induced S-phase arrest and cell death with IC50 values 2.5-fold higher than cisplatin. Oxoplatin may be converted to cisplatin by intracellular reducing agents, however, exposure to 0.1 M HCl mimicking gastric acid yielded cis-diammine-tetrachlorido-platinum(IV) exhibiting twofold increased activity. Similar results were obtained for another platinum(IV) compound, JM 149 (ammine-dichlorido-(cyclohexylamine)-dihydroxido-platinum(IV)), but not for its parent drug JM 216/satraplatin. Genome-wide expression profiling of H526 small cell lung cancer cells treated with these platinum species revealed clear differences in the expression pattern of affected genes between oxoplatin and cisplatin. In conclusion, oxoplatin constitutes a potent oral agent that is either reduced or converted to distinct active compounds, for example, by gastric acid or acidic areas prevailing in solid tumors, in dependence of the respective pharmaceutical formulation. PMID:19587824

  12. Anticancer activity of liposomal bergamot essential oil (BEO) on human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Celia, Christian; Trapasso, Elena; Locatelli, Marcello; Navarra, Michele; Ventura, Cinzia Anna; Wolfram, Joy; Carafa, Maria; Morittu, Valeria Maria; Britti, Domenico; Di Marzio, Luisa; Paolino, Donatella

    2013-12-01

    Citrus extracts, particularly bergamot essential oil (BEO) and its fractions, have been found to exhibit anticancer efficacy. However, the poor water solubility, low stability and limited bioavailability have prevented the use of BEO in cancer therapy. To overcome such drawbacks, we formulated BEO liposomes that improved the water solubility of the phytocomponents and increased their anticancer activity in vitro against human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The results warrant further investigation of BEO liposomes for in vivo applications.

  13. Synthesis and anti-cancer screening of novel heterocyclic-(2H)-1,2,3-triazoles as potential anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Penthala, Narsimha Reddy; Madhukuri, Leena; Thakkar, Shraddha; Madadi, Nikhil Reddy; Lamture, Gauri; Eoff, Robert L.; Crooks, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    trans-Cyanocombretastatin A-4 (trans-CA-4) analogues have been structurally modified to afford their more stable CA-4-(2H)-1,2,3-triazole analogues. Fifteen novel, stable 4-heteroaryl-5-aryl-(2H)-1,2,3-triazole CA-4 analogues (8a–i, 9 and 11a–e) were evaluated for anti-cancer activity against a panel of 60 human cancer cell lines. These analogues displayed potent cytotoxic activity against both hematological and solid tumor cell lines with GI50 values in the low nanomolar range. The most potent compound, 8a, was a benzothiophen-2-yl analogue that incorporated a 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl moiety connected to the (2H)-1,2,3-triazole ring system. Compound 8a exhibited GI50 values of <10 nM against 80% of the cancer cell lines in the panel. Three triazole analogues, 8a, 8b and 8g, showed particularly potent growth inhibition against the triple negative Hs578T breast cancer cell line with GI50 values of 10.3 nM, 66.5 nM and 20.3 nM, respectively. Molecular docking studies suggest that these compounds bind to the same hydrophobic pocket at the interface of α- and β-tubulin that is occupied by colchicine and cis-CA-4, and are stabilized by Van der Waals’ interactions with surrounding amino acid residues. Compound 8a was found to inhibit tubulin polymerization in vitro with an IC50 value of 1.7 µM. The potent cytotoxicity of these novel compounds and their inhibition of tubulin dynamics make these triazole analogues promising candidates for development as anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27066215

  14. Luteolin nanoparticle in chemoprevention – in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Debatosh; Jung, Kyung-Ho; Zhang, Hongzheng; Nannapaneni, Sreenivas; Wang, Xu; Amin, A.R.M Ruhul; Chen, Zhengjia; Chen, Zhuo (G).; Shin, Dong M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer prevention (chemoprevention) by using naturally occurring dietary agents has gained immense interest due to the broad safety window of these compounds. However, many of these compounds are hydrophobic and poorly soluble in water. They frequently display low bioavailability, poor systemic delivery, and low efficacy. To circumvent this problem, we explored a novel approach towards chemoprevention using nanotechnology to deliver luteolin, a natural compound present in green vegetables. We formulated water soluble polymer-encapsulated Nano-Luteolin from hydrophobic luteolin, and studied its anticancer activity against lung cancer and head and neck cancer. In vitro studies demonstrated that, like luteolin, Nano-Luteolin inhibited the growth of lung cancer cells (H292 cell line) and squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN) cells (Tu212 cell line). In Tu212 cells, the IC50 value of Nano-Luteolin was 4.13μM, and that of luteolin was 6.96μM. In H292 cells, the IC50 of luteolin was 15.56μM, and Nano-Luteolin was 14.96μM. In vivo studies using a tumor xenograft mouse model demonstrated that Nano-Luteolin has a significant inhibitory effect on the tumor growth of SCCHN in comparison to luteolin. Our results suggest that nanoparticle delivery of naturally occurring dietary agents like luteolin has many advantages and may have potential application in chemoprevention in clinical settings. PMID:24403290

  15. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel quinazolinyl-diaryl urea derivatives as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Nian; Wang, Xian-Fu; Li, Ting; Wu, De-Wen; Fu, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Guang-Ji; Shen, Xing-Can; Wang, Heng-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Through a structure-based molecular hybridization approach, a series of novel quinazolinyl-diaryl urea derivatives were designed, synthesized, and screened for their in vitro antiproliferative activities against three cancer cell lines (HepG2, MGC-803, and A549). Six compounds (7 g, 7 m, 7 o, 8 e, 8 g, and 8 m) showed stronger activity against a certain cell line compared with the positive reference drugs sorafenib and gefitinib. Among the six compounds, 8 g exhibited the strongest activity. In particular, compound 8 g induced A549 apoptosis, arrested cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase, elevated intracellular reactive oxygen species level, and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. This compound can also effectively regulate the expression of apoptosis- and cell cycle-related proteins, and influence the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. Molecular docking and structure-activity relationship analyses revealed that it can bind well to the active site of the receptor c-Raf, which was consistent with the biological data. Therefore, compound 8 g may be a potent antitumor agent, representing a promising lead for further optimization.

  16. Amide Coupling Reaction for the Synthesis of Bispyridine-based Ligands and Their Complexation to Platinum as Dinuclear Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Apps, Michael G.; Johnson, Ben W.; Sutcliffe, Oliver B.; Brown, Sarah D.; Wheate, Nial J.

    2014-01-01

    Amide coupling reactions can be used to synthesize bispyridine-based ligands for use as bridging linkers in multinuclear platinum anticancer drugs. Isonicotinic acid, or its derivatives, are coupled to variable length diaminoalkane chains under an inert atmosphere in anhydrous DMF or DMSO with the use of a weak base, triethylamine, and a coupling agent, 1-propylphosphonic anhydride. The products precipitate from solution upon formation or can be precipitated by the addition of water. If desired, the ligands can be further purified by recrystallization from hot water. Dinuclear platinum complex synthesis using the bispyridine ligands is done in hot water using transplatin. The most informative of the chemical characterization techniques to determine the structure and gross purity of both the bispyridine ligands and the final platinum complexes is 1H NMR with particular analysis of the aromatic region of the spectra (7-9 ppm). The platinum complexes have potential application as anticancer agents and the synthesis method can be modified to produce trinuclear and other multinuclear complexes with different hydrogen bonding functionality in the bridging ligand. PMID:24893964

  17. Photophysical characterization of anticancer drug valrubicin in rHDL nanoparticles and its use as an imaging agent.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sunil; Chib, Rahul; Raut, Sangram; Bermudez, Jaclyn; Sabnis, Nirupama; Duggal, Divya; Kimball, Joseph D; Lacko, Andras G; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles are target-specific drug delivery agents that are increasingly used in cancer therapy to enhance bioavailability and to reduce off target toxicity of anti-cancer agents. Valrubicin is an anti-cancer drug, currently approved only for vesicular bladder cancer treatment because of its poor water solubility. On the other hand, valrubicin carrying reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticles appear ideally suited for extended applications, including systemic cancer chemotherapy. We determined selected fluorescence properties of the free (unencapsulated) drug vs. valrubicin incorporated into rHDL nanoparticles. We have found that upon encapsulation into rHDL nanoparticles the quantum yield of valrubicin fluorescence increased six fold while its fluorescence lifetime increased about 2 fold. Accordingly, these and potassium iodide (KI) quenching data suggest that upon incorporation, valrubicin is localized deep in the interior of the nanoparticle, inside the lipid matrix. Fluorescence anisotropy of the rHDL valrubicin nanoparticles was also found to be high along with extended rotational correlation time. The fluorescence of valrubicin could also be utilized to assess its distribution upon delivery to prostate cancer (PC3) cells. Overall the fluorescence properties of the rHDL: valrubicin complex reveal valuable novel characteristics of this drug delivery vehicle that may be particularly applicable when used in systemic (intravenous) therapy.

  18. Synthesis of Rapamycin Derivatives Containing the Triazole Moiety Used as Potential mTOR-Targeted Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lijun; Huang, Jie; Chen, Xiaoming; Yu, Hui; Li, Kualiang; Yang, Dan; Chen, Xiaqin; Ying, Jiayin; Pan, Fusheng; Lv, Youbing; Cheng, Yuanrong

    2016-06-01

    Rapamycin, a potent antifungal antibiotic, was approved as immunosuppressant, and lately its derivatives have been developed into mTOR targeting anticancer drugs. Structure modification was performed at the C-42 position of rapamycin, and a novel series of rapamycin triazole hybrids (4a-d, 5a-e, 8a-e, and 9a-e) was facilely synthesized via Huisgen's reaction. The anticancer activity of these compounds was evaluated against the Caski, H1299, MGC-803, and H460 human cancer cell lines. Some of the derivatives (8a-e, 9a-e) appeared to have stronger activity than that of rapamycin; however, 4a-d and 5a-e failed to show potential anticancer activity. Compound 9e with a (2,4-dichlorophenylamino)methyl moiety on the triazole ring was the most active anticancer compound, which showed IC50 values of 6.05 (Caski), 7.89 (H1299), 25.88 (MGC-803), and 8.60 μM (H460). In addition, research on the mechanism showed that 9e was able to cause cell morphological changes and to induce apoptosis in the Caski cell line. Most importantly, 9e can decrease the phosphorylation of mTOR and of its downstream key proteins, S6 and P70S6K1, indicating that 9e can effectively inhibit the mTOR signaling pathway. Thus, it may have the potential to become a new mTOR inhibitor against various cancers.

  19. Phytosterols as a natural anticancer agent: Current status and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Naiyer; Khan, Wajahatullah; Md, Shadab; Ali, Asgar; Saluja, Sundeep Singh; Sharma, Sadhana; Al-Allaf, Faisal A; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Ibrahim, Ibrahim Abdel Aziz; Abdel-Wahab, Ali Fathi; Afify, Mohamed Abdelaziz; Al-Ghamdi, Saeed Saeed

    2017-04-01

    Phytosterols are naturally occurring compounds in plants, structurally similar to cholesterol. The human diet is quite abundant in sitosterol and campesterol. Phytosterols are known to have various bioactive properties including reducing intestinal cholesterol absorption which alleviates blood LDL-cholesterol and cardiovascular problems. It is indicated that phytosterol rich diets may reduce cancer risk by 20%. Phytosterols may also affect host systems, enabling antitumor responses by improving immune response recognition of cancer, affecting the hormone dependent endocrine tumor growth, and by sterol biosynthesis modulation. Moreover, phytosterols have also exhibited properties that directly inhibit tumor growth, including reduced cell cycle progression, apoptosis induction, and tumor metastasis inhibition. The objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on occurrences, chemistry, pharmacokinetics and potential anticancer properties of phytosterols in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, anticancer effects of phytosterols have strongly been suggested and support their dietary inclusion to prevent and treat cancers.

  20. Repurposing drugs in oncology (ReDO)—cimetidine as an anti-cancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Pantziarka, Pan; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vidula; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2014-01-01

    Cimetidine, the first H2 receptor antagonist in widespread clinical use, has anti-cancer properties that have been elucidated in a broad range of pre-clinical and clinical studies for a number of different cancer types. These data are summarised and discussed in relation to a number of distinct mechanisms of action. Based on the evidence presented, it is proposed that cimetidine would synergise with a range of other drugs, including existing chemotherapeutics, and that further exploration of the potential of cimetidine as an anti-cancer therapeutic is warranted. Furthermore, there is compelling evidence that cimetidine administration during the peri-operative period may provide a survival benefit in some cancers. A number of possible combinations with other drugs are discussed in the supplementary material accompanying this paper. PMID:25525463

  1. The Applications of Targeting Anti-Cancer Agents in Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guang-Chun; Yang, Xu; Yu, Yan; Zhao, Dai-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cancer targeting drugs appear to be a new and powerful "weapon" for cancer therapies. These targeting drugs are directed against specific molecules that are over-expressed or where certain unique factors are aberrantly expressed either in cancer cells or in diseased cell sites. Compared with traditional chemotherapeutic drugs, these targeting drugs have the advantages of high specificity, efficacy and less side effects. Target therapy is a breakthrough and revolutionary advance in the field of cancer therapy. Tumor angiogenesis plays a key role in tumor growth and metastasis and the mutation of tyrosine kinases is also strongly associated with cancer progression. Thus, in this review, we will discuss the advances in the development of targeting anti-cancer drugs by narrowing it down to small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptors belonging to the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases and angiogenic inhibitors. It will also address concerns for drug resistance and adverse events.

  2. Recent development of ATP-competitive small molecule phosphatidylinostitol-3-kinase inhibitors as anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Wan, Wen-zhu; Li, Yan; Zhou, Guan-lian; Liu, Xin-guang

    2017-01-01

    Phosphatidylinostitol-3-kinase (PI3K) is the potential anticancer target in the PI3K/Akt/ mTOR pathway. Here we reviewed the ATP-competitive small molecule PI3K inhibitors in the past few years, including the pan Class I PI3K inhibitors, the isoform-specific PI3K inhibitors and/or the PI3K/mTOR dual inhibitors. PMID:27769061

  3. In vitro anticancer activity of twelve Chinese medicinal herbs.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Mark; Hamilton, Bobbi; Dairkee, Schanaz H; Cohen, Isaac; Campbell, Michael J

    2005-07-01

    Aqueous extracts of 12 Chinese medicinal herbs, Anemarrhena asphodeloides, Artemisia argyi, Commiphora myrrha, Duchesnea indica, Gleditsia sinensis, Ligustrum lucidum, Rheum palmatum, Rubia cordifolia, Salvia chinensis, Scutellaria barbata, Uncaria rhychophylla and Vaccaria segetalis were evaluated for their antiproliferative activity on eight cancer cell lines as well as on normal human mammary epithelial cells. Five human and three murine cancer cell lines representing different tissues (breast, lung, pancreas and prostate) were used. All the crude aqueous extracts demonstrated growth inhibitory activity on some or all of the cancer cell lines, but only two showed activity against the normal mammary epithelial cells. Overall, the murine cell lines tended to be more sensitive to most of the extracts compared with the human cell lines. Among the human cell lines, cell type specificity was observed for two extracts. These results indicate the potential use of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs as antineoplastic agents and suggest that further studies evaluating their mechanism(s) of action and the isolation of active antitumor compounds are warranted.

  4. Ferns and lycopods--a potential treasury of anticancer agents but also a carcinogenic hazard.

    PubMed

    Tomšík, Pavel

    2014-06-01

    Many species of seedless vascular plants-ferns and lycopods-have been used as food and folk medicine since ancient times. Some of them have become the focus of intensive research concerning their anticancer properties. Studies on the anticancer effect of crude extracts are being increasingly replaced by bioactivity-guided fractionation, as well as detailed assessment of the mechanism of action. Numerous compounds-especially flavonoids such as amentoflavone and protoapigenone, and also simpler phenolic compounds, steroids, alkaloids and terpenoids-were isolated and found to be cytotoxic, particularly pro-apoptotic, or to induce cell cycle arrest in cancer cell lines in vitro. In in vivo experiments, some fern-derived compounds inhibited tumour growth with little toxicity. On the other hand, many ferns-not only the well-known Bracken (Pteridium)-may pose a significant hazard to human health due to the fact that they contain carcinogenic sesquiterpenoids and their analogues. The objective of this review is to summarise the recent state of research on the anticancer properties of ferns and lycopods, with a focus on their characteristic bioactive constituents. The carcinogenic hazard posed by ferns is also mentioned.

  5. Novel angular benzophenazines: dual topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II inhibitors as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Vicker, Nigel; Burgess, Luke; Chuckowree, Irina S; Dodd, Rory; Folkes, Adrian J; Hardick, David J; Hancox, Timothy C; Miller, Warren; Milton, John; Sohal, Sukhjit; Wang, Shouming; Wren, Stephen P; Charlton, Peter A; Dangerfield, Wendy; Liddle, Chris; Mistry, Prakash; Stewart, Alistair J; Denny, William A

    2002-01-31

    A series of substituted angular benzophenazines were prepared using a new synthetic route via a novel regiocontrolled condensation of 1,2-naphthoquinones and 2,3-diaminobenzoic acids. The synthesis and biological activity of this new series of substituted 8,9-benzo[a]phenazine carboxamide systems are described. The analogues were evaluated against the H69 parental human small cell lung carcinoma cell line and H69/LX4 resistant cell line which overexpresses P-glycoprotein. Selected analogues were evaluated against the COR-L23 parental human non small cell lung carcinoma cell line and the COR-L23/R resistant cell line which overexpresses multidrug resistance protein. This series of novel angular benzophenazines were potent cytotoxic agents in these cell lines and may be able to circumvent multidrug resistance mechanisms which result in the lack of efficacy of many drugs in cancer chemotherapy. These compounds show dual inhibition of topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II and thus target two key enzymes responsible for the topology of DNA that are active at different points in the cell cycle. The introduction of chirality into the carboxamide side chain of these novel benzophenazine carboxamides has resulted in the discovery of a potent enantiospecific series of cytotoxic agents, exemplified by 4-methoxy-benzo[a]phenazine-11-carboxylic acid (2-(dimethylamino)-1-(R)-methyl-ethyl)-amide, XR11576 ((R)-4j' '). In vivo activity has been demonstrated for 4-methoxy-benzo[a]phenazine-11-carboxylic acid (2-(dimethylamino)-1-(R)-methyl-ethyl)-amide, XR11576, after intravenous administration to female mice, and this compound has been selected as a development candidate for further evaluation.

  6. A SIRT2-selective inhibitor promotes c-Myc oncoprotein degradation and exhibits broad anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Hui; Hu, Jing; He, Bin; Negron Abril, Yashira L.; Stupinski, Jack; Weiser, Keren; Carbonaro, Marisa; Chiang, Ying-Ling; Southard, Teresa; Giannakakou, Paraskevi; Weiss, Robert S.; Lin, Hening

    2016-01-01

    Summary Targeting sirtuins for cancer treatment has been a topic of debate due to conflicting reports and lack of potent and specific inhibitors. We have developed a thiomyristoyl lysine compound, TM, as a potent SIRT2-specific inhibitor with broad anticancer effect in various human cancer cells and mouse models of breast cancer. Mechanistically, SIRT2 inhibition promotes c-Myc ubiquitination and degradation. The anticancer effect of TM correlates with its ability to decrease c-Myc level. TM had limited effects on non-cancerous cells and tumor-free mice, suggesting that cancer cells have an increased dependency on SIRT2 that can be exploited for therapeutic benefit. Our studies demonstrate that SIRT2-selective inhibitors are promising anticancer agents and may represent a general strategy to target certain c-Myc-driven cancers. PMID:26977881

  7. Psoralea glandulosa as a Potential Source of Anticancer Agents for Melanoma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Madrid, Alejandro; Cardile, Venera; González, César; Montenegro, Ivan; Villena, Joan; Caggia, Silvia; Graziano, Adriana; Russo, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of identifying novel agents with antigrowth and pro-apoptotic activity on melanoma cancer, the present study was undertaken to investigate the biological activity of the resinous exudate of aerial parts from Psoralea glandulosa, and its active components (bakuchiol (1), 3-hydroxy-bakuchiol (2) and 12-hydroxy-iso-bakuchiol (3)) against melanoma cells (A2058). In addition, the effect in cancer cells of bakuchiol acetate (4), a semi-synthetic derivative of bakuchiol, was examined. The results obtained show that the resinous exudate inhibited the growth of cancer cells with IC50 value of 10.5 μg/mL after 48 h of treatment, while, for pure compounds, the most active was the semi-synthetic compound 4. Our data also demonstrate that resin is able to induce apoptotic cell death, which could be related to an overall action of the meroterpenes present. In addition, our data seem to indicate that the apoptosis correlated to the tested products appears, at least in part, to be associated with an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In summary, our study provides the first evidence that P. glandulosa may be considered a source of useful molecules in the development of analogues with more potent efficacy against melanoma cells. PMID:25860949

  8. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Rapamycin Benzothiazole Hybrids as mTOR Targeted Anti-cancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lijun; Huang, Jie; Chen, Xiaoming; Yu, Hui; Li, Kualiang; Yang, Dan; Chen, Xiaqin; Ying, Jiayin; Pan, Fusheng; Lv, Youbing; Cheng, Yuanrong

    2016-01-01

    The immunosuppressant drug rapamycin, was firstly identified as a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) allosteric inhibitor, and its derivatives have been successfully developed as anti-cancer drugs. Therefore, finding rapamycin derivatives with better anti-cancer activity has been proved to be an effective way to discover new targeted anti-cancer drugs. In this paper, structure modification was performed at the C-43 position of rapamycin using bioisosterism and a hybrid approach: a series of novel rapamycin-benzothiazole hybrids 4a-e, 5a-c, and 9a, b have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for their anti-cancer activity against Caski, CNE-2, SGC-7901, PC-3, SK-NEP-1 and A-375 human cancer cell lines. Some of these compounds (4a-e, 9a, b) displayed good to excellent potency against the Caski and SK-NEP-1 cell line as compared with rapamycin. Compound 9b as the most active compound showed IC50 values of 8.3 (Caski) and 9.6 μM (SK-NEP-1), respectively. In addition, research on the mechanism showed that 9b was able to cause G1 phase arrest and induce apoptosis in the Caski cell line. Most importantly, it significantly decreased the phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein, p70S6K1 and 4EBP1, which indicated that 9b inhibited the cancer cell growth by blocking the mTOR pathway and may have the potential to become a new mTOR inhibitor.

  9. Effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 on Cancer Cells and Potential Applications in Combination with Established and Putative Anti-Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Abu el Maaty, Mohamed A.; Wölfl, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The diverse effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), the bio-active form of vitamin D, on cancer cell metabolism and proliferation has made it an interesting candidate as a supporting therapeutic option in cancer treatment. An important strategy in cancer therapy is the use of combination chemotherapy to overcome drug resistance associated with numerous anti-cancer agents and to provide better means of avoiding undesirable side effects. This complex strategy is widely adopted by oncologists and several established “cocktails” of chemotherapeutics are routinely administered to cancer patients. Among the principles followed in designing such treatment regimens is the use of drugs with different mechanisms of action to overcome the issue of tumor heterogeneity and to evade resistance. In light of the profound and diverse effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 reported by in vitro and in vivo studies, we discuss how these effects could support the use of this molecule in combination with “classical” cytotoxic drugs, such as platins and anti-metabolites, for the treatment of solid and hematological tumors. We also examine recent evidence supporting synergistic activities with other promising anti-cancer drug candidates, and postulate mechanisms through which 1,25(OH)2D3 may help evade chemoresistance. PMID:28124999

  10. Scaffold-hopping of bioactive flavonoids: Discovery of aryl-pyridopyrimidinones as potent anticancer agents that inhibit catalytic role of topoisomerase IIα.

    PubMed

    Priyadarshani, Garima; Amrutkar, Suyog; Nayak, Anmada; Banerjee, Uttam C; Kundu, Chanakya N; Guchhait, Sankar K

    2016-10-21

    A strategy of scaffold-hopping of bioactive natural products, flavones and isoflavones, leading to target-based discovery of potent anticancer agents has been reported for the first time. Scaffold-hopped flavones, 2-aryl-4H-pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-4-ones and the scaffold-hopped isoflavones, 3-aryl-pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-4-ones were synthesized via Pd-catalyzed activation-arylation methods. Most of the compounds were found to exhibit pronounced human topoisomerase IIα (hTopoIIα) inhibitory activities and several compounds were found to be more potent than etoposide (a hTopoIIα-inhibiting anticancer drug). These classes of compounds were found to be hTopoIIα-selective catalytic inhibitors while not interfering with topoisomerase I and interacted with DNA plausibly in groove domain. Cytotoxicities against various cancer cells, low toxicity in normal cells, and apoptotic effects were observed. Interestingly, compared to parent flavones/isoflavones, their scaffold-hopped analogs bearing alike functionalities showed significant/enhanced hTopoIIα-inhibitory and cytotoxic properties, indicating the importance of a natural product-based scaffold-hopping strategy in the drug discovery.

  11. Anticancer activity of 7,8-dihydroxyflavone in melanoma cells via downregulation of α-MSH/cAMP/MITF pathway.

    PubMed

    Sim, Deok Yong; Sohng, Jae Kyung; Jung, Hye Jin

    2016-07-01

    Malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive skin cancer and highly resistant to most conventional treatment. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the anticancer effects and mechanisms of action of 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF), a monophenolic flavone, in melanoma cells. At concentrations not exhibiting cytotoxicity, 7,8-DHF potently inhibited growth and clonogenic survival of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH)-stimulated B16F10 melanoma cells. Furthermore, it significantly blocked migration and invasion of the metastatic melanoma cells. We also observed that 7,8-DHF exhibits anti-melanogenic activity through inhibition of tyrosinase activity in α-MSH-stimulating condition. Notably, the suppressive activities of 7,8-DHF on melanoma progression were associated with the downregulation of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and its main downstream transcription targets, including hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) and c-MET, by a decrease in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level. In addition, combination treatment with 7,8-DHF and resveratrol, a known therapeutic agent against melanoma, had greater anticancer activities and MITF inhibition than treatment with each single agent in α-MSH-treated B16F10 cells. Collectively, these findings may contribute to the potential application of 7,8-DHF in the prevention and treatment of malignant melanoma.

  12. Vitamin E succinate-conjugated F68 micelles for mitoxantrone delivery in enhancing anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuling; Xu, Yingqi; Wu, Minghui; Fan, Lijiao; He, Chengwei; Wan, Jian-Bo; Li, Peng; Chen, Meiwan; Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Mitoxantrone (MIT) is a chemotherapeutic agent with promising anticancer efficacy. In this study, Pluronic F68-vitamine E succinate (F68-VES) amphiphilic polymer micelles were developed for delivering MIT and enhancing its anticancer activity. MIT-loaded F68–VES (F68–VES/MIT) micelles were prepared via the solvent evaporation method with self-assembly under aqueous conditions. F68–VES/MIT micelles were found to be of optimal particle size with the narrow size distribution. Transmission electron microscopy images of F68–VES/MIT micelles showed homogeneous spherical shapes and smooth surfaces. F68–VES micelles had a low critical micelle concentration value of 3.311 mg/L, as well as high encapsulation efficiency and drug loading. Moreover, F68–VES/MIT micelles were stable in the presence of fetal bovine serum for 24 hours and maintained sustained drug release in vitro. Remarkably, the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of F68–VES/MIT micelles was lower than that of free MIT in both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells (two human breast cancer cell lines). In addition, compared with free MIT, there was an increased trend of apoptosis and cellular uptake of F68–VES/MIT micelles in MDA-MB-231 cells. Taken together, these results indicated that F68–VES polymer micelles were able to effectively deliver MIT and largely improve its potency in cancer therapy. PMID:27471384

  13. Ag@Ag8W4O16 nanoroasted rice beads with photocatalytic, antibacterial and anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Selvamani, Muthamizh; Krishnamoorthy, Giribabu; Ramadoss, Manigandan; Sivakumar, Praveen Kumar; Settu, Munusamy; Ranganathan, Suresh; Vengidusamy, Narayanan

    2016-03-01

    Increasing resistance of pathogens and cancer cell line towards antibiotics and anticancer agents has caused serious health problems in the past decades. Due to these problems in recent years, researchers have tried to combine nanotechnology with material science to have intrinsic antimicrobial and anticancer activity. The metals and metal oxides were investigated with respect to their antimicrobial and anticancer effects towards bacteria and cancer cell line. In the present work metal@metal tungstate (Ag@Ag8W4O16 nanoroasted rice beads) is investigated for antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus using Mueller-Hinton broth and the anticancer activity against B16F10 cell line was studied. Silver decorated silver tungstate (Ag@Ag8W4O16) was synthesized by the microwave irradiation method using Cetyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide (CTAB). Ag@Ag8W4O16 was characterized by using various spectroscopic techniques. The phase and crystalline nature were analyzed by using XRD. The morphological analysis was carried out using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM). Further, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Raman spectral analysis were carried out in order to ascertain the presence of functional groups in Ag@Ag8W4O16. The optical property was investigated using Diffuse Reflectance Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy (DRS-UV-Vis) and the band gap was found to be 3.08eV. Surface area of the synthesized Ag@Ag8W4O16 wasanalyzed by BET analysis and Ag@Ag8W4O16 was utilized for the degradation of organic dyes methylene blue and rhodamine B. The morphology of the Ag@Ag8W4O16 resembles roasted rice beads with breath and length in nm range. The oxidation state of tungsten (W) and silver (Ag) was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  14. Potential therapeutic applications of multifunctional host-defense peptides from frog skin as anti-cancer, anti-viral, immunomodulatory, and anti-diabetic agents.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Lukic, Miodrag L; Flatt, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Frog skin constitutes a rich source of peptides with a wide range of biological properties. These include host-defense peptides with cytotoxic activities against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses, and mammalian cells. Several hundred such peptides from diverse species have been described. Although attention has been focused mainly on antimicrobial activity, the therapeutic potential of frog skin peptides as anti-infective agents remains to be realized and no compound based upon their structures has yet been adopted in clinical practice. Consequently, alternative applications are being explored. Certain naturally occurring frog skin peptides, and analogs with improved therapeutic properties, show selective cytotoxicity against tumor cells and viruses and so have potential for development into anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. Some peptides display complex cytokine-mediated immunomodulatory properties. Effects on the production of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines by peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been observed so that clinical applications as anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and immunostimulatory agents are possible. Several frog skin peptides, first identified on the basis of antimicrobial activity, have been shown to stimulate insulin release both in vitro and in vivo and so show potential as incretin-based therapies for treatment of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review assesses the therapeutic possibilities of peptides from frogs belonging to the Ascaphidae, Alytidae, Pipidae, Dicroglossidae, Leptodactylidae, Hylidae, and Ranidae families that complement their potential role as anti-infectives for use against multidrug-resistant microorganisms.

  15. Mitochondrial Targeting of Vitamin E Succinate Enhances Its Pro-apoptotic and Anti-cancer Activity via Mitochondrial Complex II*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lan-Feng; Jameson, Victoria J. A.; Tilly, David; Cerny, Jiri; Mahdavian, Elahe; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Stursa, Jan; Witting, Paul K.; Stantic, Bela; Rohlena, Jakub; Truksa, Jaroslav; Kluckova, Katarina; Dyason, Jeffrey C.; Ledvina, Miroslav; Salvatore, Brian A.; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Coster, Mark J.; Ralph, Stephen J.; Smith, Robin A. J.; Neuzil, Jiri

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex II (CII) has been recently identified as a novel target for anti-cancer drugs. Mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate (MitoVES) is modified so that it is preferentially localized to mitochondria, greatly enhancing its pro-apoptotic and anti-cancer activity. Using genetically manipulated cells, MitoVES caused apoptosis and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in CII-proficient malignant cells but not their CII-dysfunctional counterparts. MitoVES inhibited the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity of CII with IC50 of 80 μm, whereas the electron transfer from CII to CIII was inhibited with IC50 of 1.5 μm. The agent had no effect either on the enzymatic activity of CI or on electron transfer from CI to CIII. Over 24 h, MitoVES caused stabilization of the oxygen-dependent destruction domain of HIF1α fused to GFP, indicating promotion of the state of pseudohypoxia. Molecular modeling predicted the succinyl group anchored into the proximal CII ubiquinone (UbQ)-binding site and successively reduced interaction energies for serially shorter phytyl chain homologs of MitoVES correlated with their lower effects on apoptosis induction, ROS generation, and SDH activity. Mutation of the UbQ-binding Ser68 within the proximal site of the CII SDHC subunit (S68A or S68L) suppressed both ROS generation and apoptosis induction by MitoVES. In vivo studies indicated that MitoVES also acts by causing pseudohypoxia in the context of tumor suppression. We propose that mitochondrial targeting of VES with an 11-carbon chain localizes the agent into an ideal position across the interface of the mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix, optimizing its biological effects as an anti-cancer drug. PMID:21059645

  16. Mitochondrial targeting of vitamin E succinate enhances its pro-apoptotic and anti-cancer activity via mitochondrial complex II.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lan-Feng; Jameson, Victoria J A; Tilly, David; Cerny, Jiri; Mahdavian, Elahe; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Stursa, Jan; Witting, Paul K; Stantic, Bela; Rohlena, Jakub; Truksa, Jaroslav; Kluckova, Katarina; Dyason, Jeffrey C; Ledvina, Miroslav; Salvatore, Brian A; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Coster, Mark J; Ralph, Stephen J; Smith, Robin A J; Neuzil, Jiri

    2011-02-04

    Mitochondrial complex II (CII) has been recently identified as a novel target for anti-cancer drugs. Mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate (MitoVES) is modified so that it is preferentially localized to mitochondria, greatly enhancing its pro-apoptotic and anti-cancer activity. Using genetically manipulated cells, MitoVES caused apoptosis and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in CII-proficient malignant cells but not their CII-dysfunctional counterparts. MitoVES inhibited the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity of CII with IC(50) of 80 μM, whereas the electron transfer from CII to CIII was inhibited with IC(50) of 1.5 μM. The agent had no effect either on the enzymatic activity of CI or on electron transfer from CI to CIII. Over 24 h, MitoVES caused stabilization of the oxygen-dependent destruction domain of HIF1α fused to GFP, indicating promotion of the state of pseudohypoxia. Molecular modeling predicted the succinyl group anchored into the proximal CII ubiquinone (UbQ)-binding site and successively reduced interaction energies for serially shorter phytyl chain homologs of MitoVES correlated with their lower effects on apoptosis induction, ROS generation, and SDH activity. Mutation of the UbQ-binding Ser(68) within the proximal site of the CII SDHC subunit (S68A or S68L) suppressed both ROS generation and apoptosis induction by MitoVES. In vivo studies indicated that MitoVES also acts by causing pseudohypoxia in the context of tumor suppression. We propose that mitochondrial targeting of VES with an 11-carbon chain localizes the agent into an ideal position across the interface of the mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix, optimizing its biological effects as an anti-cancer drug.

  17. Novel molecular, cytotoxical, and immunological study on promising and selective anticancer activity of Mung bean sprouts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The anticancer and immunomodulatory activity of mung bean sprouts (MBS) and the underlying mechanisms against human cervical and hepatocarcinoma cancer cells were explored. Methods MBS cytotoxicity and MBS-induced anticancer cytokines, TNF-α and IFN-β from cancer cells, and immunological cytokines, IL-4, IFN-γ, and IL-10 from peripheral mononuclear cells (PMNC) were assessed by MTS and ELISA assays. Apoptotic cells were investigated by flow cytometry. The expression level of apoptotic genes (Bax, BCL-2, Capsases 7–9) and cell cycle regulatory genes (cyclin D, E, and A) and tumor suppressor proteins (p27, p21, and p53) was assessed by real-time qPCR in the cancer cells treated with extract IC50. Results The cytotoxicity on normal human cells was significantly different from HeLa and HepG2 cells, 163.97 ± 5.73, 13.3 ± 0.89, and 14.04 ± 1.5 mg/ml, respectively. The selectivity index (SI) was 12.44 ± 0.83 for HeLa and 11.94 ± 1.2 for HepG2 cells. Increased levels of TNF-α and IFN-β were observed in the treated HeLa and HepG2 culture supernatants when compared with untreated cells. MBS extract was shown to be an immunopolarizing agent by inducing IFNγ and inhibiting IL-4 production by PBMC; this leads to triggering of CMI and cellular cytotoxicity. The extract induced apoptosis, in a dose and time dependent manner, in treated HeLa and HepG2, but not in untreated, cells (P < 0.05). The treatment significantly induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 in HeLa cells. The percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase of the treated HeLa cells increased from 62.87 ± 2.1%, in untreated cells, to 80.48 ± 2.97%. Interestingly, MBS IC50 induced the expression of apoptosis and tumor suppressor related genes in both HeLa and HepG2 cells. MBS extract succeeded in inducing cdk-inhibitors, p21, p53, and p27 in HeLa cells while it induced only p53 in HepG2 cells (P < 0.05). This is a clue for the cell type- specific interaction of the studied extract. These proteins inhibit

  18. Folate-targeted pH-responsive calcium zoledronate nanoscale metal-organic frameworks: Turning a bone antiresorptive agent into an anticancer therapeutic.

    PubMed

    Au, Kin Man; Satterlee, Andrew; Min, Yuanzeng; Tian, Xi; Kim, Young Seok; Caster, Joseph M; Zhang, Longzhen; Zhang, Tian; Huang, Leaf; Wang, Andrew Z

    2016-03-01

    Zoledronate (Zol) is a third-generation bisphosphonate that is widely used as an anti-resorptive agent for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis. While there is preclinical data indicating that bisphosphonates such as Zol have direct cytotoxic effects on cancer cells, such effect has not been firmly established in the clinical setting. This is likely due to the rapid absorption of bisphosphonates by the skeleton after intravenous (i.v.) administration. Herein, we report the reformulation of Zol using nanotechnology and evaluation of this novel nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (nMOFs) formulation of Zol as an anticancer agent. The nMOF formulation is comprised of a calcium zoledronate (CaZol) core and a polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface. To preferentially deliver CaZol nMOFs to tumors as well as facilitate cellular uptake of Zol, we incorporated folate (Fol)-targeted ligands on the nMOFs. The folate receptor (FR) is known to be overexpressed in several tumor types, including head-and-neck, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers. We demonstrated that these targeted CaZol nMOFs possess excellent chemical and colloidal stability in physiological conditions. The release of encapsulated Zol from the nMOFs occurs in the mid-endosomes during nMOF endocytosis. In vitro toxicity studies demonstrated that Fol-targeted CaZol nMOFs are more efficient than small molecule Zol in inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in FR-overexpressing H460 non-small cell lung and PC3 prostate cancer cells. Our findings were further validated in vivo using mouse xenograft models of H460 and PC3. We demonstrated that Fol-targeted CaZol nMOFs are effective anticancer agents and increase the direct antitumor activity of Zol by 80-85% in vivo through inhibition of tumor neovasculature, and inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis.

  19. Effects of molecular weight and hydrolysis conditions on anticancer activity of fucoidans from sporophyll of Undaria pinnatifida.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Chung, Donghwa; Shin, Il-Shik; Lee, HyeonYong; Kim, JinChul; Lee, YongJin; You, SangGuan

    2008-12-01

    Hydrolyzed fucoidans, from sporophyll of Undaria pinnatifida, were used to determine the effects of molecular weight (Mw) and hydrolysis conditions on cancer cell growth. Native fucoidans showed anticancer activity of 37.6%. When hydrolyzed in boiling water with HCl for 5 min, fucoidans (Mw = 490 kDa) significantly increased anticancer activity to 75.9%. However, fucoidans hydrolyzed in a microwave oven showed little improvement of anticancer activity and even exhibited the inhibition activity below 30% when treated more than 90s. This suggests that anticancer activity of fucoidans could be significantly enhanced by lowering their Mw only when they are depolymerized by mild condition.

  20. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship study on anti-cancer activity of 3,4-dihydroquinazoline derivatives against human lung cancer A549 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sehyeon; Choi, Min Ji; Kim, Minju; Lee, Sunhoe; Lee, Jinsung; Lee, Seok Joon; Cho, Haelim; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Lee, Jae Yeol

    2015-03-01

    A series of 3,4-dihydroquinazoline derivatives with anti-cancer activities against human lung cancer A549 cells were subjected to three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies using the comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) approaches. The most potent compound, 1 was used to align the molecules. As a result, the best prediction was obtained with CoMSIA combined the steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic, hydrogen bond donor, and hydrogen bond acceptor fields (q2 = 0.720, r2 = 0.897). This model was validated by an external test set of 6 compounds giving satisfactory predictive r2 value of 0.923 as well as the scrambling stability test. This model would guide the design of potent 3,4-dihydroquinazoline derivatives as anti-cancer agent for the treatment of human lung cancer.

  1. Synthesis and anticancer effects evaluation of 1-alkyl-3-(6-(2-methoxy-3-sulfonylaminopyridin-5-yl)benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)urea as anticancer agents with low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-Xiao; Li, Huan; Wang, Juan; Mao, Shuai; Xin, Min-Hang; Lu, She-Min; Mei, Qi-Bing; Zhang, San-Qi

    2015-10-01

    As a PI3K and mTOR dual inhibitor, N-(2-chloro-5-(2-acetylaminobenzo[d]thiazol-6-yl)pyridin-3-yl)-4-fluorophenylsulfonamide displays toxicity when orally administrated. In the present study, alkylurea moiety replaced the acetamide group in the compound and a series of 1-alkyl-3-(6-(2,3-disubstituted pyridin-5-yl)benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)urea derivatives were synthesized. The antiproliferative activities of the synthesized compounds in vitro were evaluated against HCT116, MCF-7, U87 MG and A549 cell lines. The compounds with potent antiproliferative activity were tested for their acute oral toxicity and inhibitory activity against PI3Ks and mTORC1. The results indicate that the compound attached a 2-(dialkylamino)ethylurea moiety at the 2-positeion of benzothiazole can retain the antiproliferative activity and inhibitory activity against PI3K and mTOR. In addition, their acute oral toxicity reduced dramatically. Moreover, compound 2f can effectively inhibit tumor growth in a mice S180 homograft model. These findings suggest that 1-(2-dialkylaminoethyl)-3-(6-(2-methoxy-3-sulfonylaminopyridin-5-yl)benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)urea derivatives can serve as potent PI3K inhibitors and anticancer agents with low toxicity.

  2. A translational study "case report" on the small molecule "energy blocker" 3-bromopyruvate (3BP) as a potent anticancer agent: from bench side to bedside.

    PubMed

    Ko, Y H; Verhoeven, H A; Lee, M J; Corbin, D J; Vogl, T J; Pedersen, P L

    2012-02-01

    The small alkylating molecule, 3-bromopyruvate (3BP), is a potent and specific anticancer agent. 3BP is different in its action from most currently available chemo-drugs. Thus, 3BP targets cancer cells' energy metabolism, both its high glycolysis ("Warburg Effect") and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. This inhibits/ blocks total energy production leading to a depletion of energy reserves. Moreover, 3BP as an "Energy Blocker", is very rapid in killing such cells. This is in sharp contrast to most commonly used anticancer agents that usually take longer to show a noticeable effect. In addition, 3BP at its effective concentrations that kill cancer cells has little or no effect on normal cells. Therefore, 3BP can be considered a member, perhaps one of the first, of a new class of anticancer agents. Following 3BP's discovery as a novel anticancer agent in vitro in the Year 2000 (Published in Ko et al. Can Lett 173:83-91, 2001), and also as a highly effective and rapid anticancer agent in vivo shortly thereafter (Ko et al. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 324:269-275, 2004), its efficacy as a potent anticancer agent in humans was demonstrated. Here, based on translational research, we report results of a case study in a young adult cancer patient with fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, a bench side discovery in the Department of Biological Chemistry at Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine was taken effectively to bedside treatment at Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt/Main Hospital, Germany. The results obtained hold promise for 3BP as a future cancer therapeutic without apparent cyto-toxicity when formulated properly.

  3. Anticancer activity of glucomoringin isothiocyanate in human malignant astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Thangavelu Soundara; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Iori, Renato; Rollin, Patrick; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2016-04-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) released from their glucosinolate precursors have been shown to inhibit tumorigenesis and they have received significant attention as potential chemotherapeutic agents against cancer. Astrocytoma grade IV is the most frequent and most malignant primary brain tumor in adults without any curative treatment. New therapeutic drugs are therefore urgently required. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antitumor activity of the glycosylated isothiocyanate moringin [4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)benzyl isothiocyanate] produced from quantitative myrosinase-induced hydrolysis of glucomoringin (GMG) under neutral pH value. We have evaluated the potency of moringin on apoptosis induction and cell death in human astrocytoma grade IV CCF-STTG1 cells. Moringin showed to be effective in inducing apoptosis through p53 and Bax activation and Bcl-2 inhibition. In addition, oxidative stress related Nrf2 transcription factor and its upstream regulator CK2 alpha expressions were modulated at higher doses, which indicated the involvement of oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis induced by moringin. Moreover, significant reduction in 5S rRNA was noticed with moringin treatment. Our in vitro results demonstrated the antitumor efficacy of moringin derived from myrosinase-hydrolysis of GMG in human malignant astrocytoma cells.

  4. Ficus spp. (fig): ethnobotany and potential as anticancer and anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Lansky, Ephraim Philip; Paavilainen, Helena M; Pawlus, Alison D; Newman, Robert A

    2008-09-26

    This review explores medieval, ancient and modern sources for ethnopharmacological uses of Ficus (fig) species, specifically for employment against malignant disease and inflammation. The close connection between inflammatory/infectious and cancerous diseases is apparent both from the medieval/ancient merging of these concepts and the modern pharmacological recognition of the initiating and promoting importance of inflammation for cancer growth. Also considered are chemical groups and compounds underlying the anticancer and anti-inflammatory actions, the relationship of fig wasps and fig botany, extraction and storage of fig latex, and traditional methods of preparing fig medicaments including fig lye, fig wine and medicinal poultices.

  5. Meta-analysis of inter-patient pharmacokinetic variability of liposomal and non-liposomal anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Schell, Ryan F.; Sidone, Brian J.; Caron, Whitney P.; Walsh, Mark D.; Zamboni, Beth A.; Ramanathan, Ramesh K.; Zamboni, William C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the inter-patient pharmacokinetic (PK) variability of liposomal and small molecule (SM) anticancer agents. Methods Inter-patient PK variability of 9 liposomal and SM formulations of the same drug were evaluated. PK variability was measured as coefficient of variance (CV%) of area under the plasma concentration versus time curve (AUC) and the fold-difference between AUCmax and AUCmin (AUC range). Results CV% of AUC and AUC ranges were 2.7-fold (P<0.001) and 16.7-fold (P=0.13) greater, respectively, for liposomal compared with SM drugs. There was an inverse linear relationship between the clearance (CL) of liposomal agents and PK variability with a lower CL associated with greater PK variability (R2 = 0.39). PK variability of liposomal agents was greater when evaluated from 0–336 h compared with 0–24 h. Conclusion PK variability of liposomes is significantly greater than SM. The factors associated with the PK variability of liposomal agents needs to be evaluated. PMID:23891988

  6. Identification of potent anticancer activity in Ximenia americana aqueous extracts used by African traditional medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, Cristina; Eyol, Erguel; Berger, Martin R. . E-mail: m.berger@dkfz.de

    2006-03-15

    The antineoplastic activity of a plant powder used in African traditional medicine for treating cancer was investigated by analyzing the activity of various extracts in vitro. The most active, aqueous extract was subsequently subjected to a detailed investigation in a panel of 17 tumor cell lines, showing an average IC{sub 5} of 49 mg raw powder/ml medium. The sensitivity of the cell lines varied by two orders of magnitude, from 1.7 mg/ml in MCF7 breast cancer cells to 170 mg/ml in AR230 chronic-myeloid leukemia cells. Immortalized, non-tumorigenic cell lines showed a marginal sensitivity. In addition, kinetic and recovery experiments performed in MCF7 and U87-MG cells and a comparison with the antineoplastic activity of miltefosine, gemcitabine, and cisplatinum in MCF7, U87-MG, HEp2, and SAOS2 cells revealed no obvious similarity between the sensitivity profiles of the extract and the three standard agents, suggesting a different mechanism of cytotoxicity. The in vivo antitumor activity was determined in the CC531 colorectal cancer rat model. Significant anticancer activity was found following administration of equitoxic doses of 100 (perorally) and 5 (intraperitoneally) mg raw powder/kg, indicating a 95% reduced activity following intestinal absorption. By sequencing the mitochondrial gene for the large subunit of the ribulose bis-phosphate carboxylase (rbcL) in DNA from the plant material, the source plant was identified as Ximenia americana. A physicochemical characterization showed that the active antineoplastic component(s) of the plant material are proteins with galactose affinity. Moreover, by mass spectrometry, one of these proteins was shown to contain a stretch of 11 amino acids identical to a tryptic peptide from the ribosome-inactivating protein ricin.

  7. Folates as adjuvants to anticancer agents: Chemical rationale and mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Danenberg, Peter V; Gustavsson, Bengt; Johnston, Patrick; Lindberg, Per; Moser, Rudolf; Odin, Elisabeth; Peters, Godefridus J; Petrelli, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Folates have been used with cytotoxic agents for decades and today they are used in hundreds of thousands of patients annually. Folate metabolism is complex. In the treatment of cancer with 5-fluorouracil, the administration of folates mechanistically leads to the formation of [6R]-5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate, and the increased concentration of this molecule leads to stabilization of the ternary complex comprising thymidylate synthase, 2'-deoxy-uridine-5'-monophosphate, and [6R]-5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. The latter is the only natural folate that can bind directly in the ternary complex, with other folates requiring metabolic activation. Modulation of thymidylate synthase activity became central in the study of folate/cytotoxic combinations and, despite wide use, research into the folate component was neglected, leaving important questions unanswered. This article revisits the mechanisms of action of folates and evaluates commercially available folate derivatives in the light of current research. Better genomic insight and availability of new analytical techniques and stable folate compounds may open new avenues of research and therapy, ultimately bringing increased clinical benefit to patients.

  8. Phosphine-gold(I) compounds as anticancer agents: general description and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Lima, João Carlos; Rodriguez, Laura

    2011-12-01

    Gold complexes have been explored as metallodrugs with great potential applications as antitumoral agents. In particular, gold-phosphine derivatives seemed quite promising since the use of the antiarthritic auranofin drug (thiolate-Au-PEt3 complex) presented also biological activity against different cancer cells. So, different auranofin analogues have been explored within this context and for this reason, the main number of phosphine-gold complexes developed with this goal contain thiolate ligands. Other complexes have been also studied such as tetrahedral bis(phosphine)gold(I) and phosphine-gold-halides. Very recently, phosphine-gold-alkynyl complexes have also shown very interesting biological activities although few reports are published related to them. Their mechanism of action seems to be clearly different that the used by platinum drugs (DNA intercalating processes) and recent studies point to be related to the inhibition of Trx reductase. Cellular uptake and biodistribution studies are well reported in the original works but the use of luminescence techniques is relatively less explored. For this, the use of these techniques is also specifically reported in this review.

  9. Anticancer Activity of Garcinia morella on T-Cell Murine Lymphoma Via Apoptotic Induction

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Bhaswati; Kandimalla, Raghuram; Bharali, Rupjyoti; Monisha, Javadi; Kunnumakara, Ajaikumar B.; Kalita, Kasturi; Kotoky, Jibon

    2016-01-01

    Traditional knowledge (TK) based medicines have gained worldwide attention and presently the scientific community is focussing on proper pharmacological validation and identification of lead compounds for the treatment of various diseases. The North East region of India is the home of valuable traditional herbal remedies. Garcinia morella Desr. (Guttiferae) is one such medicinal plant used by traditional healers for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. The present study was aimed to evaluate the antioxidant and anticancer activity of methanol extracts of the leaf, bark and fruit of G. morella (GM) in different in vitro and in vivo experimental conditions. The results of this study showed that GM methanol extracts possessed in vitro antioxidant and anticancer properties, where the fruit extract (GF) showed maximum activity. The anticancer activity was further confirmed by the results of in vivo administration of GF (200 mg/kg) for ten days to Dalton’s lymphoma (DLA) induced mice. GF extract significantly increased the mean survival time (MST) of the animals, decreased the tumor volume and restored the hematological and biochemical parameters. The present study for the first time reported the anticancer property of GF on DLA. Further from the experiments conducted to elucidate the mechanism of action of GF on DLA, it can be concluded that GF exerts its anticancer effect through induction of caspases and DNA fragmentation that ultimately leads to apoptosis. However, further experimentation is required to elucidate the active principle and validate these findings in various in vivo settings. PMID:26858645

  10. Anticancer activity of essential oils and their chemical components - a review

    PubMed Central

    Bayala, Bagora; Bassole, Imaël HN; Scifo, Riccardo; Gnoula, Charlemagne; Morel, Laurent; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A; Simpore, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Essential oils are widely used in pharmaceutical, sanitary, cosmetic, agriculture and food industries for their bactericidal, virucidal, fungicidal, antiparasitical and insecticidal properties. Their anticancer activity is well documented. Over a hundred essential oils from more than twenty plant families have been tested on more than twenty types of cancers in last past ten years. This review is focused on the activity of essential oils and their components on various types of cancers. For some of them the mechanisms involved in their anticancer activities have been carried out. PMID:25520854

  11. Anticancer activity of bicalutamide-loaded PLGA nanoparticles in prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    GUO, JUN; WU, SHU-HONG; REN, WEI-GUO; WANG, XIN-LI; YANG, AI-QING

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non-cutaneous malignancy in men in western and most developing countries. Bicalutamide (BLT) is an antineoplastic hormonal agent primarily used in the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancers. In the present study, the aim was to develop a nanotechnology-based delivery system to target prostate cancer cells. This involved the development of a BLT-loaded poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) PLGA (PLGA-BLT) nanoparticulate system in an attempt to improve the therapeutic efficacy of BLT in prostate cancer and to mitigate its toxicity. Nanosized particles with a uniform size distribution and spherical shape were developed. PLGA-BLT showed a pronounced cytotoxic effect on LNCaP and C4-2 cancer cells. The superior cell-killing effect of the nanoparticles may be attributable to their sustained drug-release characteristics and high cellular internalization. PLGA-BLT was also found to significantly inhibit colony formation in the two cell lines. Furthermore, the caspase-3 activity of PLGA-BLT treated cancer cells was enhanced, indicating the cell apoptosis-inducing potential of PLGA-BLT. Overall, these results suggest that nanotechnology-based formulations of BLT exhibit superior anticancer activity and have enormous potential in the treatment of prostate cancers. PMID:26668633

  12. Ligand substitutions between ruthenium–cymene compounds can control protein versus DNA targeting and anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Adhireksan, Zenita; Davey, Gabriela E.; Campomanes, Pablo; Groessl, Michael; Clavel, Catherine M.; Yu, Haojie; Nazarov, Alexey A.; Yeo, Charmian Hui Fang; Ang, Wee Han; Dröge, Peter; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Dyson, Paul J.; Davey, Curt A.

    2014-01-01

    Ruthenium compounds have become promising alternatives to platinum drugs by displaying specific activities against different cancers and favourable toxicity and clearance properties. Nonetheless, their molecular targeting and mechanism of action are poorly understood. Here we study two prototypical ruthenium-arene agents—the cytotoxic antiprimary tumour compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(ethylene-diamine)Cl]PF6 and the relatively non-cytotoxic antimetastasis compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane)Cl2]—and discover that the former targets the DNA of chromatin, while the latter preferentially forms adducts on the histone proteins. Using a novel ‘atom-to-cell’ approach, we establish the basis for the surprisingly site-selective adduct formation behaviour and distinct cellular impact of these two chemically similar anticancer agents, which suggests that the cytotoxic effects arise largely from DNA lesions, whereas the protein adducts may be linked to the other therapeutic activities. Our study shows promise for developing new ruthenium drugs, via ligand-based modulation of DNA versus protein binding and thus cytotoxic potential, to target distinguishing epigenetic features of cancer cells. PMID:24637564

  13. Anticancer activity of bicalutamide-loaded PLGA nanoparticles in prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun; Wu, Shu-Hong; Ren, Wei-Guo; Wang, Xin-Li; Yang, Ai-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non-cutaneous malignancy in men in western and most developing countries. Bicalutamide (BLT) is an antineoplastic hormonal agent primarily used in the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancers. In the present study, the aim was to develop a nanotechnology-based delivery system to target prostate cancer cells. This involved the development of a BLT-loaded poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) PLGA (PLGA-BLT) nanoparticulate system in an attempt to improve the therapeutic efficacy of BLT in prostate cancer and to mitigate its toxicity. Nanosized particles with a uniform size distribution and spherical shape were developed. PLGA-BLT showed a pronounced cytotoxic effect on LNCaP and C4-2 cancer cells. The superior cell-killing effect of the nanoparticles may be attributable to their sustained drug-release characteristics and high cellular internalization. PLGA-BLT was also found to significantly inhibit colony formation in the two cell lines. Furthermore, the caspase-3 activity of PLGA-BLT treated cancer cells was enhanced, indicating the cell apoptosis-inducing potential of PLGA-BLT. Overall, these results suggest that nanotechnology-based formulations of BLT exhibit superior anticancer activity and have enormous potential in the treatment of prostate cancers.

  14. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)—nitroglycerin as an anti-cancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Sukhatme, Vidula; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vikas P; Pantziarka, Pan

    2015-01-01

    Nitroglycerin (NTG), a drug that has been in clinical use for more than a century, has a range of actions which make it of particular interest in an oncological setting. It is generally accepted that the main mechanism of action of NTG is via the production of nitric oxide (NO), which improves cardiac oxygenation via multiple mechanisms including improved blood flow (vasodilation), decreased platelet aggregation, increased erythrocyte O2 release and decreased mitochondrial utilization of oxygen. Its vasoactive properties mean that it has the potential to exploit more fully the enhanced permeability and retention effect in delivering anti-cancer drugs to tumour tissues. Moreover NTG can reduce HIF-1α levels in hypoxic tumour tissues and this may have anti-angiogenic, pro-apoptotic and anti-efflux effects. Additionally NTG may enhance anti-tumour immunity. Pre-clinical and clinical data on these anti-cancer properties of NTG are summarised and discussed. While there is evidence of a positive action as a monotherapy in prostate cancer, there are mixed results in NSCLC where initially positive results have yet to be fully replicated. Based on the evidence presented, a case is made that further exploration of the clinical benefits that may accrue to cancer patients is warranted. Additionally, it is proposed that NTG may synergise with a number of other drugs, including other repurposed drugs, and these are discussed in the supplementary material appended to this paper. PMID:26435741

  15. Adenoviral Vectors Armed with Cell Fusion-Inducing Proteins as Anti-Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Del Papa, Joshua; Parks, Robin J.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a devastating disease that affects millions of patients every year, and causes an enormous economic burden on the health care system and emotional burden on affected families. The first line of defense against solid tumors is usually extraction of the tumor, when possible, by surgical methods. In cases where solid tumors can not be safely removed, chemotherapy is often the first line of treatment. As metastatic cancers often become vigorously resistant to treatments, the development of novel, more potent and selective anti-cancer strategies is of great importance. Adenovirus (Ad) is the most commonly used virus in cancer clinical trials, however, regardless of the nature of the Ad-based therapeutic, complete responses to treatment remain rare. A number of pre-clinical studies have shown that, for all vector systems, viral spread throughout the tumor mass can be a major limiting factor for complete tumor elimination. By expressing exogenous cell-fusion proteins, many groups have shown improved spread of Ad-based vectors. This review summarizes the research done to examine the potency of Ad vectors expressing fusogenic proteins as anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:28106842

  16. Design and synthesis of novel 1,2,3-triazole-pyrimidine-urea hybrids as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li-Ying; Wang, Bo; Pang, Lu-Ping; Zhang, Miao; Wang, Sai-Qi; Zheng, Yi-Chao; Shao, Kun-Peng; Xue, Deng-Qi; Liu, Hong-Min

    2015-03-01

    A series of novel 1,2,3-triazole-pyrimidine-urea hybrids were designed, synthesized and evaluated for anticancer activity against four selected cancer cell lines (MGC-803, EC-109, MCF-7 and B16-F10). Majority of the synthesized compounds exhibited moderate to potent activity against all the cancer cell lines assayed. Particularly, compounds 26, 30 and 38 exhibited excellent growth inhibition against B16-F10 with IC50 values of 32nM, 35nM and 42nM, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that compound 26 induced the cellular apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner.

  17. Recent Advancements In 1, 4-Disubstituted 1H-1,2,3-Triazoles As Potential Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Lal, Kashmiri; Yadav, Pinki

    2016-08-11

    Cancer is a class of formidable disease with a high degree of mortality. Although, there has been much progress in chemotherapy still the problem of drug resistance has led to the search for newer leads with superior efficacy. 1,2,3-Triazole are among a vast number of nitrogen containing heterocycles studied extensively as pharmacologically important scaffolds. Recently developed copper (I)-catalyzed cycloaddition reaction between organic azides and terminal alkynes yielding 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles has attracted considerable attention because it allows the construction of vast array of 1,2,3-triazoles with significant potential in pharmaceutical chemistry. In this article, an attempt to summarize the wide range of anticancer agents derived from Copper(I)-Catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition reported by the authors worldwide has been made. This review includes articles published from 2010 onwards and summarizes the recent progress on the development of 1,4-disubstituted 1H-1,2,3-triazole as novel anticancer chemotypes with high therapeutic indices.

  18. Tuning the anticancer activity of a novel pro-apoptotic peptide using gold nanoparticle platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akrami, Mohammad; Balalaie, Saeed; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Alipour, Mohsen; Salehi, Fahimeh; Bahador, Abbas; Haririan, Ismaeil

    2016-08-01

    Pro-apoptotic peptides induce intrinsic apoptosis pathway in cancer cells. However, poor cellular penetration of the peptides is often associated with limited therapeutic efficacy. In this report, a series of peptide-gold nanoparticle platforms were developed to evaluate the anticancer activity of a novel alpha-lipoic acid-peptide conjugate, LA-WKRAKLAK, with respect to size and shape of nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were found to enhance cell internalization as well as anticancer activity of the peptide conjugates. The smaller nanospheres showed a higher cytotoxicity, morphological change and cellular uptake compared to larger nanospheres and nanorods, whereas nanorods showed more hemolytic activity compared to nanospheres. The findings suggested that the anticancer and biological effects of the peptides induced by intrinsic apoptotic pathway were tuned by peptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (P-AuNPs) as a function of their size and shape.

  19. In vitro anticancer activity of fucoidan from Turbinaria conoides against A549 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Marudhupandi, Thangapandi; Ajith Kumar, Thipramalai Thankappan; Lakshmanasenthil, Shanmugaasokan; Suja, Gunasekaran; Vinothkumar, Thirumalairaj

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the anticancer activity of fucoidan isolated from brown seaweed Turbinaria conoides. Extracted fucoidan contained 53 ± 0.69% of fucose and 38 ± 0.42% of sulphate, respectively. Functional groups and structural characteristics of the fucoidan were analyzed by FT-IR and NMR. In vitro anticancer effect was studied on A549 cell line. Fucoidan inhibited the growth of cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner and potent anticancer activities were 24.9-73.5% in the concentrations of 31.25-500 μg/ml. The CTC50 value against the cancer cell was found to be 45 μg/ml and the CTC50 value of normal Vero cell line is 325 μg/ml. This study suggests that the fucoidan from T. conoides could be significantly improved if the active component is further purified and tested for further investigation in various cancer cell lines.

  20. Tuning the anticancer activity of a novel pro-apoptotic peptide using gold nanoparticle platforms

    PubMed Central

    Akrami, Mohammad; Balalaie, Saeed; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Alipour, Mohsen; Salehi, Fahimeh; Bahador, Abbas; Haririan, Ismaeil

    2016-01-01

    Pro-apoptotic peptides induce intrinsic apoptosis pathway in cancer cells. However, poor cellular penetration of the peptides is often associated with limited therapeutic efficacy. In this report, a series of peptide-gold nanoparticle platforms were developed to evaluate the anticancer activity of a novel alpha-lipoic acid-peptide conjugate, LA-WKRAKLAK, with respect to size and shape of nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were found to enhance cell internalization as well as anticancer activity of the peptide conjugates. The smaller nanospheres showed a higher cytotoxicity, morphological change and cellular uptake compared to larger nanospheres and nanorods, whereas nanorods showed more hemolytic activity compared to nanospheres. The findings suggested that the anticancer and biological effects of the peptides induced by intrinsic apoptotic pathway were tuned by peptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (P-AuNPs) as a function of their size and shape. PMID:27491007

  1. Coevolution between human's anticancer activities and functional foods from crop origin center in the world.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ya-Wen; Du, Juan; Pu, Xiao-Ying; Yang, Jia-Zhen; Yang, Tao; Yang, Shu-Ming; Yang, Xiao-Meng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death around the world. Anticancer activities from many functional food sources have been reported in years, but correlation between cancer prevalence and types of food with anticancer activities from crop origin center in the world as well as food source with human migration are unclear. Hunger from food shortage is the cause of early human evolution from Africa to Asia and later into Eurasia. The richest functional foods are found in crop origin centers, housing about 70% in the world populations. Crop origin centers have lower cancer incidence and mortality in the world, especially Central Asia, Middle East, Southwest China, India and Ethiopia. Asia and Africa with the richest anticancer crops is not only the most important evolution base of humans and origin center of anticancer functional crop, but also is the lowest mortality and incidence of cancers in the world. Cancer prevention of early human migrations was associated with functional foods from crop origin centers, especially Asia with four centers and one subcenter of crop origin, accounting for 58% of the world population. These results reveal that coevolution between human's anticancer activities associated with functional foods for crop origin centers, especially in Asia and Africa.

  2. Atypical fluoroquinolone gold(III) chelates as potential anticancer agents: relevance of DNA and protein interactions for their mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Gouvea, Ligiane R; Garcia, Luciene S; Lachter, Daniela R; Nunes, Paula Roberta; de Castro Pereira, Flávia; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela P; Louro, Sônia R W; Barbeira, Paulo Jorge S; Teixeira, Letícia R

    2012-09-01

    Quinolones are known for their antimicrobial and antitumor activities. Gold(III) compounds constitute an emerging class of biologically active substances, of special interest as potential anticancer agents. In this work three gold(III) complexes of the fluoroquinolones antimicrobial agents norfloxacin (NOR), levofloxacin (LEVO) and sparfloxacin (SPAR) were prepared and characterized with physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. In these complexes, NOR, LEVO and SPAR act as bidentate neutral ligands bound to gold(III) through the nitrogen atoms of the piperazine ring, which is an unusual mode of coordination for this class of compounds. Two chloride ions occupy the remaining coordination sites. The cytotoxic activity of the fluoroquinolones and their gold(III) complexes was tested against the A20 (murine lymphoma), B16-F10 (murine melanoma) and K562 (human myeloid leukemia) tumor cell lines as well as the L919 (murine lung fibroblasts) and MCR-5 (human lung fibroblasts) normal cells lines. All complexes were more active than their corresponding free ligands. Complex [AuCl(2)(LEVO)]Cl was selected for DNA fragmentation and cell cycle analysis. Spectroscopic titration with calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) showed that the complexes can bind weakly to CT DNA, probably by an external contact (electrostatic or groove binding). The complexes exhibit good binding propensity to bovine serum albumin (BSA) having relatively high binding constant values.

  3. Molecular combo of photodynamic therapeutic agent silicon(iv) phthalocyanine and anticancer drug cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jiafei; Zhang, Yangmiao; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhang, Changli; Guo, Zijian

    2009-02-28

    The combination of a red light PDT agent and a Pt(ii)-based chemotherapeutic drug at the molecular level maintains the intrinsic functions of each unit; the conjugated complexes exhibit remarkable photocytoxicity and demonstrate potential to serve as agents for DNA-targeting PDT as well as red light photochemotherapy.

  4. Field Agent Activities: Level 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gussett, James

    One of a series of monographs providing information about the Delaware Model: A Systems Approach to Science Education (Del Mod System), this monograph describes the role of field agents. These agents are responsible for individual teachers who express a desire for involvement in improving teacher effectiveness and to be involved in the teaching of…

  5. 1,2,3-Triazole-nimesulide hybrid: Their design, synthesis and evaluation as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Mareddy, Jyoti; Suresh, N; Kumar, C Ganesh; Kapavarapu, Ravikumar; Jayasree, A; Pal, Sarbani

    2017-02-01

    A new hybrid template has been designed by integrating the structural features of nimesulide and the 1,2,3-triazole moiety in a single molecular entity at the same time eliminating the problematic nitro group of nimesulide. The template has been used for the generation of a library of molecules as potential anticancer agents. A mild and greener CuAAC approach has been used to synthesize these compounds via the reaction of 4-azido derivative of nimesulide and terminal alkynes in water. Three of these compounds showed promising growth inhibition (IC50 ∼6-10μM) of A549, HepG2, HeLa and DU145 cancer cell lines but no significant effects on HEK293 cell line. They also inhibited PDE4B in vitro (60-70% at 10μM) that was supported by the docking studies (PLP score 87-94) in silico.

  6. Design and synthesis of novel hydroxyanthraquinone nitrogen mustard derivatives as potential anticancer agents via a bioisostere approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li-Ming; Ma, Feng-Yan; Jin, Hai-Shan; Zheng, Shilong; Zhong, Qiu; Wang, Guangdi

    2016-01-01

    A series of hydroxyanthraquinones having an alkylating N-mustard pharmacophore at 1′-position were synthesized via a bioisostere approach to evaluate their cytotoxicity against four tumor cell lines (MDA-MB-231, HeLa, MCF-7 and A549). These compounds displayed significant in vitro cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells, reflecting the excellent selectivity for the human breast cancer. Among them, compound 5k was the most cytotoxic with IC50 value of 0.263 nM and is more potent than DXR (IC50 = 0.294 nM) in inhibiting the growth of MCF-7 cells. The excellent cytotoxicity and good selectivity of compound 5k suggest that it could be a promising lead for further design and development of anticancer agents, especially for breast cancer. PMID:26291039

  7. Berberine-induced anticancer activities in FaDu head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yo-Seob; Yim, Min-Ji; Kim, Bok-Hee; Kang, Kyung-Rok; Lee, Sook-Young; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Kim, Su-Gwan; Yu, Sang-Joun; Lee, Gyeong-Je; Kim, Do Kyung; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated berberine‑induced apoptosis and the signaling pathways underlying its activity in FaDu head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells. Berberine did not affect the viability of primary human normal oral keratinocytes. In contrast, the cytotoxicity of berberine was significantly increased in FaDu cells stimulated with berberine for 24 h. Furthermore, berberine increased nuclear condensation and apoptosis rates in FaDu cells than those in untreated control cells. Berberine also induced the upregulation of apoptotic ligands, such as FasL and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, and triggered the activation of caspase-8, -7 and -3, and poly(ADP ribose) polymerase, characteristic of death receptor-dependent extrinsic apoptosis. Moreover, berberine activated the mitochondria‑dependent apoptotic signaling pathway by upregulating pro-apoptotic factors, such as Bax, Bad, Apaf-1, and the active form of caspase-9, and downregulating anti-apoptotic factors, such as Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. In addition, berberine increased the expression of the tumor suppressor p53 in FaDu cells. The pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk suppressed the activation of caspase-3 and prevented cytotoxicity in FaDu cells treated with berberine. Interestingly, berberine suppressed cell migration through downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9. Moreover, the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and p38, components of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway that are associated with the expression of MMP and VEGF, was suppressed in FaDu cells treated with berberine for 24 h. Therefore, these data suggested that berberine exerted anticancer effects in FaDu cells through induction of apoptosis and suppression of migration. Berberine may have potential applications as a chemotherapeutic agent for the management of head and neck squamous carcinoma.

  8. Combined anticancer activity of osthole and cisplatin in NCI-H460 lung cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Man; Zhang, Yi; Qu, Dan; Liu, Hong-Bo; Gu, Xiu; Jiao, Guang-Yu; Zhao, Li

    2013-03-01

    Drug combination therapies are common practice in the treatment of cancer. Cisplatin is the most active chemotherapeutic agent for lung cancer treatment. Osthole is a natural compound extracted from a number of medicinal plants. To determine whether osthole enhances the anticancer effect of cisplatin in human lung cancer, we treated NCI-H460 cells with osthole alone or in combination with cisplatin and evaluated cell growth and apoptosis using 3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that, in comparison with single agent treatment, the combination of osthole and cisplatin resulted in greater efficacy in growth inhibition and apoptosis induction. Western blot analysis revealed that the combination effect of osthole and cisplatin was due to regulation of the Bcl-2 family proteins. Findings of this investigation suggested that osthole combined with cisplatin is a potential clinical chemotherapeutic approach in human lung cancer.

  9. Inhibition of Pediatric Glioblastoma Tumor Growth by the Anti-Cancer Agent OKN-007 in Orthotopic Mouse Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho de Souza, Patricia; Mallory, Samantha; Smith, Nataliya; Saunders, Debra; Li, Xiao-Nan; McNall-Knapp, Rene Y.; Fung, Kar-Ming; Towner, Rheal A.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric glioblastomas (pGBM), although rare, are one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in children, with tumors essentially refractory to existing treatments. Here, we describe the use of conventional and advanced in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to assess a novel orthotopic xenograft pGBM mouse (IC-3752GBM patient-derived culture) model, and to monitor the effects of the anti-cancer agent OKN-007 as an inhibitor of pGBM tumor growth. Immunohistochemistry support data is also presented for cell proliferation and tumor growth signaling. OKN-007 was found to significantly decrease tumor volumes (p<0.05) and increase animal survival (p<0.05) in all OKN-007-treated mice compared to untreated animals. In a responsive cohort of treated animals, OKN-007 was able to significantly decrease tumor volumes (p<0.0001), increase survival (p<0.001), and increase diffusion (p<0.01) and perfusion rates (p<0.05). OKN-007 also significantly reduced lipid tumor metabolism in responsive animals [(Lip1.3 and Lip0.9)-to-creatine ratio (p<0.05)], as well as significantly decrease tumor cell proliferation (p<0.05) and microvessel density (p<0.05). Furthermore, in relationship to the PDGFRα pathway, OKN-007 was able to significantly decrease SULF2 (p<0.05) and PDGFR-α (platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α) (p<0.05) immunoexpression, and significantly increase decorin expression (p<0.05) in responsive mice. This study indicates that OKN-007 may be an effective anti-cancer agent for some patients with pGBMs by inhibiting cell proliferation and angiogenesis, possibly via the PDGFRα pathway, and could be considered as an additional therapy for pediatric brain tumor patients. PMID:26248280

  10. Effect of cyclosporin A on human bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage progenitors with anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Y; Matsuda, H; Kida, K

    1995-10-01

    Cyclosporin A (CyA) overcomes P-glycoprotein (P-gp) associated multidrug resistance (MDR). P-gp expression is frequently observed among, not only various cancer cells, but also several normal tissues including bone marrow progenitor cells. These findings lead us to examine whether CyA enhances the myelotoxicity of anti-cancer agents. Bone marrow mononuclear cells were incubated with anti-cancer agents (vincristine, VCR; doxorubicin, ADM; etoposide, VP-16; cytarabine, Ara-C; methotrexate, MTX) and a concentration of CyA (0.5, 5.0 micrograms/mL). The methylcellulose assay for granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (CFU-GM) was conducted using the post-treated cells. There was no significant toxicity for marrow CFU-GM formation after 72 h incubation with CyA (84-108% of control). The inhibitory concentration that reduced colonies by 50% (IC50) was 12 nmol/L for VCR, 6 nmol/L for ADM, 220 nmol/L for VP-16, 15 nmol/L for Ara-C and 35 nmol/L for MTX, respectively. For VCR, ADM and VP-16, the number of CFU-GM was unchanged with the addition of CyA at 0.5 microgram/mL concentration. In contrast at 5 micrograms/mL CyA, the number of CFU-GM (% of control) was reduced significantly (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). With MTX and Ara-C, the number of CFU-GM was unchanged after addition of CyA, even at 5 micrograms/mL concentration. We conclude CyA may therefore enhance cytotoxic drug sensitivity in MDR tumor cells at a clinically achievable concentration (0.5 microgram/mL) without marrow toxicity.

  11. Investigating the cellular fate of a DNA-targeted platinum-based anticancer agent by orthogonal double-click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xin; Ding, Song; Liu, Fang; Kucera, Gregory L; Bierbach, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to study a platinum-based anticancer agent in intact NCI-H460 lung cancer cells. Orthogonal copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click) reactions were used to simultaneously determine the cell-cycle-specific localization of the azide-functionalized platinum-acridine agent 1 and monitor its effects on nucleic acid metabolism. Copper-catalyzed postlabeling showed advantages over copper-free click chemistry using a dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO)-modified reporter dye, which produced high background levels in microscopic images and failed to efficiently label platinum adducts in chromatin. Compound 1 was successfully labeled with the fluorophore DIBO to yield 1* (characterized by in-line high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray mass spectrometry). 1 and 1* show a high degree of colocalization in the confocal images, but the ability of 1* to target the (compacted) chromatin was markedly reduced, most likely owing to the steric bulk introduced by the DIBO tag. Nuclear platinum levels correlated inversely with the ability of the cells to synthesize DNA and cause cell cycle arrest, as confirmed by bivariate flow cytometry analysis. In addition, a decrease in the level of cellular transcription, shrinkage of the nucleolar regions, and redistribution of RNA into the cytosol were observed. Postlabeling in conjunction with colocalization experiments is a useful tool for studying the cell killing mechanism of this type of DNA-targeted agent.

  12. Investigating the cellular fate of a DNA-targeted platinum-based anticancer agent by orthogonal double-click chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Xin; Ding, Song; Liu, Fang; Kucera, Gregory L.

    2014-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to study a platinum-based anticancer agent in intact NCI-H460 lung cancer cells. Orthogonal copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (click) reactions were used to simultaneously determine the cell-cycle-specific localization of the azide-functionalized platinum–acridine agent 1 and monitor its effects on nucleic acid metabolism. Copper-catalyzed postlabeling showed advantages over copper-free click chemistry using a dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO)-modified reporter dye, which produced high background levels in microscopic images and failed to efficiently label platinum adducts in chromatin. Compound 1 was successfully labeled with the fluorophore DIBO to yield 1* (characterized by in-line high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray mass spectrometry). 1 and 1* show a high degree of colocalization in the confocal images, but the ability of 1* to target the (compacted) chromatin was markedly reduced, most likely owing to the steric bulk introduced by the DIBO tag. Nuclear platinum levels correlated inversely with the ability of the cells to synthesize DNA and cause cell cycle arrest, as confirmed by bivariate flow cytometry analysis. In addition, a decrease in the level of cellular transcription, shrinkage of the nucleolar regions, and redistribution of RNA into the cytosol were observed. Postlabeling in conjunction with colocalization experiments is a useful tool for studying the cell killing mechanism of this type of DNA-targeted agent. PMID:24407462

  13. The effects of nanoparticle drug loading on the pharmacokinetics of anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Petschauer, Jennifer S.; Madden, Andrew J.; Kirschbrown, Whitney P.; Song, Gina; Zamboni, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in carrier-mediated agents, which include nanoparticles, nanosomes and conjugates, have revolutionized drug delivery capabilities over the past decade. While providing numerous advantages, such as greater solubility, duration of exposure and delivery to the site of action over their small-molecule counterparts, there is substantial variability in systemic clearance and distribution, tumor delivery and pharmacologic effects (efficacy and toxicity) of these agents. This review provides an overview of factors that affect the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of carrier-mediated agents in preclinical models and patients. PMID:25707978

  14. Cheminformatics models based on machine learning approaches for design of USP1/UAF1 abrogators as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Wahi, Divya; Jamal, Salma; Goyal, Sukriti; Singh, Aditi; Jain, Ritu; Rana, Preeti; Grover, Abhinav

    2015-06-01

    Cancer cells have upregulated DNA repair mechanisms, enabling them survive DNA damage induced during repeated rapid cell divisions and targeted chemotherapeutic treatments. Cancer cell proliferation and survival targeting via inhibition of DNA repair pathways is currently a very promiscuous anti-tumor approach. The deubiquitinating enzyme, USP1 is known to promote DNA repair via complexing with UAF1. The USP1/UAF1 complex is responsible for regulating DNA break repair pathways such as trans-lesion synthesis pathway, Fanconi anemia pathway and homologous recombination. Thus, USP1/UAF1 inhibition poses as an efficient anti-cancer strategy. The recently made available high throughput screen data for anti USP1/UAF1 activity prompted us to compute bioactivity predictive models that could help in screening for potential USP1/UAF1 inhibitors having anti-cancer properties. The current study utilizes publicly available high throughput screen data set of chemical compounds evaluated for their potential USP1/UAF1 inhibitory effect. A machine learning approach was devised for generation of computational models that could predict for potential anti USP1/UAF1 biological activity of novel anticancer compounds. Additional efficacy of active compounds was screened by applying SMARTS filter to eliminate molecules with non-drug like features. The structural fragment analysis was further performed to explore structural properties of the molecules. We demonstrated that modern machine learning approaches could be efficiently employed in building predictive computational models and their predictive performance is statistically accurate. The structure fragment analysis revealed the structures that could play an important role in identification of USP1/UAF1 inhibitors.

  15. Activation of the anticancer drugs cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide by cytochrome P450 BM3 mutants.

    PubMed

    Vredenburg, Galvin; den Braver-Sewradj, Shalenie; van Vugt-Lussenburg, Barbara M A; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Commandeur, Jan N M; Vos, J Chris

    2015-01-05

    Cyclophosphamide (CPA) and ifosfamide (IFA) are widely used anticancer agents that require metabolic activation by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. While 4-hydroxylation yields DNA-alkylating and cytotoxic metabolites, N-dechloroethylation results in the generation of neuro- and nephrotoxic byproducts. Gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapies (GDEPT) have been suggested to facilitate local CPA and IFA bioactivation by expressing CYP enzymes within the tumor cells, thereby increasing efficacy. We screened bacterial CYP BM3 mutants, previously engineered to metabolize drug-like compounds, for their ability to catalyze 4-hydroxylation of CPA and IFA. Two CYP BM3 mutants showed very rapid initial bioactivation of CPA and IFA, followed by a slower phase of product formation. N-dechloroethylation by these mutants was very low (IFA) to undetectable (CPA). Using purified CYP BM3 as an extracellular bioactivation tool, cytotoxicity of CPA and IFA metabolism was confirmed in U2OS cells. This novel application of CYP BM3 possibly provides a clean and catalytically efficient alternative to liver microsomes or S9 for the study of CYP-mediated drug toxicity. To our knowledge, the observed rate of CPA and IFA 4-hydroxylation by these CYP BM3 mutants is the fastest reported to date, and might be of potential interest for CPA and IFA GDEPT.

  16. Diterpenes from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis): Defining their potential for anti-cancer activity.

    PubMed

    Petiwala, Sakina M; Johnson, Jeremy J

    2015-10-28

    Recently, rosemary extracts standardized to diterpenes (e.g. carnosic acid and carnosol) have been approved by the European Union (EU) and given a GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) status in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Incorporation of rosemary into our food system and through dietary selection (e.g. Mediterranean Diet) has increased the likelihood of exposure to diterpenes in rosemary. In consideration of this, a more thorough understanding of rosemary diterpenes is needed to understand its potential for a positive impact on human health. Three agents in particular have received the most attention that includes carnosic acid, carnosol, and rosmanol with promising results of anti-cancer activity. These studies have provided evidence of diterpenes to modulate deregulated signaling pathways in different solid and blood cancers. Rosemary extracts and the phytochemicals therein appear to be well tolerated in different animal models as evidenced by the extensive studies performed for approval by the EU and the FDA as an antioxidant food preservative. This mini-review reports on the pre-clinical studies performed with carnosic acid, carnosol, and rosmanol describing their mechanism of action in different cancers.

  17. Eldecalcitol (ED-71), an analog of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 as a potential anti-cancer agent for oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Shintani, T; Rosli, S N Z; Takatsu, F; Choon, Y F; Hayashido, Y; Toratani, S; Usui, E; Okamoto, T

    2016-11-01

    We have previously reported that 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibits NF-κB activity and thus inhibits growth of OSCC cells in serum-free culture and down-regulates HBp17/FGFBP-1 expression, which is important for cancer cell growth and angiogenesis. Here, we have investigated the effects of ED-71, an analog of vitamin D3 (VD) on OSCC cell lines in serum-free culture. It is known that ED-71 has a stronger inhibitory effect on bone resorption compared to VD and other VD analogs. To the best of our knowledge, there was no report examining the potential of ED-71 as an anti-cancer agent for OSCC. We found that ED-71 is able to inhibit the growth of cancer cell lines at a concentration of hundred times lower than calcitriol. As Cyp24A1 was reportedly induced in cancer cells, we measured the expression of CYP24A1 in OSCC cell lines (NA and UE), A431 epidermoid carcinoma and normal fibroblast cell (gfi) in serum-free culture. As a result, CYP24A1 mRNA and the protein expression in the OSCC cells treated with ED-71 increased in a dose-dependent manner. However, in vivo experiment, in which the A431 cells were implanted in mice, tumor formation was reduced by the ED-71 treatment with no significant difference between Cyp24A1 expression in the tumors of ED-71-treated and control group, as analyzed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. These results suggest that ED-71 is a potential anti-cancer agent for OSCC.

  18. Anticancer Activity, Antioxidant Activity, and Phenolic and Flavonoids Content of Wild Tragopogon porrifolius Plant Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Rishmawi, Suzi; Ariqat, Sharehan H.; Khalid, Mahmoud F.; Warad, Ismail; Salah, Zaidoun

    2016-01-01

    Tragopogon porrifolius, commonly referred to as white salsify, is an edible herb used in folk medicine to treat cancer. Samples of Tragopogon porrifolius plant grown wild in Palestine were extracted with different solvents: water, 80% ethanol, and 100% ethanol. The extracts were analyzed for their total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), and antioxidant activity (AA). Four different antioxidant assays were used to evaluate AA of the extracts: two measures the reducing power of the extracts (ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and cupric reducing antioxidant power (CUPRAC)), while two other assays measure the scavenging ability of the extracts (2,2-azino-di-(3-ethylbenzothialozine-sulphonic acid (ABTS)) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)). Anticancer activity of the plant extracts were also tested on HOS and KHOS osteosarcoma cell lines. The results revealed that the polarity of the extraction solvent affects the TPC, TFC, and AA. It was found that both TPC and AA are highest for plant extracted with 80% ethanol, followed by water, and finally with 100% ethanol. TFC however was the highest in the following order: 80% ethanol > 100% ethanol > water. The plant extracts showed anticancer activities against KHOS cancer cell lines; they reduced total cell count and induced cell death in a drastic manner. PMID:27999608

  19. Analysis of the anticancer activity of curcuminoids, thiotryptophan and 4-phenoxyphenol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Parsai, Shireen; Keck, Rick; Skrzypczak-Jankun, Ewa; Jankun, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin, a non-nutritive yellow pigment derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa (turmeric), is considered to be an established nutraceutical with anticancer activity. Turmeric contains three principal components, curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin, of which curcumin is most abundant and potent. The concurrence of a high consumption of turmeric and a low incidence of prostate cancer in Asian countries may suggest a role for curcumin in chemoprevention. Curcumin has been identified to exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anticarcinogenic properties. Since the compound does not exhibit side effects, curcumin has been designated for several clinical trials as a treatment for human cancers. The pro-apototic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory characteristics of curcumin are implicated in its anticancer activity, yet the mechanism of action of curcumin remains unknown. To achieve an effective pharmacological outcome, curcumin must reach and sustain appropriate levels at the site of action. However, the main disadvantage of curcumin is its high metabolic instability and poor aqueous solubility that limits its systemic bioavailability. To overcome this difficulty, the present study tested the anticancer activity of new curcumin-like compounds (E21cH and Q012095H). Also, the use of new medicaments requires an understanding of their pharmacokinetic profiles and targets. Thus, molecular modeling methods were used to identify the targets of curcumin and curcumin-like compounds compared with other anticancer drugs (Q012138 and Q012169AT), which were used as the controls. The present study identified several enzymes that are targeted by curcumin, aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 (AKR1B10), serine/threonine-protein kinase, protein kinase C, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), cyclooxygenase and epidermal growth factor receptor, which were tested as targets for these anticancer chemicals. All the examined small compounds demonstrated anticancer

  20. Triptolide has anticancer and chemosensitization effects by down-regulating Akt activation through the MDM2/REST pathway in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jing; Su, Tiefen; Qu, Zhiling; Yang, Qin; Wang, Yu; Li, Jiansha; Zhou, Sheng

    2016-04-26

    Triptolide has been shown to exhibit anticancer activity. However, its mechanism of action is not clearly defined. Herein we report a novel signaling pathway, MDM2/Akt, is involved in the anticancer mechanism of triptolide. We observed that triptolide inhibits MDM2 expression in human breast cancer cells with either wild-type or mutant p53. This MDM2 inhibition resulted in decreased Akt activation. More specifically, triptolide interfered with the interaction between MDM2 and the transcription factor REST to increase expression of the regulatory subunit of PI3-kinase p85 and consequently inhibit Akt activation. We further showed that, regardless of p53 status, triptolide inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, and caused G1 phase cell cycle arrest. Triptolide also enhanced the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin. MDM2 inhibition plays a causative role in these effects. The inhibitory effect of triptolide on MDM2-mediated Akt activation was eliminated with MDM2 overexpression. MDM2-overexpressing tumor cells, in turn, were less susceptible to the anticancer and chemosensitization effects of triptolide than control cells. Triptolide also exhibited anticancer and chemosensitization effects in nude mouse xenograft model. When it was administered to tumor-bearing nude mice, triptolide inhibited tumor growth and enhanced the antitumor effects of doxorubicin. In summary, triptolide has anticancer and chemosensitization effects by down-regulating Akt activation through the MDM2/REST pathway in human breast cancer. Our study helps to elucidate the p53-independent regulatory function of MDM2 in Akt signaling, offering a novel view of the mechanism by which triptolide functions as an anticancer agent.

  1. Compatibility and stability of the investigational polypeptide marine anticancer agent kahalalide F in infusion devices.

    PubMed

    Nuijen, B; Bouma, M; Manada, C; Jimeno, J M; Lazaro, L L; Bult, A; Beijnen, J H

    2001-01-01

    Kahalalide F is a novel marine-derived antitumor agent isolated from the marine mollusk Elysia rufescens, an organism living in the seas near Hawaii. The compound has shown highly selective in vitro activity against prostate tumors and phase I trials in patients with androgen independent prostate tumors incorporating a daily times five and weekly schedule have been initiated. Kahalalide F is pharmaceutically formulated as a lyophilized product containing 150 microg active substance per dosage unit. Prior to i.v. administration it is reconstituted with a solution composed of Cremophor EL, ethanol absolute and Water for Injection (CEW, 5/5/90% v/v/v) with further dilution in 0.9% w/v sodium chloride for infusion. The aim of this study was to investigate the compatibility and stability of kahalalide F with different infusion systems prior to the start of clinical trials with the compound. Due to the presence of Cremophor EL in the infusion solution, leaching of diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) from polyvinyl chloride infusion containers (PVC, Add-a-Flex) was found. Loss of kahalalide F as a consequence of sorption to contact surfaces was shown with an infusion container composed of low density polyethylene (LD-PE, Miniflac). We conclude that kahalalide F must be administered in a 3-h infusion in concentrations of 0.5 microg/mL to 14.7 microg/mL using an administration set consisting of a glass container and a low-extrables, DEHP-free extension set. Kahalalide F 150 microg/vial powder for infusion reconstituted with 5/5/90% v/v/v CEW is stable in the original container for at least 24 h at room temperature (+20-25 degrees C) and ambient light conditions. Infusion solutions stored in glass infusion containers at either room temperature (+20-25 degrees C, in the dark) or refrigerated conditions (+2-8 degrees C, in the dark) are stable for at least 5 days after preparation.

  2. New arylated benzo[h]quinolines induce anti-cancer activity by oxidative stress-mediated DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Dharmendra K.; Rai, Reeta; Kumar, Naresh; Singh, Surjeet; Misra, Sanjeev; Sharma, Praveen; Shaw, Priyanka; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Mancera, Ricardo L.; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Mi-hyun; Pratap, Ramendra

    2016-01-01

    The anti-cancer activity of the benzo[h]quinolines was evaluated on cultured human skin cancer (G361), lung cancer (H460), breast cancer (MCF7) and colon cancer (HCT116) cell lines. The inhibitory effect of these compounds on the cell growth was determined by the MTT assay. The compounds 3e, 3f, 3h and 3j showed potential cytotoxicity against these human cancer cell lines. Effect of active compounds on DNA oxidation and expression of apoptosis related gene was studied. We also developed a quantitative method to measure the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases-2 (CDK2) by western blotting in the presence of active compound. In addition, molecular docking revealed that benzo[h]quinolines can correctly dock into the hydrophobic pocket of the targets receptor protein aromatase and CDK2, while their bioavailability/drug-likeness was predicted to be acceptable but requires future optimization. These findings reveal that benzo[h]quinolines act as anti-cancer agents by inducing oxidative stress-mediated DNA damage. PMID:27922047

  3. Discovery of a Series of Acridinones as Mechanism-Based Tubulin Assembly Inhibitors with Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Magalhaes, Luma G.; Marques, Fernando B.; da Fonseca, Marina B.; Rogério, Kamilla R.; Graebin, Cedric S.; Andricopulo, Adriano D.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules play critical roles in vital cell processes, including cell growth, division, and migration. Microtubule-targeting small molecules are chemotherapeutic agents that are widely used in the treatment of cancer. Many of these compounds are structurally complex natural products (e.g., paclitaxel, vinblastine, and vincristine) with multiple stereogenic centers. Because of the scarcity of their natural sources and the difficulty of their partial or total synthesis, as well as problems related to their bioavailability, toxicity, and resistance, there is an urgent need for novel microtubule binding agents that are effective for treating cancer but do not have these disadvantages. In the present work, our lead discovery effort toward less structurally complex synthetic compounds led to the discovery of a series of acridinones inspired by the structure of podophyllotoxin, a natural product with important microtubule assembly inhibitory activity, as novel mechanism-based tubulin assembly inhibitors with potent anticancer properties and low toxicity. The compounds were evaluated in vitro by wound healing assays employing the metastatic and triple negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Four compounds with IC50 values between 0.294 and 1.7 μM were identified. These compounds showed selective cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-231 and DU-145 cancer cell lines and promoted cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and apoptosis. Consistent with molecular modeling results, the acridinones inhibited tubulin assembly in in vitro polymerization assays with IC50 values between 0.9 and 13 μM. Their binding to the colchicine-binding site of tubulin was confirmed through competitive assays. PMID:27508497

  4. Plant derived substances with anti-cancer activity: from folklore to practice

    PubMed Central

    Fridlender, Marcelo; Kapulnik, Yoram; Koltai, Hinanit

    2015-01-01

    Plants have had an essential role in the folklore of ancient cultures. In addition to the use as food and spices, plants have also been utilized as medicines for over 5000 years. It is estimated that 70–95% of the population in developing countries continues to use traditional medicines even today. A new trend, that involved the isolation of plant active compounds begun during the early nineteenth century. This trend led to the discovery of different active compounds that are derived from plants. In the last decades, more and more new materials derived from plants have been authorized and subscribed as medicines, including those with anti-cancer activity. Cancer is among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The number of new cases is expected to rise by about 70% over the next two decades. Thus, there is a real need for new efficient anti-cancer drugs with reduced side effects, and plants are a promising source for such entities. Here we focus on some plant-derived substances exhibiting anti-cancer and chemoprevention activity, their mode of action and bioavailability. These include paclitaxel, curcumin, and cannabinoids. In addition, development and use of their synthetic analogs, and those of strigolactones, are discussed. Also discussed are commercial considerations and future prospects for development of plant derived substances with anti-cancer activity. PMID:26483815

  5. Structure-activity relationships for organometallic osmium arene phenylazopyridine complexes with potent anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Habtemariam, Abraha; Basri, Aida M B H; Braddick, Darren; Clarkson, Guy J; Sadler, Peter J

    2011-10-28

    We report the synthesis and characterisation of 32 half sandwich phenylazopyridine Os(II) arene complexes [Os(η(6)-arene)(phenylazopyridine)X](+) in which X is chloride or iodide, the arene is p-cymene or biphenyl and the pyridine and phenyl rings contain a variety of substituents (F, Cl, Br, I, CF(3), OH or NO(2)). Ten X-ray crystal structures have been determined. Cytotoxicity towards A2780 human ovarian cancer cells ranges from high potency at nanomolar concentrations to inactivity. In general the introduction of an electron-withdrawing group (e.g. F, Cl, Br or I) at specific positions on the pyridine ring significantly increases cytotoxic activity and aqueous solubility. Changing the arene from p-cymene to biphenyl and the monodentate ligand X from chloride to iodide also increases the activity significantly. Activation by hydrolysis and DNA binding appears not to be the major mechanism of action since both the highly active complex [Os(η(6)-bip)(2-F-azpy)I]PF(6) (9) and the moderately active complex [Os(η(6)-bip)(3-Cl-azpy)I]PF(6) (23) are very stable and inert towards aquation. Studies of octanol-water partition coefficients (log P) and subcellular distributions of osmium in A2780 human ovarian cancer cells suggested that cell uptake and targeting to cellular organelles play important roles in determining activity. Although complex 9 induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in A2780 cells, the ROS level did not appear to play a role in the mechanism of anticancer activity. This class of organometallic osmium complexes has new and unusual features worthy of further exploration for the design of novel anticancer drugs.

  6. Anticancer Activity of the Antimicrobial Peptide Scolopendrasin VII Derived from the Centipede, Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Ha; Kim, In-Woo; Kim, Sang-Hee; Kim, Mi-Ae; Yun, Eun-Young; Nam, Sung-Hee; Ahn, Mi-Young; Kang, Dongchul; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2015-08-01

    Previously, we performed de novo RNA sequencing of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans using high-throughput sequencing technology and identified several antimicrobial peptide candidates. Among them, a cationic antimicrobial peptide, scolopendrasin VII, was selected based on its physicochemical properties, such as length, charge, and isoelectric point. Here, we assessed the anticancer activities of scolopendrasin VII against U937 and Jurkat leukemia cell lines. The results showed that scolopendrasin VII decreased the viability of the leukemia cells in MTS assays. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining revealed that scolopendrasin VII induced necrosis in the leukemia cells. Scolopendrasin VII-induced necrosis was mediated by specific interaction with phosphatidylserine, which is enriched in the membrane of cancer cells. Taken together, these data indicated that scolopendrasin VII induced necrotic cell death in leukemia cells, probably through interaction with phosphatidylserine. The results provide a useful anticancer peptide candidate and an efficient strategy for new anticancer peptide development.

  7. Potential anticancer heterometallic Fe-Au and Fe-Pd agents: initial mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Lease, Nicholas; Vasilevski, Vadim; Carreira, Monica; de Almeida, Andreia; Sanaú, Mercedes; Hirva, Pipsa; Casini, Angela; Contel, María

    2013-07-25

    A series of gold(III) and palladium(II) heterometallic complexes with new iminophosphorane ligands derived from ferrocenylphosphanes [{Cp-P(Ph2)═N-Ph}2Fe] (1), [{Cp-P(Ph2)═N-CH2-2-NC5H4}2Fe] (2), and [{Cp-P(Ph2)═N-CH2-2-NC5H4}Fe(Cp)] (3) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Ligands 2 and 3 afford stable coordination complexes [AuCl2(3)]ClO4, [{AuCl2}2(2)](ClO4)2, [PdCl2(3)], and [{PdCl2}2(2)]. The complexes have been evaluated for their antiproliferative properties in human ovarian cancer cells sensitive and resistant to cisplatin (A2780S/R), in human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and in a nontumorigenic human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK-293T). The highly cytotoxic trimetallic derivatives M2Fe (M = Au, Pd) are more cytotoxic to cancer cells than their corresponding monometallic fragments. Moreover, these complexes were significantly more cytotoxic than cisplatin in the resistant A2780R and the MCF7 cell lines. Studies of the interactions of the trimetallic compounds with DNA and the zinc-finger protein PARP-1 indicate that they exert anticancer effects in vitro based on different mechanisms of actions with respect to cisplatin.

  8. Natural product modulators of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as potential anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Tiago; Sieglitz, Florian; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L

    2016-11-07

    Treatment of cancer is a significant challenge in clinical medicine, and its research is a top priority in chemical biology and drug discovery. Consequently, there is an urgent need for identifying innovative chemotypes capable of modulating unexploited drug targets. The transient receptor potential (TRPs) channels persist scarcely explored as targets, despite intervening in a plethora of pathophysiological events in numerous diseases, including cancer. Both agonists and antagonists have proven capable of evoking phenotype changes leading to either cell death or reduced cell migration. Among these, natural products entail biologically pre-validated and privileged architectures for TRP recognition. Furthermore, several natural products have significantly contributed to our current knowledge on TRP biology. In this Tutorial Review we focus on selected natural products, e.g. capsaicinoids, cannabinoids and terpenes, by highlighting challenges and opportunities in their use as starting points for designing natural product-inspired TRP channel modulators. Importantly, the de-orphanization of natural products as TRP channel ligands may leverage their exploration as viable strategy for developing anticancer therapies. Finally, we foresee that TRP channels may be explored for the selective pharmacodelivery of cytotoxic payloads to diseased tissues, providing an innovative platform in chemical biology and molecular medicine.

  9. Iron(III)-binding of the anticancer agents doxorubicin and vosaroxin.

    PubMed

    Mjos, Katja Dralle; Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Jamieson, Gene; Fox, Judith A; Orvig, Chris

    2015-02-07

    The Fe(iii)-binding constant of vosaroxin, an anticancer quinolone derivative, has been determined spectrophotometrically and compared with the analogous Fe(iii) complex formed with doxorubicin. The in vivo metabolic stability and iron coordination properties of the quinolones compared to the anthracylines may provide significant benefit to cardiovascular safety. The mechanism of action of both molecules target the topoisomerase II enzyme. Both doxorubicin (Hdox, log βFeL3 = 33.41, pM = 17.0) and vosaroxin (Hvox, log βFeL3 = 33.80(3), pM = 15.9) bind iron(iii) with comparable strength; at physiological pH however, [Fe(vox)3] is the predominant species in contrast to a mixture of species observed for the Fe:dox system. Iron(iii) nitrate and gallium(iii) nitrate at a 1 : 3 ratio with vosaroxin formed stable tris(vosaroxacino)-iron(iii) and tris(vosaroxino)gallium(iii) complexes that were isolated and characterized. Their redox behavior was studied by CV, and their stereochemistry was further explored in temperature dependent (1)H NMR studies. The molecular pharmacology of their interaction with iron(iii) may be one possible differentiation in the safety profile of quinolones compared to anthracyclines in relation to cardiotoxicity.

  10. Tumor-targeting peptides and small molecules as anti-cancer agents to overcome drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Sarafraz-Yazdi, Ehsan; Pincus, Matthew R; Michl, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of chemotherapy in cancer therapy, development of resistance to every new therapeutic has been the universal experience. The growing understanding of cancer genomics, cancer-associated signal transduction pathways, and key protein drivers of cancer has enabled cancer biologists and medicinal chemists to develop targeted molecules to interfere with these pathways to tackle drug resistant cancers. However, to the dismay of oncologists, the clinical use of many of these tools has once again brought to the forefront the inevitable challenge of drug resistance. It is now understood that cancer resistance to different therapies involves multiple challenges that encompass the cancer cell itself as well as host physiology. This review presents small molecule inhibitors and peptides as two therapeutic approaches in anti-cancer drug development. Resistance to selected samples of these novel therapies is described in the context of cell autonomous resistance, the contributions of the tumor microenvironment, and germ line factors. For each approach, advantages and disadvantages are discussed on how to better overcome the inevitable challenge of resistance in cancer treatment.

  11. Potential Anticancer Heterometallic Fe-Au and Fe-Pd Agents: Initial Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Lease, Nicholas; Vasilevski, Vadim; Carreira, Monica; de Almeida, Andreia; Sanaú, Mercedes; Hirva, Pipsa; Casini, Angela; Contel, Maria

    2013-01-01

    A series of gold(III) and palladium(II) heterometallic complexes with new iminophosphorane ligands derived from ferrocenyl-phosphanes [{Cp-P(Ph2)=N-Ph}2Fe] (1), [{Cp-P(Ph2)=N-CH2-2-NC5H4}2Fe] (2) and [{Cp-P(Ph2)=N-CH2-2-NC5H4}Fe(Cp)] (3) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Ligands 2 and 3 afford stable coordination complexes [AuCl2(3)]ClO4, [{AuCl2}2(2)](ClO4)2, [PdCl2(3)] and [{PdCl2}2(2)]. The complexes have been evaluated for their antripoliferative properties in human ovarian cancer cells sensitive and resistant to cisplatin (A2780S/R), in human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and in a non-tumorigenic human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK-293T). The highly cytotoxic trimetallic derivatives M2Fe (M = Au, Pd) are more cytotoxic to cancer cells than their corresponding monometallic fragments. Moreover, these complexes were significantly more cytotoxic than cisplatin in the resistant A2780R and the MCF7 cell lines. Studies of the interactions of the trimetallic compounds with DNA and the zinc-finger protein PARP-1 indicate that they exert anticancer effects in vitro based on different mechanisms of actions with respect to cisplatin. PMID:23786413

  12. Potent anticancer activity of photo-activated oxo-bridged diiron(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Chanu, S Binita; Banerjee, Samya; Roy, Mithun

    2017-01-05

    Cancer-specific anticancer drugs are still an elusive goal. Using light as the temporal control to generate cytotoxic species from photo-activated prodrug in the presence or absence of molecular oxygen has shown potential application targeted chemotherapy as in photodynamic therapy (PDT). In the present work we explored the chemistry of several photo-active (μ-oxo)diiron(III) complexes of the following formulation [{Fe(μ-O) (L-his)(B)}2](ClO4)2 (1a-1c), [Fe2(μ-O)(H2O)2B4](ClO4)4 (2b, 2c) and [Fe2(μ-O)(μ-O2CMe)B4](ClO4)3 (3b, 3c), L-his = l-histidine, B is 2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) and dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq) complexes for tumor-specific anticancer activity. Facile redox chemistry and photochemical aspects of the complexes prompted us to investigate the cytotoxic as well as the photo-activated cytotoxic properties of the complexes to the cancer cells. In the present investigation we explored the cancer-specific condition of excess concentration of H2O2 for our approach to targeted chemotherapy. Cytotoxic effect of the complexes to the cancer cells was found to be significantly higher than in normal cells indicating tumor-specific anticancer activity of the complexes. Cytotoxic effect was even more pronounced when the cancer cells treated with the complexes were exposed to the visible light (400-700 nm). There was >12 fold increase in cytotoxicity of the photoactivated complexes in cancer cells (MCF-7) in comparison to the normal cells (MCF-10a). We have defined a factor viz. cancer cell specificity factor (f) describing the targeted photochemotherapeutic effect of the complexes at their specific concentration. The factor (f) > 1 indicated the cancer cell specificity of the complexes, while f > 2.5 for the complexes under the visible light exposure suggested photodynamic effect. DCFDA assay indicated the presence of excess of ROS in the treated HeLa cells. ROS concentration was found to increase even more on visible

  13. Anticancer Activity of VDR-Coregulator Inhibitor PS121912

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Preetpal S.; Teske, Kelly; Feleke, Belaynesh; Yuan, Nina Y.; Guthrie, Margaret L.; Fernstrum, Grant B.; Vyas, Nishita D.; Han, Lanlan; Preston, Joshua; Bogart, Jonathan W.; Silvaggi, Nicholas R.; Cook, James M.; Singh, Rakesh K.; Bikle, Daniel D.; Arnold, Leggy A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose PS121912 has been developed as selective vitamin D receptor (VDR)–coregulator inhibitor starting from a high throughput screening campaign to identify new agents that modulate VDR without causing hypercalcemia. Initial antiproliferative effects of PS121912 were observed that are characterized herein to enable future in vivo investigation with this molecule. Methods Antiproliferation and apoptosis was determined using four different cancer cell lines (DU145, Caco2, HL-60, and SKOV3) in the presence of PS121912, 1,25-(OH)2D3, or a combination of 1,25-(OH)2D3 and PS121912. VDR si-RNA was used to identify the role of VDR during this process. The application of ChIP enabled us to determine the involvement of coregulator recruitment during transcription, which was investigated by rt-PCR with VDR target genes and those affiliated with cell cycle progression. Translational changes of apoptotic proteins were determined with an antibody array. The preclinical characterization of PS121912 include the determination of metabolic stability and CYP3A4 inhibition. Results PS121912 induced apoptosis in all four cancer cells, with HL-60 cells being the most sensitive. At sub-micromolar concentrations, PS121912 amplified the growth inhibition of cancer cells caused by 1,25-(OH)2D3 without being antiproliferative by itself. A knockout study with VDR si-RNA confirmed the mediating role of VDR. VDR target genes induced by 1,25-(OH)2D3 were down-regulated with the co-treatment of PS121912. This process was highly dependent on the recruitment of coregulators that in case of CYP24A1 was SRC2. The combination of PS121912 and 1,25-(OH)2D3 reduced the presence of SRC2 and enriched the occupancy of corepressor NCoR at the promoter site. E2F transcription factor 1 and 4 were down-regulated in the presence of PS121912 and 1,25-(OH)2D3 that in turn reduced the transcription levels of cyclin A and D thus arresting HL-60 cells in the S or G2/M phase. In addition, proteins with

  14. Pre-clinical evaluation of a novel class of anti-cancer agents, the Pyrrolo-1, 5-benzoxazepines

    PubMed Central

    Greene, LM; Butini, S; Campiani, G; Williams, DC; Zisterer, DM

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules are currently ranked one of the most validated targets for chemotherapy; with clinical use of microtubule targeting agents (MTAs) extending beyond half a century. Recent research has focused on the development of novel MTAs to combat drug resistance and drug associated toxicities. Of particular interest are compounds structurally different to those currently used within the clinic. The pyrrolo-1, 5-benzoxazepines (PBOXs) are a structurally distinct novel group of anti-cancer agents, some of which target tubulin. Herein, we review the chemistry, mechanism of action, preclinical development of the PBOXs and comparisons with clinically relevant chemotherapeutics. The PBOXs induce a range of cellular responses including; cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, autophagy, anti-vascular and anti-angiogenic effects. The apoptotic potential of the PBOXs extends across a wide spectrum of cancer-derived cell lines, by targeting tubulin and multiple molecular pathways frequently deregulated in human cancers. Extensive experimental data suggest that combining the PBOXs with established chemotherapeutics or radiation is therapeutically advantageous. Pre-clinical highlights of the PBOXs include; cancer specificity and improved therapeutic efficacy as compared to some current first line therapeutics. PMID:27994676

  15. Anti-cancer agents based on 6-trifluoromethoxybenzimidazole derivatives and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Gakh, Andrei A; Vovk, Mykhaylo V; Mel& #x27; nychenko, Nina V; Sukach, Volodymyr A

    2012-10-23

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds having the structural Formulas (1a,1b), stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof as chemotherapy agents for treating of cancer, particularly androgen-independent prostate cancer. The disclosure also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  16. Anti-cancer agents based on 6-trifluoromethoxybenzimidazole derivatives and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Vovk, Mykhaylo V.; Mel'nychenko, Nina V.; Sukach, Volodymyr A.

    2012-08-14

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds having the structural Formulas (1a,1b), stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof as chemotherapy agents for treating of cancer, particularly androgen-independent prostate cancer. The disclosure also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  17. Quantitative High-Throughput Drug Screening Identifies Novel Classes of Drugs with Anticancer Activity in Thyroid Cancer Cells: Opportunities for Repurposing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lisa; He, Mei; Zhang, Yaqin; Nilubol, Naris; Shen, Min

    2012-01-01

    Context: Despite increased understanding of the pathogenesis and targets for thyroid cancer and other cancers, developing a new anticancer chemical agent remains an expensive and long process. An alternative approach is the exploitation of clinically used and/or bioactive compounds. Objective: Our objective was to identify agents with an anticancer effect in thyroid cancer cell lines using quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS). Design: We used the newly assembled National Institutes of Health Chemical Genomic Center's pharmaceutical collection, which contains 2816 clinically approved drugs and bioactive compounds to perform qHTS. Results: Multiple agents, across a variety of therapeutic categories and with different modes of action, were found to have an antiproliferative effect. We found the following therapeutic categories were the most enriched categories with antiproliferative activity: cardiotonic and antiobesity agents. Sixteen agents had an efficacy of greater than 60% and a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) in the nanomolar range. We validated the results of the qHTS using two agents (bortezomib and ouabain) in additional cell lines representing different histological subtypes of thyroid cancer and with different mutations (BRAF V600E, RET/PTC1, p53, PTEN). Both agents induced apoptosis, and ouabain also caused cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study to use qHTS of a large drug library to identify candidate drugs for anticancer therapy. Our results indicate such a screening approach can lead to the discovery of novel agents in different therapeutic categories and drugs with nonclassic chemotherapy mode of action. Our approach could lead to drug repurposing and accelerate clinical trials of compounds with well-established pharmacokinetics and toxicity profiles. PMID:22170715

  18. Activity Recognition for Agent Teams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    correspond to a real team, but is rather a visual illusion caused by a coincidental configuration of agents. 50 CHAPTER 4. STABR The behavior...each frame-pair were only classified with 76% accuracy, such a method would hallucinate false action transitions at unacceptable rates). Fortunately

  19. Screening and evaluation of antiparasitic and in vitro anticancer activities of Panamanian endophytic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Luis, Sergio; Cherigo, Lilia; Higginbotham, Sarah; Arnold, Elizabeth; Spadafora, Carmenza; Ibañez, Alicia; Gerwick, William H.; Cubilla-Rios, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Summary Many compounds produced by fungi have relevant pharmaceutical applications. The purpose of this study was to collect and isolate endophytic fungi from different regions of Panama and then to test their potential therapeutic activities against Leishmania donovani, Plasmodium falciparum, and Trypanosoma cruzi as well as their anticancer activities in MCF-7 cells. Of the 25 fungal isolates obtained, ten of them had good anti-parasitic potential, showing selective activity against L. donovani; four had significant anti-malarial activity; and three inhibited the growth of T. cruzi. Anticancer activity was demonstrated in four isolates. Of the active isolates, Edenia sp. strain F0755, Xylaria sp. strain F1220, Aspergillus sp. strain F1544, Mycoleptodiscus sp. strain F0194, Phomopsis sp. strain F1566, Pycnoporus sp. strain F0305, and Diaporthe sp. strain F1647 showed the most promise based on their selective bioactivity and lack of toxicity in the assays. PMID:22069153

  20. In-vitro anticancer and antimicrobial activities of PLGA/silver nanofiber composites prepared by electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Almajhdi, Fahad N; Fouad, H; Khalil, Khalil Abdelrazek; Awad, Hanem M; Mohamed, Sahar H S; Elsarnagawy, T; Albarrag, Ahmed M; Al-Jassir, Fawzi F; Abdo, Hany S

    2014-04-01

    In the present work, a series of 0, 1 and 7 wt% silver nano-particles (Ag NPs) incorporated poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nano-fibers were synthesized by the electrospinning process. The PLGA/Ag nano-fibers sheets were characterized using SEM, TEM and DSC analyses. The three synthesized PLGA/silver nano-fiber composites were screened for anticancer activity against liver cancer cell line using MTT and LDH assays. The anticancer activity of PLGA nano-fibers showed a remarkable improvement due to increasing the concentration of the Ag NPs. In addition to the given result, PLGA nano-fibers did not show any cytotoxic effect. However, PLGA nano-fibers that contain 1 % nano silver showed anticancer activity of 8.8 %, through increasing the concentration of the nano silver to 7 % onto PLGA nano-fibers, the anticancer activity was enhanced to a 67.6 %. Furthermore, the antibacterial activities of these three nano-fibers, against the five bacteria strains namely; E.coli o157:H7 ATCC 51659, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 13565, Bacillus cereus EMCC 1080, Listeria monocytogenes EMCC 1875 and Salmonella typhimurium ATCC25566 using the disc diffusion method, were evaluated. Sample with an enhanced inhibitory effect was PLGA/Ag NPs (7 %) which inhibited all strains (inhibition zone diameter 10 mm); PLGA/Ag NPs (1 %) sample inhibited only one strain (B. cereus) with zone diameter 8 mm. The PLGA nano-fiber sample has not shown any antimicrobial activity. Based on the anticancer as well as the antimicrobial results in this study, it can be postulated that: PLGA nanofibers containing 7 % nano silver are suitable as anticancer- and antibiotic-drug delivery systems, as they will increase the anticancer as well as the antibiotic drug potency without cytotoxicity effect on the normal cells. These findings also suggest that Ag NPs, of the size (5-10 nm) evaluated in the present study, are appropriate for therapeutic application from a safety standpoint.

  1. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of organometallic gold(I) derivatives as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, Elena; Tomás, Alejandro; Atrián-Blasco, Elena; Gascón, Sonia; Romanos, Eduardo; Rodriguez-Yoldi, Mary Jesus; Cerrada, Elena; Laguna, Mariano

    2016-02-14

    Alkyne gold(I) derivatives with the water soluble phosphanes PTA (1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane) and DAPTA (3,7-diacetyl-1,3,7-triaza-5-phosphabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane) were described and their anticancer potential against the colon cancer cell line Caco-2 (PD7 and TC7 clones) was studied. Strong antiproliferative effects are found, for all the new complexes, to be even more pronounced than for the reference drug cisplatin, and similar to auranofin. The interaction of these derivatives with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. The types of quenching and binding constants were determined by a fluorescence quenching method. Moderate values of the binding constants are calculated for the tested derivatives indicating that these complexes can be stored and carried easily by this protein in the body. The study of the thermodynamic parameters in the case of [Au(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CCH2Spyridine)(PTA)] points out to the presence of van der Waals interactions or hydrogen bonding between the metallic complex and the protein. In addition, the complex [Au(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CCH2Spyridine)(PTA)] has shown inhibition in colon cancer proliferation of HTC-116-luc2 cell lines via the apoptotic pathway and S-phase arrest of the cell cycle. Intraperitoneal injection of this derivative in athymic nude mice inoculated with HTC-116-luc2 cells prolonged their survival and displayed moderate inhibition of the tumour growth with no subsequent organ (kidney and liver) damage after treatment.

  2. Fluorine-Containing Taxoid Anticancer Agents and Their Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Joshua; Vineberg, Jacob G.; Zuniga, Edison S.; Ojima, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    A long-standing problem of conventional chemotherapy is the lack of tumor-specific treatments. Traditional chemotherapy relies on the premise that rapidly proliferating cancer cells are more likely to be killed by a cytotoxic agent. In reality, however, cytotoxic agents have very little or no specificity, which leads to systemic toxicity, causing undesirable severe side effects. Consequently, various “molecularly targeted cancer therapies” have been developed for use in specific cancers, including tumor-targeting drug delivery systems. In general, such a drug delivery system consists of a tumor recognition moiety and a cytotoxic “warhead” connected through a “smart” linker to form a conjugate. When a multi-functionalized nanomaterial is used as the vehicle, a “Trojan Horse” approach can be used for mass delivery of cytotoxic “warheads” to maximize the efficacy. Exploitation of the special properties of fluorine has proven successful in the development of new and effective biochemical tools as well as therapeutic agents. Fluorinated congeners can also serve as excellent probes for the investigation of biochemical mechanisms. 19F-NMR can provide unique and powerful tools for mechanistic investigations in chemical biology. This account presents our recent progress, in perspective, on the molecular approaches to the design and development of novel tumor-targeted drug delivery systems for new generation chemotherapy by exploiting the unique nature of fluorine. PMID:23935213

  3. A novel anticancer agent SNG1153 inhibits growth of lung cancer stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Zhu, Hai; Han, Yuqing; Jin, Mingji; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Congya; Ma, Junfeng; Lin, Qingcong; Wang, Zhaoyi; Meng, Kun; Fu, Xueqi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in both men and women. Lung cancer contains a small population of cancer cells with stem-like features known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are often more resistant to current therapeutic treatments. Thus, it is urgent to develop a novel agent that is able to inhibit CSCs growth. In this study, we examined the ability of SNG1153, a novel chemical agent to inhibit the growth of lung CSCs. We found that SNG1153 inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in established lung cancer cells. We also found that SNG1153 inhibited the tumorsphere formation and decreased CD133-positive (lung CSC marker) cancer cells. SNG1153 was able to attenuate tumor formation in NOD/SCID (non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient) mice injected with lung tumorsphere cells. We further demonstrated that SNG1153 induced β-catenin phosphorylation and down-regulated β-catenin. Our results thus demonstrate that SNG1153 effectively inhibits the growth of lung CSCs and suggest that SNG1153 may be a novel therapeutic agent to treat human lung cancer. PMID:27281614

  4. Synthesis, anticancer and antibacterial activity of salinomycin N-benzyl amides.

    PubMed

    Antoszczak, Michał; Maj, Ewa; Napiórkowska, Agnieszka; Stefańska, Joanna; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Ewa; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Janczak, Jan; Brzezinski, Bogumil; Huczyński, Adam

    2014-11-25

    A series of 12 novel monosubstituted N-benzyl amides of salinomycin (SAL) was synthesized for the first time and characterized by NMR and FT-IR spectroscopic methods. Molecular structures of three salinomycin derivatives in the solid state were determined using single crystal X-ray method. All compounds obtained were screened for their antiproliferative activity against various human cancer cell lines as well as against the most problematic bacteria strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Novel salinomycin derivatives exhibited potent anticancer activity against drug-resistant cell lines. Additionally, two N-benzyl amides of salinomycin revealed interesting antibacterial activity. The most active were N-benzyl amides of SAL substituted at -ortho position and the least anticancer active derivatives were those substituted at the -para position.

  5. Characterization of anticancer, DNase and antifungal activity of pumpkin 2S albumin.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Prabhat Pratap Singh; Nikhil, Kumar; Singh, Anamika; Selvakumar, Purushotham; Roy, Partha; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2014-06-13

    The plant 2S albumins exhibit a spectrum of biotechnologically exploitable functions. Among them, pumpkin 2S albumin has been shown to possess RNase and cell-free translational inhibitory activities. The present study investigated the anticancer, DNase and antifungal activities of pumpkin 2S albumin. The protein exhibited a strong anticancer activity toward breast cancer (MCF-7), ovarian teratocarcinoma (PA-1), prostate cancer (PC-3 and DU-145) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell lines. Acridine orange staining and DNA fragmentation studies indicated that cytotoxic effect of pumpkin 2S albumin is mediated through induction of apoptosis. Pumpkin 2S albumin showed DNase activity against both supercoiled and linear DNA and exerted antifungal activity against Fusarium oxysporum. Secondary structure analysis by CD showed that protein is highly stable up to 90°C and retains its alpha helical structure. These results demonstrated that pumpkin 2S albumin is a multifunctional protein with host of potential biotechnology applications.

  6. Biological evaluation of some new N-(2,6-dimethoxypyrimidinyl) thioureido benzenesulfonamide derivatives as potential antimicrobial and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ghorab, Mostafa M; Alsaid, Mansour S; El-Gaby, Mohamed S A; Safwat, Nesreen A; Elaasser, Mahmoud M; Soliman, Aiten M

    2016-11-29

    A series of novel heterocyclic thioureas 3a-u containing sulfonamide moiety have been synthesized by the condensation of isothiocyanatobenzenesulfonamide 2 with a variety of heterocyclic amines. The newly synthesized heterocyclic thioureas were investigated for their antimicrobial and anticancer activity. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity were done using well diffusion method. Interestingly, compounds 3j and 3m, showed similar or better activity compared with the reference drug against the tested microorganisms. Although, 3j was less active among its analogues to inhibit the breast carcinoma cells, it exhibit strong broad spectrum antimicrobial activities. However, The results of the cytotoxic activity revealed that compound 3p was the most active against the breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7) giving promising IC50 value of 1.72 μg/mL, compared with reference drug (5-flourouracil) with IC50 value of 4.8 μg/mL. The most potent compounds in cytotoxic activity 3b and 3p were further docked inside the active site of CAIX and were found to exhibit a proper binding with the active site amino acids according to their bond lengths, angles and conformational energy.

  7. Identification of endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducing agents by antagonizing autophagy: a new potential strategy for identification of anti-cancer therapeutics in B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Emilia; Maddocks, Kami; Flynn, Joseph; Jones, Jeffrey; Cole, Sara L.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Byrd, John C.; Johnson, Amy J.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a vital function in multiple cellular processes. There is a growing interest in developing therapeutic agents that can target the ER in cancer cells, inducing a stress response that leads to cell death. However, ER stress-inducing agents can also induce autophagy, a survival strategy of cancer cells. Therefore, by inhibiting autophagy we can increase the efficacy of the ER stress-inducing agents. Nelfinavir, a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitor with anti-cancer properties, can induce ER stress. Nelfinavir’s effects on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are yet to be elucidated. Herein we demonstrate that nelfinavir induces ER morphological changes and stress response, along with an autophagic protective strategy. Our data reveal that chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, significantly increases nelfinavir cytotoxicity. These results identify a novel strategy potentially effective in CLL treatment, by repositioning two well-known drugs as a combinatorial therapy with anti-cancer properties. PMID:23469959

  8. Utilization of microbial iron assimilation processes for the development of new antibiotics and inspiration for the design of new anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Miller, Marvin J; Zhu, Helen; Xu, Yanping; Wu, Chunrui; Walz, Andrew J; Vergne, Anne; Roosenberg, John M; Moraski, Garrett; Minnick, Albert A; McKee-Dolence, Julia; Hu, Jingdan; Fennell, Kelley; Kurt Dolence, E; Dong, Li; Franzblau, Scott; Malouin, Francois; Möllmann, Ute

    2009-02-01

    Pathogenic microbes rapidly develop resistance to antibiotics. To keep ahead in the "microbial war", extensive interdisciplinary research is needed. A primary cause of drug resistance is the overuse of antibiotics that can result in alteration of microbial permeability, alteration of drug target binding sites, induction of enzymes that destroy antibiotics (ie., beta-lactamase) and even induction of efflux mechanisms. A combination of chemical syntheses, microbiological and biochemical studies demonstrate that the known critical dependence of iron assimilation by microbes for growth and virulence can be exploited for the development of new approaches to antibiotic therapy. Iron recognition and active transport relies on the biosyntheses and use of microbe-selective iron-chelating compounds called siderophores. Our studies, and those of others, demonstrate that siderophores and analogs can be used for iron transport-mediated drug delivery ("Trojan Horse" antibiotics) and induction of iron limitation/starvation (Development of new agents to block iron assimilation). Recent extensions of the use of siderophores for the development of novel potent and selective anticancer agents are also described.

  9. Anticancer activity and chemoprevention of xenobiotic organosulfurs in preclinical model systems

    PubMed Central

    Click, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    There seems to be little doubt that xenobiotic and plant derived organosulfur compounds have enormous benefits for in vitro cellular functions and for a multitude of diseases, including cancer. Since there are numerous reviews on anticancer activities of plant organosulfurs, the focus herein will be on alterations associated with xenobiotic organosulfurs. Benefits of 2-mercaptoethanol (2-Me), N-Acetyl-cysteine, cysteamine, thioproline, piroxicam, disulfiram, amifostine, sulindac, celecoxib, oltipraz and their derivates on transplanted homologous tumors and on autochthonous cancers with a viral-, radiation-, chemical carcinogen-, and undefined-etiology are assessed. Because all organosulfurs were not tested for activity in each of the etiology categories, comparative evaluations are restricted. In general, all ‘appeared’ to lower the incidence of cancer irrespective of etiology; however, since most of these values were determined at ages much younger than at a natural-end-of-life-age, differences most likely, instead, reflect a delayed initiation and/or a slowed progression of tumorigenesis. The poorest, long-term benefits of early intervention protocols occurred for viral- and chemical carcinogen-induced cancers. In addition, once tumorigenesis was beyond the initiation stage, outcomes of organosulfur therapies were extremely poor, indicating that they will not be of significant value as stand alone treatments. More importantly, except for the lifetime prevention of spontaneous and radiation-induced mammary tumors by daily dietary 2-Me, similar life long prevention of tumorigenesis was not achieved with other xenobiotics or any of nature’s plant organosulfurs. These results raise an interesting question: Is the variability in incidence found for different organosulfurs associated with (a) their structure, (b) the length of the untreated latency period, (c) treatment duration/dose, and/or (d) the etiology-inducing agent? PMID:25383193

  10. Azide derivatized anticancer agents of Vitamin K 3: X-ray structural, DSC, resonance spectral and API studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badave, Kirti; Patil, Yogesh; Gonnade, Rajesh; Srinivas, Darbha; Dasgupta, Rajan; Khan, Ayesha; Rane, Sandhya

    2011-12-01

    Compound 1 [1-imino (acetyl hydrazino)-Vitamin K 3], displays valence tautomerically related electronic isomers as Form I and Form II. Form I exhibits 2D packing fragment with 1D ribbon chains of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and shows EPR silent features. While Form II is EPR active and exhibits biradical nature with double quantum transitions at g = 2.0040. 1H NMR of compound 2, [1-imino (hydrazino carboxylate)-Vitamin K 3] and Form II exhibit π delocalization via resonance assisted H-bonding [RAHB] effect compared to Form I. Molecular interactions in Form I and II are visualized by DSC. The electronic structures of compounds 1 and 2 have been correlated to their API values by measuring anticancer activities, mitochondrial potentials and DNA shearing patterns. Form II and compound 2 indicate mitochondria mediated apoptosis (˜75% cell death) while Form I causes 35% cell death.

  11. A novel green one-step synthesis of gold nanoparticles using crocin and their anti-cancer activities.

    PubMed

    Hoshyar, Reyhane; Khayati, Gholam Reza; Poorgholami, Maliheh; Kaykhaii, Massoud

    2016-06-01

    Functionalized nanoparticles are specifically designed to deliver drugs at tumor cells and can potentially enhance anticancer activity of drugs such as crocin. In the present study, we have applied antioxidant crocin as a reducing agent for one pot green synthesis of controlled size gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Spherical, stable and uniform AuNPs were synthesized using crocin. These AuNPs are characterized by UV-Vis, TEM and XRD techniques. The prepared AuNPs showed surface plasm on resonance centered at 520nm with the average particle size of about 4-10nm. The anti-cancer effect of AuNPs was determined using MTT and LDH tests. The cellular data showed that these AuNPs significantly decreased cancerous cells' growth after 24 and 48hours in a time- and dose-dependent manner (P<0.05). The results suggest that such AuNPs can be synthesized simply and quickly with invaluable clinical as well as pharmaceutical activities which can help to treat human breast cancer.

  12. d-Amino Acid Position Influences the Anticancer Activity of Galaxamide Analogs: An Apoptotic Mechanism Study

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Defa; Yu, Siming; Zhong, Shenghui; Zhao, Bingxin; Qiu, Shaoling; Chen, Jianwei; Lunagariya, Jignesh; Liao, Xiaojian; Xu, Shihai

    2017-01-01

    Galaxamide, an extract from Galaxaura filamentosa, is a cyclic pentapeptide containing five l-leucines. Due to the particular cyclic structure and the excellent anticancer activity, synthesis of Galaxamide and its analogs and their subsequent bio-applications have attracted great attention. In the present work, we synthesized six Galaxamide analogs by replacing one of the l-leucines with phenylalanine and varying the d-amino acid position. The anticancer effect of the synthesized Galaxamide analogs was tested against four in vitro human cancer cell lines, human hepatocellular cells (HepG2), human breast cancer cell (MCF-7), human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MDA-MB-435) and a human cervical carcinoma cell line (Hela). Results showed that Galaxamide analogs with different d-amino acid positions displayed distinct anticancer potential. The Galaxamide analog containing d-amino acid at position 5 (Analog-6) presented the strongest anticancer activity. The mechanism study revealed that Analog-6 could cause the early apoptosis of HepG2 cells by inhibiting their growth in the sub-G1 stage of the cell cycle and induce the chromatin condensation and fragmentation, which can be seen as 68% of HepG2 cells inhibited in the sub-G1 stage. Moreover, a mitochondria-mediated pathway was found to be involved in the apoptotic process of Analog-6 on HepG2 cells. PMID:28287429

  13. d-Amino Acid Position Influences the Anticancer Activity of Galaxamide Analogs: An Apoptotic Mechanism Study.

    PubMed

    Bai, Defa; Yu, Siming; Zhong, Shenghui; Zhao, Bingxin; Qiu, Shaoling; Chen, Jianwei; Lunagariya, Jignesh; Liao, Xiaojian; Xu, Shihai

    2017-03-10

    Galaxamide, an extract from Galaxaura filamentosa, is a cyclic pentapeptide containing five l-leucines. Due to the particular cyclic structure and the excellent anticancer activity, synthesis of Galaxamide and its analogs and their subsequent bio-applications have attracted great attention. In the present work, we synthesized six Galaxamide analogs by replacing one of the l-leucines with phenylalanine and varying the d-amino acid position. The anticancer effect of the synthesized Galaxamide analogs was tested against four in vitro human cancer cell lines, human hepatocellular cells (HepG₂), human breast cancer cell (MCF-7), human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MDA-MB-435) and a human cervical carcinoma cell line (Hela). Results showed that Galaxamide analogs with different d-amino acid positions displayed distinct anticancer potential. The Galaxamide analog containing d-amino acid at position 5 (Analog-6) presented the strongest anticancer activity. The mechanism study revealed that Analog-6 could cause the early apoptosis of HepG₂ cells by inhibiting their growth in the sub-G1 stage of the cell cycle and induce the chromatin condensation and fragmentation, which can be seen as 68% of HepG₂ cells inhibited in the sub-G1 stage. Moreover, a mitochondria-mediated pathway was found to be involved in the apoptotic process of Analog-6 on HepG₂ cells.

  14. Nanoformulation improves activity of the (pre)clinical anticancer ruthenium complex KP1019.

    PubMed

    Heffeter, P; Riabtseva, A; Senkiv, Y; Kowol, C R; Körner, W; Jungwith, U; Mitina, N; Keppler, B K; Konstantinova, T; Yanchuk, I; Stoika, R; Zaichenko, A; Berger, W

    2014-05-01

    Ruthenium anticancer drugs belong to the most promising non-platinum anticancer metal compounds in clinical evaluation. However, although the clinical results are promising regarding both activity and very low adverse effects, the clinical application is currently hampered by the limited solubility and stability of the drug in aqueous solution. Here, we present a new nanoparticle formulation based on polymer-based micelles loaded with the anticancer lead ruthenium compound KP1019. Nanoprepared KP1019 was characterised by enhanced stability in aqueous solutions. Moreover, the nanoparticle formulation facilitated cellular accumulation of KP1019 (determined by ICP-MS measurements) resulting in significantly lowered IC50 values. With regard to the mode of action, increased cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase (PI-staining), DNA damage (Comet assay) as well as enhanced levels of apoptotic cell death (caspase 7 and PARP cleavage) were found in HCT116 cells treated with the new nanoformulation of KP1019. Summarizing, we present for the first time evidence that nanoformulation is a feasible strategy for improving the stability as well as activity of experimental anticancer ruthenium compounds.

  15. Water Extract of Ashwagandha Leaves Has Anticancer Activity: Identification of an Active Component and Its Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ran; Shah, Navjot; Widodo, Nashi; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Ishida, Yoshiyuki; Terao, Keiji; Kaul, Sunil C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer is a leading cause of death accounting for 15-20% of global mortality. Although advancements in diagnostic and therapeutic technologies have improved cancer survival statistics, 75% of the world population live in underdeveloped regions and have poor access to the advanced medical remedies. Natural therapies hence become an alternative choice of treatment. Ashwagandha, a tropical herb used in Indian Ayurvedic medicine, has a long history of its health promoting and therapeutic effects. In the present study, we have investigated an anticancer activity in the water extract of Ashwagandha leaves (ASH-WEX). Methodology/Principal Findings Anticancer activity in the water extract of Ashwagandha leaves (ASH-WEX) was detected by in vitro and in vivo assays. Bioactivity-based size fractionation and NMR analysis were performed to identify the active anticancer component(s). Mechanism of anticancer activity in the extract and its purified component was investigated by biochemical assays. We report that the ASH-WEX is cytotoxic to cancer cells selectively, and causes tumor suppression in vivo. Its active anticancer component was identified as triethylene glycol (TEG). Molecular analysis revealed activation of tumor suppressor proteins p53 and pRB by ASH-WEX and TEG in cancer cells. In contrast to the hypophosphorylation of pRB, decrease in cyclin B1 and increase in cyclin D1 in ASH-WEX and TEG-treated cancer cells (undergoing growth arrest), normal cells showed increase in pRB phosphorylation and cyclin B1, and decrease in cyclin D1 (signifying their cell cycle progression). We also found that the MMP-3 and MMP-9 that regulate metastasis were down regulated in ASH-WEX and TEG-treated cancer cells; normal cells remained unaffected. Conclusion We provide the first molecular evidence that the ASH-WEX and TEG have selective cancer cell growth arrest activity and hence may offer natural and economic resources for anticancer medicine. PMID:24130852

  16. Comparison of the effects of various anticancer agents on intestinal anastomosis after intraperitoneal administration.

    PubMed

    Arikan, A Y; Senel, F M; Akman, R Y; Can, C

    1999-01-01

    In this study, the effects of intraperitoneal 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cisplatinum (Cis), adriamycin (Adr), and methotrexate (MTX) administration on rat intestinal anastomosis were compared. Cis and MTX led to significant weight loss in the first 5 days compared with the control group. Within 14 days all rats except the MTX group nearly reached their preoperative weight. No remarkable weight loss or systemic toxicity was observed among the 5-FU and Adr groups. The anastomosis bursting pressure (ABP) at 1 week was significantly lower than that of the control group (P < 0.01 and P < 0.005, respectively). On day 14 the anastomosis bursting pressure in the Cis group was similar to that of the control group but was significantly lower in the MTX group (P < 0.002). Histopathologically, MTX avoided the development of a mucosal layer at the anastomosis site and led to ulcer formation in some of the rats. The ABPs at 7 and 14 days were similar to those in the control group. Neither of the agents had any significant mechanical or histopathologic adverse effects on anastomosis. According to the results of our study, MTX impaired the healing of the anastomosis, and we thus conclude that the intraperitoneal administration of this agent is not safe. On the other hand, Cis showed a detrimental effect on the anastomosis, particularly in the early phase, but this effect disappeared in the late phase. Cis thus should not be administered in the early postoperative phase. As a result, 5-FU and Adr were found to be the safest agents as they did not delay wound healing and did not reduce the anastomotic strength.

  17. Molecular predictors of therapeutic response to specific anti-cancer agents

    DOEpatents

    Spellman, Paul T.; Gray, Joe W.; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Heiser, Laura M.; Gibb, William J.; Kuo, Wen-lin; Wang, Nicholas J.

    2016-11-29

    Herein is described the use of a collection of 50 breast cancer cell lines to match responses to 77 conventional and experimental therapeutic agents with transcriptional, proteomic and genomic subtypes found in primary tumors. Almost all compounds produced strong differential responses across the cell lines produced responses that were associated with transcriptional and proteomic subtypes and produced responses that were associated with recurrent genome copy number abnormalities. These associations can now be incorporated into clinical trials that test subtype markers and clinical responses simultaneously.

  18. Anticancer and enhanced antimicrobial activity of biosynthesizd silver nanoparticles against clinical pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeshkumar, Shanmugam; Malarkodi, Chelladurai; Vanaja, Mahendran; Annadurai, Gurusamy

    2016-07-01

    The present investigation shows the biosynthesis of eco-friendly silver nanoparticles using culture supernatant of Enterococcus sp. and study the effect of enhanced antimicrobial activity, anticancer activity against pathogenic bacteria, fungi and cancer cell lines. Silver nanoparticles was synthesized by adding 1 mM silver nitrate into the 100 ml of 24 h freshly prepared culture supernatant of Enterococcus sp. and were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), Selected Area Diffraction X-Ray (SAED), Energy Dispersive X Ray (EDX) and Fourier Transform Infra red Spectroscopy (FT-IR). The synthesized silver nanoparticles were impregnated with commercial antibiotics for evaluation of enhanced antimicrobial activity. Further these synthesized silver nanoparticles were assessed for its anticancer activity against cancer cell lines. In this study crystalline structured nanoparticles with spherical in the size ranges from 10 to 80 nm and it shows excellent enhanced antimicrobial activity than the commercial antibiotics. The in vitro assay of silver nanoparticles on anticancer have great potential to inhibit the cell viability. Amide linkages and carboxylate groups of proteins from Enterococcus sp. may bind with silver ions and convert into nanoparticles. The activities of commercial antibiotics were enhanced by coating silver nanoparticles shows significant improved antimicrobial activity. Silver nanoparticles have the great potential to inhibit the cell viability of liver cancer cells lines (HepG2) and lung cancer cell lines (A549).

  19. Investigations of fungal secondary metabolites with potential anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Balde, ElHadj Saidou; Andolfi, Anna; Bruyère, Céline; Cimmino, Alessio; Lamoral-Theys, Delphine; Vurro, Maurizio; Damme, Marc Van; Altomare, Claudio; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert; Evidente, Antonio

    2010-05-28

    Fourteen metabolites, isolated from phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi, were evaluated for their in vitro antigrowth activity for six distinct cancer cell lines, using the MTT colorimetric assay. Bislongiquinolide (1) and dihydrotrichodimerol (5), which belong to the bisorbicillinoid structural class, displayed significant growth inhibitory activity against the six cancer cell lines studied, while the remaining compounds displayed weak or no activity. The data show that 1 and 5 have similar growth inhibitory activities with respect to those cancer cell lines that display certain levels of resistance to pro-apoptotic stimuli or those that are sensitive to apoptosis. Quantitative videomicroscopy analysis revealed that 1 and 5 exert their antiproliferative effect through cytostatic and not cytotoxic activity. The preliminary results from the current study have stimulated further structure-activity investigations with respect to the growth inhibitory activity of compounds belonging to the bisorbicillinoid group.

  20. Mode of action and resistance studies unveil new roles for tropodithietic acid as an anticancer agent and the γ-glutamyl cycle as a proton sink.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Maxwell Z; Wang, Rurun; Gitai, Zemer; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R

    2016-02-09

    While we have come to appreciate the architectural complexity of microbially synthesized secondary metabolites, far less attention has been paid to linking their structural features with possible modes of action. This is certainly the case with tropodithietic acid (TDA), a broad-spectrum antibiotic generated by marine bacteria that engage in dynamic symbioses with microscopic algae. TDA promotes algal health by killing unwanted marine pathogens; however, its mode of action (MoA) and significance for the survival of an algal-bacterial miniecosystem remains unknown. Using cytological profiling, we herein determine the MoA of TDA and surprisingly find that it acts by a mechanism similar to polyether antibiotics, which are structurally highly divergent. We show that like polyether drugs, TDA collapses the proton motive force by a proton antiport mechanism, in which extracellular protons are exchanged for cytoplasmic cations. The α-carboxy-tropone substructure is ideal for this purpose as the proton can be carried on the carboxyl group, whereas the basicity of the tropylium ion facilitates cation export. Based on similarities to polyether anticancer agents we have further examined TDA's cytotoxicity and find it to exhibit potent, broad-spectrum anticancer activities. These results highlight the power of MoA-profiling technologies in repurposing old drugs for new targets. In addition, we identify an operon that confers TDA resistance to the producing marine bacteria. Bioinformatic and biochemical analyses of these genes lead to a previously unknown metabolic link between TDA/acid resistance and the γ-glutamyl cycle. The implications of this resistance mechanism in the context of the algal-bacterial symbiosis are discussed.

  1. Mode of action and resistance studies unveil new roles for tropodithietic acid as an anticancer agent and the γ-glutamyl cycle as a proton sink

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Maxwell Z.; Wang, Rurun; Gitai, Zemer; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R.

    2016-01-01

    While we have come to appreciate the architectural complexity of microbially synthesized secondary metabolites, far less attention has been paid to linking their structural features with possible modes of action. This is certainly the case with tropodithietic acid (TDA), a broad-spectrum antibiotic generated by marine bacteria that engage in dynamic symbioses with microscopic algae. TDA promotes algal health by killing unwanted marine pathogens; however, its mode of action (MoA) and significance for the survival of an algal–bacterial miniecosystem remains unknown. Using cytological profiling, we herein determine the MoA of TDA and surprisingly find that it acts by a mechanism similar to polyether antibiotics, which are structurally highly divergent. We show that like polyether drugs, TDA collapses the proton motive force by a proton antiport mechanism, in which extracellular protons are exchanged for cytoplasmic cations. The α-carboxy-tropone substructure is ideal for this purpose as the proton can be carried on the carboxyl group, whereas the basicity of the tropylium ion facilitates cation export. Based on similarities to polyether anticancer agents we have further examined TDA’s cytotoxicity and find it to exhibit potent, broad-spectrum anticancer activities. These results highlight the power of MoA-profiling technologies in repurposing old drugs for new targets. In addition, we identify an operon that confers TDA resistance to the producing marine bacteria. Bioinformatic and biochemical analyses of these genes lead to a previously unknown metabolic link between TDA/acid resistance and the γ-glutamyl cycle. The implications of this resistance mechanism in the context of the algal-bacterial symbiosis are discussed. PMID:26802120

  2. Development and validation of a rapid HPLC method for quantitation of SP-141, a novel pyrido[b]indole anticancer agent, and an initial pharmacokinetic study in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Subhasree; Qin, Jiang-Jiang; Voruganti, Sukesh; Wang, Ming-Hai; Sharma, Horrick; Patil, Shivaputra; Buolamwini, John K.; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in targeting the MDM2 oncogene for cancer therapy. SP-141, a novel designed small molecule MDM2 inhibitor, exerts excellent in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity. To facilitate the preclinical development of this candidate anticancer agent, we have developed an HPLC method for the quantitative analysis of SP-141. The method was validated to be precise, accurate, and specific, with a linear range of 16.2–32,400 ng/mL in plasma, 16.2–6480 ng/mL in homogenates of brain, heart, liver, kidneys, lungs, muscle and tumor, and 32.4–6480 ng/mL in spleen homogenates. The lower limit of quantification was 16.2 ng/mL in plasma and all the tissue homogenates, except for spleen homogenates, where it was 32.4 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-assay precisions (coefficient of variation) were between 0.86 and 13.39%, and accuracies (relative errors) ranged from −8.50 to 13.92%. The relative recoveries were 85.6–113.38%. SP-141 was stable in mouse plasma, modestly plasma bound and metabolized by S9 microsomal enzymes. We performed an initial pharmacokinetic study in tumor-bearing nude mice, demonstrating that SP-141 has a short half-life in plasma and wide tissue distribution. In summary, this HPLC method can be used in future preclinical and clinical investigations of SP-141. PMID:25294254

  3. [Research progress of chemistry and anti-cancer activities of natural products from Chinese Garcinia plants].

    PubMed

    Fu, Wen-Wei; Tan, Hong-Sheng; Xu, Hong-Xi

    2014-02-01

    Garcinia plants are one of the rich sources of natural xanthones and benzophenones which have attracted a great deal of attention from the scientists in the fields of chemistry and pharmacology. Recently, many structurally unique constituents with various bioactivities, especially anti-tumor activity, have been isolated from Garcinia plants. This concise review focused on the anti-cancer activity natural products isolated from Chinese Garcinia plants, and the research finding by authors and collaborators over the past several years were cited.

  4. Targeting Anti-Cancer Active Compounds: Affinity-Based Chromatographic Assays

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Cardoso, Carmen Lucia; Seidl, Claudia; Moaddel, Ruin; Cass, Quezia Bezerra

    2016-01-01

    Affinity-based chromatography assays encompass the use of solid supports containing immobilized biological targets to monitor binding events in the isolation , identification and/or characterization of bioactive compounds. This powerful bioanalytical technique allows the screening of potential binders through fast analyses that can be directly performed using isolated substances or complex matrices. An overview of the recent researches in frontal and zonal affinity-based chromatography screening assays, which has been used as a tool in the identification and characterization of new anti-cancer agents, is discussed. In addition, a critical evaluation of the recently emerged ligands fishing assays in complex mixtures is also discussed. PMID:27306095

  5. Novel anticancer activity of phloroglucinol against breast cancer stem-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Rae-Kwon; Uddin, Nizam; Hyun, Jin-Won; Kim, Changil; Suh, Yongjoon; Lee, Su-Jae

    2015-08-01

    Poor prognosis of breast cancer patients is closely associated with metastasis and relapse. There is substantial evidence supporting that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are primarily responsible for relapse in breast cancer after anticancer treatment. However, there is a lack of suitable drugs that target breast cancer stem-like cells (BCSCs). Here, we report that phloroglucinol (PG), a natural phlorotannin component of brown algae, suppresses sphere formation, anchorage-independent colony formation and in vivo tumorigenicity. In line with these observations, treatment with PG also decreased CD44{sup +} cancer cell population as well as expression of CSC regulators such as Sox2, CD44, Oct4, Notch2 and β-catenin. Also, treatment with PG sensitized breast cancer cells to anticancer drugs such as cisplatin, etoposide, and taxol as well as to ionizing radiation. Importantly, PG inhibited KRAS and its downstream PI3K/AKT and RAF-1/ERK signaling pathways that regulate the maintenance of CSCs. Taken together, our findings implicate PG as a good candidate to target BCSCs and to prevent the disease relapse. - Highlights: • Phloroglucinol suppresses in vivo tumor formation. • Phloroglucinol sensitizes breast cancer cells to anticancer agents. • Phloroglucinol inhibits breast cancer stem-like cells. • Phloroglucinol inhibits PI3K/AKT and KRAS/RAF/ERK signaling pathways.

  6. The water soluble peripherally tetra-substituted zinc(ii), manganese(iii) and copper(ii) phthalocyanines as new potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Barut, Burak; Sofuoğlu, Ayşenur; Biyiklioglu, Zekeriya; Özel, Arzu

    2016-09-28

    In this study, [2-(2-morpholin-4-ylethoxy)ethoxy] group substituted zinc(ii), manganese(iii) and copper(ii) phthalocyanines 2-4 and their water soluble derivatives 2a, 3a and 4a were synthesized and the interactions of compounds 2a, 3a and 4a with CT-DNA and supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA were investigated. The results of binding experiments showed that these compounds were able to interact with CT-DNA via intercalative mode with a strong binding affinity in the order 3a > 2a > 4a. DNA-photocleavage activities of compounds 2a, 3a and 4a were determined. These compounds cleaved supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA efficiently under irradiation at 650 nm for 2a and 4a, and at 750 nm for 3a. These compounds displayed remarkable inhibitory activities against topoisomerase I enzyme in a dose-dependent manner. All of these results suggest that these phthalocyanines might be suitable anticancer agents due to their strong binding affinities, significant cleavage activities and effective topoisomerase I inhibition.

  7. One-Pot Three-Component Synthesis of Novel Diethyl((2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinolin-3-yl)(arylamino)methyl)phosphonate as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yi-Lin; Wu, Zhi-Lin; Xiao, Meng-Wu; Tang, Yu-Ting; Li, Kang-Ming; Ye, Jiao; Xiang, Jian-Nan; Hu, Ai-Xi

    2016-01-01

    With the aim of discovering new anticancer agents, we have designed and synthesized novel α-aminophosphonate derivatives containing a 2-oxoquinoline structure using a convenient one-pot three-component method. The newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for antitumor activities against the A549 (human lung adenocarcinoma cell), HeLa (human cervical carcinoma cell), MCF-7 (human breast cancer cell), and U2OS (human osteosarcoma cell) cancer cell lines in vitro, employing a standard 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results of pharmacological screening indicated that many compounds exhibited moderate to high levels of antitumor activities against the tested cancer cell lines and that most compounds showed more potent inhibitory activities comparable to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) which was used as a positive control. The mechanism of representative compound 4u (diethyl((2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinolin-3-yl)(phenyl-amino)methyl)phosphonate) indicated that the compound mainly arrested HeLa cells in S and G2 stages and was accompanied by apoptosis in HeLa cells. This action was confirmed by acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, Hoechst 33342 staining, and flow cytometry. PMID:27136538

  8. Uptake, delivery, and anticancer activity of thymoquinone nanoparticles in breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhoury, Isabelle; Saad, Walid; Bouhadir, Kamal; Nygren, Peter; Schneider-Stock, Regine; Gali-Muhtasib, Hala

    2016-07-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) is a promising anticancer molecule but its development is hindered by its limited bioavailability. Drug encapsulation is commonly used to overcome low drug solubility, limited bioavailability, and nonspecific targeting. In this project, TQ nanoparticles (TQ-NP) were synthesized and characterized. The cytotoxicity of the NP was investigated in nontumorigenic MCF-10-A breast cells, while the uptake, distribution, as well as the anticancer potential were investigated in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Flash Nanoprecipitation and dynamic light scattering coupled with scanning electron microscopy were used to prepare and characterize TQ-NP prior to measuring their anticancer potential by MTT assay. The uptake and subcellular intake of TQ-NP were evaluated by fluorometry and confocal microscopy. TQ-NP were stable with a hydrodynamic average diameter size around 100 nm. Entrapment efficiency and loading content of TQ-NP were high (around 80 and 50 %, respectively). In vitro, TQ-NP had equal or enhanced anticancer activity effects compared to TQ in MCF-7 and aggressive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, respectively, with no significant cytotoxicity of the blank NP. In addition, TQ and TQ-NP were relatively nontoxic to MCF-10-A normal breast cells. TQ-NP uptake mechanism was both time and concentration dependent. Treatment with inhibitors of endocytosis suggested the involvement of caveolin in TQ-NP uptake. This was further confirmed by subcellular localization findings showing the colocalization of TQ-NP with caveolin and transferrin as well as with the early and late markers of endocytosis. Altogether, the results describe an approach for the enhancement of TQ anticancer activity and uncover the mechanisms behind cell-TQ-NP interaction.

  9. Study on Anticancer Activity of Extracts of Sponges Collected from Biak Water, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trianto, A.; Ridhlo, A.; Triningsih, D. W.; Tanaka, J.

    2017-02-01

    Indonesia is center of biodiversity where marine sponges are abundant. a source of bioactive compounds with various pharmaceutical properties such as anticancer, antifungal, antibacterial, antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, and anti-malarial. In a continuation of a search for biologically active molecules from marine organisms we investigated the potency of marine sponges as anticancer. A total of 106 sponge specimens were collected between 3-40 m depths by SCUBA diving in Biak waters during August 2005. The specimens were extracted with methanol to provided crude extracts. The methanolic extracts were tested against NBT-T2 cell line. The assay result showed that 8.5 %, 29.2 % and 46.2 % of the extract have activity against the cell line at 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 μg/mL. While, a 16.0 % of the extract did not showed activity against the cell line.

  10. Isolation, transformation, anticancer, and apoptosis activity of lupeyl acetate from Artocarpus integra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwito, Hery; Heffen, Wan Lelly; Cahyana, Herry; Suwarso, Wahyudi Priyono

    2016-03-01

    Lupeyl acetate -a major constituent of the bark of Artocarpus integra- was isolated and then transformed chemically into lupeol and lupenone by hydrolysis and oxidation reaction respectively. The molecular structures of the prepared compounds were determined based on FTIR, MS and NMR spectrum evidences. Their anticancer activities were determined against breast cancer cells MCF-7 using neutral red assay, while their apoptotic activity were confirmed by flowcytometric analysis using Annexin V-FTIC assay and DNA fragmentation. The IC50 of Lupeyl acetate, lupeol, and lupenone were 48.79; 43.09; and 8.07 µg/mL respectively. The results of flowcytometric analysis and DNA fragmentation showed that anticancer activity of the prepared compounds following apoptosis mechanism.

  11. Facile synthesis and antibacterial, antitubercular, and anticancer activities of novel 1,4-dihydropyridines.

    PubMed

    Sirisha, Kalam; Achaiah, Garlapati; Reddy, Vanga Malla

    2010-06-01

    A series of twenty new 4-substituted-2,6-dimethyl-3,5-bis-N-(heteroaryl)-carbamoyl-1,4-dihydropyridines have been prepared from a three-component one-pot condensation reaction of N-heteroaryl acetoacetamide, an aromatic/heteroaromatic aldehyde, and ammonium acetate under four different experimental conditions. Except for the conventional method, all the experimental conditions were simple, eco-friendly, economical, and the reactions were rapid and high-yielding. The methods employed have been compared in terms of yields, cost, and simplicity. The synthesized compounds were characterized by different spectroscopic techniques and evaluated for their in-vitro anticancer, antibacterial, and antitubercular activities. Amongst the compounds tested, compound 25 exhibited the highest anticancer activity while compounds 14 and 18 exhibited significant antibacterial and antitubercular activities.

  12. Anticancer activities against cholangiocarcinoma, toxicity and pharmacological activities of Thai medicinal plants in animal models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a devastating cancer with increasing worldwide incidence and mortality rates, is largely ineffective. The discovery and development of effective chemotherapeutics is urgently needed. Methods/Design The study aimed at evaluating anticancer activities, toxicity, and pharmacological activities of the curcumin compound (CUR), the crude ethanolic extracts of rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Ginger: ZO) and Atractylodes lancea thung. DC (Khod-Kha-Mao: AL), fruits of Piper chaba Hunt. (De-Plee: PC), and Pra-Sa-Prao-Yhai formulation (a mixture of parts of 18 Thai medicinal plants: PPF) were investigated in animal models. Anti-cholangiocarcinoma (anti-CCA) was assessed using CCA-xenograft nude mouse model. The antihypertensive, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, and anti-ulcer activities and effects on motor coordination were investigated using Rota-rod test, CODA tail-cuff system, writhing and hot plate tests, carrageenan-induced paw edema test, brewer's yeast test, and alcohol-induced gastric ulcer test, respectively. Acute and subacute toxicity tests were performed according to the OECD guideline for testing of chemicals with modification. Results Promising anticancer activity against CCA in nude mouse xenograft model was shown for the ethanolic extract of AL at all oral dose levels (1000, 3000, and 5000 mg/kg body weight) as well as the extracts of ZO, PPF, and CUR compound at the highest dose level (5000, 4000, and 5000 mg/kg body weight, respectively). PC produced no significant anti-CCA activity. Results from acute and subacute toxicity tests both in mice and rats indicate safety profiles of all the test materials in a broad range of dose levels. No significant toxicity except stomach irritation and general CNS depressant signs were observed. Investigation of pharmacological activities of the test materials revealed promising anti-inflammatory (ZO, PPF, and AL), analgesic (CUR and PPF), antipyretic

  13. Evaluation of SD-208, a TGF-β-RI Kinase Inhibitor, as an Anticancer Agent in Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Fadakar, Puran; Akbari, Abolfazl; Ghassemi, Fariba; Mobini, Gholam Reza; Mohebi, Masoumeh; Bolhassani, Manzar; Abed Khojasteh, Hoda; Heidari, Mansour

    2016-06-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular tumor in children resulting from genetic alterations and transformation of mature retinal cells. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of SD-208, TGF-β-RI kinase inhibitor, on the expression of some miRNAs including a miR-17/92 cluster in retinoblastoma cells. Prior to initiate this work, the cell proliferation was studied by Methyl Thiazolyl Tetrazolium (MTT) and bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assays. Then, the expression patterns of four miRNAs (18a, 20a, 22, and 34a) were investigated in the treated SD-208 (0.0, 1, 2 and 3 µM) and untreated Y-79 cells. A remarkable inhibition of the cell proliferation was found in Y-79 cells treated with SD-208 versus untreated cells. Also, the expression changes were observed in miRNAs 18a, 20a, 22 and 34a in response to SD-208 treatment (P<0.05). The findings of the present study suggest that the anti-cancer effect of SD-208 may be exerted due to the regulation of specific miRNAs, at least in this particular retinoblastoma cell line. To the best of the researchers' knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that the SD-208 could alter the expression of tumor suppressive miRNAs as well as oncomiRs in vitro. In conclusion, the present data suggest that SD-208 could be an alternative agent in retinoblastoma treatment.

  14. Identification of potential transmembrane protease serine 4 inhibitors as anti-cancer agents by integrated computational approach.

    PubMed

    Ilamathi, M; Hemanth, R; Nishanth, S; Sivaramakrishnan, V

    2016-01-21

    Transmembrane protease serine 4 is a well known cell surface protease facilitating the extracellular matrix degradation and epithelial mesenchymal transition in hepatocellular carcinoma. Henceforth targeting transmembrane protease serine 4 is strongly believed to provide therapeutic intervention against hepatocellular carcinoma. Owing to lack of crystal structure for human transmembrane protease serine 4, we predicted its three dimensional structure for the first time in this study. Experimentally proven inhibitor-Tyroserleutide (TSL) against hepatocellular carcinoma via transmembrane protease serine 4 was used as a benchmark to identify structurally similar candidates from PubChem database to create the TSL library. Virtual screening of TSL library against modeled transmembrane protease serine 4 revealed the top four potential inhibitors. Further binding free energy (ΔGbind) analysis of the potential inhibitors revealed the best potential lead compound against transmembrane protease serine 4. Drug likeliness nature of the top four potential hits were additionally analyzed in comparison to TSL to confirm on the best potential lead compound with the highest % of human oral absorption. Consequently, e-pharmacophore mapping of the best potential lead compound yielded a six point feature. It was observed to contain four hydrogen bond donor sites (D), one positively ionizable site (P) and one aromatic ring (R). Such e-pharmacophore insight obtained from structural determinants by integrated computational analysis could serve as a framework for further advancement of drug discovery process of new anti-cancer agents with less toxicity and high specificity targeting transmembrane protease serine 4 and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  15. HS-133, a novel fluorescent phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor as a potential imaging and anticancer agent for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunseung; Son, Mi Kwon; Yun, Sun-Mi; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Kyeong-Ryoon; Lee, Soyoung; Kim, Donghee; Hong, Sungwoo; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2014-01-01

    As PI3K/Akt signaling is frequently deregulated in a wide variety of human tumors, PI3K inhibitors are an emerging class of drugs for cancer treatment. The monitoring of the drug behavior and distribution in the biological system can play an important role for targeted therapy and provide information regarding the response or resistance to available therapies. In this study, therefore, we have developed a family of xanthine derivatives, serving as a dual function exhibiting fluorescence, as well as inhibiting PI3K. Among them, HS-133 showed anti-proliferative effects and was monitored for its subcellular localization by a fluorescence microscopy. HS-133 suppressed the PI3K/Akt pathway and induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase. The induction of apoptosis by HS-133 was confirmed by the increases of the cleaved PARP, caspase-3, and caspase-8. Furthermore, HS-133 decreased the protein expression of HIF-1α and VEGF, as well inhibited the tube formation and migration of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In vivo imaging also showed that tumors were visualized fluorescent with HS-133, and its oral administration significantly inhibited the growth of tumor in SkBr3 mouse xenograft models. Thus, we suggest that HS-133 may be used as a fluorescent anticancer agent against human breast cancer. PMID:25338206

  16. Synthesis and anticancer activity of novel fluorinated asiatic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Bruno M F; Salvador, Jorge A R; Marín, Silvia; Cascante, Marta

    2016-05-23

    A series of novel fluorinated Asiatic Acid (AA) derivatives were successfully synthesized, tested for their antiproliferative activity against HeLa and HT-29 cell lines, and their structure activity relationships were evaluated. The great majority of fluorinated derivatives showed stronger antiproliferative activity than AA in a concentration dependent manner. The most active compounds have a pentameric A-ring containing an α,β-unsaturated carbonyl group. The compounds with better cytotoxic activity were then evaluated against MCF-7, Jurkat, PC-3, A375, MIA PaCa-2 and BJ cell lines. Derivative 14 proved to be the most active compound among all tested derivatives and its mechanism of action was further investigated in HeLa cell line. The results showed that compound 14 induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 stage as a consequence of up-regulation of p21(cip1/waf1) and p27(kip1) and down-regulation of cyclin D3 and Cyclin E. Furthermore, compound 14 was found to induce caspase driven-apoptosis with activation of caspases-8 and caspase-3 and the cleavage of PARP. The cleavage of Bid into t-Bid, the up-regulation of Bax and the down-regulation of Bcl-2 were also observed after treatment of HeLa cells with compound 14. Taken together, these mechanistic studies revealed the involvement of extrinsic and intrinsic pathways in the apoptotic process induced by compound 14. Importantly, the antiproliferative activity of this compound on the non-tumor BJ human fibroblast cell line is weaker than in the tested cancer cell lines. The enhanced potency (between 45 and 90-fold more active than AA in a panel of cancer cell lines) and selectivity of this new AA derivative warrant further preclinical evaluation.

  17. Autophagy blockade sensitizes the anticancer activity of CA-4 via JNK-Bcl-2 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yangling; Luo, Peihua; Wang, Jincheng; Dai, Jiabin; Yang, Xiaochun; Wu, Honghai; Yang, Bo He, Qiaojun

    2014-01-15

    Combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) has already entered clinical trials of solid tumors over ten years. However, the limited anticancer activity and dose-dependent toxicity restrict its clinical application. Here, we offered convincing evidence that CA-4 induced autophagy in various cancer cells, which was demonstrated by acridine orange staining of intracellular acidic vesicles, the degradation of p62, the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and GFP-LC3 punctate fluorescence. Interestingly, CA-4-mediated apoptotic cell death was further potentiated by pretreatment with autophagy inhibitors (3-methyladenine and bafilomycin A1) or small interfering RNAs against the autophagic genes (Atg5 and Beclin 1). The enhanced anticancer activity of CA-4 and 3-MA was further confirmed in the SGC-7901 xenograft tumor model. These findings suggested that CA-4-elicited autophagic response played a protective role that impeded the eventual cell death while autophagy inhibition was expected to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy of CA-4. Meanwhile, CA-4 treatment led to phosphorylation/activation of JNK and JNK-dependent phosphorylation of Bcl-2. Importantly, JNK inhibitor or JNK siRNA inhibited autophagy but promoted CA-4-induced apoptosis, indicating a key requirement of JNK-Bcl-2 pathway in the activation of autophagy by CA-4. We also identified that pretreatment of Bcl-2 inhibitor (ABT-737) could significantly enhance anticancer activity of CA-4 due to inhibition of autophagy. Taken together, our data suggested that the JNK-Bcl-2 pathway was considered as the critical regulator of CA-4-induced protective autophagy and a potential drug target for chemotherapeutic combination. - Highlights: • Autophagy inhibition could be a potential for combretastatin A-4 antitumor efficacy. • The JNK-Bcl-2 pathway plays a critical role in CA-4-induced autophagy. • ABT-737 enhances CA-4 anticancer activity due to inhibition of autophagy.

  18. Hybrid imidazole (benzimidazole)/pyridine (quinoline) derivatives and evaluation of their anticancer and antimycobacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Mantu, Dorina; Antoci, Vasilichia; Moldoveanu, Costel; Zbancioc, Gheorghita; Mangalagiu, Ionel I

    2016-01-01

    The design, synthesis, structure, and in vitro anticancer and antimycobacterial activity of new hybrid imidazole (benzimidazole)/pyridine (quinoline) derivatives are described. The strategy adopted for synthesis is straight and efficient, involving a three-step setup procedure: N-acylation, N-alkylation, and quaternization of nitrogen heterocycle. The solubility in microbiological medium and anticancer and antimycobacterial activity of a selection of new synthesized compounds were evaluated. The hybrid derivatives have an excellent solubility in microbiological medium, which make them promising from the pharmacological properties point of view. One of the hybrid compounds, 9 (with a benzimidazole and 8-aminoquinoline skeleton), exhibits a very good and selective antitumor activity against Renal Cancer A498 and Breast Cancer MDA-MB-468. Moreover, the anticancer assay suggests that the hybrid Imz (Bimz)/2-AP (8-AQ) compounds present a specific affinity to Renal Cancer A498. Concerning the antimycobacterial activity, only the hybrid compound, 9, has a significant activity. SAR correlations have been performed.

  19. Texaphyrins and water-soluble zinc(II) ionophores: development, mechanism of anticancer activity, and synergistic effects

    PubMed Central

    Preihs, Christian; Magda, Darren J.

    2014-01-01

    Texaphyrins, first prepared by Sessler and coworkers in the 1980s, represent early examples of expanded porphyrins. This class of pentaaza, oligopyrrolic macrocycles demonstrates excellent tumor localization and metal-chelating properties. In biological milieus, texaphyrins act as redox mediators and are able to produce reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, texaphyrins have been shown to upregulate zinc in vivo, an important feature that inspired us to develop new zinc ionophores that might allow the same function to be elicited but via a simpler chemical means. In this review, the basic properties of texaphyrins and the zinc ionophores they helped spawn will be discussed in the cadre of developing an understanding that could lead to the preparation of new, redox-active anticancer agents. PMID:25295224

  20. Synthesis of flexirubin-mediated silver nanoparticles using Chryseobacterium artocarpi CECT 8497 and investigation of its anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Venil, Chidambaram Kulandaisamy; Sathishkumar, Palanivel; Malathi, Mahalingam; Usha, Rajamanickam; Jayakumar, Rajarajeswaran; Yusoff, Abdull Rahim Mohd; Ahmad, Wan Azlina

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the synthesis of silver nanoparticles from a pigment produced by a recently-discovered bacterium, Chryseobacterium artocarpi CECT 8497, was achieved, followed by an investigation of its anticancer properties. The bacterial pigment was identified as flexirubin following NMR ((1)H NMR and (13)C NMR), UV-Vis, and LC-MS analysis. An aqueous silver nitrate solution was treated with isolated flexirubin to produce silver nanoparticles. The synthesised silver nanoparticles were subsequently characterised by UV-Vis spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy methodologies. Furthermore, the anticancer effects of synthesised silver nanoparticles in a human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) were evaluated. The tests showed significant cytotoxicity activity of the silver nanoparticles in the cultured cells, with an IC50 value of 36μgmL(-1). This study demonstrates that silver nanoparticles, synthesised from flexirubin from C. artocarpi CECT 8497, may have potential as a novel chemotherapeutic agent.

  1. Synthesis of new class of spirocarbocycle derivatives by multicomponent domino reaction and their evaluation for antimicrobial, anticancer activity and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Sudhapriya, N; Perumal, P T; Balachandran, C; Ignacimuthu, S; Sangeetha, M; Doble, Mukesh

    2014-08-18

    A series of 25 new spirocarbocycles were synthesized by a three component reaction that involves few cyclic nucleophiles, vinyl malononitriles and aldehydes with variable substitution patterns. All the synthesized compounds were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity and the compounds showed significant activity. Synthesized compounds 4c, 4i and 6i showed good anticancer activity against A549 cancer cell line. Molecular docking studies indicated that compound 4i had the greatest affinity for DNA gyrase receptor than others and compound 6i had the greatest affinity for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor. These compounds can be better therapeutic agents for microbial and cancer cell lines.

  2. Hsp90 inhibitors as anti-cancer agents, from basic discoveries to clinical development.

    PubMed

    Soga, Shiro; Akinaga, Shiro; Shiotsu, Yukimasa

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 is an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone which stabilizes various oncogenic kinases, including HER2, EGFR, BCR-ABL, B-Raf and EML4-ALK, which are essential for tumor growth. Several monoclonal antibodies and small molecule kinase inhibitors which target these kinases have been identified as potential new molecular target therapeutics. Previous reports have shown that many oncogenic proteins essential for cancer transformation are chaperoned by the Hsp90 complex, and some of these client proteins have been discovered by using Hsp90 inhibitors, such as geldanamycin (GA) and radicicol (RD).Thus far more than 200 client proteins have been identified. In past derivatives of these natural products have been evaluated in clinical trials, but none of the 1st generation of Hsp90 inhibitors has been approved yet because of their limitations in physico-chemical properties and/or safety profiles. However, recent reports have indicated that more than 10 new agents, 2nd generation of Hsp90 inhibitors with different chemotypes from GA and RD, have entered clinical trials and some of them showed clinical efficacy. In this review article, we describe the discoveries of major Hsp90 client proteins in the cancer field by RD derivatives, the history of KW-2478 discovery and development by Kyowa Hakko Kirin, and gave an update on the current status of new Hsp90 inhibitors in clinical trials.

  3. Noncovalent Binding to DNA: Still a Target in Developing Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Portugal, José; Barceló, Francisca

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding compounds are of extraordinary importance in medicine, accounting for a substantial portion of antitumor drugs in clinical usage. However, their mechanisms of action remain sometimes incompletely understood. This review critically examines two broad classes of molecules that bind noncovalently to DNA: intercalators and groove binders. Intercalators bind to DNA by inserting their chromophore moiety between two consecutive base pairs, whereas groove binders fit into the grooves of DNA. Noncovalent DNAinteractive drugs can recognize certain supramolecular DNA structures such as the Gquadruplexes found in telomeres and in numerous gene promoters, and they can act as topoisomerase I and II poisons. We discuss how DNA-binding compounds affect transcription and compete with protein factors for binding to consensus binding sites in gene promoters both in vitro and in cultured cancer cells. Moreover, we comment on the design of molecules that can tightly and specifically bind to any desired target DNA, such as various hairpin polyamides which efficacy as chemotherapeutic agents is being evaluated. At present, genome-wide studies, which provide details of events that may influence both cancer progression and therapeutic outcome, are a common way used to analyze the effects of DNA-binding compounds. A conclusive feature that emerges from reviewing the information on DNA-binding compounds is that both natural sources and chemical approaches can be productively used to obtain drugs to manipulate gene expression in cancer cells.

  4. Polycyclic aromatic compounds as anticancer agents: synthesis and biological evaluation of methoxy dibenzofluorene derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Frederick F.; Banik, Bimal K.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of a new methoxy dibenzofluorene through alkylation, cyclodehydration and aromatization in a one-pot operation is achieved for the first time. Using this hydrocarbon, a few derivatives are prepared through aromatic nitration, catalytic hydrogenation, coupling reaction with a side chain and reduction. The benzylic position of this hydrocarbon with the side chain is oxidized and reduced. Some of these derivatives have demonstrated excellent antitumor activities in vitro. This study confirms antitumor activity depends on the structures of the molecules. PMID:25136549

  5. Design and optimization of 20-O-linked camptothecin glycoconjugates as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Lerchen, H G; Baumgarten, J; von dem Bruch, K; Lehmann, T E; Sperzel, M; Kempka, G; Fiebig, H H

    2001-11-22

    To improve the biological profile of 20(S)-camptothecin, a novel class of 20-O-linked camptothecin glycoconjugates has been designed for preferential cellular uptake into tumor cells by an active transport mechanism. Such conjugates have been optimized for enhanced solubility, stabilization of the camptothecin lactone ring, sufficient hydrolytic and proteolytic stability, and for an overall improvement in tumor selectivity. The constitution of the peptide spacer has a major impact on stability and biological activity of the conjugates both in vitro and in vivo. Glycoconjugates 17-22 with valine residues at the linkage position to camptothecin are sufficiently stable and show good antitumor activity in vitro against HT29 and other tumor cell lines. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry experiments indicate that glycoconjugates such as 19 are taken up into lysosomal compartments of the tumor cell line HT29 by an active transport mechanism. The steric configuration of the particular amino acid residues linked to the camptothecin moiety has a major impact on the in vivo activity of the corresponding glycoconjugates in the breast cancer xenograft MX-1 model. Inhibiting tumor growth by >96%, the glycoconjugates 19 and 21 show the best activity in this particular model and have been investigated more extensively. The glycoconjugate 19 compares favorably to topotecan 4 and glycoconjugate 21 with respect to toxicity against hematopoietic stem cells and hepatocytes. Based on its profile, 19 has been selected for clinical trials.

  6. New agents with antimycobacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Marco-Contelles, José; Gómez-Sánchez, Elena

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we report that a series of structurally simple a-halogenoacetamides show potent and excellent antimycobacterial activities against drug-sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)Rv and drug-resistant M. avium.

  7. Imprime PGG-Mediated Anti-Cancer Immune Activation Requires Immune Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiaohong; Ottoson, Nadine R.; Walsh, Richard M.; Gorden, Keith B; Harrison, Ben; Maimonis, Peter J.; Leonardo, Steven M.; Ertelt, Kathleen E.; Danielson, Michael E.; Michel, Kyle S.; Nelson, Mariana; Graff, Jeremy R.; Patchen, Myra L.; Bose, Nandita

    2016-01-01

    Imprime PGG (Imprime), an intravenously-administered, soluble β-glucan, has shown compelling efficacy in multiple phase 2 clinical trials with tumor targeting or anti-angiogenic antibodies. Mechanistically, Imprime acts as pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) directly activating innate immune effector cells, triggering a coordinated anti-cancer immune response. Herein, using whole blood from healthy human subjects, we show that Imprime-induced anti-cancer functionality is dependent on immune complex formation with naturally-occurring, anti-β glucan antibodies (ABA). The formation of Imprime-ABA complexes activates complement, primarily via the classical complement pathway, and is opsonized by iC3b. Immune complex binding depends upon Complement Receptor 3 and Fcg Receptor IIa, eliciting phenotypic activation of, and enhanced chemokine production by, neutrophils and monocytes, enabling these effector cells to kill antibody-opsonized tumor cells via the generation of reactive oxygen species and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis. Importantly, these innate immune cell changes were not evident in subjects with low ABA levels but could be rescued with exogenous ABA supplementation. Together, these data indicate that pre-existing ABA are essential for Imprime-mediated anti-cancer immune activation and suggest that pre-treatment ABA levels may provide a plausible patient selection biomarker to delineate patients most likely to benefit from Imprime-based therapy. PMID:27812183

  8. Screening the yeast genome for energetic metabolism pathways involved in a phenotypic response to the anti-cancer agent 3-bromopyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Paweł; Jurkiewicz, Paweł; Cal-Bąkowska, Magdalena; Ko, Young H.; Pedersen, Peter L.; Goffeau, Andre; Ułaszewski, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    In this study the detailed characteristic of the anti-cancer agent 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) activity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model is described, with the emphasis on its influence on energetic metabolism of the cell. It shows that 3-BP toxicity in yeast is strain-dependent and influenced by the glucose-repression system. Its toxic effect is mainly due to the rapid depletion of intracellular ATP. Moreover, lack of the Whi2p phosphatase results in strongly increased sensitivity of yeast cells to 3-BP, possibly due to the non-functional system of mitophagy of damaged mitochondria through the Ras-cAMP-PKA pathway. Single deletions of genes encoding glycolytic enzymes, the TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondrial carriers result in multiple effects after 3-BP treatment. However, it can be concluded that activity of the pentose phosphate pathway is necessary to prevent the toxicity of 3-BP, probably due to the fact that large amounts of NADPH are produced by this pathway, ensuring the reducing force needed for glutathione reduction, crucial to cope with the oxidative stress. Moreover, single deletions of genes encoding the TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondrial carriers generally cause sensitivity to 3-BP, while totally inactive mitochondrial respiration in the rho0 mutant resulted in increased resistance to 3-BP. PMID:26862728

  9. Synthesis of ent-BE-43547A1 reveals a potent hypoxia-selective anticancer agent and uncovers the biosynthetic origin of the APD-CLD natural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villadsen, Nikolaj L.; Jacobsen, Kristian M.; Keiding, Ulrik B.; Weibel, Esben T.; Christiansen, Bjørn; Vosegaard, Thomas; Bjerring, Morten; Jensen, Frank; Johannsen, Mogens; Tørring, Thomas; Poulsen, Thomas B.

    2016-11-01

    Tumour hypoxia is speculated to be a key driver of therapeutic resistance and metastatic dissemination. Consequently, the discovery of new potent agents that selectively target the hypoxic cell population may reveal new and untapped antitumour mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that the BE-43547 subclass of the APD-CLD (amidopentadienoate-containing cyclolipodepsipeptides) natural products possesses highly hypoxia-selective growth-inhibitory activity against pancreatic cancer cells. To enable this discovery, we have developed the first synthesis of the BE-43547-macrocyclic scaffold in 16 steps (longest linear sequence), which also allowed access to the full panel of relative stereoisomers and ultimately to the assignment of stereochemical configuration. Discrepancies between the spectroscopic signatures of the synthetic compounds with that originally reported for the BE-43547 members stimulated us to re-isolate the natural product from a BE-43547-producing microorganism during which we elucidated the biosynthetic gene clusters for the BE-43547 family as well as for all other known APD-CLDs. Our studies underline the exciting possibilities for the further development of the anticancer activities of these natural products.

  10. Screening the yeast genome for energetic metabolism pathways involved in a phenotypic response to the anti-cancer agent 3-bromopyruvate.

    PubMed

    Lis, Paweł; Jurkiewicz, Paweł; Cal-Bąkowska, Magdalena; Ko, Young H; Pedersen, Peter L; Goffeau, Andre; Ułaszewski, Stanisław

    2016-03-01

    In this study the detailed characteristic of the anti-cancer agent 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) activity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model is described, with the emphasis on its influence on energetic metabolism of the cell. It shows that 3-BP toxicity in yeast is strain-dependent and influenced by the glucose-repression system. Its toxic effect is mainly due to the rapid depletion of intracellular ATP. Moreover, lack of the Whi2p phosphatase results in strongly increased sensitivity of yeast cells to 3-BP, possibly due to the non-functional system of mitophagy of damaged mitochondria through the Ras-cAMP-PKA pathway. Single deletions of genes encoding glycolytic enzymes, the TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondrial carriers result in multiple effects after 3-BP treatment. However, it can be concluded that activity of the pentose phosphate pathway is necessary to prevent the toxicity of 3-BP, probably due to the fact that large amounts of NADPH are produced by this pathway, ensuring the reducing force needed for glutathione reduction, crucial to cope with the oxidative stress. Moreover, single deletions of genes encoding the TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondrial carriers generally cause sensitivity to 3-BP, while totally inactive mitochondrial respiration in the rho0 mutant resulted in increased resistance to 3-BP.

  11. Preclinical evaluation of the metabolism and disposition of RRx-001, a novel investigative anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Scicinski, Jan; Oronsky, Bryan; Taylor, Michael; Luo, Gang; Musick, Timothy; Marini, Joseph; Adams, Christopher M; Fitch, William L

    2012-09-01

    RRx-001 has shown promise as a novel cancer therapeutic agent. The disposition of RRx-001 was evaluated in vitro and after intravenous administration to rats. At both 24 and 168 h after a single intravenous administration of ¹⁴C-RRx-001 (10 mg/kg), the majority of radiolabel was in the blood. The recovery of label in excreta was quite low, but the major route of radiolabel excretion was via the kidney, with approximately 26% in the urine by the first 8 h and decreasing amounts in all subsequent collections to a total of 36.3% by 168 h. The partitioning of total radioactivity in red blood cells (RBCs) and plasma was determined after in vitro addition to human, rat, dog, and monkey whole blood at 1 and 20 μM. In rat, at 30 min, approximately 75% of the radioactivity is associated with RBCs and 25% with plasma. In human, at 30 min, approximately 25% of the radioactivity is associated with RBCs and 75% with plasma. Analysis by liquid chromatography/radiodetection/mass spectrometry showed that ¹⁴C-RRx-001 reacted rapidly with whole blood to give four major soluble metabolites: the GSH and Cys adducts of RRx-001 (M1 and M2) and the corresponding mononitro GSH and Cys adducts (M3 and M4). Human Hb was incubated with cold RRx-001 in buffer, and a standard proteomics protocol was used to separate and identify the tryptic peptides. Standard peptide collision-induced fragment ions supported the structure of the peptide GTFATLSELHCDK with the alkylation on the Cys-93 locus of the Hb β chain.

  12. Synthesis and biological evaluation of Germanium(IV)-polyphenol complexes as potential anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Pi, Jiang; Zeng, Jing; Luo, Jian-Jun; Yang, Pei-Hui; Cai, Ji-Ye

    2013-05-15

    Germanium (Ge) is considered to play a key role in the pharmacological effects of some medicinal plants. Here, two new Ge(IV)-polyphenol complexes were synthesized and measured for their potential biological activities. The results indicated that these Ge(IV)-polyphenol complexes possessed great anti-oxidative activities, both showing stronger hydroxyl scavenging effects than their corresponding ligands. We also demonstrated the strong intercalating abilities of Ge(IV)-polyphenol complexes into calf thymus-DNA molecules. In addition, these two Ge(IV)-polyphenol complexes showed strong proliferative inhibition effect on HepG2 cancer cells. Moreover, the morphological changes in HepG2 cells induced by Ge(IV)-polyphenol complexes were detected by atomic force microscopy. All these results collectively suggested that Ge(IV)-polyphenol complexes could be served as promising pharmacologically active substances against cancer treatment.

  13. Synthesis and biological evaluation of salinomycin triazole analogues as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Minjian; Deng, Zixin; Tian, Jian; Liu, Tiangang

    2017-02-15

    Salinomycin, a polyether antibiotic used for treatment of coccidial disease in animal husbandry, has demonstrated promising efficacy for treating different cancers. To enrich structure-activity relationship of salinomycin in tumours, we prepared a series of new triazole derivatives in specific site of salinomycin by click cycloaddition reactions, and assessed their antiproliferative activities on breast cancer cell lines. The screening results indicated that most derivatives modified at the C20 hydroxyl group have potent antitumour activity. Notably, salinomycin triazole dimers were 3.27-4.97 times more toxic than the natural substance in ERα-positive breast cancer cells (MCF-7), and had moderately improved toxicity in triple-negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231).

  14. Review of the anticancer activities of bee products

    PubMed Central

    Premratanachai, Pongsathon; Chanchao, Chanpen

    2014-01-01

    Bee products have long been used in traditional medicine. The raw materials, crude extracts and purified active compounds from them have been found to exhibit interesting bioactivities, such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. In addition, they have been widely used in the treatment of many immune-related diseases, as well as in recent times in the treatment of tumors. Bee product peptides induce apoptotic cell death in vitro in several transformed (cancer) human cell lines, including those derived from renal, lung, liver, prostate, bladder and lymphoid cancers. These bioactive natural products may, therefore, prove to be useful as part of a novel targeted therapy for some types of cancer, such as prostate and breast cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the in vivo and in vitro potential of selective bee products against tumor cells. PMID:25182716

  15. Potential anticancer activity of lichen secondary metabolite physodic acid.

    PubMed

    Cardile, V; Graziano, A C E; Avola, R; Piovano, M; Russo, A

    2017-02-01

    Secondary metabolites present in lichens, which comprise aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, aromatic and terpenic compounds, are unique with respect to those of higher plants and show interesting biological and pharmacological activities. However, only a few of these compounds, have been assessed for their effectiveness against various in vitro cancer models. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of three lichen secondary metabolites (atranorin, gyrophoric acid and physodic acid) on A375 melanoma cancer cell line. The tested compounds arise from different lichen species collected in different areas of Continental and Antarctic Chile. The obtained results confirm the major efficiency of depsidones. In fact, depsides atranorin and gyrophoric acid, showed a lower activity inhibiting the melanoma cancer cells only at more high concentrations. Whereas the depsidone physodic acid, showed a dose-response relationship in the range of 6.25-50 μM concentrations in A375 cells, activating an apoptotic process, that probably involves the reduction of Hsp70 expression. Although the molecular mechanism, by which apoptosis is induced by physodic acid remains unclear, and of course further studies are needed, the results here reported confirm the promising biological properties of depsidone compounds, and may offer a further impulse to the development of analogues with more powerful efficiency against melanoma cells.

  16. Ursolic acid exerts anti-cancer activity by suppressing vaccinia-related kinase 1-mediated damage repair in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Hoon; Ryu, Hye Guk; Lee, Juhyun; Shin, Joon; Harikishore, Amaravadhi; Jung, Hoe-Youn; Kim, Ye Seul; Lyu, Ha-Na; Oh, Eunji; Baek, Nam-In; Choi, Kwan-Yong; Yoon, Ho Sup; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Many mitotic kinases have been targeted for the development of anti-cancer drugs, and inhibitors of these kinases have been expected to perform well for cancer therapy. Efforts focused on selecting good targets and finding specific drugs to target are especially needed, largely due to the increased frequency of anti-cancer drugs used in the treatment of lung cancer. Vaccinia-related kinase 1 (VRK1) is a master regulator in lung adenocarcinoma and is considered a key molecule in the adaptive pathway, which mainly controls cell survival. We found that ursolic acid (UA) inhibits the catalytic activity of VRK1 via direct binding to the catalytic domain of VRK1. UA weakens surveillance mechanisms by blocking 53BP1 foci formation induced by VRK1 in lung cancer cells, and possesses synergistic anti-cancer effects with DNA damaging drugs. Taken together, UA can be a good anti-cancer agent for targeted therapy or combination therapy with DNA damaging drugs for lung cancer patients. PMID:26412148

  17. Synthesis of some new 1,3,5-trisubstituted pyrazolines bearing benzene sulfonamide as anticancer and anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Rafia; Ovais, Syed; Yaseen, Shafiya; Hamid, Hinna; Alam, M S; Samim, Mohammad; Singh, Surender; Javed, Kalim

    2011-07-15

    Thirteen new 2-pyrazoline derivatives bearing benzenesulfonamide moiety (2a-m) were synthesized by condensing appropriate chalcones with 4-hydrazinonbenzenesulfonamide hydrochloride and tested for anticancer and anti-inflammatory actions. According to the protocol of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in vitro disease-oriented human cells screening panel assay compounds 2b, 2c, 2e, 2f and 2g exhibited considerable antitumor activities against the entire tested tumor cell lines and showed effective growth inhibition GI(50) (MG-MID) values of 2.63, 2.57, 6.61, 3.31 and 2.57μM, respectively, beside a cyclostatic activity TGI (MG-MID) 9.54, 8.51, 24.0, 19.9 and 8.71μM, respectively. Two compounds 2g and 2k showed more potent anti-inflammatory activity than celecoxib at 5h in carrageenan-induced rat paw edema bioassay. These compounds (2g and 2k) proved to have superior gastrointestinal safety profiles as compared to celecoxib, when tested for their ulcerogenic effects. Compounds 2g and 2k showed no inhibition against the enzymatic activity of bovine COX-2 (in vitro).

  18. The anticancer activity of the fungal metabolite terrecyclic acid A is associated with modulation of multiple cellular stress response pathways.

    PubMed

    Turbyville, Thomas J; Wijeratne, E M Kithsiri; Whitesell, Luke; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie

    2005-10-01

    Tumors are dependent on cellular stress responses, in particular the heat shock response, for survival in their hypoxic, acidotic, and nutrient-deprived microenvironments. Using cell-based reporter assays, we have identified terrecyclic acid A (TCA) from Aspergillus terreus, a fungus inhabiting the rhizosphere of Opuntia versicolor of the Sonoran desert, as a small-molecule inducer of the heat shock response that shows anticancer activity. Further characterization suggested that TCA also affects oxidative and inflammatory cellular stress response pathways. The presence of an alpha-methylene ketone moiety suggested that TCA may form adducts with sulfhydryl groups of proteins. Reaction with labile intracellular cysteines was supported by our finding that the glutathione precursor N-acetyl-cysteine protected tumor cells from the cytotoxic effects of TCA whereas the glutathione-depleting agent buthionine sulfoximine enhanced its activity. Related sesquiterpenes have been shown to increase levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to inhibit nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) transcriptional activity. To assess whether TCA could have similar activities, we used a ROS-sensitive dye and flow cytometry to show that TCA does indeed increase ROS levels in 3LL cells. When tested in cells carrying NF-kappaB reporter constructs, TCA also exhibited concentration-dependent inhibition of cytokine-induced NF-kappaB transcriptional activity. These findings suggest that TCA modulates multiple stress pathways-the oxidative, heat shock, and inflammatory responses-in tumor cells that promote their survival. Small-molecule natural products such as TCA may serve as useful probes for understanding the relationships between these pathways, potentially providing leads for the design of novel and effective anticancer drugs.

  19. Anti-cancer small molecule JP-8g exhibits potent in vivo anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yulong; Liu, Jia; Sun, Tao; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Yao, Jia; Kai, Ming; Jiang, Xianxing; Wang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Spirooxindoles are a class of compounds with diverse biological activity. Previously, we identified a series of spirooxindole-pyranopyrimidine compounds that exhibited broad-spectrum anti-cancer activity. In this study, we evaluated one of these compounds, JP-8g, on mouse models and found that it showed potent in vivo anti-inflammatory activity. Further investigation suggested that JP-8g may execute its anti-inflammatory activity through nitric oxide synthase signaling pathways. Our results suggest that these spirooxindole-pyranopyrimidine class compounds have potential for not only cancer treatment but also inflammation therapy. PMID:24626153

  20. Update on uses and properties of citrus flavonoids: new findings in anticancer, cardiovascular, and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Benavente-García, O; Castillo, J

    2008-08-13

    -inflammatory mediators, mainly the arachidonic acid derivatives, prostaglandins E 2, F 2, and thromboxane A 2. The anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of Citrus flavonoids can play a key role in their activity against several degenerative diseases and particularly brain diseases. The most abundant Citrus flavonoids are flavanones, such as hesperidin, naringin, or neohesperidin. However, generally, the flavones, such as diosmin, apigenin, or luteolin, exhibit higher biological activity, even though they occur in much lower concentrations. Diosmin and rutin have a demonstrated activity as a venotonic agent and are present in several pharmaceutical products. Apigenin and their glucosides have been shown a good anti-inflammatory activity without the side effects of other anti-inflammatory products. In this paper, we discuss the relation between each structural factor of Citrus flavonoids and the anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and cardiovascular protection activity of Citrus flavonoids and their role in degenerative diseases.