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Sample records for active ar splice

  1. Differential regulation of metabolic pathways by androgen receptor (AR) and its constitutively active splice variant, AR-V7, in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shafi, Ayesha A; Putluri, Vasanta; Arnold, James M; Tsouko, Efrosini; Maity, Suman; Roberts, Justin M; Coarfa, Cristian; Frigo, Daniel E; Putluri, Nagireddy; Sreekumar, Arun; Weigel, Nancy L

    2015-10-13

    Metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) is primarily an androgen-dependent disease, which is treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Tumors usually develop resistance (castration-resistant PCa [CRPC]), but remain androgen receptor (AR) dependent. Numerous mechanisms for AR-dependent resistance have been identified including expression of constitutively active AR splice variants lacking the hormone-binding domain. Recent clinical studies show that expression of the best-characterized AR variant, AR-V7, correlates with resistance to ADT and poor outcome. Whether AR-V7 is simply a constitutively active substitute for AR or has novel gene targets that cause unique downstream changes is unresolved. Several studies have shown that AR activation alters cell metabolism. Using LNCaP cells with inducible expression of AR-V7 as a model system, we found that AR-V7 stimulated growth, migration, and glycolysis measured by ECAR (extracellular acidification rate) similar to AR. However, further analyses using metabolomics and metabolic flux assays revealed several differences. Whereas AR increased citrate levels, AR-V7 reduced citrate mirroring metabolic shifts observed in CRPC patients. Flux analyses indicate that the low citrate is a result of enhanced utilization rather than a failure to synthesize citrate. Moreover, flux assays suggested that compared to AR, AR-V7 exhibits increased dependence on glutaminolysis and reductive carboxylation to produce some of the TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle) metabolites. These findings suggest that these unique actions represent potential therapeutic targets.

  2. Androgen receptor splice variants circumvent AR blockade by microtubule-targeting agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanyi; Liu, Xichun; Li, Jianzhuo; Ledet, Elisa; Alvarez, Xavier; Qi, Yanfeng; Fu, Xueqi; Sartor, Oliver; Dong, Yan; Zhang, Haitao

    2015-09-15

    Docetaxel-based chemotherapy is established as a first-line treatment and standard of care for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. However, half of the patients do not respond to treatment and those do respond eventually become refractory. A better understanding of the resistance mechanisms to taxane chemotherapy is both urgent and clinical significant, as taxanes (docetaxel and cabazitaxel) are being used in various clinical settings. Sustained signaling through the androgen receptor (AR) has been established as a hallmark of CRPC. Recently, splicing variants of AR (AR-Vs) that lack the ligand-binding domain (LBD) have been identified. These variants are constitutively active and drive prostate cancer growth in a castration-resistant manner. In taxane-resistant cell lines, we found the expression of a major variant, AR-V7, was upregulated. Furthermore, ectopic expression of two clinically relevant AR-Vs (AR-V7 and ARV567es), but not the full-length AR (AR-FL), reduced the sensitivities to taxanes in LNCaP cells. Treatment with taxanes inhibited the transcriptional activity of AR-FL, but not those of AR-Vs. This could be explained, at least in part, due to the inability of taxanes to block the nuclear translocation of AR-Vs. Through a series of deletion constructs, the microtubule-binding activity was mapped to the LBD of AR. Finally, taxane-induced cytoplasm sequestration of AR-FL was alleviated when AR-Vs were present. These findings provide evidence that constitutively active AR-Vs maintain the AR signaling axis by evading the inhibitory effects of microtubule-targeting agents, suggesting that these AR-Vs play a role in resistance to taxane chemotherapy.

  3. Splicing Factor Prp8 Interacts With NES(AR) and Regulates Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Nguyen, Minh M; Masoodi, Khalid Z; Singh, Prabhpreet; Jing, Yifeng; O'Malley, Katherine; Dar, Javid A; Dhir, Rajiv; Wang, Zhou

    2015-12-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a pivotal role in the development of primary as well as advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer. Previous work in our lab identified a novel nuclear export signal (NES) (NES(AR)) in AR ligand-binding domain essential for AR nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. By characterizing the localization of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged NES(AR), we designed and executed a yeast mutagenesis screen and isolated 7 yeast mutants that failed to display the NES(AR) export function. One of those mutants was identified as the splicing factor pre-mRNA processing factor 8 (Prp8). We further showed that Prp8 could regulate NES(AR) function using short hairpin RNA knockdown of Prp8 coupled with a rapamycin export assay in mammalian cells and knockdown of Prp8 could induce nuclear accumulation of GFP-tagged AR in PC3 cells. Prp8 expression was decreased in castration-resistant LuCaP35 xenograft tumors as compared with androgen-sensitive xenografts. Laser capture microdissection and quantitative PCR showed Prp8 mRNA levels were decreased in human prostate cancer specimens with high Gleason scores. In prostate cancer cells, coimmunoprecipitation and deletion mutagenesis revealed a physical interaction between Prp8 and AR mainly mediated by NES(AR). Luciferase assay with prostate specific antigen promoter-driven reporter demonstrated that Prp8 regulated AR transcription activity in prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, Prp8 knockdown also increased polyubiquitination of endogenous AR. This may be 1 possible mechanism by which it modulates AR activity. These results show that Prp8 is a novel AR cofactor that interacts with NES(AR) and regulates AR function in prostate cancer cells.

  4. Kava components down-regulate expression of AR and AR splice variants and reduce growth in patient-derived prostate cancer xenografts in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuesen; Liu, Zhongbo; Xu, Xia; Blair, Christopher A; Sun, Zheng; Xie, Jun; Lilly, Michael B; Zi, Xiaolin

    2012-01-01

    Men living in Fiji and drinking kava have low incidence of prostate cancer (PCa). However, the PCa incidence among Fijian men who had migrated to Australia, increased by 5.1-fold. We therefore examined the potential effects of kava root extracts and its active components (kavalactones and flavokawains) on PCa growth and androgen receptor (AR) expression. PCa cell lines (LNCaP, LAPC-4, 22Rv1, C4-2B, DU145 and PC-3) with different AR expression, and a transformed prostate myofibroblast cell line (WPMY-1), were treated with a commercial kava extract, kavalactones (kawain, 5'6'-dehydrokawain, yangonin, methysticin) and flavokawain B. Expression of AR and its target genes (PSA and TMPRSS2) was examined. Two novel patient-derived PCa xenograft models from high grade PCa specimens were established by implanting the specimens into nude mice and passing tumor pieces through subcutaneous injection in nude mice, and then treated with kava extract and flavokawain B to examine their effects on tumor growth, AR expression and serum PSA levels. The kava extract and flavokawain B effectively down-regulated the expression of both the full-length AR and AR splice variants. The kava extract and kavalactones accelerated AR protein degradation, while flavokawain B inhibited AR mRNA transcription via decreasing Sp1 expression and the binding of Sp1 to the AR promoter. The kava root extract and flavokawain B reduce tumor growth, AR expression in tumor tissues and levels of serum PSA in the patient-derived PCa xenograft models. These results suggest a potential usefulness of a safe kava product or its active components for prevention and treatment of advanced PCa by targeting AR. PMID:22347450

  5. A Snapshot of the Expression Signature of Androgen Receptor Splicing Variants and Their Distinctive Transcriptional Activities

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rong; Isaacs, William B.; Luo, Jun

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The diversity and complexity of the human androgen receptor (AR) splicing variants are well appreciated but not fully understood. The goal of this study is to generate a comprehensive expression signature of AR variants in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and to address the relative importance of the individual variants in conferring the castration-resistant phenotype. METHODS A modified RNA amplification method, termed selective linear amplification of sense RNA, was developed to amplify all AR transcripts containing AR exon 3 in CRPC specimens, which were profiled using tiling expression microarrays. Coding sequences for the AR variants were cloned into expression vectors and assessed for their transcriptional activities. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine their in vivo expression patterns in an expanded set of clinical specimens. RESULTS In addition to expression peaks in AR intron 3, a novel AR exon, termed exon 9, was discovered. Exon 9 was spliced into multiple novel AR variants. Different AR splicing variants were functionally distinctive, with some demonstrating constitutive activity while others were conditionally active. Conditionally active AR-Vs may activate AR signaling depending on the cellular context. Importantly, AR variant functions did not appear to depend on the full-length AR. CONCLUSIONS This study provided the first unbiased snapshot of the AR variant signature consisting of multiple AR variants with distinctive functional properties, directly in CRPC specimens. Study findings suggest that the aggregate function of multiple AR variants may confer a castration-resistant phenotype independent of the full-length AR. PMID:21446008

  6. Androgen receptor and its splice variant, AR-V7, differentially regulate FOXA1 sensitive genes in LNCaP prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Krause, William C; Shafi, Ayesha A; Nakka, Manjula; Weigel, Nancy L

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is an androgen-dependent disease, and tumors that are resistant to androgen ablation therapy often remain androgen receptor (AR) dependent. Among the contributors to castration-resistant PCa are AR splice variants that lack the ligand-binding domain (LBD). Instead, they have small amounts of unique sequence derived from cryptic exons or from out of frame translation. The AR-V7 (or AR3) variant is constitutively active and is expressed under conditions consistent with CRPC. AR-V7 is reported to regulate a transcriptional program that is similar but not identical to that of AR. However, it is unknown whether these differences are due to the unique sequence in AR-V7, or simply to loss of the LBD. To examine transcriptional regulation by AR-V7, we have used lentiviruses encoding AR-V7 (amino acids 1-627 of AR with the 16 amino acids unique to the variant) to prepare a derivative of the androgen-dependent LNCaP cells with inducible expression of AR-V7. An additional cell line was generated with regulated expression of AR-NTD (amino acids 1-660 of AR); this mutant lacks the LBD but does not have the AR-V7 specific sequence. We find that AR and AR-V7 have distinct activities on target genes that are co-regulated by FOXA1. Transcripts regulated by AR-V7 were similarly regulated by AR-NTD, indicating that loss of the LBD is sufficient for the observed differences. Differential regulation of target genes correlates with preferential recruitment of AR or AR-V7 to specific cis-regulatory DNA sequences providing an explanation for some of the observed differences in target gene regulation.

  7. The RNA-binding protein Sam68 regulates expression and transcription function of the androgen receptor splice variant AR-V7.

    PubMed

    Stockley, Jacqueline; Markert, Elke; Zhou, Yan; Robson, Craig N; Elliott, David J; Lindberg, Johan; Leung, Hing Y; Rajan, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Castration-resistant (CR) prostate cancer (PCa) partly arises due to persistence of androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity in the absence of cognate ligand. An emerging mechanism underlying the CRPCa phenotype and predicting response to therapy is the expression of the constitutively-active AR-V7 splice variant generated by AR cryptic exon 3b inclusion. Here, we explore the role of the RNA-binding protein (RBP) Sam68 (encoded by KHDRBS1), which is over-expressed in clinical PCa, on AR-V7 expression and transcription function. Using a minigene reporter, we show that Sam68 controls expression of exon 3b resulting in an increase in endogenous AR-V7 mRNA and protein expression in RNA-binding-dependent manner. We identify a novel protein-protein interaction between Sam68 and AR-V7 mediated by a common domain shared with full-length AR, and observe these proteins in the cell nucleoplasm. Using a luciferase reporter, we demonstrate that Sam68 co-activates ligand-independent AR-V7 transcriptional activity in an RNA-binding-independent manner, and controls expression of the endogenous AR-V7-specific gene target UBE2C. Our data suggest that Sam68 has separable effects on the regulation of AR-V7 expression and transcriptional activity, through its RNA-binding capacity. Sam68 and other RBPs may control expression of AR-V7 and other splice variants as well as their downstream functions in CRPCa. PMID:26310125

  8. The RNA-binding protein Sam68 regulates expression and transcription function of the androgen receptor splice variant AR-V7.

    PubMed

    Stockley, Jacqueline; Markert, Elke; Zhou, Yan; Robson, Craig N; Elliott, David J; Lindberg, Johan; Leung, Hing Y; Rajan, Prabhakar

    2015-08-27

    Castration-resistant (CR) prostate cancer (PCa) partly arises due to persistence of androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity in the absence of cognate ligand. An emerging mechanism underlying the CRPCa phenotype and predicting response to therapy is the expression of the constitutively-active AR-V7 splice variant generated by AR cryptic exon 3b inclusion. Here, we explore the role of the RNA-binding protein (RBP) Sam68 (encoded by KHDRBS1), which is over-expressed in clinical PCa, on AR-V7 expression and transcription function. Using a minigene reporter, we show that Sam68 controls expression of exon 3b resulting in an increase in endogenous AR-V7 mRNA and protein expression in RNA-binding-dependent manner. We identify a novel protein-protein interaction between Sam68 and AR-V7 mediated by a common domain shared with full-length AR, and observe these proteins in the cell nucleoplasm. Using a luciferase reporter, we demonstrate that Sam68 co-activates ligand-independent AR-V7 transcriptional activity in an RNA-binding-independent manner, and controls expression of the endogenous AR-V7-specific gene target UBE2C. Our data suggest that Sam68 has separable effects on the regulation of AR-V7 expression and transcriptional activity, through its RNA-binding capacity. Sam68 and other RBPs may control expression of AR-V7 and other splice variants as well as their downstream functions in CRPCa.

  9. An imaging agent to detect androgen receptor and its active splice variants in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Yusuke; Tien, Amy H.; Pan, Jinhe; Leung, Jacky K.; Banuelos, Carmen A.; Jian, Kunzhong; Wang, Jun; Mawji, Nasrin R.; Fernandez, Javier Garcia; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Andersen, Raymond J.; Sadar, Marianne D.

    2016-01-01

    Constitutively active splice variants of androgen receptor (AR-Vs) lacking ligand-binding domain (LBD) are a mechanism of resistance to androgen receptor LBD–targeted (AR LBD–targeted) therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). There is a strong unmet clinical need to identify prostate cancer patients with AR-V–positive lesions to determine whether they will benefit from further AR LBD–targeting therapies or should receive taxanes or investigational drugs like EPI-506 or galeterone. Both EPI-506 (NCT02606123) and galeterone (NCT02438007) are in clinical trials and are proposed to have efficacy against lesions that are positive for AR-Vs. AR activation function-1 (AF-1) is common to the N-terminal domains of full-length AR and AR-Vs. Here, we provide proof of concept for developing imaging compounds that directly bind AR AF-1 to detect both AR-Vs and full-length AR. 123I-EPI-002 had specific binding to AR AF-1, which enabled direct visualization of CRPC xenografts that express full-length AR and AR-Vs. Our findings highlight the potential of 123I-EPI-002 as an imaging agent for the detection of full-length AR and AR-Vs in CRPC. PMID:27525313

  10. Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS) activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    A review on the activities and achievements of Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS) and Armenian astronomy in general during the last years is given. ArAS membership, ArAS electronic newsletters (ArASNews), ArAS webpage, Annual Meetings, Annual Prize for Young Astronomers (Yervant Terzian Prize) and other awards, international relations, presence in international organizations, local and international summer schools, science camps, astronomical Olympiads and other events, matters related to astronomical education, astronomical heritage, amateur astronomy, astronomy outreach and ArAS further projects are described and discussed.

  11. Anti-tumor activity of splice-switching oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, John A.; Li, Shyh-Dar; Yang, Angela; Huang, Leaf; Kole, Ryszard

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing has emerged as an important target for molecular therapies. Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) modulate alternative splicing by hybridizing to pre-mRNA sequences involved in splicing and blocking access to the transcript by splicing factors. Recently, the efficacy of SSOs has been established in various animal disease models; however, the application of SSOs against cancer targets has been hindered by poor in vivo delivery of antisense therapeutics to tumor cells. The apoptotic regulator Bcl-x is alternatively spliced to express anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL and pro-apoptotic Bcl-xS. Bcl-xL is upregulated in many cancers and is associated with chemoresistance, distinguishing it as an important target for cancer therapy. We previously showed that redirection of Bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing from Bcl-xL to -xS induced apoptosis in breast and prostate cancer cells. In this study, the effect of SSO-induced Bcl-x splice-switching on metastatic melanoma was assessed in cell culture and B16F10 tumor xenografts. SSOs were delivered in vivo using lipid nanoparticles. Administration of nanoparticle with Bcl-x SSO resulted in modification of Bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing in lung metastases and reduced tumor load, while nanoparticle alone or formulated with a control SSO had no effect. Our findings demonstrate in vivo anti-tumor activity of SSOs that modulate Bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:20719743

  12. Position-dependent splicing activation and repression by SR and hnRNP proteins rely on common mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Erkelenz, Steffen; Mueller, William F.; Evans, Melanie S.; Busch, Anke; Schöneweis, Katrin; Hertel, Klemens J.; Schaal, Heiner

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing is regulated by splicing factors that modulate splice site selection. In some cases, however, splicing factors show antagonistic activities by either activating or repressing splicing. Here, we show that these opposing outcomes are based on their binding location relative to regulated 5′ splice sites. SR proteins enhance splicing only when they are recruited to the exon. However, they interfere with splicing by simply relocating them to the opposite intronic side of the splice site. hnRNP splicing factors display analogous opposing activities, but in a reversed position dependence. Activation by SR or hnRNP proteins increases splice site recognition at the earliest steps of exon definition, whereas splicing repression promotes the assembly of nonproductive complexes that arrest spliceosome assembly prior to splice site pairing. Thus, SR and hnRNP splicing factors exploit similar mechanisms to positively or negatively influence splice site selection. PMID:23175589

  13. Activation of an Endoribonuclease by Non-intein Protein Splicing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Stephen J; Stern, David B

    2016-07-29

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast-localized poly(A)-binding protein RB47 is predicted to contain a non-conserved linker (NCL) sequence flanked by highly conserved N- and C-terminal sequences, based on the corresponding cDNA. RB47 was purified from chloroplasts in association with an endoribonuclease activity; however, protein sequencing failed to detect the NCL. Furthermore, while recombinant RB47 including the NCL did not display endoribonuclease activity in vitro, versions lacking the NCL displayed strong activity. Both full-length and shorter forms of RB47 could be detected in chloroplasts, with conversion to the shorter form occurring in chloroplasts isolated from cells grown in the light. This conversion could be replicated in vitro in chloroplast extracts in a light-dependent manner, where epitope tags and protein sequencing showed that the NCL was excised from a full-length recombinant substrate, together with splicing of the flanking sequences. The requirement for endogenous factors and light differentiates this protein splicing from autocatalytic inteins, and may allow the chloroplast to regulate the activation of RB47 endoribonuclease activity. We speculate that this protein splicing activity arose to post-translationally repair proteins that had been inactivated by deleterious insertions or extensions. PMID:27311716

  14. The splicing activator DAZAP1 integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk-regulated cell proliferation and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Rajarshi; Roy, Sreerupa Ghose; Tsai, Yihsuan S.; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Graves, Lee M.; Wang, Zefeng

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is a critical stage of gene regulation in response to environmental stimuli. Here we show that DAZAP1, an RNA-binding protein involved in mammalian development and spermatogenesis, promotes inclusion of weak exons through specific recognition of diverse cis-elements. The carboxy-terminal proline-rich domain of DAZAP1 interacts with and neutralizes general splicing inhibitors, and is sufficient to activate splicing when recruited to pre-mRNA. This domain is phosphorylated by the MEK/Erk (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase) pathway and this modification is essential for the splicing regulatory activity and the nuclear/cytoplasmic translocation of DAZAP1. Using mRNA-seq, we identify endogenous splicing events regulated by DAZAP1, many of which are involved in maintaining cell growth. Knockdown or over-expression of DAZAP1 causes a cell proliferation defect. Taken together, these studies reveal a molecular mechanism that integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk-regulated cell proliferation.

  15. The splicing activator DAZAP1 integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk regulated cell proliferation and migration

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Rajarshi; Roy, Sreerupa Ghose; Tsai, Yihsuan S.; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Graves, Lee M.; Wang, Zefeng

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA is a critical stage of gene regulation in response to environmental stimuli. Here we show that DAZAP1, an RNA binding protein involved in mammalian development and spermatogenesis, promotes inclusion of weak exons through specific recognition of diverse cis-elements. The C-terminal proline-rich domain of DAZAP1 interacts with and neutralizes general splicing inhibitors, and is sufficient to activate splicing when recruited to pre-mRNA. This domain is phosphorylated by the MEK/Erk pathway and this modification is essential for the splicing regulatory activity and the nuclear/cytoplasmic translocation of DAZAP1. Using mRNA-seq we identify endogenous splicing events regulated by DAZAP1, many of which are involved in maintaining cell growth. Knockdown or over-expression of DAZAP1 causes a cell proliferation defect. Taken together, these studies reveal a molecular mechanism that integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk regulated cell proliferation. PMID:24452013

  16. SUMO-specific protease 1 modulates cadmium-augmented transcriptional activity of androgen receptor (AR) by reversing AR SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ruiqin; Cui, Yaxiong; Yuan, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Haitao; Wang, Yimei; He, Jun; Zhao, Jun; Peng, Shuangqing

    2014-09-01

    Cadmium is a potential prostate carcinogen and can mimic the effects of androgen by a mechanism that involves the hormone-binding domain of the androgen receptor (AR), which is a key transcriptional factor in prostate carcinogenesis. We focused on transcriptional activity of AR to investigate the toxicity of cadmium exposure on human prostate cell lines. Cadmium increased the proliferative index of LNCaP and the proliferative effect was obstructed significantly by AR blocking agent. In luciferase assay, cadmium activated the transcriptional activity of AR in 293T cells co-transfected with wild-type AR and an ARE (AR response elements)-luciferase reporter gene. Cadmium also increased expression of PSA, a downstream gene of AR, whereas the metal had no significant effect on AR amount. AR is regulated by multiple posttranslational modifications including SUMOylation. SUMOylated AR shows a lower transcriptional activity. SUMO-specific protease 1 (SENP1) decreases AR SUMOylation by deconjugating AR-SUMO covalent bond. We detected that cadmium increased the amount of SENP1 in a dose and time dependent manner. Knocking down of SENP1 by RNAi led to decrease of PSA expression and transcriptional activity of AR in luciferase assay. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) results showed that SUMOylation level of AR was decreased after cadmium treatment. In conclusion, our results indicated that cadmium-induced SENP1 enhanced AR transcriptional activity by decreasing AR SUMOylation.

  17. Bipartite functions of the CREB co-activators selectively direct alternative splicing or transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Amelio, Antonio L; Caputi, Massimo; Conkright, Michael D

    2009-09-16

    The CREB regulated transcription co-activators (CRTCs) regulate many biological processes by integrating and converting environmental inputs into transcriptional responses. Although the mechanisms by which CRTCs sense cellular signals are characterized, little is known regarding how CRTCs contribute to the regulation of cAMP inducible genes. Here we show that these dynamic regulators, unlike other co-activators, independently direct either pre-mRNA splice-site selection or transcriptional activation depending on the cell type or promoter context. Moreover, in other scenarios, the CRTC co-activators coordinately regulate transcription and splicing. Mutational analyses showed that CRTCs possess distinct functional domains responsible for regulating either pre-mRNA splicing or transcriptional activation. Interestingly, the CRTC1-MAML2 oncoprotein lacks the splicing domain and is incapable of altering splice-site selection despite robustly activating transcription. The differential usage of these distinct domains allows CRTCs to selectively mediate multiple facets of gene regulation, indicating that co-activators are not solely restricted to coordinating alternative splicing with increase in transcriptional activity.

  18. A splice site mutant of maize activates cryptic splice sites, elicits intron inclusion and exon exclusion, and permits branch point elucidation.

    PubMed

    Lal, S; Choi, J H; Shaw, J R; Hannah, L C

    1999-10-01

    DNA sequence analysis of the bt2-7503 mutant allele of the maize brittle-2 gene revealed a point mutation in the 5' terminal sequence of intron 3 changing GT to AT. This lesion completely abolishes use of this splice site, activates two cryptic splice sites, and alters the splicing pattern from extant splice sites. One activated donor site, located nine nt 5' to the normal splice donor site, begins with the dinucleotide GC. While non-consensus, this sequence still permits both trans-esterification reactions of pre-mRNA splicing. A second cryptic site located 23 nt 5' to the normal splice site and beginning with GA, undergoes the first trans-esterification reaction leading to lariat formation, but lacks the ability to participate in the second reaction. Accumulation of this splicing intermediate and use of an innovative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction technique (J. Vogel, R.H. Wolfgang, T. Borner [1997] Nucleic Acids Res 25: 2030-2031) led to the identification of 3' intron sequences needed for lariat formation. In most splicing reactions, neither cryptic site is recognized. Most mature transcripts include intron 3, while the second most frequent class lacks exon 3. Traditionally, the former class of transcripts is taken as evidence for the intron definition of splicing, while the latter class has given credence to the exon definition of splicing. PMID:10517832

  19. 76 FR 27077 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form AR-11 and Form AR-11SR, Extension of an Existing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form AR-11 and...; OMB Control No. 1615-0007. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration... collection: Form AR-11 and Form AR-11SR. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. (4) Affected public...

  20. Attenuation of the suppressive activity of cellular splicing factor SRSF3 by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF57 protein is required for RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Majerciak, Vladimir; Lu, Mathew; Li, Xiaofan; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 is a multifunctional post-transcriptional regulator essential for viral gene expression during KSHV lytic infection. ORF57 requires interactions with various cellular proteins for its function. Here, we identified serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 (SRSF3, formerly known as SRp20) as a cellular cofactor involved in ORF57-mediated splicing of KSHV K8β RNA. In the absence of ORF57, SRSF3 binds to a suboptimal K8β intron and inhibits K8β splicing. Knockdown of SRSF3 promotes K8β splicing, mimicking the effect of ORF57. The N-terminal half of ORF57 binds to the RNA recognition motif of SRSF3, which prevents SRSF3 from associating with the K8β intron RNA and therefore attenuates the suppressive effect of SRSF3 on K8β splicing. ORF57 also promotes splicing of heterologous non-KSHV transcripts that are negatively regulated by SRSF3, indicating that the effect of ORF57 on SRSF3 activity is independent of RNA target. SPEN proteins, previously identified as ORF57-interacting partners, suppress ORF57 splicing activity by displacing ORF57 from SRSF3-RNA complexes. In summary, we have identified modulation of SRSF3 activity as the molecular mechanism by which ORF57 promotes RNA splicing.

  1. Attenuation of the suppressive activity of cellular splicing factor SRSF3 by Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus ORF57 protein is required for RNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Majerciak, Vladimir; Lu, Mathew; Li, Xiaofan

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 is a multifunctional post-transcriptional regulator essential for viral gene expression during KSHV lytic infection. ORF57 requires interactions with various cellular proteins for its function. Here, we identified serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 (SRSF3, formerly known as SRp20) as a cellular cofactor involved in ORF57-mediated splicing of KSHV K8β RNA. In the absence of ORF57, SRSF3 binds to a suboptimal K8β intron and inhibits K8β splicing. Knockdown of SRSF3 promotes K8β splicing, mimicking the effect of ORF57. The N-terminal half of ORF57 binds to the RNA recognition motif of SRSF3, which prevents SRSF3 from associating with the K8β intron RNA and therefore attenuates the suppressive effect of SRSF3 on K8β splicing. ORF57 also promotes splicing of heterologous non-KSHV transcripts that are negatively regulated by SRSF3, indicating that the effect of ORF57 on SRSF3 activity is independent of RNA target. SPEN proteins, previously identified as ORF57-interacting partners, suppress ORF57 splicing activity by displacing ORF57 from SRSF3–RNA complexes. In summary, we have identified modulation of SRSF3 activity as the molecular mechanism by which ORF57 promotes RNA splicing. PMID:25234929

  2. Stimulation of StAR expression by cAMP is controlled by inhibition of highly inducible SIK1 via CRTC2, a co-activator of CREB.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwoo; Tong, Tiegang; Takemori, Hiroshi; Jefcoate, Colin

    2015-06-15

    In mouse steroidogenic cells the activation of cholesterol metabolism is mediated by steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Here, we visualized a coordinated regulation of StAR transcription, splicing and post-transcriptional processing, which are synchronized by salt inducible kinase (SIK1) and CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC2). To detect primary RNA (pRNA), spliced primary RNA (Sp-RNA) and mRNA in single cells, we generated probe sets by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These methods allowed us to address the nature of StAR gene expression and to visualize protein-nucleic acid interactions through direct detection. We show that SIK1 represses StAR expression in Y1 adrenal and MA10 testis cells through inhibition of processing mediated by CRTC2. Digital image analysis matches qPCR analyses of the total cell culture. Evidence is presented for spatially separate accumulation of StAR pRNA and Sp-RNA at the gene loci in the nucleus. These findings establish that cAMP, SIK and CRTC mediate StAR expression through activation of individual StAR gene loci.

  3. The role of mitochondrial fusion and StAR phosphorylation in the regulation of StAR activity and steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana F; Orlando, Ulises; Helfenberger, Katia E; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2015-06-15

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein regulates the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis, i.e. the delivery of cholesterol from the outer (OMM) to the inner (IMM) mitochondrial membrane. StAR is a 37-kDa protein with an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence that is cleaved off during mitochondrial import to yield 30-kDa intramitochondrial StAR. StAR acts exclusively on the OMM and its activity is proportional to how long it remains on the OMM. However, the precise fashion and the molecular mechanism in which StAR remains on the OMM have not been elucidated yet. In this work we will discuss the role of mitochondrial fusion and StAR phosphorylation by the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) as part of the mechanism that regulates StAR retention on the OMM and activity.

  4. Splice Site Strength-Dependent Activity and Genetic Buffering by Poly-G Runs

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xinshu; Wang, Zefeng; Jang, Minyoung; Nutiu, Razvan; Wang, Eric T.; Burge, Christopher B.

    2009-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is regulated through combinatorial activity of RNA motifs including splice sites and splicing regulatory elements (SREs). Here, we show that the activity of the G-run class of SREs is ∼4-fold higher when adjacent to intermediate strength 5'ss relative to weak 5'ss, and ∼1.3-fold higher relative to strong 5'ss. This dependence on 5'ss strength was observed in splicing reporters and in global microarray and mRNA-Seq analyses of splicing changes following RNAi against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) H, which crosslinked to G-runs adjacent to many regulated exons. An exon’s responsiveness to changes in hnRNP H levels therefore depends in a complex way on G-run abundance and 5'ss strength, and other splicing factors may function similarly. This pattern of activity enables G-runs and hnRNP H to buffer the effects of 5'ss mutations, augmenting the frequency of 5'ss polymorphism and the evolution of new splicing patterns. PMID:19749754

  5. Hypophosphatemic rickets caused by a novel splice donor site mutation and activation of two cryptic splice donor sites in the PHEX gene.

    PubMed

    Zou, Minjing; Buluş, Derya; Al-Rijjal, Roua A; Andıran, Nesibe; BinEssa, Huda; Kattan, Walaa E; Meyer, Brian; Shi, Yufei

    2015-01-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH) is the most common inherited form of rickets. XLH is caused by inactivating mutations in the PHEX gene and is transmitted as an X-linked dominant disorder. We investigated PHEX mutation in a sporadic Turkish girl with hypophosphatemic rickets. The patient was 2 years of age with a complaint of inability to walk. She had bowing of legs and growth retardation. Laboratory data showed normal calcium, low phosphate with markedly elevated ALP, and low phosphate renal tubular reabsorption. She was treated with Calcitriol 0.5 mg/kg/day and oral phosphate supplement with good response. The entire coding region of PHEX gene was sequenced from patient's peripheral leukocyte DNA and a novel 13 bp deletion at the donor splice site of exon5 was found (c.663+12del). Instead of using the donor splice site of intron 4 to splice out exon 5 and intron 5, the spliceosome utilized two nearby cryptic donor splice sites (5' splice site) to splice out intron 4, resulting in two smaller transcripts. Both of them could not translate into functional proteins due to frameshift. Her parents did not carry the mutation, indicating that this is a de novo PHEX mutation likely resulting from mutagenesis of X chromosome in paternal germ cells. We conclude that c.663+12del is a novel mutation that can activate nearby cryptic 5' splice sites. The selection of cryptic 5' splice sites adds the complexity of cell's splicing mechanisms. The current study extends the database of PHEX mutation and cryptic 5' splice sites.

  6. A novel mutation in the β-spectrin gene causes the activation of a cryptic 5'-splice site and the creation of a de novo 3'-splice site.

    PubMed

    Salas, Pilar Carrasco; Rosales, José Miguel Lezana; Milla, Carmen Palma; Montiel, Javier López; Siles, Juan López

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of genes involved in hereditary spherocytosis, by next-generation sequencing in two patients with clinical diagnosis of the disease, showed the presence of the c.1795+1G>A mutation in the SPTB gene. cDNA amplification then revealed the occurrence of a consequent aberrant mRNA isoform produced from the activation of a cryptic 5'-splice site and the creation of a newly 3'-splice site. The mechanisms by which these two splice sites are used as a result of the same mutation should be analyzed in depth in further studies.

  7. Activation and repression functions of an SR splicing regulator depend on exonic versus intronic-binding position.

    PubMed

    Shen, Manli; Mattox, William

    2012-01-01

    SR proteins and related factors play widespread roles in alternative pre-mRNA splicing and are known to promote splice site recognition through their Arg-Ser-rich effector domains. However, binding of SR regulators to some targets results in repression of splice sites through a distinct mechanism. Here, we investigate how activated and repressed targets of the Drosophila SR regulator Transformer2 elicit its differing effects on splicing. We find that, like activation, repression affects early steps in the recognition of splice sites and spliceosome assembly. Repositioning of regulatory elements reveals that Tra2 complexes that normally repress splicing from intronic positions activate splicing when located in an exon. Protein tethering experiments demonstrate that this position dependence is an intrinsic property of Tra2 and further show that repression and activation are mediated by separate effector domains of this protein. When other Drosophila SR factors (SF2 and Rbp1) that activate splicing from exonic positions were tethered intronically they failed to either activate or repress splicing. Interestingly, both activities of Tra2 favor the exonic identity of the RNA sequences that encompass its binding sites. This suggests a model in which these two opposite functions act in concert to define both the position and extent of alternatively spliced exons.

  8. The regulation of glial-specific splicing of Neurexin IV requires HOW and Cdk12 activity.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Floriano; Thuma, Leila; Klämbt, Christian

    2012-05-01

    The differentiation of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an essential process in the development of a complex nervous system and depends on alternative splicing. In the fly BBB, glial cells establish intensive septate junctions that require the cell-adhesion molecule Neurexin IV. Alternative splicing generates two different Neurexin IV isoforms: Neurexin IV(exon3), which is found in cells that form septate junctions, and Neurexin IV(exon4), which is found in neurons that form no septate junctions. Here, we show that the formation of the BBB depends on the RNA-binding protein HOW (Held out wings), which triggers glial specific splicing of Neurexin IV(exon3). Using a set of splice reporters, we show that one HOW-binding site is needed to include one of the two mutually exclusive exons 3 and 4, whereas binding at the three further motifs is needed to exclude exon 4. The differential splicing is controlled by nuclear access of HOW and can be induced in neurons following expression of nuclear HOW. Using a novel in vivo two-color splicing detector, we then screened for genes required for full HOW activity. This approach identified Cyclin-dependent kinase 12 (Cdk12) and the splicesosomal component Prp40 as major determinants in regulating HOW-dependent splicing of Neurexin IV. Thus, in addition to the control of nuclear localization of HOW, the phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II by Cdk12 provides an elegant mechanism in regulating timed splicing of newly synthesized mRNA molecules.

  9. Alternative splicing of MALT1 controls signalling and activation of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Meininger, Isabel; Griesbach, Richard A.; Hu, Desheng; Gehring, Torben; Seeholzer, Thomas; Bertossi, Arianna; Kranich, Jan; Oeckinghaus, Andrea; Eitelhuber, Andrea C.; Greczmiel, Ute; Gewies, Andreas; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Ruland, Jürgen; Brocker, Thomas; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Heyd, Florian; Krappmann, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    MALT1 channels proximal T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling to downstream signalling pathways. With MALT1A and MALT1B two conserved splice variants exist and we demonstrate here that MALT1 alternative splicing supports optimal T-cell activation. Inclusion of exon7 in MALT1A facilitates the recruitment of TRAF6, which augments MALT1 scaffolding function, but not protease activity. Naive CD4+ T cells express almost exclusively MALT1B and MALT1A expression is induced by TCR stimulation. We identify hnRNP U as a suppressor of exon7 inclusion. Whereas selective depletion of MALT1A impairs T-cell signalling and activation, downregulation of hnRNP U enhances MALT1A expression and T-cell activation. Thus, TCR-induced alternative splicing augments MALT1 scaffolding to enhance downstream signalling and to promote optimal T-cell activation. PMID:27068814

  10. Altered motor activity of alternative splice variants of the mammalian kinesin-3 protein KIF1B.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Ruri; Mitsui, Keiji; Kanazawa, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    Several mammalian kinesin motor proteins exist as multiple isoforms that arise from alternative splicing of a single gene. However, the roles of many motor protein splice variants remain unclear. The kinesin-3 motor protein KIF1B has alternatively spliced isoforms distinguished by the presence or absence of insertion sequences in the conserved amino-terminal region of the protein. The insertions are located in the loop region containing the lysine-rich cluster, also known as the K-loop, and in the hinge region adjacent to the motor domain. To clarify the functions of these alternative splice variants of KIF1B, we examined the biochemical properties of recombinant KIF1B with and without insertion sequences. In a microtubule-dependent ATPase assay, KIF1B variants that contained both insertions had higher activity and affinity for microtubules than KIF1B variants that contained no insertions. Mutational analysis of the K-loop insertion revealed that variants with a longer insertion sequence at this site had higher activity. However, the velocity of movement in motility assays was similar between KIF1B with and without insertion sequences. Our results indicate that splicing isoforms of KIF1B that vary in their insertion sequences have different motor activities.

  11. hnRNP I/PTB can antagonize the splicing repressor activity of SRp30c

    PubMed Central

    Paradis, Caroline; Cloutier, Philippe; Shkreta, Lulzim; Toutant, Johanne; Klarskov, Klaus; Chabot, Benoit

    2007-01-01

    The control of alternative pre-mRNA splicing often requires the participation of factors displaying synergistic or antagonistic activities. In the hnRNP A1 pre-mRNA, three elements promote the exclusion of alternative exon 7B, while a fourth intron element (CE9) represses splicing of exon 7B to the downstream exon. We have shown previously that the 5′ portion of the 38-nucleotide-long CE9 element is bound by SRp30c, and that this interaction is important for repression in vitro. To determine whether SRp30c alone can impose repression, we tested a high-affinity SRp30c binding site that we identified using the SELEX protocol. We find that multiple high-affinity SRp30c sites are required to replicate the level of repression obtained with CE9, and that both the 5′ and the 3′ portions of CE9 contribute to SRp30c binding. Performing RNA affinity chromatography with the complete CE9 element recovered hnRNP I/PTB. Surprisingly however, His-tagged PTB reduced the binding of SRp30c to CE9 in a nuclear extract, stimulated splicing to a downstream 3′ splice site, and relieved the CE9-mediated splicing repression in vitro. Our in vivo results are consistent with the notion that increasing PTB levels alleviates the repression imposed by CE9 to a downstream 3′ splice site. Thus, PTB can function as an anti-repressor molecule to counteract the splicing inhibitory activity of SRp30c. PMID:17548433

  12. CXC Chemokine Receptor 3 Alternative Splice Variants Selectively Activate Different Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Berchiche, Yamina A; Sakmar, Thomas P

    2016-10-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) C-X-C chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) is a potential drug target that mediates signaling involved in cancer metastasis and inflammatory diseases. The CXCR3 primary transcript has three potential alternative splice variants and cell-type specific expression results in receptor variants that are believed to have different functional characteristics. However, the molecular pharmacology of ligand binding to CXCR3 alternative splice variants and their downstream signaling pathways remain poorly explored. To better understand the role of the functional consequences of alternative splicing of CXCR3, we measured signaling in response to four different chemokine ligands (CXCL4, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11) with agonist activity at CXCR3. Both CXCL10 and CXCL11 activated splice variant CXCR3A. Whereas CXCL10 displayed full agonistic activity for Gαi activation and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation and partial agonist activity for β-arrestin recruitment, CXCL9 triggered only modest ERK1/2 phosphorylation. CXCL11 induced CXCR3B-mediated β-arrestin recruitment and little ERK phosphorylation. CXCR3Alt signaling was limited to modest ligand-induced receptor internalization and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in response to chemokines CXCL11, CXCL10, and CXCL9. These results show that CXCR3 splice variants activate different signaling pathways and that CXCR3 variant function is not redundant, suggesting a mechanism for tissue specific biased agonism. Our data show an additional layer of complexity for chemokine receptor signaling that might be exploited to target specific CXCR3 splice variants. PMID:27512119

  13. Feed-Forward Microprocessing and Splicing Activities at a MicroRNA–Containing Intron

    PubMed Central

    Janas, Maja M.; Khaled, Mehdi; Schubert, Steffen; Bernstein, Jacob G.; Golan, David; Veguilla, Rosa A.; Fisher, David E.; Shomron, Noam; Levy, Carmit; Novina, Carl D.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of mammalian microRNA (miRNA) genes reside within introns of protein-encoding and non-coding genes, yet the mechanisms coordinating primary transcript processing into both mature miRNA and spliced mRNA are poorly understood. Analysis of melanoma invasion suppressor miR-211 expressed from intron 6 of melastatin revealed that microprocessing of miR-211 promotes splicing of the exon 6–exon 7 junction of melastatin by a mechanism requiring the RNase III activity of Drosha. Additionally, mutations in the 5′ splice site (5′SS), but not in the 3′SS, branch point, or polypyrimidine tract of intron 6 reduced miR-211 biogenesis and Drosha recruitment to intron 6, indicating that 5′SS recognition by the spliceosome promotes microprocessing of miR-211. Globally, knockdown of U1 splicing factors reduced intronic miRNA expression. Our data demonstrate novel mutually-cooperative microprocessing and splicing activities at an intronic miRNA locus and suggest that the initiation of spliceosome assembly may promote microprocessing of intronic miRNAs. PMID:22028668

  14. Synthetic mRNA splicing modulator compounds with in vivo antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Lagisetti, Chandraiah; Pourpak, Alan; Goronga, Tinopiwa; Jiang, Qin; Cui, Xiaoli; Hyle, Judith; Lahti, Jill M; Morris, Stephan W; Webb, Thomas R

    2009-11-26

    We report our progress on the development of new synthetic anticancer lead compounds that modulate the splicing of mRNA. We also report the synthesis and evaluation of new biologically active ester and carbamate analogues. Further, we describe initial animal studies demonstrating the antitumor efficacy of compound 5 in vivo. Additionally, we report the enantioselective and diastereospecific synthesis of a new 1,3-dioxane series of active analogues. We confirm that compound 5 inhibits the splicing of mRNA in cell-free nuclear extracts and in a cell-based dual-reporter mRNA splicing assay. In summary, we have developed totally synthetic novel spliceosome modulators as therapeutic lead compounds for a number of highly aggressive cancers. Future efforts will be directed toward the more complete optimization of these compounds as potential human therapeutics.

  15. Alternative 3' splice acceptor sites modulate enzymic activity in derivative alleles of the maize bronze1-mutable 13 allele.

    PubMed Central

    Okagaki, R J; Sullivan, T D; Schiefelbein, J W; Nelson, O E

    1992-01-01

    The defective Suppressor-mutator (dSpm)-induced allele bronze1-mutable 13 (bz1-m13) and many of its derivative alleles are leaky mutants with measurable levels of flavonol O3-glucosyltransferase activity. This activity results from splicing at acceptor site-1, one of two cryptic 3' splice sites within the dSpm insertion in bz1-m13. In this study, splicing in bz1-m13 change-in-state (CS) alleles CS-3 and CS-64 was shown to be altered from bz1-m13; previous work found altered splicing in CS-9. CS-64 is a null allele and lacks the acceptor site-1-spliced transcript because this site is deleted. CS-3 and CS-9 had increased levels of the acceptor site-1 transcript relative to bz1-m13 and increased enzymic activities. A deletion in CS-9 altered splicing by eliminating acceptor site-2. Both acceptor sites were intact in CS-3, but a deletion removed most of a 275-bp GC-rich sequence in dSpm. This suggests that GC-rich sequences affect splicing and is consistent with models postulating a role for AU content in the splicing of plant introns. Splicing does not necessarily occur, however, at the junction of AU-rich intron sequences and GC-rich exon sequences. PMID:1477558

  16. Conservation of context-dependent splicing activity in distant Muscleblind homologs

    PubMed Central

    Oddo, Julia C.; Saxena, Tanvi; McConnell, Ona L.; Berglund, J. Andrew; Wang, Eric T.

    2016-01-01

    The Muscleblind (MBL) protein family is a deeply conserved family of RNA binding proteins that regulate alternative splicing, alternative polyadenylation, RNA stability and RNA localization. Their inactivation due to sequestration by expanded CUG repeats causes symptoms in the neuromuscular disease myotonic dystrophy. MBL zinc fingers are the most highly conserved portion of these proteins, and directly interact with RNA. We identified putative MBL homologs in Ciona intestinalis and Trichoplax adhaerens, and investigated their ability, as well as that of MBL homologs from human/mouse, fly and worm, to regulate alternative splicing. We found that all homologs can regulate alternative splicing in mouse cells, with some regulating over 100 events. The cis-elements through which each homolog exerts its splicing activities are likely to be highly similar to mammalian Muscleblind-like proteins (MBNLs), as suggested by motif analyses and the ability of expanded CUG repeats to inactivate homolog-mediated splicing. While regulation of specific target exons by MBL/MBNL has not been broadly conserved across these species, genes enriched for MBL/MBNL binding sites in their introns may play roles in cell adhesion, ion transport and axon guidance, among other biological pathways, suggesting a specific, conserved role for these proteins across a broad range of metazoan species. PMID:27557707

  17. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is localized to subnuclear domains enriched in splicing factors

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yi Ericsson, Ida Doseth, Berit Liabakk, Nina B. Krokan, Hans E. Kavli, Bodil

    2014-03-10

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is the mutator enzyme in adaptive immunity. AID initiates the antibody diversification processes in activated B cells by deaminating cytosine to uracil in immunoglobulin genes. To some extent other genes are also targeted, which may lead to genome instability and B cell malignancy. Thus, it is crucial to understand its targeting and regulation mechanisms. AID is regulated at several levels including subcellular compartmentalization. However, the complex nuclear distribution and trafficking of AID has not been studied in detail previously. In this work, we examined the subnuclear localization of AID and its interaction partner CTNNBL1 and found that they associate with spliceosome-associated structures including Cajal bodies and nuclear speckles. Moreover, protein kinase A (PKA), which activates AID by phosphorylation at Ser38, is present together with AID in nuclear speckles. Importantly, we demonstrate that AID physically associates with the major spliceosome subunits (small nuclear ribonucleoproteins, snRNPs), as well as other essential splicing components, in addition to the transcription machinery. Based on our findings and the literature, we suggest a transcription-coupled splicing-associated model for AID targeting and activation. - Highlights: • AID and its interaction partner CTNNBL1 localize to Cajal bodies and nuclear speckles. • AID associates with its activating kinase PKA in nuclear speckles. • AID is linked to the splicing machinery in switching B-cells. • Our findings suggest a transcription-coupled splicing associated mechanism for AID targeting and activation.

  18. Exonic splicing signals impose constraints upon the evolution of enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Falanga, Alessia; Stojanović, Ozren; Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Pinto, Sofia; Millán, José Luis; Vlahoviček, Kristian; Baralle, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Exon splicing enhancers (ESEs) overlap with amino acid coding sequences implying a dual evolutionary selective pressure. In this study, we map ESEs in the placental alkaline phosphatase gene (ALPP), absent in the corresponding exon of the ancestral tissue-non-specific alkaline phosphatase gene (ALPL). The ESEs are associated with amino acid differences between the transcripts in an area otherwise conserved. We switched out the ALPP ESEs sequences with the sequence from the related ALPL, introducing the associated amino acid changes. The resulting enzymes, produced by cDNA expression, showed different kinetic characteristics than ALPL and ALPP. In the organism, this enzyme will never be subjected to selection because gene splicing analysis shows exon skipping due to loss of the ESE. Our data prove that ESEs restrict the evolution of enzymatic activity. Thus, suboptimal proteins may exist in scenarios when coding nucleotide changes and consequent amino acid variation cannot be reconciled with the splicing function. PMID:24692663

  19. Early base-pair fluctuations and the activation of mRNA splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ariel

    1991-05-01

    By means of multiprocessed Monte Carlo simulations we study the amplification in time structural fluctuations in sequential RNA folding concomitant with transcription. The simulations allow for an exploration of configuration space subject to the realistic time-constraints of RNA synthesis. The treatment focuses on the splicing YC4 intron as a study case. We show how an early disruption in the folding may result in a terminal structure which is active for splicing, bringing together the two cleavage sites at both ends of the intron.

  20. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Anne-Mette; Swensen, Jeff; Uriz, Inaki E; Lapin, Morten; Kristjansdottir, Karen; Petersen, Ulrika S S; Bang, Jeanne Mari V; Guerra, Barbara; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Dobrowolski, Steven F; Carey, John C; Yu, Ping; Vaughn, Cecily; Calhoun, Amy; Larsen, Martin R; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Stevenson, David A; Andresen, Brage S

    2016-05-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE) and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS). We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3' splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO) that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping.

  1. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kristjansdottir, Karen; Petersen, Ulrika S. S.; Bang, Jeanne Mari V.; Guerra, Barbara; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Dobrowolski, Steven F.; Carey, John C.; Yu, Ping; Calhoun, Amy; Larsen, Martin R.; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Stevenson, David A.; Andresen, Brage S.

    2016-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE) and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS). We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3’ splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO) that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping. PMID:27195699

  2. Dissociation of the carbohydrate-binding and splicing activities of galectin-1.

    PubMed

    Voss, Patricia G; Gray, Richard M; Dickey, Seth W; Wang, Weizhong; Park, Jung W; Kasai, Ken-Ichi; Hirabayashi, Jun; Patterson, Ronald J; Wang, John L

    2008-10-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal1) and galectin-3 (Gal3) are two members of a family of carbohydrate-binding proteins that are found in the nucleus and that participate in pre-mRNA splicing assayed in a cell-free system. When nuclear extracts (NE) of HeLa cells were subjected to adsorption on a fusion protein containing glutathione S-transferase (GST) and Gal3, the general transcription factor II-I (TFII-I) was identified by mass spectrometry as one of the polypeptides specifically bound. Lactose and other saccharide ligands of the galectins inhibited GST-Gal3 pull-down of TFII-I while non-binding carbohydrates failed to yield the same effect. Similar results were also obtained using GST-Gal1. Site-directed mutants of Gal1, expressed and purified as GST fusion proteins, were compared with the wild-type (WT) in three assays: (a) binding to asialofetuin-Sepharose as a measure of the carbohydrate-binding activity; (b) pull-down of TFII-I from NE; and (c) reconstitution of splicing in NE depleted of galectins as a test of the in vitro splicing activity. The binding of GST-Gal1(N46D) to asialofetuin-Sepharose was less than 10% of that observed for GST-Gal1(WT), indicating that the mutant was deficient in carbohydrate-binding activity. In contrast, both GST-Gal1(WT) and GST-Gal1(N46D) were equally efficient in pull-down of TFII-I and in reconstitution of splicing activity in the galectin-depleted NE. Moreover, while the splicing activity of the wild-type protein can be inhibited by saccharide ligands, the carbohydrate-binding deficient mutant was insensitive to such inhibition. Together, all of the results suggest that the carbohydrate-binding and the splicing activities of Gal1 can be dissociated and therefore, saccharide-binding, per se, is not required for the splicing activity. PMID:18662664

  3. Activity-dependent alternative splicing increases persistent sodium current and promotes seizure

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Günay, Cengiz; Marley, Richard; Prinz, Astrid A.; Baines, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Activity of voltage-gated Na channels (Nav) is modified by alternative splicing. However, whether altered splicing of human Nav’s contributes to epilepsy remains to be conclusively shown. We show here that altered splicing of the Drosophila Nav (paralytic, DmNav) contributes to seizure-like behaviour in identified seizure-mutants. We focus attention on a pair of mutually-exclusive alternate exons (termed K and L), which form part of the voltage sensor (S4) in domain III of the expressed channel. The presence of exon L results in a large, non-inactivating, persistent INap. Many forms of human epilepsy are associated with an increase in this current. In wildtype (WT) Drosophila larvae ~70-80% of DmNav transcripts contain exon L, the remainder contain exon K. Splicing of DmNav to include exon L is increased to ~100% in both the slamdance and easily-shocked seizure-mutants. This change to splicing is prevented by reducing synaptic activity levels through exposure to the antiepileptic phenytoin or the inhibitory transmitter GABA. Conversely, enhancing synaptic activity in WT, by feeding of picrotoxin, is sufficient to increase INap and promote seizure through increased inclusion of exon L to 100%. We also show that the underlying activity-dependent mechanism requires the presence of Pasilla, an RNA-binding protein. Finally, we use computational modelling to show that increasing INap is sufficient to potentiate membrane excitability consistent with a seizure phenotype. Thus, increased synaptic excitation favors inclusion of exon L which, in turn, further increases neuronal excitability. Thus, at least in Drosophila, this self-reinforcing cycle may promote the incidence of seizure. PMID:22623672

  4. Splice-shifting oligonucleotide (SSO) mediated blocking of an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) created by the prevalent c.903+469T>C MTRR mutation corrects splicing and restores enzyme activity in patient cells.

    PubMed

    Palhais, Bruno; Præstegaard, Veronica S; Sabaratnam, Rugivan; Doktor, Thomas Koed; Lutz, Seraina; Burda, Patricie; Suormala, Terttu; Baumgartner, Matthias; Fowler, Brian; Bruun, Gitte Hoffmann; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Kožich, Viktor; Andresen, Brage Storstein

    2015-05-19

    The prevalent c.903+469T>C mutation in MTRR causes the cblE type of homocystinuria by strengthening an SRSF1 binding site in an ESE leading to activation of a pseudoexon. We hypothesized that other splicing regulatory elements (SREs) are also critical for MTRR pseudoexon inclusion. We demonstrate that the MTRR pseudoexon is on the verge of being recognized and is therefore vulnerable to several point mutations that disrupt a fine-tuned balance between the different SREs. Normally, pseudoexon inclusion is suppressed by a hnRNP A1 binding exonic splicing silencer (ESS). When the c.903+469T>C mutation is present two ESEs abrogate the activity of the ESS and promote pseudoexon inclusion. Blocking the 3'splice site or the ESEs by SSOs is effective in restoring normal splicing of minigenes and endogenous MTRR transcripts in patient cells. By employing an SSO complementary to both ESEs, we were able to rescue MTRR enzymatic activity in patient cells to approximately 50% of that in controls. We show that several point mutations, individually, can activate a pseudoexon, illustrating that this mechanism can occur more frequently than previously expected. Moreover, we demonstrate that SSO blocking of critical ESEs is a promising strategy to treat the increasing number of activated pseudoexons. PMID:25878036

  5. Splice-shifting oligonucleotide (SSO) mediated blocking of an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) created by the prevalent c.903+469T>C MTRR mutation corrects splicing and restores enzyme activity in patient cells

    PubMed Central

    Palhais, Bruno; Præstegaard, Veronica S.; Sabaratnam, Rugivan; Doktor, Thomas Koed; Lutz, Seraina; Burda, Patricie; Suormala, Terttu; Baumgartner, Matthias; Fowler, Brian; Bruun, Gitte Hoffmann; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Kožich, Viktor; Andresen, Brage Storstein

    2015-01-01

    The prevalent c.903+469T>C mutation in MTRR causes the cblE type of homocystinuria by strengthening an SRSF1 binding site in an ESE leading to activation of a pseudoexon. We hypothesized that other splicing regulatory elements (SREs) are also critical for MTRR pseudoexon inclusion. We demonstrate that the MTRR pseudoexon is on the verge of being recognized and is therefore vulnerable to several point mutations that disrupt a fine-tuned balance between the different SREs. Normally, pseudoexon inclusion is suppressed by a hnRNP A1 binding exonic splicing silencer (ESS). When the c.903+469T>C mutation is present two ESEs abrogate the activity of the ESS and promote pseudoexon inclusion. Blocking the 3′splice site or the ESEs by SSOs is effective in restoring normal splicing of minigenes and endogenous MTRR transcripts in patient cells. By employing an SSO complementary to both ESEs, we were able to rescue MTRR enzymatic activity in patient cells to approximately 50% of that in controls. We show that several point mutations, individually, can activate a pseudoexon, illustrating that this mechanism can occur more frequently than previously expected. Moreover, we demonstrate that SSO blocking of critical ESEs is a promising strategy to treat the increasing number of activated pseudoexons. PMID:25878036

  6. A model for meteoritic and lunar 40Ar/39Ar age spectra: Addressing the conundrum of multi-activation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnke, P.; Harrison, T. Mark; Heizler, M. T.; Warren, P. H.

    2016-11-01

    Results of whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar step-heating analyses of extra-terrestrial materials have been used to constrain the timing of impacts in the inner solar system, solidification of the lunar magma ocean, and development of planetary magnetic fields. Despite the importance of understanding these events, the samples we have in hand are non-ideal due to mixed provenance, isotopic disturbances from potentially multiple heating episodes, and laboratory artifacts such as nuclear recoil. Although models to quantitatively assess multi-domain, diffusive 40Ar* loss have long been applied to terrestrial samples, their use on extra-terrestrial materials has been limited. Here we introduce a multi-activation energy, multi-diffusion domain model and apply it to 40Ar/39Ar temperature-cycling, step-heating data for meteoritic and lunar samples. We show that age spectra of extra-terrestrial materials, the Jilin chondrite (K-4) and Apollo 16 lunar breccia (67514 , 43), yielding seemingly non-ideal behavior commonly interpreted as either laboratory artifacts or localized shock heating of pyroxene, are meaningful and can be understood in context of the presence of multi-diffusion domains containing multiple activation energies. Internally consistent results from both the meteoritic and lunar samples reveal high-temperature/short duration thermal episodes we interpret as due to moderate shock heating.

  7. A novel prostate cancer therapeutic strategy using icaritin-activated arylhydrocarbon-receptor to co-target androgen receptor and its splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Feng; Indran, Inthrani R.; Zhang, Zhi Wei; Tan, M.H.Eileen; Li, Yu; Lim, Z.L.Ryan; Hua, Rui; Yang, Chong; Soon, Fen-Fen; Li, Jun; Xu, H.Eric; Cheung, Edwin; Yong, Eu-Leong

    2015-01-01

    Persistent androgen receptor (AR) signaling is the key driving force behind progression and development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In many patients, AR COOH-terminal truncated splice variants (ARvs) play a critical role in contributing to the resistance against androgen depletion therapy. Unfortunately, clinically used antiandrogens like bicalutamide (BIC) and enzalutamide (MDV), which target the ligand binding domain, have failed to suppress these AR variants. Here, we report for the first time that a natural prenylflavonoid, icaritin (ICT), can co-target both persistent AR and ARvs. ICT was found to inhibit transcription of key AR-regulated genes, such as KLK3 [prostate-specific antigen (PSA)] and ARvs-regulated genes, such as UBE2C and induce apoptosis in AR-positive prostate cancer (PC) cells. Mechanistically, ICT promoted the degradation of both AR and ARvs by binding to arylhydrocarbon-receptor (AhR) to mediate ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation. Therefore, ICT impaired AR transactivation in PC cells. Knockdown of AhR gene restored AR stability and partially prevented ICT-induced growth suppression. In clinically relevant murine models orthotopically implanted with androgen-sensitive and CRPC cells, ICT was able to target AR and ARvs, to inhibit AR signaling and tumor growth with no apparent toxicity. Our results provide a mechanistic framework for the development of ICT, as a novel lead compound for AR-positive PC therapeutics, especially for those bearing AR splice variants. PMID:25908644

  8. T cell activation regulates CD6 alternative splicing by transcription dynamics and SRSF1.

    PubMed

    da Glória, Vânia G; Martins de Araújo, Mafalda; Mafalda Santos, Ana; Leal, Rafaela; de Almeida, Sérgio F; Carmo, Alexandre M; Moreira, Alexandra

    2014-07-01

    The T cell-surface glycoprotein CD6 is a modulator of cellular responses and has been implicated in several autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis. During Ag presentation, CD6 is targeted to the immunological synapse in a ligand binding-dependent manner, in which CD6 domain 3 directly contacts CD166, expressed on the APC. T cell activation results in the induction of CD6Δd3, an alternatively spliced isoform that lacks the ligand-binding domain and thus no longer localizes at the immunological synapse. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms regulating the expression of CD6Δd3 upon human primary T cell activation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we observed an increase in RNA polymerase II occupancy along the CD6 gene and augmented CD6 transcription. We showed that activation leads to transcription-related chromatin modifications, revealed by higher CD6 acetylation levels. Modulation of chromatin conformation using a histone deacetylase inhibitor that increases transcription rate causes an increase of exon 5 skipping. We further showed that the splicing factor SRSF1 binds to a regulatory element in CD6 intron 4, activating exon 5 splicing and promoting exon 5 inclusion. Concomitant with T cell activation-induced exon 5 skipping, we observed a downregulation of SRSF1. Using RNA immunoprecipitation, we showed that in activated T cells, SRSF1 recruitment to the CD6 transcript is impaired by increased chromatin acetylation levels. We propose that upon T cell activation, SRSF1 becomes limiting, and its function in CD6 exon 5 splicing is countered by an increase in CD6 transcription, dependent on chromatin acetylation.

  9. Cross-regulation between an alternative splicing activator and a transcription repressor controls neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Raj, Bushra; O'Hanlon, Dave; Vessey, John P; Pan, Qun; Ray, Debashish; Buckley, Noel J; Miller, Freda D; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2011-09-01

    Neurogenesis requires the concerted action of numerous genes that are regulated at multiple levels. However, how different layers of gene regulation are coordinated to promote neurogenesis is not well understood. We show that the neural-specific Ser/Arg repeat-related protein of 100 kDa (nSR100/SRRM4) negatively regulates REST (NRSF), a transcriptional repressor of genes required for neurogenesis. nSR100 directly promotes alternative splicing of REST transcripts to produce a REST isoform (REST4) with greatly reduced repressive activity, thereby activating expression of REST targets in neural cells. Conversely, REST directly represses nSR100 in nonneural cells to prevent the activation of neural-specific splicing events. Consistent with a critical role for nSR100 in the inhibition of REST activity, blocking nSR100 expression in the developing mouse brain impairs neurogenesis. Our results thus reveal a fundamental role for direct regulatory interactions between a splicing activator and transcription repressor in the control of the multilayered regulatory programs required for neurogenesis. PMID:21884984

  10. Cooperative binding of TIA-1 and U1 snRNP in K-SAM exon splicing activation

    SciTech Connect

    Gesnel, Marie-Claude; Theoleyre, Sandrine; Del Gatto-Konczak, Fabienne; Breathnach, Richard . E-mail: breathna@nantes.inserm.fr

    2007-07-13

    In 293 cells, splicing of the human fibroblast growth factor receptor-2 K-SAM alternative exon is inefficient, but can be made efficient by provoking TIA-1 binding to the U-rich IAS1 sequence downstream from the exon's 5' splice site. We show here that TIA-1 domains known to interact with U1 snRNP and to recruit it to 5' splice sites in vitro are required for TIA-1 activation of K-SAM exon splicing in vivo. We further show that tethering downstream from the K-SAM exon a fusion between the U1 snRNP component U1C and the bacteriophage MS2 coat protein provokes IAS1-dependent exon splicing, and present evidence that the fusion functions after its incorporation into U1 snRNP. Our in vivo data, taken together with previous in vitro results, show that K-SAM splicing activation involves cooperative binding of TIA-1 and U1 snRNP to the exon's 5' splice site region.

  11. Alteration of natural (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface by gas transport and water infiltration.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Sophie; Sun, Yunwei; Purtschert, Roland; Raghoo, Lauren; Pili, Eric; Carrigan, Charles R

    2016-05-01

    High (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas is proposed as a key evidence for the detection of underground nuclear explosion by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. However, such a detection is challenged by the natural background of (37)Ar in the subsurface, mainly due to Ca activation by cosmic rays. A better understanding and improved capability to predict (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface and its spatial and temporal variability is thus required. A numerical model integrating (37)Ar production and transport in the subsurface is developed, including variable soil water content and water infiltration at the surface. A parameterized equation for (37)Ar production in the first 15 m below the surface is studied, taking into account the major production reactions and the moderation effect of soil water content. Using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, a realistic and comprehensive probability distribution of natural (37)Ar activity concentrations in soil gas is proposed, including the effects of water infiltration. Site location and soil composition are identified as the parameters allowing for a most effective reduction of the possible range of (37)Ar activity concentrations. The influence of soil water content on (37)Ar production is shown to be negligible to first order, while (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas and its temporal variability appear to be strongly influenced by transient water infiltration events. These results will be used as a basis for practical CTBTO concepts of operation during an OSI.

  12. Alteration of natural (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface by gas transport and water infiltration.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Sophie; Sun, Yunwei; Purtschert, Roland; Raghoo, Lauren; Pili, Eric; Carrigan, Charles R

    2016-05-01

    High (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas is proposed as a key evidence for the detection of underground nuclear explosion by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. However, such a detection is challenged by the natural background of (37)Ar in the subsurface, mainly due to Ca activation by cosmic rays. A better understanding and improved capability to predict (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface and its spatial and temporal variability is thus required. A numerical model integrating (37)Ar production and transport in the subsurface is developed, including variable soil water content and water infiltration at the surface. A parameterized equation for (37)Ar production in the first 15 m below the surface is studied, taking into account the major production reactions and the moderation effect of soil water content. Using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, a realistic and comprehensive probability distribution of natural (37)Ar activity concentrations in soil gas is proposed, including the effects of water infiltration. Site location and soil composition are identified as the parameters allowing for a most effective reduction of the possible range of (37)Ar activity concentrations. The influence of soil water content on (37)Ar production is shown to be negligible to first order, while (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas and its temporal variability appear to be strongly influenced by transient water infiltration events. These results will be used as a basis for practical CTBTO concepts of operation during an OSI. PMID:26939033

  13. PRP8 intein in Ajellomycetaceae family pathogens: sequence analysis, splicing evaluation and homing endonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Theodoro, Raquel Cordeiro; Volkmann, Gerrit; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Bagagli, Eduardo

    2011-02-01

    Inteins are intervening sequences that are transcribed and translated with flanking host protein sequences and then self-excised by protein splicing. Bi-functional inteins also contain a homing endonuclease responsible for their genetic mobility. The PRP8 intein, the most widespread among fungi, occurs in important pathogens such as Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, from the Ajellomycetaceae family. Herein, we describe the bi-functional PRP8 intein in two other Ajellomycetacean pathogens, Blastomyces dermatitidis and Emmonsia parva. Sequence analysis and experimental evidence suggest that the homing endonuclease from PbrPRP8 is inactive. The splicing activity of the PRP8 intein from the B. dermatitidis, E. parva and P. brasiliensis species complex was demonstrated in a non-native protein context in Escherichia coli. Since the PRP8 intein is located in a functionally essential nuclear protein, it can be considered a promising therapeutic target for anti-fungal drugs, because inhibition of intein splicing should inhibit proliferation of intein-containing pathogens. PMID:20682355

  14. ASC-J9 Suppresses Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Growth through Degradation of Full-length and Splice Variant Androgen Receptors12

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Shinichi; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Chuang, Kun-Lung; Xu, Defeng; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Tochigi, Tatsuo; Pang, See-Tong; Li, Lei; Arai, Yoichi; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2012-01-01

    Early studies suggested androgen receptor (AR) splice variants might contribute to the progression of prostate cancer (PCa) into castration resistance. However, the therapeutic strategy to target these AR splice variants still remains unresolved. Through tissue survey of tumors from the same patients before and after castration resistance, we found that the expression of AR3, a major AR splice variant that lacks the AR ligand-binding domain, was substantially increased after castration resistance development. The currently used antiandrogen, Casodex, showed little growth suppression in CWR22Rv1 cells. Importantly, we found that AR degradation enhancer ASC-J9 could degrade both full-length (fAR) and AR3 in CWR22Rv1 cells as well as in C4-2 and C81 cells with addition of AR3. The consequences of such degradation of both fAR and AR3 might then result in the inhibition of AR transcriptional activity and cell growth in vitro. More importantly, suppression of AR3 specifically by short-hairpin AR3 or degradation of AR3 by ASC-J9 resulted in suppression of AR transcriptional activity and cell growth in CWR22Rv1-fARKD (fAR knockdown) cells in which DHT failed to induce, suggesting the importance of targeting AR3. Finally, we demonstrated the in vivo therapeutic effects of ASC-J9 by showing the inhibition of PCa growth using the xenografted model of CWR22Rv1 cells orthotopically implanted into castrated nude mice with undetectable serum testosterone. These results suggested that targeting both fAR- and AR3-mediated PCa growth by ASC-J9 may represent the novel therapeutic approach to suppress castration-resistant PCa. Successful clinical trials targeting both fAR and AR3 may help us to battle castration-resistant PCa in the future. PMID:22355276

  15. PKC-Theta is a Novel SC35 Splicing Factor Regulator in Response to T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    McCuaig, Robert Duncan; Dunn, Jennifer; Li, Jasmine; Masch, Antonia; Knaute, Tobias; Schutkowski, Mike; Zerweck, Johannes; Rao, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of nuclear pre-mRNA is essential for generating protein diversity and regulating gene expression. While many immunologically relevant genes undergo alternative splicing, the role of regulated splicing in T cell immune responses is largely unexplored, and the signaling pathways and splicing factors that regulate alternative splicing in T cells are poorly defined. Here, we show using a combination of Jurkat T cells, human primary T cells, and ex vivo naïve and effector virus-specific T cells isolated after influenza A virus infection that SC35 phosphorylation is induced in response to stimulatory signals. We show that SC35 colocalizes with RNA polymerase II in activated T cells and spatially overlaps with H3K27ac and H3K4me3, which mark transcriptionally active genes. Interestingly, SC35 remains coupled to the active histone marks in the absence of continuing stimulatory signals. We show for the first time that nuclear PKC-θ co-exists with SC35 in the context of the chromatin template and is a key regulator of SC35 in T cells, directly phosphorylating SC35 peptide residues at RNA recognition motif and RS domains. Collectively, our findings suggest that nuclear PKC-θ is a novel regulator of the key splicing factor SC35 in T cells. PMID:26594212

  16. Age-Related Nuclear Translocation of P2X6 Subunit Modifies Splicing Activity Interacting with Splicing Factor 3A1

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Hernández, Juan Ignacio; Sebastián-Serrano, Álvaro; Gómez-Villafuertes, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    P2X receptors are ligand-gated ion channels sensitive to extracellular nucleotides formed by the assembling of three equal or different P2X subunits. In this work we report, for the first time, the accumulation of the P2X6 subunit inside the nucleus of hippocampal neurons in an age-dependent way. This location is favored by its anchorage to endoplasmic reticulum through its N-terminal domain. The extracellular domain of P2X6 subunit is the key to reach the nucleus, where it presents a speckled distribution pattern and is retained by interaction with the nuclear envelope protein spectrin α2. The in vivo results showed that, once inside the nucleus, P2X6 subunit interacts with the splicing factor 3A1, which ultimately results in a reduction of the mRNA splicing activity. Our data provide new insights into post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA splicing, describing a novel mechanism that could explain why this process is sensitive to changes that occur with age. PMID:25874565

  17. Androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) and drug efficacy in castration-resistant prostate cancer: Biomarker for treatment selection exclusion or inclusion?

    PubMed

    Leibrand, Crystal R; Price, Douglas K; Figg, William D

    2016-05-01

    Currently there are no molecular biomarkers used to help guide treatment selection for those patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. A recent study published in JAMA Oncology (Antonarakis et al.) presents evidence supporting the potential use of androgen receptor splice variant 7 as a biomarker for optimal treatment selection in this population.

  18. Identification of Evolutionarily Conserved Exons as Regulated Targets for the Splicing Activator Tra2β in Development

    PubMed Central

    Best, Andrew; Liu, Yilei; Jakubik, Miriam; Mende, Ylva; Ehrmann, Ingrid; Curk, Tomaz; Rossbach, Kristina; Bourgeois, Cyril F.; Stévenin, James; Grellscheid, David; Jackson, Michael S.; Wirth, Brunhilde; Elliott, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing amplifies the information content of the genome, creating multiple mRNA isoforms from single genes. The evolutionarily conserved splicing activator Tra2β (Sfrs10) is essential for mouse embryogenesis and implicated in spermatogenesis. Here we find that Tra2β is up-regulated as the mitotic stem cell containing population of male germ cells differentiate into meiotic and post-meiotic cells. Using CLIP coupled to deep sequencing, we found that Tra2β binds a high frequency of exons and identified specific G/A rich motifs as frequent targets. Significantly, for the first time we have analysed the splicing effect of Sfrs10 depletion in vivo by generating a conditional neuronal-specific Sfrs10 knock-out mouse (Sfrs10fl/fl; Nestin-Cretg/+). This mouse has defects in brain development and allowed correlation of genuine physiologically Tra2β regulated exons. These belonged to a novel class which were longer than average size and importantly needed multiple cooperative Tra2β binding sites for efficient splicing activation, thus explaining the observed splicing defects in the knockout mice. Regulated exons included a cassette exon which produces a meiotic isoform of the Nasp histone chaperone that helps monitor DNA double-strand breaks. We also found a previously uncharacterised poison exon identifying a new pathway of feedback control between vertebrate Tra2 proteins. Both Nasp-T and the Tra2a poison exon are evolutionarily conserved, suggesting they might control fundamental developmental processes. Tra2β protein isoforms lacking the RRM were able to activate specific target exons indicating an additional functional role as a splicing co-activator. Significantly the N-terminal RS1 domain conserved between flies and humans was essential for the splicing activator function of Tra2β. Versions of Tra2β lacking this N-terminal RS1 domain potently repressed the same target exons activated by full-length Tra2β protein. PMID:22194695

  19. Fluctuations and resulting competing pathways in RNA folding: The activation of splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ariel

    1991-01-01

    We implement a parallel processing Monte Carlo simulation to explore RNA configuration space that takes into account fluctuations in base-pairing patterns. The choice of folding pathways is biased by the refolding events that occur as the chain is being assembled. We prove that fluctuations in the initial stages of folding might lead to either active or inactive emerging structures. As an illustration, competing pathways that are the result of fluctuation propagation are computed for the splicing YC4 intron (a segment of the mitochondrial RNA from fungi), and the emerging structures are proved to be biologically relevant.

  20. Bovine Herpesvirus 4 Modulates Its β-1,6-N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase Activity through Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Lété, Céline; Markine-Goriaynoff, Nicolas; Machiels, Bénédicte; Pang, Poh-Choo; Xiao, Xue; Canis, Kevin; Suzuki, Masami; Fukuda, Minoru; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M.; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Carbohydrates play major roles in host-virus interactions. It is therefore not surprising that, during coevolution with their hosts, viruses have developed sophisticated mechanisms to hijack for their profit different pathways of glycan synthesis. Thus, the Bo17 gene of Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) encodes a homologue of the cellular core 2 protein β-1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-mucin type (C2GnT-M), which is a key player for the synthesis of complex O-glycans. Surprisingly, we show in this study that, as opposed to what is observed for the cellular enzyme, two different mRNAs are encoded by the Bo17 gene of all available BoHV-4 strains. While the first one corresponds to the entire coding sequence of the Bo17 gene, the second results from the splicing of a 138-bp intron encoding critical residues of the enzyme. Antibodies generated against the Bo17 C terminus showed that the two forms of Bo17 are expressed in BoHV-4 infected cells, but enzymatic assays revealed that the spliced form is not active. In order to reveal the function of these two forms, we then generated recombinant strains expressing only the long or the short form of Bo17. Although we did not highlight replication differences between these strains, glycomic analyses and lectin neutralization assays confirmed that the splicing of the Bo17 gene gives the potential to BoHV-4 to fine-tune the global level of core 2 branching activity in the infected cell. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of new mechanisms to regulate the activity of glycosyltransferases from the Golgi apparatus. IMPORTANCE Viruses are masters of adaptation that hijack cellular pathways to allow their growth. Glycans play a central role in many biological processes, and several studies have highlighted mechanisms by which viruses can affect glycosylation. Glycan synthesis is a nontemplate process regulated by the availability of key glycosyltransferases. Interestingly, bovine herpesvirus 4 encodes one such

  1. Direct interaction between AR and PAK6 in androgen-stimulated PAK6 activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Busby, Jennifer; John, Ciny; Wei, Jianning; Yuan, Xin; Lu, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    A p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6) was previously identified to be an androgen receptor (AR) interacting protein through a yeast two-hybrid screening. We used hormone responsive prostate cancer LAPC4 and LNCap cell lines as models to study the signaling events associated with androgen stimulation and PAK6. An androgen-stimulated PAK6 kinase activation was observed in LAPC4 cells expressing endogenous PAK6 and in LNCap cells ectopically expressing a wild type PAK6. This activation was likely mediated through a direct interaction between AR and PAK6 since siRNA knock-down of AR in LAPC4 cells downregulated androgen-stimulated PAK6 activation. In addition, LNCap cells expressing a non-AR-interacting PAK6 mutant exhibited dampened androgen-stimulated kinase activation. As a consequence of androgen-stimulated activation, PAK6 was phosphorylated at multiple serine/threonine residues including the AR-interacting domain of PAK6. Furthermore, androgen-stimulation promoted prostate cancer cell motility and invasion were demonstrated in LNCap cells ectopically expressing PAK6-WT. In contrast, LNCap expressing non-AR-interacting mutant PAK6 did not respond to androgen stimulation with increased cell motility and invasion. Our results demonstrate that androgen-stimulated PAK6 activation is mediated through a direct interaction between AR and PAK6 and PAK6 activation promotes prostate cancer cells motility and invasion.

  2. 76 FR 43336 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form AR-11, Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... published in the Federal Register on May 10, 2011, at 76 FR 27077 allowing for a 60-day public comment... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form AR-11... Collection under Review: Form AR- 11, Alien's Change of Address Card; OMB Control No. 1615-0007....

  3. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation of Splicing Factor 45 (SPF45) Regulates SPF45 Alternative Splicing Site Utilization, Proliferation, and Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ayoubi, Adnan M.; Zheng, Hui; Liu, Yuying; Bai, Tao

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of alternative mRNA splicing factors by extracellular cues and signal transduction cascades is poorly understood. Using an engineered extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) that can utilize ATP analogs, we have identified the alternative mRNA splicing factor 45 (SPF45), which is overexpressed in cancer, as a novel coimmunoprecipitating ERK2 substrate. ERK2 phosphorylated SPF45 on Thr71 and Ser222 in vitro and in cells in response to H-RasV12, B-RAF-V600E, and activated MEK1. Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and p38α also phosphorylated SPF45 in vitro and associated with SPF45 in cells. SPF45 was differentially phosphorylated in cells by all three mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases in response to phorbol myristate acid (PMA), H2O2, UV, and anisomycin stimulation. ERK and p38 activation decreased SPF45-dependent exon 6 exclusion from fas mRNA in a minigene assay in cells. Stable overexpression of SPF45 in SKOV-3 cells dramatically inhibited cell proliferation in a phosphorylation-dependent manner through inhibition of ErbB2 expression. SPF45 overexpression also induced EDA inclusion into fibronectin transcripts and fibronectin expression in a phosphorylation-dependent and -independent manner, respectively, specifically affecting cellular adhesion to a fibronectin matrix. These data identify SPF45 as the first splicing factor regulated by multiple MAP kinase pathways and show effects of both SPF45 overexpression and phosphorylation. PMID:22615491

  4. A new trick of an old molecule: androgen receptor splice variants taking the stage?!

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiyong; Qiu, Yun

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American men. Although most prostate cancers are initially androgen-dependent and respond to androgen ablation therapy, majority of them eventually relapse and progress into incurable castration-resistant (or hormone refractory) prostate cancer. The underlying mechanisms are the focus of intensive investigation for development of more effective treatment. Mounting evidence from both clinical and basic research has demonstrated that the activity of the androgen receptor (AR) is still required for castration-resistant prostate cancer. Multiple mechanisms by which AR is re-activated under androgen-depleted conditions may be involved in the development of castration resistance. The recent identification of AR splicing variants may add another layer of complexity in AR biology. The present review summarizes recent progress in study of AR splicing variants in prostate cancer.

  5. Mutual interdependence of splicing and transcription elongation.

    PubMed

    Brzyżek, Grzegorz; Świeżewski, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    Transcription and splicing are intrinsically linked, as splicing needs a pre-mRNA substrate to commence. The more nuanced view is that the rate of transcription contributes to splicing regulation. On the other hand there is accumulating evidence that splicing has an active role in controlling transcription elongation by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). We briefly review those mechanisms and propose a unifying model where splicing controls transcription elongation to provide an optimal timing for successive rounds of splicing.

  6. Biogeochemical cyclic activity of bacterial arsB in arsenic-contaminated mines.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jin-Soo; Ren, Xianghao; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2008-01-01

    Biogeochemical cyclic activity of the ars (arsenic resistance system) operon is arsB influx/efflux encoded by the ecological of Pseudomonas putida. This suggests that studying arsenite-oxidizing bacteria may lead to a better understanding of molecular geomicrobiology, which can be applied to the bioremediation of arsenic-contaminated mines. This is the first report in which multiple arsB-binding mechanisms have been used on indigenous bacteria. In ArsB (strains OS-5; ABB83931; OS-19; ABB04282 and RW-28; ABB88574), there are ten putative enzyme, Histidine (His) 131, His 133, His 137, Arginine (Arg) 135, Arg 137, Arg 161, Trptohan (Trp) 142, Trp 164, Trp 166, and Trp 171, which are each located in different regions of the partial sequence. The adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transports, binding affinities and associating ratable constants show that As-binding is comparatively insensitive to the location of the residues within the moderately stable alpha-helical structure. The alpha-helical structures in ArsB-permease and anion permease arsB have been shown to import/export arsenic in P. putida. We proposed that arsB residues, His 131, His 133, His 137, Arg 135, Arg 137, Arg 161, Trp 142, Trp 164, Trp 166, and Trp 171 are required for arsenic binding and activation of arsA/arsB or arsAB. This arsB influx/efflux pum-ping is important, and the effect in arsenic species change and mobility in mine soil has got a significantly ecological role because it allows arsenic oxidizing/reducing bacteria to control biogeochemical cycle of abandoned mines. PMID:19202875

  7. A novel mutation in the β-spectrin gene causes the activation of a cryptic 5′-splice site and the creation of a de novo 3′-splice site

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Pilar Carrasco; Rosales, José Miguel Lezana; Milla, Carmen Palma; Montiel, Javier López; Siles, Juan López

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of genes involved in hereditary spherocytosis, by next-generation sequencing in two patients with clinical diagnosis of the disease, showed the presence of the c.1795+1G>A mutation in the SPTB gene. cDNA amplification then revealed the occurrence of a consequent aberrant mRNA isoform produced from the activation of a cryptic 5′-splice site and the creation of a newly 3′-splice site. The mechanisms by which these two splice sites are used as a result of the same mutation should be analyzed in depth in further studies. PMID:27081538

  8. Structural basis by which alternative splicing modulates the organizer activity of FGF8 in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Shaun K.; Li, James Y.H.; Bromleigh, Carrie; Eliseenkova, Anna V.; Ibrahimi, Omar A.; Lao, Zhimin; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J.; Joyner, Alexandra L.; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2006-01-01

    Two of the four human FGF8 splice isoforms, FGF8a and FGF8b, are expressed in the mid-hindbrain region during development. Although the only difference between these isoforms is the presence of an additional 11 amino acids at the N terminus of FGF8b, these isoforms possess remarkably different abilities to pattern the midbrain and anterior hindbrain. To reveal the structural basis by which alternative splicing modulates the organizing activity of FGF8, we solved the crystal structure of FGF8b in complex with the “c” splice isoform of FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2c). Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we also characterized the receptor-binding specificity of FGF8a and FGF8b, the “b” isoform of FGF17 (FGF17b), and FGF18. The FGF8b-FGFR2c structure shows that alternative splicing permits a single additional contact between phenylalanine 32 (F32) of FGF8b and a hydrophobic groove within Ig domain 3 of the receptor that is also present in FGFR1c, FGFR3c, and FGFR4. Consistent with the structure, mutation of F32 to alanine reduces the affinity of FGF8b toward all these receptors to levels characteristic of FGF8a. More importantly, analysis of the mid-hindbrain patterning ability of the FGF8bF32A mutant in chick embryos and murine midbrain explants shows that this mutation functionally converts FGF8b to FGF8a. Moreover, our data suggest that the intermediate receptor-binding affinities of FGF17b and FGF18, relative to FGF8a and FGF8b, also account for the distinct patterning abilities of these two ligands. We also show that the mode of FGF8 receptor-binding specificity is distinct from that of other FGFs and provide the first biochemical evidence for a physiological FGF8b-FGFR1c interaction during mid-hindbrain development. Consistent with the indispensable role of FGF8 in embryonic development, we show that the FGF8 mode of receptor binding appeared as early as in nematodes and has been preserved throughout evolution. PMID:16384934

  9. Structural Basis by Which Alternative Splicing Modulates the Organizer Activity of FGF8 in the Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen,S.; Li, J.; Eliseenkova, A.; Ibrahimi, O.; Lao, Z.; Zhang, F.; Linhardt, R.; Joyner, A.; Mohammadi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Two of the four human FGF8 splice isoforms, FGF8a and FGF8b, are expressed in the mid-hindbrain region during development. Although the only difference between these isoforms is the presence of an additional 11 amino acids at the N terminus of FGF8b, these isoforms possess remarkably different abilities to pattern the midbrain and anterior hindbrain. To reveal the structural basis by which alternative splicing modulates the organizing activity of FGF8, we solved the crystal structure of FGF8b in complex with the 'c' splice isoform of FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2c). Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we also characterized the receptor-binding specificity of FGF8a and FGF8b, the 'b' isoform of FGF17 (FGF17b), and FGF18. The FGF8b-FGFR2c structure shows that alternative splicing permits a single additional contact between phenylalanine 32 (F32) of FGF8b and a hydrophobic groove within Ig domain 3 of the receptor that is also present in FGFR1c, FGFR3c, and FGFR4. Consistent with the structure, mutation of F32 to alanine reduces the affinity of FGF8b toward all these receptors to levels characteristic of FGF8a. More importantly, analysis of the mid-hindbrain patterning ability of the FGF8b{sup F32A} mutant in chick embryos and murine midbrain explants shows that this mutation functionally converts FGF8b to FGF8a. Moreover, our data suggest that the intermediate receptor-binding affinities of FGF17b and FGF18, relative to FGF8a and FGF8b, also account for the distinct patterning abilities of these two ligands. We also show that the mode of FGF8 receptor-binding specificity is distinct from that of other FGFs and provide the first biochemical evidence for a physiological FGF8b-FGFR1c interaction during mid-hindbrain development. Consistent with the indispensable role of FGF8 in embryonic development, we show that the FGF8 mode of receptor binding appeared as early as in nematodes and has been preserved throughout evolution.

  10. BRCA1 splice variants exhibit overlapping and distinct transcriptional transactivation activities.

    PubMed

    McEachern, Kristen A; Archey, William B; Douville, Karen; Arrick, Bradley A

    2003-05-01

    The global changes in gene expression induced by transient increased expression of full length BRCA1 as well as the spliced variant BRCA1(S) were evaluated by cDNA expression array in a human non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cell line, MCF10A. Over 30 genes were identified that displayed an altered expression pattern in response to the expression of BRCA1 splice variants. The expression of NFkappaB inducing kinase was markedly down-regulated in BRCA1(L) transfected cells. However, a NFkappaB-responsive promoter construct yielded increased basal activity in BRCA1(L) transfected cells, as well as following treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alpha or lymphotoxin. In addition, nuclear extracts from BRCA1(L) transfected cells displayed increased DNA binding to the kappaB consensus site. The transcriptional activity of a panel of promoter constructs was evaluated following expression of wild type or mutant BRCA1. Full length BRCA1 transactivated the estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) and BCL2 promoters as well as AP-1, SRE, and CRE containing promoters. Transactivation activity of the exon 11-deleted BRCA1(S) was more limited and usually of lower magnitude. The ability of a pathogenic mutation, 5382insC, to abrogate the transcriptional transactivation by BRCA1(L) and BRCA1(S) was also investigated. Mutant BRCA1 retained wild type levels of transcriptional activity for the ERalpha promoter as well as for the NFkappaB, AP-1, and CRE-responsive promoters but had reduced or no activity with the BCL2 and SRE promoters. These results show that BRCA1 isoforms have both overlapping and distinct transcriptional transactivation activity, and that a mutant form of BRCA1 implicated in carcinogenesis is not devoid of all activity.

  11. Targeting chromatin binding regulation of constitutively active AR variants to overcome prostate cancer resistance to endocrine-based therapies

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Siu Chiu; Selth, Luke A.; Li, Yingming; Nyquist, Michael D.; Miao, Lu; Bradner, James E.; Raj, Ganesh V.; Tilley, Wayne D.; Dehm, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) variants (AR-Vs) expressed in prostate cancer (PCa) lack the AR ligand binding domain (LBD) and function as constitutively active transcription factors. AR-V expression in patient tissues or circulating tumor cells is associated with resistance to AR-targeting endocrine therapies and poor outcomes. Here, we investigated the mechanisms governing chromatin binding of AR-Vs with the goal of identifying therapeutic vulnerabilities. By chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing (ChIP-seq) and complementary biochemical experiments, we show that AR-Vs display a binding preference for the same canonical high-affinity androgen response elements (AREs) that are preferentially engaged by AR, albeit with lower affinity. Dimerization was an absolute requirement for constitutive AR-V DNA binding and transcriptional activation. Treatment with the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) inhibitor JQ1 resulted in inhibition of AR-V chromatin binding and impaired AR-V driven PCa cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, this was associated with a novel JQ1 action of down-regulating AR-V transcript and protein expression. Overall, this study demonstrates that AR-Vs broadly restore AR chromatin binding events that are otherwise suppressed during endocrine therapy, and provides pre-clinical rationale for BET inhibition as a strategy for inhibiting expression and chromatin binding of AR-Vs in PCa. PMID:25908785

  12. Targeting chromatin binding regulation of constitutively active AR variants to overcome prostate cancer resistance to endocrine-based therapies.

    PubMed

    Chan, Siu Chiu; Selth, Luke A; Li, Yingming; Nyquist, Michael D; Miao, Lu; Bradner, James E; Raj, Ganesh V; Tilley, Wayne D; Dehm, Scott M

    2015-07-13

    Androgen receptor (AR) variants (AR-Vs) expressed in prostate cancer (PCa) lack the AR ligand binding domain (LBD) and function as constitutively active transcription factors. AR-V expression in patient tissues or circulating tumor cells is associated with resistance to AR-targeting endocrine therapies and poor outcomes. Here, we investigated the mechanisms governing chromatin binding of AR-Vs with the goal of identifying therapeutic vulnerabilities. By chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing (ChIP-seq) and complementary biochemical experiments, we show that AR-Vs display a binding preference for the same canonical high-affinity androgen response elements (AREs) that are preferentially engaged by AR, albeit with lower affinity. Dimerization was an absolute requirement for constitutive AR-V DNA binding and transcriptional activation. Treatment with the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) inhibitor JQ1 resulted in inhibition of AR-V chromatin binding and impaired AR-V driven PCa cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, this was associated with a novel JQ1 action of down-regulating AR-V transcript and protein expression. Overall, this study demonstrates that AR-Vs broadly restore AR chromatin binding events that are otherwise suppressed during endocrine therapy, and provides pre-clinical rationale for BET inhibition as a strategy for inhibiting expression and chromatin binding of AR-Vs in PCa.

  13. Enhanced expression of Rubisco activase splicing variants differentially affects Rubisco activity during low temperature treatment in Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Jurczyk, Barbara; Pociecha, Ewa; Grzesiak, Maciej; Kalita, Katarzyna; Rapacz, Marcin

    2016-07-01

    Alternative splicing of the Rubisco activase gene was shown to be a point for optimization of photosynthetic carbon assimilation. It can be expected to be a stress-regulated event that depends on plant freezing tolerance. The aim of the study was to examine the relationships among Rubisco activity, the expression of two Rubisco activase splicing variants and photoacclimation to low temperature. The experiment was performed on two Lolium perenne genotypes with contrasting levels of freezing tolerance. The study investigated the effect of pre-hardening (15°C) and cold acclimation (4°C) on net photosynthesis, photosystem II photochemical activity, Rubisco activity and the expression of two splicing variants of the Rubisco activase gene. The results showed an induction of Rubisco activity at both 15°C and 4°C only in a highly freezing-tolerant genotype. The enhanced Rubisco activity after pre-hardening corresponded to increased expression of the splicing variant representing the large isoform, while the increase in Rubisco activity during cold acclimation was due to the activation of both transcript variants. These boosts in Rubisco activity also corresponded to an activation of non-photochemical mechanism of photoacclimation induced at low temperature exclusively in the highly freezing-tolerant genotype. In conclusion, enhanced expression of Rubisco activase splicing variants caused an increase in Rubisco activity during pre-hardening and cold acclimation in the more freezing-tolerant Lolium perenne genotype. The induction of the transcript variant representing the large isoform may be an important element of increasing the carbon assimilation rate supporting the photochemical mechanism of photosynthetic acclimation to cold. PMID:27152456

  14. Cell homeostasis in a Leishmania major mutant overexpressing the spliced leader RNA is maintained by an increased proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Juliano S; Ferreira, Tiago R; Defina, Tânia P A; Dossin, Fernando de M; Beattie, Kenneth A; Lamont, Douglas J; Cloutier, Serge; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Schenkman, Sergio; Cruz, Angela K

    2010-10-01

    Although several stage-specific genes have been identified in Leishmania, the molecular mechanisms governing developmental gene regulation in this organism are still not well understood. We have previously reported an attenuation of virulence in Leishmania major and L. braziliensis carrying extra-copies of the spliced leader RNA gene. Here, we surveyed the major differences in proteome and transcript expression profiles between the spliced leader RNA overexpressor and control lines using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and differential display reverse transcription PCR, respectively. Thirty-nine genes related to stress response, cytoskeleton, proteolysis, cell cycle control and proliferation, energy generation, gene transcription, RNA processing and post-transcriptional regulation have abnormal patterns of expression in the spliced leader RNA overexpressor line. The evaluation of proteolytic pathways in the mutant revealed a selective increase of cysteine protease activity and an exacerbated ubiquitin-labeled protein population. Polysome profile analysis and measurement of cellular protein aggregates showed that protein translation in the spliced leader RNA overexpressor line is increased when compared to the control line. We found that L. major promastigotes maintain homeostasis in culture when challenged with a metabolic imbalance generated by spliced leader RNA surplus through modulation of intracellular proteolysis. However, this might interfere with a fine-tuned gene expression control necessary for the amastigote multiplication in the mammalian host.

  15. Nuclear Speckle-related Protein 70 Binds to Serine/Arginine-rich Splicing Factors 1 and 2 via an Arginine/Serine-like Region and Counteracts Their Alternative Splicing Activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Young-Dae; Choi, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Hye-Ran; Na, Bo-Ra; Im, Sin-Hyeog; Jun, Chang-Duk

    2016-03-18

    Nuclear speckles are subnuclear storage sites containing pre-mRNA splicing machinery. Proteins assembled in nuclear speckles are known to modulate transcription and pre-mRNA processing. We have previously identified nuclear speckle-related protein 70 (NSrp70) as a novel serine/arginine (SR)-related protein that co-localizes with classical SR proteins such as serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1 or ASF/SF2) and SRSF2 (SC35). NSrp70 mediates alternative splice site selection, targeting several pre-mRNAs, including CD44 exon v5. Here we demonstrated that NSrp70 interacts physically with two SR proteins, SRSF1 and SRSF2, and reverses their splicing activity in terms of CD44 exon v5 as exon exclusion. The NSrp70 RS-like region was subdivided into three areas. Deletion of the first arginine/serine-rich-like region (RS1) completely abrogated binding to the SR proteins and to target mRNA and also failed to induce splicing of CD44 exon v5, suggesting that RS1 is critical for NSrp70 functioning. Interestingly, RS1 deletion also resulted in the loss of NSrp70 and SR protein speckle positioning, implying a potential scaffolding role for NSrp70 in nuclear speckles. NSrp70 contains an N-terminal coiled-coil domain that is critical not only for self-oligomerization but also for splicing activity. Consistently, deletion of the coiled-coil domain resulted in indefinite formation of nuclear speckles. Collectively, these results demonstrate that NSrp70 acts as a new molecular counterpart for alternative splicing of target RNA, counteracting SRSF1 and SRSF2 splicing activity.

  16. Phosphorylation and Alternative Splicing of 7B2 Reduce Prohormone Convertase 2 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Molina, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    FAM20C is a secretory kinase responsible for the phosphorylation of multiple secreted proteins in mammalian cells; it has been shown to phosphorylate serine residues within a variety of different bone proteins. In this work we demonstrate that FAM20C also phosphorylates threonines, specifically those within the N-terminal domain of the neuroendocrine chaperone 7B2. Analysis of the primary sequence of 7B2 revealed that three threonine residues in its N-terminal domain are located within FAM20C consensus motifs: Thr73, Thr99, and Thr111. The individual substitution of Thr73 and Thr111 residues by neutral alanines caused a marked decrease in the total phosphorylation of 7B2. Furthermore, the phosphomimetic substitution of Thr111 by Glu clearly diminished the ability of 7B2 to activate pro-prohormone convertase 2 (PC2) in 7B2-lacking SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells, suggesting that the phosphorylation of this residue critically impacts the 7B2-proPC2 interaction. However, the phosphomimetic mutation did not alter 7B2's ability to function as an antiaggregant for human islet amyloid polypeptide. FAM20C-mediated phosphorylation of a common alternatively spliced variant of human 7B2 that lacks Ala100 (thus eliminating the Thr99 phosphorylation consensus site) was similar to the Ala-containing protein, but this variant did not activate proPC2 as efficiently as the Ala-containing protein. Although threonines within 7B2 were phosphorylated efficiently, FAM20C was incapable of performing the well-known regulatory threonine phosphorylation of the molecular chaperone binding immunoglobulin protein. Taken together, these results indicate that FAM20C plays a role in 7B2-mediated proPC2 activation by phosphorylating residue Thr111; and that 7B2 function is regulated by alternative splicing. PMID:25811241

  17. Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma caused by activation of a cryptic splice site in KRT9.

    PubMed

    Fuchs-Telem, D; Padalon-Brauch, G; Sarig, O; Sprecher, E

    2013-03-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) is caused by mutations in KRT9 and less often, KRT1. All known mutations in KRT9 have been found in regions of the gene encoding the conserved central α-helix rod domain. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis of EPPK in a patient of Ashkenazi Jewish origin. The patient was found to carry a novel missense mutation in KRT9, resulting in the substitution of a poorly conserved leucine for valine at position 11 of the amino acid sequence. Despite its unusual location, the mutation was shown to be pathogenic through activation of a cryptic donor splice site, resulting in the deletion of 162 amino acids. The present data indicate the need to screen keratin genes in their entirety, as mutations altering domains of lesser functional importance may exert their deleterious effect at the transcriptional level.

  18. Cryptic exon activation by disruption of exon splice enhancer: novel mechanism causing 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stucki, Martin; Suormala, Terttu; Fowler, Brian; Valle, David; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2009-10-16

    3-Methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of leucine catabolism. MCC is a heteromeric mitochondrial enzyme composed of biotin-containing alpha (MCCA) and smaller beta (MCCB) subunits encoded by MCCA and MCCB, respectively. We report studies of the c.1054G-->A mutation in exon 11 of MCCB detected in the homozygous state in a patient with MCC deficiency. Sequence analysis of MCCB cDNA revealed two overlapping transcripts, one containing the normal 73 bp of exon 11 including the missense mutation c.1054G-->A (p.G352R), the other with exon 11 replaced by a 64-bp sequence from intron 10 (cryptic exon 10a) that maintains the reading frame and is flanked by acceptable splice consensus sites. In expression studies, we show that both transcripts lack detectable MCC activity. Western blot analysis showed slightly reduced levels of MCCB using the transcript containing the missense mutation, whereas no MCCB was detected with the transcript containing the cryptic exon 10a. Analysis of the region harboring the mutation revealed that the c.1054G-->A mutation is located in an exon splice enhancer sequence. Using MCCB minigene constructs to transfect MCCB-deficient fibroblasts, we demonstrate that the reduction in utilization of exon 11 associated with the c.1054G-->A mutation is due to alteration of this exon splice enhancer. Further, we show that optimization of the weak splice donor site of exon 11 corrects the splicing defect. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a point mutation disrupting an exon splice enhancer that causes exon skipping along with utilization of a cryptic exon.

  19. Alternative splicing isoform in succinate dehydrogenase complex, subunit C causes downregulation of succinate-coenzyme Q oxidoreductase activity in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Nana; Yokoyama, Chikako; Itamura, Noriaki; Miyajima-Nakano, Yoshiharu; Hisatomi, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is localized to the inner mitochondrial membrane and is responsible for the redox of succinic acid. SDH is a tetrameric iron-sulfur flavoprotein of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and respiratory chain. The SDH complex, subunit C (SDHC) transcript has deletion-type alternative splicing sites. Generally, alternative splicing produces variant proteins and expression patterns, as products of different genes. In certain cases, specific alternative splicing variants (ASVs) have been associated with human disease. Due to a frameshift mutation causing loss of the heme binding region, the SDHC Δ5 isoform (lacking exon 5) exhibits no SDHC activity. To investigate whether the SDHC splicing variants can function as dominant-negative inhibitors, SDHC ASVs were overexpressed in HCT-15 human colorectal cancer cells. Using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, a dominant-negative effect of the Δ5 isoform on SDHC mRNA was shown. In addition, Δ5 overexpression increased the levels of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, in the Δ5 isoform-overexpressing cells, SDH activity was reduced. SDHC activation is a significant event during the electron transport chain, and the function of the SDHC Δ5 variant may be significant for the differentiation of tumor cells. PMID:25435987

  20. BCAS2 Regulates Delta-Notch Signaling Activity through Delta Pre-mRNA Splicing in Drosophila Wing Development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chu-Wei; Chen, Po-Han; Chan, Shih-Peng; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Lee, Hsiu-Hsiang; Wu, June-Tai; Chen, Show-Li

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we showed that BCAS2 is essential for Drosophila viability and functions in pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we provide strong evidence that BCAS2 regulates the activity of Delta-Notch signaling via Delta pre-mRNA splicing. Depletion of dBCAS2 reduces Delta mRNA expression and leads to accumulation of Delta pre-mRNA, resulting in diminished transcriptions of Delta-Notch signaling target genes, such as cut and E(spl)m8. Furthermore, ectopic expression of human BCAS2 (hBCAS2) and Drosophila BCAS2 (dBCAS2) in a dBCAS2-deprived fly can rescue dBCAS2 depletion-induced wing damage to the normal phenotypes. These rescued phenotypes are correlated with the restoration of Delta pre-mRNA splicing, which affects Delta-Notch signaling activity. Additionally, overexpression of Delta can rescue the wing deformation by deprivation of dBCAS2; and the depletion of dBCAS2 can restore the aberrant eye associated with Delta-overexpressing retinas; providing supporting evidence for the regulation of Delta-Notch signaling by dBCAS2. Taken together, dBCAS2 participates in Delta pre-mRNA splicing that affects the regulation of Delta-Notch signaling in Drosophila wing development. PMID:26091239

  1. The exon junction complex controls transposable element activity by ensuring faithful splicing of the piwi transcript

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Colin D.; Mestdagh, Claire; Akhtar, Junaid; Kreim, Nastasja; Deinhard, Pia; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Treisman, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is a highly conserved ribonucleoprotein complex that binds RNAs during splicing and remains associated with them following export to the cytoplasm. While the role of this complex in mRNA localization, translation, and degradation has been well characterized, its mechanism of action in splicing a subset of Drosophila and human transcripts remains to be elucidated. Here, we describe a novel function for the EJC and its splicing subunit, RnpS1, in preventing transposon accumulation in both Drosophila germline and surrounding somatic follicle cells. This function is mediated specifically through the control of piwi transcript splicing, where, in the absence of RnpS1, the fourth intron of piwi is retained. This intron contains a weak polypyrimidine tract that is sufficient to confer dependence on RnpS1. Finally, we demonstrate that RnpS1-dependent removal of this intron requires splicing of the flanking introns, suggesting a model in which the EJC facilitates the splicing of weak introns following its initial deposition at adjacent exon junctions. These data demonstrate a novel role for the EJC in regulating piwi intron excision and provide a mechanism for its function during splicing. PMID:25104425

  2. Activation of Src and transformation by an RPTPα splice mutant found in human tumours

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Yao, Ling; Xu, Rongting; Wu, Huacheng; Wang, Min; White, Brian S; Shalloway, David; Zheng, Xinmin

    2011-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase α (RPTPα)-mediated Src activation is required for survival of tested human colon and oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cell lines. To explore whether mutated RPTPα participates in human carcinogenesis, we sequenced RPTPα cDNAs from five types of human tumours and found splice mutants in ∼30% of colon, breast, and liver tumours. RPTPα245, a mutant expressed in all three tumour types, was studied further. Although it lacks any catalytic domain, RPTPα245 expression in the tumours correlated with Src tyrosine dephosphorylation, and its expression in rodent fibroblasts activated Src by a novel mechanism. This involved RPTPα245 binding to endogenous RPTPα (eRPTPα), which decreased eRPTPα–Grb2 binding and increased eRPTPα dephosphorylation of Src without increasing non-specific eRPTPα activity. RPTPα245–eRPTPα binding was blocked by Pro210 → Leu/Pro211 → Leu mutation, consistent with the involvement of the structural ‘wedge' that contributes to eRPTPα homodimerization. RPTPα245-induced fibroblast transformation was blocked by either Src or eRPTPα RNAi, indicating that this required the dephosphorylation of Src by eRPTPα. The transformed cells were tumourigenic in nude mice, suggesting that RPTPα245-induced activation of Src in the human tumours may have contributed to carcinogenesis. PMID:21725282

  3. Curcumin down-regulates AR gene expression and activation in prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keiichiro; Yasunaga, Yutaka; Segawa, Takehiko; Ko, Daejin; Moul, Judd W; Srivastava, Shiv; Rhim, Johng S

    2002-10-01

    Curcumin, traditionally used as a seasoning spice in Indian cuisine, has been reported to decrease the proliferation potential of prostate cancer cells, by a mechanism that is not fully understood. In the current study, we have evaluated the effects of curcumin in cell growth, activation of signal transduction, and transforming activities of both androgen-dependent and independent cell lines. Prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP and PC-3, were treated with curcumin and its effects were further analyzed on signal transduction and expression of androgen receptor (AR) and AR-related cofactors using transient transfection assay and Western blotting. Our results show that curcumin down-regulates transactivation and expression of AR, activator protein-1 (AP-1), nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), and CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein)-binding protein (CBP). Curcumin also inhibited the transforming activities of both cell lines as evidenced by the reduced colony forming ability in soft agar. The results obtained here demonstrate that curcumin has a potential therapeutic effect on prostate cancer cells through down-regulation of AR and AR-related cofactors (AP-1, NF-kappaB and CBP). PMID:12239622

  4. Measurement of the activity of an artificial neutrino source based on {sup 37}Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurashitov, D. N.; Veretenkin, E. P.; Gavrin, V. N.; Gorbachev, V. V.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Mirmov, I. N. Shikhin, A. A.; Yants, V. E.; Barsanov, V. I.; Dzhanelidze, A. A.; Zlokazov, S. B.; Markov, S. Yu.; Shakirov, Z. N.; Cleveland, B. T.

    2007-02-15

    The activity of an artificial neutrino source based on {sup 37}Ar was measured by a specially developed method of directly counting {sup 37}Ar decays in a proportional counter. This source was used to irradiate the target of the SAGE radiochemical gallium-germanium neutrino telescope at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory (Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow), whereupon the measurements were performed at the Institute of Reactor Materials (Zarechny, Sverdlovsk oblast, Russia). The method used to prepare gaseous samples for measurements in proportional counters and the counting procedure are described. The measured activity of the {sup 37}Ar neutrino source is 405.1 {+-} 3.7 kCi (corrected for decays that occurred within the period between the instant of activity measurement and the commencement of the irradiation of Ga target at 04:00 Moscow time, 30.04.2004)

  5. S6K1 alternative splicing modulates its oncogenic activity and regulates mTORC1

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Hur, Vered; Denichenko, Polina; Siegfried, Zahava; Maimon, Avi; Krainer, Adrian; Davidson, Ben; Karni, Rotem

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal S6 Kinase 1 (S6K1) is a major mTOR downstream signaling molecule which regulates cell size and translation efficiency. Here we report that short isoforms of S6K1 are over-produced in breast cancer cell lines and tumors. Overexpression of S6K1 short isoforms induces transformation of human breast epithelial cells. The long S6K1 variant (Iso-1) induced opposite effects: It inhibits Ras-induced transformation and tumor formation, while its knockdown or knockout induced transformation, suggesting that Iso-1 has a tumor suppressor activity. We further found that S6K1 short isoforms bind and activate mTORC1, elevating 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, cap-dependent translation and Mcl-1 protein levels. Both a phosphorylation-defective 4E-BP1 mutant and the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin partially blocked the oncogenic effects of S6K1 short isoforms, suggesting that these are mediated by mTORC1 and 4E-BP1. Thus, alternative splicing of S6K1 acts as a molecular switch in breast cancer cells elevating oncogenic isoforms that activate mTORC1. PMID:23273915

  6. The novel HDAC inhibitor AR-42-induced anti-colon cancer cell activity is associated with ceramide production

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Weihong; Xu, Bin; Yao, Yiting; Yu, Xiaoling; Shen, Jie

    2015-08-07

    In the current study, we investigated the potential activity of AR-42, a novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, against colon cancer cells. Our in vitro results showed that AR-42 induced ceramide production, exerted potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities in established (SW-620 and HCT-116 lines) and primary human colon cancer cells. Exogenously-added sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) suppressed AR-42-induced activity, yet a cell-permeable ceramide (C4) facilitated AR-42-induced cytotoxicity against colon cancer cells. In addition, AR-42-induced ceramide production and anti-colon cancer cell activity were inhibited by the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1, but were exacerbated by PDMP, which is a ceramide glucosylation inhibitor. In vivo, oral administration of a single dose of AR-42 dramatically inhibited SW-620 xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice, without inducing overt toxicities. Together, these results show that AR-42 dramatically inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and ceramide production might be the key mechanism responsible for its actions. - Highlights: • AR-42 is anti-proliferative against primary/established colon cancer cells. • AR-42 induces significant apoptotic death in primary/established colon cancer cells. • Ceramide production mediates AR-42-induced cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells. • AR-42 oral administration potently inhibits SW-620 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  7. Hormonal activation of a kinase cascade localized at the mitochondria is required for StAR protein activity.

    PubMed

    Poderoso, Cecilia; Maloberti, Paula; Duarte, Alejandra; Neuman, Isabel; Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2009-03-01

    It is known that ERK1/2 and MEK1/2 participate in the regulation of Star gene transcription. However, their role in StAR protein post-transcriptional regulation is not described yet. In this study we analyzed the relationship between the MAPK cascade and StAR protein phosphorylation and function. We have demonstrated that (a) steroidogenesis in MA-10 Leydig cells depends on the specific of ERK1/2 activation at the mitochondria; (b) ERK1/2 phosphorylation is driven by mitochondrial PKA and constitutive MEK1/2 in this organelle; (c) active ERK1/2 interacts with StAR protein, leads to StAR protein phosphorylation at Ser(232) only in the presence of cholesterol; (d) directed mutagenesis of Ser(232) (S232A) inhibited in vitro StAR protein phosphorylation by ERK1; (e) transient transfection of MA-10 cells with StAR S232A cDNA markedly reduced the yield of progesterone production. We show that StAR protein is a substrate of ERK1/2, and that mitochondrial ERK1/2 is part of a multimeric complex that regulates cholesterol transport.

  8. Alarin but not its alternative-splicing form, GALP (Galanin-like peptide) has antimicrobial activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Akihiro; Wong, Pooi-Fong; Hojo, Hironobu; Hasegawa, Makoto; Ichinose, Akitoyo; Llanes, Rafael; Kubo, Yoshinao; Senba, Masachika; Ichinose, Yoshio

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: • Alarin inhibits the growth of E. coli but not S. aureus. • Alarin’s potency is comparable to LL-37 in inhibiting the growth of E. coli. • Alarin can cause bacterial membrane blebbing. • Alalin does not induce hemolysis on erythrocytes. -- Abstract: Alarin is an alternative-splicing form of GALP (galanin-like peptide). It shares only 5 conserved amino acids at the N-terminal region with GALP which is involved in a diverse range of normal brain functions. This study seeks to investigate whether alarin has additional functions due to its differences from GALP. Here, we have shown using a radial diffusion assay that alarin but not GALP inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli (strain ML-35). The conserved N-terminal region, however, remained essential for the antimicrobial activity of alarin as truncated peptides showed reduced killing effect. Moreover, alarin inhibited the growth of E. coli in a similar potency as human cathelicidin LL-37, a well-studied antimicrobial peptide. Electron microscopy further showed that alarin induced bacterial membrane blebbing but unlike LL-37, it did not cause hemolysis of erythrocytes. In addition, alarin is only active against the gram-negative bacteria, E. coli but not the gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, these data suggest that alarin has potentials as an antimicrobial and should be considered for the development in human therapeutics.

  9. Multiple cryptic splice sites can be activated by IDS point mutations generating misspliced transcripts.

    PubMed

    Lualdi, Susanna; Pittis, Maria G; Regis, Stefano; Parini, Rossella; Allegri, Anna E; Furlan, Francesca; Bembi, Bruno; Filocamo, Mirella

    2006-08-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) were reported as the cause of the X-linked recessive lysosomal disease, mucopolysaccharidosis II (MPS II). Amongst the different mutations, it emerges that nearly 10% are nucleotide substitutions causing splicing mutations. We now report the molecular characterisation of three MPS II patients with multiple aberrant transcripts due to three different point mutations. The c.418+1G>C that occurred in the invariant splice-site motif, produced only aberrantly spliced transcripts. Whilst the mutations affecting variant motifs (c.419G>T) or coding regions (c.245C>T) led to aberrantly spliced transcripts in addition to correctly spliced transcripts with the respective predicted missense mutation, p.G140V or p.A82V. A combination of experimental tests and computational approaches were used to understand the molecular basis underlying the altered transcription patterns. In addition, by using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, the reduction of mRNA amount in two patients observed was likely due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. Overall, our results further emphasised the importance of cloning and sequencing independent transcripts to reveal less abundant, aberrant products, which often could not be detected by direct sequencing. Moreover, the different splicing patterns observed in the three patients as a consequence of point mutations show how sensitive the balance is between constitutive and cryptic splice sites in the IDS gene. The generation of such diverse transcripts, together with their level of expression, could contribute to the profound phenotypic variability reported in MPS II.

  10. The mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase of Podospora anserina is a bifunctional enzyme active in protein synthesis and RNA splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Kämper, U; Kück, U; Cherniack, A D; Lambowitz, A M

    1992-01-01

    The Neurospora crassa mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (mt tyrRS), which is encoded by the nuclear gene cyt-18, functions not only in aminoacylation but also in the splicing of group I introns. Here, we isolated the cognate Podospora anserina mt tyrRS gene, designated yts1, by using the N. crassa cyt-18 gene as a hybridization probe. DNA sequencing of the P. anserina gene revealed an open reading frame (ORF) of 641 amino acids which has significant similarity to other tyrRSs. The yts1 ORF is interrupted by two introns, one near its N terminus at the same position as the single intron in the cyt-18 gene and the other downstream in a region corresponding to the nucleotide-binding fold. The P. anserina yts1+ gene transformed the N. crassa cyt-18-2 mutant at a high frequency and rescued both the splicing and protein synthesis defects. Furthermore, the YTS1 protein synthesized in Escherichia coli was capable of splicing the N. crassa mt large rRNA intron in vitro. Together, these results indicate that YTS1 is a bifunctional protein active in both splicing and protein synthesis. The P. anserina YTS1 and N. crassa CYT-18 proteins share three blocks of amino acids that are not conserved in bacterial or yeast mt tyrRSs which do not function in splicing. One of these blocks corresponds to the idiosyncratic N-terminal domain shown previously to be required for splicing activity of the CYT-18 protein. The other two are located in the putative tRNA-binding domain toward the C terminus of the protein and also appear to be required for splicing. Since the E. coli and yeast mt tyrRSs do not function in splicing, the adaptation of the Neurospora and Podospora spp. mt tyrRSs to function in splicing most likely occurred after the divergence of their common ancestor from yeast. Images PMID:1531084

  11. Selective phthalate activation of naturally occurring human constitutive androstane receptor splice variants and the pregnane X receptor.

    PubMed

    DeKeyser, Joshua G; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M; Peterson, Eric C; Chen, Tao; Omiecinski, Curtis J

    2011-04-01

    Phthalates and other endocrine-disruptive chemicals are manufactured in large quantities for use as plasticizers and other commercial applications, resulting in ubiquitous human exposure and thus, concern regarding their toxicity. Innate defense against small molecule exposures is controlled in large part by the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR). The human CAR gene undergoes multiple alternative splicing events resulting in the CAR2 and CAR3 variant receptors. Recent studies from our laboratory show that CAR2 is potently and specifically activated by di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). We hypothesized that alternative splicing is a mechanism for increasing CAR's functional diversity, broadening the human receptors' repertoire of response to environmental xenobiotics. In these studies, we examine the interaction of alternatively spliced CARs and PXR with a range of suspected endocrine disruptors, including phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA), and 4-N-nonylphenol (NP). Transactivation and two-hybrid studies in COS-1 cells revealed differential selectivity of endocrine-disrupting chemicals for the variant CAR and PXR. Ex vivo studies showed DEHP and di-isononyl phthalate potently induced CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 expression in human hepatocytes. Mutation analysis of CAR2, in silico modeling, and ligand docking studies suggested that the SPTV amino acid insertion of CAR2 creates a unique ligand-binding pocket. Alternative gene splicing results in variant CAR receptors that selectively recognize phthalates and BPA. The interaction of phthalates with CAR and PXR suggests a xenobiotic response that is complex and biologically redundant.

  12. 40Ar/39Ar dating of tuff vents in the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy): Toward a new chronostratigraphic reconstruction of the Holocene volcanic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fedele, L.; Insinga, D.D.; Calvert, A.T.; Morra, V.; Perrotta, A.; Scarpati, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Campi Flegrei hosts numerous monogenetic vents inferred to be younger than the 15 ka Neapolitan Yellow Tuff. Sanidine crystals from the three young Campi Flegrei vents of Fondi di Baia, Bacoli and Nisida were dated using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. These vents, together with several other young edifices, occur roughly along the inner border of the Campi Flegrei caldera, suggesting that the volcanic conduits are controlled by caldera-bounding faults. Plateau ages of ∼9.6 ka (Fondi di Baia), ∼8.6 ka (Bacoli) and ∼3.9 ka (Nisida) indicate eruptive activity during intervals previously interpreted as quiescent. A critical revision, involving calendar age correction of literature 14C data and available 40Ar/39Ar age data, is presented. A new reference chronostratigraphic framework for Holocene Phlegrean activity, which significantly differs from the previously adopted ones, is proposed. This has important implications for understanding the Campi Flegrei eruptive history and, ultimately, for the evaluation of related volcanic risk and hazard, for which the inferred history of its recent activity is generally taken into account.

  13. Quantification of alternative splicing variants of human telomerase reverse transcriptase and correlations with telomerase activity in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Wu, Bing-quan; Zhong, Hao-hao; Tian, Xin-xia; Fang, Wei-gang

    2012-01-01

    Telomerase plays important roles in the development and progression of malignant tumors, and its activity is primarily determined by transcriptional regulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). Several mRNA alternative splicing variants (ASVs) for hTERT have been identified, but it remains unclear whether telomerase activity is directly associated with hTERT splicing transcripts. In this study, we developed novel real-time PCR protocols using molecular beacons and applied to lung carcinoma cell lines and cancerous tissues for quantification of telomerase activity and three essential hTERT deletion transcripts respectively. The results showed that lung carcinoma cell lines consistently demonstrated telomerase activity (14.22-31.43 TPG units per 100 cells) and various hTERT alternative splicing transcripts. For 165 lung cancer cases, telomerase activity showed significant correlation with tumor differentiation (poorly->moderately->well-differentiated, P<0.01) and with histotypes (combined small cell and squamous cell carcinoma>squamous cell carcinoma>adenosquamous carcinoma>adenocarcinoma, P<0.05). Although the overall hTERT transcripts were detected in all the samples, they were not associated with telomerase activity (r = 0.092, P = 0.24). Telomerase activity was significantly correlated with the transcriptional constituent ratio of α-deletion (r = -0.267, P = 0.026), β-deletion (r = -0.693, P = 0.0001) and γ-deletion (r = -0.614, P = 0.001). The positive rate and average constituent ratio of β-deletion transcripts (92.12%, 0.23) were higher than those of α-deletion (41.82%, 0.12) or γ-deletion (16.36%, 0.18) transcripts. The combined small-cell and squamous cell carcinomas expressed less deletion transcripts, especially β-deletion, than other histotypes, which might explain their higher telomerase activity. In conclusion, the molecular beacon-based real-time PCR protocols are rapid, sensitive and specific methods to quantify telomerase

  14. High throughput microscopy identifies bisphenol AP, a bisphenol A analog, as a novel AR down-regulator

    PubMed Central

    Stossi, Fabio; Dandekar, Radhika D.; Bolt, Michael J.; Newberg, Justin Y.; Mancini, Maureen G.; Kaushik, Akash K.; Putluri, Vasanta; Sreekumar, Arun; Mancini, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains a deadly disease especially when patients become resistant to drugs that target the Androgen Receptor (AR) ligand binding domain. At this stage, patients develop recurring castrate-resistant prostate cancers (CRPCs). Interestingly, CRPC tumors maintain dependency on AR for growth; moreover, in CRPCs, constitutively active AR splice variants (e.g., AR-V7) begin to be expressed at higher levels. These splice variants lack the ligand binding domain and are rendered insensitive to current endocrine therapies. Thus, it is of paramount importance to understand what regulates the expression of AR and its splice variants to identify new therapeutic strategies in CRPCs. Here, we used high throughput microscopy and quantitative image analysis to evaluate effects of selected endocrine disruptors on AR levels in multiple breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Bisphenol AP (BPAP), which is used in chemical and medical industries, was identified as a down-regulator of both full length AR and the AR-V7 splice variant. We validated its activity by performing time-course, dose-response, Western blot and qPCR analyses. BPAP also reduced the percent of cells in S phase, which was accompanied by a ~60% loss in cell numbers and colony formation in anchorage-independent growth assays. Moreover, it affected mitochondria size and cell metabolism. In conclusion, our high content analysis-based screening platform was used to classify the effect of compounds on endogenous ARs, and identified BPAP as being capable of causing AR (both full-length and variants) down-regulation, cell cycle arrest and metabolic alterations in CRPC cell lines. PMID:26918604

  15. High throughput microscopy identifies bisphenol AP, a bisphenol A analog, as a novel AR down-regulator.

    PubMed

    Stossi, Fabio; Dandekar, Radhika D; Bolt, Michael J; Newberg, Justin Y; Mancini, Maureen G; Kaushik, Akash K; Putluri, Vasanta; Sreekumar, Arun; Mancini, Michael A

    2016-03-29

    Prostate cancer remains a deadly disease especially when patients become resistant to drugs that target the Androgen Receptor (AR) ligand binding domain. At this stage, patients develop recurring castrate-resistant prostate cancers (CRPCs). Interestingly, CRPC tumors maintain dependency on AR for growth; moreover, in CRPCs, constitutively active AR splice variants (e.g., AR-V7) begin to be expressed at higher levels. These splice variants lack the ligand binding domain and are rendered insensitive to current endocrine therapies. Thus, it is of paramount importance to understand what regulates the expression of AR and its splice variants to identify new therapeutic strategies in CRPCs. Here, we used high throughput microscopy and quantitative image analysis to evaluate effects of selected endocrine disruptors on AR levels in multiple breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Bisphenol AP (BPAP), which is used in chemical and medical industries, was identified as a down-regulator of both full length AR and the AR-V7 splice variant. We validated its activity by performing time-course, dose-response, Western blot and qPCR analyses. BPAP also reduced the percent of cells in S phase, which was accompanied by a ~60% loss in cell numbers and colony formation in anchorage-independent growth assays. Moreover, it affected mitochondria size and cell metabolism. In conclusion, our high content analysis-based screening platform was used to classify the effect of compounds on endogenous ARs, and identified BPAP as being capable of causing AR (both full-length and variants) down-regulation, cell cycle arrest and metabolic alterations in CRPC cell lines.

  16. FgPrp4 Kinase Is Important for Spliceosome B-Complex Activation and Splicing Efficiency in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuli; Jin, Qiaojun; Jiang, Cong; Li, Yang; Li, Chaohui; Liu, Huiquan; Kang, Zhensheng; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2016-04-01

    PRP4 encodes the only kinase among the spliceosome components. Although it is an essential gene in the fission yeast and other eukaryotic organisms, the Fgprp4 mutant was viable in the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum. Deletion of FgPRP4 did not block intron splicing but affected intron splicing efficiency in over 60% of the F. graminearum genes. The Fgprp4 mutant had severe growth defects and produced spontaneous suppressors that were recovered in growth rate. Suppressor mutations were identified in the PRP6, PRP31, BRR2, and PRP8 orthologs in nine suppressor strains by sequencing analysis with candidate tri-snRNP component genes. The Q86K mutation in FgMSL1 was identified by whole genome sequencing in suppressor mutant S3. Whereas two of the suppressor mutations in FgBrr2 and FgPrp8 were similar to those characterized in their orthologs in yeasts, suppressor mutations in Prp6 and Prp31 orthologs or FgMSL1 have not been reported. Interestingly, four and two suppressor mutations identified in FgPrp6 and FgPrp31, respectively, all are near the conserved Prp4-phosphorylation sites, suggesting that these mutations may have similar effects with phosphorylation by Prp4 kinase. In FgPrp31, the non-sense mutation at R464 resulted in the truncation of the C-terminal 130 aa region that contains all the conserved Prp4-phosphorylation sites. Deletion analysis showed that the N-terminal 310-aa rich in SR residues plays a critical role in the localization and functions of FgPrp4. We also conducted phosphoproteomics analysis with FgPrp4 and identified S289 as the phosphorylation site that is essential for its functions. These results indicated that FgPrp4 is critical for splicing efficiency but not essential for intron splicing, and FgPrp4 may regulate pre-mRNA splicing by phosphorylation of other components of the tri-snRNP although itself may be activated by phosphorylation at S289.

  17. Evolution of splicing regulatory networks in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    McManus, C. Joel; Coolon, Joseph D.; Eipper-Mains, Jodi; Wittkopp, Patricia J.; Graveley, Brenton R.

    2014-01-01

    The proteome expanding effects of alternative pre-mRNA splicing have had a profound impact on eukaryotic evolution. The events that create this diversity can be placed into four major classes: exon skipping, intron retention, alternative 5′ splice sites, and alternative 3′ splice sites. Although the regulatory mechanisms and evolutionary pressures among alternative splicing classes clearly differ, how these differences affect the evolution of splicing regulation remains poorly characterized. We used RNA-seq to investigate splicing differences in D. simulans, D. sechellia, and three strains of D. melanogaster. Regulation of exon skipping and tandem alternative 3′ splice sites (NAGNAGs) were more divergent than other splicing classes. Splicing regulation was most divergent in frame-preserving events and events in noncoding regions. We further determined the contributions of cis- and trans-acting changes in splicing regulatory networks by comparing allele-specific splicing in F1 interspecific hybrids, because differences in allele-specific splicing reflect changes in cis-regulatory element activity. We find that species-specific differences in intron retention and alternative splice site usage are primarily attributable to changes in cis-regulatory elements (median ∼80% cis), whereas species-specific exon skipping differences are driven by both cis- and trans-regulatory divergence (median ∼50% cis). These results help define the mechanisms and constraints that influence splicing regulatory evolution and show that networks regulating the four major classes of alternative splicing diverge through different genetic mechanisms. We propose a model in which differences in regulatory network architecture among classes of alternative splicing affect the evolution of splicing regulation. PMID:24515119

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibitor AR42 regulates telomerase activity in human glioma cells via an Akt-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Luen; Huang, Po-Hsien; Chiu, Hao-Chieh; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih; Kuo, Cheng-Ju; Chen, Huan-Da; Chen, Chang-Shi

    2013-05-24

    Epigenetic regulation via abnormal activation of histone deacetylases (HDACs) is a mechanism that leads to cancer initiation and promotion. Activation of HDACs results in transcriptional upregulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and increases telomerase activity during cellular immortalization and tumorigenesis. However, the effects of HDAC inhibitors on the transcription of hTERT vary in different cancer cells. Here, we studied the effects of a novel HDAC inhibitor, AR42, on telomerase activity in a PTEN-null U87MG glioma cell line. AR42 increased hTERT mRNA in U87MG glioma cells, but suppressed total telomerase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Further analyses suggested that AR42 decreases the phosphorylation of hTERT via an Akt-dependent mechanism. Suppression of Akt phosphorylation and telomerase activity was also observed with PI3K inhibitor LY294002 further supporting the hypothesis that Akt signaling is involved in suppression of AR42-induced inhibition of telomerase activity. Finally, ectopic expression of a constitutive active form of Akt restored telomerase activity in AR42-treated cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the novel HDAC inhibitor AR42 can suppress telomerase activity by inhibiting Akt-mediated hTERT phosphorylation, indicating that the PI3K/Akt pathway plays an important role in the regulation of telomerase activity in response to this HDAC inhibitor.

  19. Exploitation of a thermosensitive splicing event to study pre-mRNA splicing in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Cizdziel, P.E.; De Mars, M.; Murphy, E.C. Jr.

    1988-04-01

    The spliced form of MuSVts110 viral RNA is approximately 20-fold more abundant at growth temperatures of 33/sup 0/C or lower than at 37 to 41/sup 0/C. This difference is due to changes in the efficiency of MuSVts110 RNA splicing rather than selective thermolability of the spliced species at 37 to 41/sup 0/C or general thermosensitivity of RNA splicing in MuSVts110-infected cells. Moreover, RNA transcribed from MuSVts110 DNA introduced into a variety of cell lines is spliced in a temperature-sensitive fashion, suggesting that the structure of the viral RNA controls the efficiency of the event. The authors exploited this novel splicing event to study the cleavage and ligation events during splicing in vivo. No spliced viral mRNA or splicing intermediates were observed in MuSVts110-infected cells (6m2 cells) at 39/sup 0/C. However, after a short (about 30-min) lag following a shift to 33/sup 0/C, viral pre-mRNA cleaved at the 5' splice site began to accumulate. Ligated exons were not detected until about 60 min following the initial detection of cleavage at the 5' splice site, suggesting that these two splicing reactions did not occur concurrently. Splicing of viral RNA in the MuSVts110 revertant 54-5A4, which lacks the sequence -AG/TGT- at the usual 3' splice site, was studied. Cleavage at the 5' splice site in the revertant viral RNA proceeded in a temperature-sensitive fashion. No novel cryptic 3' splice sites were activated; however, splicing at an alternate upstream 3' splice site used at low efficiency in normal MuSVts110 RNA was increased to a level close to that of 5'-splice-site cleavage in the revertant viral RNA.

  20. AR-v7 protein expression is regulated by protein kinase and phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinan; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E.; Rennie, Paul S.; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-01-01

    Failure of androgen-targeted therapy and progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are often attributed to sustained expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and its major splice variant, AR-v7. Although the new generation of anti-androgens such as enzalutamide effectively inhibits AR activity, accumulating pre-clinical and clinical evidence indicates that AR-v7 remains constitutively active in driving CRPC progression. However, molecular mechanisms which control AR-v7 protein expression remain unclear. We apply multiple prostate cancer cell models to demonstrate that enzalutamide induces differential activation of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1) and Akt kinase depending on the gene context of cancer cells. The balance between PP-1 and Akt activation governs AR phosphorylation status and activation of the Mdm2 ubiquitin ligase. Mdm2 recognizes phosphorylated serine 213 of AR-v7, and induces AR-v7 ubiquitination and protein degradation. These findings highlight the decisive roles of PP-1 and Akt for AR-v7 protein expression and activities when AR is functionally blocked. PMID:26378044

  1. AR-v7 protein expression is regulated by protein kinase and phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinan; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E; Rennie, Paul S; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-10-20

    Failure of androgen-targeted therapy and progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are often attributed to sustained expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and its major splice variant, AR-v7. Although the new generation of anti-androgens such as enzalutamide effectively inhibits AR activity, accumulating pre-clinical and clinical evidence indicates that AR-v7 remains constitutively active in driving CRPC progression. However, molecular mechanisms which control AR-v7 protein expression remain unclear. We apply multiple prostate cancer cell models to demonstrate that enzalutamide induces differential activation of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1) and Akt kinase depending on the gene context of cancer cells. The balance between PP-1 and Akt activation governs AR phosphorylation status and activation of the Mdm2 ubiquitin ligase. Mdm2 recognizes phosphorylated serine 213 of AR-v7, and induces AR-v7 ubiquitination and protein degradation. These findings highlight the decisive roles of PP-1 and Akt for AR-v7 protein expression and activities when AR is functionally blocked.

  2. Identification of a Male-Specific RNA Binding Protein That Regulates Sex-Specific Splicing of Bmdsx by Increasing RNA Binding Activity of BmPSI▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka G.; Imanishi, Shigeo; Dohmae, Naoshi; Asanuma, Miwako; Matsumoto, Shogo

    2010-01-01

    Bmdsx is a sex-determining gene in the silkworm and is alternatively spliced in males and females. CE1 is a splicing silencer element responsible for the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx. To identify sex-specific factors implicated in the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx, we performed RNA affinity chromatography using CE1 RNA as a ligand. We have identified BmIMP, a Bombyx homolog of IGF-II mRNA binding protein (IMP), as a male-specific factor that specifically binds to CE1. The gene encoding BmIMP is localized on the Z chromosome and is male-specifically expressed in various tissues. Antisense inhibition of BmIMP expression increased female-specific splicing of Bmdsx pre-mRNA. Coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown analyses demonstrated that BmIMP physically interacts with BmPSI, which has been identified as a factor implicated in the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx, through the KH domains of BmIMP. The functional consequence of this interaction was examined using RNA mobility shift analysis. BmIMP increased BmPSI-CE1 RNA binding activity by decreasing the rate of BmPSI dissociation from CE1 RNA. Truncation analysis of BmIMP suggested that the KH domains are responsible for enhancing BmPSI-CE1 RNA binding activity. These results suggest that BmIMP may enhance the male-specific splicing of Bmdsx pre-mRNA by increasing RNA binding activity of BmPSI. PMID:20956562

  3. Structure function and splice site analysis of the synaptogenic activity of the neurexin-1 beta LNS domain.

    PubMed

    Graf, Ethan R; Kang, Yunhee; Hauner, Anna M; Craig, Ann Marie

    2006-04-19

    Recent findings suggest that the neurexin-neuroligin link promotes both GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptogenesis, but the mechanism by which neurexins influence the clustering of appropriate neuroligins and postsynaptic differentiation remains unclear. Previous studies suggested that the presence or absence of alternatively spliced residues at splice site 4 (S4) in the neurexin LNS domain may regulate neurexin function. We demonstrate that addition of the S4 insert selectively reduces the ability of neurexin-1beta to cluster neuroligin-1/3/4 and glutamatergic postsynaptic proteins, although clustering of neuroligin-2 and GABAergic postsynaptic proteins remain strong. Furthermore, addition of the S4 insert decreases the binding affinity of neurexin-1beta to neuroligins-1 and -4 but has little effect on binding to neuroligins-2 and -3. Additional structure-function studies reveal the neurexin binding interface mediating synaptogenic activity to be composed primarily of residues in the beta2beta3, beta6beta7, and beta10beta11 loops on one rim of the LNS domain beta sandwich. Mutation of two predicted Ca(2+)-binding residues disrupts postsynaptic protein clustering and binding to neuroligins, consistent with previous findings that neurexin-neuroligin binding is Ca2+ dependent. Glutamatergic postsynaptic clustering was more readily disrupted by the mutagenesis than GABAergic postsynaptic protein clustering. Perhaps neurexins-neuroligins, or neurexin-1beta at least, is most important for GABA synapse formation or controlling the balance of GABA and glutamate synapses. These results suggest that differential neurexin-neuroligin binding affinities and splice variations may play an instructive role in postsynaptic differentiation.

  4. The novel HDAC inhibitor AR-42-induced anti-colon cancer cell activity is associated with ceramide production.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weihong; Xu, Bin; Yao, Yiting; Yu, Xiaoling; Shen, Jie

    2015-08-01

    In the current study, we investigated the potential activity of AR-42, a novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, against colon cancer cells. Our in vitro results showed that AR-42 induced ceramide production, exerted potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities in established (SW-620 and HCT-116 lines) and primary human colon cancer cells. Exogenously-added sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) suppressed AR-42-induced activity, yet a cell-permeable ceramide (C4) facilitated AR-42-induced cytotoxicity against colon cancer cells. In addition, AR-42-induced ceramide production and anti-colon cancer cell activity were inhibited by the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1, but were exacerbated by PDMP, which is a ceramide glucosylation inhibitor. In vivo, oral administration of a single dose of AR-42 dramatically inhibited SW-620 xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice, without inducing overt toxicities. Together, these results show that AR-42 dramatically inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and ceramide production might be the key mechanism responsible for its actions.

  5. Who Activates the Nucleophile in Ribozyme Catalysis? An Answer from the Splicing Mechanism of Group II Introns.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lorenzo; Palermo, Giulia; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Magistrato, Alessandra

    2016-08-24

    Group II introns are Mg(2+)-dependent ribozymes that are considered to be the evolutionary ancestors of the eukaryotic spliceosome, thus representing an ideal model system to understand the mechanism of conversion of premature messenger RNA (mRNA) into mature mRNA. Neither in splicing nor for self-cleaving ribozymes has the role of the two Mg(2+) ions been established, and even the way the nucleophile is activated is still controversial. Here we employed hybrid quantum-classical QM(Car-Parrinello)/MM molecular dynamics simulations in combination with thermodynamic integration to characterize the molecular mechanism of the first and rate-determining step of the splicing process (i.e., the cleavage of the 5'-exon) catalyzed by group II intron ribozymes. Remarkably, our results show a new RNA-specific dissociative mechanism in which the bulk water accepts the nucleophile's proton during its attack on the scissile phosphate. The process occurs in a single step with no Mg(2+) ion activating the nucleophile, at odds with nucleases enzymes. We suggest that the novel reaction path elucidated here might be an evolutionary ancestor of the more efficient two-metal-ion mechanism found in enzymes. PMID:27309711

  6. The splicing regulator PTBP1 controls the activity of the transcription factor Pbx1 during neuronal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Anthony J; Lin, Chia-Ho; Damianov, Andrey; Adams, Katrina L; Novitch, Bennett G; Black, Douglas L

    2015-01-01

    The RNA-binding proteins PTBP1 and PTBP2 control programs of alternative splicing during neuronal development. PTBP2 was found to maintain embryonic splicing patterns of many synaptic and cytoskeletal proteins during differentiation of neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) into early neurons. However, the role of the earlier PTBP1 program in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and NPCs was not clear. We show that PTBP1 controls a program of neuronal gene expression that includes the transcription factor Pbx1. We identify exons specifically regulated by PTBP1 and not PTBP2 as mouse ESCs differentiate into NPCs. We find that PTBP1 represses Pbx1 exon 7 and the expression of the neuronal Pbx1a isoform in ESCs. Using CRISPR-Cas9 to delete regulatory elements for exon 7, we induce Pbx1a expression in ESCs, finding that this activates transcription of neuronal genes. Thus, PTBP1 controls the activity of Pbx1 to suppress its neuronal transcriptional program prior to induction of NPC development. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09268.001 PMID:26705333

  7. Ricin Inhibits Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response by Preventing Splicing of the HAC1 mRNA*

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Bijal A.; Tortora, Andrew; Li, Xiao-Ping; Tumer, Nilgun E.

    2011-01-01

    Ricin A chain (RTA) inhibits protein synthesis by removing a specific adenine from the highly conserved α-sarcin/ricin loop in the large rRNA. Expression of RTA with its own signal sequence in yeast resulted in its translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and subsequent glycosylation. Because RTA must unfold within the ER, it may be vulnerable to host defenses, such as the unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR was induced in cells expressing an active site mutant but not the wild type RTA, indicating that the active site of RTA played a role in perturbing the ER stress response. The inactive RTA without the signal sequence did not induce UPR, indicating that translocation into the ER was critical for induction of UPR. The wild type RTA inhibited activation of UPR not only due to ER stress induced by the protein itself but also by global effectors such as tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. Mature RTA without the signal sequence also inhibited UPR, providing evidence that inhibition of UPR occurred on the cytosolic face of the ER. RTA could not inhibit UPR when the spliced form of HAC1 mRNA was provided in trans, indicating that it had a direct effect on UPR upstream of HAC1-dependent transcriptional activation. Only the precursor form of HAC1 mRNA was detected in cells expressing RTA after exposure to ER stress, demonstrating that ricin inhibits activation of UPR by preventing HAC1 mRNA splicing. The RTA mutants that depurinated ribosomes but did not kill cells were not able to inhibit activation of UPR by tunicamycin, providing evidence that the inability to activate UPR in response to ER stress contributes to the cytotoxicity of ricin. PMID:18180297

  8. Calcium activated K⁺ channels in the electroreceptor of the skate confirmed by cloning. Details of subunits and splicing.

    PubMed

    King, Benjamin L; Shi, Ling Fang; Kao, Peter; Clusin, William T

    2016-03-01

    Elasmobranchs detect small potentials using excitable cells of the ampulla of Lorenzini which have calcium-activated K(+) channels, first described in 1974. A distinctive feature of the outward current in voltage clamped ampullae is its apparent insensitivity to voltage. The sequence of a BK channel α isoform expressed in the ampulla of the skate was characterized. A signal peptide is present at the beginning of the gene. When compared to human isoform 1 (the canonical sequence), the largest difference was absence of a 59 amino acid region from the S8-S9 intra-cellular linker that contains the strex regulatory domain. The ampulla isoform was also compared with the isoform predicted in late skate embryos where strex was also absent. The BK voltage sensors were conserved in both skate isoforms. Differences between the skate and human BK channel included alternative splicing. Alternative splicing occurs at seven previously defined sites that are characteristic for BK channels in general and hair cells in particular. Skate BK sequences were highly similar to the Australian ghost shark and several other vertebrate species. Based on alignment of known BK sequences with the skate genome and transcriptome, there are at least two isoforms of Kcnma1α expressed in the skate. One of the β subunits (β4), which is known to decrease voltage sensitivity, was also identified in the skate genome and transcriptome and in the ampulla. These studies advance our knowledge of BK channels and suggest further studies in the ampulla and other excitable tissues. PMID:26687710

  9. Consensus PP1 binding motifs regulate transcriptional corepression and alternative RNA splicing activities of the steroid receptor coregulators, p54nrb and PSF.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liangliang; Xie, Ning; Rennie, Paul; Challis, John R G; Gleave, Martin; Lye, Stephen J; Dong, Xuesen

    2011-07-01

    Originally identified as essential pre-mRNA splicing factors, non-POU-domain-containing, octamer binding protein (p54nrb) and PTB-associated RNA splicing factor (PSF) are also steroid receptor corepressors. The mechanisms by which p54nrb and PSF regulate gene transcription remain unclear. Both p54nrb and PSF contain protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) consensus binding RVxF motifs, suggesting that PP1 may regulate phosphorylation status of p54nrb and PSF and thus their function in gene transcription. In this report, we demonstrated that PP1 forms a protein complex with both p54nrb and PSF. PP1 interacts directly with the RVxF motif only in p54nrb, but not in PSF. Association with PP1 results in dephosphorylation of both p54nrb and PSF in vivo and the loss of their transcriptional corepressor activities. Using the CD44 minigene as a reporter, we showed that PP1 regulates p54nrb and PSF alternative splicing activities that determine exon skipping vs. inclusion in the final mature RNA for translation. In addition, changes in transcriptional corepression and RNA splicing activities of p54nrb and PSF are correlated with alterations in protein interactions of p54nrb and PSF with transcriptional corepressors such as Sin3A and histone deacetylase 1, and RNA splicing factors such as U1A and U2AF. Furthermore, we demonstrated a novel function of the RVxF motif within PSF that enhances its corepression and RNA splicing activities independent of PP1. We conclude that the RVxF motifs play an important role in controlling the multifunctional properties of p54nrb and PSF in the regulation of gene transcription.

  10. Tephrochronology of the Mont-Dore volcanic Massif (Massif Central, France): new 40Ar/39Ar constraints on the Late Pliocene and Early Pleistocene activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomade, Sébastien; Pastre, Jean-François; Nehlig, Pierre; Guillou, Hervé; Scao, Vincent; Scaillet, Stéphane

    2014-03-01

    The Mont-Dore Massif (500 km2), the youngest stratovolcano of the French Massif Central, consists of two volcanic edifices: the Guéry and the Sancy. To improve our knowledge of the oldest explosive stages of the Mont-Dore Massif, we studied 40Ar/39Ar-dated (through single-grain laser and step-heating experiments) 11 pyroclastic units from the Guéry stratovolcano. We demonstrate that the explosive history of the Guéry can be divided into four cycles of explosive eruption activity between 3.09 and 1.46 Ma (G.I to G.IV). We have also ascertained that deposits associated with the 3.1-3.0-Ma rhyolitic activity, which includes the 5-km3 "Grande Nappe" ignimbrite, are not recorded in the central part of the Mont-Dore Massif. All the pyroclastites found in the left bank of the Dordogne River belong to a later explosive phase (2.86-2.58 Ma, G.II) and were channelled down into valleys or topographic lows where they are currently nested. This later activity also gave rise to most of the volcanic products in the Perrier Plateau (30 km east of the Mont-Dore Massif); three quarters of the volcano-sedimentary sequence (up to 100 m thick) was emplaced within less than 20 ky, associated with several flank collapses in the northeastern part of the Guéry. The age of the "Fournet flora" (2.69 ± 0.01 Ma) found within an ash bed belonging to G.II suggests that temperate forests already existed in the French Massif Central before the Pliocene/Pleistocene boundary. The Guéry's third explosive eruption activity cycle (G.III) lasted between 2.36 and 1.91 Ma. It encompassed the Guéry Lake and Morangie pumice and ash deposits, as well as seven other important events recorded as centimetric ash beds some 60 to 100 km southeast of the Massif in the Velay region. We propose a general tephrochronology for the Mont-Dore stratovolcano covering the last 3.1 My. This chronology is based on 44 40Ar/39Ar-dated events belonging to eight explosive eruption cycles each lasting between 100 and 200

  11. The nuclear splicing factor RNA binding motif 5 promotes caspase activation in human neuronal cells, and increases after traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Travis C; Du, Lina; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Vagni, Vincent A; Dezfulian, Cameron; Poloyac, Samuel M; Jackson, Edwin K; Clark, Robert SB; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2015-01-01

    Splicing factors (SFs) coordinate nuclear intron/exon splicing of RNA. Splicing factor disturbances can cause cell death. RNA binding motif 5 (RBM5) and 10 (RBM10) promote apoptosis in cancer cells by activating detrimental alternative splicing of key death/survival genes. The role(s) of RBM5/10 in neurons has not been established. Here, we report that RBM5 knockdown in human neuronal cells decreases caspase activation by staurosporine. In contrast, RBM10 knockdown augments caspase activation. To determine whether brain injury alters RBM signaling, we measured RBM5/10 protein in mouse cortical/hippocampus homogenates after controlled cortical impact (CCI) traumatic brain injury (TBI) plus hemorrhagic shock (CCI+HS). The RBM5/10 staining was higher 48  to 72 hours after injury and appeared to be increased in neuronal nuclei of the hippocampus. We also measured levels of other nuclear SFs known to be essential for cellular viability and report that splicing factor 1 (SF1) but not splicing factor 3A (SF3A) decreased 4  to 72 hours after injury. Finally, we confirm that RBM5/10 regulate protein expression of several target genes including caspase-2, cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein (c-FLIP), LETM1 Domain-Containing Protein 1 (LETMD1), and amyloid precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2) in neuronal cells. Knockdown of RBM5 appeared to increase expression of c-FLIP(s), LETMD1, and APLP2 but decrease caspase-2. PMID:25586139

  12. CUDC-101, a Novel Inhibitor of Full-Length Androgen Receptor (flAR) and Androgen Receptor Variant 7 (AR-V7) Activity: Mechanism of Action and In Vivo Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huiying; Mediwala, Sanjay N; Szafran, Adam T; Mancini, Michael A; Marcelli, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is an androgen receptor (AR)-dependent disease expected to cause the death of more than 27,000 Americans in 2015. There are only a few available treatments for CRPC, making the discovery of new drugs an urgent need. We report that CUDC-101 (an inhibitor od HER2/NEU, EGFR and HDAC) inhibits both the full length AR (flAR) and the AR variant AR-V7. This observation prompted experiments to discover which of the known activities of CUDC-101 is responsible for the inhibition of flAR/AR-V7 signaling. We used pharmacologic and genetic approaches, and found that the effect of CUDC-101 on flAR and AR-V7 was duplicated only by other HDAC inhibitors, or by silencing the HDAC isoforms HDAC5 and HDAC10. We observed that CUDC-101 treatment or AR-V7 silencing by RNAi equally reduced transcription of the AR-V7 target gene, PSA, without affecting viability of 22Rv1 cells. However, when cellular proliferation was used as an end point, CUDC-101 was more effective than AR-V7 silencing, raising the prospect that CUDC-101 has additional targets beside AR-V7. In support of this, we found that CUDC-101 increased the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, and decreased that of the oncogene HER2/NEU. To determine if CUDC-101 reduces growth in a xenograft model of prostate cancer, this drug was given for 14 days to castrated male SCID mice inoculated with 22Rv1 cells. Compared to vehicle, CUDC-101 reduced xenograft growth in a statistically significant way, and without macroscopic side effects. These studies demonstrate that CUDC-101 inhibits wtAR and AR-V7 activity and growth of 22Rv1 cells in vitro and in vivo. These effects result from the ability of CUDC-101 to target not only HDAC signaling, which was associated with decreased flAR and AR-V7 activity, but multiple additional oncogenic pathways. These observations raise the possibility that treatment of CRPC may be achieved by using similarly multi-targeted approaches.

  13. SR proteins Asf/SF2 and 9G8 interact to activate enhancer-dependent intron D splicing of bovine growth hormone pre-mRNA in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Li, X; Shambaugh, M E; Rottman, F M; Bokar, J A

    2000-01-01

    The alternative splicing of the last intron (intron D) of bovine growth hormone (bGH) pre-mRNA requires a down-stream exonic splicing enhancer (FP/ESE). The presence of at least one SR protein has been shown to be essential for FP/ESE function and splicing of intron D in in vitro splicing assays. However, in vitro reconstitution of splicing using individual purified SR proteins may not accurately reflect the true complexity of alternative splicing in an intact nucleus, where multiple SR proteins in varying amounts are likely to be available simultaneously. Here, a panel of recombinant baculovirus-expressed SR proteins was produced and tested for the ability to activate FP/ESE-dependent splicing. Individual recombinant SR proteins differed significantly in their activity in promoting intron D splicing. Among the recombinant SR proteins tested, SRp55 was the most active, SC35 showed very little activity, and ASF/SF2 and 9G8 individually had intermediate activity. At least one SR protein (ASF/SF2) bound to the FP/ESE with characteristics of a cooperative interaction. Most interestingly, low concentrations of ASF/SF2 and 9G8 acted synergistically to activate intron D splicing. This was due in part to synergistic binding to the FP/ESE. Splicing of bGH intron D is inherently complex, and is likely controlled by an interaction of the FP/ESE with several trans-acting protein factors acting both independently and cooperatively. This level of complexity may be required for precise control of alternative splicing by an exon sequence, which simultaneously is constrained to maintain translational integrity of the mature mRNA. PMID:11142383

  14. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-10-29

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging.

  15. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging. PMID:26529031

  16. NBBS isolated from Pygeum africanum bark exhibits androgen antagonistic activity, inhibits AR nuclear translocation and prostate cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Maria; Schleich, Sonja; Roell, Daniela; Schubert, Undine; Tanner, Tamzin; Claessens, Frank; Matusch, Rudolf; Baniahmad, Aria

    2010-12-01

    Extracts from Pygeum africanum are used in the treatment of prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa). The ligand-activated human androgen receptor (AR) is known to control the growth of the prostate gland. Inhibition of human AR is therefore a major goal in treatment of patients. Here, we characterize the compound N-butylbenzene-sulfonamide (NBBS) isolated from P. africanum as a specific AR antagonist. This antihormonal activity inhibits AR- and progesterone receptor- (PR) mediated transactivation, but not the related human glucocorticoid receptor (GR) or the estrogen receptors (ERα or ERβ). Importantly, NBBS inhibits both endogenous PSA expression and growth of human PCa cells. Mechanistically, NBBS binds to AR and inhibits its translocation to the cell nucleus. Furthermore, using a battery of chemically synthesized derivatives of NBBS we revealed important structural aspects for androgen antagonism and have identified more potent AR antagonistic compounds. Our data suggest that NBBS is one of the active compounds of P. africanum bark and may serve as a naturally occurring, novel therapeutic agent for treatment of prostatic diseases. Thus, NBBS and its derivatives may serve as novel chemical platform for treatment prostatitis, BPH and PCa.

  17. Estimation of (41)Ar activity concentration and release rate from the TRIGA Mark-II research reactor.

    PubMed

    Hoq, M Ajijul; Soner, M A Malek; Rahman, A; Salam, M A; Islam, S M A

    2016-03-01

    The BAEC TRIGA research reactor (BTRR) is the only nuclear reactor in Bangladesh. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Regulatory Authority (BAERA) regulations require that nuclear reactor licensees undertake all reasonable precautions to protect the environment and the health and safety of persons, including identifying, controlling and monitoring the release of nuclear substances to the environment. The primary activation product of interest in terms of airborne release from the reactor is (41)Ar. (41)Ar is a noble gas readily released from the reactor stacks and most has not decayed by the time it moves offsite with normal wind speed. Initially (41)Ar is produced from irradiation of dissolved air in the primary water which eventually transfers into the air in the reactor bay. In this study, the airborne radioisotope (41)Ar generation concentration, ground level concentration and release rate from the BTRR bay region are evaluated theoretically during the normal reactor operation condition by several governing equations. This theoretical calculation eventually minimizes the doubt about radiological safety to determine the radiation level for (41)Ar activity whether it is below the permissible limit or not. Results show that the estimated activity for (41)Ar is well below the maximum permissible concentration limit set by the regulatory body, which is an assurance for the reactor operating personnel and general public. Thus the analysis performed within this paper is so much effective in the sense of ensuring radiological safety for working personnel and the environment.

  18. Estimation of (41)Ar activity concentration and release rate from the TRIGA Mark-II research reactor.

    PubMed

    Hoq, M Ajijul; Soner, M A Malek; Rahman, A; Salam, M A; Islam, S M A

    2016-03-01

    The BAEC TRIGA research reactor (BTRR) is the only nuclear reactor in Bangladesh. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Regulatory Authority (BAERA) regulations require that nuclear reactor licensees undertake all reasonable precautions to protect the environment and the health and safety of persons, including identifying, controlling and monitoring the release of nuclear substances to the environment. The primary activation product of interest in terms of airborne release from the reactor is (41)Ar. (41)Ar is a noble gas readily released from the reactor stacks and most has not decayed by the time it moves offsite with normal wind speed. Initially (41)Ar is produced from irradiation of dissolved air in the primary water which eventually transfers into the air in the reactor bay. In this study, the airborne radioisotope (41)Ar generation concentration, ground level concentration and release rate from the BTRR bay region are evaluated theoretically during the normal reactor operation condition by several governing equations. This theoretical calculation eventually minimizes the doubt about radiological safety to determine the radiation level for (41)Ar activity whether it is below the permissible limit or not. Results show that the estimated activity for (41)Ar is well below the maximum permissible concentration limit set by the regulatory body, which is an assurance for the reactor operating personnel and general public. Thus the analysis performed within this paper is so much effective in the sense of ensuring radiological safety for working personnel and the environment. PMID:26736180

  19. Active control of divertor asymmetry on EAST by localized D2 and Ar puffing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongsheng; Guo, Houyang; Wang, Huiqian; Luo, Guangnan; Wu, Zhenwei; Wu, Jinhua; Gao, Wei; Wang, Liang; Li, Qiang; East Team

    2011-03-01

    The divertor asymmetry in particle and power fluxes has been investigated on the EAST superconducting tokamak [S. Wu and EAST Team, Fusion Eng. Des. 82, 463 (2007)] for both single null (SN) and double null (DN) divertor configurations. D2 and Ar puffing at various divertor locations has also been explored as an active means to reduce peak target heat load and control divertor asymmetry. For SN, peak heat load on the outer divertor target is 2-3 times that on the inner divertor target under typical ohmic plasma conditions. DN operation leads to a stronger in-out asymmetry favoring the outer divertor. D2 and Ar puffing promotes partial detachment near the strike points, greatly reducing peak target heat load (over 50%), while the far-SOL divertor plasma remains attached. What is remarkable is that the particle flux is even increased away from the strike points when the B×∇B drift is directed toward the divertor target, thus facilitating particle removal.

  20. The importance of non-nuclear AR signaling in prostate cancer progression and therapeutic resistance.

    PubMed

    Zarif, Jelani C; Miranti, Cindy K

    2016-05-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) remains the major oncogenic driver of prostate cancer, as evidenced by the efficacy of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in naïve patients, and the continued effectiveness of second generation ADTs in castration resistant disease. However, current ADTs are limited to interfering with AR ligand binding, either through suppression of androgen production or the use of competitive antagonists. Recent studies demonstrate 1) the expression of constitutively active AR splice variants that no longer depend on androgen, and 2) the ability of AR to signal in the cytoplasm independently of its transcriptional activity (non-genomic); thus highlighting the need to consider other ways to target AR. Herein, we review canonical AR signaling, but focus on AR non-genomic signaling, some of its downstream targets and how these effectors contribute to prostate cancer cell behavior. The goals of this review are to 1) re-highlight the continued importance of AR in prostate cancer as the primary driver, 2) discuss the limitations in continuing to use ligand binding as the sole targeting mechanism, 3) discuss the implications of AR non-genomic signaling in cancer progression and therapeutic resistance, and 4) address the need to consider non-genomic AR signaling mechanisms and pathways as a viable targeting strategy in combination with current therapies.

  1. Requirement of a novel splicing variant of human histone deacetylase 6 for TGF-{beta}1-mediated gene activation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Yan; Nguyen, Hong T.; Lasky, Joseph A.; Cao, Subing; Li, Cui; Hu, Jiyao; Guo, Xinyue; Burow, Matthew E.; Shan, Bin

    2010-02-19

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) belongs to the family of class IIb HDACs and predominantly deacetylates non-histone proteins in the cytoplasm via the C-terminal deacetylase domain of its two tandem deacetylase domains. HDAC6 modulates fundamental cellular processes via deacetylation of {alpha}-tubulin, cortactin, molecular chaperones, and other peptides. Our previous study indicates that HDAC6 mediates TGF-{beta}1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in A549 cells. In the current study, we identify a novel splicing variant of human HDAC6, hHDAC6p114. The hHDAC6p114 mRNA arises from incomplete splicing and encodes a truncated isoform of the hHDAC6p114 protein of 114 kDa when compared to the major isoform hHDAC6p131. The hHDAC6p114 protein lacks the first 152 amino acids from N-terminus in the hHDAC6p131 protein, which harbors a nuclear export signal peptide and 76 amino acids of the N-terminal deacetylase domain. hHDAC6p114 is intact in its deacetylase activity against {alpha}-tubulin. The expression hHDAC6p114 is elevated in a MCF-7 derivative that exhibits an EMT-like phenotype. Moreover, hHDAC6p114 is required for TGF-{beta}1-activated gene expression associated with EMT in A549 cells. Taken together, our results implicate that expression and function of hHDAC6p114 is differentially regulated when compared to hHDAC6p131.

  2. Alternative splicing of human papillomavirus type-16 E6/E6* early mRNA is coupled to EGF signaling via Erk1/2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Simone; Arce, Johanna De-Castro; Langbein, Lutz; Steenbergen, Renske D. M.; Rösl, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Certain types of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are etiologically linked to cervical cancer. Their transforming capacity is encoded by a polycistronic premRNA, where alternative splicing leads to the translation of functional distinct proteins such as E6, E6*, and E7. Here we show that splicing of HPV16 E6/E7 ORF cassette is regulated by the epidermal growth factor (EGF) pathway. The presence of EGF was coupled to preferential E6 expression, whereas depletion of EGF, or treatment with EGF receptor (EGFR) neutralizing antibodies or the EGFR inhibitor tyrphostin AG1478, resulted in E6 exon exclusion in favor of E6*. As a consequence, increased p53 levels and enhanced translation of E7 with a subsequent reduction of the retinoblastoma protein pRb could be discerned. E6 exon exclusion upon EGF depletion was independent from promoter usage, mRNA stability, or selective mRNA transport. Time-course experiments and incubation with cycloheximide demonstrated that E6 alternative splicing is a direct and reversible effect of EGF signal transduction, not depending on de novo protein synthesis. Within this process, Erk1/2-kinase activation was the critical event for E6 exon inclusion, mediated by the upstream MAP kinase MEK1/2. Moreover, siRNA knockdown experiments revealed an involvement of splicing factors hnRNPA1 and hnRNPA2 in E6 exon exclusion, whereas the splicing factors Brm and Sam68 were found to promote E6 exon inclusion. Because there is a natural gradient of EGF and EGF receptor expression in the stratified epithelium, it is reasonable to assume that EGF modulates E6/E7 splicing during the viral life cycle and transformation. PMID:20351270

  3. Traceless splicing enabled by substrate-induced activation of the Nostoc punctiforme Npu DnaE intein after mutation of a catalytic cysteine to serine.

    PubMed

    Cheriyan, Manoj; Chan, Siu-Hong; Perler, Francine

    2014-12-12

    Inteins self-catalytically cleave out of precursor proteins while ligating the surrounding extein fragments with a native peptide bond. Much attention has been lavished on these molecular marvels with the hope of understanding and harnessing their chemistry for novel biochemical transformations including coupling peptides from synthetic or biological origins and controlling protein function. Despite an abundance of powerful applications, the use of inteins is still hampered by limitations in our understanding of their specificity (defined as flanking sequences that permit splicing) and the challenge of inserting inteins into target proteins. We examined the frequently used Nostoc punctiforme Npu DnaE intein after the C-extein cysteine nucleophile (Cys+1) was mutated to serine or threonine. Previous studies demonstrated reduced rates and/or splicing yields with the Npu DnaE intein after mutation of Cys+1 to Ser+1. In this study, genetic selection identified extein sequences with Ser+1 that enabled the Npu DnaE intein to splice with only a 5-fold reduction in rate compared to the wild-type Cys+1 intein and without mutation of the intein itself to activate Ser+1 as a nucleophile. Three different proteins spliced efficiently after insertion of the intein flanked by the selected sequences. We then used this selected specificity to achieve traceless splicing in a targeted enzyme at a location predicted by primary sequence similarity to only the selected C-extein sequence. This study highlights the latent catalytic potential of the Npu DnaE intein to splice with an alternative nucleophile and enables broader intein utility by increasing insertion site choices.

  4. Serine Arginine-Rich Splicing Factor 1 (SRSF1) Contributes to the Transcriptional Activation of CD3ζ in Human T Cells.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Vaishali R; Gillooly, Andrew R; Perl, Marcel A; Markopoulou, Anastasia; Tsokos, George C

    2015-01-01

    T lymphocytes from many patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) express decreased levels of the T cell receptor (TCR)-associated CD3 zeta (ζ) signaling chain, a feature directly linked to their abnormal phenotype and function. Reduced mRNA expression partly due to defective alternative splicing, contributes to the reduced expression of CD3ζ chain. We previously identified by oligonucleotide pulldown and mass spectrometry approaches, the serine arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) binding to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of CD3ζ mRNA. We showed that SRSF1 regulates alternative splicing of the 3'UTR of CD3ζ to promote expression of the normal full length 3`UTR over an unstable splice variant in human T cells. In this study we show that SRSF1 regulates transcriptional activation of CD3ζ. Specifically, overexpression and silencing of SRSF1 respectively increases and decreases CD3ζ total mRNA and protein expression in Jurkat and primary T cells. Using promoter-luciferase assays, we show that SRSF1 enhances transcriptional activity of the CD3ζ promoter in a dose dependent manner. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that SRSF1 is recruited to the CD3ζ promoter. These results indicate that SRSF1 contributes to transcriptional activation of CD3ζ. Thus our study identifies a novel mechanism whereby SRSF1 regulates CD3ζ expression in human T cells and may contribute to the T cell defect in SLE.

  5. AR-V7 and prostate cancer: The watershed for treatment selection?

    PubMed

    Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Brunelli, Matteo; Buti, Sebastiano; Modena, Alessandra; Nabissi, Massimo; Artibani, Walter; Martignoni, Guido; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a key role in progression to metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Despite the recent progress in targeting persistent AR activity with the next-generation hormonal therapies (abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide), resistance to these agents limits therapeutic efficacy for many patients. Several explanations for response and/or resistance to abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide are emerging, but growing interest is focusing on importance of AR splice variants (AR-Vs) and in particular of AR-V7. Increasing evidences highlight the concept that variant expression could be used as a potential predictive biomarker and a therapeutic target in advanced prostate cancer. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of treatment resistance or sensitivity can help to achieve a more effective management of mCRPC, increasing clinical outcomes and representing a promising and engaging area of prostate cancer research.

  6. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in the human pituitary gland: expression and splicing pattern in adenomas versus normal pituitary.

    PubMed

    Occhi, G; Albiger, N; Berlucchi, S; Gardiman, M; Scanarini, M; Scienza, R; Fassina, A; Mantero, F; Scaroni, C

    2007-07-01

    Pituitary adenomas are slow-growing tumours arising within the pituitary gland. If secreting, they give rise to well-known syndromes such as Cushing's disease or acromegaly; when hormonally inactive, they come to clinical attention often with local mass effects or pituitary deficiency. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a nuclear hormone receptor with a key role in fat and glucose metabolism, but also involved in several neoplasia, has recently been detected in pituitary adenomas. In the present study, we evaluated the occurrence and splicing profile of PPARgamma in 43 cases of pituitary adenoma of different subtypes and compared it to 12 normal pituitary glands. By real-time polymerase chain reaction, PPARgamma was expressed as much in adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-secreting and ACTH-silent adenomas as in controls, with a moderate underexpression in somatotrophinomas and prolactinomas and overexpression in 54% of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPA). There was no apparent qualitative change in the splicing profile of pathological pituitary glands, nor was the presence of specific isoforms with dominant negative effects against PPARgamma detected. Western blotting revealed similar expression levels in the different subgroups of pituitary adenomas and normal glands. Immunohistochemistry confirmed PPARgamma expression in approximately one-half of analysed samples. The intra- and intergroup differences observed in pituitary adenomas may represent new elements in the process of understanding the different clinical responses of Cushing's and Nelson patients to PPARgamma-ligand treatment. Moreover, the higher level of PPARgamma expression detected in the NFPA subgroup may suggest its possible role as a molecular target in these pituitary adenomas, paving the way for investigations on the effectiveness of treatment with thiazolidinediones in such patients. PMID:17561883

  7. Palmitoylation of the β4-subunit regulates surface expression of large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel splice variants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lie; Bi, Danlei; Tian, Lijun; McClafferty, Heather; Steeb, Franziska; Ruth, Peter; Knaus, Hans Guenther; Shipston, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    Regulatory β-subunits of large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels play an important role in generating functional diversity and control of cell surface expression of the pore forming α-subunits. However, in contrast to α-subunits, the role of reversible post-translational modification of intracellular residues on β-subunit function is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the human β4-subunit is S-acylated (palmitoylated) on a juxtamembrane cysteine residue (Cys-193) in the intracellular C terminus of the regulatory β-subunit. β4-Subunit palmitoylation is important for cell surface expression and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) exit of the β4-subunit alone. Importantly, palmitoylated β4-subunits promote the ER exit and surface expression of the pore-forming α-subunit, whereas β4-subunits that cannot be palmitoylated do not increase ER exit or surface expression of α-subunits. Strikingly, however, this palmitoylation- and β4-dependent enhancement of α-subunit surface expression was only observed in α-subunits that contain a putative trafficking motif (… REVEDEC) at the very C terminus of the α-subunit. Engineering this trafficking motif to other C-terminal α-subunit splice variants results in α-subunits with reduced surface expression that can be rescued by palmitoylated, but not depalmitoylated, β4-subunits. Our data reveal a novel mechanism by which palmitoylated β4-subunit controls surface expression of BK channels through masking of a trafficking motif in the C terminus of the α-subunit. As palmitoylation is dynamic, this mechanism would allow precise control of specific splice variants to the cell surface. Our data provide new insights into how complex interplay between the repertoire of post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms controls cell surface expression of BK channels.

  8. Understanding splicing regulation through RNA splicing maps.

    PubMed

    Witten, Joshua T; Ule, Jernej

    2011-03-01

    Alternative splicing is a highly regulated process that greatly increases the proteome diversity and plays an important role in cellular differentiation and disease. Interactions between RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and pre-mRNA are the principle regulator of splicing decisions. Findings from recent genome-wide studies of protein-RNA interactions have been combined with assays of the global effects of RBPs on splicing to create RNA splicing maps. These maps integrate information from all pre-mRNAs regulated by single RBPs to identify the global positioning principles guiding splicing regulation. Recent studies using this approach have identified a set of positional principles that are shared between diverse RBPs. Here, we discuss how insights from RNA splicing maps of different RBPs inform the mechanistic models of splicing regulation.

  9. Sintokamide A Is a Novel Antagonist of Androgen Receptor That Uniquely Binds Activation Function-1 in Its Amino-terminal Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Banuelos, Carmen A.; Tavakoli, Iran; Tien, Amy H.; Caley, Daniel P.; Mawji, Nasrin R.; Li, Zhenzhen; Wang, Jun; Yang, Yu Chi; Imamura, Yusuke; Yan, Luping; Wen, Jian Guo; Andersen, Raymond J.; Sadar, Marianne D.

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a validated drug target for all stages of prostate cancer including metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). All current hormone therapies for CRPC target the C-terminal ligand-binding domain of AR and ultimately all fail with resumed AR transcriptional activity. Within the AR N-terminal domain (NTD) is activation function-1 (AF-1) that is essential for AR transcriptional activity. Inhibitors of AR AF-1 would potentially block most AR mechanisms of resistance including constitutively active AR splice variants that lack the ligand-binding domain. Here we provide evidence that sintokamide A (SINT1) binds AR AF-1 region to specifically inhibit transactivation of AR NTD. Consistent with SINT1 targeting AR AF-1, it attenuated transcriptional activities of both full-length AR and constitutively active AR splice variants, which correlated with inhibition of growth of enzalutamide-resistant prostate cancer cells expressing AR splice variants. In vivo, SINT1 caused regression of CRPC xenografts and reduced expression of prostate-specific antigen, a gene transcriptionally regulated by AR. Inhibition of AR activity by SINT1 was additive to EPI-002, a known AR AF-1 inhibitor that is in clinical trials (NCT02606123). This implies that SINT1 binds to a site on AF-1 that is unique from EPI. Consistent with this suggestion, these two compounds showed differences in blocking AR interaction with STAT3. This work provides evidence that the intrinsically disordered NTD of AR is druggable and that SINT1 analogs may provide a novel scaffold for drug development for the treatment of prostate cancer or other diseases of the AR axis. PMID:27576691

  10. Regulatory Implications of Non-Trivial Splicing: Isoform 3 of Rab1A Shows Enhanced Basal Activity and Is Not Controlled by Accessory Proteins.

    PubMed

    Schöppner, Patricia; Csaba, Gergely; Braun, Tatjana; Daake, Marina; Richter, Bettina; Lange, Oliver F; Zacharias, Martin; Zimmer, Ralf; Haslbeck, Martin

    2016-04-24

    Alternative splicing often affects structured and highly conserved regions of proteins, generating so called non-trivial splicing variants of unknown structure and cellular function. The human small G-protein Rab1A is involved in the regulation of the vesicle transfer from the ER to Golgi. A conserved non-trivial splice variant lacks nearly 40% of the sequence of the native Rab1A, including most of the regulatory interaction sites. We show that this variant of Rab1A represents a stable and folded protein, which is still able to bind nucleotides and co-localizes with membranes. Nevertheless, it should be mentioned that compared to other wild-typeRabGTPases, the measured nucleotide binding affinities are dramatically reduced in the variant studied. Furthermore, the Rab1A variant forms hetero-dimers with wild-type Rab1A and its presence in the cell enhances the efficiency of alkaline phosphatase secretion. However, this variant shows no specificity for GXP nucleotides, a constantly enhanced GTP hydrolysis activity and is no longer controlled by GEF or GAP proteins, indicating a new regulatory mechanism for the Rab1A cycle via alternative non-trivial splicing. PMID:26953259

  11. Multiple splice variants of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide type 1 receptor detected by RT-PCR in single rat pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Bresson-Bépoldin, L; Jacquot, M C; Schlegel, W; Rawlings, S R

    1998-10-01

    Alternative splicing of the rat type 1 pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) receptor (PVR1) produces variants that couple either to both adenylyl cyclase (AC) and phospholipase C (PLC) (PVR1 short, PVR1 hop, PVR1 hiphop), or to AC alone (PVR1 hip). We have previously shown that populations of clonal alphaT3-1 gonadotrophs express PVR1 hop and PVR1 short mRNAs, whereas clonal GH4C1 somatotrophs do not. Here we have used the single cell RT-PCR technique to investigate whether normal rat gonadotrophs and somatotrophs express PVR1 mRNA, whether a single cell co-expresses multiple splice variant forms, and whether differential PVR1 mRNA expression correlates with differences in PACAP-stimulated Ca2+ signalling. We found that individual rat gonadotrophs expressed mRNA either for PVR1 hop, for PVR1 short, or co-expressed the two forms. Although we found no differences between the splice variant(s) expressed and the characteristics of PACAP-stimulated Ca2+ responses, the expression of PVR1 mRNA is consistent with the known PACAP stimulation of the PLC system in gonadotrophs. Individual rat somatotrophs also expressed PVR1 hop or PVR1 short (but not PVR1 hip) mRNAs although these forms were never co-expressed. The expression of PVR1 mRNA in somatotrophs can explain in part the activation by PACAP of the AC system in such cells. In conclusion, the single cell RT-PCR technique was used to demonstrate expression of multiple PVR1 splice variants in single identified pituitary cells. These findings open up important questions on the role of alternative splicing in cell biology. PMID:9801454

  12. Multiple splice variants of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide type 1 receptor detected by RT-PCR in single rat pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Bresson-Bépoldin, L; Jacquot, M C; Schlegel, W; Rawlings, S R

    1998-10-01

    Alternative splicing of the rat type 1 pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) receptor (PVR1) produces variants that couple either to both adenylyl cyclase (AC) and phospholipase C (PLC) (PVR1 short, PVR1 hop, PVR1 hiphop), or to AC alone (PVR1 hip). We have previously shown that populations of clonal alphaT3-1 gonadotrophs express PVR1 hop and PVR1 short mRNAs, whereas clonal GH4C1 somatotrophs do not. Here we have used the single cell RT-PCR technique to investigate whether normal rat gonadotrophs and somatotrophs express PVR1 mRNA, whether a single cell co-expresses multiple splice variant forms, and whether differential PVR1 mRNA expression correlates with differences in PACAP-stimulated Ca2+ signalling. We found that individual rat gonadotrophs expressed mRNA either for PVR1 hop, for PVR1 short, or co-expressed the two forms. Although we found no differences between the splice variant(s) expressed and the characteristics of PACAP-stimulated Ca2+ responses, the expression of PVR1 mRNA is consistent with the known PACAP stimulation of the PLC system in gonadotrophs. Individual rat somatotrophs also expressed PVR1 hop or PVR1 short (but not PVR1 hip) mRNAs although these forms were never co-expressed. The expression of PVR1 mRNA in somatotrophs can explain in part the activation by PACAP of the AC system in such cells. In conclusion, the single cell RT-PCR technique was used to demonstrate expression of multiple PVR1 splice variants in single identified pituitary cells. These findings open up important questions on the role of alternative splicing in cell biology.

  13. A novel human aquaporin-4 splice variant exhibits a dominant-negative activity: a new mechanism to regulate water permeability

    PubMed Central

    De Bellis, Manuela; Pisani, Francesco; Mola, Maria Grazia; Basco, Davide; Catalano, Francesco; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Svelto, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Two major isoforms of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) have been described in human tissue. Here we report the identification and functional analysis of an alternatively spliced transcript of human AQP4, AQP4-Δ4, that lacks exon 4. In transfected cells AQP4-Δ4 is mainly retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and shows no water transport properties. When AQP4-Δ4 is transfected into cells stably expressing functional AQP4, the surface expression of the full-length protein is reduced. Furthermore, the water transport activity of the cotransfectants is diminished in comparison to transfectants expressing only AQP4. The observed down-regulation of both the expression and water channel activity of AQP4 is likely to originate from a dominant-negative effect caused by heterodimerization between AQP4 and AQP4-Δ4, which was detected in coimmunoprecipitation studies. In skeletal muscles, AQP4-Δ4 mRNA expression inversely correlates with the level of AQP4 protein and is physiologically associated with different types of skeletal muscles. The expression of AQP4-Δ4 may represent a new regulatory mechanism through which the cell-surface expression and therefore the activity of AQP4 can be physiologically modulated. PMID:24356448

  14. Galeterone and VNPT55 induce proteasomal degradation of AR/AR-V7, induce significant apoptosis via cytochrome c release and suppress growth of castration resistant prostate cancer xenografts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kwegyir-Afful, Andrew K; Ramalingam, Senthilmurugan; Purushottamachar, Puranik; Ramamurthy, Vidya P; Njar, Vincent C O

    2015-09-29

    Galeterone (Gal) is a first-in-class multi-target oral small molecule that will soon enter pivotal phase III clinical trials in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients. Gal disrupts androgen receptor (AR) signaling via inhibition of CYP17, AR antagonism and AR degradation. Resistance to current therapy is attributed to up-regulation of full-length AR (fAR), splice variants AR (AR-Vs) and AR mutations. The effects of gal and VNPT55 were analyzed on f-AR and AR-Vs (AR-V7/ARv567es) in LNCaP, CWR22Rv1 and DU145 (transfected with AR-Vs) human PC cells in vitro and CRPC tumor xenografts. Galeterone/VNPT55 decreased fAR/AR-V7 mRNA levels and implicates Mdm2/CHIP enhanced ubiquitination of posttranslational modified receptors, targeting them for proteasomal degradation. Gal and VNPT55 also induced significant apoptosis in PC cells via increased Bax/Bcl2 ratio, cytochrome-c release with concomitant cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP. More importantly, gal and VNPT55 exhibited strong in vivo anti-CRPC activities, with no apparent host toxicities. This study demonstrate that gal and VNPT55 utilize cell-based mechanisms to deplete both fAR and AR-Vs. Importantly, the preclinical activity profiles, including profound apoptotic induction and inhibition of CRPC xenografts suggest that these agents offer considerable promise as new therapeutics for patients with CRPC and those resistant to current therapy.

  15. Extensive in silico analysis of NF1 splicing defects uncovers determinants for splicing outcome upon 5' splice-site disruption.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, K; Roca, X; Beiglböck, H; Callens, T; Etzler, J; Rao, A R; Krainer, A R; Fonatsch, C; Messiaen, L

    2007-06-01

    We describe 94 pathogenic NF1 gene alterations in a cohort of 97 Austrian neurofibromatosis type 1 patients meeting the NIH criteria. All mutations were fully characterized at the genomic and mRNA levels. Over half of the patients carried novel mutations, and only a quarter carried recurrent minor-lesion mutations at 16 mutational warm spots. The remaining patients carried NF1 microdeletions (7%) and rare recurring mutations. Thirty-six of the mutations (38%) altered pre-mRNA splicing, and fall into five groups: exon skipping resulting from mutations at authentic splice sites (type I), cryptic exon inclusion caused by deep intronic mutations (type II), creation of de novo splice sites causing loss of exonic sequences (type III), activation of cryptic splice sites upon authentic splice-site disruption (type IV), and exonic sequence alterations causing exon skipping (type V). Extensive in silico analyses of 37 NF1 exons and surrounding intronic sequences suggested that the availability of a cryptic splice site combined with a strong natural upstream 3' splice site (3'ss)is the main determinant of cryptic splice-site activation upon 5' splice-site disruption. Furthermore, the exonic sequences downstream of exonic cryptic 5' splice sites (5'ss) resemble intronic more than exonic sequences with respect to exonic splicing enhancer and silencer density, helping to distinguish between exonic cryptic and pseudo 5'ss. This study provides valuable predictors for the splicing pathway used upon 5'ss mutation, and underscores the importance of using RNA-based techniques, together with methods to identify microdeletions and intragenic copy-number changes, for effective and reliable NF1 mutation detection.

  16. Differential activation of human constitutive androstane receptor and its SV23 and SV24 splice variants by rilpivirine and etravirine

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Devinder; Lau, Aik Jiang; Sherman, Matthew A; Chang, Thomas K H

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Rilpivirine and etravirine are second-generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) indicated for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates the expression of genes involved in various biological processes, including the transport and biotransformation of drugs. We investigated the effect of rilpivirine and etravirine on the activity of the wild-type human CAR (hCAR-WT) and its hCAR-SV23 and hCAR-SV24 splice variants, and compared it with first-generation NNRTIs (efavirenz, nevirapine, and delavirdine). Experimental Approach Receptor activation, ligand-binding domain (LBD) transactivation, and co-activator recruitment were investigated in transiently transfected, NNRTI-treated HepG2 cells. Nuclear translocation of green fluorescent protein-tagged hCAR-WT and CYP2B6 gene expression were assessed in NNRTI-treated human hepatocytes. Key Results Rilpivirine and etravirine activated hCAR-WT, but not hCAR-SV23 or hCAR-SV24, and without transactivating the LBD or recruiting steroid receptor coactivators SRC-1, SRC-2, or SRC-3. Among the first-generation NNRTIs investigated, only efavirenz activated hCAR-WT, hCAR-SV23, and hCAR-SV24, but none of them transactivated the LBD of these receptors or substantively recruited SRC-1, SRC-2, or SRC-3. Rilpivirine, etravirine, and efavirenz triggered nuclear translocation of hCAR-WT and increased hCAR target gene (CYP2B6) expression. Conclusion and Implications NNRTIs activate hCAR-WT, hCAR-SV23, and hCAR-SV24 in a drug-specific and isoform-selective manner. The activation occurs by a mechanism that does not appear to involve binding to the LBD or recruitment of SRC-1, SRC-2, or SRC-3. PMID:25363652

  17. Control of adenovirus E1B mRNA synthesis by a shift in the activities of RNA splice sites.

    PubMed Central

    Montell, C; Fisher, E F; Caruthers, M H; Berk, A J

    1984-01-01

    The primary transcript from adenovirus 2 early region 1B (E1B) is processed by differential RNA splicing into two overlapping mRNAs, 13S and 22S. The 22S mRNA is the major E1B mRNA during the early phase of infection, whereas the 13S mRNA predominates during the late phase. In previous work, it has been shown that this shift in proportions of the E1B mRNAs is influenced by increased cytoplasmic stability of the 13S mRNA at late times in infection. Two observations presented here demonstrate that the increase in proportion of the 13S mRNA at late times is also regulated by a change in the specificity of RNA splicing. First, the relative concentrations of the 13S to 22S nuclear RNAs were not constant throughout infection but increased at late times. Secondly, studies with the mutant, adenovirus 2 pm2250 , provided evidence that there was an increased propensity to utilize a 5' splice in the region of the 13S 5' splice site at late times in infection. Adenovirus 2 pm2250 has a G----C transversion in the first base of E1B 13S mRNA intron preventing splicing of the 13S mRNA but not of the 22S mRNA. During the early phase of a pm2250 infection, the E1B primary transcripts were processed into the 22S mRNA only. However, during the late phase, when the 13S mRNA normally predominates, E1B primary transcripts were also processed by RNA splicing at two formerly unused or cryptic 5' splice sites. Both cryptic splice sites were located much closer to the disrupted 13S 5' splice site than to the 22S 5' splice site. Thus, the temporal increase in proportion of the 13S mRNA to the 22S mRNA is regulated by two processes, an increase in cytoplasmic stability of the 13S mRNA and an increased propensity to utilize the 13S 5' splice site during the late phase of infection. Adenovirus 2 pm2250 was not defective for productive infection of HeLa cells or for transformation of rat cells. Images PMID:6727875

  18. Cryptic splice sites and split genes

    PubMed Central

    Kapustin, Yuri; Chan, Elcie; Sarkar, Rupa; Wong, Frederick; Vorechovsky, Igor; Winston, Robert M.; Tatusova, Tatiana; Dibb, Nick J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new program called cryptic splice finder (CSF) that can reliably identify cryptic splice sites (css), so providing a useful tool to help investigate splicing mutations in genetic disease. We report that many css are not entirely dormant and are often already active at low levels in normal genes prior to their enhancement in genetic disease. We also report a fascinating correlation between the positions of css and introns, whereby css within the exons of one species frequently match the exact position of introns in equivalent genes from another species. These results strongly indicate that many introns were inserted into css during evolution and they also imply that the splicing information that lies outside some introns can be independently recognized by the splicing machinery and was in place prior to intron insertion. This indicates that non-intronic splicing information had a key role in shaping the split structure of eukaryote genes. PMID:21470962

  19. Ubiquitylation and activation of a Rab GTPase is promoted by a β₂AR-HACE1 complex.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Véronik; Degrandmaison, Jade; Marois, Sébastien; Robitaille, Mélanie; Génier, Samuel; Nadeau, Stéphanie; Angers, Stéphane; Parent, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    We and others have shown that trafficking of G-protein-coupled receptors is regulated by Rab GTPases. Cargo-mediated regulation of vesicular transport has received great attention lately. Rab GTPases, which form the largest branch of the Ras GTPase superfamily, regulate almost every step of vesicle-mediated trafficking. Rab GTPases are well-recognized targets of human diseases but their regulation and the mechanisms connecting them to cargo proteins are still poorly understood. Here, we show by overexpression and depletion studies that HACE1, a HECT-domain-containing ubiquitin ligase, promotes the recycling of the β₂-adrenergic receptor (β₂AR), a prototypical G-protein-coupled receptor, through a Rab11a-dependent mechanism. Interestingly, the β₂AR in conjunction with HACE1 triggered ubiquitylation of Rab11a, as observed by western blot analysis. LC-MS/MS experiments determined that Rab11a is ubiquitylated on Lys145. A Rab11a-K145R mutant failed to undergo β₂AR-HACE1-induced ubiquitylation and inhibited the HACE1-mediated recycling of the β₂AR. Rab11a, but not Rab11a-K145R, was activated by β₂AR-HACE1, indicating that ubiquitylation of Lys145 is involved in activation of Rab11a. Co-expression of β₂AR-HACE1 also potentiated ubiquitylation of Rab6a and Rab8a, but not of other Rab GTPases that were tested. We report a novel regulatory mechanism of Rab GTPases through their ubiquitylation, with associated functional effects demonstrated on Rab11a. This suggests a new pathway whereby a cargo protein, such as a G-protein-coupled receptor, can regulate its own trafficking by inducing the ubiquitylation and activation of a Rab GTPase.

  20. Titanium spallation cross sections between 30 and 584 MeV and Ar-39 activities on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinburnn, F.; Fireman, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    The production cross sections of Ar39 for Ti spallation at 45-, 319-, 433-, and 584-MeV proton energies were measured to be 0.37 + or - 0.09, 12.4 + or - 3.7, 9.1 + or - 2.7, and 17.8 + or - 6.2 mb, respectively. Normalized Ar39 production rates and activities are also derived for protons above 40 MeV and for three differential proton spectra of the type approximately E(- alpha). It is concluded that, even for samples of high-Ti content, Ti spallation by solar protons below 200-MeV energy does not contribute significantly to their Ar39 radioactivity.

  1. Forward Modeling of Synthetic EUV/SXR Emission from Solar Coronal Active Regions: Case of AR 11117

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, V. S.; Allred, J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in obtaining high spatial resolution images of the solar corona in the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) with Hinode, TRACE, SDO and recent Hi-C missions and soft X-ray (SXR) bands opened a new avenue in understanding the solar coronal heating, the major goal of solar physics. The data from EUV/SXR missions suggest that solar corona is a non-uniform environment structured into active regions (AR) represented by bundles magnetic loops heated to temperatures exceeding 5 MK. Any viable coronal heating model should be capable of reproducing EUV and SXR emission from coronal active regions well as dynamic activity. Measurements of emission measures (EM) for ARs provide clues to time dependence of the heating mechanism: static versus impulsive. While static equilibrium coronal loop models are successful in reproducing SXR emission within an AR, they cannot adequately predict the bright EUV loops. Meantime, impulsive heating is capable in reproducing both EUV and SXR loop emission. The major goal of this paper is to construct realistic synthetic EM images of specific solar corona active region, AR 11117 by using our 1D fully non-linear time-dependent single-fluid hydrodynamic code. We first construct a magnetic skeleton for the entire active region using the HMI/SDO magnetogram for AR 11117 and populate magnetic field lines with plasma. We then parametrically specify impulsive heating of individual strands (flux tubes) comprising coronal loops. Next, we simulated the response of the entire active region (with LOS projection effects) to the heating function (volumetric heating rate) scaled with magnetic field and spatial scale parameters and find the best match between synthetic and actual (reconstructed) DEMs obtained by SDO.

  2. Alternatively Spliced Tissue Factor Promotes Plaque Angiogenesis Through the Activation of HIF-1α and VEGF Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Giannarelli, Chiara; Alique, Matilde; Rodriguez, David T.; Yang, Dong Kwon; Jeong, Dongtak; Calcagno, Claudia; Hutter, Randolph; Millon, Antoine; Kovacic, Jason C.; Weber, Thomas; Faries, Peter L.; Soff, Gerald A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Hajjar, Roger J.; Fuster, Valentin; Badimon, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Alternatively Spliced Tissue Factor (asTF) is a novel isoform of full-length Tissue Factor (fl-TF) that exhibits angiogenic activity. Although asTF has been detected in human plaques, it is unknown whether its expression in atherosclerosis causes increased neovascularization and an advanced plaque phenotype. Methods and Results Carotid (n=10) and coronary specimens (n=8), from patients with stable or unstable angina, were classified as complicated or uncomplicated based on plaque morphology. Analysis of asTF expression and cell type –specific expression revealed a strong expression and co-localization of asTF with macrophages and neovessels within complicated, but not un-complicated, human plaques. Our results showed that the angiogenic activity of asTF is mediated via HIF-1α up-regulation through integrins and activation of phosphatidylinositol-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. HIF-1α up-regulation by asTF also was associated with increased VEGF expression in primary human endothelial cells, and VEGF-Trap significantly reduced the angiogenic effect of asTF in vivo. Furthermore, asTF gene transfer significantly increased neointima formation and neovascularization following carotid wire injury in ApoE−/− mice. Conclusions The results of this study provide strong evidence that asTF promotes neointima formation and angiogenesis in an experimental model of accelerated atherosclerosis. Herein, we demonstrate that the angiogenic effect of asTF is mediated via the activation of the HIF-1/VEGF signaling. This mechanism may be relevant to neovascularization, progression and associated complications of human atherosclerosis as suggested by the increased expression of asTF in complicated vs. uncomplicated human carotid and coronary plaques. PMID:25116956

  3. Alternative splicing of the androgen receptor in polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangfang; Pan, Jiexue; Liu, Ye; Meng, Qing; Lv, Pingping; Qu, Fan; Ding, Guo-Lian; Klausen, Christian; Leung, Peter C. K.; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Yao, Weimiao; Zhou, Cai-Yun; Shi, Biwei; Zhang, Junyu; Sheng, Jianzhong; Huang, Hefeng

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common female endocrine disorders and a leading cause of female subfertility. The mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of PCOS remains to be illustrated. Here, we identify two alternative splice variants (ASVs) of the androgen receptor (AR), insertion and deletion isoforms, in granulosa cells (GCs) in ∼62% of patients with PCOS. AR ASVs are strongly associated with remarkable hyperandrogenism and abnormalities in folliculogenesis, and are absent from all control subjects without PCOS. Alternative splicing dramatically alters genome-wide AR recruitment and androgen-induced expression of genes related to androgen metabolism and folliculogenesis in human GCs. These findings establish alternative splicing of AR in GCs as the major pathogenic mechanism for hyperandrogenism and abnormal folliculogenesis in PCOS. PMID:25825716

  4. Identification of a novel mouse Dbl proto-oncogene splice variant: evidence that SEC14 domain is involved in GEF activity regulation.

    PubMed

    Ognibene, Marzia; Vanni, Cristina; Blengio, Fabiola; Segalerba, Daniela; Mancini, Patrizia; De Marco, Patrizia; Torrisi, Maria R; Bosco, Maria C; Varesio, Luigi; Eva, Alessandra

    2014-03-10

    The Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor protoDbl is involved in different biochemical pathways affecting cell proliferation and migration. The N-terminal sequence of protoDbl contains negative regulatory elements that restrict the catalytic activity of the DH-PH module. Here, we report the identification of a new mouse protoDbl splice variant lacking exon 3. We found that the splice variant mRNA is expressed in the spleen and bone marrow lymphocytes, adrenal gland, gonads and brain. The protoDbl variant protein was detectable in the brain. The newly identified variant displays the disruption of the SEC14 domain, positioned on exons 2 and 3 in the protoDbl N-terminal region. We show here that an altered SEC14 sequence leads to enhanced Dbl translocation to the plasma membrane and to augmented transforming and exchange activity.

  5. Evolution of RNA-protein interactions: non-specific binding led to RNA splicing activity of fungal mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Lamech, Lilian T; Mallam, Anna L; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2014-12-01

    The Neurospora crassa mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (mtTyrRS; CYT-18 protein) evolved a new function as a group I intron splicing factor by acquiring the ability to bind group I intron RNAs and stabilize their catalytically active RNA structure. Previous studies showed: (i) CYT-18 binds group I introns by using both its N-terminal catalytic domain and flexibly attached C-terminal anticodon-binding domain (CTD); and (ii) the catalytic domain binds group I introns specifically via multiple structural adaptations that occurred during or after the divergence of Peziomycotina and Saccharomycotina. However, the function of the CTD and how it contributed to the evolution of splicing activity have been unclear. Here, small angle X-ray scattering analysis of CYT-18 shows that both CTDs of the homodimeric protein extend outward from the catalytic domain, but move inward to bind opposite ends of a group I intron RNA. Biochemical assays show that the isolated CTD of CYT-18 binds RNAs non-specifically, possibly contributing to its interaction with the structurally different ends of the intron RNA. Finally, we find that the yeast mtTyrRS, which diverged from Pezizomycotina fungal mtTyrRSs prior to the evolution of splicing activity, binds group I intron and other RNAs non-specifically via its CTD, but lacks further adaptations needed for group I intron splicing. Our results suggest a scenario of constructive neutral (i.e., pre-adaptive) evolution in which an initial non-specific interaction between the CTD of an ancestral fungal mtTyrRS and a self-splicing group I intron was "fixed" by an intron RNA mutation that resulted in protein-dependent splicing. Once fixed, this interaction could be elaborated by further adaptive mutations in both the catalytic domain and CTD that enabled specific binding of group I introns. Our results highlight a role for non-specific RNA binding in the evolution of RNA-binding proteins.

  6. Evolution of RNA-Protein Interactions: Non-Specific Binding Led to RNA Splicing Activity of Fungal Mitochondrial Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Lamech, Lilian T.; Mallam, Anna L.; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The Neurospora crassa mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (mtTyrRS; CYT-18 protein) evolved a new function as a group I intron splicing factor by acquiring the ability to bind group I intron RNAs and stabilize their catalytically active RNA structure. Previous studies showed: (i) CYT-18 binds group I introns by using both its N-terminal catalytic domain and flexibly attached C-terminal anticodon-binding domain (CTD); and (ii) the catalytic domain binds group I introns specifically via multiple structural adaptations that occurred during or after the divergence of Peziomycotina and Saccharomycotina. However, the function of the CTD and how it contributed to the evolution of splicing activity have been unclear. Here, small angle X-ray scattering analysis of CYT-18 shows that both CTDs of the homodimeric protein extend outward from the catalytic domain, but move inward to bind opposite ends of a group I intron RNA. Biochemical assays show that the isolated CTD of CYT-18 binds RNAs non-specifically, possibly contributing to its interaction with the structurally different ends of the intron RNA. Finally, we find that the yeast mtTyrRS, which diverged from Pezizomycotina fungal mtTyrRSs prior to the evolution of splicing activity, binds group I intron and other RNAs non-specifically via its CTD, but lacks further adaptations needed for group I intron splicing. Our results suggest a scenario of constructive neutral (i.e., pre-adaptive) evolution in which an initial non-specific interaction between the CTD of an ancestral fungal mtTyrRS and a self-splicing group I intron was “fixed” by an intron RNA mutation that resulted in protein-dependent splicing. Once fixed, this interaction could be elaborated by further adaptive mutations in both the catalytic domain and CTD that enabled specific binding of group I introns. Our results highlight a role for non-specific RNA binding in the evolution of RNA-binding proteins. PMID:25536042

  7. Cooperative magnetographic and radioastronomical investigations of the active solar region AR 3804 in July 1982.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, Sh. B.; Borovik, V. N.; Gel'Frejkh, G. B.; Bogod, V. M.; Korzhavin, A. N.; Petrov, Z. E.; Hofmann, A.; Bachmann, G.

    An analysis of the radiation peculiar source in the active solar region AR 3804 is presented using the magnetograms obtained at ZIAP AW DDR in Potsdam. The source is on the border line of polarities of the photospheric magnetic field above the filament and has the flux spectrum increasing with the wavelength, the brightness temperature at 4 cm being above 6×106K, and the logarithm spectrum slope in the shortwave region (λ = 2 cm) being about n = 10. The polarization degree within 2 - 4 cm is close to 30%. An analysis of magnetograms of the total field vector showed that in the source region there is observed a density increase of the longitudinal current in the photosphere, this increase having different signs on different sides from the zero magnetic line. Near the source there is observed a magnetic field hill of the reverse polarity relative to the background field. It is suggested to relate the source with the magnetic loop of the "twisted" field in the corona in which the local energy emission and corona heating due to dissipation of magnetic fields of complex configuration occur (apparently, with the current sheet formation).

  8. PROBA2/SWAP Observations of the Unusual Activity of AR12192

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, Daniel B.; West, Matthew J.

    2015-04-01

    AR 12192 was the most productive active region of the present solar cycle in terms of flares, but it exhibited many unusual properties. It announced its presence on 14 October 2014 with an eruption that led to the formation of perhaps the largest post-eruptive loop system seen in the solar corona in solar cycle 24. Later this region produced a series of large M- and X-class flares, most of which were essentially confined flares, not associated with any coronal mass ejection. During its second passage across the solar disk, it was associated with a huge region of open field that was observed extending to heights as great as 3 solar-radii in the EUV, some of the largest heights at which any EUV structure has been observed. We discuss our observations of this region with the SWAP EUV imager on board the PROBA2 spacecraft and the implications of the many unusual events and structures associated with this region on our understanding of the mechanisms, such as magnetic reconnection, that drive coronal dynamics, in particular those involved in the onset of flares and eruptions.

  9. The genetic basis for individual differences in mRNA splicing and APOBEC1 editing activity in murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Musa A.; Butty, Vincent; Jensen, Kirk D.C.; Saeij, Jeroen P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing and mRNA editing are known to contribute to transcriptome diversity. Although alternative splicing is pervasive and contributes to a variety of pathologies, including cancer, the genetic context for individual differences in isoform usage is still evolving. Similarly, although mRNA editing is ubiquitous and associated with important biological processes such as intracellular viral replication and cancer development, individual variations in mRNA editing and the genetic transmissibility of mRNA editing are equivocal. Here, we have used linkage analysis to show that both mRNA editing and alternative splicing are regulated by the macrophage genetic background and environmental cues. We show that distinct loci, potentially harboring variable splice factors, regulate the splicing of multiple transcripts. Additionally, we show that individual genetic variability at the Apobec1 locus results in differential rates of C-to-U(T) editing in murine macrophages; with mouse strains expressing mostly a truncated alternative transcript isoform of Apobec1 exhibiting lower rates of editing. As a proof of concept, we have used linkage analysis to identify 36 high-confidence novel edited sites. These results provide a novel and complementary method that can be used to identify C-to-U editing sites in individuals segregating at specific loci and show that, beyond DNA sequence and structural changes, differential isoform usage and mRNA editing can contribute to intra-species genomic and phenotypic diversity. PMID:24249727

  10. CALCULATING SEPARATE MAGNETIC FREE ENERGY ESTIMATES FOR ACTIVE REGIONS PRODUCING MULTIPLE FLARES: NOAA AR11158

    SciTech Connect

    Tarr, Lucas; Longcope, Dana; Millhouse, Margaret

    2013-06-10

    It is well known that photospheric flux emergence is an important process for stressing coronal fields and storing magnetic free energy, which may then be released during a flare. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captured the entire emergence of NOAA AR 11158. This region emerged as two distinct bipoles, possibly connected underneath the photosphere, yet characterized by different photospheric field evolutions and fluxes. The combined active region complex produced 15 GOES C-class, two M-class, and the X2.2 Valentine's Day Flare during the four days after initial emergence on 2011 February 12. The M and X class flares are of particular interest because they are nonhomologous, involving different subregions of the active region. We use a Magnetic Charge Topology together with the Minimum Current Corona model of the coronal field to model field evolution of the complex. Combining this with observations of flare ribbons in the 1600 A channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board SDO, we propose a minimization algorithm for estimating the amount of reconnected flux and resulting drop in magnetic free energy during a flare. For the M6.6, M2.2, and X2.2 flares, we find a flux exchange of 4.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx, 2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx, and 21.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx, respectively, resulting in free energy drops of 3.89 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg, 2.62 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg, and 1.68 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 32} erg.

  11. Bond activation with an apparently benign ethynyl dithiocarbamate Ar-C≡C-S-C(S)NR2.

    PubMed

    Ung, Gaël; Frey, Guido D; Schoeller, Wolfgang W; Bertrand, Guy

    2011-10-10

    The hedgehog molecule: A simple ethynyl dithiocarbamate [Ar-C≡C-S-C(S)NR(2)] is able to cleave a broad range of enthalpically strong σ bonds and to activate carbon dioxide and elemental sulfur. Depending on the substrate, the bond activation process involves either the existence of an equilibrium with the nonobservable mesoionic carbene isomer or the cooperation of the nucleophilic carbon-carbon triple bond and the electrophilic CS carbon atom. PMID:23210141

  12. Activation of c-myb by 5' retrovirus promoter insertion in myeloid neoplasms is dependent upon an intact alternative splice donor site (SD') in gag

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, Jean Marie; Houzet, Laurent; Koller, Richard; Bies, Juraj; Wolff, Linda; Mougel, Marylene . E-mail: mmougel@univ-montp1.fr

    2004-12-20

    Alternative splicing in Mo-MuLV recruits a splice donor site, SD', within the gag that is required for optimal replication in vitro. Remarkably, this SD' site was also found to be utilized for production of oncogenic gag-myb fusion RNA in 100% of murine-induced myeloid leukemia (MML) in pristane-treated BALB/c mice. Therefore, we investigated the influence of silent mutations of SD' in this model. Although there was no decrease in the overall incidence of disease, there was a decrease in the incidence of myeloid leukemia with a concomitant increase in lymphoid leukemia. Importantly, there was a complete lack of myeloid tumors associated with 5' insertional mutagenic activation of c-myb, suggesting the specific requirement of the SD' site in this mechanism.

  13. Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Vivo by Overexpression of Antagonistic Splicing Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceres, Javier F.; Stamm, Stefan; Helfman, David M.; Krainer, Adrian R.

    1994-09-01

    The opposing effects of SF2/ASF and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 influence alternative splicing in vitro. SF2/ASF or hnRNP A1 complementary DNAs were transiently overexpressed in HeLa cells, and the effect on alternative splicing of several cotransfected reporter genes was measured. Increased expression of SF2/ASF activated proximal 5' splice sites, promoted inclusion of a neuron-specific exon, and prevented abnormal exon skipping. Increased expression of hnRNP A1 activated distal 5' splice sites. Therefore, variations in the intracellular levels of antagonistic splicing factors influence different modes of alternative splicing in vivo and may be a natural mechanism for tissue-specific or developmental regulation of gene expression.

  14. Probabilistic simple splicing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvarajoo, Mathuri; Heng, Fong Wan; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Turaev, Sherzod

    2014-06-01

    A splicing system, one of the early theoretical models for DNA computing was introduced by Head in 1987. Splicing systems are based on the splicing operation which, informally, cuts two strings of DNA molecules at the specific recognition sites and attaches the prefix of the first string to the suffix of the second string, and the prefix of the second string to the suffix of the first string, thus yielding the new strings. For a specific type of splicing systems, namely the simple splicing systems, the recognition sites are the same for both strings of DNA molecules. It is known that splicing systems with finite sets of axioms and splicing rules only generate regular languages. Hence, different types of restrictions have been considered for splicing systems in order to increase their computational power. Recently, probabilistic splicing systems have been introduced where the probabilities are initially associated with the axioms, and the probabilities of the generated strings are computed from the probabilities of the initial strings. In this paper, some properties of probabilistic simple splicing systems are investigated. We prove that probabilistic simple splicing systems can also increase the computational power of the splicing languages generated.

  15. TRIMe7-CypA, an alternative splicing isoform of TRIMCyp in rhesus macaque, negatively modulates TRIM5α activity

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Lei; Tang, Yan-Dong; Liu, Jian-Dong; Yu, Chang-Qing; Sun, Liu-Ke; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • TRIMe7-CypA expresses in rhesus and pig-tailed, but not long-tailed macaques. • TRIMe7-CypA does not show the restriction to a HIV-GFP report virus in vitro. • It acts as a negative modulator to TRIM5α likely by competitive inhibition. - Abstract: The existence of innate, host-specific restriction factors is a major obstacle to the development of nonhuman primate models for AIDS studies, and TRIM5α is one of the most important of these restriction factors. In recent years, a TRIM5 chimeric gene that was retrotransposed by a cyclophilin A (CypA) cDNA was identified in certain macaque species. The TRIM5α-CypA fusion protein, TRIMCyp, which was expressed in these monkeys, had lost its restriction ability toward HIV-1. We previously found that TRIMe7-CypA, an alternative splicing isoform of the TRIMCyp transcripts, was expressed in pig-tailed and rhesus macaques but absent in long-tailed macaques. In this study, the anti-HIV-1 activity of TRIMe7-CypA in the rhesus macaque (RhTRIMe7-CypA) was investigated. The over-expression of RhTRIMe7-CypA in CrFK, HeLa and HEK293T cells did not restrict the infection or replication of an HIV-1-GFP reporter virus in these cells. As a positive control, rhesus (rh)TRIM5α strongly inhibited the reporter virus. Intriguingly, the anti-HIV-1 activity of RhTRIM5α was significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the co-repression of RhTRIMe7-CypA. Our data indicate that although the RhTRIMe7-CypA isoform does not appear to restrict HIV-1, it may act as a negative modulator of TRIM family proteins, presumably by competitive inhibition.

  16. The major human pregnane X receptor (PXR) splice variant, PXR.2, exhibits significantly diminished ligand-activated transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yvonne S; Yasuda, Kazuto; Assem, Mahfoud; Cline, Cynthia; Barber, Joe; Li, Chia-Wei; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Ai, Ni; Chen, J Don; Welsh, William J; Ekins, Sean; Schuetz, Erin G

    2009-06-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR; PXR.1) can be activated by structurally diverse lipophilic ligands. PXR.2, an alternatively spliced form of PXR, lacks 111 nucleotides encoding 37 amino acids in the ligand binding domain. PXR.2 bound a classic CYP3A4 PXR response element (PXRE) in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, but transfected PXR.2 failed to transactivate a CYP3A4-promoter-luciferase reporter plasmid in HepG2 cells treated with various PXR ligands. Cotransfection experiments showed that PXR.2 behaved as a dominant negative, interfering with PXR.1/rifampin activation of CYP3A4-PXRE-LUC. In HepG2 and LS180 cells stably transduced with PXR.1, PXR target genes (CYP3A4, MDR1, CYP2B6, and UGT1A1) were higher than mock-transduced cells in the absence of ligand and were further induced in the presence of rifampin. In contrast, PXR.2 stably introduced into the same host cells failed to induce target genes over levels in mock-transfected cells after drug treatment. Our homology modeling suggests that ligands bind PXR.1 more favorably, probably because of the presence of a key disordered loop region, which is missing in PXR.2. Yeast two-hybrid assays revealed that, even in the presence of ligand, the corepressors remain tightly bound to PXR.2, and coactivators are unable to bind at helix 12. In summary, PXR.2 can bind to PXREs but fails to transactivate target genes because ligands do not bind the ligand binding domain of PXR.2 productively, corepressors remain tightly bound, and coactivators are not recruited to PXR.2. PMID:19251824

  17. Splicing regulation: From a parts list of regulatory elements to an integrated splicing code

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zefeng; Burge, Christopher B.

    2008-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is a major contributor to both proteomic diversity and control of gene expression levels. Splicing is tightly regulated in different tissues and developmental stages, and its disruption can lead to a wide range of human diseases. An important long-term goal in the splicing field is to determine a set of rules or “code” for splicing that will enable prediction of the splicing pattern of any primary transcript from its sequence. Outside of the core splice site motifs, the bulk of the information required for splicing is thought to be contained in exonic and intronic cis-regulatory elements that function by recruitment of sequence-specific RNA-binding protein factors that either activate or repress the use of adjacent splice sites. Here, we summarize the current state of knowledge of splicing cis-regulatory elements and their context-dependent effects on splicing, emphasizing recent global/genome-wide studies and open questions. PMID:18369186

  18. Coordinate repression of a trio of neuron-specific splicing events by the splicing regulator PTB.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Liu, W; Grabowski, P J

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the ability of the polypyrimidine tract binding protein PTB to function as a coordinator of splicing regulation for a trio of neuron-specific exons that are subject to developmental splicing changes in the rat cerebellum. Three neuron-specific exons that show positive regulation are derived from the GABA(A) receptor gamma2 subunit 24 nucleotide exon, clathrin light chain B exon EN, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor NR1 subunit exon 5 pre-mRNAs. The functional activity of splicing repressor signals located in the 3' splice site regions adjacent to the neural exons is shown using an alternative splicing switch assay, in which these short RNA sequences function in trans to switch splicing to the neural pathway in HeLa splicing reactions. Parallel UV crosslinking/competition assays demonstrate selective binding of PTB in comparison to substantially lower binding at adjacent, nonneural 3' splice sites. Substantially lower PTB binding and splicing switch activity is also observed for the 3' splice site of NMDA exon 21, which is subject to negative regulation in cerebellum tissue in the same time frame. In splicing active neural extracts, the balance of control shifts to positive regulation, and this shift correlates with a PTB status that is predominantly the neural form. In this context, the addition of recombinant PTB is sufficient to switch splicing to the nonneural pathway. The neural extracts also reveal specific binding of the CUG triplet repeat binding protein to a subset of regulatory 3' splice site regions. These interactions may interfere with PTB function or modulate splicing levels in a substrate-specific manner within neural tissue. Together these results strengthen the evidence that PTB is a splicing regulator with multiple targets and demonstrate its ability to discriminate among neural and nonneural substrates. Thus, a variety of mechanisms that counterbalance the splicing repressor function of PTB in neural tissue are

  19. Zebrafish stem/progenitor factor msi2b exhibits two phases of activity mediated by different splice variants.

    PubMed

    Hochgreb-Hägele, Tatiana; Koo, Daniel E S; Das, Neha M; Bronner, Marianne E

    2014-02-01

    The Musashi (Msi) family of RNA-binding proteins is important in stem and differentiating cells in many species. Here, we present a zebrafish gene/protein trap line gt(msi2b-citrine)(ct) (57) (a) that expresses a Citrine fusion protein with endogenous Msi2b. Our results reveal two phases of Msi2b expression: ubiquitous expression in progenitor cells in the early embryo and later, tissue-specific expression in differentiating cells in the olfactory organ, pineal gland, and subpopulations of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS). Interestingly, this division between early and late phases is paralleled by differential expression of msi2b alternative splicing products. Whereas the full-length and long variant v3 Msi2b predominate at early stages, the later expression of variants in differentiating tissues appears to be tissue specific. Using the gt(msi2b-citrine)(ct) (57) (a), we characterized tissue-specific expression of Msi2b with cellular resolution in subsets of differentiating cells in the olfactory organ, pineal gland, CNS, and ventral neural tube. By performing transcription activator-like effectors nuclease-mediated biallelic genome editing or morpholino knockdown of Msi2b in zebrafish, our results show that early inactivation of Msi2b results in severe embryonic defects including hypertrophy of the ventricles and shortening of the body, consistent with an important role in cell proliferation and survival. Moreover, specific inactivation of Msi2b full-length indicates that this species is essential for the early role of Msi2b. This line provides a valuable tool both for live imaging of the endogenous Msi2b at subcellular resolution and manipulation of Msi2b-expressing cells.

  20. USDA-ARS extension activities in medical, veterinary and urban entomology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Within the USDA Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS), National Program 104 conducts research on veterinary, medical, and urban entomology. The goal of this program is to develop more effective methods of preventing or suppressing insects, ticks, and mites that affect animal and human well-being....

  1. An international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Forrest M; Randerson, James T; Thornton, Peter E; Bonan, Gordon; Erickson III, David J; Fung, Inez

    2009-12-01

    The need to capture important climate feedbacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, called Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results (Friedlingstein et al., 2006). This work suggests that a more rigorous set of global offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are needed. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) was designed to meet this need by providing a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). Recently, a similar effort in Europe, called the International Land Model Benchmark (ILAMB) Project, was begun to assess the performance of European land surface models. These two projects will now serve as prototypes for a proposed international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for those models participating in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Initially used for model validation for terrestrial biogeochemistry models in the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM), C-LAMP incorporates a simulation protocol for both offline and partially coupled simulations using a prescribed historical trajectory of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Models are confronted with data through comparisons against AmeriFlux site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA Globalview flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site measurements. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the CLM version 3 in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): the CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon

  2. An International Land-Biosphere Model Benchmarking Activity for the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Thornton, P. E.; Bonan, G. B.; Brooks, B. J.; Erickson, D. J.; Fung, I.

    2009-12-01

    The need to capture important climate feedbacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, called Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results (Friedlingstein et al., 2006). This work suggests that a more rigorous set of global offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are needed. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) was designed to meet this need by providing a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). Recently, a similar effort in Europe, called the International Land Model Benchmark (ILAMB) Project, was begun to assess the performance of European land surface models. These two projects will now serve as prototypes for a proposed international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for those models participating in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Initially used for model validation for terrestrial biogeochemistry models in the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM), C-LAMP incorporates a simulation protocol for both offline and partially coupled simulations using a prescribed historical trajectory of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Models are confronted with data through comparisons against AmeriFlux site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA Globalview flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site measurements. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the CLM version 3 in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): the CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon

  3. Activating the branch-forming splicing pathway by reengineering the ribozyme component of a natural group II intron.

    PubMed

    Monachello, Dario; Michel, François; Costa, Maria

    2016-03-01

    When assayed in vitro, group IIC self-splicing introns, which target bacterial Rho-independent transcription terminators, generally fail to yield branched products during splicing despite their possessing a seemingly normal branchpoint. Starting with intron O.i.I1 from Oceanobacillus iheyensis, whose crystallographically determined structure lacks branchpoint-containing domain VI, we attempted to determine what makes this intron unfit for in vitro branch formation. A major factor was found to be the length of the helix at the base of domain VI: 4 base pairs (bp) are required for efficient branching, even though a majority of group IIC introns have a 3-bp helix. Equally important for lariat formation is the removal of interactions between ribozyme domains II and VI, which are specific to the second step of splicing. Conversely, mismatching of domain VI and its proposed first-step receptor in subdomain IC1 was found to be detrimental; these data suggest that the intron-encoded protein may promote branch formation partly by modulating the equilibrium between conformations specific to the first and second steps of splicing. As a practical application, we show that by making just two changes to the O.i.I1 ribozyme, it is possible to generate sufficient amounts of lariat intron for the latter to be purified and used in kinetic assays in which folding and reaction are uncoupled.

  4. Activating the branch-forming splicing pathway by reengineering the ribozyme component of a natural group II intron.

    PubMed

    Monachello, Dario; Michel, François; Costa, Maria

    2016-03-01

    When assayed in vitro, group IIC self-splicing introns, which target bacterial Rho-independent transcription terminators, generally fail to yield branched products during splicing despite their possessing a seemingly normal branchpoint. Starting with intron O.i.I1 from Oceanobacillus iheyensis, whose crystallographically determined structure lacks branchpoint-containing domain VI, we attempted to determine what makes this intron unfit for in vitro branch formation. A major factor was found to be the length of the helix at the base of domain VI: 4 base pairs (bp) are required for efficient branching, even though a majority of group IIC introns have a 3-bp helix. Equally important for lariat formation is the removal of interactions between ribozyme domains II and VI, which are specific to the second step of splicing. Conversely, mismatching of domain VI and its proposed first-step receptor in subdomain IC1 was found to be detrimental; these data suggest that the intron-encoded protein may promote branch formation partly by modulating the equilibrium between conformations specific to the first and second steps of splicing. As a practical application, we show that by making just two changes to the O.i.I1 ribozyme, it is possible to generate sufficient amounts of lariat intron for the latter to be purified and used in kinetic assays in which folding and reaction are uncoupled. PMID:26769855

  5. The connection between splicing and cancer.

    PubMed

    Srebrow, Anabella; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2006-07-01

    Alternative splicing is a crucial mechanism for generating protein diversity. Different splice variants of a given protein can display different and even antagonistic biological functions. Therefore, appropriate control of their synthesis is required to assure the complex orchestration of cellular processes within multicellular organisms. Mutations in cis-acting splicing elements or changes in the activity of constitutive or alternative splicing could have a profound regulatory proteins that compromise the accuracy of either impact on human pathogenesis, in particular in tumor development and progression. Mutations in splicing elements, for example, have been found in genes such as LKB1, KIT, CDH17, KLF6 and BRCA1, and changes in trans-acting regulators can affect the expression of genes such as Ron, RAC1 and CD44.

  6. The evolution of spliced leader trans-splicing in nematodes.

    PubMed

    Pettitt, Jonathan; Harrison, Neale; Stansfield, Ian; Connolly, Bernadette; Müller, Berndt

    2010-08-01

    Spliced leader trans-splicing occurs in many primitive eukaryotes including nematodes. Most of our knowledge of trans-splicing in nematodes stems from the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans and relatives, and from work with Ascaris. Our investigation of spliced leader trans-splicing in distantly related Dorylaimia nematodes indicates that spliced-leader trans-splicing arose before the nematode phylum and suggests that the spliced leader RNA gene complements in extant nematodes have evolved from a common ancestor with a diverse set of spliced leader RNA genes.

  7. Active transgenes in zebrafish are enriched in acetylated histone H4 and dynamically associate with RNA Pol II and splicing complexes.

    PubMed

    Collas, P; Liang, M R; Vincent, M; Aleström, P

    1999-04-01

    We have investigated the functional organization of active and silent integrated luciferase transgenes in zebrafish, with the aim of accounting for the variegation of transgene expression in this species. We demonstrate the enrichment of transcriptionally active transgenes in acetylated histone H4 and the dynamic association of the transgenes with splicing factor SC35 and RNA Pol II. Analysis of interphase nuclei and extended chromatin fibers by immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization reveals a co-localization of transgenes with acetylated H4 in luciferase-expressing animals only. Enrichment of expressed transgenes in acetylated H4 is further demonstrated by their co-precipitation from chromatin using anti-acetylated H4 antibodies. Little correlation exists, however, between the level of histone acetylation and the degree of transgene expression. In transgene-expressing zebrafish, most transgenes co-localize with Pol II and SC35, whereas no such association occurs in non-expressing individuals. Inhibition of Pol II abolishes transgene expression and disrupts association of transgenes with SC35, although inactivated transgenes remains enriched in acetylated histones. Exposure of embryos to the histone deacetylation inhibitor TSA induces expression of most silent transgenes. Chromatin containing activated transgenes becomes enriched in acetylated histones and the transgenes recruit SC35 and Pol II. The results demonstrate a correlation between H4 acetylation and transgene activity, and argue that active transgenes dynamically recruit splicing factors and Pol II. The data also suggest that dissociation of splicing factors from transgenes upon Pol II inhibition is not a consequence of changes in H4 acetylation. PMID:10198286

  8. Basal adenosine modulates the functional properties of AMPA receptors in mouse hippocampal neurons through the activation of A1R A2AR and A3R

    PubMed Central

    Di Angelantonio, Silvia; Bertollini, Cristina; Piccinin, Sonia; Rosito, Maria; Trettel, Flavia; Pagani, Francesca; Limatola, Cristina; Ragozzino, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a widespread neuromodulator within the CNS and its extracellular level is increased during hypoxia or intense synaptic activity, modulating pre- and postsynaptic sites. We studied the neuromodulatory action of adenosine on glutamatergic currents in the hippocampus, showing that activation of multiple adenosine receptors (ARs) by basal adenosine impacts postsynaptic site. Specifically, the stimulation of both A1R and A3R reduces AMPA currents, while A2AR has an opposite potentiating effect. The effect of ARs stimulation on glutamatergic currents in hippocampal cultures was investigated using pharmacological and genetic approaches. A3R inhibition by MRS1523 increased GluR1-Ser845 phosphorylation and potentiated AMPA current amplitude, increasing the apparent affinity for the agonist. A similar effect was observed blocking A1R with DPCPX or by genetic deletion of either A3R or A1R. Conversely, impairment of A2AR reduced AMPA currents, and decreased agonist sensitivity. Consistently, in hippocampal slices, ARs activation by AR agonist NECA modulated glutamatergic current amplitude evoked by AMPA application or afferent fiber stimulation. Opposite effects of AR subtypes stimulation are likely associated to changes in GluR1 phosphorylation and represent a novel mechanism of physiological modulation of glutamatergic transmission by adenosine, likely acting in normal conditions in the brain, depending on the level of extracellular adenosine and the distribution of AR subtypes. PMID:26528137

  9. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar laser fusion and K-Ar ages from Lathrop Wells, Nevada, and Cima, California: The age of the latest volcanic activity in the Yucca Mountain area

    SciTech Connect

    Turrin, B.D. |; Champion, D.E.

    1991-12-31

    K-Ar and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, Nevada, and from the Cima volcanic field, California, indicate that the recently reported 20-ka age estimate for the Lathrop Wells volcanic center is incorrect. Instead an age of 119{+-}11 to 141{+-}10 ka is indicated for the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. This age corrected is concordant with the ages determined by two independent isotopic geochronometric techniques and with the stratigraphy of surficial deposits in the Yucca Mountain region. In addition, paleomagnetic data and radiometric age data indicate only two volcanic events at the Lathrop Wells volcanic center that are probably closely linked in time, not as many as five as recently reported.

  10. 40Ar/39Ar laser fusion and K-Ar ages from Lathrop Wells, Nevada, and Cima, California. The age of the latest volcanic activity in the Yucca Mountain area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turrin, Brent D.; Champion, Duane E.; ,

    1991-01-01

    K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, Nevada, and from the Cima volcanic field, California, indicate that the recently reported 20-ka age estimate for the Lathrop Wells volcanic center is incorrect. Instead an age of 119??11 to 141??10 ka is indicated for the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. This age corrected is concordant with the ages determined by two independent isotopic geochronometric techniques and with the stratigraphy of surficial deposits in the Yucca Mountain region. In addition, paleomagnetic data and radiometric age data indicate only two volcanic events at the Lathrop Wells volcanic center that are probably closely linked in time, not as many as five as recently reported.

  11. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar laser fusion and K-Ar ages from Lathrop Wells, Nevada, and Cima, California: The age of the latest volcanic activity in the Yucca Mountain area

    SciTech Connect

    Turrin, B.D. |; Champion, D.E.

    1991-05-01

    K-Ar and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, Nevada, and from the Cima volcanic field, California, indicate that the recently reported 20-ka age estimate for the Lathrop Wells volcanic center is incorrect. Instead, an age of 119 {plus_minus} 11 to 141 {plus_minus} 10 ka is indicated for the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. This age corrected is concordant with the ages determined by two independent isotopic geochronometric techniques and with the stratigraphy of surficial deposits in the Yucca Mountain region. In addition, paleomagnetic data and radiometric age data indicate only two volcanic events at the Lathrop Wells volcanic center that are probably closely linked in time, not as many as five as recently reported. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. A constant-alpha force-free-field analysis of the active region AR 4711 of February, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Hai-Shou; Hong, Q. F.; Ding, Y. J.

    1988-01-01

    The theory of Yang et al. (1983) is used to analyze the large active region AR 4711 of Feb. 1986. This region stored between 0.01 x 10 to the 32nd and 5.36 x 10 to the 32nd erg of extractable free magnetic energy, sufficient to supply the energies of the observed flare activities in this region. The region was an energetic quadrupolar sunspot group, occurring during solar minimum; this group was strongly twisted and produced many intense flares.

  13. A liver X receptor (LXR)-{beta} alternative splicing variant (LXRBSV) acts as an RNA co-activator of LXR-{beta}

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Koshi; Ishida, Emi; Matsumoto, Shunichi; Shibusawa, Nobuyuki; Okada, Shuichi; Monden, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Tetsurou; Yamada, Masanobu; Mori, Masatomo

    2009-12-25

    We report the isolation and functional characterization of a novel transcriptional co-activator, termed LXRBSV. LXRBSV is an alternative splicing variant of liver X receptor (LXR)-{beta} LXRBSV has an intronic sequence between exons 2 and 3 in the mouse LXR-{beta} gene. The LXRBSV gene is expressed in various tissues including the liver and brain. We sub-cloned LXRBSV into pSG5, a mammalian expression vector, and LXRBSV in pSG5 augmented human Sterol Response Element Binding Protein (SREBP)-1c promoter activity in HepG2 cells in a ligand (TO901317) dependent manner. The transactivation mediated by LXRBSV is selective for LXR-{beta}. The LXRBSV protein was deduced to be 64 amino acids in length; however, a GAL4-LXRBSV fusion protein was not able to induce transactivation. Serial deletion constructs of LXRBSV demonstrated that the intronic sequence inserted in LXRBSV is required for its transactivation activity. An ATG mutant of LXRBSV was able to induce transactivation as wild type. Furthermore, LXRBSV functions in the presence of cycloheximide. Taken together, we have concluded that LXRBSV acts as an RNA transcript not as a protein. In the current study, we have demonstrated for the first time that an alternative splicing variant of a nuclear receptor acts as an RNA co-activator.

  14. Bidirectional modulation of hippocampal gamma (20-80 Hz) frequency activity in vitro via alpha(α)- and beta(β)-adrenergic receptors (AR).

    PubMed

    Haggerty, D C; Glykos, V; Adams, N E; Lebeau, F E N

    2013-12-01

    Noradrenaline (NA) in the hippocampus plays an important role in memory function and has been shown to modulate different forms of synaptic plasticity. Oscillations in the gamma frequency (20-80 Hz) band in the hippocampus have also been proposed to play an important role in memory functions and, evidence from both in vitro and in vivo studies, has suggested this activity can be modulated by NA. However, the role of different NA receptor subtypes in the modulation of gamma frequency activity has not been fully elucidated. We have found that NA (30 μM) exerts a bidirectional control on the magnitude of kainate-evoked (50-200 nM) gamma frequency oscillations in the cornu Ammonis (CA3) region of the rat hippocampus in vitro via activation of different receptor subtypes. Activation of alpha-adrenergic receptors (α-AR) reduced the power of the gamma frequency oscillation. In contrast, activation of beta-adrenergic receptors (β-AR) caused an increase in the power of the gamma frequency oscillations. Using specific agonists and antagonists of AR receptor subtypes we demonstrated that these effects are mediated specifically via α1A-AR and β1-AR subtypes. NA activated both receptor subtypes, but the α1A-AR-mediated effect predominated, resulting in a reversible suppression of gamma frequency activity. These results suggest that NA is able to differentially modulate on-going gamma frequency oscillatory activity that could result in either increased or decreased information flow through the hippocampus.

  15. Prevention of 5-hydroxytryptamine2C receptor RNA editing and alternate splicing in C57BL/6 mice activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and alters mood

    PubMed Central

    Bombail, Vincent; Qing, Wei; Chapman, Karen E; Holmes, Megan C

    2014-01-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine2C (5-HT)2C receptor is widely implicated in the aetiology of affective and eating disorders as well as regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis. Signalling through this receptor is regulated by A-to-I RNA editing, affecting three amino acids in the protein sequence, with unedited transcripts encoding a receptor (INI) that, in vitro, is hyperactive compared with edited isoforms. Targeted alteration (knock-in) of the Htr2c gene to generate ‘INI’ mice with no alternate splicing, solely expressing the full-length unedited isoform, did not produce an overt metabolic phenotype or altered anxiety behaviour, but did display reduced depressive-like and fear-associated behaviours. INI mice exhibited a hyperactive hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, with increased nadir plasma corticosterone and corticotrophin-releasing hormone expression in the hypothalamus but responded normally to chronic stress and showed normal circadian activity and activity in a novel environment. The circadian patterns of 5-HT2C receptor mRNA and mbii52, a snoRNA known to regulate RNA editing and RNA splicing of 5-HT2C receptor pre-mRNA, were altered in INI mice compared with wild-type control mice. Moreover, levels of 5-HT1A receptor mRNA were increased in the hippocampus of INI mice. These gene expression changes may underpin the neuroendocrine and behavioural changes observed in INI mice. However, the phenotype of INI mice was not consistent with a globally hyperactive INI receptor encoded by the unedited transcript in the absence of alternate splicing. Hence, the in vivo outcome of RNA editing may be neuronal cell type specific. PMID:25257581

  16. The expression and activity of thioredoxin reductase 1 splice variants v1 and v2 regulate the expression of genes associated with differentiation and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Nalvarte, Ivan; Damdimopoulos, Anastasios E.; Rüegg, Joëlle; Spyrou, Giannis

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian redox-active selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) is a main player in redox homoeostasis. It transfers electrons from NADPH to a large variety of substrates, particularly to those containing redox-active cysteines. Previously, we reported that the classical form of cytosolic TrxR1 (TXNRD1_v1), when overexpressed in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293), prompted the cells to undergo differentiation [Nalvarte et al. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 54510–54517]. In the present study, we show that several genes associated with differentiation and adhesion are differentially expressed in HEK-293 cells stably overexpressing TXNRD1_v1 compared with cells expressing its splice variant TXNRD1_v2. Overexpression of these two splice forms resulted in distinctive effects on various aspects of cellular functions including gene regulation patterns, alteration of growth rate, migration and morphology and susceptibility to selenium-induced toxicity. Furthermore, differentiation of the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y induced by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) increased both TXNRD1_v1 and TXNRD1_v2 expressions along with several of the identified genes associated with differentiation and adhesion. Selenium supplementation in the SH-SY5Y cells also induced a differentiated morphology and changed expression of the adhesion protein fibronectin 1 and the differentiation marker cadherin 11, as well as different temporal expression of the studied TXNRD1 variants. These data suggest that both TXNRD1_v1 and TXNRD1_v2 have distinct roles in differentiation, possibly by altering the expression of the genes associated with differentiation, and further emphasize the importance in distinguishing each unique action of different TrxR1 splice forms, especially when studying the gene silencing or knockout of TrxR1. PMID:26464515

  17. The expression and activity of thioredoxin reductase 1 splice variants v1 and v2 regulate the expression of genes associated with differentiation and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Nalvarte, Ivan; Damdimopoulos, Anastasios E; Rüegg, Joëlle; Spyrou, Giannis

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian redox-active selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) is a main player in redox homoeostasis. It transfers electrons from NADPH to a large variety of substrates, particularly to those containing redox-active cysteines. Previously, we reported that the classical form of cytosolic TrxR1 (TXNRD1_v1), when overexpressed in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293), prompted the cells to undergo differentiation [Nalvarte et al. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279: , 54510-54517]. In the present study, we show that several genes associated with differentiation and adhesion are differentially expressed in HEK-293 cells stably overexpressing TXNRD1_v1 compared with cells expressing its splice variant TXNRD1_v2. Overexpression of these two splice forms resulted in distinctive effects on various aspects of cellular functions including gene regulation patterns, alteration of growth rate, migration and morphology and susceptibility to selenium-induced toxicity. Furthermore, differentiation of the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y induced by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) increased both TXNRD1_v1 and TXNRD1_v2 expressions along with several of the identified genes associated with differentiation and adhesion. Selenium supplementation in the SH-SY5Y cells also induced a differentiated morphology and changed expression of the adhesion protein fibronectin 1 and the differentiation marker cadherin 11, as well as different temporal expression of the studied TXNRD1 variants. These data suggest that both TXNRD1_v1 and TXNRD1_v2 have distinct roles in differentiation, possibly by altering the expression of the genes associated with differentiation, and further emphasize the importance in distinguishing each unique action of different TrxR1 splice forms, especially when studying the gene silencing or knockout of TrxR1. PMID:26464515

  18. Heterozygous splice mutation in PIK3R1 causes human immunodeficiency with lymphoproliferation due to dominant activation of PI3K

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Carrie L.; Zhang, Yu; Venida, Anthony; Wang, Ying; Hughes, Jason; McElwee, Joshua; Butrick, Morgan; Matthews, Helen; Price, Susan; Biancalana, Matthew; Wang, Xiaochuan; Richards, Michael; Pozos, Tamara; Barlan, Isil; Ozen, Ahmet; Rao, V. Koneti; Su, Helen C.

    2014-01-01

    Class IA phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K), which generate PIP3 as a signal for cell growth and proliferation, exist as an intracellular complex of a catalytic subunit bound to a regulatory subunit. We and others have previously reported that heterozygous mutations in PIK3CD encoding the p110δ catalytic PI3K subunit cause a unique disorder termed p110δ-activating mutations causing senescent T cells, lymphadenopathy, and immunodeficiency (PASLI) disease. We report four patients from three families with a similar disease who harbor a recently reported heterozygous splice site mutation in PIK3R1, which encodes the p85α, p55α, and p50α regulatory PI3K subunits. These patients suffer from recurrent sinopulmonary infections and lymphoproliferation, exhibit hyperactive PI3K signaling, and have prominent expansion and skewing of peripheral blood CD8+ T cells toward terminally differentiated senescent effector cells with short telomeres. The PIK3R1 splice site mutation causes skipping of an exon, corresponding to loss of amino acid residues 434–475 in the inter-SH2 domain. The mutant p85α protein is expressed at low levels in patient cells and activates PI3K signaling when overexpressed in T cells from healthy subjects due to qualitative and quantitative binding changes in the p85α–p110δ complex and failure of the C-terminal region to properly inhibit p110δ catalytic activity. PMID:25488983

  19. Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM) regulates steroidogenic activity via steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)-voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2) interaction.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Manoj; Kaur, Jasmeet; Pawlak, Kevin J; Bose, Mahuya; Whittal, Randy M; Bose, Himangshu S

    2015-01-30

    Steroid hormones are essential for carbohydrate metabolism, stress management, and reproduction and are synthesized from cholesterol in mitochondria of adrenal glands and gonads/ovaries. In acute stress or hormonal stimulation, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) transports substrate cholesterol into the mitochondria for steroidogenesis by an unknown mechanism. Here, we report for the first time that StAR interacts with voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2) at the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM) prior to its translocation to the mitochondrial matrix. In the MAM, StAR interacts with mitochondrial proteins Tom22 and VDAC2. However, Tom22 knockdown by siRNA had no effect on pregnenolone synthesis. In the absence of VDAC2, StAR was expressed but not processed into the mitochondria as a mature 30-kDa protein. VDAC2 interacted with StAR via its C-terminal 20 amino acids and N-terminal amino acids 221-229, regulating the mitochondrial processing of StAR into the mature protein. In the absence of VDAC2, StAR could not enter the mitochondria or interact with MAM-associated proteins, and therefore steroidogenesis was inhibited. Furthermore, the N terminus was not essential for StAR activity, and the N-terminal deletion mutant continued to interact with VDAC2. The endoplasmic reticulum-targeting prolactin signal sequence did not affect StAR association with the MAM and thus its mitochondrial targeting. Therefore, VDAC2 controls StAR processing and activity, and MAM is thus a central location for initiating mitochondrial steroidogenesis.

  20. Androgen receptor splice variants and polycystic ovary syndrome: cause or effect?

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Kirsty A; Handelsman, David J

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR)-mediated androgen action provides not only a classical pivotal role in male development and functions but also a recently proven role in female reproductive physiology. Splice variants of AR are reported to occur in various androgen-sensitive cancers and now, a recent study by Wang et al. proposed that AR splice variants have an etiological role in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Although further investigations are required to fully appraise the significance of their discovery, these seminal findings have exciting and important implications for opening a new chapter in the understanding of the role of AR signaling in the origins and pathogenesis of PCOS. PMID:26306851

  1. Introduction to cotranscriptional RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Merkhofer, Evan C; Hu, Peter; Johnson, Tracy L

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that many intron-containing genes can be cotranscriptionally spliced has led to an increased understanding of how splicing and transcription are intricately intertwined. Cotranscriptional splicing has been demonstrated in a number of different organisms and has been shown to play roles in coordinating both constitutive and alternative splicing. The nature of cotranscriptional splicing suggests that changes in transcription can dramatically affect splicing, and new evidence suggests that splicing can, in turn, influence transcription. In this chapter, we discuss the mechanisms and consequences of cotranscriptional splicing and introduce some of the tools used to measure this process.

  2. Deregulation of splicing factors and breast cancer development.

    PubMed

    Silipo, Marco; Gautrey, Hannah; Tyson-Capper, Alison

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that many genes implicated in the development and progression of breast cancer undergo aberrant alternative splicing events to produce proteins with pro-cancer properties. These changes in alternative splicing can arise from mutations or single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the DNA sequences of cancer-related genes, which can strongly affect the activity of splicing factors and influence the splice site choice. However, it is important to note that absence of mutations is not sufficient to prevent misleading choices in splice site selection. There is now increasing evidence to demonstrate that the expression profile of ten splicing factors (including SRs and hnRNPs) and eight RNA-binding proteins changes in breast cancer cells compared with normal cells. These modifications strongly influence the alternative splicing pattern of many cancer-related genes despite the absence of any detrimental mutations within their DNA sequences. Thus, a comprehensive assessment of the splicing factor status in breast cancer is important to provide insights into the mechanisms that lead to breast cancer development and metastasis. Whilst most studies focus on mutations that affect alternative splicing in cancer-related genes, this review focuses on splicing factors and RNA-binding proteins that are themselves deregulated in breast cancer and implicated in cancer-related alternative splicing events.

  3. A novel TMEM16A splice variant lacking the dimerization domain contributes to calcium-activated chloride secretion in human sweat gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ertongur-Fauth, Torsten; Hochheimer, Andreas; Buescher, Joerg Martin; Rapprich, Stefan; Krohn, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Sweating is an important physiological process to regulate body temperature in humans, and various disorders are associated with dysregulated sweat formation. Primary sweat secretion in human eccrine sweat glands involves Ca(2+) -activated Cl(-) channels (CaCC). Recently, members of the TMEM16 family were identified as CaCCs in various secretory epithelia; however, their molecular identity in sweat glands remained elusive. Here, we investigated the function of TMEM16A in sweat glands. Gene expression analysis revealed that TMEM16A is expressed in human NCL-SG3 sweat gland cells as well as in isolated human eccrine sweat gland biopsy samples. Sweat gland cells express several previously described TMEM16A splice variants, as well as one novel splice variant, TMEM16A(acΔe3) lacking the TMEM16A-dimerization domain. Chloride flux assays using halide-sensitive YFP revealed that TMEM16A is functionally involved in Ca(2+) -dependent Cl(-) secretion in NCL-SG3 cells. Recombinant expression in NCL-SG3 cells showed that TMEM16A(acΔe3) is forming a functional CaCC, with basal and Ca(2+) -activated Cl(-) permeability distinct from canonical TMEM16A(ac). Our results suggest that various TMEM16A isoforms contribute to sweat gland-specific Cl(-) secretion providing opportunities to develop sweat gland-specific therapeutics for treatment of sweating disorders.

  4. Resveratrol Inhibits IL-6-Induced Transcriptional Activity of AR and STAT3 in Human Prostate Cancer LNCaP-FGC Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mee-Hyun; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Keum, Young-Sam; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Surh, Young-Joon; Choi, Bu Young

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer. Although prostate tumors respond to androgen ablation therapy at an early stage, they often acquire the potential of androgen-independent growth. Elevated transcriptional activity of androgen receptor (AR) and/or signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) contributes to the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. In the present study, we examined the effect of resveratrol, a phytoalexin present in grapes, on the reporter gene activity of AR and STAT3 in human prostate cancer (LNCaP-FGC) cells stimulated with interleukin-6 (IL-6) and/or dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Our study revealed that resveratrol suppressed the growth of LNCaP-FGC cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Whereas the AR transcriptional activity was induced by treatment with either IL-6 or DHT, the STAT3 transcriptional activity was induced only by treatment with IL-6 but not with DHT. Resveratrol significantly attenuated IL-6-induced STAT3 transcriptional activity, and DHT- or IL-6-induced AR transcriptional activity. Treatment of cells with DHT plus IL-6 significantly increased the AR transcriptional activity as compared to DHT or IL-6 treatment alone and resveratrol markedly diminished DHT plus IL-6-induced AR transcriptional activity. Furthermore, the production of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was decreased by resveratrol in the DHT-, IL-6- or DHT plus IL-6-treated LNCaP-FGC cells. Taken together, the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on IL-6- and/or DHT-induced AR transcriptional activity in LNCaP prostate cancer cells are partly mediated through the suppression of STAT3 reporter gene activity, suggesting that resveratrol may be a promising therapeutic choice for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  5. Novel stably transfected human reporter cell line AIZ-AR as a tool for an assessment of human androgen receptor transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Bartonkova, Iveta; Novotna, Aneta; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor plays multiple physiological and pathological roles in human organism. In the current paper, we describe construction and characterization of a novel stably transfected human reporter cell line AIZ-AR for assessment of transcriptional activity of human androgen receptor. Cell line AIZ-AR is derived from human prostate carcinoma epithelial cell line 22Rv1 that was transfected with reporter plasmid containing 3 copies of androgen response regions (ARRs) followed by a single copy of androgen response element (ARE) from the promoter region of human prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene. AIZ-AR cells remained fully functional for more than 60 days and over 25 passages in the culture and even after cryopreservation. Time-course analyses showed that AIZ-AR cells allow detection of AR ligands as soon as after 8 hours of the treatment. We performed dose-response analyses with 23 steroids in 96-well plate format. We observed activation of AR by androgens, but not by estrogens and mineralocorticoids. Some glucocorticoids and progesterone also induced luciferase, but their potencies were 2-3 orders of magnitude weaker as compared to androgens. Taken together, we have developed a rapid, sensitive, selective, high-throughput and reproducible tool for detection of human AR ligands, with potential use in pharmacological and environmental applications.

  6. CD147 modulates androgen receptor activity through the Akt/Gsk-3β/β-catenin/AR pathway in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Fang; Qin, Yingxin; Hao, Feng; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Chen; Chen, Shuang; Zhao, Liangzhong; Wang, Liguo; Cai, Jianhui

    2016-01-01

    The androgen signaling pathway serves an important role in the development of prostate cancer. β-Catenin is an androgen receptor (AR) cofactor and augments AR signaling. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a target of phosphorylated serine/threonine protein kinase B (p-Akt), regulates β-catenin stability. In addition, β-catenin, a coregulator of AR, physically interacts with AR and enhances AR-mediated target gene transcription. The multifunctional glycoprotein cluster of differentiation (CD) 147 is highly expressed on the cell surface of the majority of cancer cells, and it promotes tumor invasion, metastasis and growth. In the present study, the molecular effects of CD147 on the Akt/GSK-3β/β-catenin/AR signaling network were investigated in LNCaP cells. Using short hairpin-mediated RNA knockdown of CD147 in LNCaP cells, it was demonstrated that downregulation of CD147 resulted in inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK-3β, and then promoted degeneration of β-catenin and reduced nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. In addition, immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that CD147 downregulation decreased the formation of a complex between β-catenin and AR. It was shown that CD147 knockdown suppressed the expression of the AR target gene prostate-specific antigen and the growth of AR-positive LNCaP cells. Furthermore, inhibition of PI3K/Akt with LY294002 augmented CD147-mediated function. The present study indicates that the PI3K/Akt pathway may facilitate CD147-mediated activation of the AR pathway. PMID:27446405

  7. Modulation of transcriptional activation and coactivator interaction by a splicing variation in the F domain of nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha1.

    PubMed

    Sladek, F M; Ruse, M D; Nepomuceno, L; Huang, S M; Stallcup, M R

    1999-10-01

    Transcription factors, such as nuclear receptors, often exist in various forms that are generated by highly conserved splicing events. Whereas the functional significance of these splicing variants is often not known, it is known that nuclear receptors activate transcription through interaction with coactivators. The parameters, other than ligands, that might modulate those interactions, however, are not well characterized, nor is the role of splicing variants. In this study, transient transfection, yeast two-hybrid, and GST pulldown assays are used to show not only that nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha1 (HNF4alpha1, NR2A1) interacts with GRIP1, and other coactivators, in the absence of ligand but also that the uncommonly large F domain in the C terminus of the receptor inhibits that interaction. In vitro, the F domain was found to obscure an AF-2-independent binding site for GRIP1 that did not map to nuclear receptor boxes II or III. The results also show that a natural splicing variant containing a 10-amino-acid insert in the middle of the F domain (HNF4alpha2) abrogates that inhibition in vivo and in vitro. A series of protease digestion assays indicates that there may be structural differences between HNF4alpha1 and HNF4alpha2 in the F domain as well as in the ligand binding domain (LBD). The data also suggest that there is a direct physical contact between the F domain and the LBD of HNF4alpha1 and -alpha2 and that that contact is different in the HNF4alpha1 and HNF4alpha2 isoforms. Finally, we propose a model in which the F domain of HNF4alpha1 acts as a negative regulatory region for transactivation and in which the alpha2 insert ameliorates the negative effect of the F domain. A conserved repressor sequence in the F domains of HNF4alpha1 and -alpha2 suggests that this model may be relevant to other nuclear receptors as well. PMID:10490591

  8. Shedding UV light on alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Marengo, Matthew S; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2009-05-15

    After DNA damage, cells modulate pre-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing to induce an anti- or proapoptotic response. In this issue, Muñoz et al. (2009) uncover a cotranscriptional mechanism for activating alternative pre-mRNA splicing after ultraviolet irradiation that depends unexpectedly on hyperphosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain and decreased rates of transcription elongation.

  9. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome caused by a deep intronic pseudoexon-activating mutation in the androgen receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Känsäkoski, Johanna; Jääskeläinen, Jarmo; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Tommiska, Johanna; Saarinen, Lilli; Lehtonen, Rainer; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Frilander, Mikko J; Palvimo, Jorma J; Toppari, Jorma; Raivio, Taneli

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked androgen receptor (AR) gene underlie complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), the most common cause of 46,XY sex reversal. Molecular genetic diagnosis of CAIS, however, remains uncertain in patients who show normal coding region of AR. Here, we describe a novel mechanism of AR disruption leading to CAIS in two 46,XY sisters. We analyzed whole-genome sequencing data of the patients for pathogenic variants outside the AR coding region. Patient fibroblasts from the genital area were used for AR cDNA analysis and protein quantification. Analysis of the cDNA revealed aberrant splicing of the mRNA caused by a deep intronic mutation (c.2450-118A>G) in the intron 6 of AR. The mutation creates a de novo 5' splice site and a putative exonic splicing enhancer motif, which leads to the preferential formation of two aberrantly spliced mRNAs (predicted to include a premature stop codon). Patient fibroblasts contained no detectable AR protein. Our results show that patients with CAIS and normal AR coding region need to be examined for deep intronic mutations that can lead to pseudoexon activation. PMID:27609317

  10. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome caused by a deep intronic pseudoexon-activating mutation in the androgen receptor gene

    PubMed Central

    Känsäkoski, Johanna; Jääskeläinen, Jarmo; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Tommiska, Johanna; Saarinen, Lilli; Lehtonen, Rainer; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Frilander, Mikko J.; Palvimo, Jorma J.; Toppari, Jorma; Raivio, Taneli

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked androgen receptor (AR) gene underlie complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), the most common cause of 46,XY sex reversal. Molecular genetic diagnosis of CAIS, however, remains uncertain in patients who show normal coding region of AR. Here, we describe a novel mechanism of AR disruption leading to CAIS in two 46,XY sisters. We analyzed whole-genome sequencing data of the patients for pathogenic variants outside the AR coding region. Patient fibroblasts from the genital area were used for AR cDNA analysis and protein quantification. Analysis of the cDNA revealed aberrant splicing of the mRNA caused by a deep intronic mutation (c.2450-118A>G) in the intron 6 of AR. The mutation creates a de novo 5′ splice site and a putative exonic splicing enhancer motif, which leads to the preferential formation of two aberrantly spliced mRNAs (predicted to include a premature stop codon). Patient fibroblasts contained no detectable AR protein. Our results show that patients with CAIS and normal AR coding region need to be examined for deep intronic mutations that can lead to pseudoexon activation. PMID:27609317

  11. Cauliflower mosaic virus Transcriptome Reveals a Complex Alternative Splicing Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Bouton, Clément; Geldreich, Angèle; Ramel, Laëtitia; Ryabova, Lyubov A.; Dimitrova, Maria; Keller, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The plant pararetrovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) uses alternative splic-ing to generate several isoforms from its polycistronic pregenomic 35S RNA. This pro-cess has been shown to be essential for infectivity. Previous works have identified four splice donor sites and a single splice acceptor site in the 35S RNA 5’ region and sug-gested that the main role of CaMV splicing is to downregulate expression of open read-ing frames (ORFs) I and II. In this study, we show that alternative splicing is a conserved process among CaMV isolates. In Cabb B-JI and Cabb-S isolates, splicing frequently leads to different fusion between ORFs, particularly between ORF I and II. The corresponding P1P2 fusion proteins expressed in E. coli interact with viral proteins P2 and P3 in vitro. However, they are detected neither during infection nor upon transient expression in planta, which suggests rapid degradation after synthesis and no important biological role in the CaMV infectious cycle. To gain a better understanding of the functional relevance of 35S RNA alternative splicing in CaMV infectivity, we inactivated the previously described splice sites. All the splicing mutants were as pathogenic as the corresponding wild-type isolate. Through RT-PCR-based analysis we demonstrate that CaMV 35S RNA exhibits a complex splicing pattern, as we identify new splice donor and acceptor sites whose selection leads to more than thirteen 35S RNA isoforms in infected turnip plants. Inactivating splice donor or acceptor sites is not lethal for the virus, since disrupted sites are systematically rescued by the activation of cryptic and/or seldom used splice sites. Taken together, our data depict a conserved, complex and flexible process, involving multiple sites, that ensures splicing of 35S RNA. PMID:26162084

  12. Differential splicing of human androgen receptor pre-mRNA in X-linked reifenstein syndrome, because of a deletion involving a putative branch site

    SciTech Connect

    Ris-Stalpers, C.; Verleun-Mooijman, M.C.T.; Blaeij, T.J.P. de; Brinkmann, A.O.; Degenhart, H.J.; Trapman, J. )

    1994-04-01

    The analysis of the androgen receptor (AR) gene, mRNA, and protein in a subject with X-linked Reifenstein syndrome (partial androgen insensitivity) is reported. The presence of two mature AR transcripts in genital skin fibroblasts of the patient is established, and, by reverse transcriptase-PCR and RNase transcription analysis, the wild-type transcript and a transcript in which exon 3 sequences are absent without disruption of the translational reading frame are identified. Sequencing and hybridization analysis show a deletion of >6 kb in intron 2 of the human AR gene, starting 18 bp upstream of exon 3. The deletion includes the putative branch-point sequence (BPS) but not the acceptor splice site on the intron 2/exon 3 boundary. The deletion of the putative intron 2 BPS results in 90% inhibition of wild-type splicing. The mutant transcript encodes an AR protein lacking the second zinc finger of the DNA-binding domain. Western/immunoblotting analysis is used to show that the mutant AR protein is expressed in genital skin fibroblasts of the patient. The residual 10% wild-type transcript can be the result of the use of a cryptic BPS located 63 bp upstream of the intron 2/exon 3 boundary of the mutant AR gene. The mutated AR protein has no transcription-activating potential and does not influence the transactivating properties of the wild-type AR, as tested in cotransfection studies. It is concluded that the partial androgen-insensitivity syndrome of this patient is the consequence of the limited amount of wild-type AR protein expressed in androgen target cells, resulting from the deletion of the intron 2 putative BPS. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. The influence of Argonaute proteins on alternative RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Batsché, Eric; Ameyar-Zazoua, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of precursor RNAs is an important process in multicellular species because it impacts several aspects of gene expression: from the increase of protein repertoire to the level of expression. A large body of evidences demonstrates that factors regulating chromatin and transcription impact the outcomes of alternative splicing. Argonaute (AGO) proteins were known to play key roles in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. More recently, their role in the nucleus of human somatic cells has emerged. Here, we will discuss some of the nuclear functions of AGO, with special emphasis on alternative splicing. The AGO-mediated modulation of alternative splicing is based on several properties of these proteins: their binding to transcripts on chromatin and their interactions with many proteins, especially histone tail-modifying enzymes, HP1γ and splicing factors. AGO proteins may favor a decrease in the RNA-polymerase II kinetics at actively transcribed genes leading to the modulation of alternative splicing decisions. They could also influence alternative splicing through their interaction with core components of the splicing machinery and several splicing factors. We will discuss the modes of AGO recruitment on chromatin at active genes. We suggest that long intragenic antisense transcripts (lincRNA) might be an important feature of genes containing splicing events regulated by AGO.

  14. K-Ar constraints on fluid-rock interaction and dissolution-precipitation events within the actively creeping shear zones from SAFOD cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, S.; Hemming, S. R.; Torgersen, T.; Fleisher, M. Q.; Cox, S. E.; Stute, M.

    2009-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) was drilled to study the physical and chemical processes responsible for faulting and earthquake generation along an active, plate-bounding fault at depth. SAFOD drill cores show multiple zones of alteration and deformation due to fluid-rock interaction in the fault rocks(Schleicher et al. 2008). In context of fluid studies in the SAFZ, noble gas and potassium measurements were performed on solid samples of sedimentary rocks obtained from drill cores across the fault (3050-4000m-MD). We used a combination of 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar methods on crushed samples of mudrock with variable amounts of visible slickensides to constrain the degree of resetting of the K-Ar system across the San Andreas Fault zone. 40Ar/39Ar was analyzed from small fragments (sand sized grains) while K-Ar was measured in crushed bulk rock samples (100-250 mg for Ar, and 5-10 mg for K analyses). The apparent 40Ar/39Ar ages based on single step laser fusion of small fragments corresponding to the detrital component in the coarse fraction, show varying ages ranging from the provenance age to <13Ma. Although more data are needed to make detailed comparisons, the apparent K-Ar ages of bulk samples in the fault zone are biased toward authigenic materials contained in the fine fraction, similar to the 40Ar/39Ar ages reported for mineralogical separates from very fine size fractions of samples obtained from 3065.98m-MD and 3294.89m-MD (Schleicher et al., submitted to Geology). The small samples measured for 40Ar/39Ar show scatter in the apparent ages, generally bracketing the bulk ages. However they are picked from sieved portions of the samples, and it is likely that there may be a loss of the younger (finer) material. Detrital provenance ages appear to be 50-60Ma in the Pacific Plate, and 100Ma in the North American Plate. 40Ar/39Ar ages within the SAFZ, as defined by geophysical logs (3200-3400m MD), are dominated by apparent detrital ages of ˜100Ma

  15. Regulation of StAR by the N-terminal Domain and Coinduction of SIK1 and TIS11b/Znf36l1 in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwoo; Tong, Tiegang; Duan, Haichuan; Foong, Yee Hoon; Musaitif, Ibrahim; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Jefcoate, Colin

    2016-01-01

    The cholesterol transfer function of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is uniquely integrated into adrenal cells, with mRNA translation and protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation occurring at the mitochondrial outer membrane (OMM). The StAR C-terminal cholesterol-binding domain (CBD) initiates mitochondrial intermembrane contacts to rapidly direct cholesterol to Cyp11a1 in the inner membrane (IMM). The conserved StAR N-terminal regulatory domain (NTD) includes a leader sequence targeting the CBD to OMM complexes that initiate cholesterol transfer. Here, we show how the NTD functions to enhance CBD activity delivers more efficiently from StAR mRNA in adrenal cells, and then how two factors hormonally restrain this process. NTD processing at two conserved sequence sites is selectively affected by StAR PKA phosphorylation. The CBD functions as a receptor to stimulate the OMM/IMM contacts that mediate transfer. The NTD controls the transit time that integrates extramitochondrial StAR effects on cholesterol homeostasis with other mitochondrial functions, including ATP generation, inter-organelle fusion, and the major permeability transition pore in partnership with other OMM proteins. PKA also rapidly induces two additional StAR modulators: salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) and Znf36l1/Tis11b. Induced SIK1 attenuates the activity of CRTC2, a key mediator of StAR transcription and splicing, but only as cAMP levels decline. TIS11b inhibits translation and directs the endonuclease-mediated removal of the 3.5-kb StAR mRNA. Removal of either of these functions individually enhances cAMP-mediated induction of StAR. High-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (HR-FISH) of StAR RNA reveals asymmetric transcription at the gene locus and slow RNA splicing that delays mRNA formation, potentially to synchronize with cholesterol import. Adrenal cells may retain slow transcription to integrate with intermembrane NTD activation. HR-FISH resolves individual 3.5-kb StAR

  16. Regulation of StAR by the N-terminal Domain and Coinduction of SIK1 and TIS11b/Znf36l1 in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinwoo; Tong, Tiegang; Duan, Haichuan; Foong, Yee Hoon; Musaitif, Ibrahim; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Jefcoate, Colin

    2016-01-01

    The cholesterol transfer function of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is uniquely integrated into adrenal cells, with mRNA translation and protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation occurring at the mitochondrial outer membrane (OMM). The StAR C-terminal cholesterol-binding domain (CBD) initiates mitochondrial intermembrane contacts to rapidly direct cholesterol to Cyp11a1 in the inner membrane (IMM). The conserved StAR N-terminal regulatory domain (NTD) includes a leader sequence targeting the CBD to OMM complexes that initiate cholesterol transfer. Here, we show how the NTD functions to enhance CBD activity delivers more efficiently from StAR mRNA in adrenal cells, and then how two factors hormonally restrain this process. NTD processing at two conserved sequence sites is selectively affected by StAR PKA phosphorylation. The CBD functions as a receptor to stimulate the OMM/IMM contacts that mediate transfer. The NTD controls the transit time that integrates extramitochondrial StAR effects on cholesterol homeostasis with other mitochondrial functions, including ATP generation, inter-organelle fusion, and the major permeability transition pore in partnership with other OMM proteins. PKA also rapidly induces two additional StAR modulators: salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) and Znf36l1/Tis11b. Induced SIK1 attenuates the activity of CRTC2, a key mediator of StAR transcription and splicing, but only as cAMP levels decline. TIS11b inhibits translation and directs the endonuclease-mediated removal of the 3.5-kb StAR mRNA. Removal of either of these functions individually enhances cAMP-mediated induction of StAR. High-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (HR-FISH) of StAR RNA reveals asymmetric transcription at the gene locus and slow RNA splicing that delays mRNA formation, potentially to synchronize with cholesterol import. Adrenal cells may retain slow transcription to integrate with intermembrane NTD activation. HR-FISH resolves individual 3.5-kb StAR

  17. Regulation of StAR by the N-terminal Domain and Coinduction of SIK1 and TIS11b/Znf36l1 in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwoo; Tong, Tiegang; Duan, Haichuan; Foong, Yee Hoon; Musaitif, Ibrahim; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Jefcoate, Colin

    2016-01-01

    The cholesterol transfer function of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is uniquely integrated into adrenal cells, with mRNA translation and protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation occurring at the mitochondrial outer membrane (OMM). The StAR C-terminal cholesterol-binding domain (CBD) initiates mitochondrial intermembrane contacts to rapidly direct cholesterol to Cyp11a1 in the inner membrane (IMM). The conserved StAR N-terminal regulatory domain (NTD) includes a leader sequence targeting the CBD to OMM complexes that initiate cholesterol transfer. Here, we show how the NTD functions to enhance CBD activity delivers more efficiently from StAR mRNA in adrenal cells, and then how two factors hormonally restrain this process. NTD processing at two conserved sequence sites is selectively affected by StAR PKA phosphorylation. The CBD functions as a receptor to stimulate the OMM/IMM contacts that mediate transfer. The NTD controls the transit time that integrates extramitochondrial StAR effects on cholesterol homeostasis with other mitochondrial functions, including ATP generation, inter-organelle fusion, and the major permeability transition pore in partnership with other OMM proteins. PKA also rapidly induces two additional StAR modulators: salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) and Znf36l1/Tis11b. Induced SIK1 attenuates the activity of CRTC2, a key mediator of StAR transcription and splicing, but only as cAMP levels decline. TIS11b inhibits translation and directs the endonuclease-mediated removal of the 3.5-kb StAR mRNA. Removal of either of these functions individually enhances cAMP-mediated induction of StAR. High-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (HR-FISH) of StAR RNA reveals asymmetric transcription at the gene locus and slow RNA splicing that delays mRNA formation, potentially to synchronize with cholesterol import. Adrenal cells may retain slow transcription to integrate with intermembrane NTD activation. HR-FISH resolves individual 3.5-kb StAR

  18. Assessing the volcanic hazard for Rome: 40Ar/39Ar and In-SAR constraints on the most recent eruptive activity and present-day uplift at Colli Albani Volcanic District

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, F.; Gaeta, M.; Giaccio, B.; Jicha, B. R.; Palladino, D. M.; Polcari, M.; Sottili, G.; Taddeucci, J.; Florindo, F.; Stramondo, S.

    2016-07-01

    We present new 40Ar/39Ar data which allow us to refine the recurrence time for the most recent eruptive activity occurred at Colli Albani Volcanic District (CAVD) and constrain its geographic area. Time elapsed since the last eruption (36 kyr) overruns the recurrence time (31 kyr) in the last 100 kyr. New interferometric synthetic aperture radar data, covering the years 1993-2010, reveal ongoing inflation with maximum uplift rates (>2 mm/yr) in the area hosting the most recent (<200 ka) vents, suggesting that the observed uplift might be caused by magma injection within the youngest plumbing system. Finally, we frame the present deformation within the structural pattern of the area of Rome, characterized by 50 m of regional uplift since 200 ka and by geologic evidence for a recent (<2000 years) switch of the local stress-field, highlighting that the precursors of a new phase of volcanic activity are likely occurring at the CAVD.

  19. Half pint/Puf68 is required for negative regulation of splicing by the SR splicing factor Transformer2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanzhi; Wagner, Eric J; Mattox, William

    2013-08-01

    The SR family of proteins plays important regulatory roles in the control of alternative splicing in a wide range of organisms. These factors affect splicing through both positive and negative controls of splice site recognition by pre-spliceosomal factors. Recent studies indicate that the Drosophila SR factor Transformer 2 (Tra2) activates and represses splicing through distinct and separable effector regions of the protein. While the interactions of its Arg-Ser-rich activator region have been well studied, cofactors involved in splicing repression have yet to be found. Here we use a luciferase-based splicing reporter assay to screen for novel proteins necessary for Tra2-dependent repression of splicing. This approach identified Half pint, also known as Puf68, as a co-repressor required for Tra2-mediated autoregulation of the M1 intron. In vivo, Half pint is required for Tra2-dependent repression of M1 splicing but is not necessary for Tra2-dependent activation of doublesex splicing. Further experiments indicate that the effect of Hfp is sequence-specific and that it associates with these target transcripts in cells. Importantly, known M1 splicing regulatory elements are sufficient to sensitize a heterologous intron to Hfp regulation. Two alternative proteins deriving from Hfp transcripts, Hfp68, and Hfp58, were found to be expressed in vivo but differed dramatically in their effect on M1 splicing. Comparison of the cellular localization of these forms in S2 cells revealed that Hfp68 is predominantly localized to the nucleus while Hfp58 is distributed across both the nucleus and cytoplasm. This accords with their observed effects on splicing and suggests that differential compartmentalization may contribute to the specificity of these isoforms. Together, these studies reveal a function for Half pint in splicing repression and demonstrate it to be specifically required for Tra2-dependent intron inclusion.

  20. Half pint/Puf68 is required for negative regulation of splicing by the SR splicing factor Transformer2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanzhi; Wagner, Eric J; Mattox, William

    2013-08-01

    The SR family of proteins plays important regulatory roles in the control of alternative splicing in a wide range of organisms. These factors affect splicing through both positive and negative controls of splice site recognition by pre-spliceosomal factors. Recent studies indicate that the Drosophila SR factor Transformer 2 (Tra2) activates and represses splicing through distinct and separable effector regions of the protein. While the interactions of its Arg-Ser-rich activator region have been well studied, cofactors involved in splicing repression have yet to be found. Here we use a luciferase-based splicing reporter assay to screen for novel proteins necessary for Tra2-dependent repression of splicing. This approach identified Half pint, also known as Puf68, as a co-repressor required for Tra2-mediated autoregulation of the M1 intron. In vivo, Half pint is required for Tra2-dependent repression of M1 splicing but is not necessary for Tra2-dependent activation of doublesex splicing. Further experiments indicate that the effect of Hfp is sequence-specific and that it associates with these target transcripts in cells. Importantly, known M1 splicing regulatory elements are sufficient to sensitize a heterologous intron to Hfp regulation. Two alternative proteins deriving from Hfp transcripts, Hfp68, and Hfp58, were found to be expressed in vivo but differed dramatically in their effect on M1 splicing. Comparison of the cellular localization of these forms in S2 cells revealed that Hfp68 is predominantly localized to the nucleus while Hfp58 is distributed across both the nucleus and cytoplasm. This accords with their observed effects on splicing and suggests that differential compartmentalization may contribute to the specificity of these isoforms. Together, these studies reveal a function for Half pint in splicing repression and demonstrate it to be specifically required for Tra2-dependent intron inclusion. PMID:23880637

  1. The activation energy for nanocrystalline diamond films deposited from an Ar/H2/CH4 hot-filament reactor.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, D C; Melo, L L; Trava-Airoldi, V J; Corat, E J

    2009-06-01

    In this work we have investigated the effect of substrate temperature on the growth rate and properties of nanocrystalline diamond thin films deposited by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD). Mixtures of 0.5 vol% CH4 and 25 vol% H2 balanced with Ar at a pressure of 50 Torr and typical deposition time of 12 h. We present the measurement of the activation energy by accurately controlling the substrate temperature independently of other CVD parameters. Growth rates have been measured in the temperature range from 550 to 800 degrees C. Characterization techniques have involved Raman spectroscopy, high resolution X-ray difractometry and scanning electron microscopy. We also present a comparison with most activation energy for micro and nanocrystalline diamond determinations in the literature and propose that there is a common trend in most observations. The result obtained can be an evidence that the growth mechanism of NCD in HFCVD reactors is very similar to MCD growth. PMID:19504946

  2. The activation energy for nanocrystalline diamond films deposited from an Ar/H2/CH4 hot-filament reactor.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, D C; Melo, L L; Trava-Airoldi, V J; Corat, E J

    2009-06-01

    In this work we have investigated the effect of substrate temperature on the growth rate and properties of nanocrystalline diamond thin films deposited by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD). Mixtures of 0.5 vol% CH4 and 25 vol% H2 balanced with Ar at a pressure of 50 Torr and typical deposition time of 12 h. We present the measurement of the activation energy by accurately controlling the substrate temperature independently of other CVD parameters. Growth rates have been measured in the temperature range from 550 to 800 degrees C. Characterization techniques have involved Raman spectroscopy, high resolution X-ray difractometry and scanning electron microscopy. We also present a comparison with most activation energy for micro and nanocrystalline diamond determinations in the literature and propose that there is a common trend in most observations. The result obtained can be an evidence that the growth mechanism of NCD in HFCVD reactors is very similar to MCD growth.

  3. The doublesex splicing enhancer components Tra2 and Rbp1 also repress splicing through an intronic silencer.

    PubMed

    Qi, Junlin; Su, Shihuang; Mattox, William

    2007-01-01

    The activation of sex-specific alternative splice sites in the Drosophila melanogaster doublesex and fruitless pre-mRNAs has been well studied and depends on the serine-arginine-rich (SR) splicing factors Tra, Tra2, and Rbp1. Little is known, however, about how SR factors negatively regulate splice sites in other RNAs. Here we examine how Tra2 blocks splicing of the M1 intron from its own transcript. We identify an intronic splicing silencer (ISS) adjacent to the M1 branch point that is sufficient to confer Tra2-dependent repression on another RNA. The ISS was found to function independently of its position within the intron, arguing against the idea that bound repressors function by simply interfering with branch point accessibility to general splicing factors. Conserved subelements of the silencer include five short repeated sequences that are required for Tra2 binding but differ from repeated binding sites found in Tra2-dependent splicing enhancers. The ISS also contains a consensus binding site for Rbp1, and this protein was found to facilitate repression of M1 splicing both in vitro and in Drosophila larvae. In contrast to the cooperative binding of SR proteins observed on the doublesex splicing enhancer, we found that Rbp1 and Tra2 bind to the ISS independently through distinct sequences. Our results suggest that functionally synergistic interactions of these SR factors can cause either splicing activation or repression.

  4. Two stages splicing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudaber, Mohammad Hassan; Yusof, Yuhani

    2015-05-01

    The study of the biological process of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) splicing system in a translucent approach was investigated in 2012 by Yusof under the framework of formal language theory. In this work, the concepts of splicing system in two stages as well as splicing languages are mathematically and biologically discussed. Additionally, some theorems based on recognition site factor of initial strings at the existence of two initial strings and two rules are provided via Yusof-Goode (Y-G) approach. Besides, an example is also given in showing the biological meaning of the introduced concept.

  5. Reactivation of latently infected HIV-1 viral reservoirs and correction of aberrant alternative splicing in the LMNA gene via AMPK activation: Common mechanism of action linking HIV-1 latency and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Finley, Jahahreeh

    2015-09-01

    Although the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has proven highly effective in controlling and suppressing HIV-1 replication, the persistence of latent but replication-competent proviruses in a small subset of CD4(+) memory T cells presents significant challenges to viral eradication from infected individuals. Attempts to eliminate latent reservoirs are epitomized by the 'shock and kill' approach, a strategy involving the combinatorial usage of compounds that influence epigenetic modulation and initiation of proviral transcription. However, efficient regulation of viral pre-mRNA splicing through manipulation of host cell splicing machinery is also indispensible for HIV-1 replication. Interestingly, aberrant alternative splicing of the LMNA gene via the usage of a cryptic splice site has been shown to be the cause of most cases of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a rare genetic condition characterized by an accelerated aging phenotype due to the accumulation of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. Recent evidence has shown that inhibition of the splicing factors ASF/SF2 (or SRSF1) and SRp55 (or SRSF6) leads to a reduction or an increase in progerin at both the mRNA and protein levels, respectively, thus altering the LMNA pre-mRNA splicing ratio. It is also well-established that during the latter stages of HIV-1 infection, an increase in the production and nuclear export of unspliced viral mRNA is indispensible for efficient HIV-1 replication and that the presence of ASF/SF2 leads to excessive viral pre-mRNA splicing and a reduction of unspliced mRNA, while the presence of SRp55 inhibits viral pre-mRNA splicing and aids in the generation and translation of unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs. The splicing-factor associated protein and putative mitochondrial chaperone p32 has also been shown to inhibit ASF/SF2, increase unspliced HIV-1 viral mRNA, and enhance mitochondrial DNA replication and oxidative phosphorylation. It is our hypothesis that activation of

  6. How did alternative splicing evolve?

    PubMed

    Ast, Gil

    2004-10-01

    Alternative splicing creates transcriptome diversification, possibly leading to speciation. A large fraction of the protein-coding genes of multicellular organisms are alternatively spliced, although no regulated splicing has been detected in unicellular eukaryotes such as yeasts. A comparative analysis of unicellular and multicellular eukaryotic 5' splice sites has revealed important differences - the plasticity of the 5' splice sites of multicellular eukaryotes means that these sites can be used in both constitutive and alternative splicing, and for the regulation of the inclusion/skipping ratio in alternative splicing. So, alternative splicing might have originated as a result of relaxation of the 5' splice site recognition in organisms that originally could support only constitutive splicing. PMID:15510168

  7. Alternative Splicing in Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shengming; Tang, Fang; Zhu, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) occurs widely in plants and can provide the main source of transcriptome and proteome diversity in an organism. AS functions in a range of physiological processes, including plant disease resistance, but its biological roles and functional mechanisms remain poorly understood. Many plant disease resistance (R) genes undergo AS, and several R genes require alternatively spliced transcripts to produce R proteins that can specifically recognize pathogen invasion. In the finely-tuned process of R protein activation, the truncated isoforms generated by AS may participate in plant disease resistance either by suppressing the negative regulation of initiation of immunity, or by directly engaging in effector-triggered signaling. Although emerging research has shown the functional significance of AS in plant biotic stress responses, many aspects of this topic remain to be understood. Several interesting issues surrounding the AS of R genes, especially regarding its functional roles and regulation, will require innovative techniques and additional research to unravel. PMID:24918296

  8. Proteasomes generate spliced epitopes by two different mechanisms and as efficiently as non-spliced epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Ebstein, F.; Textoris-Taube, K.; Keller, C.; Golnik, R.; Vigneron, N.; Van den Eynde, B. J.; Schuler-Thurner, B.; Schadendorf, D.; Lorenz, F. K. M.; Uckert, W.; Urban, S.; Lehmann, A.; Albrecht-Koepke, N.; Janek, K.; Henklein, P.; Niewienda, A.; Kloetzel, P. M.; Mishto, M.

    2016-01-01

    Proteasome-catalyzed peptide splicing represents an additional catalytic activity of proteasomes contributing to the pool of MHC-class I-presented epitopes. We here biochemically and functionally characterized a new melanoma gp100 derived spliced epitope. We demonstrate that the gp100mel47–52/40–42 antigenic peptide is generated in vitro and in cellulo by a not yet described proteasomal condensation reaction. gp100mel47–52/40–42 generation is enhanced in the presence of the β5i/LMP7 proteasome-subunit and elicits a peptide-specific CD8+ T cell response. Importantly, we demonstrate that different gp100mel-derived spliced epitopes are generated and presented to CD8+ T cells with efficacies comparable to non-spliced canonical tumor epitopes and that gp100mel-derived spliced epitopes trigger activation of CD8+ T cells found in peripheral blood of half of the melanoma patients tested. Our data suggest that both transpeptidation and condensation reactions contribute to the frequent generation of spliced epitopes also in vivo and that their immune relevance may be comparable to non-spliced epitopes. PMID:27049119

  9. Coupling of signal transduction to alternative pre-mRNA splicing by a composite splice regulator.

    PubMed Central

    König, H; Ponta, H; Herrlich, P

    1998-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA is a fundamental mechanism of differential gene expression in that it can give rise to functionally distinct proteins from a single gene, according to the developmental or physiological state of cells in multicellular organisms. In the pre-mRNA of the cell surface molecule CD44, the inclusion of up to 10 variant exons (v1-v10) is regulated during development, upon activation of lymphocytes and dendritic cells, and during tumour progression. Using minigene constructs containing CD44 exon v5, we have discovered exonic RNA elements that couple signal transduction to alternative splicing. They form a composite splice regulator encompassing an exon recognition element and splice silencer elements. Both type of elements are necessary to govern cell type-specific inclusion of the exon as well as inducible inclusion in T cells after stimulation by concanavalin A, by Ras signalling or after activation of protein kinase C by phorbol ester. Inducible splicing does not depend on de novo protein synthesis. The coupling of signal transduction to alternative splicing by such elements probably represents the mechanism whereby splice patterns of genes are established during development and can be changed under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:9582284

  10. THE KINEMATICS AND PLASMA PROPERTIES OF A SOLAR SURGE TRIGGERED BY CHROMOSPHERIC ACTIVITY IN AR11271

    SciTech Connect

    Kayshap, P.; Srivastava, Abhishek K.; Murawski, K.

    2013-01-20

    We observe a solar surge in NOAA AR11271 using the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 304 A image data on 2011 August 25. The surge rises vertically from its origin up to a height of Almost-Equal-To 65 Mm with a terminal velocity of Almost-Equal-To 100 km s{sup -1}, and thereafter falls and fades gradually. The total lifetime of the surge was Almost-Equal-To 20 minutes. We also measure the temperature and density distribution of the observed surge during its maximum rise and find an average temperature and a density of 2.0 MK and 4.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}, respectively. The temperature map shows the expansion and mixing of cool plasma lagging behind the hot coronal plasma along the surge. Because SDO/HMI temporal image data do not show any detectable evidence of significant photospheric magnetic field cancellation for the formation of the observed surge, we infer that it is probably driven by magnetic-reconnection-generated thermal energy in the lower chromosphere. The radiance (and thus the mass density) oscillations near the base of the surge are also evident, which may be the most likely signature of its formation by a reconnection-generated pulse. In support of the present observational baseline of the triggering of the surge due to chromospheric heating, we devise a numerical model with conceivable implementation of the VAL-C atmosphere and a thermal pulse as an initial trigger. We find that the pulse steepens into a slow shock at higher altitudes which triggers plasma perturbations exhibiting the observed features of the surge, e.g., terminal velocity, height, width, lifetime, and heated fine structures near its base.

  11. Transcriptional activation of LON Gene by a new form of mitochondrial stress: A role for the nuclear respiratory factor 2 in StAR overload response (SOR).

    PubMed

    Bahat, Assaf; Perlberg, Shira; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Isaac, Sara; Eden, Amir; Lauria, Ines; Langer, Thomas; Orly, Joseph

    2015-06-15

    High output of steroid hormone synthesis in steroidogenic cells of the adrenal cortex and the gonads requires the expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) that facilitates cholesterol mobilization to the mitochondrial inner membrane where the CYP11A1/P450scc enzyme complex converts the sterol to the first steroid. Earlier studies have shown that StAR is active while pausing on the cytosolic face of the outer mitochondrial membrane while subsequent import of the protein into the matrix terminates the cholesterol mobilization activity. Consequently, during repeated activity cycles, high level of post-active StAR accumulates in the mitochondrial matrix. To prevent functional damage due to such protein overload effect, StAR is degraded by a sequence of three to four ATP-dependent proteases of the mitochondria protein quality control system, including LON and the m-AAA membranous proteases AFG3L2 and SPG7/paraplegin. Furthermore, StAR expression in both peri-ovulatory ovarian cells, or under ectopic expression in cell line models, results in up to 3-fold enrichment of the mitochondrial proteases and their transcripts. We named this novel form of mitochondrial stress as StAR overload response (SOR). To better understand the SOR mechanism at the transcriptional level we analyzed first the unexplored properties of the proximal promoter of the LON gene. Our findings suggest that the human nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), also known as GA binding protein (GABP), is responsible for 88% of the proximal promoter activity, including the observed increase of transcription in the presence of StAR. Further studies are expected to reveal if common transcriptional determinants coordinate the SOR induced transcription of all the genes encoding the SOR proteases.

  12. Ar-Ar Ages of Lake Tahoe Basalts Confirm Several Eruptions at 2.3 to 2.0 Ma and Establish 0.92 Ma Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortemeier, W. T.; Moore, J. G.; Schweickert, R. A.; Calvert, A. T.

    2009-12-01

    New geochronology of Plio-Pleistocene basaltic flows from the Tahoe City, CA area in the NW part of the Lake Tahoe basin requires reassessment of the volcanic hazard, as the youngest volcanism in the basin, previously believed to be about 2 Ma, is less than 1 Ma. Six new 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating experiments on groundmass from crystalline interiors of lavas yielded interpretable results ranging from 0.92 Ma to 4.1 Ma. These data indicate the volcanic field should be considered dormant, not extinct. Our new data establish that basaltic volcanism occurred in two major pulses: (1) 2.3 - 2.0 Ma -- geochemically diverse alkali basalts erupted, forming subaerial and water-contact lavas at Eagle Rock, Granlibakken Creek, Rocky Ridge, and Tahoe City quarry [confirming Dalrymple’s (1964) data at Tahoe City quarry]; (2) 0.92 Ma -- trachyandesite erupted from a vent or vents ~ 2km north of Tahoe City, burying basaltic units and still older andesite (dated at 4.1 Ma at Rampart in this study), and filling a graben or channel carved in the older basalt at Tahoe City (Muehlberg, 2007). Lava and tephra from both 2.3-2.0 Ma and 0.92 Ma eruptive pulses interacted with wet, diatomaceous sediments of a shallow, warm, diatom-rich lake (“Prototahoe”) indicating this was a shallow, lava-dammed lake for over a million years. Shorelines of Prototahoe are now up to 200 m above present lake level as marked by the transition between pillow lava/breccia and subaerial columnar lava dated at two sites at 2.3 and 2.0 Ma. Prototahoe extended from the Tahoe-Sierra frontal fault zone on the west to east of the Dollar Point fault and south beyond Sugar Pine Point. Incision of the Truckee River canyon occurred later than the 0.92 Ma lava eruptions. The volcanic hazard at Lake Tahoe is greater than previously thought, based on the <1 Ma age of youngest volcanism within the east-dipping Tahoe-Sierra frontal fault zone, as well as on a deep earthquake swarm and rapid crustal movement in the

  13. Translational control of intron splicing in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Jaillon, Olivier; Bouhouche, Khaled; Gout, Jean-François; Aury, Jean-Marc; Noel, Benjamin; Saudemont, Baptiste; Nowacki, Mariusz; Serrano, Vincent; Porcel, Betina M; Ségurens, Béatrice; Le Mouël, Anne; Lepère, Gersende; Schächter, Vincent; Bétermier, Mireille; Cohen, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Sperling, Linda; Duret, Laurent; Meyer, Eric

    2008-01-17

    Most eukaryotic genes are interrupted by non-coding introns that must be accurately removed from pre-messenger RNAs to produce translatable mRNAs. Splicing is guided locally by short conserved sequences, but genes typically contain many potential splice sites, and the mechanisms specifying the correct sites remain poorly understood. In most organisms, short introns recognized by the intron definition mechanism cannot be efficiently predicted solely on the basis of sequence motifs. In multicellular eukaryotes, long introns are recognized through exon definition and most genes produce multiple mRNA variants through alternative splicing. The nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway may further shape the observed sets of variants by selectively degrading those containing premature termination codons, which are frequently produced in mammals. Here we show that the tiny introns of the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia are under strong selective pressure to cause premature termination of mRNA translation in the event of intron retention, and that the same bias is observed among the short introns of plants, fungi and animals. By knocking down the two P. tetraurelia genes encoding UPF1, a protein that is crucial in NMD, we show that the intrinsic efficiency of splicing varies widely among introns and that NMD activity can significantly reduce the fraction of unspliced mRNAs. The results suggest that, independently of alternative splicing, species with large intron numbers universally rely on NMD to compensate for suboptimal splicing efficiency and accuracy.

  14. Larvicidal and Biting Deterrent Activity of Essential Oils of Curcuma longa, Ar-turmerone, and Curcuminoids Against Aedes aegypti and Anopheles quadrimaculatus (Culicidae: Diptera).

    PubMed

    Ali, Abbas; Wang, Yan-Hong; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2015-09-01

    Essential oils and extract of Curcuma longa, ar-turmerone, and curcuminoids were evaluated for their larvicidal and deterrent activity against mosquitoes. Ar-turmerone and curcuminoids constituted 36.9, 24.9 and 50.6% of rhizome oil, leaf oil, and rhizome extract, respectively. Ar-turmerone was the major compound of the rhizome oil (36.9%) and leaf oil (24.9%). The ethanolic extract had 15.4% ar-turmerone with 6.6% bisdesmethoxycurcumin, 6.1% desmethoxycurcumin, and 22.6% curcumin. In in vitro studies, essential oils of the leaf (biting deterrence index [BDI] = 0.98), rhizome (BDI = 0.98), and rhizome ethanolic extract (BDI = 0.96) at 10 µg/cm(2) showed biting deterrent activity similar to DEET at 25 nmol/cm(2) against Aedes aegypti L. Among the pure compounds, ar-turmerone (BDI = 1.15) showed the biting deterrent activity higher than DEET at 25 nmol/cm(2) whereas the activity of other compounds was lower than DEET. In Anopheles quadrimaculatus Say, only ar-turmerone showed deterrent activity similar to DEET. In dose-response bioassay, ar-turmerone showed significantly higher biting deterrence than DEET at all the dosages. Ar-turmerone, at 15 nmol/cm(2), showed activity similar to DEET at 25 nmol/cm(2) and activity at 5 nmol/cm(2) was similar to DEET at 20 and 15 nmol/cm(2). Leaf essential oil with LC(50) values of 1.8 and 8.9 ppm against larvae of An. quadrimaculatus and Ae. aegypti, respectively, showed highest toxicity followed by rhizome oil and ethanolic extract. Among the pure compounds, ar-turmerone with LC(50) values of 2.8 and 2.5 ppm against larvae of An. quadrimaculatus and Ae. aegypti, respectively, was most toxic followed by bisdesmethoxycurcumin, curcumin, and desmethoxycurcumin. PMID:26336212

  15. Larvicidal and Biting Deterrent Activity of Essential Oils of Curcuma longa, Ar-turmerone, and Curcuminoids Against Aedes aegypti and Anopheles quadrimaculatus (Culicidae: Diptera).

    PubMed

    Ali, Abbas; Wang, Yan-Hong; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2015-09-01

    Essential oils and extract of Curcuma longa, ar-turmerone, and curcuminoids were evaluated for their larvicidal and deterrent activity against mosquitoes. Ar-turmerone and curcuminoids constituted 36.9, 24.9 and 50.6% of rhizome oil, leaf oil, and rhizome extract, respectively. Ar-turmerone was the major compound of the rhizome oil (36.9%) and leaf oil (24.9%). The ethanolic extract had 15.4% ar-turmerone with 6.6% bisdesmethoxycurcumin, 6.1% desmethoxycurcumin, and 22.6% curcumin. In in vitro studies, essential oils of the leaf (biting deterrence index [BDI] = 0.98), rhizome (BDI = 0.98), and rhizome ethanolic extract (BDI = 0.96) at 10 µg/cm(2) showed biting deterrent activity similar to DEET at 25 nmol/cm(2) against Aedes aegypti L. Among the pure compounds, ar-turmerone (BDI = 1.15) showed the biting deterrent activity higher than DEET at 25 nmol/cm(2) whereas the activity of other compounds was lower than DEET. In Anopheles quadrimaculatus Say, only ar-turmerone showed deterrent activity similar to DEET. In dose-response bioassay, ar-turmerone showed significantly higher biting deterrence than DEET at all the dosages. Ar-turmerone, at 15 nmol/cm(2), showed activity similar to DEET at 25 nmol/cm(2) and activity at 5 nmol/cm(2) was similar to DEET at 20 and 15 nmol/cm(2). Leaf essential oil with LC(50) values of 1.8 and 8.9 ppm against larvae of An. quadrimaculatus and Ae. aegypti, respectively, showed highest toxicity followed by rhizome oil and ethanolic extract. Among the pure compounds, ar-turmerone with LC(50) values of 2.8 and 2.5 ppm against larvae of An. quadrimaculatus and Ae. aegypti, respectively, was most toxic followed by bisdesmethoxycurcumin, curcumin, and desmethoxycurcumin.

  16. Elimination of projection effects from vector magnetograms - The pre-flare configuration of active region AR 4474

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, P.; Hagyard, M. J.; Hathaway, D. H.

    1988-01-01

    A simple method of transforming vector magnetograms to heliographic coordinates is demonstrated. The merits of this transformation are illustrated using a vector magnetogram obtained with the MSFC vector magnetograph 80 minutes prior to a white light flare in active region AR 4474 on April 25, 1984. The original magnetogram shows strong magnetic shear along the neutral line at both the flare site and a nonflaring site. The transformation of the magnetogram to heliographic coordinates shows that the elimination of projection effects results in a much shorter length of the sheared region at the nonflaring site than what is inferred from the image plane vector magnetogram. The length of the sheared region at the flare site is relatively less affected by the transformation.

  17. Chromatin and alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Alló, M; Schor, I E; Muñoz, M J; de la Mata, M; Agirre, E; Valcárcel, J; Eyras, E; Kornblihtt, A R

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing affects more than 90% of human genes. Coupling between transcription and splicing has become crucial in the complex network underlying alternative splicing regulation. Because chromatin is the real template for nuclear transcription, changes in its structure, but also in the "reading" and "writing" of the histone code, could modulate splicing choices. Here, we discuss the evidence supporting these ideas, from the first proposal of chromatin affecting alternative splicing, performed 20 years ago, to the latest findings including genome-wide evidence that nucleosomes are preferentially positioned in exons. We focus on two recent reports from our laboratories that add new evidence to this field. The first report shows that a physiological stimulus such as neuron depolarization promotes intragenic histone acetylation (H3K9ac) and chromatin relaxation, causing the skipping of exon 18 of the neural cell adhesion molecule gene. In the second report, we show how specific histone modifications can be created at targeted gene regions as a way to affect alternative splicing: Using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), we increased the levels of H3K9me2 and H3K27me3 in the proximity of alternative exon 33 of the human fibronectin gene, favoring its inclusion into mature messenger RNA (mRNA) through a mechanism that recalls RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing.

  18. Crystal structure, mutational analysis and RNA-dependent ATPase activity of the yeast DEAD-box pre-mRNA splicing factor Prp28

    SciTech Connect

    Jacewicz, Agata; Schwer, Beate; Smith, Paul; Shuman, Stewart

    2014-10-10

    Yeast Prp28 is a DEAD-box pre-mRNA splicing factor implicated in displacing U1 snRNP from the 5' splice site. Here we report that the 588-aa Prp28 protein consists of a trypsin-sensitive 126-aa N-terminal segment (of which aa 1–89 are dispensable for Prp28 function in vivo) fused to a trypsin-resistant C-terminal catalytic domain. Purified recombinant Prp28 and Prp28-(127–588) have an intrinsic RNA-dependent ATPase activity, albeit with a low turnover number. The crystal structure of Prp28-(127–588) comprises two RecA-like domains splayed widely apart. AMPPNP•Mg2+ is engaged by the proximal domain, with proper and specific contacts from Phe194 and Gln201 (Q motif) to the adenine nucleobase. The triphosphate moiety of AMPPNP•Mg2+ is not poised for catalysis in the open domain conformation. Guided by the Prp28•AMPPNP structure, and that of the Drosophila Vasa•AMPPNP•Mg2+•RNA complex, we targeted 20 positions in Prp28 for alanine scanning. ATP-site components Asp341 and Glu342 (motif II) and Arg527 and Arg530 (motif VI) and RNA-site constituent Arg476 (motif Va) are essential for Prp28 activity in vivo. Synthetic lethality of double-alanine mutations highlighted functionally redundant contacts in the ATP-binding (Phe194-Gln201, Gln201-Asp502) and RNA-binding (Arg264-Arg320) sites. As a result, overexpression of defective ATP-site mutants, but not defective RNA-site mutants, elicited severe dominant-negative growth defects.

  19. Crystal structure, mutational analysis and RNA-dependent ATPase activity of the yeast DEAD-box pre-mRNA splicing factor Prp28

    DOE PAGES

    Jacewicz, Agata; Schwer, Beate; Smith, Paul; Shuman, Stewart

    2014-10-10

    Yeast Prp28 is a DEAD-box pre-mRNA splicing factor implicated in displacing U1 snRNP from the 5' splice site. Here we report that the 588-aa Prp28 protein consists of a trypsin-sensitive 126-aa N-terminal segment (of which aa 1–89 are dispensable for Prp28 function in vivo) fused to a trypsin-resistant C-terminal catalytic domain. Purified recombinant Prp28 and Prp28-(127–588) have an intrinsic RNA-dependent ATPase activity, albeit with a low turnover number. The crystal structure of Prp28-(127–588) comprises two RecA-like domains splayed widely apart. AMPPNP•Mg2+ is engaged by the proximal domain, with proper and specific contacts from Phe194 and Gln201 (Q motif) to themore » adenine nucleobase. The triphosphate moiety of AMPPNP•Mg2+ is not poised for catalysis in the open domain conformation. Guided by the Prp28•AMPPNP structure, and that of the Drosophila Vasa•AMPPNP•Mg2+•RNA complex, we targeted 20 positions in Prp28 for alanine scanning. ATP-site components Asp341 and Glu342 (motif II) and Arg527 and Arg530 (motif VI) and RNA-site constituent Arg476 (motif Va) are essential for Prp28 activity in vivo. Synthetic lethality of double-alanine mutations highlighted functionally redundant contacts in the ATP-binding (Phe194-Gln201, Gln201-Asp502) and RNA-binding (Arg264-Arg320) sites. As a result, overexpression of defective ATP-site mutants, but not defective RNA-site mutants, elicited severe dominant-negative growth defects.« less

  20. From Cryptic Toward Canonical Pre-mRNA Splicing in Pompe Disease: a Pipeline for the Development of Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Bergsma, Atze J; In 't Groen, Stijn Lm; Verheijen, Frans W; van der Ploeg, Ans T; Pijnappel, Wwm Pim

    2016-01-01

    While 9% of human pathogenic variants have an established effect on pre-mRNA splicing, it is suspected that an additional 20% of otherwise classified variants also affect splicing. Aberrant splicing includes disruption of splice sites or regulatory elements, or creation or strengthening of cryptic splice sites. For the majority of variants, it is poorly understood to what extent and how these may affect splicing. We have identified cryptic splicing in an unbiased manner. Three types of cryptic splicing were analyzed in the context of pathogenic variants in the acid α-glucosidase gene causing Pompe disease. These involved newly formed deep intronic or exonic cryptic splice sites, and a natural cryptic splice that was utilized due to weakening of a canonical splice site. Antisense oligonucleotides that targeted the identified cryptic splice sites repressed cryptic splicing at the expense of canonical splicing in all three cases, as shown by reverse-transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and by enhancement of acid α-glucosidase enzymatic activity. This argues for a competition model for available splice sites, including intact or weakened canonical sites and natural or newly formed cryptic sites. The pipeline described here can detect cryptic splicing and correct canonical splicing using antisense oligonucleotides to restore the gene defect. PMID:27623443

  1. From Cryptic Toward Canonical Pre-mRNA Splicing in Pompe Disease: a Pipeline for the Development of Antisense Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Bergsma, Atze J; in ‘t Groen, Stijn LM; Verheijen, Frans W; van der Ploeg, Ans T; Pijnappel, WWM Pim

    2016-01-01

    While 9% of human pathogenic variants have an established effect on pre-mRNA splicing, it is suspected that an additional 20% of otherwise classified variants also affect splicing. Aberrant splicing includes disruption of splice sites or regulatory elements, or creation or strengthening of cryptic splice sites. For the majority of variants, it is poorly understood to what extent and how these may affect splicing. We have identified cryptic splicing in an unbiased manner. Three types of cryptic splicing were analyzed in the context of pathogenic variants in the acid α-glucosidase gene causing Pompe disease. These involved newly formed deep intronic or exonic cryptic splice sites, and a natural cryptic splice that was utilized due to weakening of a canonical splice site. Antisense oligonucleotides that targeted the identified cryptic splice sites repressed cryptic splicing at the expense of canonical splicing in all three cases, as shown by reverse-transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and by enhancement of acid α-glucosidase enzymatic activity. This argues for a competition model for available splice sites, including intact or weakened canonical sites and natural or newly formed cryptic sites. The pipeline described here can detect cryptic splicing and correct canonical splicing using antisense oligonucleotides to restore the gene defect. PMID:27623443

  2. Insights from zebrafish and mouse models on the activity and safety of ar-turmerone as a potential drug candidate for the treatment of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Orellana-Paucar, Adriana Monserrath; Afrikanova, Tatiana; Thomas, Joice; Aibuldinov, Yelaman K; Dehaen, Wim; de Witte, Peter A M; Esguerra, Camila V

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study, we uncovered the anticonvulsant properties of turmeric oil and its sesquiterpenoids (ar-turmerone, α-, β-turmerone and α-atlantone) in both zebrafish and mouse models of chemically-induced seizures using pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). In this follow-up study, we aimed at evaluating the anticonvulsant activity of ar-turmerone further. A more in-depth anticonvulsant evaluation of ar-turmerone was therefore carried out in the i.v. PTZ and 6-Hz mouse models. The potential toxic effects of ar-turmerone were evaluated using the beam walking test to assess mouse motor function and balance. In addition, determination of the concentration-time profile of ar-turmerone was carried out for a more extended evaluation of its bioavailability in the mouse brain. Ar-turmerone displayed anticonvulsant properties in both acute seizure models in mice and modulated the expression patterns of two seizure-related genes (c-fos and brain-derived neurotrophic factor [bdnf]) in zebrafish. Importantly, no effects on motor function and balance were observed in mice after treatment with ar-turmerone even after administering a dose 500-fold higher than the effective dose in the 6-Hz model. In addition, quantification of its concentration in mouse brains revealed rapid absorption after i.p. administration, capacity to cross the BBB and long-term brain residence. Hence, our results provide additional information on the anticonvulsant properties of ar-turmerone and support further evaluation towards elucidating its mechanism of action, bioavailability, toxicity and potential clinical application.

  3. SR proteins are required for nematode trans-splicing in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, J R; Bruzik, J P

    1999-01-01

    SR (ser/arg) proteins have been shown to play roles in numerous aspects of pre-mRNA splicing, including modulation of alternative splicing, commitment of substrates to the splicing pathway, and splice site communication. The last of these, splice site communication, is particularly relevant to trans-splicing in which the 5' and 3' exons originate on separate molecules. The participation of SR proteins in naturally occurring, spliced leader RNA-dependent transsplicing has not been examined. Here, we have isolated SR proteins from an organism that performs both trans- and cis-splicing, the nematode Ascaris lumbricoides. To examine their activity in in vitro splicing reactions, we have also developed and characterized an SR protein-depleted whole-cell extract. When tested in this extract, the nematode SR proteins are required for both trans- and cis-splicing. In addition, the state of phosphorylation of the nematode SR proteins is critical to their activity in vitro. Interestingly, mammalian (HeLa) and A. lumbricoides SR proteins exhibit equivalent activities in cis-splicing, while the nematode SR proteins are much more active in trans-splicing. Thus, it appears that SR proteins purified from an organism that naturally trans-splices its pre-mRNAs promote this reaction to a greater extent than do their mammalian counterparts. PMID:10411135

  4. Transactivation of the p21 promoter by BRCA1 splice variants in mammary epithelial cells: evidence for both common and distinct activities of wildtype and mutant forms.

    PubMed

    Lu, M; Arrick, B A

    2000-12-14

    We have evaluated the transcriptional activation of a human p21 promoter reporter construct by transfection of BRCA1 expression constructs into tumorigenic and nontumorigenic human breast cell lines. Two cell lines with wildtype p53 (MCF-7 and MCF10A) demonstrated transcriptional activation of the p21 promoter by full-length BRCA1 (BRCA1L) as well as by two splice variants that lack most of exon 11 (BRCA1S and BRCA1S-9,10). In contrast, two cell lines with mutant p53 (MDA-231 and HCC1937) were inactive. Co-transfection of BRCA1L with BRCA1S or BRCA1S-9,10 exhibited synergistic p21 promoter activation, due to augmented expression of the cytomegalovirus promoter-based BRCA1 expression constructs. We examined the transcriptional activity of two known sequence alterations in BRCA1, one that results in a carboxy-terminal truncation of BRCA1 and is clearly pathogenic, and the other a missense mutation that is suspected of predisposing to cancer. Although both mutations have been shown to be defective in some assays of transactivation, we observed both mutations to be fully active in activation of the p21 promoter when incorporated in the full-length BRCA1L. In contrast, these mutations rendered BRCA1S inactive. These observations indicate that such transcriptional assays cannot serve as the basis for a functional appraisal of BRCA1 sequence alterations encountered in the course of genetic testing.

  5. Validation of the Soil Moisture Active Passive mission using USDA-ARS experimental watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The calibration and validation program of the Soil Moisture Active Passive mission (SMAP) relies upon an international cooperative of in situ networks to provide ground truth references across a variety of landscapes. The USDA Agricultural Research Service operates several experimental watersheds wh...

  6. Initial validation of the Soil Moisture Active Passive mission using USDA-ARS watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission was launched in January 2015 to measure global surface soil moisture. The calibration and validation program of SMAP relies upon an international cooperative of in situ networks to provide ground truth references across a variety of landscapes. The U...

  7. RHESSI AND TRACE OBSERVATIONS OF MULTIPLE FLARE ACTIVITY IN AR 10656 AND ASSOCIATED FILAMENT ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Kushwaha, Upendra; Cho, K.-S.; Veronig, Astrid M.

    2013-07-01

    We present Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) observations of multiple flare activity that occurred in the NOAA active region 10656 over a period of 2 hr on 2004 August 18. Out of four successive flares, three were class C events, and the final event was a major X1.8 solar eruptive flare. The activities during the pre-eruption phase, i.e., before the X1.8 flare, are characterized by three localized episodes of energy release occurring in the vicinity of a filament that produces intense heating along with non-thermal emission. A few minutes before the eruption, the filament undergoes an activation phase during which it slowly rises with a speed of {approx}12 km s{sup -1}. The filament eruption is accompanied by an X1.8 flare, during which multiple hard X-ray (HXR) bursts are observed up to 100-300 keV energies. We observe a bright and elongated coronal structure simultaneously in E(UV) and 50-100 keV HXR images underneath the expanding filament during the period of HXR bursts, which provides strong evidence for ongoing magnetic reconnection. This phase is accompanied by very high plasma temperatures of {approx}31 MK, followed by the detachment of the prominence from the solar source region. From the location, timing, strength, and spectrum of HXR emission, we conclude that the prominence eruption is driven by the distinct events of magnetic reconnection occurring in the current sheet below the erupting prominence. These multi-wavelength observations also suggest that the localized magnetic reconnections associated with different evolutionary stages of the filament in the pre-eruption phase play an important role in destabilizing the active-region filament through the tether-cutting process, leading to large-scale eruption and X-class flare.

  8. Isolation and characterization of a bacteriocin (Butyrivibriocin AR10) from the ruminal anaerobe Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens AR10: evidence in support of the widespread occurrence of bacteriocin-like activity among ruminal isolates of B. fibrisolvens.

    PubMed Central

    Kalmokoff, M L; Teather, R M

    1997-01-01

    Forty-nine isolates of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens and a single isolate of Butyrivibrio crossotus were screened for the production of inhibitors by a deferred plating procedure. Twenty-five isolates produced factors which, to various degrees, inhibited the growth of the other Butyrivibrio isolates. None of the inhibitory activity was due to bacteriophages. The inhibitory products from 18 of the producing strains were sensitive to protease digestion. Differences in the ranges of activity among the Butyrivibrio isolates and protease sensitivity profiles suggest that a number of different inhibitory compounds are produced. These findings suggest that the production of bacteriocin-like inhibitors may be a widespread characteristic throughout the genus Butyrivibrio. The bacteriocin-like activity from one isolate, B. fibrisolvens AR10, was purified and confirmed to reside in a single peptide. Crude bacteriocin extracts were prepared by ammonium sulfate and methanol precipitation of spent culture supernatants, followed by dialysis and high-speed centrifugation. The active component was isolated from the semicrude extract by reverse-phase chromatography. Tricine-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis confirmed that the peptide was purified to homogeneity, having an estimated molecular mass of approximately 4,000 Da. The N terminus of the peptide was blocked. A cyanogen bromide cleavage fragment of the native peptide yielded a sequence of 20 amino acids [(M)GIQLAPAXYQDIVNXVAAG]. No homology with previously reported bacteriocins was found. Butyrivibriocin AR10 represents the first bacteriocin isolated from a ruminal anaerobe. PMID:9023920

  9. RNA splicing and genes

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, P.A.

    1988-11-25

    The splicing of long transcripts RNA (copied from DNA in the cell nucleus) into smaller specific mRNA is an important event in the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. The splicing reaction occurs as a late step in the nuclear pathway for synthesis of mRNAs. This pathway commences with initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase II and probably involves an integrated series of steps each dependent on previous events. Splicing of precursors to mRNAs involves the formation of a spliceosome complex containing 5' and 3' splice sites. This complex contains the evolutionary highly conserved small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) Us, U4, U5, and U6. The most abundant snRNA, U1, is required to form the spliceosome and may be a part of the spliceosome. Analogues of these snRNAs have been identified in yeast. Assembly of the spliceosome probably involves the binding of a multi-snRNA complex containing U4, U5, and U6 snRNAs. Several observations suggest that the association of snRNAs in such complexes is quite dynamic. It is argued that the snRANs in the spliceosome form a catalytic RNA structure that is responsible for the cleavage and ligation steps during splicing.

  10. Viral interactions with components of the splicing machinery.

    PubMed

    Meyer, F

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genes are often interrupted by stretches of sequence with no protein coding potential or obvious function. After transcription, these interrupting sequences must be removed to give rise to the mature messenger RNA. This fundamental process is called RNA splicing and is achieved by complicated machinery made of protein and RNA that assembles around the RNA to be edited. Viruses also use RNA splicing to maximize their coding potential and economize on genetic space, and use clever strategies to manipulate the splicing machinery to their advantage. This article gives an overview of the splicing process and provides examples of viral strategies that make use of various components of the splicing system to promote their replicative cycle. Representative virus families have been selected to illustrate the interaction with various regulatory proteins and ribonucleoproteins. The unifying theme is fine regulation through protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions with the spliceosome components and associated factors to promote or prevent spliceosome assembly on given splice sites, in addition to a strong influence from cis-regulatory sequences on viral transcripts. Because there is an intimate coupling of splicing with the processes that direct mRNA biogenesis, a description of how these viruses couple the regulation of splicing with the retention or stability of mRNAs is also included. It seems that a unique balance of suppression and activation of splicing and nuclear export works optimally for each family of viruses.

  11. Viral interactions with components of the splicing machinery.

    PubMed

    Meyer, F

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genes are often interrupted by stretches of sequence with no protein coding potential or obvious function. After transcription, these interrupting sequences must be removed to give rise to the mature messenger RNA. This fundamental process is called RNA splicing and is achieved by complicated machinery made of protein and RNA that assembles around the RNA to be edited. Viruses also use RNA splicing to maximize their coding potential and economize on genetic space, and use clever strategies to manipulate the splicing machinery to their advantage. This article gives an overview of the splicing process and provides examples of viral strategies that make use of various components of the splicing system to promote their replicative cycle. Representative virus families have been selected to illustrate the interaction with various regulatory proteins and ribonucleoproteins. The unifying theme is fine regulation through protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions with the spliceosome components and associated factors to promote or prevent spliceosome assembly on given splice sites, in addition to a strong influence from cis-regulatory sequences on viral transcripts. Because there is an intimate coupling of splicing with the processes that direct mRNA biogenesis, a description of how these viruses couple the regulation of splicing with the retention or stability of mRNAs is also included. It seems that a unique balance of suppression and activation of splicing and nuclear export works optimally for each family of viruses. PMID:27571697

  12. OBSERVATIONS OF MULTIPLE SURGES ASSOCIATED WITH MAGNETIC ACTIVITIES IN AR 10484 ON 2003 OCTOBER 25

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, Wahab; Srivastava, Abhishek K.; Schmieder, B.; Chandra, R.; Bisht, S.; Kumar, Pankaj

    2012-06-10

    We present a multi-wavelength study of recurrent surges observed in H{alpha}, UV (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/EIT), and Radio (Learmonth, Australia) from the super-active region NOAA 10484 on 2003 October 25. Several bright structures visible in H{alpha} and UV corresponding to subflares are also observed at the base of each surge. Type III bursts are triggered and RHESSI X-ray sources are evident with surge activity. The major surge consists of bunches of ejective paths forming a fan-shaped region with an angular size of ( Almost-Equal-To 65 Degree-Sign ) during its maximum phase. The ejection speed reaches up to {approx}200 km s{sup -1}. The SOHO/Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms reveal that a large dipole emerges from the east side of the active region on 2003 October 18-20, a few days before the surges. On 2003 October 25, the major sunspots were surrounded by 'moat regions' with moving magnetic features (MMFs). Parasitic fragmented positive polarities were pushed by the ambient dispersion motion of the MMFs and annihilated with negative polarities at the borders of the moat region of the following spot to produce flares and surges. A topology analysis of the global Sun using Potential Field Source Surface shows that the fan structures visible in the EIT 171 A images follow magnetic field lines connecting the present active region to a preceding active region in the southeast. Radio observations of Type III bursts indicate that they are coincident with the surges, suggesting that magnetic reconnection is the driver mechanism. The magnetic energy released by the reconnection is transformed into plasma heating and provides the kinetic energy for the ejections. A lack of a radio signature in the high corona suggests that the surges are confined to follow the closed field lines in the fans. We conclude that these cool surges may have some local heating effects in the closed loops, but probably play a minor role in global coronal heating and the

  13. Spectroscopic and modeling investigations of the gas phase chemistry and composition in microwave plasma activated B2H6/CH4/Ar/H2 mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Richley, James C; Davies, David R W; Ashfold, Michael N R

    2010-09-23

    A comprehensive study of microwave (MW) activated B2H6/CH4/Ar/H2 plasmas used for the chemical vapor deposition of B-doped diamond is reported. Absolute column densities of ground state B atoms, electronically excited H(n = 2) atoms, and BH, CH, and C2 radicals have been determined by cavity ring down spectroscopy, as functions of height (z) above a molybdenum substrate and of the plasma process conditions (B2H6, CH4, and Ar partial pressures; total pressure, p; and supplied MW power, P). Optical emission spectroscopy has also been used to explore variations in the relative densities of electronically excited H atoms, H2 molecules, and BH, CH, and C2 radicals, as functions of the same process conditions. These experimental data are complemented by extensive 2D(r, z) modeling of the plasma chemistry, which result in substantial refinements to the existing B/C/H/O thermochemistry and chemical kinetics. Comparison with the results of analogous experimental/modeling studies of B2H6/Ar/H2 and CH4/Ar/H2 plasmas in the same MW reactor show that: (i) trace B2H6 additions have negligible effect on a pre-established CH4/Ar/H2 plasma; (ii) the spatial extent of the B and BH concentration profiles in a B2H6/CH4/Ar/H2 plasma is smaller than in a hydrocarbon-free B2H6/Ar/H2 plasma operating at the same p, P, etc.; (iii) B/C coupling reactions (probably supplemented by reactions involving trace O2 present as air impurity in the process gas mixture) play an important role in determining the local BHx (x = 0-3) radical densities; and (iv) gas phase B atoms are the most likely source of the boron that incorporates into the growing B-doped diamond film. PMID:20735120

  14. Starvation actively inhibits splicing of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA via a bifunctional ESE/ESS element bound by hnRNP K.

    PubMed

    Cyphert, T J; Suchanek, A L; Griffith, B N; Salati, L M

    2013-09-01

    Regulated expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is due to changes in the rate of pre-mRNA splicing and not changes in its transcription. Starvation alters pre-mRNA splicing by decreasing the rate of intron removal, leading to intron retention and a decrease in the accumulation of mature mRNA. A regulatory element within exon 12 of G6PD pre-mRNA controls splicing efficiency. Starvation caused an increase in the expression of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K protein and this increase coincided with the increase in the binding of hnRNP K to the regulatory element and a decrease in the expression of G6PD mRNA. HnRNP K bound to two C-rich motifs forming an ESS within exon 12. Overexpression of hnRNP K decreased the splicing and expression of G6PD mRNA, while siRNA-mediated depletion of hnRNP K caused an increase in the splicing and expression of G6PD mRNA. Binding of hnRNP K to the regulatory element was enhanced in vivo by starvation coinciding with a decrease in G6PD mRNA. HnRNP K binding to the C-rich motifs blocked binding of serine-arginine rich, splicing factor 3 (SRSF3), a splicing enhancer. Thus hnRNP K is a nutrient regulated splicing factor responsible for the inhibition of the splicing of G6PD during starvation.

  15. Vitamin D and alternative splicing of RNA.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Chun, Rene F; Lisse, Thomas S; Garcia, Alejandro J; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S; Hewison, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The active form of vitamin D (1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D) exerts its genomic effects via binding to a nuclear high-affinity vitamin D receptor (VDR). Recent deep sequencing analysis of VDR binding locations across the complete genome has significantly expanded our understanding of the actions of vitamin D and VDR on gene transcription. However, these studies have also promoted appreciation of the extra-transcriptional impact of vitamin D on gene expression. It is now clear that vitamin D interacts with the epigenome via effects on DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and microRNA generation to maintain normal biological functions. There is also increasing evidence that vitamin D can influence pre-mRNA constitutive splicing and alternative splicing, although the mechanism for this remains unclear. Pre-mRNA splicing has long been thought to be a post-transcription RNA processing event, but current data indicate that this occurs co-transcriptionally. Several steroid hormones have been recognized to coordinately control gene transcription and pre-mRNA splicing through the recruitment of nuclear receptor co-regulators that can both control gene transcription and splicing. The current review will discuss this concept with specific reference to vitamin D, and the potential role of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNPC), a nuclear factor with an established function in RNA splicing. hnRNPC, has been shown to be involved in the VDR transcriptional complex as a vitamin D-response element-binding protein (VDRE-BP), and may act as a coupling factor linking VDR-directed gene transcription with RNA splicing. In this way hnRNPC may provide an additional mechanism for the fine-tuning of vitamin D-regulated target gene expression. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'.

  16. CALCULATING ENERGY STORAGE DUE TO TOPOLOGICAL CHANGES IN EMERGING ACTIVE REGION NOAA AR 11112

    SciTech Connect

    Tarr, Lucas; Longcope, Dana

    2012-04-10

    The minimum current corona model provides a way to estimate stored coronal energy using the number of field lines connecting regions of positive and negative photospheric flux. This information is quantified by the net flux connecting pairs of opposing regions in a connectivity matrix. Changes in the coronal magnetic field, due to processes such as magnetic reconnection, manifest themselves as changes in the connectivity matrix. However, the connectivity matrix will also change when flux sources emerge or submerge through the photosphere, as often happens in active regions. We have developed an algorithm to estimate the changes in flux due to emergence and submergence of magnetic flux sources. These estimated changes must be accounted for in order to quantify storage and release of magnetic energy in the corona. To perform this calculation over extended periods of time, we must additionally have a consistently labeled connectivity matrix over the entire observational time span. We have therefore developed an automated tracking algorithm to generate a consistent connectivity matrix as the photospheric source regions evolve over time. We have applied this method to NOAA Active Region 11112, which underwent a GOES M2.9 class flare around 19:00 on 2010 October 16th, and calculated a lower bound on the free magnetic energy buildup of {approx}8.25 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg over 3 days.

  17. Validation of the Soil Moisture Active Passive mission using USDA-ARS experimental watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosh, M. H.; Jackson, T. J.; Bindlish, R.; Colliander, A.; Kim, S.; Das, N. N.; Yueh, S. H.; Bosch, D. D.; Goodrich, D. C.; Prueger, J. H.; Starks, P. J.; Livingston, S.; Seyfried, M. S.; Coopersmith, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    The calibration and validation program of the Soil Moisture Active Passive mission (SMAP) relies upon an international cooperative of in situ networks to provide ground truth references across a variety of landscapes. The USDA Agricultural Research Service operates several experimental watersheds which contribute to the validation of SMAP soil moisture products. These watersheds consist of a network of in situ sensors that measure soil moisture at a variety of depths including the 5 cm depth, which is critical for satellite validation. Comparisons of the in situ network estimates to the satellite products are ongoing, but initial results have shown strong correlation between satellite estimates and in situ soil moisture measurements once scaling functions were applied. The scaling methodologies for the in situ networks are being reviewed and evaluated. Results from the Little Washita, Fort Cobb, St. Joseph's and Little River Experimental Watersheds show good agreement between the satellite products and in situ measurements. Walnut Gulch results show high accuracy, although with the caveat that these domains are semi-arid with a substantially lower dynamic range. The South Fork Watershed is examined more closely for its detailed scaling function development as well as an apparent bias between satellite and in situ values.

  18. Splice assembly tool and method of splicing

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.

    1980-01-01

    A splice assembly tool for assembling component parts of an electrical conductor while producing a splice connection between electrical cables therewith, comprises a first structural member adaptable for supporting force applying means thereon, said force applying means enabling a rotary force applied manually thereto to be converted to a longitudinal force for subsequent application against a first component part of said electrical connection, a second structural member adaptable for engaging a second component part in a manner to assist said first structural member in assembling the component parts relative to one another and transmission means for conveying said longitudinal force between said first and said second structural members, said first and said second structural members being coupled to one another by said transmission means, wherein at least one of said component parts comprises a tubular elastomeric sleeve and said force applying means provides a relatively high mechanical advantage when said rotary force is applied thereto so as to facilitate assembly of said at least one tubular elastomeric sleeve about said other component part in an interference fit manner.

  19. The allele-specific suppressor sup-39 alters use of cryptic splice sites in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Roller, A B; Hoffman, D C; Zahler, A M

    2000-01-01

    Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans sup-39 gene cause allele-specific suppression of the uncoordination defect of unc-73(e936). e936 is a point mutation that changes the canonical G at the 5' end of intron 16 to a U. This mutation activates three splice donors, two of which define introns beginning with the canonical GU. Use of these two cryptic splice sites causes loss of reading frame; interestingly these messages are not substrates for nonsense-mediated decay. The third splice donor, used in 10% of steady-state e936 messages, is the mutated splice donor at the wild-type position, which defines an intron beginning with UU. In the presence of a sup-39 mutation, these same three splice donors are used, but the ratio of messages produced by splicing at these sites changes. The percentage of unc-73(e936) messages containing the wild-type splice junction is increased to 33% with a corresponding increase in the level of UNC-73 protein. This sup-39-induced change was also observed when the e936 mutant intron region was inserted into a heterologous splicing reporter construct transfected into worms. Experiments with splicing reporter constructs showed that the degree of 5' splice site match to the splicing consensus sequence can strongly influence cryptic splice site choice. We propose that mutant SUP-39 is a new type of informational suppressor that alters the use of weak splice donors. PMID:10757761

  20. SpliceDisease database: linking RNA splicing and disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Zhang, Jie; Li, Kaibo; Zhao, Wei; Cui, Qinghua

    2012-01-01

    RNA splicing is an important aspect of gene regulation in many organisms. Splicing of RNA is regulated by complicated mechanisms involving numerous RNA-binding proteins and the intricate network of interactions among them. Mutations in cis-acting splicing elements or its regulatory proteins have been shown to be involved in human diseases. Defects in pre-mRNA splicing process have emerged as a common disease-causing mechanism. Therefore, a database integrating RNA splicing and disease associations would be helpful for understanding not only the RNA splicing but also its contribution to disease. In SpliceDisease database, we manually curated 2337 splicing mutation disease entries involving 303 genes and 370 diseases, which have been supported experimentally in 898 publications. The SpliceDisease database provides information including the change of the nucleotide in the sequence, the location of the mutation on the gene, the reference Pubmed ID and detailed description for the relationship among gene mutations, splicing defects and diseases. We standardized the names of the diseases and genes and provided links for these genes to NCBI and UCSC genome browser for further annotation and genomic sequences. For the location of the mutation, we give direct links of the entry to the respective position/region in the genome browser. The users can freely browse, search and download the data in SpliceDisease at http://cmbi.bjmu.edu.cn/sdisease.

  1. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Brooks, Angela N.; Duff, Michael O.; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W.; Celniker, Susan E.; et al

    2015-08-20

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected themore » splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. In conclusion, this large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs.« less

  2. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Angela N.; Duff, Michael O.; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W.; Celniker, Susan E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-08-20

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected the splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. In conclusion, this large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs.

  3. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Angela N.; Duff, Michael O.; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W.; Celniker, Susan E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected the splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. This large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs. PMID:26294686

  4. Ar-39-Ar-40 ages of four ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    1994-01-01

    Ureilites Novo Urei, Havero, and Kenna show strong evidence of one or more Ar-40 degassing events in the time period of 3.3-4.1 Ga ago. These ages may be compared to current interpretations of ureilite chronology. These include the suggestion of metasomatic activity on the parent body 3.7 Ga ago that reset some Sm-Nd ages and the suggestion that ureilites have experienced terrestrial contamination of several trace elements (including Pb and LREE), which makes suspect ages younger than approximately 4.5 Ga. Because the K-Ar chronometer can be sensitive to metamorphic events, we made Ar-39-Ar-40 determinations on bulk samples (0.12-0.14 g each) of four ureilites. The Ar-39-Ar-40 age spectra and K/Ca ratios as a function of cumulative Ar release from stepwise temperature extractions for the four ureilites analyzed are shown. Because Ar-39-Ar-40 ages shown by low and high temperature extractions may be suspect, we examined the intermediate temperature extractions. Although interpretation of these spectra is obviously uncertain, we believe that the most recent times of Ar degassing can be roughly inferred. These times are approximately 3.3 Ga for Havero, 3.3-3.7 Ga for Novo Urei, and approximately 4.1 Ga for Kenna, for which Ar degassing may not have been complete. The indication of Ar-39-Ar-40 degassing ages of 3.3-4.1 Ga for three ureilites that also contain an enhanced LREE component and (excepting Havero) produce a 3.74 Ga Sm-Nd age, suggests that both chronometers may have responded to the same parent body event. On the other hand, it is also possible that the Ar data reflect one or more separate events that did not strongly affect the Sm-Nd system, a situation that commonly occurs in eucrites. Thus the existence of reset Ar ages does not require similarly reset Sm-Nd ages.

  5. Bacillus cereus AR156 primes induced systemic resistance by suppressing miR825/825* and activating defense-related genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dongdong; Xia, Jing; Jiang, Chunhao; Qi, Beibei; Ling, Xiaoyu; Lin, Siyuan; Zhang, Weixiong; Guo, Jianhua; Jin, Hailing; Zhao, Hongwei

    2016-04-01

    Small RNAs play an important role in plant immune responses. However, their regulatory function in induced systemic resistance (ISR) is nascent. Bacillus cereus AR156 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that induces ISR in Arabidopsis against bacterial infection. Here, by comparing small RNA profiles of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000-infected Arabidopsis with and without AR156 pretreatment, we identified a group of Arabidopsis microRNAs (miRNAs) that are differentially regulated by AR156 pretreatment. miR825 and miR825* are two miRNA generated from a single miRNA gene. Northern blot analysis indicated that they were significantly downregulated in Pst DC3000-infected plants pretreated with AR156, in contrast to the plants without AR156 pretreatment. miR825 targets two ubiquitin-protein ligases, while miR825* targets toll-interleukin-like receptor (TIR)-nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) type resistance (R) genes. The expression of these target genes negatively correlated with the expression of miR825 and miR825*. Moreover, transgenic plants showing reduced expression of miR825 and miR825* displayed enhanced resistance to Pst DC3000 infection, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing miR825 and miR825* were more susceptible. Taken together, our data indicates that Bacillus cereus AR156 pretreatment primes ISR to Pst infection by suppressing miR825 and miR825* and activating the defense related genes they targeted.

  6. Bacillus cereus AR156 primes induced systemic resistance by suppressing miR825/825* and activating defense-related genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Dongdong; Xia, Jing; Jiang, Chunhao; Qi, Beibei; Ling, Xiaoyu; Lin, Siyuan; Zhang, Weixiong; Guo, Jianhua; Jin, Hailing; Zhao, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs play an important role in plant immune responses. However, their regulatory function in induced systemic resistance (ISR) is nascent. Bacillus cereus AR156 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that induces ISR in Arabidopsis against bacterial infection. Here, by comparing small RNA profiles of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000-infected Arabidopsis with and without AR156 pretreatment, we identified a group of Arabidopsis microRNAs (miRNAs) that are differentially regulated by AR156 pretreatment. miR825 and miR825* are two miRNA generated from a single miRNA gene. Northern blot analysis indicated that they were significantly downregulated in Pst DC3000-infected plants pretreated with AR156, in contrast to the plants without AR156 pretreatment.miR825 targets two ubiquitin-protein ligases, while miR825* targets toll-interleukin-like receptor (TIR)-nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) type resistance (R) genes. The expression of these target genes negatively correlated with the expression of miR825 and miR825*. Moreover, transgenic plants showing reduced expression of miR825 and miR825* displayed enhanced resistance to Pst DC3000 infection, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing miR825 and miR825* were more susceptible. Taken together, our data indicates that Bacillus cereus AR156 pretreatment primes ISR to Pst infection by suppressing miR825 and miR825* and activating the defense related genes they targeted. PMID:26526683

  7. The role of the B7-1a molecule, an alternatively spliced form of murine B7-1 (CD80), on T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Inobe, M; Aoki, N; Linsley, P S; Ledbetter, J A; Abe, R; Murakami, M; Uede, T

    1996-07-15

    B7 molecules (CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2/B70)) on APCs provide costimulatory signals for T cell proliferation. We previously described the presence of an alternatively spliced form of murine CD80 (previously termed MB7-2 and renamed as B7-1a) that completely lacks the second Ig-like domain coded by exon 3 in activated murine B cells. in this study, we first examined whether B7-1a mRNA can be detected in vivo by RNase protection assay. The expression of B7-1a mRNA was only detected in lymphoid organs although the level of expression was lesser than that of CD80 mRNA. However, we demonstrated that the expression of B7-1a mRNA like CD80 mRNA was considerably augmented in spleen cells treated with either LPS in vitro or OVA/CFA conjugate in vivo. We next determined the functional activity of B7-1a using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells transfected by B7 genes. When resting T cells were cocultured with CHO cells expressing B7-1a molecules in the presence of PMA/ionomycin, T cell proliferation was not detected, while CHO cells either expressing CD80 or CD86 could promote the proliferation of resting T cells. in contrast to resting T cells, CHO cells expressing B7-1a could support the proliferation of activated T cells. Thus, costimulatory activity of B7-1a molecules was dependent upon the activation stage of T cells. Therefore the IgV-like region of CD80 contains a critical region for functional interaction with its ligands and can transduce a costimulatory signal for T cell proliferation.

  8. The TLQP-21 Peptide Activates the G-protein-coupled receptor C3aR1 via a Folding-upon-Binding Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Severini, Cinzia; Gopinath, Tata; Braun, Patrick D.; Sassano, Maria F.; Gurney, Allison; Roth, Bryan L.; Vulchanova, Lucy; Possenti, Roberta; Veglia, Gianluigi; Bartolomucci, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY TLQP-21, a VGF-encoded peptide is emerging as a novel target for obesity-associated disorders. TLQP-21 is found in the sympathetic nerve terminals in the adipose tissue and targets the G-protein-coupled-receptor (GPCR) Complement-3a-Receptor1 (C3aR1). So far, the mechanisms of TLQP-21-induced receptor activation remained unexplored. Here, we report that TLQP-21 is intrinsically disordered and undergoes a disorder-to-order transition, adopting an α-helical conformation, upon targeting cells expressing the C3aR1. We determined that the hot spots for TLQP-21 are located at the C-terminus, with mutations in the last four amino acids progressively reducing the bioactivity and, a single site mutation (R21A) or C-terminal amidation abolishing its function completely. Interestingly, the human TLQP-21 sequence carrying a S20A substitution activates the human C3aR1 receptor with lower potency compared to the rodent sequence. These studies reveal the mechanism of action of TLQP-21 and provide molecular templates for designing agonists and antagonists to modulate C3aR1 functions. PMID:25456411

  9. Functional impact of splice isoform diversity in individual cells

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Karen; Makeyev, Eugene V.

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing provides an effective means for expanding coding capacity of eukaryotic genomes. Recent studies suggest that co-expression of different splice isoforms may increase diversity of RNAs and proteins at a single-cell level. A pertinent question in the field is whether such co-expression is biologically meaningful or, rather, represents insufficiently stringent splicing regulation. Here we argue that isoform co-expression may produce functional outcomes that are difficult and sometimes impossible to achieve using other regulation strategies. Far from being a ‘splicing noise’, co-expression is often established through co-ordinated activity of specific cis-elements and trans-acting factors. Further work in this area may uncover new biological functions of alternative splicing (AS) and generate important insights into mechanisms allowing different cell types to attain their unique molecular identities. PMID:27528755

  10. Alternative splicing of inner-ear-expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanfei; Liu, Yueyue; Nie, Hongyun; Ma, Xin; Xu, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    Alternative splicing plays a fundamental role in the development and physiological function of the inner ear. Inner-ear-specific gene splicing is necessary to establish the identity and maintain the function of the inner ear. For example, exon 68 of Cadherin 23 (Cdh23) gene is subject to inner-ear-specific alternative splicing, and as a result, Cdh23(+ 68) is only expressed in inner ear hair cells. Alternative splicing along the tonotopic axis of the cochlea contributes to frequency tuning, particularly in lower vertebrates, such as chickens and turtles. Differential splicing of Kcnma1, which encodes for the α subunit of the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (BK channel), has been suggested to affect the channel gating properties and is important for frequency tuning. Consequently, deficits in alternative splicing have been shown to cause hearing loss, as we can observe in Bronx Waltzer (bv) mice and Sfswap mutant mice. Despite the advances in this field, the regulation of alternative splicing in the inner ear remains elusive. Further investigation is also needed to clarify the mechanism of hearing loss caused by alternative splicing deficits. PMID:27376950

  11. Involvement of PARP1 in the regulation of alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Matveeva, Elena; Maiorano, John; Zhang, Qingyang; Eteleeb, Abdallah M; Convertini, Paolo; Chen, Jing; Infantino, Vittoria; Stamm, Stefan; Wang, Jiping; Rouchka, Eric C; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne N

    2016-01-01

    Specialized chromatin structures such as nucleosomes with specific histone modifications decorate exons in eukaryotic genomes, suggesting a functional connection between chromatin organization and the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing. Through profiling the functional location of Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase, we observed that it is associated with the nucleosomes at exon/intron boundaries of specific genes, suggestive of a role for this enzyme in alternative splicing. Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase has previously been implicated in the PARylation of splicing factors as well as regulation of the histone modification H3K4me3, a mark critical for co-transcriptional splicing. In light of these studies, we hypothesized that interaction of the chromatin-modifying factor, Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase with nucleosomal structures at exon–intron boundaries, might regulate pre-mRNA splicing. Using genome-wide approaches validated by gene-specific assays, we show that depletion of PARP1 or inhibition of its PARylation activity results in changes in alternative splicing of a specific subset of genes. Furthermore, we observed that PARP1 bound to RNA, splicing factors and chromatin, suggesting that Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase serves as a gene regulatory hub to facilitate co-transcriptional splicing. These studies add another function to the multi-functional protein, Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase, and provide a platform for further investigation of this protein’s function in organizing chromatin during gene regulatory processes. PMID:27462443

  12. Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of KV10.1 Potassium Channels Modulate Channel Properties and Can Activate Cyclin-dependent Kinase in Xenopus Oocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos Gomes, Fernanda; Romaniello, Vincenzo; Sánchez, Araceli; Weber, Claudia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Psol, Maryna; Pardo, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed selectively in the mammalian brain but also aberrantly in cancer cells. In this study we identified short splice variants of KV10.1 resulting from exon-skipping events (E65 and E70) in human brain and cancer cell lines. The presence of the variants was confirmed by Northern blot and RNase protection assays. Both variants completely lacked the transmembrane domains of the channel and produced cytoplasmic proteins without channel function. In a reconstituted system, both variants co-precipitated with the full-length channel and induced a robust down-regulation of KV10.1 current when co-expressed with the full-length form, but their effect was mechanistically different. E65 required a tetramerization domain and induced a reduction in the overall expression of full-length KV10.1, whereas E70 mainly affected its glycosylation pattern. E65 triggered the activation of cyclin-dependent kinases in Xenopus laevis oocytes, suggesting a role in cell cycle control. Our observations highlight the relevance of noncanonical functions for the oncogenicity of KV10.1, which need to be considered when ion channels are targeted for cancer therapy. PMID:26518875

  13. mPEG-PAMAM-G4 Nucleic Acid Nanocomplexes: Enhanced Stability, RNase Protection, and Activity of Splice Switching Oligomer and Poly I:C RNA

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Reveles, Juan; Sedaghat-Herati, Reza; Gilley, David R.; Schaeffer, Ashley M.; Ghosh, Kartik C.; Greene, Thomas D.; Gann, Hannah E.; Dowler, Wesley A; Kramer, Stephen; Dean, John M.; Delong, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    Dendrimer chemistries have virtually exploded in recent years with increasing interest in this class of Polymers as gene delivery vehicles. An effective nucleic acid delivery vehicle must efficiently bind its cargo and form physically stable complexes. Most importantly, the nucleic acid must be protected in biological fluids and tissues, as RNA is extremely susceptible to nuclease degradation. Here, we characterized the association of nucleic acids with generation 4 PEGylated Poly(amidoamine)dendrimer (mPEG-PAMAM-G4). We investigated the formation, size, and stability over time of the nanoplexes at various N/P ratios by gel shift and dynamic light scatter spectroscopy (DLS). Further characterization of the mPEG-PAMAM-G4:nucleic acid association was provided by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and by circular dichroism (CD). Importantly, mPEG-PAMAM-G4 complexation protected RNA from treatment with RNase A, degradation in serum and various tissue homogenates. mPEG-PAMAM-G4 complexation also significantly enhanced the functional delivery of RNA in a novel engineered human melanoma cell line with splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) targeting a recombinant luciferase transcript. mPEG-PAMAM-G4 triconjugates formed between gold nanoparticle (GNP) and particularly manganese oxide (MnO) nanorods, Poly IC, an anti-cancer RNA, showed enhanced cancer-killing activity by an MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) cell viability assay. PMID:24164501

  14. Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of KV10.1 Potassium Channels Modulate Channel Properties and Can Activate Cyclin-dependent Kinase in Xenopus Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramos Gomes, Fernanda; Romaniello, Vincenzo; Sánchez, Araceli; Weber, Claudia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Psol, Maryna; Pardo, Luis A

    2015-12-18

    KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed selectively in the mammalian brain but also aberrantly in cancer cells. In this study we identified short splice variants of KV10.1 resulting from exon-skipping events (E65 and E70) in human brain and cancer cell lines. The presence of the variants was confirmed by Northern blot and RNase protection assays. Both variants completely lacked the transmembrane domains of the channel and produced cytoplasmic proteins without channel function. In a reconstituted system, both variants co-precipitated with the full-length channel and induced a robust down-regulation of KV10.1 current when co-expressed with the full-length form, but their effect was mechanistically different. E65 required a tetramerization domain and induced a reduction in the overall expression of full-length KV10.1, whereas E70 mainly affected its glycosylation pattern. E65 triggered the activation of cyclin-dependent kinases in Xenopus laevis oocytes, suggesting a role in cell cycle control. Our observations highlight the relevance of noncanonical functions for the oncogenicity of KV10.1, which need to be considered when ion channels are targeted for cancer therapy. PMID:26518875

  15. Role of Acinus in Regulating Retinoic Acid-Responsive Gene Pre-mRNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Soprano, Kenneth J.; Soprano, Dianne Robert

    2014-01-01

    Acinus-S’ is a co-repressor for retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-dependent gene transcription and has been suggested to be involved in RNA processing. In this study the role of Acinus isoforms in regulating pre-mRNA splicing was explored using in vivo splicing assays. Both Acinus-L and Acinus-S’, with the activity of Acinus-L higher than that of Acinus-S’, increase the splicing of a retinoic acid (RA)-responsive minigene containing a weak 5′ splice site but not a RA-responsive minigene containing a strong 5′ splice site. RA treatment further enhances the splicing of the weak 5′ splice site by Acinus in a dose- and time-dependent manner, suggesting a RA-dependent activity in addition to a RA-independent activity of Acinus. The RA-independent effect of Acinus occurs to varying degrees using minigene constructs containing several different promoters while the RA-dependent splicing activity of Acinus is specific for transcripts derived from the minigene driven by a RA response element (RARE)-containing promoter. This suggests that the ligand-dependent splicing activity of Acinus is related to the RA-activated RAR bound to the RARE. The RRM domain is necessary for the RA-dependent splicing activity of Acinus and the RA-independent splicing activity of Acinus is repressed by RNPS1. Importantly, measurement of the splicing of endogenous human RARβ and Bcl-x in vivo demonstrates that Acinus stimulates the use of the weaker alternative 5′ splice site of these two genes in a RA-dependent manner for RARβ and a RA-independent manner for Bcl-x. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that Acinus functions in both RAR-dependent splicing and RAR-dependent transcription. PMID:25205379

  16. Splicing and splice factor SRp55 participate in the response to DNA damage by changing isoform ratios of target genes.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Valery; Schmidt, Erin L; Filippova, Maria; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope J

    2008-08-15

    Alternative splicing is an important source of protein diversity, and is an established but not yet fully understood mechanism for gene regulation in higher eukaryotes. Its regulation is governed by a variety of mechanisms, including variation in the expression levels of splicing factors engaged in spliceosome formation. SRp55 is one of the most ubiquitous splicing factors and one that can be up-regulated by DNA damage in the absence of p53, and we had previously found that depletion of its activity increased resistance to DNA damage in p53-dependant manner. To assess its influence on the splicing patterns of genes involved in apoptosis, we performed splice-specific microarray analysis of cells treated with siRNA specific for this gene. This analysis, backed by RT-PCR verification, identified three genes, KSR1, ZAK and mda7/IL24, which are sensitive to SRp55 depletion. We also analyzed the splice patterns of apoptosis-related genes in p53-deficient U2OS cells following treatment with the genotoxic drug mitomycin C. This analysis revealed that DNA damage resulted in changes in splicing activity that modified the splicing pattern of Fas, a key pro-apoptotic, p53-inducible death receptor. Interestingly, this modification led to an enrichment of the anti-apoptotic soluble Fas isoform, and this secreted isoform was detected in the media surrounding cells subjected to DNA damage. These findings show that modulation of splicing activity in p53-deficient cells during the early response to sub-lethal DNA damage results in a change in the splicing of target genes, thus modifying the cellular response to genotoxic agents.

  17. Plate description of active deformation in the Africa (AF)-Arabia (AR)-Eurasia (EU) zone of plate interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernant, P.; McClusky, S.; Reilinger, R.

    2006-12-01

    We present the results of 17 years of GPS monitoring in this zone of plate interaction and show that to the resolution of our observations (i.e., ~1-2 mm/yr; ~ ±10 % of relative plate motions), deformation is consistent with plate-block models with relative motion between adjacent plates/blocks accommodated by elastic strain accumulation. Relative plate motions are consistent with geologically recent (~ 3 Ma) plate motions where geologic estimates of relative plate motion have been determined (AR- Nubia: Red Sea; AR-Somalia: Gulf of Aden; AF-EU; AR-EU). Furthermore, fault slip rates derived from the GPS block motions are mostly equal to geologic slip rates determined for long enough time intervals to average out earthquake cycle effects. We conclude that a plate description (i.e., relative Euler vectors) is appropriate to describe the kinematics of continental deformation during the past few Myr in this zone of plate interaction.

  18. Ar-Ar_Redux: rigorous error propagation of 40Ar/39Ar data, including covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rigorous data reduction and error propagation algorithms are needed to realise Earthtime's objective to improve the interlaboratory accuracy of 40Ar/39Ar dating to better than 1% and thereby facilitate the comparison and combination of the K-Ar and U-Pb chronometers. Ar-Ar_Redux is a new data reduction protocol and software program for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology which takes into account two previously underappreciated aspects of the method: 1. 40Ar/39Ar measurements are compositional dataIn its simplest form, the 40Ar/39Ar age equation can be written as: t = log(1+J [40Ar/39Ar-298.5636Ar/39Ar])/λ = log(1 + JR)/λ Where λ is the 40K decay constant and J is the irradiation parameter. The age t does not depend on the absolute abundances of the three argon isotopes but only on their relative ratios. Thus, the 36Ar, 39Ar and 40Ar abundances can be normalised to unity and plotted on a ternary diagram or 'simplex'. Argon isotopic data are therefore subject to the peculiar mathematics of 'compositional data', sensu Aitchison (1986, The Statistical Analysis of Compositional Data, Chapman & Hall). 2. Correlated errors are pervasive throughout the 40Ar/39Ar methodCurrent data reduction protocols for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology propagate the age uncertainty as follows: σ2(t) = [J2 σ2(R) + R2 σ2(J)] / [λ2 (1 + R J)], which implies zero covariance between R and J. In reality, however, significant error correlations are found in every step of the 40Ar/39Ar data acquisition and processing, in both single and multi collector instruments, during blank, interference and decay corrections, age calculation etc. Ar-Ar_Redux revisits every aspect of the 40Ar/39Ar method by casting the raw mass spectrometer data into a contingency table of logratios, which automatically keeps track of all covariances in a compositional context. Application of the method to real data reveals strong correlations (r2 of up to 0.9) between age measurements within a single irradiation batch. Propertly taking

  19. Rapid generation of splicing reporters with pSpliceExpress

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Shivendra; Khanna, Amit; Stamm, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Almost all human protein-coding transcripts undergo pre-mRNA splicing and a majority of them is alternatively spliced. The most common technique used to analyze the regulation of an alternative exon is through reporter minigene constructs. However, their construction is time-consuming and is often complicated by the limited availability of appropriate restriction sites. Here, we report a fast and simple recombination-based method to generate splicing reporter genes, using a new vector, pSpliceExpress. The system allows generation of minigenes within one week. Minigenes generated with pSpliceExpress show the same regulation as displayed by conventionally cloned reporter constructs and provide an alternate avenue to study splice site selection in vivo. PMID:18930792

  20. Our favourite alternative splice site.

    PubMed

    Lerivray, Hubert; Méreau, Agnès; Osborne, H Beverley

    2006-05-01

    Alternative splicing is a widespread mechanism in mammals that generates several mRNAs from one gene, thereby creating genetic diversity of the genome. Variant splice patterns are often specific to different stages of development or particular tissues, and alternative splicing defects are being more frequently detected in genetic diseases and cancers. The increasingly important role of alternative splicing in the function and the regulation of cellular process makes it critical to have an easy-to-use data repository for the biological and medical research communities. We have compared web resources that give access to information on alternatively spliced genes, and the FAST DB (Friendly Alternative Splicing and Transcripts DataBase) site came out as our favourite.

  1. Paleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar results from the Grant intrusive breccia and coparison to the Permian Downeys Bluff Sill; evidence for Permian igneous activity at Hicks Dome, southern Illinois Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Snee, Lawrence W.

    1997-01-01

    Igneous processes at Hicks dome, a structural upwarp at lat 37.5 degrees N., long 88.4 degrees W. in the southern part of the Illinois Basin, may have thermally affected regional basinal fluid flow and may have provided fluorine for the formation of the Illinois-Kentucky Fluorspar district. The timing of both igneous activity and mineralization is poorly known. For this reason, we have dated an intrusive breccia at Hicks dome, the Grant intrusion, using 40Ar/39Ar geochronometric and paleomagnetic methods. Concordant plateau dates, giving Permian ages, were obtained from amphibole (272.1+or-0.7 [1 sigma] Ma) and phlogopite (272.7+or-0.7 [1 sigma] Ma). After alternating-field (AF) demagnetization, specimens that contain titanomagnetite-bearing igneous rock fragments give a mean remanent direction of declination (D)=168.4 degrees; inclination (I)=-8 degrees; alpha 95=8.6 degrees; number of specimens (N)=10; this direction yields a virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) at lat 54.8 degrees N., long 119.0 degrees E., delta p=4.4 degrees, delta m=8.7 degrees, near the late Paleozoic part of the North American apparent pole wander path. A nearly identical magnetization was found for the nearby Downeys Bluff sill (previously dated at about 275+or-24 Ma by the Rb-Sr method), in southern Illinois. Both AF and thermal demagnetization isolated shallow, southeasterly remanent directions carried by magnetite in the sill and from pyrrhotite in the baked contact of the Upper Mississippian Downeys Bluff Limestone: D=158.6 degrees; I=-11.8 degrees; alpha 95=3.8 degrees; N=15, yielding a VGP at lat 53.0 degrees N., long 128.7 degrees E., delta p=2.0 degrees, delta m=3.9 degrees. The paleomagnetic results, isotopic dates, and petrographic evidence thus favor the acquisition of thermal remanent magnetization by the Grant breccia and the Downeys Bluff sill during the Permian. The isotopic dates record rapid cooling from temperatures greater than 550 degrees C to less than 300 degrees C (the

  2. Splicing Wires Permanently With Explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Kushnick, Anne C.

    1990-01-01

    Explosive joining process developed to splice wires by enclosing and metallurgically bonding wires within copper sheets. Joints exhibit many desirable characteristics, 100-percent conductivity and strength, no heat-induced annealing, no susceptibility to corrosion in contacts between dissimilar metals, and stability at high temperature. Used to join wires to terminals, as well as to splice wires. Applicable to telecommunications industry, in which millions of small wires spliced annually.

  3. The neurogenetics of alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Celine K.; Black, Douglas L.; Zheng, Sika

    2016-01-01

    Alternative precursor-mRNA splicing is a key mechanism for regulating gene expression in mammals and is controlled by specialized RNA-binding proteins. The misregulation of splicing is implicated in multiple neurological disorders. We describe recent mouse genetic studies of alternative splicing that reveal its critical role in both neuronal development and the function of mature neurons. We discuss the challenges in understanding the extensive genetic programmes controlled by proteins that regulate splicing, both during development and in the adult brain. PMID:27094079

  4. The OsCYP19-4 Gene Is Expressed as Multiple Alternatively Spliced Transcripts Encoding Isoforms with Distinct Cellular Localizations and PPIase Activities under Cold Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Areum; Lee, Sang Sook; Jung, Won Yong; Park, Hyun Ji; Lim, Bo Ra; Kim, Hyun-Soon; Ahn, Jun Cheul; Cho, Hye Sun

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is an important molecular mechanism by which single genes can generate multiple mRNA isoforms. We reported previously that, in Oryza sativa, the cyclophilin 19-4 (OsCYP19-4.1) transcript was significantly upregulated in response to cold stress, and that transgenic plants were cold tolerant. Here we show that, under cold stress, OsCYP19-4 produces eight transcript variants by intron retention and exon skipping, resulting in production of four distinct protein isoforms. The OsCYP19-4 AS isoforms exhibited different cellular localizations in the epidermal cells: in contrast to OsCYP19-4.1, the OsCYP19-4.2 and OsCYP19-4.3 proteins were primarily targeted to guard and subsidiary cells, whereas OsCYP19-4.5, which consists largely of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) targeting signal, was co-localized with the RFP-BiP marker in the ER. In OsCYP19-4.2, the key residues of the PPIase domain are altered; consistent with this, recombinant OsCYP19-4.2 had significantly lower PPIase activity than OsCYP19-4.1 in vitro. Specific protein-protein interactions between OsCYP19-4.2/3 and AtRCN1 were verified in yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) and bimolecular fluoresence complementation (BiFC assays), although the OsCYP19-4 isoforms could not bind each other. Based on these results, we propose that two OsCYP19-4 AS isoforms, OsCYP19-4.2 and OsCYP19-4.3, play roles linking auxin transport and cold stress via interactions with RCN1. PMID:27447607

  5. Activation of a cryptic splice site in the growth hormone receptor associated with growth hormone insensitivity syndrome in a genetic isolate of Laron Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Schiavi, A.; Bartlett, R.; Brown, M.

    1994-09-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disease found worldwide. Despite various ethnic differences, all patients with LS described display classic dysmorphic features and extreme short stature due to defects in the growth hormone receptor (GHR). The vast majority of these patients are sporadic occurrences resulting from consanguineous matings; however, an Ecuadorian genetic isolate of LS has been reported. Our investigations have identified a genetic isolate of LS of Anglo Saxon origin. Seven individuals, by all clinical and biochemical criteria, have LS. As a result of extensive review of family and medical histories we have constructed a pedigree tracing the lineage of our affected patients through the 17th century. No GHR gross deletions were detected using an exon-specific PCR assay developed in our laboratory. Previous molecular analyses have identified mutations in exons 2-7 in numerous patients with classical LS. Single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was performed on GHR exons 2-7, and a marked conformational shift was noted in exon 7. Cycle sequencing of exon 7 from three affected individuals, and from four first-degree relatives, revealed a C{r_arrow}T transition at position 766 of the cDNA, and a heterozygous C{r_arrow}T transition at the identical position in the obligate carriers studied. This mutation is predicted to activate a cryptic donor splice site 63 base pairs upstream from the 3{prime} end of exon 7, effectively truncating the GHR cDNA without changing the reading frame. The resultant GHR protein is shortened by a proposed 21 amino acids. The identification and conformation of this mutation not only identifies a novel mutation in the GHR, and the first to be described in LS patients of English descent, but also allows for comparisons between genotypes and phenotypes in an inbred population.

  6. The OsCYP19-4 Gene Is Expressed as Multiple Alternatively Spliced Transcripts Encoding Isoforms with Distinct Cellular Localizations and PPIase Activities under Cold Stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, Areum; Lee, Sang Sook; Jung, Won Yong; Park, Hyun Ji; Lim, Bo Ra; Kim, Hyun-Soon; Ahn, Jun Cheul; Cho, Hye Sun

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is an important molecular mechanism by which single genes can generate multiple mRNA isoforms. We reported previously that, in Oryza sativa, the cyclophilin 19-4 (OsCYP19-4.1) transcript was significantly upregulated in response to cold stress, and that transgenic plants were cold tolerant. Here we show that, under cold stress, OsCYP19-4 produces eight transcript variants by intron retention and exon skipping, resulting in production of four distinct protein isoforms. The OsCYP19-4 AS isoforms exhibited different cellular localizations in the epidermal cells: in contrast to OsCYP19-4.1, the OsCYP19-4.2 and OsCYP19-4.3 proteins were primarily targeted to guard and subsidiary cells, whereas OsCYP19-4.5, which consists largely of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) targeting signal, was co-localized with the RFP-BiP marker in the ER. In OsCYP19-4.2, the key residues of the PPIase domain are altered; consistent with this, recombinant OsCYP19-4.2 had significantly lower PPIase activity than OsCYP19-4.1 in vitro. Specific protein-protein interactions between OsCYP19-4.2/3 and AtRCN1 were verified in yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) and bimolecular fluoresence complementation (BiFC assays), although the OsCYP19-4 isoforms could not bind each other. Based on these results, we propose that two OsCYP19-4 AS isoforms, OsCYP19-4.2 and OsCYP19-4.3, play roles linking auxin transport and cold stress via interactions with RCN1. PMID:27447607

  7. Histone methylation, alternative splicing and neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fiszbein, Ana; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing, as well as chromatin structure, greatly contributes to specific transcriptional programs that promote neuronal differentiation. The activity of G9a, the enzyme responsible for mono- and di-methylation of lysine 9 on histone H3 (H3K9me1 and H3K9me2) in mammalian euchromatin, has been widely implicated in the differentiation of a variety of cell types and tissues. In a recent work from our group (Fiszbein et al., 2016) we have shown that alternative splicing of G9a regulates its nuclear localization and, therefore, the efficiency of H3K9 methylation, which promotes neuronal differentiation. We discuss here our results in the light of a report from other group (Laurent et al. 2015) demonstrating a key role for the alternative splicing of the histone demethylase LSD1 in controlling specific gene expression in neurons. All together, these results illustrate the importance of alternative splicing in the generation of a proper equilibrium between methylation and demethylation of histones for the regulation of neuron-specific transcriptional programs. PMID:27606339

  8. Histone methylation, alternative splicing and neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fiszbein, Ana; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing, as well as chromatin structure, greatly contributes to specific transcriptional programs that promote neuronal differentiation. The activity of G9a, the enzyme responsible for mono- and di-methylation of lysine 9 on histone H3 (H3K9me1 and H3K9me2) in mammalian euchromatin, has been widely implicated in the differentiation of a variety of cell types and tissues. In a recent work from our group (Fiszbein et al., 2016) we have shown that alternative splicing of G9a regulates its nuclear localization and, therefore, the efficiency of H3K9 methylation, which promotes neuronal differentiation. We discuss here our results in the light of a report from other group (Laurent et al. 2015) demonstrating a key role for the alternative splicing of the histone demethylase LSD1 in controlling specific gene expression in neurons. All together, these results illustrate the importance of alternative splicing in the generation of a proper equilibrium between methylation and demethylation of histones for the regulation of neuron-specific transcriptional programs.

  9. Methods for Characterization of Alternative RNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Samuel E; Cheng, Chonghui

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of alternative splicing to detect the abundance of differentially spliced isoforms of a gene in total RNA can be accomplished via RT-PCR using both quantitative real-time and semi-quantitative PCR methods. These methods require careful PCR primer design to ensure specific detection of particular splice isoforms. We also describe analysis of alternative splicing using a splicing "minigene" in mammalian cell tissue culture to facilitate investigation of the regulation of alternative splicing of a particular exon of interest.

  10. Convergent evolution of alternative splices at domain boundaries of the BK channel.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Anthony A; Aldrich, Richard W

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a widespread mechanism for generating transcript diversity in higher eukaryotic genomes. The alternative splices of the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channel have been the subject of a good deal of experimental functional characterization in the Arthropoda, Chordata, and Nematoda phyla. In this review, we examine a list of splices of the BK channel by manual curation of Unigene clusters mapped to mouse, human, chicken, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans genomes. We find that BK alternative splices do not appear to be conserved across phyla. Despite this lack of conservation, splices occur in both vertebrates and invertebrates at identical regions of the channel at experimentally established domain boundaries. The fact that, across phyla, unique splices occur at experimentally established domain boundaries suggests a prominent role for the convergent evolution of alternative splices that produce functional changes via changes in interdomain communication. PMID:18694345

  11. Synergistic Effect of Simple Sugars and Carboxymethyl Cellulose on the Production of a Cellulolytic Cocktail from Bacillus sp. AR03 and Enzyme Activity Characterization.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Adriana P; Pisa, José H; Valdeón, Daniel H; Perotti, Nora I; Martínez, María A

    2016-04-01

    A cellulase-producing bacterium isolated from pulp and paper feedstock, Bacillus sp. AR03, was evaluated by means of a factorial design showing that peptone and carbohydrates were the main variables affecting enzyme production. Simple sugars, individually and combined with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), were further examined for their influence on cellulase production by strain AR03. Most of the mono and disaccharides assayed presented a synergistic effect with CMC. As a result, a peptone-based broth supplemented with 10 g/L sucrose and 10 g/L CMC maximized enzyme production after 96 h of cultivation. This medium was used to produce endoglucanases in a 1-L stirred tank reactor in batch mode at 30 °C, which reduced the fermentation period to 48 h and reaching 3.12 ± 0.02 IU/mL of enzyme activity. Bacillus sp. AR03 endoglucanases showed an optimum temperature of 60 °C and a pH of 6.0 with a wide range of pH stability. Furthermore, presence of 10 mM Mn(2+) and 5 mM Co(2+) produced an increase of enzyme activity (246.7 and 183.7 %, respectively), and remarkable tolerance to NaCl, Tween 80, and EDTA was also observed. According to our results, the properties of the cellulolytic cocktail from Bacillus sp. AR03 offer promising features in view of potential biorefinery applications.

  12. Synergistic Effect of Simple Sugars and Carboxymethyl Cellulose on the Production of a Cellulolytic Cocktail from Bacillus sp. AR03 and Enzyme Activity Characterization.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Adriana P; Pisa, José H; Valdeón, Daniel H; Perotti, Nora I; Martínez, María A

    2016-04-01

    A cellulase-producing bacterium isolated from pulp and paper feedstock, Bacillus sp. AR03, was evaluated by means of a factorial design showing that peptone and carbohydrates were the main variables affecting enzyme production. Simple sugars, individually and combined with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), were further examined for their influence on cellulase production by strain AR03. Most of the mono and disaccharides assayed presented a synergistic effect with CMC. As a result, a peptone-based broth supplemented with 10 g/L sucrose and 10 g/L CMC maximized enzyme production after 96 h of cultivation. This medium was used to produce endoglucanases in a 1-L stirred tank reactor in batch mode at 30 °C, which reduced the fermentation period to 48 h and reaching 3.12 ± 0.02 IU/mL of enzyme activity. Bacillus sp. AR03 endoglucanases showed an optimum temperature of 60 °C and a pH of 6.0 with a wide range of pH stability. Furthermore, presence of 10 mM Mn(2+) and 5 mM Co(2+) produced an increase of enzyme activity (246.7 and 183.7 %, respectively), and remarkable tolerance to NaCl, Tween 80, and EDTA was also observed. According to our results, the properties of the cellulolytic cocktail from Bacillus sp. AR03 offer promising features in view of potential biorefinery applications. PMID:26797928

  13. Tau mis-splicing in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Ah; Ahn, Sang Il; Gallo, Jean-Marc

    2016-08-01

    Tau proteins, which stabilize the structure and regulate the dynamics of microtubules, also play important roles in axonal transport and signal transduction. Tau proteins are missorted, aggregated, and found as tau inclusions under many pathological conditions associated with neurodegenerative disorders, which are collectively known as tauopathies. In the adult human brain, tau protein can be expressed in six isoforms due to alternative splicing. The aberrant splicing of tau pre-mRNA has been consistently identified in a variety of tauopathies but is not restricted to these types of disorders as it is also present in patients with non-tau proteinopathies and RNAopathies. Tau mis-splicing results in isoform-specific impairments in normal physiological function and enhanced recruitment of excessive tau isoforms into the pathological process. A variety of factors are involved in the complex set of mechanisms underlying tau mis-splicing, but variation in the cis-element, methylation of the MAPT gene, genetic polymorphisms, the quantity and activity of spliceosomal proteins, and the patency of other RNA-binding proteins, are related to aberrant splicing. Currently, there is a lack of appropriate therapeutic strategies aimed at correcting the tau mis-splicing process in patients with neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, a more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between tau mis-splicing and neurodegenerative disorders will aid in the development of efficient therapeutic strategies for patients with a tauopathy or other, related neurodegenerative disorders. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(8): 405-413]. PMID:27222125

  14. An alternative splicing product of the murine trpv1 gene dominant negatively modulates the activity of TRPV1 channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunbo; Hu, Hong-Zhen; Colton, Craig K; Wood, Jackie D; Zhu, Michael X

    2004-09-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), or vanilloid receptor 1, is the founding member of the vanilloid type of TRP superfamily of nonselective cation channels. TRPV1 is activated by noxious heat, acid, and alkaloid irritants as well as several endogenous ligands and is sensitized by inflammatory factors, thereby serving important functions in detecting noxious stimuli in the sensory system and pathological states in different parts of the body. Whereas numerous studies have been carried out using the rat and human TRPV1 cDNA, the mouse TRPV1 cDNA has not been characterized. Here, we report molecular cloning of two TRPV1 cDNA variants from dorsal root ganglia of C57BL/6 mice. The deduced proteins are designated TRPV1alpha and TRPV1beta and contain 839 and 829 amino acids, respectively. TRPV1beta arises from an alternative intron recognition signal within exon 7 of the trpv1 gene. We found a predominant expression of TRPV1alpha in many tissues and significant expression of TRPV1beta in dorsal root ganglia, skin, stomach, and tongue. When expressed in HEK 293 cells or Xenopus oocytes, TRPV1alpha formed a Ca(2+)-permeable channel activated by ligands known to stimulate TRPV1. TRPV1beta was not functional by itself but its co-expression inhibited the function of TRPV1alpha. Furthermore, although both isoforms were synthesized at a similar rate, less TRPV1beta than TRPV1alpha protein was found in cells and on the cell surface, indicating that the beta isoform is highly unstable. Our data suggest that TRPV1beta is a naturally occurring dominant-negative regulator of the responses of sensory neurons to noxious stimuli. PMID:15234965

  15. Splicing defects in the ataxia-telangiectasia gene, ATM: underlying mutations and consequences.

    PubMed Central

    Teraoka, S N; Telatar, M; Becker-Catania, S; Liang, T; Onengüt, S; Tolun, A; Chessa, L; Sanal, O; Bernatowska, E; Gatti, R A; Concannon, P

    1999-01-01

    Mutations resulting in defective splicing constitute a significant proportion (30/62 [48%]) of a new series of mutations in the ATM gene in patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) that were detected by the protein-truncation assay followed by sequence analysis of genomic DNA. Fewer than half of the splicing mutations involved the canonical AG splice-acceptor site or GT splice-donor site. A higher percentage of mutations occurred at less stringently conserved sites, including silent mutations of the last nucleotide of exons, mutations in nucleotides other than the conserved AG and GT in the consensus splice sites, and creation of splice-acceptor or splice-donor sites in either introns or exons. These splicing mutations led to a variety of consequences, including exon skipping and, to a lesser degree, intron retention, activation of cryptic splice sites, or creation of new splice sites. In addition, 5 of 12 nonsense mutations and 1 missense mutation were associated with deletion in the cDNA of the exons in which the mutations occurred. No ATM protein was detected by western blotting in any AT cell line in which splicing mutations were identified. Several cases of exon skipping in both normal controls and patients for whom no underlying defect could be found in genomic DNA were also observed, suggesting caution in the interpretation of exon deletions observed in ATM cDNA when there is no accompanying identification of genomic mutations. PMID:10330348

  16. Global regulation of alternative splicing by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR)

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Oz; Oren, Shirley; Safran, Michal; Deshet-Unger, Naamit; Akiva, Pinchas; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Cesarkas, Karen; Kabesa, Reut; Amariglio, Ninette; Unger, Ron; Rechavi, Gideon; Eyal, Eran

    2013-01-01

    Alternative mRNA splicing is a major mechanism for gene regulation and transcriptome diversity. Despite the extent of the phenomenon, the regulation and specificity of the splicing machinery are only partially understood. Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing of pre-mRNA by ADAR enzymes has been linked to splicing regulation in several cases. Here we used bioinformatics approaches, RNA-seq and exon-specific microarray of ADAR knockdown cells to globally examine how ADAR and its A-to-I RNA editing activity influence alternative mRNA splicing. Although A-to-I RNA editing only rarely targets canonical splicing acceptor, donor, and branch sites, it was found to affect splicing regulatory elements (SREs) within exons. Cassette exons were found to be significantly enriched with A-to-I RNA editing sites compared with constitutive exons. RNA-seq and exon-specific microarray revealed that ADAR knockdown in hepatocarcinoma and myelogenous leukemia cell lines leads to global changes in gene expression, with hundreds of genes changing their splicing patterns in both cell lines. This global change in splicing pattern cannot be explained by putative editing sites alone. Genes showing significant changes in their splicing pattern are frequently involved in RNA processing and splicing activity. Analysis of recently published RNA-seq data from glioblastoma cell lines showed similar results. Our global analysis reveals that ADAR plays a major role in splicing regulation. Although direct editing of the splicing motifs does occur, we suggest it is not likely to be the primary mechanism for ADAR-mediated regulation of alternative splicing. Rather, this regulation is achieved by modulating trans-acting factors involved in the splicing machinery. PMID:23474544

  17. Alternative splicing and muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pistoni, Mariaelena; Ghigna, Claudia; Gabellini, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is a major contributor to proteomic diversity and to the control of gene expression in higher eukaryotic cells. For this reasons, alternative splicing is tightly regulated in different tissues and developmental stages and its disruption can lead to a wide range of human disorders. The aim of this review is to focus on the relevance of alternative splicing for muscle function and muscle disease. We begin by giving a brief overview of alternative splicing, muscle-specific gene expression and muscular dystrophy. Next, to illustrate these concepts we focus on two muscular dystrophy, myotonic muscular dystrophy and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, both associated to disruption of splicing regulation in muscle. PMID:20603608

  18. Therapeutic targeting of splicing in cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stanley Chun-Wei; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have highlighted that splicing patterns are frequently altered in cancer and that mutations in genes encoding spliceosomal proteins, as well as mutations affecting the splicing of key cancer-associated genes, are enriched in cancer. In parallel, there is also accumulating evidence that several molecular subtypes of cancer are highly dependent on splicing function for cell survival. These findings have resulted in a growing interest in targeting splicing catalysis, splicing regulatory proteins, and/or specific key altered splicing events in the treatment of cancer. Here we present strategies that exist and that are in development to target altered dependency on the spliceosome, as well as aberrant splicing, in cancer. These include drugs to target global splicing in cancer subtypes that are preferentially dependent on wild-type splicing for survival, methods to alter post-translational modifications of splicing-regulating proteins, and strategies to modulate pathologic splicing events and protein-RNA interactions in cancer. PMID:27603132

  19. CORSiCA Atmospheric Observatory: Intense activities in 2012 in the frame of HyMeX and ChArMEx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Dominique

    2013-04-01

    In the western Mediterranean basin, Corsica Island is at a strategic location for atmospheric studies in the framework of the Mediterranean projects HyMeX (Hydrological Mediterranean Experiment; http://www.hymex.org/) and ChArMEx (the Chemistry-Aerososl MEditerranean Experiment; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) developped under the umbrella of the programme MISTRALS (Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional and Local Scales; http://www.mistrals-home.org). The development of a multi-sites instrumented platform located on this island is the core of the project CORSiCA (Corsican Observatory for Research and Studies on Climate and Atmosphere-ocean environment). CORSiCA is operated in the framework of the HyMEx and ChArMEx Long Observation Period (LOP), Enhanced Observation Period (EOP) and Special Observation Periods (SOP). In the present communication we will focus on the scientific objectives and describe the diversity of observations that have been performed by many institutes in Corsica in the frame of 2012 campaigns including HyMeX Special Observation Period 1 in autumn, ChArMEx pre-campaign and VESSAER in summer. Results from these campaigns will be illustrated and projects for future campaign activities and long-term monitoring in the framework of the CORSiCA Atmospheric Observatory will be presented (more details can be found in other more specific presentations). Acknowledgements are addressed to campaigns main sponsors: HyMeX: Météo-France, INSU, KIT; pre-ChArMEx: INSU, ADEME, CEA; VESSAER: FP7/Infrastructures/EUFAR, COST, Météo-France. The development of the CORSiCA platform is supported by Collectivité Territoriale de Corse (CPER) and EU FEDER funds.

  20. The effect of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) in kidney I/R mediated by C5a/C5aR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ze-Ying; Wu, Yang-Qian; Luo, Heng; Liu, Dong-Xu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between NFAT and C5a/C5aR in C5a/C5aR-mediated kidney Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, the rats' NRK-52E cell line was used in this study and was distributed into 4 groups, I: the normal control (NC), II: the ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury cell model (MG), III: the ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury cell model treated with C5a (50 nmol/l) (MG + C5a), IV: the ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury cell model treated with C5aR antagonist (2.5 μmol/l) (MG + anti-C5aR). Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry were performed. Nuclear Factor Activated T Cell (NFAT), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL-6) were detected in this study. The results of immunofluorescence showed that NFAT had a nuclear translocation phenomenon during the study. The RT-PCR and WB data indicated that the expression of TNF-α and IL-6 in group III were higher than any other groups. Apoptosis in group III was much serious than other groups. All the results in this study showed that NFAT plays an important role in ischemia/reperfusion injury, it can be induced to up-regulate the inflammatory factor TNF-α and IL-6 by the complement system member C5a/C5aR.

  1. Noncanonical and canonical splice sites: a novel mutation at the rare noncanonical splice-donor cut site (IVS4+1A>G) of SEDL causes variable splicing isoforms in X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Feng; Gao, Jianjun; Li, Jun; Liu, Yun; Feng, Guoyin; Fang, Wenli; Chang, Hongfen; Xie, Jiang; Zheng, Haitao; Li, Tingyu; He, Lin

    2009-01-01

    X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda can be caused by mutations in the SEDL gene. This study describes an interesting novel mutation (IVS4+1A>G) located exactly at the rare noncanonical AT–AC consensus splicing donor point of SEDL, which regained the canonical GT–AG consensus splicing junction in addition to several other rarer noncanonical splice patterns. The mutation activated several cryptic splice sites and generated the production of seven erroneous splicing isoforms, which we confirmed by sequencing of RT-PCR products and resequencing of cDNA clones. All the practical splice donors/acceptors were further assessed using FSPLICE 1.0 and SPL(M) Platforms to predict potential splice sites in genomic DNA. Subsequently, the expression levels of SEDL among the affected patients, carriers and controls were estimated using real-time quantitative PCR. Expression analyses showed that the expression levels of SEDL in both patients and carriers were decreased. Taken together, these results illustrated how disruption of the AT donor site in a rare AT–AC intron, leading to a canonical GT donor site, resulted in a multitude of aberrant transcripts, thus impairing exon definition. The unexpected splicing patterns resulting from the special mutation provide additional challenges and opportunities for understanding splicing mechanisms and specificity. PMID:19002213

  2. Splicing in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Zaghlool, Ammar; Ameur, Adam; Cavelier, Lucia; Feuk, Lars

    2014-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear over the past decade that RNA has important functions in human cells beyond its role as an intermediate translator of DNA to protein. It is now known that RNA plays highly specific roles in pathways involved in regulatory, structural, and catalytic functions. The complexity of RNA production and regulation has become evident with the advent of high-throughput methods to study the transcriptome. Deep sequencing has revealed an enormous diversity of RNA types and transcript isoforms in human cells. The transcriptome of the human brain is particularly interesting as it contains more expressed genes than other tissues and also displays an extreme diversity of transcript isoforms, indicating that highly complex regulatory pathways are present in the brain. Several of these regulatory proteins are now identified, including RNA-binding proteins that are neuron specific. RNA-binding proteins also play important roles in regulating the splicing process and the temporal and spatial isoform production. While significant progress has been made in understanding the human transcriptome, many questions still remain regarding the basic mechanisms of splicing and subcellular localization of RNA. A long-standing question is to what extent the splicing of pre-mRNA is cotranscriptional and posttranscriptional, respectively. Recent data, including studies of the human brain, indicate that splicing is primarily cotranscriptional in human cells. This chapter describes the current understanding of splicing and splicing regulation in the human brain and discusses the recent global sequence-based analyses of transcription and splicing. PMID:25172473

  3. The ArsD As(III) metallochaperone

    PubMed Central

    Ajees, A. Abdul; Yang, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic, a toxic metalloid widely existing in the environment, causes a variety of health problems. The ars operon encoded by Escherichia coli plasmid R773 has arsD and arsA genes, where ArsA is an ATPase that is the catalytic subunit of the ArsAB As(III) extrusion pump, and ArsD is an arsenic chaperone for ArsA. ArsD transfers As(III) to ArsA and increases the affinity of ArsA for As(III), allowing resistance to environmental concentrations of arsenic. Cys12, Cys13 and Cys18 in ArsD form a three sulfur-coordinated As(III) binding site that is essential for metallochaperone activity. ATP hydrolysis by ArsA is required for transfer of As(III) from ArsD to ArsA, suggesting that transfer occurs with a conformation of ArsA that transiently forms during the catalytic cycle. The 1.4 Å x-ray crystal structure of ArsD shows a core of four β-strands flanked by four α-helices in a thioredoxin fold. Docking of ArsD with ArsA was modeled in silico. Independently ArsD mutants exhibiting either weaker or stronger interaction with ArsA were selected. The locations of the mutations mapped on the surface of ArsD are consistent with the docking model. The results suggest that the interface with ArsA involves one surface of α1 helix and metalloid binding site of ArsD. PMID:21188475

  4. Discovery of naturally occurring splice variants of the rat histamine H3 receptor that act as dominant-negative isoforms.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Remko A; Lozada, Adrian Flores; van Marle, André; Shenton, Fiona C; Drutel, Guillaume; Karlstedt, Kaj; Hoffmann, Marcel; Lintunen, Minnamaija; Yamamoto, Yumiko; van Rijn, Richard M; Chazot, Paul L; Panula, Pertti; Leurs, Rob

    2006-04-01

    We described previously the cDNA cloning of three functional rat histamine H3 receptor (rH3R) isoforms as well as the differential brain expression patterns of their corresponding mRNAs and signaling properties of the resulting rH3A, rH3B, and rH3C receptor isoforms (Mol Pharmacol 59:1-8). In the current report, we describe the cDNA cloning, mRNA localization in the rat central nervous system, and pharmacological characterization of three additional rH3R splice variants (rH3D, rH3E, and rH3F) that differ from the previously published isoforms in that they result from an additional alternative-splicing event. These new H3R isoforms lack the seventh transmembrane (TM) helix and contain an alternative, putatively extracellular, C terminus (6TM-rH3 isoforms). After heterologous expression in COS-7 cells, radioligand binding or functional responses upon the application of various H3R ligands could not be detected for the 6TM-rH3 isoforms. In contrast to the rH3A receptor (rH3AR), detection of the rH3D isoform using hemagglutinin antibodies revealed that the rH3D isoform remains mainly intracellular. The expression of the rH3D-F splice variants, however, modulates the cell surface expression-levels and subsequent functional responses of the 7TM H3R isoforms. Coexpression of the rH3AR and the rH3D isoforms resulted in the intracellular retention of the rH3AR and reduced rH3AR functionality. Finally, we show that in rat brain, the H3R mRNA expression levels are modulated upon treatment with the convulsant pentylenetetrazole, suggesting that the rH3R isoforms described herein thus represent a novel physiological mechanism for controlling the activity of the histaminergic system.

  5. Entropic contributions to the splicing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osella, Matteo; Caselle, Michele

    2009-12-01

    It has been recently argued that depletion attraction may play an important role in different aspects of cellular organization, ranging from the organization of transcriptional activity in transcription factories to the formation of nuclear bodies. In this paper, we suggest a new application of these ideas in the context of the splicing process, a crucial step of messenger RNA maturation in eukaryotes. We shall show that entropy effects and the resulting depletion attraction may explain the relevance of the aspecific intron length variable in the choice of splice-site recognition modality. On top of that, some qualitative features of the genome architecture of higher eukaryotes can find evolutionary realistic motivation in the light of our model.

  6. Reconstruction of fault zone evolution from 40Ar/39Ar white mica, zircon and apatite fission track, and apatite U/Th-He thermochronology: 65 million years of fault activity along the Lavanttal Fault Zone (Eastern Alps)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Walter; Woelfler, Andreas; Rabitsch, Robert; Genser, Johann

    2010-05-01

    By applying distinct thermochronological methods with closure temperatures ranging from ~450° to ~40°C we reveal the thermochronological evolution of the Lavanttal Fault Zone (LFZ) and the adjacent Koralm Complex (Eastern Alps).The LFZ is generally described to be related to Miocene orogen-parallel escape tectonics in the Eastern Alps. 40Ar/39Ar dating on white mica, zircon and apatite fission track, and apatite U/Th-He thermochronology were carried out on host rocks and fault- related rocks (cataclasites and fault gouges) directly adjacent to the undeformed host rock. The main part of 40Ar/39Ar muscovite ages provided in this study is in accordance to the ages described from the adjacent Koralm Complex. The related plateau ages are therefore interpreted to represent the cooling of the host rocks during Late Cretaceous times (80-90 Ma). Muscovites derived from cataclastic shear zones show Argon release spectra characterized by reduced incremental ages for the first heating steps. This probably indicates Argon loss along the grain boundaries during shearing and lattice distortion. Samples from fault-related catclasites are characterized by a plateau age of ca. 78 Ma and highly reduced incremental ages, respectively, far below the protolith cooling ages described above. This indicates lattice distortion and related Argon loss during cataclastic shearing, and incomplete subsequent resetting. As the incremental ages are in parts highly erratic statements about the timing of shearing remain speculative. Zircon fission track ages range between 77.6±5.5 and 64.8±4.6 Ma both within fault- and host rocks. Although all four fault/host rock sample-pair ages do overlap within the 1σ error, there is a clear trend of descending ages to the fault rocks. Apatite fission track protolith ages range between 51.1±2.3 in the central Koralm massif, and 37.7±4.3 Ma along its western margin, ages from fault- related rocks vary between 46.6 ± 4.7 and 43.3 ± 4.2 in the central part

  7. Accurate Splicing of HDAC6 Pre-mRNA Requires SON

    PubMed Central

    Battini, Vishnu Priya; Bubulya, Athanasios; Bubulya, Paula A.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing requires proper splice site selection mediated by many factors including snRNPs and serine-arginine rich (SR) splicing factors. Our lab previously reported that the SR-like protein SON maintains organization of pre-mRNA splicing factors in nuclear speckles as well as splicing of many human transcripts including mRNAs coding for the chromatin-modifying enzymes HDAC6, ADA and SETD8. However, the mechanism by which SON maintains accurate splicing is unknown. To build tools for understanding SON-dependent pre-mRNA splicing, we constructed a minigene reporter plasmid driving expression of the genomic sequence spanning exons 26 through 29 of HDAC6. Following SON depletion, we observed altered splicing of HDAC6 reporter transcripts that showed exclusion of exons 27 and 28, reflecting the splicing patterns of endogenous HDAC6 mRNA. Importantly, loss of HDAC6 biological function was also observed, as indicated by truncated HDAC6 protein and corresponding absence of aggresome assembly activities of HDAC6 binding-of-ubiquitin zinc finger (BUZ) domain. We therefore propose that SON-mediated splicing regulation of HDAC6 is essential for supporting protein degradation pathways that prevent human disease. PMID:25782155

  8. The transcription factor c-Myb affects pre-mRNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Orvain, Christophe; Matre, Vilborg; Gabrielsen, Odd S.

    2008-07-25

    c-Myb is a transcription factor which plays a key role in haematopoietic proliferation and lineage commitment. We raised the question of whether c-Myb may have abilities beyond the extensively studied transcriptional activation function. In this report we show that c-Myb influences alternative pre-mRNA splicing. This was seen by its marked effect on the 5'-splice site selection during E1A alternative splicing, while no effect of c-Myb was observed when reporters for the 3'-splice site selection or for the constitutive splicing process were tested. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation experiments provided evidence for interactions between c-Myb and distinct components of the splicing apparatus, such as the general splicing factor U2AF{sup 65} and hnRNPA1 involved in the 5'-splice site selection. The effect on 5'-splice site selection was abolished in the oncogenic variant v-Myb. Altogether, these data provide evidence that c-Myb may serve a previously unappreciated role in the coupling between transcription and splicing.

  9. Estimation of the minimum mRNA splicing error rate in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Skandalis, A

    2016-01-01

    The majority of protein coding genes in vertebrates contain several introns that are removed by the mRNA splicing machinery. Errors during splicing can generate aberrant transcripts and degrade the transmission of genetic information thus contributing to genomic instability and disease. However, estimating the error rate of constitutive splicing is complicated by the process of alternative splicing which can generate multiple alternative transcripts per locus and is particularly active in humans. In order to estimate the error frequency of constitutive mRNA splicing and avoid bias by alternative splicing we have characterized the frequency of splice variants at three loci, HPRT, POLB, and TRPV1 in multiple tissues of six vertebrate species. Our analysis revealed that the frequency of splice variants varied widely among loci, tissues, and species. However, the lowest observed frequency is quite constant among loci and approximately 0.1% aberrant transcripts per intron. Arguably this reflects the "irreducible" error rate of splicing, which consists primarily of the combination of replication errors by RNA polymerase II in splice consensus sequences and spliceosome errors in correctly pairing exons. PMID:26811995

  10. Identification of a splicing enhancer in MLH1 using COMPARE, a new assay for determination of relative RNA splicing efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-Qing; Mattox, William

    2006-01-15

    Exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs) are sequences that facilitate recognition of splice sites and prevent exon-skipping. Because ESEs are often embedded within protein-coding sequences, alterations in them can also often be interpreted as nonsense, missense or silent mutations. To correctly interpret exonic mutations and their roles in diseases, it is important to develop strategies that identify ESE mutations. Potential ESEs can be found computationally in many exons but it has proven difficult to predict whether a given mutation will have effects on splicing based on sequence alone. Here, we describe a flexible in vitro method that can be used to functionally compare the effects of multiple sequence variants on ESE activity in a single in vitro splicing reaction. We have applied this method in parallel with conventional splicing assays to test for a splicing enhancer in exon 17 of the human MLH1 gene. Point mutations associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) have previously been found to correlate with exon-skipping in both lymphocytes and tumors from patients. We show that sequences from this exon can replace an ESE from the mouse IgM gene to support RNA splicing in HeLa nuclear extracts. ESE activity was reduced by HNPCC point mutations in codon 659, indicating that their primary effect is on splicing. Surprisingly, the strongest enhancer function mapped to a different region of the exon upstream of this codon. Together, our results indicate that HNPCC point mutations in codon 659 affect an auxillary element that augments the enhancer function to ensure exon inclusion.

  11. Functional analysis of pre-mRNA splicing factor SF2/ASF structural domains.

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, J F; Krainer, A R

    1993-01-01

    Human pre-mRNA splicing factor SF2/ASF has an activity required for general splicing in vitro and promotes utilization of proximal alternative 5' splice sites in a concentration-dependent manner by opposing hnRNP A1. We introduced selected mutations in the N-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM) and the C-terminal Arg/Ser (RS) domain of SF2/ASF, and assayed the resulting recombinant proteins for constitutive and alternative splicing in vitro and for binding to pre-mRNA and mRNA. Mutants inactive in constitutive splicing can affect alternative splice site selection, demonstrating that these activities involve distinct molecular interactions. Specific protein-RNA contact mediated by Phe56 and Phe58 in the RNP-1 submotif of the SF2/ASF RRM are essential for constitutive splicing, although they are not required for RRM-mediated binding to pre-mRNA. The RS domain is also required for constitutive splicing activity and both Arg and Ser residues are important. Analysis of domain deletion mutants demonstrated strong synergy between the RRM and a central degenerate RRM repeat in binding to RNA. These two domains are sufficient for alternative splicing activity in the absence of an RS domain. Images PMID:8223480

  12. New alternative splicing BCR/ABL-OOF shows an oncogenic role by lack of inhibition of BCR GTPase activity and an increased of persistence of Rac activation in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Panuzzo, Cristina; Volpe, Gisella; Cibrario Rocchietti, Elisa; Casnici, Claudia; Crotta, Katia; Crivellaro, Sabrina; Carrà, Giovanna; Lorenzatti, Roberta; Peracino, Barbara; Torti, Davide; Morotti, Alessandro; Camacho-Leal, Maria Pilar; Defilippi, Paola; Marelli, Ornella; Saglio, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia 80% of patients present alternative splice variants involving BCR exons 1, 13 or 14 and ABL exon 4, with a consequent impairment in the reading frame of the ABL gene. Therefore BCR/ABL fusion proteins (BCR/ABL-OOF) are characterized by an in-frame BCR portion followed by an amino acids sequence arising from the out of frame (OOF) reading of the ABL gene. The product of this new transcript contains the characteristic BCR domains while lacking the COOH-terminal Rho GTPase GAP domain. The present work aims to characterize the protein functionality in terms of cytoskeleton (re-)modelling, adhesion and activation of canonical oncogenic signalling pathways. Here, we show that BCR/ABL-OOF has a peculiar endosomal localization which affects EGF receptor activation and turnover. Moreover, we demonstrate that BCR/ABL-OOF expression leads to aberrant cellular adhesion due to the activation of Rac GTPase, increase in cellular proliferation, migration and survival. When overexpressed in a BCR/ABL positive cell line, BCR/ABL-OOF induces hyperactivation of Rac signaling axis offering a therapeutic window for Rac-targeted therapy. Our data support a critical role of BCR/ABL-OOF in leukemogenesis and identify a subset of patients that may benefit from Rac-targeted therapies. PMID:26682280

  13. New alternative splicing BCR/ABL-OOF shows an oncogenic role by lack of inhibition of BCR GTPase activity and an increased of persistence of Rac activation in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Panuzzo, Cristina; Volpe, Gisella; Rocchietti, Elisa Cibrario; Casnici, Claudia; Crotta, Katia; Crivellaro, Sabrina; Carrà, Giovanna; Lorenzatti, Roberta; Peracino, Barbara; Torti, Davide; Morotti, Alessandro; Camacho-Leal, Maria Pilar; Defilippi, Paola; Marelli, Ornella; Saglio, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia 80% of patients present alternative splice variants involving BCR exons 1, 13 or 14 and ABL exon 4, with a consequent impairment in the reading frame of the ABL gene. Therefore BCR/ABL fusion proteins (BCR/ABL-OOF) are characterized by an in-frame BCR portion followed by an amino acids sequence arising from the out of frame (OOF) reading of the ABL gene. The product of this new transcript contains the characteristic BCR domains while lacking the COOH-terminal Rho GTPase GAP domain. The present work aims to characterize the protein functionality in terms of cytoskeleton (re-)modelling, adhesion and activation of canonical oncogenic signalling pathways. Here, we show that BCR/ABL-OOF has a peculiar endosomal localization which affects EGF receptor activation and turnover. Moreover, we demonstrate that BCR/ABL-OOF expression leads to aberrant cellular adhesion due to the activation of Rac GTPase, increase in cellular proliferation, migration and survival. When overexpressed in a BCR/ABL positive cell line, BCR/ABL-OOF induces hyperactivation of Rac signaling axis offering a therapeutic window for Rac-targeted therapy. Our data support a critical role of BCR/ABL-OOF in leukemogenesis and identify a subset of patients that may benefit from Rac-targeted therapies. PMID:26682280

  14. Alpha 2-chimerin, an SH2-containing GTPase-activating protein for the ras-related protein p21rac derived by alternate splicing of the human n-chimerin gene, is selectively expressed in brain regions and testes.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, C; Sin, W C; Teo, M; Michael, G J; Smith, P; Dong, J M; Lim, H H; Manser, E; Spurr, N K; Jones, T A

    1993-01-01

    n-Chimerin (alpha 1-chimerin) is a brain GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for the ras-related p21rac. We now report the occurrence of another form of chimerin, termed alpha 2-chimerin. This is the product of an alternately spliced transcript of the human n-chimerin gene encoding an N-terminal SH2 (src homology 2) domain in addition to the phorbol ester receptor and GAP domains. alpha 1- and alpha 2-chimerin mRNAs were expressed differently. In the rat brain, only alpha 1-chimerin mRNA was expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells, although both alpha 1- and alpha 2-chimerin mRNAs occurred in neurons in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus. Only alpha 2-chimerin RNA was expressed in rat testes, in early pachytene spermatocytes. A 45-kDa SH2-containing chimerin corresponding to the alpha 2 form was purified from rat brain. As with Escherichia coli 45-kDa recombinant alpha 2-chimerin, purified brain alpha 2-chimerin exhibited racGAP activity which was stimulated by phosphatidylserine. The recombinant SH2 domain bound several 32P-labelled phosphoproteins of PC12 cells, whose phosphorylation increased in response to trophic factors, including nerve growth factor. To examine the relationships of alpha 1- and alpha 2-chimerin transcripts, human genomic DNA clones were characterized. In alpha 2-chimerin mRNA, a 3' splice acceptor site within exon 1 of alpha 1-chimerin mRNA was used, replacing its 5' untranslated region and N-terminal coding sequence. The single human n-chimerin gene was mapped to chromosome 2q31-q32.1, colocalizing with the CRE-BP1 transcription factor gene (2q32). It contained several splice junctions conserved with the sequence-related protein kinase C and bcr genes. alpha 2-Chimerin is only the second SH2-containing GAP and the first example of an SH2 domain generated by alternate splicing. Images PMID:8336731

  15. Oncogenic fusion protein EWS-FLI1 is a network hub that regulates alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Selvanathan, Saravana P.; Erkizan, Hayriye V.; Dirksen, Uta; Natarajan, Thanemozhi G.; Dakic, Aleksandra; Yu, Songtao; Liu, Xuefeng; Paulsen, Michelle T.; Ljungman, Mats E.; Wu, Cathy H.; Lawlor, Elizabeth R.; Üren, Aykut; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis and processing of mRNA, from transcription to translation initiation, often requires splicing of intragenic material. The final mRNA composition varies based on proteins that modulate splice site selection. EWS-FLI1 is an Ewing sarcoma (ES) oncoprotein with an interactome that we demonstrate to have multiple partners in spliceosomal complexes. We evaluate the effect of EWS-FLI1 on posttranscriptional gene regulation using both exon array and RNA-seq. Genes that potentially regulate oncogenesis, including CLK1, CASP3, PPFIBP1, and TERT, validate as alternatively spliced by EWS-FLI1. In a CLIP-seq experiment, we find that EWS-FLI1 RNA-binding motifs most frequently occur adjacent to intron–exon boundaries. EWS-FLI1 also alters splicing by directly binding to known splicing factors including DDX5, hnRNP K, and PRPF6. Reduction of EWS-FLI1 produces an isoform of γ-TERT that has increased telomerase activity compared with wild-type (WT) TERT. The small molecule YK-4–279 is an inhibitor of EWS-FLI1 oncogenic function that disrupts specific protein interactions, including helicases DDX5 and RNA helicase A (RHA) that alters RNA-splicing ratios. As such, YK-4–279 validates the splicing mechanism of EWS-FLI1, showing alternatively spliced gene patterns that significantly overlap with EWS-FLI1 reduction and WT human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Exon array analysis of 75 ES patient samples shows similar isoform expression patterns to cell line models expressing EWS-FLI1, supporting the clinical relevance of our findings. These experiments establish systemic alternative splicing as an oncogenic process modulated by EWS-FLI1. EWS-FLI1 modulation of mRNA splicing may provide insight into the contribution of splicing toward oncogenesis, and, reciprocally, EWS-FLI1 interactions with splicing proteins may inform the splicing code. PMID:25737553

  16. Differences between the internal energy depositions induced by collisional activation and by electron transfer of W(CO)62+ ions on collision with Ar and K targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Shigeo; Kitaguchi, Akihiro; Kameoka, Satoko; Toyoda, Michisato; Ichihara, Toshio

    2006-06-01

    Doubly charged tungsten hexacarbonyl W(CO )62+ ions were made to collide with Ar and K targets to give singly and doubly charged positive ions by collision-induced dissociation (CID). The resulting ions were analyzed and detected by using a spherical electrostatic analyzer. Whereas the doubly charged fragment ions resulting from collisional activation (CA) were dominant with the Ar target, singly charged fragment ions resulting from electron transfer were dominant with the K target. The internal energy deposition in collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) evaluated with the Ar target was broad and decreased with increasing internal energy. The predominant peaks observed with the K target were associated with singly charged W(CO)2+ and W(CO )3+ ions: these ions were not the result of CA, but arose from dissociation induced by electron transfer (DIET). The internal energy deposition resulting from the electron transfer was very narrow and centered at a particular energy, 7.8eV below the energy level of the W(CO )62+ ion. This narrow internal energy distribution was explained in terms of electron transfer by Landau-Zener [Z. Phys. Soviet 2, 46 (1932); Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 137, 646 (1952)] potential crossing at a separation of 5.9×10-8cm between a W(CO )62+ ion and a K atom, and the coulombic repulsion between singly charged ions in the exit channel. A large cross section of 1.1×10-14cm2 was estimated for electron capture of the doubly charged W(CO )62+ ion from the alkali metal target, whose ionization energy is very low. The term "collision-induced dissociation," taken literally, includes all dissociation processes induced by collision, and therefore encompasses both CAD and DIET processes in the present work. Although the terms CID and CAD have been defined similarly, we would like to propose that they should not be used interchangeably, on the basis that there are differences in the observed ions and in their intensities with Ar and K targets.

  17. Challenge of human Jurkat T-cells with the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin elicits major changes in cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) expression by up-regulating PDE3 and inducing PDE4D1 and PDE4D2 splice variants as well as down-regulating a novel PDE4A splice variant.

    PubMed Central

    Erdogan, S; Houslay, M D

    1997-01-01

    The cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 and PDE4 isoforms provide the major cAMP-hydrolysing PDE activities in Jurkat T-cells, with additional contributions from the PDE1 and PDE2 isoforms. Challenge of cells with the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin led to a rapid, albeit transient, increase in PDE3 activity occurring over the first 45 min, followed by a sustained increase in PDE3 activity which began after approximately 3 h and continued for at least 24 h. Only this second phase of increase in PDE3 activity was blocked by the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D. After approximately 3 h of exposure to forskolin, PDE4 activity had increased, via a process that could be inhibited by actinomycin D, and it remained elevated for at least a 24 h period. Such actions of forskolin were mimicked by cholera toxin and 8-bromo-cAMP. Forskolin increased intracellular cAMP concentrations in a time-dependent fashion and its action was enhanced when PDE induction was blocked with actinomycin D. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis, using generic primers designed to detect transcripts representing enzymically active products of the four PDE4 genes, identified transcripts for PDE4A and PDE4D but not for PDE4B or PDE4C in untreated Jurkat T-cells. Forskolin treatment did not induce transcripts for either PDE4B or PDE4C; however, it reduced the RT-PCR signal for PDE4A transcripts and markedly enhanced that for PDE4D transcripts. Using RT-PCR primers for PDE4 splice variants, a weak signal for PDE4D1 was evident in control cells whereas, in forskolin-treated cells, clear signals for both PDE4D1 and PDE4D2 were detected. RT-PCR analysis of the PDE4A species indicated that it was not the PDE4A isoform PDE-46 (PDE4A4B). Immunoblotting of control cells for PDE4 forms identified a single PDE4A species of approximately 118 kDa, which migrated distinctly from the PDE4A4B isoform PDE-46, with immunoprecipitation analyses showing that it provided all of the PDE4 activity in control

  18. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dlamini, Zodwa; Tshidino, Shonisani C.; Hull, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets. PMID:26580598

  19. The alternative splicing program of differentiated smooth muscle cells involves concerted non-productive splicing of post-transcriptional regulators

    PubMed Central

    Llorian, Miriam; Gooding, Clare; Bellora, Nicolas; Hallegger, Martina; Buckroyd, Adrian; Wang, Xiao; Rajgor, Dipen; Kayikci, Melis; Feltham, Jack; Ule, Jernej; Eyras, Eduardo; Smith, Christopher W.J.

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a key component of gene expression programs that drive cellular differentiation. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are important in the function of a number of physiological systems; however, investigation of SMC AS has been restricted to a handful of events. We profiled transcriptome changes in mouse de-differentiating SMCs and observed changes in hundreds of AS events. Exons included in differentiated cells were characterized by particularly weak splice sites and by upstream binding sites for Polypyrimidine Tract Binding protein (PTBP1). Consistent with this, knockdown experiments showed that that PTBP1 represses many smooth muscle specific exons. We also observed coordinated splicing changes predicted to downregulate the expression of core components of U1 and U2 snRNPs, splicing regulators and other post-transcriptional factors in differentiated cells. The levels of cognate proteins were lower or similar in differentiated compared to undifferentiated cells. However, levels of snRNAs did not follow the expression of splicing proteins, and in the case of U1 snRNP we saw reciprocal changes in the levels of U1 snRNA and U1 snRNP proteins. Our results suggest that the AS program in differentiated SMCs is orchestrated by the combined influence of auxiliary RNA binding proteins, such as PTBP1, along with altered activity and stoichiometry of the core splicing machinery. PMID:27317697

  20. Alternative splicing regulation and cell lineage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; He, Ling; Tang, Liling

    2012-11-01

    The alternative splicing of precursor mRNA is an essential mechanism for protein diversity. It plays important biological roles, such as proliferation, differentiation and development of cells. Furthermore, alternative splicing participates in the pathogenesis of diseases, including cancer. Thus, in-depth understanding of splicing regulation is of great significance. Regulation of alternative splicing is an extraordinary complicated process in which several signal molecules are at work. Besides the cis-elements and trans-factors, several lines of evidences suggest that other molecules, structures or process also regulate splicing, such as RNA structures, transcription and transcription factors, chromatin and protein. Meanwhile, increasing body of evidence shows that alternative splicing correlated closely to stem cell lineage differentiation. It means that there is a fundamental role for splicing in controlling regulatory program required for cell lineage differentiation. This review systematically sums up the regulation of alternative splicing and summarizes the splicing events during cell lineage differentiation of stem cells.

  1. Targeting RNA splicing for disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Havens, Mallory A; Duelli, Dominik M; Hastings, Michelle L

    2013-01-01

    Splicing of pre-messenger RNA into mature messenger RNA is an essential step for the expression of most genes in higher eukaryotes. Defects in this process typically affect cellular function and can have pathological consequences. Many human genetic diseases are caused by mutations that cause splicing defects. Furthermore, a number of diseases are associated with splicing defects that are not attributed to overt mutations. Targeting splicing directly to correct disease-associated aberrant splicing is a logical approach to therapy. Splicing is a favorable intervention point for disease therapeutics, because it is an early step in gene expression and does not alter the genome. Significant advances have been made in the development of approaches to manipulate splicing for therapy. Splicing can be manipulated with a number of tools including antisense oligonucleotides, modified small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), trans-splicing, and small molecule compounds, all of which have been used to increase specific alternatively spliced isoforms or to correct aberrant gene expression resulting from gene mutations that alter splicing. Here we describe clinically relevant splicing defects in disease states, the current tools used to target and alter splicing, specific mutations and diseases that are being targeted using splice-modulating approaches, and emerging therapeutics.

  2. Spliced-leader trans-splicing in freshwater planarians.

    PubMed

    Zayas, Ricardo M; Bold, Tyler D; Newmark, Phillip A

    2005-10-01

    trans-Splicing, in which a spliced-leader (SL) RNA is appended to the most 5' exon of independently transcribed pre-mRNAs, has been described in a wide range of eukaryotes, from protozoans to chordates. Here we describe trans-splicing in the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, a free-living member of the phylum Platyhelminthes. Analysis of an expressed sequence tag (EST) collection from this organism showed that over 300 transcripts shared one of two approximately 35-base sequences (Smed SL-1 and SL-2) at their 5' ends. Examination of genomic sequences encoding representatives of these transcripts revealed that these shared sequences were transcribed elsewhere in the genome. RNA blot analysis, 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends, as well as genomic sequence data showed that 42-nt SL sequences were derived from small RNAs of approximately 110 nt. Similar sequences were also found at the 5' ends of ESTs from the planarian Dugesia japonica. trans-Splicing has already been described in numerous representatives of the phylum Platyhelminthes (trematodes, cestodes, and polyclads); its presence in two representatives of the triclads supports the hypothesis that this mode of RNA processing is ancestral within this group. The upcoming complete genome sequence of S. mediterranea, combined with this animal's experimental accessibility and susceptibility to RNAi, provide another model organism in which to study the function of the still-enigmatic trans-splicing.

  3. Three-dimensional magnetic restructuring in two homologous solar flares in the seismically active NOAA AR 11283

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Wang, Haimin; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Jiang, Chaowei; Dennis, Brian R.; Su, Yang; Donea, Alina

    2014-11-10

    We carry out a comprehensive investigation comparing the three-dimensional magnetic field restructuring, flare energy release, and the helioseismic response of two homologous flares, the 2011 September 6 X2.1 (FL1) and September 7 X1.8 (FL2) flares in NOAA AR 11283. In our analysis, (1) a twisted flux rope (FR) collapses onto the surface at a speed of 1.5 km s{sup –1} after a partial eruption in FL1. The FR then gradually grows to reach a higher altitude and collapses again at 3 km s{sup –1} after a fuller eruption in FL2. Also, FL2 shows a larger decrease of the flux-weighted centroid separation of opposite magnetic polarities and a greater change of the horizontal field on the surface. These imply a more violent coronal implosion with corresponding more intense surface signatures in FL2. (2) The FR is inclined northward and together with the ambient fields, it undergoes a southward turning after both events. This agrees with the asymmetric decay of the penumbra observed in the peripheral regions. (3) The amounts of free magnetic energy and nonthermal electron energy released during FL1 are comparable to those of FL2 within the uncertainties of the measurements. (4) No sunquake was detected in FL1; in contrast, FL2 produced two seismic emission sources S1 and S2 both lying in the penumbral regions. Interestingly, S1 and S2 are connected by magnetic loops, and the stronger source S2 has a weaker vertical magnetic field. We discuss these results in relation to the implosion process in the low corona and the sunquake generation.

  4. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Restructuring in Two Homologous Solar Flares in the Seismically Active NOAA AR 11283

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Wiegelmann, Thomas; JIang, Chaowei; Dennis, Brian R.; Su, Yang; Donea, Alina; Wang, Haimin

    2014-01-01

    We carry out a comprehensive investigation comparing the three-dimensional magnetic field restructuring, flare energy release, and the helioseismic response of two homologous flares, the 2011 September 6 X2.1 (FL1) and September 7 X1.8 (FL2) flares in NOAA AR 11283. In our analysis, (1) a twisted flux rope (FR) collapses onto the surface at a speed of 1.5 km s(exp-1) after a partial eruption in FL1. The FR then gradually grows to reach a higher altitude and collapses again at 3 km s(exp-1) after a fuller eruption in FL2. Also, FL2 shows a larger decrease of the flux-weighted centroid separation of opposite magnetic polarities and a greater change of the horizontal field on the surface. These imply a more violent coronal implosion with corresponding more intense surface signatures in FL2. (2) The FR is inclined northward and together with the ambient fields, it undergoes a southward turning after both events. This agrees with the asymmetric decay of the penumbra observed in the peripheral regions. (3) The amounts of free magnetic energy and nonthermal electron energy released during FL1 are comparable to those of FL2 within the uncertainties of the measurements. (4) No sunquake was detected in FL1; in contrast, FL2 produced two seismic emission sources S1 and S2 both lying in the penumbral regions. Interestingly, S1 and S2 are connected by magnetic loops, and the stronger source S2 has a weaker vertical magnetic field. We discuss these results in relation to the implosion process in the low corona and the sunquake generation.

  5. Sec16 alternative splicing dynamically controls COPII transport efficiency.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmi, Ilka; Kanski, Regina; Neumann, Alexander; Herdt, Olga; Hoff, Florian; Jacob, Ralf; Preußner, Marco; Heyd, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The transport of secretory proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi depends on COPII-coated vesicles. While the basic principles of the COPII machinery have been identified, it remains largely unknown how COPII transport is regulated to accommodate tissue- or activation-specific differences in cargo load and identity. Here we show that activation-induced alternative splicing of Sec16 controls adaptation of COPII transport to increased secretory cargo upon T-cell activation. Using splice-site blocking morpholinos and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering, we show that the number of ER exit sites, COPII dynamics and transport efficiency depend on Sec16 alternative splicing. As the mechanistic basis, we suggest the C-terminal Sec16 domain to be a splicing-controlled protein interaction platform, with individual isoforms showing differential abilities to recruit COPII components. Our work connects the COPII pathway with alternative splicing, adding a new regulatory layer to protein secretion and its adaptation to changing cellular environments. PMID:27492621

  6. Sec16 alternative splicing dynamically controls COPII transport efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmi, Ilka; Kanski, Regina; Neumann, Alexander; Herdt, Olga; Hoff, Florian; Jacob, Ralf; Preußner, Marco; Heyd, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The transport of secretory proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi depends on COPII-coated vesicles. While the basic principles of the COPII machinery have been identified, it remains largely unknown how COPII transport is regulated to accommodate tissue- or activation-specific differences in cargo load and identity. Here we show that activation-induced alternative splicing of Sec16 controls adaptation of COPII transport to increased secretory cargo upon T-cell activation. Using splice-site blocking morpholinos and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering, we show that the number of ER exit sites, COPII dynamics and transport efficiency depend on Sec16 alternative splicing. As the mechanistic basis, we suggest the C-terminal Sec16 domain to be a splicing-controlled protein interaction platform, with individual isoforms showing differential abilities to recruit COPII components. Our work connects the COPII pathway with alternative splicing, adding a new regulatory layer to protein secretion and its adaptation to changing cellular environments. PMID:27492621

  7. Alternative splicing impairs soluble guanylyl cyclase function in aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emil; Golunski, Eva; Laing, Susan T; Estrera, Anthony L; Sharina, Iraida G

    2014-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) receptor soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a key regulator of several important vascular functions and is important for maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis and vascular plasticity. Diminished sGC expression and function contributes to pathogenesis of several cardiovascular diseases. However, the processes that control sGC expression in vascular tissue remain poorly understood. Previous work in animal and cell models revealed the complexity of alternative splicing of sGC genes and demonstrated its importance in modulation of sGC function. The aim of this study was to examine the role of alternative splicing of α1 and β1 sGC in healthy and diseased human vascular tissue. Our study found a variety of α1 and β1 sGC splice forms expressed in human aorta. Their composition and abundance were different between samples of aortic tissue removed during surgical repair of aortic aneurysm and samples of aortas without aneurysm. Aortas with aneurysm demonstrated decreased sGC activity, which correlated with increased expression of dysfunctional sGC splice variants. In addition, the expression of 55-kDa oxidation-resistant α1 isoform B sGC (α1-IsoB) was significantly lower in aortic samples with aneurysm. The α1-IsoB splice variant was demonstrated to support sGC activity in aortic lysates. Together, our results suggest that alternative splicing contributes to diminished sGC function in vascular dysfunction. Precise understanding of sGC splicing regulation could help to design new therapeutic interventions and to personalize sGC-targeting therapies in treatments of vascular disease.

  8. Serine Arginine Splicing Factor 3 Is Involved in Enhanced Splicing of Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase RNA in Response to Nutrients and Hormones in Liver*

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Callee M.; Suchanek, Amanda L.; Cyphert, Travis J.; Kohan, Alison B.; Szeszel-Fedorowicz, Wioletta; Salati, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Expression of G6PD is controlled by changes in the degree of splicing of the G6PD mRNA in response to nutrients in the diet. This regulation involves an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) in exon 12 of the mRNA. Using the G6PD model, we demonstrate that nutrients and hormones control the activity of serine-arginine-rich (SR) proteins, a family of splicing co-activators, and thereby regulate the splicing of G6PD mRNA. In primary rat hepatocyte cultures, insulin increased the amount of phosphorylated SR proteins, and this effect was counteracted by arachidonic acid. The results of RNA affinity analysis with nuclear extracts from intact liver demonstrated that the SR splicing factor proteins SRSF3 and SRSF4 bound to the G6PD ESE. Consequently, siRNA-mediated depletion of SRSF3, but not SRSF4, in liver cells inhibited accumulation of both mRNA expressed from a minigene containing exon 12 and the endogenous G6PD mRNA. Consistent with the functional role of SRSF3 in regulating splicing, SRSF3 was observed to bind to the ESE in both intact cells and in animals using RNA immunoprecipitation analysis. Furthermore, refeeding significantly increased the binding of SRSF3 coincident with increased splicing and expression of G6PD. Together, these data establish that nutritional regulation of SRSF3 activity is involved in the differential splicing of the G6PD transcript in response to nutrients. Nutritional regulation of other SR proteins presents a regulatory mechanism that could cause widespread changes in mRNA splicing. Nutrients are therefore novel regulators of mRNA splicing. PMID:23233666

  9. The Proper Splicing of RNAi Factors Is Critical for Pericentric Heterochromatin Assembly in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kallgren, Scott P.; Moresco, James J.; Tu, Patricia G.; Yates, John R.; Nagy, Peter L.; Jia, Songtao

    2014-01-01

    Heterochromatin preferentially assembles at repetitive DNA elements, playing roles in transcriptional silencing, recombination suppression, and chromosome segregation. The RNAi machinery is required for heterochromatin assembly in a diverse range of organisms. In fission yeast, RNA splicing factors are also required for pericentric heterochromatin assembly, and a prevailing model is that splicing factors provide a platform for siRNA generation independently of their splicing activity. Here, by screening the fission yeast deletion library, we discovered four novel splicing factors that are required for pericentric heterochromatin assembly. Sequencing total cellular RNAs from the strongest of these mutants, cwf14Δ, showed intron retention in mRNAs of several RNAi factors. Moreover, introducing cDNA versions of RNAi factors significantly restored pericentric heterochromatin in splicing mutants. We also found that mutations of splicing factors resulted in defective telomeric heterochromatin assembly and mis-splicing the mRNA of shelterin component Tpz1, and that replacement of tpz1+ with its cDNA partially rescued heterochromatin defects at telomeres in splicing mutants. Thus, proper splicing of RNAi and shelterin factors contributes to heterochromatin assembly at pericentric regions and telomeres. PMID:24874881

  10. Functional analysis and in vitro correction of splicing FAH mutations causing tyrosinemia type I.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Carro, R; Sánchez-Alcudia, R; Pérez, B; Navarrete, R; Pérez-Cerdá, C; Ugarte, M; Desviat, L R

    2014-08-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type I (HT1) is a rare disease caused by a deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) in the tyrosine catabolic pathway, resulting mainly in hepatic alterations due to accumulation of the toxic metabolites fumarylacetoacetate, maleylacetoacetate and succinylacetone. We have characterized using minigenes four splicing mutations affecting exonic or intronic nucleotides of the FAH gene identified in two HT1 patients. Two of the mutations are novel, c.82-1G>A and c.913G>C and the other two have been previously associated with a splicing defect (c.836A>G and c.1062+5G>A). All mutations were confirmed to affect splicing in minigenes, resulting in exon skipping or activation of a cryptic splice site. We have analyzed the effect of different compounds known to modulate splicing (valproic acid, phenyl butyrate, M344, EIPA, and resveratrol) and the overexpression of splice factors of the SR protein family on the transcriptional profile of the mutant minigenes. For the c.836A>G mutation, a partial recovery of the correctly spliced transcript was observed. These results confirm the relevance of performing functional studies for mutations potentially affecting the splicing process and open the possibility of supplementary therapeutic approaches to diseases caused by splicing defects.

  11. The intronic splicing code: multiple factors involved in ATM pseudoexon definition.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Ashish; Buratti, Emanuele; van Santen, Maria A; Lührmann, Reinhard; Baralle, Francisco E

    2010-02-17

    Abundance of pseudo splice sites in introns can potentially give rise to innumerable pseudoexons, outnumbering the real ones. Nonetheless, these are efficiently ignored by the splicing machinery, a process yet to be understood completely. Although numerous 5' splice site-like sequences functioning as splicing silencers have been found to be enriched in predicted human pseudoexons, the lack of active pseudoexons pose a fundamental challenge to how these U1snRNP-binding sites function in splicing inhibition. Here, we address this issue by focusing on a previously described pathological ATM pseudoexon whose inhibition is mediated by U1snRNP binding at intronic splicing processing element (ISPE), composed of a consensus donor splice site. Spliceosomal complex assembly demonstrates inefficient A complex formation when ISPE is intact, implying U1snRNP-mediated unproductive U2snRNP recruitment. Furthermore, interaction of SF2/ASF with its motif seems to be dependent on RNA structure and U1snRNP interaction. Our results suggest a complex combinatorial interplay of RNA structure and trans-acting factors in determining the splicing outcome and contribute to understanding the intronic splicing code for the ATM pseudoexon.

  12. Fetal bovine serum and human constitutive androstane receptor: Evidence for activation of the SV23 splice variant by artemisinin, artemether, and arteether in a serum-free cell culture system

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Aik Jiang; Chang, Thomas K.H.

    2014-06-01

    The naturally occurring SV23 splice variant of human constitutive androstane receptor (hCAR-SV23) is activated by di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), which is detected as a contaminant in fetal bovine serum (FBS). In our initial experiment, we compared the effect of dialyzed FBS, charcoal-stripped, dextran-treated FBS (CS-FBS), and regular FBS on the basal activity and ligand-activation of hCAR-SV23 in a cell-based reporter gene assay. In transfected HepG2 cells cultured in medium supplemented with 10% FBS, basal hCAR-SV23 activity varied with the type of FBS (regular > dialyzed > CS). DEHP increased hCAR-SV23 activity when 10% CS-FBS, but not regular FBS or dialyzed FBS, was used. With increasing concentrations (1–10%) of regular FBS or CS-FBS, hCAR-SV23 basal activity increased, whereas in DEHP-treated cells, hCAR-SV23 activity remained similar (regular FBS) or slightly increased (CS-FBS). Subsequent experiments identified a serum-free culture condition to detect DEHP activation of hCAR-SV23. Under this condition, artemisinin, artemether, and arteether increased hCAR-SV23 activity, whereas they decreased it in cells cultured in medium supplemented with 10% regular FBS. By comparison, FBS increased the basal activity of the wild-type isoform of hCAR (hCAR-WT), whereas it did not affect the basal activity of the SV24 splice variant (hCAR-SV24) or ligand activation of hCAR-SV24 and hCAR-WT by 6-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]thiazole-5-carbaldehyde O-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxime (CITCO). The use of serum-free culture condition was suitable for detecting CITCO activation of hCAR-WT and hCAR-SV24. In conclusion, FBS leads to erroneous classification of pharmacological ligands of hCAR-SV23 in cell-based assays, but investigations on functional ligands of hCAR isoforms can be conducted in serum-free culture condition. - Highlights: • FBS leads to erroneous pharmacological classification of hCAR-SV23 ligands. • Artemisinin, artemether, and arteether activate h

  13. Regulation of the transcriptional coactivator FHL2 licenses activation of the androgen receptor in castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Meagan J; Binge, Lauren C; Sriratana, Absorn; Wang, Hong; Robinson, Paul A; Pook, David; Fedele, Clare G; Brown, Susan; Dyson, Jennifer M; Cottle, Denny L; Cowling, Belinda S; Niranjan, Birunthi; Risbridger, Gail P; Mitchell, Christina A

    2013-08-15

    It is now clear that progression from localized prostate cancer to incurable castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is driven by continued androgen receptor (AR), signaling independently of androgen. Thus, there remains a strong rationale to suppress AR activity as the single most important therapeutic goal in CRPC treatment. Although the expression of ligand-independent AR splice variants confers resistance to AR-targeted therapy and progression to lethal castrate-resistant cancer, the molecular regulators of AR activity in CRPC remain unclear, in particular those pathways that potentiate the function of mutant AR in CRPC. Here, we identify FHL2 as a novel coactivator of ligand-independent AR variants that are important in CRPC. We show that the nuclear localization of FHL2 and coactivation of the AR is driven by calpain cleavage of the cytoskeletal protein filamin, a pathway that shows differential activation in prostate epithelial versus prostate cancer cell lines. We further identify a novel FHL2-AR-filamin transcription complex, revealing how deregulation of this axis promotes the constitutive, ligand-independent activation of AR variants, which are present in CRPC. Critically, the calpain-cleaved filamin fragment and FHL2 are present in the nucleus only in CRPC and not benign prostate tissue or localized prostate cancer. Thus, our work provides mechanistic insight into the enhanced AR activation, most notably of the recently identified AR variants, including AR-V7 that drives CRPC progression. Furthermore, our results identify the first disease-specific mechanism for deregulation of FHL2 nuclear localization during cancer progression. These results offer general import beyond prostate cancer, given that nuclear FHL2 is characteristic of other human cancers where oncogenic transcription factors that drive disease are activated like the AR in prostate cancer.

  14. The Activation-Induced Assembly of an RNA/Protein Interactome Centered on the Splicing Factor U2AF2 Regulates Gene Expression in Human CD4 T Cells.

    PubMed

    Whisenant, Thomas C; Peralta, Eigen R; Aarreberg, Lauren D; Gao, Nina J; Head, Steven R; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Williamson, Jamie R; Salomon, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CD4 T cells is a reaction to challenges such as microbial pathogens, cancer and toxins that defines adaptive immune responses. The roles of T cell receptor crosslinking, intracellular signaling, and transcription factor activation are well described, but the importance of post-transcriptional regulation by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) has not been considered in depth. We describe a new model expanding and activating primary human CD4 T cells and applied this to characterizing activation-induced assembly of splicing factors centered on U2AF2. We immunoprecipitated U2AF2 to identify what mRNA transcripts were bound as a function of activation by TCR crosslinking and costimulation. In parallel, mass spectrometry revealed the proteins incorporated into the U2AF2-centered RNA/protein interactome. Molecules that retained interaction with the U2AF2 complex after RNAse treatment were designated as "central" interactome members (CIMs). Mass spectrometry also identified a second class of activation-induced proteins, "peripheral" interactome members (PIMs), that bound to the same transcripts but were not in physical association with U2AF2 or its partners. siRNA knockdown of two CIMs and two PIMs caused changes in activation marker expression, cytokine secretion, and gene expression that were unique to each protein and mapped to pathways associated with key aspects of T cell activation. While knocking down the PIM, SYNCRIP, impacts a limited but immunologically important set of U2AF2-bound transcripts, knockdown of U2AF1 significantly impairs assembly of the majority of protein and mRNA components in the activation-induced interactome. These results demonstrated that CIMs and PIMs, either directly or indirectly through RNA, assembled into activation-induced U2AF2 complexes and play roles in post-transcriptional regulation of genes related to cytokine secretion. These data suggest an additional layer of regulation mediated by the activation-induced assembly of RNA

  15. The Activation-Induced Assembly of an RNA/Protein Interactome Centered on the Splicing Factor U2AF2 Regulates Gene Expression in Human CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aarreberg, Lauren D.; Gao, Nina J.; Head, Steven R.; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Williamson, Jamie R.; Salomon, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CD4 T cells is a reaction to challenges such as microbial pathogens, cancer and toxins that defines adaptive immune responses. The roles of T cell receptor crosslinking, intracellular signaling, and transcription factor activation are well described, but the importance of post-transcriptional regulation by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) has not been considered in depth. We describe a new model expanding and activating primary human CD4 T cells and applied this to characterizing activation-induced assembly of splicing factors centered on U2AF2. We immunoprecipitated U2AF2 to identify what mRNA transcripts were bound as a function of activation by TCR crosslinking and costimulation. In parallel, mass spectrometry revealed the proteins incorporated into the U2AF2-centered RNA/protein interactome. Molecules that retained interaction with the U2AF2 complex after RNAse treatment were designated as “central” interactome members (CIMs). Mass spectrometry also identified a second class of activation-induced proteins, “peripheral” interactome members (PIMs), that bound to the same transcripts but were not in physical association with U2AF2 or its partners. siRNA knockdown of two CIMs and two PIMs caused changes in activation marker expression, cytokine secretion, and gene expression that were unique to each protein and mapped to pathways associated with key aspects of T cell activation. While knocking down the PIM, SYNCRIP, impacts a limited but immunologically important set of U2AF2-bound transcripts, knockdown of U2AF1 significantly impairs assembly of the majority of protein and mRNA components in the activation-induced interactome. These results demonstrated that CIMs and PIMs, either directly or indirectly through RNA, assembled into activation-induced U2AF2 complexes and play roles in post-transcriptional regulation of genes related to cytokine secretion. These data suggest an additional layer of regulation mediated by the activation-induced assembly

  16. Some Characterizations in Splicing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Yusof, Yuhani; Wan Heng, Fong

    2010-11-01

    The splitting and recombinant of deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA by specified enzymes using concepts in Formal Language Theory was first mathematically modeled by Head in 1987. This splicing system, S can be presented as a set of initial string I over an alphabet A that acts upon 5' or 3' overhangs of restriction enzymes and can be simply viewed as S = (A, I, B, C). In this paper, a great interest in presenting some relations on certain types of splicing system namely null-context, uniform, simple, semi-simple, semi-null and Sk based on differentiating their rules are given as proposition, corollaries and counterexamples.

  17. Reactivation of Fetal Splicing Programs in Diabetic Hearts Is Mediated by Protein Kinase C Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sunil K.; Deshmukh, Vaibhav; Liu, Patrick; Nutter, Curtis A.; Espejo, Rosario; Hung, Ming-Lung; Wang, Guey-Shin; Yeo, Gene W.; Kuyumcu-Martinez, Muge N.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is one of the complications of diabetes that eventually leads to heart failure and death. Aberrant activation of PKC signaling contributes to diabetic cardiomyopathy by mechanisms that are poorly understood. Previous reports indicate that PKC is implicated in alternative splicing regulation. Therefore, we wanted to test whether PKC activation in diabetic hearts induces alternative splicing abnormalities. Here, using RNA sequencing we identified a set of 22 alternative splicing events that undergo a developmental switch in splicing, and we confirmed that splicing reverts to an embryonic pattern in adult diabetic hearts. This network of genes has important functions in RNA metabolism and in developmental processes such as differentiation. Importantly, PKC isozymes α/β control alternative splicing of these genes via phosphorylation and up-regulation of the RNA-binding proteins CELF1 and Rbfox2. Using a mutant of CELF1, we show that phosphorylation of CELF1 by PKC is necessary for regulation of splicing events altered in diabetes. In summary, our studies indicate that activation of PKCα/β in diabetic hearts contributes to the genome-wide splicing changes through phosphorylation and up-regulation of CELF1/Rbfox2 proteins. These findings provide a basis for PKC-mediated cardiac pathogenesis under diabetic conditions. PMID:24151077

  18. Diverse alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing landscape of circular RNAs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ou; Dong, Rui; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jia-Lin; Luo, Zheng; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Ling-Ling; Yang, Li

    2016-09-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) derived from back-spliced exons have been widely identified as being co-expressed with their linear counterparts. A single gene locus can produce multiple circRNAs through alternative back-splice site selection and/or alternative splice site selection; however, a detailed map of alternative back-splicing/splicing in circRNAs is lacking. Here, with the upgraded CIRCexplorer2 pipeline, we systematically annotated different types of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing events in circRNAs from various cell lines. Compared with their linear cognate RNAs, circRNAs exhibited distinct patterns of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing. Alternative back-splice site selection was correlated with the competition of putative RNA pairs across introns that bracket alternative back-splice sites. In addition, all four basic types of alternative splicing that have been identified in the (linear) mRNA process were found within circRNAs, and many exons were predominantly spliced in circRNAs. Unexpectedly, thousands of previously unannotated exons were detected in circRNAs from the examined cell lines. Although these novel exons had similar splice site strength, they were much less conserved than known exons in sequences. Finally, both alternative back-splicing and circRNA-predominant alternative splicing were highly diverse among the examined cell lines. All of the identified alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing in circRNAs are available in the CIRCpedia database (http://www.picb.ac.cn/rnomics/circpedia). Collectively, the annotation of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing in circRNAs provides a valuable resource for depicting the complexity of circRNA biogenesis and for studying the potential functions of circRNAs in different cells. PMID:27365365

  19. Diverse alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing landscape of circular RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ou; Dong, Rui; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jia-Lin; Luo, Zheng; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Ling-Ling; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) derived from back-spliced exons have been widely identified as being co-expressed with their linear counterparts. A single gene locus can produce multiple circRNAs through alternative back-splice site selection and/or alternative splice site selection; however, a detailed map of alternative back-splicing/splicing in circRNAs is lacking. Here, with the upgraded CIRCexplorer2 pipeline, we systematically annotated different types of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing events in circRNAs from various cell lines. Compared with their linear cognate RNAs, circRNAs exhibited distinct patterns of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing. Alternative back-splice site selection was correlated with the competition of putative RNA pairs across introns that bracket alternative back-splice sites. In addition, all four basic types of alternative splicing that have been identified in the (linear) mRNA process were found within circRNAs, and many exons were predominantly spliced in circRNAs. Unexpectedly, thousands of previously unannotated exons were detected in circRNAs from the examined cell lines. Although these novel exons had similar splice site strength, they were much less conserved than known exons in sequences. Finally, both alternative back-splicing and circRNA-predominant alternative splicing were highly diverse among the examined cell lines. All of the identified alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing in circRNAs are available in the CIRCpedia database (http://www.picb.ac.cn/rnomics/circpedia). Collectively, the annotation of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing in circRNAs provides a valuable resource for depicting the complexity of circRNA biogenesis and for studying the potential functions of circRNAs in different cells. PMID:27365365

  20. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis.

  1. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  2. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  3. Half Pint/Puf68 is required for negative regulation of splicing by the SR factor Transformer2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanzhi; Wagner, Eric J; Mattox, William

    2013-01-01

    The SR family of proteins plays important regulatory roles in the control of alternative splicing in a wide range of organisms. These factors affect splicing through both positive and negative controls of splice site recognition by pre-spliceosomal factors. Recent studies indicate that the Drosophila SR factor Transformer 2 (Tra2) activates and represses splicing through distinct and separable effector regions of the protein. While the interactions of its Arg-Ser-rich activator region have been well studied, cofactors involved in splicing repression have yet to be found. Here we use a luciferase-based splicing reporter assay to screen for novel proteins necessary for Tra2-dependent repression of splicing. This approach identified Half pint, also known as Puf68, as a co-repressor required for Tra2-mediated autoregulation of the M1 intron. In vivo, Half pint is required for Tra2-dependent repression of M1 splicing but is not necessary for Tra2-dependent activation of doublesex splicing. Further experiments indicate that the effect of Hfp is sequence-specific and that it associates with these target transcripts in cells. Importantly, known M1 splicing regulatory elements are sufficient to sensitize a heterologous intron to Hfp regulation. Two alternative proteins deriving from Hfp transcripts, Hfp68, and Hfp58, were found to be expressed in vivo but differed dramatically in their effect on M1 splicing. Comparison of the cellular localization of these forms in S2 cells revealed that Hfp68 is predominantly localized to the nucleus while Hfp58 is distributed across both the nucleus and cytoplasm. This accords with their observed effects on splicing and suggests that differential compartmentalization may contribute to the specificity of these isoforms. Together, these studies reveal a function for Half pint in splicing repression and demonstrate it to be specifically required for Tra2-dependent intron inclusion. PMID:23880637

  4. A quantitative high-throughput in vitro splicing assay identifies inhibitors of spliceosome catalysis.

    PubMed

    Berg, Michael G; Wan, Lili; Younis, Ihab; Diem, Michael D; Soo, Michael; Wang, Congli; Dreyfuss, Gideon

    2012-04-01

    Despite intensive research, there are very few reagents with which to modulate and dissect the mRNA splicing pathway. Here, we describe a novel approach to identify such tools, based on detection of the exon junction complex (EJC), a unique molecular signature that splicing leaves on mRNAs. We developed a high-throughput, splicing-dependent EJC immunoprecipitation (EJIPT) assay to quantitate mRNAs spliced from biotin-tagged pre-mRNAs in cell extracts, using antibodies to EJC components Y14 and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4aIII (eIF4AIII). Deploying EJIPT we performed high-throughput screening (HTS) in conjunction with secondary assays to identify splicing inhibitors. We describe the identification of 1,4-naphthoquinones and 1,4-heterocyclic quinones with known anticancer activity as potent and selective splicing inhibitors. Interestingly, and unlike previously described small molecules, most of which target early steps, our inhibitors represented by the benzothiazole-4,7-dione, BN82685, block the second of two trans-esterification reactions in splicing, preventing the release of intron lariat and ligation of exons. We show that BN82685 inhibits activated spliceosomes' elaborate structural rearrangements that are required for second-step catalysis, allowing definition of spliceosomes stalled in midcatalysis. EJIPT provides a platform for characterization and discovery of splicing and EJC modulators. PMID:22252314

  5. Intron Retention in the Alternatively Spliced Region of RON Results from Weak 3’ Splice Site Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lindsay D.; Lucas, Christian M.; Eperon, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    The RON gene encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor for macrophage-stimulating protein. A constitutively active isoform that arises by skipping of exon 11 is expressed in carcinomas and contributes to an invasive phenotype. However, a high proportion of the mRNA expressed from the endogenous gene, or from transfected minigenes, appears to retain introns 10 and 11. It is not known whether this represents specific repression or the presence of weak splicing signals. We have used chimeric pre-mRNAs spliced in vitro to investigate the reason for intron retention. A systematic test showed that, surprisingly, the exon sequences known to modulate exon 11 skipping were not limiting, but the 3’ splice site regions adjacent to exons 11 and 12 were too weak to support splicing when inserted into a globin intron. UV-crosslinking experiments showed binding of hnRNP F/H just 5’ of these regions, but the hnRNP F/H target sequences did not mediate inhibition. Instead, the failure of splicing is linked to weak binding of U2AF65, and spliceosome assembly stalls prior to formation of any of the ATP-dependent complexes. We discuss mechanisms by which U2AF65 binding is facilitated in vivo. PMID:24155930

  6. COMMUNICATION: Alternative splicing and genomic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Kevin

    2004-06-01

    Alternative splicing allows an organism to make different proteins in different cells at different times, all from the same gene. In a cell that uses alternative splicing, the total length of all the exons is much shorter than in a cell that encodes the same set of proteins without alternative splicing. This economical use of exons makes genes more stable during reproduction and development because a genome with a shorter exon length is more resistant to harmful mutations. Genomic stability may be the reason why higher vertebrates splice alternatively. For a broad class of alternatively spliced genes, a formula is given for the increase in their stability.

  7. A nonsense mutation in mouse Tardbp affects TDP43 alternative splicing activity and causes limb-clasping and body tone defects.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, Thomas; McGoldrick, Philip; Fratta, Pietro; de Oliveira, Hugo M; Kent, Rosie; Phatak, Vinaya; Brandner, Sebastian; Blanco, Gonzalo; Greensmith, Linda; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in TARDBP, encoding Tar DNA binding protein-43 (TDP43), cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Attempts to model TDP43 dysfunction in mice have used knockouts or transgenic overexpressors, which have revealed the difficulties of manipulating TDP43, whose level is tightly controlled by auto-regulation. In a complementary approach, to create useful mouse models for the dissection of TDP43 function and pathology, we have identified a nonsense mutation in the endogenous mouse Tardbp gene through screening an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutant mouse archive. The mutation is predicted to cause a Q101X truncation in TDP43. We have characterised Tardbp(Q101X) mice to investigate this mutation in perturbing TDP43 biology at endogenous expression levels. We found the Tardbp(Q101X) mutation is homozygous embryonic lethal, highlighting the importance of TDP43 in early development. Heterozygotes (Tardbp(+/Q101X) ) have abnormal levels of mutant transcript, but we find no evidence of the truncated protein and mice have similar full-length TDP43 protein levels as wildtype littermates. Nevertheless, Tardbp(+/Q101X) mice have abnormal alternative splicing of downstream gene targets, and limb-clasp and body tone phenotypes. Thus the nonsense mutation in Tardbp causes a mild loss-of-function phenotype and behavioural assessment suggests underlying neurological abnormalities. Due to the role of TDP43 in ALS, we investigated potential interactions with another known causative gene, mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Tardbp(+/Q101X) mice were crossed with the SOD1(G93Adl) transgenic mouse model of ALS. Behavioural and physiological assessment did not reveal modifying effects on the progression of ALS-like symptoms in the double mutant progeny from this cross. In summary, the Tardbp(Q101X) mutant mice are a useful tool for the dissection of TDP43 protein regulation, effects on splicing, embryonic development and neuromuscular phenotypes

  8. 40Ar/39Ar ages of the AD 79 eruption of Vesuvius, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.; Champion, D.; Melluso, L.; Morra, V.; Perrotta, A.; Scarpati, C.; Tedesco, D.; Calvert, A.

    2007-01-01

    The Italian volcano, Vesuvius, erupted explosively in AD 79. Sanidine from pumice collected at Casti Amanti in Pompeii and Villa Poppea in Oplontis yielded a weighted-mean 40Ar/39Ar age of 1925??66 years in 2004 (1?? uncertainty) from incremental-heating experiments of eight aliquants of sanidine. This is the calendar age of the eruption. Our results together with the work of Renne et al. (1997) and Renne and Min (1998) demonstrate the validity of the 40Ar/39Ar method to reconstruct the recent eruptive history of young, active volcanoes. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  9. The genetics of splicing in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Justin; Hackett, Christopher S.; Zhang, Shile; Song, Young K.; Bell, Robert J.A.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Quigley, David A.; Balmain, Allan; Song, Jun S.; Costello, Joseph F.; Gustafson, W. Clay; Dyke, Terry Van; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Khan, Javed; Weiss, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of mRNA splicing, a critical and tightly regulated cellular function, underlies the majority of proteomic diversity, and is frequently disrupted in disease. Using an integrative genomics approach, we combined both genome and exon level transcriptome data in two somatic tissues (cerebella and peripheral ganglia) from a transgenic mouse model of neuroblastoma, a tumor that arises from peripheral neural crest. Here we describe splicing quantitative trait loci (sQTL) associated with differential splicing across the genome that we use to identify genes with previously unknown functions within the splicing pathway and to define de novo intronic splicing motifs that influence splicing from hundreds of bases away. Our results show that these splicing motifs represent sites for functional recurrent mutations and highlight novel candidate genes in human cancers, including childhood neuroblastoma. PMID:25637275

  10. Development of AR-V7 as a putative treatment selection marker for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer cells demonstrate a remarkable “addiction” to androgen receptor (AR) signaling in all stages of disease progression. As such, suppression of AR signaling remains the therapeutic goal in systemic treatment of prostate cancer. A number of molecular alterations arise in patients treated with AR-directed therapies. These molecular alterations may indicate the emergence of treatment resistance and may be targeted for the development of novel agents for prostate cancer. The presence of functional androgen receptor splice variants may represent a potential explanation for resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide, newer AR-directed agents developed to treat metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). In the last 8 years, many androgen receptor splice variants have been identified and characterized. Among these, androgen receptor splice variant-7 (AR-V7) has been investigated extensively. In AR-V7, the entire COOH-terminal ligand-binding domain of the canonical AR is truncated and replaced with a variant-specific peptide of 16 amino acids. Functionally, AR-V7 is capable of mediating constitutive nuclear localization and androgen receptor signaling in the absence of androgens, or in the presence of enzalutamide. In this review, we will focus on clinical translational studies involving detection/measurement of AR-V7. Methods have been developed to detect AR-V7 in clinical mCRPC specimens. AR-V7 can be reliably measured in both tissue and circulating tumor cells derived from mCRPC patients, making it possible to conduct both cross-sectional and longitudinal clinical correlative studies. Current evidence derived from studies focusing on detection of AR-V7 in mCRPC support its potential clinical utility as a treatment selection marker. PMID:27174161

  11. Development of AR-V7 as a putative treatment selection marker for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer cells demonstrate a remarkable "addiction" to androgen receptor (AR) signaling in all stages of disease progression. As such, suppression of AR signaling remains the therapeutic goal in systemic treatment of prostate cancer. A number of molecular alterations arise in patients treated with AR-directed therapies. These molecular alterations may indicate the emergence of treatment resistance and may be targeted for the development of novel agents for prostate cancer. The presence of functional androgen receptor splice variants may represent a potential explanation for resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide, newer AR-directed agents developed to treat metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). In the last 8 years, many androgen receptor splice variants have been identified and characterized. Among these, androgen receptor splice variant-7 (AR-V7) has been investigated extensively. In AR-V7, the entire COOH-terminal ligand-binding domain of the canonical AR is truncated and replaced with a variant-specific peptide of 16 amino acids. Functionally, AR-V7 is capable of mediating constitutive nuclear localization and androgen receptor signaling in the absence of androgens, or in the presence of enzalutamide. In this review, we will focus on clinical translational studies involving detection/measurement of AR-V7. Methods have been developed to detect AR-V7 in clinical mCRPC specimens. AR-V7 can be reliably measured in both tissue and circulating tumor cells derived from mCRPC patients, making it possible to conduct both cross-sectional and longitudinal clinical correlative studies. Current evidence derived from studies focusing on detection of AR-V7 in mCRPC support its potential clinical utility as a treatment selection marker.

  12. The Role of Alternative Splicing in the Control of Immune Homeostasis and Cellular Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yabas, Mehmet; Elliott, Hannah; Hoyne, Gerard F

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA helps to enhance the genetic diversity within mammalian cells by increasing the number of protein isoforms that can be generated from one gene product. This provides a great deal of flexibility to the host cell to alter protein function, but when dysregulation in splicing occurs this can have important impact on health and disease. Alternative splicing is widely used in the mammalian immune system to control the development and function of antigen specific lymphocytes. In this review we will examine the splicing of pre-mRNAs yielding key proteins in the immune system that regulate apoptosis, lymphocyte differentiation, activation and homeostasis, and discuss how defects in splicing can contribute to diseases. We will describe how disruption to trans-acting factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), can impact on cell survival and differentiation in the immune system. PMID:26703587

  13. The Role of Alternative Splicing in the Control of Immune Homeostasis and Cellular Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yabas, Mehmet; Elliott, Hannah; Hoyne, Gerard F.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA helps to enhance the genetic diversity within mammalian cells by increasing the number of protein isoforms that can be generated from one gene product. This provides a great deal of flexibility to the host cell to alter protein function, but when dysregulation in splicing occurs this can have important impact on health and disease. Alternative splicing is widely used in the mammalian immune system to control the development and function of antigen specific lymphocytes. In this review we will examine the splicing of pre-mRNAs yielding key proteins in the immune system that regulate apoptosis, lymphocyte differentiation, activation and homeostasis, and discuss how defects in splicing can contribute to diseases. We will describe how disruption to trans-acting factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), can impact on cell survival and differentiation in the immune system. PMID:26703587

  14. Oncogenic Alternative Splicing Switches: Role in Cancer Progression and Prospects for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bonomi, Serena; Gallo, Stefania; Catillo, Morena; Pignataro, Daniela; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Ghigna, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in the abundance or activities of alternative splicing regulators generate alternatively spliced variants that contribute to multiple aspects of tumor establishment, progression and resistance to therapeutic treatments. Notably, many cancer-associated genes are regulated through alternative splicing suggesting a significant role of this post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism in the production of oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Thus, the study of alternative splicing in cancer might provide a better understanding of the malignant transformation and identify novel pathways that are uniquely relevant to tumorigenesis. Understanding the molecular underpinnings of cancer-associated alternative splicing isoforms will not only help to explain many fundamental hallmarks of cancer, but will also offer unprecedented opportunities to improve the efficacy of anti-cancer treatments. PMID:24285959

  15. Aberrant splicing of U12-type introns is the hallmark of ZRSR2 mutant myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Vikas; Kanojia, Deepika; Li, Jia; Okamoto, Ryoko; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Kohlmann, Alexander; Sanada, Masashi; Grossmann, Vera; Sundaresan, Janani; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Miyano, Satoru; Thol, Felicitas; Ganser, Arnold; Yang, Henry; Haferlach, Torsten; Ogawa, Seishi; Koeffler, H. Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the spliceosome gene ZRSR2 — located on the X chromosome — are associated with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). ZRSR2 is involved in the recognition of 3΄ splice site during the early stages of spliceosome assembly; however, its precise role in RNA splicing has remained unclear. Here, we characterize ZRSR2 as an essential component of the minor spliceosome (U12-dependent) assembly. shRNA mediated knockdown of ZRSR2 leads to impaired splicing of the U12-type introns, and RNA-Sequencing of MDS bone marrow reveals that loss of ZRSR2 activity causes increased mis-splicing. These splicing defects involve retention of the U12-type introns while splicing of the U2-type introns remain mostly unaffected. ZRSR2 deficient cells also exhibit reduced proliferation potential and distinct alterations in myeloid and erythroid differentiation in vitro. These data identify a specific role for ZRSR2 in RNA splicing and highlight dysregulated splicing of U12-type introns as a characteristic feature of ZRSR2 mutations in MDS. PMID:25586593

  16. Human SAP18 mediates assembly of a splicing regulatory multiprotein complex via its ubiquitin-like fold

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kusum K.; Erkelenz, Steffen; Rattay, Stephanie; Dehof, Anna Katharina; Hildebrandt, Andreas; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Schaal, Heiner; Schwerk, Christian

    2010-01-01

    RNPS1, Acinus, and SAP18 form the apoptosis- and splicing-associated protein (ASAP) complex, which is also part of the exon junction complex. Whereas RNPS1 was originally identified as a general activator of mRNA processing, all three proteins have been found within functional spliceosomes. Both RNPS1 and Acinus contain typical motifs of splicing regulatory proteins including arginine/serine-rich domains. Due to the absence of such structural features, however, a function of SAP18 in splicing regulation is completely unknown. Here we have investigated splicing regulatory activities of the ASAP components. Whereas a full-length Acinus isoform displayed only limited splicing regulatory activity, both RNPS1 and, surprisingly, SAP18 strongly modulated splicing regulation. Detailed mutational analysis and three-dimensional modeling data revealed that the ubiquitin-like fold of SAP18 was required for efficient splicing regulatory activity. Coimmunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence experiments demonstrated that SAP18 assembles a nuclear speckle-localized splicing regulatory multiprotein complex including RNPS1 and Acinus via its ubiquitin-like fold. Our results therefore suggest a novel function of SAP18 in splicing regulation. PMID:20966198

  17. Trans-splicing with the group I intron ribozyme from Azoarcus

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Gregory F.; Müller, Ulrich F.

    2014-01-01

    Group I introns are ribozymes (catalytic RNAs) that excise themselves from RNA primary transcripts by catalyzing two successive transesterification reactions. These cis-splicing ribozymes can be converted into trans-splicing ribozymes, which can modify the sequence of a separate substrate RNA, both in vitro and in vivo. Previous work on trans-splicing ribozymes has mostly focused on the 16S rRNA group I intron ribozyme from Tetrahymena thermophila. Here, we test the trans-splicing potential of the tRNAIle group I intron ribozyme from the bacterium Azoarcus. This ribozyme is only half the size of the Tetrahymena ribozyme and folds faster into its active conformation in vitro. Our results showed that in vitro, the Azoarcus and Tetrahymena ribozymes favored the same set of splice sites on a substrate RNA. Both ribozymes showed the same trans-splicing efficiency when containing their individually optimized 5′ terminus. In contrast to the previously optimized 5′-terminal design of the Tetrahymena ribozyme, the Azoarcus ribozyme was most efficient with a trans-splicing design that resembled the secondary structure context of the natural cis-splicing Azoarcus ribozyme, which includes base-pairing between the substrate 5′ portion and the ribozyme 3′ exon. These results suggested preferred trans-splicing interactions for the Azoarcus ribozyme under near-physiological in vitro conditions. Despite the high activity in vitro, however, the splicing efficiency of the Azoarcus ribozyme in Escherichia coli cells was significantly below that of the Tetrahymena ribozyme. PMID:24344321

  18. Spliced leader RNA trans-splicing discovered in copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Yi, Xiaoyan; Huang, Yousong; Chen, Hongju; Lin, Senjie; Campbell, David A.; Sturm, Nancy R.; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2015-12-01

    Copepods are one of the most abundant metazoans in the marine ecosystem, constituting a critical link in aquatic food webs and contributing significantly to the global carbon budget, yet molecular mechanisms of their gene expression are not well understood. Here we report the detection of spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing in calanoid copepods. We have examined nine species of wild-caught copepods from Jiaozhou Bay, China that represent the major families of the calanoids. All these species contained a common 46-nt SL (CopepodSL). We further determined the size of CopepodSL precursor RNA (slRNA; 108-158 nt) through genomic analysis and 3‧-RACE technique, which was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Structure modeling showed that the copepod slRNA folded into typical slRNA secondary structures. Using a CopepodSL-based primer set, we selectively enriched and sequenced copepod full-length cDNAs, which led to the characterization of copepod transcripts and the cataloging of the complete set of 79 eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) for a single copepod species. We uncovered the SL trans-splicing in copepod natural populations, and demonstrated that CopepodSL was a sensitive and specific tool for copepod transcriptomic studies at both the individual and population levels and that it would be useful for metatranscriptomic analysis of copepods.

  19. Spliced leader RNA trans-splicing discovered in copepods

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Yi, Xiaoyan; Huang, Yousong; Chen, Hongju; Lin, Senjie; Campbell, David A.; Sturm, Nancy R.; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Copepods are one of the most abundant metazoans in the marine ecosystem, constituting a critical link in aquatic food webs and contributing significantly to the global carbon budget, yet molecular mechanisms of their gene expression are not well understood. Here we report the detection of spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing in calanoid copepods. We have examined nine species of wild-caught copepods from Jiaozhou Bay, China that represent the major families of the calanoids. All these species contained a common 46-nt SL (CopepodSL). We further determined the size of CopepodSL precursor RNA (slRNA; 108-158 nt) through genomic analysis and 3′-RACE technique, which was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Structure modeling showed that the copepod slRNA folded into typical slRNA secondary structures. Using a CopepodSL-based primer set, we selectively enriched and sequenced copepod full-length cDNAs, which led to the characterization of copepod transcripts and the cataloging of the complete set of 79 eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) for a single copepod species. We uncovered the SL trans-splicing in copepod natural populations, and demonstrated that CopepodSL was a sensitive and specific tool for copepod transcriptomic studies at both the individual and population levels and that it would be useful for metatranscriptomic analysis of copepods. PMID:26621068

  20. Alanine repeats influence protein localization in splicing speckles and paraspeckles.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Chang, Wei-Lun; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2014-12-16

    Mammalian splicing regulatory protein RNA-binding motif protein 4 (RBM4) has an alanine repeat-containing C-terminal domain (CAD) that confers both nuclear- and splicing speckle-targeting activities. Alanine-repeat expansion has pathological potential. Here we show that the alanine-repeat tracts influence the subnuclear targeting properties of the RBM4 CAD in cultured human cells. Notably, truncation of the alanine tracts redistributed a portion of RBM4 to paraspeckles. The alanine-deficient CAD was sufficient for paraspeckle targeting. On the other hand, alanine-repeat expansion reduced the mobility of RBM4 and impaired its splicing activity. We further took advantage of the putative coactivator activator (CoAA)-RBM4 conjoined splicing factor, CoAZ, to investigate the function of the CAD in subnuclear targeting. Transiently expressed CoAZ formed discrete nuclear foci that emerged and subsequently separated-fully or partially-from paraspeckles. Alanine-repeat expansion appeared to prevent CoAZ separation from paraspeckles, resulting in their complete colocalization. CoAZ foci were dynamic but, unlike paraspeckles, were resistant to RNase treatment. Our results indicate that the alanine-rich CAD, in conjunction with its conjoined RNA-binding domain(s), differentially influences the subnuclear localization and biogenesis of RBM4 and CoAZ.

  1. Virus deletion mutants that affect a 3' splice site in the E3 transcription unit of adenovirus 2.

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, B M; Brady, H A; Wold, W S

    1985-01-01

    Five viable virus mutants were constructed with deletions near a 3' splice site located at nucleotide 2157 in the E3 transcription unit of adenovirus 2. The mutants were examined for splicing activity at the 2157 3' splice site in vivo by nuclease-gel analysis of steady-state cytoplasmic mRNA. Splicing was not prevented by an exon deletion (dl719) that leaves 16 5'-proximal exon nucleotides intact or by intron deletions that leave 34 (dl717, dl712) or 18 (dl716) 3'-proximal intron nucleotides intact. The sequences deleted in one of these intron mutants (dl716) include the putative branchpoint site used in lariat formation during splicing. Thus, a surrogate branchpoint site apparently can be used for splicing. Another intron mutant (dl714) has a deletion that leaves 15 3'-proximal intron nucleotides intact; remarkably, this deletion virtually abolished splicing, even though the deletion is only 3 nucleotides closer to the splice site than is the deletion in dl716 which splices normally. The three nucleotides deleted in dl714 that are retained by dl716 are the sequence TGT. The TGT sequence is located on the 5' boundary of the pyrimidine-rich region upstream of the nucleotide 2157 3' splice site. Such pyrimidine-rich regions are ubiquitous at 3' splice sites. Most likely, the TGT is required for splicing at the nucleotide 2157 3' splice site. The TGT may be important because of its specific sequence or because it forms the 5' boundary of the pyrimidine-rich region. Images PMID:3879768

  2. Hallmarks of alternative splicing in cancer.

    PubMed

    Oltean, S; Bates, D O

    2014-11-13

    The immense majority of genes are alternatively spliced and there are many isoforms specifically associated with cancer progression and metastasis. The splicing pattern of specific isoforms of numerous genes is altered as cells move through the oncogenic process of gaining proliferative capacity, acquiring angiogenic, invasive, antiapoptotic and survival properties, becoming free from growth factor dependence and growth suppression, altering their metabolism to cope with hypoxia, enabling them to acquire mechanisms of immune escape, and as they move through the epithelial-mesenchymal and mesenchymal-epithelial transitions and metastasis. Each of the 'hallmarks of cancer' is associated with a switch in splicing, towards a more aggressive invasive cancer phenotype. The choice of isoforms is regulated by several factors (signaling molecules, kinases, splicing factors) currently being identified systematically by a number of high-throughput, independent and unbiased methodologies. Splicing factors are de-regulated in cancer, and in some cases are themselves oncogenes or pseudo-oncogenes and can contribute to positive feedback loops driving cancer progression. Tumour progression may therefore be associated with a coordinated splicing control, meaning that there is the potential for a relatively small number of splice factors or their regulators to drive multiple oncogenic processes. The understanding of how splicing contributes to the various phenotypic traits acquired by tumours as they progress and metastasise, and in particular how alternative splicing is coordinated, can and is leading to the development of a new class of anticancer therapeutics-the alternative-splicing inhibitors. PMID:24336324

  3. Salt-Dependent Conditional Protein Splicing of an Intein from Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    Reitter, Julie N; Cousin, Christopher E; Nicastri, Michael C; Jaramillo, Mario V; Mills, Kenneth V

    2016-03-01

    An intein from Halobacterium salinarum can be isolated as an unspliced precursor protein with exogenous exteins after Escherichia coli overexpression. The intein promotes protein splicing and uncoupled N-terminal cleavage in vitro, conditional on incubation with NaCl or KCl at concentrations of >1.5 M. The protein splicing reaction also is conditional on reduction of a disulfide bond between two active site cysteines. Conditional protein splicing under these relatively mild conditions may lead to advances in intein-based biotechnology applications and hints at the possibility that this H. salinarum intein could serve as a switch to control extein activity under physiologically relevant conditions.

  4. Antarlides: A New Type of Androgen Receptor (AR) Antagonist that Overcomes Resistance to AR-Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shun; Fujimaki, Takahiro; Panbangred, Watanalai; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Imoto, Masaya

    2016-02-18

    Prostate cancer is treated with androgen receptor (AR) antagonists but most patients experience disease progression after long-term treatment with these compounds. Therefore, new AR antagonists are required for patient follow-up treatment. In the course of screening for a new AR antagonist, we isolated the novel compounds antarlides A-E (1-5) from Streptomyces sp. BB47. Antarlides are mutually isomeric with respect to the double bond and have a 22-membered-ring macrocyclic structure. The full stereostructure of 1 was established by chemical modifications, including methanolysis, the Trost method, acetonide formation, and the PGME method. 1-5 inhibited the binding of androgen to ARs in vitro. In addition, 2 inhibited the transcriptional activity of not only wild-type AR but also mutant ARs, which are seen in patients with acquired resistance to clinically used AR antagonists. Therefore, antarlides are a potent new generation of AR antagonists that overcome resistance.

  5. GRS Measurements of Ar in Mars' Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, A. L.; Boynton, W. V.; Kerry, K. E.; Janes, D. M.; Kelly, N. J.; Crombie, M. K.; Hunten, D. M.; Nelli, S. M.; Murphy, J. R.; Reedy, R. C.; Metzger, A. E.

    2005-08-01

    One and one half Mars years of atmospheric argon (Ar) measurements are described in the context of understanding how Ar, a minor constituent of Mars atmosphere that does not condense at Mars temperatures, can be used to study martian circulation and dynamics. There is a repeated factor of 6 enhancement of Ar measured over south polar latitudes. The maximum in Ar abundance occurs near the onset of southern winter. There is no similar strong enhancement of Ar over north-polar regions during northern winter; only modest evidence for an enhancement peak is present. Part of this difference is explained by the global topographic dichotomy and the fact that the duration of northern autumn and winter is shorter than southern autumn and winter. Rapid seasonal fluctuations in Ar abundance may indicate evidence for wave activity at the perimeter of the southern seasonal polar cap. The apparent lack of coincidence of Ar enhancement with the relatively cold, cryptic terrain or relatively warm, bright albedo regions, indirectly supports the conclusion that the low temperatures measured over the south polar region by IRTM are probably caused by the combination of low CO2 abundance over south polar night and low emissivity regions on the surface associated with small grain size.

  6. 40Ar/39Ar geochronological constraints on the formation of the Dayingezhuang gold deposit: New implications for timing and duration of hydrothermal activity in the Jiaodong gold province, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, Li-Qiang; Deng, J.; Goldfarb, Richard J.; Zhang, Jiahua; Gao, Bang-Fei; Wang, Zhong-Liang

    2014-01-01

    China's largest gold resource is located in the highly endowed northwestern part of the Jiaodong gold province. Most gold deposits in this area are associated with the NE- to NNE-trending shear zones on the margins of the 130–126 Ma Guojialing granite. These deposits collectively formed at ca. 120 ± 5 Ma during rapid uplift of the granite. The Dayingezhuang deposit is a large (> 120 t Au) orogenic gold deposit in the same area, but located along the eastern margin of the Late Jurassic Linglong Metamorphic Core Complex. New 40Ar/39Ar geochronology on hydrothermal sericite and muscovite from the Dayingezhuang deposit indicate the gold event is related to evolution of the core complex at 130 ± 4 Ma and is the earliest important gold event that is well-documented in the province. The Dayingezhuang deposit occurs along the Linglong detachment fault, which defines the eastern edge of the ca. 160–150 Ma Linglong granite–granodiorite massif. The anatectic rocks of the massif were rapidly uplifted, at rates of at least 1 km/m.y. from depths of 25–30 km, to form the metamorphic core complex. The detachment fault, with Precambrian metamorphic basement rocks in the hangingwall and the Linglong granitoids and migmatites in the footwall, is characterized by early mylonitization and a local brittle overprinting in the footwall. Gold is associated with quartz–sericite–pyrite–K-feldspar altered footwall cataclasites at the southernmost area of the brittle deformation along the detachment fault. Our results indicate that there were two successive, yet distinct gold-forming tectonic episodes in northwestern Jiaodong. One event first reactivated the detachment fault along the edge of the Linglong massif between 134 and 126 Ma, and then a second reactivated the shears along the margins of the Guojialing granite. Both events may relate to a component of northwest compression after a middle Early Cretaceous shift from regional NW–SE extension to a NE

  7. Coordinated Dynamics of RNA Splicing Speckles in the Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Kota, Krishna P; Alam, Samer G; Nickerson, Jeffrey A; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2016-06-01

    Despite being densely packed with chromatin, nuclear bodies and a nucleoskeletal network, the nucleus is a remarkably dynamic organelle. Chromatin loops form and relax, RNA transcripts and transcription factors move diffusively, and nuclear bodies move. We show here that RNA splicing speckled domains (splicing speckles) fluctuate in constrained nuclear volumes and remodel their shapes. Small speckles move in a directed way toward larger speckles with which they fuse. This directed movement is reduced upon decreasing cellular ATP levels or inhibiting RNA polymerase II activity. The random movement of speckles is reduced upon decreasing cellular ATP levels, moderately reduced after inhibition of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling and modestly increased upon inhibiting RNA polymerase II activity. To define the paths through which speckles can translocate in the nucleus, we generated a pressure gradient to create flows in the nucleus. In response to the pressure gradient, speckles moved along curvilinear paths in the nucleus. Collectively, our results demonstrate a new type of ATP-dependent motion in the nucleus. We present a model where recycling splicing factors return as part of small sub-speckles from distal sites of RNA processing to larger splicing speckles by a directed ATP-driven mechanism through interchromatin spaces.

  8. Novel mutations affecting LRP5 splicing in patients with osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG)

    PubMed Central

    Laine, C M; Chung, B D; Susic, M; Prescott, T; Semler, O; Fiskerstrand, T; D'Eufemia, P; Castori, M; Pekkinen, M; Sochett, E; Cole, W G; Netzer, C; Mäkitie, O

    2011-01-01

    Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma sydrome (OPPG) is an autosomal recessive disorder with early-onset severe osteoporosis and blindness, caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene. Heterozygous carriers exhibit a milder bone phenotype. Only a few splice mutations in LRP5 have been published. We present clinical and genetic data for four patients with novel LRP5 mutations, three of which affect splicing. Patients were evaluated clinically and by radiography and bone densitometry. Genetic screening of LRP5 was performed on the basis of the clinical diagnosis of OPPG. Splice aberrances were confirmed by cDNA sequencing or exon trapping. The effect of one splice mutation on LRP5 protein function was studied. A novel splice-site mutation c.1584+4A>T abolished the donor splice site of exon 7 and activated a cryptic splice site, which led to an in-frame insertion of 21 amino acids (p.E528_V529ins21). Functional studies revealed severely impaired signal transduction presumably caused by defective intracellular transport of the mutated receptor. Exon trapping was used on two samples to confirm that splice-site mutations c.4112-2A>G and c.1015+1G>T caused splicing-out of exons 20 and 5, respectively. One patient carried a homozygous deletion of exon 4 causing the loss of exons 4 and 5, as demonstrated by cDNA analysis. Our results broaden the spectrum of mutations in LRP5 and provide the first functional data on splice aberrations. PMID:21407258

  9. The strength of the HIV-1 3' splice sites affects Rev function

    PubMed Central

    Kammler, Susanne; Otte, Marianne; Hauber, Ilona; Kjems, Jørgen; Hauber, Joachim; Schaal, Heiner

    2006-01-01

    Background The HIV-1 Rev protein is a key component in the early to late switch in HIV-1 splicing from early intronless (e.g. tat, rev) to late intron-containing Rev-dependent (e.g. gag, vif, env) transcripts. Previous results suggested that cis-acting sequences and inefficient 5' and 3' splice sites are a prerequisite for Rev function. However, we and other groups have shown that two of the HIV-1 5' splice sites, D1 and D4, are efficiently used in vitro and in vivo. Here, we focus on the efficiency of the HIV-1 3' splice sites taking into consideration to what extent their intrinsic efficiencies are modulated by their downstream cis-acting exonic sequences. Furthermore, we delineate their role in RNA stabilization and Rev function. Results In the presence of an efficient upstream 5' splice site the integrity of the 3' splice site is not essential for Rev function whereas an efficient 3' splice site impairs Rev function. The detrimental effect of a strong 3' splice site on the amount of Rev-dependent intron-containing HIV-1 glycoprotein coding (env) mRNA is not compensatable by weakening the strength of the upstream 5' splice site. Swapping the HIV-1 3' splice sites in an RRE-containing minigene, we found a 3' splice site usage which was variably dependent on the presence of the usual downstream exonic sequence. The most evident activation of 3' splice site usage by its usual downstream exonic sequence was observed for 3' splice site A1 which was turned from an intrinsic very weak 3' splice site into the most active 3' splice site, even abolishing Rev activity. Performing pull-down experiments with nuclear extracts of HeLa cells we identified a novel ASF/SF2-dependent exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) within HIV-1 exon 2 consisting of a heptameric sequence motif occurring twice (M1 and M2) within this short non-coding leader exon. Single point mutation of M1 within an infectious molecular clone is detrimental for HIV-1 exon 2 recognition without affecting Rev

  10. Suppression of mammalian 5' splice-site defects by U1 small nuclear RNAs from a distance.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J B; Snow, J E; Spencer, S D; Levinson, A D

    1994-10-25

    One of the earliest events in the process of intron removal from mRNA precursors is the establishment of a base-pairing interaction between U1 small nuclear (sn) RNA and the 5' splice site. Mutations at the 5' splice site that prevent splicing can often be suppressed by coexpression of U1 snRNAs with compensatory changes, but in yeast, accurate splicing is not restored when the universally conserved first intron base is changed. In our mammalian system as well, such a mutation could not be suppressed, but the complementary U1 caused aberrant splicing 12 bases downstream. This result is reminiscent of observations in yeast that aberrant 5' splice sites can be activated by U1 snRNA from a distance. Using a rapid, qualitative protein expression assay, we provide evidence that 5' splice-site mutations can be suppressed in mammalian cells by U1 snRNAs with complementarity to a range of sequences upstream or downstream of the site. Our approach uncouples in vivo the commitment-activation step of mammalian splicing from the process of 5' splice-site definition and as such will facilitate the genetic characterization of both.

  11. Splice cassette II of Na+,HCO3(-) cotransporter NBCn1 (slc4a7) interacts with calcineurin A: implications for transporter activity and intracellular pH control during rat artery contractions.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, Andreas A; Parker, Mark D; Lee, Soojung; Boron, Walter F; Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Ebbe

    2013-03-22

    Activation of Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contributes to intracellular pH (pH(i)) control during artery contraction, but the signaling pathways involved have been unknown. We investigated whether physical and functional interactions between the Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransporter NBCn1 (slc4a7) and the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-activated serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin exist and play a role for pHi control in VSMCs. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that splice cassette II from the N terminus of NBCn1 interacts with calcineurin Aβ. When cassette II was truncated or mutated to disrupt the putative calcineurin binding motif PTVVIH, the interaction was abolished. Native NBCn1 and calcineurin Aβ co-immunoprecipitated from A7r5 rat VSMCs. A peptide (acetyl-DDIPTVVIH-amide), which mimics the putative calcineurin binding motif, inhibited the co-immunoprecipitation whereas a mutated peptide (acetyl-DDIATAVAA-amide) did not. Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport activity was investigated in VSMCs of mesenteric arteries after an NH4(+) prepulse. During depolarization with 50 mM extracellular K(+) to raise intracellular [Ca(2+)], Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport activity was inhibited 20-30% by calcineurin inhibitors (FK506 and cyclosporine A). FK506 did not affect Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport activity in VSMCs when cytosolic [Ca(2+)] was lowered by buffering, nor did it disrupt binding between NBCn1 and calcineurin Aβ. FK506 augmented the intracellular acidification of VSMCs during norepinephrine-induced artery contractions. No physical or functional interactions between calcineurin Aβ and the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1 were observed in VSMCs. In conclusion, we demonstrate a physical interaction between calcineurin Aβ and cassette II of NBCn1. Intracellular Ca(2+) activates Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport activity in VSMCs in a calcineurin-dependent manner which is important for protection against intracellular acidification.

  12. Alterations Associated with Androgen Receptor Gene Activation in Salivary Duct Carcinoma (SDC) of Both Sexes: Potential Therapeutic Ramifications

    PubMed Central

    Mitani, Yoshitsugu; Rao, Pulivarthi H.; Maity, Sankar N.; Lee, Yu-Chen; Ferrarotto, Renata; Post, Julian C.; Licitra, Lisa; Lippman, Scott M.; Kies, Merrill S.; Weber, Randal S.; Caulin, Carlos; Lin, Sue-Hwa; El-Naggar, Adel K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the molecular events associated with the activation of androgen receptor (AR) as a potential therapeutic target in patients with salivary duct carcinoma (SDC). Experimental Design Comprehensive molecular and expression analysis of the AR gene in 35 tumor specimens (20 males and 15 females) and cell lines derived from SDC using Western blotting and RT-PCR, FISH analysis, and DNA sequencing were conducted. In vitro and in vivo animal studies were also performed. Results AR expression was detected in 70% of the tumors and was mainly nuclear and homogenous in both male and female SDCs, although variable cytoplasmic and/or nuclear localization was also found. We report the identification of Ligand-independent AR splice variants, mutations and extra AR gene copy in primary untreated SDC tumors. In contrast to prostate cancer, no AR gene amplification was observed. In vitro knockdown of AR in a female derived SDC cell line revealed marked growth inhibition in culture and in vivo androgen independent tumor growth. Conclusions Our study provides new detailed information on the molecular and structural alterations associated with AR gene activation in SDC and shed more light on the putative functional role of AR in SDC cells. Based on these data, we propose that patients with SDC (male and female) can be stratified for hormone-based therapy in future clinical trials. PMID:25316813

  13. Splicing of intron 3 of human BACE requires the flanking introns 2 and 4.

    PubMed

    Annies, Maik; Stefani, Muriel; Hueber, Andreas; Fischer, Frauke; Paganetti, Paolo

    2009-10-16

    Regulation of proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein by the aspartic protease BACE may occur by alternative splicing and the generation of enzymatically inactive forms. In fact, the presence of exonic donor and acceptor sites for intron 3 generates the two deficient variants BACE457 and BACE476. In HEK293 cells, when introns are inserted separately in the BACE cDNA, we found that whilst introns 2 and 4 are efficiently spliced out, intron 3 is not removed. On the other hand, splicing to wild-type BACE is restored when intron 3 is flanked by the two other introns. The presence of all three introns also leads to alternative splicing of intron 3 and the generation of BACE476. In contrast, BACE457 expression takes place only after mutating the donor splice site of intron 3, indicating that additional regulatory elements are necessary for the use of the splicing site within exon 4. Overall, our data demonstrate that a complex splicing of intron 3 regulates the maturation of the BACE mRNA. This appears orchestrated by domains present in the exons and introns flanking intron 3. Excessive BACE activity is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, therefore this complex regulation might guarantee low neuronal BACE activity and disease prevention.

  14. Haploinsufficiency of the c-myc transcriptional repressor FIR, as a dominant negative-alternative splicing model, promoted p53-dependent T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia progression by activating Notch1.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Kouichi; Rahmutulla, Bahityar; Tanaka, Nobuko; Ishige, Takayuki; Satoh, Mamoru; Hoshino, Tyuji; Miyagi, Satoru; Mori, Takeshi; Itoga, Sakae; Shimada, Hideaki; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Kito, Minoru; Nakajima-Takagi, Yaeko; Kubo, Shuji; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Hatano, Masahiko; Miki, Takashi; Matsuo, Masafumi; Fukuyo, Masaki; Kaneda, Atsushi; Iwama, Atsushi; Nomura, Fumio

    2015-03-10

    FUSE-binding protein (FBP)-interacting repressor (FIR) is a c-myc transcriptional suppressor. A splice variant of FIR that lacks exon 2 in the transcriptional repressor domain (FIRΔexon2) upregulates c-myc transcription by inactivating wild-type FIR. The ratio of FIRΔexon2/FIR mRNA was increased in human colorectal cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma tissues. Because FIRΔexon2 is considered to be a dominant negative regulator of FIR, FIR heterozygous knockout (FIR⁺/⁻) C57BL6 mice were generated. FIR complete knockout (FIR⁻/⁻) was embryonic lethal before E9.5; therefore, it is essential for embryogenesis. This strongly suggests that insufficiency of FIR is crucial for carcinogenesis. FIR⁺/⁻ mice exhibited prominent c-myc mRNA upregulation, particularly in the peripheral blood (PB), without any significant pathogenic phenotype. Furthermore, elevated FIRΔexon2/FIR mRNA expression was detected in human leukemia samples and cell lines. Because the single knockout of TP53 generates thymic lymphoma, FIR⁺/⁻TP53⁻/⁻ generated T-cell type acute lymphocytic/lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) with increased organ or bone marrow invasion with poor prognosis. RNA-sequencing analysis of sorted thymic lymphoma cells revealed that the Notch signaling pathway was activated significantly in FIR⁺/⁻TP53⁻/⁻ compared with that in FIR⁺/⁺TP53⁻/⁻ mice. Notch1 mRNA expression in sorted thymic lymphoma cells was confirmed using qRT-PCR. In addition, flow cytometry revealed that c-myc mRNA was negatively correlated with FIR but positively correlated with Notch1 in sorted T-ALL/thymic lymphoma cells. Moreover, the knockdown of TP53 or c-myc using siRNA decreased Notch1 expression in cancer cells. In addition, an adenovirus vector encoding FIRΔexon2 cDNA increased bleomycin-induced DNA damage. Taken together, these data suggest that the altered expression of FIRΔexon2 increased Notch1 at least partially by activating c-Myc via a TP53-independent pathway. In

  15. Haploinsufficiency of the c-myc transcriptional repressor FIR, as a dominant negative-alternative splicing model, promoted p53-dependent T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia progression by activating Notch1

    PubMed Central

    Rahmutulla, Bahityar; Tanaka, Nobuko; Ishige, Takayuki; Satoh, Mamoru; Hoshino, Tyuji; Miyagi, Satoru; Mori, Takeshi; Itoga, Sakae; Shimada, Hideaki; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Kito, Minoru; Nakajima-Takagi, Yaeko; Kubo, Shuji; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Hatano, Masahiko; Miki, Takashi; Matsuo, Masafumi; Fukuyo, Masaki; Kaneda, Atsushi; Iwama, Atsushi; Nomura, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    FUSE-binding protein (FBP)-interacting repressor (FIR) is a c-myc transcriptional suppressor. A splice variant of FIR that lacks exon 2 in the transcriptional repressor domain (FIRΔexon2) upregulates c-myc transcription by inactivating wild-type FIR. The ratio of FIRΔexon2/FIR mRNA was increased in human colorectal cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma tissues. Because FIRΔexon2 is considered to be a dominant negative regulator of FIR, FIR heterozygous knockout (FIR+/−) C57BL6 mice were generated. FIR complete knockout (FIR−/−) was embryonic lethal before E9.5; therefore, it is essential for embryogenesis. This strongly suggests that insufficiency of FIR is crucial for carcinogenesis. FIR+/− mice exhibited prominent c-myc mRNA upregulation, particularly in the peripheral blood (PB), without any significant pathogenic phenotype. Furthermore, elevated FIRΔexon2/FIR mRNA expression was detected in human leukemia samples and cell lines. Because the single knockout of TP53 generates thymic lymphoma, FIR+/−TP53−/− generated T-cell type acute lymphocytic/lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) with increased organ or bone marrow invasion with poor prognosis. RNA-sequencing analysis of sorted thymic lymphoma cells revealed that the Notch signaling pathway was activated significantly in FIR+/−TP53−/− compared with that in FIR+/+TP53−/− mice. Notch1 mRNA expression in sorted thymic lymphoma cells was confirmed using qRT-PCR. In addition, flow cytometry revealed that c-myc mRNA was negatively correlated with FIR but positively correlated with Notch1 in sorted T-ALL/thymic lymphoma cells. Moreover, the knockdown of TP53 or c-myc using siRNA decreased Notch1 expression in cancer cells. In addition, an adenovirus vector encoding FIRΔexon2 cDNA increased bleomycin-induced DNA damage. Taken together, these data suggest that the altered expression of FIRΔexon2 increased Notch1 at least partially by activating c-Myc via a TP53-independent pathway. In conclusion

  16. Crosstalk between the HpArsRS two-component system and HpNikR is necessary for maximal activation of urease transcription.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Beth M; West, Abby L; Gancz, Hanan; Servetas, Stephanie L; Pich, Oscar Q; Gilbreath, Jeremy J; Hallinger, Daniel R; Forsyth, Mark H; Merrell, D Scott; Michel, Sarah L J

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori NikR (HpNikR) is a nickel dependent transcription factor that directly regulates a number of genes in this important gastric pathogen. One key gene that is regulated by HpNikR is ureA, which encodes for the urease enzyme. In vitro DNA binding studies of HpNikR with the ureA promoter (PureA ) previously identified a recognition site that is required for high affinity protein/DNA binding. As a means to determine the in vivo significance of this recognition site and to identify the key DNA sequence determinants required for ureA transcription, herein, we have translated these in vitro results to analysis directly within H. pylori. Using a series of GFP reporter constructs in which the PureA DNA target was altered, in combination with mutant H. pylori strains deficient in key regulatory proteins, we confirmed the importance of the previously identified HpNikR recognition sequence for HpNikR-dependent ureA transcription. Moreover, we identified a second factor, the HpArsRS two-component system that was required for maximum transcription of ureA. While HpArsRS is known to regulate ureA in response to acid shock, it was previously thought to function independently of HpNikR and to have no role at neutral pH. However, our qPCR analysis of ureA expression in wildtype, ΔnikR and ΔarsS single mutants as well as a ΔarsS/nikR double mutant strain background showed reduced basal level expression of ureA when arsS was absent. Additionally, we determined that both HpNikR and HpArsRS were necessary for maximal expression of ureA under nickel, low pH and combined nickel and low pH stresses. In vitro studies of HpArsR-P with the PureA DNA target using florescence anisotropy confirmed a direct protein/DNA binding interaction. Together, these data support a model in which HpArsRS and HpNikR cooperatively interact to regulate ureA transcription under various environmental conditions. This is the first time that direct "cross-talk" between HpArsRS and HpNikR at

  17. Crosstalk between the HpArsRS two-component system and HpNikR is necessary for maximal activation of urease transcription

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Beth M.; West, Abby L.; Gancz, Hanan; Servetas, Stephanie L.; Pich, Oscar Q.; Gilbreath, Jeremy J.; Hallinger, Daniel R.; Forsyth, Mark H.; Merrell, D. Scott; Michel, Sarah L. J.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori NikR (HpNikR) is a nickel dependent transcription factor that directly regulates a number of genes in this important gastric pathogen. One key gene that is regulated by HpNikR is ureA, which encodes for the urease enzyme. In vitro DNA binding studies of HpNikR with the ureA promoter (PureA) previously identified a recognition site that is required for high affinity protein/DNA binding. As a means to determine the in vivo significance of this recognition site and to identify the key DNA sequence determinants required for ureA transcription, herein, we have translated these in vitro results to analysis directly within H. pylori. Using a series of GFP reporter constructs in which the PureA DNA target was altered, in combination with mutant H. pylori strains deficient in key regulatory proteins, we confirmed the importance of the previously identified HpNikR recognition sequence for HpNikR-dependent ureA transcription. Moreover, we identified a second factor, the HpArsRS two-component system that was required for maximum transcription of ureA. While HpArsRS is known to regulate ureA in response to acid shock, it was previously thought to function independently of HpNikR and to have no role at neutral pH. However, our qPCR analysis of ureA expression in wildtype, ΔnikR and ΔarsS single mutants as well as a ΔarsS/nikR double mutant strain background showed reduced basal level expression of ureA when arsS was absent. Additionally, we determined that both HpNikR and HpArsRS were necessary for maximal expression of ureA under nickel, low pH and combined nickel and low pH stresses. In vitro studies of HpArsR-P with the PureA DNA target using florescence anisotropy confirmed a direct protein/DNA binding interaction. Together, these data support a model in which HpArsRS and HpNikR cooperatively interact to regulate ureA transcription under various environmental conditions. This is the first time that direct “cross-talk” between HpArsRS and HpNikR at

  18. Molecular aspects of DNA splicing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Yuhani; Lim, Wen Li; Goode, T. Elizabeth; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Heng, Fong Wan; Wahab, Mohd Firdaus Abd

    2015-05-01

    The pioneer model of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) splicing system in a framework of Formal Language Theory was introduced by Head that led to the existence of other models of splicing system, namely Paun, Pixton and Yusof-Goode. These entire models are inspired by the molecular biological process of DNA splicing. Hence, this paper focuses on the translucent DNA splicing process, particularly on the generated language. Starting with some preliminaries in a limit graph, this paper also provides the experimental design with the predicted and actual result.

  19. The low information content of Neurospora splicing signals: implications for RNA splicing and intron origin.

    PubMed

    Collins, Richard A; Stajich, Jason E; Field, Deborah J; Olive, Joan E; DeAbreu, Diane M

    2015-05-01

    When we expressed a small (0.9 kb) nonprotein-coding transcript derived from the mitochondrial VS plasmid in the nucleus of Neurospora we found that it was efficiently spliced at one or more of eight 5' splice sites and ten 3' splice sites, which are present apparently by chance in the sequence. Further experimental and bioinformatic analyses of other mitochondrial plasmids, random sequences, and natural nuclear genes in Neurospora and other fungi indicate that fungal spliceosomes recognize a wide range of 5' splice site and branchpoint sequences and predict introns to be present at high frequency in random sequence. In contrast, analysis of intronless fungal nuclear genes indicates that branchpoint, 5' splice site and 3' splice site consensus sequences are underrepresented compared with random sequences. This underrepresentation of splicing signals is sufficient to deplete the nuclear genome of splice sites at locations that do not comprise biologically relevant introns. Thus, the splicing machinery can recognize a wide range of splicing signal sequences, but splicing still occurs with great accuracy, not because the splicing machinery distinguishes correct from incorrect introns, but because incorrect introns are substantially depleted from the genome.

  20. MEIS1 functions as a potential AR negative regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Liang; Yang, Yutao; Hang, Xingyi; Cui, Jiajun; Gao, Jiangping

    2014-10-15

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays critical roles in human prostate carcinoma progression and transformation. However, the activation of AR is regulated by co-regulators. MEIS1 protein, the homeodomain transcription factor, exhibited a decreased level in poor-prognosis prostate tumors. In this study, we investigated a potential interaction between MEIS1 and AR. We found that overexpression of MEIS1 inhibited the AR transcriptional activity and reduced the expression of AR target gene. A potential protein–protein interaction between AR and MEIS1 was identified by the immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays. Furthermore, MEIS1 modulated AR cytoplasm/nucleus translocation and the recruitment to androgen response element in prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene promoter sequences. In addition, MEIS1 promoted the recruitment of NCoR and SMRT in the presence of R1881. Finally, MEIS1 inhibited the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP cells. Taken together, our data suggests that MEIS1 functions as a novel AR co-repressor. - Highlights: • A potential interaction was identified between MEIS1 and AR signaling. • Overexpression of MEIS1 reduced the expression of AR target gene. • MEIS1 modulated AR cytoplasm/nucleus translocation. • MEIS1 inhibited the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP cells.

  1. Splicing mosaic of the myophosphorylase gene due to a silent mutation in McArdle disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Cadenas, I; Andreu, A L; Gamez, J; Gonzalo, R; Martín, M A; Rubio, J C; Arenas, J

    2003-11-25

    The authors report the molecular findings in a patient with McArdle disease who harbored a silent polymorphism (K608K) in the myophosphorylase gene. cDNA studies demonstrated that this polymorphism leads to a severe mosaic alteration in mRNA splicing, including exon skipping, activation of cryptic splice-sites, and exon-intron reorganizations. These findings suggest that, in patients with McArdle disease in whom no pathogenic mutation has been found, any a priori silent polymorphism should be re-evaluated as a putative splicing mutation.

  2. Tumor suppressor properties of the splicing regulatory factor RBM10

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Jordi; Bechara, Elias; Schlesinger, Doerte; Delgado, Javier; Serrano, Luis; Valcárcel, Juan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT RBM10 is an RNA binding protein and alternative splicing regulator frequently mutated in lung adenocarcinomas. Recent results indicate that RBM10 inhibits proliferation of lung cancer cells by promoting skipping of exon 9 of the gene NUMB, a frequent alternative splicing change in lung cancer generating a negative regulator of Notch signaling. Complementing these observations, we show that knock down of RBM10 in human cancer cells enhances growth of mouse tumor xenografts, confirming that RBM10 acts as a tumor suppressor, while knock down of an oncogenic mutant version of RBM10 reduces xenograft tumor growth. A RBM10 mutation found in lung cancer cells, V354E, disrupts RBM10-mediated regulation of NUMB alternative splicing, inducing the cell proliferation-promoting isoform. We now show that 2 natural RBM10 isoforms that differ by the presence or absence of V354 in the second RNA Recognition Motif (RRM2), display similar regulatory effects on NUMB alternative splicing, suggesting that V354E actively disrupts RBM10 activity. Structural modeling localizes V354 in the outside surface of one α-helix opposite to the RNA binding surface of RBM10, and we show that the mutation does not compromise binding of the RRM2 domain to NUMB RNA regulatory sequences. We further show that other RBM10 mutations found in lung adenocarcinomas also compromise regulation of NUMB exon 9. Collectively, our previous and current results reveal that RBM10 is a tumor suppressor that represses Notch signaling and cell proliferation through the regulation of NUMB alternative splicing. PMID:26853560

  3. SplicingTypesAnno: annotating and quantifying alternative splicing events for RNA-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyong; Zuo, Fenghua; Ru, Yuanbin; Guo, Jiqiang; Yan, Xiaoyan; Sablok, Gaurav

    2015-04-01

    Alternative splicing plays a key role in the regulation of the central dogma. Four major types of alternative splicing have been classified as intron retention, exon skipping, alternative 5 splice sites or alternative donor sites, and alternative 3 splice sites or alternative acceptor sites. A few algorithms have been developed to detect splice junctions from RNA-Seq reads. However, there are few tools targeting at the major alternative splicing types at the exon/intron level. This type of analysis may reveal subtle, yet important events of alternative splicing, and thus help gain deeper understanding of the mechanism of alternative splicing. This paper describes a user-friendly R package, extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. SplicingTypesAnno can: (1) provide annotation for major alternative splicing at exon/intron level. By comparing the annotation from GTF/GFF file, it identifies the novel alternative splicing sites; (2) offer a convenient two-level analysis: genome-scale annotation for users with high performance computing environment, and gene-scale annotation for users with personal computers; (3) generate a user-friendly web report and additional BED files for IGV visualization. SplicingTypesAnno is a user-friendly R package for extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types at exon/intron level for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. It is publically available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/splicingtypes/files/ or http://genome.sdau.edu.cn/research/software/SplicingTypesAnno.html. PMID:25720307

  4. TCERG1 Regulates Alternative Splicing of the Bcl-x Gene by Modulating the Rate of RNA Polymerase II Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Marta; Cloutier, Alexandre; Sánchez-Hernández, Noemí; Michelle, Laetitia; Lemieux, Bruno; Blanchette, Marco; Hernández-Munain, Cristina; Chabot, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    Complex functional coupling exists between transcriptional elongation and pre-mRNA alternative splicing. Pausing sites and changes in the rate of transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) may therefore have fundamental impacts in the regulation of alternative splicing. Here, we show that the elongation and splicing-related factor TCERG1 regulates alternative splicing of the apoptosis gene Bcl-x in a promoter-dependent manner. TCERG1 promotes the splicing of the short isoform of Bcl-x (Bcl-xs) through the SB1 regulatory element located in the first half of exon 2. Consistent with these results, we show that TCERG1 associates with the Bcl-x pre-mRNA. A transcription profile analysis revealed that the RNA sequences required for the effect of TCERG1 on Bcl-x alternative splicing coincide with a putative polymerase pause site. Furthermore, TCERG1 modifies the impact of a slow polymerase on Bcl-x alternative splicing. In support of a role for an elongation mechanism in the transcriptional control of Bcl-x alternative splicing, we found that TCERG1 modifies the amount of pre-mRNAs generated at distal regions of the endogenous Bcl-x. Most importantly, TCERG1 affects the rate of RNAPII transcription of endogenous human Bcl-x. We propose that TCERG1 modulates the elongation rate of RNAPII to relieve pausing, thereby activating the proapoptotic Bcl-xS 5′ splice site. PMID:22158966

  5. Ar-Ar ages and thermal histories of enstatite meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Dixon, Eleanor T.; Garrison, Daniel H.

    2010-05-01

    Compared with ordinary chondrites, there is a relative paucity of chronological and other data to define the early thermal histories of enstatite parent bodies. In this study, we report 39Ar-40Ar dating results for five EL chondrites: Khairpur, Pillistfer, Hvittis, Blithfield, and Forrest; five EH chondrites: Parsa, Saint Marks, Indarch, Bethune, and Reckling Peak 80259; three igneous-textured enstatite meteorites that represent impact melts on enstatite chondrite parent bodies: Zaklodzie, Queen Alexandra Range 97348, and Queen Alexandra Range 97289; and three aubrites, Norton County, Bishopville, and Cumberland Falls Several Ar-Ar age spectra show unusual 39Ar recoil effects, possibly the result of some of the K residing in unusual sulfide minerals, such as djerfisherite and rodderite, and other age spectra show 40Ar diffusion loss. Few additional Ar-Ar ages for enstatite meteorites are available in the literature. When all available Ar-Ar data on enstatite meteorites are considered, preferred ages of nine chondrites and one aubrite show a range of 4.50-4.54Ga, whereas five other meteorites show only lower age limits over 4.35-4.46Ga. Ar-Ar ages of several enstatite chondrites are as old or older as the oldest Ar-Ar ages of ordinary chondrites, which suggests that enstatite chondrites may have derived from somewhat smaller parent bodies, or were metamorphosed to lower temperatures compared to other chondrite types. Many enstatite meteorites are brecciated and/or shocked, and some of the younger Ar-Ar ages may record these impact events. Although impact heating of ordinary chondrites within the last 1Ga is relatively common for ordinary chondrites, only Bethune gives any significant evidence for such a young event.

  6. HnRNP A1 controls a splicing regulatory circuit promoting mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition

    PubMed Central

    Bonomi, Serena; di Matteo, Anna; Buratti, Emanuele; Cabianca, Daphne S.; Baralle, Francisco E.; Ghigna, Claudia; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an embryonic program used by cancer cells to acquire invasive capabilities becoming metastatic. ΔRon, a constitutively active isoform of the Ron tyrosine kinase receptor, arises from skipping of Ron exon 11 and provided the first example of an alternative splicing variant causatively linked to the activation of tumor EMT. Splicing of exon 11 is controlled by two adjacent regulatory elements, a silencer and an enhancer of splicing located in exon 12. The alternative splicing factor and oncoprotein SRSF1 directly binds to the enhancer, induces the production of ΔRon and activates EMT leading to cell locomotion. Interestingly, we now find an important role for hnRNP A1 in controlling the activity of the Ron silencer. HnRNP A1 is able to antagonize the binding of SRSF1 and prevent exon skipping. Notably, hnRNP A1, by inhibiting the production of ΔRon, activates the reversal program, namely the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition, which instead occurs at the final metastasis sites. Also, hnRNP A1 affects Ron splicing by regulating the expression level of hnRNP A2/B1, which similarly to SRSF1 can promote ΔRon production. These results shed light on how splicing regulation contributes to the tumor progression and provide potential targets to develop anticancer therapies. PMID:23863836

  7. Alternative Splicing in the Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells into Cardiac Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Salomonis, Nathan; Nelson, Brandon; Vranizan, Karen; Pico, Alexander R.; Hanspers, Kristina; Kuchinsky, Allan; Ta, Linda; Mercola, Mark; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2009-01-01

    The role of alternative splicing in self-renewal, pluripotency and tissue lineage specification of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is largely unknown. To better define these regulatory cues, we modified the H9 hESC line to allow selection of pluripotent hESCs by neomycin resistance and cardiac progenitors by puromycin resistance. Exon-level microarray expression data from undifferentiated hESCs and cardiac and neural precursors were used to identify splice isoforms with cardiac-restricted or common cardiac/neural differentiation expression patterns. Splice events for these groups corresponded to the pathways of cytoskeletal remodeling, RNA splicing, muscle specification, and cell cycle checkpoint control as well as genes with serine/threonine kinase and helicase activity. Using a new program named AltAnalyze (http://www.AltAnalyze.org), we identified novel changes in protein domain and microRNA binding site architecture that were predicted to affect protein function and expression. These included an enrichment of splice isoforms that oppose cell-cycle arrest in hESCs and that promote calcium signaling and cardiac development in cardiac precursors. By combining genome-wide predictions of alternative splicing with new functional annotations, our data suggest potential mechanisms that may influence lineage commitment and hESC maintenance at the level of specific splice isoforms and microRNA regulation. PMID:19893621

  8. Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Strategies to Rescue Factor IX Variants That Affect Splicing and Protein Function.

    PubMed

    Tajnik, Mojca; Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Bussani, Erica; Barbon, Elena; Balestra, Dario; Pinotti, Mirko; Pagani, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Mutations that result in amino acid changes can affect both pre-mRNA splicing and protein function. Understanding the combined effect is essential for correct diagnosis and for establishing the most appropriate therapeutic strategy at the molecular level. We have identified a series of disease-causing splicing mutations in coagulation factor IX (FIX) exon 5 that are completely recovered by a modified U1snRNP particle, through an SRSF2-dependent enhancement mechanism. We discovered that synonymous mutations and missense substitutions associated to a partial FIX secretion defect represent targets for this therapy as the resulting spliced-corrected proteins maintains normal FIX coagulant specific activity. Thus, splicing and protein alterations contribute to define at the molecular level the disease-causing effect of a number of exonic mutations in coagulation FIX exon 5. In addition, our results have a significant impact in the development of splicing-switching therapies in particular for mutations that affect both splicing and protein function where increasing the amount of a correctly spliced protein can circumvent the basic functional defects. PMID:27227676

  9. Spatio-temporal regulations and functions of neuronal alternative RNA splicing in developing and adult brains.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takatoshi; Hidaka, Chiharu; Iijima, Yoko

    2016-08-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a fundamental mechanism that generates molecular diversity from a single gene. In the central nervous system (CNS), key neural developmental steps are thought to be controlled by alternative splicing decisions, including the molecular diversity underlying synaptic wiring, plasticity, and remodeling. Significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms and functions of alternative pre-mRNA splicing in neurons through studies in invertebrate systems; however, recent studies have begun to uncover the potential role of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS. This article provides an overview of recent findings regarding the regulation and function of neuronal alternative splicing. In particular, we focus on the spatio-temporal regulation of neurexin, a synaptic adhesion molecule, by neuronal cell type-specific factors and neuronal activity, which are thought to be especially important for characterizing neural development and function within the mammalian CNS. Notably, there is increasing evidence that implicates the dysregulation of neuronal splicing events in several neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the detailed mechanisms of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS may provide plausible treatment strategies for these diseases.

  10. Alternative splicing of the maize Ac transposase transcript in transgenic sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Lisson, Ralph; Hellert, Jan; Ringleb, Malte; Machens, Fabian; Kraus, Josef; Hehl, Reinhard

    2010-09-01

    The maize Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable element system was introduced into sugar beet. The autonomous Ac and non-autonomous Ds element excise from the T-DNA vector and integrate at novel positions in the sugar beet genome. Ac and Ds excisions generate footprints in the donor T-DNA that support the hairpin model for transposon excision. Two complete integration events into genomic sugar beet DNA were obtained by IPCR. Integration of Ac leads to an eight bp duplication, while integration of Ds in a homologue of a sugar beet flowering locus gene did not induce a duplication. The molecular structure of the target site indicates Ds integration into a double strand break. Analyses of transposase transcription using RT-PCR revealed low amounts of alternatively spliced mRNAs. The fourth intron of the transposase was found to be partially misspliced. Four different splice products were identified. In addition, the second and third exon were found to harbour two and three novel introns, respectively. These utilize each the same splice donor but several alternative splice acceptor sites. Using the SplicePredictor online tool, one of the two introns within exon two is predicted to be efficiently spliced in maize. Most interestingly, splicing of this intron together with the four major introns of Ac would generate a transposase that lacks the DNA binding domain and two of its three nuclear localization signals, but still harbours the dimerization domain.

  11. Alternative splicing of the maize Ac transposase transcript in transgenic sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Lisson, Ralph; Hellert, Jan; Ringleb, Malte; Machens, Fabian; Kraus, Josef

    2010-01-01

    The maize Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable element system was introduced into sugar beet. The autonomous Ac and non-autonomous Ds element excise from the T-DNA vector and integrate at novel positions in the sugar beet genome. Ac and Ds excisions generate footprints in the donor T-DNA that support the hairpin model for transposon excision. Two complete integration events into genomic sugar beet DNA were obtained by IPCR. Integration of Ac leads to an eight bp duplication, while integration of Ds in a homologue of a sugar beet flowering locus gene did not induce a duplication. The molecular structure of the target site indicates Ds integration into a double strand break. Analyses of transposase transcription using RT–PCR revealed low amounts of alternatively spliced mRNAs. The fourth intron of the transposase was found to be partially misspliced. Four different splice products were identified. In addition, the second and third exon were found to harbour two and three novel introns, respectively. These utilize each the same splice donor but several alternative splice acceptor sites. Using the SplicePredictor online tool, one of the two introns within exon two is predicted to be efficiently spliced in maize. Most interestingly, splicing of this intron together with the four major introns of Ac would generate a transposase that lacks the DNA binding domain and two of its three nuclear localization signals, but still harbours the dimerization domain. PMID:20512402

  12. Alternative splicing of the maize Ac transposase transcript in transgenic sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Lisson, Ralph; Hellert, Jan; Ringleb, Malte; Machens, Fabian; Kraus, Josef; Hehl, Reinhard

    2010-09-01

    The maize Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable element system was introduced into sugar beet. The autonomous Ac and non-autonomous Ds element excise from the T-DNA vector and integrate at novel positions in the sugar beet genome. Ac and Ds excisions generate footprints in the donor T-DNA that support the hairpin model for transposon excision. Two complete integration events into genomic sugar beet DNA were obtained by IPCR. Integration of Ac leads to an eight bp duplication, while integration of Ds in a homologue of a sugar beet flowering locus gene did not induce a duplication. The molecular structure of the target site indicates Ds integration into a double strand break. Analyses of transposase transcription using RT-PCR revealed low amounts of alternatively spliced mRNAs. The fourth intron of the transposase was found to be partially misspliced. Four different splice products were identified. In addition, the second and third exon were found to harbour two and three novel introns, respectively. These utilize each the same splice donor but several alternative splice acceptor sites. Using the SplicePredictor online tool, one of the two introns within exon two is predicted to be efficiently spliced in maize. Most interestingly, splicing of this intron together with the four major introns of Ac would generate a transposase that lacks the DNA binding domain and two of its three nuclear localization signals, but still harbours the dimerization domain. PMID:20512402

  13. Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Strategies to Rescue Factor IX Variants That Affect Splicing and Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, Erica; Barbon, Elena; Pinotti, Mirko; Pagani, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Mutations that result in amino acid changes can affect both pre-mRNA splicing and protein function. Understanding the combined effect is essential for correct diagnosis and for establishing the most appropriate therapeutic strategy at the molecular level. We have identified a series of disease-causing splicing mutations in coagulation factor IX (FIX) exon 5 that are completely recovered by a modified U1snRNP particle, through an SRSF2-dependent enhancement mechanism. We discovered that synonymous mutations and missense substitutions associated to a partial FIX secretion defect represent targets for this therapy as the resulting spliced-corrected proteins maintains normal FIX coagulant specific activity. Thus, splicing and protein alterations contribute to define at the molecular level the disease-causing effect of a number of exonic mutations in coagulation FIX exon 5. In addition, our results have a significant impact in the development of splicing-switching therapies in particular for mutations that affect both splicing and protein function where increasing the amount of a correctly spliced protein can circumvent the basic functional defects. PMID:27227676

  14. Arc fusion splicing of photonic crystal fibers to standard single mode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzycki, Krzysztof; Kobelke, Jens; Schuster, Kay; Wójcik, Jan

    2010-04-01

    Coupling a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) to measuring instruments or optical subsystems is often done by splicing it to short lengths of single mode fiber (SMF) used for interconnections, as SMF is standardized, widely available and compatible with most fiber optic components and measuring instruments. This paper presents procedures and results of loss measurements during fusion splicing of five PCFs tested at NIT laboratory within activities of COST Action 299 "FIDES". Investigated silica-based fibers had 80-200 μm cladding diameter and were designed as single mode. A standard splicing machine designed for telecom fibers was used, but splicing procedure and arc power were tailored to each PCF. Splice loss varied between 0.7 and 2.8 dB at 1550 nm. Splices protected with heat-shrinkable sleeves served well for gripping fibers during mechanical tests and survived temperature cycling from -30°C to +70°C with stable loss. Collapse of holes in the PCF was limited by reducing fusion time to 0.2-0.5 s; additional measures included reduction of discharge power and shifting SMF-PCF contact point away from the axis of electrodes. Unfortunately, short fusion time sometimes precluded proper smoothing of glass surface, leading to a trade-off between splice loss and strength.

  15. Ar/Ar Dating Independent of Monitor Standard Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, S.; Hemming, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Because the reported age of an analyzed sample is dependent on the age of the co-irradiated monitor standard(s), Ar/Ar dating is a relative dating technique. There is disagreement at the 1% scale in the age of commonly used monitor standards, and there is a great need to improve the inter-laboratory calibrations. Additionally, new approaches and insights are needed to meet the challenge of bringing the Ar/Ar chronometer to the highest possible precision and accuracy. In this spirit, we present a conceptual framework for Ar/Ar dating that does not depend on the age of monitor standards, but only on the K content of a solid standard. The concept is demonstrated by introducing a re-expressed irradiation parameter (JK) that depends on the ratio of 39ArK to 40Ar* rather than the 40Ar*/39ArK ratio. JK is equivalent to the traditional irradiation parameter J and is defined as JK = (39Ar/40K) • (λ/λe). The ultimate precision and accuracy of the method will depend on how precisely and accurately the 39Ar and 40K can be estimated, and will require isotope dilution measurements of both from the same aliquot. We are testing the workability of our technique at the 1% level by measuring weighed and irradiated hornblende and biotite monitor standards using GLO-1 glauconite to define a calibration curve for argon signals versus abundance.

  16. Aberrant RNA splicing in cancer; expression changes and driver mutations of splicing factor genes.

    PubMed

    Sveen, A; Kilpinen, S; Ruusulehto, A; Lothe, R A; Skotheim, R I

    2016-05-12

    Alternative splicing is a widespread process contributing to structural transcript variation and proteome diversity. In cancer, the splicing process is commonly disrupted, resulting in both functional and non-functional end-products. Cancer-specific splicing events are known to contribute to disease progression; however, the dysregulated splicing patterns found on a genome-wide scale have until recently been less well-studied. In this review, we provide an overview of aberrant RNA splicing and its regulation in cancer. We then focus on the executors of the splicing process. Based on a comprehensive catalog of splicing factor encoding genes and analyses of available gene expression and somatic mutation data, we identify cancer-associated patterns of dysregulation. Splicing factor genes are shown to be significantly differentially expressed between cancer and corresponding normal samples, and to have reduced inter-individual expression variation in cancer. Furthermore, we identify enrichment of predicted cancer-critical genes among the splicing factors. In addition to previously described oncogenic splicing factor genes, we propose 24 novel cancer-critical splicing factors predicted from somatic mutations. PMID:26300000

  17. Functional selection of splicing enhancers that stimulate trans-splicing in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Boukis, L A; Bruzik, J P

    2001-01-01

    The role of exonic sequences in naturally occurring trans-splicing has not been explored in detail. Here, we have identified trans-splicing enhancers through the use of an iterative selection scheme. Several classes of enhancer sequences were identified that led to dramatic increases in trans-splicing efficiency. Two sequence families were investigated in detail. These include motifs containing the element (G/C)GAC(G/C) and also 5' splice site-like sequences. Distinct elements were tested for their ability to function as splicing enhancers and in competition experiments. In addition, discrete trans-acting factors were identified. This work demonstrates that splicing enhancers are able to effect a large increase in trans-splicing efficiency and that the process of exon definition is able to positively enhance trans-splicing even though the reaction itself is independent of the need for the 5' end of U1 snRNA. Due to the presence of internal introns in messages that are trans-spliced, the natural arrangement of 5' splice sites downstream of trans-splicing acceptors may lead to a general promotion of this unusual reaction. PMID:11421358

  18. Aberrant RNA splicing in cancer; expression changes and driver mutations of splicing factor genes.

    PubMed

    Sveen, A; Kilpinen, S; Ruusulehto, A; Lothe, R A; Skotheim, R I

    2016-05-12

    Alternative splicing is a widespread process contributing to structural transcript variation and proteome diversity. In cancer, the splicing process is commonly disrupted, resulting in both functional and non-functional end-products. Cancer-specific splicing events are known to contribute to disease progression; however, the dysregulated splicing patterns found on a genome-wide scale have until recently been less well-studied. In this review, we provide an overview of aberrant RNA splicing and its regulation in cancer. We then focus on the executors of the splicing process. Based on a comprehensive catalog of splicing factor encoding genes and analyses of available gene expression and somatic mutation data, we identify cancer-associated patterns of dysregulation. Splicing factor genes are shown to be significantly differentially expressed between cancer and corresponding normal samples, and to have reduced inter-individual expression variation in cancer. Furthermore, we identify enrichment of predicted cancer-critical genes among the splicing factors. In addition to previously described oncogenic splicing factor genes, we propose 24 novel cancer-critical splicing factors predicted from somatic mutations.

  19. Splicing factor SRSF1 negatively regulates alternative splicing of MDM2 under damage

    PubMed Central

    Comiskey, Daniel F.; Jacob, Aishwarya G.; Singh, Ravi K.; Tapia-Santos, Aixa S.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic stress induces alternative splicing of the oncogene MDM2 generating MDM2-ALT1, an isoform attributed with tumorigenic properties. However, the mechanisms underlying this event remain unclear. Here we explore MDM2 splicing regulation by utilizing a novel minigene that mimics endogenous MDM2 splicing in response to UV and cisplatinum-induced DNA damage. We report that exon 11 is necessary and sufficient for the damage-specific alternative splicing of the MDM2 minigene and that the splicing factor SRSF1 binds exon 11 at evolutionarily conserved sites. Interestingly, mutations disrupting this interaction proved sufficient to abolish the stress-induced alternative splicing of the MDM2 minigene. Furthermore, SRSF1 overexpression promoted exclusion of exon 11, while its siRNA-mediated knockdown prevented the stress-induced alternative splicing of endogenous MDM2. Additionally, we observed elevated SRSF1 levels under stress and in tumors correlating with the expression of MDM2-ALT1. Notably, we demonstrate that MDM2-ALT1 splicing can be blocked by targeting SRSF1 sites on exon 11 using antisense oligonucleotides. These results present conclusive evidence supporting a negative role for SRSF1 in MDM2 alternative splicing. Importantly, we define for the first time, a clear-cut mechanism for the regulation of damage-induced MDM2 splicing and present potential strategies for manipulating MDM2 expression via splicing modulation. PMID:25845590

  20. [Apoptotic endonuclease EndoG induces alternative splicing of telomerase catalytic subunit hTERT and death of tumor cells].

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, D D; Vasina, D A; Orlova, V S; Gotovtseva, V Y; Bibikova, M V; Pokrovsky, V S; Pokrovskaya, M V; Aleksandrova, S S; Sokolov, N N

    2016-03-01

    Telomerase activity is known to be regulated by alternative splicing of its catalytic subunit hTERT (human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase) mRNA. Induction of non-active spliced hTERT leads to inhibition of telomerase activity. However, very little is known about the mechanism of hTERT mRNA alternative splicing. The aim of this study was to determine the role of apoptotic endonuclease EndoG in alternative splicing of hTERT and telomerase activity. Strong correlation was found between expression of EndoG and hTERT splice-variants in 12 colon cancer cell lines. Overexpression of EndoG in СаСо-2 cells downregulated the expression of active full-length hTERT variant and upregulated non-active spliced variant. Reduction of full-length hTERT caused downregulation of telomerase activity, dramatically shortening of telomeres length during cell divisions, converting cells to the replicative senescence state, activation of apoptosis and finally cell death. These data indicated the participation of EndoG in alternative splicing of mRNA of telomerase catalytic subunit, regulation of telomerase activity and cell fate. PMID:27420614

  1. 40Ar/39Ar Dating of Volcanic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. E.; Renne, P. R.; Watkins, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    Application of the 40Ar/39Ar method to volcanic glasses has been somewhat stigmatized following several studies demonstrating secondary mobility of K and Ar. Much of the stigma is unwarranted, however, since most studies only impugned the reliability of the K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar techniques when applied to glass shards rather than obsidian clasts with low surface area to volume ratios. We provide further evidence for problematic K loss and/or 39Ar recoil ejection from glass shards in 40Ar/39Ar step heating results for comagmatic feldspars and shards. In an extreme case, the plateau age of the feldspars (0.17 ± 0.03 Ma at 2σ) is significantly younger than the plateau age of the glass (0.85 ± 0.05 Ma at 2σ). If the feldspar age is reasonably interpreted as the eruption age of the ash, it is likely that the glass shards experienced K and/or 39Ar loss. Electron microprobe analyses of the glass shards have low totals (~93%) and no systematic lateral variability (i.e., diffusion gradients) in K, suggesting that the lengthscale of the glass shards is smaller than the lengthscale of K diffusion. Obsidian clasts should not be as susceptible to K loss since any hydrated (K-depleted) volume represents a small fraction of the total material and can often be physically removed prior to analysis. Samples described here are detrital obsidian clasts from the Afar region of Ethiopia. Evidence from Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and previous work by Anovitz (1999), confirm that the scale of water and potassium mobility are often small in comparison to the size of obsidian clasts but large enough to effect the bulk composition of glass shards. This expectation is confirmed in another tuff wherein comagmatic obsidian clasts and sanidine phenocrysts yield indistinguishable 40Ar/39Ar ages of 4.4 Ma High abundances of non-radiogenic 40Ar, and kinetic fractionation of Ar isotopes during quenching and/or laboratory degassing resulting in incomplete equilibration between

  2. Functional coupling of transcription and splicing.

    PubMed

    Montes, Marta; Becerra, Soraya; Sánchez-Álvarez, Miguel; Suñé, Carlos

    2012-06-15

    The tightly regulated process of precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) alternative splicing is a key mechanism to increase the number and complexity of proteins encoded by the genome. Evidence gathered in recent years has established that transcription and splicing are physically and functionally coupled and that this coupling may be an essential aspect of the regulation of splicing and alternative splicing. Recent advances in our understanding of transcription and of splicing regulation have uncovered the multiple interactions between components from both types of machinery. These interactions help to explain the functional coupling of RNAPII transcription and pre-mRNA alternative splicing for efficient and regulated gene expression at the molecular level. Recent technological advances, in addition to novel cell and molecular biology approaches, have led to the development of new tools for addressing mechanistic questions to achieve an integrated and global understanding of the functional coupling of RNAPII transcription and pre-mRNA alternative splicing. Here, we review major milestones and insights into RNA polymerase II transcription and pre-mRNA alternative splicing as well as new concepts and challenges that have arisen from multiple genome-wide approaches and analyses at the single-cell resolution.

  3. Phosphorylation of the alternative mRNA splicing factor 45 (SPF45) by Clk1 regulates its splice site utilization, cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuying; Conaway, LaShardai; Rutherford Bethard, Jennifer; Al-Ayoubi, Adnan M.; Thompson Bradley, Amber; Zheng, Hui; Weed, Scott A.; Eblen, Scott T.

    2013-01-01

    Alternative mRNA splicing is a mechanism to regulate protein isoform expression and is regulated by alternative splicing factors. The alternative splicing factor 45 (SPF45) is overexpressed in cancer, although few biological effects of SPF45 are known, and few splicing targets have been identified. We previously showed that Extracellular Regulated Kinase 2 (ERK2) phosphorylation of SPF45 regulates cell proliferation and adhesion to fibronectin. In this work, we show that Cdc2-like kinase 1 (Clk1) phosphorylates SPF45 on eight serine residues. Clk1 expression enhanced, whereas Clk1 inhibition reduced, SPF45-induced exon 6 exclusion from Fas mRNA. Mutational analysis of the Clk1 phosphorylation sites on SPF45 showed both positive and negative regulation of splicing, with a net effect of inhibiting SPF45-induced exon 6 exclusion, correlating with reduced Fas mRNA binding. However, Clk1 enhanced SPF45 protein expression, but not mRNA expression, whereas inhibition of Clk1 increased SPF45 degradation through a proteasome-dependent pathway. Overexpression of SPF45 or a phospho-mimetic mutant, but not a phospho-inhibitory mutant, stimulated ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion, correlating with increased fibronectin expression, ERK activation and enhanced splicing and phosphorylation of full-length cortactin. Our results demonstrate for the first time that SPF45 overexpression enhances cell migration and invasion, dependent on biochemical regulation by Clk1. PMID:23519612

  4. Alternative splice variants of AID are not stoichiometrically present at the protein level in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rebhandl, Stefan; Huemer, Michael; Zaborsky, Nadja; Gassner, Franz Josef; Catakovic, Kemal; Felder, Thomas Klaus; Greil, Richard; Geisberger, Roland

    2014-07-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) is a DNA-mutating enzyme that mediates class-switch recombination as well as somatic hypermutation of antibody genes in B cells. Due to off-target activity, AID is implicated in lymphoma development by introducing genome-wide DNA damage and initiating chromosomal translocations such as c-myc/IgH. Several alternative splice transcripts of AID have been reported in activated B cells as well as malignant B cells such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). As most commercially available antibodies fail to recognize alternative splice variants, their abundance in vivo, and hence their biological significance, has not been determined. In this study, we assessed the protein levels of AID splice isoforms by introducing an AID splice reporter construct into cell lines and primary CLL cells from patients as well as from WT and TCL1(tg) C57BL/6 mice (where TCL1 is T-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1). The splice construct is 5'-fused to a GFP-tag, which is preserved in all splice isoforms and allows detection of translated protein. Summarizing, we show a thorough quantification of alternatively spliced AID transcripts and demonstrate that the corresponding protein abundances, especially those of splice variants AID-ivs3 and AID-ΔE4, are not stoichiometrically equivalent. Our data suggest that enhanced proteasomal degradation of low-abundance proteins might be causative for this discrepancy.

  5. The Characterizations of Different Splicing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Fariba; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Heng, Fong Wan

    The concept of splicing system was first introduced by Head in 1987 to model the biological process of DNA recombination mathematically. This model was made on the basis of formal language theory which is a branch of applied discrete mathematics and theoretical computer science. In fact, splicing system treats DNA molecule and the recombinant behavior by restriction enzymes and ligases in the form of words and splicing rules respectively. The notion of splicing systems was taken into account from different points of view by many mathematicians. Several modified definitions have been introduced by many researchers. In this paper, some properties of different kinds of splicing systems are presented and their relationships are investigated. Furthermore, these results are illustrated by some examples.

  6. TALEN-engineered AR gene rearrangements reveal endocrine uncoupling of androgen receptor in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Nyquist, Michael D; Li, Yingming; Hwang, Tae Hyun; Manlove, Luke S; Vessella, Robert L; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Voytas, Daniel F; Dehm, Scott M

    2013-10-22

    Androgen receptor (AR) target genes direct development and survival of the prostate epithelial lineage, including prostate cancer (PCa). Thus, endocrine therapies that inhibit the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) are effective in treating PCa. AR transcriptional reactivation is central to resistance, as evidenced by the efficacy of AR retargeting in castration-resistant PCa (CRPC) with next-generation endocrine therapies abiraterone and enzalutamide. However, resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide limits this efficacy in most men, and PCa remains the second-leading cause of male cancer deaths. Here we show that AR gene rearrangements in CRPC tissues underlie a completely androgen-independent, yet AR-dependent, resistance mechanism. We discovered intragenic AR gene rearrangements in CRPC tissues, which we modeled using transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated genome engineering. This modeling revealed that these AR gene rearrangements blocked full-length AR synthesis, but promoted expression of truncated AR variant proteins lacking the AR ligand-binding domain. Furthermore, these AR variant proteins maintained the constitutive activity of the AR transcriptional program and a CRPC growth phenotype independent of full-length AR or androgens. These findings demonstrate that AR gene rearrangements are a unique resistance mechanism by which AR transcriptional activity can be uncoupled from endocrine regulation in CRPC.

  7. 40Ar/36Ar analyses of historic lava flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.

    1969-01-01

    The ratio 40Ar/36Ar was measured for 26 subaerial historic lava flows. Approximately one-third of the samples had 40Ar/36Ar ratios either higher or lower than the atmospheric value of 295.5 at the 95% confidence level. Excess radiogenic 40Ar in five flows ranged from about 1 ?? 10-13 to 1.5 ?? 10-12 mol/g. Possible excess 36Ar in three flows was on the order of 10-16 to 10-15 mol/g. Upper 95% confidence limits for excess 40Ar in samples with normal 40Ar/36Ar ratios are generally less than 3 ?? 10-13 mol/g. The origin of the excess 36Ar is unknown but it may be due either to the incorporation of primitive argon that has been stored in the mantle in very low potassium environments or to enrichment in 36Ar as atmospheric argon diffuses into the rocks after they cool. ?? 1969.

  8. An Engineered Split Intein for Photoactivated Protein Trans-Splicing.

    PubMed

    Wong, Stanley; Mosabbir, Abdullah A; Truong, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Protein splicing is mediated by inteins that auto-catalytically join two separated protein fragments with a peptide bond. Here we engineered a genetically encoded synthetic photoactivatable intein (named LOVInC), by using the light-sensitive LOV2 domain from Avena sativa as a switch to modulate the splicing activity of the split DnaE intein from Nostoc punctiforme. Periodic blue light illumination of LOVInC induced protein splicing activity in mammalian cells. To demonstrate the broad applicability of LOVInC, synthetic protein systems were engineered for the light-induced reassembly of several target proteins such as fluorescent protein markers, a dominant positive mutant of RhoA, caspase-7, and the genetically encoded Ca2+ indicator GCaMP2. Spatial precision of LOVInC was demonstrated by targeting activity to specific mammalian cells. Thus, LOVInC can serve as a general platform for engineering light-based control for modulating the activity of many different proteins. PMID:26317656

  9. Initial sub-aerial volcanic activity along the central Lesser Antilles inner arc: New K-Ar ages from Les Saintes volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zami, Fabienne; Quidelleur, Xavier; Ricci, Julia; Lebrun, Jean-Frédéric; Samper, Agnès

    2014-10-01

    We present new groundmass K-Ar ages obtained using the Cassignol-Gillot technique, together with whole-rock major and trace elements, from Les Saintes islands (Terre-de-Haut and Terre-de-Bas). They are located along the northern Lesser Antilles inner arc, between Basse-Terre Island (western Guadeloupe) to the North and Dominica Island to the South. Ages reveal that the main volcanic phase in Terre-de-Haut occurred between 2.98 ± 0.04 and 2.00 ± 0.03 Ma, and show that the onset of sub-aerial volcanism in Terre-de-Haut is slightly older (~ 0.2 Myr) than that of northern Basse-Terre. Volcanism in Les Saintes resumed to the west, with the rapid construction of Terre-de-Bas Island at 0.888 ± 0.009 Ma. Major elements analyses show that most lavas from Les Saintes belong to a sub-alkaline medium-K magmatic series and are mainly andesites, with relatively rare basaltic andesites and dacites. Rare earth elements spectra reveal a strong enrichment in light elements, as observed for Dominica lavas, and significantly higher than observed for Basse-Terre lavas. Noticeably, Terre-de-Bas spectra display more enriched patterns relative to those from Terre-de-Haut lavas, suggesting a lower degree of partial melting or a stronger sedimentary component incorporated to the subducting slab. Overall, geochemical signatures of Les Saintes and Dominica magmas display common characteristics, which we interpret as reflecting strong petrogenetic affinities, while both are significantly different from that of Basse-Terre lavas. Finally, this study provides a precise timing of subaerial volcanism of Les Saintes Islands, which can be used to better constrain through time the development of the tectonic half-graben where these islands lie, which is part of the arc-parallel en-echelon faults system accommodating the oblique convergence of the North American plate from Montserrat to Dominica. In addition, these results reveal that the initiation of Terre-de-Haut volcanism is presently the

  10. Alternative pre-mRNA splicing switches modulate gene expression in late erythropoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Miki L.; Clark, Tyson A.; Gee, Sherry L.; Kang, Jeong-Ah; Schweitzer, Anthony C.; Wickrema, Amittha; Conboy, John G.

    2009-02-03

    Differentiating erythroid cells execute a unique gene expression program that insures synthesis of the appropriate proteome at each stage of maturation. Standard expression microarrays provide important insight into erythroid gene expression but cannot detect qualitative changes in transcript structure, mediated by RNA processing, that alter structure and function of encoded proteins. We analyzed stage-specific changes in the late erythroid transcriptome via use of high-resolution microarrays that detect altered expression of individual exons. Ten differentiation-associated changes in erythroblast splicing patterns were identified, including the previously known activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 splicing. Six new alternative splicing switches involving enhanced inclusion of internal cassette exons were discovered, as well as 3 changes in use of alternative first exons. All of these erythroid stage-specific splicing events represent activated inclusion of authentic annotated exons, suggesting they represent an active regulatory process rather than a general loss of splicing fidelity. The observation that 3 of the regulated transcripts encode RNA binding proteins (SNRP70, HNRPLL, MBNL2) may indicate significant changes in the RNA processing machinery of late erythroblasts. Together, these results support the existence of a regulated alternative pre-mRNA splicing program that is critical for late erythroid differentiation.

  11. Alternative Splicing Regulation During C. elegans Development: Splicing Factors as Regulated Targets

    PubMed Central

    Barberan-Soler, Sergio; Zahler, Alan M.

    2008-01-01

    Alternative splicing generates protein diversity and allows for post-transcriptional gene regulation. Estimates suggest that 10% of the genes in Caenorhabditis elegans undergo alternative splicing. We constructed a splicing-sensitive microarray to detect alternative splicing for 352 cassette exons and tested for changes in alternative splicing of these genes during development. We found that the microarray data predicted that 62/352 (∼18%) of the alternative splicing events studied show a strong change in the relative levels of the spliced isoforms (>4-fold) during development. Confirmation of the microarray data by RT-PCR was obtained for 70% of randomly selected genes tested. Among the genes with the most developmentally regulated alternatively splicing was the hnRNP F/H splicing factor homolog, W02D3.11 – now named hrpf-1. For the cassette exon of hrpf-1, the inclusion isoform comprises 65% of hrpf-1 steady state messages in embryos but only 0.1% in the first larval stage. This dramatic change in the alternative splicing of an alternative splicing factor suggests a complex cascade of splicing regulation during development. We analyzed splicing in embryos from a strain with a mutation in the splicing factor sym-2, another hnRNP F/H homolog. We found that approximately half of the genes with large alternative splicing changes between the embryo and L1 stages are regulated by sym-2 in embryos. An analysis of the role of nonsense-mediated decay in regulating steady-state alternative mRNA isoforms was performed. We found that 8% of the 352 events studied have alternative isoforms whose relative steady-state levels in embryos change more than 4-fold in a nonsense-mediated decay mutant, including hrpf-1. Strikingly, 53% of these alternative splicing events that are affected by NMD in our experiment are not obvious substrates for NMD based on the presence of premature termination codons. This suggests that the targeting of splicing factors by NMD may have downstream

  12. Protein Trans-Splicing of an Atypical Split Intein Showing Structural Flexibility and Cross-Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Huiling; Meng, Qing; Liu, Xiang-Qin

    2012-01-01

    Inteins catalyze a protein splicing reaction to excise the intein from a precursor protein and join the flanking sequences (exteins) with a peptide bond. In a split intein, the intein fragments (IN and IC) can reassemble non-covalently to catalyze a trans-splicing reaction that joins the exteins from separate polypeptides. An atypical split intein having a very small IN and a large IC is particularly useful for joining synthetic peptides with recombinant proteins, which can be a generally useful method of introducing site-specific chemical labeling or modifications into proteins. However, a large IC derived from an Ssp DnaX intein was found recently to undergo spontaneous C-cleavage, which raised questions regarding its structure-function and ability to trans-splice. Here, we show that this IC could undergo trans-splicing in the presence of IN, and the trans-splicing activity completely suppressed the C-cleavage activity. We also found that this IC could trans-splice with small IN sequences derived from two other inteins, showing a cross-reactivity of this atypical split intein. Furthermore, we found that this IC could trans-splice even when the IN sequence was embedded in a nearly complete intein sequence, suggesting that the small IN could project out of the central pocket of the intein to become accessible to the IC. Overall, these findings uncovered a new atypical split intein that can be valuable for peptide-protein trans-splicing, and they also revealed an interesting structural flexibility and cross-reactivity at the active site of this intein. PMID:23024818

  13. An Interspecific Plant Hybrid Shows Novel Changes in Parental Splice Forms of Genes for Splicing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Scascitelli, Moira; Cognet, Marie; Adams, Keith L.

    2010-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization plays an important role in plant adaptive evolution and speciation, and the process often results in phenotypic novelty. Hybrids can show changes in genome structure and gene expression compared with their parents including chromosomal rearrangments, changes in cytosine methylation, up- and downregulation of gene expression, and gene silencing. Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental aspect of the expression of many genes. However alternative splicing patterns have not been examined in multiple genes in an interspecific plant hybrid compared with its parents. Here we studied alternative splicing patterns in an interspecific Populus hybrid and its parents by assaying 40 genes using reverse transcription PCR. Most of the genes showed identical alternative splicing patterns between the parents and the hybrid. We found new alternative splicing variants present in the hybrid in two SR genes involved in the regulation of splicing and alternative splicing. The novel alternative splicing patterns included changes in donor and acceptor sites to create a new exon in one allele of PtRSZ22 in the hybrid and retention of an intron in both alleles of PtSR34a.1 in the hybrid, with effects on the function of the corresponding truncated proteins, if present. Our results suggest that novel alternative splicing patterns are present in a small percentage of genes in hybrids, but they could make a considerable impact on the expression of some genes. Changes in alternative splicing are likely to be an important component of the genetic changes that occur upon interspecific hybridization. PMID:20100939

  14. ArsP: a methylarsenite efflux permease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Madegowda, Mahendra; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    Trivalent organoarsenic compounds are far more toxic than either pentavalent organoarsenicals or inorganic arsenite. Many microbes methylate inorganic arsenite (As(III)) to more toxic and carcinogenic methylarsenite (MAs(III)). Additionally, monosodium methylarsenate (MSMA or MAs(V)) has been used widely as an herbicide and is reduced by microbial communities to MAs(III). Roxarsone (3-nitro-4-hydroxybenzenearsonic acid) is a pentavalent aromatic arsenical that is used as antimicrobial growth promoter for poultry and swine, and its active form is the trivalent species Rox(III). A bacterial permease, ArsP, from Campylobacter jejuni, was recently shown to confer resistance to roxarsone. In this study C. jejuni arsP was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to confer resistance to MAs(III) and Rox(III) but not to inorganic As(III) or pentavalent organoarsenicals. Cells of E. coli expressing arsP did not accumulate trivalent organoarsenicals. Everted membrane vesicles from those cells accumulated MAs(III)>Rox(III) with energy supplied by NADH oxidation, reflecting efflux from cells. The vesicles did not transport As(III), MAs(V) or pentavalent roxarsone. Mutation or modification of the two conserved cysteine residues resulted in loss of transport activity, suggesting that they play a role in ArsP function. Thus ArsP is the first identified efflux system specific for trivalent organoarsenicals. PMID:26234817

  15. The Chaperone-Like Activity of α-Synuclein Attenuates Aggregation of Its Alternatively Spliced Isoform, 112-Synuclein In Vitro: Plausible Cross-Talk between Isoforms in Protein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Manda, Krishna Madhuri; Yedlapudi, Deepthi; Korukonda, Srikanth; Bojja, Sreedhar; Kalivendi, Shasi V.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal oligomerization and aggregation of α-synuclein (α-syn/WT-syn) has been shown to be a precipitating factor in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Earlier observations on the induced-alternative splicing of α-syn by Parkinsonism mimetics as well as identification of region specific abnormalities in the transcript levels of 112-synclein (112-syn) in diseased subjects underscores the role of 112-syn in the pathophysiology of PD. In the present study, we sought to identify the aggregation potential of 112-syn in the presence or absence of WT-syn to predict its plausible role in protein aggregation events. Results demonstrate that unlike WT-syn, lack of 28 aa in the C-terminus results in the loss of chaperone-like activity with a concomitant gain in vulnerability to heat-induced aggregation and time-dependent fibrillation. The effects were dose and time-dependent and a significant aggregation of 112-syn was evident at as low as 45°C following 10 min of incubation. The heat-induced aggregates were found to be ill-defined structures and weakly positive towards Thioflavin-T (ThT) staining as compared to clearly distinguishable ThT positive extended fibrils resulting upon 24 h of incubation at 37°C. Further, the chaperone-like activity of WT-syn significantly attenuated heat-induced aggregation of 112-syn in a dose and time-dependent manner. On contrary, WT-syn synergistically enhanced fibrillation of 112-syn. Overall, the present findings highlight a plausible cross-talk between isoforms of α-syn and the relative abundance of these isoforms may dictate the nature and fate of protein aggregates. PMID:24892822

  16. FUS interacts with nuclear matrix-associated protein SAFB1 as well as Matrin3 to regulate splicing and ligand-mediated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Takanashi, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    FUS (Fused-in-Sarcoma) is a multifunctional DNA/RNA binding protein linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia (ALS/FTD). Since FUS is localized mainly in the nucleus with nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling, it is critical to understand physiological functions in the nucleus to clarify pathogenesis. Here we report a yeast two-hybrid screening identified FUS interaction with nuclear matrix-associated protein SAFB1 (scaffold attachment factor B1). FUS and SAFB1, abundant in chromatin-bound fraction, interact in a DNA-dependent manner. N-terminal SAP domain of SAFB1, a DNA-binding motif, was required for its localization to chromatin-bound fraction and splicing regulation. In addition, depletion of SAFB1 reduced FUS’s localization to chromatin-bound fraction and splicing activity, suggesting SAFB1 could tether FUS to chromatin compartment thorough N-terminal DNA-binding motif. FUS and SAFB1 also interact with Androgen Receptor (AR) regulating ligand-dependent transcription. Moreover, FUS interacts with another nuclear matrix-associated protein Matrin3, which is muted in a subset of familial ALS cases and reportedly interacts with TDP-43. Interestingly, ectopic ALS-linked FUS mutant sequestered endogenous Matrin3 and SAFB1 in the cytoplasmic aggregates. These findings indicate SAFB1 could be a FUS’s functional platform in chromatin compartment to regulate RNA splicing and ligand-dependent transcription and shed light on the etiological significance of nuclear matrix-associated proteins in ALS pathogenesis. PMID:27731383

  17. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Growth Suppression of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) mediates the developmental, physiologic, and pathologic effects of androgens including 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). However, the mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells are not well understood, though they are central to prostate development, homeostasis, and neoplasia. Here, we identify androgen-responsive genes that restrain cell cycle progression and proliferation of human prostate epithelial cell lines (HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR), and we investigate the mechanisms through which AR regulates their expression. DHT inhibited proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, and cell cycle analysis revealed a prolonged G1 interval. In the cell cycle, the G1/S-phase transition is initiated by the activity of cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes, which relieve growth suppression. In HPr-1AR, cyclin D1/2 and CDK4/6 mRNAs were androgen-repressed, whereas CDK inhibitor, CDKN1A, mRNA was androgen-induced. The regulation of these transcripts was AR-dependent, and involved multiple mechanisms. Similar AR-mediated down-regulation of CDK4/6 mRNAs and up-regulation of CDKN1A mRNA occurred in PC3-Lenti-AR. Further, CDK4/6 overexpression suppressed DHT-inhibited cell cycle progression and proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, whereas CDKN1A overexpression induced cell cycle arrest. We therefore propose that AR-mediated growth suppression of HPr-1AR involves cyclin D1 mRNA decay, transcriptional repression of cyclin D2 and CDK4/6, and transcriptional activation of CDKN1A, which serve to decrease CDK4/6 activity. AR-mediated inhibition of PC3-Lenti-AR proliferation occurs through a similar mechanism, albeit without down-regulation of cyclin D. Our findings provide insight into AR-mediated regulation of prostate epithelial cell proliferation. PMID:26372468

  18. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Growth Suppression of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Chae; Chen, Congcong; Bolton, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) mediates the developmental, physiologic, and pathologic effects of androgens including 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). However, the mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells are not well understood, though they are central to prostate development, homeostasis, and neoplasia. Here, we identify androgen-responsive genes that restrain cell cycle progression and proliferation of human prostate epithelial cell lines (HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR), and we investigate the mechanisms through which AR regulates their expression. DHT inhibited proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, and cell cycle analysis revealed a prolonged G1 interval. In the cell cycle, the G1/S-phase transition is initiated by the activity of cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes, which relieve growth suppression. In HPr-1AR, cyclin D1/2 and CDK4/6 mRNAs were androgen-repressed, whereas CDK inhibitor, CDKN1A, mRNA was androgen-induced. The regulation of these transcripts was AR-dependent, and involved multiple mechanisms. Similar AR-mediated down-regulation of CDK4/6 mRNAs and up-regulation of CDKN1A mRNA occurred in PC3-Lenti-AR. Further, CDK4/6 overexpression suppressed DHT-inhibited cell cycle progression and proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, whereas CDKN1A overexpression induced cell cycle arrest. We therefore propose that AR-mediated growth suppression of HPr-1AR involves cyclin D1 mRNA decay, transcriptional repression of cyclin D2 and CDK4/6, and transcriptional activation of CDKN1A, which serve to decrease CDK4/6 activity. AR-mediated inhibition of PC3-Lenti-AR proliferation occurs through a similar mechanism, albeit without down-regulation of cyclin D. Our findings provide insight into AR-mediated regulation of prostate epithelial cell proliferation.

  19. Alternative RNA splicing of KSHV ORF57 produces two different RNA isoforms.

    PubMed

    Majerciak, Vladimir; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-15

    In lytically infected B cells Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 gene encodes two RNA isoforms by alternative splicing of its pre-mRNA, which contains a small, constitutive intron in its 5' half and a large, suboptimal intron in its 3's half. The RNA1 isoform encodes full-length ORF57 and is a major isoform derived from splicing of the constitutive small intron, but retaining the suboptimal large intron as the coding region. A small fraction (<5%) of ORF57 RNA undergoes double splicing to produce a smaller non-coding RNA2 due to lack of a translational termination codon. Both RNAs are cleaved and polyadenylated at the same cleavage site CS83636. The insertion of ORF57 RNA1 into a restriction cutting site in certain mammalian expression vectors activates splicing of the subopitmal intron and produces a truncated ORF57 protein.

  20. Alternative splicing controls selective trans-synaptic interactions of the neuroligin-neurexin complex.

    PubMed

    Chih, Ben; Gollan, Leora; Scheiffele, Peter

    2006-07-20

    Formation of synapses requires specific cellular interactions that organize pre- and postsynaptic compartments. The neuroligin-neurexin complex mediates heterophilic adhesion and can trigger assembly of glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses in cultured hippocampal neurons. Both neuroligins and neurexins are encoded by multiple genes. Alternative splicing generates large numbers of isoforms, which may engage in selective axo-dendritic interactions. We explored whether alternative splicing of the postsynaptic neuroligins modifies their activity toward glutamatergic and GABAergic axons. We find that small extracellular splice insertions restrict the function of neuroligin-1 and -2 to glutamatergic and GABAergic contacts and alter interaction with presynaptic neurexins. The neuroligin isoforms associated with GABAergic contacts bind to neurexin-1alpha and a subset of neurexin-1betas. In turn, these neurexin isoforms induce GABAergic but not glutamatergic postsynaptic differentiation. Our findings suggest that alternative splicing plays a central role in regulating selective extracellular interactions through the neuroligin-neurexin complex at glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses.

  1. Structural Characterization of the Catalytic Subunit of a Novel RNA Splicing Endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, Kate; Hall, Michelle D.; Xu, Fangmin; Xue, Song; Li, Hong

    2010-07-13

    The RNA splicing endonuclease is responsible for recognition and excision of nuclear tRNA and all archaeal introns. Despite the conserved RNA cleavage chemistry and a similar enzyme assembly, currently known splicing endonuclease families have limited RNA specificity. Different from previously characterized splicing endonucleases in Archaea, the splicing endonuclease from archaeum Sulfolobus solfataricus was found to contain two different subunits and accept a broader range of substrates. Here, we report a crystal structure of the catalytic subunit of the S. solfataricus endonuclease at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure, together with analytical ultracentrifugation analysis, identifies the catalytic subunit as an inactive but stable homodimer, thus suggesting the possibility of two modes of functional assembly for the active enzyme.

  2. Rbfox proteins regulate tissue-specific alternative splicing of Mef2D required for muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Runfola, Valeria; Sebastian, Soji; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Gabellini, Davide

    2015-02-15

    Among the Mef2 family of transcription factors, Mef2D is unique in that it undergoes tissue-specific splicing to generate an isoform that is essential for muscle differentiation. However, the mechanisms mediating this muscle-specific processing of Mef2D remain unknown. Using bioinformatics, we identified Rbfox proteins as putative modulators of Mef2D muscle-specific splicing. Accordingly, we found direct and specific Rbfox1 and Rbfox2 binding to Mef2D pre-mRNA in vivo. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments demonstrated that Rbfox1 and Rbfox2 cooperate in promoting Mef2D splicing and subsequent myogenesis. Thus, our findings reveal a new role for Rbfox proteins in regulating myogenesis through activation of essential muscle-specific splicing events.

  3. Whole-Rock 40Ar/39Ar Step-heating Analyses, Problems and Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnke, P.; Harrison, M.; Heizler, M. T.; Lovera, O. M.; Warren, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    Whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar step-heating analyses of extra-terrestrial materials are used to constrain the impact history of the inner solar system, the formation age of the Moon, and timing of paleomagnetic fields. Despite the importance of knowing the timing of these important events, the samples we have in hand are usually disturbed through mixing, (multiple?) impact events, and perhaps recoil loss. Extra-terrestrial 40Ar/39Ar data are typically interpreted through the assignment of essentially arbitrary plateau ages rather than through a robust physical model. Although the use of models capable of quantitatively assessing diffusive 40Ar* loss in extra-terrestrial samples has been around for nearly 50 years, this early advance has been widely ignored. Here we present implications of applying a robust, multi-activation energy, multi-diffusion domain model to step-heated 40Ar/39Ar data, with temperature cycling. Our findings show that for even a single heating event, "plateau" ages are unlikely to record meaningful ages. Further, if the sample has experienced multiple heating events or contains inherited clasts, recovering a unique solution may be impossible. Indeed the most readily interpretable portion of the age spectrum is the early heating steps which represents a maximum age estimate of the last re-heating event. Our results challenge the chronologic validity of 40Ar/39Ar "plateau" ages and by extension the hypotheses that are based on this data (e.g., the Late Heavy Bombardment). Future work will require new analytical procedures, interpretative frameworks, and (potentially) the combination of multiple chronometers to derive a robust impact history for the early solar system.

  4. 30 CFR 57.12088 - Splicing trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Splicing trailing cables. 57.12088 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12088 Splicing trailing cables. No splice, except a vulcanized splice or its equivalent, shall be made in a trailing cable within 25 feet of the machine unless the machine is equipped with...

  5. Nitric Oxide Receptor Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Undergoes Splicing Regulation in Differentiating Human Embryonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharin, Vladislav G.; Mujoo, Kalpana; Kots, Alexander Y.; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), an important mediator molecule in mammalian physiology, initiates a number of signaling mechanisms by activating the enzyme soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). Recently, a new role for NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling in embryonic development and cell differentiation has emerged. The changes in expression of NO synthase isoforms and various sGC subunits has been demonstrated during human and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells differentiation. Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that nascent α1 sGC transcript undergoes alternative splicing and that expression of α1 sGC splice forms directly affects sGC activity. Expression of sGC splice variants in the process of human ES (hES) cells differentiation has not been investigated. In this report, we demonstrate that α1 sGC undergoes alternative splicing during random hES differentiation for the first time. Our results indicate that C-α1 sGC splice form is expressed at high levels in differentiating cells and its intracellular distribution varies from canonical α1 sGC subunit. Together, our data suggest that alternative splicing of sGC subunits is associated with differentiation of hES cells. PMID:20964618

  6. FUBP1: a new protagonist in splicing regulation of the DMD gene

    PubMed Central

    Miro, Julie; Laaref, Abdelhamid Mahdi; Rofidal, Valérie; Lagrafeuille, Rosyne; Hem, Sonia; Thorel, Delphine; Méchin, Déborah; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Mouly, Vincent; Claustres, Mireille; Tuffery-Giraud, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms for in-frame skipping of DMD exon 39 caused by the nonsense c.5480T>A mutation in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. RNase-assisted pull down assay coupled with mass spectrometry revealed that the mutant RNA probe specifically recruits hnRNPA1, hnRNPA2/B1 and DAZAP1. Functional studies in a human myoblast cell line transfected with DMD minigenes confirmed the splicing inhibitory activity of hnRNPA1 and hnRNPA2/B1, and showed that DAZAP1, also known to activate splicing, acts negatively in the context of the mutated exon 39. Furthermore, we uncovered that recognition of endogenous DMD exon 39 in muscle cells is promoted by FUSE binding protein 1 (FUBP1), a multifunctional DNA- and RNA-binding protein whose role in splicing is largely unknown. By serial deletion and mutagenesis studies in minigenes, we delineated a functional intronic splicing enhancer (ISE) in intron 38. FUBP1 recruitment to the RNA sequence containing the ISE was established by RNA pull down and RNA EMSA, and further confirmed by RNA-ChIP on endogenous DMD pre-mRNA. This study provides new insights about the splicing regulation of DMD exon 39, highlighting the emerging role of FUBP1 in splicing and describing the first ISE for constitutive exon inclusion in the mature DMD transcript. PMID:25662218

  7. RNA-dependent dynamic histone acetylation regulates MCL1 alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Dilshad H.; Gonzalez, Carolina; Cooper, Charlton; Sun, Jian-Min; Chen, Hou Yu; Healy, Shannon; Xu, Wayne; Smith, Karen T.; Workman, Jerry L.; Leygue, Etienne; Davie, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) and lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) catalyze dynamic histone acetylation at regulatory and coding regions of transcribed genes. Highly phosphorylated HDAC2 is recruited within corepressor complexes to regulatory regions, while the nonphosphorylated form is associated with the gene body. In this study, we characterized the nonphosphorylated HDAC2 complexes recruited to the transcribed gene body and explored the function of HDAC-complex-mediated dynamic histone acetylation. HDAC1 and 2 were coimmunoprecipitated with several splicing factors, including serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) which has roles in alternative splicing. The co-chromatin immunoprecipitation of HDAC1/2 and SRSF1 to the gene body was RNA-dependent. Inhibition of HDAC activity and knockdown of HDAC1, HDAC2 or SRSF1 showed that these proteins were involved in alternative splicing of MCL1. HDAC1/2 and KAT2B were associated with nascent pre-mRNA in general and with MCL1 pre-mRNA specifically. Inhibition of HDAC activity increased the occupancy of KAT2B and acetylation of H3 and H4 of the H3K4 methylated alternative MCL1 exon 2 nucleosome. Thus, nonphosphorylated HDAC1/2 is recruited to pre-mRNA by splicing factors to act at the RNA level with KAT2B and other KATs to catalyze dynamic histone acetylation of the MCL1 alternative exon and alter the splicing of MCL1 pre-mRNA. PMID:24234443

  8. Aberrant splicing and drug resistance in AML.

    PubMed

    de Necochea-Campion, Rosalia; Shouse, Geoffrey P; Zhou, Qi; Mirshahidi, Saied; Chen, Chien-Shing

    2016-01-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies has unveiled a new window into the heterogeneity of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In particular, recurrent mutations in spliceosome machinery and genome-wide aberrant splicing events have been recognized as a prominent component of this disease. This review will focus on how these factors influence drug resistance through altered splicing of tumor suppressor and oncogenes and dysregulation of the apoptotic signaling network. A better understanding of these factors in disease progression is necessary to design appropriate therapeutic strategies recognizing specific alternatively spliced or mutated oncogenic targets. PMID:27613060

  9. Regular languages, regular grammars and automata in splicing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad Jan, Nurhidaya; Fong, Wan Heng; Sarmin, Nor Haniza

    2013-04-01

    Splicing system is known as a mathematical model that initiates the connection between the study of DNA molecules and formal language theory. In splicing systems, languages called splicing languages refer to the set of double-stranded DNA molecules that may arise from an initial set of DNA molecules in the presence of restriction enzymes and ligase. In this paper, some splicing languages resulted from their respective splicing systems are shown. Since all splicing languages are regular, languages which result from the splicing systems can be further investigated using grammars and automata in the field of formal language theory. The splicing language can be written in the form of regular languages generated by grammar. Besides that, splicing systems can be accepted by automata. In this research, two restriction enzymes are used in splicing systems namely BfuCI and NcoI.

  10. THE ROLE OF SON IN SPLICING, DEVELOPMENT AND DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xinyi; Ng, Huck-Hui; Bubulya, Paula A.

    2014-01-01

    SON is a nuclear protein involved in multiple cellular processes including transcription, pre-mRNA splicing and cell cycle regulation. Although SON was discovered 25 years ago, the importance of SON’s function was only realized recently when its roles in nuclear organization and pre-mRNA splicing as well as the influence of these activities in maintaining cellular health were unveiled. Furthermore, SON was implicated to have a key role in stem cells as well as during the onset of various diseases such as cancer, influenza, and hepatitis. Here we review the progress that has been made in studying this multi-functional protein and discuss questions that remain to be answered about SON. PMID:24789761

  11. Splice Variants of Androgen Receptor and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Caffo, Orazio; Maines, Francesca; Veccia, Antonello; Kinspergher, Stefania; Galligioni, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    Over the last ten years, two new-generation hormonal drugs and two chemotherapeutic agents have been approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Unfortunately, some patients have primary resistance to them and the others eventually develop secondary resistance. It has recently been suggested that the presence of androgen receptor splice variants plays a leading role in the primary and secondary resistance to the new hormonal drugs, whereas their presence seem to have only a partial effect on the activity of the chemotherapeutic agents. The aim of this paper is to review the published data concerning the role of androgen receptor splice variants in prostate cancer biology, and their potential use as biomarkers when making therapeutic decisions. PMID:27471583

  12. Phosphorylation of SRSF1 by SRPK1 regulates alternative splicing of tumor-related Rac1b in colorectal cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Vânia; Henriques, Andreia F A; Henriques, Andreia; Pereira, Joana F S; Pereira, Joana; Neves Costa, Ana; Moyer, Mary Pat; Moita, Luís Ferreira; Gama-Carvalho, Margarida; Matos, Paulo; Jordan, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The premessenger RNA of the majority of human genes can generate various transcripts through alternative splicing, and different tissues or disease states show specific patterns of splicing variants. These patterns depend on the relative concentrations of the splicing factors present in the cell nucleus, either as a consequence of their expression levels or of post-translational modifications, such as protein phosphorylation, which are determined by signal transduction pathways. Here, we analyzed the contribution of protein kinases to the regulation of alternative splicing variant Rac1b that is overexpressed in certain tumor types. In colorectal cells, we found that depletion of AKT2, AKT3, GSK3β, and SRPK1 significantly decreased endogenous Rac1b levels. Although knockdown of AKT2 and AKT3 affected only Rac1b protein levels suggesting a post-splicing effect, the depletion of GSK3β or SRPK1 decreased Rac1b alternative splicing, an effect mediated through changes in splicing factor SRSF1. In particular, the knockdown of SRPK1 or inhibition of its catalytic activity reduced phosphorylation and subsequent translocation of SRSF1 to the nucleus, limiting its availability to promote the inclusion of alternative exon 3b into the Rac1 pre-mRNA. Altogether, the data identify SRSF1 as a prime regulator of Rac1b expression in colorectal cells and provide further mechanistic insight into how the regulation of alternative splicing events by protein kinases can contribute to sustain tumor cell survival.

  13. Radiolabeled semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay for the analysis of alternative splicing of interleukin genes.

    PubMed

    Shakola, Felitsiya; Byrne, Stephen; Javed, Kainaat; Ruggiu, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing evolved as a very efficient way to generate proteome diversity from a limited number of genes, while at the same time modulating posttranscriptional events of gene expression-such as stability, turnover, subcellular localization, binding properties, and general activity of both mRNAs and proteins. Since the vast majority of human genes undergo alternative splicing, it comes to no surprise that interleukin genes also show extensive alternative splicing. In fact, there is a growing body of evidence indicating that alternative splicing plays a central role in modulating the pleiotropic functions of cytokines, and aberrant expression of alternatively spliced interleukin mRNAs has been linked to disease. However, while several interleukin splice variants have been described, their function is still poorly understood. This is particularly relevant, since alternatively spliced cytokine isoforms can act both as disease biomarkers and as candidate entry points for therapeutic intervention. In this chapter we describe a protocol that uses radiolabeled semi-quantitative RT-PCR to efficiently detect, analyze, and quantify alternative splicing patterns of cytokine genes. PMID:24908320

  14. Involvement of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and of HA95 in pre-mRNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Kvissel, Anne-Katrine . E-mail: a.k.kvissel@basalmed.uio.no; Orstavik, Sigurd; Eikvar, Sissel; Brede, Gaute; Jahnsen, Tore; Collas, Philippe; Akusjaervi, Goeran; Skalhegg, Bjorn Steen

    2007-08-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a holoenzyme consisting of two catalytic (C) subunits bound to a regulatory (R) subunit dimer. Stimulation by cAMP dissociates the holoenzyme and causes translocation to the nucleus of a fraction of the C subunit. Apart from transcription regulation, little is known about the function of the C subunit in the nucleus. In the present report, we show that both C{alpha} and C{beta} are localized to spots in the mammalian nucleus. Double immunofluorescence analysis of splicing factor SC35 with the C subunit indicated that these spots are splicing factor compartments (SFCs). Using the E1A in vivo splicing assay, we found that catalytically active C subunits regulate alternative splicing and phosphorylate several members of the SR-protein family of splicing factors in vitro. Furthermore, nuclear C subunits co-localize with the C subunit-binding protein homologous to AKAP95, HA95. HA95 also regulates E1A alternative splicing in vivo, apparently through its N-terminal domain. Localization of the C subunit to SFCs and the E1A splicing pattern were unaffected by cAMP stimulation. Our findings demonstrate that the nuclear PKA C subunit co-locates with HA95 in SFCs and regulates pre-mRNA splicing, possibly through a cAMP-independent mechanism.

  15. Radiolabeled semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay for the analysis of alternative splicing of interleukin genes.

    PubMed

    Shakola, Felitsiya; Byrne, Stephen; Javed, Kainaat; Ruggiu, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing evolved as a very efficient way to generate proteome diversity from a limited number of genes, while at the same time modulating posttranscriptional events of gene expression-such as stability, turnover, subcellular localization, binding properties, and general activity of both mRNAs and proteins. Since the vast majority of human genes undergo alternative splicing, it comes to no surprise that interleukin genes also show extensive alternative splicing. In fact, there is a growing body of evidence indicating that alternative splicing plays a central role in modulating the pleiotropic functions of cytokines, and aberrant expression of alternatively spliced interleukin mRNAs has been linked to disease. However, while several interleukin splice variants have been described, their function is still poorly understood. This is particularly relevant, since alternatively spliced cytokine isoforms can act both as disease biomarkers and as candidate entry points for therapeutic intervention. In this chapter we describe a protocol that uses radiolabeled semi-quantitative RT-PCR to efficiently detect, analyze, and quantify alternative splicing patterns of cytokine genes.

  16. Involvement of Alternative Splicing in Barley Seed Germination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qisen; Zhang, Xiaoqi; Wang, Songbo; Tan, Cong; Zhou, Gaofeng; Li, Chengdao

    2016-01-01

    Seed germination activates many new biological processes including DNA, membrane and mitochondrial repairs and requires active protein synthesis and sufficient energy supply. Alternative splicing (AS) regulates many cellular processes including cell differentiation and environmental adaptations. However, limited information is available on the regulation of seed germination at post-transcriptional levels. We have conducted RNA-sequencing experiments to dissect AS events in barley seed germination. We identified between 552 and 669 common AS transcripts in germinating barley embryos from four barley varieties (Hordeum vulgare L. Bass, Baudin, Harrington and Stirling). Alternative 3' splicing (34%-45%), intron retention (32%-34%) and alternative 5' splicing (16%-21%) were three major AS events in germinating embryos. The AS transcripts were predominantly mapped onto ribosome, RNA transport machineries, spliceosome, plant hormone signal transduction, glycolysis, sugar and carbon metabolism pathways. Transcripts of these genes were also very abundant in the early stage of seed germination. Correlation analysis of gene expression showed that AS hormone responsive transcripts could also be co-expressed with genes responsible for protein biosynthesis and sugar metabolisms. Our RNA-sequencing data revealed that AS could play important roles in barley seed germination.

  17. Involvement of Alternative Splicing in Barley Seed Germination

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qisen; Zhang, Xiaoqi; Wang, Songbo; Tan, Cong; Zhou, Gaofeng; Li, Chengdao

    2016-01-01

    Seed germination activates many new biological processes including DNA, membrane and mitochondrial repairs and requires active protein synthesis and sufficient energy supply. Alternative splicing (AS) regulates many cellular processes including cell differentiation and environmental adaptations. However, limited information is available on the regulation of seed germination at post-transcriptional levels. We have conducted RNA-sequencing experiments to dissect AS events in barley seed germination. We identified between 552 and 669 common AS transcripts in germinating barley embryos from four barley varieties (Hordeum vulgare L. Bass, Baudin, Harrington and Stirling). Alternative 3’ splicing (34%-45%), intron retention (32%-34%) and alternative 5’ splicing (16%-21%) were three major AS events in germinating embryos. The AS transcripts were predominantly mapped onto ribosome, RNA transport machineries, spliceosome, plant hormone signal transduction, glycolysis, sugar and carbon metabolism pathways. Transcripts of these genes were also very abundant in the early stage of seed germination. Correlation analysis of gene expression showed that AS hormone responsive transcripts could also be co-expressed with genes responsible for protein biosynthesis and sugar metabolisms. Our RNA-sequencing data revealed that AS could play important roles in barley seed germination. PMID:27031341

  18. A Bidirectional SF2/ASF- and SRp40-Dependent Splicing Enhancer Regulates Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 rev, env, vpu, and nef Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Caputi, Massimo; Freund, Marcel; Kammler, Susanne; Asang, Corinna; Schaal, Heiner

    2004-01-01

    The integrated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome is transcribed in a single pre-mRNA that is alternatively spliced into more than 40 mRNAs. We characterized a novel bidirectional exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) that regulates the expression of the HIV-1 env, vpu, rev, and nef mRNAs. The ESE is localized downstream of the vpu-, env-, and nef-specific 3′ splice site no. 5. SF2/ASF and SRp40 activate the ESE and are required for efficient 3′ splice site usage and binding of the U1 snRNP to the downstream 5′ splice site no. 4. U1 snRNP binding to the 5′ splice site no. 4 is required for splicing of the rev and nef mRNAs and to increase expression of the partially spliced env mRNA. Finally, our results indicate that this ESE is necessary for the recruitment of the U1 snRNP to the 5′ splice site no. 4, even when the 5′ splice site and the U1 snRNA have been mutated to obtain a perfect complementary match. The ESE characterized here is highly conserved in most viral subtypes. PMID:15163745

  19. One-electron pseudopotential investigation of the RbAr and FrAr van der Waals systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhiflaoui, J.; Berriche, H.

    2012-12-01

    The potential energy curves of the ground state and many excited states of RbAr and FrAr van der Waals systems have been determined using a one-electron pseudopotential approach. The pseudopotential technique is used to replace the effect of the Rb+ and Fr+ cores and the electron-Ar interaction. In addition a core-core interaction is included. This has permitted to reduce the number of active electrons of the RbAr and FrAr systems to only one electron, the valence electron. This has led to use very large basis sets for Rb, Fr and Ar atoms. In this context, the potential energy curves of the ground and many excited states are performed at the SCF level. The core-core interactions for Rb+Ar and Fr+Ar are included using the CCSD(T) accurate potentials of Hickling et al. [H. Hickling, L. Viehland, D. Shepherd, P. Soldan, E. Lee and T. Wright, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 6 (2004) 4233]. In addition, the spectroscopic constants of these states are derived and compared with the available theoretical works. Such comparison for RbAr has shown a very good agreement for the ground and the first excited states. However, the FrAr system was not studied previously and its spectroscopic constants are presented here for the first time.

  20. An alternative hypothesis for high-T 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum discordance in polyphase extraterrestrial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, W. S.; Shuster, D. L.; Renne, P. R.; Weiss, B. P.

    2009-12-01

    A common feature observed in 40Ar/39Ar age spectra of extraterrestrial (ET) rocks is a conspicuous decrease in the ages of high temperature extractions relative to lower temperature steps and a correlated increase in Ca/K, often succeeded by a monotonic increase in ages. This feature is routinely attributed to recoil-implanted 39Ar from a potassium (K)-rich donor phase into a K-poor receptor phase (e.g., 1,2). While 39Ar recoil redistribution is undoubtedly manifested in many terrestrial and ET 40Ar/39Ar whole-rock age spectra, it cannot easily explain the magnitude of high release temperature 40Ar*/39ArK anomalies observed in Martian meteorites ALH 84001 and Nakhla, as well as other course-grained meteorites and lunar rocks. Depending on the aliquot and sample, 50 - 100% of the pyroxene release spectra in ALH 84001 and Nakhla appear strongly perturbed to lower ages. As the mean recoil distance of 39Ar ~0.1 µm, the recoil hypothesis demands that a high-K phase be ubiquitously distributed amongst sub-micron to micron sized pyroxene crystals to account for the observed pyroxene age spectra. However, in both Nakhla and ALH 84001, pyroxene is often completely isolated from high-K phases and individual grains commonly exceed 100 µm in diameter. 40Ar/39Ar analyses of pyroxene-bearing terrestrial basalts, wherein fine-grained pyroxene and plagioclase are intimately adjoined, show that recoil-implanted 39Ar into pyroxene produces much less precipitous anomalies in 40Ar*/39ArK, as predicted by the recoil lengthscale. An alternative hypothesis is that whole-rock age spectra of ET samples with anomalously low ages at high temperatures may reflect diffusive 40Ar distributions within considerably degassed pyroxene grains. Owing to apparent differences in activation energies between glass and/or plagioclase and pyroxene, 40Ar may diffuse more rapidly from pyroxene under certain high-temperature conditions (i.e., above the temperature at which the extrapolated Ar Arrhenius

  1. Mechanistic Support for Combined MET and AR Blockade in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuanyuan; Feng, Felix Y; Wang, Yugang; Cao, Xuhong; Han, Sumin; Wilder-Romans, Kari; Navone, Nora M; Logothetis, Christopher; Taichman, Russell S; Keller, Evan T; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Alva, Ajjai S; Smith, David C; Tomlins, Scott A; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Morgan, Todd M

    2016-01-01

    A recent phase III trial of the MET kinase inhibitor cabozantinib in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) failed to meet its primary survival end point; however, most men with CRPC have intact androgen receptor (AR) signaling. As previous work supports negative regulation of MET by AR signaling, we hypothesized that intact AR signaling may have limited the efficacy of cabozantinib in some of these patients. To assess the role of AR signaling on MET inhibition, we first performed an in silico analysis of human CRPC tissue samples stratified by AR signaling status ((+) or (-)), which identified MET expression as markedly increased in AR(-) samples. In vitro, AR signaling inhibition in AR(+) CRPC models increased MET expression and resulted in susceptibility to ligand (HGF) activation. Likewise, MET inhibition was only effective in blocking cancer phenotypes in cells with MET overexpression. Using multiple AR(+) CRPC in vitro and in vivo models, we showed that combined cabozantinib and enzalutamide (AR antagonist) treatment was more efficacious than either inhibitor alone. These data provide a compelling rationale to combine AR and MET inhibition in CRPC and may explain the negative results of the phase III cabozantinib study in CRPC. Similarly, the expression of MET in AR(-) disease, whether due to AR inhibition or loss of AR signaling, suggests potential utility for MET inhibition in select patients with AR therapy resistance and in AR(-) prostate cancer.

  2. IL-7 splicing variant IL-7{delta}5 induces human breast cancer cell proliferation via activation of PI3K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Deshun; Liu, Bing; Jin, Xiaobao; Zhu, Jiayong

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study confirms the role of IL-7{delta}5 in breast cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IL-7{delta}5 promotes breast cancer cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IL-7{delta}5 promotes cell proliferation via activation of PI3K/Akt pathway. -- Abstract: Various tumor cells express interleukin 7 (IL-7) and IL-7 variants. IL-7 has been confirmed to stimulate solid tumor cell proliferation. However, the effect of IL-7 variants on tumor cell proliferation remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the role of IL-7{delta}5 (an IL-7 variant lacking exon 5) on proliferation and cell cycle progression of human MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The results showed that IL-7{delta}5 promoted cell proliferation and cell cycle progression from G1 phase to G2/M phase, associated with upregulation of cyclin D1 expression and the downregulation of p27{sup kip1} expression. Mechanistically, we found that IL-7{delta}5 induced the activation of Akt. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt pathway by LY294002 reversed the proliferation and cell cycle progression of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells induced by IL-7{delta}5. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that IL-7{delta}5 variant induces human breast cancer cell proliferation and cell cycle progression via activation of PI3K/Akt pathway. Thus, IL-7{delta}5 may be a potential target for human breast cancer therapeutics intervention.

  3. Distinct splicing signatures affect converged pathways in myelodysplastic syndrome patients carrying mutations in different splicing regulators.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jinsong; Zhou, Bing; Thol, Felicitas; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Liang; Shao, Changwei; DeBoever, Christopher; Hou, Jiayi; Li, Hairi; Chaturvedi, Anuhar; Ganser, Arnold; Bejar, Rafael; Zhang, Dong-Er; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Heuser, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are heterogeneous myeloid disorders with prevalent mutations in several splicing factors, but the splicing programs linked to specific mutations or MDS in general remain to be systematically defined. We applied RASL-seq, a sensitive and cost-effective platform, to interrogate 5502 annotated splicing events in 169 samples from MDS patients or healthy individuals. We found that splicing signatures associated with normal hematopoietic lineages are largely related to cell signaling and differentiation programs, whereas MDS-linked signatures are primarily involved in cell cycle control and DNA damage responses. Despite the shared roles of affected splicing factors in the 3' splice site definition, mutations in U2AF1, SRSF2, and SF3B1 affect divergent splicing programs, and interestingly, the affected genes fall into converging cancer-related pathways. A risk score derived from 11 splicing events appears to be independently associated with an MDS prognosis and AML transformation, suggesting potential clinical relevance of altered splicing patterns in MDS. PMID:27492256

  4. TMEM16A alternative splicing coordination in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background TMEM16A, also known as Anoctamin-1, is a calcium-activated chloride channel gene overexpressed in many tumors. The role of TMEM16A in cancer is not completely understood and no data are available regarding the potential tumorigenic properties of the multiple isoforms generated by alternative splicing (AS). Methods We evaluated TMEM16A AS pattern, isoforms distribution and Splicing Coordination (SC), in normal tissues and breast cancers, through a semi-quantitative PCR-assay that amplifies transcripts across three AS exons, 6b, 13 and 15. Results In breast cancer, we did not observe an association either to AS of individual exons or to specific TMEM16A isoforms, and induced expression of the most common isoforms present in tumors in the HEK293 Flp-In Tet-ON system had no effect on cellular proliferation and migration. The analysis of splicing coordination, a mechanism that regulates AS of distant exons, showed a preferential association of exon 6b and 15 in several normal tissues and tumors: isoforms that predominantly include exon 6b tend to exclude exon 15 and vice versa. Interestingly, we found an increase in SC in breast tumors compared to matched normal tissues. Conclusions As the different TMEM16A isoforms do not affect proliferation or migration and do not associate with tumors, our results suggest that the resulting channel activities are not directly involved in cell growth and motility. Conversely, the observed increase in SC in breast tumors suggests that the maintenance of the regulatory mechanism that coordinates distant alternative spliced exons in multiple genes other than TMEM16A is necessary for cancer cell viability. PMID:23866066

  5. The roles played by highly truncated splice variants of G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes greatly increases the total number of receptor isoforms which may be expressed in a cell-dependent and time-dependent manner. This increased diversity of cell signaling options caused by the generation of splice variants is further enhanced by receptor dimerization. When alternative splicing generates highly truncated GPCRs with less than seven transmembrane (TM) domains, the predominant effect in vitro is that of a dominant-negative mutation associated with the retention of the wild-type receptor in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). For constitutively active (agonist-independent) GPCRs, their attenuated expression on the cell surface, and consequent decreased basal activity due to the dominant-negative effect of truncated splice variants, has pathological consequences. Truncated splice variants may conversely offer protection from disease when expression of co-receptors for binding of infectious agents to cells is attenuated due to ER retention of the wild-type co-receptor. In this review, we will see that GPCRs retained in the ER can still be functionally active but also that highly truncated GPCRs may also be functionally active. Although rare, some truncated splice variants still bind ligand and activate cell signaling responses. More importantly, by forming heterodimers with full-length GPCRs, some truncated splice variants also provide opportunities to generate receptor complexes with unique pharmacological properties. So, instead of assuming that highly truncated GPCRs are associated with faulty transcription processes, it is time to reassess their potential benefit to the host organism. PMID:22938630

  6. Titration of serine/arginine (SR) splicing factors during adenoviral infection modulates E1A pre-mRNA alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Himmelspach, M; Cavaloc, Y; Chebli, K; Stévenin, J; Gattoni, R

    1995-10-01

    Alternative splicing of the adenovirus-2 E1A pre-mRNA involves the use of three 5' splice sites and is modulated during infection because the 13S mRNA and 9S mRNA reactions are predominant during the early and late periods, respectively. We had previously reproduced in vitro the 13S to 9S modulation with nuclear extracts isolated from infected HeLa cells and shown that high molecular weight viral RNAs are involved in this modulation, most likely by sequestering or titrating general splicing factors. To further test this hypothesis, we titrated splicing factors from an uninfected nuclear extract using competitor RNA or by progressive inactivation of splicing factors with monoclonal antibodies. We found that the 13S to 9S modulation occurs when titrating only with certain RNAs (essentially adenoviral RNAs), and also by progressively inactivating the 9G8 SR splicing factor. The demonstration that late nuclear extracts contain levels of active SR splicing factors limiting for the 13S reaction has been made by complementation experiments. We show that late nuclear extracts do not complement SR factor-deficient extracts, whereas late extracts treated with micrococcal nuclease complement them. Furthermore, complementation of late nuclear extracts with each of the three 30-35-kDa SR factors (9G8, SC35, and SF2/ASF) restores an efficient 13S mRNA reaction. Thus, our results provide evidence that the 13S to 9S modulation is triggered through a titration of SR factors required for the 13S mRNA reaction by major late transcripts that accumulate in nuclei late in infection.

  7. Androgen Receptor Splice Variants Contribute to Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness through Induction of EMT and Expression of Stem Cell Marker Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Dejuan; Sethi, Seema; Li, Yiwei; Chen, Wei; Sakr, Wael A.; Heath, Elisabeth; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanism(s) by which androgen receptor (AR) splice variants contribute to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is still lacking. Methods Expressions of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and stem cell markers were molecularly tested using prostate cancer (PCa) cells transfected with AR and AR3 (also known as AR-V7) plasmids or siRNA, and also cultured cells under androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) condition. Cell migration, clonogenicity, sphere forming capacity was assessed using PCa cells under all experimental conditions and 3, 3′-diindolylmethane (DIM; BR-DIM) treatment. Human PCa samples from BR-DIM untreated or treated patients were also used for assessing the expression of AR3 and stem cell markers. Results Overexpression of AR led to the induction of EMT phenotype, while overexpression of AR3 not only induced EMT but also led to the expression of stem cell signature genes. More importantly, ADT enhanced the expression of AR and AR3 concomitant with up-regulated expression of EMT and stem cell marker genes. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment decreased the expression of AR and AR3, and reversed the expression of these EMT and stem cell marker genes. BR-DIM administered to PCa patients prior to radical prostatectomy inhibited the expression of cancer stem cell markers consistent with inhibition of self-renewal of PCa cells after BR-DIM treatment. Conclusion AR variants could contribute to PCa progression through induction of EMT and acquisition of stem cell characteristics, which could be attenuated by BR-DIM, suggesting that BR-DIM could become a promising agent for the prevention of CRPC and/or for the treatment of PCa PMID:25307492

  8. Alternative Splicing in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Love, Julia E.; Hayden, Eric J.; Rohn, Troy T.

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases have a variety of different genes contributing to their underlying pathology. Unfortunately, for many of these diseases it is not clear how changes in gene expression affect pathology. Transcriptome analysis of neurodegenerative diseases using ribonucleic acid sequencing (RNA Seq) and real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) provides for a platform to allow investigators to determine the contribution of various genes to the disease phenotype. In Alzheimer’s disease (AD) there are several candidate genes reported that may be associated with the underlying pathology and are, in addition, alternatively spliced. Thus, AD is an ideal disease to examine how alternative splicing may affect pathology. In this context, genes of particular interest to AD pathology include the amyloid precursor protein (APP), TAU, and apolipoprotein E (APOE). Here, we review the evidence of alternative splicing of these genes in normal and AD patients, and recent therapeutic approaches to control splicing. PMID:26942228

  9. Functional Characterization of the spf/ash Splicing Variation in OTC Deficiency of Mice and Man

    PubMed Central

    Viecelli, Hiu Man; Rüfenacht, Veronique; Pérez, Belén; Ugarte, Magdalena; Häberle, Johannes; Thöny, Beat; Desviat, Lourdes Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    The spf/ash mouse model of ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency, a severe urea cycle disorder, is caused by a mutation (c.386G>A; p.R129H) in the last nucleotide of exon 4 of the Otc gene, affecting the 5’ splice site and resulting in partial use of a cryptic splice site 48 bp into the adjacent intron. The equivalent nucleotide change and predicted amino acid change is found in OTC deficient patients. Here we have used liver tissue and minigene assays to dissect the transcriptional profile resulting from the “spf/ash” mutation in mice and man. For the mutant mouse, we confirmed liver transcripts corresponding to partial intron 4 retention by the use of the c.386+48 cryptic site and to normally spliced transcripts, with exon 4 always containing the c.386G>A (p.R129H) variant. In contrast, the OTC patient exhibited exon 4 skipping or c.386G>A (p.R129H)-variant exon 4 retention by using the natural or a cryptic splice site at nucleotide position c.386+4. The corresponding OTC tissue enzyme activities were between 3-6% of normal control in mouse and human liver. The use of the cryptic splice sites was reproduced in minigenes carrying murine or human mutant sequences. Some normally spliced transcripts could be detected in minigenes in both cases. Antisense oligonucleotides designed to block the murine cryptic +48 site were used in minigenes in an attempt to redirect splicing to the natural site. The results highlight the relevance of in depth investigations of the molecular mechanisms of splicing mutations and potential therapeutic approaches. Notably, they emphasize the fact that findings in animal models may not be applicable for human patients due to the different genomic context of the mutations. PMID:25853564

  10. In Vitro and In Vivo Modulation of Alternative Splicing by the Biguanide Metformin

    PubMed Central

    Laustriat, Delphine; Gide, Jacqueline; Barrault, Laetitia; Chautard, Emilie; Benoit, Clara; Auboeuf, Didier; Boland, Anne; Battail, Christophe; Artiguenave, François; Deleuze, Jean-François; Bénit, Paule; Rustin, Pierre; Franc, Sylvia; Charpentier, Guillaume; Furling, Denis; Bassez, Guillaume; Nissan, Xavier; Martinat, Cécile; Peschanski, Marc; Baghdoyan, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    Major physiological changes are governed by alternative splicing of RNA, and its misregulation may lead to specific diseases. With the use of a genome-wide approach, we show here that this splicing step can be modified by medication and demonstrate the effects of the biguanide metformin, on alternative splicing. The mechanism of action involves AMPK activation and downregulation of the RBM3 RNA-binding protein. The effects of metformin treatment were tested on myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1), a multisystemic disease considered to be a spliceopathy. We show that this drug promotes a corrective effect on several splicing defects associated with DM1 in derivatives of human embryonic stem cells carrying the causal mutation of DM1 as well as in primary myoblasts derived from patients. The biological effects of metformin were shown to be compatible with typical therapeutic dosages in a clinical investigation involving diabetic patients. The drug appears to act as a modifier of alternative splicing of a subset of genes and may therefore have novel therapeutic potential for many more diseases besides those directly linked to defective alternative splicing. PMID:26528939

  11. New discoveries of old SON: a link between RNA splicing and cancer.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Christopher J; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ahn, Eun-Young Erin

    2014-02-01

    The SON protein is a ubiquitously expressed DNA- and RNA-binding protein primarily localized to nuclear speckles. Although several early studies implicated SON in DNA-binding, tumorigenesis and apoptosis, functional significance of this protein had not been recognized until recent studies discovered SON as a novel RNA splicing co-factor. During constitutive RNA splicing, SON ensures efficient intron removal from the transcripts containing suboptimal splice sites. Importantly, SON-mediated splicing is required for proper processing of selective transcripts related to cell cycle, microtubules, centrosome maintenance, and genome stability. Moreover, SON regulates alternative splicing of RNAs from the genes involved in apoptosis and epigenetic modification. In addition to the role in RNA splicing, SON has an ability to suppress transcriptional activation at certain promoter/enhancer DNA sequences. Considering the multiple SON target genes which are directly involved in cell proliferation, genome stability and chromatin modifications, SON is an emerging player in gene regulation during cancer development and progression. Here, we summarize available information from several early studies on SON, and highlight recent discoveries describing molecular mechanisms of SON-mediated gene regulation. We propose that our future effort on better understanding of diverse SON functions would reveal novel targets for cancer therapy.

  12. The transcription factor FBI-1 inhibits SAM68-mediated BCL-X alternative splicing and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bielli, Pamela; Busà, Roberta; Di Stasi, Savino M; Munoz, Manuel J; Botti, Flavia; Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Sette, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is tightly coupled to transcription for the majority of human genes. However, how these two processes are linked is not well understood. Here, we unveil a direct role for the transcription factor FBI-1 in the regulation of AS. FBI-1 interacts with the splicing factor SAM68 and reduces its binding to BCL-X mRNA. This, in turn, results in the selection of the proximal 5′ splice site in BCL-X exon 2, thereby favoring the anti-apoptotic BCL-XL variant and counteracting SAM68-mediated apoptosis. Conversely, depletion of FBI-1, or expression of a SAM68 mutant lacking the FBI-1 binding region, restores the ability of SAM68 to induce BCL-XS splicing and apoptosis. FBI-1's role in splicing requires the activity of histone deacetylases, whose pharmacological inhibition recapitulates the effects of FBI-1 knockdown. Our study reveals an unexpected function for FBI-1 in splicing modulation with a direct impact on cell survival. PMID:24514149

  13. The transcription factor FBI-1 inhibits SAM68-mediated BCL-X alternative splicing and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bielli, Pamela; Busà, Roberta; Di Stasi, Savino M; Munoz, Manuel J; Botti, Flavia; Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Sette, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is tightly coupled to transcription for the majority of human genes. However, how these two processes are linked is not well understood. Here, we unveil a direct role for the transcription factor FBI-1 in the regulation of AS. FBI-1 interacts with the splicing factor SAM68 and reduces its binding to BCL-X mRNA. This, in turn, results in the selection of the proximal 5' splice site in BCL-X exon 2, thereby favoring the anti-apoptotic BCL-XL variant and counteracting SAM68-mediated apoptosis. Conversely, depletion of FBI-1, or expression of a SAM68 mutant lacking the FBI-1 binding region, restores the ability of SAM68 to induce BCL-XS splicing and apoptosis. FBI-1's role in splicing requires the activity of histone deacetylases, whose pharmacological inhibition recapitulates the effects of FBI-1 knockdown. Our study reveals an unexpected function for FBI-1 in splicing modulation with a direct impact on cell survival.

  14. Antagonistic factors control the unproductive splicing of SC35 terminal intron

    PubMed Central

    Dreumont, Natacha; Hardy, Sara; Behm-Ansmant, Isabelle; Kister, Liliane; Branlant, Christiane; Stévenin, James; Bourgeois, Cyril F.

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing is regulated in part by variations in the relative concentrations of a variety of factors, including serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins. The SR protein SC35 self-regulates its expression by stimulating unproductive splicing events in the 3′ untranslated region of its own pre-mRNA. Using various minigene constructs containing the terminal retained intron and flanking exons, we identified in the highly conserved last exon a number of exonic splicing enhancer elements responding specifically to SC35, and showed an inverse correlation between affinity of SC35 and enhancer strength. The enhancer region, which is included in a long stem loop, also contains repressor elements, and is recognized by other RNA-binding proteins, notably hnRNP H protein and TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43). Finally, in vitro and in cellulo experiments indicated that hnRNP H and TDP-43 antagonize the binding of SC35 to the terminal exon and specifically repress the use of SC35 terminal 3′ splice site. Our study provides new information about the molecular mechanisms of SC35-mediated splicing activation. It also highlights the existence of a complex network of self- and cross-regulatory mechanisms between splicing regulators, which controls their homeostasis and offers many ways of modulating their concentration in response to the cellular environment. PMID:19965769

  15. Altered mRNA Splicing in SMN-Depleted Motor Neuron-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Todd, A. Gary; Astroski, Jacob W.; Lin, Hai; Liu, Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an intractable neurodegenerative disease afflicting 1 in 6–10,000 live births. One of the key functions of the SMN protein is regulation of spliceosome assembly. Reduced levels of the SMN protein that are observed in SMA have been shown to result in aberrant mRNA splicing. SMN-dependent mis-spliced transcripts in motor neurons may cause stresses that are particularly harmful and may serve as potential targets for the treatment of motor neuron disease or as biomarkers in the SMA patient population. We performed deep RNA sequencing using motor neuron-like NSC-34 cells to screen for SMN-dependent mRNA processing changes that occur following acute depletion of SMN. We identified SMN-dependent splicing changes, including an intron retention event that results in the production of a truncated Rit1 transcript. This intron-retained transcript is stable and is mis-spliced in spinal cord from symptomatic SMA mice. Constitutively active Rit1 ameliorated the neurite outgrowth defect in SMN depleted NSC-34 cells, while expression of the truncated protein product of the mis-spliced Rit1 transcript inhibited neurite extension. These results reveal new insights into the biological consequence of SMN-dependent splicing in motor neuron-like cells. PMID:27736905

  16. ROS and p53 in regulation of UVB-induced HDM2 alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lingying; Wu, Shiyong

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays an important role in proteasome diversity and gene expression regulation in eukaryotic cells. Hdm2, the human homolog of mdm2 (murine double minute oncogene 2), is known to be an oncogene as its role in suppression of p53. Hdm2 alternative splicing, occurs in both tumor and normal tissues, is believed to be a response of cells for cellular stress, and thus modulate p53 activity. Therefore, understanding the regulation of hdm2 splicing is critical in elucidating the mechanisms of tumor development and progression. In this study, we determined the effect of ultraviolet B light (UVB) on alternative splicing of hdm2. Our data indicated that UVB (50 mJ cm(-2)) alone is not a good inducer of alternative splicing of hdm2. The less effectiveness could be due to the induction of ROS and p53 by UVB because removing ROS by L-NAC (10 mm) in p53 null cells could lead to alternative splicing of hdm2 upon UVB irradiation. PMID:24986024

  17. Expression and alternative splicing pattern of human telomerase reverse transcriptase in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Masachika; Kamma, Hiroshi; Wu, Wenwen; Hamasaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Setsuko; Horiguchi, Hisashi; Matsui-Horiguchi, Miwa; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2004-04-01

    Telomerase activity is generally considered to be necessary for cancer cells to avoid senescence. The expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is believed to be a rate-limiting step in telomerase activation. Recently, it has been proposed that the alternative splicing of hTERT is also involved in regulation of telomerase activity. However, the regulatory mechanism of telomerase in cancer cells has not been thoroughly investigated. To clarify it in lung cancer cells, we measured the expression of the hTERT transcript, analyzed its alternative splicing by RT-PCR, and compared it with telomerase activity and telomere length. The expression of the hTERT transcript was positively correlated with telomerase activity in lung cancer cells. Cancer cells with high telomerase activity contained 4 splicing variants of hTERT, and the full-length variant was 31.3-54.2% of the total transcripts. Cells of the TKB-20 cell line, which has extremely low telomerase activity, showed a different splicing pattern of hTERT in addition to low expression. The functional full-length variant was scarcely detected in TKB-20 cells, suggesting that the telomerase activity was repressed by alternative splicing of hTERT. Telomere length was not necessarily correlated with telomerase activity or hTERT expression in lung cancer cells. Cells of the TKB-4 cell line that also showed relatively low telomerase activity (as TKB-20 cells) had long telomeres. In conclusion, hTERT expression is regulated at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in lung cancer cells, and the alternative splicing of hTERT is involved in the control of telomerase activity.

  18. Differential unroofing within the central metasedimentary Belt of the Grenville Orogen: constraints from 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosca, M.A.; Essene, E.J.; Kunk, M.J.; Sutter, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    An 40Ar/39Ar thermochronological investigation of upper greenschist to granulite facies gneiss, amphibolite and marble was conducted in the Central Metasedimentary Belt (CMB), Ontario, to constrain its cooling history. Incremental 40Ar/39Ar release spectra indicate that substantial differential unroofing occurred in the CMB between ??? 1000 and ??? 600 Ma. A consistent pattern of significantly older hornblende and phlogopite 40Ar/3Ar cooling ages on the southeast sides of major northeast striking shear zones is interpreted to reflect late displacement due to extensional deformation. Variations in hornblende 40Ar/39Ar age plateaus exceeding 200 Ma occur over distances less than 50 km with major age discontinuities occurring across the Robertson Lake shear zone and the Sharbot Lake mylonite zone which separate the Sharbot Lake terrane from the Elzevir and Frontenac terranes. Extensional displacements of up to 14 km are inferred between the Frontenac and Elzevir terranes of the CMB. No evidence for significant post argon-closure vertical displacement is indicated in the vicinity of the Perth Road mylonite within the Frontenac terrane. Variations of nearly 100 Ma in phlogopite 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages occur in undeformed marble on either side of the Bancroft Shear Zone. Phlogopites from sheared and mylonitized marble within the shear zone yield 40Ar/39Ar diffusional loss profiles, but have older geologically meaningless ages thought to reflect incorporation of excess argon. By ??? 900 Ma, southeast directed extension was occurring throughout the CMB, possibly initiated along previous zones of compressional shearing. An easterly migration of active zones of extension is inferred, possibly related to an earlier, overall easterly migration of active zones of regional thrusting and easterly migration of an ancient subduction zone. The duration of extensional shearing is not well constrained, but must have ceased before ??? 600 Ma as required by the deposition of overlying

  19. The Alternative Splicing Mutation Database: a hub for investigations of alternative splicing using mutational evidence

    PubMed Central

    Bechtel, Jason M; Rajesh, Preeti; Ilikchyan, Irina; Deng, Ying; Mishra, Pankaj K; Wang, Qi; Wu, Xiaochun; Afonin, Kirill A; Grose, William E; Wang, Ye; Khuder, Sadik; Fedorov, Alexei

    2008-01-01

    Background Some mutations in the internal regions of exons occur within splicing enhancers and silencers, influencing the pattern of alternative splicing in the corresponding genes. To understand how these sequence changes affect splicing, we created a database of these mutations. Findings The Alternative Splicing Mutation Database (ASMD) serves as a repository for all exonic mutations not associated with splicing junctions that measurably change the pattern of alternative splicing. In this initial published release (version 1.2), only human sequences are present, but the ASMD will grow to include other organisms, (see Availability and requirements section for the ASMD web address). This relational database allows users to investigate connections between mutations and features of the surrounding sequences, including flanking sequences, RNA secondary structures and strengths of splice junctions. Splicing effects of the mutations are quantified by the relative presence of alternative mRNA isoforms with and without a given mutation. This measure is further categorized by the accuracy of the experimental methods employed. The database currently contains 170 mutations in 66 exons, yet these numbers increase regularly. We developed an algorithm to derive a table of oligonucleotide Splicing Potential (SP) values from the ASMD dataset. We present the SP concept and tools in detail in our corresponding article. Conclusion The current data set demonstrates that mutations affecting splicing are located throughout exons and might be enriched within local RNA secondary structures. Exons from the ASMD have below average splicing junction strength scores, but the difference is small and is judged not to be significant. PMID:18611286

  20. Preliminary 40Ar-39Ar thermochronological study of Dien Bien Phu Fault, northern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T.; Lo, C.; Wang, P.; Lee, T.; Chung, S.; Lan, C.

    2003-12-01

    The Song Ma belt, located along the suture zone between the South China and Indochina blocks, was offset by the Dien Bien Phu Fault (DBF) in northern Vietnam. Many previous studies suggested that the Dien Bien Phu Fault is one of the Tertiary shear zones, resulted from the Cenozoic extrusion tectonics due to the Eurasian-Indian collision. However, the timing of the movement of DBF is remained unclear due to lacking of age data. In the present study, schists and mylonitic granites from DBF, and undeformed granites from the granitic belt along the south China block, were analysed by 40Ar-39Ar method. K-feldspar, hornblende, and biotite samples form granite plutons along south edge of South China block displayed different age ranges between opposite sides of DBF. Samples from plutonic body which is located in west side exhibit plateau ages ranging form 207Ma to 229Ma. Whereas, hornblende separates from granites on the west side exhibit much older plateau dates at around 277Ma. More detail studies were required to get better understand about the discrepancy of dating results between granitic masses located in different sides of DBF. On the other hand, Laser 40Ar-39Ar single-grain analyses conducted on deformed biotites and muscovites separated from the schists in DBF, show 40Ar-39Ar ages ranging form 185Ma to 205Ma, which are much younger than the plateau dates of those undeformed granitic samples. In summary, K-feldspar, hornblende and biotite samples from the undeformed granites, exhibit plateau dates in the range of 207- 277Ma, reflecting the ages of plutonism during the Indosinian orogeny. Whereas, muscovites and biotites extracted from schists and deformed granites in DBF, display young 40Ar-39Ar ages in the range of 205-185 Ma. This may suggest that although the DBF might have been reactivated during the Cenozoic extrusion tectonics, but it was in fact active in the Mesozoic.

  1. Hyper-parallel tempering Monte Carlo simulations of Ar adsorption in new models of microporous non-graphitizing activated carbon: effect of microporosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzyk, Artur P.; Furmaniak, Sylwester; Gauden, Piotr A.; Harris, Peter J. F.; Wloch, Jerzy; Kowalczyk, Piotr

    2007-10-01

    The adsorption of gases on microporous carbons is still poorly understood, partly because the structure of these carbons is not well known. Here, a model of microporous carbons based on fullerene-like fragments is used as the basis for a theoretical study of Ar adsorption on carbon. First, a simulation box was constructed, containing a plausible arrangement of carbon fragments. Next, using a new Monte Carlo simulation algorithm, two types of carbon fragments were gradually placed into the initial structure to increase its microporosity. Thirty six different microporous carbon structures were generated in this way. Using the method proposed recently by Bhattacharya and Gubbins (BG), the micropore size distributions of the obtained carbon models and the average micropore diameters were calculated. For ten chosen structures, Ar adsorption isotherms (87 K) were simulated via the hyper-parallel tempering Monte Carlo simulation method. The isotherms obtained in this way were described by widely applied methods of microporous carbon characterisation, i.e. Nguyen and Do, Horvath-Kawazoe, high-resolution αs plots, adsorption potential distributions and the Dubinin-Astakhov (DA) equation. From simulated isotherms described by the DA equation, the average micropore diameters were calculated using empirical relationships proposed by different authors and they were compared with those from the BG method.

  2. Analysis of specific RNA in cultured cells through quantitative integration of q-PCR and N-SIM single cell FISH images: Application to hormonal stimulation of StAR transcription.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwoo; Foong, Yee Hoon; Musaitif, Ibrahim; Tong, Tiegang; Jefcoate, Colin

    2016-07-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) has been proposed to serve as the switch that can turn on/off steroidogenesis. We investigated the events that facilitate dynamic StAR transcription in response to cAMP stimulation in MA-10 Leydig cells, focusing on splicing anomalies at StAR gene loci. We used 3' reverse primers in a single reaction to respectively quantify StAR primary (p-RNA), spliced (sp-RNA/mRNA), and extended 3' untranslated region (UTR) transcripts, which were quantitatively imaged by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This approach delivers spatio-temporal resolution of initiation and splicing at single StAR loci, and transfers individual mRNA molecules to cytoplasmic sites. Gene expression was biphasic, initially showing slow splicing, transitioning to concerted splicing. The alternative 3.5-kb mRNAs were distinguished through the use of extended 3'UTR probes, which exhibited distinctive mitochondrial distribution. Combining quantitative PCR and FISH enables imaging of localization of RNA expression and analysis of RNA processing rates.

  3. Alternative Splicing of G9a Regulates Neuronal Differentiation.

    PubMed