Science.gov

Sample records for active archive secaa

  1. ITM-Related Data and Model Services at the Sun Earth Connection Active Archive (SECAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, R.; Bilitza, D.; Kovalick, T.; Papitashvili, N.; Candey, R.; Han, D.

    2004-12-01

    NASA's Sun Earth Connection Active Archive (SECAA) provides access to a large volume of data and models that are of relevance to Ionospheric, Thermospheric and Mesospheric (ITM) physics. SECAA has developed a number of web systems to facilitate user access to this important data source and is making these services available through Web Services (or Application Programming Interfaces, API) directly to applications such as VxOs. The Coordinated Data Analysis web (CDAWeb) lets user plot data using a wide range of parameter display options including mapped images and movies. Capabilities also include parameter listings and data downloads in CDF and ASCII format. CDAWeb provides access to data from most of NASA's currently operating space science satellites and many of the earlier missions; of special ITM interest are DE-2, ISIS, FAST, Equator-S, and TIMED. SECAA maintains and supports the Common Data Format (CDF) including software to read and write CDF files. Most recently translator services have been added for CDF translations to/from netCDF, FITS, CDFXML, and ASCII. The SSCWeb interface enables users to plot orbits for the majority of space physics satellites (including TIMED, UARS, DMSP, NOAA, LANL etc.) and to query for magnetic field line conjunctions between multiple spacecraft and ground stations and for magnetic region occupancy. Recently an Interactive 3-D orbit viewer was added to SSCWeb. Access to legacy data from older ITM satellite missions is provided through the ATMOWeb system with the ability to generate plots and download data subsets in ASCII format. Recently added capabilities include the option to filter the data using an upper and lower boundary for any one of the data set parameters. We will also present the newest version of the web portal to SECAA's models catalog, ftp archive, and web interfaces. The web interfaces (Fortran, C, Java) let users compute, list, plot, and download model parameters for selected models (IRI, IGRF, MSIS/CIRA, AE

  2. Importance of SECAA Web Services for the Integrated SEC Data Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candey, R. M.; Chimiak, R. A.; Han, D. B.; Harris, B. T.; Johnson, R. C.; Klipsch, C. A.; Kovalick, T. J.; Leckner, H. A.; Liu, M. H.; McGuire, R. E.

    2004-12-01

    The Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) at NASA GSFC has developed new and state-of-the-art, distributed programming (web services) interfaces to SPDF's space science mission services and data. This work is an essential step in integrating these powerful and popular SPDF software systems (and the NASA mission data they now serve) with external science data and model software systems under a NASA Virtual Observatory paradigm for enhancing the scientific return of space physics research. The distributed components of a space physics virtual observatory work together via standard interfaces and metadata agreements to form a system that appears as a single super-instrument providing geophysical measurements and models across time and space, enabling researchers to easily and seamlessly analyze data from many more sources than possible before. We are providing a critical set of these lower level components, leveraging our data format expertise and our existing and very popular science and orbit data web-based services, Coordinated Data Analysis Web [CDAWeb] and Satellite Situation Center Web [SSCweb], by adding web services for orbit location, data finding across FTP sites and in CDAWeb, data file format translation, and display. These services tie together existing data holdings, standardize and simplify their use, and enable much enhanced interoperability and data analysis. A Java3D application, TIPSOD (Tool for Interactive Plotting, Sonification and 3-D Orbit Display), developed in-house, makes use of these web services. CDAWeb, SSCWeb, CDF tools, and web services are a joint effort of the Sun-Earth Connections (SEC) Active Archive (SECAA) in the NASA GSFC Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) and the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC); see .

  3. Cluster Active Archive: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, H.; Perry, C.; McCaffrey, S.; Herment, D.; Allen, A. J.; Harvey, C. C.; Escoubet, C. P.; Gruenberger, C.; Taylor, M. G. G. T.; Turner, R.

    The four-satellite Cluster mission investigates the small-scale structures and physical processes related to interaction between the solar wind and the magnetospheric plasma. The Cluster Active Archive (CAA) (URL: http://caa.estec.esa.int) will contain the entire set of Cluster high-resolution data and other allied products in a standard format and with a complete set of metadata in machine readable format. The total amount of the data files in compressed format is expected to exceed 50 TB. The data archive is publicly accessible and suitable for science use and publication by the world-wide scientific community. The CAA aims to provide user-friendly services for searching and accessing these data and ancillary products. The CAA became operational in February 2006 and as of Summer 2008 has data from most of the Cluster instruments for at least the first 5 years of operations (2001-2005). The coverage and range of products are being continually improved with more than 200 datasets available from each spacecraft, including high-resolution magnetic and electric DC fields and wave spectra; full three-dimensional electron and ion distribution functions from a few eV to hundreds of keV; and various ancillary and browse products to help with spacecraft and event location. The CAA is continuing to extend and improve the online capabilities of the system and the quality of the existing data. It will add new data files for years 2006-2009 and is preparing for the long-term archive with complete coverage after the completion of the Cluster mission.

  4. Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodden, Lee; Pease, Phil; Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Rosen, Wayne

    1993-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center (GSFC V0 DAAC) is being developed to enhance and improve scientific research and productivity by consolidating access to remote sensor earth science data in the pre-EOS time frame. In cooperation with scientists from the science labs at GSFC, other NASA facilities, universities, and other government agencies, the DAAC will support data acquisition, validation, archive and distribution. The DAAC is being developed in response to EOSDIS Project Functional Requirements as well as from requirements originating from individual science projects such as SeaWiFS, Meteor3/TOMS2, AVHRR Pathfinder, TOVS Pathfinder, and UARS. The GSFC V0 DAAC has begun operational support for the AVHRR Pathfinder (as of April, 1993), TOVS Pathfinder (as of July, 1993) and the UARS (September, 1993) Projects, and is preparing to provide operational support for SeaWiFS (August, 1994) data. The GSFC V0 DAAC has also incorporated the existing data, services, and functionality of the DAAC/Climate, DAAC/Land, and the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) Systems.

  5. The Cluster Active Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, H.; Perry, C. H.; Escoubet, C. P.; McCaffrey, S.; Herment, D.; Esson, S.; Bowen, H.; Buggy, O.; Taylor, M. G.

    2008-05-01

    The four-satellite Cluster mission investigates small-scale structures (in three dimensions) of the Earth's plasma environment, such as those involved in the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetospheric plasma, in global magnetotail dynamics, in cross-tail currents, and in the formation and dynamics of the neutral line and of plasmoids. The Cluster Active Archive CAA (http://caa.estec.esa.int/) will contain the entire set of Cluster high resolution data and other allied products in a standard format and with a complete set of metadata in machine readable form. The data archived are (1) publicly accessible, (2) of the best quality achievable with the given resources, and (3) suitable for science use and publication by both the Cluster and broader scientific community. The CAA to provide user friendly services for searching and accessing these data, e.g. users can save and restore their selections speeding up similar requests. The CAA is continuing to extend and improve the online capabilities of the system, e.g., the CAA products can be downloaded either via a web interface or a machine accessible interface.

  6. Earth observation archive activities at DRA Farnborough

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, M. D.; Williams, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Space Sector, Defence Research Agency (DRA), Farnborough have been actively involved in the acquisition and processing of Earth Observation data for over 15 years. During that time an archive of over 20,000 items has been built up. This paper describes the major archive activities, including: operation and maintenance of the main DRA Archive, the development of a prototype Optical Disc Archive System (ODAS), the catalog systems in use at DRA, the UK Processing and Archive Facility for ERS-1 data, and future plans for archiving activities.

  7. Examining Activism in Practice: A Qualitative Study of Archival Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Joy Rainbow

    2013-01-01

    While archival literature has increasingly discussed activism in the context of archives, there has been little examination of the extent to which archivists in the field have accepted or incorporated archival activism into practice. Scholarship that has explored the practical application of archival activism has predominately focused on case…

  8. Archive & Data Management Activities for ISRO Science Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakkar, Navita; Moorthi, Manthira; Gopala Krishna, Barla; Prashar, Ajay; Srinivasan, T. P.

    2012-07-01

    . For other AO payloads users can view the metadata and the data is available through FTP site. This same archival and dissemination strategy will be extended for the next moon mission Chandrayaan-2. ASTROSAT is going to be the first multi-wavelength astronomical mission for which the data is archived at ISSDC. It consists of five astronomical payloads that would allow simultaneous multi-wavelengths observations from X-ray to Ultra-Violet (UV) of astronomical objects. It is planned to archive the data sets in FITS. The archive of the ASTROSAT will be done in the Archive Layer at ISSDC. The Browse of the Archive will be available through the ISDA (Indian Science Data Archive) web site. The Browse will be IVOA compliant with a search mechanism using VOTable. The data will be available to the users only on request basis via a FTP site after the lock in period is over. It is planned that the Level2 pipeline software and various modules for processing the data sets will be also available on the web site. This paper, describes the archival procedure of Chandrayaan-1 and archive plan for the ASTROSAT, Chandrayaan-2 and other future mission of ISRO including the discussion on data management activities.

  9. The Hydrologic Cycle Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Danny M.; Goodman, H. Michael

    1995-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center Distributed Active Archive Center in Huntsville, Alabama supports the acquisition, production, archival and dissemination of data relevant to the study of the global hydrologic cycle. This paper describes the Hydrologic Cycle DAAC, surveys its principle data holdings, addresses future growth, and gives information for accessing the data sets.

  10. Cluster Active Archive: lessons learnt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, H. E.; Perry, C. H.; Taylor, M. G.; Escoubet, C. P.; Masson, A.

    2010-12-01

    The ESA Cluster Active Archive (CAA) was opened to public in February 2006 after an initial three-year development phase. It provides access (both web GUI and command-line tool are available) to the calibrated full-resolution datasets of the four-satellite Cluster mission. The data archive is publicly accessible and suitable for science use and publication by the world-wide scientific community. There are more than 350 datasets from each spacecraft, including high-resolution magnetic and electric DC and AC fields as well as full 3-dimensional electron and ion distribution functions and moments from a few eV to hundreds of keV. The Cluster mission has been in operation since February 2001, and currently although the CAA can provide access to some recent observations, the ingestion of some other datasets can be delayed by a few years due to large and difficult calibration routines of aging detectors. The quality of the datasets is the central matter to the CAA. Having the same instrument on four spacecraft allows the cross-instrument comparisons and provide confidence on some of the instrumental calibration parameters. Furthermore it is highly important that many physical parameters are measured by more than one instrument which allow to perform extensive and continuous cross-calibration analyses. In addition some of the instruments can be regarded as absolute or reference measurements for other instruments. The CAA attempts to avoid as much as possible mission-specific acronyms and concepts and tends to use more generic terms in describing the datasets and their contents in order to ease the usage of the CAA data by “non-Cluster” scientists. Currently the CAA has more 1000 users and every month more than 150 different users log in the CAA for plotting and/or downloading observations. The users download about 1 TeraByte of data every month. The CAA has separated the graphical tool from the download tool because full-resolution datasets can be visualized in many

  11. ESA Science Archives and associated VO activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arviset, Christophe; Baines, Deborah; Barbarisi, Isa; Castellanos, Javier; Cheek, Neil; Costa, Hugo; Fajersztejn, Nicolas; Gonzalez, Juan; Fernandez, Monica; Laruelo, Andrea; Leon, Ignacio; Ortiz, Inaki; Osuna, Pedro; Salgado, Jesus; Tapiador, Daniel

    ESA's European Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC), near Madrid, Spain, hosts most of ESA space based missions' scientific archives, in planetary (Mars Express, Venus Express, Rosetta, Huygens, Giotto, Smart-1, all in ESA Planetary Science Archive), in astronomy (XMM-Newton, Herschel, ISO, Integral, Exosat, Planck) and in solar physics (Soho). All these science archives are operated by a dedicated Science Archives and Virtual Observatory Team (SAT) at ESAC, enabling common and efficient design, development, operations and maintenance of the archives software systems. This also ensures long term preservation and availability of such science archives, as a sustainable service to the science community. ESA space science data can be accessed through powerful and user friendly user interface, as well as from machine scriptable interface and through VO interfaces. Virtual Observatory activities are also fully part of ESA archiving strategy and ESA is a very ac-tive partner in VO initiatives in Europe through Euro-VO AIDA and EuroPlanet and worldwide through the IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) and the IPDA (International Planetary Data Alliance).

  12. Planetary Data Archiving Activities of ISRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopala Krishna, Barla; D, Rao J.; Thakkar, Navita; Prashar, Ajay; Manthira Moorthi, S.

    composition & mineralogy of mars, Mars Exospheric Neutral Composition Analyser (MENCA) to study the composition and density of the Martian neutral atmosphere and Lyman Alpha Photometer (LAP) to investigate the loss process of water in Martian atmosphere, towards fulfilling the mission objectives. Active archive created in PDS for some of the instrument data during the earth phase of the mission is being analysed by the PIs. The Mars science data from the onboard instruments is expected during September 2014. The next planetary mission planned to moon is Chandrayaan-2 which consists of an orbiter having five instruments (http://www.isro.org) viz, (i) Imaging IR Spectrometer (IIRS) for mineral mapping, (ii) TMC-2 for topographic mapping, (iii) MiniSAR to detect water ice in the permanently shadowed regions on the Lunar poles, up to a depth of a few meters, (iv) Large Area Soft X-ray spectrometer (CLASS) & Solar X-ray Monitor (XSM) for mapping the major elements present on the lunar surface and (v)Neutral Mass Spectrometer (ChACE2) to carry out a detailed study of the lunar exosphere towards moon exploration; a rover for some specific experiments and a Lander for technology experiment and demonstration. The data is planned to be archived in PDS standards.

  13. Status of LDEF activation measurements and archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. Alan; Parnell, Thomas A.; Laird, Christopher E.

    1995-01-01

    We review the status of induced radioactivity measurements for the LDEF spacecraft which includes studies of the nuclide, target, directional and depth dependences of the activation. Analysis of the data has focused on extraction of the specific activities for many materials to develop a global picture of the low Earth orbital environment to which the LDEF was subjected. Preliminary comparisons of data in a previous review showed that it was possible to make meaningful intercomparisons between results obtained at different facilities. Generally these comparisons were good and gave results to within 10-20 percent, although some analysis remains. These results clearly provide constraints for recent calculations being performed of the radiation environment of the LDEF. We are not anticipating a period of production of final activation results. An archive is being prepared jointly between NASA/Marshall and Eastern Kentucky University which will include gamma ray spectra and other intermediate results.

  14. Contents of the JPL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) archive, version 2-91

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Elizabeth A. (Editor); Lassanyi, Ruby A. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) archive at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) includes satellite data sets for the ocean sciences and global change research to facilitate multidisciplinary use of satellite ocean data. Parameters include sea surface height, surface wind vector, sea surface temperature, atmospheric liquid water, and surface pigment concentration. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory DAAC is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) and will be the United States distribution site for the Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/POSEIDON data and metadata.

  15. Interim report on Landsat national archive activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, John E.

    1993-01-01

    The Department of the Interior (DOI) has the responsibility to preserve and to distribute most Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and Multispectral Scanner (MSS) data that have been acquired by the five Landsat satellites operational since July 1972. Data that are still covered by exclusive marketing rights, which were granted by the U.S. Government to the commercial Landsat operator, cannot be distributed by the DOI. As the designated national archive for Landsat data, the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Data Center (EDC) has initiated two new programs to protect and make available any of the 625,000 MSS scenes currently archived and the 200,000 TM scenes to be archived at EDC by 1995. A specially configured system has begun converting Landsat MSS data from obsolete high density tapes (HDT's) to more dense digital cassette tapes. After transcription, continuous satellite swaths are (1) divided into standard scenes defined by a world reference system, (2) geographically located by latitude and longitude, and (3) assessed for overall quality. Digital browse images are created by subsampling the full-resolution swaths. Conversion of the TM HDT's will begin in the fourth quarter of 1992 and will be conducted concurrently with MSS conversion. Although the TM archive is three times larger than the entire MSS archive, conversion of data from both sensor systems and consolidation of the entire Landsat archive at EDC will be completed by the end of 1994. Some MSS HDT's have deteriorated, primarily as a result of hydrolysis of the pigment binder. Based on a small sample of the 11 terabytes of post-1978 MSS data and the 41 terabytes of TM data to be converted, it appears that to date, less than 2 percent of the data have been lost. The data loss occurs within small portions of some scenes; few scenes are lost entirely. Approximately 10,000 pre-1979 MSS HDT's have deteriorated to such an extent, as a result of hydrolysis, that the data cannot be recovered without special treatment of

  16. Coordinating Computing, Network and Archiving activities within INAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasian, F.; Bodo, G.; Fini, L.; Garilli, B.; Longo, G.; Massimino, P.; Nanni, M.; Smareglia, R.

    When INAF was reformed, it was decided to create a `Computing, Network and Archives Service' within the Projects Department, in order to coordinate all computer-related activities and to properly harmonize management and development policies in the field. A `Computing, Network and Archives Committee' was immediately nominated for the duration of one year to cope with the immediate needs. The Committee has the task of identifying and making operational strategies to coordinate activities in the areas of interest, improving service to all users, implementing synergies and economies, while guaranteeing a single INAF contact point for all external institutions working in the field.

  17. EDI Data Products in the Cluster Active Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, E.; Puhl-Quinn, P.; Vaith, H.; Chutter, M.; Quinn, J.; Paschmann, G.; Torbert, R.

    The Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) contribution to the Cluster Active Archive (CAA) is described. Presented are descriptions of the EDI instrument, the various CAA/EDI data products, the CAA ingestion schedule and the current EDI status. An example of a science application is given for one of the main EDI data products available in the CAA.

  18. Land processes distributed active archive center product lifecycle plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daucsavage, John C.; Bennett, Stacie D.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Science Data System Program worked together to establish, develop, and operate the Land Processes (LP) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) to provide stewardship for NASA’s land processes science data. These data are critical science assets that serve the land processes science community with potential value beyond any immediate research use, and therefore need to be accounted for and properly managed throughout their lifecycle. A fundamental LP DAAC objective is to enable permanent preservation of these data and information products. The LP DAAC accomplishes this by bridging data producers and permanent archival resources while providing intermediate archive services for data and information products.

  19. Planetary Data Archiving Activities in Indian Space Research Organisation (isro)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopala Krishna, Barla; Srivastava, Pradeep Kumar

    and related ancillary data. The archive includes raw and reduced data, calibration data, auxiliary data, higher-level derived data products, documentation and software. The ISDA makes use of the well-proven archive standards of the Planetary Data System (PDS) and planning to follow IPDA guidelines. This is to comply with the global standards for long term preservation of the data to maintain the usability and facilitate scientific community with the high quality data for their analysis. The data deliveries from various instruments are already started to ISSDC. The science archives received from MiniSAR and M3 are peer reviewed by the host organizations and hence no further reviews planned at ISSDC. For the other instrument data archives, peer reviews are planned at ISSDC, for which the activity will start during April 2010. A pre review has already been carried out for certain instrument data sets and currently the review comments are being incorporated. The data for the first normal phase operation (November 2008 to February 2009) is planned to be made available (through long term archive) sometime during August 2010 to the users. However the data is already available to the PI teams in the PDS standard, for analysis and use in the instrument cross calibration. Chandrayaan-2 is the next planetary mission to Moon from ISRO in future (which will carry rovers; expected to give a good amount of science data, which is also planned to be archived in ISSDC for dissemination.

  20. Development of Secondary Archive System at Goddard Space Flight Center Version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, Mark; Kodis, John; Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Wacker, Chris; Woytek, Joanne; Lynnes, Chris

    1996-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has been developed to support existing and pre Earth Observing System (EOS) Earth science datasets, facilitate the scientific research, and test EOS data and information system (EOSDIS) concepts. To ensure that no data is ever lost, each product received at GSFC DAAC is archived on two different media, VHS and digital linear tape (DLT). The first copy is made on VHS tape and is under the control of UniTree. The second and third copies are made to DLT and VHS media under a custom built software package named 'Archer'. While Archer provides only a subset of the functions available with commercial software like UniTree, it supports migration between near-line and off-line media and offers much greater performance and flexibility to satisfy the specific needs of a data center. Archer is specifically designed to maximize total system throughput, rather than focusing on the turn-around time for individual files. The commercial off the shelf software (COTS) hierarchical storage management (HSM) products evaluated were mainly concerned with transparent, interactive, file access to the end-user, rather than a batch-orientated, optimizable (based on known data file characteristics) data archive and retrieval system. This is critical to the distribution requirements of the GSFC DAAC where orders for 5000 or more files at a time are received. Archer has the ability to queue many thousands of file requests and to sort these requests into internal processing schedules that optimize overall throughput. Specifically, mount and dismount, tape load and unload cycles, and tape motion are minimized. This feature did not seem to be available in many COTS pacages. Archer also uses a generic tar tape format that allows tapes to be read by many different systems rather than the proprietary format found in most COTS packages. This paper discusses some of the specific requirements at GSFC DAAC, the

  1. Cluster Active Archive products and multipoint magnetospheric investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, C.; Laakso, H.; Taylor, M.; Escoubet, P.

    2007-12-01

    The four-satellite Cluster mission investigates the small-scale structures (in three dimensions) of the Earth's plasma environment, such as those involved in the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetospheric plasma, in global magnetotail dynamics, in cross-tail currents, and in the formation and dynamics of the neutral line and of plasmoids. The Cluster Active Archive CAA (http://caa.estec.esa.int/) contains the entire set of Cluster high resolution data and other allied products in a standard format. The CAA currently has data from most of the Cluster instruments for at least the first three years of operations (2001-2003). The coverage and range of products is being continually improved with more than 200 datasets available from each spacecraft including high-resolution magnetic & electric DC fields and wave spectra; full 3D electron & ion distributions from a few eV to hundreds of keV; and various ancillary & browse products to help with spacecraft and event location. The data archived are (1) publicly accessible, (2) of the best quality achievable with the given resources, and (3) suitable for science use and publication by both the Cluster and broader scientific community. The presentation contains examples of user friendly services of the CAA for searching and accessing these data and ancillary products and of online capabilities of the system.

  2. Roles of Cluster Active Archive in heliophysics science research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, S.; Laakso, H.; Perry, C.; Taylor, M.; Escoubet, P.; Esson, S.; Herment, D.

    2007-12-01

    The four-satellite Cluster mission investigates small-scale structures (in three dimensions) of the Earth's plasma environment, such as those involved in the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetospheric plasma, in global magnetotail dynamics, in cross-tail currents, and in the formation and dynamics of the neutral line and of plasmoids. The Cluster Active Archive CAA (http://caa.estec.esa.int/) will contain the entire set of Cluster high resolution data and other allied products in a standard format and with a complete set of metadata in machine readable form. The data archived are (1) publicly accessible, (2) of the best quality achievable with the given resources, and (3) suitable for science use and publication by both the Cluster and broader scientific community. The CAA tends to provide user friendly services for searching and accessing these data, e.g., users can save their frequent data requests as profiles speeding up their future similar requests. The CAA is continuing to extend and improve the online capabilities of the system, e.g., the CAA products can be downloaded either via a web interface or a machine accessible interface.

  3. Near-line Archive Data Mining at the Goddard Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, L.; Mack, R.; Eng, E.; Lynnes, C.

    2002-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is generating immense volumes of data, in some cases too much to provide to users with data-intensive needs. As an alternative to moving the data to the user and his/her research algorithms, we are providing a means to move the algorithms to the data. The Near-line Archive Data Mining (NADM) system is the Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive Center's (GES DAAC) web data mining portal to the EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data pool, a 50-TB online disk cache. The NADM web portal enables registered users to submit and execute data mining algorithm codes on the data in the EOSDIS data pool. A web interface allows the user to access the NADM system. The users first develops personalized data mining code on their home platform and then uploads them to the NADM system. The C, FORTRAN and IDL languages are currently supported. The user developed code is automatically audited for any potential security problems before it is installed within the NADM system and made available to the user. Once the code has been installed the user is provided a test environment where he/she can test the execution of the software against data sets of the user's choosing. When the user is satisfied with the results, he/she can promote their code to the "operational" environment. From here the user can interactively run his/her code on the data available in the EOSDIS data pool. The user can also set up a processing subscription. The subscription will automatically process new data as it becomes available in the EOSDIS data pool. The generated mined data products are then made available for FTP pickup. The NADM system uses the GES DAAC-developed Simple Scalable Script-based Science Processor (S4P) to automate tasks and perform the actual data processing. Users will also have the option of selecting a DAAC-provided data mining algorithm and using it to process the data of their choice.

  4. GHRC: NASAs Hazardous Weather Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Rahul; Bugbee, Kaylin

    2016-01-01

    The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC; ghrc.nsstc.nasa.gov) is one of NASA's twelve Distributed Active Archive Centers responsible for providing access to NASA's Earth science data to users worldwide. Each of NASA's twelve DAACs focuses on a specific science discipline within Earth science, provides data stewardship services and supports its research community's needs. Established in 1991 as the Marshall Space Flight Center DAAC and renamed GHRC in 1997, the data center's original mission focused on the global hydrologic cycle. However, over the years, data holdings, tools and expertise of GHRC have gradually shifted. In 2014, a User Working Group (UWG) was established to review GHRC capabilities and provide recommendations to make GHRC more responsive to the research community's evolving needs. The UWG recommended an update to the GHRC mission, as well as a strategic plan to move in the new direction. After a careful and detailed analysis of GHRC's capabilities, research community needs and the existing data landscape, a new mission statement for GHRC has been crafted: to provide a comprehensive active archive of both data and knowledge augmentation services with a focus on hazardous weather, its governing dynamical and physical processes, and associated applications. Within this broad mandate, GHRC will focus on lightning, tropical cyclones and storm-induced hazards through integrated collections of satellite, airborne, and in-situ data sets. The new mission was adopted at the recent 2015 UWG meeting. GHRC will retain its current name until such time as it has built substantial data holdings aligned with the new mission.

  5. Usability and quality of the Cluster Active Archive (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, H. E.

    2009-12-01

    There is a large number of data archives for magnetospheric physics that, however, usually provide access only to spin-averaged datasets. In addition only limited resources have been used to calibrate the measurements to a level that the users could easily analyze them with no need to worry about the quality of the data. These are the starting points to the ESA Cluster Active Archive (CAA, see URL: http://caa.estec.esa.int) that provides access to the calibrated full-resolution datasets of the four-satellite Cluster mission. The data archive is publicly accessible and suitable for science use and publication by the world-wide scientific community. This presentation will focus on the usability aspects of the overall system and its services and the quality of its datasets. The Cluster mission has collected observations for nine years since 2001 and has now submitted a proposal for further observations during years 2010-12. The CAA will contain the entire set of Cluster high-resolution data and other allied products in a standard format and with a complete set of metadata in machine readable format. The data can be accessed either via web GUI or via command line wget tool. Currently there are more than 200 datasets from each spacecraft, including high-resolution magnetic and electric DC and AC fields; full 3-dimensional electron and ion distribution functions and moments from a few eV to hundreds of keV; and various ancillary and browse products to help with spacecraft and event location. To ensure the high quality of its datasets, the CAA runs a series of cross-calibration workshops that focus on detailed comparisons of the measurements. Currently the observations from years 2001-7 are available for most instruments. The total amount of data files in compressed format is expected to exceed 50 TB. The CAA became operational in February 2006 and now has more than 900 registered users who download about 100-1000 GB of data every month. The CAA provides user

  6. Earth Science Data Archive and Access at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptoukh, Gregory

    1999-01-01

    The Goddard Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC), as an integral part of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), is the official source of data for several important earth remote sensing missions. These include the Sea-viewing Wide-Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) launched in August 1997, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) launched in November 1997, and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) scheduled for launch in mid 1999 as part of the EOS AM-1 instrumentation package. The data generated from these missions supports a host of users in the hydrological, land biosphere and oceanographic research and applications communities. The volume and nature of the data present unique challenges to an Earth science data archive and distribution system such as the DAAC. The DAAC system receives, archives and distributes a large number of standard data products on a daily basis, including data files that have been reprocessed with updated calibration data or improved analytical algorithms. A World Wide Web interface is provided allowing interactive data selection and automatic data subscriptions as distribution options. The DAAC also creates customized and value-added data products, which allow additional user flexibility and reduced data volume. Another significant part of our overall mission is to provide ancillary data support services and archive support for worldwide field campaigns designed to validate the results from the various satellite-derived measurements. In addition to direct data services, accompanying documentation, WWW links to related resources, support for EOSDIS data formats, and informed response to inquiries are routinely provided to users. The current GDAAC WWW search and order system is being restructured to provide users with a simplified, hierarchical access to data. Data Browsers have been developed for several data sets to aid users in ordering data. These Browsers allow users to specify

  7. Constraint based scheduling for the Goddard Space Flight Center distributed Active Archive Center's data archive and distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, Nick, Jr.; Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Bodden, Lee; Boddy, Mark; White, Jim; Beane, John

    1994-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has been operational since October 1, 1993. Its mission is to support the Earth Observing System (EOS) by providing rapid access to EOS data and analysis products, and to test Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) design concepts. One of the challenges is to ensure quick and easy retrieval of any data archived within the DAAC's Data Archive and Distributed System (DADS). Over the 15-year life of EOS project, an estimated several Petabytes (10(exp 15)) of data will be permanently stored. Accessing that amount of information is a formidable task that will require innovative approaches. As a precursor of the full EOS system, the GSFC DAAC with a few Terabits of storage, has implemented a prototype of a constraint-based task and resource scheduler to improve the performance of the DADS. This Honeywell Task and Resource Scheduler (HTRS), developed by Honeywell Technology Center in cooperation the Information Science and Technology Branch/935, the Code X Operations Technology Program, and the GSFC DAAC, makes better use of limited resources, prevents backlog of data, provides information about resources bottlenecks and performance characteristics. The prototype which is developed concurrently with the GSFC Version 0 (V0) DADS, models DADS activities such as ingestion and distribution with priority, precedence, resource requirements (disk and network bandwidth) and temporal constraints. HTRS supports schedule updates, insertions, and retrieval of task information via an Application Program Interface (API). The prototype has demonstrated with a few examples, the substantial advantages of using HTRS over scheduling algorithms such as a First In First Out (FIFO) queue. The kernel scheduling engine for HTRS, called Kronos, has been successfully applied to several other domains such as space shuttle mission scheduling, demand flow manufacturing, and avionics communications

  8. Sentinel-1 Data System at the Alaska Satellite Facility Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, V. G.

    2014-12-01

    The Alaska Satellite Facility Distributed Active Archive Center (ASF DAAC) has a long history of supporting international collaborations between NASA and foreign flight agencies to promote access to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data for US science research. Based on the agreement between the US and the EC, data from the Sentinel missions will be distributed by NASA through archives that mirror those established by ESA. The ASF DAAC is the designated archive and distributor for Sentinel-1 data. The data will be copied from the ESA archive to a rolling archive at the NASA Goddard center, and then pushed to a landing area at the ASF DAAC. The system at ASF DAAC will take the files as they arrive and put them through an ingest process. Ingest will populate the database with the information required to enable search and download of the data through Vertex, the ASF DAAC user interface. Metadata will be pushed to the NASA Common Metadata Repository, enabling data discovery through clients that utilize the repository. Visual metadata will be pushed to the NASA GIBS system for visualization through clients linked to that system. Data files will be archived in the DataDirect Networks (DDN) device that is the primary storage device for the ASF DAAC. A backup copy of the data will be placed in a second DDN device that serves as the disaster recovery solution for the ASF DAAC.

  9. Architecture and evolution of Goddard Space Flight Center Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Bodden, Lee; Rosen, Wayne; Sherman, Mark; Pease, Phil

    1994-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has been developed to enhance Earth Science research by improved access to remote sensor earth science data. Building and operating an archive, even one of a moderate size (a few Terabytes), is a challenging task. One of the critical components of this system is Unitree, the Hierarchical File Storage Management System. Unitree, selected two years ago as the best available solution, requires constant system administrative support. It is not always suitable as an archive and distribution data center, and has moderate performance. The Data Archive and Distribution System (DADS) software developed to monitor, manage, and automate the ingestion, archive, and distribution functions turned out to be more challenging than anticipated. Having the software and tools is not sufficient to succeed. Human interaction within the system must be fully understood to improve efficiency to improve efficiency and ensure that the right tools are developed. One of the lessons learned is that the operability, reliability, and performance aspects should be thoroughly addressed in the initial design. However, the GSFC DAAC has demonstrated that it is capable of distributing over 40 GB per day. A backup system to archive a second copy of all data ingested is under development. This backup system will be used not only for disaster recovery but will also replace the main archive when it is unavailable during maintenance or hardware replacement. The GSFC DAAC has put a strong emphasis on quality at all level of its organization. A Quality team has also been formed to identify quality issues and to propose improvements. The DAAC has conducted numerous tests to benchmark the performance of the system. These tests proved to be extremely useful in identifying bottlenecks and deficiencies in operational procedures.

  10. JPL Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) data availability, version 1-94

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) archive at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) includes satellite data sets for the ocean sciences and global-change research to facilitate multidisciplinary use of satellite ocean data. Parameters include sea-surface height, surface-wind vector, sea-surface temperature, atmospheric liquid water, and integrated water vapor. The JPL PO.DAAC is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) and is the United States distribution site for Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/POSEIDON data and metadata.

  11. The EOSDIS Version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center for physical oceanography and air-sea interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilland, Jeffrey E.; Collins, Donald J.; Nichols, David A.

    1991-01-01

    The Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory will support scientists specializing in physical oceanography and air-sea interaction. As part of the NASA Earth Observing System Data and Information System Version 0 the DAAC will build on existing capabilities to provide services for data product generation, archiving, distribution and management of information about data. To meet scientist's immediate needs for data, existing data sets from missions such as Seasat, Geosat, the NOAA series of satellites and the Global Positioning Satellite system will be distributed to investigators upon request. In 1992, ocean topography, wave and surface roughness data from the Topex/Poseidon radar altimeter mission will be archived and distributed. New data products will be derived from Topex/Poseidon and other sensor systems based on recommendations of the science community. In 1995, ocean wind field measurements from the NASA Scatterometer will be supported by the DAAC.

  12. Data catalog for JPL Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digby, Susan

    1995-01-01

    The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) archive at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory contains satellite data sets and ancillary in-situ data for the ocean sciences and global-change research to facilitate multidisciplinary use of satellite ocean data. Geophysical parameters available from the archive include sea-surface height, surface-wind vector, surface-wind speed, surface-wind stress vector, sea-surface temperature, atmospheric liquid water, integrated water vapor, phytoplankton pigment concentration, heat flux, and in-situ data. PO.DAAC is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System and is the United States distribution site for TOPEX/POSEIDON data and metadata.

  13. Long Term Activity Analysis in Surveillance Video Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ming-yu

    2010-01-01

    Surveillance video recording is becoming ubiquitous in daily life for public areas such as supermarkets, banks, and airports. The rate at which surveillance video is being generated has accelerated demand for machine understanding to enable better content-based search capabilities. Analyzing human activity is one of the key tasks to understand and…

  14. The humus 'memory' - Are paleoenvironmental changes and past human activities archived in peat humic acids?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccone, C.; Shotyk, W.; Miano, T. M.

    2012-04-01

    For at least two centuries, ombrotrophic (i.e., rainwater-fed) peat bogs have been recognized as excellent archives of the past. Rennie (1807), for example, interpreted stratigraphic changes in Scottish bogs not only in terms of natural changes in paleoclimate, but was also able to identify environmental changes induced by humans. The use of bogs as archives of climate change in the early XXth century was accelerated by studies of fossil plant remains, and by systematic investigations of pollen grains pioneered by von Post in Sweden. In Denmark, Glob outlined the remarkably well-preserved remains of bog bodies. In Britain, Godwin provided an introduction to the use of bogs as archives of human history, vegetation change, and Holocene climate, with a more recent survey provided by Charman. Anyway, although hundreds of studies have been carried out in the last decades using ombrotrophic cores, scientific literature is still rather controversial about the role of bogs as reliable records, as several authors argued that all "climatic, vegetational and human activity-related information" could be affected by/during humification processes. In the present communication, the authors will summarize data collected in the last 8 years analyzing two peat cores collected in 1991 and 2005 from Etang de la Gruère (Jura Mountains, Switzerland), i.e., the longest continuous record of atmospheric depositions in continental Europe, where 6.5 m of peat has accumulated in the past ca. 15,000 years. Using several physico-chemical and spectroscopic approaches [e.g., elemental analysis (CHNS-O) and atomic ratios, Ft-IR, molecular fluorescence, UV-Vis, DSC, alkaline CuO oxidation (for phenolic constituents), stable isotopic ratios (for δ13C, δ18O, and δ15N), XRF (for major and trace elements), LB γ-spectrometry (for 137Cs and 241Am)], the authors will try to answer to the following questions: 1) are ombrotrophic bogs reliable archives of dusts and trace elements deposition? 2) are

  15. Collection, analysis, and archival of LDEF activation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.; Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.

    1993-01-01

    The study of the induced radioactivity of samples intentionally placed aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and samples obtained from the LDEF structure is reviewed. The eight laboratories involved in the gamma-ray counting are listed and the scientists and the associated counting facilities are described. Presently, most of the gamma-ray counting has been completed and the spectra are being analyzed and corrected for efficiency and self absorption. The acquired spectra are being collected at Eastern Kentucky University for future reference. The results of these analyses are being compiled and reviewed for possible inconsistencies as well as for comparison with model calculations. These model calculations are being revised to include the changes in trapped-proton flux caused by the onset of the period of maximum solar activity and the rapidly decreasing spacecraft orbit. Tentative plans are given for the storage of the approximately 1000 gamma-ray spectra acquired in this study and the related experimental data.

  16. Fluvial deposits as an archive of early human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; White, M. J.; Beaumont, P.; Antoine, P.; Bridgland, D. R.; Limondin-Lozouet, N.; Santisteban, J. I.; Schreve, D. C.; Shaw, A. D.; Wenban-Smith, F. F.; Westaway, R. W. C.; White, T. S.

    2007-11-01

    River terraces are well established as an important source of Lower and Middle Palaeolithic artefacts in Europe, large collections having been assembled there during the years of manual gravel extraction. Now that many terrace sequences can be reliably dated and correlated with the oceanic record, potentially useful patterns can be recognized in the distribution of artefacts. The earliest appearance of artefacts in terrace staircases, marking the arrival of the first tool-making hominins in the region in question, is the first of several archaeological markers within fluvial sequences. The Lower to Middle Palaeolithic transition, with the appearance of Levallois, is another. Others may be more regional in significance: the occurrences of Clactonian (Mode 1) industry, twisted ovate handaxes and bout coupé handaxes, for example. IGCP Project no. 449 instigated the compilation of fluvial records from all over the 'old world'. Comparison between British and Central European sequences confirms the established view that there is a demarcation between handaxe making in the west and flake/core industries in the east. Other centres of activity reported here have been in the Middle East (Syria), South Africa and India. Data from such areas will be key in deciphering the story of the earlier 'out-of-Africa' migration, that by pre-Homo sapiens people. There is clear evidence for diachroneity between the first appearances of different industries, in keeping with the well-established idea of northward migration.

  17. The NASA Heliophysics Active Final Archive at the Space Physics Data Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    The 2009 NASA Heliophysics Science Data Management Policy re-defined and extended the responsibilities of the Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) project. Building on SPDF's established capabilities, the new policy assigned the role of active "Final Archive" for non-solar NASA Heliophysics data to SPDF. The policy also recognized and formalized the responsibilities of SPDF as a source for critical infrastructure services such as VSPO to the overall Heliophysics Data Environment (HpDE) and as a Center of Excellence for existing SPDF science-enabling services and software including CDAWeb, SSCWeb/4D Orbit Viewer, OMNIweb and CDF. We will focus this talk to the principles, strategies and planned SPDF architecture to effectively and efficiently perform these roles, with special emphasis on how SPDF will ensure the long-term preservation and ongoing online community access to all the data entrusted to SPDF. We will layout our archival philosophy and what we are advocating in our work with NASA missions both current and future, with potential providers of NASA and NASA-relevant archival data, and to make the data and metadata held by SPDF accessible to other systems and services within the overall HpOE. We will also briefly review our current services, their metrics and our current plans and priorities for their evolution.

  18. The NASA Heliophysics Active Final Archive at the Space Physics Data Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, R. E.; Bilitza, D.; Candey, R. M.; Chimiak, R.; Cooper, J. F.; Garcia, L. N.; Harris, B.; Johnson, R. C.; King, J. H.; Kovalick, T.; Lal, N.; Leckner, H.; Liu, M.; Papitashvili, N. E.; Roberts, D.

    2012-12-01

    The 2009 NASA Heliophysics Science Data Management Policy re-defined and extended the responsibilities of the Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) project. Building on SPDF's established capabilities, the new policy assigned the role of active "Final Archive" for non-solar NASA Heliophysics data to SPDF. The policy also recognized and formalized the responsibilities of SPDF as a source for critical infrastructure services such as VSPO to the overall Heliophysics Data Environment (HpDE) and as a Center of Excellence for existing SPDF science-enabling services and software including CDAWeb, SSCWeb/4D Orbit Viewer, OMNIweb and CDF. In this talk, we will discuss the positive impacts of this policy on data planning by missions such as RBSP and MMS and on working coordination with SPDF capabilities to better address NASA program-level requirements in multi-mission science and long-term archiving. We will discuss the key principles, strategies and planned SPDF architecture to effectively and efficiently perform these roles, with special emphasis on how SPDF will ensure the long-term preservation and ongoing online community access to all the data entrusted to SPDF. We will lay out our archival philosophy and what we are advocating in our work with NASA missions both current and future, with potential providers of NASA and NASA-relevant archival data, and to make the data and metadata held by SPDF accessible to other systems and services within the overall HpDE. We will also briefly review our current services, their metrics and our current plans and priorities for their evolution.

  19. AVIRIS and TIMS data processing and distribution at the land processes distributed active archive center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, G. R.; Myers, J.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Government has initiated the Global Change Research program, a systematic study of the Earth as a complete system. NASA's contribution of the Global Change Research Program is the Earth Observing System (EOS), a series of orbital sensor platforms and an associated data processing and distribution system. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is the archiving, production, and distribution system for data collected by the EOS space segment and uses a multilayer architecture for processing, archiving, and distributing EOS data. The first layer consists of the spacecraft ground stations and processing facilities that receive the raw data from the orbiting platforms and then separate the data by individual sensors. The second layer consists of Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAAC) that process, distribute, and archive the sensor data. The third layer consists of a user science processing network. The EOSDIS is being developed in a phased implementation. The initial phase, Version 0, is a prototype of the operational system. Version 0 activities are based upon existing systems and are designed to provide an EOSDIS-like capability for information management and distribution. An important science support task is the creation of simulated data sets for EOS instruments from precursor aircraft or satellite data. The Land Processes DAAC, at the EROS Data Center (EDC), is responsible for archiving and processing EOS precursor data from airborne instruments such as the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS), the Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS), and Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). AVIRIS, TIMS, and TMS are flown by the NASA-Ames Research Center ARC) on an ER-2. The ER-2 flies at 65000 feet and can carry up to three sensors simultaneously. Most jointly collected data sets are somewhat boresighted and roughly registered. The instrument data are being used to construct data sets that simulate the spectral and spatial

  20. Analysis of the access patterns at GSFC distributed active archive center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore; Bedet, Jean-Jacques

    1996-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has been operational for more than two years. Its mission is to support existing and pre Earth Observing System (EOS) Earth science datasets, facilitate the scientific research, and test Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) concepts. Over 550,000 files and documents have been archived, and more than six Terabytes have been distributed to the scientific community. Information about user request and file access patterns, and their impact on system loading, is needed to optimize current operations and to plan for future archives. To facilitate the management of daily activities, the GSFC DAAC has developed a data base system to track correspondence, requests, ingestion and distribution. In addition, several log files which record transactions on Unitree are maintained and periodically examined. This study identifies some of the users' requests and file access patterns at the GSFC DAAC during 1995. The analysis is limited to the subset of orders for which the data files are under the control of the Hierarchical Storage Management (HSM) Unitree. The results show that most of the data volume ordered was for two data products. The volume was also mostly made up of level 3 and 4 data and most of the volume was distributed on 8 mm and 4 mm tapes. In addition, most of the volume ordered was for deliveries in North America although there was a significant world-wide use. There was a wide range of request sizes in terms of volume and number of files ordered. On an average 78.6 files were ordered per request. Using the data managed by Unitree, several caching algorithms have been evaluated for both hit rate and the overhead ('cost') associated with the movement of data from near-line devices to disks. The algorithm called LRU/2 bin was found to be the best for this workload, but the STbin algorithm also worked well.

  1. Environmental Data from the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for Biogeochemical Dynamics

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC) is a NASA-sponsored source for biogeochemical and ecological data and models useful in environmental research. Data have been collected on the ground, by aircraft, by satellite, and from computer models. The extent of data and model products ranges from site specific to global, and durations range from days to years. Data products and models are free, but users must typically register. Major field campaigns with available data include: • The Boreal Ecosystem - Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) • The First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment (FIFE) Project) • The Large-Scale Biosphere - Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) • The North American Carbon Program (NACP) • Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research (OTTER) Project • The SAFARI 2000 (S2K) Project in Africa • Superior National Forest(SNF)Project Validation projects with available data include: • BigFoot • The Accelerated Canopy Chemistry Program (ACCP) • The EOS Land Validation Project • FLUXNET • MODIS • The Prototype Validation Exercise (PROVE) The ORNL DAAC also provides access to data for many regional and global projects and to a model archive. (Specialized Interface)(Registration Required)

  2. Multi-Standard Metadata Retrieval Framework at the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, N. T.; Huang, T.; Armstrong, E. M.; Gangl, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    With the vast amount of Earth Science data available, providing the user community with high quality metadata to facilitate information retrieval and exchange is integral to scientific research. The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) archives and distributes data products along with metadata pertinent to the physical state of the ocean. As one of the Earth Science data center for NASA, PO.DAAC is expected to work with multiple metadata standards. Since there is no single metadata standard that meets everyone's needs, a web-based framework has been designed and integrated as part of PO.DAAC's scalable Core Data System to enable users to quickly retrieve metadata in the format that they need. Currently, the framework supports the Open Search specification for data discovery, ISO 19115-2, Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) and Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata standards, with new metadata standards still being added. In this talk we will present the architecture behind the framework that makes it possible to support various metadata standards as well as the challenges we encountered.

  3. Influences and interactions of inundation, peat, and snow on active layer thickness: Modeling Archive

    DOE Data Explorer

    Scott Painter; Ethan Coon; Cathy Wilson; Dylan Harp; Adam Atchley

    2016-04-21

    This Modeling Archive is in support of an NGEE Arctic publication currently in review [4/2016]. The Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) was used to simulate thermal hydrological conditions across varied environmental conditions for an ensemble of 1D models of Arctic permafrost. The thickness of organic soil is varied from 2 to 40cm, snow depth is varied from approximately 0 to 1.2 meters, water table depth was varied from -51cm below the soil surface to 31 cm above the soil surface. A total of 15,960 ensemble members are included. Data produced includes the third and fourth simulation year: active layer thickness, time of deepest thaw depth, temperature of the unfrozen soil, and unfrozen liquid saturation, for each ensemble member. Input files used to run the ensemble are also included.

  4. Data Information for Global Change Studies: NASA's Distributed Active Archive Centers and Cooperating Data Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is an integral part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Earth Science Enterprise (ESE). ESE is a long-term global change research program designed to improve our understanding of the Earth's interrelated processes involving the atmosphere, oceans, land surfaces, and polar regions. Data from EOS instruments and other Earth science measurement systems are useful in understanding the causes and processes of global climate change and the consequences of human activities. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) provides a structure for data management and user services for products derived from EOS satellite instruments and other NASA Earth science data. Within the EOSDIS framework, the Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) have been established to provide expertise in one or more Earth science disciplines. The DAACs and cooperating data centers provide data and information services to support the global change research community. Much of the development of the DAACs has been in anticipation of the enormous amount of data expected from EOS instruments to be launched within the next two decades. Terra, the EOS flagship launched in December 1999, is the first of a series of EOS satellites to carry several instruments with multispectral capabilities. Some data products from these instruments are now available from several of the DAACs. These and other data products can be ordered through the EOS Data Gateway (EDG) and DAAC-specific online ordering systems.

  5. Participating in politics resembles physical activity: general action patterns in international archives, United States archives, and experiments.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Kenji; Handley, Ian M; Albarracín, Dolores

    2011-02-01

    A series of studies examined whether political participation can emerge from general patterns of indiscriminate activity. In the first two studies, general action tendencies were measured by combining national and state-level indicators of high activity (e.g., impulsiveness, pace of life, and physical activity) from international and U.S. data. This action-tendency index positively correlated with a measure of political participation that consisted of voting behaviors and participation in political demonstrations. The following two experimental studies indicated that participants exposed to action words (e.g., go, move) had stronger intentions to vote in an upcoming election and volunteered more time to make phone calls on behalf of a university policy than participants exposed to inaction words did (e.g., relax, stop). These studies suggest that political participation can be predicted from general tendencies toward activity present at the national and state levels, as well as from verbal prompts suggestive of activity. PMID:21177515

  6. Participating in Politics Resembles Physical Activity: General Action Patterns in International Archives, United States Archives, and Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Kenji; Handley, Ian M.; Albarracín, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    A series of studies examined whether political participation can emerge from general patterns of indiscriminate activity. In the first two studies, general action tendencies were measured by combining national and state-level indicators of high activity (e.g., impulsiveness, pace of life, and physical activity) from international and U.S. data. This action-tendency index positively correlated with a measure of political participation that consisted of voting behaviors and participation in political demonstrations. The following two experimental studies indicated that participants exposed to action words (e.g., go, move) had stronger intentions to vote in an upcoming election and volunteered more time to make phone calls on behalf of a university policy than participants exposed to inaction words did (e.g., relax, stop). These studies suggest that political participation can be predicted from general tendencies toward activity present at the national and state levels, as well as from verbal prompts suggestive of activity. PMID:21177515

  7. An Introduction to the New Data Streaming and Data Mining Services Provided by the ESA Cluster Active Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, C. H.; McCaffrey, S.; Laakso, H. E.; Taylor, M. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Cluster Active Archive has been operating since 2006 and is the principal repository for high quality data from the European Space Agency's cornerstone space physics Cluster mission. The archive holds nearly 10 years of high resolution in-situ plasma, particles and waves data from the 11 instruments on each of the four Cluster spacecraft. The archive has more than 1200 registered users and includes processed science data amounting to tens of terabytes of time series data divided into around 1400 logical datasets. We present an introduction to the capabilities and implementation of two new web based services that have been developed to enhance access to the archive data holdings and to assisting science users in locating intervals of scientific interest. i. The new data streaming service supports requests for arbitrary lengths of time series data from a single dataset and supplements the existing web GUI and machine interfaces. The service is primarily aimed at science tool developers who want a simple REST based mechanism to load Cluster data into their application. ii. The data mining service, which makes use of the streaming interface, allows the construction of complex conditions incorporating multiple datasets to identify lists of time intervals of interest for further analysis. For example searching a year of data for tail crossings (identified by rapid change in the azimuth direction of the magnetic field), when the spacecraft is in Burst Mode involves joining three independent datasets and takes about 30 seconds.

  8. Continuous, Large-Scale Processing of Seismic Archives for High-Resolution Monitoring of Seismic Activity and Seismogenic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldhauser, F.; Schaff, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Archives of digital seismic data recorded by seismometer networks around the world have grown tremendously over the last several decades helped by the deployment of seismic stations and their continued operation within the framework of monitoring earthquake activity and verification of the Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. We show results from our continuing effort in developing efficient waveform cross-correlation and double-difference analysis methods for the large-scale processing of regional and global seismic archives to improve existing earthquake parameter estimates, detect seismic events with magnitudes below current detection thresholds, and improve real-time monitoring procedures. We demonstrate the performance of these algorithms as applied to the 28-year long seismic archive of the Northern California Seismic Network. The tools enable the computation of periodic updates of a high-resolution earthquake catalog of currently over 500,000 earthquakes using simultaneous double-difference inversions, achieving up to three orders of magnitude resolution improvement over existing hypocenter locations. This catalog, together with associated metadata, form the underlying relational database for a real-time double-difference scheme, DDRT, which rapidly computes high-precision correlation times and hypocenter locations of new events with respect to the background archive (http://ddrt.ldeo.columbia.edu). The DDRT system facilitates near-real-time seismicity analysis, including the ability to search at an unprecedented resolution for spatio-temporal changes in seismogenic properties. In areas with continuously recording stations, we show that a detector built around a scaled cross-correlation function can lower the detection threshold by one magnitude unit compared to the STA/LTA based detector employed at the network. This leads to increased event density, which in turn pushes the resolution capability of our location algorithms. On a global scale, we are currently building

  9. FULL SPECTRAL SURVEY OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER ARCHIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, Elizabeth; Markowitz, Alex; Rothschild, Richard

    2013-08-01

    We have analyzed spectra for all active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer archive. We present long-term average values of absorption, Fe line equivalent width (EW), Compton reflection, and photon index, and calculate fluxes and luminosities in the 2-10 keV band for 100 AGN with sufficient brightness and overall observation time to yield high-quality spectral results. We compare these parameters across the different classifications of Seyferts and blazars. Our distributions of photon indices for Seyfert 1s and 2s are consistent with the idea that Seyferts share a common central engine; however, our distributions of Compton reflection hump strengths do not support the classical picture of absorption by a torus and reflection off a Compton-thick disk with type depending only on inclination angle. We conclude that a more complex reflecting geometry such as a combined disk and torus or clumpy torus is likely a more accurate picture of the Compton-thick material. We find that Compton reflection is present in {approx}85% of Seyferts and by comparing Fe line EW's to Compton reflection hump strengths we have found that on average 40% of the Fe line arises in Compton thick material; however, this ratio was not consistent from object to object and did not seem to be dependent on optical classification.

  10. Data Management And Pre-Archival Activities For A Complex UAS Project In The Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrichs, J. F.; Tschudi, M. A.; Norman, J.; Schultz, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Marginal Ice Zone Observations and Processes EXperiment (MIZOPEX) had the objective of employing UASs to study ocean-ice interactions in the Beaufort Sea. The aircraft operated from Oliktok Point in Alaska during July and August 2013. The project team included representatives of several different institutions widely dispersed geographically. Mission planning activities used multiple tools including the Waypoint Planning Tool (WPT) developed by NASA Ames and a combination of vector and raster datasets to support development of flight plans. Flight planning datasets were downloaded and visualizations created for WPT and Google Earth using an automated tool running remotely from the field site. Data collected during the project included both image and non-image data from 16 different instruments with varying spatial coverage and resolution. UAS data volumes were large (on the order of 3-4 Tb per flight) and the datasets were delivered shortly after flight using a wide variety of media types. The data management portion of the project included acquisition of imagery for planning, capturing the flight sensor data, preliminary processing, and compilation of metadata for archival at the National Snow and Ice Data Center.

  11. Molecular fossils of prokaryotes in ancient authigenic minerals: archives of microbial activity in reefs and mounds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heindel, Katrin; Birgel, Daniel; Richoz, Sylvain; Westphal, Hildegard; Peckmann, Jörn

    2016-04-01

    metazoans other than corals (sponges, bivalves, gastropods, ostracods) and foraminifera, first metazoan-microbialite reefs developed on the Early Triassic seafloor. After the last glacial maximum, microbialites formed in coral reefs. Our evidence shows that sulphate-reducing bacteria played an intrinsic role in the precipitation of these microbialites during the Holocene sea-level rise. With more nutrients and organic matter distributed in the reef ecosystem, anoxic microenvironments preferentially developed. Such conditions favored heterotrophic bacteria, particularly, sulphate-reducing bacteria. It is suggested that matrix-solute interaction related to the activity of sulphate reducers induced carbonate precipitation in extracellular polymeric substances. Overall, authigenic mineral phases from various environments can be used as excellent archives to describe former microbial activity in sediments. The early entombment of the lipids in the mineral matrix avoids the loss of specific and important information, which may have been lost in soft sediments rather quick.

  12. The Seamless SAR Archive (SSARA) Project and Other SAR Activities at UNAVCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, S.; Crosby, C. J.; Meertens, C. M.; Fielding, E. J.; Bryson, G.; Buechler, B.; Nicoll, J.; Baru, C.

    2014-12-01

    The seamless synthetic aperture radar archive (SSARA) implements a seamless distributed access system for SAR data and derived data products (i.e. interferograms). SSARA provides a unified application programming interface (API) for SAR data search and results at the Alaska Satellite Facility and UNAVCO (WInSAR and EarthScope data archives) through the use of simple web services. A federated query service was developed using the unified APIs, providing users a single search interface for both archives. Interest from the international community has prompted an effort to incorporate ESA's Virtual Archive 4 Geohazard Supersites and Natural Laboratories (GSNL) collections and other archives into the federated query service. SSARA also provides Digital Elevation Model access for topographic correction via a simple web service through OpenTopography and tropospheric correction products through JPL's OSCAR service. Additionally, UNAVCO provides data storage capabilities for WInSAR PIs with approved TerraSAR-X and ALOS-2 proposals which allows easier distribution to US collaborators on associated proposals and facilitates data access through the SSARA web services. Further work is underway to incorporate federated data discovery for GSNL across SAR, GPS, and seismic datasets provided by web services from SSARA, GSAC, and COOPEUS.

  13. Web Services Implementations at Land Process and Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, M.; Bambacus, M.; Lynnes, C.; Sauer, B.; Falke, S.; Yang, W.

    2007-12-01

    NASA's vast array of scientific data within its Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) is especially valuable to both traditional research scientists as well as the emerging market of Earth Science Information Partners. For example, the air quality science and management communities are increasingly using satellite derived observations in their analyses and decision making. The Air Quality Cluster in the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) uses web infrastructures of interoperability, or Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), to extend data exploration, use, and analysis and provides a user environment for DAAC products. In an effort to continually offer these NASA data to the broadest research community audience, and reusing emerging technologies, both NASA's Goddard Earth Science (GES) and Land Process (LP) DAACs have engaged in a web services pilot project. Through these projects both GES and LP have exposed data through the Open Geospatial Consortiums (OGC) Web Services standards. Reusing several different existing applications and implementation techniques, GES and LP successfully exposed a variety data, through distributed systems to be ingested into multiple end-user systems. The results of this project will enable researchers world wide to access some of NASA's GES & LP DAAC data through OGC protocols. This functionality encourages inter-disciplinary research while increasing data use through advanced technologies. This paper will concentrate on the implementation and use of OGC Web Services, specifically Web Map and Web Coverage Services (WMS, WCS) at GES and LP DAACs, and the value of these services within scientific applications, including integration with the DataFed air quality web infrastructure and in the development of data analysis web applications.

  14. Development of novel repellents using structure-activity modeling of compounds in the USDA archival database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has developed repellents and insecticides for the U.S. military since 1942. Repellency and toxicity data for over 30,000 compounds are contained within the USDA archive. Repellency data from subsets of similarly structured compounds were used to dev...

  15. Lake Geneva sediments: Archive for past environmental changes and human activity during the last 3000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Katrina; Corella, Juan Pablo; Girardclos, Stéphanie

    2013-04-01

    Lake sediments are excellent archives of environmental changes in the watershed and provide high-resolution records of regional paleohydrological variability. Lake Geneva is the largest peri-alpine lake in western Europe, with a maximal water depth of 309 m. It is part of the Rhone river system and was formed during the Pleistocene by glacial erosion. Our study focuses on the deepest part of the lake basin, where sedimentation is mainly controlled by fluvial input from the Rhone and Dranse rivers. These two river systems are sensitive to regional climate variations in the alpine realm and to human activity that affect the discharge regime and sediment delivery to the lake. In Lake Geneva, high resolution seismic reflection profiles reveal two distinct units in the late Holocene sedimentation history. One unit (Unit 1) consists of a succession of five large lens-shaped seismic sub-units, characterized by transparent/chaotic seismic facies with irregular lower boundaries, interpreted as mass-movement deposits. These sub-units are interbedded within parallel, continuous, high-amplitude reflections, interpreted as the 'background' lake sediment. The second unit (Unit 2) consists of 5 m-thick 'background' seismic facies with parallel geometry. It displays alternating dm-thick chaotic/transparent and continuous, high amplitude reflections, which are interpreted as hemipelagic layers punctuated by turbidites. This turbidite layers, are interpreted as floods- and mass movement-related deposits. Four 7- to 12-m long sediment cores were retrieved with a modified Kullenberg system from the deepest part of Lake Geneva. The sedimentary sequence spans the last 3000 years. Magnetic susceptibility and density were measured by Geotek Multisensor Core Logger at 0.5 cm resolution. X-ray fluorescence was carried out using an Avaatech core scanner from the University of Barcelona at 1-cm resolution. This technique provides semi-quantitative information of the sediment elemental

  16. Examination of the vocal fold activity using ultra high speed filming: archival recordings by Paul Moore and Hans von Leden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izdebski, Krzysztof; Vaughan, Laura

    2012-02-01

    We present excerpts from three archival ultra high-speed films on the function of the human larynx by Paul Moore, Ph. D. and Hans von Leden, M.D. The films received two awards for best scientific cinematography from two different international film festivals in Italy in 1957. These films present ultra high-speed cinematographic accounts on the workings of the human vocal folds during various phonatory and ventilatory activities. These films were captured at speeds of 2000 to 5000 frames-per-second via an ingeniously arranged laryngeal mirror viewing device. Such speeds were revolutionary six decades ago. Technology currently allows us to film laryngeal behavior at speeds of up to 16,000 frames-per-second using digital recordings. However, the ultra high-speed films by Paul and Hans remain a beacon for anyone sincerely interested in how the smallest instrument of sound production works, and how it is subjected to failure by intrinsic or extrinsic factors.

  17. Archiving Derrida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Marla

    2003-01-01

    Derrida's archive, broadly speaking, is brilliantly mad, for he digs exegetically into the most difficult textual material and combines the most unlikely texts--from Socrates to Freud, from postcards to encyclopedias, from madness(es) to the archive, from primal scenes to death. In this paper, the author would like to do a brief study of the…

  18. Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) 25th Anniversary Recognition "A Model for Government Partnerships". LP DAAC "History and a Look Forward"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behnke, Jeanne; Doescher, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This presentation discusses 25 years of interactions between NASA and the USGS to manage a Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LPDAAC) for the purpose of providing users access to NASA's rich collection of Earth Science data. The presentation addresses challenges, efforts and metrics on the performance.

  19. PDS MSL Analyst's Notebook: Supporting Active Rover Missions and Adding Value to Planetary Data Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Thomas

    Planetary data archives of surface missions contain data from numerous hosted instruments. Because of the nondeterministic nature of surface missions, it is not possible to assess the data without understanding the context in which they were collected. The PDS Analyst’s Notebook (http://an.rsl.wustl.edu) provides access to Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) data archives by integrating sequence information, engineering and science data, observation planning and targeting, and documentation into web-accessible pages to facilitate “mission replay.” In addition, Mars Exploration Rover (MER), Mars Phoenix Lander, Lunar Apollo surface mission, and LCROSS mission data are available in the Analyst’s Notebook concept, and a Notebook is planned for the Insight mission. The MSL Analyst’s Notebook contains data, documentation, and support files for the Curiosity rovers. The inputs are incorporated on a daily basis into a science team version of the Notebook. The public version of the Analyst’s Notebook is comprised of peer-reviewed, released data and is updated coincident with PDS data releases as defined in mission archive plans. The data are provided by the instrument teams and are supported by documentation describing data format, content, and calibration. Both operations and science data products are included. The operations versions are generated to support mission planning and operations on a daily basis. They are geared toward researchers working on machine vision and engineering operations. Science versions of observations from some instruments are provided for those interested in radiometric and photometric analyses. Both data set documentation and sol (i.e., Mars day) documents are included in the Notebook. The sol documents are the mission manager and documentarian reports that provide a view into science operations—insight into why and how particular observations were made. Data set documents contain detailed information regarding the mission, spacecraft

  20. The Archival Back Burner: Manuscript Collections and the National Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Aaron D.

    2004-01-01

    Greater access to archival materials remains a significant challenge to archivists, librarians, and researchers. In addition to official records documenting governmental activities and agencies, the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) has significant collections of donated personal papers. Some are processed, some are in the…

  1. The National Archives Constitution Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann

    2000-01-01

    In the summer of 1998, education specialists at the National Archives received a grant from the Department of Education to hire nine outstanding classroom teachers to develop lessons and activities based on historical documents that had been digitized by the agency and were available online. Discussion includes exploring the National Archives web…

  2. Data archiving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, David

    1991-01-01

    The viewgraphs of a discussion on data archiving presented at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) Mass Storage Workshop is included. The mass storage system at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) is described. Topics covered in the presentation include product goals, data library systems (DLS), client system commands, networks, archival devices, DLS features, client application systems, multiple mass storage devices, and system growth.

  3. Data Access Tools And Services At The Goddard Distributed Active Archive Center (GDAAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, Long; Eng, Eunice; Sweatman, Paul

    2003-01-01

    As one of the largest providers of Earth Science data from the Earth Observing System, GDAAC provides the latest data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) data products via GDAAC's data pool (50TB of disk cache). In order to make this huge volume of data more accessible to the public and science communities, the GDAAC offers multiple data access tools and services: Open Source Project for Network Data Access Protocol (OPeNDAP), Grid Analysis and Display System (GrADS/DODS) (GDS), Live Access Server (LAS), OpenGlS Web Map Server (WMS) and Near Archive Data Mining (NADM). The objective is to assist users in retrieving electronically a smaller, usable portion of data for further analysis. The OPeNDAP server, formerly known as the Distributed Oceanographic Data System (DODS), allows the user to retrieve data without worrying about the data format. OPeNDAP is capable of server-side subsetting of HDF, HDF-EOS, netCDF, JGOFS, ASCII, DSP, FITS and binary data formats. The GrADS/DODS server is capable of serving the same data formats as OPeNDAP. GDS has an additional feature of server-side analysis. Users can analyze the data on the server there by decreasing the computational load on their client's system. The LAS is a flexible server that allows user to graphically visualize data on the fly, to request different file formats and to compare variables from distributed locations. Users of LAS have options to use other available graphics viewers such as IDL, Matlab or GrADS. WMS is based on the OPeNDAP for serving geospatial information. WMS supports OpenGlS protocol to provide data in GIs-friendly formats for analysis and visualization. NADM is another access to the GDAAC's data pool. NADM gives users the capability to use a browser to upload their C, FORTRAN or IDL algorithms, test the algorithms, and mine data in the data pool. With NADM, the GDAAC provides an

  4. Supporting users through integrated retrieval, processing, and distribution systems at the Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalvelage, Thomas A.; Willems, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    The LP DAAC is the primary archive for the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) data; it is the only facility in the United States that archives, processes, and distributes data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission/Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra spacecraft; and it is responsible for the archive and distribution of “land products” generated from data acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites.

  5. Managing Data and Facilitating Science: A spectrum of activities in the Centre for Environmental Data Archival. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, B.; Bennett, V.; Callaghan, S.; Juckes, M. N.; Pepler, S.

    2013-12-01

    The UK Centre for Environmental Data Archival (CEDA) hosts a number of formal data centres, including the British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC), and is a partner in a range of national and international data federations, including the InfraStructure for the European Network for Earth system Simulation, the Earth System Grid Federation, and the distributed IPCC Data Distribution Centres. The mission of CEDA is to formally curate data from, and facilitate the doing of, environmental science. The twin aims are symbiotic: data curation helps facilitate science, and facilitating science helps with data curation. Here we cover how CEDA delivers this strategy by established internal processes supplemented by short-term projects, supported by staff with a range of roles. We show how CEDA adds value to data in the curated archive, and how it supports science, and show examples of the aforementioned symbiosis. We begin by discussing curation: CEDA has the formal responsibility for curating the data products of atmospheric science and earth observation research funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC). However, curation is not just about the provider community, the consumer communities matter too, and the consumers of these data cross the boundaries of science, including engineers, medics, as well as the gamut of the environmental sciences. There is a small, and growing cohort of non-science users. For both producers and consumers of data, information about data is crucial, and a range of CEDA staff have long worked on tools and techniques for creating, managing, and delivering metadata (as well as data). CEDA "science support" staff work with scientists to help them prepare and document data for curation. As one of a spectrum of activities, CEDA has worked on data Publication as a method of both adding value to some data, and rewarding the effort put into the production of quality datasets. As such, we see this activity as both a curation and a

  6. Archive of digital boomer seismic reflection data collected during USGS field activity 04SGI01 in the Withlacoochee River of West-Central Florida, March 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calderon, Karynna; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Yobbi, Dann K.; McBride, W. Scott; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2006-01-01

    In March of 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a geophysical survey in the Withlacoochee River of west-central Florida. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, GIS information, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, observer's logbook, and FGDC metadata. Filtered and gained digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansion of all acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided.

  7. Measuring Mass Flux, Kinetic Luminosities and Abundances in Outflows from Active Galactic Nuclei using the FUSE Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriss, Gerard

    Previous studies of active galactic nuclei (AGN) show that over half of all AGN show outflows from their nuclear regions as evidenced by blue-shifted absorption lines. Measuring the energetics of outflows is a high priority for NASA's science objective of understanding the effect of energetic processes around supermassive black holes on the surrounding environment in galaxies, clusters and the intergalactic medium. Therefore, the most important goals in the study of these outflows are to measure their mass flux, kinetic luminosity, and chemical abundances in order to assess their importance to AGN feedback on their environment. The broad range of redshifts and the access to short rest wavelengths made possible by Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations of AGN opens a vast discovery space using the many more diagnostic lines (compared to longer wavelengths) in the 500-1050 A range (rest wavelengths) that show up as absorption troughs in AGN outflows. This is especially true for the density- sensitive excited-state transitions of highly ionized elements (e.g., OIV* 790) that can yield the distance of the outflows from the central source, and the increasingly higher ionization species (O VI, Ne VIII, Na IX and Mg X) that supply the crucial connection between the UV and X-ray (so-called warm absorbers) manifestation of AGN outflows. Over the course of its 10 years of operation, FUSE observed nearly two hundred active galactic nuclei (AGN) at redshifts from less than 0.01 to nearly 3. While a select few of the brightest individual objects have been studied in detail, the surveys of the overall data set done to date examined only the lowest redshift objects (z<0.15), and only using data from the first 6 years or so of the mission. Our preliminary examination of the FUSE archive reveals dozens of AGN with appropriate characteristics for us to carry out our proposed program of study. Many of the best objects also have HST spectra available, and we will

  8. Customer Support Operations In Support Of The NASA/JPL Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, S. L.; Chen, Y. M.

    2004-12-01

    PO.DAAC is responsible for the ingest, archive and distribution of data relevant to the physical state of the ocean. The PO.DAAC provides a level of service for customer support for core Earth Observing System Data Information System (EOSDIS) missions such as TOPEX/POSEIDON, Jason, SeaWinds on QuikSCAT, SeaWinds on ADEOS-II, NOAA AVHRR and MODIS. PO.DAAC's level of support has broadened recently to include missions outside of the EOSDIS including, WindSat, GHRSST, Naval Oceanographic, Monterey Bay Aquarium, AirSAR and GOES. Customer support operations is managed and conducted in partnership between Raytheon ITSS and JPL and includes a full complement of services to accommodate the various PO.DAAC and Earth Observing System user communities. Customer support activities are ubiquitous to service industries from banking to shopping and this presentation will detail how two operational applications have been adopted for use in Earth Science data communities. Customer Response Management Operations System Integrated system that combines PO.DAAC's communications channels including web, email, phone and personal interactions into one intelligent knowledge base. The knowledge is shared with customers and the entire team to deliver consistent and timely information. The system allows 24 x 7 customer support service via extensive on-line searchable knowledge base. PO.DAAC has customized the system to fully integrate with PO.DAAC's existing legacy database and order tracking system. Website Communication Channel The newly redesigned PO.DAAC website (http://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov) is the central gateway to all of the Data, Tools and Services offered at the data center. The consistent look and feel was developed to enhance the ease of searching and ordering earth science data in particular. Data is accessible within a few clicks using the improved dynamic data catalog interface. New data products and information are delivered quickly to customers via the dynamic system and

  9. Jupiter and Saturn Magnetospheric Active Archives at CDPP in support of the JUICE and Cassini missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, N.; Renard, B.; Cecconi, B.; Budnik, E.; Génot, V.; Jacquey, C.; Fedorov, A.; Hitier, R.; Bourrel, N.; Gangloff, M.; Pallier, E.; Bouchemit, M.; Besson, B.

    2012-09-01

    AMDA (Automated Multi-Dataset Analysis, http://cdpp-amda.cesr.fr/) is a web-based facility developed at CDPP Toulouse in France (http://cdpp.cesr.fr) for on line analysis of space physics data (heliosphere, magnetospheres, planetary environments) coming from either its local database or distant ones. We will report the status of our current technical and scientific efforts to integrate in the local database of AMDA Jupiter- and Saturn-related magnetospheric datasets from heterogeneous sources, including NASA/Planetary Data System (http://ppi.pds.nasa.gov/). We will also present our prototype Virtual Observatory activities to connect the AMDA tool to the IVOA Aladin astrophysical tool to enable pluridisciplinary studies of giant planet auroral emissions. This will be offered as a service of the scientific community in order to enhance the science return of the NASA/Cassini mission and in preparation of the JUICE mission.

  10. ActivePapers: a platform for publishing and archiving computer-aided research

    PubMed Central

    Hinsen, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    The lack of replicability and reproducibility of scientific studies based on computational methods has lead to serious mistakes in published scientific findings, some of which have been discovered and publicized recently. Many strategies are currently pursued to improve the situation. This article reports the first conclusions from the ActivePapers project, whose goal is the development and application of a computational platform that allows the publication of computational research in a form that enables installation-free deployment, encourages reuse, and permits the full integration of datasets and software into the scientific record. The main finding is that these goals can be achieved with existing technology, but that there is no straightforward way to adapt legacy software to such a framework. PMID:26064469

  11. Supporting users through integrated retrieval, processing, and distribution systems at the land processes distributed active archive center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalvelage, T.; Willems, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    The design of the EOS Data and Information Systems (EOSDIS) to acquire, archive, manage and distribute Earth observation data to the broadest possible user community was discussed. A number of several integrated retrieval, processing and distribution capabilities have been explained. The value of these functions to the users were described and potential future improvements were laid out for the users. The users were interested in acquiring the retrieval, processing and archiving systems integrated so that they can get the data they want in the format and delivery mechanism of their choice.

  12. Late glacial explosive activity on Mount Etna: Implications for proximal-distal tephra correlations and the synchronisation of Mediterranean archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, P. G.; Tomlinson, E. L.; Lane, C. S.; Wulf, S.; Smith, V. C.; Coltelli, M.; Keller, J.; Lo Castro, D.; Manning, C. J.; Müller, W.; Menzies, M. A.

    2013-09-01

    Plinian and Ignimbrite deposits represent explosive activity (ca. 17-19 cal ka) within the predominantly effusive and mildly explosive (Strombolian) volcanic history of Mount Etna (Italy). Proximal glasses from the Biancavilla Ignimbrites and Unit D Plinian fall deposits are characterised. Fall deposits recorded at Acireale (D1b and D2b) and Giarre (D1a and D2a) are geochemically distinct confirming they relate to different eruptions. The Acireale Plinian fall (D1b and D2b) deposits compositionally overlap with the Biancavilla Ignimbrite deposits. These explosive eruptions from Etna are considered responsible for widespread ash dispersals throughout the central Mediterranean region, producing the marker tephra layers (Y-1/Et-1) recorded in marine and lacustrine sedimentary archives. Stratigraphically these distal tephras occur at or close to the onset of the last deglaciation (Termination 1) within their respective palaeoenvironmental records, therefore making them potentially crucial tephrostratigraphic markers. This study investigates distal tephra deposits thought to be from Etna recorded in the Ionian Sea (Y-1), Lago Grande di Monticchio (LGdM, Italy; tephras TM-11 and TM-12-1), Lago di Mezzano (Italy) and the Haua Fteah cave (Libya). The glass chemistry of Y-1 tephras recorded in the Ionian Sea and at Haua Fteah is consistent with the Biancavilla Ignimbrites (16,965-17,670 cal yrs BP) and the upper Acireale Plinian fall (D2b). The LGdM record indicates that explosive activity on Etna associated with Unit D spans a minimum of 1540 ± 80 varve years. TM-12-1 (19,200-19,804 cal yrs BP) in LGdM appears to represent the oldest distal counterpart of Etna Unit D explosive activity and is associated with the lower Acireale (D1b) Plinian eruption. The proximally undefined TM-11 (17,640-18,324 cal yrs BP) and distal correlatives are geochemically distinct from the Ionian Sea Y-1 tephra. Such significant compositional differences seen between distal tephra layers are not

  13. [California State Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rea, Jay W.

    The first paper on the California State Archives treats the administrative status, legal basis of the archives program, and organization of the archives program. The problem areas in this States' archival program are discussed at length. The second paper gives a crude sketch of the legal and administrative history of the California State Archives,…

  14. Software Archive Related Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, Lorella

    2008-01-01

    With the archive opening of the major X-ray and Gamma ray missions, the school is intended to provide information on the resource available in the data archive and the public software. This talk reviews the archive content, the data format for the major active missions Chandra, XMM-Newton, Swift, RXTE, Integral and Suzaku and the available software for each of these missions. It will explain the FITS format in general and the specific layout for the most popular mission, explaining the role of keywords and how they fit in the multimission standard approach embrace by the High Energy Community. Specifically, it reviews : the difference data levels and the difference software applicable; the popular/standard method of analysis for high level products such as spectra, timing and images; the role of calibration in the multi mission approach; how to navigate the archive query databases. It will present also how the school is organized and how the information provided will be relevant to each of the afternoon science projects that will be proposed to the students and led by a project leader

  15. Building a COTS archive for satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Ken; Terril, Dave; Kelly, Jack; Nichols, Cathy

    1994-01-01

    The goal of the NOAA/NESDIS Active Archive was to provide a method of access to an online archive of satellite data. The archive had to manage and store the data, let users interrogate the archive, and allow users to retrieve data from the archive. Practical issues of the system design such as implementation time, cost and operational support were examined in addition to the technical issues. There was a fixed window of opportunity to create an operational system, along with budget and staffing constraints. Therefore, the technical solution had to be designed and implemented subject to constraint imposed by the practical issues. The NOAA/NESDIS Active Archive came online in July of 1994, meeting all of its original objectives.

  16. Critical experiment data archiving

    SciTech Connect

    Koponen, B.L. ); Clayton, E.D.; Doherty, A.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Critical experiment facilities produced a large number of important data during the past 45 years; however, many useful data remain unpublished. The unpublished material exists in the form of experimenters' logbooks, notes, photographs, material descriptions, etc., This data could be important for computer code validation, understanding the physics of criticality, facility design, or for setting process limits. In the past, criticality specialists have been able to obtain unpublished details by direct contact with the experimenters. Obviously, this will not be possible indefinitely. Most of the US critical experiment facilities are now closed, and the experimenters are moving to other jobs, retiring, or otherwise becoming unavailable for this informal assistance. Also, the records are in danger of being discarded or lost during facility closures, cleanup activities, or in storage. A project was begun in 1989 to ensure that important unpublished data from critical experiment facilities in the United States are archived and made available as a resource of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS). The objective of this paper is to summarize the project accomplishments to date and bring these activities to the attention of those who might be aware of the location of source information needed for archiving and could assist in getting the materials included in the archive.

  17. Archives in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haider, Syed Jalaluddin

    2004-01-01

    This article traces the origins and development of archives in Pakistan. The focus is on the National Archives of Pakistan, but also includes a discussion of the archival collections at the provincial and district levels. This study further examines the state of training facilities available to Pakistani archivists. Archival development has been…

  18. Reference Services in Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalen, Lucille; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This 16-article issue focuses on history, policy, services, users, organization, evaluation, and automation of the archival reference process. Collections at academic research libraries, a technical university, Board of Education, business archives, a bank, labor and urban archives, a manuscript repository, religious archives, and regional history…

  19. Active Data Archive Product Tracking and Automated SPASE Metadata Generation in Support of the Heliophysics Data Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2013-12-01

    The understanding of Solar interaction with the Earth and other bodies in the solar system is a primary goal of Heliophysics as outlined in the NASA Science Mission Directive Science Plan. Heliophysics researchers need access to a vast collection of satellite and ground-based observations coupled with numerical simulation data to study complex processes some of which, as in the case of space weather, pose danger to physical elements of modern society. The infrastructure of the Heliophysics data environment plays a vital role in furthering the understanding of space physics processes by providing researchers with means for data discovery and access. The Heliophysics data environment is highly dynamic with thousands of data products involved. Access to data is facilitated via the Heliophysics Virtual Observatories (VxO) but routine access is possible only if the VxO SPASE metadata repositories contain accurate and up to date information. The Heliophysics Data Consortium has the stated goal of providing routine access to all relevant data products inclusively. Currently, only a small fraction of the data products relevant to Heliophysics studies have been described and registered in a VxO repository. And, for those products that have been described in SPASE, there is a significant time lag from when new data becomes available to when VxO metadata are updated to provide access. It is possible to utilize automated tools to shorten the response time of VxO data product registration via active data archive product tracking. Such a systematic approach is designed to address data access reliability by embracing the highly dynamic nature of the Heliophysics data environment. For example, the CDAWEB data repository located at the NASA Space Science Physics Data facility maintains logs of the data products served to the community. These files include two that pertain to full directory list information, updated daily, and a set of SHA1SUM hash value files, one for each of more

  20. The Yohkoh Legacy Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, L. W.; Takeda, A.; McKenzie, D. E.

    2008-12-01

    Yohkoh was a Japan/US/UK mission for the study of high energy processes on the sun. Scientific operation extended from September 1991 until 14 December 2001, nearly an entire solar activity cycle. Observations included full-disk soft and hard x-ray imaging, hard x-ray spectroscopy, and high resolution flare spectroscopy in S XV, Ca XIX, Fe XXV and Fe XXVI from the Bent Crystal Spectrometer (BCS). The Yohkoh Legacy Archive (YLA) brings together all Yohkoh observational data along with extensive documentation required for a full understanding of instrumentation, mission operations, and data reduction and correction. Extensive meta-data aid the user in efficiently accessing the data base. Creation of the YLA has been the work of 8 years; the top objective has been to present the extensive Yohkoh database in a form fully usable for scientists or students who are unfamiliar with Yohkoh instrumentation. The YLA may be accessed at http://solar.physics.montana.edu/ylegacy or through the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO), although the VSO capability is still under development. Data from the Yohkoh hard x-ray instruments and BCS are presented in flare list formats. The Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) images are available in quantitative and movie formats. This long, uniform, archive of SXT images is especially useful for solar cycle studies as well as high resolution soft x-ray flare studies. Examples of YLA data products and research enabled by the archive will be presented.

  1. Enlivening Dance History Pedagogy through Archival Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Tresa

    2012-01-01

    Dance archives can bring students into contact with historical subjects through artifacts of the past. This article advocates the use of archival projects in undergraduate dance history courses, arguing that such hands-on learning activities give students dynamic and interactive experiences of history. The author describes a creative project she…

  2. Archival Representation in the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the representation systems of three digitized archival collections using the traditional archival representation framework of provenance, order, and content. The results of the study reveal a prominent role of provenance representation, a compromised role of order representation, and an active role of content representation in…

  3. Quaternary fluvial archives: achievements of the Fluvial Archives Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridgland, David; Cordier, Stephane; Herget, Juergen; Mather, Ann; Vandenberghe, Jef; Maddy, Darrel

    2013-04-01

    In their geomorphological and sedimentary records, rivers provide valuable archives of environments and environmental change, at local to global scales. In particular, fluvial sediments represent databanks of palaeoenvironment and palaeoclimatic (for example) of fossils (micro- and macro-), sedimentary and post-depositional features and buried soils. Well-dated sequences are of the most value, with dating provided by a wide range of methods, from radiometric (numerical) techniques to included fossils (biostratigraphy) and/or archaeological material. Thus Quaternary fluvial archives can also provide important data for studies of Quaternary biotic evolution and early human occupation. In addition, the physical disposition of fluvial sequences, be it as fragmented terrace remnants or as stacked basin-fills, provides valuable information about geomorphological and crustal evolution. Since rivers are long-term persistent features in the landscape, their sedimentary archives can represent important frameworks for regional Quaternary stratigraphy. Fluvial archives are distributed globally, being represented on all continents and across all climatic zones, with the exception of the frozen polar regions and the driest deserts. In 1999 the Fluvial Archives Group (FLAG) was established, as a working group of the Quaternary Research Association (UK), aimed at bringing together those interested in such archives. This has evolved into an informal organization that has held regular biennial combined conference and field-trip meetings, has co-sponsored other meetings and conference sessions, and has presided over two International Geoscience Programme (IGCP) projects: IGCP 449 (2000-2004) 'Global Correlation of Late Cenozoic Fluvial Deposits' and IGCP 518 (2005-2007) 'Fluvial sequences as evidence for landscape and climatic evolution in the Late Cenozoic'. Through these various activities a sequence of FLAG publications has appeared, including special issues in a variety of

  4. COMBINE Archive Specification Version 1.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Frank T; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Several standard formats have been proposed that can be used to describe models, simulations, data or other essential information in a consistent fashion. These constitute various separate components required to reproduce a given published scientific result. The Open Modeling EXchange format (OMEX) supports the exchange of all the information necessary for a modeling and simulation experiment in biology. An OMEX file is a ZIP container that includes a manifest file, an optional metadata file, and the files describing the model. The manifest is an XML file listing all files included in the archive and their type. The metadata file provides additional information about the archive and its content. Although any format can be used, we recommend an XML serialization of the Resource Description Framework. Together with the other standard formats from the Computational Modeling in Biology Network (COMBINE), OMEX is the basis of the COMBINE Archive. The content of a COMBINE Archive consists of files encoded in COMBINE standards whenever possible, but may include additional files defined by an Internet Media Type. The COMBINE Archive facilitates the reproduction of modeling and simulation experiments in biology by embedding all the relevant information in one file. Having all the information stored and exchanged at once also helps in building activity logs and audit trails. PMID:26528559

  5. Researching Television News Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhoit, Frances Goins

    To demonstrate the uses and efficiency of major television news archives, a study was conducted to describe major archival programs and to compare the Vanderbilt University Television News Archives and the CBS News Index. Network coverage of an annual news event, the 1983 State of the Union address, is traced through entries in both. The findings…

  6. My Dream Archive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his experience as he traveled from island to island with a single objective--to reach the archives. He found out that not all archives are the same. In recent months, his daydreaming in various facilities has yielded a recurrent question on what would constitute the Ideal Archive. What follows, in no particular…

  7. Introduction: Consider the Archive.

    PubMed

    Yale, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, historians of archives have paid increasingly careful attention to the development of state, colonial, religious, and corporate archives in the early modern period, arguing that power (of various kinds) was mediated and extended through material writing practices in and around archives. The history of early modern science, likewise, has tracked the production of scientific knowledge through the inscription and circulation of written records within and between laboratories, libraries, homes, and public spaces, such as coffeehouses and bookshops. This Focus section interrogates these two bodies of scholarship against each other. The contributors ask how archival digitization is transforming historical practice; how awareness of archival histories can help us to reconceptualize our work as historians of science; how an archive's layered purposes, built up over centuries of record keeping, can shape the historical narratives we write; and how scientific knowledge emerging from archives gained authority and authenticity. PMID:27197412

  8. Real-time data archiving for GTA

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, R.A.; Atkins, W.H.

    1992-01-01

    The architecture of the GTA control system, the nature of a typical GTA commissioning activity, and the varied interests of those analyzing the data make it challenging to develop a general-purpose scheme for archiving data and making the data available to those who will use it. Addressing the needs of those who develop and trouble-shoot hardware and software increases the challenge. This paper describes the aspects of GTA that affect archiving operations and discusses how the features of the EPICS archiving module meet a variety of needs for storing and accessing data.

  9. Real-time data archiving for GTA

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, R.A.; Atkins, W.H.

    1992-09-01

    The architecture of the GTA control system, the nature of a typical GTA commissioning activity, and the varied interests of those analyzing the data make it challenging to develop a general-purpose scheme for archiving data and making the data available to those who will use it. Addressing the needs of those who develop and trouble-shoot hardware and software increases the challenge. This paper describes the aspects of GTA that affect archiving operations and discusses how the features of the EPICS archiving module meet a variety of needs for storing and accessing data.

  10. How to Transplant a Large Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, J.; Arviset, C.; Osuna, P.; Rosa, M.

    2013-10-01

    During 2011 and 2012 the European Hubble Space Telescope Archive was moved with all its data and services from its old home at ESO near Munich to to its new one at ESA/ESAC near Madrid. The successful move of the active HST and Hubble Legacy Archives took slightly more than a year despite a limited amount of preparation beforehand and a minimum of manpower available for the task. This talk describes the logistics of the move, lessons learned and the strategies which have been employed to make the Hubble archives easy to maintain, self-contained and easily portable between environments with sufficient storage capacity and ubiquitous grid processing power.

  11. Archival Services and Technologies for Scientific Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Jörg; Hardt, Marcus; Streit, Achim; van Wezel, Jos

    2014-06-01

    After analysis and publication, there is no need to keep experimental data online on spinning disks. For reliability and costs inactive data is moved to tape and put into a data archive. The data archive must provide reliable access for at least ten years following a recommendation of the German Science Foundation (DFG), but many scientific communities wish to keep data available much longer. Data archival is on the one hand purely a bit preservation activity in order to ensure the bits read are the same as those written years before. On the other hand enough information must be archived to be able to use and interpret the content of the data. The latter is depending on many also community specific factors and remains an areas of much debate among archival specialists. The paper describes the current practice of archival and bit preservation in use for different science communities at KIT for which a combination of organizational services and technical tools are required. The special monitoring to detect tape related errors, the software infrastructure in use as well as the service certification are discussed. Plans and developments at KIT also in the context of the Large Scale Data Management and Analysis (LSDMA) project are presented. The technical advantages of the T10 SCSI Stream Commands (SSC-4) and the Linear Tape File System (LTFS) will have a profound impact on future long term archival of large data sets.

  12. Proton NMR-Based Metabolite Analyses of Archived Serial Paired Serum and Urine Samples from Myeloma Patients at Different Stages of Disease Activity Identifies Acetylcarnitine as a Novel Marker of Active Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khanim, Farhat L.; Günther, Ulrich L.; Viant, Mark R.; Morgan, Gareth J.; Bunce, Christopher M.; Drayson, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Biomarker identification is becoming increasingly important for the development of personalized or stratified therapies. Metabolomics yields biomarkers indicative of phenotype that can be used to characterize transitions between health and disease, disease progression and therapeutic responses. The desire to reproducibly detect ever greater numbers of metabolites at ever diminishing levels has naturally nurtured advances in best practice for sample procurement, storage and analysis. Reciprocally, since many of the available extensive clinical archives were established prior to the metabolomics era and were not processed in such an ‘ideal’ fashion, considerable scepticism has arisen as to their value for metabolomic analysis. Here we have challenged that paradigm. Methods We performed proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-based metabolomics on blood serum and urine samples from 32 patients representative of a total cohort of 1970 multiple myeloma patients entered into the United Kingdom Medical Research Council Myeloma IX trial. Findings Using serial paired blood and urine samples we detected metabolite profiles that associated with diagnosis, post-treatment remission and disease progression. These studies identified carnitine and acetylcarnitine as novel potential biomarkers of active disease both at diagnosis and relapse and as a mediator of disease associated pathologies. Conclusions These findings show that samples conventionally processed and archived can provide useful metabolomic information that has important implications for understanding the biology of myeloma, discovering new therapies and identifying biomarkers potentially useful in deciding the choice and application of therapy. PMID:23431376

  13. Archive of ground penetrating radar data collected during USGS field activity 13BIM01—Dauphin Island, Alabama, April 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forde, Arnell S.; Smith, Christopher G.; Reynolds, Billy J.

    2016-01-01

    From April 13 to 20, 2013, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (USGS-SPCMSC) conducted geophysical and sediment sampling surveys on Dauphin Island, Alabama, as part of Field Activity 13BIM01. The objectives of the study were to quantify inorganic and organic accretion rates in back-barrier and mainland marsh and estuarine environments. Various field and laboratory methods were used to achieve these objectives, including subsurface imaging using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), sediment sampling, lithologic and microfossil analyses, and geochronology techniques to produce barrier island stratigraphic cross sections to help interpret the recent (last 2000 years) geologic evolution of the island.This data series report is an archive of GPR and associated Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected in April 2013 from Dauphin Island and adjacent barrier-island environments. In addition to GPR data, marsh core and vibracore data were also collected collected but are not reported (or included) in the current report. Data products, including elevation-corrected subsurface profile images of the processed GPR data, unprocessed digital GPR trace data, post-processed GPS data, Geographic Information System (GIS) files and accompanying Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata, can be downloaded from the Data Downloads page.

  14. The GTC Public Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alacid, J. Manuel; Solano, Enrique

    2015-12-01

    The Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) archive is operational since November 2011. The archive, maintained by the Data Archive Unit at CAB in the framework of the Spanish Virtual Observatory project, provides access to both raw and science ready data and has been designed in compliance with the standards defined by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) to guarantee a high level of data accessibility and handling. In this presentation I will describe the main capabilities the GTC archive offers to the community, in terms of functionalities and data collections, to carry out an efficient scientific exploitation of GTC data.

  15. Archives of Atmospheric Lead Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Dominik; Shotyk, William; Kempf, Oliver

    Environmental archives such as peat bogs, sediments, corals, trees, polar ice, plant material from herbarium collections, and human tissue material have greatly helped to assess both ancient and recent atmospheric lead deposition and its sources on a regional and global scale. In Europe detectable atmospheric lead pollution began as early as 6000years ago due to enhanced soil dust and agricultural activities, as studies of peat bogs reveal. Increased lead emissions during ancient Greek and Roman times have been recorded and identified in many long-term archives such as lake sediments in Sweden, ice cores in Greenland, and peat bogs in Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands. For the period since the Industrial Revolution, other archives such as corals, trees, and herbarium collections provide similar chronologies of atmospheric lead pollution, with periods of enhanced lead deposition occurring at the turn of the century and since 1950. The main sources have been industry, including coal burning, ferrous and nonferrous smelting, and open waste incineration until c.1950 and leaded gasoline use since 1950. The greatest lead emissions to the atmosphere all over Europe occurred between 1950 and 1980 due to traffic exhaust. A marked drop in atmospheric lead fluxes found in most archives since the 1980s has been attributed to the phasing out of leaded gasoline. The isotope ratios of lead in the various archives show qualitatively similar temporal changes, for example, the immediate response to the introduction and phasing out of leaded gasoline. Isotope studies largely confirm source assessments based on lead emission inventories and allow the contributions of various anthropogenic sources to be calculated.

  16. Archive of Digital Boomer Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Field Activity 96LCA04 in Lakes Mabel and Starr, Central Florida, August 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Swancar, Amy; Tihansky, Ann B.; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2008-01-01

    In August of 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted geophysical surveys of Lakes Mabel and Starr, central Florida, as part of the Central Highlands Lakes project, which is part of a larger USGS Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, observer's logbook; and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Filtered and gained (a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansions of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. For detailed information about the hydrologic setting of Lake Starr and the interpretation of some of these seismic reflection data, see Swancar and others (2000) at http://fl.water.usgs.gov/publications/Abstracts/wri00_4030_swancar.html. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided. The USGS Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) - St. Petersburg assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 96LCA04 tells us the data were collected in 1996 for the Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study and the data were collected during the fourth field activity for that project in that calendar year. Refer to http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/definition/activity.html for a detailed description of the method used to assign the field activity ID. The boomer plate is an acoustic energy source that consists of capacitors charged to a high voltage and discharged through a transducer in the water. The transducer is towed on a sled floating on the water surface and when

  17. Archive of Digital Boomer Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Field Activity 02LCA02 in Lakes Ada, Crystal, Jennie, Mary, Rice, and Sylvan, Central Florida, July 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Davis, Jeffrey B.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2008-01-01

    In July of 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey and St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) conducted geophysical surveys in Lakes Ada, Crystal, Jennie, Mary, Rice, and Sylvan, central Florida, as part of the USGS Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Filtered and gained (a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansions of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided. The USGS Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) - St. Petersburg assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 02LCA02 tells us the data were collected in 2002 for the Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study and the data were collected during the second field activity for that study in that calendar year. Refer to http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/definition/activity.html for a detailed description of the method used to assign the field activity ID. The boomer plate is an acoustic energy source that consists of capacitors charged to a high voltage and discharged through a transducer in the water. The transducer is towed on a sled floating on the water surface and when discharged emits a short acoustic pulse, or shot, which propagates through the water, sediment column, or rock beneath. The acoustic energy is reflected at density boundaries (such as the seafloor, sediment, or rock layers beneath the

  18. Cancer imaging archive available

    Cancer.gov

    NCI’s Cancer Imaging Program has inaugurated The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA), a web-accessible and unique clinical imaging archive linked to The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) tissue repository. It contains a large proportion of original, pre-surgical MRIs from cases that have been genomically characterized in TCGA.

  19. [Church Archives; Selected Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Terry; And Others

    Papers presented at the Institute which were concerned with keeping of church archives are entitled: "St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Eugene, Oregon;""Central Lutheran Church, Eugene, Oregon: A History;""Mormon Church Archives: An Overview;""Sacramental Records of St. Mary's Catholic Church, Eugene, Oregon;""Chronology of St. Mary's Catholic Church,…

  20. Determination of filling factors of Active Regions, Coronal Holes and Quiet Sun for the EIT archive 1997-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeeck, Cis; Delouille, Veronique; De Visscher, Ruben; Mampaey, Benjamin; Haberreiter, Margit

    2013-04-01

    In previous work, we have proposed a multi-channel unsupervised spatially-constrained multichannel fuzzy clustering algorithm (SPoCA) that automatically segments EUV solar images into Active Regions (AR), Coronal Holes (CH), and Quiet Sun (QS). This algorithm has been running in near real time on AIA data as part of the SDO Feature Finding Team Project since 2010, populating the Heliophysics Events Knowledgebase (HEK) with Active Region and Coronal Hole events. After having corrected for the limb brightening effect, SPoCA computes an optimal clustering with respect to the regions of interest using fuzzy segmentation. The process is fast and automatic. Morphological dilation is employed to assemble neighboring bright AR cores into individual AR regions. Combining SPoCA's detection of AR, and CH on subsequent images allows automatic tracking and naming of any region of interest. We applied SPOCA on SOHO-EIT, SECCHI-EUVI, PROBA2-SWAP, and SDO-AIA, and show in particular the filling factors of AR/QS/CH as well as AR and CH mean intensity time series obtained from the full dataset of synoptic SOHO/EIT images taken between 1997 and 2011. Such segmentation can be used for several applications. Filling factors or AR, QS, and CH can be included into (semi-) empirical models of the solar atmosphere, which can in turn feed models of solar EUV irradiance. Another application is the investigation of active longitudes as well as long-term statistical studies of AR and CH parameters.

  1. Archive of digital boomer seismic reflection data collected during USGS field activities 95LCA03 and 96LCA02 in the Peace River of West-Central Florida, 1995 and 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calderon, Karynna; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Tihansky, Ann B.; Lewelling, Bill R.; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Harrison, Arnell S.

    2006-01-01

    In October and November of 1995 and February of 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Southwest Florida Water Management District, conducted geophysical surveys of the Peace River in west-central Florida from east of Bartow to west of Arcadia. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, GIS files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, observers' logbooks, and formal FGDC metadata. Filtered and gained digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansion of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided.

  2. A comprehensive cost model for NASA data archiving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Klenk, K. F.; Treinish, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    A simple archive cost model has been developed to help predict NASA's archiving costs. The model covers data management activities from the beginning of the mission through launch, acquisition, and support of retrospective users by the long-term archive; it is capable of determining the life cycle costs for archived data depending on how the data need to be managed to meet user requirements. The model, which currently contains 48 equations with a menu-driven user interface, is available for use on an IBM PC or AT.

  3. The Gaia Archive at ESAC: a VO-inside archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Nunez, J.

    2015-12-01

    The ESDC (ESAC Science Data Center) is one of the active members of the IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) that have defined a set of standards, libraries and concepts that allows to create flexible,scalable and interoperable architectures on the data archives development. In the case of astronomy science that involves the use of big catalogues, as in Gaia or Euclid, TAP, UWS and VOSpace standards can be used to create an architecture that allows the explotation of this valuable data from the community. Also, new challenges arise like the implementation of the new paradigm "move code close to the data", what can be partially obtained by the extension of the protocols (TAP+, UWS+, etc) or the languages (ADQL). We explain how we have used VO standards and libraries for the Gaia Archive that, not only have producing an open and interoperable archive but, also, minimizing the developement on certain areas. Also we will explain how we have extended these protocols and the future plans.

  4. Distribution and Support of Aquarius/SAC-D Data through the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsontos, V. M.; Vazquez, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Center (PO.DAAC) serves as the designated NASA repository and distribution node for all Aquarius/SAC-D data products in close collaboration with the project. Here we report on the status of Aquarius data holdings at PO.DAAC, observed patterns of usage of these datasets, and the range of data services and access tools that we provide in support of this mission. These currently include dataset discovery and access via the PO.DAAC web-portal, an interactive L3-browser tool for online visualization, and user services that span help-desk support, Aquarius user guide documentation, and reader software development. In anticipation of the release of the Aquarius science quality dataset by the end of 2012 and as the project transitions out of the current calibration/evaluation phase, additional PO.DAAC tools and services that will be leveraged for Aquarius are described. These range from OPeNDAP and THREDDS data access services, web-based visualization via PO.DAAC's SOTO tool and LAS, to our advanced L2 subsetting tool called HITIDE.

  5. The NASA Exoplanet Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Solange; Akeson, R. L.; Ciardi, D.; Kane, S. R.; Plavchan, P.; von Braun, K.; NASA Exoplanet Archive Team

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Exoplanet Archive is an online service that compiles and correlates astronomical information on extra solar planets and their host stars. The data in the archive include exoplanet parameters (such as orbits, masses, and radii), associated data (such as published radial velocity curves, photometric light curves, images, and spectra), and stellar parameters (such as magnitudes, positions, and temperatures). All the archived data are linked to the original literature reference.The archive provides tools to work with these data, including interactive tables (with plotting capabilities), interactive light curve viewer, periodogram service, transit and ephemeris calculator, and application program interface.The NASA Exoplanet Archive is the U.S. portal to the public CoRoT mission data for both the Exoplanet and Asteroseismology data sets. The NASA Exoplanet Archive also serves data related to Kepler Objects of Interest (Planet Candidates and the Kepler False Positives, KOI) in an integrated and interactive table containing stellar and transit parameters. In support of the Kepler Extended Mission, the NASA Exoplanet Archive will host transit modeling parameters, centroid results, several statistical values, and summary and detailed reports for all transit-like events identified by the Kepler Pipeline. To access this information visit us at: http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu

  6. Technology and the Transformation of Archival Description

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitti, Daniel V.

    2005-01-01

    The emergence of computer and network technologies has presented the archival profession with daunting challenges as well as inspiring opportunities. Archivists have been actively imagining and realizing the application of advanced technologies to their professional functions and activities. Using advanced technologies, archivists have been…

  7. The PSA: Planetary Science Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelemy, M.; Martinez, S.; Heather, D.; Vazquez, J. L.; Arviset, C.; Osuna, P.; PSA development Team

    2012-04-01

    Scientific and engineering data from ESA's planetary missions are made accessible to the world-wide scientific community via the Planetary Science Archive (PSA). The PSA consists of online services incorporating search, preview, download, notification and delivery basket functionality. Besides data from the GIOTTO spacecraft and several ground-based cometary observations, the PSA contains data from the Mars Express, Venus Express, Rosetta, SMART-1 and Huygens missions. The focus of the PSA activities is on the long-term preservation of data and knowledge from ESA's planetary missions. Scientific users can access the data online using several interfaces: - The Advanced Search Interface allows complex parameter based queries, providing the end user with a facility to complete very specific searches on meta-data and geometrical parameters. By nature, this interface requires careful use and heavy interaction with the end-user to input and control the relevant search parameters. - The Map-based Interface is currently operational only for Mars Express HRCS and OMEGA data. This interface allows an end-user to specify a region-of-interest by dragging a box onto a base map of Mars. From this interface, it is possible to directly visualize query results. The Map-based and Advanced interfaces are linked and cross-compatible. If a user defines a region-of-interest in the Map-based interface, the results can be refined by entering more detailed search parameters in the Advanced interface. - The FTP Browser Interface is designed for more experienced users, and allows for direct browsing and access of the data set content through ftp-tree search. Each dataset contains documentation and calibration information in addition to the scientific or engineering data. All data are prepared by the corresponding instrument teams, mostly located in Europe. PSA supports the instrument teams in the full archiving process, from the definition of the data products, meta-data and product labels

  8. The Planetary Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penteado, Paulo F.; Trilling, David; Szalay, Alexander; Budavári, Tamás; Fuentes, César

    2014-11-01

    We are building the first system that will allow efficient data mining in the astronomical archives for observations of Solar System Bodies. While the Virtual Observatory has enabled data-intensive research making use of large collections of observations across multiple archives, Planetary Science has largely been denied this opportunity: most astronomical data services are built based on sky positions, and moving objects are often filtered out.To identify serendipitous observations of Solar System objects, we ingest the archive metadata. The coverage of each image in an archive is a volume in a 3D space (RA,Dec,time), which we can represent efficiently through a hierarchical triangular mesh (HTM) for the spatial dimensions, plus a contiguous time interval. In this space, an asteroid occupies a curve, which we determine integrating its orbit into the past. Thus when an asteroid trajectory intercepts the volume of an archived image, we have a possible observation of that body. Our pipeline then looks in the archive's catalog for a source with the corresponding coordinates, to retrieve its photometry. All these matches are stored into a database, which can be queried by object identifier.This database consists of archived observations of known Solar System objects. This means that it grows not only from the ingestion of new images, but also from the growth in the number of known objects. As new bodies are discovered, our pipeline can find archived observations where they could have been recorded, providing colors for these newly-found objects. This growth becomes more relevant with the new generation of wide-field surveys, particularly LSST.We also present one use case of our prototype archive: after ingesting the metadata for SDSS, 2MASS and GALEX, we were able to identify serendipitous observations of Solar System bodies in these 3 archives. Cross-matching these occurrences provided us with colors from the UV to the IR, a much wider spectral range than that

  9. The Herschel Science Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdugo, Eva

    2015-12-01

    The Herschel mission required a Science Archive able to serve data to very different users: The own Data Analysis Software (both Pipeline and Interactive Analysis), the consortia of the different instruments and the scientific community. At the same time, the KP consortia were committed to deliver to the Herschel Science Centre, the processed products corresponding to the data obtained as part of their Science Demonstration Phase and the Herschel Archive should include the capability to store and deliver them. I will explain how the current Herschel Science Archive is designed to cover all these requirements.

  10. Establishing a Research Culture for Archive Administration in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mary

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the current state of academic research within the discipline of archive administration in the UK. It identifies and examines a number of reasons why research output from the UK is so low when compared with activity on an international basis. These reasons include the historic nature of archival education in the UK, the…

  11. Mining Subsidence-generated legacy sediments in a Mid-European low-order stream floodplain as an archive for historic human activity and flooding events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchty-Lemke, Michael; Lehmkuhl, Frank; Frings, Roy; Henkel, Sebastian; Schwarzbauer, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Legacy sediments, which were deposited as a consequence of mining subsidence in a floodplain area, can be used as an archive for human activity and past flooding. The morphodynamics of the Wurm River, a low-order stream in the Lower Rhine Embayment at the border between Germany and the Netherlands, is significantly influenced by a long colliery history, which caused alterations in the natural river landscape. In addition, substances which are transported via municipal wastewaters as well as contaminants emitted by specific regional industries were deposited in the floodplain sediments. This study aims at the reconstruction of human activity and past flooding events derived from geochemical and sedimentological data for different time slices within the 20st century. The spatial and chronological distribution of contaminants is investigated on the basis of several sections and drilling cores along the middle reaches of the Wurm River. Sections within mining subsidence areas and outside of those are compared regarding their sedimentation rates and element contents. Additional information is gathered from digital terrain models, historical documents such as the Tranchot map (early 19th century), and interviews of contemporary witnesses. Sedimentation rates derived from Cs-137 measurements allow a temporal assignment of the legacy sediments. A section within a segment of the Siegfried Line (Westwall), constructed in 1939, that crosses the Wurm River shows a significant increase in sedimentation rates in contrast to the floodplain area that is unaffected by subsidence processes. Furthermore, source-specific contaminants can be used to refine the stratigraphy, since source and period of emission are known. The evaluation of past flooding events is supported by numerical modeling of flood scenarios, which provides detailed information about flooded areas depending on the discharge, particularly for the areas which are under influence of mining subsidence. Besides the

  12. Dang An: A Brief History of the Chinese Imperial Archives and Its Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wenxian

    2004-01-01

    Archives are preserved records of human activities. An account of Chinese archival development is as long as the written records of the Chinese history. Oracle bones, bronze ware, and wood and bamboo strips are the three most important recording forms of the early Chinese civilization, as they represented three major stages of archival development…

  13. Archive of Digital Boomer and CHIRP Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Field Activity 08LCA03 in Lake Panasoffkee, Florida, May 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; McBride, W. Scott; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2009-01-01

    In May of 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical surveys in Lake Panasoffkee, located in central Florida, as part of the USGS Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer and Compressed High Intensity Radar Pulse (CHIRP)* seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Filtered and gained (a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles and geospatially corrected interactive profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansions of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. *Due to poor data acquisition conditions associated with the lake bottom sediments, only two CHIRP tracklines were collected during this field activity. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are provided. The USGS Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) - St. Petersburg assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 08LCA03 tells us the data were collected in 2008 for the Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study and the data were collected during the third field activity for that study in that calendar year. Refer to http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/definition/activity.html for a detailed description of the method used to assign the field activity ID. The naming convention used for each seismic line is as follows: yye##a, where 'yy' are the last two digits of the year in which the data were collected, 'e' is a 1-letter abbreviation for the equipment type (for example, b for boomer and c

  14. Latin American Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belsunce, Cesar A. Garcia

    1983-01-01

    Examination of the situation of archives in four Latin American countries--Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, and Costa Rica--highlights national systems, buildings, staff, processing of documents, accessibility and services to the public and publications and extension services. (EJS)

  15. Archive of Digital Boomer Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Field Activity 08LCA01 in 10 Central Florida Lakes, March 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Davis, Jeffrey B.; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2009-01-01

    In March of 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey and St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) conducted geophysical surveys in Lakes Avalon, Big, Colby, Helen, Johns, Prevatt, Searcy, Saunders, Three Island, and Trout, located in central Florida, as part of the USGS Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Filtered and gained (a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansions of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU) (Cohen and Stockwell, 2005). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided. The USGS Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) - St. Petersburg assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 08LCA01 tells us the data were collected in 2008 for the Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study and the data were collected during the first field activity for that study in that calendar year. Refer to http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/definition/activity.html for a detailed description of the method used to assign the field activity ID. The naming convention used for each seismic line is as follows: yye##a, where yy is the last two digits of the year in which the data were collected, e is a 1-letter abbreviation for the equipment type (for example, b for boomer), ## is a 2-digit number representing a specific track, and a is a letter representing the section of a line

  16. Cassini Archive Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, Diane; Sayfi, Elias; Tinio, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    The Cassini Archive Tracking System (CATS) is a computer program that enables tracking of scientific data transfers from originators to the Planetary Data System (PDS) archives. Without CATS, there is no systematic means of locating products in the archive process or ensuring their completeness. By keeping a database of transfer communications and status, CATS enables the Cassini Project and the PDS to efficiently and accurately report on archive status. More importantly, problem areas are easily identified through customized reports that can be generated on the fly from any Web-enabled computer. A Web-browser interface and clearly defined authorization scheme provide safe distributed access to the system, where users can perform functions such as create customized reports, record a transfer, and respond to a transfer. CATS ensures that Cassini provides complete science archives to the PDS on schedule and that those archives are available to the science community by the PDS. The three-tier architecture is loosely coupled and designed for simple adaptation to multimission use. Written in the Java programming language, it is portable and can be run on any Java-enabled Web server.

  17. The PSA: Planetary Science Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelemy, Maud; Metselaar, Harold; Martinez, Santa; Heather, David; Vazquez, Jose Luis; Manaud, Nicolas; Ortiz, Iñaki; Arviset, Christophe; Osuna, Pedro

    2010-05-01

    Scientific and engineering data from ESA's planetary missions are made accessible to the world-wide scientific community via the Planetary Science Archive (PSA). The PSA consists of online services incorporating search, preview, download, notification and delivery basket functionality. Besides data from the GIOTTO spacecraft and several ground-based cometary observations, the PSA contains data from the Mars Express, Venus Express, Rosetta, and Huygens missions. Preparation for the release of data from the SMART-1 spacecraft is ongoing. The focus of the PSA activities is on the long-term preservation of data and knowledge from ESA's planetary missions. Scientific users can access the data online using several interfaces: - The Classical Interface allows complex parameter based queries, providing the end user with a facility to complete very specific searches on meta-data and geometrical parameters. By nature, this interface requires careful use and heavy interaction with the end-user to input and control the relevant search parameters. - The Map-based Interface is currently operational only for Mars Express HRCS and OMEGA data. This interface allows an end-user to specify a region-of-interest by dragging a box onto a base map of Mars. From this interface, it is possible to directly visualize query results. The Map-based and Classical interfaces are linked and cross-compatible. If a user defines a region-of-interest in the Map-based interface, the results can be refined by entering more detailed search parameters in the Classical interface. - The Dataset Browser Interface is designed for more experienced users, and allows for direct browsing and access of the data set content through ftp-tree search. Each dataset contains documentation and calibration information in addition to the scientific or engineering data. All data are prepared by the corresponding instrument teams, mostly located in Europe. PSA staff supports the instrument teams in the full archiving process

  18. The PSA: Planetary Science Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelemy, M.; Metselaar, H.; Martinez, S.; Heather, D.; Vazquez, J. L.; Wirth, K.; Manaud, N.; Ortiz, I.; Arviset, C.; Fernandez, M.

    2009-04-01

    Scientific and engineering data from ESA's planetary missions are made accessible to the world-wide scientific community via the Planetary Science Archive (PSA). The PSA consists of online services incorporating search, preview, download, notification and delivery basket functionality. Besides data from the GIOTTO spacecraft and several ground-based cometary observations, the PSA contains data from the Mars Express, Venus Express, Rosetta, and Huygens missions. Preparation for the release of data from the SMART-1 spacecraft is ongoing. The focus of the PSA activities is on the long-term preservation of data and knowledge from ESA's planetary missions. Scientific users can access the data online using several interfaces: The Classical Interface allows complex parameter based queries, providing the end user with a facility to complete very specific searches on meta-data and geometrical parameters. By nature, this interface requires careful use and heavy interaction with the end-user to input and control the relevant search parameters. The Map-based Interface is currently operational only for Mars Express HRCS and OMEGA data. This interface allows an end-user to specify a region-of-interest by dragging a box onto a base map of Mars. From this interface, it is possible to directly visualize query results. The Map-based and Classical interfaces are linked and cross-compatible. If a user defines a region-of-interest in the Map-based interface, the results can be refined by entering more detailed search parameters in the Classical interface. The Dataset Browser Interface is designed for more experienced users, and allows for direct browsing and access of the data set content through ftp-tree search. Each dataset contains documentation and calibration information in addition to the scientific or engineering data. All data are prepared by the corresponding instrument teams, mostly located in Europe. PSA staff supports the instrument teams in the full archiving process

  19. The Golosyiv plate archive digitisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva, T. P.; Sergeev, A. V.; Pakuliak, L. K.; Yatsenko, A. I.

    2007-08-01

    The plate archive of the Main Astronomical Observatory of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (Golosyiv, Kyiv) includes about 85 000 plates which have been taken in various observational projects during 1950-2005. Among them are about 25 000 of direct northern sky area plates and more than 600 000 plates containing stellar, planetary and active solar formations spectra. Direct plates have a limiting magnitude of 14.0-16.0 mag. Since 2002 we have been organising the storage, safeguarding, cataloguing and digitization of the plate archive. The very initial task was to create the automated system for detection of astronomical objects and phenomena, search of optical counterparts in the directions of gamma-ray bursts, research of long period, flare and other variable stars, search and rediscovery of asteroids, comets and other Solar System bodies to improve the elements of their orbits, informational support of CCD observations and space projects, etc. To provide higher efficiency of this work we have prepared computer readable catalogues and database for 250 000 direct wide field plates. Now the catalogues have been adapted to Wide Field Plate Database (WFPDB) format and integrated into this world database. The next step will be adaptation of our catalogues, database and images to standards of the IVOA. Some magnitude and positional accuracy estimations for Golosyiv archive plates have been done. The photometric characteristics of the images of NGC 6913 cluster stars on two plates of the Golosyiv's double wide angle astrograph have been determined. Very good conformity of the photometric characteristics obtained with external accuracies of 0.13 and 0.15 mag. has been found. The investigation of positional accuracy have been made with A3± format fixed bed scanner (Microtek ScanMaker 9800XL TMA). It shows that the scanner has non-detectable systematic errors on the X-axis, and errors of ± 15 μm on the Y-axis. The final positional errors are about ± 2 μm (

  20. Dynamic Data Management Based on Archival Process Integration at the Centre for Environmental Data Archival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Esther; Waterfall, Alison; Pepler, Sam; Newey, Charles

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we decribe a business process modelling approach to the integration of exisiting archival activities. We provide a high level overview of existing practice and discuss how procedures can be extended and supported through the description of preservation state. The aim of which is to faciliate the dynamic controlled management of scientific data through its lifecycle. The main types of archival processes considered are: • Management processes that govern the operation of an archive. These management processes include archival governance (preservation state management, selection of archival candidates and strategic management) . • Operational processes that constitute the core activities of the archive which maintain the value of research assets. These operational processes are the acquisition, ingestion, deletion, generation of metadata and preservation actvities, • Supporting processes, which include planning, risk analysis and monitoring of the community/preservation environment. We then proceed by describing the feasability testing of extended risk management and planning procedures which integrate current practices. This was done through the CEDA Archival Format Audit which inspected British Atmospherics Data Centre and National Earth Observation Data Centre Archival holdings. These holdings are extensive, comprising of around 2PB of data and 137 million individual files which were analysed and characterised in terms of format based risk. We are then able to present an overview of the risk burden faced by a large scale archive attempting to maintain the usability of heterogeneous environmental data sets. We conclude by presenting a dynamic data management information model that is capable of describing the preservation state of archival holdings throughout the data lifecycle. We provide discussion of the following core model entities and their relationships: • Aspirational entities, which include Data Entity definitions and their associated

  1. The Role of Planetary Data System Archive Standards in International Planetary Data Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinness, Edward; Slavney, Susan; Beebe, Reta; Crichton, Daniel

    . Over the next several years, there will be additional planetary missions to the Moon and Mars led by countries such as Japan, China, India, and Russia, along with the European Space Agency (ESA). Planetary missions are also beginning to involve more international collaboration. Thus, it is important that the archives produced by these missions have some common standards so that the data can be readily used in research by the international planetary science community. In addition, the adoption of common archive standards would save time and effort for agencies in terms of data archive design and development. ESA has successfully adopted PDS standards for archives from a suite of missions that includes Mars Express, Venus Express, Cassini-Huygens, and Rosetta. An approach for advancing the use of a common set of archiving standards for planetary data was the creation of the International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA). Representatives from the PDS are active participants in the IPDA. One of the PDS contributions to the IPDA is to work on IPDA projects that seek to develop a core set of archiving standards for use by the international space agencies.

  2. Archive of Digital Boomer Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Field Activity 08LCA04 in Lakes Cherry, Helen, Hiawassee, Louisa, and Prevatt, Central Florida, September 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Davis, Jeffrey B.; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2009-01-01

    From September 2 through 4, 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey and St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) conducted geophysical surveys in Lakes Cherry, Helen, Hiawassee, Louisa, and Prevatt, central Florida. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, GIS information, FACS logs, and formal FGDC metadata. Filtered and gained digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided.

  3. Reading Robin Kelsey's "Archive Style" across the Archival Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the author's comments on Robin Kelsey's "Archive Style: Photographs and Illustrations for U.S. Surveys, 1850-1890," a book about government documents that happen to be visual materials. The word "archive" now has intellectual cache in the academic world, but its currency has little to do with the "real world of archives" as…

  4. Training in the Archives: Archival Research as Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buehl, Jonathan; Chute, Tamar; Fields, Anne

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the rationale and efficacy of a graduate-level teaching module providing loosely structured practice with real archives. Introducing early career scholars to archival methods changed their beliefs about knowledge, research, teaching, and their discipline(s). This case study suggests that archives can be productive training…

  5. Evolution of Archival Storage (from Tape to Memory)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, Hampapuram K.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last three decades, there has been a significant evolution in storage technologies supporting archival of remote sensing data. This section provides a brief survey of how these technologies have evolved. Three main technologies are considered - tape, hard disk and solid state disk. Their historical evolution is traced, summarizing how reductions in cost have helped being able to store larger volumes of data on faster media. The cost per GB of media is only one of the considerations in determining the best approach to archival storage. Active archives generally require faster response to user requests for data than permanent archives. The archive costs have to consider facilities and other capital costs, operations costs, software licenses, utilities costs, etc. For meeting requirements in any organization, typically a mix of technologies is needed.

  6. The Ethics of Archival Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Heidi A.; Porter, James E.

    2012-01-01

    What are the key ethical issues involved in conducting archival research? Based on examination of cases and interviews with leading archival researchers in composition, this article discusses several ethical questions and offers a heuristic to guide ethical decision making. Key to this process is recognizing the person-ness of archival materials.…

  7. Twitter Stream Archiver

    SciTech Connect

    Steed, Chad Allen

    2014-07-01

    The Twitter Archiver system allows a user to enter their Twitter developer account credentials (obtained separately from the Twitter developer website) and read from the freely available Twitter sample stream. The Twitter sample stream provides a random sample of the overall volume of tweets that are contributed by users to the system. The Twitter Archiver system consumes the stream and serializes the information to text files at some predefined interval. A separate utility reads the text files and creates a searchable index using the open source Apache Lucene text indexing system.

  8. Twitter Stream Archiver

    2014-07-01

    The Twitter Archiver system allows a user to enter their Twitter developer account credentials (obtained separately from the Twitter developer website) and read from the freely available Twitter sample stream. The Twitter sample stream provides a random sample of the overall volume of tweets that are contributed by users to the system. The Twitter Archiver system consumes the stream and serializes the information to text files at some predefined interval. A separate utility reads themore » text files and creates a searchable index using the open source Apache Lucene text indexing system.« less

  9. Mapping the Archives: 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    With this issue, "Research in Drama Education" (RiDE) continues its occasional series of short informational pieces on archives in the field of drama and theatre education and applied theatre and performance. Each instalment includes summaries of one or more collections of significant material in the field. Over time, this will build in to a…

  10. Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project

    SciTech Connect

    Klasky, Hilda B; Bass, Bennett Richard; Williams, Paul T; Phillips, Rick; Erickson, Marjorie A; Kirk, Mark T; Stevens, Gary L

    2013-01-01

    The Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project (REAP), which is being conducted by the Probabilistic Integrity Safety Assessment (PISA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under funding from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission s (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, aims to provide an archival source of information about the effect of neutron radiation on the properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Specifically, this project is an effort to create an Internet-accessible RPV steel embrittlement database. The project s website, https://reap.ornl.gov, provides information in two forms: (1) a document archive with surveillance capsule(s) reports and related technical reports, in PDF format, for the 104 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States, with similar reports from other countries; and (2) a relational database archive with detailed information extracted from the reports. The REAP project focuses on data collected from surveillance capsule programs for light-water moderated, nuclear power reactor vessels operated in the United States, including data on Charpy V-notch energy testing results, tensile properties, composition, exposure temperatures, neutron flux (rate of irradiation damage), and fluence, (Fast Neutron Fluence a cumulative measure of irradiation for E>1 MeV). Additionally, REAP contains data from surveillance programs conducted in other countries. REAP is presently being extended to focus on embrittlement data analysis, as well. This paper summarizes the current status of the REAP database and highlights opportunities to access the data and to participate in the project.

  11. Mapping the Archives: 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    With this issue, "RiDE" continues its new occasional series of short informational pieces on archives in the field of drama and theatre education and applied theatre and performance. Each instalment includes summaries of one or more collections of significant material in the field. Over time this will build into a readily accessible directory of…

  12. Noroviruses in Archival Samples

    PubMed Central

    Skraber, Sylvain; Italiaander, Ronald; Lodder, Willemijn J.

    2005-01-01

    Application of recent techniques to detect current pathogens in archival effluent samples collected and concentrated in 1987 lead to the characterization of norovirus GGII.6 Seacroft, unrecognized until 1990 in a clinical sample. Retrospective studies will likely increase our knowledge about waterborne transmission of emerging pathogens. PMID:15757575

  13. Aspects of Electronic Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Monica

    1986-01-01

    Reviews the current status of electronic archiving, especially in Great Britain and the United States, including current use of various electronic storage media; advantages and utilizations of optical disk technology; trends toward full-text databases and increased videotex use; growing quantity of electronic information; and problems in archiving…

  14. Archive Storage Media Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranade, Sanjay

    1990-01-01

    Reviews requirements for a data archive system and describes storage media alternatives that are currently available. Topics discussed include data storage; data distribution; hierarchical storage architecture, including inline storage, online storage, nearline storage, and offline storage; magnetic disks; optical disks; conventional magnetic…

  15. NASA Data Archive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holley, Daniel C.; Haight, Kyle G.; Lindstrom, Ted

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to expose a range of naive individuals to the NASA Data Archive and to obtain feedback from them, with the goal of learning how useful people with varied backgrounds would find the Archive for research and other purposes. We processed 36 subjects in four experimental categories, designated in this report as C+R+, C+R-, C-R+ and C-R-, for computer experienced researchers, computer experienced non-researchers, non-computer experienced researchers, and non-computer experienced non-researchers, respectively. This report includes an assessment of general patterns of subject responses to the various aspects of the NASA Data Archive. Some of the aspects examined were interface-oriented, addressing such issues as whether the subject was able to locate information, figure out how to perform desired information retrieval tasks, etc. Other aspects were content-related. In doing these assessments, answers given to different questions were sometimes combined. This practice reflects the tendency of the subjects to provide answers expressing their experiences across question boundaries. Patterns of response are cross-examined by subject category in order to bring out deeper understandings of why subjects reacted the way they did to the archive. After the general assessment, there will be a more extensive summary of the replies received from the test subjects.

  16. Archiving TNG Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasian, Fabio

    The TNG (Telescopio Nazionale Galileo), a 3.5 meter telescope derived from ESO's NTT which will see first light in La Palma during 1996, will be one of the first cases where operations will be carried out following an end-to-end data management scheme. An archive of both technical and scientific data will be produced directly at the telescope as a natural extension of the data handling chain. This is possible thanks to the total integration of the data management facilities with the telescope control system. In this paper, the archive system at the TNG is described in terms of archiving facilities, production of hard media and exportable database tables, on-line technical, calibration and transit archives, interaction with the quick-look utilities for the different instruments, and data access and retrieval mechanisms. The interfaces of the system with other TNG subsystems are discussed, and first results obtained testing a prototype implementation with a simulated data flow are shown.

  17. Mapping the Archives 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    With this issue, "RiDE" begins a new occasional series of short informational pieces on archives in the field of drama and theatre education and applied theatre and performance. Each instalment will include summaries of several collections of significant material in the field. Over time this will build into a readily accessible annotated directory…

  18. Development of a GPS Seamless Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharber, M.; Bock, Y.; Gilmore, B.

    2003-12-01

    The Scripps Orbit and Permanent Array Center (SOPAC) has completed development of software for UNAVCO's GPS Seamless Archive Center (GSAC). The GSAC is a collection of GPS data archives and their operating agencies that have agreed to exchange information about their individual data holdings. GSAC allows a user to locate GPS data and metadata from these different archives through a single interface; hence GSAC is an operating virtual observatory for continuous and "campaign" GPS data. Data providers collect or generate data and then supply the data to data wholesalers. Data wholesalers collect and archive data and metadata, from one or more data providers. GSAC currently has 7 U.S.-based data wholesalers (NASA's CDDIS, UC Berkeley's NCEDC, NGS, CWU's PANGA archive, SCEC, SOPAC, and UNAVCO). Together these archives hold over 2 million GPS data (RINEX) files collected for over 10,000 monuments, including a nearly complete set of data collected between 1986 and 2003 for the global network and western North America, and a significant quantity of data collected by U.S. scientists in other tectonically active regions. Data retailers collect information from the wholesalers in a well-defined manner and run a service for clients to access the information. Currently there are two GSAC retailers (SOPAC and UNAVCO). The GSAC software suite includes a Web-based interactive client (GSAC Wizard) to locate data, a command-line client to locate and download data, and a retailer service that uses a macro language to pass commands to a server using the http url. The command-line client uses the retailer service to communicate with the retailer server. SOPAC has also modified its map interface to work with GSAC so that GPS data can be located using a spatial context, and maintains a GSAC Home Page (http://gsac.ucsd.edu). In this abstract, we highlight achievements and lessons learned from our development of the current system, but focus on a possible next generation GSAC that will

  19. Sci-Tech Archives and Manuscript Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount, Ellis, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Selected collections of scientific and technical archives and manuscripts described in eight articles include the Edison Archives; American Museum of Natural History Library; MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Institute Archives and Special Collections; National Archives; Dard Hunter Paper Museum; American Zoo and Aquarium Archives; and…

  20. HEASARC Software Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas (Technical Monitor); Murray, Stephen S.

    2003-01-01

    (1) Chandra Archive: SAO has maintained the interfaces through which HEASARC gains access to the Chandra Data Archive. At HEASARC's request, we have implemented an anonymous ftp copy of a major part of the public archive and we keep that archive up-to- date. SAO has participated in the ADEC interoperability working group, establishing guidelines or interoperability standards and prototyping such interfaces. We have provided an NVO-based prototype interface, intending to serve the HEASARC-led NVO demo project. HEASARC's Astrobrowse interface was maintained and updated. In addition, we have participated in design discussions surrounding HEASARC's Caldb project. We have attended the HEASARC Users Group meeting and presented CDA status and developments. (2) Chandra CALDB: SA0 has maintained and expanded the Chandra CALDB by including four new data file types, defining the corresponding CALDB keyword/identification structures. We have provided CALDB upgrades for the public (CIAO) and for Standard Data Processing. Approximately 40 new files have been added to the CALDB in these version releases. There have been in the past year ten of these CALDB upgrades, each with unique index configurations. In addition, with the inputs from software, archive, and calibration scientists, as well as CIAO/SDP software developers, we have defined a generalized expansion of the existing CALDB interface and indexing structure. The purpose of this is to make the CALDB more generally applicable and useful in new and future missions that will be supported archivally by HEASARC. The generalized interface will identify additional configurational keywords and permit more extensive calibration parameter and boundary condition specifications for unique file selection. HEASARC scientists and developers from SAO and GSFC have become involved in this work, which is expected to produce a new interface for general use within the current year. (3) DS9: One of the decisions that came from last year

  1. WFPDB: European Plate Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Milcho

    2007-08-01

    The Wide-Field Plate Database (WFPDB) gives an inventory of all wide-field (>~ 1 sq. deg) photographic observations archived in astronomical institutions over the world. So it facilitates and stimulates their use and preservation as a valuable source of information for future investigations in astronomy. At present WFPDB manages plate-index information for 25% of all existing plates providing on-line access from Sofia (http://www.skyarchive.org/search) and in CDS, Strasbourg. Here we present the new development of WFPDB as an instrument for searching of long term brightness variations of different sky objects stressing on the European photographic plate collections (from existing 2 million wide-field plates more than 55% are in Europe: Germany, Russia, Ukraine, Italy, Czech Republic, etc.). We comment examples of digitization (with flatbed scanners) of the European plate archives in Sonneberg, Pulkovo, Asiago, Byurakan, Bamberg, etc. and virtual links of WFPDB with European AVO, ADS, IBVS.

  2. Gaia: Processing to Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mullane, W.; Lammers, U.; Hernandez, J.

    2011-07-01

    Gaia is ESA's ambitious space astrometry mission with a foreseen launch date in late 2012. Its main objective is to perform a stellar census of the 109 brightest objects in our galaxy (completeness to V=20 mag) from which an astrometric catalog of μas level accuracy will be constructed. We update the viewer briefly on the status of the Astrometric Global Iterative Solution for Gaia. The results of AGIS feed in to the Main Database (MDB) which will be described here also. All results from Gaia processing in fact are in the MDB which is governed by a strict Interface Control Document (ICD). We describe the Distributed Data Model tool developed for Gaia, the Data Dictionary. Finally we mention public access to Gaia data in the archive. We present current plans and thinking on the archive from the ESA/DPAC perspective.

  3. Register of Education and Training Activities in Librarianship, Information Science and Archives = Inventaire des activites de formation dans le domaine de la bibliotheconomie, des sciences de l'information et de l'archivistique = Inventario de las actividades de formacion en la esfera de la bibliotecologia, las ciencias de la informacion y la archivologia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Grolier, Eric, Comp.

    This register provides information on information science, librarianship, documentation, and archival science training activities conducted outside regular university courses organized by specialized schools. Based on a December 1980 UNESCO questionnaire survey, the register includes seminars, refresher courses, continuing education courses, and…

  4. Archiving tools for EOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindrilaru, Elvin-Alin; Peters, Andreas-Joachim; Duellmann, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Archiving data to tape is a critical operation for any storage system, especially for the EOS system at CERN which holds production data for all major LHC experiments. Each collaboration has an allocated quota it can use at any given time therefore, a mechanism for archiving "stale" data is needed so that storage space is reclaimed for online analysis operations. The archiving tool that we propose for EOS aims to provide a robust client interface for moving data between EOS and CASTOR (tape backed storage system) while enforcing best practices when it comes to data integrity and verification. All data transfers are done using a third-party copy mechanism which ensures point-to- point communication between the source and destination, thus providing maximum aggregate throughput. Using ZMQ message-passing paradigm and a process-based approach enabled us to achieve optimal utilisation of the resources and a stateless architecture which can easily be tuned during operation. The modular design and the implementation done in a high-level language like Python, has enabled us to easily extended the code base to address new demands like offering full and incremental backup capabilities.

  5. Lohse's historic plate archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, M.; Tsvetkova, K.; Richter, G.; Scholz, G.; Böhm, P.

    The description and the analysis of Oswald Lohse's astrophotographic plates, collected at the Astrophysical Observatory Potsdam in the period 1879 - 1889, are presented. 67 plates of the archive, taken with the greatest instrument of the observatory at that time - the refractor (D = 0.30 m, F = 5.40 m, scale = 38''/mm) and with the second heliographic objective (D = 0.13 m, F = 1.36 m, scale = 152''/mm) - - survived two world wars in relative good condition. The plate emulsions are from different manufacturers in the beginning of astrophotography (Gädicke, Schleussner, Beernaert, etc.). The sizes of the plates are usually 9x12 cm2, which corresponds to fields of 1.2deg and 5deg respectively for each instrument mentioned above. The average limiting magnitude is 13.0(pg). Besides of the plates received for technical experiments (work on photographic processes, testing of new instruments and methods of observations), the scientific observations follow programs for studies of planet surfaces, bright stars, some double stars, stellar clusters and nebulous objects. Lohse's archive is included into the Wide Field Plate Database (http://www.skyarchive.org) as the oldest systematic one, covering the fields of Orion (M42/43), Pleiades, h & chi Persei, M37, M3, M11, M13, M92, M31, etc. With the PDS 2020 GM+ microdensitometer of Münster University 10 archive plates were digitized.

  6. The COROT Archive at LAEFF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, Almudena; Gutiérrez, Raúl; Solano, Enrique; García-Torres, Miguel; López, Mauro; Sarro, Luis Manuel

    We describe here the main capabilities of the COROT archive. The archive (http://sdc.laeff.inta.es/corotfa/jsp/searchform.jsp), managed at LAEFF in the framework of the Spanish Virtual Observatory (http://svo.laeff.inta.es), has been developed following the standards and requirements defined by IVOA (http://www.ivoa.net). The COROT archive at LAEFF will be publicly available by the end of 2008.

  7. A Robust, Low-Cost Virtual Archive for Science Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Christopher; Vollmer, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Despite their expense tape silos are still often the only affordable option for petabytescale science data archives, particularly when other factors such as data reliability, floor space, power and cooling load are accounted for. However, the complexity, management software, hardware reliability and access latency of tape silos make online data storage ever more attractive. Drastic reductions in low-cost mass-market PC disk drivers help to make this more affordable (approx. 1$/GB), but are challenging to scale to the petabyte range and of questionable reliability for archival use, On the other hand, if much of the science archive could be "virtualized", i.e., produced on demand when requested by users, we would need store only a fraction of the data online, perhaps bringing an online-only system into in affordable range. Radiance data from the satellite-borne Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument provides a good opportunity for such a virtual archive: the raw data amount to 140 GB/day, but these are small relative to the 550 GB/day making up the radiance products. These data are routinely processed as inputs for geophysical parameter products and then archived on tape at the Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive (GES DAAC) for distributing to users. Virtualizing them would be an immediate and signifcant reduction in the amount of data being stored in the tape archives and provide more customizable products. A prototype of such a virtual archive is being developed to prove the concept and develop ways of incorporating the robustness that a science data archive requires.

  8. SODA: Smart Objects, Dumb Archives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maly, Kurt; Zubair, Mohammad; Shen, Stewart N. T.

    2004-01-01

    We present the Smart Object, Dumb Archive (SODA) model for digital libraries (DLs). The SODA model transfers functionality traditionally associated with archives to the archived objects themselves. We are exploiting this shift of responsibility to facilitate other DL goals, such as interoperability, object intelligence and mobility, and heterogeneity. Objects in a SODA DL negotiate presentation of content and handle their own terms and conditions. In this paper we present implementations of our smart objects, buckets, and our dumb archive (DA). We discuss the status of buckets and DA and how they are used in a variety of DL projects.

  9. Analyzing Archival Intelligence: A Collaboration between Library Instruction and Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensley, Merinda Kaye; Murphy, Benjamin P.; Swain, Ellen D.

    2014-01-01

    Although recent archival scholarship promotes the use of primary sources for developing students' analytical research skills, few studies focus on standards or protocols for teaching or assessing archival instruction. Librarians have designed and tested standards and learning assessment strategies for library instruction, and archivists would do…

  10. Social Media and Archives: A Survey of Archive Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Bruce; Eckert, Ellen; Proffitt, Merrilee

    2013-01-01

    In April and May of 2012, the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) Research conducted a survey of users of archives to learn more about their habits and preferences. In particular, they focused on the roles that social media, recommendations, reviews, and other forms of user-contributed annotation play in archival research. OCLC surveyed faculty,…

  11. Cluster Science Archive: the ESA long term archive of the Cluster mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Arnaud; Escoubet, C. Philippe; Laakso, Harri

    2014-05-01

    The science data archive of the Cluster mission is a major contribution of the European Space Agency (ESA) to the International Living With a Star program. Known as the Cluster Active Archive (CAA), its availability since 2006 has resulted in a significant increase of the scientific return of this on-going mission. The Cluster science archive (CSA) has been developed in parallel to CAA over the last few years at the European Space Astronomy Center of ESA in Madrid, Spain. It is the long-term science archive of the Cluster mission developed and managed along with all the other ESA science missions data archives. CSA design and data services are based on the CAA interface and its user-friendly services. Publicly opened in November 2013, CSA is available in parallel to CAA during a transition period until CAA will be closed in spring 2014. It is the purpose of this presentation to first provide an overview of the various services offered by the Cluster Science Archive, including: data visualisation, VO support and command line capabilities (which enables data access via Matlab or IDL softwares). Upcoming services will then be presented (e.g. data streaming, particle distribution plot visualisation...). Support data related to on-going FP7 projects such as ECLAT and MAARBLE will be soon available on the CSA and will be briefly presented. Possible new services such as data mining will finally be evoked. This last point will hopefully lead to an open and lively debate about which services shall be offered to the scientific community by a space agency for a specific type of mission and what should be left to the community to develop.

  12. HEASARC Software Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas (Technical Monitor); Murray, Stephen S.

    2003-01-01

    (1) Chandra Archive: SAO has maintained the interfaces through which HEASARC gains access to the Chandra Data Archive. At HEASARC's request, we have implemented an anonymous ftp copy of a major part of the public archive and we keep that archive up-to- date. SAO has participated in the ADEC interoperability working group, establishing guidelines or interoperability standards and prototyping such interfaces. We have provided an NVO-based prototype interface, intending to serve the HEASARC-led NVO demo project. HEASARC's Astrobrowse interface was maintained and updated. In addition, we have participated in design discussions surrounding HEASARC's Caldb project. We have attended the HEASARC Users Group meeting and presented CDA status and developments. (2) Chandra CALDB: SA0 has maintained and expanded the Chandra CALDB by including four new data file types, defining the corresponding CALDB keyword/identification structures. We have provided CALDB upgrades for the public (CIAO) and for Standard Data Processing. Approximately 40 new files have been added to the CALDB in these version releases. There have been in the past year ten of these CALDB upgrades, each with unique index configurations. In addition, with the inputs from software, archive, and calibration scientists, as well as CIAO/SDP software developers, we have defined a generalized expansion of the existing CALDB interface and indexing structure. The purpose of this is to make the CALDB more generally applicable and useful in new and future missions that will be supported archivally by HEASARC. The generalized interface will identify additional configurational keywords and permit more extensive calibration parameter and boundary condition specifications for unique file selection. HEASARC scientists and developers from SAO and GSFC have become involved in this work, which is expected to produce a new interface for general use within the current year. (3) DS9: One of the decisions that came from last year

  13. Big Data Archives: Replication and synchronizing on a large scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, T. A.; Walker, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Modern data archives provide unique challenges to replication and synchronization because of their large size. We collect more digital information today than any time before and the volume of data collected is continuously increasing. Some of these data are from unique observations, like those from planetary missions that should be preserved for use by future generations. In addition data from NASA missions are considered federal records and must be retained. While the data may be stored on resilient hardware (i.e. RAID systems) they also must be protected from local or regional disasters. Meeting this challenge requires creating multiple copies. This task is complicated by the fact that new data are constantly being added creating what are called "active archives". Having reliable, high performance tools for replicating and synchronizing active archives in a timely fashion is critical to preservation of the data. When archives were smaller using tools like bbcp, rsync and rcp worked fairly well. While these tools are affective they are not optimized for synchronizing big data archives and their poor performance at scale lead us to develop a new tool designed specifically for big data archives. It combines the best features of git, bbcp, rsync and rcp. We call this tool "Mimic" and we discuss the design of the tool, performance comparisons and its use at NASA's Planetary Plasma Interactions (PPI) Node of the Planetary Data System (PDS).

  14. To amend title 44, United States Code, to require any organization that is established for the purpose of raising funds for creating, maintaining, expanding, or conducting activities at a Presidential archival depository or any facilities relating to a Presidential archival depository to disclose the sources and amounts of any funds raised, and for other purposes.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Duncan, John J., Jr. [R-TN-2

    2011-02-17

    02/18/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Health Care, District of Columbia, Census and the National Archives. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  15. Teaching Undergraduates to Think Archivally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimer, Cory L.; Daines, J. Gordon, III

    2012-01-01

    This case study describes efforts in the L. Tom Perry Special Collections to build and teach an undergraduate course to develop archival literacy skills in undergraduate students. The article reviews current models of archival instruction and describes how these were applied in creating the course content. An evaluation of the course's outcomes…

  16. History, Archives, and Information Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrank, Lawrence J.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses trends and issues in the archival, historical, and information sciences. Examines the relationship between history and information science; surveys archives in the context of contemporary issues pervading history and information science. Also discusses concerns common to all three sciences, including technological obsolescence and…

  17. History of hydrology archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, William

    There has long been concern over how to archive important material related to the history of hydrology. Bill Back (U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Va.), past chairman of the AGU Committee on History and Heritage of Hydrology, has made contact with the American Heritage Center, which has been collecting such material for nearly 20 years. They now have an expanding program and are most enthusiastic about helping us preserve historical material. They would like to receive files, manuscripts, photographs, and similar material from hydrologists throughout the United States and other countries.

  18. Community archiving of imaging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Steven L.; Roys, Steven R.; Munjal, Sunita

    1996-05-01

    The quantity of image data created in a large radiology practice has long been a challenge for available archiving technology. Traditional methods ofarchiving the large quantity of films generated in radiology have relied on warehousing in remote sites, with courier delivery of film files for historical comparisons. A digital community archive, accessible via a wide area network, represents a feasible solution to the problem of archiving digital images from a busy practice. In addition, it affords a physician caring for a patient access to imaging studies performed at a variety ofhealthcare institutions without the need to repeat studies. Security problems include both network security issues in the WAN environment and access control for patient, physician and imaging center. The key obstacle to developing a community archive is currently political. Reluctance to participate in a community archive can be reduced by appropriate design of the access mechanisms.

  19. SACS: Spitzer Archival Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Daniel

    combined, providing a high-purity, uniform sample. Matching the Spitzer/IRAC-selected clusters with data at similar and longer wavelengths available in the archive (WISE 3- 5μm, Spitzer/MIPS 24μm or Herschel/SPIRE 250μm data) we will be also able to study the dependence on the environment of star formation and AGN activity out to z~2, and to study the effect of star-forming galaxies and AGNs on cosmological results from ongoing Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) and X-ray cluster surveys. The identified clusters will be valuable for both astrophysics and cosmology. In terms of astrophysics, the redshift probed by the MIR color selection targets a key epoch in cluster development, when star formation is shutting down and the galaxies are becoming passive. Massive clusters also distort space-time around them, creating powerful gravitational telescopes that lens the distant universe. This both allows detailed studies of the lensed objects with otherwise unachievable sensitivity, as well as provides a unique probe of the mass distribution in the lensing cluster. In terms of cosmology, clusters are the most massive structures in the universe, and their space density is sensitive to basic cosmological parameters. Clusters identified by this program will become a lasting legacy of Spitzer, providing exciting targets for Chandra, Hubble, James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Astro-H, Athena, as well as future 30-m class ground-based telescopes (e.g., GMT, ELT, TMT). The upcoming large-scale, space-based surveys of eROSITA, Euclid, and WFIRST all have distant cluster studies as key scientific goals. Our proposed survey will provide new high redshift targets for those satellites, enabling unique, exciting multi-wavelength studies of the Spitzer-selected sample, as well as a training set to identify additional high-redshift clusters outside of the Spitzer footprint.

  20. Data Archiving: The Perspective of the IAU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, R. E.

    2009-08-01

    Historically, the archiving of photographic observations has been predominantly a service on behalf of the astronomical community, both local and worldwide. In parallel, efforts to ensure the long-term preservation of that material have mostly come through the community at large via its official body, the International Astronomical Union. While the rôle of the IAU is largely passive, it is vital in providing a framework in which its international Working Groups can share, manage and achieve decisions and co-operations at levels which would be difficult to reach by individual action. To serve the purposes for which they have been archived, historic data need to be kept ticking over in a healthy condition. The IAU provides an excellent forum for the activities which those needs entail.

  1. Multimedia medical archiving system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Arun K.; Atallah, George C.; Rao, Amar; Perez-Lopez, Kathleen G.; Freedman, Matthew T.

    1995-11-01

    The demand for digital radiological imaging and archiving applications has been increasingly rapidly. These digital applications offer significant advantages to the physician over the traditional film-based technique. They result in faster and better quality services, support remote access and conferencing capabilities, provide on demand service availability, eliminate film processing costs, and most significantly, they are suitable services for the evolving global information super highway. Several existing medical multimedia systems incorporate and utilize those advanced technical features. However, radiologists are seeking an order of magnitude improvement in the overall current system design and performance indices (such as transactions response times, system utilization and throughput). One of the main technical concern radiologists are raising is the miss-filing occurrence. This even will decrease the radiologist productivity; introduce unnecessarily workload; and will result in total customer dissatisfaction. This paper presents Multimedia Medical Archiving System, which can be used in hospitals and medical centers for storing and retrieving radiological images. Furthermore, this paper emphasizes a viable solution for the miss-filing problem. The results obtained demonstrate and quantify the improvement in the overall radiological operations. Specifically this paper demonstrates an order of 80% improvement in the response time for retrieving images. This enhancement in system performance directly translates to a tremendous improvement in the radiologist's productivity.

  2. Data and Metadata Management at the Keck Observatory Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berriman, G. B.; Holt, J. M.; Mader, J. A.; Tran, H. D.; Goodrich, R. W.; Gelino, C. R.; Laity, A. C.; Kong, M.; Swain, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    A collaboration between the W. M. Keck Observatory (WMKO) in Hawaii and the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI) in California, the Keck Observatory Archive (KOA) was commissioned in 2004 to archive data from WMKO, which operates two classically scheduled 10 m ground-based telescopes. The data from Keck are not suitable for direct ingestion into the archive since the metadata contained in the original FITS headers lack the information necessary for proper archiving. The data pose a number of challenges for KOA: different instrument builders used different standards, and the nature of classical observing, where observers have complete control of the instruments and their observations, lead to heterogeneous data sets. For example, it is often difficult to determine if an observation is a science target, a sky frame, or a sky flat. It is also necessary to assign the data to the correct owners and observing programs, which can be a challenge for time-domain and target-of-opportunity observations, or on split nights, during which two or more principle investigators share a given night. In addition, having uniform and adequate calibrations is important for the proper reduction of data. Therefore, KOA needs to distinguish science files from calibration files, identify the type of calibrations available, and associate the appropriate calibration files with each science frame. We describe the methodologies and tools that we have developed to successfully address these difficulties, adding content to the FITS headers and “retrofitting" the metadata in order to support archiving Keck data, especially those obtained before the archive was designed. With the expertise gained from having successfully archived observations taken with all eight currently active instruments at WMKO, we have developed lessons learned from handling this complex array of heterogeneous metadata. These lessons help ensure a smooth ingestion of data not only for current but also future instruments

  3. Metadata and data management for the Keck Observatory Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, H. D.; Holt, J.; Goodrich, R. W.; Mader, J. A.; Swain, M.; Laity, A. C.; Kong, M.; Gelino, C. R.; Berriman, G. B.

    2014-07-01

    A collaboration between the W. M. Keck Observatory (WMKO) in Hawaii and the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI) in California, the Keck Observatory Archive (KOA) was commissioned in 2004 to archive observing data from WMKO, which operates two classically scheduled 10 m ground-based telescopes. The observing data from Keck is not suitable for direct ingestion into the archive since the metadata contained in the original FITS headers lack the information necessary for proper archiving. Coupled with different standards among instrument builders and the heterogeneous nature of the data inherent in classical observing, in which observers have complete control of the instruments and their observations, the data pose a number of technical challenges for KOA. For example, it is often difficult to determine if an observation is a science target, a sky frame, or a sky flat. It is also necessary to assign the data to the correct owners and observing programs, which can be a challenge for time-domain and target-of-opportunity observations, or on split nights, during which two or more principle investigators share a given night. In addition, having uniform and adequate calibrations are important for the proper reduction of data. Therefore, KOA needs to distinguish science files from calibration files, identify the type of calibrations available, and associate the appropriate calibration files with each science frame. We describe the methodologies and tools that we have developed to successfully address these difficulties, adding content to the FITS headers and "retrofitting" the metadata in order to support archiving Keck data, especially those obtained before the archive was designed. With the expertise gained from having successfully archived observations taken with all eight currently active instruments at WMKO, we have developed lessons learned from handling this complex array of heterogeneous metadata that help ensure a smooth ingestion of data not only for current

  4. (Per)Forming Archival Research Methodologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaillet, Lynee Lewis

    2012-01-01

    This article raises multiple issues associated with archival research methodologies and methods. Based on a survey of recent scholarship and interviews with experienced archival researchers, this overview of the current status of archival research both complicates traditional conceptions of archival investigation and encourages scholars to adopt…

  5. Ethics and Truth in Archival Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesar, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The complexities of the ethics and truth in archival research are often unrecognised or invisible in educational research. This paper complicates the process of collecting data in the archives, as it problematises notions of ethics and truth in the archives. The archival research took place in the former Czechoslovakia and its turbulent political…

  6. Archives and Automation: Issues and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Rob

    This paper focuses on archives and automation, and reviews recent literature on various topics concerning archives and automation. Topics include: resistance to technology and the need to educate about automation; the change in archival theory due to the information age; problems with technology use; the history of organizing archival records…

  7. Archive of Digital Boomer Sub-bottom Data Collected During USGS Field Activities 97LCA01, 97LCA02, and 97LCA03, West-Central and East Coast Florida, February through July 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forde, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Metz, Patricia A.; Tihansky, Ann B.; Davis, Jeffrey B.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2011-01-01

    From February through July of 1997, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical surveys of several Florida water bodies as part of the USGS Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study. These areas include Lakes Dosson, Halfmoon and Round in west-central Florida and Sebastian Inlet and Indian River Lagoon on the east coast of the State. Field activity 97LCA01 was conducted in cooperation with the Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD), and field activities 97LCA02 and 97LCA03 were conducted in cooperation with the St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD). This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer sub-bottom data, trackline maps, navigation files, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, observer's logbook, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Filtered and gained (showing a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansions of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report.

  8. [Individual archiving of digital angiocardiograms].

    PubMed

    Stiel, G M; Nienaber, C A; Schaps, K P; Meinertz, T

    1996-08-01

    CD-R will be introduced internationally as a standardized individual archive and exchange medium allowing individual solutions for long-term archiving in a catheterization laboratory. The concept of digital archiving on two CD-R includes a long-term primary basic archive and a secondary one edited by intelligent (medical) data reduction (IDR). The basic archive is automatically composed by a background process consisting of unprocessed images or image series and is fundamental for further transfers, storage, presentations and additional studies. The digital working archive comprises a set of images and image series edited by IDR, as well as the results of morphometric studies as well as identification and documentation data. IDR is based upon the elimination of useless and redundant images series, documentation of coronary interventions on one single representative image and on the reduction of relevant images series and physiological data into an ECG-controlled representative cardiac cycle. IDR edits a redundancy-free set of 130 images (diagnostic study) or only 85 images of an interventional study. Two cardiologists and two cardiosurgeons independently studied 24 IDR-edited angiograms and the corresponding unedited digital angiograms and found no significant differences in the diagnostically relevant coronary morphology and left ventricular function. This study shows that an edited angiogram may not only serve for digital archiving but also form the basis for further evaluation or copies. PMID:8975495

  9. National Geophysical Data Center Tsunami Data Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroker, K. J.; Dunbar, P. K.; Brocko, R.

    2008-12-01

    NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and co-located World Data Center for Geophysics and Marine Geology long-term tsunami data archive provides data and derived products essential for tsunami hazard assessment, forecast and warning, inundation modeling, preparedness, mitigation, education, and research. As a result of NOAA's efforts to strengthen its tsunami activities, the long-term tsunami data archive has grown from less than 5 gigabyte in 2004 to more than 2 terabytes in 2008. The types of data archived for tsunami research and operation activities have also expanded in fulfillment of the P.L. 109-424. The archive now consists of: global historical tsunami, significant earthquake and significant volcanic eruptions database; global tsunami deposits and proxies database; reference database; damage photos; coastal water-level data (i.e. digital tide gauge data and marigrams on microfiche); bottom pressure recorder (BPR) data as collected by Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) buoys. The tsunami data archive comes from a wide variety of data providers and sources. These include the NOAA Tsunami Warning Centers, NOAA National Data Buoy Center, NOAA National Ocean Service, IOC/NOAA International Tsunami Information Center, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, U.S. Geological Survey, tsunami catalogs, reconnaissance reports, journal articles, newspaper articles, internet web pages, and email. NGDC has been active in the management of some of these data for more than 50 years while other data management efforts are more recent. These data are openly available, either directly on-line or by contacting NGDC. All of the NGDC tsunami and related databases are stored in a relational database management system. These data are accessible over the Web as tables, reports, and interactive maps. The maps provide integrated web-based GIS access to individual GIS layers including tsunami sources, tsunami effects, significant earthquakes

  10. An Integrative Approach to Archival Outreach: A Case Study of Becoming Part of the Constituents' Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rettig, Patricia J.

    2007-01-01

    Archival outreach, an essential activity for any repository, should focus on what constituents are already doing and capitalize on existing venues related to the repository's subject area. The Water Resources Archive at Colorado State University successfully undertook this integrative approach to outreach. Detailed in the article are outreach…

  11. Comprehensive planning of data archive in Japanese planetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yukio; Shinohara, Iku; Hoshino, Hirokazu; Tateno, Naoki; Hareyama, Makoto; Okada, Naoki; Ebisawa, Ken

    Comprehensive planning of data archive in Japanese planetary missions Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) provides HAYABUSA and KAGUYA data as planetary data archives. These data archives, however, were prepared independently. Therefore the inconsistency of data format has occurred, and the knowledge of data archiving activity is not inherited. Recently, the discussion of comprehensive planning of data archive has started to prepare up-coming planetary missions, which indicates the comprehensive plan of data archive is required in several steps. The framework of the comprehensive plan is divided into four items: Preparation, Evaluation, Preservation, and Service. 1. PREPARATION FRAMEWORK Data is classified into several types: raw data, level-0, 1, 2 processing data, ancillary data, and etc. The task of mission data preparation is responsible for instrument teams, but preparations beside mission data and support of data management are essential to make unified conventions and formats over instruments in a mission, and over missions. 2. EVALUATION FRAMEWORK There are two meanings of evaluation: format and quality. The format evaluation is often discussed in the preparation framework. The data quality evaluation which is often called quality assurance (QA) or quality control (QC) must be performed by third party apart from preparation teams. An instrument team has the initiative for the preparation itself, and the third-party group is organized to evaluate the instrument team's activity. 3. PRESERVATION FRAMEWORK The main topic of this framework is document management, archiving structure, and simple access method. The mission produces many documents in the process of the development. Instrument de-velopment is no exception. During long-term development of a mission, many documents are obsoleted and updated repeatedly. A smart system will help instrument team to reduce some troubles of document management and archiving task. JAXA attempts to follow PDS manners

  12. NOAA Enterprise Archive Access Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rank, R. H.; McCormick, S.; Cremidis, C.

    2010-12-01

    A challenge for any consumer of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) environmental data archives is that the disparate nature of these archives makes it difficult for consumers to access data in a unified manner. If it were possible for consumers to have seamless access to these archives, they would be able to better utilize the data and thus maximize the return on investment for NOAA’s archival program. When unified data access is coupled with sophisticated data querying and discovery techniques, it will be possible to provide consumers with access to richer data sets and services that extend the use of key NOAA data. Theoretically, there are two ways that unified archive access may be achieved. The first approach is to develop a single archive or archiving standard that would replace the current NOAA archives. However, the development of such an archive would pose significant technical and administrative challenges. The second approach is to develop a middleware application that would provide seamless access to all existing archives, in effect allowing each archive to exist “as is” but providing a translation service for the consumer. This approach is deemed more feasible from an administrative and technical standpoint; however, it still presents unique technical challenges due to the disparate architectures that exist across NOAA archives. NOAA has begun developing the NEAAT. The purpose of NEAAT is to provide a middleware and a simple standardized API between NOAA archives and data consumers. It is important to note that NEAAT serves two main purposes: 1) To provide a single application programming interface (API) that enables designated consumers to write their own custom applications capable of searching and acquiring data seamlessly from multiple NOAA archives. 2) To allow archive managers to expose their data to consumers in conjunction with other NOAA resources without modifying their archiving systems or way of presenting data

  13. The Hubble Spectroscopic Legacy Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeples, Molly S.; Tumlinson, Jason; Fox, Andrew; Aloisi, Alessandra; Ayres, Thomas R.; Danforth, Charles; Fleming, Scott W.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Jedrzejewski, Robert I.; Keeney, Brian A.; Oliveira, Cristina M.

    2016-01-01

    With no future space ultraviolet instruments currently planned, the data from the UV spectrographs aboard the Hubble Space Telescope have a legacy value beyond their initial science goals. The Hubble Spectroscopic Legacy Archive will provide to the community new science-grade combined spectra for all publicly available data obtained by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) and the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). These data will be packaged into "smart archives" according to target type and scientific themes to facilitate the construction of archival samples for common science uses. A new "quick look" capability will make the data easy for users to quickly access, assess the quality of, and download for archival science starting in Cycle 24, with the first generation of these products for the FUV modes of COS available online via MAST in early 2016.

  14. Small Data Archives and Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, A.

    2010-10-01

    Preservation is important for documenting original observations, and existing data are an important resource which can be re-used. Observatories should set up electronic data archives and formulate archiving policies. VO (Virtual Observatory) compliance is desirable; even if this is not possible, at least some VO ideas should be applied. Data archives should be visible and their data kept on-line. Metadata should be plentiful, and as standard as possible, just like file formats. Literature and data should be cross-linked. Libraries can play an important role in this process. In this paper, we discuss data archiving for small projects and observatories. We review the questions of digitization, cost factors, manpower, organizational structure and more.

  15. A path to filled archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Dirk; Jannaschk, Kai

    2011-09-01

    Reluctance to deposit data is rife among researchers, despite broad agreement on the principle of data sharing. More and better information will reach hitherto empty archives, if professional support is given during data creation, not in a project's final phase.

  16. ESA's Planetary Science Archive: Status and Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heather, David; Barthelemy, Maud; Manaud, Nicolas; Martinez, Santa; Szumlas, Marek; Vazquez, Jose Luis; Arviset, Christophe; Osuna, Pedro; PSA Development Team

    2013-04-01

    Scientific and engineering data from ESA's planetary missions are made accessible to the world-wide scientific community via the Planetary Science Archive (PSA). The PSA consists of online services incorporating search, preview, download, notification and delivery basket functionality. The PSA currently holds data from Mars Express, Venus Express, SMART-1, Huygens, Rosetta and Giotto, as well as several ground-based cometary observations. It will be used for archiving on ExoMars, BepiColombo and for the European contributions to Chandrayaan-1. The focus of the PSA activities is on the long-term preservation of data and knowledge from ESA's planetary missions. Scientific users can access the data online using several interfaces: - The Advanced Search Interface allows complex parameter based queries, providing the end user with a facility to complete very specific searches on meta-data and geometrical parameters. - The Map-based Interface is currently operational only for Mars Express HRSC and OMEGA data. This interface allows an end-user to specify a region-of-interest by dragging a box onto a base map of Mars. From this interface, it is possible to directly visualize query results. The Map-based and Advanced interfaces are linked and cross-compatible. If a user defines a region-of-interest in the Map-based interface, the results can be refined by entering more detailed search parameters in the Advanced interface. - The FTP Browser Interface is designed for more experienced users, and allows for direct browsing and access of the data set content through ftp-tree search. Each dataset contains documentation and calibration information in addition to the scientific or engineering data. All PSA data are prepared by the corresponding instrument teams, and are made to comply with the internationally recognized PDS standards. PSA supports the instrument teams in the full archiving process, from the definition of the data products, meta-data and product labels through to

  17. Archive of boomer seismic reflection data collected during USGS field activities 01ASR01, 01ASR02, 02ASR01, 02ASR02, Miami, Florida, November 2001-January 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calderon, Karynna; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Wiese, Dana S.; Flocks, James G.

    2002-01-01

    This appendix consists of two-dimensional marine seismic reflection profile data collected in canals in the Lake Belt Area of Miami, Florida. These data were acquired in November and December of 2001 and January and February of 2002 using a 4.9-m (16-ft) jonboat. The data are available in a variety of formats, including binary, ASCII, HTML, shapefiles, and GIF images. Binary data are in Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format and may be downloaded for further processing or display. The SEG-Y data files are too large to fit on one CD-ROM, so they have been distributed onto two CD-ROMs as explained below. Reference maps and GIF images of the profiles may be viewed with your web browser. The GIS information provided is compatible with ESRI's GIS software. A reconnaissance test line (02ASR02-02b02) was collected northwest of the survey area during Field Activity 02ASR02 for possible use in a future project. It is archived here for organizational purposes only.

  18. ACRF Archive User Meeting Summary

    SciTech Connect

    SA Edgerton; RA McCord; DP Kaiser

    2007-10-30

    On October 30, 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sponsored an all-day workshop to assess the status of the ACRF Archive. Focus areas included usability of current functions, plans for revised functions, proposals for new functions, and an overarching discussion of new ideas. Although 13 scientists familiar with ACRF and the ARM Program were invited to the workshop, only 10 scientists were available to attend the workshop. ACRF consists of the infrastructure that was developed to support the ARM Program and includes the ACRF Archive (previously called the ARM Archive). The scientists who participated in the meeting ranged from those who used the Archive frequently to those who seldom or never had accessed the Archive. The group was spread across disciplines, i.e. modelers, conservationists, and others from universities and government laboratories. A few of the participants were funded by the ARM Program, but most were not funded currently by ARM. During the past year, several improvements were made to the ACRF Archive to link it with the ARM/ACRF web pages, add a shopping cart feature, and expand on search parameters. Additional modifications have been proposed and prototypes of these proposals were made available for the participants. The participants were given several exercises to do before the meeting, and their feedback was requested to help identify potential problems and shortcomings with the existing structure and to recommend improvements.

  19. EOSDIS: Archive and Distribution Systems in the Year 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behnke, Jeanne; Lake, Alla

    2000-01-01

    Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) is a long-term NASA research mission to study the processes leading to global climate change. The Earth Observing System (EOS) is a NASA campaign of satellite observatories that are a major component of ESE. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is another component of ESE that will provide the Earth science community with easy, affordable, and reliable access to Earth science data. EOSDIS is a distributed system, with major facilities at seven Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) located throughout the United States. The EOSDIS software architecture is being designed to receive, process, and archive several terabytes of science data on a daily basis. Thousands of science users and perhaps several hundred thousands of non-science users are expected to access the system. The first major set of data to be archived in the EOSDIS is from Landsat-7. Another EOS satellite, Terra, was launched on December 18, 1999. With the Terra launch, the EOSDIS will be required to support approximately one terabyte of data into and out of the archives per day. Since EOS is a multi-mission program, including the launch of more satellites and many other missions, the role of the archive systems becomes larger and more critical. In 1995, at the fourth convening of NASA Mass Storage Systems and Technologies Conference, the development plans for the EOSDIS information system and archive were described. Five years later, many changes have occurred in the effort to field an operational system. It is interesting to reflect on some of the changes driving the archive technology and system development for EOSDIS. This paper principally describes the Data Server subsystem including how the other subsystems access the archive, the nature of the data repository, and the mass-storage I/O management. The paper reviews the system architecture (both hardware and software) of the basic components of the archive. It discusses the operations concept, code

  20. Archiving of HEAO-1 data products and the creation of a general user's guide to the archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nousek, John A.

    1993-01-01

    The activities at Penn State University are described. Initiated at Penn State in Jan. 1989, the goal of this program was to preserve the results of the HEAO-1 mission by transforming the obsolete and disorganized data products into modern and documented forms. The result of this effort was an archive of top level data products, totalling 70 Mbytes; a general User's Guide to the archive, which is attached; and a hardcopy archive containing standardized plots and output of fits made to all the pointing data taken by the HEAO-1 A-2 LED experiment. A more detailed description of these activities is found in the following sections. Accompanying this document is a copy of the User's Guide which may provide additional detail.

  1. HEASARC - The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smale, Alan P.

    2011-01-01

    The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is NASA's archive for high-energy astrophysics and cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, supporting the broad science goals of NASA's Physics of the Cosmos theme. It provides vital scientific infrastructure to the community by standardizing science data formats and analysis programs, providing open access to NASA resources, and implementing powerful archive interfaces. Over the next five years the HEASARC will ingest observations from up to 12 operating missions, while serving data from these and over 30 archival missions to the community. The HEASARC archive presently contains over 37 TB of data, and will contain over 60 TB by the end of 2014. The HEASARC continues to secure major cost savings for NASA missions, providing a reusable mission-independent framework for reducing, analyzing, and archiving data. This approach was recognized in the NRC Portals to the Universe report (2007) as one of the HEASARC's great strengths. This poster describes the past and current activities of the HEASARC and our anticipated developments in coming years. These include preparations to support upcoming high energy missions (NuSTAR, Astro-H, GEMS) and ground-based and sub-orbital CMB experiments, as well as continued support of missions currently operating (Chandra, Fermi, RXTE, Suzaku, Swift, XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL). In 2012 the HEASARC (which now includes LAMBDA) will support the final nine-year WMAP data release. The HEASARC is also upgrading its archive querying and retrieval software with the new Xamin system in early release - and building on opportunities afforded by the growth of the Virtual Observatory and recent developments in virtual environments and cloud computing.

  2. Archive of Digital Boomer Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Field Activities 93LCA01 and 94LCA01 in Kingsley, Orange, and Lowry Lakes, Northeast Florida, 1993 and 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calderon, Karynna; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Davis, Jeffrey B.; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2004-01-01

    In August and September of 1993 and January of 1994, the U.S. Geological Survey, under a cooperative agreement with the St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD), conducted geophysical surveys of Kingsley Lake, Orange Lake, and Lowry Lake in northeast Florida. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, GIS information, observer's logbook, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, and formal FGDC metadata. A filtered and gained GIF image of each seismic profile is also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansion of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Examples of SU processing scripts and in-house (USGS) software for viewing SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided. The data archived here were collected under a cooperative agreement with the St. Johns River Water Management District as part of the USGS Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) Project. For further information about this study, refer to http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/stjohns, Kindinger and others (1994), and Kindinger and others (2000). The USGS Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) - Coastal and Watershed Studies in St. Petersburg, Florida, assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 93LCA01 tells us the data were collected in 1993 for the Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) Project and the data were collected during the first field activity for that project in that calendar year. For a detailed description of the method used to assign the field activity ID, see http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/definition/activity.html. The boomer is an acoustic energy source that consists of capacitors charged to a high voltage and discharged

  3. The Operation and Architecture of the Keck Observatory Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berriman, G. B.; Gelino, C. R.; Laity, A.; Kong, M.; Swain, M.; Holt, J.; Goodrich, R.; Mader, J.; Tran, H. D.

    2014-05-01

    The Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) and the W. M. Keck Observatory (WMKO) are collaborating to build an archive for the twin 10-m Keck Telescopes, located near the summit of Mauna Kea. The Keck Observatory Archive (KOA) takes advantage of IPAC's long experience with managing and archiving large and complex data sets from active missions and serving them to the community; and of the Observatory's knowledge of the operation of its sophisticated instrumentation and the organization of the data products. By the end of 2013, KOA will contain data from all eight active observatory instruments, with an anticipated volume of 28 TB. The data include raw science and observations, quick look products, weather information, and, for some instruments, reduced and calibrated products. The goal of including data from all instruments is the cumulation of a rapid expansion of the archive's holdings, and already data from four new instruments have been added since October 2012. One more active instrument, the integral field spectrograph OSIRIS, is scheduled for ingestion in December 2013. After preparation for ingestion into the archive, the data are transmitted electronically from WMKO to IPAC for curation in the physical archive. This process includes validation of the science and content of the data and verification that data were not corrupted in transmission. The archived data include both newly-acquired observations and all previously acquired observations. The older data extends back to the date of instrument commissioning; for some instruments, such as HIRES, these data can extend as far back as 1994. KOA will continue to ingest all newly obtained observations, at an anticipated volume of 4 TB per year, and plans to ingest data from two decommissioned instruments. Access to these data is governed by a data use policy that guarantees Principal Investigators (PI) exclusive access to their data for at least 18 months, and allows for extensions as granted by

  4. From archives to picture archiving and communications systems.

    PubMed

    Verhelle, F; Van den Broeck, R; Osteaux, M

    1995-12-01

    Keeping organised and consistent film archives is a well-known problem in the radiological world. With the introduction of digital modalities (CT, MR,...) the idea of archiving the image data in a non common way was born. The aim is to keep the information in digital form from acquisition to destination, e.g. archives, viewing station, teleradiology, a task that was not as easy as some people believed, due to bare technical possibilities and to the lack of standards concerning medical image data. These reasons made it not so common to integrate components of different origins into a digital Picture Archiving and Communication environment. How should we attempt to integrate the analogue examinations? It is ridiculous to exclude the conventional XR-examination that accounts for more than 70% of the total production. We believe that there will be a migration to light-stimulable phosphor plates, but these are not yet user friendly and certainly not cost effective. We have similar problems of immature technology as we had for the digital modalities. In a first attempt the bridge can be crossed, between the two worlds by means of converters (laser scanner, CCD camera). PACS will become a reality in the future as almost all examinations will be digitalized. We are now in a transition period with its inconveniences, but we will gain a lot soon. The migration from piles of films through a computer assisted radiological archiving system to a full digital environment is sketched in a historical survey. PMID:8576029

  5. The Planck Legacy Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupac, X.; Arviset, C.; Fernandez Barreiro, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Tauber, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Planck Collaboration has released in 2015 their second major dataset through the Planck Legacy Archive (PLA). It includes cosmological, Extragalactic and Galactic science data in temperature (intensity) and polarization. Full-sky maps are provided with unprecedented angular resolution and sensitivity, together with a large number of ancillary maps, catalogues (generic, SZ clusters and Galactic cold clumps), time-ordered data and other information. The extensive cosmological likelihood package allows cosmologists to fully explore the plausible parameters of the Universe. A new web-based PLA user interface is made public since Dec. 2014, allowing easier and faster access to all Planck data, and replacing the previous Java-based software. Numerous additional improvements to the PLA are also being developed through the so-called PLA Added-Value Interface, making use of an external contract with the Planetek Hellas and Expert Analytics software companies. This will allow users to process time-ordered data into sky maps, separate astrophysical components in existing maps, simulate the microwave and infrared sky through the Planck Sky Model, and use a number of other functionalities.

  6. Characterisation of particulate matter in different types of archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mašková, Ludmila; Smolík, Jiří; Vodička, Petr

    2015-04-01

    To determine the composition of particulate matter (PM) in the indoor environments of four different types of archives (three naturally ventilated and one filtered), intensive size-resolved sampling was performed for four seasons of the year. For reconstituting indoor PM, nine aerosol components were considered. Organic matter was the dominant component of both fine and coarse fractions and represented approximately 50-80% of the PM. In the fine fraction, the next most abundant components were elemental carbon and sulphate, and in the coarse fraction the next most abundant were crustal matter, sulphate and nitrate. The resulting mass closure explained 95(±13)% and 115(±38)% of the gravimetric indoor PM in the fine and coarse size fractions, respectively. The results revealed that all the particles found indoors can be considered to be potentially threatening to the stored materials. The results also showed that the most important source of indoor PM in the naturally ventilated archives was penetration from the outdoor air, whereas in the filtered archive, the concentrations of particles were strongly reduced. In naturally ventilated archives the influence of domestic heating, road traffic and local sources (industrial pollution, camp fires) was observed. Furthermore, activities of the staff were identified as an indoor source of coarse particles in all archives.

  7. Operational environmental satellite archives in the 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Bates, John J.; Privette, Jeff; Vizbulis, Rick

    2007-09-01

    NASA, NOAA, and USGS collections of Earth science data are large, federated, and have active user communities and collections. Our experience raises five categories of issues for long-term archival: *Organization of the data in the collections is not well-described by text-based categorization principles *Metadata organization for these data is not well-described by Dublin Core and needs attention to data access and data use patterns *Long-term archival requires risk management approaches to dealing with the unique threats to knowledge preservation specific to digital information *Long-term archival requires careful attention to archival cost management *Professional data stewards for these collections may require special training. This paper suggests three mechanisms for improving the quality of long-term archival: *Using a maturity model to assess the readiness of data for accession, for preservation, and for future data usefulness *Developing a risk management strategy for systematically dealing with threats of data loss *Developing a life-cycle cost model for continuously evolving the collections and the data centers that house them.

  8. (abstract) Satellite Physical Oceanography Data Available From an EOSDIS Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digby, Susan A.; Collins, Donald J.

    1996-01-01

    The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory archives and distributes data as part of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). Products available from JPL are largely satellite derived and include sea-surface height, surface-wind speed and vectors, integrated water vapor, atmospheric liquid water, sea-surface temperature, heat flux, and in-situ data as it pertains to satellite data. Much of the data is global and spans fourteen years.There is email access, a WWW site, product catalogs, and FTP capabilities. Data is free of charge.

  9. NVO, surveys and archiving ground-based data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huchra, John P.

    2002-12-01

    The era of extremely large, public databases in astronomy is upon us. Such databases will open (are opening!) the field to new research and new researchers. However it is important to be sure the resources are available to properly archive groundbased astronomical data, and include the necessary quality checks and calibrations. An NVO without a proper archive will have limited usefulness. This also implies that with limited resources, not all data can or should be archived. NASA already has a very good handle on US space-based astronomical data. Agencies and organizations that operate astronomical facilities, particularly groundbased observatories, need to plan and budget for these activities now. We should not underestimate the effort required to produce high quality data products that will be useful for the broader community.

  10. Archival storage solutions for PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunn, Timothy

    1997-05-01

    While they are many, one of the inhibitors to the wide spread diffusion of PACS systems has been robust, cost effective digital archive storage solutions. Moreover, an automated Nearline solution is key to a central, sharable data repository, enabling many applications such as PACS, telemedicine and teleradiology, and information warehousing and data mining for research such as patient outcome analysis. Selecting the right solution depends on a number of factors: capacity requirements, write and retrieval performance requirements, scaleability in capacity and performance, configuration architecture and flexibility, subsystem availability and reliability, security requirements, system cost, achievable benefits and cost savings, investment protection, strategic fit and more.This paper addresses many of these issues. It compares and positions optical disk and magnetic tape technologies, which are the predominant archive mediums today. Price and performance comparisons will be made at different archive capacities, plus the effect of file size on storage system throughput will be analyzed. The concept of automated migration of images from high performance, high cost storage devices to high capacity, low cost storage devices will be introduced as a viable way to minimize overall storage costs for an archive. The concept of access density will also be introduced and applied to the selection of the most cost effective archive solution.

  11. The ``One Archive'' for JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, G.; Kyprianou, M.; Levay, K.; Sienkewicz, M.; Donaldson, T.; Dower, T.; Swam, M.; Bushouse, H.; Greenfield, P.; Kidwell, R.; Wolfe, D.; Gardner, L.; Nieto-Santisteban, M.; Swade, D.; McLean, B.; Abney, F.; Alexov, A.; Binegar, S.; Aloisi, A.; Slowinski, S.; Gousoulin, J.

    2015-09-01

    The next generation for the Space Telescope Science Institute data management system is gearing up to provide a suite of archive system services supporting the operation of the James Webb Space Telescope. We are now completing the initial stage of integration and testing for the preliminary ground system builds of the JWST Science Operations Center which includes multiple components of the Data Management Subsystem (DMS). The vision for astronomical science and research with the JWST archive introduces both solutions to formal mission requirements and innovation derived from our existing mission systems along with the collective shared experience of our global user community. We are building upon the success of the Hubble Space Telescope archive systems, standards developed by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance, and collaborations with our archive data center partners. In proceeding forward, the “one archive” architectural model presented here is designed to balance the objectives for this new and exciting mission. The STScI JWST archive will deliver high quality calibrated science data products, support multi-mission data discovery and analysis, and provide an infrastructure which supports bridges to highly valued community tools and services.

  12. The new European Hubble archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Arevalo, Maria; Merin, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The European Hubble Archive (hereafter eHST), hosted at ESA's European Space Astronomy Centre, has been released for public use in October 2015. The eHST is now fully integrated with the other ESA science archives to ensure long-term preservation of the Hubble data, consisting of more than 1 million observations from 10 different scientific instruments. The public HST data, the Hubble Legacy Archive, and the high-level science data products are now all available to scientists through a single, carefully designed and user friendly web interface. In this talk, I will show how the the eHST can help boost archival research, including how to search on sources in the field of view thanks to precise footprints projected onto the sky, how to obtain enhanced previews of imaging data and interactive spectral plots, and how to directly link observations with already published papers. To maximise the scientific exploitation of Hubble's data, the eHST offers connectivity to virtual observatory tools, easily integrates with the recently released Hubble Source Catalog, and is fully accessible through ESA's archives multi-mission interface.

  13. Multilevel Digital Archives: Strategy and Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubanov, L. I.; Merzlyakov, N. S.; Karnaukhov, V. N.

    The paper describes a methodology we use to translate an existing conventional archive into a digital one. The method does well for large archives comprising documents with essential graphic constituent (handwritten texts, photographs, drawings, etc.). Main structural components of our digital archive are relational database and image bank which are physically separated but logically linked together. The components make up three-level distributed structure consisting of primary archive, its regional replicas, and various secondary archives (among them subsets presented in the Web and collections of compact discs). Only authorized user are allowed to access two upper levels, and the bottom level is open for free public access. A secondary archive is created and updated automatically without special development. Such construction allows us to combine reliable storage, easy access and protection of intellectual property. The paper also presents several digital archives already implemented in the Archive of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

  14. 50 CFR 635.33 - Archival tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Implantation report. Any person affixing or implanting an archival tag into a regulated species must obtain... catch, possess, retain, and land an Atlantic HMS in which an archival tag has been implanted or...

  15. 50 CFR 635.33 - Archival tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Implantation report. Any person affixing or implanting an archival tag into a regulated species must obtain... catch, possess, retain, and land an Atlantic HMS in which an archival tag has been implanted or...

  16. Physical Review Online Archives (PROLA)

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, T.; Davies, J.; Kilman, D.; Laroche, F.

    1997-05-01

    In cooperation with the American Physical Society, the Computer Research and Applications Group (CIC-3 -- see Section 13 for an acronym glossary) at Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed and deployed a journal archive system called, The Physical Review OnLine Archive (PROLA). It is intended to be a complete, full service on-line archive of the existing issues of the journal Physical Review from its inception to the advent of a full-service electronic version. The fundamental goals of PROLA are to provide screen-viewable and printable images of every article, full-text and fielded search capability, good browsing features, direct article retrieval tools, and hyperlinking to all references, errata, and comments. The research focus is on transitioning large volumes of paper journals to a modern electronic environment.

  17. Cataloging Sound Recordings Using Archival Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David H.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the processing and cataloging of archival sound recording collections. The use of "Anglo American Cataloguing Rules, 2nd edition" (AACR 2) and "Archives, Personal Papers and Manuscripts" (APPM) is explained, the MARC format for Archival and Manuscripts Control (AMC) is described, finding aids and subject indexing are discussed, and…

  18. A Background to Motion Picture Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, James E.; Bolen, Donald L., Jr.

    The emphasis of archives is on the maintenance and preservation of materials for scholarly research and professional reference. Archives may be established as separate entities or as part of a library or museum. Film archives may include camera originals (positive and negative), sound recordings, outtakes, scripts, contracts, advertising…

  19. Digital Archives: Democratizing the Doing of History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolick, Cheryl Mason

    2006-01-01

    The creation of digital archives has shifted the dynamics of doing historical research by changing who is able to conduct the research and how historical research is done. Digital archives are collections of numerical data, texts, images, maps, videos, and audio files that are available through the Internet. The majority of digital archives are…

  20. 36 CFR 1275.24 - Archival processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Archival processing. 1275.24... THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION Preservation and Protection § 1275.24 Archival processing. When authorized by the Archivist and until the commencement of archival processing in accordance with subpart D of...

  1. 50 CFR 635.33 - Archival tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Archival tags. 635.33 Section 635.33..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ATLANTIC HIGHLY MIGRATORY SPECIES Management Measures § 635.33 Archival tags. (a) Implantation report. Any person affixing or implanting an archival tag into a regulated species must...

  2. Encoded Archival Description as a Halfway Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dow, Elizabeth H.

    2009-01-01

    In the mid 1990s, Encoded Archival Description (EAD) appeared as a revolutionary technology for publishing archival finding aids on the Web. The author explores whether or not, given the advent of Web 2.0, the archival community should abandon EAD and look for something to replace it. (Contains 18 notes.)

  3. Standing on the Record: The National Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Carolyn

    1984-01-01

    Profiles National Archives established by Congress in 1934 to collect and organize federal documents of permanent historic value. Types of materials included in archives, the Washington building and regional centers, the "Declaration of Independence," arrangement and preservation of materials, declassification of documents, and archives and…

  4. Reengineering Archival Access through the OAI Protocols.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prom, Christopher J.

    2003-01-01

    The Open Archives Initiative (OAI) Protocol for Metadata Harvesting program presents a method by which metadata regarding archives and manuscripts can be shared and made more interoperable with metadata from other sources. Outlines a method for exposing hierarchical metadata from encoded archival description (EAD) files and assesses some…

  5. 36 CFR 1253.7 - Regional Archives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regional Archives. 1253.7 Section 1253.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION PUBLIC AVAILABILITY AND USE LOCATION OF NARA FACILITIES AND HOURS OF USE § 1253.7 Regional Archives. Hours...

  6. A Generic Archive Protocol and an Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, J. M.; Jennings, D. G.; McGlynn, T. A.; Ruggiero, N. G.; Serlemitsos, T. A.

    1993-01-01

    Archiving vast amounts of data has become a major part of every scientific space mission today. GRASP, the Generic Retrieval/Ar\\-chive Services Protocol, addresses the question of how to archive the data collected in an environment where the underlying hardware archives and computer hosts may be rapidly changing.

  7. 22 CFR 171.6 - Archival records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Archival records. 171.6 Section 171.6 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ACCESS TO INFORMATION AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION AND RECORDS TO THE PUBLIC General Policy and Procedures § 171.6 Archival records. The Department ordinarily transfers records to the National Archives when they are...

  8. The Preservation of Paper Collections in Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Cynthia Ann

    The preservation methods used for paper collections in archives were studied through a survey of archives in the metropolitan Atlanta (Georgia) area. The preservation policy or program was studied, and the implications for conservators and preservation officers were noted. Twelve of 15 archives responded (response rate of 80 percent). Basic…

  9. Project Gemini online digital archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-01-01

    An archive containing the first high-resolution digital scans of the original flight films from Project Gemini, the second U.S. human spaceflight program, was unveiled by the NASA Johnson Space Center and Arizona State University's (ASU) School of Earth and Space Exploration on 6 January. The archive includes images from 10 flights. Project Gemini, which ran from 1964 to 1966, followed Project Mercury and preceded the Apollo spacecraft. Mercury and Apollo imagery are also available through ASU. For more information, see http://tothemoon.ser.asu.edu/gallery/gemini and http://apollo.sese.asu.edu/index.html.

  10. Long-term data archiving

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David Steven

    2009-01-01

    Long term data archiving has much value for chemists, not only to retain access to research and product development records, but also to enable new developments and new discoveries. There are some recent regulatory requirements (e.g., FDA 21 CFR Part 11), but good science and good business both benefit regardless. A particular example of the benefits of and need for long term data archiving is the management of data from spectroscopic laboratory instruments. The sheer amount of spectroscopic data is increasing at a scary rate, and the pressures to archive come from the expense to create the data (or recreate it if it is lost) as well as its high information content. The goal of long-term data archiving is to save and organize instrument data files as well as any needed meta data (such as sample ID, LIMS information, operator, date, time, instrument conditions, sample type, excitation details, environmental parameters, etc.). This editorial explores the issues involved in long-term data archiving using the example of Raman spectral databases. There are at present several such databases, including common data format libraries and proprietary libraries. However, such databases and libraries should ultimately satisfy stringent criteria for long term data archiving, including readability for long times into the future, robustness to changes in computer hardware and operating systems, and use of public domain data formats. The latter criterion implies the data format should be platform independent and the tools to create the data format should be easily and publicly obtainable or developable. Several examples of attempts at spectral libraries exist, such as the ASTM ANDI format, and the JCAMP-DX format. On the other hand, proprietary library spectra can be exchanged and manipulated using proprietary tools. As the above examples have deficiencies according to the three long term data archiving criteria, Extensible Markup Language (XML; a product of the World Wide Web

  11. Encoded Archival Context (EAC) and Archival Description: Rationale and Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szary, Richard V.

    2005-01-01

    The use of contextual information about the creators and users of archival and manuscript resources has always been a critical method for discovering and providing access to them. Traditionally, this information has been unstructured and ephemeral, being part of the knowledge that experienced staff bring to reference queries. The development of…

  12. History of human activity in last 800 years reconstructed from combined archive data and high-resolution analyses of varved lake sediments from Lake Czechowskie, Northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słowiński, Michał; Tyszkowski, Sebastian; Ott, Florian; Obremska, Milena; Kaczmarek, Halina; Theuerkauf, Martin; Wulf, Sabine; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to reconstruct human and landscape development in the Tuchola Pinewoods (Northern Poland) during the last 800 years. We apply an approach that combines historic maps and documents with pollen data. Pollen data were obtained from varved lake sediments at a resolution of 5 years. The chronology of the sediment record is based on varve counting, AMS 14C dating, 137Cs activity concentration measurements and tephrochronology (Askja AD 1875). We applied the REVEALS model to translate pollen percentage data into regional plant abundances. The interpretation of the pollen record is furthermore based on pollen accumulation rate data. The pollen record and historic documents show similar trends in vegetation development. During the first phase (AD 1200-1412), the Lake Czechowskie area was still largely forested with Quercus, Carpinus and Pinus forests. Vegetation was more open during the second phase (AD 1412-1776), and reached maximum openness during the third phase (AD 1776-1905). Furthermore, intensified forest management led to a transformation from mixed to pine dominated forests during this period. Since the early 20th century, the forest cover increased again with dominance of the Scots pine in the stand. While pollen and historic data show similar trends, they differ substantially in the degree of openness during the four phases with pollen data commonly suggesting more open conditions. We discuss potential causes for this discrepancy, which include unsuitable parameters settings in REVEALS and unknown changes in forest structure. Using pollen accumulation data as a third proxy record we aim to identify the most probable causes. Finally, we discuss the observed vegetation change in relation the socio-economic development of the area. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute of Integrated Climate and Landscape Evolution Analysis - ICLEA- of the Helmholtz Association and National Science Centre, Poland (grant No. 2011/01/B/ST10

  13. High Resolution Time-Series Analysis of Paleo-Climate Proxies Archived in an Actively Forming Stalagmite from Niue Island, South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, C. M.; Aharon, P.; Lambert, W. J.

    2012-12-01

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the dominant climate variability factor in today's world. Planet Earth is currently experiencing a global warming trend that raises the question of how ENSO will behave in a warmer state. An assessment of ENSO's behavior during the Medieval Warm Period (MWP, AD 950-1250) and the Little Ice Age (LIA, AD 1350-1850) will afford a better understanding of how it may interact with future global climate change. A 61-cm long, actively forming, stalagmite from an inland cave on Niue Island (19°00' S, 169°50' W) was sampled in July of 2011. A growth rate of 366 μm/yr was established on the basis of an annual growth-band counting chronology supported by precise U/Th dates. The stalagmite was sub-sampled at 300 μm intervals using a Computer Automated Mill (CAM) and the calcite powders (50-100 μg) were analyzed for stable oxygen and carbon isotopes in a Continuous Flow Isotope-Ratio Mass Spectrometer (CF-IRMS) system. Annually resolved δ18O and δ13C time-series exhibit a range of -2.0 to -5.9 (‰ VPDB) and -1.8 to -9.5 (‰ VPDB), respectively. The inter-annual and interdecadal periodicities exhibited by the isotope time-series are interpreted as manifestations of ENSO-driven rainfall variability with time. The continuous millennial proxy record presented here offers valuable insights on ENSO variability during the MWP and LIA events, respectively.

  14. Migration Stories: Upgrading a PDS Archive to PDS4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazden, D. P.; Walker, R. J.; Mafi, J. N.; King, T. A.; Joy, S. P.; Moon, I. S.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing bandwidth, storage capacity and computational capabilities have greatly increased our ability to access data and use them. A significant challenge, however, is to make data archived under older standards useful in the new data environments. NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) recently released version 4 of its information model (PDS4). PDS4 is an improvement and has advantages over previous versions. PDS4 adopts the XML standard for metadata and expresses structural requirements with XML Schema and content constraints by using Schematron. This allows for thorough validation by using off the shelf tools. This is a substantial improvement over previous PDS versions. PDS4 was designed to improve discoverability of products (resources) in a PDS archive. These additions allow for more uniform metadata harvesting from the collection level to the product level. New tools and services are being deployed that depend on the data adhering to the PDS4 model. However, the PDS has been an operational archive since 1989 and has large holdings that are compliant with previous versions of the PDS information model. The challenge is the make the older data accessible and useable with the new PDS4 based tools. To provide uniform utility and access to the entire archive the older data must be migrated to the PDS4 model. At the Planetary Plasma Interactions (PPI) Node of the PDS we've been actively planning and preparing to migrate our legacy archive to the new PDS4 standards for several years. With the release of the PDS4 standards we have begun the migration of our archive. In this presentation we will discuss the preparation of the data for the migration and how we are approaching this task. The presentation will consist of a series of stories to describe our experiences and the best practices we have learned.

  15. Planetary science data archiving in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heather, David

    2012-07-01

    Europe is currently enjoying a time of plenty in terms of planetary science missions and the resulting planetary data. The European Space Agency are flying or developing missions to many planetary bodies and are co-operating with other Agencies to ensure maximization of resources. Prior to the arrival of Mars Express at the Red Planet on 25th December 2003, Europe had very little experience in the development and management of planetary data. Since then, with the continuing MEX operations, the launch and successful operation of Venus Express, the ongoing Rosetta mission and its recent asteroid encounters, the SMART-1 technology tester mission to the Moon, the Huygens probe to Titan, and with contributing payload on ISRO's Chandrayaan-1 mission to the Moon, Europe has had a flood of data to deal with. We have had to learn fast! In addition to the basic challenges of managing and distributing such an influx of new data, there has been considerable effort in Europe to develop and manage the resources required to query and use them from within the community. The Integrated and Distributed Information Service (IDIS), part of the EU funded Europlanet activities, is a good example of this, aiming to centralize data sources and useful resources for scientists wishing to use the planetary data. Europe has been working very closely with international partners to globalize planetary data archiving standards, and all major planetary data providers and distributors in Europe are participating fully in the International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA). A major focus of this work has been in the development of a protocol that will allow for the interoperability of archives and sharing of data across the globe. Close interactions are also ongoing with NASA's Planetary Data System as the standards used for planetary data archiving evolve. This talk will outline the planetary science data archiving situation in Europe, and summarize the various ongoing efforts to coordinate at an

  16. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Gene V., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document consists of the 2000 edition of the "Education Policy Analysis Archives." The papers include: (1) "Teacher Quality and Student Achievement: A Review of State Policy Evidence" (Linda Darling-Hammond); (2) "America Y2K: The Obsolescence of Educational Reforms" (Sherman Dorn); (3) "Forces for Change in Mathematics Education: The Case of…

  17. Microfilm Permanence and Archival Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avedon, Don M.

    1972-01-01

    The facts about microfilm permanence and archival quality are presented in simple terms. The major factors, including the film base material, the film emulsion, processing, and storage conditions are reviewed. The designations on the edge of the film are explained and a list of refernces provided. (14 references) (Author)

  18. Teacher Evaluation: Archiving Teaching Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Lance D.

    2014-01-01

    Teacher evaluation is a current hot topic within music education. This article offers strategies for K-12 music educators on how to promote their effectiveness as teachers through archival documentation in a teacher portfolio. Using the Danielson evaluation model (based on four domains of effective teaching practices), examples of music teaching…

  19. Natural Learning Case Study Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Natural Learning Case Study Archives (NLCSA) is a research facility for those interested in using case study analysis to deepen their understanding of common sense knowledge and natural learning (how the mind interacts with everyday experiences to develop common sense knowledge). The database comprises three case study corpora based on experiences…

  20. Managing an Archive of Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andres, Vince; Walter, David; Hallal, Charles; Jones, Helene; Callac, Chris

    2004-01-01

    The SSC Multimedia Archive is an automated electronic system to manage images, acquired both by film and digital cameras, for the Public Affairs Office (PAO) at Stennis Space Center (SSC). Previously, the image archive was based on film photography and utilized a manual system that, by today s standards, had become inefficient and expensive. Now, the SSC Multimedia Archive, based on a server at SSC, contains both catalogs and images for pictures taken both digitally and with a traditional, film-based camera, along with metadata about each image. After a "shoot," a photographer downloads the images into the database. Members of the PAO can use a Web-based application to search, view and retrieve images, approve images for publication, and view and edit metadata associated with the images. Approved images are archived and cross-referenced with appropriate descriptions and information. Security is provided by allowing administrators to explicitly grant access privileges to personnel to only access components of the system that they need to (i.e., allow only photographers to upload images, only PAO designated employees may approve images).

  1. Preservation and Archives in Vietnam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henchy, Judith

    This report, based on visits to Vietnamese libraries and archives between 1987 and 1997, examines the largely unexplored corpus of Vietnamese textual resources in research institutions and libraries there and elsewhere, the associated problems of bibliographic control, and issues of preservation. The following topics are addressed: the history of…

  2. Life Sciences Data Archive (LSDA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, M.; Johnson-Throop, Kathy; Thomas, D.; Shackelford, K.

    2008-01-01

    In the early days of spaceflight, space life sciences data were been collected and stored in numerous databases, formats, media-types and geographical locations. While serving the needs of individual research teams, these data were largely unknown/unavailable to the scientific community at large. As a result, the Space Act of 1958 and the Science Data Management Policy mandated that research data collected by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration be made available to the science community at large. The Biomedical Informatics and Health Care Systems Branch of the Space Life Sciences Directorate at JSC and the Data Archive Project at ARC, with funding from the Human Research Program through the Exploration Medical Capability Element, are fulfilling these requirements through the systematic population of the Life Sciences Data Archive. This program constitutes a formal system for the acquisition, archival and distribution of data for Life Sciences-sponsored experiments and investigations. The general goal of the archive is to acquire, preserve, and distribute these data using a variety of media which are accessible and responsive to inquiries from the science communities.

  3. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Gene V., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document consists of the 21 articles published in the electronic journal "Education Policy Analysis Archives" for the year 1996. The articles are: (1) "The Political Legacy of School Accountability Systems" (Sherman Dorn); (2) "Review of Stephen Arons's 'Short Route to Chaos'" (Charles L. Glenn); (3) "Planting Land Mines in Common Ground: A…

  4. THE EPA REMOTE SENSING ARCHIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    What would you do if you were faced with organizing 30 years of remote sensing projects that had been haphazardly stored at two separate locations for years then combined? The EPA Remote Sensing Archive, currently located in Las Vegas, Nevada. contains the remote sensing data and...

  5. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Gene V., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This document consists of the 19 articles published in the Electronic Journal "Education Policy Analysis Archives" for the year 1996: (1) "The Achievement Crisis Is Real: A Review of 'The Manufactured Crisis'" (Lawrence C. Stedman); (2) "Staff Development Policy: Fuzzy Choices in an Imperfect Market" (Robert T. Stout); (3) "Making Molehills out of…

  6. Bibliographies, Reference Works, and Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Clark A.

    1985-01-01

    Explores the history of science in America from the viewpoint of access to sources. Considered are a number of specific bibliographic and other reference works, as well as important recent projects and developments that aim to preserve and improve access to archival and other documentation and historical data for future use. (JN)

  7. Digitization of Archives of Astronomical Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omizzolo, Alessandro; Cesare, Barbieri; Blanco, Carlo; Bucciarelli, Beatrice; di Paola, Andrea; Nesci, Roberto

    The photographic plate archives of telescopes around the world contain a veritable treasury of astronomical data. Unfortunately the emulsion is a volatile support and full exploitation of the scientific content is more and more difficult. A large-scale two-year project to digitize the archive of plates of the Italian Astronomical Observatories and of the Specola Vaticana has been started in 2002 with funds from the Ministry of the University and Research following a pilot program funded by the University of Padova in 2001. Identical systems composed by a high quality commercial scanner plus dedicated personal computers and acquisition software (developed initially at DLR Berlin) have been installed in all participating Institutes. Three main goals make up the total project: to provide high quality photometric sequences with the Campo Imperatore telescopes to be used on the scanned plates to perform astrometric measures taking advantage of the large span of time covered by the plates and to distribute the digitized information to all interested researchers via the international Web. This paper presents some of the activities carried out and results obtained so far

  8. The ESA Planetary Science Archive User Group (PSA-UG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pio Rossi, Angelo; Cecconi, Baptiste; Fraenz, Markus; Hagermann, Axel; Heather, David; Rosenblatt, Pascal; Svedhem, Hakan; Widemann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    ESA has established a Planetary Science Archive User Group (PSA-UG), with the task of offering independent advice to ESA's Planetary Science Archive (e.g. Heather et al., 2013). The PSA-UG is an official and independent body that continuously evaluates services and tools provided by the PSA to the community of planetary data scientific users. The group has been tasked with the following top level objectives: a) Advise ESA on future development of the PSA. b) Act as a focus for the interests of the scientific community. c) Act as an advocate for the PSA. d) Monitor the PSA activities. Based on this, the PSA-UG will report through the official ESA channels. Disciplines and subjects represented by PSA-UG members include: Remote Sensing of both Atmosphere and Solid Surfaces, Magnetospheres, Plasmas, Radio Science and Auxilliary data. The composition of the group covers ESA missions populating the PSA both now and in the near future. The first members of the PSA-UG were selected in 2013 and will serve for 3 years, until 2016. The PSA-UG will address the community through workshops, conferences and the internet. Written recommendations will be made to the PSA coordinator, and an annual report on PSA and the PSA-UG activities will be sent to the Solar System Exploration Working Group (SSEWG). Any member of the community and planetary data user can get in touch with individual members of the PSA-UG or with the group as a whole via the contacts provided on the official PSA-UG web-page: http://archives.esac.esa.int/psa/psa-ug. The PSA is accessible via: http://archives.esac.esa.int/psa References: Heather, D., Barthelemy, M., Manaud, N., Martinez, S., Szumlas, M., Vazquez, J. L., Osuna, P. and the PSA Development Team (2013) ESA's Planetary Science Archive: Status, Activities and Plans. EuroPlanet Sci. Congr. #EPSC2013-626

  9. Design and implementation of scalable tape archiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemoto, Toshihiro; Kitsuregawa, Masaru; Takagi, Mikio

    1996-01-01

    In order to reduce costs, computer manufacturers try to use commodity parts as much as possible. Mainframes using proprietary processors are being replaced by high performance RISC microprocessor-based workstations, which are further being replaced by the commodity microprocessor used in personal computers. Highly reliable disks for mainframes are also being replaced by disk arrays, which are complexes of disk drives. In this paper we try to clarify the feasibility of a large scale tertiary storage system composed of 8-mm tape archivers utilizing robotics. In the near future, the 8-mm tape archiver will be widely used and become a commodity part, since recent rapid growth of multimedia applications requires much larger storage than disk drives can provide. We designed a scalable tape archiver which connects as many 8-mm tape archivers (element archivers) as possible. In the scalable archiver, robotics can exchange a cassette tape between two adjacent element archivers mechanically. Thus, we can build a large scalable archiver inexpensively. In addition, a sophisticated migration mechanism distributes frequently accessed tapes (hot tapes) evenly among all of the element archivers, which improves the throughput considerably. Even with the failures of some tape drives, the system dynamically redistributes hot tapes to the other element archivers which have live tape drives. Several kinds of specially tailored huge archivers are on the market, however, the 8-mm tape scalable archiver could replace them. To maintain high performance in spite of high access locality when a large number of archivers are attached to the scalable archiver, it is necessary to scatter frequently accessed cassettes among the element archivers and to use the tape drives efficiently. For this purpose, we introduce two cassette migration algorithms, foreground migration and background migration. Background migration transfers cassettes between element archivers to redistribute frequently accessed

  10. "The Glory and Romance of Our History Are Here Preserved." An Introduction to the Records of the National Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC. Office of Public Programs.

    This publication is intended for teachers bringing a class to visit the National Archives in Washington, D.C., for a workshop on primary documents. The National Archives serves as the repository for all federal records of enduring value. Primary sources are vital teaching tools because they actively engage the student's imagination so that he or…

  11. Contents of the NASA ocean data system archive, version 11-90

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Elizabeth A. (Editor); Lassanyi, Ruby A. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ocean Data System (NODS) archive at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) includes satellite data sets for the ocean sciences and global-change research to facilitate multidisciplinary use of satellite ocean data. Parameters include sea-surface height, surface-wind vector, sea-surface temperature, atmospheric liquid water, and surface pigment concentration. NODS will become the Data Archive and Distribution Service of the JPL Distributed Active Archive Center for the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) and will be the United States distribution site for Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/POSEIDON data and metadata.

  12. Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benada, J. Robert

    1997-01-01

    This new TOPEX/POSEIDON product provides the full mission data set in a new format with many data quality improvements brought about by the work of many scientists during the mission. It is a revised form to the MGDR-A CD-ROM set which covered data from the beginning of the mission, Septermber 22, 1992 to April 23, 1996.

  13. Archives Library Information Center (ALIC) Notes, 1989-1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALIC Notes, 1992

    1992-01-01

    The Archives Library Information Center (ALIC) within the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) collects printed material on archives, manuscripts, and records management. ALIC compiles a database of these materials, sources of archival services and supplies, and information on significant archival projects. "ALIC Notes" is a brief…

  14. Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) Data Archiving in the CAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, I. S.; Barthe, A.; Penou, E.; Brunato, S.; Reme, H.; Kistler, L. M.; Blagau, A.; Facsko, G.; Kronberg, E.; Laakso, H. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Cluster Active Archive (CAA) aims at preserving the four Cluster spacecraft data, so that they are usable in the long-term by the scientific community as well as by the instrument team PIs and Co-Is. This implies that the data are filed together with the descriptive and documentary elements making it possible to select and interpret them. The CIS (Cluster Ion Spectrometry) experiment is a comprehensive ionic plasma spectrometry package onboard the four Cluster spacecraft, capable of obtaining full three-dimensional ion distributions (about 0 to 40 keV/e) with a time resolution of one spacecraft spin (4 sec) and with mass-per-charge composition determination. The CIS package consists of two different instruments, a Hot Ion Analyser (HIA) and a time-of-flight ion Composition Distribution Function (CODIF) analyser. For the archival of the CIS data a multi-level approach has been adopted. The CAA archival includes processed raw data (Level 1 data), moments of the ion distribution functions (Level 2 data), and calibrated high-resolution data in a variety of physical units (Level 3 data). The latter are 3-D ion distribution functions and 2-D pitch-angle distributions. In addition, a software package has been developed to allow the CAA user to interactively calculate partial or total moments of the ion distributions. Instrument cross-calibration has been an important activity in preparing the data for archival. The CIS data archive includes also experiment documentation, graphical products for browsing through the data, and data caveats. In addition, data quality indexes are under preparation, to help the user. Given the complexity of an ion spectrometer, and the variety of its operational modes, each one being optimised for a different magnetospheric region or measurement objective, consultation of the data caveats by the end user will always be a necessary step in the data analysis.

  15. Archiving Space Geodesy Data for 20+ Years at the CDDIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Carey E.; Dube, M. P.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1982, the Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS) has supported the archive and distribution of geodetic data products acquired by NASA programs. These data include GPS (Global Positioning System), GLONASS (GLObal NAvigation Satellite System), SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging), VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry), and DORIS (Doppler Orbitography and Radiolocation Integrated by Satellite). The data archive supports NASA's space geodesy activities through the Solid Earth and Natural Hazards (SENH) program. The CDDIS data system and its archive have become increasingly important to many national and international programs, particularly several of the operational services within the International Association of Geodesy (IAG), including the International GPS Service (IGS), the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS), the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS), the International DORIS Service (IDS), and the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS). The CDDIS provides easy and ready access to a variety of data sets, products, and information about these data. The specialized nature of the CDDIS lends itself well to enhancement and thus can accommodate diverse data sets and user requirements. All data sets and metadata extracted from these data sets are accessible to scientists through ftp and the web; general information about each data set is accessible via the web. The CDDIS, including background information about the system and its user communities, the computer architecture, archive contents, available metadata, and future plans will be discussed.

  16. Enterprise utilization of "always on-line" diagnostic study archive.

    PubMed

    McEnery, Kevin W; Suitor, Charles T; Thompson, Stephen K; Shepard, Jeffrey S; Murphy, William A

    2002-01-01

    To meet demands for enterprise image distribution, an "always on-line" image storage archive architecture was implemented before soft copy interpretation. It was presumed that instant availability of historical diagnostic studies would elicit a substantial utilization. Beginning November 1, 2000 an enterprise distribution archive was activated (Stentor, SanFrancisco, CA). As of August 8, 2001, 83,052 studies were available for immediate access without the need for retrieval from long-term archive. Image storage and retrieval logs for the period from June 12, 2001 to August 8, 2001 were analyzed. A total of 41,337 retrieval requests were noted for the 83,052 studies available as August 8, 2001. Computed radiography represented 16.8% of retrieval requests; digital radiography, 16.9%; computed tomography (CT), 44.5%; magnetic resonance (MR), 19.2%; and ultrasonography, 2.6%. A total of 51.5% of study retrievals were for studies less than 72 hours old. Study requests for cases greater than 100 days old represented 9.9% of all accessions, 9.7% of CT accessions, and 15.4% of MR accessions. Utilization of the archive indicates a substantial proportion of study retrievals for studies less than 72 hours after study completion. However, significant interest in historical CT and MR examinations was shown. PMID:12105703

  17. Archiving and Data Processing Software for Solar Radio Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov-Maksimov, V. E.; Bogod, V. M.; Korzhavin, A. N.; Opeikina, L. V.; Shatilov, V. A.

    1997-03-01

    Regular daily observations of the Sun have been made over long time intervals since 1975 with the RATAN--600 radio telescope in the centimeter and decimeter wavelength ranges with high spatial resolution. A huge archive of observational data has been accumulated. The archive contains valuable astrophysical information covering a period that exceeds the duration of a solar activity cycle. However, all these data were stored on different data media (magnetic tapes, diskettes, streamer's cartridges, etc.) and in different formats. The main purpose of the work presented here is to produce a homogeneous database with our experimental data. We plan to create an electronic journal of observations using a relational database. Presently the journal of observations exists only in the form of a single paper copy and information about observations must be searched for manually. The electronic journal of observations will contain all the information about the observations and allow an easy extraction of such information and a simple selection of the observational data for any specific astrophysical problem. We plan to develop a software package for primary data reduction of observations of the Sun on RATAN-600, stored in various primary formats, and to create a homogeneous archive in the FITS format. A binary table extension to FITS will be used. We also plan to record our archive on a CD-ROM.

  18. Using NASA Archives in High Schools to Study AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petach, Helen; Spuck, T.; Meredith, K.; Ramseyer, E.; Gorjian, V.

    2011-01-01

    The NITARP (NASA IPAC Teacher Archive Research Project) program provides a link between NASA researchers and high school teachers and students. This past year the Luminous Data Miners (LDM) developed and implemented a research plan to investigate whether the UV light emitted from the accretion disk of an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) is correlated with the IR emission from its surrounding dust. Contemporaneous data was obtained from the GALEX and Spitzer data archives for a set of galaxies. Scientists, teachers, and students from across the country work together in this authentic research experience. Students learned about the physics of the science in question, the structure of the archived data stored in NASA databases, extraction methods for obtaining relevant data, use of photometry tools to make brightness measurements, and relevant correlations that could be determined. Our results suggest that students are eager to have these research opportunities and will make use of data archives to carry out research projects to answer relevant questions. This poster will highlight the process the students and teachers went through and the tools they developed along the way.

  19. Natural and Cultural Preservation - Complementary Endeavors through Soil Archive Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Oren; Frumin, Suembikya; Kolska Horwitz, Liora; Maeir, Aren M.; Weiss, Ehud; Zhevelev, Helena M.

    2016-04-01

    Soil is an excellent archive for the history of landscape components such as ancient topography, erosion and accumulation processes, and vegetation characterization. In special cases, the soil archive even preserves botanical faunal and mollusc assemblages, allowing for the production of an archive of organic species as well. Long-term human activities in the past have left their imprints on certain landscape systems, leading to the formation of landscapes composed of both cultural and natural assets. The aim of this presentation is to suggest a conceptual model, based on the soil archive, which enables the preservation and sustainability of such environments. The proposed area (eastern Mediterranean) underwent cycles of ancient site establishment and abandonment. When areas were occupied, the natural vegetation around settlements experienced human interventions such as woodcutting, grazing and horticulture. During site abandonment, these interventions ceased, resulting in vegetation regeneration, a reduction in biodiversity, increased fire hazard, etc. This ultimately led to the deterioration of the landscape system as well as the destruction of cultural assets such as ancient buildings and/or remnants. In order to preserve and restore these sites, a conceptual model that combines both modern natural conservation strategies and restoration of traditional land-use techniques is proposed. This model provides a complementary approach to existing natural and cultural preservation efforts.

  20. The NAS Computational Aerosciences Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miceli, Kristina D.; Globus, Al; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    In order to further the state-of-the-art in computational aerosciences (CAS) technology, researchers must be able to gather and understand existing work in the field. One aspect of this information gathering is studying published work available in scientific journals and conference proceedings. However, current scientific publications are very limited in the type and amount of information that they can disseminate. Information is typically restricted to text, a few images, and a bibliography list. Additional information that might be useful to the researcher, such as additional visual results, referenced papers, and datasets, are not available. New forms of electronic publication, such as the World Wide Web (WWW), limit publication size only by available disk space and data transmission bandwidth, both of which are improving rapidly. The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Systems Division at NASA Ames Research Center is in the process of creating an archive of CAS information on the WWW. This archive will be based on the large amount of information produced by researchers associated with the NAS facility. The archive will contain technical summaries and reports of research performed on NAS supercomputers, visual results (images, animations, visualization system scripts), datasets, and any other supporting meta-information. This information will be available via the WWW through the NAS homepage, located at http://www.nas.nasa.gov/, fully indexed for searching. The main components of the archive are technical summaries and reports, visual results, and datasets. Technical summaries are gathered every year by researchers who have been allotted resources on NAS supercomputers. These summaries, together with supporting visual results and references, are browsable by interested researchers. Referenced papers made available by researchers can be accessed through hypertext links. Technical reports are in-depth accounts of tools and applications research projects

  1. Interrogating trees as archives of sulphur deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynn, P. M.; Loader, N. J.; Fairchild, I. J.

    2012-04-01

    A principal driver of climatic variability over the past 1,000 years and essential forcing mechanism for climate, are the changes in atmospheric composition resulting from sulphur aerosols. Natural and anthropogenic aerosols released into the atmosphere disrupt the radiative balance through backscattering and absorption of incoming solar radiation and increase cloud albedo by acting as condensation nuclei. Understanding the impact of sulphur emissions upon climate beyond the last few hundred years however is not straightforward and natural archives of environmental information must be explored. Tree-rings represent one such archive as they are widely distributed and preserve environmental information within a precisely dateable, annually resolved timescale. Until recently the sulphur contained within tree-rings has largely remained beyond the reach of environmental scientists and climate modelers owing to difficulties associated with the extraction of a robust signal and uncertainties regarding post-depositional mobility. Our recent work using synchrotron radiation has established that the majority of non-labile sulphur in two conifer species is preserved within the cellular structure of the woody tissue after uptake and demonstrates an increasing trend in sulphur concentration during the 20th century and during known volcanic events. Due to the clear isotopic distinction between marine (+21), geological (+10 to +30), atmospheric pollution (-3 to +9 ) and volcanic sources of sulphur (0 to +5), isotopic ratios provide a diagnostic tool with which changes in the source of atmospheric sulphur can be detected in a more reliable fashion than concentration alone. Sulphur isotopes should thereby provide a fingerprint of short lived events including volcanic activity when extracted at high resolution and in conjunction with high resolution S concentrations defining the event. Here we present methodologies associated with extracting the sulphur isotopic signal from tree

  2. Tomcat, Oracle & XML Web Archive

    SciTech Connect

    Cothren, D. C.

    2008-01-01

    The TOX (Tomcat Oracle & XML) web archive is a foundation for development of HTTP-based applications using Tomcat (or some other servlet container) and an Oracle RDBMS. Use of TOX requires coding primarily in PL/SQL, JavaScript, and XSLT, but also in HTML, CSS and potentially Java. Coded in Java and PL/SQL itself, TOX provides the foundation for more complex applications to be built.

  3. Career History Archival Medical and Personnel System.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, E K Eric; Garland, Cedric F; Miller, Milan R; Gorham, Edward D

    2005-02-01

    The Career History Archival Medical and Personnel System is a database that provides information on cancer, chronic diseases, occupational and preventive medicine, epidemiological research, and the use of health care in the Navy and Marine Corps. It was created at the Naval Health Research Center for enlisted Navy personnel, and it is being expanded to encompass all military personnel. Its objective is to provide a comprehensive, chronologically ordered database of career and medical events in all active duty military service members and to track career and disease events in order from the date of entry to service to the date service ended. Events include the dates of beginning and ending of each specific military occupation, all assignments to a military units or ships, all hospitalized diseases, and other events. The database contains detailed epidemiological data on more than six million members of the military services. It is the largest known epidemiological database in the United States. PMID:15782842

  4. Inside an environmental data archive WWW site

    SciTech Connect

    Grubb, J.W.; Jennings, S.V.; Yow, T.G.; Smith, A.W.

    1997-03-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC), which is associated with NASA`s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), provides access to tabular and imagery datasets used in ecological and environmental research. Because of its large and diverse data holdings, twin challenges for the ORNL DAAC are to help users find data of interest from the hundreds of thousands of files available at the DAAC without overwhelming them and to manage such a large collection of data. Therefore, the ORNL DAAC has developed a number of World Wide Web (WWW) tools such as the Biogeochemical Information Ordering Management Environment (BIOME), a WWW search and order system, as well as WWW-based data management and configuration control tools. This paper describes the specialized attributes incorporated into these systems that allow for easy access to and management of the data.

  5. System Architecture for a Hubble Legacy Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, W. W., III; Gaffney, N.; Jenkner, H.; Whitmore, B.

    2007-10-01

    The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), in collaboration with the European Coordinating Facility (ECF) and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC), is studying the development of an enhanced archive for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Distinct from (but complimentary to) the existing archive system at the STScI, development of this enhanced archive affords the opportunity to leverage modern architectural and design principles toward meeting project objectives and serving the archive community. To wit, the STScI is designing the entire system as a service-oriented architecture (SOA). Composed of loosely-coupled, highly-interoperable Web services, an SOA embodies a great deal of flexibility in meeting future needs placed on the HST archive while also positioning it well within the emerging Virtual Observatory (VO) framework. A high-level architecture for the enhanced archive at the STScI is presented.

  6. Commercial imagery archive product development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakkas, Alysa

    1999-12-01

    The Lockheed Martin (LM) team had garnered over a decade of operational experience in digital imagery management and analysis for the US Government at numerous worldwide sites. Recently, it set out to create a new commercial product to serve the needs of large-scale imagery archiving and analysis markets worldwide. LM decided to provide a turnkey commercial solution to receive, store, retrieve, process, analyze and disseminate in 'push' or 'pull' modes components and adapted and developed its own algorithms to provide added functionality not commercially available elsewhere. The resultant product, Intelligent Library System, satisfies requirements for (a) a potentially unbounded, data archive automated workflow management for increased user productivity; (c) automatic tracking and management of files stored on shelves; (d) ability to ingest, process and disseminate data involves with bandwidths ranging up to multi-gigabit per second; (e) access through a thin client- to-server network environment; (f) multiple interactive users needing retrieval of filters in seconds from both archived images or in real time, and (g) scalability that maintains information throughput performance as the size of the digital library grows.

  7. Archives and National Development in the Third World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamba, Angeline S.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the national archives of Zimbabwe, the legislation that has directed the collection and use of the archives, the value of colonial archives in the educational process, the preservation of cultural heritage, and the formation of national policy. (CLB)

  8. The Protein Data Bank: unifying the archive

    PubMed Central

    Westbrook, John; Feng, Zukang; Jain, Shri; Bhat, T. N.; Thanki, Narmada; Ravichandran, Veerasamy; Gilliland, Gary L.; Bluhm, Wolfgang F.; Weissig, Helge; Greer, Douglas S.; Bourne, Philip E.; Berman, Helen M.

    2002-01-01

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB; http://www.pdb.org/) is the single worldwide archive of structural data of biological macromolecules. This paper describes the progress that has been made in validating all data in the PDB archive and in releasing a uniform archive for the community. We have now produced a collection of mmCIF data files for the PDB archive (ftp://beta.rcsb.org/pub/pdb/uniformity/data/mmCIF/). A utility application that converts the mmCIF data files to the PDB format (called CIFTr) has also been released to provide support for existing software. PMID:11752306

  9. Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Archive System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Brenda K.

    1995-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Archive System is designed to provide spacecraft designers and space environment researchers single point access to all available resources from LDEF. These include data, micrographs, photographs, technical reports, papers, hardware and test specimens, as well as technical expertise. Further, the LDEF Archive System is planned such that it could be the foundation for a NASA Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Archive System, with the addition of other spaceflight, laboratory and theoretical space environments and effects data and associated materials. This paper describes the current status and plans of the LDEF Archive System.

  10. Free audio archive brings legends to life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-09-01

    A free online archive that contains thousands of hours of interviews with physicists and astronomers has been launched by the American Institute of Physics (AIP). The archive currently contains full transcripts of interviews with over 400 physicists that were recorded by historians and journalists from 1960 onwards as well as selected parts of the audio files. By the end of the year, the archive, belonging to the AIP's Niels Bohr Library and Archives in Washington, DC, will contain 500 online transcripts and over a dozen audio interviews.

  11. Seventy Years of the Journal "Medical Archives".

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet

    2016-02-01

    This year journal "Medical Archives" celebrates 70th anniversary of its continuing publication. Medical Archives is oldest biomedical journal in Bosnia and Herzegovina and one of the oldest medical journals in Europe, established in the year 1947, as official scientific and professional journal of Association of Physicians of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Until present Medical Archives has published over 5000 articles. Today Medical Archives is internationally recognized medical peer-reviewed indexed journal, visible in more than 30 international on-line databases. PMID:26980925

  12. [Archival tags and geolocation methods for marine animals: A review].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-feng; Fan, Wei; Dai, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Archival tags, a group of data storable electronic tags, are widely used as strong tools for obtaining long term and large scale activity information of marine animals, specifically highly migratory oceanic fishes, and corresponding environmental data. Though retrieving tags is an indispensable step for obtaining data, which is a shortage of archival tags, a series of achievements have been made on marine animals by using archival tags since the 1990s. With the appearance of pop-up satellite tag, which solved the problem of data retrieving and was fully independent of the fishing, both breadth and depth of marine animals' studies are extended by the end of the 1990s. Geolocation based on light intensity is the key to estimate marine animals' movement and has achieved some progress in the past 20 years. However, the accuracy of geolocation for latitude is not high enough, and there is still much room for improvement. To date, most geolocation methods that use ambient daylight involve identifying the times when the sun is at a precisely known zenith angle (e.g., sunrise and sunset). The problem of estimating longitude has been proved easy to solve, but accurate latitude estimates remain elusive. This paper mainly introduced two tags, i. e., archival tags and pop-up tags, and three geolocation methods, i.e. , 1) the "fixed reference" method, 2) the "variable reference" method, and 3) the "reflection" method. We also presented a prospect analysis on archival tags and possible research direction of geolocation methods. We believed that miniaturization and multi-sensor integration are the trends for electronic tags while more environmental factors such as depth, SST (sea surface temperature) or magnetic field intensity, instead of single factor, as auxiliary parameters would be used for improving the geolocation accuracy in the future. PMID:26915216

  13. The NAS Computational Aerosciences Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miceli, Kristina D.; Globus, Al; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    In order to further the state-of-the-art in computational aerosciences (CAS) technology, researchers must be able to gather and understand existing work in the field. One aspect of this information gathering is studying published work available in scientific journals and conference proceedings. However, current scientific publications are very limited in the type and amount of information that they can disseminate. Information is typically restricted to text, a few images, and a bibliography list. Additional information that might be useful to the researcher, such as additional visual results, referenced papers, and datasets, are not available. New forms of electronic publication, such as the World Wide Web (WWW), limit publication size only by available disk space and data transmission bandwidth, both of which are improving rapidly. The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Systems Division at NASA Ames Research Center is in the process of creating an archive of CAS information on the WWW. This archive will be based on the large amount of information produced by researchers associated with the NAS facility. The archive will contain technical summaries and reports of research performed on NAS supercomputers, visual results (images, animations, visualization system scripts), datasets, and any other supporting meta-information. This information will be available via the WWW through the NAS homepage, located at http://www.nas.nasa.gov/, fully indexed for searching. The main components of the archive are technical summaries and reports, visual results, and datasets. Technical summaries are gathered every year by researchers who have been allotted resources on NAS supercomputers. These summaries, together with supporting visual results and references, are browsable by interested researchers. Referenced papers made available by researchers can be accessed through hypertext links. Technical reports are in-depth accounts of tools and applications research projects

  14. A complete public archive for the Einstein IPC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents progress made in the period 29 September 1992 and 28 September 1993, on the project described in our proposal 'A Complete Public Archive for the Einstein IPC,' which was approved under the Astrophysics Data Program last year. All of the principal first-year objectives were achieved and we expect to continue our efforts over the next two years toward the goal of transferring the entire activity to the HEASARC.

  15. The Hinode/XRT Full-Sun Image Corrections and the Improved Synoptic Composite Image Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Aki; Yoshimura, Keiji; Saar, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    The XRT Synoptic Composite Image Archive (SCIA) is a storage and gallery of X-ray full-Sun images obtained through the synoptic program of the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) onboard the Hinode satellite. The archived images provide a quick history of solar activity through the daily and monthly layout pages and long-term data for morphological and quantitative studies of the X-ray corona. This article serves as an introduction to the SCIA, i.e., to the structure of the archive and specification of the data products included therein. We also describe a number of techniques used to improve the quality of the archived images: preparation of composite images to increase intensity dynamic range, removal of dark spots that are due to contaminants on the CCD, and correction of the visible stray light contamination that has been detected on the Ti-poly and C-poly filter images since May 2012.

  16. [Information production by scientists and the history of science: typological study of personal archives].

    PubMed

    Silva, Maria Celina Soares de Mello E; Trancoso, Márcia Cristina Duarte

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses the study of document typology in the personal archives of scientists and its importance in the history of science studies and for the archivist's work. A brief history is presented of diplomatic to typological information, emphasizing that identifying document production activity as essential for its classification. The article illustrates personal archive characteristics as regards the diversity of documental types and, in particular, those belonging to physicists. Furthermore, it presents five examples of documental types found in the archives of physicists as examples of research in progress. It also highlights the elaboration of a glossary of different documental kinds and types found in the private archives of Museum of Astronomy and Related Sciences in Rio de Janeiro. PMID:26331648

  17. Issues surrounding PACS archiving to external, third-party DICOM archives.

    PubMed

    Langer, Steve

    2009-03-01

    In larger health care imaging institutions, it is becoming increasingly obvious that separate image archives for every department are not cost effective or scalable. The solution is to have each department's picture archiving communication system (PACS) have only a local cache, and archive to an enterprise archive that drives a universal clinical viewer. It sounds simple, but how many PACS can truly work with a third-party Integration of the Health Care Enterprise Compliant Image Archive? The answer is somewhat disappointing. PMID:18449605

  18. Atmospheric Science Program (ASP) Data Archive

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Science Program (ASP) originally consisted of an atmospheric chemistry program, an environmental meteorology program, a tropospheric aerosol program, and NARSTO activities. In 2004, the ASP was reconfigured to focus on aerosol radiative forcing of climate change: aerosol formation and evolution and aerosol properties that affect direct and indirect influences on climate and climate change. This included developing a comprehensive understanding of the atmospheric processes that control the transport, transformation, and fate of energy related trace chemicals and particulate matter. The current focus of the program is aerosol radiative forcing of climate. Effective October 1, 2009, The ASP merged with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM), with the overall program now called Atmospheric System Research. The overall research goal is one that was shared in common, i.e. to further the understanding of how the climate, as a system works, and to represent the understanding in computer models. The Office of Science and Brookhaven announced, ôA major benefit of the merge is expected to be a strengthening of the aerosol- and cloud-related research components of the programs by bringing together the ARM capabilities of continuous remote sensing measurements of cloud properties and aerosol influences on radiation with the ASP capabilities for in-situ characterization of aerosol properties, evolution, and cloud interactions.ö [http://www.asp.bnl.gov/#New] The ASP data archive has now been moved to a new location in order to be maintained with ARM data. The new url is http://iop.archive.arm.gov/arm-iop/0special-data/ASP_Campaigns_past/. BNL continues to maintain an excellent list of ASP-publications at http://www.asp.bnl.gov/asp_pubs.html

  19. International Ultraviolet Explorer Final Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    CSC processed IUE images through the Final Archive Data Processing System. Raw images were obtained from both NDADS and the IUEGTC optical disk platters for processing on the Alpha cluster, and from the IUEGTC optical disk platters for DECstation processing. Input parameters were obtained from the IUE database. Backup tapes of data to send to VILSPA were routinely made on the Alpha cluster. IPC handled more than 263 requests for priority NEWSIPS processing during the contract. Staff members also answered various questions and requests for information and sent copies of IUE documents to requesters. CSC implemented new processing capabilities into the NEWSIPS processing systems as they became available. In addition, steps were taken to improve efficiency and throughput whenever possible. The node TORTE was reconfigured as the I/O server for Alpha processing in May. The number of Alpha nodes used for the NEWSIPS processing queue was increased to a maximum of six in measured fashion in order to understand the dependence of throughput on the number of nodes and to be able to recognize when a point of diminishing returns was reached. With Project approval, generation of the VD FITS files was dropped in July. This action not only saved processing time but, even more significantly, also reduced the archive storage media requirements, and the time required to perform the archiving, drastically. The throughput of images verified through CDIVS and processed through NEWSIPS for the contract period is summarized below. The number of images of a given dispersion type and camera that were processed in any given month reflects several factors, including the availability of the required NEWSIPS software system, the availability of the corresponding required calibrations (e.g., the LWR high-dispersion ripple correction and absolute calibration), and the occurrence of reprocessing efforts such as that conducted to incorporate the updated SWP sensitivity-degradation correction in May.

  20. Broadsides & Posters from the National Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC.

    This booklet evolved from research for the exhibition "Uncle Sam Speaks: Broadsides and Posters from the National Archives," which opened at the National Archives in February 1986. The booklet is presented chronologically, beginning with broadsides from the American Revolution and ending with posters of the 1980's. Accompanying text explains the…

  1. Improving Internet Archive Service through Proxy Cache.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Hsiang-Fu; Chen, Yi-Ming; Wang, Shih-Yong; Tseng, Li-Ming

    2003-01-01

    Discusses file transfer protocol (FTP) servers for downloading archives (files with particular file extensions), and the change to HTTP (Hypertext transfer protocol) with increased Web use. Topics include the Archie server; proxy cache servers; and how to improve the hit rate of archives by a combination of caching and better searching mechanisms.…

  2. WFAU Science Archives: Facilitating Survey Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Nicholas

    2015-12-01

    The Wide-Field Astronomy Unit in Edinburgh (WFAU) specializes in building and operating survey science archives. Imaging surveys carried out on UKIRT/WFCAM, VISTA/VIRCAM and the VST/OmegaCAM account for most of our current work, although we also operate the archive for the Gaia-ESO Spectroscopic survey.

  3. Subject Access to Archival Materials Using LCSH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiraglia, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of subject access to archival materials focuses on the use of Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH). The process of subject analysis is described, an example of the depth of cataloging for archival materials is given, and the basic principles of syndetic structure of LCSH are explained. (five references) (LRW)

  4. The National Archives and Electronic Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedlin, Edie; Harrison, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the events that led to the National Archives policy of preserving magnetic tapes of data generated by federal agencies and accumulating these databases as research tools. The current methods of preservation and access are described, and technical problems and archival concerns about standards are identified. (12 notes with references)…

  5. Jean Piaget Archives Bibliography on Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Susie; And Others

    This bibliography lists all entries from the Jean Piaget Archives Catalogues dealing with mental retardation. The list, including almost 200 entries, encompasses four works by Piaget himself, one collaboration, and 189 works by other authors. Entries are arranged in order by their publication in one of the 12 catalogues of the archives, providing…

  6. 22 CFR 171.6 - Archival records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Archival records. 171.6 Section 171.6 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ACCESS TO INFORMATION AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION AND RECORDS TO THE PUBLIC General Policy and Procedures § 171.6 Archival records. The Department ordinarily transfers records to...

  7. A Registry of Archived Electronic Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sue; Look, Hugh; Bide, Mark; Muir, Adrienne

    2010-01-01

    Concerns about e-journal archiving have increased in recent years. There is no central list of archived titles and there are inconsistencies in the information available about them. This makes it difficult for journal collection managers to take decisions on discarding print back runs and moving to electronic only subscriptions. In 2007, the UK's…

  8. Reference Service in an Academic Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Frances

    2000-01-01

    Examines reference questions received at the archives of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to determine why archival reference service is more time-consuming than standard academic library reference service. Also discusses differences in kinds of information and resources provided, arrangement of materials, and description and access.…

  9. A MySQL Based EPICS Archiver

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Slominski

    2009-10-01

    Archiving a large fraction of the EPICS signals within the Jefferson Lab (JLAB) Accelerator control system is vital for postmortem and real-time analysis of the accelerator performance. This analysis is performed on a daily basis by scientists, operators, engineers, technicians, and software developers. Archiving poses unique challenges due to the magnitude of the control system. A MySQL Archiving system (Mya) was developed to scale to the needs of the control system; currently archiving 58,000 EPICS variables, updating at a rate of 11,000 events per second. In addition to the large collection rate, retrieval of the archived data must also be fast and robust. Archived data retrieval clients obtain data at a rate over 100,000 data points per second. Managing the data in a relational database provides a number of benefits. This paper describes an archiving solution that uses an open source database and standard off the shelf hardware to reach high performance archiving needs. Mya has been in production at Jefferson Lab since February of 2007.

  10. 36 CFR 1275.24 - Archival processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Archival processing. 1275.24 Section 1275.24 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NIXON PRESIDENTIAL MATERIALS PRESERVATION AND PROTECTION OF AND ACCESS TO THE PRESIDENTIAL HISTORICAL MATERIALS OF THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION...

  11. 36 CFR 1275.24 - Archival processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Archival processing. 1275.24 Section 1275.24 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NIXON PRESIDENTIAL MATERIALS PRESERVATION AND PROTECTION OF AND ACCESS TO THE PRESIDENTIAL HISTORICAL MATERIALS OF THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION...

  12. 36 CFR 1275.24 - Archival processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Archival processing. 1275.24 Section 1275.24 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NIXON PRESIDENTIAL MATERIALS PRESERVATION AND PROTECTION OF AND ACCESS TO THE PRESIDENTIAL HISTORICAL MATERIALS OF THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION...

  13. 36 CFR 1275.24 - Archival processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Archival processing. 1275.24 Section 1275.24 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NIXON PRESIDENTIAL MATERIALS PRESERVATION AND PROTECTION OF AND ACCESS TO THE PRESIDENTIAL HISTORICAL MATERIALS OF THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION...

  14. Cost-Driven Design for Archival Repositories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crespo, Arturo; Garcia-Molina, Hector

    Digital information can be lost for a variety of reasons, including magnetic decay, format and device obsolescence, human or system error, among many others. A solution is to build an archival repository, a system capable of storing and preserving digital objects as technologies and organizations evolve. Designing an archival repository is a…

  15. Guide to the Seattle Archives Branch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Richard, Comp.

    The guide presents an overview of the textual and microfilmed records located at the Seattle Branch of the National Archives of the United States. Established in 1969, the Seattle Archives Branch is one of 11 branches which preserve and make available for research those U.S. Government records of permanent value created and maintained by Federal…

  16. Mining the Spitzer Legacy Science Data Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrett, T. H.; Storrie-Lombardi, L.; Squires, G.; Alexov, A.

    2005-12-01

    The original Spitzer Legacy Science Program is now approaching completion with the basic observations archived and the `enhanced' data products populating dedicated Spitzer and IRSA archives. To date the Legacy teams of C2D, FEPS, GLIMPSE, GOODS, SINGS and SWIRE have delivered more than half of the total planned `enhanced' data products to the public archives. The archives include fully reduced and calibrated imaging, spectra, and tabular data derived from the Spitzer IRAC, MIPS and IRS observations, as well as ancillary ground-based imaging and spectroscopy. Science results are now flowing from the Legacy teams, addressing the fundamental questions that the Spitzer observations where designed and optimized to answer. However, the data archives are mostly untapped in their science potential, offering a rich resource for astronomical data mining. We describe the archives in detail, spanning their structure, content and accessibility. User friendly resources for mining the data are showcased, including the Spitzer Science Center archive tool Leopard and the Infrared Science Archive services Atlas and RADAR.

  17. 22 CFR 171.6 - Archival records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Archival records. 171.6 Section 171.6 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ACCESS TO INFORMATION AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION AND RECORDS TO THE PUBLIC General Policy and Procedures § 171.6 Archival records. The Department ordinarily transfers records to...

  18. Archiving Methodology. Volume I: Project Officer's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leinwand (C.M.) Associates, Inc., Newton, MA.

    Recently, to encourage secondary analysis, the federal government has begun to arrange for public policy data to be documented, archived and released to the public. The purpose of this document is to provide government project officers with guidelines for archiving government-sponsored data files. The guidelines represent a model for…

  19. 36 CFR 1280.78 - Does NARA charge fees for the use of public areas in the National Archives Building?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... NARA will either exercise this authority directly, or, for activities co-sponsored with the Foundation for the National Archives, as part of your group's arrangements with the Foundation. (b) We...

  20. 36 CFR 1280.78 - Does NARA charge fees for the use of public areas in the National Archives Building?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... NARA will either exercise this authority directly, or, for activities co-sponsored with the Foundation for the National Archives, as part of your group's arrangements with the Foundation. (b) We...

  1. 36 CFR 1280.78 - Does NARA charge fees for the use of public areas in the National Archives Building?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... NARA will either exercise this authority directly, or, for activities co-sponsored with the Foundation for the National Archives, as part of your group's arrangements with the Foundation. (b) We...

  2. 36 CFR 1280.78 - Does NARA charge fees for the use of public areas in the National Archives Building?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... NARA will either exercise this authority directly, or, for activities co-sponsored with the Foundation for the National Archives, as part of your group's arrangements with the Foundation. (b) We...

  3. 36 CFR 1280.78 - Does NARA charge fees for the use of public areas in the National Archives Building?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... NARA will either exercise this authority directly, or, for activities co-sponsored with the Foundation for the National Archives, as part of your group's arrangements with the Foundation. (b) We...

  4. VO for Education: Archive Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramella, M.; Iafrate, G.; De Marco, M.; Molinaro, M.; Knapic, C.; Smareglia, R.; Cepparo, F.

    2014-05-01

    The number of remote control telescopes dedicated to education is increasing in many countries, leading to correspondingly larger and larger amount of stored educational data that are usually available only to local observers. Here we present the project for a new infrastructure that will allow teachers using educational telescopes to archive their data and easily publish them within the Virtual Observatory (VO) avoiding the complexity of professional tools. Students and teachers anywhere will be able to access these data with obvious benefits for the realization of grander scale collaborative projects. Educational VO data will also be an important resource for teachers not having direct access to any educational telescopes. We will use the educational telescope at our observatory in Trieste as a prototype for the future VO educational data archive resource. The publishing infrastructure will include: user authentication, content and curation validation, data validation and ingestion, VO compliant resource generation. All of these parts will be performed by means of server side applications accessible through a web graphical user interface (web GUI). Apart from user registration, that will be validated by a natural person responsible for the archive (after having verified the reliability of the user and inspected one or more test files), all the subsequent steps will be automated. This means that at the very first data submission through the webGUI, a complete resource including archive and published VO service will be generated, ready to be registered to the VO. The efforts required to the registered user will consist only in describing herself/himself at registration step and submitting the data she/he selects for publishing after each observation sessions. The infrastructure will be file format independent and the underlying data model will use a minimal set of standard VO keywords, some of which will be specific for outreach and education, possibly including VO

  5. Data Engineering for Archive Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, R.

    2015-09-01

    From the moment astronomical observations are made the resulting data products begin to grow stale. Even if perfect binary copies are preserved through repeated timely migration to more robust storage media, data standards evolve and new tools are created that require different kinds of data or metadata. The expectations of the astronomical community change even if the data do not. We discuss data engineering to mitigate the ensuing risks with examples from a recent project to refactor seven million archival images to new standards of nomenclature, metadata, format, and compression. A more detailed version of this paper is available at http://arxiv.org/abs/1410.3481.

  6. Three Dimensional Holographic Archival Memory

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbard, Bruce

    2006-11-09

    To address the DOE need for the storage and handling of terabyte of nuclear physics data, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) developed a new multi-terabit, 90° recording geometry 3D holographic archival optical memory storage and search system. In contrast to state-of-the-art memory approaches, 3DHAM handles the data through highly parallel optical processing in conjunction with highly redundant hologram multiplexing. The 3DHAM system advantages also stem from its unique 3D volume-recording medium, which theoretically has a significantly greater data density than diskbased systems.

  7. HST archive primer, version 4.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fruchter, A. (Editor); Baum, S. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This version of the HST Archive Primer provides the basic information a user needs to know to access the HST archive via StarView the new user interface to the archive. Using StarView, users can search for observations interest, find calibration reference files, and retrieve data from the archive. Both the terminal version of StarView and the X-windows version feature a name resolver which simplifies searches of the HST archive based on target name. In addition, the X-windows version of StarView allows preview of all public HST data; compressed versions of public images are displayed via SAOIMAGE, while spectra are plotted using the public plotting package, XMGR. Finally, the version of StarView described here features screens designed for observers preparing Cycle 5 HST proposals.

  8. Data Transfer Study HPSS Archiving

    SciTech Connect

    Wynne, James; Parete-Koon, Suzanne T; Mitchell, Quinn; White, Stanley R

    2015-01-01

    The movement of the large amounts of data produced by codes run in a High Performance Computing (HPC) environment can be a bottleneck for project workflows. To balance filesystem capacity and performance requirements, HPC centers enforce data management policies to purge old files to make room for new computation and analysis results. Users at Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) and many other HPC user facilities must archive data to avoid data loss during purges, therefore the time associated with data movement for archiving is something that all users must consider. This study observed the difference in transfer speed from the originating location on the Lustre filesystem to the more permanent High Performance Storage System (HPSS). The tests were done with a number of different transfer methods for files that spanned a variety of sizes and compositions that reflect OLCF user data. This data will be used to help users of Titan and other Cray supercomputers plan their workflow and data transfers so that they are most efficient for their project. We will also discuss best practice for maintaining data at shared user facilities.

  9. Optical archiving for scientific data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrey, Barbara E.

    1989-01-01

    Write-once-read-many (WORM) optical disk technology is now practical for use as (1) a near online storage media, (2) long-term storage in a passive repository, and (3) under some circumstances, transporting from and to data generators and data users at remote sites. Optical technology provides several significant advantages over magnetic tapes as a data storage media because it is more compact, provides random access, has a longer lifetime, at least 30 years, and is less sensitive to environmental factors such as temperature and humidity. Two major archival projects using optical technology underway are discussed: the Coastal Zone Color Scanner data and the Dynamics Explorer data. Both projects have used the software for optical archive and retrieval (SOAR) to transfer data in a volume format that can be read transparently by VAX/VMS. Through the use of this software technique, (1) data generators and data users do not have to rewrite extant software and (2) the VAX/VMS Files-11 volume format is in wide use, so it can serve as an interim standard and will be accessible in the long-term.

  10. Facilitating Navigation Through Large Archives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Robert O.; Smith, Stephanie L.; Troung, Dat; Hodgson, Terry R.

    2005-01-01

    Automated Visual Access (AVA) is a computer program that effectively makes a large collection of information visible in a manner that enables a user to quickly and efficiently locate information resources, with minimal need for conventional keyword searches and perusal of complex hierarchical directory systems. AVA includes three key components: (1) a taxonomy that comprises a collection of words and phrases, clustered according to meaning, that are used to classify information resources; (2) a statistical indexing and scoring engine; and (3) a component that generates a graphical user interface that uses the scoring data to generate a visual map of resources and topics. The top level of an AVA display is a pictorial representation of an information archive. The user enters the depicted archive by either clicking on a depiction of subject area cluster, selecting a topic from a list, or entering a query into a text box. The resulting display enables the user to view candidate information entities at various levels of detail. Resources are grouped spatially by topic with greatest generality at the top layer and increasing detail with depth. The user can zoom in or out of specific sites or into greater or lesser content detail.

  11. The ESA Planetary Science Archive User Group (PSA-UG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, A. P.; Cecconi, B.; Fraenz, M.; Hagermann, A.; Heather, D.; Rosenblatt, P.; Svedhem, H.; Widemann, T.

    2014-04-01

    ESA has established a Planetary Science Archive User Group (PSA-UG), with the task of offering independent advice to ESA's Planetary Science Archive (e.g. Heather et al., 2013). The PSA-UG is an official and independent body that continuously evaluates services and tools provided by the PSA to the community of planetary data scientific users. The group has been tasked with the following top level objectives: a) Advise ESA on future development of the PSA. b) Act as a focus for the interests of the scientific community. c) Act as an advocate for the PSA. d) Monitor the PSA activities. Based on this, the PSA-UG will report through the official ESA channels. Disciplines and subjects represented by PSA-UG members include: Remote Sensing of both Atmosphere and Solid Surfaces, Magnetospheres, Plasmas, Radio Science and Auxilliary data. The composition of the group covers ESA missions populating the PSA both now and in the near future. The first members of the PSA-UG were selected in 2013 and will serve for 3 years, until 2016. The PSA-UG will address the community through workshops, conferences and the internet. Written recommendations will be made to the PSA coordinator, and an annual report on PSA and the PSA-UG activities will be sent to the Solar System Exploration Working Group (SSEWG). Any member of the community and planetary data user can get in touch with individual members of the PSA-UG or with the group as a whole via the contacts provided on the official PSA-UG web-page: http://archives.esac.esa.int/psa/psa-ug The PSA is accessible via: http://archives.esac.esa.int/psa

  12. Archiving and Disseminating Quantitative Social Research Data on Chicanos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Myriam; Arce, Carlos H.

    An initial but comprehensive attempt to formally discuss the archiving of Chicano social science data archiving, reveals the range and quality of archivable datasets on Chicanos with a proposed taxonomic scheme for archiving them, and addresses technical and procedural issues and the strategies being adopted to establish a Chicano data archive…

  13. Reconceptualizing Academic Libraries and Archives in the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulus, Michael J., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the concept of "the archive" in the digital age and the situation of libraries and archives within the lifecycle of information. After discussing the changing nature of books, records, scholarly communication, and the concept of "the archive," this paper merges book and record lifecycle models into a new archival cycle. To…

  14. Taming the "Beast": An Archival Management System Based on EAD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Jennie A.; Evans, Jennifer; Kumar, Amit

    2006-01-01

    In April 2005, the University of Maryland Libraries launched "ArchivesUM" (www.lib.umd.edu/archivesum), an online database of finding aids for manuscript and archival collections using Encoded Archival Description (EAD). "ArchivesUM," however, is only the publicly available end-product of a much larger project-an integrated system that ties…

  15. 36 CFR 1253.2 - National Archives at College Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false National Archives at College Park. 1253.2 Section 1253.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS... Archives at College Park. The National Archives at College Park is located at 8601 Adelphi Road,...

  16. 36 CFR 1253.2 - National Archives at College Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false National Archives at College Park. 1253.2 Section 1253.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS... Archives at College Park. The National Archives at College Park is located at 8601 Adelphi Road,...

  17. 36 CFR 1253.2 - National Archives at College Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true National Archives at College Park. 1253.2 Section 1253.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS... Archives at College Park. The National Archives at College Park is located at 8601 Adelphi Road,...

  18. 36 CFR 1253.2 - National Archives at College Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National Archives at College Park. 1253.2 Section 1253.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS... Archives at College Park. The National Archives at College Park is located at 8601 Adelphi Road,...

  19. European distributed seismological data archives infrastructure: EIDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, John; Hanka, Winfried; Mazza, Salvatore; Pederson, Helle; Sleeman, Reinoud; Stammler, Klaus; Strollo, Angelo

    2014-05-01

    The European Integrated waveform Data Archive (EIDA) is a distributed Data Center system within ORFEUS that (a) securely archives seismic waveform data and related metadata gathered by European research infrastructures, and (b) provides transparent access to the archives for the geosciences research communities. EIDA was founded in 2013 by ORFEUS Data Center, GFZ, RESIF, ETH, INGV and BGR to ensure sustainability of a distributed archive system and the implementation of standards (e.g. FDSN StationXML, FDSN webservices) and coordinate new developments. Under the mandate of the ORFEUS Board of Directors and Executive Committee the founding group is responsible for steering and maintaining the technical developments and organization of the European distributed seismic waveform data archive and the integration within broader multidisciplanry frameworks like EPOS. EIDA currently offers uniform data access to unrestricted data from 8 European archives (www.orfeus-eu.org/eida), linked by the Arclink protocol, hosting data from 75 permanent networks (1800+ stations) and 33 temporary networks (1200+) stations). Moreover, each archive may also provide unique, restricted datasets. A webinterface, developed at GFZ, offers interactive access to different catalogues (EMSC, GFZ, USGS) and EIDA waveform data. Clients and toolboxes like arclink_fetch and ObsPy can connect directly to any EIDA node to collect data. Current developments are directed to the implementation of quality parameters and strong motion parameters.

  20. New Services from the Chandra Data Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelman, S.; Rots, A.

    2014-05-01

    Users of the Chandra Data Archive (CDA) have been creating private mirrors of the archive for many years. The majority of the mirrors are partial mirrors of the CDA and most are not permanent. Maintaining a private mirror is not an easy task. The CDA is a dynamic archive which makes maintaining a private archive challenging and maintenance of many mirrors can put a strain on our servers, potentially impacting other users. To aid users in maintaining private mirrors, we have developed recipes and tools to create and fully maintain customized archives using a minimum of CDA resources. In conjunction with the new CDA services, several CIAO tools have been developed to work with private archives for retrieving data and determining the dataset identifiers associated with sets of files. In addition to tools for maintaining custom Chandra archives, the CDA is also publishing dynamic RSS feeds to provide announcements related to sets of observations which match requirements specified by the user. We hope users find these new services to be a beneficial part of the their research toolkit.

  1. Stewardship of very large digital data archives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Patric

    1991-01-01

    An archive is a permanent store. There are relatively few very large digital data archives in existence. Most business records are expired within five or ten years. Many kinds of business records that do have long lives are embedded in data bases that are continually updated and re-issued cyclically. Also, a great deal of permanent business records are actually archived as microfilm, fiche, or optical disk images - their digital version being an operational convenience rather than an archive. The problems forseen in stewarding the very large digital data archives that will accumulate during the mission of the Earth Observing System (EOS) are addressed. It focuses on the function of shepherding archived digital data into an endless future. Stewardship entails storing and protecting the archive and providing meaningful service to the community of users. The steward will (1) provide against loss due to physical phenomena; (2) assure that data is not lost due to storage technology obsolescence; and (3) maintain data in a current formatting methodology.

  2. Hubble Legacy Archive And The Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Jessica; Whitmore, B.; Eisenhamer, B.; Bishop, M.; Knisely, L.

    2012-01-01

    The Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA) at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) hosts the Image of the Month (IOTM) Series. The HLA is a joint project of STScI, the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF), and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC). The HLA is designed optimize science from the Hubble Space Telescope by providing online enhanced Hubble products and advanced browsing capabilities. The IOTM's are created for astronomers and the public to highlight various features within HLA, such as the "Interactive Display", "Footprint” and "Inventory” features to name a few. We have been working with the Office of Public Outreach (OPO) to create a standards based educational module for middle school to high school students of the IOTM: Rings and the Moons of Uranus. The set of Uranus activities are highlighted by a movie that displays the orbit of five of Uranus’ largest satellites. We made the movie based on eight visits of Uranus from 2000-06-16 to 2000-06-18, using the PC chip on the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) and filter F850LP (proposal ID: 8680). Students will be engaged in activities that will allow them to "discover” the rings and satellites around Uranus, calculate the orbit of the satellites, and introduces students to analyze real data from Hubble.

  3. SIOExplorer: Opening Archives for Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. P.; Staudigl, H.; Johnson, C.; Helly, J.; Day, D.

    2003-04-01

    The SIOExplorer project began with a desire to organize the data archives of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, which include the observations from 822 cruises over 50 years. Most of the data volume comes from 244 multibeam seafloor swath mapping cruises since 1982. Rather than just create an online archive or a website, the decision was made to build a fully searchable digital library, and to include related historical images and documents from the SIO Archives in the SIO Library. It soon became apparent that much of the material would be appealing to students of all ages, as well as the general public. Access to several global databases was added, along with the seamount catalog and geochemical resources of www.earthref.org. SIOExplorer has now become a part of the National Science Digital Library (www.nsdl.org) and can be accessed directly at http://SIOExplorer.ucsd.edu. From the beginning, it was obvious that a scalable Information Technology architecture would be needed. Data and documents from three separate organizations would need to be integrated initially, with more to follow in subsequent years. Each organization had its own data standards and formats. Almost no metadata existed. With millions of files and approximately 1 terabyte of data, we realized that a team approach would be required, combining the expertise of SIO, the UCSD Libraries and the San Diego Supercomputer Center. General purpose tools have now been developed to automate collection development, create and manage metadata, and geographically search the library. Each digital object in the library has an associated metadata structure, which includes a Dublin Core block along with domain-specific blocks, as needed. Objects can be searched geospatially, temporally, by keyword, and by expert-level. For example, expert-level classification makes it possible to screen out research-grade contents, revealing material appropriate for the selected grade, such as K-6. Now that the library has

  4. An Intelligent Archive Testbed Incorporating Data Mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H.; Isaac, D.; Yang, W.; Bonnlander, B.; Danks, D.

    2009-01-01

    Many significant advances have occurred during the last two decades in remote sensing instrumentation, computation, storage, and communication technology. A series of Earth observing satellites have been launched by U.S. and international agencies and have been operating and collecting global data on a regular basis. These advances have created a data rich environment for scientific research and applications. NASA s Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS) has been operational since August 1994 with support for pre-EOS data. Currently, EOSDIS supports all the EOS missions including Terra (1999), Aqua (2002), ICESat (2002) and Aura (2004). EOSDIS has been effectively capturing, processing and archiving several terabytes of standard data products each day. It has also been distributing these data products at a rate of several terabytes per day to a diverse and globally distributed user community (Ramapriyan et al. 2009). There are other NASA-sponsored data system activities including measurement-based systems such as the Ocean Data Processing System and the Precipitation Processing system, and several projects under the Research, Education and Applications Solutions Network (REASoN), Making Earth Science Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs), and the Advancing Collaborative Connections for Earth-Sun System Science (ACCESS) programs. Together, these activities provide a rich set of resources constituting a value chain for users to obtain data at various levels ranging from raw radiances to interdisciplinary model outputs. The result has been a significant leap in our understanding of the Earth systems that all humans depend on for their enjoyment, livelihood, and survival. The trend in the community today is towards many distributed sets of providers of data and services. Despite this, visions for the future include users being able to locate, fuse and utilize data with location transparency and high degree of

  5. Long Term Archiving and CCSDS Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucon, Danièle

    This article presents some conceptual and implementation CCSDS -Consultative Committee for Space Data Systemsstandards for long term archiving. It focuses on the most recent one, the Producer Archive Interface Specification (PAIS) standard. This standard, currently available as a draft on the CCSDS web site, will be published by the beginning of 2014. It will enable the Producer to share with the Archive a sufficiently precise and unambiguous formal definition of the Digital Objects to be produced and transferred, by means of a model. It will also enable a precise definition of the packaging of these objects in the form of Submission Information Packages (SIPs), including the order in which they should be transferred.

  6. A system approach to archival storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, John W.

    1991-01-01

    The introduction and viewgraphs of a discussion on a system approach to archival storage presented at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) Mass Storage Workshop is included. The use of D-2 iron particles for archival storage is discussed along with how acceleration factors relating short-term tests to archival life times can be justified. Ampex Recording Systems is transferring D-2 video technology to data storage applications, and encountering concerns about corrosion. To protect the D-2 standard, Battelle tests were done on all four tapes in the Class 2 environment. Error rates were measured before and after the test on both exposed and control groups.

  7. Lessons Learned from the Application of NOAA's "What to Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchey, N.

    2012-04-01

    A procedure for addressing the complete lifecycle of data was defined by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in August 2008. The "NOAA Procedure for Scientific Records Appraisal and Archive Approval" supports US government mandates and directives for records management from the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) and other US government agencies. This NOAA-wide procedure provides a foundation to identify, appraise, and decide what scientific records are preserved and which are to be disposed and it establishes a formally documented process. The National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, North Carolina implemented the procedure within our organization and applied it to multiple, diverse data types. Initial applications confirm the procedure's flexibility allowing expeditious decisions for well-documented and established records, as well as supporting complex requests requiring engagement of external record experts. With each successive use, a pattern of activities contributing to the cost, complexity, challenges and management of the process is emerging. Lessons learned from the application of NOAA's "What to Archive" process at NCDC will be presented.

  8. Architecture Studio Archive: A Case Study in the Comprehensive Digital Capture and Repository of Student Design Work as an Aid to Teaching, Research, and Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Ross; Arndell, Michael; Christensen, Sten

    2009-01-01

    The "Architecture Studio Archive" pilot sought to form a comprehensive digital archive of the diverse student work conducted in the first year of the Bachelor of Design in Architecture Degree at the University of Sydney. The design studio is the primary vehicle for teaching architectural design. It is a locus for creative activity, with students…

  9. Directory of Unesco Information Services: Library, Archives, and Documentation Centres = Repertoire des Services d'information de l'Unesco: bibliotheque, archives et centres de documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Unesco Information Services.

    Although primarily a directory of Unesco documentation centers and information units, this guide also provides information on the Main Library and the Unesco Archives. The listing for each of the nine centers includes information on any subdivisions of the center: (1) Bureau for Co-ordination of Operational Activities (BAO); (2) Culture and…

  10. Making geospatial data in ASF archive readily accessible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gens, R.; Hogenson, K.; Wolf, V. G.; Drew, L.; Stern, T.; Stoner, M.; Shapran, M.

    2015-12-01

    The way geospatial data is searched, managed, processed and used has changed significantly in recent years. A data archive such as the one at the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF), one of NASA's twelve interlinked Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs), used to be searched solely via user interfaces that were specifically developed for its particular archive and data sets. ASF then moved to using an application programming interface (API) that defined a set of routines, protocols, and tools for distributing the geospatial information stored in the database in real time. This provided a more flexible access to the geospatial data. Yet, it was up to user to develop the tools to get a more tailored access to the data they needed. We present two new approaches for serving data to users. In response to the recent Nepal earthquake we developed a data feed for distributing ESA's Sentinel data. Users can subscribe to the data feed and are provided with the relevant metadata the moment a new data set is available for download. The second approach was an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) web feature service (WFS). The WFS hosts the metadata along with a direct link from which the data can be downloaded. It uses the open-source GeoServer software (Youngblood and Iacovella, 2013) and provides an interface to include the geospatial information in the archive directly into the user's geographic information system (GIS) as an additional data layer. Both services are run on top of a geospatial PostGIS database, an open-source geographic extension for the PostgreSQL object-relational database (Marquez, 2015). Marquez, A., 2015. PostGIS essentials. Packt Publishing, 198 p. Youngblood, B. and Iacovella, S., 2013. GeoServer Beginner's Guide, Packt Publishing, 350 p.

  11. IACPub: The IAC Publications Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Prieto, J. A.; Gómez, M.

    2015-04-01

    We present IACPub, the IAC's publications archive, a bibliographic database recently developed by our IT Research Division Service in collaboration with the Scientific Secretariat and the library. The database contains bibliographic records of refereed and non-refereed publications by IAC authors, as well as a complete bibliography of all authors affiliated with the IAC since 2012. Bibliographic records are imported from ADS and, in a few cases, from other databases. Records are enriched with local data such as the author's position, name (as normalized by the Secretariat), information projects, grants, resources used, and other related fields. This information is updated by the authors themselves through the Research Project Report Application. This web interface allows users to obtain their bibliography as well as various statistics and metrics for analysis and assessment purposes.

  12. The EXOSAT database and archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, A. P.; Parmar, A. N.

    1992-01-01

    The EXOSAT database provides on-line access to the results and data products (spectra, images, and lightcurves) from the EXOSAT mission as well as access to data and logs from a number of other missions (such as EINSTEIN, COS-B, ROSAT, and IRAS). In addition, a number of familiar optical, infrared, and x ray catalogs, including the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) guide star catalog are available. The complete database is located at the EXOSAT observatory at ESTEC in the Netherlands and is accessible remotely via a captive account. The database management system was specifically developed to efficiently access the database and to allow the user to perform statistical studies on large samples of astronomical objects as well as to retrieve scientific and bibliographic information on single sources. The system was designed to be mission independent and includes timing, image processing, and spectral analysis packages as well as software to allow the easy transfer of analysis results and products to the user's own institute. The archive at ESTEC comprises a subset of the EXOSAT observations, stored on magnetic tape. Observations of particular interest were copied in compressed format to an optical jukebox, allowing users to retrieve and analyze selected raw data entirely from their terminals. Such analysis may be necessary if the user's needs are not accommodated by the products contained in the database (in terms of time resolution, spectral range, and the finesse of the background subtraction, for instance). Long-term archiving of the full final observation data is taking place at ESRIN in Italy as part of the ESIS program, again using optical media, and ESRIN have now assumed responsibility for distributing the data to the community. Tests showed that raw observational data (typically several tens of megabytes for a single target) can be transferred via the existing networks in reasonable time.

  13. Sport: The Liveliest Art. Diamonds Are a Publisher's Best Friend: The Baseball Mystique and Scholarly Publishing; "Take Me Out to the Ball Game...." The Importance of Archiving Sporting Activities; Telling the Story: Museums and Libraries Partner To Make Sport History Live; "I'm Not Surfing. This is My Job"; Sideline: Webliography of General Sports Sites: The Big Four; Public Libraries Step Up to the Plate: Knowing and Responding to the Needs of Our Rapidly Changing Communities; Sideline: Sports Fiction; Ten Best Sport Titles...in My Public Library, in My Media Center, in My High School Library, in My Academic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Steve; Wise, Suzanne; Koonts, Russell S.; Sumner, Jim; Meier, James R.; Gonzalez, Lena; Ruszczyk, James R.; Fiedler, Stephanie; Mayo, Kim P.; Holmes, Gerald

    2001-01-01

    Eight articles in this section focus on sports: the baseball mystique and scholarly publishing; importance of archiving sporting activities; museums and libraries partner to make sport history live; online resources for sports information; Webliography of general sports sites; public libraries responding to changing needs; sports fiction; and "ten…

  14. Archival Footage: John Glenn's Mercury Flight

    NASA Video Gallery

    Archival films document John Glenn's historic Feb. 20, 1962 Mercury flight in his Friendship 7, in which he became the first American to orbit the Earth. Clips include boarding the capsule, splashd...

  15. Astronomy Picture of the Day Archive

    Science.gov Websites

    Astronomy Picture of the Day Archive | Index | Search | Today's Picture | 2016 June 03: NGC 4631: The Whale Galaxy 2016 June 02: Three Planets from Pic du Midi 2016 June 01: Tychos ...

  16. NATIONAL ARCHIVE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE DATA (NACJD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD) preserves and distributes computerized crime and justice data from Federal agencies, state agencies, and investigator initiated research projects to users for secondary statistical analysis. Founded in 1978 as part of the Inte...

  17. 36 CFR 1253.7 - Regional Archives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... at Boston is located in the Frederick C. Murphy Federal Center, 380 Trapelo Rd., Waltham, MA 02452... Saturday hours. The telephone number is 781-663-0130. The National Archives at Boston, Pittsfield Annex...

  18. 36 CFR 1253.7 - Regional Archives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... National Archives at Boston is located in the Frederick C. Murphy Federal Center, 380 Trapelo Rd., Waltham... Boston, Pittsfield Annex is located at 10 Conte Drive, Pittsfield, MA 01201-8230. The telephone number...

  19. Stellar Populations Archive: The Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, D. R.; Ouellette, J. O.; Shara, M.; Hurley, J.; Ferguson, H.

    2001-12-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope cycle 10 panels have awarded us an archival grant to create a web based archive for the 101 Galactic globular clusters observed with WFPC2 on the Hubble Space Telescope. We will reduce all globular cluster WFPC2 data using ALLFrame in order to provide a photometric database which is precise and consistent from cluster to cluster. In addition the American Museum of Natural History has recently acquired three special purpose computers (GRAPE6) for dynamical simulations of stellar clusters. The simulations will be archived and a public database will be made available. The archive will go online early 2002 and as each cluster is reduced it will be made public. It is hoped that this "service to the community" will encourage comparitive studies of the Galactic globular cluster system. This database will also produce a library of template stellar populations with widespread applications.

  20. PCB Analysis Plan for Tank Archive Samples

    SciTech Connect

    NGUYEN, D.M.

    2001-03-22

    This analysis plan specifies laboratory analysis, quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC), and data reporting requirements for analyzing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) concentrations in archive samples. Tank waste archive samples that are planned for PCB analysis are identified in Nguyen 2001. The tanks and samples are summarized in Table 1-1. The analytical data will be used to establish a PCB baseline inventory in Hanford tanks.

  1. Archiving Microgravity Flight Data and Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    To obtain help in evaluating its current strategy for archiving data and samples obtained in microgravity research, NASA's Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) asked the Space Studies Board's Committee on Microgravity Research for guidance on the following questions: What data should be archived and where should it be kept? In what form should the data be maintained (electronic files, photographs, hard copy, samples)? What should the general format of the database be? To what extent should it be universally accessible and through what mechanisms? Should there be a period of time for which principal investigators have proprietary access? If so, how long should proprietary data be stored? What provisions should be made for data obtained from ground-based experiments? What should the deadline be for investigators placing their data in the archive? How long should data be saved? How long should data be easily accessible? As a prelude to making recommendations for optimum selection and storage of microgravity data and samples, the committee in this report briefly describes NASA's past archiving practices and outlines MSAD's current archiving strategy. Although the committee found that only a limited number of experiments have thus far been archived, it concluded that the general archiving strategy, characterized by MSAD as minimalist, appears viable. A central focus of attention is the Experiment Data Management Plan (EDMP), MSAD's recently instituted data management and archiving framework for flight experiments. Many of the report's recommendations are aimed at enhancing the effectiveness of the EDMP approach, which the committee regards as an appropriate data management method for MSAD. Other recommendations provide guidance on broader issues related to the questions listed above. This report does not address statutory or regulatory records retention requirements.

  2. Archiving, processing, and disseminating ASTER products at the USGS EROS Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, B.; Tolk, B.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey EROS Data Center archives, processes, and disseminates Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data products. The ASTER instrument is one of five sensors onboard the Earth Observing System's Terra satellite launched December 18, 1999. ASTER collects broad spectral coverage with high spatial resolution at near infrared, shortwave infrared, and thermal infrared wavelengths with ground resolutions of 15, 30, and 90 meters, respectively. The ASTER data are used in many ways to understand local and regional earth-surface processes. Applications include land-surface climatology, volcanology, hazards monitoring, geology, agronomy, land cover change, and hydrology. The ASTER data are available for purchase from the ASTER Ground Data System in Japan and from the Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center in the United States, which receives level 1A and level 1B data from Japan on a routine basis. These products are archived and made available to the public within 48 hours of receipt. The level 1A and level 1B data are used to generate higher level products that include routine and on-demand decorrelation stretch, brightness temperature at the sensor, emissivity, surface reflectance, surface kinetic temperature, surface radiance, polar surface and cloud classification, and digital elevation models. This paper describes the processes and procedures used to archive, process, and disseminate standard and on-demand higher level ASTER products at the Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center.

  3. Software Architecture of the Spitzer Archive Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, J.; Wu, X.; Roby, W.; Hoac, A.; Goldina, T.; Hartley, B.

    2007-10-01

    The Spitzer Science Center (SSC) provides a set of user tools to support search and retrieval of Spitzer Archive (SA) data via the Internet. This presentation describes the software architecture and design principles that support the Archive Interface subsystem of the SA (Handley 2007). The Archive Interface is an extension of the core components of the Uplink subsystem and provides a set web services to allow open access to the SA data set. Web services technology provides a basis for searching the archive and retrieving data products. The archive interface provides three modes of access: a rich client, a Web browser, and scripts (via Web services). The rich client allows the user to perform complex queries and submit requests for data that are asynchronously down-loaded to the local workstation. Asynchronous down-load is a critical feature given the large volume of a typical data set (on the order of 40~GB). For basic queries and retrieval of data the Web browser interface is provided. For advanced users, scripting languages with web services capabilities (i.e. Perl) can used to query and down-load data from the SA. The archive interface subsystem is the primary means for searching and retrieving data from the SA and is critical to the success of the Spitzer Space Telescope.

  4. The NASA Exoplanet Archive: Data Inventory Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Solange; Akeson, Rachel L.; Ciardi, David R.; Chen, Xi; Christiansen, Jessie; Plavchan, Peter

    2014-06-01

    We present here the latest addition to the NASA Exoplanet Archive - the Data Inventory Service, a tool aimed to provide the user with all the data available within the archive (exoplanet and stellar parameters, time series from ground-based transit surveys (such as Super WASP, XO, HAT-P, KELT), Kepler Pipeline products, CoRoT light curves, etc.) at or near the location of an astronomical object. The NASA Exoplanet Archive is an online service dedicated to compile and to serve public astronomical data sets involved in the search for and characterization of extrasolar planets and their host stars. The data in the archive include stellar parameters (e.g., positions, magnitudes, temperatures, etc.), exoplanet parameters (such as masses and orbital parameters) and discovery/characterization data (e.g., published radial velocity curves, photometric light curves, spectra, etc.). In support of the Kepler Extended Mission, the NASA Exoplanet Archive also hosts data related to Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI), Kepler Pipeline products such as Threshold Crossing Events (TCE) and Data Validation Reports, and Kepler Stellar parameters as used by the Kepler Pipeline. The archive provides tools to work with these data, including interative tables (with plotting capabilities), interactive light curve viewer, periodogram service, transit and ephemeris calculator, and application program interface. To access this information visit us at: http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu

  5. An enhanced archive facilitating climate impacts analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maurer, E.P.; Brekke, L.; Pruitt, T.; Thrasher, B.; Long, J.; Duffy, P.; Dettinger, M.; Cayan, D.; Arnold, J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the expansion of a publicly available archive of downscaled climate and hydrology projections for the United States. Those studying or planning to adapt to future climate impacts demand downscaled climate model output for local or regional use. The archive we describe attempts to fulfill this need by providing data in several formats, selectable to meet user needs. Our archive has served as a resource for climate impacts modelers, water managers, educators, and others. Over 1,400 individuals have transferred more than 50 TB of data from the archive. In response to user demands, the archive has expanded from monthly downscaled data to include daily data to facilitate investigations of phenomena sensitive to daily to monthly temperature and precipitation, including extremes in these quantities. New developments include downscaled output from the new Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) climate model simulations at both the monthly and daily time scales, as well as simulations of surface hydrologi- cal variables. The web interface allows the extraction of individual projections or ensemble statistics for user-defined regions, promoting the rapid assessment of model consensus and uncertainty for future projections of precipitation, temperature, and hydrology. The archive is accessible online (http://gdo-dcp.ucllnl.org/downscaled_ cmip_projections).

  6. The Legacy of Hideki Yukawa, Sin-itiro Tomonaga, and Shoichi Sakata: Some Aspects from their Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konuma, Michiji; Bando, Masako; Gotoh, Haruyoshi; Hayakawa, Hisao; Hirata, Kohji; Ito, Kazuyuki; Ito, Kenji; Kanaya, Kazuyuki; Konagaya, Daisuke; Kugo, Taichiro; Namba, Chusei; Nishitani, Tadashi; Takaiwa, Yoshinobu; Tanabashi, Masaharu; Tanaka, Kio; Tanaka, Sho; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Yoshikawa, Tadashi

    Hideki Yukawa, Sin-itiro Tomonaga and Shoichi Sakata pioneered nuclear and particle physics and left enduring legacies. Their friendly collaboration and severe competition laid the foundation to bring up the active postwar generation of nuclear and particle physicists in Japan. In this presentation we illustrate milestones of nuclear and particle physics in Japan from 1930's to mid-1940's which have been clarified in Yukawa Hall Archival Library, Tomonaga Memorial Room and Sakata Memorial Archival Library.

  7. Challenges for Data Archival Centers in Evolving Environmental Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Cook, R. B.; Gu, L.; Santhana Vannan, S. K.; Beaty, T.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental science has entered into a big data era as enormous data about the Earth environment are continuously collected through field and airborne missions, remote sensing observations, model simulations, sensor networks, etc. An open-access and open-management data infrastructure for data-intensive science is a major grand challenge in global environmental research (BERAC, 2010). Such an infrastructure, as exemplified in EOSDIS, GEOSS, and NSF EarthCube, will provide a complete lifecycle of environmental data and ensures that data will smoothly flow among different phases of collection, preservation, integration, and analysis. Data archival centers, as the data integration units closest to data providers, serve as the source power to compile and integrate heterogeneous environmental data into this global infrastructure. This presentation discusses the interoperability challenges and practices of geosciences from the aspect of data archival centers, based on the operational experiences of the NASA-sponsored Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC) and related environmental data management activities. Specifically, we will discuss the challenges to 1) encourage and help scientists to more actively share data with the broader scientific community, so that valuable environmental data, especially those dark data collected by individual scientists in small independent projects, can be shared and integrated into the infrastructure to tackle big science questions; 2) curate heterogeneous multi-disciplinary data, focusing on the key aspects of identification, format, metadata, data quality, and semantics to make them ready to be plugged into a global data infrastructure. We will highlight data curation practices at the ORNL DAAC for global campaigns such as BOREAS, LBA, SAFARI 2000; and 3) enhance the capabilities to more effectively and efficiently expose and deliver "big" environmental data to broad range of users and systems

  8. Ontolology Negotiation Between Scientific Archives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailin, Sidney C.; Truszkowski, Walt; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to ontology negotiation between information agents. Ontologies are declarative (data driven) expressions of an agent's "world": the objects, operations, facts, and rules that constitute the logical space within which an agent performs. Ontology negotiation enables agents to cooperate in performing a task, even if they are based on different ontologies. 'Me process allows agents to discover ontology conflicts and then, though incremental interpretation, clarification, and explanation, establish a common basis for communicating with each other. The need for ontology negotiation stems from the proliferation of information sources and of agents with widely varying specialty expertise. The unmanageability of massive amounts of web-based information is already becoming apparent. It is starting to have an impact on professions that rely on distributed archived information. If the expansion continues at its present rate without an ontology negotiation process being introduced, there will soon be no way to ensure the accuracy and completeness of information that scientists obtain from sources other than their own experiments. Ontology negotiation is becoming increasingly recognized as a crucial element of scalable agent technology. This is because agents, by their very nature, are supposed to operate with a fair amount of autonomy and independence from their end-users. Part of this independence is the ability to enlist other agents for help in performing a task (such as locating information on the web). The agents enlisted for help may be "owned" by a different end-user or organization (such as a document archive), and there is no guarantee that they will use the same terminology or understand the same concepts (objects, operators, theorems, rules) as the recruiting agent. For NASA, the need for ontology negotiation arises at the boundaries between scientific disciplines. For example: modeling the effects of global warming might involve

  9. The Correlation of Archival Education and Job Requirements since the Advent of Encoded Archival Description

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    Historical methodology and library techniques have been the basis for archival education, but arguments of placement of an archival program within the university and the desirable degree for professional archivists have led to inconsistencies in graduate school curricula. The author conducted a study to determine if graduate schools adequately…

  10. Picture archiving and communication in radiology.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Marzia; Nanni, Marinella; Cimarra, Stefania; Crisafulli, Letizia; Campioni, Paolo; Marano, Pasquale

    2003-01-01

    After over 80 years of exclusive archiving of radiologic films, at present, in Radiology, digital archiving is increasingly gaining ground. Digital archiving allows a considerable reduction in costs and space saving, but most importantly, immediate or remote consultation of all examinations and reports in the hospital clinical wards, is feasible. The RIS system, in this case, is the starting point of the process of electronic archiving which however is the task of PACS. The latter can be used as radiologic archive in accordance with the law provided that it is in conformance with some specifications as the use of optical long-term storage media or with electronic track of change. PACS archives, in a hierarchical system, all digital images produced by each diagnostic imaging modality. Images and patient data can be retrieved and used for consultation or remote consultation by the reporting radiologist who requires images and reports of previous radiologic examinations or by the referring physician of the ward. Modern PACS owing to the WEB server allow remote access to extremely simplified images and data however ensuring the due regulations and access protections. Since the PACS enables a simpler data communication within the hospital, security and patient privacy should be protected. A secure and reliable PACS should be able to minimize the risk of accidental data destruction, and should prevent non authorized access to the archive with adequate security measures in relation to the acquired knowledge and based on the technological advances. Archiving of data produced by modern digital imaging is a problem now present also in small Radiology services. The technology is able to readily solve problems which were extremely complex up to some years ago as the connection between equipment and archiving system owing also to the universalization of the DICOM 3.0 standard. The evolution of communication networks and the use of standard protocols as TCP/IP can minimize

  11. Scalable Data Mining and Archiving for the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. L.; Mattmann, C. A.; Hart, A. F.; Lazio, J.; Bennett, T.; Wagstaff, K. L.; Thompson, D. R.; Preston, R.

    2011-12-01

    As the technologies for remote observation improve, the rapid increase in the frequency and fidelity of those observations translates into an avalanche of data that is already beginning to eclipse the resources, both human and technical, of the institutions and facilities charged with managing the information. Common data management tasks like cataloging both data itself and contextual meta-data, creating and maintaining scalable permanent archive, and making data available on-demand for research present significant software engineering challenges when considered at the scales of modern multi-national scientific enterprises such as the upcoming Square Kilometre Array project. The NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), leveraging internal research and technology development funding, has begun to explore ways to address the data archiving and distribution challenges with a number of parallel activities involving collaborations with the EVLA and ALMA teams at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), and members of the Square Kilometre Array South Africa team. To date, we have leveraged the Apache OODT Process Control System framework and its catalog and archive service components that provide file management, workflow management, resource management as core web services. A client crawler framework ingests upstream data (e.g., EVLA raw directory output), identifies its MIME type and automatically extracts relevant metadata including temporal bounds, and job-relevant/processing information. A remote content acquisition (pushpull) service is responsible for staging remote content and handing it off to the crawler framework. A science algorithm wrapper (called CAS-PGE) wraps underlying code including CASApy programs for the EVLA, such as Continuum Imaging and Spectral Line Cube generation, executes the algorithm, and ingests its output (along with relevant extracted metadata). In addition to processing, the Process Control System has been leveraged to provide data

  12. Biocuration of functional annotation at the European nucleotide archive

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Richard; Alako, Blaise; Amid, Clara; Cerdeño-Tárraga, Ana; Cleland, Iain; Goodgame, Neil; ten Hoopen, Petra; Jayathilaka, Suran; Kay, Simon; Leinonen, Rasko; Liu, Xin; Pallreddy, Swapna; Pakseresht, Nima; Rajan, Jeena; Rosselló, Marc; Silvester, Nicole; Smirnov, Dmitriy; Toribio, Ana Luisa; Vaughan, Daniel; Zalunin, Vadim; Cochrane, Guy

    2016-01-01

    The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA; http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena) is a repository for the submission, maintenance and presentation of nucleotide sequence data and related sample and experimental information. In this article we report on ENA in 2015 regarding general activity, notable published data sets and major achievements. This is followed by a focus on sustainable biocuration of functional annotation, an area which has particularly felt the pressure of sequencing growth. The importance of functional annotation, how it can be submitted and the shifting role of the biocurator in the context of increasing volumes of data are all discussed. PMID:26615190

  13. MAO NAS of Ukraine Plate Archives: Towards the WFPDB Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva, T. P.; Golovnya, V. V.; Yizhakevych, E. M.; Kizyun, L. N.; Pakuliak, L. K.; Shatokhina, S. V.; Tsvetkov, M. K.; Tsvetkova, K. P.; Sergeev, A. V.

    2006-04-01

    The plate archives of the Main Astronomical Observatory (Golosyiv, Kyiv) includes about 85 000 plates which were taken for various astronomical projects in the period 1950-2005. Among them there are more than 60 000 plates containing stellar, planetary and active solar formations spectra and more than 20 000 of direct northern sky area plates (mostly with wide-field). The catalogues of these direct wide-field plates have been prepared in computer-readable form. Now they are reduced in the WFPDB format and included into the database.

  14. Biocuration of functional annotation at the European nucleotide archive.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Richard; Alako, Blaise; Amid, Clara; Cerdeño-Tárraga, Ana; Cleland, Iain; Goodgame, Neil; Ten Hoopen, Petra; Jayathilaka, Suran; Kay, Simon; Leinonen, Rasko; Liu, Xin; Pallreddy, Swapna; Pakseresht, Nima; Rajan, Jeena; Rosselló, Marc; Silvester, Nicole; Smirnov, Dmitriy; Toribio, Ana Luisa; Vaughan, Daniel; Zalunin, Vadim; Cochrane, Guy

    2016-01-01

    The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA; http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena) is a repository for the submission, maintenance and presentation of nucleotide sequence data and related sample and experimental information. In this article we report on ENA in 2015 regarding general activity, notable published data sets and major achievements. This is followed by a focus on sustainable biocuration of functional annotation, an area which has particularly felt the pressure of sequencing growth. The importance of functional annotation, how it can be submitted and the shifting role of the biocurator in the context of increasing volumes of data are all discussed. PMID:26615190

  15. Archiving of Planetary Ring Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, James L.

    2001-01-01

    Stellar occultation data provide our only Earth-based means of probing planetary rings at kilometer spatial resolution. The occultation data archive at MIT contains original data and analysis products of stellar occultations by the ring systems of the planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune observed by members of the group (and other groups) from 1977 to the present. During this time period, several media have been used to record and store the original and processed data: (1) chart records; (2) printed output, (3) audio reel tape; (4) audio cassette tape; (5) 7-track, 1/2-inch computer tape; (6) 9-track, 1/2-inch computer tape at 800, 1600, and 6250 bpi; (7) NOVA disk platters (2.5 and 5.0 Mbyte); (8) write once optical disks; (9) punched cards; and (10) read-write optical disks. With the rapid change of computer technology over this time period, some of these media have become not only obsolete, but nearly extinct. In particular, it has become nearly impossible to find any facilities that can still read 800 bpi tapes, which contain the only copies of several important data sets for the ring system of Uranus. In particular, we have an extensive ring data collection that includes data sets for the following Uranian ring occultations: U0, U11, U12, U13, U14, U25, U17, and U36.

  16. The NEON Soil Archive - A community resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, E.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a 30-year National Science Foundation-funded facility for understanding and forecasting the impacts of climate change, land use change, and invasive species on aspects of continental-scale ecology such as biodiversity, biogeochemistry, infectious diseases, and ecohydrology. NEON will measure a wide range of properties at 60 terrestrial and 36 aquatic sites throughout the US using in situ sensors, sample collection/lab analysis, and remote sensing, and all data will be made freely available. The Observatory is currently under construction and will be fully operational by 2017, however, limited data collection and release will begin in 2013. In addition, NEON is archiving large numbers of samples, including surface soils (top ~30 cm) collected from locations across each site, and soils collected by horizon to 2 m deep from a single soil pit at each site. Here I present information about the latter, focusing on sampling and processing, metadata, and currently available samples. At each terrestrial site the soil pit is dug in the locally dominant soil type and soil is collected by horizon, mixed, and ~4-8 liters soil is sent for processing. Soil samples are air-dried and sieved (mineral soil) or air-dried (organic soil) and 1.2 kg is split between 4 glass jars for archiving (protocol available upon request). To date 15 soil pits have been sampled, representing 7 soil orders, and soils from 110 horizons have been archived or are being processed. Metadata associated with each archive sample include a soil profile description, photos, and soil properties (total C, N, S, Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si, Sr, Ti, Zr, bulk density, pH, and texture). The procedure for requesting samples from the archive is under development and I encourage scientists to use the archive in their future research. Collecting and processing samples for the NEON Soil Archive

  17. Advocacy for the Archives and History Office of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory: Stages and Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Deken, Jean Marie; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    Advocating for the good of the SLAC Archives and History Office (AHO) has not been a one-time affair, nor has it been a one-method procedure. It has required taking time to ascertain the current and perhaps predict the future climate of the Laboratory, and it has required developing and implementing a portfolio of approaches to the goal of building a stronger archive program by strengthening and appropriately expanding its resources. Among the successful tools in the AHO advocacy portfolio, the Archives Program Review Committee has been the most visible. The Committee and the role it serves as well as other formal and informal advocacy efforts are the focus of this case study My remarks today will begin with a brief introduction to advocacy and outreach as I understand them, and with a description of the Archives and History Office's efforts to understand and work within the corporate culture of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. I will then share with you some of the tools we have employed to advocate for the Archives and History Office programs and activities; and finally, I will talk about how well - or badly - those tools have served us over the past decade.

  18. Analysis of the request patterns to the NSSDC on-line archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore

    1994-01-01

    NASA missions, both for earth science and for space science, collect huge amounts of data, and the rate at which data is being gathered is increasing. For example, the EOSDIS project is expected to collect petabytes per year. In addition, these archives are being made available to remote users over the Internet. The ability to manage the growth of the size and request activity of scientific archives depends on an understanding of the access patterns of scientific users. The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has run their on-line mass storage archive of space data, the National Data Archive and Distribution Service (NDADS), since November 1991. A large world-wide space research community makes use of NSSDC, requesting more than 20,000 files per month. Since the initiation of their service, they have maintained log files which record all accesses the archive. In this report, we present an analysis of the NDADS log files. We analyze the log files, and discuss several issues, including caching, reference patterns, clustering, and system loading.

  19. Getting from then to now: Sustaining the Lesbian Herstory Archives as a lesbian organization.

    PubMed

    Smith-Cruz, Shawn ta; Rando, Flavia; Corbman, Rachel; Edel, Deborah; Gwenwald, Morgan; Nestle, Joan; Thistlethwaite, Polly

    2016-01-01

    This article is a compilation of six narratives written by collective members of the volunteer-run Lesbian Herstory Archives, the oldest and largest collection of lesbian material in the world. Narratives draw on a yearlong series of conversations, which culminated in a panel discussion at the 40th Anniversary celebration. Authors' narratives detail the significance of the Lesbian Herstory Archives as a successful and sustainable lesbian organization. Topics covered span four decades and include: the organization's history and practice, founding and activism, the acquisition of the current space, community engagement, and processing of special collections. PMID:26914823

  20. Designing an Open E-Mail Interface to a Data Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richon, J.

    An active and useful data archive often has to support two conflicting goals: providing an easy way to retrieve data, and preventing people from getting proprietary data. The retrieval method should be insulated from the user interface so that changes to one system do not force changes to the other. This paper discusses the issues associated with data retrieval and system isolation, and how the Space Telescope Science Institute developed a flexible and open means to retrieve data from the Hubble Data Archive that can support almost any user front-end system.

  1. From Archive to Awards Ceremony: An Approach for Engaging Students in Historical Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erekson, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent literature on history teaching has emphasized "doing history"--whether as "active learning", cognitive science, or with simple photocopies of primary sources. This article extends the discussion of a "signature pedagogy" of history to include all aspects of the work of historians, from archival research through public presentation. It…

  2. Accidentally Found on Purpose: Information-Seeking Behavior of Historians in Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duff, Wendy M.; Johnson, Catherine A.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a qualitative research study of the information-seeking behavior of historians. Investigates how they locate primary sources, carry out their research, and use archival materials; and identifies four different types of information-seeking activities, including orienting oneself to materials, seeking know materials, building contextual…

  3. Role and Justification of Web Archiving by National Libraries: A Questionnaire Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiozaki, Ryo; Eisenschitz, Tamara

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a questionnaire survey of 16 national libraries designed to clarify how national libraries attempt to justify their web archiving activities. Results indicate they envisage that a) the benefits brought about by their initiatives are greater than the overall costs, b) the costs imposed on libraries are greater than the costs…

  4. Opportunistic Collaboration: Unlocking the Archives of the Birmingham Institute of Art and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everitt, Sian

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To review a small specialist repository's strategic and opportunistic approach to utilising collaborative regional and national digital initiatives to increase access. The Birmingham Institute of Art and Design (BIAD) Archives activity is evaluated to determine whether a project-based approach recognises and meets the needs of historians,…

  5. 36 CFR 1280.66 - May I use the National Archives Library?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Archives Library? 1280.66 Section 1280.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS... the Washington, DC, Area? § 1280.66 May I use the National Archives Library? The National Archives Library facilities in the National Archives Building and in the National Archives at College Park...

  6. 36 CFR 1280.66 - May I use the National Archives Library?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Archives Library? 1280.66 Section 1280.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS... the Washington, DC, Area? § 1280.66 May I use the National Archives Library? The National Archives Library facilities in the National Archives Building and in the National Archives at College Park...

  7. 36 CFR 1280.66 - May I use the National Archives Library?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Archives Library? 1280.66 Section 1280.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS... the Washington, DC, Area? § 1280.66 May I use the National Archives Library? The National Archives Library facilities in the National Archives Building and in the National Archives at College Park...

  8. 36 CFR 1280.66 - May I use the National Archives Library?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Archives Library? 1280.66 Section 1280.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS... the Washington, DC, Area? § 1280.66 May I use the National Archives Library? The National Archives Library facilities in the National Archives Building and in the National Archives at College Park...

  9. 36 CFR 1280.66 - May I use the National Archives Library?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Archives Library? 1280.66 Section 1280.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS... the Washington, DC, Area? § 1280.66 May I use the National Archives Library? The National Archives Library facilities in the National Archives Building and in the National Archives at College Park...

  10. Shoichi Sakata: His Life and Physics ---Collections of Materials in Sakata Memorial Archival Library---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabashi, M.

    Shoichi Sakata and his Nagoya School made a lot of important achievements at the predawn of the particle physics revolution. The ``two-meson'' theory (introduction of the second generation leptons), the ``C-meson theory'' (a theory which inspired Tomonaga's renormalization theory), the ``Sakata model'' (a precursor to the quark model), and the ``Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata'' theory on the neutrino mixings are among them. These outputs are now regarded as essential ingredients in modern particle physics. Sakata also took his leadership in setting up democratic administration system in his theoretical particle physics group (E-ken). It was this democratic atmosphere in which many excellent physicists were brought up as Sakata's diciples. In this talk, I introduce Sakata and his achievements in physics, showing various materials archived in the Sakata Memorial Archival Library (SMAL), an archival repository of primary material showing Sakata's activities. These SMAL documents vividly show Sakata's way of thinking in his approach to the new physics.

  11. NADIR: A Flexible Archiving System Current Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapic, C.; De Marco, M.; Smareglia, R.; Molinaro, M.

    2014-05-01

    The New Archiving Distributed InfrastructuRe (NADIR) is under development at the Italian center for Astronomical Archives (IA2) to increase the performances of the current archival software tools at the data center. Traditional softwares usually offer simple and robust solutions to perform data archive and distribution but are awkward to adapt and reuse in projects that have different purposes. Data evolution in terms of data model, format, publication policy, version, and meta-data content are the main threats to re-usage. NADIR, using stable and mature framework features, answers those very challenging issues. Its main characteristics are a configuration database, a multi threading and multi language environment (C++, Java, Python), special features to guarantee high scalability, modularity, robustness, error tracking, and tools to monitor with confidence the status of each project at each archiving site. In this contribution, the development of the core components is presented, commenting also on some performance and innovative features (multi-cast and publisher-subscriber paradigms). NADIR is planned to be developed as simply as possible with default configurations for every project, first of all for LBT and other IA2 projects.

  12. Better Living Through Metadata: Examining Archive Usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.; Winkelman, S.; Rots, A.

    2013-10-01

    The primary purpose of an observatory's archive is to provide access to the data through various interfaces. User interactions with the archive are recorded in server logs, which can be used to answer basic questions like: Who has downloaded dataset X? When did she do this? Which tools did she use? The answers to questions like these fill in patterns of data access (e.g., how many times dataset X has been downloaded in the past three years). Analysis of server logs provides metrics of archive usage and provides feedback on interface use which can be used to guide future interface development. The Chandra X-ray Observatory is fortunate in that a database to track data access and downloads has been continuously recording such transactions for years; however, it is overdue for an update. We will detail changes we hope to effect and the differences the changes may make to our usage metadata picture. We plan to gather more information about the geographic location of users without compromising privacy; create improved archive statistics; and track and assess the impact of web “crawlers” and other scripted access methods on the archive. With the improvements to our download tracking we hope to gain a better understanding of the dissemination of Chandra's data; how effectively it is being done; and perhaps discover ideas for new services.

  13. Databases and Archiving for CryoEM.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, A; Lawson, C L

    2016-01-01

    CryoEM in structural biology is currently served by three public archives-EMDB for 3DEM reconstructions, PDB for models built from 3DEM reconstructions, and EMPIAR for the raw 2D image data used to obtain the 3DEM reconstructions. These archives play a vital role for both the structural community and the wider biological community in making the data accessible so that results may be reused, reassessed, and integrated with other structural and bioinformatics resources. The important role of the archives is underpinned by the fact that many journals mandate the deposition of data to PDB and EMDB on publication. The field is currently undergoing transformative changes where on the one hand high-resolution structures are becoming a routine occurrence while on the other hand electron tomography is enabling the study of macromolecules in the cellular context. Concomitantly the archives are evolving to best serve their stakeholder communities. In this chapter, we describe the current state of the archives, resources available for depositing, accessing, searching, visualizing and validating data, on-going community-wide initiatives and opportunities, and challenges for the future. PMID:27572735

  14. Life Sciences Data Archive Scientific Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckey, Jay C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The Life Sciences Data Archive will provide scientists, managers and the general public with access to biomedical data collected before, during and after spaceflight. These data are often irreplaceable and represent a major resource from the space program. For these data to be useful, however, they must be presented with enough supporting information, description and detail so that an interested scientist can understand how, when and why the data were collected. The goal of this contract was to provide a scientific consultant to the archival effort at the NASA-Johnson Space Center. This consultant (Jay C. Buckey, Jr., M.D.) is a scientist, who was a co-investigator on both the Spacelab Life Sciences-1 and Spacelab Life Sciences-2 flights. In addition he was an alternate payload specialist for the Spacelab Life Sciences-2 flight. In this role he trained on all the experiments on the flight and so was familiar with the protocols, hardware and goals of all the experiments on the flight. Many of these experiments were flown on both SLS-1 and SLS-2. This background was useful for the archive, since the first mission to be archived was Spacelab Life Sciences-1. Dr. Buckey worked directly with the archive effort to ensure that the parameters, scientific descriptions, protocols and data sets were accurate and useful.

  15. Stewardship of very large digital data archives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Patric

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses the problems foreseen by the author in stewarding the very large digital data archives that will accumulate during the mission of the Earth Orbiting Satellite (EOS). It focuses on the function of 'shepherding' archived digital data into an endless future. Stewardship entails a great deal more than storing and protecting the archive. It also includes all aspects of providing meaningful service to the community of users (scientists) who will want to access the data. The complete steward will be required to do the following: (1) provide against loss due to physical phenomena; (2) assure that data is not 'lost' due to storage technology obsolescence; (3) maintain data in a current formatting methodology with the additional requirement of being able to reconstitute the data to its original, as-received format; (4) secure against loss or pollution of data due to accidental, misguided, or willful software intrusion; (5) prevent unauthorized electronic access to the data, including unauthorized placement of data into the archive; (6) index the data in a metadatabase so that all anticipatable queries can be served without searching through the data itself; (7) provide responsive access to the metadatabase; (8) provide appropriately responsive access to the data; (9) incorporate additions and changes to the archive (and to the metadatabase) in a timely way; and (10) deliver only copies of data to clients - retain physical custody of the 'official' data. Items 1 through 4 are discussed in this paper.

  16. Quality and usability aspects of space physics data archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, H. E.; Escoubet, C. P.; Masson, A.; Perry, C. H.; Taylor, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    The ESA Cluster Active Archive (CAA) was opened to public in February 2006 after an initial three-year development phase. It provides access to the calibrated full-resolution observations of the four-satellite Cluster mission that has been in operation since February 2001. The data archive is required to include all full-resolution measurements, be publicly accessible and suitable for science use and publication by the world-wide scientific community. The guidelines for the development of the archive system include the following two key terms: quality and usability. The former is essentially related to the quality of the data products, in particular as far as the quality of instrument calibrations is concerned. To help this activity, the CAA runs two calibration/cross-calibration workshops where the calibration results and activities are discussed in great detail. The usability is related to the usability of the data access tools (both web GUI and command-line tool are available) but also to the content of the data products (e.g. all necessary science and auxiliary parameters must be included) in order to fully exploit the observations. Both aspects are critical to the success of the Cluster archive that has currently about 1500 different users who can have highly varying knowledge of the Cluster instruments and observations. There is a large group of Cluster investigators who are fully capable of assessing the quality of the archived data products which however may require various additional science and auxiliary data that must all be included in the archive. On the other hand there is a much larger group of users who have very limited knowledge, if any, of the Cluster mission and all they need is a number of physical parameters either measured or determined by the four Cluster spacecraft. The latter forms a major challenge particularly for the completeness of the metadata as one must include a complete set of information about each data product. The CAA attempts

  17. Strategy of creation of digital archives accessible through the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubanov, Lev I.; Merzlyakov, Nikolay S.; Karnaukhov, Viktor N.; Osipova, Nadezhda

    2001-12-01

    The paper describes a methodology we use to translate an existing conventional archive into a digital one. The method does well for large archives comprising documents with essential graphic constituent (handwritten texts, photographs, drawings, etc.). Main structural components of our digital archive are relational database and image bank which are physically separated but logically linked together. The components make up three-level distributed structure consisting of primary archive, its regional replicas, and various secondary archives (among them subsets presented in the Web and collections of compact discs). Only authorizes user are allowed to access two upper levels, and the bottom level is open for free public access. A secondary archive is created and updated automatically without special development. Such construction allows us to combine reliable storage, easy access and protection of intellectual property. The paper also presents several digital archives already implemented in the Archive of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

  18. The SDSS data archive server

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, Eric H., Jr.; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Archive Server (DAS) provides public access to data files produced by the SDSS data reduction pipeline. This article discusses challenges in public distribution of data of this volume and complexity, and how the project addressed them. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)1 is an astronomical survey of covering roughly one quarter of the night sky. It contains images of this area, a catalog of almost 300 million objects detected in those images, and spectra of more than a million of these objects. The catalog of objects includes a variety of data on each object. These data include not only basic information but also fit parameters for a variety of models, classifications by sophisticated object classification algorithms, statistical parameters, and more. If the survey contains the spectrum of an object, the catalog includes a variety of other parameters derived from its spectrum. Data processing and catalog generation, described more completely in the SDSS Early Data Release2 paper, consists of several stages: collection of imaging data, processing of imaging data, selection of spectroscopic targets from catalogs generated from the imaging data, collection of spectroscopic data, processing of spectroscopic data, and loading of processed data into a database. Each of these stages is itself a complex process. For example, the software that processes the imaging data determines and removes some instrumental signatures in the raw images to create 'corrected frames', models the point spread function, models and removes the sky background, detects objects, measures object positions, measures the radial profile and other morphological parameters for each object, measures the brightness of each object using a variety of methods, classifies the objects, calibrates the brightness measurements against survey standards, and produces a variety of quality assurance plots and diagnostic tables. The complexity of the spectroscopic data

  19. The JPL ASTER Volcano Archive: the development and capabilities of a 15 year global high resolution archive of volcano data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linick, J. P.; Pieri, D. C.; Sanchez, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    The physical and temporal systematics of the world's volcanic activity is a compelling and productive arena for the exercise of orbital remote sensing techniques, informing studies ranging from basic volcanology to societal risk. Comprised of over 160,000 frames and spanning 15 years of the Terra platform mission, the ASTER Volcano Archive (AVA: http://ava.jpl.nasa.gov) is the world's largest (100+Tb) high spatial resolution (15-30-90m/pixel), multi-spectral (visible-SWIR-TIR), downloadable (kml enabled) dedicated archive of volcano imagery. We will discuss the development of the AVA, and describe its growing capability to provide new easy public access to ASTER global volcano remote sensing data. AVA system architecture is designed to facilitate parameter-based data mining, and for the implementation of archive-wide data analysis algorithms. Such search and analysis capabilities exploit AVA's unprecedented time-series data compilations for over 1,550 volcanoes worldwide (Smithsonian Holocene catalog). Results include thermal anomaly detection and mapping, as well as detection of SO2 plumes from explosive eruptions and passive SO2 emissions confined to the troposphere. We are also implementing retrospective ASTER image retrievals based on volcanic activity reports from Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) and the US Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA). A major planned expansion of the AVA is currently underway, with the ingest of the full 1972-present LANDSAT, and NASA EO-1, volcano imagery for comparison and integration with ASTER data. Work described here is carried out under contract to NASA at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory as part of the California Institute of Technology.

  20. Collaborative Establishment of a Long-Term Archive for Stewardship of Interdisciplinary Scientific Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, R. R.; Chen, R. S.; Cartolano, R. T.; Bose, R.

    2008-12-01

    Much of the scientific data that are being collected today cannot be recreated if they are not properly preserved and documented. Establishment of reliable long-term digital archives is essential to preserving these data and associated documentation beyond the working lifetimes of current scientists. Numerous challenges, both technical and institutional, need to be addressed before these data or their documentation become lost or inaccessible. Direct collaboration between university research libraries and active scientific data centers is one approach to addressing these challenges. We report here on the collaboration between the Columbia Libraries / Information Services and the Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) to establish an interdisciplinary long-term archive for data from the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC). The SEDAC long-term archive serves as a trustworthy digital repository to support preparation, submission, appraisal, ingest, discovery, integration, and interoperability of scientific data that are expected to be of long-term interest to both natural and social scientists. Significant progress has been made in establishing the necessary policies and procedures, implementing needed standards and technologies, and assessing strengths and possible weaknesses in the long-term sustainability of the archive. Benefits have included sharing approaches and best practices for information technology solutions and scientific data stewardship. A key issue is the expected future integration of this specialized archive into the long-term digital repository currently being developed by the University. Planned activities include testing the migration of selected data from the SEDAC long-term archive to the forthcoming Libraries repository and the development of interfaces between the digital object management systems being implemented by SEDAC and the Libraries, which are both based on the Flexible Extensible

  1. National Satellite Land Remote Sensing Data Archive

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faundeen, John L.; Kelly, Francis P.; Holm, Thomas M.; Nolt, Jenna E.

    2013-01-01

    The National Satellite Land Remote Sensing Data Archive (NSLRSDA) resides at the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center. Through the Land Remote Sensing Policy Act of 1992, the U.S. Congress directed the Department of the Interior (DOI) to establish a permanent Government archive containing satellite remote sensing data of the Earth's land surface and to make this data easily accessible and readily available. This unique DOI/USGS archive provides a comprehensive, permanent, and impartial observational record of the planet's land surface obtained throughout more than five decades of satellite remote sensing. Satellite-derived data and information products are primary sources used to detect and understand changes such as deforestation, desertification, agricultural crop vigor, water quality, invasive plant species, and certain natural hazards such as flood extent and wildfire scars.

  2. News from the ESO Science Archive Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzycki, A.; Arnaboldi, M.; Bierwirth, T.; Boelter, M.; Da Rocha, C.; Delmotte, N.; Forchì, V.; Fourniol, N.; klein Gebbinck, M.; Lange, U.; Mascetti, L.; Micol, A.; Moins, C.; Munte, C.; Pluciennik, C.; Retzlaff, J.; Romaniello, M.; Rosse, N.; Sequeiros, I. V.; Vuong, M.-H.; Zampieri, S.

    2015-09-01

    ESO Science Archive Facility (SAF) - one of the world's biggest astronomical archives - combines two roles: operational (ingest, tallying, safekeeping and distribution to observers of raw data taken with ESO telescopes and processed data generated both internally and externally) and scientific (publication and delivery of all flavours of data to external users). This paper presents the “State of the SAF.” SAF, as a living entity, is constantly implementing new services and upgrading the existing ones. We present recent and future developments related to the Archive's Request Handler and metadata handling as well as performance and usage statistics and trends. We also discuss the current and future datasets on offer at SAF.

  3. National Radiobiology Archives distributed access programmer's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, J. C.; Smith, S. K.; Watson, C. R.

    1991-12-01

    The National Radiobiology Archives is a comprehensive effort to gather, organize, and catalog original data, representative specimens, and supporting materials related to significant radiobiology studies. This provides researchers with information for analyses which compare or combine results of these and other studies and with materials for analysis by advanced molecular biology techniques. This Programmer's Guide document describes the database access software, NRADEMO, and the subset loading script NRADEMO/MAINT/MAINTAIN, which comprise the National Laboratory Archives Distributed Access Package. The guide is intended for use by an experienced database management specialist. It contains information about the physical and logical organization of the software and data files. It also contains printouts of all the scripts and associated batch processing files. It is part of a suite of documents published by the National Radiobiology Archives.

  4. Sandia Data Archive (SDA) file specifications.

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Ao, Tommy

    2015-02-01

    The Sandia Data Archive (SDA) format is a specific implementation of the HDF5 (Hierarchal Data Format version 5) standard. The format was developed for storing data in a universally accessible manner. SDA files may contain one or more data records, each associated with a distinct text label. Primitive records provide basic data storage, while compound records support more elaborate grouping. External records allow text/binary files to be carried inside an archive and later recovered. This report documents version 1.0 of the SDA standard. The information provided here is sufficient for reading from and writing to an archive. Although the format was original designed for use in MATLAB, broader use is encouraged.

  5. Scientific Archives in the Age of Digitization.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, Brian

    2016-03-01

    Historians are increasingly working with material that is not only digital but has been digitized. Early digitization projects aimed to encode data for systematic analysis; more recent projects have sought to reproduce unique archival material in a manner that allows for open-ended historical inquiry without the need to travel to archives and manipulate physical objects. Such projects have undeniable benefits for the preservation of documents and access to them. Yet historians must be aware of the scope of digitization, the reasons why material is chosen to be digitized, and limitations on the dissemination of digitized sources. Furthermore, some physical aspects of sources, and of collections of sources, are lost in their digital simulacra. Nonetheless, digitization and the standardization of metadata offer significant possibilities for future archival research and documentation. PMID:27197413

  6. Archival of Poker Flat MST radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddle, A. C.; Balsley, B. B.; Gage, K. S.

    1986-01-01

    The Poker Flat MST (mesosphere stratosphere troposphere) radar has operated from early 1979 to 1985. The data recorded during that time resides on some 1100 magnetic tapes. A second set containing only the derived parameters of velocity, width and signal to noise of the primary echo at each height, plus the noise spectra, occupies another 250 tapes. While processing to generate the compressed data set does correct some known errors, no attempt has been made to identify or remove spurious echoes. Because the Poker Flat data set is such a unique and valuable resource, a proposal is made to archive the data in forms more useful for analysis. The archived data set would contain only the parameters for significant echoes with contamination from airplanes, unwanted ionospheric returns, frequently aliased Doppler signals and other sources removed. The archived set should be as good or better than the example shown and may occupy only 25 to 50 tapes.

  7. The UCLASS archive of stuttered speech

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Peter; Davis, Stephen; Bartrip, Jon

    2008-01-01

    Purpose This letter gives details of two releases of audio recordings available from speakers who stutter that can be accessed on the web. Most of the recordings are from school-age children. These are available on the UCLASS website and information is provided about how to access the site. A description of the recordings and background information about the speakers who contributed recordings to UCLASS Releases One and Two are given. The sample types available in Release One are monolog. Release Two has monologs, readings and conversations. Three optional software formats that can be used with the archive are described (though processing the archive is not restricted to these formats). Some perceptual assessment of the quality of each recording is given. An assessment of the strengths and limitations of the recording archive is presented. Finally, some past applications and future research possibilities using the recordings are discussed. PMID:19339703

  8. Archive and records management-Fiscal year 2010 offline archive media trade study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodoh, Tom; Boettcher, Ken; Gacke, Ken; Greenhagen, Cheryl; Engelbrecht, Al

    2010-01-01

    This document is a trade study comparing offline digital archive storage technologies. The document compares and assesses several technologies and recommends which technologies could be deployed as the next generation standard for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Archives must regularly migrate to the next generation of digital archive technology, and the technology selected must maintain data integrity until the next migration. This document is the fiscal year 2010 (FY10) revision of a study completed in FY01 and revised in FY03, FY04, FY06, and FY08.

  9. Authority Control at the National Archives and Records Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Lydia J. E.; Simmons, C. Jerry

    2007-01-01

    The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) launched the Archival Research Catalog (ARC) in 2002. ARC was the first centralized system for describing materials held throughout NARA's nationwide system of archival repositories. ARC's complicated development involved the entire agency, as staff wrestled with years of distinct descriptive…

  10. Archives and Records Management for Decision Makers: A RAMP Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazikana, Peter C.

    Intended to highlight those aspects of the archival field that government officials should be aware of, this report on the Records and Archives Management Programme (RAMP) outlines the major principles of records management and archives administration, identifies the information needs of the decision makers, and assesses the ways in which records…

  11. Guide to the Archives of International Organizations. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walne, Peter, Comp.

    This compilation forms Part II of the guide according to the plan conceived by a working party of the Section of Archivists of International Organisations of the International Council on Archives in 1974-1975. The directory provides access to national and other archive and manuscript repositories that maintain the archives of international…

  12. Draft Model Law on Archives: Description and Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carbone, Salvatore; Gueze, Raoul

    A model law on archives which was prepared for the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) by the International Council on Archives is presented. The aim of the law is to help countries in varying stages of development to construct legal guidelines for archival use which are in line with the exigencies of modern…

  13. Resources for Archives: Developing Collections, Constituents, Colleagues, and Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primer, Ben

    2009-01-01

    The essential element for archival success is to be found in the quality of management decisions made and public services provided. Archivists can develop first-class archives operations through understanding the organizational context; planning; hiring, retaining, and developing staff; meeting archival standards for storage and access; and…

  14. Digital Archival Image Collections: Who Are the Users?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herold, Irene M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Archival digital image collections are a relatively new phenomenon in college library archives. Digitizing archival image collections may make them accessible to users worldwide. There has been no study to explore whether collections on the Internet lead to users who are beyond the institution or a comparison of users to a national or…

  15. Trusting Description: Authenticity, Accountability, and Archival Description Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacNeil, Heather

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested that one of the purposes of archival description is to establish grounds for presuming the authenticity of the records being described. The article examines the implications of this statement by examining the relationship between and among authenticity, archival description, and archival accountability, assessing how this…

  16. Technologically Enhanced Archival Collections: Using the Buddy System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holz, Dayna

    2006-01-01

    Based in the context of challenges faced by archives when managing digital projects, this article explores options of looking outside the existing expertise of archives staff to find collaborative partners. In teaming up with other departments and organizations, the potential scope of traditional archival digitization projects is expanded beyond…

  17. An Introduction to Archival Automation: A RAMP Study with Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Michael

    Developed under a contract with the International Council on Archives, these guidelines are designed to emphasize the role of automation techniques in archives and records services, provide an indication of existing computer systems used in different archives services and of specific computer applications at various stages of archives…

  18. The SETI related use of large astronomical archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, R.; Balazs, B.

    Large archives of scientific data in computer processable form are coming into existence right now. This paper examines how such archives can be used for SETI-related projects. Particular emphasis is given to software techniques which will make the large scale, automatized cross-search of archives possible.

  19. Archiving Mars Mission Data Sets with the Planetary Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinness, Edward A.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the Planetary Data System (PDS) to archive the datasets that are received from the Mars Missions. It reviews the lessons learned in the actual archiving process, and presents an overview of the actual archiving process. It also reviews the lessons learned from the perspectives of the projects, the data producers and the data users.

  20. International Council on Archives, Microfilm Committee. Bulletin 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Council on Archives. Microfilm Committee.

    The Microfilm Committee of the International Council on Archives grew out of various international meetings which began in 1966 with a congress on "Archives for Scholarship--Encouraging Greater Ease of Access." Meetings since then have resulted in recommendations that (1) archives and records should be fully microfilmed and widely distributed for…

  1. 36 CFR 1253.2 - National Archives at College Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Archives at College Park. 1253.2 Section 1253.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS... College Park. (a) The National Archives at College Park is located at 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park,...

  2. Cassini/Huygens Program Archive Plan for Science Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conners, D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the Cassini/Huygens science data archive system which includes policy, roles and responsibilities, description of science and supplementary data products or data sets, metadata, documentation, software, and archive schedule and methods for archive transfer to the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS).

  3. Managing spacecraft measurements over a decade: The calibration and archiving of Cassini and Cluster magnetometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alconcel, L.; Fox, P.; Kellock, S. J.; Brown, P.; Lucek, E. A.; Carr, C.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2013-12-01

    As the PI institute for the magnetometer (MAG) team on the Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn, Imperial College has been responsible for routinely delivering high quality data to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) since 2004. The PDS maintains an archive of information from planetary missions to allow easy user access through a web browser and provides confidence that the data has been rigorously validated. Furthermore, the data calibration yields a sensitive gauge of changes on board the spacecraft and a way to assess the risk of certain activities. When the four Earth-observing Cluster spacecraft were launched in late 2000, a framework for producing and exchanging uniform scientific data sets was already in place. It would form the basis of ESA's Cluster Active Archive (CAA) to which Imperial College, as the PI institute for the fluxgate magnetometers (FGM), has regularly contributed calibrated and validated data. Like the PDS, the CAA aims to preserve the Cluster mission information so that it remains accessible and usable in the long term. The FGM team has archived high resolution data for the mission from January 2001 to April 2013. To demonstrate the stability of our instruments, we have studied the long-term trends in both the Cassini MAG and Cluster FGM data sets. The results help us to establish confidence in the relative accuracy of the measurements. Moreover, they plainly exhibit the necessity of the calibration and archiving activities for high-value scientific space missions.

  4. National Wind Tunnel Complex (NWTC) Project Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This archive was designed with three purposes in mind. First, it was designed as a medium for providing our program deliverables to our customers-NASA and the industry team. Secondly, it was designed to be "The" critical resource for a program restart. Finally, the archive should serve as an invaluable technical resource for aerodynamic and wind tunnel science. The documents are stored in both native format and, for the majority of the documents, in scanned format. The end user is responsible for having applications for viewing and using native and scanned format documents.

  5. Digital Archiving: Where the Past Lives Again

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxson, K. B.

    2012-06-01

    The process of digital archiving for variable star data by manual entry with an Excel spreadsheet is described. Excel-based tools including a Step Magnitude Calculator and a Julian Date Calculator for variable star observations where magnitudes and Julian dates have not been reduced are presented. Variable star data in the literature and the AAVSO International Database prior to 1911 are presented and reviewed, with recent archiving work being highlighted. Digitization using optical character recognition software conversion is also demonstrated, with editing and formatting suggestions for the OCR-converted text.

  6. Metrically preserving the USGS aerial film archive

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moe, Donald; Longhenry, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Since 1972, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, has provided fi lm-based products to the public. EROS is home to an archive of 12 million frames of analog photography ranging from 1937 to the present. The archive contains collections from both aerial and satellite platforms including programs such as the National High Altitude Program (NHAP), National Aerial Photography Program (NAPP), U.S. Antarctic Resource Center (USARC), Declass 1(CORONA, ARGON, and LANYARD), Declass 2 (KH-7 and KH-9), and Landsat (1972 – 1992, Landsat 1–5).

  7. Historical earthquake data in record groups of Slovene National Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosir, M.; Cecic, I.

    2003-04-01

    Slovene earthquake catalogue is under the process of reevaluation. Therefore, for strong historical events it is necessary to check the existing data and at the same time try to find some new information about known and yet unknown significant events. A historian is presently inspecting the material of the National Archives for the period 1500--1800. In comparison to older period, historical sources from the beginning of the 16th century, kept at the National Archives of Slovenia, have considerably increased in number, due to the spreading of records management and increase in the number of offices and official clerks. Records at the archive are arranged according to record groups, which means by institutions, organizations or individuals that created records. For the period from 1500 to 1747 the most important record groups are those of Carniolian Estates and Carniolian Vizdom that include data regarding the activities of the provincial agencies. Record groups of individual land estates are also of great interest although less extensive. Card files and indexes examined so far indicate an interesting portray. Among sources dealing with catastrophes of that time we find mostly information on fires and floods, less numerous are those describing earthquakes. The search is furthermore made more difficult since the information on earthquakes was not explicitely included in descriptions under independent subjects such as fires or floods, but was mostly hidden under subjects connected to building renovation and similar. In general, data on earthquakes are rather scattered. Regardless of the rarity of such data it is expected that the search will discover new data about known and unknown historical events in Slovenia.

  8. Development and implementation of ultrasound picture archiving and communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Wolfram S.; Tessler, Franklin N.; Grant, Edward G.; Kangarloo, Hooshang; Huang, H. K.

    1990-08-01

    The Department of Radiological Sciences at the UCLA School of Medicine is developing an archiving and communication system (PACS) for digitized ultrasound images. In its final stage the system will involve the acquisition and archiving of ultrasound studies from four different locations including the Center for Health Sciences, the Department for Mental Health and the Outpatient Radiology and Endoscopy Departments with a total of 200-250 patient studies per week. The concept comprises two stages of image manipulation for each ultrasound work area. The first station is located close to the examination site and accomodates the acquisition of digital images from up to five ultrasound devices and provides for instantaneous display and primary viewing and image selection. Completed patient studies are transferred to a main workstation for secondary review, further analysis and comparison studies. The review station has an on-line storage capacity of 10,000 images with a resolution of 512x512 8 bit data to allow for immediate retrieval of active patient studies of up to two weeks. The main work stations are connected through the general network and use one central archive for long term storage and a film printer for hardcopy output. First phase development efforts concentrate on the implementation and testing of a system at one location consisting of a number of ultrasound units with video digitizer and network interfaces and a microcomputer workstation as host for the display station with two color monitors, each allowing simultaneous display of four 512x512 images. The discussion emphasizes functionality, performance and acceptance of the system in the clinical environment.

  9. What Are the Boundaries of Archival Context? The SIASFI Project and the Online Guide to the Florence State Archives, Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitali, Stefano

    2005-01-01

    Creating archival descriptions in a digital environment and communicating across the Internet is not the same as traditional paper-based communication. As in other cultural domains, in archival description the medium influences the structure and content of information. The SIASFI Project and the Online Guide to the State Archives of Florence are…

  10. The preservation of LANDSAT data by the National Land Remote Sensing Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, John E.

    1992-01-01

    Digital data, acquired by the National Landsat Remote Sensing Program, document nearly two decades of global agricultural, environmental, and sociological change. The data were widely applied and continue to be essential to a variety of geologic, hydrologic, agronomic, and strategic programs and studies by governmental, academic, and commercial researchers. Landsat data were acquired by five observatories that use primarily two digital sensor systems. The Multispectral Scanner (MSS) was onboard all five Landsats, which have orbited over 19 years; the higher resolution Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor acquired data for the last 9 years on Landsats 4 and 5 only. The National Land Remote Sensing Archive preserves the 800,000 scenes, which total more than 60 terabytes of data, on master tapes that are steadily deteriorating. Data are stored at two terabytes of data, on master tapes that are steadily deteriorating. Data are stored at two locations (Sioux Falls, South Dakota and Landover, Maryland), in three archive formats. The U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Data Center has initiated a project to consolidate and convert, over the next 4 years, two of the archive formats from antiquated instrumentation tape to rotary-recorded cassette magnetic tape. The third archive format, consisting of 300,000 scenes of MSS data acquired from 1972 through 1978, will not be converted because of budgetary constraints. This data preservation project augments EDC's experience in data archiving and information management, expertise that is critical to EDC's role as a Distributed Active Archive Center for the Earth Observing System, a new and much larger national earth science program.

  11. System Security Authorization Agreement (SSAA) for the WIRE Archive and Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) Archive and Research Facility (WARF) is operated and maintained by the Department of Physics, USAF Academy. The lab is located in Fairchild Hall, 2354 Fairchild Dr., Suite 2A103, USAF Academy, CO 80840. The WARF will be used for research and education in support of the NASA Wide Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) satellite, and for related high-precision photometry missions and activities. The WARF will also contain the WIRE preliminary and final archives prior to their delivery to the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC). The WARF consists of a suite of equipment purchased under several NASA grants in support of WIRE research. The core system consists of a Red Hat Linux workstation with twin 933 MHz PIII processors, 1 GB of RAM, 133 GB of hard disk space, and DAT and DLT tape drives. The WARF is also supported by several additional networked Linux workstations. Only one of these (an older 450 Mhz PIII computer running Red Hat Linux) is currently running, but the addition of several more is expected over the next year. In addition, a printer will soon be added. The WARF will serve as the primary research facility for the analysis and archiving of data from the WIRE satellite, together with limited quantities of other high-precision astronomical photometry data from both ground- and space-based facilities. However, the archive to be created here will not be the final archive; rather, the archive will be duplicated at the NSSDC and public access to the data will generally take place through that site.

  12. The CORDEX archive in ESGF: a global archive for regional data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juckes, Martin; Lautenschlager, Michael; Legutke, Stephanie; Bøssing Christensen, Ole; Kolax, Michael; Denvil, Sébastien

    2013-04-01

    The CORDEX program will produce regional model simulations for all areas of the globe, run by many modelling centres but with a consistent set of experimental parameters. Following the example set with the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project, Phase 5 (CMIP5) archive of global climate simulations, a federated archive infrastructure will be exploited to support efficient distribution of the data and provide a single catalogue with a flexible search interface. Initial work towards establishing the European component of federated archive for CORDEX using the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) software has been started in the FP7 project IS-ENES (InfraStructure for the European Network for Earth System Modelling http://is.enes.org) and will be continued under IS-ENES2 (with additional support for an archive node at the University of Cape Town, S. Africa). The ESGF system allows data held at multiple sites to be accessed by users in a transparent manner. This poster will describe key adaptations of the ESGF CMIP5 infrastructure for CORDEX and some of the data services the system will provide. The vocabularies which underpin the facets of the search interface have been adapted and extended, a strategy for quality control has been developed. For the CMIP5 archive, most modelling centres contributing data also deployed an ESGF archive node. For the CORDEX archive a different approach will be followed because data is expected from a larger number of contributors without the resources needed to run such software. Instead, the CORDEX federated archive will be hosted at a moderate number of institutions with the required resources and expertise.

  13. Profiles of international archives: Les archives Jean Piaget, University of Geneva, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Burman, Jeremy Trevelyan

    2013-05-01

    This research report provides a look behind closed doors at the Jean Piaget Archives in Geneva, Switzerland. It situates the potential visitor, contextualizes the Archives in its own history, and then describes what scholars can expect to find. New details about Piaget's views on Equal Rights and Equal Pay are also provided, including a look at how they affected the women who worked his factory (esp. Bärbel Inhelder). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:23544355

  14. 50 CFR 635.33 - Archival tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Archival tags. 635.33 Section 635.33 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION.... (d) Quota monitoring. If an Atlantic HMS landed under the authority of paragraph (b) of this...

  15. The screwworm eradication data system archives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, C. M.; Spaulding, R. R.; Giddings, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    The archives accumulated during 1 year of operation of the Satellite Temperature-Monitoring System during development of the Screwworm Eradication Data System are reported. Brief descriptions of all the kinds of tapes, as well as their potential uses, are presented. Reference is made to other documents that explain the generation of these data.

  16. Archiving Innovations Preserve Essential Historical Records

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    The Apollo 11 mission left on the Moon a silicon disc inscribed with microscopic recreations of messages from 73 countries. NanoArk Corporation of Fairport, New York, built on that NASA technology to develop a fire and water resistant archiving innovation that provides cost savings and security in preserving documents. Since its launch, NanoArk has grown from 2 to 10 employees.

  17. Copyright and Archival Collections of Sound Recordings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Abe A.

    1972-01-01

    To elucidate problems that arise in using archival collections of sound recordings, the author outlines some aspects of copyright pertaining generally to literary and musical works, and considers the extension of these concepts to the new copyright category of sound recordings. (3 references) (Author/SJ)

  18. NATIONAL ARCHIVE OF COMPUTERIZED DATA ON AGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA), located within ICPSR, is funded by the National Institute on Aging. NACDA's mission is to advance research on aging by helping researchers to profit from the under-exploited potential of a broad range of datasets. NACDA ...

  19. Web Archiving at the Library of Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotke, Abbie

    2011-01-01

    Recent years have seen an explosion of the number of institutions involved in or beginning to think about web archiving. Many National Digital Stewardship Alliance (NDSA) members, as well as other universities, historical societies, and state and local governments, have recognized the need for and importance of preserving a variety of web content…

  20. Network accessible multi-terabyte archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybczynski, Fred

    1991-01-01

    The viewgraphs of a discussion on Network Accessible Multi-terabyte Archive presented at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) Mass Storage Workshop is included. Topics covered in the presentation include the rotary storage system (RSS) including RSS data access, data management, administration, and hardware and software architecture.

  1. Simple, Script-Based Science Processing Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Christopher; Hegde, Mahabaleshwara; Barth, C. Wrandle

    2007-01-01

    The Simple, Scalable, Script-based Science Processing (S4P) Archive (S4PA) is a disk-based archival system for remote sensing data. It is based on the data-driven framework of S4P and is used for data transfer, data preprocessing, metadata generation, data archive, and data distribution. New data are automatically detected by the system. S4P provides services such as data access control, data subscription, metadata publication, data replication, and data recovery. It comprises scripts that control the data flow. The system detects the availability of data on an FTP (file transfer protocol) server, initiates data transfer, preprocesses data if necessary, and archives it on readily available disk drives with FTP and HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) access, allowing instantaneous data access. There are options for plug-ins for data preprocessing before storage. Publication of metadata to external applications such as the Earth Observing System Clearinghouse (ECHO) is also supported. S4PA includes a graphical user interface for monitoring the system operation and a tool for deploying the system. To ensure reliability, S4P continuously checks stored data for integrity, Further reliability is provided by tape backups of disks made once a disk partition is full and closed. The system is designed for low maintenance, requiring minimal operator oversight.

  2. The Apollo Digital Image Archive: Project Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, K. N.; Robinson, M. S.; Lawrence, S. J.; Danton, J.; Bowman-Cisneros, E.; Licht, A.; Close, W.; Ingram, R.

    2012-03-01

    Photographs acquired by the Apollo astronauts are currently being scanned at JSC and the files sent to ASU for the Apollo Digital Image Archive. The metric frames are nearing completion while the panoramic frames are in the process of being released.

  3. National Radiobiology Archives Distributed Access user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, C.; Smith, S. ); Prather, J. )

    1991-11-01

    This User's Manual describes installation and use of the National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) Distributed Access package. The package consists of a distributed subset of information representative of the NRA databases and database access software which provide an introduction to the scope and style of the NRA Information Systems.

  4. Making Archival and Special Collections More Accessible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renspie, Melissa, Comp.; Shepard, Linda, Comp.; Childress, Eric, Comp.

    2015-01-01

    Revealing hidden assets stewarded by research institutions so they can be made available for research and learning locally and globally is a prime opportunity for libraries to create and deliver new value. "Making Archival and Special Collections More Accessible" collects important work OCLC Research has done to help achieve the…

  5. The Cancer Digital Slide Archive - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. David Gutman and Dr. Lee Cooper developed The Cancer Digital Slide Archive (CDSA), a web platform for accessing pathology slide images of TCGA samples. Find out how they did it and how to use the CDSA website in this Case Study.

  6. Enabling Science with the Hubble Legacy Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkner, Helmut; Miller, W. Warren; Whitmore, Bradley C.

    Significant enhancements to the Hubble archive will prepare it for legacy use and provide major new science capabilities. The focus is on higher-level data products than are available from the classic Hubble archive, including fully calibrated exposures and enhanced image products as well as source lists. All data products are immediately available on disk, eliminating the latency of queued data delivery. This capability will make HST data easier to obtain, combine, and compare with data from other space missions and with ground-based data. Image headers will be updated with improved astrometric information, greatly reducing the 1-2 arcsecond errors that frequently affect current pipeline products. A generalized footprint service allows users to determine quickly whether, and for how long, a particular region of the sky has been observed with HST instruments. In addition, all Hubble data become accessible through standard Virtual Observatory interfaces. This improved archive, the Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA), is expected to provide an essential research resource for many years, if not decades.

  7. Developing a Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bow, Catherine; Christie, Michael; Devlin, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The fluctuating fortunes of Northern Territory bilingual education programs in Australian languages and English have put at risk thousands of books developed for these programs in remote schools. In an effort to preserve such a rich cultural and linguistic heritage, the Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages project is establishing an open access,…

  8. LBT Distributed Archive: Status and Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapic, C.; Smareglia, R.; Thompson, D.; Grede, G.

    2011-07-01

    After the first release of the LBT Distributed Archive, this successful collaboration is continuing within the LBT corporation. The IA2 (Italian Center for Astronomical Archive) team had updated the LBT DA with new features in order to facilitate user data retrieval while abiding by VO standards. To facilitate the integration of data from any new instruments, we have migrated to a new database, developed new data distribution software, and enhanced features in the LBT User Interface. The DBMS engine has been changed to MySQL. Consequently, the data handling software now uses java thread technology to update and synchronize the main storage archives on Mt. Graham and in Tucson, as well as archives in Trieste and Heidelberg, with all metadata and proprietary data. The LBT UI has been updated with additional features allowing users to search by instrument and some of the more important characteristics of the images. Finally, instead of a simple cone search service over all LBT image data, new instrument specific SIAP and cone search services have been developed. They will be published in the IVOA framework later this fall.

  9. Stratification: Future Strategies for Video Archiving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalisky, Lorin David

    2000-01-01

    Discusses digital video management and archiving issues, including processing power; software for browsing, searching, and indexing; media servers to handle streams; storage solutions; metadata; large file sizes; organizational issues; rights management issues, including licensing; and cataloging options, including segmentation of individual…

  10. Web-based medical image archive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Edward B.; Warach, Steven; Cheung, Huey; Wang, Shaohua A.; Tangiral, Phanidral; Luby, Marie; Martino, Robert L.

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents a Web-based medical image archive system in three-tier, client-server architecture for the storage and retrieval of medical image data, as well as patient information and clinical data. The Web-based medical image archive system was designed to meet the need of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke for a central image repository to address questions of stroke pathophysiology and imaging biomarkers in stroke clinical trials by analyzing images obtained from a large number of clinical trials conducted by government, academic and pharmaceutical industry researchers. In the database management-tier, we designed the image storage hierarchy to accommodate large binary image data files that the database software can access in parallel. In the middle-tier, a commercial Enterprise Java Bean server and secure Web server manages user access to the image database system. User-friendly Web-interfaces and applet tools are provided in the client-tier for easy access to the image archive system over the Internet. Benchmark test results show that our three-tier image archive system yields fast system response time for uploading, downloading, and querying the image database.

  11. Digitizing and Securing Archived Laboratory Notebooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caporizzo, Marilyn

    2008-01-01

    The Information Group at Millipore has been successfully using a digital rights management tool to secure the email distribution of archived laboratory notebooks. Millipore is a life science leader providing cutting-edge technologies, tools, and services for bioscience research and biopharmaceutical manufacturing. Consisting of four full-time…

  12. Transcending Silos, Developing Synergies: Libraries and Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Gillian

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Very little research crosses the institutional boundaries of libraries and archives, and theres appears to be little predisposition to look for areas of common interest. However, practitioners in these settings have much to learn from each other. Purpose: This paper argues that practitioners' understanding of information management…

  13. Video data annotation, archiving, and access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkin, D.; Connor, J.; Stout, N. J.; Walz, K.; Schlining, K.; Graybeal, J.

    2002-12-01

    Scientifically useful, high-quality video data can be challenging to integrate with other data, and to analyze and archive for use in ocean science. The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) uses high-resolution video equipment to record over 300 remotely operated vehicle dives per year. Over the past 14 years, 13,000 videotapes have been archived and maintained as a centralized institutional resource. MBARI has developed a set of software applications to annotate and access video data. Users can identify the location of video sequences using a data query component; complex queries can be made by constraining temporal, spatial, or physical parameters (e.g., season, location, or depth). The applications reference a knowledge base of over 3,000 biological, geological and technical terms, providing consistent hierarchical information about objects and associated descriptions for annotating video at sea or on shore. The annotation, knowledge base, and query components together provide a comprehensive video archive software system that can be applied to a variety of scientific disciplines. Also in development, using the XML data format, is an interactive reference interface to explore MBARI's deep-sea knowledge base. When complete, the full software system will be disseminated to the research community via the web or CD, to help meet the challenges inherent in archiving video data.

  14. Creating Trading Networks of Digital Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Brian; Garcia-Molina, Hector

    Digital materials are vulnerable to a number of different kinds of failures, including decay of the digital media, loss due to hackers and viruses, accidental deletions, natural disasters, and bankruptcy of the institution holding the collection. Digital archives can best survive failures if they have made several copies of their collections at…

  15. The SUMER Data in the SOHO Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curdt, W.; Germerott, D.; Wilhelm, K.; Schühle, U.; Teriaca, L.; Innes, D.; Bocchialini, K.; Lemaire, P.

    2014-06-01

    We have released an archive of all observational data of the VUV spectrometer Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) on SOHO that have been acquired until now. The operational phase started with `first light' observations on 27 January 1996 and will end in 2014. Future data will be added to the archive when they become available. The archive consists of a set of raw data (Level 0) and a set of data that are processed and calibrated to the best knowledge we have today (Level 1). This communication describes step by step the data acquisition and processing that has been applied in an automated manner to build the archive. It summarizes the expertise and insights into the scientific use of SUMER spectra that has accumulated over the years. It also indicates possibilities for further enhancement of the data quality. With this article we intend to convey our own understanding of the instrument performance to the scientific community and to introduce the new, standard FITS-format database.

  16. The USA PATRIOT Act: Archival Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trinkaus-Randall, Gregor

    2005-01-01

    In October 2001, Congress passed the USA PATRIOT Act to strengthen the ability of the U.S. government to combat terrorism. Unfortunately, some sections of the Act strike at core values and practices of libraries and archives, especially in the areas of record keeping, privacy, confidentiality, security, and access to the collections. This article…

  17. Challenges in simulation automation and archival.

    SciTech Connect

    Blacker, Teddy Dean

    2010-09-01

    The challenges of simulation streamlining and automation continue. The need for analysis verification, reviews, quality assurance, pedigree, and archiving are strong. These automation and archival needs can alternate between competing and complementing when determining how to improve the analysis environment and process. The needs compete for priority, resource allocation, and business practice importance. Likewise, implementation strategies of both automation and archival can swing between rather local work groups to more global corporate initiatives. Questions abound about needed connectivity (and the extent of this connectivity) to various CAD systems, product data management (PDM) systems, test data repositories and various information management implementations. This is a complex set of constraints. This presentation will bring focus to this complex environment through sharing experiences. The experiences are those gleaned over years of effort at Sandia to make reasonable sense out of the decisions to be made. It will include a discussion of integration and development of home grown tools for both automation and archival. It will also include an overview of efforts to understand local requirements, compare in-house tools to commercial offerings against those requirements, and options for future progress. Hopefully, sharing this rich set of experiences may prove useful to others struggling to make progress in their own environments.

  18. Current status of the international Halley Watch infrared net archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguinness, Brian B.

    1988-01-01

    The primary purposes of the Halley Watch have been to promote Halley observations, coordinate and standardize the observing where useful, and to archive the results in a database readily accessible to cometary scientists. The intention of IHW is to store the observations themselves, along with any information necessary to allow users to understand and use the data, but to exclude interpretations of these data. Each of the archives produced by the IHW will appear in two versions: a printed archive and a digital archive on CD-ROMs. The archive is expected to have a very long lifetime. The IHW has already produced an archive for P/Crommelin. This consists of one printed volume and two 1600 bpi tapes. The Halley archive will contain at least twenty gigabytes of information.

  19. ESA New Generation Science Archives: SOHO and EXOSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuna, P.; Arviset, C.; Baines, D.; Barbarisi, I.; Castellanos, J.; Cheek, N.; Costa, H.; Fajersztejn, N.; Fernandez, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Laruelo, A.; Leon, I.; Ortiz, I.; Salgado, J.; Stebe, A.; Tapiador, D.

    2010-12-01

    The ESAC Science Archives and VO Team (SAT) has developed a new infrastructure for the development and maintenance of the ESA space based missions’ Science Archives. This infrastructure makes use of state-of-the-art technology to overcome some of the already known limitations of older technologies, used for the building of the current archives, the older of which has been live since 1998. This paper describes how the SAT approached the issue of re-engineering their infrastructure to result in a more flexible, reusable, robust and cost-effective way of building their archives. It also describes how the new technology has been applied to the building of two Science Archive s from scratch: the SOHO Science Archive (a Solar physics mission) and the EXOSAT Science Archive (an astronomy mission).

  20. CASDA: The CSIRO ASKAP Science Data Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Jessica Mary

    2015-08-01

    The Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) is an array of 36 antennas under construction in Western Australia. It is designed as a survey instrument for extensive radio astronomy surveys of the Southern Sky. ASKAP is a data driven facility where the data rates are extremely high. In full operations the volume of archived data will reach around five petabytes per year. Such high data rates require that ASKAP data processing is carried out using automated pipelines to produce data products and associated metadata that are stored and made available through the science archive. Data products and associated metadata will be stored at the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre in Perth, Australia.In this talk I will give an overview of the CSIRO ASKAP Science Data Archive (CASDA). CASDA will provide the long term storage for ASKAP data products, and the hardware and software facilities that enable astronomers to make use of these. The archive can be thought of as the end stage of the full ASKAP system. It will include calibrated visibilities for continuum data, and image cubes for both spectral line and continuum radio astronomy data. Source detection algorithms will be used to search data cubes for radio sources and source-related information will be captured in catalogues. Virtual Observatory tools are used so that so that the survey results from ASKAP can be compared with infrared, optical and X-ray survey results from other facilities. The archive is being developed with extensive consultation and engagement with the user community, and is due for first public release in December 2015 shortly before the start of ASKAP Early Science.

  1. The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope: The Final Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, William V.; Blair, William P.; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Romelfanger, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) was a 0.9 m telescope and moderate-resolution (Delta)lambda equals 3 A) far-ultraviolet (820-1850 Å) spectrograph that flew twice on the space shuttle, in 1990 December (Astro-1, STS-35) and 1995 March (Astro-2, STS-67). The resulting spectra were originally archived in a nonstandard format that lacked important descriptive metadata. To increase their utility, we have modified the original datareduction software to produce a new and more user-friendly data product, a time-tagged photon list similar in format to the Intermediate Data Files (IDFs) produced by the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer calibration pipeline. We have transferred all relevant pointing and instrument-status information from locally-archived science and engineering databases into new FITS header keywords for each data set. Using this new pipeline, we have reprocessed the entire HUT archive from both missions, producing a new set of calibrated spectral products in a modern FITS format that is fully compliant with Virtual Observatory requirements. For each exposure, we have generated quicklook plots of the fully-calibrated spectrum and associated pointing history information. Finally, we have retrieved from our archives HUT TV guider images, which provide information on aperture positioning relative to guide stars, and converted them into FITS-format image files. All of these new data products are available in the new HUT section of the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST), along with historical and reference documents from both missions. In this article, we document the improved data-processing steps applied to the data and show examples of the new data products.

  2. Building an Archive Backbone Extending TAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinaro, M.; Apollo, P.; Knapic, C.; Smareglia, R.

    2014-05-01

    A data center (DC) willing to add VO (Virtual Observatory) capabilities to existing archival resources, or new ones, will probably face some issues regarding the constraints on the existing structure of the datasets. On the opposite direction a DC may want to give priority to VO flavored data access but maintain flexibility on proprietary or dedicated access solutions. This contribution tries to delineate a solution, feasible for both approaches, taking advantage of the IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) existing standards and, at the same time, forcing no constraint at archive generation or ingestion level. The IVOA TAP (Table Access Protocol) specification generalizes the way a set of database schemas and tables, related or not, can be deployed as a queryable resource in the framewok of the Virtual Observatory. The TAP protocol itself has, at its core, a DB schema, named TAP_SCHEMA, that actually acts as an attribute-extended information schema for the exposed set of tables; the TAP_SCHEMA, in short, describes the content of the schemas and tables, and their connections, in a VO aware flavour. It seems then quite immediate to think about pushing the generalization step a little further, i.e. to extend the TAP_SCHEMA itself to provide a more general description of an astrophysical archive (or part of it). Here we discuss on how, adding optional tables and columns to the TAP_SCHEMA, it would be possible to create an archive thin layer solution in terms of this DB schema alongside with a content manager application for it. The goal is to provide a re-usable, configurable connection between an archive's back end and front end, having the benefit of creating a VO translation layer to ease VO resource and service deployment and preserving custom data access and publishing.

  3. The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope: The Final Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, William V.; Blair, William P.; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Romelfanger, Mary L.

    2013-04-01

    The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) was a 0.9 m telescope and moderate-resolution (Δλ = 3 Å) far-ultraviolet (820-1850 Å) spectrograph that flew twice on the space shuttle, in 1990 December (Astro-1, STS-35) and 1995 March (Astro-2, STS-67). The resulting spectra were originally archived in a nonstandard format that lacked important descriptive metadata. To increase their utility, we have modified the original data-reduction software to produce a new and more user-friendly data product, a time-tagged photon list similar in format to the Intermediate Data Files (IDFs) produced by the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer calibration pipeline. We have transferred all relevant pointing and instrument-status information from locally-archived science and engineering databases into new FITS header keywords for each data set. Using this new pipeline, we have reprocessed the entire HUT archive from both missions, producing a new set of calibrated spectral products in a modern FITS format that is fully compliant with Virtual Observatory requirements. For each exposure, we have generated quick-look plots of the fully-calibrated spectrum and associated pointing history information. Finally, we have retrieved from our archives HUT TV guider images, which provide information on aperture positioning relative to guide stars, and converted them into FITS-format image files. All of these new data products are available in the new HUT section of the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST), along with historical and reference documents from both missions. In this article, we document the improved data-processing steps applied to the data and show examples of the new data products.

  4. 36 CFR 1254.14 - Are some procedures in regional archives and Presidential libraries different from those in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... regional director of archival operations or Presidential library director indicates, you must follow the procedures in regional archives and Presidential library archival research rooms where researchers...

  5. Implementation of a digital archive center for a radiology department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Albert W. K.; Taira, Ricky K.; Huang, H. K.

    1992-07-01

    A distributed digital archive system configured with dual archive devices (two archive servers, two database servers and two 680-Gbyte optical libraries) that provides fault-tolerant image archival has been implemented for the Radiology Department at UCLA. Digital images from various radiologic imaging devices are transmitted via Ethernet and FDDI networks to archive servers, where images are archived to optical disks and distributed to remote display stations or the print station via 1-Gbit/sec high-speed UltraNet network. The dual configuration of the system provides non-interrupt archive operations in the event of failure of any of the archive components. Once a failed device is detected, the system automatically re-configures itself so that all images are routed to the second equivalent device and archived. The global Ethernet network serves as a backup for the FDDI and UltraNet networks. In the even of FDDI or UltraNet failure, all images can be transmitted across the Ethernet. The system archives 1.5 to 2.0 Gbytes of data per day and provides inter-sectional image referencing throughout the department.

  6. Archiving of Wideband Plasma Wave Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, William S.

    1997-01-01

    Beginning with the third year of funding, we began a more ambitious archiving production effort, minimizing work on new software and concentrating on building representative archives of the missions mentioned above, recognizing that only a small percentage of the data from any one mission can be archived with reasonable effort. We concentrated on data from Dynamics Explorer and ISEE 1, archiving orbits or significant fractions of orbits which attempt to capture the essence of the mission and provide data which will hopefully be sufficient for ongoing and new research as well as to provide a reference to upcoming and current ISTP missions which will not fly in the same regions of space as the older missions and which will not have continuous wideband data. We archived approximately 181 Gigabytes of data, accounting for some 1582 hours of data. Included in these data are all of the AMPTE chemical releases, all of the Spacelab 2/PDP data obtained during the free-flight portion of its mission, as well as significant portions of the S3, DE-1, Imp-6, Hawkeye, Injun 5, and ISEE 1 and 2 data sets. Table 1 summarizes these data. All of the data archived are summarized in gif-formatted images of frequency-time spectrograms which are directly accessible via the internet. Each of the gif files are identified by year, day, and time as described in the Web page. This provides a user with a specific date/time in mind a way of determining very quickly if there is data for the interval in question and, by clicking on the file name, browsing the data. Alternately, a user can browse the data for interesting features and events simply by viewing each of the gif files. When a user finds data of interest, he/she can notify us by email of the time period involved. Based on the user's needs, we can provide data on a convenient medium or by ftp, or we can mount the appropriate data and provide access to our analysis tools via the network. We can even produce products such as plots or

  7. 36 CFR 1256.20 - May I obtain access to Federal archival records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Federal archival records? 1256.20 Section 1256.20 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES... MATERIALS Access to Federal Archival Records § 1256.20 May I obtain access to Federal archival records? (a) Most Federal archival records are open for research without submitting a Freedom of Information...

  8. The proactive historian: Methodological opportunities presented by the new archives documenting genomics.

    PubMed

    García-Sancho, Miguel

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, I propose a strategy for navigating newly available archives in the study of late-twentieth century genomics. I demonstrate that the alleged 'explosion of data' characteristic of genomics-and of contemporary science in general-is not a new problem and that historians of earlier periods have dealt with information overload by relying on the 'perspective of time': the filtering effect the passage of time naturally exerts on both sources and memories. I argue that this reliance on the selective capacity of time results in inheriting archives curated by others and, consequently, poses the risk of reifying ahistorical scientific discourses. Through a preliminary examination of archives documenting early attempts at mapping and sequencing the human genome, I propose an alternative approach, in which historians proactively problematize and improve available sources. This approach provides historians with a voice in the socio-political management of scientific heritage and advances methodological innovations in the use of oral histories. It also provides a narrative framework in which to address big science initiatives by following second order administrators, rather than individual scientists. The new genomic archives thus represent an opportunity for historians to take an active role in current debates concerning 'big data' and critically embed the humanities in pressing global problems. PMID:26459668

  9. The NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP) at Pierce College

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallory, Carolyn R.; Feig, M.; Mahmud, N.; Silic, T.; Rebull, L.; Hoette, V.; Johnson, C.; McCarron, K.

    2011-01-01

    Our team from Pierce Community College, Woodland Hills, CA, participated in the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP) this past year (2010). (NITARP is described in another poster, Rebull et al.) Our team worked with archival Spitzer, 2MASS, and optical data to look for young stars in CG4, part of the Gum Nebula; our scientific results are described in a companion poster, Johnson et al. In this poster, we describe more about what we learned and how we incorporated our NITARP experiences into the Pierce College environment. Students developed critical thinking skills and an ability to organize their data analysis and develop a mental "big picture" of what is going on in the CG4 region. The NITARP program is one of several "Active Learning" programs going on at Pierce, and the other programs are briefly summarized in this poster as well. This program was made possible through the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Project (NITARP) and was funded by NASA Astrophysics Data Program and Archive Outreach funds.

  10. SPDF Ancillary Services and Technologies Supporting Open Access, Use and Archiving of MMS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candey, R. M.; Bilitza, D.; Chimiak, R.; Cooper, J. F.; Garcia, L. N.; Harris, B. T.; Hills, H. K.; Johnson, R. C.; Kovalick, T. J.; Lal, N.; Leckner, H. A.; Liu, M. H.; McGuire, R. E.; Papitashvili, N. E.; Roberts, D. A.; Yurow, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    The primary data and orbit services of NASA's Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) now or soon to be supporting direct and correlative analysis of MMS survey and burst science data products are discussed in the McGuire et.al. paper "SPDF Data and Orbit Services Supporting Open Access, Use and Archiving of MMS Data." This present paper will review additional services and elements of the SPDF program relevant to SPDF's support of MMS and SPDF's broader long-term role as an active heliophysics final archive. Specific topics include - Additional detail on options and APIs for accessing data in SPDF; - Status and plans for the Common Data Format (CDF) and ISTP/SPDF metadata standard, including extension of the metadata standard to planned science data in netCDF from the upcoming GOLD and ICON missions; - Future missions to be supported by SPDF; - Overview and status of MMS and other data descriptions in the Heliophysics Data Portal (HDP)/Virtual Space Physics Observatory (VSPO) - Status and plans for the OMNI database and services, as baseline solar wind data for interpreting magnetospheric data such as that of MMS; - An overview of SPDF's ingest and archiving architecture, including our ongoing effort to bring online legacy heliophysics data originally archived at NSSDC. All SPDF data and services are available from the SPDF home page at http://spdf.gsfc.nasa.gov .

  11. Building digital archives by the National Diet Library : Toward knowledge sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Masaki

    This article shows the current situation of construction of the National Diet Library (NDL)'s digital archive and the direction of activities for “creating and reproducing new knowledge” which “knowledge sharing” aims at. The NDL, as a deposit library has a responsibility to acquire and preserve not only paper materials but also digital contents, and needs to make them accessible anytime and anywhere. The NDL acquires and preserves digital contents to a maximum extent to build the NDL digital archive. However, it is impossible to collect all of them, so the NDL plans to accumulate all knowledge in cooperation with other institutions to build distributed digital archives. The NDL plays a data provider role to navigate all the distributed digital archival information and make it available as semantically-related knowledge to build “NDL Search”. The NDL will make it possible to create new knowledge reusing the existing information as knowledge to build up the knowledge infrastructure.

  12. Policies and Procedures for Accessing Archived NASA Lunar Data via the Web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Nathan L.; Williams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) was established by NASA to provide for the preservation and dissemination of scientific data from NASA missions. This paper describes the policies specifically related to lunar science data. NSSDC presently archives 660 lunar data collections. Most of these data (423 units) are stored offline in analog format. The remainder of this collection consists of magnetic tapes and discs containing approximately 1.7 TB of digital lunar data. The active archive for NASA lunar data is the Planetary Data System (PDS). NSSDC has an agreement with the PDS Lunar Data Node to assist in the restoration and preparation of NSSDC-resident lunar data upon request for access and distribution via the PDS archival system. Though much of NSSDC's digital store also resides in PDS, NSSDC has many analog data collections and some digital lunar data sets that are not in PDS. NSSDC stands ready to make these archived lunar data accessible to both the research community and the general public upon request as resources allow. Newly requested offline lunar data are digitized and moved to near-line storage devices called digital linear tape jukeboxes. The data are then packaged and made network-accessible via FTP for the convenience of a growing segment of the user community. This publication will 1) discuss the NSSDC processes and policies that govern how NASA lunar data is preserved, restored, and made accessible via the web and 2) highlight examples of special lunar data requests.

  13. Skylab Medical Data Center and Archives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spross, F. R.

    1974-01-01

    The founding of the Skylab medical data center and archives as a central area to house medical data from space flights is described. Skylab program strip charts, various daily reports and summaries, experiment reports and logs, status report on Skylab data quality, raw data digital tapes, processed data microfilm, and other Skylab documents are housed in the data center. In addition, this memorandum describes how the data center acted as a central point for the coordination of preflight and postflight baseline data and how it served as coordinator for all data processing through computation and analysis. Also described is a catalog identifying Skylab medical experiments and all related data currently archived in the data center.

  14. Landsat International Cooperators and Global Archive Consolidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2016-01-01

    Landsat missions have always been an important component of U.S. foreign policy, as well as science and technology policy. The program’s longstanding network of International Cooperators (ICs), which operate numerous International Ground Stations (IGS) around the world, embodies the United States’ policy of peaceful use of outer space and the worldwide dissemination of civil space technology for public benefit. Thus, the ICs provide an essential dimension to the Landsat mission.In 2010, the Landsat Global Archive Consolidation (LGAC) effort began, with a goal to consolidate the Landsat data archives of all international ground stations, make the data more accessible to the global Landsat community, and significantly increase the frequency of observations over a given area of interest to improve scientific uses such as change detection and analysis.

  15. Rendering an archive in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiman, David A.; Twose, Claire; Lee, Teresa Y. H.; Fletcher, Alex; Yoo, Terry S.

    2003-05-01

    We examine the requirements for a publicly accessible, online collection of three-dimensional biomedical image data, including those yielded by radiological processes such as MRI, ultrasound and others. Intended as a repository and distribution mechanism for such medical data, we created the National Online Volumetric Archive (NOVA) as a case study aimed at identifying the multiple issues involved in realizing a large-scale digital archive. In the paper we discuss such factors as the current legal and health information privacy policy affecting the collection of human medical images, retrieval and management of information and technical implementation. This project culminated in the launching of a website that includes downloadable datasets and a prototype data submission system.

  16. The Nimbus 7 LIMS map archival tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggard, K. V.; Remsberg, E. E.; Russell, J. M., III

    1986-01-01

    The development of the Langley Map Archival Tape (LAMAT) is described. The role of the Nimbus 7 orbit characteristics in the analysis and interpretation of LAMAT data is discussed. The pressure ranges and heights for the LAMAT components are given and the synoptic fields for each pressure and latitude were modeled as Fourier series in longitude with time-dependent coefficients. Examples of LAMAT temperature fields are presented and the accuracies of the LAMAT fields are evaluated. The fit between the Langley inverted profile archival tape (LAIPAT) and LAMAT is examined by comparing averaged zonal mean fields and standard deviations. Consideration is given to diurnal variations of LAIPAT data, and the time and spatial smoothing of the data.

  17. Automating Data Submission to a National Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Work, T. T.; Chandler, C. L.; Groman, R. C.; Allison, M. D.; Gegg, S. R.; Biological; Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office

    2010-12-01

    In late 2006, the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) funded the Biological and Chemical Oceanographic Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) to work closely with investigators to manage oceanographic data generated from their research projects. One of the final data management tasks is to ensure that the data are permanently archived at the U.S. National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) or other appropriate national archiving facility. In the past, BCO-DMO submitted data to NODC as an email with attachments including a PDF file (a manually completed metadata record) and one or more data files. This method is no longer feasible given the rate at which data sets are contributed to BCO-DMO. Working with collaborators at NODC, a more streamlined and automated workflow was developed to keep up with the increased volume of data that must be archived at NODC. We will describe our new workflow; a semi-automated approach for contributing data to NODC that includes a Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) compliant Extensible Markup Language (XML) metadata file accompanied by comma-delimited data files. The FGDC XML file is populated from information stored in a MySQL database. A crosswalk described by an Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT) is used to transform the XML formatted MySQL result set to a FGDC compliant XML metadata file. To ensure data integrity, the MD5 algorithm is used to generate a checksum and manifest of the files submitted to NODC for permanent archive. The revised system supports preparation of detailed, standards-compliant metadata that facilitate data sharing and enable accurate reuse of multidisciplinary information. The approach is generic enough to be adapted for use by other data management groups.

  18. IDD Archival Hardware Architecture and Workflow

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonsa, D; Nekoogar, F; Martz, H

    2008-10-09

    This document describes the functionality of every component in the DHS/IDD archival and storage hardware system shown in Fig. 1. The document describes steps by step process of image data being received at LLNL then being processed and made available to authorized personnel and collaborators. Throughout this document references will be made to one of two figures, Fig. 1 describing the elements of the architecture and the Fig. 2 describing the workflow and how the project utilizes the available hardware.

  19. SITools2: A Framework for Archival Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malapert, Jean-Christophe; Marseille, Matthieu

    2011-11-01

    SITools2 is a CNES generic tool performed by a joint effort between CNES and scientific laboratories. SITools provides a self-manageable data access layer deployed on already existing scientific laboratory databases. This new version of SITools is a JAVA-based framework, under open source license, that provides a portable archive system, highly configurable, easy to use by laboratories, with a plugin mechanism so developers can add their own applications.

  20. The NPARC Alliance Verification and Validation Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Dudek, Julianne C.; Tatum, Kenneth E.

    2000-01-01

    The NPARC Alliance (National Project for Applications oriented Research in CFD) maintains a publicly-available, web-based verification and validation archive as part of the development and support of the WIND CFD code. The verification and validation methods used for the cases attempt to follow the policies and guidelines of the ASME and AIAA. The emphasis is on air-breathing propulsion flow fields with Mach numbers ranging from low-subsonic to hypersonic.

  1. Application of XML to Journal Table Archiving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaya, E. J.; Blackwell, J. H.; Gass, J. E.; Kargatis, V. E.; Schneider, G. L.; Weiland, J. L.; Borne, K. D.; White, R. A.; Cheung, C. Y.

    1998-12-01

    The Astronomical Data Center (ADC) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is a major archive for machine-readable astronomical data tables. Many ADC tables are derived from published journal articles. Article tables are reformatted to be machine-readable and documentation is crafted to facilitate proper reuse by researchers. The recent switch of journals to web based electronic format has resulted in the generation of large amounts of tabular data that could be captured into machine-readable archive format at fairly low cost. The large data flow of the tables from all major North American astronomical journals (a factor of 100 greater than the present rate at the ADC) necessitates the development of rigorous standards for the exchange of data between researchers, publishers, and the archives. We have selected a suitable markup language that can fully describe the large variety of astronomical information contained in ADC tables. The eXtensible Markup Language XML is a powerful internet-ready documentation format for data. It provides a precise and clear data description language that is both machine- and human-readable. It is rapidly becoming the standard format for business and information transactions on the internet and it is an ideal common metadata exchange format. By labelling, or "marking up", all elements of the information content, documents are created that computers can easily parse. An XML archive can easily and automatically be maintained, ingested into standard databases or custom software, and even totally restructured whenever necessary. Structuring astronomical data into XML format will enable efficient and focused search capabilities via off-the-shelf software. The ADC is investigating XML's expanded hyperlinking power to enhance connectivity within the ADC data/metadata and developing XSL display scripts to enhance display of astronomical data. The ADC XML Definition Type Document can be viewed at http://messier.gsfc.nasa.gov/dtdhtml/DTD-TREE.html

  2. Archival Chandra observations of M22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Killian; Callanan, Paul

    2015-09-01

    We report on a 86 ksec archival Chandra ACIS observation of the globular cluster M22 (obtained 2014-05-22). These data have been used to search for X-ray counterparts to the two black hole candidates, M22 VLA1 and M22 VLA2, identified by Strader et al (2012, Nature 490 71), and are considerably deeper than the 16 ksec ACIS exposure used for this previous work.

  3. The Comet Halley archive: Summary volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek (Editor); Fry, Lori (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The contents are as follows: The Organizational History of the International Halley Watch; Operations of the International Halley Watch from a Lead Center Perspective; The Steering Group; Astrometry Network; Infrared Studies Network; Large-Scale Phenomena Network; Meteor Studies Network; Near-Nucleus Studies Network; Photometry and Polarimetry Network; Radio Science Network; Spectroscopy and Spectrophotometry Network; Amateur Observation Network; Use of the CD-ROM Archive; The 1986 Passage of Comet Halley; and Recent Observations of Comet Halley.

  4. Three Good Reasons for Celebrating at the ESO/ST-ECF Science Archive Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-12-01

    Great Demand for Data from New "Virtual Observatory" Summary Due to a happy coincidence, the ESO/ST-ECF Science Archive Facility is celebrating three different milestones at the same time: * its 10th anniversary since the establishment in 1991 * the 10,000th request for data , and * the signing-up of active user number 2000 . This Archive contains over 8 Terabytes (1 Terabyte = 1 million million bytes) of valuable observational data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST), the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) and other ESO telescopes . Its success paves the way for the establishment of "Virtual Observatories" from which first-class data can be obtained by astronomers all over the world. This greatly enhances the opportunities for more (young) scientists to participate in front-line research. PR Photo 34/00 : Front-page of a new brochure, describing the ESO/ST-ECF Science Archive Facility. Just 10 years ago, on the 1st of January 1991, the ESO/ST-ECF (European Southern Observatory/Space Telescope-European Coordinating Facility) Science Archive Facility opened. It has since served the astronomical community with gigabyte after gigabyte of high-quality astronomical data from some of the world's leading telescopes. The Archive, which is located in Garching, just outside Munich (Germany), contains data from the 2.4-m NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope , as well as from several ESO telescopes: the four 8.2-m Unit Telescopes of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory , and the 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) , the 3.6-m telescope and the MPG/ESO 2.2-m telescope at La Silla. The Archive is a continuously developing project - in terms of amounts of data stored, the number of users and in particular because of the current dramatic development of innovative techniques for data handling and storage. In the year 2000 more than 2 Terabytes (2000 Gigabytes) of data were distributed to users worldwide. The archiving of VLT data has been described in ESO PR

  5. UkrVO Joint Digitized Archive and Scientific Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilova, I. B.; Pakuliak, L. K.; Protsyuk, Yu. I.; Shlyapnikov, A. A.; Savanevich, V. E.; Kondrashova, N. N.; Yatsenko, A. I.; Andruk, V. N.

    The UkrVO (Ukrainian Virtual Observatory) database consists of about 200 000 astronomical photographic plates and 500 000 CCD frames containing unique astronomical information for formulating important scientific tasks. This database is compiled from observations conducted in 1898--2011 at the observing sites of 8 Ukrainian observatories, with about 60 instruments. This paper deals with some principal scientific projects where the UkrVO data\\-bases are used, namely, the creation of the Joint Digitized Archive (JDA); compilation of new stellar catalogues; search for optical counterparts of gamma-ray bursts; spectroscopic study of solar flares and solar active formations; development of software for searches for new small bodies of the solar system.

  6. PH5 for integrating and archiving different data types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Steve; Hess, Derick; Beaudoin, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    PH5 is IRIS PASSCAL's file organization of HDF5 used for seismic data. The extensibility and portability of HDF5 allows the PH5 format to evolve and operate on a variety of platforms and interfaces. To make PH5 even more flexible, the seismic metadata is separated from the time series data in order to achieve gains in performance as well as ease of use and to simplify user interaction. This separation affords easy updates to metadata after the data are archived without having to access waveform data. To date, PH5 is currently used for integrating and archiving active source, passive source, and onshore-offshore seismic data sets with the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC). Active development to make PH5 fully compatible with FDSN web services and deliver StationXML is near completion. We are also exploring the feasibility of utilizing QuakeML for active seismic source representation. The PH5 software suite, PIC KITCHEN, comprises in-field tools that include data ingestion (e.g. RefTek format, SEG-Y, and SEG-D), meta-data management tools including QC, and a waveform review tool. These tools enable building archive ready data in-field during active source experiments greatly decreasing the time to produce research ready data sets. Once archived, our online request page generates a unique web form and pre-populates much of it based on the metadata provided to it from the PH5 file. The data requester then can intuitively select the extraction parameters as well as data subsets they wish to receive (current output formats include SEG-Y, SAC, mseed). The web interface then passes this on to the PH5 processing tools to generate the requested seismic data, and e-mail the requester a link to the data set automatically as soon as the data are ready. PH5 file organization was originally designed to hold seismic time series data and meta-data from controlled source experiments using RefTek data loggers. The flexibility of HDF5 has enabled us to extend the use of PH5 in several

  7. Optical Archive Organization And Strategies For The 1990S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britt, Margaret O.; Ricca, Stephen P.; Rocca, Jeffrey J.; Sicherman, George L.

    1989-05-01

    The advent of second-generation optical storage technology and user experience with PACS dictate a new look at PACS long-term database organization and optical archive strategy. Optical disk drives are growing faster and more reliable, disks and jukeboxes will hold more data for their size, and the cost per byte of optical disk storage will fall. Users are becoming more sophisticated in their use of PACS. Field experience has increased our knowledge of user needs and refined our models of optical archive usage. COnsidering these advances, this paper addresses such topics as centralized archives, standards and equipment compatibility, flexible archival and de-archival criteria, data reliability, backup strategies, and improved archive performance.

  8. The Role of Data Archives in Synoptic Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, Kevin

    The detailed study of solar cycle variations requires analysis of recorded datasets spanning many years of observations, that is, a data archive. The use of digital data, combined with powerful database server software, gives such archives new capabilities to provide, quickly and flexibly, selected pieces of information to scientists. Use of standardized protocols will allow multiple databases, independently maintained, to be seamlessly joined, allowing complex searches spanning multiple archives. These data archives also benefit from being developed in parallel with the telescope itself, which helps to assure data integrity and to provide close integration between the telescope and archive. Development of archives that can guarantee long-term data availability and strong compatibility with other projects makes solar-cycle studies easier to plan and realize.

  9. Results from the Survey of ESA Science Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arviset, C.; Baines, D.; Osuna, P.

    2013-10-01

    Most of ESA's Space Science Archives are currently hosted at ESAC, the European Space Astronomy Centre, located near Madrid, Spain. All these science archives are designed, developed, operated and maintained by a dedicated Science Archives and VO Team, providing support to all science operations centres at ESAC. At the end of 2011, a questionnaire was sent to all users of the ESAC Science Archives in the last five years, asking them about their usage frequency, their satisfaction level, the type of interfaces used (GUI or scriptable interface or others) and the purpose for which they are using the archives. The survey also allowed optionally to provide qualitative feedback. This paper presents the main results from this questionnaire, from a global perspective of all the archives.

  10. Introducing the PRIDE Archive RESTful web services.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, Florian; del-Toro, Noemi; Ternent, Tobias; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2015-07-01

    The PRIDE (PRoteomics IDEntifications) database is one of the world-leading public repositories of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics data and it is a founding member of the ProteomeXchange Consortium of proteomics resources. In the original PRIDE database system, users could access data programmatically by accessing the web services provided by the PRIDE BioMart interface. New REST (REpresentational State Transfer) web services have been developed to serve the most popular functionality provided by BioMart (now discontinued due to data scalability issues) and address the data access requirements of the newly developed PRIDE Archive. Using the API (Application Programming Interface) it is now possible to programmatically query for and retrieve peptide and protein identifications, project and assay metadata and the originally submitted files. Searching and filtering is also possible by metadata information, such as sample details (e.g. species and tissues), instrumentation (mass spectrometer), keywords and other provided annotations. The PRIDE Archive web services were first made available in April 2014. The API has already been adopted by a few applications and standalone tools such as PeptideShaker, PRIDE Inspector, the Unipept web application and the Python-based BioServices package. This application is free and open to all users with no login requirement and can be accessed at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/ws/archive/. PMID:25904633

  11. Natural sound archives: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Ranft, Richard

    2004-06-01

    Recordings of wild animals were first made in the Palearctic in 1900, in the Nearctic in 1929, in Antarctica in 1934, in Asia in 1937, and in the Neotropics in the 1940s. However, systematic collecting did not begin until the 1950s. Collections of animal sound recordings serve many uses in education, entertainment, science and nature conservation. In recent years, technological developments have transformed the ways in which sounds can be sampled, stored and accessed. Now the largest collections between them hold altogether around 0.5 million recordings with their associated data. The functioning of a major archive will be described with reference to the British Library Sound Archive. Preserving large collections for the long term is a primary concern in the digital age. While digitization and digital preservation has many advantages over analogue methods, the rate of technology change and lack of standardization are a serious problem for the world's major audio archives. Another challenge is to make collections more easily and widely accessible via electronic networks. On-line catalogues and access to the actual sounds via the internet are already available for some collections. Case studies describing the establishment and functioning of sound libraries in Mexico, Colombia and Brazil are given in individually authored sections in an Appendix. PMID:15258666

  12. Footprints in the Hubble Legacy Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubow, Stephen H.; Donaldson, T.; Gillies, K.; Greene, G.; Budavari, T.; Szalay, A.

    2010-01-01

    Footprints are geometric outlines of observations. They are displayed against a background image. The observations of the Hubble Space Telescope are defined by a set of hierarchical geometric regions of instrument coverage: exposures, combined observations, high level science products, and mosaics. In the growing global community of networked applications, the science end-user has several use cases for visualizing and accessing footprint data including scientific proposal preparation, research and analysis of generated science products, and interoperability between archives for correlation of coverage. The Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA) at Space Telescope Science Institute, in coordination with ESO-ECF and CADC, has developed a web based science user interface built on a VO service oriented architecture system to enable varying levels of astronomical community access to science products derived from the HST archive. We describe new features and technologies for the HLA footprint component web browser visualization tool and the underyling footprint services utilized by the HST Astronomers Proposal Tool (APT) in compliance with an IVOA standard data access protocol. The service infrastructure is based on a high performance spherical geometric model developed by Johns Hopkins University (JHU) and database search algorithms co-developed by STScI and JHU.

  13. Logjam: A scalable unified log file archiver

    2001-08-01

    Log files are a necessary record of events on any system. However, as systems scale, so does the volume of data captured. To complicate matters, this data can be distributed across all nodes within the system. This creates challenges in ways to obtain these files as well as archiving them in a consistent manner. It has become commonplace to develop a custom written utility for each system that is tailored specifically to that system. Formore » computer centers that contain multiple systems, each system would have their own respective utility for gathering and archiving log files. Each time a new log file is produced, a modification to the utility is necessary. With each modification, risks of errors could be introduced as well as spending time to introduce that change. This is precisely the purpose of logjam. Once installed, the code only requires modification when new features are required. A configuration file is used to identify each log file as well as where to harvest it and how to archive it. Adding a new log file is as simple as defining it in a configuration file and testing can be performed in the production environment.« less

  14. Yucca Mountain licensing support network archive assistant.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Bauer, Travis L.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Shaneyfelt, Wendy

    2008-03-01

    This report describes the Licensing Support Network (LSN) Assistant--a set of tools for categorizing e-mail messages and documents, and investigating and correcting existing archives of categorized e-mail messages and documents. The two main tools in the LSN Assistant are the LSN Archive Assistant (LSNAA) tool for recategorizing manually labeled e-mail messages and documents and the LSN Realtime Assistant (LSNRA) tool for categorizing new e-mail messages and documents. This report focuses on the LSNAA tool. There are two main components of the LSNAA tool. The first is the Sandia Categorization Framework, which is responsible for providing categorizations for documents in an archive and storing them in an appropriate Categorization Database. The second is the actual user interface, which primarily interacts with the Categorization Database, providing a way for finding and correcting categorizations errors in the database. A procedure for applying the LSNAA tool and an example use case of the LSNAA tool applied to a set of e-mail messages are provided. Performance results of the categorization model designed for this example use case are presented.

  15. The HST Milky Way Stellar Photometry Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radburn-Smith, David

    2012-10-01

    The Hubble Legacy Archive has invested a significant effort into automatically generating photometry for point sources in all HST observations regardless of the target. We estimate that this archive contains up to 800,000 Milky Way {MW} stars, distributed across the whole sky, complete to some three magnitudes fainter than SDSS. Approximately half of these stars have color information, which is required for stellar population analysis. This considerable archive is thus in need of collation, analysis, and publication.Here we propose to compile such a catalog for public access and to use it for two science goals: 1} A test of existing MW stellar models, where we will in particular constrain the fainter and more distant stellar populations; and 2} Probe the shape and structure of the MW stellar halo with a deeper star catalog than is currently available. These science cases will be used to fully define the catalog, in particular by assessing the different populations present in the observations, and by assessing the level of noise from contaminants and the completeness of the survey

  16. Logjam: A scalable unified log file archiver

    SciTech Connect

    Cardo, Nicholas P.

    2001-08-01

    Log files are a necessary record of events on any system. However, as systems scale, so does the volume of data captured. To complicate matters, this data can be distributed across all nodes within the system. This creates challenges in ways to obtain these files as well as archiving them in a consistent manner. It has become commonplace to develop a custom written utility for each system that is tailored specifically to that system. For computer centers that contain multiple systems, each system would have their own respective utility for gathering and archiving log files. Each time a new log file is produced, a modification to the utility is necessary. With each modification, risks of errors could be introduced as well as spending time to introduce that change. This is precisely the purpose of logjam. Once installed, the code only requires modification when new features are required. A configuration file is used to identify each log file as well as where to harvest it and how to archive it. Adding a new log file is as simple as defining it in a configuration file and testing can be performed in the production environment.

  17. Archiving Saudi heritage using the holographic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althagafi, A.; Richardson, M.

    2015-03-01

    This paper focuses on the use of the Yuri Nikolaevich DENISYUK holographic recording process to document, archive and display Saudi heritage. The goal of this research is to develop a technique of archiving heritage by using a high-tech holographic process to capture a three-dimensional presentation of ancient jewelry artifacts of the Saudi Heritage in particular. This study concentrates on five particular items of handmade authentic ancient metal jewelry from different parts of Saudi Arabia. When conducting this research experiments were conducted using both red-green sensitive plates sensitive to 633 nm and 532 nm respectively. Material thickness ranged between 1.5 and 3 millimeters were used, consequently in the dark room, varied chemicals for developing the holograms were employed. Red and green laser devices were also used with exposure times between 8 to 18 seconds of laser light dispersion through diffused surfaces in reflection holography. The outcome in each case was varied. The holograms captured the jewelry pieces with all the engravings and minute details, thus archiving the Saudi Heritage of that time. What makes holograms a revolutionary method for presenting valuable and/or ancient artifacts is the fact that they offer a more practical and convenient solution to travel around the world than displaying the originals items. Thus, museum visitors can enjoy and appreciate the precious artifacts otherwise unseen and lost without holography.

  18. Volatile aldehydes in libraries and archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenech, Ann; Strlič, Matija; Kralj Cigić, Irena; Levart, Alenka; Gibson, Lorraine T.; de Bruin, Gerrit; Ntanos, Konstantinos; Kolar, Jana; Cassar, May

    2010-06-01

    Volatile aldehydes are produced during degradation of paper-based materials. This may result in their accumulation in archival and library repositories. However, no systematic study has been performed so far. In the frame of this study, passive sampling was carried out at ten locations in four libraries and archives. Despite the very variable sampling locations, no major differences were found, although air-filtered repositories were found to have lower concentrations while a non-ventilated newspaper repository exhibited the highest concentrations of volatile aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, furfural and hexanal). Five employees in one institution were also provided with personal passive samplers to investigate employees' exposure to volatile aldehydes. All values were lower than the presently valid exposure limits. The concentration of volatile aldehydes, acetic acid, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in general was also compared with that of outdoor-generated pollutants. It was evident that inside the repository and particularly inside archival boxes, the concentration of VOCs and acetic acid was much higher than the concentration of outdoor-generated pollutants, which are otherwise more routinely studied in connection with heritage materials. This indicates that further work on the pro-degradative effect of VOCs on heritage materials is necessary and that monitoring of VOCs in heritage institutions should become more widespread.

  19. The Hubble Legacy Archive NICMOS grism data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudling, W.; Kümmel, M.; Haase, J.; Hook, R.; Kuntschner, H.; Lombardi, M.; Micol, A.; Stoehr, F.; Walsh, J.

    2008-11-01

    The Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA) aims to create calibrated science data from the Hubble Space Telescope archive and make them accessible via user-friendly and Virtual Observatory (VO) compatible interfaces. It is a collaboration between the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC) and the Space Telescope - European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF). Data produced by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) instruments with slitless spectroscopy modes are among the most difficult to extract and exploit. As part of the HLA project, the ST-ECF aims to provide calibrated spectra for objects observed with these HST slitless modes. In this paper, we present the HLA NICMOS G141 grism spectra. We describe in detail the calibration, data reduction and spectrum extraction methods used to produce the extracted spectra. The quality of the extracted spectra and associated direct images is demonstrated through comparison with near-IR imaging catalogues and existing near-IR spectroscopy. The output data products and their associated metadata are publicly available (http://hla.stecf.org/) through a web form, as well as a VO-compatible interface that enables flexible querying of the archive of the 2470 NICMOS G141 spectra. In total, spectra of 1923  unique targets are included.

  20. AITAS : Assembly Integration Test data Archiving System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, J.-C.; Madec, F.; Vigan, A.; Nowak, M.; Irdis Team

    2012-09-01

    The aim of AITAS is to automatically archive and index data acquired from an instrument during test and validation phase. AITAS product has been built initially to fill the needs of the IRDIS-SPHERE (ESO-VLT) project to archive and organise data during the test phase. We have developed robust and secure tools to retrieve data from the acquisition workstation, build an archive and index data by keywords to provide search functionality among large amount of data. This import of data is done automatically after setting some configuration files. In addition APIs and GUI client have been developed in order to retrieve data from a generic interface and use them in test processing phase. The end user is able to select data and retrieve using any criteria listed in the metadata of the files. One main advantage of this system is that it is intrinsically generic so that it can be used in instrument project in astrophysical laboratories without any further modifications.

  1. Automating OSIRIS Data Reduction for the Keck Observatory Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Hien D.; Holt, J.; Goodrich, R. W.; Lyke, J. E.; Gelino, C. R.; Berriman, G. B.; KOA Team

    2014-01-01

    Since the end of 2013, the Keck Observatory Archive (KOA) has served data from all active instruments on the Keck Telescopes. OSIRIS (OH-Suppressing Infra-Red Imaging Spectrograph), the last active instrument to be archived in KOA, has been in use behind the adaptive optics (AO) system at Keck since February 2005. It uses an array of tiny lenslets to simultaneously produce spectra at up to 4096 locations. Due to the complicated nature of the OSIRIS raw data, the OSIRIS team developed a comprehensive data reduction program. This data reduction system has an online mode for quick real-time reductions which are used primarily for basic data visualization and quality assessment done at the telescope while observing. The offline version of the data reduction system includes an expanded reduction method list, does more iterations for a better construction of the data cubes, and is used to produce publication-quality products. It can also use reconstruction matrices that are developed after the observations were taken, and are more refined. The KOA team is currently utilizing the standard offline reduction mode to produce quick-look browse products for the raw data. Users of the offline data reduction system generally use a graphical user interface to manually setup the reduction parameters. However, in order to reduce and serve the ~200,000 science files on disk, all of the reduction parameters and steps need to be fully automated. This pipeline will also be used to automatically produce quick-look browse products for future OSIRIS data after each night's observations. Here we discuss the complexities of OSIRIS data, the reduction system in place, methods for automating the system, performance using virtualization, and progress made to date in generating the KOA products.

  2. Automating OSIRIS Data Reduction for the Keck Observatory Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, J.; Tran, H. D.; Goodrich, R.; Berriman, G. B.; Gelino, C. R.; KOA Team

    2014-05-01

    By the end of 2013, the Keck Observatory Archive (KOA) will serve data from all active instruments on the Keck Telescopes. OSIRIS (OH-Suppressing Infra-Red Imaging Spectrograph), the last active instrument to be archived in KOA, has been in use behind the (AO) system at Keck since February 2005. It uses an array of tiny lenslets to simultaneously produce spectra at up to 4096 locations. Due to the complicated nature of the OSIRIS raw data, the OSIRIS team developed a comprehensive data reduction program. This data reduction system has an online mode for quick real-time reductions, which are used primarily for basic data visualization and quality assessment done at the telescope while observing. The offline version of the data reduction system includes an expanded reduction method list, does more iterations for a better construction of the data cubes, and is used to produce publication-quality products. It can also use reconstruction matrices that are developed after the observations were taken, and are more refined. The KOA team is currently utilizing the standard offline reduction mode to produce quick-look browse products for the raw data. Users of the offline data reduction system generally use a graphical user interface to manually setup the reduction parameters. However, in order to reduce and serve the 200,000 science files on disk, all of the reduction parameters and steps need to be fully automated. This pipeline will also be used to automatically produce quick-look browse products for future OSIRIS data after each night's observations. Here we discuss the complexities of OSIRIS data, the reduction system in place, methods for automating the system, performance using virtualization, and progress made to date in generating the KOA products.

  3. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project Archival Reference, Final Draft

    SciTech Connect

    1991-03-13

    This report provides an archival reference to the scientific information and other pertinent documents and materials associated with the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project (SSDP). This archiving process ensures that valuable technical data and information obtained during the life of the project can be retrieved, organized and maintained as a historical record for future reference. This paper describes the background of the project and the process used for archiving the materials. [DJE-2005

  4. Image Technologies for Preservation in Libraries and Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasue, Akio

    Since 1930's when microfilms first introduced in libraries and archives, image technologies have become indispensable measures for such institutions. Their importance is still growing in the present digital and internet environment. The report first traces back the history of image technologies in library and archives from the point of long term preservation of their collections. Then it points out the issues involved in order to manage library and archives preservation.

  5. 76 FR 52991 - Renewal of Advisory Committee on Electronic Records Archives

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Renewal of Advisory Committee on Electronic Records Archives AGENCY: National... Administration's (NARA) Advisory Committee on Electronic Records Archives. In accordance with Office of... Electronic Records Archives in NARA's ceiling of discretionary advisory committees. FOR FURTHER...

  6. The Starchive: An open access, open source archive of nearby and young stars and their planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Angelle; Gelino, Chris; Elfeki, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Historically, astronomers have utilized a piecemeal set of archives such as SIMBAD, the Washington Double Star Catalog, various exoplanet encyclopedias and electronic tables from the literature to cobble together stellar and exo-planetary parameters in the absence of corresponding images and spectra. As the search for planets around young stars through direct imaging, transits and infrared/optical radial velocity surveys blossoms, there is a void in the available set of to create comprehensive lists of the stellar parameters of nearby stars especially for important parameters such as metallicity and stellar activity indicators. For direct imaging surveys, we need better resources for downloading existing high contrast images to help confirm new discoveries and find ideal target stars. Once we have discovered new planets, we need a uniform database of stellar and planetary parameters from which to look for correlations to better understand the formation and evolution of these systems. As a solution to these issues, we are developing the Starchive - an open access stellar archive in the spirit of the open exoplanet catalog, the Kepler Community Follow-up Program and many others. The archive will allow users to download various datasets, upload new images, spectra and metadata and will contain multiple plotting tools to use in presentations and data interpretations. While we will highly regulate and constantly validate the data being placed into our archive the open nature of its design is intended to allow the database to be expanded efficiently and have a level of versatility which is necessary in today's fast moving, big data community. Finally, the front-end scripts will be placed on github and users will be encouraged to contribute new plotting tools. Here, I will introduce the community to the content and expected capabilities of the archive and query the audience for community feedback.

  7. An integrated picture archiving and communications system-radiology information system in a radiological department.

    PubMed

    Wiltgen, M; Gell, G; Graif, E; Stubler, S; Kainz, A; Pitzler, R

    1993-02-01

    In this report we present an integrated picture archiving and communication system (PACS)--radiology information system (RIS) which runs as part of the daily routine in the Department of Radiology at the University of Graz. Although the PACS and the RIS have been developed independently, the two systems are interfaced to ensure a unified and consistent long-term archive. The configuration connects four computer tomography scanners (one of them situated at a distance of 1 km), a magnetic resonance imaging scanner, a digital subtraction angiography unit, an evaluation console, a diagnostic console, an image display console, an archive with two optical disk drives, and several RIS terminals. The configuration allows the routine archiving of all examinations on optical disks independent of reporting. The management of the optical disks is performed by the RIS. Images can be selected for retrieval via the RIS by using patient identification or medical criteria. A special software process (PACS-MONITOR) enables the user to survey and manage image communication, archiving, and retrieval as well as to get information about the status of the system at any time and handle the different procedures in the PACS. The system is active 24 hours a day. To make the PACS operation as independent as possible from the permanent presence of a system manager (electronic data processing expert), a rule-based expert system (OPERAS; OPERating ASsistant) is in use to localize and eliminate malfunctions that occur during routine work. The PACS-RIS reduces labor and speeds access to images within radiology and clinical departments. PMID:8439578

  8. The Planetary Data System—An Accumulating Archive developed by Scientists for Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, T. H.; McLaughlin, S.; Grayzeck, E. J.; Knopf, W.; Crichton, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Since 1986 the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS) has archived, curated, and distributed digital data from NASA's planetary missions. The goals of the PDS are both to provide the planetary science community convenient access to data from NASA's missions- and to curate, maintain, and provide a permanent archive for mission data sets so that scientists will be able to access these data, including meta data, in the future. The PDS contains data from almost 60 years of NASA missions to our planetary system. The PDS is a distributed system, with nodes that are archive data centers for specific discipline areas (from planetary geology to space physics). The PDS also provides engineering support to the entire PDS through the Engineering Node. In order to adequately capture complete mission data sets into the PDS containing not only raw and reduced instrument data, but also calibration and documentation and geometry data required to interpret and use these data sets both singly and together, we (PDS) work with NASA Flight Programs and missions from the initial Announcement of Opportunity to the end of mission to define, organize, and document the data for the archive. This process includes peer-review of data sets by members of the science community to ensure that the data sets are scientifically useful, effectively organized, and well documented (and searchable). The PDS works to make the data in our accumulating archives easily searchable so that members of the science community can both query the archive to find data relevant to specific scientific investigations and easily retrieve the data for analysis. In order to ensure long-term preservation of data and make data sets more easily searchable with the new capabilities in Information Technology becoming available (and as existing technologies become obsolete), the PDS has developed and deployed a new data archiving system, known as PDS4, released in 2013. The LADEE, MAVEN, OSIRIS REx, InSight, and Mars2020 missions are

  9. Free Delivery of a 30-YEAR Vegetation Product Archive by the Biopar Land Monitoring Core Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacholczyk, P.; Makhmara, H.; Lacaze, R. N.; Baret, F.; Weiss, M.; Verger, A.

    2012-12-01

    Geoland2 project is part of the GMES EU-lead initiative and intends to prepare, validate and demonstrate pre-operational service chains and products of the Land Monitoring Core Service. The BioPar Core Monitoring Service distributes through the Geoland 2 portal global products related to biophysical variables : the Leaf Area Index (LAI), the Fraction of green Vegetation Cover (FCover), the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FAPAR) and the Normalized Differential Vegetation Index (NDVI). Long term global biophysical products are of great interest for earth science modeling applications and global change monitoring. Since end of 2011 a 12-year archive (1999-2011) of these biophysical vegetation products derived from SPOT/VEGETATION sensor, called GEOV1_VGT, is available and is continuously updated every ten days. Since this summer, a 20-year archive (1981-2000) of LAI, FAPAR and FCover biophysical vegetation products derived from the AVHRR long term data archive, called GEOV1_AVHRR, has been processed by CNES and is now available through the Geoland 2 portal. The LAI, FAPAR and FCover products issued from VGT and AVHRR data have the same characteristics (temporal resolution 10 days, global coverage) except for the spatial resolution (1/112° for VGT and 0.05° for AVHRR), with an overlap of two years (1999-2000). The evaluation of GEOV1_VGT and GEOV1_AVHRR archive indicates a very good agreement between the two datasets, including a similar level of accuracy in comparison with ground-based measurements made during the 1999-2000 overlap period. Despite that a more consistent 30-year global product at a lower resolution is very useful for communities studying carbon cycle, climate or water cycle. The last step, foreseen for this Autumn, is to process these two archives and to provide to the users a continuous 30-year vegetation product (called GEOV1_GCM) at 0.5° scale. Close to its end the BioPar project has provided demonstration products

  10. Creation of a seamless GOES/XRS flux data archive based on Yohkoh GOES database.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Aki

    2016-05-01

    The GOES X-ray flux data, i.e., solar soft X-ray flux data from the X-Ray Sensor (XRS) on board Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites, are one of the most frequently used data sources, not only for monitoring the current solar activity, but also for studyinglong-term variation of the solar irradiance. While their official archive is located at the NOAA/NCEI (National Centers for Environmental Information, formerly the National Geophysical Data Center), two GOES/XRS data archives developed under the SolarSoft database, ($SSWDB/ydb and $SSWDB/goes) are most commonly used among the solar physics research community. The former was initially developed as a part of the Yohkoh database, prepared in the Yohkoh specific data format since 1991 to the present. The latter archive started since 2002 is prepared in ASCII text format by the Solar Data Analysis Center (SDAC). Except for the most recent files at SDAC (after GOES14), the data files in these archives (Yohkoh, SDAC, and NCEI) are created separately for each available GOES satellite, which sometimes causes difficulty in reading data for long time ranges surrounding switch-over of the primary satellite. The creation of a single series of files will reduce the effort of users or of software to find available data while minimizing or eliminating data gaps.In 2011, the Yohkoh Legacy data Archive (YLA) project carefully examined the $SSWDB/ydb files to replenish their missing records with the original dataset obtained at NGDC, and thus have better time coverage (until 2010) than the SDAC archive. As a subsequenct project, we are preparing a single seamless series of solar X-ray flux based on the Yohkoh GOES database, in which the primary satellite is selected when multiple satellites are available, to create an archive from a series of primary satellites. Our current goal is to create a series of daily text files with short (0.5-4A) and long (1-8A) channel flux values at the time resolution of 1 minute, from

  11. Libraries, Archives and Museums: What's in Them for Us? PIALA '98. Selected Papers from the Pacific Islands Association of Libraries and Archives Conference (8th, Tofol, Kosrae, Federated States of Micronesia, November 17-20, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlene, Ed.

    This proceedings contains papers from the 1998 annual conference of the Pacific Islands Association of Libraries and Archives (PIALA). After welcoming remarks from Henry Robert and Isabel Rungrad, the following papers are included: "Sharing Our Successes, Discussing Our Future: A Survey of Pacific Collections Activities--Report from the University…

  12. Virtual Heritage Archives: Building a Centralized Australian Rock Art Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubt, R. A.

    2013-07-01

    This paper examines use of multi-media in the curation, presentation and promotion of rock art. It discusses the construction of a centralised Australian rock art database and explores new technologies available for looking at rock art. In 2011, Prof. Taçon Chair in Rock Art Research and Director of PERAHU (Place, Evolution and Rock Art Heritage Unit) called for a national rock art database raising awareness of the importance of preserving rock art as part of Australia's valuable Indigenous heritage (Taçon, 2011). Australia has over 100,000 rock art sites, important heritage places for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and a testament to over 10,000 years of human activity, including interactions with other peoples and the environment. Many of these sites have not been documented or recorded and are threatened by natural and cultural agents. It is becoming increasingly important to develop conservation models for the protection and preservation of sites. Indigenous cultural heritage is difficult to manage on a local government level due to complex human / time / environment relationships and the importance of intangible cultural heritage (SoE SEWPAC, 2011). Currently no centralised database system exists in Australia to curate, present and promote rock art.

  13. [The contribution of the Archive of the Military Medical Museum in summarizing the experience of the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Budko, A A; Gribovskaya, G A

    2015-06-01

    During 70 years of existence of the Military Medical Museum one of its main goals was to create an archive of military medical documents, the formation of his ideology and collecting funds, saving and promotion of unique materials related to the history of Russia, feat of arms Defenders of the Fatherland in the wars of the XX century. Creating a military medical museum archive was conceived in the beginning of the Great Patriotic War by leading figures of the military medicine--E.I.Smirnov, S.M.Bagdasaryan, V.N.Shevkunenko, A.N.Maksimenkov, who offered to collect all materials about the work of physicians at the front and in the rear, to consider the archive as a base for scientific works on the history of the military health care. Today the archive was removed from the Army Medical Museum and now it is a branch of the Central Archive of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation (military medical records). His staff keeps the traditions established by predecessors and use in their activities a wealth of experience and background research. PMID:26442319

  14. Accessing picture archiving and communication system text and image information through personal computers.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, M R; Wong, A W; Lee, J K; Huang, H K

    1994-11-01

    Recent advances in storage technology have made possible the archiving of tremendous amounts of text and image information within a picture archiving and communication system (PACS). However, a radiologist's access to this information typically has been limited to viewing workstations designed primarily to support clinical activities. Unfortunately, these workstations often overlook the benefits of PACS in teaching and research applications, which are of significant importance in an academic institution. To support such activities at our own institution, we have included two major objectives in our second-generation PACS development: (1) to provide access to text and image information archived within our PACS in an environment that is easily accessible to and comfortable for our radiologists, namely, their own Macintosh (Apple Computer, Cupertino, CA) personal computers; and (2) to provide this information in standard Macintosh formats, so that tools with which radiologists are already familiar can be used in frequently performed teaching activities--the production of slides and prints, the maintenance of personal teaching and research files, and specialized image analysis and processing. PMID:7976909

  15. Beagle Dog Tissue Archive (previously part of National Radiobiology Archives): from the Janus Tissue Archive at Northwestern University

    DOE Data Explorer

    Watson, Charles R.

    Following the advent of the atomic age, many nations have investigated the effects of radioactive exposure in animal models. Some of these investigations involved costly and unique experiments that produced tissue and data archives which are unlikely to be reproduced. In an effort to extract the value from these collections, programs have started in Japan, Europe, and America to preserve and make public the data and tissues from these studies for further investigation. The Beagle Dog Experiments, carried out at Argonne National Laboratory from 1952 to 1991 by Thomas Fritz, William Norris, and Tom Seed and supported by grants from the Atomic Energy Commission, investigated the effects of Cobalt-60 radiation on beagle dogs. Documentation from these studies is availible in pdf form. This web portal seeks to make accessible the animal tissues and study data from the Beagle Dog Experiments using data organized by Charles Watson. Use the search form to the left to look for dog data from particular experimental conditions. Click a dog number to return the full dog record. Use the dog record to find tissues of interest and make a sample tissue request. These tissue samples and the data were known until recently as the the U.S. National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) and were maintained as the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) at Washington State University. Life-span studies using beagle dogs were done at the Argonne National Laboratory, University of California at Davis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, and the University of Utah. The results and many microscope slides from these life-span studies, totaling some 6000 dogs, are now available to researchers. A seminal work included in the Archive is The Atlas of Experimentally-Induced Neoplasia in the Beagle Dog (Watson et al, 1997).

  16. Preservation of carbonate clumped isotopes in sedimentary paleoclimate archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, G. A.; Passey, B. H.; Grossman, E. L.; Shenton, B.; Perez-Huerta, A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is increasingly used to reconstruct paleotemperatures of ancient terrestrial environments. One promising application is elucidating paleoelevation from carbonate archives such as paleosols, lacustrine marls, and fossil freshwater shells. Unlike conventional stable isotope approaches (e.g., mineral δ18O or δD), clumped isotope thermometry is independent of the isotopic composition of the precipitating waters and can therefore be used to reconstruct elevation by both the temperature-altitude relationship and the rainfall δ18O-altitude relationship. However, interpretation of clumped isotope data is not without its own complications. Like conventional stable isotopes, clumped isotope paleotemperatures can be effectively reset to warmer values by dissolution/reprecipitation-type diagenesis during sedimentary burial. It is also known that carbonate clumped isotope bonds (i.e., 13C-18O) are susceptible to 'reordering' in the solid mineral lattice at warmer burial temperatures, with laboratory studies of natural carbonates indicating activation of this phenomenon at temperatures as low as 100 °C over geologic timescales. A challenge in applying carbonate clumped isotope thermometry to natural samples is now evaluating terrestrial archives with respect to both types of alteration: 'open-system' alteration and 'closed-system' bond reordering. In this talk we will review our experimental efforts to constrain the kinetics of clumped isotope reordering, with relevance to low-temperature carbonates like fossil shells and early diagenetic minerals, and present new laboratory data that further inform our theoretical framework for the mechanism(s) of 13C-18O bond reordering. Together with traditional analytical and petrographic screening for recrystallization, empirical and laboratory studies of carbonate clumped isotope reordering represent the next steps in evaluating isotopic records of paleoclimate, paleobiology, and paleoelevation

  17. Classification of Compact Submillimeter Sources in the Planck Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Chelen H.; Border, C.; O'Connor, K.; Rothrock, D.; Chary, R.; Bingham, M.; Clark, M.; Ernst, M.; Gilbert, S.; Koop, S.; Maddaus, M.; Miller, I.; O'Bryan, A.; Ravelomanantsoa, T.; SanMiguel, D.; Schmidt, L.; Searls, E.; Tong, W.; Torres, O.; Zeidner, A.; NITARP

    2013-01-01

    The Planck satellite is a third-generation space-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiment with greater resolution and broader frequency range than its predecessors, COBE and WMAP. The completion of the first high-sensitivity submillimeter all-sky survey in April 2010 allows a unique opportunity to study the classes of astronomical sources that are foregrounds to the CMB. This project uses the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalog (ERCSC) to classify compact objects, which have not previously been seen by IRAS. In an effort to avoid the effects of confusion from the high density of sources in the Galactic plane, we confine our study to |b|>20°. Due to the ~5 arcmin resolution of Planck data and resultant uncertainty in the positions of sources, we used WISE 12-µm and 24-µm data to determine accurate positions and an estimate of the far-infrared color temperature of the sources. Other catalogs, including Akari, IRAS, Sloan and 2MASS, were then searched to pinpoint the counterpart of the source and obtain their spectral energy distribution (SED). The SED was used to constrain the origin of the far-infrared emission and provide further clues as to the nature of the sources. Preliminary results show Planck ERCSC sources include planetary nebulae, star-forming galaxies, stars with surrounding dust, and cold stellar cores. Teachers and students from four schools are active participants in the data analysis process to bring authentic research into the classroom. This research was made possible through the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Project (NITARP) and was funded by NASA Astrophysics Data Program and Archive Outreach funds.

  18. Sound Recordings in the Audiovisual Archives Division of the National Archives. Preliminary Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Mayfield S.; Waffen, Leslie C.

    Some 47,000 sound recordings dating from the turn of the century have been collected in the National Archives. These recordings, consisting of recordings of press conferences, panel discussions, interviews, speeches, court and conference proceedings, entertainment programs, and news broadcasts, are listed in this paper by government agency. The…

  19. Expert Systems Technology and Its Implication for Archives. National Archives Technical Information Paper No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelson, Avra

    This report introduces archivists to the potential of expert systems for improving archives administration and alerts them to ways in which they can expect intelligent technologies to impact federal record-keeping systems and scholarly research methods. The report introduces the topic by describing expert systems used in three Fortune 500…

  20. International Data Archive and Analysis Center. I. International Relations Archive. II. Voluntary International Coordination. III. Attachments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Warren; Tanter, Raymond

    The International Relations Archive undertakes as its primary goals the acquisition, management and dissemination of international affairs data. The first document enclosed is a copy of the final machine readable codebook prepared for the data from the Political Events Project, 1948-1965. Also included is a copy of the final machine-readable…

  1. The Sky Brightness Data Archive (SBDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craine, Eric R.; Craine, Erin M.; Craine, Brian L.

    2011-05-01

    Although many astronomers have long been sensitive to issues of light pollution and deteriorating sky quality it is only in recent years that such interest has extended to other groups including, among others, ecologists, health professionals, and urban planners. Issues of light pollution and loss of dark skies are starting to appear in the scientific literature in the context of health and behavior impacts on both human and animal life. Nonetheless, a common deficiency in most such studies is the absence of historical or baseline data against which to compare sky brightness trends and temporal changes. To address this deficiency we have begun to collect a variety of types of quantitative sky brightness data for insertion in an international sky brightness archive that can be accessed for research projects which are dependent upon an understanding of the nature of local light pollution issues. To aid this process we have developed a mobile sky brightness meter which automatically logs sky brightness and observation location. The device can be stationary for long periods of time or can be easily transported for continuous sky brightness measurement from ground vehicles, boats, or aircraft. The sampling rate is typically about 0.25Hz. We present here examples of different modes of sky brightness measurement, various means of displaying and analyzing such data, ways to interpret natural astronomical phenomena apparent in the data, and suggest a number of complementary scientific projects that may capture the interest of both professional and amateur scientists. Finally, we discuss the status of the archive and ways that potential contributors may submit their observations for publication in the archive.

  2. Picture archiving and communications systems (PACS).

    PubMed

    Honeyman, J C; Frost, M M; Huda, W; Loeffler, W; Ott, M; Staab, E V

    1994-01-01

    Although there has been a recent increase in interest in picture archiving and communications systems (PACS) topics, little has been published to assist the non-technical person in understanding the complexities of the technologies required for a PACS implementation. This issue of Current Problems in Radiology defines each PACS component and explains why each is important in a system design. PACS installations at the University of Florida are used as examples to tie the concepts together. The infrastructure required for PACS consists of the information system interfaces, networks, and databases. Information system interfaces guarantee consistent patient data across all platforms and reduce labor requirements by eliminating duplicate data entry. Data networks move information from the originating location to users around the hospital, clinic, campus, city, or world. In the PACS environment, the data consist of patient and study information as well as images and information about these images. Databases organize the data from multiple sources into a coherent package that can be queried for many different purposes, such as retrieving images, reviewing patient and study information, studying practice statistics, and performing outcomes analysis. PACS components consist of acquisition nodes, archives, and output devices. Acquisition nodes may include "digital modalities" such as CT, MRI, nuclear medicine, and computed radiography (CR), along with devices to convert from analog to digital, such as digitizers and frame grabbers. Options for archives are discussed along with configuration schemes. Output devices include both hard copy (film and paper prints) and soft copy (workstations for display and diagnosis). Finally, a description of the PACS installations at the University of Florida is presented, with comments on some of the difficulties and complexities encountered. A discussion of the cost and benefits of PACS is included, along with a forecast of the future of

  3. Rosetta Planetary Science Archive (PSA) Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Kristin R.; Cardesin, A.; Barthelemy, M.; Diaz del Rio, J.; Zender, J.; Arviset, C.

    2006-09-01

    The Planetary Science Archive (PSA) is an online database (accessible via http://www.rssd.esa.int/PSA) implemented by ESA/RSSD. Currently the PSA contains the science data from the Giotto (Halley), Mars Express and SMART-1 (Moon) missions, and the Rosetta Supplementary Archive (Wirtanen). The PSA user is offered a broad range of search possibilities. Search queries can be combined without restrictions and are executed across the whole database. The PSA utilizes the Planetary Data System (PDS) standard. In spring 2007 the PSA will provide the first science and engineering data collected by Rosetta. In preparation for the initial Peer Review to be performed before publication of these data, an Internal Review was held in March 2006, executed by staff internal to the organizations responsible for the Rosetta archiving (ESA, PDS, CNES). The Internal Reviewers identified shortcomings in documentation, data structures, and completeness of the data delivery. They recommended the usage of unified conventions and formats across different instruments. Work is ongoing to include standardized geometry information in the datasets. Rosetta was launched in March 2004 to rendezvous with comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (C-G) in May 2014. After having placed a lander on the comet's surface, the Rosetta orbiter will continue to orbit C-G and accompany the comet through perihelion. Rosetta makes use of three Earth swingbys and one Mars swingby in order to reach C-G. Rosetta will also perform close flybys at two asteroids, namely 2867 Steins in September 2008 and 21 Lutetia in July 2010. In addition, Rosetta makes scientific observations of targets of opportunity, e.g. lightcurves of the flyby asteroids to study the rotation, and plasma measurements when passing through cometary ion tails or meteoroid streams. Rosetta continuously monitored the encounter of the Deep Impact probe with comet 9P/Tempel 1 over an extended period of 16 days around the impact on 4 July 2005.

  4. Mining scientific data archives through metadata generation

    SciTech Connect

    Springmeyer, R.; Werner, N.; Long, J.

    1997-04-01

    Data analysis and management tools typically have not supported the documenting of data, so scientists must manually maintain all information pertaining to the context and history of their work. This metadata is critical to effective retrieval and use of the masses of archived data, yet little of it exists on-line or in an accessible format. Exploration of archived legacy data typically proceeds as a laborious process, using commands to navigate through file structures on several machines. This file-at-a-time approach needs to be replaced with a model that represents data as collections of interrelated objects. The tools that support this model must focus attention on data while hiding the complexity of the computational environment. This problem was addressed by developing a tool for exploring large amounts of data in UNIX directories via automatic generation of metadata summaries. This paper describes the model for metadata summaries of collections and the Data Miner tool for interactively traversing directories and automatically generating metadata that serves as a quick overview and index to the archived data. The summaries include thumbnail images as well as links to the data, related directories, and other metadata. Users may personalize the metadata by adding a title and abstract to the summary, which is presented as an HTML page viewed with a World Wide Web browser. We have designed summaries for 3 types of collections of data: contents of a single directory; virtual directories that represent relations between scattered files; and groups of related calculation files. By focusing on the scientists` view of the data mining task, we have developed techniques that assist in the ``detective work `` of mining without requiring knowledge of mundane details about formats and commands. Experiences in working with scientists to design these tools are recounted.

  5. GLAS Long-Term Archive: Preservation and Stewardship for a Vital Earth Observing Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, D. K.; Moses, J. F.; Zwally, J.; Schutz, B. E.; Hancock, D.; McAllister, M.; Webster, D.; Bond, C.

    2012-12-01

    Data Stewardship, preservation, and reproducibility are fast becoming principal parts of a data manager's work. In an era of distributed data and information systems, it is of vital importance that organizations make a commitment to both current and long-term goals of data management and the preservation of scientific data. Satellite missions and instruments go through a lifecycle that involves pre-launch calibration, on-orbit data acquisition and product generation, and final reprocessing. Data products and descriptions flow to the archives for distribution on a regular basis during the active part of the mission. However there is additional information from the product generation and science teams needed to ensure the observations will be useful for long term climate studies. Examples include ancillary input datasets, product generation software, and production history as developed by the team during the course of product generation. These data and information will need to be archived after product data processing is completed. NASA has developed a set of Earth science data and information content requirements for long term preservation that is being used for all the EOS missions as they come to completion. Since the ICESat/GLAS mission was one of the first to end, NASA and NSIDC, in collaboration with the science team, are collecting data, software, and documentation, preparing for long-term support of the ICESat mission. For a long-term archive, it is imperative to preserve sufficient information about how products were prepared in order to ensure future researchers that the scientific results are accurate, understandable, and useable. Our experience suggests data centers know what to preserve in most cases. That is, the processing algorithms along with the Level 0 or Level 1a input and ancillary products used to create the higher-level products will be archived and made available to users. In other cases, such as pre-launch, calibration/validation, and test

  6. Digitisation Projects at the University of Dundee Archive Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Caroline

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the reasons behind, and issues involved in digitisation projects at archival repositories. Design/methodology/approach: The paper uses practical examples from the University of Dundee Archive Services to consider why archivists devote time and resources to digitising collections and to mounting digital images online. Advantages…

  7. Remembering the Backstory: Why Keeping and Promoting School Archives Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Germain, Janine

    2016-01-01

    As a consulting archivist, the author always thinking about the "backstory" of a place, how an institution's legacy is cultivated and preserved, and how all of the stuff a school collects over time can reveal the culture of the place. School archives are by far a favorite "genre" of archive for the author, primarily because she…

  8. 40 CFR 58.16 - Data submittal and archiving requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Data submittal and archiving requirements. 58.16 Section 58.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) AMBIENT AIR QUALITY SURVEILLANCE Monitoring Network § 58.16 Data submittal and archiving requirements. (a) The state, or...

  9. 36 CFR 1253.1 - National Archives Building.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hours of the Office of the Federal Register are located in 1 CFR 2.3. ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Archives Building. 1253.1 Section 1253.1 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS...

  10. The American Archival Profession and Information Technology Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of the use of standards by archivists highlights the U.S. MARC AMC (Archives-Manuscript Control) format for reporting archival records and manuscripts; their interest in specific standards being developed for the OSI (Open Systems Interconnection) reference model; and the management of records in electronic formats. (16 references) (LAE)

  11. SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND MENTAL HEALTH DATA ARCHIVE (SAMHDA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive (SAMHDA) is an initiative of the Office of Applied Studies, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. The goal of the archive is to provide re...

  12. Management of Archives and Manuscript Collections for Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, Richard H., Ed.

    1975-01-01

    The January 1975 issue of "Drexel Library Quarterly" is devoted to the management of archives and manuscript collections. Following a brief preface, the series of eight articles begins with an overview of establishing and administering an archives or manuscript program. Next is a discussion of the problems of defining manuscript collections and…

  13. Professional Training for Encoded Archival Description in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This paper represents an abridgement of a panel session that reported on the status of training for archivists in the use of Encoded Archival Description (EAD) in seven countries (France, Germany, Netherlands, Portugal, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and United States). It touched on related archival descriptive standards and practices and…

  14. Minimal Processing: Its Context and Influence in the Archival Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorzalski, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Since its publication in 2005, Mark A. Greene and Dennis Meissner's "More Product, Less Process: Revamping Traditional Archival Processing" has led to much discussion and self-examination within the archival community about working through backlogs. This article discusses the impact of Greene and Meissner's work and considers the questions and…

  15. The Archive Effect: Appropriation Films and the Experience of History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Jaimie Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of cinema, filmmakers have appropriated previously shot visual-- and later audiovisual--documents and recontextualized them in their own films for various ends. Because these documents have generally derived from official state or commercial film archives, they have come to be referred to as "archival documents." Endowed with…

  16. Rejected Manuscripts in Publishers' Archives: Legal Rights and Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamburger, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on an analysis of how various archival repositories deal with rejected manuscripts in publishers' archives as part of existing collections and as potential donations, and includes suggestions for ways to provide access while maintaining the author's legal rights. Viewpoints from the journal editor, author, archivist, and…

  17. Using Information Visualization to Support Access to Archival Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Robert B.

    2005-01-01

    As more archival metadata and archival records become available online, providing effective interfaces to those materials is increasingly important to give users access. This article describes five approaches from the hypertext and visualization research communities which can be used to improve such access: (1) navigating hierarchical structures,…

  18. Promoting Reflexivity and Inclusivity in Archival Education, Research, and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Kelvin L.; Gilliland, Anne J.

    2010-01-01

    The area of archival studies today transcends the professional field of archival science. It encompasses an ever-broadening array of disciplinary discussions and methodological approaches that are identifying, critiquing, and addressing the shifting social, cultural, philosophical, and political, as well as the technological, imperatives of record…

  19. The Archival Photograph and Its Meaning: Formalisms for Modeling Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Allen C.

    2009-01-01

    This article explores ontological principles and their potential applications in the formal description of archival photographs. Current archival descriptive practices are reviewed and the larger question is addressed: do archivists who are engaged in describing photographs need a more formalized system of representation, or do existing encoding…

  20. Assessment of Self-Archiving in Institutional Repositories: Across Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xia, Jingfeng

    2007-01-01

    This research examined self-archiving practices by four disciplines in seven institutional repositories. By checking each individual item for its metadata and deposition status, the research found that a disciplinary culture is not obviously presented. Rather, self-archiving is regulated by a liaison system and a mandate policy.