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Sample records for active bacterial cells

  1. Enhanced Efflux Activity Facilitates Drug Tolerance in Dormant Bacterial Cells.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yingying; Zhao, Zhilun; Li, Yingxing; Zou, Jin; Ma, Qi; Zhao, Yanna; Ke, Yuehua; Zhu, Yun; Chen, Huiyi; Baker, Matthew A B; Ge, Hao; Sun, Yujie; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Bai, Fan

    2016-04-21

    Natural variations in gene expression provide a mechanism for multiple phenotypes to arise in an isogenic bacterial population. In particular, a sub-group termed persisters show high tolerance to antibiotics. Previously, their formation has been attributed to cell dormancy. Here we demonstrate that bacterial persisters, under β-lactam antibiotic treatment, show less cytoplasmic drug accumulation as a result of enhanced efflux activity. Consistently, a number of multi-drug efflux genes, particularly the central component TolC, show higher expression in persisters. Time-lapse imaging and mutagenesis studies further establish a positive correlation between tolC expression and bacterial persistence. The key role of efflux systems, among multiple biological pathways involved in persister formation, indicates that persisters implement a positive defense against antibiotics prior to a passive defense via dormancy. Finally, efflux inhibitors and antibiotics together effectively attenuate persister formation, suggesting a combination strategy to target drug tolerance.

  2. Enhanced Efflux Activity Facilitates Drug Tolerance in Dormant Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Yingying; Zhao, Zhilun; Li, Yingxing; Zou, Jin; Ma, Qi; Zhao, Yanna; Ke, Yuehua; Zhu, Yun; Chen, Huiyi; Baker, Matthew A.B.; Ge, Hao; Sun, Yujie; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Bai, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Natural variations in gene expression provide a mechanism for multiple phenotypes to arise in an isogenic bacterial population. In particular, a sub-group termed persisters show high tolerance to antibiotics. Previously, their formation has been attributed to cell dormancy. Here we demonstrate that bacterial persisters, under β-lactam antibiotic treatment, show less cytoplasmic drug accumulation as a result of enhanced efflux activity. Consistently, a number of multi-drug efflux genes, particularly the central component TolC, show higher expression in persisters. Time-lapse imaging and mutagenesis studies further establish a positive correlation between tolC expression and bacterial persistence. The key role of efflux systems, among multiple biological pathways involved in persister formation, indicates that persisters implement a positive defense against antibiotics prior to a passive defense via dormancy. Finally, efflux inhibitors and antibiotics together effectively attenuate persister formation, suggesting a combination strategy to target drug tolerance. PMID:27105118

  3. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide activates CD57-negative human NK cells.

    PubMed

    Kanevskiy, L M; Erokhina, S A; Streltsova, M A; Telford, W G; Sapozhnikov, A M; Kovalenko, E I

    2014-12-01

    NK cells play an important regulatory role in sepsis by induction and augmentation of proinflammatory reactions in early stages of the septic process and by suppression of immune response in later stages of inflammation. The present work was aimed at the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the main pathogenic factor of sepsis development, on human NK cells ex vivo. We show that LPS activates immature CD57-negative NK cells, which typically constitute less than half of the normal NK cell population in human peripheral blood. Under conditions of NK cell stimulation with IL-2, addition of LPS provokes an increase in IFN-γ production. However, LPS both increased and inhibited NK cell cytotoxic activity. It is important to note that the activation of NK cells on LPS addition was observed in the absence of TLR4 on the NK cell surface. These results confirm our previous data arguing for a direct interaction of LPS with NK cells and evidence an atypical mechanism of LPS-induced NK cell activation without the involvement of surface TLR4.

  4. Fluorometric cell-based assay for β-galactosidase activity in probiotic gram-positive bacterial cells - Lactobacillus helveticus.

    PubMed

    Watson, Amanda L; Chiu, Norman H L

    2016-09-01

    Although methods for measuring β-galactosidase activity in intact gram-negative bacterial cells have been reported, the methods may not be applicable to measuring β-galactosidase activity in gram-positive bacterial cells. This report focuses on the development of a fluorometric cell-based assay for measuring β-galactosidase activity in gram-positive cells.

  5. Prodigiosin inhibits motility and activates bacterial cell death revealing molecular biomarkers of programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Darshan, N; Manonmani, H K

    2016-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of prodigiosin from Serratia nematodiphila darsh1, a bacterial pigment was tested against few food borne bacterial pathogens Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The mode of action of prodigiosin was studied. Prodigiosin induced bactericidal activity indicating a stereotypical set of biochemical and morphological feature of Programmed cell death (PCD). PCD involves DNA fragmentation, generation of ROS, and expression of a protein with caspase-like substrate specificity in bacterial cells. Prodigiosin was observed to be internalized into bacterial cells and was localized predominantly in the membrane and the nuclear fraction, thus, facilitating intracellular trafficking and then binding of prodigiosin to the bacterial DNA. Corresponding to an increasing concentration of prodigiosin, the level of certain proteases were observed to increase in bacteria studied, thus initiating the onset of PCD. Prodigiosin at a sub-inhibitory concentration inhibits motility of pathogens. Our observations indicated that prodigiosin could be a promising antibacterial agent and could be used in the prevention of bacterial infections. PMID:27460563

  6. Prodigiosin inhibits motility and activates bacterial cell death revealing molecular biomarkers of programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Darshan, N; Manonmani, H K

    2016-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of prodigiosin from Serratia nematodiphila darsh1, a bacterial pigment was tested against few food borne bacterial pathogens Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The mode of action of prodigiosin was studied. Prodigiosin induced bactericidal activity indicating a stereotypical set of biochemical and morphological feature of Programmed cell death (PCD). PCD involves DNA fragmentation, generation of ROS, and expression of a protein with caspase-like substrate specificity in bacterial cells. Prodigiosin was observed to be internalized into bacterial cells and was localized predominantly in the membrane and the nuclear fraction, thus, facilitating intracellular trafficking and then binding of prodigiosin to the bacterial DNA. Corresponding to an increasing concentration of prodigiosin, the level of certain proteases were observed to increase in bacteria studied, thus initiating the onset of PCD. Prodigiosin at a sub-inhibitory concentration inhibits motility of pathogens. Our observations indicated that prodigiosin could be a promising antibacterial agent and could be used in the prevention of bacterial infections.

  7. Bacterial Manipulation of NK Cell Regulatory Activity Increases Susceptibility to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Brandon S.; Schmidt, Rebecca L.; Jamieson, Amanda; Merkel, Patricia; Knight, Vijaya; Cole, Caroline M.; Raulet, David H.; Lenz, Laurel L.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells produce interferon (IFN)-γ and thus have been suggested to promote type I immunity during bacterial infections. Yet, Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) and some other pathogens encode proteins that cause increased NK cell activation. Here, we show that stimulation of NK cell activation increases susceptibility during Lm infection despite and independent from robust NK cell production of IFNγ. The increased susceptibility correlated with IL-10 production by responding NK cells. NK cells produced IL-10 as their IFNγ production waned and the Lm virulence protein p60 promoted induction of IL-10 production by mouse and human NK cells. NK cells consequently exerted regulatory effects to suppress accumulation and activation of inflammatory myeloid cells. Our results reveal new dimensions of the role played by NK cells during Lm infection and demonstrate the ability of this bacterial pathogen to exploit the induction of regulatory NK cell activity to increase host susceptibility. PMID:27295349

  8. Neutrophil cell death, activation and bacterial infection in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Watt, A; Courtney, J; Moore, J; Ennis, M; Elborn, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterised by chronic endobronchial bacterial infection and neutrophil mediated inflammation. Neutrophil apoptosis is essential for the resolution of inflammation. This study assessed the relationship between levels of neutrophil apoptosis and sputum microbiology in matched clinically stable patients with CF. Methods: Sputum was induced from 34 patients (nine with no Gram negative infection, 10 colonised with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 with Burkholderia cenocepacia, and five with other infections). Apoptotic neutrophils measured by flow cytometric Annexin V/propidium iodide staining and morphology were similar in all groups. Results: Patients infected with P aeruginosa or B cenocepacia had a significantly lower percentage of viable neutrophils in the sputum than those with no Gram negative infection (Kruskal-Wallis p = 0.01, median (interquartile range (IQR)) 14.2% (9.4–21.6), 15.8% (12.3–19.5), and 48.4% (23.0–66.4); p = 0.003 and p = 0.002, respectively). They also had significantly higher levels of secondary necrotic granulocytes in sputum than patients with no Gram negative infection (Kruskal-Wallis p<0.0001, median (IQR) 55.5% (48.4–64.5), 50.4% (44.6–61.9), and 24.8% (14.4–30.5); p<0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively). Neutrophils (x106/g sputum) in P aeruginosa infected patients (Kruskal-Wallis p = 0.05, median (IQR) 6.3 (3.5–12.7)) and B cenocepacia infected patients (5.7 (1.5–14.5)) were significantly higher than in the group with no Gram negative infection (0.5 (0.5–4.3), p = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). Conclusion: These results suggest that cell death and clearance may be altered in patients with CF colonised with P aeruginosa and B cenocepacia compared with those with no Gram negative infection. PMID:16061707

  9. Experimental evaluation of decrease in bacterial activity due to cell death and activity decay in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaodi; Wang, Qilin; Zhang, Xiangping; Cao, Yali; van Mark Loosdrecht, C M

    2009-08-01

    Decrease in bacterial activity (cell decay) in activated sludge can be attributed to cell death (reduction in the amount of active bacteria) and activity decay (reduction in the specific activity of active bacteria). The aim of this study was to experimentally differentiate between cell death and activity decay as a source of decrease in microbial activity. By means of measuring maximal oxygen uptake rates, verifying membrane integrity by live/dead staining and verifying presence of 16S rRNA with fluorescence in-situ hybridization, the decay rates and the death rates of ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB), nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and ordinary heterotrophic organisms (OHOs) were determined respectively in a nitrifying sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and a heterotrophic SBR. The experiments revealed that in the nitrifying system activity decay contributed 47% and 82% to the decreased activities of AOB and NOB and that cell death was responsible for 53% and 18% of decreases in their respective activities. In the heterotrophic system, activity decay took a share of 78% in the decreased activity of OHOs, and cell death was only responsible for 22% of decrease in their activity. The difference between the importance of cell death on the decreased activities of AOB and OHOs might be caused by the mechanisms of substrate storage and/or cryptic growth/death-regeneration of OHOs. The different nutrient sources for AOB and NOB might be the reason for a relatively smaller fraction of cell death in NOB.

  10. Are the actively respiring cells (CTC+) those responsible for bacterial production in aquatic environments?

    PubMed

    Servais, P; Agogué, H; Courties, C; Joux, F; Lebaron, P

    2001-04-01

    The 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) staining method is commonly and increasingly used to detect and to enumerate actively respiring cells (CTC+ cells) in aquatic systems. However, this method remains controversial since some authors promote this technique while others pointed out several drawbacks of the method. Using flow cytometry (FCM), we showed that CTC staining kinetics vary greatly from one sample to another. Therefore, there is no universal staining protocol that can be applied to aquatic bacterial communities. Furthermore, using (3)H-leucine incorporation, it was shown that the CTC dye has a rapid toxic effect on bacterial cells by inhibiting protein synthesis, a key physiological function. The coupling of radioactive labelling with cell sorting by FCM suggested that CTC+ cells contribute to less than 60% of the whole bacterial activity determined at the community level. From these results, it is clearly demonstrated that the CTC method is not valid to detect active bacteria, i.e. cells responsible for bacterial production.

  11. Vaginal bacterial flora activates rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Brzezińska - Błaszczyk, E.; Wasiela, M.

    2002-01-01

    Sixteen strains of physiological and pathological vaginal bacteria were tested for their ability to secrete histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro. We noticed that Mycoplasma hominis-induced histamine release was very high (up to 53.6%). The stimulation of rat mast cells with Staphylococccus cohnii, Staphylococcus coagulase(-) (two strains), Ureaplasma urealyticum, Peptostreptococcus spp., Bacteroides capillosus, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae resulted in lower but significant histamine secretion (11.2%-17.5%). Other bacteria strains (Staphylococcus epidermidids, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Actinomyces naeslundii (two strains) and Lactobacillus fermentum (two strains) caused very low (4.2% - 8.8%) histamine release.

  12. Human-restricted bacterial pathogens block shedding of epithelial cells by stimulating integrin activation.

    PubMed

    Muenzner, Petra; Bachmann, Verena; Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Hentschel, Jochen; Hauck, Christof R

    2010-09-01

    Colonization of mucosal surfaces is the key initial step in most bacterial infections. One mechanism protecting the mucosa is the rapid shedding of epithelial cells, also termed exfoliation, but it is unclear how pathogens counteract this process. We found that carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-binding bacteria colonized the urogenital tract of CEA transgenic mice, but not of wild-type mice, by suppressing exfoliation of mucosal cells. CEA binding triggered de novo expression of the transforming growth factor receptor CD105, changing focal adhesion composition and activating beta1 integrins. This manipulation of integrin inside-out signaling promotes efficient mucosal colonization and represents a potential target to prevent or cure bacterial infections. PMID:20813953

  13. Ion Channels Activated by Mechanical Forces in Bacterial and Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Sokabe, Masahiro; Sawada, Yasuyuki; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Since the first discovery of mechanosensitive ion channel (MSC) in non-sensory cells in 1984, a variety of MSCs has been identified both in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. One of the central issues concerning MSCs is to understand the molecular and biophysical mechanisms of how mechanical forces activate/open MSCs. It has been well established that prokaryotic (mostly bacterial) MSCs are activated exclusively by membrane tension. Thus the problem to be solved with prokaryotic MSCs is the mechanisms how the MSC proteins receive tensile forces from the lipid bilayer and utilize them for channel opening. On the other hand, the activation of many eukaryotic MSCs crucially depends on tension in the actin cytoskeleton. By using the actin cytoskeleton as a force sensing antenna, eukaryotic MSCs have obtained sophisticated functions such as remote force sensing and force-direction sensing, which bacterial MSCs do not have. Actin cytoskeletons also give eukaryotic MSCs an interesting and important function called "active touch sensing", by which cells can sense rigidity of their substrates. The contractile actin cytoskeleton stress fiber (SF) anchors its each end to a focal adhesion (FA) and pulls the substrate to generate substrate-rigidity-dependent stresses in the FA. It has been found that those stresses are sensed by some Ca2+-permeable MSCs existing in the vicinity of FAs, thus the MSCs work as a substrate rigidity sensor that can transduce the rigidity into intracellular Ca2+ levels. This short review, roughly constituting of two parts, deals with molecular and biophysical mechanisms underlying the MSC activation process mostly based on our recent studies; (1) structure-function in bacterial MSCs activation at the atomic level, and (2) roles of actin cytoskeletons in the activation of eukaryotic MSCs.

  14. Distinguishing activity decay and cell death from bacterial decay for two types of methanogens.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaodi; Cai, Zhengqing; Fu, Kunming; Zhao, Dongye

    2012-03-15

    As bacterial decay consists of cell death and activity decay, and the corresponding information about AOB/NOB, OHO, PAOs and GAOs has been experimentally acquired, another functional type of bacteria in biological wastewater treatment, methanogens, remains to be investigated, to gather the same information, which is extremely important for such bacteria with low growth rates. With successfully selection and enrichment of both aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens, and by means of measuring specific methane activity (SMA) and hydrogen consumption rate (HCR), a series of decay experiments and molecular techniques such as FISH verification and LIVE/DEAD staining revealed, identified and calculated the decay and death rates of both aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens respectively. The results indicated that the decay rates of aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens were 0.070 and 0.034 d(-1) respectively, and the death rates were thus calculated at 0.022 and 0.016 d(-1) respectively. For this reason, cell deaths were only responsible for 31% and 47% of the total bacterial decay of aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens, and activity decays actually contributed significantly to the total bacterial decay, respectively at 69% and 53%.

  15. Assessment of total bacterial cells in extended aeration activated sludge plants using flow cytometry as a microbial monitoring tool.

    PubMed

    Abzazou, Tarik; Salvadó, Humbert; Bruguera-Casamada, Carmina; Simón, Pedro; Lardín, Carlos; Araujo, Rosa M

    2015-08-01

    The extended aeration activated sludge (EAAS) process is one of the most applied biological processes in small towns. Here, we study the abundance and viability of total bacterial cells in two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) operating with an EAAS process. We use flow cytometry (FCM) combined with SYTO13 and propidium iodide (PI) dyes as a rapid, easy, reliable and accurate microbial monitoring tool. A disaggregation procedure with an ultrasonic bath was designed to detach total bacterial cells from activated sludge flocs for subsequent FCM analysis. This procedure permitted the recovery of total bacterial cells from sludge flocs without affecting bacterial viability, as indicated by bacterial strain controls. Since FCM is a multi-parameter technique, it was possible to determine total bacterial abundance and their viability in the activated sludge. As a comparative method, epifluorescence microscopy was also used to quantify total bacterial cells; both methods produced similar results. The FCM analysis revealed relative microbial stability in both the WWTPs. The total bacterial abundance quantified by FCM in the two plants studied was 1.02-6.23 × 10(11) cells L(-1) with 70-72% viability, one logarithm less than that reported in the literature for WWTPs using the conventional activated sludge process. This can be explained by the difference in the operational parameters between the conventional plant and EAAS, mainly the organic loading rate.

  16. T-cell activation or tolerization: the Yin and Yang of bacterial superantigens

    PubMed Central

    Sähr, Aline; Förmer, Sandra; Hildebrand, Dagmar; Heeg, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial superantigens (SAg) are exotoxins from pathogens which interact with innate and adaptive immune cells. The paradox that SAgs cause activation and inactivation/anergy of T-cells was soon recognized. The structural and molecular events following SAg binding to antigen presenting cells (APCs) followed by crosslinking of T-cell receptors were characterized in detail. Activation, cytokine burst and T-cell anergy have been described in vitro and in vivo. Later it became clear that SAg-induced T-cell anergy is in part caused by SAg-dependent activation of T-regulatory cells (Tregs). Although the main focus of analyses was laid on T-cells, it was also shown that SAg binding to MHC class II molecules on APCs induces a signal, which leads to activation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Accordingly APCs are mandatory for T-cell activation. So far it is not known, whether APCs play a role during SAg-triggered activation of Tregs. We therefore tested whether in SAg (Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A) -treated APCs an anti-inflammatory program is triggered in addition. We show here that not only the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the co-inhibitory surface molecule PD-L1 (CD274) but also inhibitory effector systems like indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) or intracellular negative feedback loops (suppressor of cytokine signaling molecules, SOCS) are induced by SAgs. Moreover, cyclosporine A completely prevented induction of this program. We therefore propose that APCs triggered by SAgs play a key role in T-cell activation as well as inactivation and induction of Treg cells. PMID:26539181

  17. Targeting Bacterial Cell Wall Peptidoglycan Synthesis by Inhibition of Glycosyltransferase Activity.

    PubMed

    Mesleh, Michael F; Rajaratnam, Premraj; Conrad, Mary; Chandrasekaran, Vasu; Liu, Christopher M; Pandya, Bhaumik A; Hwang, You Seok; Rye, Peter T; Muldoon, Craig; Becker, Bernd; Zuegg, Johannes; Meutermans, Wim; Moy, Terence I

    2016-02-01

    Synthesis of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan requires glycosyltransferase enzymes that transfer the disaccharide-peptide from lipid II onto the growing glycan chain. The polymerization of the glycan chain precedes cross-linking by penicillin-binding proteins and is essential for growth for key bacterial pathogens. As such, bacterial cell wall glycosyltransferases are an attractive target for antibiotic drug discovery. However, significant challenges to the development of inhibitors for these targets include the development of suitable assays and chemical matter that is suited to the nature of the binding site. We developed glycosyltransferase enzymatic activity and binding assays using the natural products moenomycin and vancomycin as model inhibitors. In addition, we designed a library of disaccharide compounds based on the minimum moenomycin fragment with peptidoglycan glycosyltransferase inhibitory activity and based on a more drug-like and synthetically versatile disaccharide building block. A subset of these disaccharide compounds bound and inhibited the glycosyltransferase enzymes, and these compounds could serve as chemical entry points for antibiotic development. PMID:26358369

  18. Mitogen-activated protein kinase activation by oxidative and bacterial stress in an amphibian cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Carter, Lisa A; Tabor, Maija B; Bonner, James C; Bonner, Lisa A

    2002-07-01

    The decline of many amphibian species could be caused by their susceptibility to environmental pollutants that cause cellular stress and cell death. A variety of intracellular signal transduction pathways are activated by environmental stress factors, which result in cell death. Mitogen-activated protein kinases are intracellular signaling molecules that include the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK-1 and ERK-2). We used cultured (italic)Xenopus(/italic) tadpole cells (XTC-2 cells) to investigate the activation of ERK by oxidative or bacterial stress, two environmental factors that could contribute to pollution in aquatic systems. We exposed XTC-2 cell monolayers to hydrogen peroxide or bacterial lipopolysaccharide and measured ERK activation by Western blotting using antibodies raised against phosphorylated ERK-1 and ERK-2. Only ERK-2 was detected in XTC-2 cells. Both hydrogen peroxide and lipopolysaccharide caused ERK-2 phosphorylation in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Hydrogen peroxide caused a 20- to 30-fold increase in ERK-2 activation that peaked 30 min after treatment, and lipopolysaccharide induced a 5- to 10-fold increase in ERK-2 activation that peaked 60 min after treatment. PD98059, an inhibitor of the ERK pathway, reduced the cytotoxic response of XTC-2 cells to hydrogen peroxide or lipopolysaccharide. These data suggest that ERK-2 is an intracellular target of oxidative and bacterial stress in amphibians that mediates, at least in part, the cytotoxic response to hydrogen peroxide or lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, the (italic)Xenopus(/italic) (XTC-2) cell culture system could serve as a useful model to identify agents that might threaten amphibian populations and human health.

  19. Gram-positive bacterial cell envelopes: The impact on the activity of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Malanovic, Nermina; Lohner, Karl

    2016-05-01

    A number of cationic antimicrobial peptides, effectors of innate immunity, are supposed to act at the cytoplasmic membrane leading to permeabilization and eventually membrane disruption. Thereby, interaction of antimicrobial peptides with anionic membrane phospholipids is considered to be a key factor in killing of bacteria. Recently, evidence was provided that killing takes place only when bacterial cell membranes are completely saturated with peptides. This adds to an ongoing debate, which role cell wall components such as peptidoglycan, lipoteichoic acid and lipopolysaccharide may play in the killing event, i.e. if they rather entrap or facilitate antimicrobial peptides access to the cytoplasmic membrane. Therefore, in this review we focused on the impact of Gram-positive cell wall components for the mode of action and activity of antimicrobial peptides as well as in innate immunity. This led us to conclude that interaction of antimicrobial peptides with peptidoglycan may not contribute to a reduction of their antimicrobial activity, whereas interaction with anionic lipoteichoic acids may reduce the local concentration of antimicrobial peptides on the cytoplasmic membrane necessary for sufficient destabilization of the membranes and bacterial killing. Further affinity studies of antimicrobial peptides toward the different cell wall as well as membrane components will be needed to address this problem on a quantitative level. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert.

  20. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting of Live Versus Dead Bacterial Cells and Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernardini, James N.; LaDuc, Myron T.; Diamond, Rochelle; Verceles, Josh

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a coupled fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescent staining technology for purifying (removing cells from sampling matrices), separating (based on size, density, morphology, and live versus dead), and concentrating cells (spores, prokaryotic, eukaryotic) from an environmental sample.

  1. [Antiviral activity of murine interferons produced by bacterial and animal cell translation of messenger RNA].

    PubMed

    Mamontova, T V; Mentkevich, L M; Orlova, T G

    1980-01-01

    Interferon was produced by E. Coli bacteria and animal cell messenger-RNA--interferon translation (mRNA--IF). The activity of the interferon produced by simultaneous mRNA--IF translation in these two cellular systems was, approximately, similar. The interferons translated by bacteria and animal cells inhibited the cytopathic effect, reproduction and plaque-formation of vesicular stomatitis virus, and, to a greater extent, of mouse encephalomyocarditis virus. The virus titration was carried out by the dye-uptake method. The bacteria-translated interferon (BTIF) was more susceptible to the indicator-virus dose variation and had antiviral effect of shorter duration than the virus-induced and animal cell-translated interferon. The BTIF, probably, due to the action of bacterial proteolytic enzymes proved nonstable on storage.

  2. Bacterial Cell Wall Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsberg, Cynthia; Brown, Stephanie; Walker, Suzanne

    Bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides cells are surrounded by a variety of cell-surface structures that allow them to thrive in extreme environments. Components of the cell envelope and extracellular matrix are responsible for providing the cells with structural support, mediating intercellular communication, allowing the cells to move or to adhere to surfaces, protecting the cells from attack by antibiotics or the immune system, and facilitating the uptake of nutrients. Some of the most important cell wall components are polysaccharide structures. This review discusses the occurrence, structure, function, and biosynthesis of the most prevalent bacterial cell surface polysaccharides: peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, arabinogalactan, and lipoarabinomannan, and capsular and extracellular polysaccharides. The roles of these polysaccharides in medicine, both as drug targets and as therapeutic agents, are also described.

  3. A 17-mer Membrane-Active MSI-78 Derivative with Improved Selectivity toward Bacterial Cells.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Claudia; Pinheiro, Marina; Fernandes, Mariana; Maia, Sílvia; Seabra, Catarina L; Ferreira-da-Silva, Frederico; Reis, Salette; Gomes, Paula; Martins, M Cristina L

    2015-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are widely recognized as an excellent alternative to conventional antibiotics. MSI-78, a highly effective and broad spectrum AMP, is one of the most promising AMPs for clinical application. In this study, we have designed shorter derivatives of MSI-78 with the aim of improving selectivity while maintaining antimicrobial activity. Shorter 17-mer derivatives were created by truncating MSI-78 at the N- and/or C-termini, while spanning MSI-78 sequence. Despite the truncations made, we found a 17-mer peptide, MSI-78(4-20) (KFLKKAKKFGKAFVKIL), which was demonstrated to be as effective as MSI-78 against the Gram-positive Staphylococcus strains tested and the Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This shorter derivative is more selective toward bacterial cells as it was less toxic to erythrocytes than MSI-78, representing an improved version of the lead peptide. Biophysical studies support a mechanism of action for MSI-78(4-20) based on the disruption of the bacterial membrane permeability barrier, which in turn leads to loss of membrane integrity and ultimately to cell death. These features point to a mechanism of action similar to the one described for the lead peptide MSI-78. PMID:26066462

  4. A 17-mer Membrane-Active MSI-78 Derivative with Improved Selectivity toward Bacterial Cells.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Claudia; Pinheiro, Marina; Fernandes, Mariana; Maia, Sílvia; Seabra, Catarina L; Ferreira-da-Silva, Frederico; Reis, Salette; Gomes, Paula; Martins, M Cristina L

    2015-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are widely recognized as an excellent alternative to conventional antibiotics. MSI-78, a highly effective and broad spectrum AMP, is one of the most promising AMPs for clinical application. In this study, we have designed shorter derivatives of MSI-78 with the aim of improving selectivity while maintaining antimicrobial activity. Shorter 17-mer derivatives were created by truncating MSI-78 at the N- and/or C-termini, while spanning MSI-78 sequence. Despite the truncations made, we found a 17-mer peptide, MSI-78(4-20) (KFLKKAKKFGKAFVKIL), which was demonstrated to be as effective as MSI-78 against the Gram-positive Staphylococcus strains tested and the Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This shorter derivative is more selective toward bacterial cells as it was less toxic to erythrocytes than MSI-78, representing an improved version of the lead peptide. Biophysical studies support a mechanism of action for MSI-78(4-20) based on the disruption of the bacterial membrane permeability barrier, which in turn leads to loss of membrane integrity and ultimately to cell death. These features point to a mechanism of action similar to the one described for the lead peptide MSI-78.

  5. Whole-cell bacterial bioreporter for actively searching and sensing of alkanes and oil spills.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dayi; He, Yi; Wang, Yun; Wang, Hui; Wu, Lin; Aries, Eric; Huang, Wei E

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 was found to tolerate seawater and have a special ability of adhering to an oil-water interface of 10-80 µm emulsified mineral and crude oil droplets. These properties make ADP1 an ideal bacterial chassis for constructing bioreporters that are able to actively search and sense oil spill in water and soils. Acinetobacter baylyi bioreporter ADPWH_alk was developed and applied to the detection of alkanes and alkenes in water, seawater and soils. Bioreporter ADPWH_alk was able to detect a broad range of alkanes and alkenes with carbon chain length from C7 to C36. So far, ADPWH_alk is the only bioreporter that is able to detect alkane with carbon chain length greater than C18. This bioreporter responded to the alkanes in about 30 min and it was independent to the cell growth phase because of two point mutations in alkM promoter recognized by alkane regulatory protein ALKR. ADPWH_alk was applied to detect mineral oil, Brent, Chestnut and Sirri crude oils in water and seawater in the range 0.1-100 mg l(-1), showing that the bioreporter oil detection was semi-quantitative. This study demonstrates that ADPWH_alk is a rapid, sensitive and semi-quantitative bioreporter that can be useful for environmental monitoring and assessment of oil spills in seawater and soils.

  6. Defective disposal of immune complexes and polyclonal B cell activation persist long after exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Granholm, N.A.; Cavallo, T. )

    1989-11-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus experience clinical exacerbation during superimposed bacterial infection. Previous studies in mice indicated that heightened immune phenomena during exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) appear to be related, in part, to polyclonal B cell activation, to abnormal disposal of immune complexes (IC), and to increased localization of IC in tissues. To investigate whether such effects were reversible, we administered bacterial LPS to C57BL/6 mice for 5 weeks. Control mice received vehicle alone. We then discontinued LPS, and 6 weeks later LPS and control mice were challenged with a subsaturating dose of radiolabeled IC; the removal of IC from the circulation, their localization in the liver, spleen, and kidney were determined. In comparison to values in control mice, in mice previously exposed to LPS, serologic features of polyclonal B cell activation persisted; liver uptake of pathogenic IC (greater than Ag2Ab2) was normal, but removal of small size IC (less than or equal to Ag2Ab2) from the circulation was delayed; localization of IC in the kidneys was enhanced, and pathologic proteinuria developed. The effects of repeated exposure to bacterial LPS are partially reversible, but they last long after LPS is discontinued and may contribute to altered disposal of IC, enhanced organ localization of IC, and organ dysfunction.

  7. T cell activation status determines the cytokine pattern induced by zymosan and bacterial DNA both in thymocytes and splenocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, C; Weber, A; Mausberg, A K; Kieseier, B C; Hartung, H P; Hofstetter, H H

    2013-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines are essential mediators of the immunopathology associated with microbial sepsis. The fungal cell wall component zymosan and bacterial DNA are well-studied experimental tools for investigating these processes, simulating the presence of fungal or bacterial infection. Cells of the immune periphery, but also immune cells in the thymus, are affected essentially by the presence of microbes or their immune stimuli in sepsis. For this reason, we investigated the cytokine pattern present in the spleen (containing mature immune cells) and the thymus (containing immature immune cells) upon exposure to zymosan and Escherichia coli DNA. To study the role of T cell activation status, we investigated ex-vivo cultures with and without αCD3 stimulation for changes in their cytokine secretion pattern as measured by cytokine enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) and flow cytometry analysis. We found that both substances strongly co-stimulate αCD3-induced interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-6 secretion in the thymus and in the spleen, but stimulate IL-17 production only moderately. Moreover, zymosan increases PLP peptide (PLPp)-specific IFN-γ and IL-6 production in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced in Swiss Jim Lambert (SJL)/J mice, confirming that T cell activation status is crucial for the cytokines secreted by an immune cell population encountering a microbial pathogen or immunostimulating parts of it. PMID:23574321

  8. Evaluating bacterial activity from cell-specific ribosomal RNA content measured with oligonucleotide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.; Lee, S.; LaRoche, J.

    1992-10-01

    We describe a procedure for measuring the cell-specific quantity of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and DNA in order to evaluate the frequency distribution of activity among cells. The procedure is inherently quantitative, does not require sample incubation and potentially can be taxon-specific. Fluorescently-labelled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the complementary 16S rRNA sequences in preserved, intact cells. The resulting cell fluorescence is proportional to cellular rRNA content and can be measured with a microscope-mounted photometer system, by image analysis, or by flow cytometry. Similarly, DNA content is measured as fluorescence of cells stained with the DNA specific fluorochrome DAPI. These are either prepared as separate samples for purposes of enumeration and DNA measurements, or are dual-labelled cells which are also hybridized with oligonucleotide probes.

  9. Evaluating bacterial activity from cell-specific ribosomal RNA content measured with oligonucleotide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.; Lee, S.; LaRoche, J.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a procedure for measuring the cell-specific quantity of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and DNA in order to evaluate the frequency distribution of activity among cells. The procedure is inherently quantitative, does not require sample incubation and potentially can be taxon-specific. Fluorescently-labelled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the complementary 16S rRNA sequences in preserved, intact cells. The resulting cell fluorescence is proportional to cellular rRNA content and can be measured with a microscope-mounted photometer system, by image analysis, or by flow cytometry. Similarly, DNA content is measured as fluorescence of cells stained with the DNA specific fluorochrome DAPI. These are either prepared as separate samples for purposes of enumeration and DNA measurements, or are dual-labelled cells which are also hybridized with oligonucleotide probes.

  10. Efficient Gene Editing in Pluripotent Stem Cells by Bacterial Injection of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jingyue; Bai, Fang; Jin, Yongxin; Santostefano, Katherine E.; Ha, Un-Hwan; Wu, Donghai

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a powerful tool for direct protein delivery into mammalian cells and has successfully been used to deliver various exogenous proteins into mammalian cells. In the present study, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) proteins have been efficiently delivered using the P. aeruginosa T3SS into mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), human ESCs (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for genome editing. This bacterial delivery system offers an alternative method of TALEN delivery that is highly efficient in cleavage of the chromosomal target and presumably safer by avoiding plasmid DNA introduction. We combined the method of bacterial T3SS-mediated TALEN protein injection and transfection of an oligonucleotide template to effectively generate precise genetic modifications in the stem cells. Initially, we efficiently edited a single-base in the gfp gene of a mESC line to silence green fluorescent protein (GFP) production. The resulting GFP-negative mESC was cloned from a single cell and subsequently mutated back to a GFP-positive mESC line. Using the same approach, the gfp gene was also effectively knocked out in hESCs. In addition, a defined single-base edition was effectively introduced into the X-chromosome-linked HPRT1 gene in hiPSCs, generating an in vitro model of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. T3SS-mediated TALEN protein delivery provides a highly efficient alternative for introducing precise gene editing within pluripotent stem cells for the purpose of disease genotype-phenotype relationship studies and cellular replacement therapies. Significance The present study describes a novel and powerful tool for the delivery of the genome editing enzyme transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) directly into pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), achieving desired base changes on the genomes of PSCs with high efficiency. This novel approach uses bacteria as a protein delivery

  11. Efficacy of coating activated carbon with milk proteins to prevent binding of bacterial cells from foods for PCR detection.

    PubMed

    Opet, Nathan J; Levin, Robert E

    2013-08-01

    Foods contaminated with pathogens are common sources of illness. Currently, the most common and sensitive rapid detection method involves the PCR. However, food matrices are complex and contain inhibitors that limit the sensitivity of the PCR. The use of coated activated carbon can effectively facilitate the removal of PCR inhibitors without binding targeted bacterial cells from food samples. With the use of activated carbon coated with milk proteins, a cell recovery at pH 7.0 of 95.7%±2.0% was obtained, compared to control uncoated activated carbon, which yielded a cell recovery of only 1.1%±0.8%. In addition, the milk protein coated activated carbon was able to absorb similar amounts of soluble compounds as uncoated activated carbon, with the exception of bovine hemoglobin. This suggests that the use of milk proteins to coat activated carbon may therefore serve as a suitable replacement for bentonite in the coating of activated carbon, which has previously been used for the removal of PCR inhibitors from food.

  12. Activity-dependent fluorescent labeling of bacterial cells expressing the TOL pathway

    SciTech Connect

    William K. Keener; Mary E. Watwood

    2005-01-01

    3-Ethynylbenzoate functions as an activity-dependent, fluorogenic and chromogenic probe for Pseudomonas putida mt-2, which is known to degrade toluene via conversion to benzoate, followed by meta ring fission of the intermediate, catechol. This direct physiological analysis allows the fluorescent labeling of cells whose toluene-degrading enzymes have been induced by an aromatic substrate.

  13. An active intracellular device to prevent lethal disease outcomes in virus-infected bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Bagh, Sangram; Mandal, Mahuya; Ang, Jordan; McMillen, David R

    2011-03-01

    Synthetic biology includes an effort to logically control cellular behavior. One long-term goal is to implement medical interventions inside living cells, creating intracellular "disease fighters"; one may imagine a system that detects viral infection and responds to halt the spread of the virus. Here, we explore a system designed to display some of the qualitative features that such disease prevention systems should have, while not claiming that the system itself has any medical application. An intracellular disease prevention mechanism should: lie dormant in the absence of the disease state; detect the onset of a lethal disease pathway; respond to halt or mitigate the disease's effects; and be subject to external deactivation when required. We have created a device that displays these properties, in the highly simplified case of a bacterial viral disease. Our system detects the onset of the lytic phase of bacteriophage lambda in Escherichia coli, responds by preventing this lethal pathway from being followed, and is deactivated by a temperature shift. We have formulated a mathematical model of the engineered system, using parameters obtained from the literature and by local experimental measurement, and shown that the model captures the essential experimental behavior of the system in most parameter regimes.

  14. Coordinated Activation of Programmed Cell Death and Defense Mechanisms in Transgenic Tobacco Plants Expressing a Bacterial Proton Pump.

    PubMed Central

    Mittler, R.; Shulaev, V.; Lam, E.

    1995-01-01

    In plants, programmed cell death is thought to be activated during the hypersensitive response to certain avirulent pathogens and in the course of several differentiation processes. We describe a transgenic model system that mimics the activation of programmed cell death in higher plants. In this system, expression of a bacterial proton pump in transgenic tobacco plants activates a cell death pathway that may be similar to that triggered by recognition of an incompatible pathogen. Thus, spontaneous lesions that resemble hypersensitive response lesions are formed, multiple defense mechanisms are apparently activated, and systemic resistance is induced in the absence of a pathogen. Interestingly, mutation of a single amino acid in the putative channel of this proton pump renders it inactive with respect to lesion formation and induction of resistance to pathogen challenge. This transgenic model system may provide insights into the mechanisms involved in mediating cell death in higher plants. In addition, it may also be used as a general agronomic tool to enhance disease protection. PMID:12242350

  15. Gamma-irradiated bacterial preparation having anti-tumor activity

    DOEpatents

    Vass, Arpad A.; Tyndall, Richard L.; Terzaghi-Howe, Peggy

    1999-01-01

    A bacterial preparation from Pseudomonas species isolated #15 ATCC 55638 that has been exposed to gamma radiation exhibits cytotoxicity that is specific for neoplastic carcinoma cells. A method for obtaining a bacterial preparation having antitumor activity consists of suspending a bacterial isolate in media and exposing the suspension to gamma radiation. A bacterial preparation of an aged culture of an amoeba-associated bacteria exhibits anti-reverse transcriptase activity. A method for obtaining a bacterial preparation having anti-reverse transcriptase activity from an amoeba-associated bacterial isolate grown to stationary phase is disclosed.

  16. Gamma-irradiated bacterial preparation having anti-tumor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Vass, A.A.; Tyndall, R.L.; Terzaghi-Howe, P.

    1999-11-16

    This application describes a bacterial preparation from Pseudomonas species isolated {number{underscore}sign}15 ATCC 55638 that has been exposed to gamma radiation exhibits cytotoxicity that is specific for neoplastic carcinoma cells. A method for obtaining a bacterial preparation having antitumor activity consists of suspending a bacterial isolate in media and exposing the suspension to gamma radiation. A bacterial preparation of an aged culture of an amoeba-associated bacteria exhibits anti-reverse transcriptase activity. A method for obtaining a bacterial preparation having anti-reverse transcriptase activity from an amoeba-associated bacterial isolate grown to stationary phase is disclosed.

  17. Use Of Low Light Image Microscopy To Monitor Genetically Engineered Bacterial Luciferase Gene Expression In Living Cells And Gene Activation Throughout The Development Of A Transgenic Organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langridge, W. H.; Escher, Alan P.; Baga, M.; O'Kane, Dennis J.; Wampler, John E.; Koncz, C.; Schell, John D.; Szalay, A. A.

    1989-12-01

    Procaryotic and eucaryotic expression vectors which contain a marker gene for selection of transformants linked to genes encoding bacterial luciferase for detection of promoter activated gene expression in vivo were used to transform the appropriate host organisms and drug resistant colonies, cells, or calli were obtained. Bacterial luciferase expression was measured by a luminescence assay for quantitative determination of promoter activation. The cellular localization of bacteria inside the host plant cell cytoplasm was achieved in a single infected plant cell based on the light emitting ability of the genetically engineered bacteria. In addition, the bacterial luciferase marker gene fusions were used to monitor cell type, tissue, and organ specific gene expression in transgenic plants in vivo. To monitor physiological changes during ontogeny of a transformed plant, low light video microscopy, aided by real time image processing techniques developed specifically to enhance extreme low light images, was successfully applied.

  18. Phylogenetic organization of bacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Ember M; Mau, Rebecca L; Schwartz, Egbert; Caporaso, J Gregory; Dijkstra, Paul; van Gestel, Natasja; Koch, Benjamin J; Liu, Cindy M; Hayer, Michaela; McHugh, Theresa A; Marks, Jane C; Price, Lance B; Hungate, Bruce A

    2016-09-01

    Phylogeny is an ecologically meaningful way to classify plants and animals, as closely related taxa frequently have similar ecological characteristics, functional traits and effects on ecosystem processes. For bacteria, however, phylogeny has been argued to be an unreliable indicator of an organism's ecology owing to evolutionary processes more common to microbes such as gene loss and lateral gene transfer, as well as convergent evolution. Here we use advanced stable isotope probing with (13)C and (18)O to show that evolutionary history has ecological significance for in situ bacterial activity. Phylogenetic organization in the activity of bacteria sets the stage for characterizing the functional attributes of bacterial taxonomic groups. Connecting identity with function in this way will allow scientists to begin building a mechanistic understanding of how bacterial community composition regulates critical ecosystem functions.

  19. Phylogenetic organization of bacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Ember M; Mau, Rebecca L; Schwartz, Egbert; Caporaso, J Gregory; Dijkstra, Paul; van Gestel, Natasja; Koch, Benjamin J; Liu, Cindy M; Hayer, Michaela; McHugh, Theresa A; Marks, Jane C; Price, Lance B; Hungate, Bruce A

    2016-01-01

    Phylogeny is an ecologically meaningful way to classify plants and animals, as closely related taxa frequently have similar ecological characteristics, functional traits and effects on ecosystem processes. For bacteria, however, phylogeny has been argued to be an unreliable indicator of an organism's ecology owing to evolutionary processes more common to microbes such as gene loss and lateral gene transfer, as well as convergent evolution. Here we use advanced stable isotope probing with 13C and 18O to show that evolutionary history has ecological significance for in situ bacterial activity. Phylogenetic organization in the activity of bacteria sets the stage for characterizing the functional attributes of bacterial taxonomic groups. Connecting identity with function in this way will allow scientists to begin building a mechanistic understanding of how bacterial community composition regulates critical ecosystem functions. PMID:26943624

  20. The Bacterial Cell Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Silhavy, Thomas J.; Kahne, Daniel; Walker, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    The bacteria cell envelope is a complex multilayered structure that serves to protect these organisms from their unpredictable and often hostile environment. The cell envelopes of most bacteria fall into one of two major groups. Gram-negative bacteria are surrounded by a thin peptidoglycan cell wall, which itself is surrounded by an outer membrane containing lipopolysaccharide. Gram-positive bacteria lack an outer membrane but are surrounded by layers of peptidoglycan many times thicker than is found in the Gram-negatives. Threading through these layers of peptidoglycan are long anionic polymers, called teichoic acids. The composition and organization of these envelope layers and recent insights into the mechanisms of cell envelope assembly are discussed. PMID:20452953

  1. SGLT1 activity in lung alveolar cells of diabetic rats modulates airway surface liquid glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Tales Lyra; Candeia-Medeiros, Návylla; Cavalcante-Araújo, Polliane M.; Melo, Igor Santana; Fávaro-Pípi, Elaine; Fátima, Luciana Alves; Rocha, Antônio Augusto; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Machado, Ubiratan Fabres; Campos, Ruy R.; Sabino-Silva, Robinson

    2016-01-01

    High glucose concentration in the airway surface liquid (ASL) is an important feature of diabetes that predisposes to respiratory infections. We investigated the role of alveolar epithelial SGLT1 activity on ASL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation. Non-diabetic and diabetic rats were intranasally treated with saline, isoproterenol (to increase SGLT1 activity) or phlorizin (to decrease SGLT1 activity); 2 hours later, glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation (methicillin-resistant Sthaphylococcus aureus, MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. aeruginosa) were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL); and alveolar SGLT1 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. BAL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation increased in diabetic animals: isoproterenol stimulated SGLT1 migration to luminal membrane, and reduced (50%) the BAL glucose concentration; whereas phlorizin increased the BAL glucose concentration (100%). These regulations were accompanied by parallel changes of in vitro MRSA and P. aeruginosa proliferation in BAL (r = 0.9651 and r = 0.9613, respectively, Pearson correlation). The same regulations were observed in in vivo P. aeruginosa proliferation. In summary, the results indicate a relationship among SGLT1 activity, ASL glucose concentration and pulmonary bacterial proliferation. Besides, the study highlights that, in situations of pulmonary infection risk, such as in diabetic subjects, increased SGLT1 activity may prevent bacterial proliferation whereas decreased SGLT1 activity can exacerbate it. PMID:26902517

  2. Visualization and quantification of archaeal and bacterial metabolically active cells in soil using fluorescence in situ hybridization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Mikhail; Manucharova, Natalia; Stepanov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    The method of in situ hybridization using fluorescent labeled 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes (FISH - fluorescence in situ hybridization) combines identification and quantification of groups of microorganisms at different phylogenetic levels, from domain to species. The FISH method enables to study the soil microbial community in situ, avoiding plating on nutrient media, and allows to identify and quantify living, metabolically active cells of Bacteria and Archaea. The full procedure consists of the following steps: desorption of the cells from the soil particles, fixation of cells, coating a fixed sample on the glass slide, hybridization with the specific probes and, finally, microscopic observation and cell counting. For the FISH analysis of Bacteria and Archaea, the paraformaldehyde-fixed samples were hybridized with Cy3-labeled Archaea-specific probe(Arc915) and 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM)-labeled Bacteria-specific probe(EUB338). When a molecular probe is incorporated into a cell, it can hybridize solely with a complementary rRNA sequence. The hybridization can be visualized under the fluorescent microscope and counted. The application of FISH will be demonstrated by the abundance of metabolically active cells of Archaea and Bacteria depending on soil properties, depth and land use. The research was carried out at field and natural ecosystems of European part of Russia. Samples were collected within the soil profiles (3-6 horizons) of Chernozem and Kastanozem with distinct land use. Quantification of metabolically active cells in virgin and arable Chernozem revealed that the abundance of Archaea in topsoil of virgin Chernozem was doubled as compared with arable soil, but it leveled off in the deeper horizons. Plowing of Chernozem decreased an amount of archaeal and bacterial active cells simultaneously, however, Bacteria were more resistant to agrogenic impact than Archaea. In Kastanozem, a significant change in the abundance of metabolically active

  3. Bacterial RNAs activate innate immunity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boyoung; Park, Yong-Soon; Lee, Soohyun; Song, Geun Cheol; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    The common molecular patterns of microbes play a critical role in the regulation of plant innate immunity. However, little is known about the role of nucleic acids in this process in plants. We pre-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaves with total RNAs from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pto DC3000) and subsequently inoculated these plants with the same bacterial cells. Total Pto DC3000 RNAs pre-infiltrated into Arabidopsis leaves elicited plant immune responses against Pto DC3000. However, sheared RNAs and RNase A application failed to induce immunity, suggesting that intact bacterial RNAs function in plant innate immunity. This notion was supported by the positive regulation of superoxide anion levels, callose deposition, two mitogen-activated protein kinases and defense-related genes observed in bacterial RNA-pre-treated leaves. Intriguingly, the Pto DC3000 population was not compromised in known pattern recognition receptor mutants for chitin, flagellin and elongation factor-Tu (EF-Tu). Plant defense-related mutant analyses further revealed that bacterial RNA-elicited innate immunity was normally required for salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling. Notably, among total RNAs, the abundant bacterial RNA species 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs were the major determinants of this response. Our findings provide evidence that bacterial RNA serves as a microbe-associated molecular pattern in plants. PMID:26499893

  4. Human Interleukin-2 and Hen Egg White Lysozyme: Screening for Bacteriolytic Activity against Various Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Levashov, P. A.; Ovchinnikova, E. D.; Morozova, O. A.; Matolygina, D. A.; Osipova, H. E.; Cherdyntseva, T. A.; Savin, S. S.; Zakharova, G. S.; Alekseeva, A. A.; Belogurova, N. G.; Smirnov, S. A.; Tishkov, V. I.; Levashov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The bacteriolytic activity of interleukin-2 and hen egg white lysozyme against 34 different species of microorganisms has been studied. It was found that 6 species of microorganisms are lysed in the presence of interleukin-2. All interleukin-2-sensitive microorganisms belong either to the Enterobacteriaceae, Bacillaceae, or the Lactobacillaceae family. It was also found that 12 species of microorganisms are lysed in the presence of lysozyme, and 16 species of microorganisms are lysed in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The bacteriolytic activity of interleukin-2 and lysozyme was studied at various pH values. PMID:27099789

  5. Human Interleukin-2 and Hen Egg White Lysozyme: Screening for Bacteriolytic Activity against Various Bacterial Cells.

    PubMed

    Levashov, P A; Ovchinnikova, E D; Morozova, O A; Matolygina, D A; Osipova, H E; Cherdyntseva, T A; Savin, S S; Zakharova, G S; Alekseeva, A A; Belogurova, N G; Smirnov, S A; Tishkov, V I; Levashov, A V

    2016-01-01

    The bacteriolytic activity of interleukin-2 and hen egg white lysozyme against 34 different species of microorganisms has been studied. It was found that 6 species of microorganisms are lysed in the presence of interleukin-2. All interleukin-2-sensitive microorganisms belong either to the Enterobacteriaceae, Bacillaceae, or the Lactobacillaceae family. It was also found that 12 species of microorganisms are lysed in the presence of lysozyme, and 16 species of microorganisms are lysed in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The bacteriolytic activity of interleukin-2 and lysozyme was studied at various pH values.

  6. Specific sorting of single bacterial cells with microfabricated fluorescence-activated cell sorting and tyramide signal amplification fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun H; Cho, Sung H; Chiang, Hsin-I; Tsai, Frank; Zhang, Kun; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2011-10-01

    When attempting to probe the genetic makeup of diverse bacterial communities that elude cell culturing, researchers face two primary challenges: isolation of rare bacteria from microbial samples and removal of contaminating cell-free DNA. We report a compact, low-cost, and high-performance microfabricated fluorescence-activated cell sorting (μFACS) technology in combination with a tyramide signal amplification fluorescence in situ hybridization (TSA-FISH) to address these two challenges. The TSA-FISH protocol that was adapted for flow cytometry yields a 10-30-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity over standard FISH methods. The μFACS technology, capable of enhancing its sensitivity by ~18 dB through signal processing, was able to enrich TSA-FISH-labeled E. coli cells by 223-fold. The μFACS technology was also used to remove contaminating cell-free DNA. After two rounds of sorting on E. coli mixed with λ-phage DNA (10 ng/μL), we demonstrated over 100,000-fold reduction in λ-DNA concentration. The integrated μFACS and TSA-FISH technologies provide a highly effective and low-cost solution for research on the genomic complexity of bacteria as well as single-cell genomic analysis of other sample types. PMID:21809842

  7. Activity of Uncleaved Caspase-8 Controls Anti-bacterial Immune Defense and TLR-Induced Cytokine Production Independent of Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    DeLaney, Alexandra; Santos-Marrero, Melanie; Grier, Jennifer T.; Sun, Yan; Zwack, Erin E.; Hu, Baofeng; Olsen, Tayla M.; Rongvaux, Anthony; López, Carolina B.; Oberst, Andrew; Beiting, Daniel P.; Brodsky, Igor E.

    2016-01-01

    Caspases regulate cell death programs in response to environmental stresses, including infection and inflammation, and are therefore critical for the proper operation of the mammalian immune system. Caspase-8 is necessary for optimal production of inflammatory cytokines and host defense against infection by multiple pathogens including Yersinia, but whether this is due to death of infected cells or an intrinsic role of caspase-8 in TLR-induced gene expression is unknown. Caspase-8 activation at death signaling complexes results in its autoprocessing and subsequent cleavage and activation of its downstream apoptotic targets. Whether caspase-8 activity is also important for inflammatory gene expression during bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we report that caspase-8 plays an essential cell-intrinsic role in innate inflammatory cytokine production in vivo during Yersinia infection. Unexpectedly, we found that caspase-8 enzymatic activity regulates gene expression in response to bacterial infection as well as TLR signaling independently of apoptosis. Using newly-generated mice in which caspase-8 autoprocessing is ablated (Casp8DA/DA), we now demonstrate that caspase-8 enzymatic activity, but not autoprocessing, mediates induction of inflammatory cytokines by bacterial infection and a wide variety of TLR stimuli. Because unprocessed caspase-8 functions in an enzymatic complex with its homolog cFLIP, our findings implicate the caspase-8/cFLIP heterodimer in control of inflammatory cytokines during microbial infection, and provide new insight into regulation of antibacterial immune defense. PMID:27737018

  8. Resonant activation: a strategy against bacterial persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yan; Zhu, Meng; Xing, Jianhua

    2010-03-01

    A bacterial colony may develop a small number of cells genetically identical to, but phenotypically different from, other normally growing bacteria. These so-called persister cells keep themselves in a dormant state and thus are insensitive to antibiotic treatment, resulting in serious problems of drug resistance. In this paper, we proposed a novel strategy to 'kill' persister cells by triggering them to switch, in a fast and synchronized way, into normally growing cells that are susceptible to antibiotics. The strategy is based on resonant activation (RA), a well-studied phenomenon in physics where the internal noise of a system can constructively facilitate fast and synchronized barrier crossings. Through stochastic Gilliespie simulation with a generic toggle switch model, we demonstrated that RA exists in the phenotypic switching of a single bacterium. Further, by coupling single cell level and population level simulations, we showed that with RA, one can greatly reduce the time and total amount of antibiotics needed to sterilize a bacterial population. We suggest that resonant activation is a general phenomenon in phenotypic transition, and can find other applications such as cancer therapy.

  9. Copper effects on bacterial activity of estuarine silty sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Ângela; Fernandes, Sandra; Sobral, Paula; Alcântara, Fernanda

    2007-07-01

    Bacteria of silty estuarine sediments were spiked with copper to 200 μg Cu g -1 dry weight sediment in order to assess the impact of copper on bacterial degradation of organic matter and on bacterial biomass production. Bacterial density was determined by direct counting under epifluorescence microscopy and bacterial production by the incorporation of 3H-Leucine. Leucine turnover rate was evaluated by 14C-leucine incorporation and ectoenzymatic activities were estimated as the hydrolysis rate of model substrates for β-glucosidase and leucine-aminopeptidase. The presence of added copper in the microcosms elicited, after 21 days of incubation, generalised anoxia and a decrease in organic matter content. The non-eroded surface of the copper-spiked sediment showed, when compared to the control, a decrease in bacterial abundance and significant lower levels of bacterial production and of leucine turnover rate. Bacterial production and leucine turnover rate decreased to 1.4% and 13% of the control values, respectively. Ectoenzymatic activities were also negatively affected but by smaller factors. After erosion by the water current in laboratory flume conditions, the eroded surface of the control sediment showed a generalised decline in all bacterial activities. The erosion of the copper-spiked sediment showed, however, two types of responses with respect to bacterial activities at the exposed surface: positive responses of bacterial production and leucine turnover rate contrasting with slight negative responses of ectoenzymatic activities. The effects of experimental erosion in the suspended cells were also different in the control and in the copper-spiked sediment. Bacterial cells in the control microcosm exhibited, when compared to the non-eroded sediment cells, decreases in all activities after the 6-h suspension. The response of the average suspended copper-spiked sediment cell differed from the control by a less sharp decrease in ectoenzymatic activities and

  10. Unstained and in vivo fluorescently stained bacterial nucleoids and plasmolysis observed by a new specimen preparation method for high-power light microscopy of metabolically active cells.

    PubMed

    Kellenberger, E; Kellenberger-Van der Kamp, C

    1994-11-01

    Microscope slides were coated with a layer of gelatin, the thickness of the gelatin increasing linearly along the long axis. The bacterial suspension is applied to the dried gelatin and covered by a coverslip. The medium is absorbed by the gelatin and thus the cells applied against the coverslip. By this method, cultures of concentrations below 10(8) cells/ml provide statistically relevant numbers for observation without prior concentration steps. It is easier to apply than the existing methods for the observation of bacterial nucleoids by phase contrast imaging. Because the cells are maintained in growing conditions the method is useful for the vital fluorescence DAPI-staining of various bacterial species and for observations of plasmolysis and its reversal at different physiological conditions and extracellular osmolalities. The previously generally assumed view that the plasmolytic changes of the cell morphology are immediate upon the hyperosmotic shock and are rapidly repaired when the cell is able to metabolize actively was confirmed; this is in contrast to some recent claims.

  11. Biophysical Measurements of Bacterial Cell Shape.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jeffrey P; Bratton, Benjamin P; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2016-01-01

    A bacteria's shape plays a large role in determining its mechanism of motility, energy requirements, and ability to avoid predation. Although it is a major factor in cell fitness, little is known about how cell shape is determined or maintained. These problems are made worse by a lack of accurate methods to measure cell shape in vivo, as current methods do not account for blurring artifacts introduced by the microscope. Here, we introduce a method using 2D active surfaces and forward convolution with a measured point spread function to measure the 3D shape of different strains of E. coli from fluorescent images. Using this technique, we are also able to measure the distribution of fluorescent molecules, such as polymers, on the cell surface. This quantification of the surface geometry and fluorescence distribution allow for a more precise measure of 3D cell shape and is a useful tool for measuring protein localization and the mechanisms of bacterial shape control. PMID:27311676

  12. Addition of Selenium Nanoparticles to Electrospun Silk Scaffold Improves the Mammalian Cell Activity While Reducing Bacterial Growth.

    PubMed

    Chung, Stanley; Ercan, Batur; Roy, Amit K; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Silk possesses many beneficial wound healing properties, and electrospun scaffolds are especially applicable for skin applications, due to their smaller interstices and higher surface areas. However, purified silk promotes microbial growth. Selenium nanoparticles have shown excellent antibacterial properties and are a novel antimicrobial chemistry. Here, electrospun silk scaffolds were doped with selenium nanoparticles to impart antibacterial properties to the silk scaffolds. Results showed significantly improved bacterial inhibition and mild improvement in human dermal fibroblast metabolic activity. These results suggest that the addition of selenium nanoparticles to electrospun silk is a promising approach to improve wound healing with reduced infection, without relying on antibiotics. PMID:27471473

  13. Addition of Selenium Nanoparticles to Electrospun Silk Scaffold Improves the Mammalian Cell Activity While Reducing Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Stanley; Ercan, Batur; Roy, Amit K.; Webster, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Silk possesses many beneficial wound healing properties, and electrospun scaffolds are especially applicable for skin applications, due to their smaller interstices and higher surface areas. However, purified silk promotes microbial growth. Selenium nanoparticles have shown excellent antibacterial properties and are a novel antimicrobial chemistry. Here, electrospun silk scaffolds were doped with selenium nanoparticles to impart antibacterial properties to the silk scaffolds. Results showed significantly improved bacterial inhibition and mild improvement in human dermal fibroblast metabolic activity. These results suggest that the addition of selenium nanoparticles to electrospun silk is a promising approach to improve wound healing with reduced infection, without relying on antibiotics. PMID:27471473

  14. 2'-O-Methylation within Bacterial RNA Acts as Suppressor of TLR7/TLR8 Activation in Human Innate Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Rimbach, Katharina; Kaiser, Steffen; Helm, Mark; Dalpke, Alexander H; Eigenbrod, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Microbial RNA is an important stimulator of innate immune responses. Differences in posttranscriptional RNA modification profiles enable the immune system to discriminate between self and non-self nucleic acids. This principle may be exploited by certain bacteria to circumvent immune cell activation. In this regard, 2'-O-methylation of Escherichia coli tRNATyr at position 18 (Gm18) has recently been described to inhibit TLR7-mediated IFN-α production in human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Extending these findings, we now demonstrate that Gm18 also potently inhibits TLR7-independent human monocyte activation by RNA derived from a variety of bacterial strains. The half minimal inhibitory concentration values were similar to those found for IFN-α inhibition in pDCs. Mechanistically, 2'-O-methylated RNA impaired upstream signalling events, including MAP kinase and NFx03BA;B activation. Our results suggest that antagonizing effects of Gm18-modified RNA are due to competition with stimulatory RNA for receptor binding. The antagonistic effect was specific for RNA because the small molecule TLR7/8 agonist R848 was not inhibited. Despite the striking phenotype in human cells, 2'-O-methylated RNA did not interfere with TLR13 activation by bacterial 23S rRNA in murine DC and BMDM. Thus, we identify here Gm18 in E. coli tRNA(Tyr) as a universal suppressor of innate immune activation in the human but not the murine system. PMID:25823462

  15. A molecular beacon defines bacterial cell asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Lawler, Melanie L; Brun, Yves V

    2006-03-10

    Many cells divide asymmetrically by generating two different cell ends or poles prior to cell division, but the mechanisms by which cells distinguish one pole from the other is poorly understood. In this issue of Cell, Huitema et al. (2006) and Lam et al. (2006) describe a protein that defines one specific pole of a bacterial cell by localizing to the site of cell division to be inherited by both progeny at the resulting new poles.

  16. Anti-bacterial activity of recombinant human β-defensin-3 secreted in the milk of transgenic goats produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Luo, Yan; Ge, Hengtao; Han, Chengquan; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yongsheng; Su, Jianmin; Quan, Fusheng; Gao, Mingqing; Zhang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether recombinant human β-defensin-3 (rHBD3) in the milk of transgenic goats has an anti-bacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Streptococcus agalactiae (S. agalactiae) that could cause mastitis. A HBD3 mammary-specific expression vector was transfected by electroporation into goat fetal fibroblasts which were used to produce fourteen healthy transgenic goats by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The expression level of rHBD3 in the milk of the six transgenic goats ranged from 98 to 121 µg/ml at 15 days of lactation, and was maintained at 90-111 µg/ml during the following 2 months. Milk samples from transgenic goats showed an obvious inhibitory activity against E. coli, S. aureus and S. agalactiae in vitro. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of rHBD3 in milk against E. coli, S. aureus and S. agalactiae were 9.5-10.5, 21.8-23.0 and 17.3-18.5 µg/mL, respectively, which was similar to those of the HBD3 standard (P>0.05). The in vivo anti-bacterial activities of rHBD3 in milk were examined by intramammary infusion of viable bacterial inoculums. We observed that 9/10 and 8/10 glands of non-transgenic goats infused with S. aureus and E. coli became infected. The mean numbers of viable bacteria went up to 2.9×10(3) and 95.4×10(3) CFU/ml at 48 h after infusion, respectively; the mean somatic cell counts (SCC) in infected glands reached up to 260.4×10(5) and 622.2×10(5) cells/ml, which were significantly higher than the SCC in uninfected goat glands. In contrast, no bacteria was presented in glands of transgenic goats and PBS-infused controls, and the SSC did not significantly change throughout the period. Moreover, the compositions and protein profiles of milk from transgenic and non-transgenic goats were identical. The present study demonstrated that HBD3 were an effective anti-bacterial protein to enhance the mastitis resistance of dairy animals.

  17. Anti-Bacterial Activity of Recombinant Human β-Defensin-3 Secreted in the Milk of Transgenic Goats Produced by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chengquan; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yongsheng; Su, Jianmin; Quan, Fusheng; Gao, Mingqing; Zhang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether recombinant human β-defensin-3 (rHBD3) in the milk of transgenic goats has an anti-bacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Streptococcus agalactiae (S. agalactiae) that could cause mastitis. A HBD3 mammary-specific expression vector was transfected by electroporation into goat fetal fibroblasts which were used to produce fourteen healthy transgenic goats by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The expression level of rHBD3 in the milk of the six transgenic goats ranged from 98 to 121 µg/ml at 15 days of lactation, and was maintained at 90–111 µg/ml during the following 2 months. Milk samples from transgenic goats showed an obvious inhibitory activity against E. coli, S. aureus and S. agalactiae in vitro. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of rHBD3 in milk against E. coli, S. aureus and S. agalactiae were 9.5–10.5, 21.8–23.0 and 17.3–18.5 µg/mL, respectively, which was similar to those of the HBD3 standard (P>0.05). The in vivo anti-bacterial activities of rHBD3 in milk were examined by intramammary infusion of viable bacterial inoculums. We observed that 9/10 and 8/10 glands of non-transgenic goats infused with S. aureus and E. coli became infected. The mean numbers of viable bacteria went up to 2.9×103 and 95.4×103 CFU/ml at 48 h after infusion, respectively; the mean somatic cell counts (SCC) in infected glands reached up to 260.4×105 and 622.2×105 cells/ml, which were significantly higher than the SCC in uninfected goat glands. In contrast, no bacteria was presented in glands of transgenic goats and PBS-infused controls, and the SSC did not significantly change throughout the period. Moreover, the compositions and protein profiles of milk from transgenic and non-transgenic goats were identical. The present study demonstrated that HBD3 were an effective anti-bacterial protein to enhance the mastitis resistance of dairy animals. PMID:23799010

  18. Electroporation of Functional Bacterial Effectors into Mammalian Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Mihai, Cosmin; Orr, Galya; Savchenko, Alexei; Skarina, Tatiana; Cui, Hong; Cort, John R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Brown, Roslyn N.

    2015-01-19

    Electroporation was used to insert purified bacterial virulence effector proteins directly into living eukaryotic cells. Protein localization was monitored by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. This method allows for studies on trafficking, function, and protein-protein interactions using active exogenous proteins, avoiding the need for heterologous expression in eukaryotic cells.

  19. Activation of phagocytic cells by Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms: effects of extracellular matrix proteins and the bacterial stress protein GroEL on netosis and MRP-14 release.

    PubMed

    Dapunt, Ulrike; Gaida, Matthias M; Meyle, Eva; Prior, Birgit; Hänsch, Gertrud M

    2016-07-01

    The recognition and phagocytosis of free-swimming (planktonic) bacteria by polymorphonuclear neutrophils have been investigated in depth. However, less is known about the neutrophil response towards bacterial biofilms. Our previous work demonstrated that neutrophils recognize activating entities within the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of biofilms (the bacterial heat shock protein GroEL) and that this process does not require opsonization. Aim of this study was to evaluate the release of DNA by neutrophils in response to biofilms, as well as the release of the inflammatory cytokine MRP-14. Neutrophils were stimulated with Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms, planktonic bacteria, extracted EPS and GroEL. Release of DNA and of MRP-14 was evaluated. Furthermore, tissue samples from patients suffering from biofilm infections were collected and evaluated by histology. MRP-14 concentration in blood samples was measured. We were able to show that biofilms, the EPS and GroEL induce DNA release. MRP-14 was only released after stimulation with EPS, not GroEL. Histology of tissue samples revealed MRP-14 positive cells in association with neutrophil infiltration and MRP-14 concentration was elevated in blood samples of patients suffering from biofilm infections. Our data demonstrate that neutrophil-activating entities are present in the EPS and that GroEL induces DNA release by neutrophils. PMID:27109773

  20. Effects of minimal exposures to atmospheric pressure plasma on the activity of Salmonella Typhimurium: Deactivation of bacterial motility and suppression of host-cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Sung; Kim, Kijung; Han, Je-Hyun; Gweon, Bomi; Ko, Ung Hyun; Yoo, Suk Jae; Choe, Wonho; Shin, Jennifer H

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) has been shown effective in sterilization by reducing the number of viable microbes during surface cleaning, food processing, or human tissue treatment. For safe conduct, the majority of previous research focused on complete abolition of microbes, which may require severe treatments. Our aim is to investigate the minimal treatment conditions necessary for effective inactivation of bacteria in such a manner that the APP treated bacteria would not be able to harm the host cells. For this, we ought to identify the objective criteria to make the bacteria dysfunctional. We choose the motile properties and the host-cell invasion capability as two measures to quantify the pathogenic state of bacteria. In this paper, we investigated how the APP treatment in a minimal dosage affects the activity of Salmonella Typhimurium. At 100 W and 15 kHz for 20 s, the APP treatment effectively suppressed active "run and tumble" type motility and induced formation of abnormally long structures. With 20 s exposure, the bacterial cells failed to cause pyroptosis in the host cells with >90% survival after 12 h of co-incubation. Our results suggest novel measures to evaluate the functional pathogenic state for identifying safe APP treatment conditions.

  1. Effects of minimal exposures to atmospheric pressure plasma on the activity of Salmonella Typhimurium: Deactivation of bacterial motility and suppression of host-cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Sung; Kim, Kijung; Han, Je-Hyun; Gweon, Bomi; Ko, Ung Hyun; Yoo, Suk Jae; Choe, Wonho; Shin, Jennifer H

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) has been shown effective in sterilization by reducing the number of viable microbes during surface cleaning, food processing, or human tissue treatment. For safe conduct, the majority of previous research focused on complete abolition of microbes, which may require severe treatments. Our aim is to investigate the minimal treatment conditions necessary for effective inactivation of bacteria in such a manner that the APP treated bacteria would not be able to harm the host cells. For this, we ought to identify the objective criteria to make the bacteria dysfunctional. We choose the motile properties and the host-cell invasion capability as two measures to quantify the pathogenic state of bacteria. In this paper, we investigated how the APP treatment in a minimal dosage affects the activity of Salmonella Typhimurium. At 100 W and 15 kHz for 20 s, the APP treatment effectively suppressed active "run and tumble" type motility and induced formation of abnormally long structures. With 20 s exposure, the bacterial cells failed to cause pyroptosis in the host cells with >90% survival after 12 h of co-incubation. Our results suggest novel measures to evaluate the functional pathogenic state for identifying safe APP treatment conditions. PMID:27345896

  2. Antibacterial activity of a bacteriocin-like substance produced by Bacillus sp. P34 that targets the bacterial cell envelope.

    PubMed

    Motta, Amanda S; Flores, Fabiana S; Souto, André A; Brandelli, Adriano

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the mode of action of BLS P34, a bacteriocin-like substance (BLS) produced by a novel Bacillus sp. strain P34 isolated from the Amazon basin. The effect of the BLS was tested against Listeria monocytogenes, showing a bactericidal effect at 200 AU (activity units) ml(-1), while no inhibition of spore outgrowth of Bacillus cereus was observed with a dose of 1,600 AU ml(-1). Growth of Escherichia coli and Salmonella Enteritidis was inhibited, but only when the chelating agent EDTA was co-added with the BLS. The effect of BLS P34 on L. monocytogenes was also investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Treated cells showed an important frequency increase in 1,452 and 1,397 cm(-1) and decrease in 1,217 and 1,058 cm(-1), corresponding assignments of fatty acids and phospholipids. Transmission electron microscopy showed damaged cell envelope and loss of protoplasmic material. BLS P34 was bactericidal to Gram-positive, and also showed inhibitory effect against Gram-negative bacteria. There is evidence that its mode of action corresponds to that of a membrane-active substance. The knowledge about the mode of action of this BLS is essential to determine its effective application as an antimicrobial agent.

  3. Origanum vulgare subsp. hirtum essential oil prevented biofilm formation and showed antibacterial activity against planktonic and sessile bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, Domenico; Napoli, Edoardo Marco; Cusimano, Maria Grazia; Vitale, Maria; Ruberto, Andgiuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Essential oils from six different populations of Origanum vulgare subsp. hirtum were compared for their antibiofilm properties. The six essential oils (A to F) were characterized by a combination of gas chromatography with flame ionization detector and gas chromatography with mass spectrometer detector analyses. All oils showed weak activity against the planktonic form of a group of Staphylococcus aureus strains and against a Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442 reference strain. The ability to inhibit biofilm formation was investigated at sub-MIC levels of 200, 100, and 50 m g/ml by staining sessile cells with safranin. Sample E showed the highest average effectiveness against all tested strains at 50 m g/ml and had inhibition percentages ranging from 30 to 52%. In the screening that used preformed biofilm from the reference strain P. aeruginosa, essential oils A through E were inactive at 200 m g/ml; F was active with a percentage of inhibition equal to 53.2%. Oregano essential oil can inhibit the formation of biofilms of various food pathogens and food spoilage organisms. PMID:24112575

  4. Origanum vulgare subsp. hirtum essential oil prevented biofilm formation and showed antibacterial activity against planktonic and sessile bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, Domenico; Napoli, Edoardo Marco; Cusimano, Maria Grazia; Vitale, Maria; Ruberto, Andgiuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Essential oils from six different populations of Origanum vulgare subsp. hirtum were compared for their antibiofilm properties. The six essential oils (A to F) were characterized by a combination of gas chromatography with flame ionization detector and gas chromatography with mass spectrometer detector analyses. All oils showed weak activity against the planktonic form of a group of Staphylococcus aureus strains and against a Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442 reference strain. The ability to inhibit biofilm formation was investigated at sub-MIC levels of 200, 100, and 50 m g/ml by staining sessile cells with safranin. Sample E showed the highest average effectiveness against all tested strains at 50 m g/ml and had inhibition percentages ranging from 30 to 52%. In the screening that used preformed biofilm from the reference strain P. aeruginosa, essential oils A through E were inactive at 200 m g/ml; F was active with a percentage of inhibition equal to 53.2%. Oregano essential oil can inhibit the formation of biofilms of various food pathogens and food spoilage organisms.

  5. Size Distribution of Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stull, V. R.

    1972-01-01

    By using differential light-scattering measurements of single cells suspended in a laser beam, an effective cell radius has been determined for 141 individual bacteria from suspensions of Staphylococcus epidermidis. The accumulation of these measurements has provided the size distribution for the sampling. PMID:4551753

  6. Identification of bacterial cells by chromosomal painting.

    PubMed Central

    Lanoil, B D; Giovannoni, S J

    1997-01-01

    Chromosomal painting is a technique for the microscopic localization of genetic material. It has been applied at the subcellular level to identify regions of eukaryotic chromosomes. Here we describe the development of bacterial chromosomal painting (BCP), a related technology for the identification of bacterial cells. Purified genomic DNAs from six bacterial strains were labeled by nick translation with the fluorochrome Fluor-X, Cy3, or Cy5. The average size of the labeled fragments was ca. 50 to 200 bp. The probes were hybridized to formaldehyde-fixed microbial cells attached to slides and visualized by fluorescence microscopy. In reciprocal comparisons, distantly related members of the class Proteobacteria (Escherichia coli and Oceanospirillum linum), different species of the genus Bacillus (B. subtilis and B. megaterium), and different serotypes of the subspecies Salmonella choleraesuis subsp. choleraesuis (serotype typhimurium LT2 and serotype typhi Ty2) could easily be distinguished. A combination of two probes, each labeled with a different fluorochrome, was used successfully to simultaneously identify two cell types in a mixture. Lysozyme treatment was required for the identification of Bacillus spp., and RNase digestion and pepsin digestion were found to enhance signal strength and specificity for all cell types tested. Chromosome in situ suppression, a technique that removes cross-hybridizing fragments from the probe, was necessary for the differentiation of the Salmonella serotypes but was not required to distinguish the more distantly related taxa. BCP may have applications in diverse branches of microbiology where the objective is the identification of bacterial cells. PMID:9055426

  7. Bacterial Networks in Cells and Communities.

    PubMed

    Sourjik, Victor; Vorholt, Julia A

    2015-11-20

    Research on the bacterial regulatory networks is currently experiencing a true revival, driven by advances in methodology and by emergence of novel concepts. The biannual conference Bacterial Networks (BacNet15) held in May 2015, in Sant Feliu de Guíxols, Spain, covered progress in the studies of regulatory networks that control bacterial physiology, cell biology, stress responses, metabolism, collective behavior and evolution. It demonstrated how interdisciplinary approaches that combine molecular biology and biochemistry with the latest microscopy developments, whole cell (-omics) approaches and mathematical modeling can help understand design principles relevant in microbiology. It further showed how current biotechnology and medical microbiology could profit from our knowledge of and ability to engineer regulatory networks of bacteria.

  8. Antimicrobial activities of daunorubicin and adriamycin derivatives on bacterial and protoplast type L-form cells of Bacillus subtilis 170, Escherichia coli B, and Proteus mirabilis VI. Structure--activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Gumpert, J; Dornberger, K; Smith, T H

    1982-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of ten N-alkylated derivatives of daunorubicin and adriamycin as well as of 5-iminodaunorubicin has been tested by using Bacillus subtilis 170, Escherichia coli B, and Proteus mirabilis VI and their stable protoplast type L-forms in an agar diffusion test. Eight of the substances showed similar activities against B. subtilis and the L-forms of all test organisms, but no activity against the bacterial forms of E. coli and P. mirabilis. The cell wall of these gram-negative bacteria is responsible for this resistance by not allowing the antibiotics to enter the cells. The piperidino compound N-(CH2)5 daunorubicin shows 2-4 times higher activity against B. subtilis and all L-forms in comparison to daunorubicin and the other derivatives. Five of the substances were inactive against all test strains. Their inactivity seems to be associated with the larger substituents at the C-3' position. Relations between molecular structure and activity are discussed considering data about the interaction with DNA and the antitumor activity. Stable protoplast type L-forms and their bacterial forms represent a suitable and effective test system to screen for more effective substances and to get more information about their mode of action.

  9. Macrophages inhibit human osteosarcoma cell growth after activation with the bacterial cell wall derivative liposomal muramyl tripeptide in combination with interferon-γ

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In osteosarcoma, the presence of tumor-infiltrating macrophages positively correlates with patient survival in contrast to the negative effect of tumor-associated macrophages in patients with other tumors. Liposome-encapsulated muramyl tripeptide (L-MTP-PE) has been introduced in the treatment of osteosarcoma patients, which may enhance the potential anti-tumor activity of macrophages. Direct anti-tumor activity of human macrophages against human osteosarcoma cells has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed osteosarcoma cell growth after co-culture with human macrophages. Methods Monocyte-derived M1-like and M2-like macrophages were polarized with LPS + IFN-γ, L-MTP-PE +/− IFN-γ or IL-10 and incubated with osteosarcoma cells. Two days later, viable tumor cell numbers were analyzed. Antibody-dependent effects were investigated using the therapeutic anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab. Results M1-like macrophages inhibited osteosarcoma cell growth when activated with LPS + IFN-γ. Likewise, stimulation of M1-like macrophages with liposomal muramyl tripeptide (L-MTP-PE) inhibited tumor growth, but only when combined with IFN-γ. Addition of the tumor-reactive anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab did not further improve the anti-tumor activity of activated M1-like macrophages. The inhibition was mediated by supernatants of activated M1-like macrophages, containing TNF-α and IL-1β. However, specific blockage of these cytokines, nitric oxide or reactive oxygen species did not inhibit the anti-tumor effect, suggesting the involvement of other soluble factors released upon macrophage activation. While LPS + IFN-γ–activated M2-like macrophages had low anti-tumor activity, IL-10–polarized M2-like macrophages were able to reduce osteosarcoma cell growth in the presence of the anti-EGFR cetuximab involving antibody-dependent tumor cell phagocytosis. Conclusion This study demonstrates that human macrophages can be induced to exert direct anti

  10. Cytokine-mediated induction of cyclo-oxygenase-2 by activation of tyrosine kinase in bovine endothelial cells stimulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Akarasereenont, P.; Bakhle, Y. S.; Thiemermann, C.; Vane, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    1. The induction of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) afforded by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) is mediated by tyrosine kinase. LPS also causes the generation of several cytokines including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). This study investigates whether endogenous IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, EGF or PDGF contribute to the induction of COX-2 elicited by LPS in BAEC and if their action is due to activation of tyrosine kinase. Furthermore, we have studied the induction of COX-2 by exogenous cytokines. 2. Accumulation of 6-oxo-prostaglandin (PG) F1 alpha in cultures of BAEC was measured by radioimmunoassay at 24 h after addition of either LPS (1 microgram ml-1) alone or LPS together with a polyclonal antibody to one of the various cytokines. In experiments designed to measure 'COX activity', 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha generated by BAEC activated with recombinant human IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, EGF or PDGF for 12 h was measured after incubation of washed cells with exogenous arachidonic acid (30 microM for 15 min). Western blot analysis determined the expression of COX-2 protein in BAEC. 3. The accumulation of 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha caused by LPS in BAEC was attenuated by co-incubation with one of the polyclonal antibodies, anti-IL-1 beta, anti-TNF-alpha, anti-EGF, anti-PDGF or with the IL-1 receptor antagonist, in a dose-dependent manner. Exogenous IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha or EGF also caused an increase in COX activity, while PDGF was ineffective.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 4 PMID:7582449

  11. Macrophage cell death upon intracellular bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xin-He; Xu, Yunsheng; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage-pathogen interaction is a complex process and the outcome of this tag-of-war for both sides is to live or die. Without attempting to be comprehensive, this review will discuss the complexity and significance of the interaction outcomes between macrophages and some facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens as exemplified by Francisella, Salmonella, Shigella and Yersinia. Upon bacterial infection, macrophages can die by a variety of ways, such as apoptosis, autophagic cell death, necrosis, necroptosis, oncosis, pyronecrosis, pyroptosis etc, which is the focus of this review. PMID:26690967

  12. Colon-targeted delivery of live bacterial cell biotherapeutics including microencapsulated live bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Satya; Malgorzata Urbanska, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    There has been an ample interest in delivery of therapeutic molecules using live cells. Oral delivery has been stipulated as best way to deliver live cells to humans for therapy. Colon, in particular, is a part of gastrointestinal (GI) tract that has been proposed to be an oral targeted site. The main objective of these oral therapy procedures is to deliver live cells not only to treat diseases like colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, and other GI tract diseases like intestinal obstruction and gastritis, but also to deliver therapeutic molecules for overall therapy in various diseases such as renal failure, coronary heart disease, hypertension, and others. This review provides a comprehensive summary of recent advancement in colon targeted live bacterial cell biotherapeutics. Current status of bacterial cell therapy, principles of artificial cells and its potentials in oral delivery of live bacterial cell biotherapeutics for clinical applications as well as biotherapeutic future perspectives are also discussed in our review. PMID:19707368

  13. Single Cell Analysis of a Bacterial Sender-Receiver System

    PubMed Central

    Mückl, Andrea; Kapsner, Korbinian; Gerland, Ulrich; Simmel, Friedrich C.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring gene expression dynamics on the single cell level provides important information on cellular heterogeneity and stochasticity, and potentially allows for more accurate quantitation of gene expression processes. We here study bacterial senders and receivers genetically engineered with components of the quorum sensing system derived from Aliivibrio fischeri on the single cell level using microfluidics-based bacterial chemostats and fluorescence video microscopy. We track large numbers of bacteria over extended periods of time, which allows us to determine bacterial lineages and filter out subpopulations within a heterogeneous population. We quantitatively determine the dynamic gene expression response of receiver bacteria to varying amounts of the quorum sensing inducer N-3-oxo-C6-homoserine lactone (AHL). From this we construct AHL response curves and characterize gene expression dynamics of whole bacterial populations by investigating the statistical distribution of gene expression activity over time. The bacteria are found to display heterogeneous induction behavior within the population. We therefore also characterize gene expression in a homogeneous bacterial subpopulation by focusing on single cell trajectories derived only from bacteria with similar induction behavior. The response at the single cell level is found to be more cooperative than that obtained for the heterogeneous total population. For the analysis of systems containing both AHL senders and receiver cells, we utilize the receiver cells as ‘bacterial sensors’ for AHL. Based on a simple gene expression model and the response curves obtained in receiver-only experiments, the effective AHL concentration established by the senders and their ‘sending power’ is determined. PMID:26808777

  14. Biosensors for Whole-Cell Bacterial Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rushworth, Jo V.; Hirst, Natalie A.; Millner, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial pathogens are important targets for detection and identification in medicine, food safety, public health, and security. Bacterial infection is a common cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In spite of the availability of antibiotics, these infections are often misdiagnosed or there is an unacceptable delay in diagnosis. Current methods of bacterial detection rely upon laboratory-based techniques such as cell culture, microscopic analysis, and biochemical assays. These procedures are time-consuming and costly and require specialist equipment and trained users. Portable stand-alone biosensors can facilitate rapid detection and diagnosis at the point of care. Biosensors will be particularly useful where a clear diagnosis informs treatment, in critical illness (e.g., meningitis) or to prevent further disease spread (e.g., in case of food-borne pathogens or sexually transmitted diseases). Detection of bacteria is also becoming increasingly important in antibioterrorism measures (e.g., anthrax detection). In this review, we discuss recent progress in the use of biosensors for the detection of whole bacterial cells for sensitive and earlier identification of bacteria without the need for sample processing. There is a particular focus on electrochemical biosensors, especially impedance-based systems, as these present key advantages in terms of ease of miniaturization, lack of reagents, sensitivity, and low cost. PMID:24982325

  15. Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting of Rickettsia prowazekii-Infected Host Cells Based on Bacterial Burden and Early Detection of Fluorescent Rickettsial Transformants

    PubMed Central

    Driskell, Lonnie O.; Tucker, Aimee M.; Woodard, Andrew; Wood, Raphael R.; Wood, David O.

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii, the causative agent of epidemic typhus, is an obligate intracellular bacterium that replicates only within the cytosol of a eukaryotic host cell. Despite the barriers to genetic manipulation that such a life style creates, rickettsial mutants have been generated by transposon insertion as well as by homologous recombination mechanisms. However, progress is hampered by the length of time required to identify and isolate R. prowazekii transformants. To reduce the time required and variability associated with propagation and harvesting of rickettsiae for each transformation experiment, characterized frozen stocks were used to generate electrocompetent rickettsiae. Transformation experiments employing these rickettsiae established that fluorescent rickettsial populations could be identified using a fluorescence activated cell sorter within one week following electroporation. Early detection was improved with increasing amounts of transforming DNA. In addition, we demonstrate that heterogeneous populations of rickettsiae-infected cells can be sorted into distinct sub-populations based on the number of rickettsiae per cell. Together our data suggest the combination of fluorescent reporters and cell sorting represent an important technical advance that will facilitate isolation of distinct R. prowazekii mutants and allow for closer examination of the effects of infection on host cells at various infectious burdens. PMID:27010457

  16. In vivo activation of the intracrine vitamin D pathway in innate immune cells and mammary tissue during a bacterial infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The active vitamin D metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), is an important regulator of immune function. The enzyme that synthesizes 1,25(OH)2D3 from 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 is 1alpha-hydroxylase (1alpha-OHase; CYP27B1). Several in vitro studies have shown that TLR signaling induces expre...

  17. TLR2-mediated Cell Stimulation in Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Mares, Debra; Simoes, Jose A.; Novak, Richard M.; Spear, Gregory T.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is associated with preterm labor, pelvic inflammatory disease and increased HIV acquisition, although the pathways that mediate these pathological effects have not been elucidated. To determine the presence of toll-like receptor (TLR)-ligands and their specificity in BV, genital tract fluids were collected from women with and without BV by cervicovaginal lavage (CVL). The CVL samples were evaluated for their ability to stimulate secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and to activate NF κB and the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR), indicators of TLR activation, in human monocytic cells. Stimulation with BV CVLs induced higher levels of IL-8 and TNFα secretion, as well as higher levels of HIV LTR and NF κB activation, than CVLs from women with normal healthy bacterial flora. To identify which TLRs were important in BV, 293 cells expressing specific TLRs were exposed to CVL samples. BV CVLs induced higher IL-8 secretion by cells expressing TLR2 than CVLs from women without BV. Surprisingly, BV CVLs did not stimulate cells expressing TLR4/MD2, although these cells responded to purified LPS, a TLR4 ligand. BV CVLs, in cells expressing TLR2, also activated the HIV LTR. Thus, these studies show that soluble factor(s) present in the lower genital tract of women with BV activate cells via TLR2, identifying a pathway through which BV may mediate adverse effects. PMID:17532476

  18. Expression of bacterial genes in plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fraley, R T; Rogers, S G; Horsch, R B; Sanders, P R; Flick, J S; Adams, S P; Bittner, M L; Brand, L A; Fink, C L; Fry, J S; Galluppi, G R; Goldberg, S B; Hoffmann, N L; Woo, S C

    1983-01-01

    Chimeric bacterial genes conferring resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics have been inserted into the Agrobacterium tumefaciens tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid and introduced into plant cells by in vitro transformation techniques. The chimeric genes contain the nopaline synthase 5' and 3' regulatory regions joined to the genes for neomycin phosphotransferase type I or type II. The chimeric genes were cloned into an intermediate vector, pMON120, and inserted into pTiB6S3 by recombination and then introduced into petunia and tobacco cells by cocultivating A. tumefaciens cells with protoplast-derived cells. Southern hybridization was used to confirm the presence of the chimeric genes in the transformed plant tissues. Expression of the chimeric genes was determined by the ability of the transformed cells to proliferate on medium containing normally inhibitory levels of kanamycin (50 micrograms/ml) or other aminoglycoside antibiotics. Plant cells transformed by wild-type pTiB6S3 or derivatives carrying the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase genes with their own promoters failed to grow under these conditions. The significance of these results for plant genetic engineering is discussed. Images PMID:6308651

  19. Structure of a bacterial toxin-activating acyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Nicholas P.; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    Secreted pore-forming toxins of pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli hemolysin (HlyA) insert into host–cell membranes to subvert signal transduction and induce apoptosis and cell lysis. Unusually, these toxins are synthesized in an inactive form that requires posttranslational activation in the bacterial cytosol. We have previously shown that the activation mechanism is an acylation event directed by a specialized acyl-transferase that uses acyl carrier protein (ACP) to covalently link fatty acids, via an amide bond, to specific internal lysine residues of the protoxin. We now reveal the 2.15-Å resolution X-ray structure of the 172-aa ApxC, a toxin-activating acyl-transferase (TAAT) from pathogenic Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. This determination shows that bacterial TAATs are a structurally homologous family that, despite indiscernible sequence similarity, form a distinct branch of the Gcn5-like N-acetyl transferase (GNAT) superfamily of enzymes that typically use acyl-CoA to modify diverse bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic substrates. A combination of structural analysis, small angle X-ray scattering, mutagenesis, and cross-linking defined the solution state of TAATs, with intermonomer interactions mediated by an N-terminal α-helix. Superposition of ApxC with substrate-bound GNATs, and assay of toxin activation and binding of acyl-ACP and protoxin peptide substrates by mutated ApxC variants, indicates the enzyme active site to be a deep surface groove. PMID:26016525

  20. Expression and stabilization of bacterial luciferase in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Stacey S.; Dionisi, Hebe M.; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2004-06-01

    Current mammalian bioreporters using either firefly luciferase (luc) or GFP constructs require lysis and/or exogenous excitation to evoke a measurable response. Consequently, these cells cannot serve as continuous, on-line monitoring devices for in vivo imaging. Bacterial luciferase, lux, produces a photonic reaction that is cyclic, resulting in autonomous signal generation without the requirement for exogenous substrates or external activation. Therefore, lux-based bioluminescent bioreporters are the only truly autonomous light-generating sensors in existence. Unfortunately, the bacterial lux system has not yet been efficiently expressed in mammalian cells. In this research, three approaches for optimal expression of the a and b subunits of the bacterial luciferase protein were compared and reporter signal stability was evaluated from stably transfected human embryonic kidney cells. Maximum light levels were obtained from cells expressing the luciferase subunits linked with an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). Cells harboring this construct produced bioluminescence equaling 2.6 X 106 photons/sec compared to 7.2 X 104 photons/sec obtained from cells expressing the luciferase from a dual promoter vector and 3.5 X 104 photons/sec from a Lux fusion protein. Furthermore, the bioluminescence levels remained stable for more than forty cell passages (5 months) in the absence of antibiotic selection. After this time, bioluminescence signals dropped at a rate of approximately 5% per cell passage. These data indicate that mammalian cell lines can be engineered to efficiently express the bacterial lux system, thus lending themselves to possible long-term continuous monitoring or imaging applications in vivo.

  1. Induction of Human Regulatory T Cells with Bacterial Superantigens.

    PubMed

    Caserta, Stefano; Taylor, Amanda L; Terrazzini, Nadia; Llewelyn, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) that suppress the activation of immune effector cells limit immunopathology and are fast emerging as therapeutic targets for autoimmune and cancer disease. Tools enabling Treg in vitro-induction, expansion, and characterization and manipulation will help future clinical developments. In this chapter, we describe in detail how to use bacterial superantigens to induce human Tregs efficiently from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. How to assess human Treg phenotype and suppressive capacity are also described. Technical details, variations, and alternative experimental conditions are provided.

  2. Diffusion of Bacterial Cells in Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Licata, Nicholas A; Mohari, Bitan; Fuqua, Clay; Setayeshgar, Sima

    2016-01-01

    The chemotaxis signal transduction network regulates the biased random walk of many bacteria in favorable directions and away from harmful ones through modulating the frequency of directional reorientations. In mutants of diverse bacteria lacking the chemotaxis response, migration in classic motility agar, which constitutes a fluid-filled porous medium, is compromised; straight-swimming cells unable to tumble become trapped within the agar matrix. Spontaneous mutations that restore spreading have been previously observed in the enteric bacterium Escherichia coli, and recent work in other bacterial species has isolated and quantified different classes of nonchemotacting mutants exhibiting the same spreading phenotype. We present a theoretical description of bacterial diffusion in a porous medium-the natural habitat for many cell types-which elucidates how diverse modifications of the motility apparatus resulting in a nonzero tumbling frequency allows for unjamming of otherwise straight-swimming cells at internal boundaries and leads to net migration. A unique result of our analysis is increasing diffusive spread with increasing tumbling frequency in the small pore limit, consistent with earlier experimental observations but not captured by previous models. Our theoretical results, combined with a simple model of bacterial diffusion and growth in agar, are compared with our experimental measurements of swim ring expansion as a function of time, demonstrating good quantitative agreement. Our results suggest that the details of the cellular tumbling process may be adapted to enable bacteria to propagate efficiently through complex environments. For engineered, self-propelled microswimmers that navigate via alternating straight runs and changes in direction, these results suggest an optimal reorientation strategy for efficient migration in a porous environment with a given microarchitecture. PMID:26745427

  3. Studying bacterial quorum-sensing at the single cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfino Perez, Pablo; Pelakh, Leslie; Young, Jonathan; Johnson, Elaine; Hagen, Stephen

    2010-03-01

    Like many bacterial species, Vibrio fischeri can detect its own population density through a quorum sensing (QS) mechanism. The bacterium releases a signal molecule (AI, autoinducer), which accumulates at high population density and triggers a genetic switch. In V.fischeri this leads to bioluminescence. Little is known about how stochastic gene expression affects QS at the level of single cells. We are imaging the luminescence of individual V.fischeri cells in a flow chamber and directly measuring the intercell variability in AI activation of the QS circuit. Our single-cell luminescence experiments allow us to track cells over time and characterize variations in their response to AI levels. We find heterogeneous response to the external signal: at a given AI concentration some cells may be strongly luminescent while others are virtually dark. The analysis of noise in the individual cell response can eventually lead to a better understanding of how cells use QS to gather information about their environment.

  4. One Bacterial Cell, One Complete Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Woyke, Tanja; Tighe, Damon; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Clum, Alicia; Copeland, Alex; Schackwitz, Wendy; Lapidus, Alla; Wu, Dongying; McCutcheon, John P.; McDonald, Bradon R.; Moran, Nancy A.; Bristow, James; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2010-04-26

    While the bulk of the finished microbial genomes sequenced to date are derived from cultured bacterial and archaeal representatives, the vast majority of microorganisms elude current culturing attempts, severely limiting the ability to recover complete or even partial genomes from these environmental species. Single cell genomics is a novel culture-independent approach, which enables access to the genetic material of an individual cell. No single cell genome has to our knowledge been closed and finished to date. Here we report the completed genome from an uncultured single cell of Candidatus Sulcia muelleri DMIN. Digital PCR on single symbiont cells isolated from the bacteriome of the green sharpshooter Draeculacephala minerva bacteriome allowed us to assess that this bacteria is polyploid with genome copies ranging from approximately 200?900 per cell, making it a most suitable target for single cell finishing efforts. For single cell shotgun sequencing, an individual Sulcia cell was isolated and whole genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA). Sanger-based finishing methods allowed us to close the genome. To verify the correctness of our single cell genome and exclude MDA-derived artifacts, we independently shotgun sequenced and assembled the Sulcia genome from pooled bacteriomes using a metagenomic approach, yielding a nearly identical genome. Four variations we detected appear to be genuine biological differences between the two samples. Comparison of the single cell genome with bacteriome metagenomic sequence data detected two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), indicating extremely low genetic diversity within a Sulcia population. This study demonstrates the power of single cell genomics to generate a complete, high quality, non-composite reference genome within an environmental sample, which can be used for population genetic analyzes.

  5. Inhibition of /sup 125/I-labeled ristocetin binding to Micrococcus luteus cells by the peptides related to bacterial cell wall mucopeptide precursors: quantitative structure-activity relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.H.; Martin, Y.; Otis, E.; Mao, J.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) of N-Ac amino acids, N-Ac dipeptides, and N-Ac tripeptides in inhibition of /sup 125/I-labeled ristocetin binding to Micrococcus luteus cell wall have been developed to probe the details of the binding between ristocetin and N-acetylated peptides. The correlation equations indicate that (1) the binding is stronger for peptides in which the side chain of the C-terminal amino acid has a large molar refractivity (MR) value, (2) the binding is weaker for peptides with polar than for those with nonpolar C-terminal side chains, (3) the N-terminal amino acid in N-Ac dipeptides contributes 12 times that of the C-terminal amino acid to binding affinity, and (4) the interactions between ristocetin and the N-terminal amino acid of N-acetyl tripeptides appear to be much weaker than those with the first two amino acids.

  6. Combatting bacterial infections by killing persister cells with mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Brian W; Chowdhury, Nityananda; Wood, Thomas K

    2015-11-01

    Persister cells are a multi-drug tolerant subpopulation of bacteria that contribute to chronic and recalcitrant clinical infections such as cystic fibrosis and tuberculosis. Persisters are metabolically dormant, so they are highly tolerant to all traditional antibiotics which are mainly effective against actively growing cells. Here, we show that the FDA-approved anti-cancer drug mitomycin C (MMC) eradicates persister cells through a growth-independent mechanism. MMC is passively transported and bioreductively activated, leading to spontaneous cross-linking of DNA, which we verify in both active and dormant cells. We find MMC effectively eradicates cells grown in numerous different growth states (e.g. planktonic cultures and highly robust biofilm cultures) in both rich and minimal media. Additionally, MMC is a potent bactericide for a broad range of bacterial persisters, including commensal Escherichia coli K-12 as well as pathogenic species of E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also demonstrate the efficacy of MMC in an animal model and a wound model, substantiating the clinical applicability of MMC against bacterial infections. Therefore, MMC is the first broad-spectrum compound capable of eliminating persister cells, meriting investigation as a new approach for the treatment of recalcitrant infections. PMID:25858802

  7. Combatting bacterial infections by killing persister cells with mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Brian W; Chowdhury, Nityananda; Wood, Thomas K

    2015-11-01

    Persister cells are a multi-drug tolerant subpopulation of bacteria that contribute to chronic and recalcitrant clinical infections such as cystic fibrosis and tuberculosis. Persisters are metabolically dormant, so they are highly tolerant to all traditional antibiotics which are mainly effective against actively growing cells. Here, we show that the FDA-approved anti-cancer drug mitomycin C (MMC) eradicates persister cells through a growth-independent mechanism. MMC is passively transported and bioreductively activated, leading to spontaneous cross-linking of DNA, which we verify in both active and dormant cells. We find MMC effectively eradicates cells grown in numerous different growth states (e.g. planktonic cultures and highly robust biofilm cultures) in both rich and minimal media. Additionally, MMC is a potent bactericide for a broad range of bacterial persisters, including commensal Escherichia coli K-12 as well as pathogenic species of E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also demonstrate the efficacy of MMC in an animal model and a wound model, substantiating the clinical applicability of MMC against bacterial infections. Therefore, MMC is the first broad-spectrum compound capable of eliminating persister cells, meriting investigation as a new approach for the treatment of recalcitrant infections.

  8. Role of Microglial Activation in the Pathophysiology of Bacterial Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Simões, Lutiana R; Goularte, Jessica A; Petronilho, Fabricia; Saigal, Priyanka; Badawy, Marwa; Quevedo, João

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening infection associated with cognitive impairment in many survivors. The pathogen invades the central nervous system (CNS) by penetrating through the luminal side of the cerebral endothelium, which is an integral part of the blood-brain barrier. The replication of bacteria within the subarachnoid space occurs concomitantly with the release of their compounds that are highly immunogenic. These compounds known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) may lead to both an increase in the inflammatory response in the host and also microglial activation. Microglia are the resident macrophages of the CNS which, when activated, can trigger a host of immunological pathways. Classical activation increases the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and reactive oxygen species, while alternative activation is implicated in the inhibition of inflammation and restoration of homeostasis. The inflammatory response from classical microglial activation can facilitate the elimination of invasive microorganisms; however, excessive or extended microglial activation can result in neuronal damage and eventually cell death. This review aims to discuss the role of microglia in the pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis as well as the process of microglial activation by PAMPs and by endogenous constituents that are normally released from damaged cells known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). PMID:25744564

  9. Metabolic Responses of Bacterial Cells to Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Żur, Joanna; Wojcieszyńska, Danuta; Guzik, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    In recent years immobilized cells have commonly been used for various biotechnological applications, e.g., antibiotic production, soil bioremediation, biodegradation and biotransformation of xenobiotics in wastewater treatment plants. Although the literature data on the physiological changes and behaviour of cells in the immobilized state remain fragmentary, it is well documented that in natural settings microorganisms are mainly found in association with surfaces, which results in biofilm formation. Biofilms are characterized by genetic and physiological heterogeneity and the occurrence of altered microenvironments within the matrix. Microbial cells in communities display a variety of metabolic differences as compared to their free-living counterparts. Immobilization of bacteria can occur either as a natural phenomenon or as an artificial process. The majority of changes observed in immobilized cells result from protection provided by the supports. Knowledge about the main physiological responses occurring in immobilized cells may contribute to improving the efficiency of immobilization techniques. This paper reviews the main metabolic changes exhibited by immobilized bacterial cells, including growth rate, biodegradation capabilities, biocatalytic efficiency and plasmid stability. PMID:27455220

  10. EGFR regulates macrophage activation and function in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Hardbower, Dana M; Singh, Kshipra; Asim, Mohammad; Verriere, Thomas G; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Barry, Daniel P; Allaman, Margaret M; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard M; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Wilson, Keith T

    2016-09-01

    EGFR signaling regulates macrophage function, but its role in bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we assessed the role of macrophage EGFR signaling during infection with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that causes persistent inflammation and gastric cancer. EGFR was phosphorylated in murine and human macrophages during H. pylori infection. In human gastric tissues, elevated levels of phosphorylated EGFR were observed throughout the histologic cascade from gastritis to carcinoma. Deleting Egfr in myeloid cells attenuated gastritis and increased H. pylori burden in infected mice. EGFR deficiency also led to a global defect in macrophage activation that was associated with decreased cytokine, chemokine, and NO production. We observed similar alterations in macrophage activation and disease phenotype in the Citrobacter rodentium model of murine infectious colitis. Mechanistically, EGFR signaling activated NF-κB and MAPK1/3 pathways to induce cytokine production and macrophage activation. Although deletion of Egfr had no effect on DC function, EGFR-deficient macrophages displayed impaired Th1 and Th17 adaptive immune responses to H. pylori, which contributed to decreased chronic inflammation in infected mice. Together, these results indicate that EGFR signaling is central to macrophage function in response to enteric bacterial pathogens and is a potential therapeutic target for infection-induced inflammation and associated carcinogenesis.

  11. EGFR regulates macrophage activation and function in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Hardbower, Dana M; Singh, Kshipra; Asim, Mohammad; Verriere, Thomas G; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Barry, Daniel P; Allaman, Margaret M; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard M; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Wilson, Keith T

    2016-09-01

    EGFR signaling regulates macrophage function, but its role in bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we assessed the role of macrophage EGFR signaling during infection with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that causes persistent inflammation and gastric cancer. EGFR was phosphorylated in murine and human macrophages during H. pylori infection. In human gastric tissues, elevated levels of phosphorylated EGFR were observed throughout the histologic cascade from gastritis to carcinoma. Deleting Egfr in myeloid cells attenuated gastritis and increased H. pylori burden in infected mice. EGFR deficiency also led to a global defect in macrophage activation that was associated with decreased cytokine, chemokine, and NO production. We observed similar alterations in macrophage activation and disease phenotype in the Citrobacter rodentium model of murine infectious colitis. Mechanistically, EGFR signaling activated NF-κB and MAPK1/3 pathways to induce cytokine production and macrophage activation. Although deletion of Egfr had no effect on DC function, EGFR-deficient macrophages displayed impaired Th1 and Th17 adaptive immune responses to H. pylori, which contributed to decreased chronic inflammation in infected mice. Together, these results indicate that EGFR signaling is central to macrophage function in response to enteric bacterial pathogens and is a potential therapeutic target for infection-induced inflammation and associated carcinogenesis. PMID:27482886

  12. Food applications of bacterial cell wall hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Callewaert, Lien; Walmagh, Maarten; Michiels, Chris W; Lavigne, Rob

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial cell wall hydrolases (BCWHs) display a remarkable structural and functional diversity that offers perspectives for novel food applications, reaching beyond those of the archetype BCWH and established biopreservative hen egg white lysozyme. Insights in BCWHs from bacteriophages to animals have provided concepts for tailoring BCWHs to target specific pathogens or spoilage bacteria, or, conversely, to expand their working range to Gram-negative bacteria. Genetically modified foods expressing BCWHs in situ showed successful, but face regulatory and ethical concerns. An interesting spin-off development is the use of cell wall binding domains of bacteriophage BCWHs for detection and removal of foodborne pathogens. Besides for improving food safety or stability, BCWHs may also find use as functional food ingredients with specific health effects.

  13. Sex cells: gender and the language of bacterial genetics.

    PubMed

    Bivins, R

    2000-01-01

    Between 1946 and 1960, a new phenomenon emerged in the field of bacteriology. "Bacterial sex," as it was called, revolutionized the study of genetics, largely by making available a whole new class of cheap, fast-growing, and easily manipulated organisms. But what was "bacterial sex?" How could single-celled organisms have "sex" or even be sexually differentiated? The technical language used in the scientific press - the public and inalienable face of 20th century science - to describe this apparently neuter organism was explicit" the cells "copulated," had "intimate contact," "conjugal unions," and engaged in "menage a trois" relationships. And yet, to describe bacteria as sexually reproducing organisms, the definition of sex itself had to change. Despite manifold contradictions and the availability of alternative language, the notion of sexually active (even promiscuous) single-celled organisms has persisted, even into contemporary textbooks on cell biology and genetics. In this paper I examine the ways in which bacteria were brought into the genetic fold, sexualized, and given gender; I also consider the issues underlying the durability of "bacterial sex."

  14. Organic matter bioavailability controls the active bacterial fraction in deep-sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, G. M.; Giuliano, L.; Danovaro, R.

    2003-04-01

    Deep-sea sediments, covering more than 60% of the earth surface, represent the largest Earth's ecosystem. Bacteria are the most abundant component and the major players of biogeochemical transformations. However, the knowledge of the physiological and metabolic state of bacterial cells in deep-sea sediments is still extremely poor, thus limiting our actual comprehension of bacterial role on C cycling and early diagenesis on global scale. The recent discovery that a large bacterial fraction is dead and/or inactive suggests that the rather constant bacterial number in the deep sea might be due to the inappropriate methodology of estimation. We investigated the abundance of nucleoid-containing cells (NuCC), assumed to be the active bacterial fraction, and their relative contribution to total bacterial counts in Mediterranean deep-sea sediments (from 670 to 2570 m depth), together with measurements of sedimentary organic matter. Our results indicate that living bacterial cells accounted for 14 to 70% of total bacterial number. The active bacterial abundance decreased by 4 times with increasing station depth. Moreover, NuCC abundance strongly decreased with increasing depth in the sediment, together with the decrease of organic matter concentrations (in terms of protein, carbohydrates and pigments). Our findings indicate that the bioavailable fraction of organic matter exert a strong control on activity and turnover rates of microbial assemblages in deep sea.

  15. Shedding light on biology of bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    To understand basic principles of living organisms one has to know many different properties of all cellular components, their mutual interactions but also their amounts and spatial organization. Live-cell imaging is one possible approach to obtain such data. To get multiple snapshots of a cellular process, the imaging approach has to be gentle enough to not disrupt basic functions of the cell but also have high temporal and spatial resolution to detect and describe the changes. Light microscopy has become a method of choice and since its early development over 300 years ago revolutionized our understanding of living organisms. As most cellular components are indistinguishable from the rest of the cellular contents, the second revolution came from a discovery of specific labelling techniques, such as fusions to fluorescent proteins that allowed specific tracking of a component of interest. Currently, several different tags can be tracked independently and this allows us to simultaneously monitor the dynamics of several cellular components and from the correlation of their dynamics to infer their respective functions. It is, therefore, not surprising that live-cell fluorescence microscopy significantly advanced our understanding of basic cellular processes. Current cameras are fast enough to detect changes with millisecond time resolution and are sensitive enough to detect even a few photons per pixel. Together with constant improvement of properties of fluorescent tags, it is now possible to track single molecules in living cells over an extended period of time with a great temporal resolution. The parallel development of new illumination and detection techniques allowed breaking the diffraction barrier and thus further pushed the resolution limit of light microscopy. In this review, we would like to cover recent advances in live-cell imaging technology relevant to bacterial cells and provide a few examples of research that has been possible due to imaging. This

  16. Shedding light on biology of bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Johannes P; Basler, Marek

    2016-11-01

    To understand basic principles of living organisms one has to know many different properties of all cellular components, their mutual interactions but also their amounts and spatial organization. Live-cell imaging is one possible approach to obtain such data. To get multiple snapshots of a cellular process, the imaging approach has to be gentle enough to not disrupt basic functions of the cell but also have high temporal and spatial resolution to detect and describe the changes. Light microscopy has become a method of choice and since its early development over 300 years ago revolutionized our understanding of living organisms. As most cellular components are indistinguishable from the rest of the cellular contents, the second revolution came from a discovery of specific labelling techniques, such as fusions to fluorescent proteins that allowed specific tracking of a component of interest. Currently, several different tags can be tracked independently and this allows us to simultaneously monitor the dynamics of several cellular components and from the correlation of their dynamics to infer their respective functions. It is, therefore, not surprising that live-cell fluorescence microscopy significantly advanced our understanding of basic cellular processes. Current cameras are fast enough to detect changes with millisecond time resolution and are sensitive enough to detect even a few photons per pixel. Together with constant improvement of properties of fluorescent tags, it is now possible to track single molecules in living cells over an extended period of time with a great temporal resolution. The parallel development of new illumination and detection techniques allowed breaking the diffraction barrier and thus further pushed the resolution limit of light microscopy. In this review, we would like to cover recent advances in live-cell imaging technology relevant to bacterial cells and provide a few examples of research that has been possible due to imaging

  17. Shedding light on biology of bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Johannes P; Basler, Marek

    2016-11-01

    To understand basic principles of living organisms one has to know many different properties of all cellular components, their mutual interactions but also their amounts and spatial organization. Live-cell imaging is one possible approach to obtain such data. To get multiple snapshots of a cellular process, the imaging approach has to be gentle enough to not disrupt basic functions of the cell but also have high temporal and spatial resolution to detect and describe the changes. Light microscopy has become a method of choice and since its early development over 300 years ago revolutionized our understanding of living organisms. As most cellular components are indistinguishable from the rest of the cellular contents, the second revolution came from a discovery of specific labelling techniques, such as fusions to fluorescent proteins that allowed specific tracking of a component of interest. Currently, several different tags can be tracked independently and this allows us to simultaneously monitor the dynamics of several cellular components and from the correlation of their dynamics to infer their respective functions. It is, therefore, not surprising that live-cell fluorescence microscopy significantly advanced our understanding of basic cellular processes. Current cameras are fast enough to detect changes with millisecond time resolution and are sensitive enough to detect even a few photons per pixel. Together with constant improvement of properties of fluorescent tags, it is now possible to track single molecules in living cells over an extended period of time with a great temporal resolution. The parallel development of new illumination and detection techniques allowed breaking the diffraction barrier and thus further pushed the resolution limit of light microscopy. In this review, we would like to cover recent advances in live-cell imaging technology relevant to bacterial cells and provide a few examples of research that has been possible due to imaging

  18. Microarray Analysis to Monitor Bacterial Cell Wall Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hee-Jeon; Hesketh, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptomics, the genome-wide analysis of gene transcription, has become an important tool for characterizing and understanding the signal transduction networks operating in bacteria. Here we describe a protocol for quantifying and interpreting changes in the transcriptome of Streptomyces coelicolor that take place in response to treatment with three antibiotics active against different stages of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. The results defined the transcriptional responses associated with cell envelope homeostasis including a generalized response to all three antibiotics involving activation of transcription of the cell envelope stress sigma factor σ(E), together with elements of the stringent response, and of the heat, osmotic, and oxidative stress regulons. Many antibiotic-specific transcriptional changes were identified, representing cellular processes potentially important for tolerance to each antibiotic. The principles behind the protocol are transferable to the study of cell envelope homeostatic mechanisms probed using alternative chemical/environmental insults or in other bacterial strains. PMID:27311662

  19. Autologous tumor cells engineered to express bacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Ramiya, Vijayakumar K; Jerald, Maya M; Lawman, Patricia D; Lawman, Michael J P

    2014-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapies are emerging as promising treatment modalities in the management of the disease. As a result, cancer vaccines are considered to be immensely crucial in preventing recurrence, a well-known nemesis in cancer patients because they have the potential to activate memory antitumor immunity. Due to poor antigenicity and self-tolerance, most tumor antigens require interventional vaccine therapies to provide an adequate "danger" signal to the immune system in order to activate a robust, clinically meaningful antitumor immunity. It has been postulated that this requirement may be achieved by providing bacterial and/or viral immunogens to prime this type of immune response. Briefly, we provide here a method of transfecting whole tumor cells with plasmid DNA encoding an immunogenic bacterial protein such as Emm55, which was derived from Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes). Subsequent inactivation of the transfected cells by irradiation (100 Gray) prevents replication. This type of whole-cell vaccine, e.g., ImmuneFx™, has demonstrated activity in a murine neuroblastoma model, in canine lymphoma patients with naturally occurring disease, and in many cancer types in companion animals. The protocols described in this chapter provide the necessary materials and methodologies to manufacture such a vaccine.

  20. Real-Time Monitoring of New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase Activity in Living Bacterial Cells by 1H NMR Spectroscopy**

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junhe; McLeod, Sarah; MacCormack, Kathleen; Sriram, Shubha; Gao, Ning; Breeze, Alexander L; Hu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Disconnections between in vitro responses and those observed in whole cells confound many attempts to design drugs in areas of serious medical need. A method based on 1D 1H NMR spectroscopy is reported that affords the ability to monitor the hydrolytic decomposition of the carbapenem antibiotic meropenem inside Escherichia coli cells expressing New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase subclass 1 (NDM-1), an emerging antibiotic-resistance threat. Cell-based NMR studies demonstrated that two known NDM-1 inhibitors, L-captopril and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), inhibit the hydrolysis of meropenem in vivo. NDM-1 activity in cells was also shown to be inhibited by spermine, a porin inhibitor, although in an in vitro assay, the influence of spermine on the activity of isolated NDM-1 protein is minimal. This new approach may have generic utility for monitoring reactions involving diffusible metabolites in other complex biological matrices and whole-cell settings, including mammalian cells. PMID:24458501

  1. Bacterial foraging based edge detection for cell image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yongsheng; Zhou, Tao; Xia, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Edge detection is the most popular and common choices for cell image segmentation, in which local searching strategies are commonly used. In spite of their computational efficiency, traditional edge detectors, however, may either produce discontinued edges or rely heavily on initializations. In this paper, we propose a bacterial foraging based edge detection (BFED) algorithm for cell image segmentation. We model the gradients of intensities as the nutrient concentration and propel bacteria to forage along nutrient-rich locations via mimicking the behavior of Escherichia coli, including the chemotaxis, swarming, reproduction, elimination and dispersal. As a nature-inspired evolutionary technique, this algorithm can identify the desired edges and mark them as the tracks of bacteria. We have evaluated the proposed algorithm against the Canny, SUSAN, Verma's and an active contour model (ACM) based edge detectors on both synthetic and real cell images. Our results suggest that the BFED algorithm can identify boundaries more effectively and provide more accurate cell image segmentation. PMID:26737139

  2. An Overview of Genetic Mechanisms in the Bacterial Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalfe, Judith; Baumberg, Simon

    1988-01-01

    Outlines the genetic elements found in the bacterial cell which play a role in recombining DNA sequences. Provides a core structure to which the mechanisms occurring in and between bacterial cells can be related. Discusses the practicalities of recombinant DNA techniques. (Author/CW)

  3. Messenger Functions of the Bacterial Cell Wall-derived Muropeptides

    PubMed Central

    Boudreau, Marc A.; Fisher, Jed. F.; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial muropeptides are soluble peptidoglycan structures central to recycling of the bacterial cell wall, and messengers in diverse cell-signaling events. Bacteria sense muropeptides as signals that antibiotics targeting cell-wall biosynthesis are present, and eukaryotes detect muropeptides during the innate immune response to bacterial infection. This review summarizes the roles of bacterial muropeptides as messengers, with a special emphasis on bacterial muropeptide structures and the relationship of structure to the biochemical events that the muropeptides elicit. Muropeptide sensing and recycling in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is discussed, followed by muropeptide sensing by eukaryotes as a crucial event to the innate immune response of insects (via peptidoglycan-recognition proteins) and mammals (through Nod-like receptors) to bacterial invasion. PMID:22409164

  4. Mast cells: multitalented facilitators of protection against bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Nikita H; Guentzel, M Neal; Rodriguez, Annette R; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Forsthuber, Thomas G; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells are crucial effector cells evoking immune responses against bacterial pathogens. The positioning of mast cells at the host–environment interface, and the multitude of pathogen-recognition receptors and preformed mediator granules make these cells potentially the earliest to respond to an invading pathogen. In this review, the authors summarize the receptors used by mast cells to recognize invading bacteria and discuss the function of immune mediators released by mast cells in control of bacterial infection. The interaction of mast cells with other immune cells, including macrophages, dendritic cells and T cells, to induce protective immunity is highlighted. The authors also discuss mast cell-based vaccine strategies and the potential application in control of bacterial disease. PMID:23390944

  5. Modification of Bacterial Effector Proteins Inside Eukaryotic Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Crina M.; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Valls, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria manipulate their hosts by delivering a number of virulence proteins -called effectors- directly into the plant or animal cells. Recent findings have shown that such effectors can suffer covalent modifications inside the eukaryotic cells. Here, we summarize the recent reports where effector modifications by the eukaryotic machinery have been described. We restrict our focus on proteins secreted by the type III or type IV systems, excluding other bacterial toxins. We describe the known examples of effectors whose enzymatic activity is triggered by interaction with plant and animal cell factors, including GTPases, E2-Ubiquitin conjugates, cyclophilin and thioredoxins. We focus on the structural interactions with these factors and their influence on effector function. We also review the described examples of host-mediated post-translational effector modifications which are required for proper subcellular location and function. These host-specific covalent modifications include phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, and lipidations such as prenylation, fatty acylation and phospholipid binding. PMID:27489796

  6. Modification of Bacterial Effector Proteins Inside Eukaryotic Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Popa, Crina M; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Valls, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria manipulate their hosts by delivering a number of virulence proteins -called effectors- directly into the plant or animal cells. Recent findings have shown that such effectors can suffer covalent modifications inside the eukaryotic cells. Here, we summarize the recent reports where effector modifications by the eukaryotic machinery have been described. We restrict our focus on proteins secreted by the type III or type IV systems, excluding other bacterial toxins. We describe the known examples of effectors whose enzymatic activity is triggered by interaction with plant and animal cell factors, including GTPases, E2-Ubiquitin conjugates, cyclophilin and thioredoxins. We focus on the structural interactions with these factors and their influence on effector function. We also review the described examples of host-mediated post-translational effector modifications which are required for proper subcellular location and function. These host-specific covalent modifications include phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, and lipidations such as prenylation, fatty acylation and phospholipid binding.

  7. Development and validation of a high-throughput cell-based screen to identify activators of a bacterial two-component signal transduction system.

    PubMed

    van Rensburg, Julia J; Fortney, Kate R; Chen, Lan; Krieger, Andrew J; Lima, Bruno P; Wolfe, Alan J; Katz, Barry P; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Spinola, Stanley M

    2015-07-01

    CpxRA is a two-component signal transduction system (2CSTS) found in many drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. In response to periplasmic stress, CpxA autophosphorylates and donates a phosphoryl group to its cognate response regulator, CpxR. Phosphorylated CpxR (CpxR-P) upregulates genes involved in membrane repair and downregulates multiple genes that encode virulence factors, which are trafficked across the cell membrane. Mutants that constitutively activate CpxRA in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Haemophilus ducreyi are avirulent in mice and humans, respectively. Thus, the activation of CpxRA has high potential as a novel antimicrobial/antivirulence strategy. Using a series of Escherichia coli strains containing a CpxR-P-responsive lacZ reporter and deletions in genes encoding CpxRA system components, we developed and validated a novel cell-based high-throughput screen (HTS) for CpxRA activators. A screen of 36,000 compounds yielded one hit compound that increased reporter activity in wild-type cells. This is the first report of a compound that activates, rather than inhibits, a 2CSTS. The activity profile of the compound against CpxRA pathway mutants in the presence of glucose suggested that the compound inhibits CpxA phosphatase activity. We confirmed that the compound induced the accumulation of CpxR-P in treated cells. Although the hit compound contained a nitro group, a derivative lacking this group retained activity in serum and had lower cytotoxicity than that of the initial hit. This HTS is amenable for the screening of larger libraries to find compounds that activate CpxRA by other mechanisms, and it could be adapted to find activators of other two-component systems.

  8. Single-molecule imaging reveals modulation of cell wall synthesis dynamics in live bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Timothy K.; Meng, Kevin; Shi, Handuo; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2016-01-01

    The peptidoglycan cell wall is an integral organelle critical for bacterial cell shape and stability. Proper cell wall construction requires the interaction of synthesis enzymes and the cytoskeleton, but it is unclear how the activities of individual proteins are coordinated to preserve the morphology and integrity of the cell wall during growth. To elucidate this coordination, we used single-molecule imaging to follow the behaviours of the two major peptidoglycan synthases in live, elongating Escherichia coli cells and after perturbation. We observed heterogeneous localization dynamics of penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 1A, the synthase predominantly associated with cell wall elongation, with individual PBP1A molecules distributed between mobile and immobile populations. Perturbations to PBP1A activity, either directly through antibiotics or indirectly through PBP1A's interaction with its lipoprotein activator or other synthases, shifted the fraction of mobile molecules. Our results suggest that multiple levels of regulation control the activity of enzymes to coordinate peptidoglycan synthesis. PMID:27774981

  9. A bacterial tyrosine phosphatase inhibits plant pattern recognition receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Brutus, Alexandre; Segonzac, Cécile; Roy, Sonali; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Oh, Man-Ho; Sklenar, Jan; Derbyshire, Paul; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro; Monaghan, Jacqueline; Menke, Frank L; Huber, Steven C; He, Sheng Yang; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-03-28

    Innate immunity relies on the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) located on the host cell's surface. Many plant PRRs are kinases. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis receptor kinase EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR), which perceives the elf18 peptide derived from bacterial elongation factor Tu, is activated upon ligand binding by phosphorylation on its tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of a single tyrosine residue, Y836, is required for activation of EFR and downstream immunity to the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. A tyrosine phosphatase, HopAO1, secreted by P. syringae, reduces EFR phosphorylation and prevents subsequent immune responses. Thus, host and pathogen compete to take control of PRR tyrosine phosphorylation used to initiate antibacterial immunity.

  10. Enhanced proliferation and activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with psoriasis vulgaris mediated by streptococcal antigen with bacterial DNA.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi-Hua; Lu, Zhi-Yong; Shi, Ruo-Fei; Xue, Feng; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Pan, Meng; Yuan, Wei-Ru; Xu, Han; Li, Wei-Ping; Zheng, Jie

    2009-11-01

    Streptococcal infection is believed to have an intimate relationship with psoriasis, although the pathogenic role of streptococcal DNA is not fully understood. To gain a clearer understanding of these dynamics, we investigated the effect of streptococcal DNA on lymphocyte proliferation and activation as well as cytokine secretion in psoriasis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from psoriatic patients had higher proliferative responses upon stimulation by streptococcal antigen (SA) when compared with those from healthy individuals. Strikingly, this enhanced proliferation of PBMCs was attenuated after administration of SA treated with DNase-I. In addition, CD69 expression levels on T cells, including skin-homing lymphocyte cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen positive T cells, and IFN-alpha secretion by PBMCs were also attenuated in patients after stimulation with SA without nucleic acid (non-nucleic acid SA, non-NASA) compared with stimulation with untreated SA. However, activation marker CD86 expression levels on B cells as well as the secretion of IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha following stimulation with SA or non-NASA were not significantly altered. Interestingly, the attenuated T-cell activation and IFN-alpha secretion in psoriatic patients could be reconstituted when stimulated by non-NASA combined with synthetic CpG-A, but not when combined with synthetic CpG-B. This study demonstrates the integral function of SA, particularly streptococcal DNA, in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  11. Structure of a bacterial cell surface decaheme electron conduit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves decaheme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outer-membrane electron transfer conduits...

  12. Mucosal SIV Vaccines Comprising Inactivated Virus Particles and Bacterial Adjuvants Induce CD8+ T-Regulatory Cells that Suppress SIV-Positive CD4+ T-Cell Activation and Prevent SIV Infection in the Macaque Model

    PubMed Central

    Andrieu, Jean-Marie; Chen, Song; Lai, Chunhui; Guo, Weizhong; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    A new paradigm of mucosal vaccination against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been investigated in the macaque model. A vaccine consisting of inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239 particles together with a living bacterial adjuvant (either the Calmette and Guerin bacillus, Lactobacillus plantarum or Lactobacillus rhamnosus) was administered to macaques via the vaginal or oral/intragastric route. In contrast to all established human and veterinary vaccines, these three vaccine regimens did not elicit SIV-specific antibodies nor cytotoxic T-lymphocytes but induced a previously unrecognized population of non-cytolytic MHCIb/E-restricted CD8+ T-regulatory cells that suppressed the activation of SIV-positive CD4+ T-lymphocytes. SIV reverse transcription was thereby blocked in inactivated CD4+ T-cells; the initial burst of virus replication was prevented and the vaccinated macaques were protected from a challenge infection. For 3–14 months after intragastric immunization, 24 macaques were challenged intrarectally with a high dose of SIVmac239 or with the heterologous strain SIV B670 (both strains grown on macaques PBMC). Twenty-three of these animals were found to be protected for up to 48 months while all 24 control macaques became infected. This protective effect against SIV challenge together with the concomitant identification of a robust ex vivo correlate of protection suggests a new approach for developing an HIV vaccine in humans. The induction of this new class of CD8+ T-regulatory cells could also possibly be used therapeutically for suppressing HIV replication in infected patients and this novel tolerogenic vaccine paradigm may have potential applications for treating a wide range of immune disorders and is likely to may have profound implications across immunology generally. PMID:25071760

  13. Shared catalysis in virus entry and bacterial cell wall depolymerization

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Daniel N.; Sham, Yuk Y.; Haugstad, Greg D.; Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Popham, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Bacterial virus entry and cell wall depolymerization require the breakdown of peptidoglycan (PG), the peptide cross-linked polysaccharide matrix that surrounds bacterial cells. Structural studies of lysostaphin, a PG lytic enzyme (autolysin), have suggested that residues in the active site facilitate hydrolysis, but a clear mechanism for this reaction has remained unsolved. The active site residues and a structural pattern of β-sheets are conserved among lysostaphin homologs (such as LytM of Staphylococcus aureus) and the C-terminal domain of gene product 13 (gp13), a protein at the tail tip of the Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage φ29. gp13 activity on PG and muropeptides was assayed using high performance liquid chromatography, and gp13 was found to be a D,D-endopeptidase that cleaved the peptide cross-link. Computational modeling of the B. subtilis cross-linked peptide into the gp13 active site suggested that Asp195 may facilitate scissile bond activation and His247 is oriented to mediate nucleophile generation. This is the first model of a Zn2+-metallopeptidase and its substrate to our knowledge. Residue Asp195 of gp13 was found to be critical for Zn2+-binding and catalysis by substitution mutagenesis with Ala or Cys. Circular dichroism and particle induced X-ray emission spectroscopy showed that the general protein folding and Zn2+-binding was maintained in the Cys mutant but reduced in the Ala mutant. These findings together support a model where the Asp195 and His247 in gp13 and homologous residues in the LytM and lysostaphin active sites facilitate hydrolysis of the peptide substrate that cross-links PG. Thus, these autolysins and phage entry enzymes have a shared chemical mechanism of action. PMID:19361422

  14. Osmotic Pressure, Bacterial Cell Walls, and Penicillin: A Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox, John E.

    1984-01-01

    An easily constructed apparatus that models the effect of penicillin on the structure of bacterial cells is described. Background information and procedures for using the apparatus during a classroom demonstration are included. (JN)

  15. Lung dendritic cells facilitate extrapulmonary bacterial dissemination during pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Rosendahl, Alva; Bergmann, Simone; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Goldmann, Oliver; Medina, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia worldwide. Given the critical role of dendritic cells (DCs) in regulating and modulating the immune response to pathogens, we investigated here the role of DCs in S. pneumoniae lung infections. Using a well-established transgenic mouse line which allows the conditional transient depletion of DCs, we showed that ablation of DCs resulted in enhanced resistance to intranasal challenge with S. pneumoniae. DCs-depleted mice exhibited delayed bacterial systemic dissemination, significantly reduced bacterial loads in the infected organs and lower levels of serum inflammatory mediators than non-depleted animals. The increased resistance of DCs-depleted mice to S. pneumoniae was associated with a better capacity to restrict pneumococci extrapulmonary dissemination. Furthermore, we demonstrated that S. pneumoniae disseminated from the lungs into the regional lymph nodes in a cell-independent manner and that this direct way of dissemination was much more efficient in the presence of DCs. We also provide evidence that S. pneumoniae induces expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in cultured bone marrow-derived DCs. MMP-9 is a protease involved in the breakdown of extracellular matrix proteins and is critical for DC trafficking across extracellular matrix and basement membranes during the migration from the periphery to the lymph nodes. MMP-9 was also significantly up-regulated in the lungs of mice after intranasal infection with S. pneumoniae. Notably, the expression levels of MMP-9 in the infected lungs were significantly decreased after depletion of DCs suggesting the involvement of DCs in MMP-9 production during pneumococcal pneumonia. Thus, we propose that S. pneumoniae can exploit the DC-derived proteolysis to open tissue barriers thereby facilitating its own dissemination from the local site of infection. PMID:23802100

  16. Activity of a Bacterial Cell Envelope Stress Response Is Controlled by the Interaction of a Protein Binding Domain with Different Partners*

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Kim, Josué; Darwin, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial phage shock protein (Psp) system is a highly conserved cell envelope stress response required for virulence in Yersinia enterocolitica and Salmonella enterica. In non-inducing conditions the transcription factor PspF is inhibited by an interaction with PspA. In contrast, PspA associates with the cytoplasmic membrane proteins PspBC during inducing conditions. This has led to the proposal that PspBC exists in an OFF state, which cannot recruit PspA, or an ON state, which can. However, nothing was known about the difference between these two states. Here, we provide evidence that it is the C-terminal domain of Y. enterocolitica PspC (PspCCT) that interacts directly with PspA, both in vivo and in vitro. Site-specific photocross-linking revealed that this interaction occurred only during Psp-inducing conditions in vivo. Importantly, we have also discovered that PspCCT can interact with the C-terminal domain of PspB (PspCCT·PspBCT). However, the PspCCT·PspBCT and PspCCT·PspA interactions were mutually exclusive in vitro. Furthermore, in vivo, PspCCT contacted PspBCT in the OFF state, whereas it contacted PspA in the ON state. These findings provide the first description of the previously proposed PspBC OFF and ON states and reveal that the regulatory switch is centered on a PspCCT partner-switching mechanism. PMID:25802329

  17. Epithelial cells secrete the chemokine interleukin-8 in response to bacterial entry.

    PubMed Central

    Eckmann, L; Kagnoff, M F; Fierer, J

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial invasion of mucosal surfaces results in a rapid influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The chemotactic stimulus responsible for this response is not known. Since epithelial cells are among the first cells entered by many enteric pathogens, we investigated the ability of epithelial cells to provide an early signal for the mucosal inflammatory response through the release of chemotactic cytokines. As shown herein, the chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8), a potent chemoattractant and activator of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, was secreted by intestinal and cervical epithelial cells in response to bacterial entry. Moreover, a variety of different bacteria, including those that remain inside phagosomal vacuoles, e.g., Salmonella spp., and those that enter the cytoplasm, e.g., Listeria monocytogenes, stimulated this response. Increased IL-8 mRNA levels could be detected within 90 min after infection. Neither bacterial lipopolysaccharide nor noninvasive bacteria, including Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecium, induced an IL-8 response. Moreover, tumor necrosis factor alpha, which is known to be expressed by some epithelial cells, was not detected in the culture supernatants after bacterial entry, and addition of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antibodies had no effect on the IL-8 response following bacterial entry. These data suggest the novel concept that epithelial cells serve as an early signaling system to host immune and inflammatory cells in the underlying mucosa following bacterial entry. Images PMID:8406853

  18. Bacterial cell biology outside the streetlight.

    PubMed

    Bulgheresi, Silvia

    2016-09-01

    As much as vertical transmission of microbial symbionts requires their deep integration into the host reproductive and developmental biology, symbiotic lifestyle might profoundly affect bacterial growth and proliferation. This review describes the reproductive oddities displayed by bacteria associated - more or less intimately - with multicellular eukaryotes.

  19. Bacterial cell biology outside the streetlight

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary As much as vertical transmission of microbial symbionts requires their deep integration into the host reproductive and developmental biology, symbiotic lifestyle might profoundly affect bacterial growth and proliferation. This review describes the reproductive oddities displayed by bacteria associated – more or less intimately – with multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:27306428

  20. Bacterial cell biology outside the streetlight.

    PubMed

    Bulgheresi, Silvia

    2016-09-01

    As much as vertical transmission of microbial symbionts requires their deep integration into the host reproductive and developmental biology, symbiotic lifestyle might profoundly affect bacterial growth and proliferation. This review describes the reproductive oddities displayed by bacteria associated - more or less intimately - with multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:27306428

  1. Impedance spectroscopy of micro-Droplets reveals activation of Bacterial Mechanosensitive Channels in Hypotonic Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Aida; Alam, Muhammad A.

    Rapid detection of bacterial pathogens is of great importance in healthcare, food safety, environmental monitoring, and homeland security. Most bacterial detection platforms rely on binary fission (i.e. cell growth) to reach a threshold cell population that can be resolved by the sensing method. Since cell division depends on the bacteria type, the detection time of such methods can vary from hours to days. In contrast, in this work, we show that bacteria cells can be detected within minutes by relying on activation of specific protein channels, i.e. mechanosensitive channels (MS channels). When cells are exposed to hypotonic solutions, MS channels allow efflux of solutes to the external solution which leads to release the excessive membrane tension. Release of the cytoplasmic solutes, in turn, results in increase of the electrical conductance measured by droplet-based impedance sensing. The approach can be an effective technique for fast, pre-screening of bacterial contamination at ultra-low concentration.

  2. Effect of flow and active mixing on bacterial growth in a colon-like geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Jonas; Segota, Igor; Arnoldini, Markus; Groisman, Alex; Hwa, Terence

    The large intestine harbors bacteria from hundreds of species, with bacterial densities reaching up to 1012 cells per gram. Many different factors influence bacterial growth dynamics and thus bacterial density and microbiota composition. One dominant force is flow which can in principle lead to a washout of bacteria from the proximal colon. Active mixing by Contractions of the colonic wall together with bacterial growth might counteract such flow-forces and allow high bacterial densities to occur. As a step towards understanding bacterial growth in the presence of mixing and flow, we constructed an in-vitro setup where controlled wall-deformations of a channel emulate Contractions. We investigate growth along the channel under a steady nutrient inflow. In the limits of no or very frequent Contractions, the device behaves like a plug-flow reactor and a chemostat respectively. Depending on mixing and flow, we observe varying spatial gradients in bacterial density along the channel. Active mixing by deformations of the channel wall is shown to be crucial in maintaining a steady-state bacterial population in the presence of flow. The growth-dynamics is quantitatively captured by a simple mathematical model, with the effect of mixing described by an effective diffusion term.

  3. Beyond growth: novel functions for bacterial cell wall hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, Timna J; Taylor, Jennifer A; Salama, Nina R

    2012-11-01

    The peptidoglycan cell wall maintains turgor pressure and cell shape of most bacteria. Cell wall hydrolases are essential, together with synthases, for growth and daughter cell separation. Recent work in diverse organisms has uncovered new cell wall hydrolases that act autonomously or on neighboring cells to modulate invasion of prey cells, cell shape, innate immune detection, intercellular communication, and competitor lysis. The hydrolases involved in these processes catalyze the cleavage of bonds throughout the sugar and peptide moities of peptidoglycan. Phenotypes associated with these diverse hydrolases reveal new functions of the bacterial cell wall beyond growth and division.

  4. Mechanics of swimming of multi-body bacterial swarmers using non-labeled cell tracking algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuyal, Kiran; Kim, Min Jun

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the survival strategy of bacterial swarmers and the mechanical advantages offered by the linear chain (head-tail) attachment of the multiple bacterial bodies in an individual swarmer cell at low Reynolds number, a non-labeled cell tracking algorithm was used to quantify the mechanics of multi-body flagellated bacteria, Serratia marcescens, swimming in a motility buffer that originally exhibited the swarming motility. Swarming is a type of bacterial motility that is characterized by the collective coordinated motion of differentiated swarmer cells on a two-dimensional surface such as agar. In this study, the bacterial swarmers with multiple cell bodies (2, 3, and 4) were extracted from the swarm plate, and then tracked individually after resuspending in the motility medium. Their motion was investigated and compared with individual undifferentiated swimming bacterial cells. The swarmers when released into the motility buffer swam actively without tumbles. Their speeds, orientations, and the diffusive properties were studied by tracking the individual cell trajectories over a short distance in two-dimensional field when the cells are swimming at a constant depth in a bulk aqueous environment. At short time scales, the ballistic trajectory was dominant for both multi-body swarmers and undifferentiated cells.

  5. (p)ppGpp and the bacterial cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Aanisa; Harinarayanan, Rajendran

    2016-06-01

    Genes of the Rel/Spo homolog (RSH) superfamily synthesize and/or hydrolyse the modified nucleotides pppGpp/ ppGpp (collectively referred to as (p)ppGpp) and are prevalent across diverse bacteria and in plant chloroplasts. Bacteria accumulate (p)ppGpp in response to nutrient deprivation (generically called the stringent response) and elicit appropriate adaptive responses mainly through the regulation of transcription. Although at different concentrations (p)ppGpp affect the expression of distinct set of genes, the two well-characterized responses are reduction in expression of the protein synthesis machinery and increase in the expression of genes coding for amino acid biosynthesis. In Escherichia coli, the cellular (p)ppGpp level inversely correlates with the growth rate and increasing its concentration decreases the steady state growth rate in a defined growth medium. Since change in growth rate must be accompanied by changes in cell cycle parameters set through the activities of the DNA replication and cell division apparatus, (p)ppGpp could coordinate protein synthesis (cell mass increase) with these processes. Here we review the role of (p)ppGpp in bacterial cell cycle regulation.

  6. (p)ppGpp and the bacterial cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Aanisa; Harinarayanan, Rajendran

    2016-06-01

    Genes of the Rel/Spo homolog (RSH) superfamily synthesize and/or hydrolyse the modified nucleotides pppGpp/ ppGpp (collectively referred to as (p)ppGpp) and are prevalent across diverse bacteria and in plant chloroplasts. Bacteria accumulate (p)ppGpp in response to nutrient deprivation (generically called the stringent response) and elicit appropriate adaptive responses mainly through the regulation of transcription. Although at different concentrations (p)ppGpp affect the expression of distinct set of genes, the two well-characterized responses are reduction in expression of the protein synthesis machinery and increase in the expression of genes coding for amino acid biosynthesis. In Escherichia coli, the cellular (p)ppGpp level inversely correlates with the growth rate and increasing its concentration decreases the steady state growth rate in a defined growth medium. Since change in growth rate must be accompanied by changes in cell cycle parameters set through the activities of the DNA replication and cell division apparatus, (p)ppGpp could coordinate protein synthesis (cell mass increase) with these processes. Here we review the role of (p)ppGpp in bacterial cell cycle regulation. PMID:27240988

  7. Conductivity and Dielectric Dispersion of Gram-Positive Bacterial Cells

    PubMed

    van der Wal A; Minor; Norde; Zehnder; Lyklema

    1997-02-01

    The conductivity of bacterial cell suspensions has been studied over a wide range of ionic strengths and is interpreted in terms of their cell wall properties. The experimental data have been analyzed after improving the high kappaa double-layer theory of Fixman, by accounting for ionic mobility in the hydrodynamically stagnant layer, i.e., in the bacterial wall. Static conductivity and dielectric dispersion measurements both show that the counterions in the porous gel-like cell wall give rise to a considerable surface conductance. From a comparison of the mobile charge with the total cell wall charge it is inferred that the mobilities of the ions in the bacterial wall are of the same order but somewhat lower than those in the bulk electrolyte solution. The occurrence of surface conductance reduces the electrophoretic mobility in electrophoresis studies. If this effect is not taken into account, the zeta-potential will be underestimated, especially at low electrolyte concentrations.

  8. Defining heterogeneity within bacterial populations via single cell approaches.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kimberly M; Isberg, Ralph R

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial populations are heterogeneous, which in many cases can provide a selective advantage during changes in environmental conditions. In some instances, heterogeneity exists at the genetic level, in which significant allelic variation occurs within a population seeded by a single cell. In other cases, heterogeneity exists due to phenotypic differences within a clonal, genetically identical population. A variety of mechanisms can drive this latter strategy. Stochastic fluctuations can drive differential gene expression, but heterogeneity in gene expression can also be driven by environmental changes sensed by individual cells residing in distinct locales. Utilizing multiple single cell approaches, workers have started to uncover the extent of heterogeneity within bacterial populations. This review will first describe several examples of phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity, and then discuss many single cell approaches that have recently been applied to define heterogeneity within bacterial populations. PMID:27273675

  9. Bacterial Cellulose as a Substrate for Microbial Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Na; Santos, Thiago M. A.; Auer, George K.; Crooks, John A.; Oliver, Piercen M.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) has a range of structural and physicochemical properties that make it a particularly useful material for the culture of bacteria. We studied the growth of 14 genera of bacteria on BC substrates produced by Acetobacter xylinum and compared the results to growth on the commercially available biopolymers agar, gellan, and xanthan. We demonstrate that BC produces rates of bacterial cell growth that typically exceed those on the commercial biopolymers and yields cultures with higher titers of cells at stationary phase. The morphology of the cells did not change during growth on BC. The rates of nutrient diffusion in BC being higher than those in other biopolymers is likely a primary factor that leads to higher growth rates. Collectively, our results suggest that the use of BC may open new avenues in microbiology by facilitating bacterial cell culture and isolation. PMID:24441155

  10. Conductivity and Dielectric Dispersion of Gram-Positive Bacterial Cells

    PubMed

    van der Wal A; Minor; Norde; Zehnder; Lyklema

    1997-02-01

    The conductivity of bacterial cell suspensions has been studied over a wide range of ionic strengths and is interpreted in terms of their cell wall properties. The experimental data have been analyzed after improving the high kappaa double-layer theory of Fixman, by accounting for ionic mobility in the hydrodynamically stagnant layer, i.e., in the bacterial wall. Static conductivity and dielectric dispersion measurements both show that the counterions in the porous gel-like cell wall give rise to a considerable surface conductance. From a comparison of the mobile charge with the total cell wall charge it is inferred that the mobilities of the ions in the bacterial wall are of the same order but somewhat lower than those in the bulk electrolyte solution. The occurrence of surface conductance reduces the electrophoretic mobility in electrophoresis studies. If this effect is not taken into account, the zeta-potential will be underestimated, especially at low electrolyte concentrations. PMID:9056304

  11. [Cashmere goat bacterial artificial chromosome recombination and cell transfection system].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Zhongyang; Yang, Yaohui; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-03-01

    The Cashmere goat is mainly used to produce cashmere, which is very popular for its delicate fiber, luscious softness and natural excellent warm property. Keratin associated protein (KAP) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) of the Cashmere goat play an important role in the proliferation and development of cashmere fiber follicle cells. Bacterial artificial chromosome containing kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4 genes were used to increase the production and quality of Cashmere. First, we constructed bacterial artificial chromosomes by homology recombination. Then Tol2 transposon was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes that were then transfected into Cashmere goat fibroblasts by Amaxa Nucleofector technology according to the manufacture's instructions. We successfully constructed the BAC-Tol2 vectors containing target genes. Each vector contained egfp report gene with UBC promoter, Neomycin resistant gene for cell screening and two loxp elements for resistance removing after transfected into cells. The bacterial artificial chromosome-Tol2 vectors showed a high efficiency of transfection that can reach 1% to 6% with a highest efficiency of 10%. We also obtained Cashmere goat fibroblasts integrated exogenous genes (kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4) preparing for the clone of Cashmere goat in the future. Our research demonstrates that the insertion of Tol2 transposons into bacterial artificial chromosomes improves the transfection efficiency and accuracy of bacterial artificial chromosome error-free recombination.

  12. [Cashmere goat bacterial artificial chromosome recombination and cell transfection system].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Zhongyang; Yang, Yaohui; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-03-01

    The Cashmere goat is mainly used to produce cashmere, which is very popular for its delicate fiber, luscious softness and natural excellent warm property. Keratin associated protein (KAP) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) of the Cashmere goat play an important role in the proliferation and development of cashmere fiber follicle cells. Bacterial artificial chromosome containing kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4 genes were used to increase the production and quality of Cashmere. First, we constructed bacterial artificial chromosomes by homology recombination. Then Tol2 transposon was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes that were then transfected into Cashmere goat fibroblasts by Amaxa Nucleofector technology according to the manufacture's instructions. We successfully constructed the BAC-Tol2 vectors containing target genes. Each vector contained egfp report gene with UBC promoter, Neomycin resistant gene for cell screening and two loxp elements for resistance removing after transfected into cells. The bacterial artificial chromosome-Tol2 vectors showed a high efficiency of transfection that can reach 1% to 6% with a highest efficiency of 10%. We also obtained Cashmere goat fibroblasts integrated exogenous genes (kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4) preparing for the clone of Cashmere goat in the future. Our research demonstrates that the insertion of Tol2 transposons into bacterial artificial chromosomes improves the transfection efficiency and accuracy of bacterial artificial chromosome error-free recombination. PMID:27349114

  13. Peptidotriazoles with antimicrobial activity against bacterial and fungal plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Güell, Imma; Micaló, Lluís; Cano, Laura; Badosa, Esther; Ferre, Rafael; Montesinos, Emilio; Bardají, Eduard; Feliu, Lidia; Planas, Marta

    2012-01-01

    We designed and prepared peptidotriazoles based on the antimicrobial peptide BP100 (LysLysLeuPheLysLysIleLeuLysTyrLeu-NH(2)) by introducing a triazole ring in the peptide backbone or onto the side chain of a selected residue. These compounds were screened for their in vitro growth inhibition of bacterial and fungal phytopathogens, and for their cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells and tobacco leaves. Their proteolytic susceptibility was also analyzed. The antibacterial activity and the hemolysis were influenced by the amino acid that was modified with the triazole as well as by the absence of presence of a substituent in this heterocyclic ring. We identified sequences active against the bacteria Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, Erwinia amylovora, Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (MIC of 1.6-12.5 μM), and against the fungi Fusarium oxysporum (MIC<6.2-12.5 μM) with low hemolytic activity (0-23% at 50 μM), high stability to protease digestion and no phytotoxicity. These peptidotriazoles constitute good candidates to design new antimicrobial agents. PMID:22198367

  14. Characterization of CCN and IN activity of bacterial isolates collected in Atlanta, GA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdue, Sara; Waters, Samantha; Karthikeyan, Smruthi; Konstantinidis, Kostas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Characterization of CCN activity of bacteria, other than a few select types such as Pseudomonas syringae, is limited, especially when looked at in conjunction with corresponding IN activity. The link between these two points is especially important for bacteria as those that have high CCN activity are likely to form an aqueous phase required for immersion freezing. Given the high ice nucleation temperature of bacterial cells, especially in immersion mode, it is important to characterize the CCN and IN activity of many different bacterial strains. To this effect, we developed a droplet freezing assay (DFA) which consists of an aluminum cold plate, cooled by a continuous flow of an ethylene glycol-water mixture, in order to observe immersion freezing of the collected bacteria. Here, we present the initial results on the CCN and IN activities of bacterial samples we have collected in Atlanta, GA. Bacterial strains were collected and isolated from rainwater samples taken from different storms throughout the year. We then characterized the CCN activity of each strain using a DMT Continuous Flow Streamwise Thermal Gradient CCN Counter by exposing the aerosolized bacteria to supersaturations ranging from 0.05% to 0.6%. Additionally, using our new DFA, we characterized the IN activity of each bacterial strain at temperatures ranging from -20oC to 0oC. The combined CCN and IN activity gives us valuable information on how some uncharacterized bacteria contribute to warm and mixed-phase cloud formation in the atmosphere.

  15. Influence of Multiple Bacterial Populations on Phenanthrene Degradation, Bacterial Cell Elution, and Species Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, B. M.; Brusseau, M. L.; Maier, R. M.; Frye, R.

    2001-05-01

    A single set of degradation coefficients is typically used when representing biodegradation in contaminant transport models. Implicit to this approach is the assumption that only a single degrading isolate exists, or that the entire community of degraders more typically present in natural systems has a uniform, constant growth rate and affinity for the contaminant. This assumption was evaluated through a miscible displacement experiment conducted using a column packed with a soil containing an indigenous microbial community comprised of 24 identified phenanthrene-degrading isolates. Results produced oscillating phenanthrene concentrations in the column effluent, indicating potential competitive interactions among the isolates. A second series of experiments, conducted in a simplified system comprised of sand and 1,2, or 3 indigenous isolates, examined the effects of species interactions on phenanthrene degradation and bacterial cell elution. Bacterial growth rates, density of cells within the column, and bacterial distribution were also evaluated. Results show single bacterial species produced relatively stable cell elution and phenanthrene concentrations in the effluent. Conversely, the behavior in the multiple species systems indicated synergistic and antagonistic interactions occurred among the species. These results illustrate that the dynamics of heterogeneous microbial communities should be considered when evaluating contaminant biodegradation and transport in subsurface systems.

  16. Geometric control of bacterial cell shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaevitz, Joshua

    2014-03-01

    How bacteria grow into specific, 3D shapes remains a central mystery in microbiology. We have developed an imaging and analysis pipeline to simultaneously probe the shape of cells and the localization of proteins in 3D during growth. We find evidence for feedback between the local geometry of the cell, localization of key morphological proteins, and cell growth that helps to ensure the maintenance of rod-shape in elongating Escherichia coli cells.

  17. Nanomechanical Response of Bacterial Cells to Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shun; Walters, Grant; Parg, Richard; Dutcher, John

    2014-03-01

    The effectiveness of antimicrobial compounds can be easily screened, however their mechanism of action is much more difficult to determine. Many compounds act by compromising the mechanical integrity of the bacterial cell envelope, and our study introduces an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based creep deformation technique to evaluate changes in the time-dependent mechanical properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 bacterial cells upon exposure to two different but structurally related antimicrobial peptides: polymyxin B and polymyxin B nonapeptide. We observed a distinctive signature for the loss of integrity of the bacterial cell envelope following exposure to the peptides. Measurements performed before and after exposure, as well as time-resolved measurements and those performed at different concentrations, revealed large changes to the viscoelastic parameters that are consistent with differences in the membrane permeabilizing effects of the peptides. The AFM creep deformation measurement provides new, unique insight into the kinetics and mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides on bacteria.

  18. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    Ost, Michael; Singh, Anurag; Peschel, Andreas; Mehling, Roman; Rieber, Nikolaus; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) comprise monocytic and granulocytic innate immune cells with the capability of suppressing T- and NK-cell responses. While the role of MDSCs has been studied in depth in malignant diseases, the understanding of their regulation and function in infectious disease conditions has just begun to evolve. Here we summarize and discuss the current view how MDSCs participate in bacterial infections and how this knowledge could be exploited for potential future therapeutics.

  19. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ost, Michael; Singh, Anurag; Peschel, Andreas; Mehling, Roman; Rieber, Nikolaus; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) comprise monocytic and granulocytic innate immune cells with the capability of suppressing T- and NK-cell responses. While the role of MDSCs has been studied in depth in malignant diseases, the understanding of their regulation and function in infectious disease conditions has just begun to evolve. Here we summarize and discuss the current view how MDSCs participate in bacterial infections and how this knowledge could be exploited for potential future therapeutics. PMID:27066459

  20. Mathematical Modeling of the Induced Mutation Process in Bacterial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, Oleg V.; Krasavin, Evgeny A.; Parkhomenko, Alexander Yu.

    2010-01-01

    A mathematical model of the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation-induced mutation process in bacterial cells Escherichia coli is developed. Using mathematical approaches, the whole chain of events is tracked from a cell exposure to the damaging factor to mutation formation in the DNA chain. An account of the key special features of the regulation of this genetic network allows predicting the effects induced by the cell exposure to certain UV energy fluence.

  1. Nanomechanical Response of Bacterial Cells to Antimicrobial Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parg, Richard; Dutcher, John

    2015-03-01

    The effectiveness of antimicrobial compounds can be easily screened, however their mechanism of action is much more difficult to determine. Many compounds act by compromising the mechanical integrity of the bacterial cell envelope, and we have developed an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based creep deformation technique to evaluate changes in the time-dependent mechanical properties of bacterial cells upon exposure to antimicrobial peptides. Measurements performed before and after exposure, as well as time-resolved measurements and those performed at different antimicrobial concentrations, revealed large changes to the viscoelastic parameters including a distinctive signature for the loss of integrity of the bacterial cell envelope. Our previous experiments have focused on Pseudomonas aeruginosaPAO1 bacterial cells in Milli-Q water, for which the cells can withstand the large osmotic pressure. In the present study we have focused on performing the measurements in buffer to obtain more biologically relevant results. The AFM creep deformation measurement provides new, unique insight into the kinetics and mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides on bacteria.

  2. Regulation of bacterial metabolic activity by dissolved organic carbon and viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jie; Jing, Hongmei; Sun, Mingming; Harrison, Paul J.; Liu, Hongbin

    2013-12-01

    regulation of bacterial metabolic activity by viruses and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was examined using natural microbial communities in three treatments (active viruses, inactive viruses, and virus free) at two contrasting coastal sites (pristine vs. eutrophic) with substantial differences in environmental conditions during the wet and dry seasons. Our results showed that net growth rates and production of bacterioplankton were reduced primarily by viruses via repressing metabolically active bacteria with high nucleic acid (HNA) content which had a high capacity for incorporating carbon, while bacterial respiration was primarily regulated by DOC lability. The quality of organic matter played a more important role in regulating bacterial growth efficiency (BGE) than the supply of organic matter in eutrophic coastal waters. The lack of HMW-DOC and high carbon demand in the virus-free treatment resulted in a significant increase in cell-specific bacterial respiration, which was responsible for the lowest bacterial growth efficiency among the three treatments. The presence of viruses did not necessarily lower bacterial growth efficiency since virus-induced mortality alleviated bacterial carbon demand and enhanced carbon cycling. Virus-induced mortality was greater in relatively pristine waters than eutrophic waters, likely since the high supply of substrates alleviated the pressure of viral infection, through extracellular proteases produced by bacteria, which might result in the hydrolytic destruction or modification of viral capsids. An important implication of our results was that the input of riverine DOC and nutrients improved bacterial metabolic activity by alleviating virus-induced mortality of bacteria in estuarine and coastal waters.

  3. Collective chemotaxis and segregation of active bacterial colonies

    PubMed Central

    Amar, M. Ben

    2016-01-01

    Still recently, bacterial fluid suspensions have motivated a lot of works, both experimental and theoretical, with the objective to understand their collective dynamics from universal and simple rules. Since some species are active, most of these works concern the strong interactions that these bacteria exert on a forced flow leading to instabilities, chaos and turbulence. Here, we investigate the self-organization of expanding bacterial colonies under chemotaxis, proliferation and eventually active-reaction. We propose a simple model to understand and quantify the physical properties of these living organisms which either give cohesion or on the contrary dispersion to the colony. Taking into account the diffusion and capture of morphogens complicates the model since it induces a bacterial density gradient coupled to bacterial density fluctuations and dynamics. Nevertheless under some specific conditions, it is possible to investigate the pattern formation as a usual viscous fingering instability. This explains the similarity and differences of patterns according to the physical bacterial suspension properties and explain the factors which favor compactness or branching. PMID:26888040

  4. Bacterial Diversity of Active Sludge in Wastewater Treatment Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xin; Ma, Mingchao; Li, Jun; Lu, Anhuai; Zhong, Zuoshen

    A bacterial 16S rDNA gene clone library was constructed to analyze the bacterial diversity of active sludge in Gaobeidian Wastewater Treatment Plant, Beijing. The results indicated that the bacterial diversity of active sludge was very high, and the clones could be divided into 5 different groups. The dominant bacterial community was proteobacteria, which accounted for 76.7%. The dominant succession of bacterial community were as follows: the β-proteobacteria (39.8%), the uncultured bacteria (22.33%), the γ-proteobacteria (20.15%), the α-proteobacteria (6.79%), and the σ-proteobacteria (4.85%). Nitrosomonas-like and Nitrospira-like bacteria, such as Nitrosomonas sp. (1.94%) and uncultured Nitrospirae bacterium (11.65%) were also detected, which have played important roles in ammonia and nitrite oxidisers in the system. However, they were only a little amount because of their slow growth and less competitive advantage than heterotrophic bacteria. Denitrifying bacteria like Thauera sp. was at a high percentage, which implies a strong denitrification ability; Roseomonas sp. was also detected in the clone library, which could be related to the degradation of organophosphorus pesticide.

  5. The active bacterial community in a pristine confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Theodore M.; Sanford, Robert A.; Santo Domingo, Jorge W.; Ashbolt, Nicholas J.; Levine, Audrey D.; Bethke, Craig M.

    2012-09-01

    This study of the active bacteria residing in a pristine confined aquifer provides unexpected insights into the ecology of iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the subsurface. At 18 wells, we trapped the microbes that attached to aquifer sediment and used molecular techniques to examine the bacterial populations. We used multivariate statistics to compare the composition of bacterial communities among the wells with respect to the chemistry of the groundwater. We found groundwater at each well was considerably richer in ferrous iron than sulfide, indicating iron-reducing bacteria should, by established criteria, dominate the sulfate reducers. Our results show, however, that areas where groundwater contains more than a negligible amount of sulfate (>0.03 mM), populations related to sulfate reducers of the generaDesulfobacter and Desulfobulbus were of nearly equal abundance with putative iron reducers related to Geobacter, Geothrix, and Desulfuromonas. Whereas sulfate is a key discriminant of bacterial community structure, we observed no statistical relationship between the distribution of bacterial populations in this aquifer and the concentration of either ferrous iron or dissolved sulfide. These results call into question the validity of using the relative concentration of these two ions to predict the nature of bacterial activity in an aquifer. Sulfate reducers and iron reducers do not appear to be segregated into discrete zones in the aquifer, as would be predicted by the theory of competitive exclusion. Instead, we find the two groups coexist in the subsurface in what we suggest is a mutualistic relationship.

  6. A comparative study of carboxyfluorescein diacetate and carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester as indicators of bacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Hoefel, Daniel; Grooby, Warwick L; Monis, Paul T; Andrews, Stuart; Saint, Christopher P

    2003-03-01

    Staining bacteria with esterified fluorogenic substrates followed by flow cytometric analysis offers a means for rapid detection of metabolically active bacteria. Flow cytometry (FCM) was used to assess carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) and carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFDA/SE) as indicators of bacterial activity for cultured bacteria, including Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and bacteria from environmental waters. In theory, CFDA/SE should be a better indicator of metabolic bacterial activity compared to CFDA due to greater intracellular retention of the fluorescent product. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of exponential phase cultures, mixtures of active and inactive cells and bacteria from environmental waters revealed CFDA was successful in detecting active bacteria, whereas CFDA/SE was not. CFDA/SE labelled inactive cells with intensities equal to that of the active population and could not even discriminate between bacteria in exponential phase growth and a fixed cell preparation. We propose that the specific mode of action of the succinimidyl ester (SE) group in combination with the nonenzymatic aqueous hydrolysis of the CFDA moiety results in the nonspecific labelling of all cells, irrespective of their metabolic state. This study shows that CFDA/SE is a poor marker of bacterial activity. PMID:12531507

  7. A simple and novel modification of comet assay for determination of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Krishna; Sanmukh, Swapnil; Chandekar, Rajshree; Paunikar, Waman

    2014-07-01

    The comet assay is the widely used method for in vitro toxicity testing which is also an alternative to the use of animal models for in vivo testing. Since, its inception in 1984 by Ostling and Johansson, it is being modified frequently for a wide range of application. In spite of its wide applicability, unfortunately there is no report of its application in bacteriophages research. In this study, a novel application of comet assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis was described. The conventional methods in bacteriophage research for studying bacterial lysis by bacteriophages are plaque assay method. It is time consuming, laborious and costly. The lytic activity of bacteriophage devours the bacterial cell which results in the release of bacterial genomic material that gets detected by ethidium bromide staining method by the comet assay protocol. The objective of this study was to compare efficacy of comet assay with different assay used to study phage mediated bacterial lysis. The assay was performed on culture isolates (N=80 studies), modified comet assay appear to have relatively higher sensitivity and specificity than other assay. The results of the study showed that the application of comet assay can be an economical, time saving and less laborious alternative to conventional plaque assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

  8. Microelectrode measurements of the activity distribution in nitrifying bacterial aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, D. de; Heuval, J.C. van den; Ottengraf, S.P.P. )

    1993-02-01

    Environmental problems caused by strongly increased ammonium emission by intensive agricultural and industrial activities, wastewater and waste gas purification plants are being redesigned. Since the growth rates and biomass yields of nitrifying organisms are low, their application in continuous-flow processes requires efficient retention of biomass, and development of bacterial aggregates with good settling properties is needed. In this study microelectrodes were used to study the activity distribution of bacterial aggregates in a biological fluidized-bed nitrification reactor with an external aerator. Measurements of ammonium, oxygen, nitrate, and pH were made. Results included the following: biomass yield was close to expected; the active nitrifying zone was limited to the outer 100 to 120 [mu]m of the aggregates; distribution of activity was determined by the penetration depth of oxygen during aggregate development; measurements of activity required the use of ammonium or nitrate microelectrodes, not oxygen microelectrodes alone. 32 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Chemical modification of the surfaces of bacterial cell walls.

    PubMed

    Neihof, R A; Echols, W H

    1978-01-01

    The surfaces of the isolated cell walls of four bacterial species were studied by microelectrophoresis following chemical treatments intended to remove specific charged groups. Acid-base titrations of the walls were used to assess specificity and extent of the modifications. Carboxyl groups were specifically and completely modified by activation with a water-soluble carbodiimide and subsequent reaction with a nucleophile, such as glycinamide, to give an uncharged pH-stable product. Aqueous media and mild reaction conditions make the method suitable for modifying carboxyl groups on cell surfaces too labile to withstand the harsh conditions required for conventional esterification reactions. Use of the carbodiimide-mediated reaction for discharging carboxyl groups, along with fluorodinitrobenzene for discharging amino groups and extraction procedures for removing constituents carrying phosphoester groups (teichoic acids), made it possible to obtain information about the spatial arrangement of charged groups on the wall surfaces. Removal of the exterior negative charge dominating wall surfaces allowed underlying amino groups to become electrokinetically effective and, in the case of E. coli, also revealed a lipophilic region with an affinity for a cationic surfactant.

  10. Chronic Alcohol Exposure Renders Epithelial Cells Vulnerable to Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Stephen; Pithadia, Ravi; Rehman, Tooba; Zhang, Lijuan; Plichta, Jennifer; Radek, Katherine A.; Forsyth, Christopher; Keshavarzian, Ali; Shafikhani, Sasha H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite two centuries of reports linking alcohol consumption with enhanced susceptibility to bacterial infections and in particular gut-derived bacteria, there have been no studies or model systems to assess the impact of long-term alcohol exposure on the ability of the epithelial barrier to withstand bacterial infection. It is well established that acute alcohol exposure leads to reduction in tight and adherens junctions, which in turn leads to increases in epithelial cellular permeability to bacterial products, leading to endotoxemia and a variety of deleterious effects in both rodents and human. We hypothesized that reduced fortification at junctional structures should also reduce the epithelial barrier’s capacity to maintain its integrity in the face of bacterial challenge thus rendering epithelial cells more vulnerable to infection. In this study, we established a cell-culture based model system for long-term alcohol exposure to assess the impact of chronic alcohol exposure on the ability of Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells to withstand infection when facing pathogenic bacteria under the intact or wounded conditions. We report that daily treatment with 0.2% ethanol for two months rendered Caco-2 cells far more susceptible to wound damage and cytotoxicity caused by most but not all bacterial pathogens tested in our studies. Consistent with acute alcohol exposure, long-term ethanol exposure also adversely impacted tight junction structures, but in contrast, it did not affect the adherens junction. Finally, alcohol-treated cells partially regained their ability to withstand infection when ethanol treatment was ceased for two weeks, indicating that alcohol’s deleterious effects on cells may be reversible. PMID:23358457

  11. Chronic alcohol exposure renders epithelial cells vulnerable to bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Wood, Stephen; Pithadia, Ravi; Rehman, Tooba; Zhang, Lijuan; Plichta, Jennifer; Radek, Katherine A; Forsyth, Christopher; Keshavarzian, Ali; Shafikhani, Sasha H

    2013-01-01

    Despite two centuries of reports linking alcohol consumption with enhanced susceptibility to bacterial infections and in particular gut-derived bacteria, there have been no studies or model systems to assess the impact of long-term alcohol exposure on the ability of the epithelial barrier to withstand bacterial infection. It is well established that acute alcohol exposure leads to reduction in tight and adherens junctions, which in turn leads to increases in epithelial cellular permeability to bacterial products, leading to endotoxemia and a variety of deleterious effects in both rodents and human. We hypothesized that reduced fortification at junctional structures should also reduce the epithelial barrier's capacity to maintain its integrity in the face of bacterial challenge thus rendering epithelial cells more vulnerable to infection. In this study, we established a cell-culture based model system for long-term alcohol exposure to assess the impact of chronic alcohol exposure on the ability of Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells to withstand infection when facing pathogenic bacteria under the intact or wounded conditions. We report that daily treatment with 0.2% ethanol for two months rendered Caco-2 cells far more susceptible to wound damage and cytotoxicity caused by most but not all bacterial pathogens tested in our studies. Consistent with acute alcohol exposure, long-term ethanol exposure also adversely impacted tight junction structures, but in contrast, it did not affect the adherens junction. Finally, alcohol-treated cells partially regained their ability to withstand infection when ethanol treatment was ceased for two weeks, indicating that alcohol's deleterious effects on cells may be reversible. PMID:23358457

  12. Micro-magnet arrays for specific single bacterial cell positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivetal, Jérémy; Royet, David; Ciuta, Georgeta; Frenea-Robin, Marie; Haddour, Naoufel; Dempsey, Nora M.; Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric; Simonet, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    In various contexts such as pathogen detection or analysis of microbial diversity where cellular heterogeneity must be taken into account, there is a growing need for tools and methods that enable microbiologists to analyze bacterial cells individually. One of the main challenges in the development of new platforms for single cell studies is to perform precise cell positioning, but the ability to specifically target cells is also important in many applications. In this work, we report the development of new strategies to selectively trap single bacterial cells upon large arrays, based on the use of micro-magnets. Escherichia coli bacteria were used to demonstrate magnetically driven bacterial cell organization. In order to provide a flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology, cells were magnetically and specifically labeled using two different strategies, namely immunomagnetic labeling and magnetic in situ hybridization. Results show that centimeter-sized arrays of targeted, isolated bacteria can be successfully created upon the surface of a flat magnetically patterned hard magnetic film. Efforts are now being directed towards the integration of a detection tool to provide a complete micro-system device for a variety of microbiological applications.

  13. The use of FTIR microscopy for the evaluation of anti-bacterial agents activity.

    PubMed

    Huleihel, Mahmoud; Pavlov, Valentina; Erukhimovitch, Vitaly

    2009-07-17

    FTIR spectroscopy has been used by chemists as a powerful tool to characterize inorganic and organic compounds. In this study we examined the potential of FTIR microspectroscopy for early evaluation of the efficiency of anti-bacterial therapy. For this purpose, the effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and ampicillin on the development of bacterial infection in cell culture was examined. CAPE is one of the most active components of propolis which is a natural honeybee product with a potent anti-bacterial activity. Our results show early (2h post-treatment), unique and significant spectral indicators for successful treatment with CAPE although some of these biomarkers showed different trends in Gram (-) compared with Gram (+) bacteria. For instance, the intensity of bands at 682 and 1316 cm(-1) decreases in all examined Gram (-) bacterial strains while significantly increases in all examined Gram (+) bacterial strains. On the other hand, both Gram (+) and Gram (-) bacteria treated with ampicillin did not show any spectral differences compared with the control untreated bacteria. It seems that FTIR spectroscopy can be used as an effective tool for an early evaluation of the efficiency of the anti-bacterial effect of CAPE and probably other used drugs.

  14. A Bacterial Cell Shape-Determining Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjie; Frirdich, Emilisa; Taylor, Jennifer A; Chan, Anson C K; Blair, Kris M; Vermeulen, Jenny; Ha, Reuben; Murphy, Michael E P; Salama, Nina R; Gaynor, Erin C; Tanner, Martin E

    2016-04-15

    Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni are human pathogens and causative agents of gastric ulcers/cancer and gastroenteritis, respectively. Recent studies have uncovered a series of proteases that are responsible for maintaining the helical shape of these organisms. The H. pylori metalloprotease Csd4 and its C. jejuni homologue Pgp1 cleave the amide bond between meso-diaminopimelate and iso-d-glutamic acid in truncated peptidoglycan side chains. Deletion of either csd4 or pgp1 results in bacteria with a straight rod phenotype, a reduced ability to move in viscous media, and reduced pathogenicity. In this work, a phosphinic acid-based pseudodipeptide inhibitor was designed to act as a tetrahedral intermediate analog against the Csd4 enzyme. The phosphinic acid was shown to inhibit the cleavage of the alternate substrate, Ac-l-Ala-iso-d-Glu-meso-Dap, with a Ki value of 1.5 μM. Structural analysis of the Csd4-inhibitor complex shows that the phosphinic acid displaces the zinc-bound water and chelates the metal in a bidentate fashion. The phosphinate oxygens also interact with the key acid/base residue, Glu222, and the oxyanion-stabilizing residue, Arg86. The results are consistent with the "promoted-water pathway" mechanism for carboxypeptidase A catalysis. Studies on cultured bacteria showed that the inhibitor causes significant cell straightening when incubated with H. pylori at millimolar concentrations. A diminished, yet observable, effect on the morphology of C. jejuni was also apparent. Cell straightening was more pronounced with an acapsular C. jejuni mutant strain compared to the wild type, suggesting that the capsule impaired inhibitor accessibility. These studies demonstrate that a highly polar compound is capable of crossing the outer membrane and altering cell shape, presumably by inhibiting cell shape determinant proteases. Peptidoglycan proteases acting as cell shape determinants represent novel targets for the development of antimicrobials

  15. Anti-bacterial activity of some Brazilian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Maria Raquel Ferreira; de Souza Luna, Josiane; dos Santos, Aldenir Feitosa; de Andrade, Maria Cristina Caño; Sant'Ana, Antônio Euzébio Goulart; Genet, Jean-Pierre; Marquez, Béatrice; Neuville, Luc; Moreau, Nicole

    2006-04-21

    Extracts from various organs of 25 plants of Brazilian traditional medicine were assayed with respect to their anti-bacterial activities against Escherichia coli, a susceptible strain of Staphylococcus aureus and two resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus harbouring the efflux pumps NorA and MsrA. Amongst the 49 extracts studied, 14 presented anti-bacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, including the ethanolic extracts from the rhizome of Jatropha elliptica, from the stem barks of Schinus terebinthifolius and Erythrina mulungu, from the stems and leaves of Caesalpinia pyramidalis and Serjania lethalis, and from the stem bark and leaves of Lafoensia pacari. The classes of compounds present in the active extracts were determined as a preliminary step towards their bioactivity-guided separation. No extracts were active against Escherichia coli.

  16. Comparison of Hemagglutination and Hemolytic Activity of Various Bacterial Clinical Isolates Against Different Human Blood Groups

    PubMed Central

    HRV, Rajkumar; Devaki, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Among the various pathogenic determinants shown by microorganisms hemagglutination and hemolysin production assume greater significance in terms of laboratory identification. This study evaluated the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of various bacterial isolates against different blood groups. One hundred and fifty bacterial strains, isolated from clinical specimens like urine, pus, blood, and other body fluids were tested for their hemagglutinating and hemolytic activity against human A, B, AB, and O group red blood cells. Among the 150 isolates 81 were Escherichia coli, 18 were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 19 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were Pseudomonas spp, six were Proteus mirabilis, and the rest 16 were Staphylococcus aureus. Nearly 85% of the isolates agglutinated A group cells followed by B and AB group (59.3% and 60.6% respectively). Least number of isolates agglutinated O group cells (38.0%). When the hemolytic activity was tested, out of these 150 isolates 79 (52.6%) hemolyzed A group cells, 61 (40.6%) hemolyzed AB group cells, 46 (30.6%) hemolyzed B group cells, and 57 (38.6%) isolates hemolyzed O group cells. Forty-six percent of the isolates exhibited both hemagglutinating and hemolytic property against A group cells, followed by B and AB group cells (28.6% and 21.3% respectively). Least number of isolates i.e., 32 (21.3%) showed both the properties against O group cells. The isolates showed wide variation in their hemagglutination and hemolytic properties against different combinations of human blood group cells. The study highlights the importance of selection of the type of cells especially when human RBCs are used for studying the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of bacterial isolates because these two properties are considered as characteristic of pathogenic strains. PMID:27014523

  17. Metatranscriptomics reveals overall active bacterial composition in caries lesions

    PubMed Central

    Simón-Soro, Aurea; Guillen-Navarro, Miriam; Mira, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying the microbial species in caries lesions is instrumental to determine the etiology of dental caries. However, a significant proportion of bacteria in carious lesions have not been cultured, and the use of molecular methods has been limited to DNA-based approaches, which detect both active and inactive or dead microorganisms. Objective To identify the RNA-based, metabolically active bacterial composition of caries lesions at different stages of disease progression in order to provide a list of potential etiological agents of tooth decay. Design Non-cavitated enamel caries lesions (n=15) and dentin caries lesions samples (n=12) were collected from 13 individuals. RNA was extracted and cDNA was constructed, which was used to amplify the 16S rRNA gene. The resulting 780 bp polymerase chain reaction products were pyrosequenced using Titanium-plus chemistry, and the sequences obtained were used to determine the bacterial composition. Results A mean of 4,900 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene with an average read length of 661 bp was obtained per sample, giving a comprehensive view of the active bacterial communities in caries lesions. Estimates of bacterial diversity indicate that the microbiota of cavities is highly complex, each sample containing between 70 and 400 metabolically active species. The composition of these bacterial consortia varied among individuals and between caries lesions of the same individuals. In addition, enamel and dentin lesions had a different bacterial makeup. Lactobacilli were found almost exclusively in dentin cavities. Streptococci accounted for 40% of the total active community in enamel caries, and 20% in dentin caries. However, Streptococcus mutans represented only 0.02–0.73% of the total bacterial community. Conclusions The data indicate that the etiology of dental caries is tissue dependent and that the disease has a clear polymicrobial origin. The low proportion of mutans streptococci detected confirms that they

  18. Evaluation of the sensitivity of bacterial and yeast cells to cold atmospheric plasma jet treatments.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Michael A; Chebbi, Ahmed; McDonnell, Kevin A; Staunton, Claire; Dowling, Denis P

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this research was first to determine the influence of the atmospheric plasma drive frequency on the generation of atomic oxygen species and its correlation with the reduction of bacterial load after treatment in vitro. The treatments were carried out using a helium-plasma jet source called PlasmaStream™. The susceptibility of multiple microbial cell lines was investigated in order to compare the response of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, as well as a yeast cell line to the atmospheric plasma treatment. It was observed for the source evaluated that at a frequency of 160 kHz, increased levels of oxygen-laden active species (i.e., OH, NO) were generated. At this frequency, the maximum level of bacterial inactivation in vitro was also achieved. Ex vivo studies (using freshly excised porcine skin as a human analog) were also carried out to verify the antibacterial effect of the plasma jet treatment at this optimal operational frequency and to investigate the effect of treatment duration on the reduction of bacterial load. The plasma jet treatment was found to yield a 4 log reduction in bacterial load after 6 min of treatment, with no observable adverse effects on the treatment surface. The gram-negative bacterial cell lines were found to be far more susceptible to the atmospheric plasma treatments than the gram-positive bacteria. Flow cytometric analysis of plasma treated bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) was conducted in order to attain a fundamental understanding of the mode of action of the treatment on bacteria at a cellular level. This study showed that after treatment with the plasma jet, E. coli cells progressed through the following steps of cell death; the inactivation of transport systems, followed by depolarization of the cytoplasmic membrane, and finally permeabilization of the cell wall.

  19. Morphology, Growth, and Size Limit of Bacterial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hongyuan; Sun, Sean X.

    2010-07-01

    Bacterial cells utilize a living peptidoglycan network (PG) to separate the cell interior from the surroundings. The shape of the cell is controlled by PG synthesis and cytoskeletal proteins that form bundles and filaments underneath the cell wall. The PG layer also resists turgor pressure and protects the cell from osmotic shock. We argue that mechanical influences alter the chemical equilibrium of the reversible PG assembly and determine the cell shape and cell size. Using a mechanochemical approach, we show that the cell shape can be regarded as a steady state of a growing network under the influence of turgor pressure and mechanical stress. Using simple elastic models, we predict the size of common spherical and rodlike bacteria. The influence of cytoskeletal bundles such as crescentin and MreB are discussed within the context of our model.

  20. How bacterial cells keep ribonucleases under control

    PubMed Central

    Deutscher, Murray P.

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleases (RNases) play an essential role in essentially every aspect of RNA metabolism, but they also can be destructive enzymes that need to be regulated to avoid unwanted degradation of RNA molecules. As a consequence, cells have evolved multiple strategies to protect RNAs against RNase action. They also utilize a variety of mechanisms to regulate the RNases themselves. These include post-transcriptional regulation, post-translational modification, trans-acting inhibitors, cellular localization, as well as others that are less well studied. In this review, I will briefly discuss how RNA molecules are protected and then examine in detail our current understanding of the mechanisms known to regulate individual RNases. PMID:25878039

  1. Global dispersion of bacterial cells on Asian dust

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Ichijo, Tomoaki; Sakotani, Akiko; Baba, Takashi; Nasu, Masao

    2012-01-01

    The atmospheric dispersion of bacteria over long distances is an important facet of microbial ecology. Certain groups of dispersed bacteria can adapt to their new location and affect established ecosystems. Aeolian dust particles are known to be carriers of microbes but further research is needed to expand our understanding of this field of microbiology. Here we showed the potential of aeolian dust to global migration of bacterial cells. We demonstrated the presence of microbial cells on dust particles directly by bio-imaging. Bacterial abundance on dust particles declined from 105 to less than 103 cells/m3 as the dust event subsided. Taxonomically diverse bacteria were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and some of these bacteria retained growth potential. Our results confirm that bacteria can attach to aeolian dust particles and they have the potential to migrate globally during dust events and thus can contribute to the diversity of downwind ecosystems. PMID:22826803

  2. Subdiffraction localization of a nanostructured photosensitizer in bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Delcanale, Pietro; Pennacchietti, Francesca; Maestrini, Giulio; Rodríguez-Amigo, Beatriz; Bianchini, Paolo; Diaspro, Alberto; Iagatti, Alessandro; Patrizi, Barbara; Foggi, Paolo; Agut, Monserrat; Nonell, Santi; Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Viappiani, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial treatments based on photosensitized production of reactive oxygen species is a promising approach to address local microbial infections. Given the small size of bacterial cells, identification of the sites of binding of the photosensitizing molecules is a difficult issue to address with conventional microscopy. We show that the excited state properties of the naturally occurring photosensitizer hypericin can be exploited to perform STED microscopy on bacteria incubated with the complex between hypericin and apomyoglobin, a self-assembled nanostructure that confers very good bioavailability to the photosensitizer. Hypericin fluorescence is mostly localized at the bacterial wall, and accumulates at the polar regions of the cell and at sites of cell wall growth. While these features are shared by Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, only the latter are effectively photoinactivated by light exposure. PMID:26494535

  3. Resistance to antibiotics targeted to the bacterial cell wall

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaidis, I; Favini-Stabile, S; Dessen, A

    2014-01-01

    Peptidoglycan is the main component of the bacterial cell wall. It is a complex, three-dimensional mesh that surrounds the entire cell and is composed of strands of alternating glycan units crosslinked by short peptides. Its biosynthetic machinery has been, for the past five decades, a preferred target for the discovery of antibacterials. Synthesis of the peptidoglycan occurs sequentially within three cellular compartments (cytoplasm, membrane, and periplasm), and inhibitors of proteins that catalyze each stage have been identified, although not all are applicable for clinical use. A number of these antimicrobials, however, have been rendered inactive by resistance mechanisms. The employment of structural biology techniques has been instrumental in the understanding of such processes, as well as the development of strategies to overcome them. This review provides an overview of resistance mechanisms developed toward antibiotics that target bacterial cell wall precursors and its biosynthetic machinery. Strategies toward the development of novel inhibitors that could overcome resistance are also discussed. PMID:24375653

  4. Studies on bacterial cell wall inhibitors. VI. Screening method for the specific inhibitors of peptidoglycan synthesis.

    PubMed

    Omura, S; Tanaka, H; Oiwa, R; Nagai, T; Koyama, Y; Takahashi, Y

    1979-10-01

    A screening method was established for selecting new specific inhibitors of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan synthesis. In the primary test, culture broths of soil isolates were selected based on relative microbial activity. A culture, to be retained, must be active against Bacillus subtilis and lack activities against Acholeplasma laidawii. In the secondary test, inhibitors of bacterial cell wall synthesis were identified by their ability to prevent the incorporation of meso-[3H]diaminopimelic acid but not to prevent the incorporation of L-[4C]leucine into the acid-insoluble macromolecular fraction of growing cells of Bacillus sp. ATCC 21206 (Dpm-). As the tertiary test, inhibitors with molecular weights under 1,000 were selected by passage through a Diaflo UM-2 membrane. By this screening procedure, six known antibiotics and one new one were picked out from ten thousand soil isolates. PMID:528376

  5. Dynamics of Bacterial Community Composition and Activity during a Mesocosm Diatom Bloom

    PubMed Central

    Riemann, Lasse; Steward, Grieg F.; Azam, Farooq

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial community composition, enzymatic activities, and carbon dynamics were examined during diatom blooms in four 200-liter laboratory seawater mesocosms. The objective was to determine whether the dramatic shifts in growth rates and ectoenzyme activities, which are commonly observed during the course of phytoplankton blooms and their subsequent demise, could result from shifts in bacterial community composition. Nutrient enrichment of metazoan-free seawater resulted in diatom blooms dominated by a Thalassiosira sp., which peaked 9 days after enrichment (≈24 μg of chlorophyll a liter−1). At this time bacterial abundance abruptly decreased from 2.8 × 106 to 0.75 × 106 ml−1, and an analysis of bacterial community composition, by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, revealed the disappearance of three dominant phylotypes. Increased viral and flagellate abundances suggested that both lysis and grazing could have played a role in the observed phylotype-specific mortality. Subsequently, new phylotypes appeared and bacterial production, abundance, and enzyme activities shifted from being predominantly associated with the <1.0-μm size fraction towards the >1.0-μm size fraction, indicating a pronounced microbial colonization of particles. Sequencing of DGGE bands suggested that the observed rapid and extensive colonization of particulate matter was mainly by specialized α-Proteobacteria- and Cytophagales-related phylotypes. These particle-associated bacteria had high growth rates as well as high cell-specific aminopeptidase, β-glucosidase, and lipase activities. Rate measurements as well as bacterial population dynamics were almost identical among the mesocosms indicating that the observed bacterial community dynamics were systematic and repeatable responses to the manipulated conditions. PMID:10653721

  6. Antibiofilm activity of Dendrophthoe falcata against different bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Alagarsamy; Rameshkumar, Ramakrishnan; Sivakumar, Nallusamy; Al Amri, Issa S; Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah; Ramesh, Manikandan

    2012-12-01

    Dendrophthoe falcata is a hemiparasitic plant commonly used for ailments such as ulcers, asthma, impotence, paralysis, skin diseases, menstrual troubles, pulmonary tuberculosis, and wounds. In this context, the validations of the traditional claim that the leaf extract of D. falcata possesses antibiofilm and anti-quorum sensing activity against different bacterial pathogens were assessed. The bacterial biofilms were quantified by crystal violet staining. Among the 17 bacterial pathogens screened, the methanolic fraction of the leaf extract clearly demonstrated antibiofilm activity for Proteus mirabilis, Vibrio vulnificus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Shigella sonnei, Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio cholerae, and Proteus vulgaris. At biofilm inhibitory concentrations, biofilm formation was reduced by up to 70-90 %. Furthermore, the potential quorum-sensing activity of the leaf extract was tested by agar well diffusion using Chromobacterium violaceum (ATCC 12472 & CV O26) reporter strains. The inhibition of violacein production may be due to direct or indirect interference on QS by active constituents or the interactive effect of different phytocompounds present in the extracts. This is the first report on antibiofilm and QS activity of D. falcata leaf extracts, signifying the scope for development of complementary medicine for biofilm-associated infections. PMID:23115018

  7. Cellular uptake and intracellular fate of protein releasing bacterial amyloids in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejandro; Garcia-Fruitós, Elena; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio

    2016-04-14

    Bacterial Inclusion Bodies (IBs) are amyloidal protein deposits that functionally mimic secretory granules from the endocrine system. When formed by therapeutically relevant proteins, they complement missing intracellular activities in jeopardized cell cultures, offering an intriguing platform for protein drug delivery in substitutive therapies. Despite the therapeutic potential of IBs, their capability to interact with eukaryotic cells, cross the cell membrane and release their functional building blocks into the cytosolic space remains essentially unexplored. We have systematically dissected the process by which bacterial amyloids interact with mammalian cells. An early and tight cell membrane anchorage of IBs is followed by cellular uptake of single or grouped IBs of variable sizes by macropinocytosis. Although an important fraction of the penetrating particles is led to lysosomal degradation, biologically significant amounts of protein are released into the cytosol. In addition, our data suggest the involvement of the bacterial cell folding modulator DnaK in the release of functional proteins from these amyloidal reservoirs. The mechanisms supporting the internalization of disintegrable protein nanoparticles revealed here offer clues to implement novel approaches for protein drug delivery based on controlled protein packaging as bacterial IBs.

  8. Biodegradation of gasoline by gellan gum-encapsulated bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Moslemy, Peyman; Neufeld, Ronald J; Guiot, Serge R

    2002-10-20

    Encapsulated cell bioaugmentation is a novel alternative solution to in situ bioremediation of contaminated aquifers. This study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of such a remediation strategy based on the performance of encapsulated cells in the biodegradation of gasoline, a major groundwater contaminant. An enriched bacterial consortium, isolated from a gasoline-polluted site, was encapsulated in gellan gum microbeads (16-53 microm diameter). The capacity of the encapsulated cells to degrade gasoline under aerobic conditions was evaluated in comparison with free (non-encapsulated) cells. Encapsulated cells (2.6 mg(cells) x g(-1) bead) degraded over 90% gasoline hydrocarbons (initial concentration 50-600 mg x L(-1)) within 5-10 days at 10 degrees C. Equivalent levels of free cells removed comparable amounts of gasoline (initial concentration 50-400 mg x L(-1)) within the same period but required up to 30 days to degrade the highest level of gasoline tested (600 mg x L(-1)). Free cells exhibited a lag phase in biodegradation, which increased from 1 to 5 days with an increase in gasoline concentration (200-600 x mg L(-1)). Encapsulation provided cells with a protective barrier against toxic hydrocarbons, eliminating the adaptation period required by free cells. The reduction of encapsulated cell mass loading from 2.6 to 1.0 mg(cells) x g(-1) bead caused a substantial decrease in the extent of biodegradation within a 30-day incubation period. Encapsulated cells dispersed within the porous soil matrix of saturated soil microcosms demonstrated a reduced performance in the removal of gasoline (initial concentrations of 400 and 600 mg x L(-1)), removing 30-50% gasoline hydrocarbons compared to 40-60% by free cells within 21 days of incubation. The results of this study suggest that gellan gum-encapsulated bacterial cells have the potential to be used for biodegradation of gasoline hydrocarbons in aqueous systems.

  9. Bacterial cells enhance laser driven ion acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Dalui, Malay; Kundu, M.; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Rajeev, R.; Ray, Krishanu; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2014-01-01

    Intense laser produced plasmas generate hot electrons which in turn leads to ion acceleration. Ability to generate faster ions or hotter electrons using the same laser parameters is one of the main outstanding paradigms in the intense laser-plasma physics. Here, we present a simple, albeit, unconventional target that succeeds in generating 700 keV carbon ions where conventional targets for the same laser parameters generate at most 40 keV. A few layers of micron sized bacteria coating on a polished surface increases the laser energy coupling and generates a hotter plasma which is more effective for the ion acceleration compared to the conventional polished targets. Particle-in-cell simulations show that micro-particle coated target are much more effective in ion acceleration as seen in the experiment. We envisage that the accelerated, high-energy carbon ions can be used as a source for multiple applications. PMID:25102948

  10. Antiviral activity and specific modes of action of bacterial prodigiosin against Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Zeng, Cheng; Liu, RenHua; Chen, Jie; Li, Ru; Wang, XinYan; Bai, WenWen; Liu, XiaoYuan; Xiang, TingTing; Zhang, Lin; Wan, YongJi

    2016-05-01

    Prodigiosin, the tripyrrole red pigment, is a bacterial secondary metabolite with multiple bioactivities; however, the antiviral activity has not been reported yet. In the present study, we found the antiviral activity of bacterial prodigiosin on Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV)-infected cells in vitro, with specific modes of action. Prodigiosin at nontoxic concentrations selectively killed virus-infected cells, inhibited viral gene transcription, especially viral early gene ie-1, and prevented virus-mediated membrane fusion. Under prodigiosin treatment, both progeny virus production and viral DNA replication were significantly inhibited. Fluorescent assays showed that prodigiosin predominantly located in cytoplasm which suggested it might interact with cytoplasm factors to inhibit virus replication. In conclusion, the present study clearly indicates that prodigiosin possesses significant antiviral activity against BmNPV.

  11. Cooperation between Monocyte-Derived Cells and Lymphoid Cells in the Acute Response to a Bacterial Lung Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Brown, Andrew S; Yang, Chao; Fung, Ka Yee; Bachem, Annabell; Bourges, Dorothée; Bedoui, Sammy; Hartland, Elizabeth L; van Driel, Ian R

    2016-06-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, a potentially fatal lung infection. Alveolar macrophages support intracellular replication of L. pneumophila, however the contributions of other immune cell types to bacterial killing during infection are unclear. Here, we used recently described methods to characterise the major inflammatory cells in lung after acute respiratory infection of mice with L. pneumophila. We observed that the numbers of alveolar macrophages rapidly decreased after infection coincident with a rapid infiltration of the lung by monocyte-derived cells (MC), which, together with neutrophils, became the dominant inflammatory cells associated with the bacteria. Using mice in which the ability of MC to infiltrate tissues is impaired it was found that MC were required for bacterial clearance and were the major source of IL12. IL12 was needed to induce IFNγ production by lymphoid cells including NK cells, memory T cells, NKT cells and γδ T cells. Memory T cells that produced IFNγ appeared to be circulating effector/memory T cells that infiltrated the lung after infection. IFNγ production by memory T cells was stimulated in an antigen-independent fashion and could effectively clear bacteria from the lung indicating that memory T cells are an important contributor to innate bacterial defence. We also determined that a major function of IFNγ was to stimulate bactericidal activity of MC. On the other hand, neutrophils did not require IFNγ to kill bacteria and alveolar macrophages remained poorly bactericidal even in the presence of IFNγ. This work has revealed a cooperative innate immune circuit between lymphoid cells and MC that combats acute L. pneumophila infection and defines a specific role for IFNγ in anti-bacterial immunity. PMID:27300652

  12. Cooperation between Monocyte-Derived Cells and Lymphoid Cells in the Acute Response to a Bacterial Lung Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Andrew S.; Yang, Chao; Fung, Ka Yee; Bachem, Annabell; Bourges, Dorothée; Bedoui, Sammy; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; van Driel, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, a potentially fatal lung infection. Alveolar macrophages support intracellular replication of L. pneumophila, however the contributions of other immune cell types to bacterial killing during infection are unclear. Here, we used recently described methods to characterise the major inflammatory cells in lung after acute respiratory infection of mice with L. pneumophila. We observed that the numbers of alveolar macrophages rapidly decreased after infection coincident with a rapid infiltration of the lung by monocyte-derived cells (MC), which, together with neutrophils, became the dominant inflammatory cells associated with the bacteria. Using mice in which the ability of MC to infiltrate tissues is impaired it was found that MC were required for bacterial clearance and were the major source of IL12. IL12 was needed to induce IFNγ production by lymphoid cells including NK cells, memory T cells, NKT cells and γδ T cells. Memory T cells that produced IFNγ appeared to be circulating effector/memory T cells that infiltrated the lung after infection. IFNγ production by memory T cells was stimulated in an antigen-independent fashion and could effectively clear bacteria from the lung indicating that memory T cells are an important contributor to innate bacterial defence. We also determined that a major function of IFNγ was to stimulate bactericidal activity of MC. On the other hand, neutrophils did not require IFNγ to kill bacteria and alveolar macrophages remained poorly bactericidal even in the presence of IFNγ. This work has revealed a cooperative innate immune circuit between lymphoid cells and MC that combats acute L. pneumophila infection and defines a specific role for IFNγ in anti-bacterial immunity. PMID:27300652

  13. A central role for carbon-overflow pathways in the modulation of bacterial cell death.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Vinai Chittezham; Sadykov, Marat R; Chaudhari, Sujata S; Jones, Joselyn; Endres, Jennifer L; Widhelm, Todd J; Ahn, Jong-Sam; Jawa, Randeep S; Zimmerman, Matthew C; Bayles, Kenneth W

    2014-06-01

    Similar to developmental programs in eukaryotes, the death of a subpopulation of cells is thought to benefit bacterial biofilm development. However mechanisms that mediate a tight control over cell death are not clearly understood at the population level. Here we reveal that CidR dependent pyruvate oxidase (CidC) and α-acetolactate synthase/decarboxylase (AlsSD) overflow metabolic pathways, which are active during staphylococcal biofilm development, modulate cell death to achieve optimal biofilm biomass. Whereas acetate derived from CidC activity potentiates cell death in cells by a mechanism dependent on intracellular acidification and respiratory inhibition, AlsSD activity effectively counters CidC action by diverting carbon flux towards neutral rather than acidic byproducts and consuming intracellular protons in the process. Furthermore, the physiological features that accompany metabolic activation of cell death bears remarkable similarities to hallmarks of eukaryotic programmed cell death, including the generation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage. Finally, we demonstrate that the metabolic modulation of cell death not only affects biofilm development but also biofilm-dependent disease outcomes. Given the ubiquity of such carbon overflow pathways in diverse bacterial species, we propose that the metabolic control of cell death may be a fundamental feature of prokaryotic development.

  14. A Central Role for Carbon-Overflow Pathways in the Modulation of Bacterial Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Vinai Chittezham; Sadykov, Marat R.; Chaudhari, Sujata S.; Jones, Joselyn; Endres, Jennifer L.; Widhelm, Todd J.; Ahn, Jong-Sam; Jawa, Randeep S.; Zimmerman, Matthew C.; Bayles, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    Similar to developmental programs in eukaryotes, the death of a subpopulation of cells is thought to benefit bacterial biofilm development. However mechanisms that mediate a tight control over cell death are not clearly understood at the population level. Here we reveal that CidR dependent pyruvate oxidase (CidC) and α-acetolactate synthase/decarboxylase (AlsSD) overflow metabolic pathways, which are active during staphylococcal biofilm development, modulate cell death to achieve optimal biofilm biomass. Whereas acetate derived from CidC activity potentiates cell death in cells by a mechanism dependent on intracellular acidification and respiratory inhibition, AlsSD activity effectively counters CidC action by diverting carbon flux towards neutral rather than acidic byproducts and consuming intracellular protons in the process. Furthermore, the physiological features that accompany metabolic activation of cell death bears remarkable similarities to hallmarks of eukaryotic programmed cell death, including the generation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage. Finally, we demonstrate that the metabolic modulation of cell death not only affects biofilm development but also biofilm-dependent disease outcomes. Given the ubiquity of such carbon overflow pathways in diverse bacterial species, we propose that the metabolic control of cell death may be a fundamental feature of prokaryotic development. PMID:24945831

  15. Water Diffusion from a Bacterial Cell in Low-Moisture Foods.

    PubMed

    Syamaladevi, Roopesh M; Tang, Juming; Zhong, QingPing

    2016-09-01

    We used a Fick's unsteady state diffusion equation to estimate the time required for a single spherical shaped bacterium (assuming Enterococcus faecium as the target microorganism) in low-moisture foods to equilibrate with the environment. We generated water sorption isotherms of freeze-dried E. faecium. The water activity of bacterial cells at given water content increased considerably as temperature increased from 20 to 80 °C, as observed in the sorption isotherms of bacterial cells. When the water vapor diffusion coefficient was assumed as between 10(-12) and 10(-10) m(2) /s for bacterial cells, the predicted equilibration times (teq ) ranged from 8.24×10(-4) to 8.24×10(-2) s. Considering a cell membrane barrier with a lower water diffusion coefficient (10(-15) m(2) /s) around the bacterial cell with a water diffusion coefficient of 10(-12) m(2) /s, the teq predicted using COMSOL Multiphysics program was 3.8×10(-1) s. This result suggests that a single bacterium equilibrates rapidly (within seconds) with change in environmental humidity and temperature.

  16. Water Diffusion from a Bacterial Cell in Low-Moisture Foods.

    PubMed

    Syamaladevi, Roopesh M; Tang, Juming; Zhong, QingPing

    2016-09-01

    We used a Fick's unsteady state diffusion equation to estimate the time required for a single spherical shaped bacterium (assuming Enterococcus faecium as the target microorganism) in low-moisture foods to equilibrate with the environment. We generated water sorption isotherms of freeze-dried E. faecium. The water activity of bacterial cells at given water content increased considerably as temperature increased from 20 to 80 °C, as observed in the sorption isotherms of bacterial cells. When the water vapor diffusion coefficient was assumed as between 10(-12) and 10(-10) m(2) /s for bacterial cells, the predicted equilibration times (teq ) ranged from 8.24×10(-4) to 8.24×10(-2) s. Considering a cell membrane barrier with a lower water diffusion coefficient (10(-15) m(2) /s) around the bacterial cell with a water diffusion coefficient of 10(-12) m(2) /s, the teq predicted using COMSOL Multiphysics program was 3.8×10(-1) s. This result suggests that a single bacterium equilibrates rapidly (within seconds) with change in environmental humidity and temperature. PMID:27505687

  17. In-vitro analysis of APA microcapsules for oral delivery of live bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Ouyang, W; Jones, M; Haque, T; Lawuyi, B; Prakash, S

    2005-08-01

    Oral administration of microcapsules containing live bacterial cells has potential as an alternative therapy for several diseases. This article evaluates the suitability of the alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate (APA) microcapsules for oral delivery of live bacterial cells, in-vitro, using a dynamic simulated human gastro-intestinal (GI) model. Results showed that the APA microcapsules were morphologically stable in the simulated stomach conditions, but did not retain their structural integrity after a 3-day exposure in simulated human GI media. The microbial populations of the tested bacterial cells and the activities of the tested enzymes in the simulated human GI suspension were not substantially altered by the presence of the APA microcapsules, suggesting that there were no significant adverse effects of oral administration of the APA microcapsules on the flora of the human gastrointestinal tract. When the APA microcapsules containing Lactobacillus plantarum 80 (LP80) were challenged in the simulated gastric medium (pH = 2.0), 80.0% of the encapsulated cells remained viable after a 5-min incubation; however, the viability decreased considerably (8.3%) after 15 min and dropped to 2.6% after 30 min and lower than 0.2% after 60 min, indicating the limitations of the currently obtainable APA membrane for oral delivery of live bacteria. Further in-vivo studies are required before conclusions can be made concerning the inadequacy of APA microcapsules for oral delivery of live bacterial cells.

  18. Antibacterial activity and mechanism of action of auranofin against multi-drug resistant bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F. N.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Paul, Lake N.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional methods employed to discover new antibiotics are both a time-consuming and financially-taxing venture. This has led researchers to mine existing libraries of clinical molecules in order to repurpose old drugs for new applications (as antimicrobials). Such an effort led to the discovery of auranofin, a drug initially approved as an anti-rheumatic agent, which also possesses potent antibacterial activity in a clinically achievable range. The present study demonstrates auranofin’s antibacterial activity is a complex process that involves inhibition of multiple biosynthetic pathways including cell wall, DNA, and bacterial protein synthesis. We also confirmed that the lack of activity of auranofin observed against Gram-negative bacteria is due to the permeability barrier conferred by the outer membrane. Auranofin’s ability to suppress bacterial protein synthesis leads to significant reduction in the production of key methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) toxins. Additionally, auranofin is capable of eradicating intracellular MRSA present inside infected macrophage cells. Furthermore, auranofin is efficacious in a mouse model of MRSA systemic infection and significantly reduces the bacterial load in murine organs including the spleen and liver. Collectively, this study provides valuable evidence that auranofin has significant promise to be repurposed as a novel antibacterial for treatment of invasive bacterial infections. PMID:26936660

  19. Cloning, bacterial expression and biological characterization of recombinant human granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 and differential expression of granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 and epithelial cell-derived neutrophil activating peptide-78 mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Froyen, G; Proost, P; Ronsse, I; Mitera, T; Haelens, A; Wuyts, A; Opdenakker, G; Van Damme, J; Billiau, A

    1997-02-01

    Human osteosarcoma cells secrete a novel C-X-C chemokine called granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 (GCP-2), which was previously identified by amino acid sequencing of the purified natural protein. In order to understand the role of this new protein in inflammatory reactions, we cloned GCP-2 DNA sequences to generate recombinant protein and specific DNA probes and primers. By means of PCR on cloned cDNA of osteosarcoma cells induced by interleukin-1 beta and fibroblasts induced by lipopolysaccharide plus dsRNA, the complete coding domain of GCP-2 was isolated. This sequence was cloned into the bacterial expression vector pHEN1 and, after induction, GCP-2 was secreted into the periplasm of Escherichia coli. Recombinant GCP-2 (rGCP-2) was purified and characterized by SDS/PAGE as a monomeric 6.5-kDa protein and by amino-terminal sequencing. The chemoattractive potency of GCP-2 for neutrophilic granulocytes was about 10-times less than that of interleukin-8 and the minimal effective dose was 10 ng/ml. However, at optimal dose (100 ng/ml) the maximal chemotactic response was comparable with that of interleukin-8. Both characteristics correspond with those of natural GCP-2. In addition, intracellular calcium release in neutrophils by recombinant GCP-2 was achieved with as little as 10 ng/ml. Quantitation studies using reverse transcriptase and the polymerase chain reaction revealed higher GCP-2 mRNA production in normal fibroblasts than in tumor cells. When compared with epithelial-cell-derived neutrophil-activating peptide-78 (ENA-78) mRNA, the GCP-2 mRNA levels were higher in all cell lines tested. In addition, GCP-2 and ENA-78 expression seem to be differentially regulated in that phorbol ester and lipopolysaccharide have opposing effects on their mRNA induction in diploid fibroblasts and epithelial cells, respectively. Interleukin-1 was demonstrated to be a general inducer for both chemokines, while interferon-gamma down-regulates their mRNA expression. The

  20. [Characterization of thermophilic strain SY-14 with capability to lyse bacterial cells].

    PubMed

    Song, Yu-dong; Hu, Hong-ying; Xi, Jin-ying

    2007-09-01

    One spore-forming thermophilic bacterial strain SY-14, isolated from sewage sludge compost, showed significant capability to lyse bacterial cells. The strain was identified as Geobacillus sp. based on morphological characteristics and homology identification of 16S rDNA sequence. The optimal temperature and pH for growth were about 60 degrees C and pH 6.0-7.0 respectively. The culture supernatant of SY-14 showed lytic activity against both intact and thermal inactivated bacterial cells, and the cell lysis percentages at 6 hours were 70% and 85% respectively. The lytic activity of the culture supernatant decreased significantly after heat treatment, which inferred the lytic activity mainly derived from extracellular lytic enzymes of SY-14. The lytic activity of the culture supernatants of SY-14 increased significantly during the log phase in the batch culture process, and then decreased quickly after the maximum activity was reached. The culture supernatant of SY-14 showed lytic activity against all the five tested Gram-negative strains and some tested Gram-positive strains.

  1. Vitamin D receptor negatively regulates bacterial-stimulated NF-kappaB activity in intestine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaoping; Liao, Anne P; Xia, Yinglin; Li, Yan Chun; Li, Jian-Dong; Sartor, R Balfour; Sun, Jun

    2010-08-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) plays an essential role in gastrointestinal inflammation. Most investigations have focused on the immune response; however, how bacteria regulate VDR and how VDR modulates the nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB pathway in intestinal epithelial cells remain unexplored. This study investigated the effects of VDR ablation on NF-kappaB activation in intestinal epithelia and the role of enteric bacteria on VDR expression. We found that VDR(-/-) mice exhibited a pro-inflammatory bias. After Salmonella infection, VDR(-/-) mice had increased bacterial burden and mortality. Serum interleukin-6 in noninfected VDR(+/+) mice was undetectable, but was easily detectable in VDR(-/-) mice. NF-kappaB p65 formed a complex with VDR in noninfected wild-type mouse intestine. In contrast, deletion of VDR abolished VDR/P65 binding. P65 nuclear translocation occurred in colonic epithelial cells of untreated VDR(-/-) mice. VDR deletion also elevated NF-kappaB activity in intestinal epithelia. VDR was localized to the surface epithelia of germ-free mice, but to crypt epithelial cells in conventionalized mice. VDR expression, distribution, transcriptional activity, and target genes were regulated by Salmonella stimulation, independent of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Our study demonstrates that commensal and pathogenic bacteria directly regulate colonic epithelial VDR expression and location in vivo. VDR negatively regulates bacterial-induced intestinal NF-kappaB activation and attenuates response to infection. Therefore, VDR is an important contributor to intestinal homeostasis and host protection from bacterial invasion and infection.

  2. Human NAIP and mouse NAIP1 recognize bacterial type III secretion needle protein for inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jieling; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Jianjin; Shao, Feng

    2013-08-27

    Inflammasome mediated by central nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) protein is critical for defense against bacterial infection. Here we show that type III secretion system (T3SS) needle proteins from several bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella typhimurium, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, and Burkholderia spp., can induce robust inflammasome activation in both human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow macrophages. Needle protein activation of human NRL family CARD domain containing 4 (NLRC4) inflammasome requires the sole human neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (hNAIP). Among the seven mouse NAIPs, NAIP1 functions as the mouse counterpart of hNAIP. We found that NAIP1 recognition of T3SS needle proteins was more robust in mouse dendritic cells than in bone marrow macrophages. Needle proteins, as well as flagellin and rod proteins from five different bacteria, exhibited differential and cell type-dependent inflammasome-stimulating activity. Comprehensive profiling of the three types of NAIP ligands revealed that NAIP1 sensing of the needle protein dominated S. flexneri-induced inflammasome activation, particularly in dendritic cells. hNAIP/NAIP1 and NAIP2/5 formed a large oligomeric complex with NLRC4 in the presence of corresponding bacterial ligands, and could support reconstitution of the NLRC4 inflammasome in a ligand-specific manner. PMID:23940371

  3. Human NAIP and mouse NAIP1 recognize bacterial type III secretion needle protein for inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jieling; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Jianjin; Shao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Inflammasome mediated by central nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) protein is critical for defense against bacterial infection. Here we show that type III secretion system (T3SS) needle proteins from several bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella typhimurium, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, and Burkholderia spp., can induce robust inflammasome activation in both human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow macrophages. Needle protein activation of human NRL family CARD domain containing 4 (NLRC4) inflammasome requires the sole human neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (hNAIP). Among the seven mouse NAIPs, NAIP1 functions as the mouse counterpart of hNAIP. We found that NAIP1 recognition of T3SS needle proteins was more robust in mouse dendritic cells than in bone marrow macrophages. Needle proteins, as well as flagellin and rod proteins from five different bacteria, exhibited differential and cell type-dependent inflammasome-stimulating activity. Comprehensive profiling of the three types of NAIP ligands revealed that NAIP1 sensing of the needle protein dominated S. flexneri-induced inflammasome activation, particularly in dendritic cells. hNAIP/NAIP1 and NAIP2/5 formed a large oligomeric complex with NLRC4 in the presence of corresponding bacterial ligands, and could support reconstitution of the NLRC4 inflammasome in a ligand-specific manner. PMID:23940371

  4. The impact of metabolic state on Cd adsorption onto bacterial cells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, K.J.; Ams, D.A.; Wedel, A.N.; Szymanowski, J.E.S.; Weber, D.L.; Schneegurt, M.A.; Fein, J.B.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the effect of bacterial metabolism on the adsorption of Cd onto Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells. Metabolically active Gram-positive cells adsorbed significantly less Cd than non-metabolizing cells. Gram-negative cells, however, showed no systematic difference in Cd adsorption between metabolizing and non-metabolizing cells. The effect of metabolism on Cd adsorption to Gram-positive cells was likely due to an influx of protons in and around the cell wall from the metabolic proton motive force, promoting competition between Cd and protons for adsorption sites on the cell wall. The relative lack of a metabolic effect on Cd adsorption onto Gram-negative compared to Gram-positive cells suggests that Cd binding in Gram-negative cells is focused in a region of the cell wall that is not reached, or is unaffected by this proton flux. Thermodynamic modeling was used to estimate that proton pumping causes the pH in the cell wall of metabolizing Gram-positive bacteria to decrease from the bulk solution value of 7.0 to approximately 5.7. ?? 2007 The Authors.

  5. Uniform dose atmospheric pressure microplasma exposure of individual bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, David; Mahony, Charles; Spence, Sarah; Perez-Martin, Fatima; Kelsey, Colin; Hamilton, Neil; Diver, Declan; Bennet, Euan; Potts, Hugh; Mariotti, Davide; McDowell, David; Maguire, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Plasma - bacteria interactions have been studied for some time with a view to using plasma exposure for wound healing, sterilization and decontamination. While high efficacy has been demonstrated, important fundamental mechanisms are not understood and may be critical for ultimate acceptance. The dose variation across the exposed population and the impact of non-lethal exposure on subsequent bacterial growth are important issues. We demonstrate that individual bacterial cells can remain viable after exposure to a uniform plasma dose. Each bacteria cell (E coli) is delivered to the atmospheric pressure plasma in an aerosolised droplet (d ~ 10 micron). The estimated plasma density is 1E13 - 1E14 cm-3, gas temperature <400 K, and exposure times vary between 0.04 and 0.1ms. Droplet evaporation in flight is ~2 micron and plasma - cell interactions are mediated by the surrounding liquid (Ringers solution) where plasma-induced droplet surface chemistry and charging is known to occur. We report the cell viability and recovery dynamics of individual exposed cells as well as impact on DNA and membrane components with reference to measured plasma parameters. This research was funded by EPSRC (Grants: EP/K006088/1 & EP/K006142/1).

  6. Detecting Bacterial Surface Organelles on Single Cells Using Optical Tweezers.

    PubMed

    Zakrisson, Johan; Singh, Bhupender; Svenmarker, Pontus; Wiklund, Krister; Zhang, Hanqing; Hakobyan, Shoghik; Ramstedt, Madeleine; Andersson, Magnus

    2016-05-10

    Bacterial cells display a diverse array of surface organelles that are important for a range of processes such as intercellular communication, motility and adhesion leading to biofilm formation, infections, and bacterial spread. More specifically, attachment to host cells by Gram-negative bacteria are mediated by adhesion pili, which are nanometers wide and micrometers long fibrous organelles. Since these pili are significantly thinner than the wavelength of visible light, they cannot be detected using standard light microscopy techniques. At present, there is no fast and simple method available to investigate if a single cell expresses pili while keeping the cell alive for further studies. In this study, we present a method to determine the presence of pili on a single bacterium. The protocol involves imaging the bacterium to measure its size, followed by predicting the fluid drag based on its size using an analytical model, and thereafter oscillating the sample while a single bacterium is trapped by an optical tweezer to measure its effective fluid drag. Comparison between the predicted and the measured fluid drag thereby indicate the presence of pili. Herein, we verify the method using polymer coated silica microspheres and Escherichia coli bacteria expressing adhesion pili. Our protocol can in real time and within seconds assist single cell studies by distinguishing between piliated and nonpiliated bacteria.

  7. Virus and Bacterial Cell Chemical Analysis by NanoSIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P; Holt, J

    2008-07-28

    In past work for the Department of Homeland Security, the LLNL NanoSIMS team has succeeded in extracting quantitative elemental composition at sub-micron resolution from bacterial spores using nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). The purpose of this task is to test our NanoSIMS capabilities on viruses and bacterial cells. This initial work has proven successful. We imaged Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) and Bacillus anthracis Sterne cells using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and then analyzed those samples by NanoSIMS. We were able resolve individual viral particles ({approx}18 nm by 300 nm) in the SEM and extract correlated elemental composition in the NanoSIMS. The phosphorous/carbon ratio observed in TMV is comparable to that seen in bacterial spores (0.033), as was the chlorine/carbon ratio (0.11). TMV elemental composition is consistent from spot to spot, and TMV is readily distinguished from debris by NanoSIMS analysis. Bacterial cells were readily identified in the SEM and relocated in the NanoSIMS for elemental analysis. The Ba Sterne cells were observed to have a measurably lower phosphorous/carbon ratio (0.005), as compared to the spores produced in the same run (0.02). The chlorine/carbon ratio was approximately 2.5X larger in the cells (0.2) versus the spores (0.08), while the fluorine/carbon ratio was approximately 10X lower in the cells (0.008) than the spores (0.08). Silicon/carbon ratios for both cells and spores encompassed a comparable range. The initial data in this study suggest that high resolution analysis is useful because it allows the target agent to be analyzed separate from particulates and other debris. High resolution analysis would also be useful for trace sample analysis. The next step in this work is to determine the potential utility of elemental signatures in these kinds of samples. We recommend bulk analyses of media and agent samples to determine the range of media compositions in use, and to determine how

  8. Bacterial actin and tubulin homologs in cell growth and division.

    PubMed

    Busiek, Kimberly K; Margolin, William

    2015-03-16

    In contrast to the elaborate cytoskeletal machines harbored by eukaryotic cells, such as mitotic spindles, cytoskeletal structures detectable by typical negative stain electron microscopy are generally absent from bacterial cells. As a result, for decades it was thought that bacteria lacked cytoskeletal machines. Revolutions in genomics and fluorescence microscopy have confirmed the existence not only of smaller-scale cytoskeletal structures in bacteria, but also of widespread functional homologs of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins. The presence of actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament homologs in these relatively simple cells suggests that primitive cytoskeletons first arose in bacteria. In bacteria such as Escherichia coli, homologs of tubulin and actin directly interact with each other and are crucial for coordinating cell growth and division. The function and direct interactions between these proteins will be the focus of this review.

  9. Bacterial autolysins trim cell surface peptidoglycan to prevent detection by the Drosophila innate immune system

    PubMed Central

    Atilano, Magda Luciana; Pereira, Pedro Matos; Vaz, Filipa; Catalão, Maria João; Reed, Patricia; Grilo, Inês Ramos; Sobral, Rita Gonçalves; Ligoxygakis, Petros; Pinho, Mariana Gomes; Filipe, Sérgio Raposo

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria have to avoid recognition by the host immune system in order to establish a successful infection. Peptidoglycan, the principal constituent of virtually all bacterial surfaces, is a specific molecular signature recognized by dedicated host receptors, present in animals and plants, which trigger an immune response. Here we report that autolysins from Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria, enzymes capable of hydrolyzing peptidoglycan, have a major role in concealing this inflammatory molecule from Drosophila peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs). We show that autolysins trim the outermost peptidoglycan fragments and that in their absence bacterial virulence is impaired, as PGRPs can directly recognize leftover peptidoglycan extending beyond the external layers of bacterial proteins and polysaccharides. The activity of autolysins is not restricted to the producer cells but can also alter the surface of neighboring bacteria, facilitating the survival of the entire population in the infected host. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02277.001 PMID:24692449

  10. Cell surface energy, contact angles and phase partition. II. Bacterial cells in biphasic aqueous mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gerson, D F; Akit, J

    1980-11-01

    Partition coefficients in biphasic mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol) and Dextran are compared to cell surface energies obtained from contact angles of each liquid phase on cell layers. Linear relationships are observed between these two independent measurements for a variety of bacterial cells. The results demonstrate the importance of interfacial phenomena and contact angles in the phase-partition process. PMID:6159003

  11. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems. PMID:25727891

  12. Effects of Bacterial Microflora of the Lower Digestive Tract of Free-Range Waterfowl on Influenza Virus Activation

    PubMed Central

    King, Marcus D.; Guentzel, M. Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P.; Bodour, Adria A.; Brahmakshatriya, Vinayak; Lupiani, Blanca; Chambers, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage activation of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA0) is required for cell entry via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Despite numerous studies describing bacterial protease-mediated influenza A viral activation in mammals, very little is known about the role of intestinal bacterial flora of birds in hemagglutinin cleavage/activation. Therefore, the cloaca of wild waterfowl was examined for (i) representative bacterial types and (ii) their ability to cleave in a “trypsin-like” manner the precursor viral hemagglutinin molecule (HA0). Using radiolabeled HA0, bacterial secretion-mediated trypsin-like conversion of HA0 to HA1 and HA2 peptide products was observed to various degrees in 42 of 44 bacterial isolates suggestive of influenza virus activation in the cloaca of wild waterfowl. However, treatment of uncleaved virus with all bacterial isolates gave rise to substantially reduced emergent virus progeny compared with what was expected. Examination of two isolates exhibiting pronounced trypsin-like conversion of HA0 to HA1 and HA2 peptide products and low infectivity revealed lipase activity to be present. Because influenza virus possesses a complex lipid envelope, the presence of lipid hydrolase activity could in part account for the observed less-than-expected level of viable progeny. A thorough characterization of respective isolate protease HA0 hydrolysis products as well as other resident activities (i.e., lipase) is ongoing such that the role of these respective contributors in virus activation/inactivation can be firmly established. PMID:21531837

  13. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of bacterial cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Parsley, Larissa C; Newman, Molli M; Liles, Mark R

    2010-09-01

    The use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to identify and enumerate specific bacteria within a mixed culture or environmental sample has become a powerful tool in combining microscopy with molecular phylogenetic discrimination. However, processing a large number of samples in parallel can be difficult because the bacterial cells are typically fixed and hybridized on microscope slides rather than processed in solution. In addition, gram-positive cells and certain environmental samples present a unique challenge to achievement of adequate cell fixation and uniform hybridization for optimal FISH analysis. Here, we describe a protocol for FISH in solution that can be performed entirely in suspension, in a microcentrifuge tube format, prior to microscopy. This protocol can be applied to both gram-positive and -negative cells, as well as complex microbial assemblages. The method employs a rapid technique for performing multiple hybridizations simultaneously, which may be used to qualitatively assess the presence of specific phylogenetic groups in bacterial cultures or environmental samples, and/or directly quantify fluorescence by fluorometry or flow cytometry.

  14. Heterologous Expression of Toxins from Bacterial Toxin-Antitoxin Systems in Eukaryotic Cells: Strategies and Applications.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Chew Chieng; Abu Bakar, Fauziah; Chan, Wai Ting; Espinosa, Manuel; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2016-02-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are found in nearly all prokaryotic genomes and usually consist of a pair of co-transcribed genes, one of which encodes a stable toxin and the other, its cognate labile antitoxin. Certain environmental and physiological cues trigger the degradation of the antitoxin, causing activation of the toxin, leading either to the death or stasis of the host cell. TA systems have a variety of functions in the bacterial cell, including acting as mediators of programmed cell death, the induction of a dormant state known as persistence and the stable maintenance of plasmids and other mobile genetic elements. Some bacterial TA systems are functional when expressed in eukaryotic cells and this has led to several innovative applications, which are the subject of this review. Here, we look at how bacterial TA systems have been utilized for the genetic manipulation of yeasts and other eukaryotes, for the containment of genetically modified organisms, and for the engineering of high expression eukaryotic cell lines. We also examine how TA systems have been adopted as an important tool in developmental biology research for the ablation of specific cells and the potential for utility of TA systems in antiviral and anticancer gene therapies. PMID:26907343

  15. Heterologous Expression of Toxins from Bacterial Toxin-Antitoxin Systems in Eukaryotic Cells: Strategies and Applications.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Chew Chieng; Abu Bakar, Fauziah; Chan, Wai Ting; Espinosa, Manuel; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2016-02-19

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are found in nearly all prokaryotic genomes and usually consist of a pair of co-transcribed genes, one of which encodes a stable toxin and the other, its cognate labile antitoxin. Certain environmental and physiological cues trigger the degradation of the antitoxin, causing activation of the toxin, leading either to the death or stasis of the host cell. TA systems have a variety of functions in the bacterial cell, including acting as mediators of programmed cell death, the induction of a dormant state known as persistence and the stable maintenance of plasmids and other mobile genetic elements. Some bacterial TA systems are functional when expressed in eukaryotic cells and this has led to several innovative applications, which are the subject of this review. Here, we look at how bacterial TA systems have been utilized for the genetic manipulation of yeasts and other eukaryotes, for the containment of genetically modified organisms, and for the engineering of high expression eukaryotic cell lines. We also examine how TA systems have been adopted as an important tool in developmental biology research for the ablation of specific cells and the potential for utility of TA systems in antiviral and anticancer gene therapies.

  16. Heterologous Expression of Toxins from Bacterial Toxin-Antitoxin Systems in Eukaryotic Cells: Strategies and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Chew Chieng; Abu Bakar, Fauziah; Chan, Wai Ting; Espinosa, Manuel; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2016-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are found in nearly all prokaryotic genomes and usually consist of a pair of co-transcribed genes, one of which encodes a stable toxin and the other, its cognate labile antitoxin. Certain environmental and physiological cues trigger the degradation of the antitoxin, causing activation of the toxin, leading either to the death or stasis of the host cell. TA systems have a variety of functions in the bacterial cell, including acting as mediators of programmed cell death, the induction of a dormant state known as persistence and the stable maintenance of plasmids and other mobile genetic elements. Some bacterial TA systems are functional when expressed in eukaryotic cells and this has led to several innovative applications, which are the subject of this review. Here, we look at how bacterial TA systems have been utilized for the genetic manipulation of yeasts and other eukaryotes, for the containment of genetically modified organisms, and for the engineering of high expression eukaryotic cell lines. We also examine how TA systems have been adopted as an important tool in developmental biology research for the ablation of specific cells and the potential for utility of TA systems in antiviral and anticancer gene therapies. PMID:26907343

  17. Metabolism, cell growth and the bacterial cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jue D; Levin, Petra A

    2009-11-01

    Adaptation to fluctuations in nutrient availability is a fact of life for single-celled organisms in the 'wild'. A decade ago our understanding of how bacteria adjust cell cycle parameters to accommodate changes in nutrient availability stemmed almost entirely from elegant physiological studies completed in the 1960s. In this Opinion article we summarize recent groundbreaking work in this area and discuss potential mechanisms by which nutrient availability and metabolic status are coordinated with cell growth, chromosome replication and cell division.

  18. Bacterial abundance, activity, and viability in the eutrophic River Warnow, northeast Germany.

    PubMed

    Freese, H M; Karsten, U; Schumann, R

    2006-01-01

    The River Warnow is the drinking water source for the city of Rostock. Its eutrophic status is accompanied by high amounts of bacteria, which may reach up to 24 x 10(6) cells mL(-1) as recorded during a seasonal study in 2002. Because the river is eutrophic and also heavily loaded with organic matter, this burden is a problem for drinking water purification, as it must be removed completely to not trigger new bacterial growth in the pipeline network. Therefore, restoration measures in the river have to be planned, and bacteria have to be favored as decomposers. That includes the investigation of the physiological state of bacteria in situ. Viable and active cells in the lower reaches of River Warnow were estimated using a broad set of methods. Intact bacteria were investigated by the LIVE/DEAD BacLight bacterial viability kit, containing a mixture of permeant and impermeant nucleic acid stains. Cells with ribosomes were visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization with the EUB338 oligonucleotide probe. Intact cells and ribosome-containing bacteria represented 24% of total numbers stained by 4'6,-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) or 66 and 62%, respectively, in relation to all bacteria visualized by the LIVE/DEAD kit. Both fractions were considered as viable, although the fraction of RIB + bacteria is most likely underestimated by the protocol applied. 5-Cyano-2,3-ditolyltetrazolium chloride (CTC) was applied to mark respiring bacteria. The esterase substrate CellTracker Green 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate showed cells with intracellular hydrolytic activity. Whereas 1.5% of DAPI-stained bacteria were observed as respiring, 3.8% exhibited intracellular hydrolytic activity on average. If these active fractions were calculated as the percentages of intact cells, much higher fractions of 5.4% were respiring and 16% hydrolytic. Temperature was a main factor influencing total and viable cell numbers simultaneously. The results confirm that there are different

  19. Abundance and diversity of heterotrophic bacterial cells assimilating phosphate in the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Longnecker, Krista; Lomas, Michael W; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S

    2010-10-01

    Microorganisms play key roles in the cycles of carbon and nutrients in the ocean, and identifying the extent to which specific taxa contribute to these cycles will establish their ecological function. We examined the use of (33)P-phosphate to identify heterotrophic bacteria actively involved in the cycling of phosphate, an essential inorganic nutrient. Seawater from the sub-tropical North Atlantic Ocean was incubated with (33)P-phosphate and analysed by microautoradiography to determine the proportion and diversity of the bacterial community-assimilating phosphate. Complementary incubations using (3)H-leucine and (3)H-thymidine were also conducted. We found that a higher proportion of total heterotrophic bacterial cells in surface water samples assimilated phosphate compared with leucine or thymidine. Bacteria from all of the phylogenetic groups we identified by CARD-FISH were able to assimilate phosphate, although the abundances of cells within each group did not scale directly with the number found to assimilate phosphate. Furthermore, a significantly higher proportion of Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Cytophaga-like cells assimilated phosphate compared with leucine or thymidine. Our results suggest that a greater proportion of bacterial cells in surface waters are actively participating in the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus, and possibly other elements, than is currently estimated through the use of (3)H-leucine or (3)H-thymidine.

  20. Structure of a Bacterial Cell Surface Decaheme Electron Conduit

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Edwards, Marcus; Gates, Andrew J.; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alex S.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.

    2011-05-23

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves deca-heme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outermembrane (OM) electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular inter-cytochrome electron exchange along ‘nanowire’ appendages. We present a 3.2 Å crystal structure of one of these deca-heme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the ten hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65 Å octa-heme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45 Å tetra-heme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g. minerals), soluble substrates (e.g. flavins) and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

  1. Investigating Deformylase and Deacylase Activity of Mammalian and Bacterial Sirtuins.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Julian; Klockenbusch, Cordula; Schwarzer, Dirk

    2016-03-01

    Lysine acylation constitutes a major group of post-translational modifications of proteins, and is found in the proteomes of organisms from all kingdoms of life. Sirtuins are considered the main erasers of these modification marks, and thus contribute to acylation-dependent regulation of enzyme activity, and potentially of protein quality control. We have established a substrate scaffold to enable the analysis of sirtuin activity with a broad range of acyl-lysine modifications, including hydrophobic fatty acids. Characterization of the deacylase activity of the bacterial SrtN, which is encoded by the yhdZ gene of Bacillus subtilis, showed that this enzyme is capable of removing a broad range of acyl groups. These investigations further showed that SrtN and human SIRT1 are efficient lysine-deformylases, thereby providing a first clue as to how this nonenzymatic modification might be removed from affected proteins.

  2. Active and Secretory IgA-Coated Bacterial Fractions Elucidate Dysbiosis in Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Džunková, Mária; Moya, Andrés; Vázquez-Castellanos, Jorge F; Artacho, Alejandro; Chen, Xinhua; Kelly, Ciaran; D'Auria, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The onset of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been associated with treatment with wide-spectrum antibiotics. Antibiotic treatment alters the activity of gut commensals and may result in modified patterns of immune responses to pathogens. To study these mechanisms during CDI, we separated bacteria with high cellular RNA content (the active bacteria) and their inactive counterparts by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of the fecal bacterial suspension. The gut dysbiosis due to the antibiotic treatment may result in modification of immune recognition of intestinal bacteria. The immune recognition patterns were assessed by FACS of bacterial fractions either coated or not with intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA). We described the taxonomic distributions of these four bacterial fractions (active versus inactive and SIgA coated versus non-SIgA coated) by massive 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and quantified the proportion of C. difficile toxin genes in the samples. The overall gut microbiome composition was more robustly influenced by antibiotics than by the C. difficile toxins. Bayesian networks revealed that the C. difficile cluster was preferentially SIgA coated during CDI. In contrast, in the CDI-negative group Fusobacterium was the characteristic genus of the SIgA-opsonized fraction. Lactobacillales and Clostridium cluster IV were mostly inactive in CDI-positive patients. In conclusion, although the proportion of C. difficile in the gut is very low, it is able to initiate infection during the gut dysbiosis caused by environmental stress (antibiotic treatment) as a consequence of decreased activity of the protective bacteria. IMPORTANCE C. difficile is a major enteric pathogen with worldwide distribution. Its expansion is associated with broad-spectrum antibiotics which disturb the normal gut microbiome. In this study, the DNA sequencing of highly active bacteria and bacteria opsonized by intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIg

  3. Active and Secretory IgA-Coated Bacterial Fractions Elucidate Dysbiosis in Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Andrés; Vázquez-Castellanos, Jorge F.; Artacho, Alejandro; Chen, Xinhua; Kelly, Ciaran

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The onset of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been associated with treatment with wide-spectrum antibiotics. Antibiotic treatment alters the activity of gut commensals and may result in modified patterns of immune responses to pathogens. To study these mechanisms during CDI, we separated bacteria with high cellular RNA content (the active bacteria) and their inactive counterparts by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of the fecal bacterial suspension. The gut dysbiosis due to the antibiotic treatment may result in modification of immune recognition of intestinal bacteria. The immune recognition patterns were assessed by FACS of bacterial fractions either coated or not with intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA). We described the taxonomic distributions of these four bacterial fractions (active versus inactive and SIgA coated versus non-SIgA coated) by massive 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and quantified the proportion of C. difficile toxin genes in the samples. The overall gut microbiome composition was more robustly influenced by antibiotics than by the C. difficile toxins. Bayesian networks revealed that the C. difficile cluster was preferentially SIgA coated during CDI. In contrast, in the CDI-negative group Fusobacterium was the characteristic genus of the SIgA-opsonized fraction. Lactobacillales and Clostridium cluster IV were mostly inactive in CDI-positive patients. In conclusion, although the proportion of C. difficile in the gut is very low, it is able to initiate infection during the gut dysbiosis caused by environmental stress (antibiotic treatment) as a consequence of decreased activity of the protective bacteria. IMPORTANCE C. difficile is a major enteric pathogen with worldwide distribution. Its expansion is associated with broad-spectrum antibiotics which disturb the normal gut microbiome. In this study, the DNA sequencing of highly active bacteria and bacteria opsonized by intestinal secretory immunoglobulin

  4. Bacterial activities driving arsenic speciation and solubility in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia-Brunet, F.; Seby, F.; Crouzet, C.; Joulian, C.; Mamindy-Pajany, Y.; Guezennec, A. G.; Hurel, C.; Marmier, N.; Bataillard, P.

    2012-04-01

    Harbour and marina sediments represent particular environments, with high concentrations in organic carbon and pollutants. Over 50 million m3 of marine sediments are dredged every year in French maritime and commercial ports, to maintain the water depth suitable for navigation, and the most part of them is discharged in deeper sea zones. The present study aimed to elucidate, using a range of complementary approaches, the influence of bacterial activity on arsenic speciation and mobility in marina sediments. Two sites were considered: L'Estaque, impacted by metallurgical activities and by the commercial port of Marseille, and St-Mandrier, less polluted, affected by classical chemical pollutants associated to professional and recreational boating. Arsenic concentration was noticeably higher in l'Estaque sediment (200-350 mg/kg) than in St-Mandrier sediment (15-50 mg/kg). In the solid phases, As(III) was the dominant species in L'Estaque sediment, whereas As(V) was the main form in St Mandrier sediment. At both sites, arsenic was the major trace element detected in interstitial water. Free sulfide and thio-arsenic complexes were detected in the interstitial water of l'Estaque sediment, suggesting a role of sulfate-reduction bacterial activity on arsenic solubility. Anaerobic microcosm experiments confirmed this hypothesis, as stimulation of sulfate-reduction induced a dramatic increase of arsenic concentration in the liquid phase, linked to the formation of soluble thio-arsenic complexes. Nevertheless, microcosms performed in aerobic conditions showed that bacterial activity globally decreased the transfer of arsenic from the sediment toward the overlying water. A red-brown fine layer developed at the sediment-water interface. Altogether, these results suggest that the sediment-water interface zone and the close transition area between aerobic and anaerobic conditions host intense biogeochemical reactions involving As, Fe and S species. These reactions most probably

  5. Protein, cell and bacterial response to atmospheric pressure plasma grafted hyaluronic acid on poly(methylmethacrylate).

    PubMed

    D'Sa, Raechelle A; Raj, Jog; Dickinson, Peter J; McMahon, M Ann S; McDowell, David A; Meenan, Brian J

    2015-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) has been immobilised on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surfaces using a novel dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma process for the purposes of repelling protein, cellular and bacterial adhesion in the context of improving the performance of ophthalmic devices. Grafting was achieved by the following steps: (1) treatment of the PMMA with a DBD plasma operating at atmospheric pressure, (2) amine functionalisation of the activated polymer surface by exposure to a 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) linker molecule and (3) reaction of HA with the surface bound amine. The mechanism and effectiveness of the grafting process was verified by surface analysis. XPS data indicates that the APTMS linker molecule binds to PMMA via the Si-O chemistry and has the required pendant amine moiety. The carboxylic acid moiety on HA then binds with this -NH2 group via standard carbodiimide chemistry. ToF-SIMS confirms the presence of a coherent HA layer the microstructure of which is verified by AFM. The plasma grafted HA coating surfaces showed a pronounced decrease in protein and cellular adhesion when tested with bovine serum albumin and human corneal epithelial cells, respectively. The ability of these coatings to resist bacterial adhesion was established using Staphylococcus aureus NTC8325. Interestingly, the coatings did not repel bacterial adhesion, indicating that the mechanism of adhesion of bacterial cells is different to that for the surface interactions of mammalian cells. It is proposed that this difference is a consequence of the specific HA conformation that occurs under the conditions employed here. Hence, it is apparent that the microstructure/architecture of the HA coatings is an important factor in fabricating surfaces intended to repel proteins, mammalian and bacterial cells.

  6. Protein, cell and bacterial response to atmospheric pressure plasma grafted hyaluronic acid on poly(methylmethacrylate).

    PubMed

    D'Sa, Raechelle A; Raj, Jog; Dickinson, Peter J; McMahon, M Ann S; McDowell, David A; Meenan, Brian J

    2015-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) has been immobilised on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surfaces using a novel dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma process for the purposes of repelling protein, cellular and bacterial adhesion in the context of improving the performance of ophthalmic devices. Grafting was achieved by the following steps: (1) treatment of the PMMA with a DBD plasma operating at atmospheric pressure, (2) amine functionalisation of the activated polymer surface by exposure to a 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) linker molecule and (3) reaction of HA with the surface bound amine. The mechanism and effectiveness of the grafting process was verified by surface analysis. XPS data indicates that the APTMS linker molecule binds to PMMA via the Si-O chemistry and has the required pendant amine moiety. The carboxylic acid moiety on HA then binds with this -NH2 group via standard carbodiimide chemistry. ToF-SIMS confirms the presence of a coherent HA layer the microstructure of which is verified by AFM. The plasma grafted HA coating surfaces showed a pronounced decrease in protein and cellular adhesion when tested with bovine serum albumin and human corneal epithelial cells, respectively. The ability of these coatings to resist bacterial adhesion was established using Staphylococcus aureus NTC8325. Interestingly, the coatings did not repel bacterial adhesion, indicating that the mechanism of adhesion of bacterial cells is different to that for the surface interactions of mammalian cells. It is proposed that this difference is a consequence of the specific HA conformation that occurs under the conditions employed here. Hence, it is apparent that the microstructure/architecture of the HA coatings is an important factor in fabricating surfaces intended to repel proteins, mammalian and bacterial cells. PMID:26449450

  7. Neuronal cells' behavior on polypyrrole coated bacterial nanocellulose three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Muller, D; Silva, J P; Rambo, C R; Barra, G M O; Dourado, F; Gama, F M

    2013-01-01

    In this work, polypyrrole (PPy) was in situ polymerized onto the surface of bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus, by chemical oxidation in aqueous medium using ammonium persulfate. Composites (BNC/PPy) were produced with varying concentrations of pyrrole (Py). The produced BNC/PPy membranes were used as a template for the seeding of PC12 rat neuronal cells. Cell suspensions were directly seeded onto the surfaces of the BNC/PPy membranes. The Py concentration affected the behavior of neuronal cells that adhered and grew significantly more on BNC/PPy comparatively to BNC. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs revealed that PC12 cells adhered on the surface of the BNC and BNC/PPy membranes. Conductive PPy coatings on nanofibers acting as an active interface for tissue engineering may be used to regulate cell activity through electrical stimulations. PMID:23796037

  8. Cell Size Distributions of Soil Bacterial and Archaeal Taxa

    PubMed Central

    Portillo, Maria C.; Leff, Jonathan W.; Lauber, Christian L.

    2013-01-01

    Cell size is a key ecological trait of soil microorganisms that determines a wide range of life history attributes, including the efficiency of nutrient acquisition. However, because of the methodological issues associated with determining cell sizes in situ, we have a limited understanding of how cell abundances vary across cell size fractions and whether certain microbial taxa have consistently smaller cells than other taxa. In this study, we extracted cells from three distinct soils and fractionated them into seven size ranges (5 μm to 0.2 μm) by filtration. Cell abundances in each size fraction were determined by direct microscopy, with the taxonomic composition of each size fraction determined by high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Most of the cells were smaller than cells typically grown in culture, with 59 to 67% of cells <1.2 μm in diameter. Furthermore, each size fraction harbored distinct bacterial and archaeal communities in each of the three soils, and many of the taxa exhibited distinct size distribution patterns, with the smaller size fractions having higher relative abundances of taxa that are rare or poorly characterized (including Acidobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Crenarchaeota, Verrucomicrobia, and Elusimicrobia). In general, there was a direct relationship between average cell size and culturability, with those soil taxa that are poorly represented in culture collections tending to be smaller. Size fractionation not only provides important insight into the life history strategies of soil microbial taxa but also is a useful tool to enable more focused investigations into those taxa that remain poorly characterized. PMID:24077710

  9. Bacterial peptidoglycan-derived molecules activate Candida albicans hyphal growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Xu, Xiao-Li

    2008-01-01

    Serum strongly induces the yeast-to-hypha growth transition in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, playing an important role in infection. However, identity of the serum inducer(s) and its sensor remain poorly defined. We used NMR to analyze the chromatographic serum fractionations enriched for the hypha-inducing activity and found structures resembling subunits of bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN). We then confirmed that several purified and synthetic muramyl dipeptides (MDPs), subunits of PGN, can indeed strongly promote C. albicans hyphal growth. Taking cue from the recognition of MDPs by the mammalian bacterial sensor Nod2 using its leucine-rich-repeat (LRR) domain, we discovered that MDPs activate the adenylyl cyclase Cyr1 by binding to its LRR domain. The cAMP/PKA signaling pathway is well known to control hyphal morphogenesis and other infection-related traits. Given the abundance of PGN at the large intestinal epithelial surface, a natural habitat and invasion site for C. albcians, our findings have important implications in the mechanisms of infection by this pathogen. PMID:19704871

  10. Bacterial peptidoglycan-derived molecules activate Candida albicans hyphal growth

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Li

    2008-01-01

    Serum strongly induces the yeast-to-hypha growth transition in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, playing an important role in infection. However, identity of the serum inducer(s) and its sensor remain poorly defined. We used NMR to analyze the chromatographic serum fractionations enriched for the hypha-inducing activity and found structures resembling subunits of bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN). We then confirmed that several purified and synthetic muramyl dipeptides (MDPs), subunits of PGN, can indeed strongly promote C. albicans hyphal growth. Taking cue from the recognition of MDPs by the mammalian bacterial sensor Nod2 using its leucine-rich-repeat (LRR) domain, we discovered that MDPs activate the adenylyl cyclase Cyr1 by binding to its LRR domain. The cAMP/PKA signaling pathway is well known to control hyphal morphogenesis and other infection-related traits. Given the abundance of PGN at the large intestinal epithelial surface, a natural habitat and invasion site for C. albcians, our findings have important implications in the mechanisms of infection by this pathogen. PMID:19704871

  11. Flagellate Predation on a Bacterial Model Community: Interplay of Size-Selective Grazing, Specific Bacterial Cell Size, and Bacterial Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Martin W.; Höfle, Manfred G.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of grazing by the bacterivorous nanoflagellate Ochromonas sp. strain DS on the taxonomic and morphological structures of a complex bacterial community was studied in one-stage chemostat experiments. A bacterial community, consisting of at least 30 different strains, was fed with a complex carbon source under conditions of low growth rate (0.5 day−1 when nongrazed) and low substrate concentration (9 mg liter−1). Before and after the introduction of the predator, the bacterial community composition was studied by in situ techniques (immunofluorescence microscopy and fluorescent in situ hybridization), as well as by cultivation on agar media. The cell sizes of nonspecifically stained and immunofluorescently labeled bacteria were measured by image analysis. Grazing by the flagellate caused a bidirectional change in the morphological structure of the community. Medium-size bacterial cells, which dominated the nongrazed community, were largely replaced by smaller cells, as well as by cells contained in large multicellular flocs. Cell morphological changes were combined with community taxonomic changes. After introduction of the flagellate, the dominating strains with medium-size cells were largely replaced by single-celled strains with smaller cells on the one hand and, on the other hand, by Pseudomonas sp. strain MWH1, which formed the large, floc-like forms. We assume that size-selective grazing was the major force controlling both the morphological and the taxonomic structures of the model community. PMID:10543797

  12. Functionalization of whole‐cell bacterial reporters with magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dayi; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.; Özmen, Mustafa; Wang, Hui; Wang, Jian; Paunov, Vesselin N.; Li, Guanghe; Huang, Wei E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We developed a biocompatible and highly efficient approach for functionalization of bacterial cell wall with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Three Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 chromosomally based bioreporters, which were genetically engineered to express bioluminescence in response to salicylate, toluene/xylene and alkanes, were functionalized with 18 ± 3 nm iron oxide MNPs to acquire magnetic function. The efficiency of MNPs functionalization of Acinetobacter bioreporters was 99.96 ± 0.01%. The MNPs‐functionalized bioreporters (MFBs) can be remotely controlled and collected by an external magnetic field. The MFBs were all viable and functional as good as the native cells in terms of sensitivity, specificity and quantitative response. More importantly, we demonstrated that salicylate sensing MFBs can be applied to sediments and garden soils, and semi‐quantitatively detect salicylate in those samples by discriminably recovering MFBs with a permanent magnet. The magnetically functionalized cells are especially useful to complex environments in which the indigenous cells, particles and impurities may interfere with direct measurement of bioreporter cells and conventional filtration is not applicable to distinguish and harvest bioreporters. The approach described here provides a powerful tool to remotely control and selectively manipulate MNPs‐functionalized cells in water and soils. It would have a potential in the application of environmental microbiology, such as bioremediation enhancement and environment monitoring and assessment. PMID:21255376

  13. In vitro interactions of biomedical polyurethanes with macrophages and bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Visai, Livia; Rindi, Simonetta; Speziale, Pietro; Petrini, Paola; Farè, Silvia; Tanzi, M Cristina

    2002-01-01

    Three commercial medical-grade polyurethanes (PUs), a poly-ether-urethane (Pellethane), and two poly-carbonate-urethanes, the one aromatic (Bionate) and the other aliphatic (Chronoflex), were tested for macrophages and bacterial cells adhesion, in the presence or absence of adhesive plasma proteins. All the experiments were carried out on PUs films obtained by solvent casting. The wettability of these films was analysed by measuring static contact angles against water. The ability of the selected PUs to adsorb human fibronectin (Fn) and fibrinogen (Fbg) was checked by ELISA with biotin-labelled proteins. All PUs were able to adsorb Fn and Fbg (Fn > Fbg). Fn adsorption was in the order: Pellethane > Chronoflex > Bionate, the highest Fbg adsorption being detected onto Bionate (Bionate > Chronoflex > Pellethane). The human macrophagic line J111, and the two main bacterial strains responsible for infection in humans (Staphylococcus aureus Newman and Staphylococcus epidermidis 14852) were incubated in turn with the three PUs, uncoated or coated with plasma proteins. No macrophage or bacterial adhesion was observed onto uncoated PUs. PUs coated with plasma, Fn or Fbg promoted bacterial adhesion (S. aureus > S. epidermidis), whereas macrophage adhered more onto PUs coated with Fn or plasma. The coating with Fbg did not promote cell adhesion. Pellethane showed the highest macrophage activation (i.e. spreading), followed, in the order, by Bionate and Chronoflex. PMID:11939455

  14. Segrosome Complex Formation during DNA Trafficking in Bacterial Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, María A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial extrachromosomal DNAs often contribute to virulence in pathogenic organisms or facilitate adaptation to particular environments. The transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next requires sufficient partitioning of DNA molecules to ensure that at least one copy reaches each side of the division plane and is inherited by the daughter cells. Segregation of the bacterial chromosome occurs during or after replication and probably involves a strategy in which several protein complexes participate to modify the folding pattern and distribution first of the origin domain and then of the rest of the chromosome. Low-copy number plasmids rely on specialized partitioning systems, which in some cases use a mechanism that show striking similarity to eukaryotic DNA segregation. Overall, there have been multiple systems implicated in the dynamic transport of DNA cargo to a new cellular position during the cell cycle but most seem to share a common initial DNA partitioning step, involving the formation of a nucleoprotein complex called the segrosome. The particular features and complex topologies of individual segrosomes depend on both the nature of the DNA binding protein involved and on the recognized centromeric DNA sequence, both of which vary across systems. The combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, with structural biology has significantly furthered our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA trafficking in bacteria. Here, I discuss recent advances and the molecular details of the DNA segregation machinery, focusing on the formation of the segrosome complex. PMID:27668216

  15. Segrosome Complex Formation during DNA Trafficking in Bacterial Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, María A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial extrachromosomal DNAs often contribute to virulence in pathogenic organisms or facilitate adaptation to particular environments. The transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next requires sufficient partitioning of DNA molecules to ensure that at least one copy reaches each side of the division plane and is inherited by the daughter cells. Segregation of the bacterial chromosome occurs during or after replication and probably involves a strategy in which several protein complexes participate to modify the folding pattern and distribution first of the origin domain and then of the rest of the chromosome. Low-copy number plasmids rely on specialized partitioning systems, which in some cases use a mechanism that show striking similarity to eukaryotic DNA segregation. Overall, there have been multiple systems implicated in the dynamic transport of DNA cargo to a new cellular position during the cell cycle but most seem to share a common initial DNA partitioning step, involving the formation of a nucleoprotein complex called the segrosome. The particular features and complex topologies of individual segrosomes depend on both the nature of the DNA binding protein involved and on the recognized centromeric DNA sequence, both of which vary across systems. The combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, with structural biology has significantly furthered our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA trafficking in bacteria. Here, I discuss recent advances and the molecular details of the DNA segregation machinery, focusing on the formation of the segrosome complex.

  16. Segrosome Complex Formation during DNA Trafficking in Bacterial Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Oliva, María A

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial extrachromosomal DNAs often contribute to virulence in pathogenic organisms or facilitate adaptation to particular environments. The transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next requires sufficient partitioning of DNA molecules to ensure that at least one copy reaches each side of the division plane and is inherited by the daughter cells. Segregation of the bacterial chromosome occurs during or after replication and probably involves a strategy in which several protein complexes participate to modify the folding pattern and distribution first of the origin domain and then of the rest of the chromosome. Low-copy number plasmids rely on specialized partitioning systems, which in some cases use a mechanism that show striking similarity to eukaryotic DNA segregation. Overall, there have been multiple systems implicated in the dynamic transport of DNA cargo to a new cellular position during the cell cycle but most seem to share a common initial DNA partitioning step, involving the formation of a nucleoprotein complex called the segrosome. The particular features and complex topologies of individual segrosomes depend on both the nature of the DNA binding protein involved and on the recognized centromeric DNA sequence, both of which vary across systems. The combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, with structural biology has significantly furthered our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA trafficking in bacteria. Here, I discuss recent advances and the molecular details of the DNA segregation machinery, focusing on the formation of the segrosome complex. PMID:27668216

  17. Bacterial Standing Stock, Activity, and Carbon Production during Formation and Growth of Sea Ice in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica †

    PubMed Central

    Grossmann, Sönnke; Dieckmann, Gerhard S.

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial response to formation and growth of sea ice was investigated during autumn in the northeastern Weddell Sea. Changes in standing stock, activity, and carbon production of bacteria were determined in successive stages of ice development. During initial ice formation, concentrations of bacterial cells, in the order of 1 × 108 to 3 × 108 liter-1, were not enhanced within the ice matrix. This suggests that physical enrichment of bacteria by ice crystals is not effective. Due to low concentrations of phytoplankton in the water column during freezing, incorporation of bacteria into newly formed ice via attachment to algal cells or aggregates was not recorded in this study. As soon as the ice had formed, the general metabolic activity of bacterial populations was strongly suppressed. Furthermore, the ratio of [3H]leucine incorporation into proteins to [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA changed during ice growth. In thick pack ice, bacterial activity recovered and growth rates up to 0.6 day-1 indicated actively dividing populations. However, biomass-specific utilization of organic compounds remained lower than in open water. Bacterial concentrations of up to 2.8 × 109 cells liter-1 along with considerably enlarged cell volumes accumulated within thick pack ice, suggesting reduced mortality rates of bacteria within the small brine pores. In the course of ice development, bacterial carbon production increased from about 0.01 to 0.4 μg of C liter-1 h-1. In thick ice, bacterial secondary production exceeded primary production of microalgae. PMID:16349347

  18. Sample storage for soil enzyme activity and bacterial community profiles.

    PubMed

    Wallenius, K; Rita, H; Simpanen, S; Mikkonen, A; Niemi, R M

    2010-04-01

    Storage of samples is often an unavoidable step in environmental data collection, since available analytical capacity seldom permits immediate processing of large sample sets needed for representative data. In microbiological soil studies, sample pretreatments may have a strong influence on measurement results, and thus careful consideration is required in the selection of storage conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the suitability of prolonged (up to 16 weeks) frozen or air-dried storage for divergent soil materials. The samples selected to this study were mineral soil (clay loam) from an agricultural field, humus from a pine forest and compost from a municipal sewage sludge composting field. The measured microbiological parameters included functional profiling with ten different hydrolysing enzyme activities determined by artificial fluorogenic substrates, and structural profiling with bacterial 16S rDNA community fingerprints by amplicon length heterogeneity analysis (LH-PCR). Storage of samples affected the observed fluorescence intensity of the enzyme assay's fluorophor standards dissolved in soil suspension. The impact was highly dependent on the soil matrix and storage method, making it important to use separate standardisation for each combination of matrix type, storage method and time. Freezing proved to be a better storage method than air-drying for all the matrices and enzyme activities studied. The effect of freezing on the enzyme activities was small (<20%) in clay loam and forest humus and moderate (generally 20-30%) in compost. The most dramatic decreases (>50%) in activity were observed in compost after air-drying. The bacterial LH-PCR community fingerprints were unaffected by frozen storage in all matrices. The effect of storage treatments was tested using a new statistical method based on showing similarity rather than difference of results.

  19. Fate of deposited cells in an aerobic binary bacterial biofilm

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    A biofilm is a matrix of microbial cells and their extracellular products that is associated with a solid surface. Previous studies on biofilm development have employed only dissolved compounds as growth limiting substrates, without the influence of microbial species invading from the bulk liquid. The goal of this research project was to quantify the kinetics of processes governing suspended biomass turnover in biofilm systems, and the accompanying effects of suspended cell deposition on biofilm population dynamics. Experiments were conducted with two species of bacteria, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 11172 grown on glucose, and Hyphomicrobium ZV620 grown on methanol. Cryptic growth and particulate hydrolysis studies were evaluated, using combinations of these two bacteria, by measuring the uptake of radiolabelled cell lysis products, under batch conditions. Biofilms studies were performed to investigate bacterial deposition, continual biofilm removal by shear induced erosion, and biofilm ecology. Biofilms were developed in a flow cell reactor, under laminar flow conditions. Bacterial species were differentiated by radioactively labelling each species with their carbon substrate. A mathematical model was developed to predict the biofilm ecology of mixed cultures. The equations developed predict biofilm accumulation, as well as substrate and oxygen consumption. Results indicate that cryptic growth will occur for bacteria growing on their own species soluble lysis products and in some cases, bacteria growing on the soluble lysis products of other species. Particulate hydrolysis only occurred for Pseudomonas putida growing on Pseudomonas putida lysis products, but the lack of particulate hydrolysis occurring in the other studies may have been due to the short experimental period.

  20. Modeling bacterial population growth from stochastic single-cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Antonio A; Molina, Ignacio; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos

    2014-09-01

    A few bacterial cells may be sufficient to produce a food-borne illness outbreak, provided that they are capable of adapting and proliferating on a food matrix. This is why any quantitative health risk assessment policy must incorporate methods to accurately predict the growth of bacterial populations from a small number of pathogens. In this aim, mathematical models have become a powerful tool. Unfortunately, at low cell concentrations, standard deterministic models fail to predict the fate of the population, essentially because the heterogeneity between individuals becomes relevant. In this work, a stochastic differential equation (SDE) model is proposed to describe variability within single-cell growth and division and to simulate population growth from a given initial number of individuals. We provide evidence of the model ability to explain the observed distributions of times to division, including the lag time produced by the adaptation to the environment, by comparing model predictions with experiments from the literature for Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua, and Salmonella enterica. The model is shown to accurately predict experimental growth population dynamics for both small and large microbial populations. The use of stochastic models for the estimation of parameters to successfully fit experimental data is a particularly challenging problem. For instance, if Monte Carlo methods are employed to model the required distributions of times to division, the parameter estimation problem can become numerically intractable. We overcame this limitation by converting the stochastic description to a partial differential equation (backward Kolmogorov) instead, which relates to the distribution of division times. Contrary to previous stochastic formulations based on random parameters, the present model is capable of explaining the variability observed in populations that result from the growth of a small number of initial cells as well as the lack of it compared to

  1. Invasion of human cells by a bacterial pathogen.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Andrew M; Massey, Ruth C

    2011-03-21

    Here we will describe how we study the invasion of human endothelial cells by bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus . The general protocol can be applied to the study of cell invasion by virtually any culturable bacterium. The stages at which specific aspects of invasion can be studied, such as the role of actin rearrangement or caveolae, will be highlighted. Host cells are grown in flasks and when ready for use are seeded into 24-well plates containing Thermanox coverslips. Using coverslips allows subsequent removal of the cells from the wells to reduce interference from serum proteins deposited onto the sides of the wells (to which S. aureus would attach). Bacteria are grown to the required density and washed to remove any secreted proteins (e.g. toxins). Coverslips with confluent layers of endothelial cells are transferred to new 24-well plates containing fresh culture medium before the addition of bacteria. Bacteria and cells are then incubated together for the required amount of time in 5% CO(2) at 37°C. For S. aureus this is typically between 15-90 minutes. Thermanox coverslips are removed from each well and dip-washed in PBS to remove unattached bacteria. If total associated bacteria (adherent and internalised) are to be quantified, coverslips are then placed in a fresh well containing 0.5% Triton X-100 in PBS. Gentle pipetting leads to complete cell lysis and bacteria are enumerated by serial dilution and plating onto agar. If the number of bacteria that have invaded the cells is needed, coverslips are added to wells containing 500 μl tissue culture medium supplemented with gentamicin and incubation continued for 1 h, which will kill all external bacteria. Coverslips can then be washed, cells lysed and bacteria enumerated by plating onto agar as described above. If the experiment requires direct visualisation, coverslips can be fixed and stained for light, fluorescence or confocal microscopy or prepared for electron microscopy.

  2. Electrochemical gating of tricarboxylic acid cycle in electricity-producing bacterial cells of Shewanella.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shoichi; Liu, Huan; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakanishi, Shuji

    2013-01-01

    Energy-conversion systems mediated by bacterial metabolism have recently attracted much attention, and therefore, demands for tuning of bacterial metabolism are increasing. It is widely recognized that intracellular redox atmosphere which is generally tuned by dissolved oxygen concentration or by appropriate selection of an electron acceptor for respiration is one of the important factors determining the bacterial metabolism. In general, electrochemical approaches are valuable for regulation of redox-active objects. However, the intracellular redox conditions are extremely difficult to control electrochemically because of the presence of insulative phospholipid bilayer membranes. In the present work, the limitation can be overcome by use of the bacterial genus Shewanella, which consists of species that are able to respire via cytochromes abundantly expressed in their outer-membrane with solid-state electron acceptors, including anodes. The electrochemical characterization and the gene expression analysis revealed that the activity of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in Shewanella cells can be reversibly gated simply by changing the anode potential. Importantly, our present results for Shewanella cells cultured in an electrochemical system under poised potential conditions showed the opposite relationship between the current and electron acceptor energy level, and indicate that this unique behavior originates from deactivation of the TCA cycle in the (over-)oxidative region. Our result obtained in this study is the first demonstration of the electrochemical gating of TCA cycle of living cells. And we believe that our findings will contribute to a deeper understanding of redox-dependent regulation systems in living cells, in which the intracellular redox atmosphere is a critical factor determining the regulation of various metabolic and genetic processes.

  3. Detection of ureolytic activity of bacterial strains isolated from entomopathogenic nematodes using infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lechowicz, Lukasz; Chrapek, Magdalena; Czerwonka, Grzegorz; Korzeniowska-Kowal, Agnieszka; Tobiasz, Anna; Urbaniak, Mariusz; Matuska-Lyzwa, Joanna; Kaca, Wieslaw

    2016-08-01

    The pathogenicity of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) depends directly on the presence of bacteria in the nematode digestive tracts. Based on 16S rRNA and MALDI-TOF analyses 20 isolated bacteria were assigned to 10 species with 10 isolates classified as Pseudomonas ssp. Six strains (30%) show ureolytic activity on Christensen medium. Spectroscopic analysis of the strains showed that the ureolytic activity is strongly correlated with the following wavenumbers: 935 cm(-1) in window W4, which carries information about the bacterial cell wall construction and 1158 cm(-1) in window W3 which corresponds to proteins in bacterial cell. A logistic regression model designed on the basis of the selected wavenumbers differentiates ureolytic from non-ureolytic bacterial strains with an accuracy of 100%. Spectroscopic studies and mathematical analyses made it possible to differentiate EPN-associated Pseudomonas sp. strains from clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. These results suggest, that infrared spectra of EPN-associated Pseudomonas sp. strains may reflect its adaptation to the host. PMID:26972384

  4. Antibacterial activity of human natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro effects of human NK cells on viability of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria was investigated. PBLs depleted of glass- adherent cells showed a significant antibacterial activity that was increased as the concentration of NK cells became higher. Leu-11- enriched cells exhibited the most efficient bactericidal activity. Stimulation of NK cells with staphylococcal enterotoxin B for 16 h produced a significant increase in the antibacterial activity of all NK cells tested. The antibacterial activity of monocyte-depleted cells and Leu-11-enriched cells was also enhanced after culturing in vitro for 16- 24 h without exogenous cytokines. Dependence of the antibacterial activity on the presence of serum in the culture medium was not found. Ultrastructural studies revealed close contact between NK cell membranes and bacteria, no evidence of phagocytosis, and extracellular bacterial ghosts, after incubation at 37 degrees C. Supernatants from purified NK cells exhibited potent bactericidal activity with kinetics and target specificity similar to that of effector cells. These results document the potent antibacterial activity of purified NK cells and suggest an extracellular mechanism of killing. PMID:2642532

  5. Circular Dichroism studies on the interactions of antimicrobial peptides with bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avitabile, Concetta; D'Andrea, Luca Domenico; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2014-03-01

    Studying how antimicrobial peptides interact with bacterial cells is pivotal to understand their mechanism of action. In this paper we explored the use of Circular Dichroism to detect the secondary structure of two antimicrobial peptides, magainin 2 and cecropin A, with E. coli bacterial cells. The results of our studies allow us to gain two important information in the context of antimicrobial peptides- bacterial cells interactions: peptides fold mainly due to interaction with LPS, which is the main component of the Gram negative bacteria outer membrane and the time required for the folding on the bacterial cells depends on the peptide analyzed.

  6. Bacterial Folates Provide an Exogenous Signal for C. elegans Germline Stem Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Snehal N; Mukherjee, Madhumati; Vagasi, Alexandra S; Bi, Gaofeng; Rahman, Mohammad M; Nguyen, Christine Q; Paul, Ligi; Selhub, Jacob; Kipreos, Edward T

    2016-07-11

    Here we describe an in vitro primary culture system for Caenorhabditis elegans germline stem cells. This culture system was used to identify a bacterial folate as a positive regulator of germ cell proliferation. Folates are a family of B-complex vitamins that function in one-carbon metabolism to allow the de novo synthesis of amino acids and nucleosides. We show that germ cell proliferation is stimulated by the folate 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate-Glun both in vitro and in animals. Other folates that can act as vitamins to rescue folate deficiency lack this germ cell stimulatory activity. The bacterial folate precursor dihydropteroate also promotes germ cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, despite its inability to promote one-carbon metabolism. The folate receptor homolog FOLR-1 is required for the stimulation of germ cells by 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate-Glun and dihydropteroate. This work defines a folate and folate-related compound as exogenous signals to modulate germ cell proliferation. PMID:27404357

  7. Bacterial Folates Provide an Exogenous Signal for C. elegans Germline Stem Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Snehal N; Mukherjee, Madhumati; Vagasi, Alexandra S; Bi, Gaofeng; Rahman, Mohammad M; Nguyen, Christine Q; Paul, Ligi; Selhub, Jacob; Kipreos, Edward T

    2016-07-11

    Here we describe an in vitro primary culture system for Caenorhabditis elegans germline stem cells. This culture system was used to identify a bacterial folate as a positive regulator of germ cell proliferation. Folates are a family of B-complex vitamins that function in one-carbon metabolism to allow the de novo synthesis of amino acids and nucleosides. We show that germ cell proliferation is stimulated by the folate 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate-Glun both in vitro and in animals. Other folates that can act as vitamins to rescue folate deficiency lack this germ cell stimulatory activity. The bacterial folate precursor dihydropteroate also promotes germ cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, despite its inability to promote one-carbon metabolism. The folate receptor homolog FOLR-1 is required for the stimulation of germ cells by 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate-Glun and dihydropteroate. This work defines a folate and folate-related compound as exogenous signals to modulate germ cell proliferation.

  8. Bacterial lifestyle shapes the regulation of stringent response activation

    PubMed Central

    Boutte, Cara C.; Crosson, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria inhabit enormously diverse niches and have a correspondingly large array of regulatory mechanisms to adapt to often inhospitable and variable environments. The stringent response allows bacteria to quickly reprogram transcription in response to changes in nutrient availability. Although the proteins controlling this response are conserved in almost all bacterial species, recent work has illuminated considerable diversity in the starvation cues and regulatory mechanisms that activate stringent signaling proteins in bacteria from different environments. In this review we describe the signals and genetic circuitries that control the stringent signaling systems of a copiotroph, a bacteriovore, an oligotroph and a mammalian pathogen – Escherichia coli, Myxococcus xanthus, Caulobacter crescentus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, respectively – and discuss how control of the stringent response in these species is adapted to their particular lifestyles. PMID:23419217

  9. Substrate Trafficking And Dioxygen Activation in Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenases

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, L.J.; Lippard, S.J.

    2009-06-03

    Non-heme carboxylate-bridged diiron centers in the hydroxylase components of the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases process four substrates during catalysis: electrons, protons, dioxygen, and hydrocarbons. Understanding how protein-protein interactions mediate the transport of these substrates to the diiron center to achieve the selective oxidation of the hydrocarbon is a significant challenge. In this Account, we summarize our current knowledge of these processes with a focus on the methane monooxygenase system. We also describe recent results for the toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase and phenol hydroxylase systems from Pseudomonas sporium OX1. The observation in these latter systems of a diiron(III) oxygenated intermediate having different Moessbauer parameters from analogous species in other carboxylate-bridged diiron proteins is discussed. The results indicate that the ability of the protein framework to tune the reactivity of the diiron center at structurally similar active sites is substantially more complex than previously recognized.

  10. Activity and bacterial diversity of snow around Russian Antarctic stations.

    PubMed

    Lopatina, Anna; Krylenkov, Vjacheslav; Severinov, Konstantin

    2013-11-01

    The diversity and temporal dynamics of bacterial communities in pristine snow around two Russian Antarctic stations was investigated. Taxonomic analysis of rDNA libraries revealed that snow communities were dominated by bacteria from a small number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that underwent dramatic swings in abundance between the 54th (2008-2009) and 55th (2009-2010) Russian Antarctic expeditions. Moreover, analysis of the 55th expedition samples indicated that there was very little, if any, correspondence in abundance of clones belonging to the same OTU present in rDNA and rRNA libraries. The latter result suggests that most rDNA clones originate from bacteria that are not alive and/or active and may have been deposited on the snow surface from the atmosphere. In contrast, clones most abundant in rRNA libraries (mostly belonging to Variovorax, Janthinobacterium, Pseudomonas, and Sphingomonas genera) may be considered as endogenous Antarctic snow inhabitants.

  11. Nutrient regulation of bacterial production and ectoenzyme activities in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donachie, Stuart P.; Christian, James R.; Karl, David M.

    Interactions between Bacteria and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the open ocean are poorly understood. While it is likely that particular compounds may disproportionately regulate heterotrophic activity, very little is known about the underlying processes. Through 10 cruises between December 1996 and April 1998 we investigated how heterotrophic (non-pigmented) Bacteria cell production, per cell α- and β-glucosidase and leucine aminopeptidase (LAPase) activities, and 14C-glucose uptake in 0.8 μm filtered seawater (fsw) cultures at Station ALOHA (22°45'N, 158°W) responded to organic and inorganic nutrient additions (glucose, single amino acids, NH 4+, NO 3-). Bacterial cell production did not change significantly in fsw with glucose (1 μM) or single exogenous N sources (1 μM N) compared to that in fsw alone. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in heterotrophic bacterial cell production in fsw amended with organic or inorganic N, nor between that in fsw with organic N and glucose, or inorganic N and glucose. Cell production did increase significantly, however, in fsw with exogenous glucose (0.38 μM) plus 1 μM inorganic N (NH 4+) relative to that in fsw only, in fsw with glucose, and in fsw with 1 μM N as amino acids (His, Tyr, Leu). There was no significant difference between heterotrophic bacterial cell production in fsw with glucose, glucose plus amino acids, and that in fsw alone. Cell-specific LAPase activity increased significantly relative to that in unamended fsw when exogenous glucose plus NH 4+ or NO 3- were provided, but amino acids, glucose, NH 4+ or NO 3- alone had little or no effect. α-Glucosidase activity tended to increase with exogenous His and Tyr additions. Our results suggest that heterotrophic activity at Station ALOHA can be regulated by the abundance of particular compounds, regardless of their total concentrations. It appears that auxotrophy and de novo synthesis of cell protein from glucose may coexist among Bacteria

  12. CAP-D3 Promotes Bacterial Clearance in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Repressing Expression of Amino Acid Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Jacqueline R.; Nickerson, Kourtney P.; Deutschman, Emily; Kim, Yeojung; West, Gail; Sadler, Tammy; Stylianou, Eleni; Krokowski, Dawid; Hatzoglou, Maria; de la Motte, Carol; Rubin, Brian P.; Fiocchi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Defects in colonic epithelial barrier defenses are associated with ulcerative colitis (UC). The proteins that regulate bacterial clearance in the colonic epithelium have not been completely identified. The chromosome-associated protein D3 (dCAP-D3), regulates responses to bacterial infection. We examined whether CAP-D3 promotes bacterial clearance in human colonic epithelium. METHODS Clearance of Salmonella or adherent-invasive Escherichia coli LF82 was assessed by gentamycin protection assays in HT-29 and Caco-2 cells expressing small hairpin RNAs against CAP-D3. We used immunoblot assays to measure levels of CAP-D3 in colonic epithelial cells from patients with UC and healthy individuals (controls). RNA sequencing identified genes activated by CAP-D3. We analyzed the roles of CAP-D3 target genes in bacterial clearance using gentamycin protection and immunofluorescence assays and studies with pharmacologic inhibitors. RESULTS CAP-D3 expression was reduced in colonic epithelial cells from patients with active UC. Reduced CAP-D3 expression decreased autophagy and impaired intracellular bacterial clearance by HT-29 and Caco-2 colonic epithelial cells. Lower levels of CAP-D3 increased transcription of genes encoding SLC7A5 and SLC3A2, whose products heterodimerize to form an amino acid transporter in HT-29 cells following bacterial infection; levels of SLC7A5–SLC3A2 were increased in tissues from patients with UC, compared with controls. Reduced CAP-D3 in HT-29 cells resulted in earlier recruitment of SLC7A5 to Salmonella-containing vacuoles, increased activity of mTORC1, and increased survival of bacteria. Inhibition of SLC7A5–SLC3A2 or mTORC1 activity rescued the bacterial clearance defects of CAP-D3– deficient cells. CONCLUSIONS CAP-D3 downregulates transcription of genes that encode amino acid transporters (SLC7A5 and SLC3A2) to promote bacterial autophagy by colon epithelial cells. Levels of CAP-D3 protein are reduced in patients with

  13. Explosive cell lysis as a mechanism for the biogenesis of bacterial membrane vesicles and biofilms.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Lynne; Toyofuku, Masanori; Hynen, Amelia L; Kurosawa, Masaharu; Pessi, Gabriella; Petty, Nicola K; Osvath, Sarah R; Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Gloag, Erin S; Shimoni, Raz; Omasits, Ulrich; Ito, Satoshi; Yap, Xinhui; Monahan, Leigh G; Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ahrens, Christian H; Charles, Ian G; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Eberl, Leo; Whitchurch, Cynthia B

    2016-01-01

    Many bacteria produce extracellular and surface-associated components such as membrane vesicles (MVs), extracellular DNA and moonlighting cytosolic proteins for which the biogenesis and export pathways are not fully understood. Here we show that the explosive cell lysis of a sub-population of cells accounts for the liberation of cytosolic content in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that explosive cell lysis also produces shattered membrane fragments that rapidly form MVs. A prophage endolysin encoded within the R- and F-pyocin gene cluster is essential for explosive cell lysis. Endolysin-deficient mutants are defective in MV production and biofilm development, consistent with a crucial role in the biogenesis of MVs and liberation of extracellular DNA and other biofilm matrix components. Our findings reveal that explosive cell lysis, mediated through the activity of a cryptic prophage endolysin, acts as a mechanism for the production of bacterial MVs. PMID:27075392

  14. Explosive cell lysis as a mechanism for the biogenesis of bacterial membrane vesicles and biofilms.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Lynne; Toyofuku, Masanori; Hynen, Amelia L; Kurosawa, Masaharu; Pessi, Gabriella; Petty, Nicola K; Osvath, Sarah R; Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Gloag, Erin S; Shimoni, Raz; Omasits, Ulrich; Ito, Satoshi; Yap, Xinhui; Monahan, Leigh G; Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ahrens, Christian H; Charles, Ian G; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Eberl, Leo; Whitchurch, Cynthia B

    2016-04-14

    Many bacteria produce extracellular and surface-associated components such as membrane vesicles (MVs), extracellular DNA and moonlighting cytosolic proteins for which the biogenesis and export pathways are not fully understood. Here we show that the explosive cell lysis of a sub-population of cells accounts for the liberation of cytosolic content in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that explosive cell lysis also produces shattered membrane fragments that rapidly form MVs. A prophage endolysin encoded within the R- and F-pyocin gene cluster is essential for explosive cell lysis. Endolysin-deficient mutants are defective in MV production and biofilm development, consistent with a crucial role in the biogenesis of MVs and liberation of extracellular DNA and other biofilm matrix components. Our findings reveal that explosive cell lysis, mediated through the activity of a cryptic prophage endolysin, acts as a mechanism for the production of bacterial MVs.

  15. Explosive cell lysis as a mechanism for the biogenesis of bacterial membrane vesicles and biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Lynne; Toyofuku, Masanori; Hynen, Amelia L.; Kurosawa, Masaharu; Pessi, Gabriella; Petty, Nicola K.; Osvath, Sarah R.; Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Gloag, Erin S.; Shimoni, Raz; Omasits, Ulrich; Ito, Satoshi; Yap, Xinhui; Monahan, Leigh G.; Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ahrens, Christian H.; Charles, Ian G.; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Eberl, Leo; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.

    2016-01-01

    Many bacteria produce extracellular and surface-associated components such as membrane vesicles (MVs), extracellular DNA and moonlighting cytosolic proteins for which the biogenesis and export pathways are not fully understood. Here we show that the explosive cell lysis of a sub-population of cells accounts for the liberation of cytosolic content in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that explosive cell lysis also produces shattered membrane fragments that rapidly form MVs. A prophage endolysin encoded within the R- and F-pyocin gene cluster is essential for explosive cell lysis. Endolysin-deficient mutants are defective in MV production and biofilm development, consistent with a crucial role in the biogenesis of MVs and liberation of extracellular DNA and other biofilm matrix components. Our findings reveal that explosive cell lysis, mediated through the activity of a cryptic prophage endolysin, acts as a mechanism for the production of bacterial MVs. PMID:27075392

  16. Interaction of Enteric Bacterial Pathogens with Murine Embryonic Stem Cells ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun; Rossi, Raffaella; Hale, Christine; Goulding, David; Dougan, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are susceptible to genetic manipulation and retain the potential to differentiate into diverse cell types, which are factors that make them potentially attractive cells for studying host-pathogen interactions. Murine ES cells were found to be susceptible to invasion by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Shigella flexneri and to the formation of attaching and effacing lesions by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. flexneri cell entry was dependent on the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 and Shigella mxi/spa type III secretion systems, respectively. Microscopy studies indicated that both S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. flexneri were located in intracellular niches in ES cells that were similar to the niches occupied in differentiated cells. ES cells were eventually killed following bacterial invasion, but no evidence of activation of classical caspase-associated apoptotic or innate immune pathways was found. To demonstrate the potential of mutant ES cells, we employed an ES cell line defective in cholesterol synthesis and found that the mutant cells were less susceptible to infection by Salmonella and Shigella than the parental ES cells. Thus, we highlighted the practical use of genetically modified ES cells for studying microbe-host interactions. PMID:19029302

  17. mTORC1-Activated Monocytes Increase Tregs and Inhibit the Immune Response to Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Huaijun; Guo, Wei; Wang, Shixuan; Xue, Ting; Yang, Fei; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yazhi; Wan, Qian; Shi, Zhexin; Zhan, Xulong

    2016-01-01

    The TSC1/2 heterodimer, a key upstream regulator of the mTOR, can inhibit the activation of mTOR, which plays a critical role in immune responses after bacterial infections. Monocytes are an innate immune cell type that have been shown to be involved in bacteremia. However, how the mTOR pathway is involved in the regulation of monocytes is largely unknown. In our study, TSC1 KO mice and WT mice were infected with E. coli. When compared to WT mice, we found higher mortality, greater numbers of bacteria, decreased expression of coactivators in monocytes, increased numbers of Tregs, and decreased numbers of effector T cells in TSC1 KO mice. Monocytes obtained from TSC1 KO mice produced more ROS, IL-6, IL-10, and TGF-β and less IL-1, IFN-γ, and TNF-α. Taken together, our results suggest that the inhibited immune functioning in TSC1 KO mice is influenced by mTORC1 activation in monocytes. The reduced expression of coactivators resulted in inhibited effector T cell proliferation. mTORC1-activated monocytes are harmful during bacterial infections. Therefore, inhibiting mTORC1 signaling through rapamycin administration could rescue the harmful aspects of an overactive immune response, and this knowledge provides a new direction for clinical therapy. PMID:27746591

  18. Lipid biomarkers and bacterial lipase activities as indicators of organic matter and bacterial dynamics in contrasted regimes at the DYFAMED site, NW Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourguet, Nicolas; Goutx, Madeleine; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Pujo-Pay, Mireille; Mével, Geneviève; Momzikoff, André; Mousseau, Laure; Guigue, Catherine; Garcia, Nicole; Raimbault, Patrick; Pete, Romain; Oriol, Louise; Lefèvre, Dominique

    2009-08-01

    This study investigated the relationships between dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition and bacterial dynamics on short time scale during spring mesotrophic (March 2003) and summer oligotrophic (June 2003) regimes, in a 0-500 m depth water column with almost no advection, at the DYFAMED site, NW Mediterranean. DOM was characterized by analyzing dissolved organic carbon (DOC), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and lipid class biotracers. Bacterial dynamic was assessed through the measurement of in situ bacterial lipase activity, abundance, production and bacterial community structure. We made the assumption that by coupling the ambient concentration of hydrolysable acyl-lipids with the measurement of their in situ bacterial hydrolysis rates (i.e. the free fatty acids release rate) would provide new insights about bacterial response to change in environmental conditions. The seasonal transition from spring to summer was accompanied by a significant accumulation of excess DOC (+5 μM) (ANOVA, p<0.05, n=8) in the upper layer (0-50 m). In this layer, the free fatty acids release rate to the bacterial carbon demand (BCD) ratio increased from 0.6±0.3 in March to 1.3±1.0 in June (ANOVA, p<0.05, n=8) showing that more uncoupling between the hydrolysis of the acyl-lipids and the BCD occurred during the evolution of the season, and that free fatty acids contributed to the excess DOC. The increase of lipolysis index and CDOM absorbance (from 0.24±0.17 to 0.39±0.13 and from 0.076±0.039 to 0.144±0.068; ANOVA, p<0.05, n=8, respectively), and the higher contribution of triglycerides, wax esters and phospholipids (from <5% to 12-31%) to the lipid pool reflected the change in the DOM quality. In addition to a strong increase of bacterial lipase activity per cell (51.4±29.4-418.3±290.6 Ag C cell -1 h -1), a significant percentage of ribotypes (39%) was different between spring and summer in the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) layer in particular, suggesting a shift

  19. Identification of Active Bacterial Communities in Drinking Water Using 16S rRNA-Based Sequence Analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA-based methods have considerably increased our understanding of the bacterial diversity of water distribution systems (WDS). However, as DNA may persist after cell death, the use of DNA-based methods cannot be used to describe metabolically-active microbes. In contrast, intra...

  20. Infection by bacterial pathogens expressing type III secretion decreases luciferase activity: ramifications for reporter gene studies.

    PubMed

    Savkovic, S D; Koutsouris, A; Wu, G; Hecht, G

    2000-09-01

    Pathogenic microbes influence gene regulation in eukaryotic hosts. Reporter gene studies can define the roles of promoter regulatory sequences. The effect of pathogenic bacteria on reporter genes has not been examined. The aim of this study was to identify which reporter genes are reliable in studies concerning host gene regulation by bacterial pathogens expressing type III secretory systems. Human intestinal epithelial cells, T84, Caco-2 and HT-29, were transfected with plasmids containing luciferase (luc), chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) or beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) as reporter genes driven by the inducible interleukin-8 (IL-8) or constitutively active simian virus 40 (SV40) promoter. Cells were infected with enteropathogenic E. coli or Salmonella typhimurium, and the reporter activity was assessed. Luc activity significantly decreased following infection, regardless of the promoter. The activity of recombinant luc was nearly ablated by incubation with either EPEC or Salmonella in a cell-free system. Activity was partially preserved by protease inhibitors, and immunoblot analysis showed a decreased amount and molecular weight of recombinant luc, suggesting protein degradation. Neither beta-gal nor CAT activity was altered by infection. Disruption of type III secretion prevented the loss of luc activity. We conclude that CAT or beta-gal, but not luc, can be used as reliable reporter genes to assess the impact of pathogenic microbes, especially those expressing type III secretion on host cell gene regulation.

  1. Bacterial toxin modulation of the eukaryotic cell cycle: are all cytolethal distending toxins created equally?

    PubMed Central

    Gargi, Amandeep; Reno, Michael; Blanke, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    The cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs) comprise a family of intracellular-acting bacterial protein toxins whose actions upon eukaryotic cells result in several consequences, the most characteristic of which is the induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest. Most CDTs are hetero-tripartite assemblies of CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC, with CdtB required for CDT-mediated cell cycle arrest. Several lines of evidence indicate that CdtA and CdtC are required for the optimal intracellular activity of CdtB, although the exact functional roles of CdtA and CdtC remain poorly understood. The genes encoding the CDTs have been identified in a diverse array of Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. More recently, the genes encoding several CdtB subunits have been associated with alternatively linked subunits resembling the B-subunits of pertussis toxin. Although the CDTs are generally considered to all function as bacterial genotoxins, the extent to which individual members of the CDTs employ similar mechanisms of cell surface binding, uptake, and trafficking within sensitive cells is poorly understood. Recently, data have begun to emerge suggesting differences in the molecular basis by which individual CDTs interact with and enter host cells, suggesting the possibility that CDTs possess properties reflecting the specific niches idiosyncratic to those CDT bacterial pathogens that produce them. The extent to which functional differences between individual CDTs reflect the specific requirements for intoxicating cells and tissues within the diverse range of host microenvironments colonized by CDT-producing pathogenic bacteria remains to be experimentally explored. PMID:23061054

  2. Surface free energy activated high-throughput cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinru; Zhang, Qian; Yan, Tao; Jiang, Zeyi; Zhang, Xinxin; Zuo, Yi Y

    2014-09-16

    Cell sorting is an important screening process in microbiology, biotechnology, and clinical research. Existing methods are mainly based on single-cell analysis as in flow cytometric and microfluidic cell sorters. Here we report a label-free bulk method for sorting cells by differentiating their characteristic surface free energies (SFEs). We demonstrated the feasibility of this method by sorting model binary cell mixtures of various bacterial species, including Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028, and Escherichia coli DH5α. This method can effectively separate 10(10) bacterial cells within 30 min. Individual bacterial species can be sorted with up to 96% efficiency, and the cell viability ratio can be as high as 99%. In addition to its capacity of sorting evenly mixed bacterial cells, we demonstrated the feasibility of this method in selecting and enriching cells of minor populations in the mixture (presenting at only 1% in quantity) to a purity as high as 99%. This SFE-activated method may be used as a stand-alone method for quickly sorting a large quantity of bacterial cells or as a prescreening tool for microbial discrimination. Given its advantages of label-free, high-throughput, low cost, and simplicity, this SFE-activated cell sorting method has potential in various applications of sorting cells and abiotic particles. PMID:25184988

  3. Peripheral T Cell Apoptosis and Its Role in Generalized Bacterial Infections: A Minireview.

    PubMed

    Chernykh, Helen R.; Norkin, Maxim N.; Leplina, Olga Yu.; Khonina, Nataliya A.; Tihonova, Marina A.; Ostanin, Alexander A.

    2001-07-01

    In the present review we have attempted to analyze recent findings concerning apoptosis of mature peripheral T cells. The great attention is made to the factors underlying resistance or sensitivity of mature T lymphocytes to activation-induced cell death. The role of preactivation and altered costimulation is discussed in this regard. Besides, the possible role of cytokines in the modulation of T cell apoptosis is emphasized. Particular attention is paid to the studies of apoptosis disorders in the pathogenesis of generalized bacterial infections. In this connection some own results are summarized as well. To characterize T cell death and its role in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections an anti-CD3-mAb or Con A-induced apoptosis in patients with severe and generalized forms of surgical infections have been investigated. We have found a significant increase of activation-induced lymphocyte apoptosis and a high level of apoptosis in freshly isolated lymphocytes in patients with surgical infections. Alternatively, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from surgical patients without infectious complications did not exhibit a marked enhancement of activation-induced cell death. Activation-induced T cell death in surgical infections appeared to be Fas-dependent, involved reactive oxygen intermediates and was partly prevented by pro-inflammatory cytokines, among which IL-2 exhibited the most pronounced anti-apoptotic activity. Likewise, APACHE II score, as a marker of the infection severity, directly correlated with a rate of activation-induced T cell apoptosis. Accelerated T cell apoptosis at the early stage of infection was revealed in survivors and non-survivors, that appears to designate a common pathway for the restriction of systemic inflammation. At the late stage of infection altered T cell apoptosis could account for different outcomes, since the patients with lethal outcome showed 2-fold increase in activation-induced cell death compared to the opposite group

  4. Control of Bacterial Persister Cells by Trp/Arg-Containing Antimicrobial Peptides▿

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Zhang, Mi; Zhou, Chunhui; Kallenbach, Neville R.; Ren, Dacheng

    2011-01-01

    Persister cells are dormant phenotypic variants inherent in a bacterial population. They play important roles in chronic infections and present great challenges to therapy due to extremely enhanced tolerance to antibiotics compared to that of normal cells of the same genotype. In this study, we report that cationic membrane-penetrating peptides containing various numbers of arginine and tryptophan repeats are effective in killing persister cells of Escherichia coli HM22, a hyper-persister producer. The activities of three linear peptides [(RW)n-NH2, where n is 2, 3, or 4] and a dendrimeric peptide, (RW)4D, in killing bacterial persisters were compared. Although the dendrimeric peptide (RW)4D requires a lower threshold to kill planktonic persisters, octameric peptide (RW)4-NH2 is the most effective against planktonic persister cells at high concentrations. For example, treatment with 80 μM (RW)4-NH2 for 60 min led to a 99.7% reduction in the number of viable persister cells. The viability of persister cells residing in surface-attached biofilms was also significantly reduced by (RW)4-NH2 and (RW)4D. These two peptides were also found to significantly enhance the susceptibility of biofilm cells to ofloxacin. The potency of (RW)4-NH2 was further marked by its ability to disperse and kill preformed biofilms harboring high percentages of persister cells. Interestingly, approximately 70% of the dispersed cells were found to have lost their intrinsic tolerance and become susceptible to ampicillin if not killed directly by this peptide. These results are helpful for better understanding the activities of these peptides and may aid in future development of more effective therapies of chronic infections. PMID:21622798

  5. Cytolethal distending toxin: a conserved bacterial genotoxin that blocks cell cycle progression, leading to apoptosis of a broad range of mammalian cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Jinadasa, Rasika N.; Bloom, Stephen E.; Weiss, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) is a heterotrimeric AB-type genotoxin produced by several clinically important Gram-negative mucocutaneous bacterial pathogens. Irrespective of the bacterial species of origin, CDT causes characteristic and irreversible cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a broad range of cultured mammalian cell lineages. The active subunit CdtB has structural homology with the phosphodiesterase family of enzymes including mammalian DNase I, and alone is necessary and sufficient to account for cellular toxicity. Indeed, mammalian cells treated with CDT initiate a DNA damage response similar to that elicited by ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks resulting in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The mechanism of CDT-induced apoptosis remains incompletely understood, but appears to involve both p53-dependent and -independent pathways. While epithelial, endothelial and fibroblast cell lines respond to CDT by undergoing arrest of cell cycle progression resulting in nuclear and cytoplasmic distension that precedes apoptotic cell death, cells of haematopoietic origin display rapid apoptosis following a brief period of cell cycle arrest. In this review, the ecology of pathogens producing CDT, the molecular biology of bacterial CDT and the molecular mechanisms of CDT-induced cytotoxicity are critically appraised. Understanding the contribution of a broadly conserved bacterial genotoxin that blocks progression of the mammalian cell cycle, ultimately causing cell death, should assist with elucidating disease mechanisms for these important pathogens. PMID:21565933

  6. Cholera toxin B induced activation of murine macrophages exposed to a fixed bacterial immunogen

    PubMed Central

    Wiedinger, Kari; Romlein, Heather; Bitsaktsis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Previous studies have demonstrated that intranasal administration of inactivated (fixed) Francisella tularensis (iFt) live vaccine strain (LVS) in conjunction with the mucosal adjuvant, cholera toxin B (CTB), provides full protection against subsequent lethal challenge with Ft LVS and partial protection against the more virulent Ft SchuS4 strain. Understanding the mechanisms of CTB-induced immune stimulation that confer protection against Ft will be valuable to the development of an effective vaccine against this highly virulent fatal pathogen. In this study, an in vitro system was utilized to further elucidate the immunologic adjuvant effect of CTB when administered with the fixed bacterial immunogen iFt. Methods: The murine macrophage cell line (RAW264.7) was treated with combinations of iFt and CTB. The treated RAW264.7 cells and their supernatants were collected and assessed for cell surface marker expression and cytokine secretion. In addition, the ability of RAW264.7 cells to present bacterial antigens (iFt or LVS) to an Ft-specific T-cell hybridoma cell line, following exposure to CTB, was analyzed. Results: We found that RAW264.7 cells responded to treatment with iFt + CTB by an increased secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α and upregulation of the surface expression of toll-like receptor 4 and the costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86. Furthermore, the experimental vaccine treatment iFt + CTB enhanced the ability of macrophages to present iFt antigens to an FT-specific T-cell hybridoma cell line, although they failed to do so with LVS. Conclusion: The adjuvant CTB administered in conjunction with iFt showed evidence of enhancing an antigen-specific proinflammatory response in vitro. These observations allow us to define, in part, the mechanisms of immune activation conferred by mucosal administration of iFt + CTB against lethal F. tularensis challenge. PMID:26668753

  7. Behind the lines–actions of bacterial type III effector proteins in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Büttner, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenicity of most Gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacteria depends on the type III secretion (T3S) system, which translocates bacterial effector proteins into plant cells. Type III effectors modulate plant cellular pathways to the benefit of the pathogen and promote bacterial multiplication. One major virulence function of type III effectors is the suppression of plant innate immunity, which is triggered upon recognition of pathogen-derived molecular patterns by plant receptor proteins. Type III effectors also interfere with additional plant cellular processes including proteasome-dependent protein degradation, phytohormone signaling, the formation of the cytoskeleton, vesicle transport and gene expression. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular functions of type III effector proteins with known plant target molecules. Furthermore, plant defense strategies for the detection of effector protein activities or effector-triggered alterations in plant targets are discussed. PMID:27526699

  8. Enhancement of bacterial denitrification for nitrate removal in groundwater with electrical stimulation from microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baogang; Liu, Ye; Tong, Shuang; Zheng, Maosheng; Zhao, Yinxin; Tian, Caixing; Liu, Hengyuan; Feng, Chuanping

    2014-12-01

    Electricity generated from the microbial fuel cell (MFC) is applied to the bioelectrical reactor (BER) directly as electrical stimulation means for enhancement of bacterial denitrification to remove nitrate effectively from groundwater. With maximum power density of 502.5 mW m-2 and voltage outputs ranging from 500 mV to 700 mV, the nitrate removal is accelerated, with less intermediates accumulation, compared with control sets without electrical stimulation. Denitrification bacteria proliferations and activities are promoted as its number and Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) concentration increased one order of magnitude (3.5 × 107 in per milliliter biofilm solution) and about 1.5 folds, respectively. Effects of electricity from MFCs on enhancement of bacterial behaviors are demonstrated for the first time. These results indicate that MFCs can be applied in the in-situ bioremediation of nitrate polluted groundwater for efficiency improvement.

  9. Live cell imaging of SOS and prophage dynamics in isogenic bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Helfrich, Stefan; Pfeifer, Eugen; Krämer, Christina; Sachs, Christian Carsten; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Nöh, Katharina; Frunzke, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Almost all bacterial genomes contain DNA of viral origin, including functional prophages or degenerated phage elements. A frequent but often unnoted phenomenon is the spontaneous induction of prophage elements (SPI) even in the absence of an external stimulus. In this study, we have analyzed SPI of the large, degenerated prophage CGP3 (187 kbp), which is integrated into the genome of the Gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of fluorescent reporter strains grown in microfluidic chips revealed the sporadic induction of the SOS response as a prominent trigger of CGP3 SPI but also displayed a considerable fraction (∼30%) of RecA-independent SPI. Whereas approx. 20% of SOS-induced cells recovered from this stress and resumed growth, the spontaneous induction of CGP3 always led to a stop of growth and likely cell death. A carbon source starvation experiment clearly emphasized that SPI only occurs in actively proliferating cells, whereas sporadic SOS induction was still observed in resting cells. These data highlight the impact of sporadic DNA damage on the activity of prophage elements and provide a time-resolved, quantitative description of SPI as general phenomenon of bacterial populations.

  10. Beta-lactam antibiotics induce a lethal malfunctioning of the bacterial cell wall synthesis machinery

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hongbaek; Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Bernhardt, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Penicillin and related beta-lactams comprise one of our oldest and most widely used antibiotic therapies. These drugs have long been known to target enzymes called penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) that build the bacterial cell wall. Investigating the downstream consequences of target inhibition and how they contribute to the lethal action of these important drugs, we demonstrate that beta-lactams do more than just inhibit the PBPs as is commonly believed. Rather, they induce a toxic malfunctioning of their target biosynthetic machinery involving a futile cycle of cell wall synthesis and degradation, thereby depleting cellular resources and bolstering their killing activity. Characterization of this mode of action additionally revealed a quality-control function for enzymes that cleave bonds in the cell wall matrix. The results thus provide insight into the mechanism of cell wall assembly and suggest how best to interfere with the process for future antibiotic development. PMID:25480295

  11. BT-benzo-29 inhibits bacterial cell proliferation by perturbing FtsZ assembly.

    PubMed

    Ray, Shashikant; Jindal, Bhavya; Kunal, Kishore; Surolia, Avadhesha; Panda, Dulal

    2015-10-01

    We have identified a potent antibacterial agent N-(4-sec-butylphenyl)-2-(thiophen-2-yl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazole-4-carboxamide (BT-benzo-29) from a library of benzimidazole derivatives that stalled bacterial division by inhibiting FtsZ assembly. A short (5 min) exposure of BT-benzo-29 disassembled the cytokinetic Z-ring in Bacillus subtilis cells without affecting the cell length and nucleoids. BT-benzo-29 also perturbed the localization of early and late division proteins such as FtsA, ZapA and SepF at the mid-cell. Further, BT-benzo-29 bound to FtsZ with a dissociation constant of 24 ± 3 μm and inhibited the assembly and GTPase activity of purified FtsZ. A docking analysis suggested that BT-benzo-29 may bind to FtsZ at the C-terminal domain near the T7 loop. BT-benzo-29 displayed significantly weaker inhibitory effects on the assembly and GTPase activity of two mutants (L272A and V275A) of FtsZ supporting the prediction of the docking analysis. Further, BT-benzo-29 did not appear to inhibit DNA duplication and nucleoid segregation and it did not perturb the membrane potential of B. subtilis cells. The results suggested that BT-benzo-29 exerts its potent antibacterial activity by inhibiting FtsZ assembly. Interestingly, BT-benzo-29 did not affect the membrane integrity of mammalian red blood cells. BT-benzo-29 bound to tubulin with a much weaker affinity than FtsZ and exerted significantly weaker effects on mammalian cells than on the bacterial cells indicating that the compound may have a strong antibacterial potential.

  12. Bacterial Cyclic AMP-Phosphodiesterase Activity Coordinates Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kalivoda, Eric J.; Brothers, Kimberly M.; Stella, Nicholas A.; Schmitt, Matthew J.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm-related infections are a major contributor to human disease, and the capacity for surface attachment and biofilm formation are key attributes for the pathogenesis of microbes. Serratia marcescens type I fimbriae-dependent biofilms are coordinated by the adenylate cyclase, CyaA, and the cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex. This study uses S. marcescens as a model system to test the role of cAMP-phosphodiesterase activity in controlling biofilm formation. Herein we describe the characterization of a putative S. marcescens cAMP-phosphodiesterase gene (SMA3506), designated as cpdS, and demonstrated to be a functional cAMP-phosphodiesterase both in vitro and in vivo. Deletion of cpdS resulted in defective biofilm formation and reduced type I fimbriae production, whereas multicopy expression of cpdS conferred a type I fimbriae-dependent hyper-biofilm. Together, these results support a model in which bacterial cAMP-phosphodiesterase activity modulates biofilm formation. PMID:23923059

  13. Cell Wall Nonlinear Elasticity and Growth Dynamics: How Do Bacterial Cells Regulate Pressure and Growth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yi

    In my thesis, I study intact and bulging Escherichia coli cells using atomic force microscopy to separate the contributions of the cell wall and turgor pressure to the overall cell stiffness. I find strong evidence of power--law stress--stiffening in the E. coli cell wall, with an exponent of 1.22±0.12, such that the wall is significantly stiffer in intact cells (E = 23±8 MPa and 49±20 MPa in the axial and circumferential directions) than in unpressurized sacculi. These measurements also indicate that the turgor pressure in living cells E. coli is 29±3 kPa. The nonlinearity in cell elasticity serves as a plausible mechanism to balance the mechanical protection and tension measurement sensitivity of the cell envelope. I also study the growth dynamics of the Bacillus subtilis cell wall to help understand the mechanism of the spatiotemporal order of inserting new cell wall material. High density fluorescent markers are used to label the entire cell surface to capture the morphological changes of the cell surface at sub-cellular to diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-minute temporal resolution. This approach reveals that rod-shaped chaining B. subtilis cells grow and twist in a highly heterogeneous fashion both spatially and temporally. Regions of high growth and twisting activity have a typical length scale of 5 μm, and last for 10-40 minutes. Motivated by the quantification of the cell wall growth dynamics, two microscopy and image analysis techniques are developed and applied to broader applications beyond resolving bacterial growth. To resolve densely distributed quantum dots, we present a fast and efficient image analysis algorithm, namely Spatial Covariance Reconstruction (SCORE) microscopy that takes into account the blinking statistics of the fluorescence emitters. We achieve sub-diffraction lateral resolution of 100 nm from 5 to 7 seconds of imaging, which is at least an order of magnitude faster than single-particle localization based methods

  14. Peptidomimetic Small Molecules Disrupt Type IV Secretion System Activity in Diverse Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Carrie L.; Good, James A. D.; Kumar, Santosh; Krishnan, K. Syam; Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Loh, John T.; Chappell, Joseph; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria utilize complex type IV secretion systems (T4SSs) to translocate diverse effector proteins or DNA into target cells. Despite the importance of T4SSs in bacterial pathogenesis, the mechanism by which these translocation machineries deliver cargo across the bacterial envelope remains poorly understood, and very few studies have investigated the use of synthetic molecules to disrupt T4SS-mediated transport. Here, we describe two synthetic small molecules (C10 and KSK85) that disrupt T4SS-dependent processes in multiple bacterial pathogens. Helicobacter pylori exploits a pilus appendage associated with the cag T4SS to inject an oncogenic effector protein (CagA) and peptidoglycan into gastric epithelial cells. In H. pylori, KSK85 impedes biogenesis of the pilus appendage associated with the cag T4SS, while C10 disrupts cag T4SS activity without perturbing pilus assembly. In addition to the effects in H. pylori, we demonstrate that these compounds disrupt interbacterial DNA transfer by conjugative T4SSs in Escherichia coli and impede vir T4SS-mediated DNA delivery by Agrobacterium tumefaciens in a plant model of infection. Of note, C10 effectively disarmed dissemination of a derepressed IncF plasmid into a recipient bacterial population, thus demonstrating the potential of these compounds in mitigating the spread of antibiotic resistance determinants driven by conjugation. To our knowledge, this study is the first report of synthetic small molecules that impair delivery of both effector protein and DNA cargos by diverse T4SSs. PMID:27118587

  15. Space- and time-resolved protein dynamics in single bacterial cells observed on a chip.

    PubMed

    Greif, Dominik; Pobigaylo, Nataliya; Frage, Benjamin; Becker, Anke; Regtmeier, Jan; Anselmetti, Dario

    2010-09-15

    Life cell imaging of bacterial cells over long times is very challenging because of the small dimensions and the need for a liquid environment assuring cell viability. In order to obtain space- and time-resolved information about protein dynamics, high resolution time-lapse fluorescence images (TLFI) of single bacterial cells were recorded in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic chip. A new gradient coating technique was applied to ensure cell loading. As a proof-of-concept, we monitored the evenly distributed cytoplasmic protein GcrA as well as the asymmetric localization of the DivK protein in cells of S. meliloti over at least two division cycles. Localization of DivK was characterized by dividing each bacterial cell into 4 sections with dimensions closely above the optical limit of resolution. This approach of generating spatio-temporal resolved information of protein dynamics in single bacterial cells is applicable to many problems.

  16. Fluid dynamics and noise in bacterial cell–cell and cell–surface scattering

    PubMed Central

    Drescher, Knut; Dunkel, Jörn; Cisneros, Luis H.; Ganguly, Sujoy; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial processes ranging from gene expression to motility and biofilm formation are constantly challenged by internal and external noise. While the importance of stochastic fluctuations has been appreciated for chemotaxis, it is currently believed that deterministic long-range fluid dynamical effects govern cell–cell and cell–surface scattering—the elementary events that lead to swarming and collective swimming in active suspensions and to the formation of biofilms. Here, we report direct measurements of the bacterial flow field generated by individual swimming Escherichia coli both far from and near to a solid surface. These experiments allowed us to examine the relative importance of fluid dynamics and rotational diffusion for bacteria. For cell–cell interactions it is shown that thermal and intrinsic stochasticity drown the effects of long-range fluid dynamics, implying that physical interactions between bacteria are determined by steric collisions and near-field lubrication forces. This dominance of short-range forces closely links collective motion in bacterial suspensions to self-organization in driven granular systems, assemblages of biofilaments, and animal flocks. For the scattering of bacteria with surfaces, long-range fluid dynamical interactions are also shown to be negligible before collisions; however, once the bacterium swims along the surface within a few microns after an aligning collision, hydrodynamic effects can contribute to the experimentally observed, long residence times. Because these results are based on purely mechanical properties, they apply to a wide range of microorganisms. PMID:21690349

  17. Characterization and use of crystalline bacterial cell surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit; Pum, Dietmar; Schuster, Bernhard

    2001-10-01

    Crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) are one of the most common outermost cell envelope components of prokaryotic organisms (archaea and bacteria). S-layers are monomolecular arrays composed of a single protein or glycoprotein species and represent the simplest biological membranes developed during evolution. S-layers as the most abundant of prokaryotic cellular proteins are appealing model systems for studying the structure, synthesis, genetics, assembly and function of proteinaceous supramolecular structures. The wealth of information existing on the general principle of S-layers have revealed a broad application potential. The most relevant features exploited in applied S-layer research are: (i) pores passing through S-layers show identical size and morphology and are in the range of ultrafiltration membranes; (ii) functional groups on the surface and in the pores are aligned in well-defined positions and orientations and accessible for chemical modifications and binding functional molecules in very precise fashion; (iii) isolated S-layer subunits from a variety of organisms are capable of recrystallizing as closed monolayers onto solid supports (e.g., metals, polymers, silicon wafers) at the air-water interface, on lipid films or onto the surface of liposomes; (iv) functional domains can be incorporated in S-layer proteins by genetic engineering. Thus, S-layer technologies particularly provide new approaches for biotechnology, biomimetics, molecular nanotechnology, nanopatterning of surfaces and formation of ordered arrays of metal clusters or nanoparticles as required for nanoelectronics.

  18. Rates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) production and bacterial activity in the eastern North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre during summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teira, E.; Pazó, M. J.; Quevedo, M.; Fuentes, M. V.; Niell, F. X.; Fernández, E.

    2003-04-01

    Rates of particulate organic carbon production, dissolved organic carbon production (DOC) and bacterial production were measured at 8 stations located in the eastern North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre during August 1998. Euphotic-depth-integrated particulate organic carbon (POC) production rate was on average 27 mg C m-2 h-1. The corresponding averaged integrated DOC production rate was 5 mg C m-2 h-1, i.e., about 20 % of total primary production. No statistically significant relationship was found between the rates of DOC and POC production, suggesting that other processes besides phytoplankton exudation, such as cell lysis or protist grazing, could substantially contribute to the release of DOC. Euphotic-depth-integrated bacterial biomass and production were, on average, 214 mg C m-2 and 1.4 mg C m-2 h-1, respectively. The lack of correlation between the rates of DOC release and bacterial activity, and a bacterial carbon demand (BCD, calculated by using an estimated bacterial growth efficiency ranging from 11 to 18%) in excess of DOC production suggest the existence of additional organic carbon sources (both allochthonous and/or autochthonous reservoirs), apart from in situ phytoplankton-derived DOC production, for the maintenance of bacterial activity in this region during summer.

  19. The General Phosphotransferase System Proteins Localize to Sites of Strong Negative Curvature in Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajan, Sutharsan; Elisha, Yair; Nevo-Dinur, Keren; Amster-Choder, Orna

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial cell poles are emerging as subdomains where many cellular activities take place, but the mechanisms for polar localization are just beginning to unravel. The general phosphotransferase system (PTS) proteins, enzyme I (EI) and HPr, which control preferential use of carbon sources in bacteria, were recently shown to localize near the Escherichia coli cell poles. Here, we show that EI localization does not depend on known polar constituents, such as anionic lipids or the chemotaxis receptors, and on the cell division machinery, nor can it be explained by nucleoid occlusion or localized translation. Detection of the general PTS proteins at the budding sites of endocytotic-like membrane invaginations in spherical cells and their colocalization with the negative curvature sensor protein DivIVA suggest that geometric cues underlie localization of the PTS system. Notably, the kinetics of glucose uptake by spherical and rod-shaped E. coli cells are comparable, implying that negatively curved “pole-like” sites support not only the localization but also the proper functioning of the PTS system in cells with different shapes. Consistent with the curvature-mediated localization model, we observed the EI protein from Bacillus subtilis at strongly curved sites in both B. subtilis and E. coli. Taken together, we propose that changes in cell architecture correlate with dynamic survival strategies that localize central metabolic systems like the PTS to subcellular domains where they remain active, thus maintaining cell viability and metabolic alertness. PMID:24129255

  20. Role of eukaryotic-like serine/threonine kinases in bacterial cell division and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Manuse, Sylvie; Fleurie, Aurore; Zucchini, Laure; Lesterlin, Christian; Grangeasse, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess a repertoire of versatile protein kinases modulating diverse aspects of their physiology by phosphorylating proteins on various amino acids including histidine, cysteine, aspartic acid, arginine, serine, threonine and tyrosine. One class of membrane serine/threonine protein kinases possesses a catalytic domain sharing a common fold with eukaryotic protein kinases and an extracellular mosaic domain found in bacteria only, named PASTA for 'Penicillin binding proteins And Serine/Threonine kinase Associated'. Over the last decade, evidence has been accumulating that these protein kinases are involved in cell division, morphogenesis and developmental processes in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. However, observations differ from one species to another suggesting that a general mechanism of activation of their kinase activity is unlikely and that species-specific regulation of cell division is at play. In this review, we survey the latest research on the structural aspects and the cellular functions of bacterial serine/threonine kinases with PASTA motifs to illustrate the diversity of the regulatory mechanisms controlling bacterial cell division and morphogenesis. PMID:26429880

  1. Role of eukaryotic-like serine/threonine kinases in bacterial cell division and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Manuse, Sylvie; Fleurie, Aurore; Zucchini, Laure; Lesterlin, Christian; Grangeasse, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess a repertoire of versatile protein kinases modulating diverse aspects of their physiology by phosphorylating proteins on various amino acids including histidine, cysteine, aspartic acid, arginine, serine, threonine and tyrosine. One class of membrane serine/threonine protein kinases possesses a catalytic domain sharing a common fold with eukaryotic protein kinases and an extracellular mosaic domain found in bacteria only, named PASTA for 'Penicillin binding proteins And Serine/Threonine kinase Associated'. Over the last decade, evidence has been accumulating that these protein kinases are involved in cell division, morphogenesis and developmental processes in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. However, observations differ from one species to another suggesting that a general mechanism of activation of their kinase activity is unlikely and that species-specific regulation of cell division is at play. In this review, we survey the latest research on the structural aspects and the cellular functions of bacterial serine/threonine kinases with PASTA motifs to illustrate the diversity of the regulatory mechanisms controlling bacterial cell division and morphogenesis.

  2. Activation of brain endothelium by Pneumococcal neuraminidase NanA promotes bacterial internalization

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Anirban; van Sorge, Nina M.; Sheen, Tamsin R.; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Mitchell, Tim J.; Doran, Kelly S.

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (SPN), the leading cause of meningitis in children and adults worldwide, is associated with an overwhelming host inflammatory response and subsequent brain injury. Here we examine the global response of the blood-brain barrier to SPN infection and the role of neuraminidase A (NanA), a SPN surface anchored protein recently described to promote central nervous system tropism. Microarray analysis of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMEC) during infection with SPN or an isogenic NanA-deficient (ΔnanA) mutant revealed differentially activated genes, including neutrophil chemoattractants IL-8, CXCL-1, CXCL-2. Studies using bacterial mutants, purified recombinant NanA proteins and in vivo neutrophil chemotaxis assays indicated that pneumococcal NanA is necessary and sufficient to activate host chemokine expression and neutrophil recruitment during infection. Chemokine induction was mapped to the NanA N-terminal lectin-binding domain with a limited contribution of the sialidase catalytic activity, and was not dependent on the invasive capability of the organism. Further, pretreatment of hBMEC with recombinant NanA protein significantly increased bacterial invasion suggesting that NanA-mediated activation of hBMEC is a prerequisite for efficient SPN invasion. These findings were corroborated in an acute murine infection model where we observed less inflammatory infiltrate and decreased chemokine expression following infection with the ΔnanA mutant. PMID:20557315

  3. Activity of quinolone CP-115,955 against bacterial and human type II topoisomerases is mediated by different interactions.

    PubMed

    Aldred, Katie J; Schwanz, Heidi A; Li, Gangqin; Williamson, Benjamin H; McPherson, Sylvia A; Turnbough, Charles L; Kerns, Robert J; Osheroff, Neil

    2015-02-10

    CP-115,955 is a quinolone with a 4-hydroxyphenyl at C7 that displays high activity against both bacterial and human type II topoisomerases. To determine the basis for quinolone cross-reactivity between bacterial and human enzymes, the activity of CP-115,955 and a series of related quinolones and quinazolinediones against Bacillus anthracis topoisomerase IV and human topoisomerase IIα was analyzed. Results indicate that the activity of CP-115,955 against the bacterial and human enzymes is mediated by different interactions. On the basis of the decreased activity of quinazolinediones against wild-type and resistant mutant topoisomerase IV and the low activity of quinolones against resistant mutant enzymes, it appears that the primary interaction of CP-115,955 with the bacterial system is mediated through the C3/C4 keto acid and the water-metal ion bridge. In contrast, the drug interacts with the human enzyme primarily through the C7 4-hydroxyphenyl ring and has no requirement for a substituent at C8 in order to attain high activity. Despite the fact that the human type II enzyme is unable to utilize the water-metal ion bridge, quinolones in the CP-115,955 series display higher activity against topoisomerase IIα in vitro and in cultured human cells than the corresponding quinazolinediones. Thus, quinolones may be a viable platform for the development of novel drugs with anticancer potential.

  4. Upregulation of TMEM16A Protein in Bronchial Epithelial Cells by Bacterial Pyocyanin

    PubMed Central

    Caci, Emanuela; Scudieri, Paolo; Di Carlo, Emma; Morelli, Patrizia; Bruno, Silvia; De Fino, Ida; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Gianotti, Ambra; Sondo, Elvira; Ferrera, Loretta; Palleschi, Alessandro; Santambrogio, Luigi; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2015-01-01

    Induction of mucus hypersecretion in the airway epithelium by Th2 cytokines is associated with the expression of TMEM16A, a Ca2+-activated Cl- channel. We asked whether exposure of airway epithelial cells to bacterial components, a condition that mimics the highly infected environment occurring in cystic fibrosis (CF), also results in a similar response. In cultured human bronchial epithelial cells, treatment with pyocyanin or with a P. aeruginosa culture supernatant caused a significant increase in TMEM16A function. The Ca2+-dependent Cl- secretion, triggered by stimulation with UTP, was particularly enhanced by pyocyanin in cells from CF patients. Increased expression of TMEM16A protein and of MUC5AC mucin by bacterial components was demonstrated by immunofluorescence in CF and non-CF cells. We also investigated TMEM16A expression in human bronchi by immunocytochemistry. We found increased TMEM16A staining in the airways of CF patients. The strongest signal was observed in CF submucosal glands. Our results suggest that TMEM16A expression/function is upregulated in CF lung disease, possibly as a response towards the presence of bacteria in the airways. PMID:26121472

  5. Effect of enzyme secreting bacterial pretreatment on enhancement of aerobic digestion potential of waste activated sludge interceded through EDTA.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, S; Adish Kumar, S; Yogalakshmi, K N; Kaliappan, S; Rajesh Banu, J

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the effect of Ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) on Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) removal tailed with bacterial enzymatic pretreatment on aerobic digestion of activated sludge was studied. In order to enhance the accessibility of sludge to the enzyme secreting bacteria; the extracellular polymeric substances were removed using EDTA. EDTA efficiently removed the EPS with limited cell lysis and enhanced the sludge enzyme activity at its lower concentration of 0.2 g/g SS. The sludge was then subjected to bacterial pretreatment to enhance the aerobic digestion. In aerobic digestion the best results in terms of Suspended solids (SS) reduction (48.5%) and COD (Chemical oxygen demand) solubilization (47.3%) was obtained in experimental reactor than in control. These results imply that aerobic digestion can be enhanced efficiently through bacterial pretreatment of EPS removed sludge.

  6. Proteasomal Degradation of Nod2 Protein Mediates Tolerance to Bacterial Cell Wall Components*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung-Hee; Biswas, Amlan; Liu, Yuen-Joyce; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system serves as the first line of defense by detecting microbes and initiating inflammatory responses. Although both Toll-like receptor (TLR) and nucleotide binding domain and leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins are important for this process, their excessive activation is hazardous to hosts; thus, tight regulation is required. Endotoxin tolerance is refractory to repeated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and serves as a host defense mechanism against septic shock caused by an excessive TLR4 response during Gram-negative bacterial infection. Gram-positive bacteria as well as their cell wall components also induce shock. However, the mechanism underlying tolerance is not understood. Here, we show that activation of Nod2 by its ligand, muramyl dipeptide (MDP) in the bacterial cell wall, induces rapid degradation of Nod2, which confers MDP tolerance in vitro and in vivo. Nod2 is constitutively associated with a chaperone protein, Hsp90, which is required for Nod2 stability and protects Nod2 from degradation. Upon MDP stimulation, Hsp90 rapidly dissociates from Nod2, which subsequently undergoes ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. The SOCS-3 protein induced by Nod2 activation further facilitates this degradation process. Therefore, Nod2 protein stability is a key factor in determining responsiveness to MDP stimulation. This indicates that TLRs and NLRs induce a tolerant state through distinct molecular mechanisms that protect the host from septic shock. PMID:23019338

  7. Colorimetric detection of Shewanella oneidensis based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Junlin; Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Junhua

    2014-06-01

    Rapid detection and enumeration of target microorganisms is considered as a powerful tool for monitoring bioremediation process that typically involves cleaning up polluted environments with functional microbes. A novel colorimetric assay is presented based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity for rapidly detecting Shewanella oneidensis, an important model organism for environmental bioremediation because of its remarkably diverse respiratory abilities. Analyte bacteria captured on the immunomagnetic beads provided a bacterial out-membrane peroxidase-amplified colorimetric readout of the immunorecognition event by oxidizing 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the present of hydrogen peroxide. The high-efficiency of immunomagnetic capture and signal amplification of peroxidase activity offers an excellent detection performance with a wide dynamic range between 5.0 × 103 and 5.0 × 106 CFU/mL toward target cells. Furthermore, this method was demonstrated to be feasible in detecting S. oneidensis cells spiked in environmental samples. The proposed colorimetric assay shows promising environmental applications for rapid detection of target microorganisms.

  8. Gustatory-mediated avoidance of bacterial lipopolysaccharides via TRPA1 activation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Soldano, Alessia; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Boonen, Brett; Franco, Luis; López-Requena, Alejandro; Liu, Guangda; Mora, Natalia; Yaksi, Emre; Voets, Thomas; Vennekens, Rudi; Hassan, Bassem A; Talavera, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Detecting pathogens and mounting immune responses upon infection is crucial for animal health. However, these responses come at a high metabolic price (McKean and Lazzaro, 2011, Kominsky et al., 2010), and avoiding pathogens before infection may be advantageous. The bacterial endotoxins lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are important immune system infection cues (Abbas et al., 2014), but it remains unknown whether animals possess sensory mechanisms to detect them prior to infection. Here we show that Drosophila melanogaster display strong aversive responses to LPS and that gustatory neurons expressing Gr66a bitter receptors mediate avoidance of LPS in feeding and egg laying assays. We found the expression of the chemosensory cation channel dTRPA1 in these cells to be necessary and sufficient for LPS avoidance. Furthermore, LPS stimulates Drosophila neurons in a TRPA1-dependent manner and activates exogenous dTRPA1 channels in human cells. Our findings demonstrate that flies detect bacterial endotoxins via a gustatory pathway through TRPA1 activation as conserved molecular mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13133.001 PMID:27296646

  9. Listeria monocytogenes PrsA2 Is Required for Virulence Factor Secretion and Bacterial Viability within the Host Cell Cytosol▿

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Francis; Freitag, Nancy E.

    2010-01-01

    In the course of establishing its replication niche within the cytosol of infected host cells, the facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes must efficiently regulate the secretion and activity of multiple virulence factors. L. monocytogenes encodes two predicted posttranslocation secretion chaperones, PrsA1 and PrsA2, and evidence suggests that PrsA2 has been specifically adapted for bacterial pathogenesis. PrsA-like chaperones have been identified in a number of Gram-positive bacteria, where they are reported to function at the bacterial membrane-cell wall interface to assist in the folding of proteins translocated across the membrane; in some cases, these proteins have been found to be essential for bacterial viability. In this study, the contributions of PrsA2 and PrsA1 to L. monocytogenes growth and protein secretion were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Neither PrsA2 nor PrsA1 was found to be essential for L. monocytogenes growth in broth culture; however, optimal bacterial viability was found to be dependent upon PrsA2 for L. monocytogenes located within the cytosol of host cells. Proteomic analyses of prsA2 mutant strains in the presence of a mutationally activated allele of the virulence regulator PrfA revealed a critical requirement for PrsA2 activity under conditions of PrfA activation, an event which normally takes place within the host cell cytosol. Despite a high degree of amino acid similarity, no detectable degree of functional overlap was observed between PrsA2 and PrsA1. Our results indicate a critical requirement for PrsA2 under conditions relevant to host cell infection. PMID:20823208

  10. Genetic encoding of caged cysteine and caged homocysteine in bacterial and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Uprety, Rajendra; Luo, Ji; Liu, Jihe; Naro, Yuta; Samanta, Subhas; Deiters, Alexander

    2014-08-18

    We report the genetic incorporation of caged cysteine and caged homocysteine into proteins in bacterial and mammalian cells. The genetic code of these cells was expanded with an engineered pyrrolysine tRNA/tRNA synthetase pair that accepts both light-activatable amino acids as substrates. Incorporation was validated by reporter assays, western blots, and mass spectrometry, and differences in incorporation efficiency were explained by molecular modeling of synthetase-amino acid interactions. As a proof-of-principle application, the genetic replacement of an active-site cysteine residue with a caged cysteine residue in Renilla luciferase led to a complete loss of enzyme activity; however, upon brief exposure to UV light, a >150-fold increase in enzymatic activity was observed, thus showcasing the applicability of the caged cysteine in live human cells. A simultaneously conducted genetic replacement with homocysteine yielded an enzyme with greatly reduced activity, thereby demonstrating the precise probing of a protein active site. These discoveries provide a new tool for the optochemical control of protein function in mammalian cells and expand the set of genetically encoded unnatural amino acids.

  11. Increases in Calmodulin Abundance and Stabilization of Activated iNOS Mediate Bacterial Killing in RAW 264.7 Macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S.; Shi, Liang; Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-08-01

    The rapid activation of macrophages in response to bacterial antigens is central to the innate immune system that permits the recognition and killing of pathogens to limit infection. To understand regulatory mechanisms underlying macrophage activation, we have investigated changes in the abundance of calmodulin (CaM) and iNOS in response to the bacterial cell wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using RAW 264.7 macrophages. Critical to these measurements was the ability to differentiate free iNOS from the CaM-bound (active) form of iNOS associated with nitric oxide generation. We observe a rapid two-fold increase in CaM abundance during the first 30 minutes that is blocked by inhibition of NF?B nuclear translocation or protein synthesis. A similar two-fold increase in the abundance of the complex between CaM and iNOS is observed with the same time dependence. In contrast, there are no detectable increases in the CaM-free (i.e., inactive) form of iNOS within the first hour; it remains at a very low abundance during the initial phase of macrophage activation. Increasing cellular CaM levels in stably transfected cells results in a corresponding increase in the abundance of the CaM/iNOS complex that promotes effective bacterial killing following challenge by Salmonella typhimurium. Thus, LPS-dependent increases in CaM abundance function in the stabilization and activation of iNOS on the rapid time-scale associated with macrophage activation and bacterial killing. These results explain how CaM and iNOS coordinately function to form a stable complex that is part of a rapid host-response that functions within the first 30 minutes following bacterial infection to up-regulate the innate immune system involving macrophage activation.

  12. Correlated atomic force microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging of live bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Micic, Miodrag; Hu, Dehong; Suh, Yung Doug; Newton, Greg; Romine, Margaret; Lu, H Peter

    2004-04-15

    We report on imaging living bacterial cells by using a correlated tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). For optimal imaging of Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells, we explored different methods of bacterial sample preparation, such as spreading the cells on poly-L-lysine coated surfaces or agarose gel coated surfaces. We have found that the agarose gel containing 99% ammonium acetate buffer can provide sufficient local aqueous environment for single bacterial cells. Furthermore, the cell surface topography can be characterized by tapping-mode in-air AFM imaging for the single bacterial cells that are partially embedded. Using in-air rather than under-water AFM imaging of the living cells significantly enhanced the contrast and signal-to-noise ratio of the AFM images. Near-field AFM-tip-enhanced fluorescence lifetime imaging (AFM-FLIM) holds high promise on obtaining fluorescence images beyond optical diffraction limited spatial resolution. We have previously demonstrated near-field AFM-FLIM imaging of polymer beads beyond diffraction limited spatial resolution. Here, as the first step of applying AFM-FLIM on imaging bacterial living cells, we demonstrated a correlated and consecutive AFM topographic imaging, fluorescence intensity imaging, and FLIM imaging of living bacterial cells to characterize cell polarity.

  13. Streptomyces: a screening tool for bacterial cell division inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jani, Charul; Tocheva, Elitza I; McAuley, Scott; Craney, Arryn; Jensen, Grant J; Nodwell, Justin

    2015-02-01

    Cell division is essential for spore formation but not for viability in the filamentous streptomycetes bacteria. Failure to complete cell division instead blocks spore formation, a phenotype that can be visualized by the absence of gray (in Streptomyces coelicolor) and green (in Streptomyces venezuelae) spore-associated pigmentation. Despite the lack of essentiality, the streptomycetes divisome is similar to that of other prokaryotes. Therefore, the chemical inhibitors of sporulation in model streptomycetes may interfere with the cell division in rod-shaped bacteria as well. To test this, we investigated 196 compounds that inhibit sporulation in S. coelicolor. We show that 19 of these compounds cause filamentous growth in Bacillus subtilis, consistent with impaired cell division. One of the compounds is a DNA-damaging agent and inhibits cell division by activating the SOS response. The remaining 18 act independently of known stress responses and may therefore act on the divisome or on divisome positioning and stability. Three of the compounds (Fil-1, Fil-2, and Fil-3) confer distinct cell division defects on B. subtilis. They also block B. subtilis sporulation, which is mechanistically unrelated to the sporulation pathway of streptomycetes but is also dependent on the divisome. We discuss ways in which these differing phenotypes can be used in screens for cell division inhibitors.

  14. Graphene oxide exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against bacterial phytopathogens and fungal conidia by intertwining and membrane perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Juanni; Peng, Hui; Wang, Xiuping; Shao, Feng; Yuan, Zhaodong; Han, Heyou

    2014-01-01

    To understand the interaction mechanism between graphene oxide (GO) and typical phytopathogens, a particular investigation was conducted about the antimicrobial activity of GO against two bacterial pathogens (P. syringae and X. campestris pv. undulosa) and two fungal pathogens (F. graminearum and F. oxysporum). The results showed that GO had a powerful effect on the reproduction of all four pathogens (killed nearly 90% of the bacteria and repressed 80% macroconidia germination along with partial cell swelling and lysis at 500 μg mL-1). A mutual mechanism is proposed in this work that GO intertwinds the bacteria and fungal spores with a wide range of aggregated graphene oxide sheets, resulting in the local perturbation of their cell membrane and inducing the decrease of the bacterial membrane potential and the leakage of electrolytes of fungal spores. It is likely that GO interacts with the pathogens by mechanically wrapping and locally damaging the cell membrane and finally causing cell lysis, which may be one of the major toxicity actions of GO against phytopathogens. The antibacterial mode proposed in this study suggests that the GO may possess antibacterial activity against more multi-resistant bacterial and fungal phytopathogens, and provides useful information about the application of GO in resisting crop diseases.To understand the interaction mechanism between graphene oxide (GO) and typical phytopathogens, a particular investigation was conducted about the antimicrobial activity of GO against two bacterial pathogens (P. syringae and X. campestris pv. undulosa) and two fungal pathogens (F. graminearum and F. oxysporum). The results showed that GO had a powerful effect on the reproduction of all four pathogens (killed nearly 90% of the bacteria and repressed 80% macroconidia germination along with partial cell swelling and lysis at 500 μg mL-1). A mutual mechanism is proposed in this work that GO intertwinds the bacteria and fungal spores with a wide range

  15. Metatranscriptomic Analysis of Groundwater Reveals an Active Anammox Bacterial Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, T. N. M.; Karaoz, U.; Thomas, B. C.; Banfield, J. F.; Brodie, E.; Williams, K. H.; Beller, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater is a major natural resource, yet little is known about the contribution of microbial anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) activity to subsurface nitrogen cycling. During anammox, energy is generated as ammonium is oxidized under anaerobic conditions to dinitrogen gas, using nitrite as the final electron acceptor. This process is a global sink for fixed nitrogen. Only a narrow range of monophyletic bacteria within the Planctomycetes carries out anammox, and the full extent of their metabolism, and subsequent impact on nitrogen cycling and microbial community structure, is still unknown. Here, we employ a metatranscriptomic analysis on enriched mRNA to identify the abundance and activity of a population of anammox bacteria within an aquifer at Rifle, CO. Planktonic biomass was collected over a two-month period after injection of up to 1.5 mM nitrate. Illumina-generated sequences were mapped to a phylogenetically binned Rifle metagenome database. We identified transcripts for genes with high protein sequence identities (81-98%) to those of anammox strain KSU-1 and to two of the five anammox bacteria genera, Brocadia and Kuenenia, suggesting an active, if not diverse, anammox population. Many of the most abundant anammox transcripts mapped to a single scaffold, indicative of a single dominant anammox species. Transcripts of the genes necessary for the anammox pathway were present, including an ammonium transporter (amtB), nitrite/formate transporter, nitrite reductase (nirK), and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzoB). The form of nitrite reductase encoded by anammox is species-dependent, and we only identified nirK, with no evidence of anammox nirS. In addition to the anammox pathway we saw evidence of the anammox bacterial dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium pathway (narH, putative nrfA, and nrfB), which provides an alternate means of generating substrates for anammox from nitrate, rather than relying on an external pool. Transcripts for hydroxylamine

  16. Computational assessment of the stiffness of the Gram-negative bacterial cell wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sandhya; Zhao, Yao; Huang, K. C.

    2010-03-01

    The bacterial cytoplasm exists in a state of constant metabolic activity, leading to a turgor pressure across the membrane that measures an atmosphere or more. For most bacteria, the peptidoglycan cell wall bears this stress and is also a primary determinant of the cell's shape. In this work, we investigate how the elastic properties of Gram-negative cell walls emerge from the molecular organization of the peptidoglycan network by studying the structure of a mechanical model of the cell wall under the computational application of several types of strain. Experimental evidence has suggested that the Young's modulus of the cell wall increases nonlinearly with the turgor pressure. We have conducted simulations to determine what intrinsic physical characteristics of the molecular components of the cell wall, including bending, tension, and anisotropy, are necessary and sufficient for recapitulating the nonlinear rise in stiffness. Furthermore, we have modeled the effect of missing springs on the elastic response of the cell-wall network to bridge the gap between molecular organization and a continuum model of cell-wall elasticity.

  17. A dynamin-like protein involved in bacterial cell membrane surveillance under environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Prachi; Eissenberger, Kristina; Karier, Laurence; Mascher, Thorsten; Bramkamp, Marc

    2016-09-01

    In ever-changing natural environments, bacteria are continuously challenged with numerous biotic and abiotic stresses. Accordingly, they have evolved both specific and more general mechanisms to counteract stress-induced damage and ensure survival. In the soil habitat of Bacillus subtilis, peptide antibiotics and bacteriophages are among the primary stressors that affect the integrity of the cytoplasmic membrane. Dynamin-like proteins (DLPs) play a major role in eukaryotic membrane re-modelling processes, including antiviral activities, but the function of the corresponding bacterial homologues was so far poorly understood. Here, we report on the protective function of a bacterial DLP, DynA from B. subtilis. We provide evidence that DynA plays an important role in a membrane surveillance system that counteracts membrane pore formation provoked by antibiotics and phages. In unstressed cells, DynA is a highly dynamic membrane-associated protein. Upon membrane damage, DynA localizes into large and static assemblies, where DynA acts locally to counteract stress-induced pores, presumably by inducing lipid bilayer fusion and sealing membrane gaps. Thus, lack of DynA increases the sensitivity to antibiotic exposure and phage infection. Taken together, our work suggests that DynA, and potentially other bacterial DLPs, contribute to the innate immunity of bacteria against membrane stress.

  18. K+ efflux is the Common Trigger of NLRP3 inflammasome Activation by Bacterial Toxins and Particulate Matter

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Planillo, Raúl; Kuffa, Peter; Martínez-Colón, Giovanny; Smith, Brenna L.; Rajendiran, Thekkelnaycke M.; Núñez, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Summary The NLRP3 inflammasome is an important component of the innate immune system. However, its mechanism of activation remains largely unknown. We show that NLRP3 activators including bacterial pore-forming toxins, nigericin, ATP and particulate matter caused mitochondrial perturbation or the opening of a large membrane pore; but this was not required for NLRP3 activation. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species generation or a change in cell volume was not necessary for NLRP3 activation. Instead, the only common activity induced by all NLRP3 agonists was the permeation of the cell membrane to K+ and Na+. Notably, reduction of the intracellular K+ concentration was sufficient to activate NLRP3 whereas an increase in intracellular Na+ modulated, but was not strictly required for inflammasome activation. These results provide a unifying model for the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in which a drop in cytosolic K+ is the common step that is necessary and sufficient for caspase-1 activation. PMID:23809161

  19. Lactic acid bacterial cell factories for gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Cao, Yusheng

    2010-11-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid that is widely present in organisms. Several important physiological functions of gamma-aminobutyric acid have been characterized, such as neurotransmission, induction of hypotension, diuretic effects, and tranquilizer effects. Many microorganisms can produce gamma-aminobutyric acid including bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Among them, gamma-aminobutyric acid-producing lactic acid bacteria have been a focus of research in recent years, because lactic acid bacteria possess special physiological activities and are generally regarded as safe. They have been extensively used in food industry. The production of lactic acid bacterial gamma-aminobutyric acid is safe and eco-friendly, and this provides the possibility of production of new naturally fermented health-oriented products enriched in gamma-aminobutyric acid. The gamma-aminobutyric acid-producing species of lactic acid bacteria and their isolation sources, the methods for screening of the strains and increasing their production, the enzymatic properties of glutamate decarboxylases and the relative fundamental research are reviewed in this article. And the potential applications of gamma-aminobutyric acid-producing lactic acid bacteria were also referred to.

  20. The Biological Sensor for Detection of Bacterial Cells in Liquid Phase Based on Plate Acoustic Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodina, Irina; Zaitsev, Boris; Shikhabudinov, Alexander; Guliy, Olga; Ignatov, Oleg; Teplykh, Andrey

    The interactions "bacterial cells - bacteriophages", "bacterial cells - antibodies" and "bacterial cells - mini- antibodies" directly in liquid phase were experimentally investigated with a help of acoustic sensor. The acoustic sensor under study represents two-channel delay line based on the plate of Y-X lithium niobate. One channel of delay line was electrically shorted, the second channel was electrically open. The liquid container was glued on plate surface between transducers of delay line. The dependencies of the change in phase and insertion loss on concentration of bacteriophages, antibodies, and mini- antibodies were obtained for both channels of delay line.

  1. Pepper mitochondrial FORMATE DEHYDROGENASE1 regulates cell death and defense responses against bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Choi, Du Seok; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2014-11-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH; EC 1.2.1.2) is an NAD-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of formate to carbon dioxide. Here, we report the identification and characterization of pepper (Capsicum annuum) mitochondrial FDH1 as a positive regulator of cell death and defense responses. Transient expression of FDH1 caused hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. The D-isomer -: specific 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase signatures of FDH1 were required for the induction of HR-like cell death and FDH activity. FDH1 contained a mitochondrial targeting sequence at the N-terminal region; however, mitochondrial localization of FDH1 was not essential for the induction of HR-like cell death and FDH activity. FDH1 silencing in pepper significantly attenuated the cell death response and salicylic acid levels but stimulated growth of Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria. By contrast, transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) overexpressing FDH1 exhibited greater resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato in a salicylic acid-dependent manner. Arabidopsis transfer DNA insertion mutant analysis indicated that AtFDH1 expression is required for basal defense and resistance gene-mediated resistance to P. syringae pv tomato infection. Taken together, these data suggest that FDH1 has an important role in HR-like cell death and defense responses to bacterial pathogens.

  2. Modification of N-glycosylation sites allows secretion of bacterial chondroitinase ABC from mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Muir, Elizabeth M; Fyfe, Ian; Gardiner, Sonya; Li, Li; Warren, Philippa; Fawcett, James W; Keynes, Roger J; Rogers, John H

    2010-01-15

    Although many eukaryotic proteins have been secreted by transfected bacterial cells, little is known about how a bacterial protein is treated as it passes through the secretory pathway when expressed in a eukaryotic cell. The eukaryotic N-glycosylation system could interfere with folding and secretion of prokaryotic proteins whose sequence has not been adapted for glycosylation in structurally appropriate locations. Here we show that such interference does indeed occur for chondroitinase ABC from the bacterium Proteus vulgaris, and can be overcome by eliminating potential N-glycosylation sites. Chondroitinase ABC was heavily glycosylated when expressed in mammalian cells or in a mammalian translation system, and this process prevented secretion of functional enzyme. Directed mutagenesis of selected N-glycosylation sites allowed efficient secretion of active chondroitinase. As these proteoglycans are known to inhibit regeneration of axons in the mammalian central nervous system, the modified chondroitinase gene is a potential tool for gene therapy to promote neural regeneration, ultimately in human spinal cord injury.

  3. Bacterial genotoxins: The long journey to the nucleus of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Frisan, Teresa

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial protein genotoxins target the DNA of eukaryotic cells, causing DNA single and double strand breaks. The final outcome of the intoxication is induction of DNA damage responses and activation of DNA repair pathways. When the damage is beyond repair, the target cell either undergoes apoptosis or enters a permanent quiescent stage, known as cellular senescence. In certain instances, intoxicated cells can survive and proliferate. This event leads to accumulation of genomic instability and acquisition of malignant traits, underlining the carcinogenic potential of these toxins. The toxicity is dependent on the toxins' internalization and trafficking from the extracellular environment to the nucleus, and requires a complex interaction with several cellular membrane compartments: the plasma membrane, the endosomes, the trans Golgi network and the endoplasmic reticulum, and finally the nucleus. This review will discuss the current knowledge of the bacterial genotoxins internalization pathways and will highlight the issues that still remain unanswered. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pore-Forming Toxins edited by Mauro Dalla Serra and Franco Gambale.

  4. Molecular Mechanism of Holin Transmembrane Domain I in Pore Formation and Bacterial Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lella, Muralikrishna; Kamilla, Soumya; Jain, Vikas; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-04-15

    Bacterial cell lysis during bacteriophage infection is timed by perfect orchestration between components of the holin-endolysin cassette. In bacteria, progressively accumulating holin in the inner membrane, retained in its inactive form by antiholin, is triggered into active hole formation, resulting in the canonical host cell lysis. However, the molecular mechanism of regulation and physical basis of pore formation in the mycobacterial cell membrane by D29 mycobacteriophage holin, particularly in the nonexistence of a known antiholin, is poorly understood. In this study, we report, for the first time, the use of fluorescence resonance transfer measurements to demonstrate that the first transmembrane domain (TM1) of D29 holin undergoes a helix ↔ β-hairpin conformational interconversion. We validate that this structural malleability is mediated by a centrally positioned proline and is responsible for controlled TM1 self-association in membrana, in the presence of a proton gradient across the lipid membrane. We demonstrate that TM1 is sufficient for bacterial growth inhibition. The biological effect of D29 holin structural alteration is presented as a holin self-regulatory mechanism, and its implications are discussed in the context of holin function. PMID:26701742

  5. Modification of N-glycosylation sites allows secretion of bacterial chondroitinase ABC from mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Elizabeth M.; Fyfe, Ian; Gardiner, Sonya; Li, Li; Warren, Philippa; Fawcett, James W.; Keynes, Roger J.; Rogers, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Although many eukaryotic proteins have been secreted by transfected bacterial cells, little is known about how a bacterial protein is treated as it passes through the secretory pathway when expressed in a eukaryotic cell. The eukaryotic N-glycosylation system could interfere with folding and secretion of prokaryotic proteins whose sequence has not been adapted for glycosylation in structurally appropriate locations. Here we show that such interference does indeed occur for chondroitinase ABC from the bacterium Proteus vulgaris, and can be overcome by eliminating potential N-glycosylation sites. Chondroitinase ABC was heavily glycosylated when expressed in mammalian cells or in a mammalian translation system, and this process prevented secretion of functional enzyme. Directed mutagenesis of selected N-glycosylation sites allowed efficient secretion of active chondroitinase. As these proteoglycans are known to inhibit regeneration of axons in the mammalian central nervous system, the modified chondroitinase gene is a potential tool for gene therapy to promote neural regeneration, ultimately in human spinal cord injury. PMID:19900493

  6. The Bacterial Alarmone (p)ppGpp Activates the Type III Secretion System in Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Ancona, Veronica; Lee, Jae Hoon; Chatnaparat, Tiyakhon; Oh, Jinrok; Hong, Jong-In

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) type III secretion system (T3SS) is a key pathogenicity factor in Erwinia amylovora. Previous studies have demonstrated that the T3SS in E. amylovora is transcriptionally regulated by a sigma factor cascade. In this study, the role of the bacterial alarmone ppGpp in activating the T3SS and virulence of E. amylovora was investigated using ppGpp mutants generated by Red recombinase cloning. The virulence of a ppGpp-deficient mutant (ppGpp0) as well as a dksA mutant of E. amylovora was completely impaired, and bacterial growth was significantly reduced, suggesting that ppGpp is required for full virulence of E. amylovora. Expression of T3SS genes was greatly downregulated in the ppGpp0 and dksA mutants. Western blotting showed that accumulations of the HrpA protein in the ppGpp0 and dksA mutants were about 10 and 4%, respectively, of that in the wild-type strain. Furthermore, higher levels of ppGpp resulted in a reduced cell size of E. amylovora. Moreover, serine hydroxamate and α-methylglucoside, which induce amino acid and carbon starvation, respectively, activated hrpA and hrpL promoter activities in hrp-inducing minimal medium. These results demonstrated that ppGpp and DksA play central roles in E. amylovora virulence and indicated that E. amylovora utilizes ppGpp as an internal messenger to sense environmental/nutritional stimuli for regulation of the T3SS and virulence. IMPORTANCE The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a key pathogenicity factor in Gram-negative bacteria. Fully elucidating how the T3SS is activated is crucial for comprehensively understanding the function of the T3SS, bacterial pathogenesis, and survival under stress conditions. In this study, we present the first evidence that the bacterial alarmone ppGpp-mediated stringent response activates the T3SS through a sigma factor cascade, indicating that ppGpp acts as an internal messenger to sense environmental/nutritional stimuli for

  7. Nanomechanical Response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Bacterial Cells to Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shun; Walters, Grant; Dutcher, John

    2013-03-01

    We have used an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based creep deformation technique to study changes to the viscoelastic properties of individual Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 cells as a function of time of exposure to two cationic peptides: polymyxin B (PMB), a cyclic antimicrobial peptide, and the structurally-related compound, polymyxin B nonapeptide (PMBN). The measurements provide a direct measure of the mechanical integrity of the bacterial cell envelope, and the results can be understood in terms of simple viscoelastic models of arrangements of springs and dashpots, which can be ascribed to different components within the bacterial cell. Time-resolved creep deformation experiments reveal abrupt changes to the viscoelastic properties of P. aeruginosa bacterial cells after exposure to both PMB and PMBN, with quantitatively different changes for the two cationic peptides. These measurements provide new insights into the kinetics and mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides on bacterial cells.

  8. Salt Reduction in a Model High-Salt Akawi Cheese: Effects on Bacterial Activity, pH, Moisture, Potential Bioactive Peptides, Amino Acids, and Growth of Human Colon Cells.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Akanksha; Shah, Nagendra P

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the effects of sodium chloride reduction and its substitution with potassium chloride on Akawi cheese during storage for 30 d at 4 °C. Survival of probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Bifidobacterium longum) and starter bacteria (Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus), angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitory and antioxidant activities, and concentrations of standard amino acids as affected by storage in different brine solutions (10% NaCl, 7.5% NaCl, 7.5% NaCl+KCl [1:1], 5% NaCl, and 5% NaCl+KCl [1:1]) were investigated. Furthermore, viability of human colon cells and human colon cancer cells as affected by the extract showing improved peptide profiles, highest release of amino acids and antioxidant activity (that is, from cheese brined in 7.5% NaCl+KCl) was evaluated. Significant increase was observed in survival of probiotic bacteria in cheeses with low salt after 30 d. Calcium content decreased slightly during storage in all cheeses brined in various solutions. Further, no significant changes were observed in ACE-inhibitory activity and antioxidant activity of cheeses during storage. Interestingly, concentrations of 4 essential amino acids (phenylalanine, tryptophan, valine, and leucine) increased significantly during storage in brine solutions containing 7.5% total salt. Low concentration of cheese extract (100 μg/mL) significantly improved the growth of normal human colon cells, and reduced the growth of human colon cancer cells. Overall, the study revealed that cheese extracts from reduced-NaCl brine improved the growth of human colon cells, and the release of essential amino acids, but did not affect the activities of potential bioactive peptides.

  9. Salt Reduction in a Model High-Salt Akawi Cheese: Effects on Bacterial Activity, pH, Moisture, Potential Bioactive Peptides, Amino Acids, and Growth of Human Colon Cells.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Akanksha; Shah, Nagendra P

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the effects of sodium chloride reduction and its substitution with potassium chloride on Akawi cheese during storage for 30 d at 4 °C. Survival of probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Bifidobacterium longum) and starter bacteria (Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus), angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitory and antioxidant activities, and concentrations of standard amino acids as affected by storage in different brine solutions (10% NaCl, 7.5% NaCl, 7.5% NaCl+KCl [1:1], 5% NaCl, and 5% NaCl+KCl [1:1]) were investigated. Furthermore, viability of human colon cells and human colon cancer cells as affected by the extract showing improved peptide profiles, highest release of amino acids and antioxidant activity (that is, from cheese brined in 7.5% NaCl+KCl) was evaluated. Significant increase was observed in survival of probiotic bacteria in cheeses with low salt after 30 d. Calcium content decreased slightly during storage in all cheeses brined in various solutions. Further, no significant changes were observed in ACE-inhibitory activity and antioxidant activity of cheeses during storage. Interestingly, concentrations of 4 essential amino acids (phenylalanine, tryptophan, valine, and leucine) increased significantly during storage in brine solutions containing 7.5% total salt. Low concentration of cheese extract (100 μg/mL) significantly improved the growth of normal human colon cells, and reduced the growth of human colon cancer cells. Overall, the study revealed that cheese extracts from reduced-NaCl brine improved the growth of human colon cells, and the release of essential amino acids, but did not affect the activities of potential bioactive peptides. PMID:26919457

  10. Bacterial growth and cell division: a mycobacterial perspective.

    PubMed

    Hett, Erik C; Rubin, Eric J

    2008-03-01

    The genus Mycobacterium is best known for its two major pathogenic species, M. tuberculosis and M. leprae, the causative agents of two of the world's oldest diseases, tuberculosis and leprosy, respectively. M. tuberculosis kills approximately two million people each year and is thought to latently infect one-third of the world's population. One of the most remarkable features of the nonsporulating M. tuberculosis is its ability to remain dormant within an individual for decades before reactivating into active tuberculosis. Thus, control of cell division is a critical part of the disease. The mycobacterial cell wall has unique characteristics and is impermeable to a number of compounds, a feature in part responsible for inherent resistance to numerous drugs. The complexity of the cell wall represents a challenge to the organism, requiring specialized mechanisms to allow cell division to occur. Besides these mycobacterial specializations, all bacteria face some common challenges when they divide. First, they must maintain their normal architecture during and after cell division. In the case of mycobacteria, that means synthesizing the many layers of complex cell wall and maintaining their rod shape. Second, they need to coordinate synthesis and breakdown of cell wall components to maintain integrity throughout division. Finally, they need to regulate cell division in response to environmental stimuli. Here we discuss these challenges and the mechanisms that mycobacteria employ to meet them. Because these organisms are difficult to study, in many cases we extrapolate from information known for gram-negative bacteria or more closely related GC-rich gram-positive organisms.

  11. Efficiency of fluorescence in situ hybridization for bacterial cell identification in temporary river sediments with contrasting water content.

    PubMed

    Fazi, Stefano; Amalfitano, Stefano; Pizzetti, Ilaria; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2007-09-01

    We studied the efficiency of two hybridization techniques for the analysis of benthic bacterial community composition under varying sediment water content. Microcosms were set up with sediments from four European temporary rivers. Wet sediments were dried, and dry sediments were artificially rewetted. The percentage of bacterial cells detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization with fluorescently monolabeled probes (FISH) significantly increased from dry to wet sediments, showing a positive correlation with the community activity measured via incorporation of (3)H leucine. FISH and signal amplification by catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD-FISH) could significantly better detect cells with low activity in dried sediments. Through the application of an optimized cell permeabilization protocol, the percentage of hybridized cells by CARD-FISH showed comparable values in dry and wet conditions. This approach was unrelated to (3)H leucine incorporation rates. Moreover, the optimized protocol allowed a significantly better visualization of Gram-positive Actinobacteria in the studied samples. CARD-FISH is, therefore, proposed as an effective technique to compare bacterial communities residing in sediments with contrasting water content, irrespective of differences in the activity state of target cells. Considering the increasing frequencies of flood and drought cycles in European temporary rivers, our approach may help to better understand the dynamics of microbial communities in such systems.

  12. Bacterial IMPDH gene used for the selection of mammalian cell transfectants.

    SciTech Connect

    Baccam, M.; Huberman, E.; Energy Systems

    2003-06-01

    Stable cell transfection is used for the expression of exogenous genes or cDNAs in eukaryotic cells. Selection of these transfectants requires a dominant selectable marker. A variety of such markers has been identified and is currently in use. However, many of these are not suitable for all cell types or require unique conditions. Here we describe a simple and versatile dominant selectable marker that involves bacterial IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH), an enzyme essential for the replication of mammalian and bacterial cells. Although IMPDH is evolutionarily conserved, the bacterial enzyme is orders of magnitude more resistant to the toxic effect of the drug mycophenolic acid, which is an IMPDH inhibitor. We have demonstrated that transfection of human, monkey or Chinese hamster cell lines with an expression vector containing bacterial IMPDH and mycophenolic acid treatment resulted in the selection of colonies with a strikingly increased resistance to mycophenolic acid toxicity. Analysis of cells derived from these colonies indicated that the acquisition of this resistance was associated with bacterial IMPDH protein expression. As a proof of principle, we showed that mammalian cell transfection with a hicistronic IMPDH/GFP expression vector and mycophenolic acid treatment can he used to successfully select transfectants that express the fluorescent protein. These results indicate that bacterial IMPDH is a practical dominant selectable marker that can be used for the selection of transfectants that express exogenous genes or cDNAs in mammalian cells.

  13. Bacterial programmed cell death of cerebral endothelial cells involves dual death pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bermpohl, Daniela; Halle, Annett; Freyer, Dorette; Dagand, Emilie; Braun, Johann S.; Bechmann, Ingo; Schröder, Nicolas W.J.; Weber, Joerg R.

    2005-01-01

    Major barriers separating the blood from tissue compartments in the body are composed of endothelial cells. Interaction of bacteria with such barriers defines the course of invasive infections, and meningitis has served as a model system to study endothelial cell injury. Here we report the impressive ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae, clinically one of the most important pathogens, to induce 2 morphologically distinct forms of programmed cell death (PCD) in brain-derived endothelial cells. Pneumococci and the major cytotoxins H202 and pneumolysin induce apoptosis-like PCD independent of TLR2 and TLR4. On the other hand, pneumococcal cell wall, a major proinflammatory component, causes caspase-driven classical apoptosis that is mediated through TLR2. These findings broaden the scope of bacterial-induced PCD, link these effects to innate immune TLRs, and provide insight into the acute and persistent phases of damage during meningitis. PMID:15902310

  14. Antibacterial and antifouling activities of chitosan/TiO2/Ag NPs nanocomposite films against packaged drinking water bacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Saravanan; Bhuvaneshwari, M; Lakshmi, D Shanthana; Mrudula, P; Chandrasekaran, N; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2016-10-01

    TiO2 and Ag NPs are widely used as antibacterial agents against many bacterial pathogens. Chitosan (polymer) itself acts as a strong antibacterial agent. Hence, chitosan/TiO2/Ag NPs incorporated nanocomposite film was prepared against packed drinking water bacterial strains. A concentration-dependent increase in the reduction of cell viability was observed in all the isolates under UV-C and dark exposure conditions. The bacteria consortium showed greater resistance against antibacterial effects of chitosan/TiO2/Ag nanocomposite as compared to single isolates. Glycocalyx test and mass assessment conclude the effective antibacterial activity by inhibiting bacterial adhesion on the film surface. The release of LDH and generation of ROS act as the predominant antibacterial mechanism induced by TiO2/Ag NPs. Surface characterization of chitosan/TiO2/Ag nanocomposite was studied by FTIR and XRD analyses and SEM analysis after interaction with the bacteria.

  15. Antibacterial and antifouling activities of chitosan/TiO2/Ag NPs nanocomposite films against packaged drinking water bacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Saravanan; Bhuvaneshwari, M; Lakshmi, D Shanthana; Mrudula, P; Chandrasekaran, N; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2016-10-01

    TiO2 and Ag NPs are widely used as antibacterial agents against many bacterial pathogens. Chitosan (polymer) itself acts as a strong antibacterial agent. Hence, chitosan/TiO2/Ag NPs incorporated nanocomposite film was prepared against packed drinking water bacterial strains. A concentration-dependent increase in the reduction of cell viability was observed in all the isolates under UV-C and dark exposure conditions. The bacteria consortium showed greater resistance against antibacterial effects of chitosan/TiO2/Ag nanocomposite as compared to single isolates. Glycocalyx test and mass assessment conclude the effective antibacterial activity by inhibiting bacterial adhesion on the film surface. The release of LDH and generation of ROS act as the predominant antibacterial mechanism induced by TiO2/Ag NPs. Surface characterization of chitosan/TiO2/Ag nanocomposite was studied by FTIR and XRD analyses and SEM analysis after interaction with the bacteria. PMID:27388596

  16. PHACOS, a functionalized bacterial polyester with bactericidal activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Dinjaski, Nina; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Mar; Selvam, Shivaram; Parra-Ruiz, Francisco J.; Lehman, Susan M.; Román, Julio San; García, Ernesto; García, José L.; García, Andrés J.; Prieto, María Auxiliadora

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial-associated infections represent a significant clinical problem, and treatment of these microbial infections is becoming troublesome due to the increasing number of antibiotic-resistant strains. Here, we report a naturally functionalized bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHACOS) with antibacterial properties. We demonstrate that PHACOS selectively and efficiently inhibits the growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) both in vitro and in vivo. This ability has been ascribed to the functionalized side chains containing thioester groups. Significantly less (3.2-fold) biofilm formation of S. aureus was detected on PHACOS compared to biofilms formed on control poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate-co-hydroxyhexanoate) and poly(ethylene terephthalate), but no differences were observed in bacterial adhesion among these polymers. PHACOS elicited minimal cytotoxic and inflammatory effects on murine macrophages and supported normal fibroblast adhesion. In vivo fluorescence imaging demonstrated minimal inflammation and excellent antibacterial activity for PHACOS compared to controls in an in vivo model of implant-associated infection. Additionally, reductions in neutrophils and macrophages in the vicinity of sterile PHACOS compared to sterile PHO implant were observed by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, a similar percentage of inflammatory cells was found in the tissue surrounding sterile PHACOS and S. aureus pre-colonized PHACOS implants, and these levels were significantly lower than S. aureus pre-colonized control polymers. These findings support a contact active surface mode of antibacterial action for PHACOS and establish this functionalized polyhydroxyalkanoate as an infection-resistant biomaterial. PMID:24094939

  17. Bacterial cell surface display for epitope mapping of hepatitis C virus core antigen.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Min; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Eui-Joong; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Oh, Jong-Won

    2003-09-26

    Cell surface expression of protein has been widely used to display enzymes and antigens. Here we show that Pseudomonas syringae ice nucleation protein with a deletion of internal repeating domain (INC) can be used in Escherichia coli to display peptide in a conformationally active form on the outside of the folded protein by fusing to the C-terminus of INC. Diagnostic potential of this technology was demonstrated by effective mapping of antigenic epitopes derived from hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. Amino acids 1-38 and 26-53 of HCV core protein were found to react more sensitively in a native conformation with the HCV patient sera than commercial diagnostic antigen, c22p (amino acids 10-53) by display-ELISA. These results demonstrate that the bacterial cell surface display using INC is useful for peptide presentation and thus epitope mapping of antigen. PMID:14553932

  18. Facile method to stain the bacterial cell surface for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Hu, Dehong; Mihai, Cosmin; Lohse, Samuel E.; Lee, Chang-Soo; Torelli, Marco; Hamers, Robert J.; Murphy, Catherine; Orr, Galya; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    A method to fluorescently stain the surfaces of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cells compatible with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is presented. This method utilizes a commercially-available fluorescent probe to label primary amines at the surface of the cell. We demonstrate efficient staining of two bacterial strains, the Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis 168. Using structured illumination microscopy and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, which require high quantum yield or specialized dyes, we show that this staining method may be used to resolve the bacterial cell surface with sub-diffraction-limited resolution. We further use this method to identify localization patterns of nanomaterials, specifically cadmium selenide quantum dots, following interaction with bacterial cells.

  19. Bacterial Biomass, Metabolic State, and Activity in Stream Sediments: Relation to Environmental Variables and Multiple Assay Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Bott, T. L.; Kaplan, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    Bacterial biomass, metabolic condition, and activity were measured over a 16-month period in the surface sediments of the following four field sites with differing dissolved organic matter regimes: a woodlot spring seep, a meadow spring seep, a second-order stream, and a third-order stream. Total bacterial biomass was measured by lipid phosphate and epifluorescence microscopic counts (EMC), and viable biomass was measured by 14C most probable number, EMC with 2-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(p-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl tetrazolium chloride reduction, and ATP. Bacterial metabolic condition was determined from the percentage of respiring cells, poly-β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations, and adenylate energy charge. Activity measures included 14C-lipid synthesis, 32P-phospholipid synthesis, the rate of uptake of algal lysate dissolved organic carbon, and respiration, from which biosynthesis was calculated (dissolved organic carbon uptake corrected for respiration). Total bacterial biomass (from EMC) ranged from 0.012 to 0.354 μg of C/mg of dry sediment and was usually lowest in the third-order stream. The percentage of cells respiring was less than 25% at all sites, indicating that most bacteria were dormant or dead. Adenylate energy charge was measured only in the third-order stream and was uniformly low. Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were greater in the woodlot spring seep than in the second- and third-order streams. Uptake of algal lysate dissolved organic carbon ranged from undetectable levels to 166 mg of C · m−2 · h−1. Little community respiration could be attributed to algal lysate metabolism. Phospholipid synthesis ranged from 0.006 to 0.354 pmol · mg of dry sediment−1 · h−1. Phospholipid synthesis rates were used to estimate bacterial turnover at the study sites. An estimated 375 bacterial generations per year were produced in the woodlot spring seep, and 67 per year were produced in the third-order stream. PMID:16346867

  20. Bacterial biomass, metabolic state, and activity in stream sediments: relation to environmental variables and multiple assay comparisons.

    PubMed

    Bott, T L; Kaplan, L A

    1985-08-01

    Bacterial biomass, metabolic condition, and activity were measured over a 16-month period in the surface sediments of the following four field sites with differing dissolved organic matter regimes: a woodlot spring seep, a meadow spring seep, a second-order stream, and a third-order stream. Total bacterial biomass was measured by lipid phosphate and epifluorescence microscopic counts (EMC), and viable biomass was measured by C most probable number, EMC with 2-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(p-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl tetrazolium chloride reduction, and ATP. Bacterial metabolic condition was determined from the percentage of respiring cells, poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations, and adenylate energy charge. Activity measures included C-lipid synthesis, P-phospholipid synthesis, the rate of uptake of algal lysate dissolved organic carbon, and respiration, from which biosynthesis was calculated (dissolved organic carbon uptake corrected for respiration). Total bacterial biomass (from EMC) ranged from 0.012 to 0.354 mug of C/mg of dry sediment and was usually lowest in the third-order stream. The percentage of cells respiring was less than 25% at all sites, indicating that most bacteria were dormant or dead. Adenylate energy charge was measured only in the third-order stream and was uniformly low. Poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were greater in the woodlot spring seep than in the second- and third-order streams. Uptake of algal lysate dissolved organic carbon ranged from undetectable levels to 166 mg of C . m . h. Little community respiration could be attributed to algal lysate metabolism. Phospholipid synthesis ranged from 0.006 to 0.354 pmol . mg of dry sediment . h. Phospholipid synthesis rates were used to estimate bacterial turnover at the study sites. An estimated 375 bacterial generations per year were produced in the woodlot spring seep, and 67 per year were produced in the third-order stream.

  1. Enzymatic Activity, Bacterial Distribution, and Organic Matter Composition in Sediments of the Ross Sea (Antarctica)

    PubMed Central

    Fabiano, Mauro; Danovaro, Roberto

    1998-01-01

    Enzymatic activities of aminopeptidase and β-glucosidase were investigated in Antarctic Ross Sea sediments at two sites (sites B and C, 567 and 439 m deep, respectively). The sites differed in trophic conditions related to organic matter (OM) composition and bacterial distribution. Carbohydrate concentrations at site B were about double those at site C, while protein and lipid levels were 10 times higher. Proteins were mainly found in a soluble fraction (>90%). Chloropigment content was generally low and phaeopigments were almost absent, indicating the presence of reduced inputs of primary organic matter. ATP concentrations (as a measure of the living microbial biomass) were significantly higher at site B. By contrast, benthic bacterial densities at site C were about double those at site B. Bacterial parameters do not appear to be “bottom-up controlled” by the amount of available food but rather “top-down controlled” by meiofauna predatory pressure, which was significantly higher at site B. Aminopeptidase and β-glucosidase extracellular enzyme activities (EEA) in Antarctic sediments appear to be high and comparable to those reported for temperate or Arctic sediments and characterized by low aminopeptidase/β-glucosidase ratios (about 10). Activity profiles showed decreasing patterns with increasing sediment depth, indicating vertical shifts in both availability and nutritional quality of degradable OM. Vertical profiles of aminopeptidase activity were related to a decrease in protein concentration and/or to an increase in the insoluble refractory proteinaceous fraction. The highest aminopeptidase activity rates were observed at site C, characterized by much lower protein concentrations. Differences in EEA between sites do not seem to be explained by differences in the in situ temperature (−1.6 and −0.8°C at sites B and C, respectively). Aminopeptidase activity profiles are consistent with the bacterial biomass and frequency of dividing cells. Enzyme

  2. Dipeptide-Based Metabolic Labeling of Bacterial Cells for Endogenous Antibody Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The number of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections has increased dramatically over the past decade. To combat these pathogens, novel antimicrobial strategies must be explored and developed. We previously reported a strategy based on hapten-modified cell wall analogues to induce recruitment of endogenous antibodies to bacterial cell surfaces. Cell surface remodeling using unnatural single d-amino acid cell wall analogues led to modification at the C-terminus of the peptidoglycan stem peptide. During peptidoglycan processing, installed hapten-displaying amino acids can be subsequently removed by cell wall enzymes. Herein, we disclose a two-step dipeptide peptidoglycan remodeling strategy aimed at introducing haptens at an alternative site within the stem peptide to improve retention and diminish removal by cell wall enzymes. Through this redesigned strategy, we determined size constraints of peptidoglycan remodeling and applied these constraints to attain hapten–linker conjugates that produced high levels of antibody recruitment to bacterial cell surfaces. PMID:27294199

  3. Cell fate regulation governed by a repurposed bacterial histidine kinase

    DOE PAGES

    Childers, W. Seth; Xu, Qingping; Mann, Thomas H.; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Blair, Jimmy A.; Deacon, Ashley M.; Shapiro, Lucy; Stock, Ann M.

    2014-10-28

    One of the simplest organisms to divide asymmetrically is the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. The DivL pseudo-histidine kinase, positioned at one cell pole, regulates cell-fate by controlling the activation of the global transcription factor CtrA via an interaction with the response regulator (RR) DivK. DivL uniquely contains a tyrosine at the histidine phosphorylation site, and can achieve these regulatory functions in vivo without kinase activity. Determination of the DivL crystal structure and biochemical analysis of wild-type and site-specific DivL mutants revealed that the DivL PAS domains regulate binding specificity for DivK~P over DivK, which is modulated by an allosteric intramolecular interactionmore » between adjacent domains. We discovered that DivL's catalytic domains have been repurposed as a phosphospecific RR input sensor, thereby reversing the flow of information observed in conventional histidine kinase (HK)-RR systems and coupling a complex network of signaling proteins for cell-fate regulation.« less

  4. Cell fate regulation governed by a repurposed bacterial histidine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Childers, W. Seth; Xu, Qingping; Mann, Thomas H.; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Blair, Jimmy A.; Deacon, Ashley M.; Shapiro, Lucy; Stock, Ann M.

    2014-10-28

    One of the simplest organisms to divide asymmetrically is the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. The DivL pseudo-histidine kinase, positioned at one cell pole, regulates cell-fate by controlling the activation of the global transcription factor CtrA via an interaction with the response regulator (RR) DivK. DivL uniquely contains a tyrosine at the histidine phosphorylation site, and can achieve these regulatory functions in vivo without kinase activity. Determination of the DivL crystal structure and biochemical analysis of wild-type and site-specific DivL mutants revealed that the DivL PAS domains regulate binding specificity for DivK~P over DivK, which is modulated by an allosteric intramolecular interaction between adjacent domains. We discovered that DivL's catalytic domains have been repurposed as a phosphospecific RR input sensor, thereby reversing the flow of information observed in conventional histidine kinase (HK)-RR systems and coupling a complex network of signaling proteins for cell-fate regulation.

  5. DNA-crosslinker cisplatin eradicates bacterial persister cells.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Nityananda; Wood, Thammajun L; Martínez-Vázquez, Mariano; García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Wood, Thomas K

    2016-09-01

    For all bacteria, nearly every antimicrobial fails since a subpopulation of the bacteria enter a dormant state known as persistence, in which the antimicrobials are rendered ineffective due to the lack of metabolism. This tolerance to antibiotics makes microbial infections the leading cause of death worldwide and makes treating chronic infections, including those of wounds problematic. Here, we show that the FDA-approved anti-cancer drug cisplatin [cis-diamminodichloroplatinum(II)], which mainly forms intra-strand DNA crosslinks, eradicates Escherichia coli K-12 persister cells through a growth-independent mechanism. Additionally, cisplatin is more effective at killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa persister cells than mitomycin C, which forms inter-strand DNA crosslinks, and cisplatin eradicates the persister cells of several pathogens including enterohemorrhagic E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and P. aeruginosa. Cisplatin was also highly effective against clinical isolates of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, cisplatin has broad spectrum activity against persister cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1984-1992. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26914280

  6. Flow-cytometric total bacterial cell counts as a descriptive microbiological parameter for drinking water treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Hammes, Frederik; Berney, Michael; Wang, Yingying; Vital, Marius; Köster, Oliver; Egli, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    There are significantly more microbial cells in drinking water than what can be cultured on synthetic growth media. Nonetheless, cultivation-based heterotrophic plate counts (HPCs) are used worldwide as a general microbial quality parameter in drinking water treatment and distribution. Total bacterial cell concentrations are normally not considered during drinking water treatment as a design, operative or legislative parameters. This is mainly because easy and rapid methods for quantification of total bacterial cell concentrations have, up to now, not been available. As a consequence, the existing lack of data does not allow demonstrating the practical value of this parameter. In this study, we have used fluorescence staining of microbial cells with the nucleic acid stain SYBR((R)) Green I together with quantitative flow cytometry (FCM) to analyse total cell concentrations in water samples from a drinking water pilot plant. The plant treats surface water (Lake Zürich) through sequential ozonation, granular active carbon (GAC) filtration and membrane ultrafiltration (UF). The data were compared with adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) measurements and conventional HPCs performed on the same water samples. We demonstrated that the impact of all three major treatment steps on the microbiology in the system could accurately be described with total cell counting: (1) ozonation caused chemical destruction of the bacterial cells; (2) GAC filtration facilitated significant regrowth of the microbial community; and (3) membrane UF physically removed the bacterial cells from the water. FCM typically detected 1-2 log units more than HPC, while ATP measurements were prone to interference from extracellular ATP released during the ozonation step in the treatment train. We have shown that total cell concentration measured with FCM is a rapid, easy, sensitive and importantly, a descriptive parameter of several widely applied drinking water treatment processes.

  7. Crystal Structures of Bacterial Peptidoglycan Amidase AmpD and an Unprecedented Activation Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-López, Cesar; Rojas-Altuve, Alzoray; Zhang, Weilie; Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Barbe, Sophie; André, Isabelle; Ferrer, Pilar; Silva-Martin, Noella; Castro, German R.; Martínez-Ripoll, Martín; Mobashery, Shahriar; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2011-01-01

    AmpD is a cytoplasmic peptidoglycan (PG) amidase involved in bacterial cell-wall recycling and in induction of β-lactamase, a key enzyme of β-lactam antibiotic resistance. AmpD belongs to the amidase_2 family that includes zinc-dependent amidases and the peptidoglycan-recognition proteins (PGRPs), highly conserved pattern-recognition molecules of the immune system. Crystal structures of Citrobacter freundii AmpD were solved in this study for the apoenzyme, for the holoenzyme at two different pH values, and for the complex with the reaction products, providing insights into the PG recognition and the catalytic process. These structures are significantly different compared with the previously reported NMR structure for the same protein. The NMR structure does not possess an accessible active site and shows the protein in what is proposed herein as an inactive “closed” conformation. The transition of the protein from this inactive conformation to the active “open” conformation, as seen in the x-ray structures, was studied by targeted molecular dynamics simulations, which revealed large conformational rearrangements (as much as 17 Å) in four specific regions representing one-third of the entire protein. It is proposed that the large conformational change that would take the inactive NMR structure to the active x-ray structure represents an unprecedented mechanism for activation of AmpD. Analysis is presented to argue that this activation mechanism might be representative of a regulatory process for other intracellular members of the bacterial amidase_2 family of enzymes. PMID:21775432

  8. Assembly of Active Bacterial and Fungal Communities Along a Natural Environmental Gradient.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Rebecca C; Gallegos-Graves, Laverne; Zak, Donald R; Kuske, Cheryl R

    2016-01-01

    Dormancy is thought to promote biodiversity within microbial communities, but how assembly of the active community responds to changes in environmental conditions is unclear. To measure the active and dormant communities of bacteria and fungi colonizing decomposing litter in maple forests, we targeted ribosomal genes and transcripts across a natural environmental gradient. Within bacterial and fungal communities, the active and dormant communities were phylogenetically distinct, but patterns of phylogenetic clustering varied. For bacteria, active communities were significantly more clustered than dormant communities, while the reverse was found for fungi. The proportion of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) classified as active and the degree of phylogenetic clustering of the active bacterial communities declined with increasing pH and decreasing C/N. No significant correlations were found for the fungal community. The opposing pattern of phylogenetic clustering in dormant and active communities and the differential response of active communities to environmental gradients suggest that dormancy differentially structures bacterial and fungal communities.

  9. Bacterial cell-surface displaying of thermo-tolerant glutamate dehydrogenase and its application in L-glutamate assay.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianxia; Liang, Bo; Han, Dongfei; Tang, Xiangjiang; Lang, Qiaolin; Feng, Ruirui; Han, Lihui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh) is reported to efficiently display on Escherichia coli cell surface by using N-terminal region of ice the nucleation protein as an anchoring motif. The presence of Gldh was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and enzyme activity assay. Gldh was detected mainly in the outer membrane fraction, suggesting that the Gldh was displayed on the bacterial cell surface. The optimal temperature and pH for the bacteria cell-surface displayed Gldh (bacteria-Gldh) were 70°C and 9.0, respectively. Additionally, the fusion protein retained almost 100% of its initial enzymatic activity after 1 month incubation at 4°C. Transition metal ions could inhibit the enzyme activity to different extents, while common anions had little adverse effect on enzyme activity. Importantly, the displayed Gldh is most specific to l-glutamate reported so far. The bacterial Gldh was enabled to catalyze oxidization of l-glutamate with NADP(+) as cofactor, and the resultant NADPH can be detected spectrometrically at 340nm. The bacterial-Gldh based l-glutamate assay was established, where the absorbance at 340nm increased linearly with the increasing l-glutamate concentration within the range of 10-400μM. Further, the proposed approach was successfully applied to measure l-glutamate in real samples. PMID:25659635

  10. Decolorization of industrial synthetic dyes using engineered Pseudomonas putida cells with surface-immobilized bacterial laccase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Microbial laccases are highly useful in textile effluent dye biodegradation. However, the bioavailability of cellularly expressed or purified laccases in continuous operations is usually limited by mass transfer impediment or enzyme regeneration difficulty. Therefore, this study develops a regenerable bacterial surface-displaying system for industrial synthetic dye decolorization, and evaluates its effects on independent and continuous operations. Results A bacterial laccase (WlacD) was engineered onto the cell surface of the solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida to construct a whole-cell biocatalyst. Ice nucleation protein (InaQ) anchor was employed, and the ability of 1 to 3 tandemly aligned N-terminal repeats to direct WlacD display were compared. Immobilized WlacD was determined to be surface-displayed in functional form using Western blot analysis, immunofluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and whole-cell enzymatic activity assay. Engineered P. putida cells were then applied to decolorize the anthraquinone dye Acid Green (AG) 25 and diazo-dye Acid Red (AR) 18. The results showed that decolorization of both dyes is Cu2+- and mediator-independent, with an optimum temperature of 35°C and pH of 3.0, and can be stably performed across a temperature range of 15°C to 45°C. A high activity toward AG25 (1 g/l) with relative decolorization values of 91.2% (3 h) and 97.1% (18 h), as well as high activity to AR18 (1 g/l) by 80.5% (3 h) and 89.0% (18 h), was recorded. The engineered system exhibited a comparably high activity compared with those of separate dyes in a continuous three-round shake-flask decolorization of AG25/AR18 mixed dye (each 1 g/l). No significant decline in decolorization efficacy was noted during first two-rounds but reaction equilibriums were elongated, and the residual laccase activity eventually decreased to low levels. However, the decolorizing capacity of the system was easily retrieved via a subsequent 4-h

  11. Steroid hormone signaling is essential to regulate innate immune cells and fight bacterial infection in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Regan, Jennifer C; Brandão, Ana S; Leitão, Alexandre B; Mantas Dias, Angela Raquel; Sucena, Elio; Jacinto, António; Zaidman-Rémy, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Coupling immunity and development is essential to ensure survival despite changing internal conditions in the organism. Drosophila metamorphosis represents a striking example of drastic and systemic physiological changes that need to be integrated with the innate immune system. However, nothing is known about the mechanisms that coordinate development and immune cell activity in the transition from larva to adult. Here, we reveal that regulation of macrophage-like cells (hemocytes) by the steroid hormone ecdysone is essential for an effective innate immune response over metamorphosis. Although it is generally accepted that steroid hormones impact immunity in mammals, their action on monocytes (e.g. macrophages and neutrophils) is still not well understood. Here in a simpler model system, we used an approach that allows in vivo, cell autonomous analysis of hormonal regulation of innate immune cells, by combining genetic manipulation with flow cytometry, high-resolution time-lapse imaging and tissue-specific transcriptomic analysis. We show that in response to ecdysone, hemocytes rapidly upregulate actin dynamics, motility and phagocytosis of apoptotic corpses, and acquire the ability to chemotax to damaged epithelia. Most importantly, individuals lacking ecdysone-activated hemocytes are defective in bacterial phagocytosis and are fatally susceptible to infection by bacteria ingested at larval stages, despite the normal systemic and local production of antimicrobial peptides. This decrease in survival is comparable to the one observed in pupae lacking immune cells altogether, indicating that ecdysone-regulation is essential for hemocyte immune functions and survival after infection. Microarray analysis of hemocytes revealed a large set of genes regulated at metamorphosis by EcR signaling, among which many are known to function in cell motility, cell shape or phagocytosis. This study demonstrates an important role for steroid hormone regulation of immunity in vivo in

  12. Cholesterol binding by the bacterial type III translocon is essential for virulence effector delivery into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Richard D; Cain, Robert J; McGhie, Emma J; Phillips, Neil; Garner, Matthew J; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2005-05-01

    A ubiquitous early step in infection of man and animals by enteric bacterial pathogens like Salmonella, Shigella and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is the translocation of virulence effector proteins into mammalian cells via specialized type III secretion systems (TTSSs). Translocated effectors subvert the host cytoskeleton and stimulate signalling to promote bacterial internalization or survival. Target cell plasma membrane cholesterol is central to pathogen-host cross-talk, but the precise nature of its critical contribution remains unknown. Using in vitro cholesterol-binding assays, we demonstrate that Salmonella (SipB) and Shigella (IpaB) TTSS translocon components bind cholesterol with high affinity. Direct visualization of cell-associated fluorescently labelled SipB and parallel immunogold transmission electron microscopy revealed that cholesterol levels limit both the amount and distribution of plasma membrane-integrated translocon. Correspondingly, cholesterol depletion blocked effector translocation into cultured mammalian cells by not only the related Salmonella and Shigella TTSSs, but also the more divergent EPEC system. The data reveal that cholesterol-dependent association of the bacterial TTSS translocon with the target cell plasma membrane is essential for translocon activation and effector delivery into mammalian cells.

  13. Cloud Activation Characteristics of Airborne Erwinia carotovora Cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franc, Gary D.; Demott, Paul J.

    1998-10-01

    Several strains of plant pathogenic bacteria, Erwinia carotovora carotovora and E. carotovora atroseptica, were observed to be active as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The CCN supersaturation spectra of bacterial aerosols were measured in the laboratory and compared to the activity of ammonium sulfate. Approximately 25%-30% of the aerosolized bacterial cells activated droplets at 1% water supersaturation compared to 80% activation of the ammonium sulfate aerosol. Physical and numerical simulations of cloud droplet activation and growth on bacteria were also performed. Both simulations predict that aerosolized bacteria will be incorporated into cloud droplets during cloud formation. Results strongly support the hypothesis that significant numbers of the tested bacterial strains are actively involved in atmospheric cloud formation and precipitation processes following natural aerosolization and vertical transport to cloud levels.

  14. Correlated Atomic Force Microscopy and Flourescence Lifetime Imaging of Live Bacterial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Micic, Miodrag; Hu, Dehong; Suh, Yung D.; Newton, Greg J.; Romine, Margaret F.; Lu, H PETER.

    2004-04-01

    We report on the imaging of living bacterial cells by using a new correlated tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal al fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Different methods of preparing the bacterial sample were explored for optimal imaging of Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells on poly-1-lysine coated surfaces and agarose gel coated surfaces. We have found that the agarose gel containing 99% buffer can provide a local aqueous environment for single bacterial cells. Furthermore, the cell surface topography can be characterized by tapping-mode in-air AFM imaging for the single bacterial cells that are partially embedded. Using in-air rather than under-water AFM imaging of the living cells significantly enhanced the contrast and single-to-noise ration of the AFM images. Near-field AFM-tip enhanced fluorescence lifetime imaging (AFM-FLIM) holds great promise for obtaining fluorescence images beyond the optical diffraction limited spatial resolution. We have previously demonstrated near-field AFM-FLIM imaging of polymer beads beyond the diffraction limited spatial resolution. Here, as the first step of applying AFM-FLIM on imaging living bacterial cells, we demonstrate a correlated and consecutive AFM topographic imaging, fluorescence intensity imaging, and FLIM imaging to characterize cell polarity.

  15. Mechanism of cell integration on biomaterial implant surfaces in the presence of bacterial contamination.

    PubMed

    Yue, Chongxia; van der Mei, Henny C; Kuijer, Roel; Busscher, Henk J; Rochford, Edward T J

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial contamination during biomaterial implantation is often unavoidable, yielding a combat between cells and bacteria. Here we aim to determine the modulatory function of bacterial components on stem-cell, fibroblast, and osteoblast adhesion to a titanium alloy, including the role of toll-like-receptors (TLRs). Presence of heat-sacrificed Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa induced dose and cell-type dependent responses. Stem-cells were most sensitive to bacterial presence, demonstrating decreased adhesion number yet increased adhesion effort with a relatively large focal adhesion contact area. Blocking TLRs had no effect on stem-cell adhesion in presence of S. aureus, but blocking both TLR2 and TLR4 induced an increased adhesion effort in presence of E. coli. Neither lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid, nor bacterial DNA provoked the same cell response as did whole bacteria. Herewith we suggest a new mechanism as to how biomaterials are integrated by cells despite the unavoidable presence of bacterial contamination. Stimulation of host cell integration of implant surfaces may open a new window to design new biomaterials with enhanced healing, thereby reducing the risk of biomaterial-associated infection of both "hardware-based" implants as well as of tissue-engineered constructs, known to suffer from similarly high infection risks as currently prevailing in "hardware-based" implants. PMID:25966819

  16. Yeast cell wall extract induces disease resistance against bacterial and fungal pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica crop.

    PubMed

    Narusaka, Mari; Minami, Taichi; Iwabuchi, Chikako; Hamasaki, Takashi; Takasaki, Satoko; Kawamura, Kimito; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Housaku Monogatari (HM) is a plant activator prepared from a yeast cell wall extract. We examined the efficacy of HM application and observed that HM treatment increased the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa leaves to bacterial and fungal infections. HM reduced the severity of bacterial leaf spot and anthracnose on A. thaliana and Brassica crop leaves with protective effects. In addition, gene expression analysis of A. thaliana plants after treatment with HM indicated increased expression of several plant defense-related genes. HM treatment appears to induce early activation of jasmonate/ethylene and late activation of salicylic acid (SA) pathways. Analysis using signaling mutants revealed that HM required SA accumulation and SA signaling to facilitate resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. In addition, HM-induced resistance conferred chitin-independent disease resistance to bacterial pathogens in A. thaliana. These results suggest that HM contains multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns that activate defense responses in plants. These findings suggest that the application of HM is a useful tool that may facilitate new disease control methods.

  17. Yeast Cell Wall Extract Induces Disease Resistance against Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica Crop

    PubMed Central

    Narusaka, Mari; Minami, Taichi; Iwabuchi, Chikako; Hamasaki, Takashi; Takasaki, Satoko; Kawamura, Kimito; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Housaku Monogatari (HM) is a plant activator prepared from a yeast cell wall extract. We examined the efficacy of HM application and observed that HM treatment increased the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa leaves to bacterial and fungal infections. HM reduced the severity of bacterial leaf spot and anthracnose on A. thaliana and Brassica crop leaves with protective effects. In addition, gene expression analysis of A. thaliana plants after treatment with HM indicated increased expression of several plant defense-related genes. HM treatment appears to induce early activation of jasmonate/ethylene and late activation of salicylic acid (SA) pathways. Analysis using signaling mutants revealed that HM required SA accumulation and SA signaling to facilitate resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. In addition, HM-induced resistance conferred chitin-independent disease resistance to bacterial pathogens in A. thaliana. These results suggest that HM contains multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns that activate defense responses in plants. These findings suggest that the application of HM is a useful tool that may facilitate new disease control methods. PMID:25565273

  18. Pentosan polysulfate protects brain endothelial cells against bacterial lipopolysaccharide-induced damages.

    PubMed

    Veszelka, Szilvia; Pásztói, Mária; Farkas, Attila E; Krizbai, István; Ngo, Thi Khue Dung; Niwa, Masami; Abrahám, Csongor S; Deli, Mária A

    2007-01-01

    Peripheral inflammation can aggravate local brain inflammation and neuronal death. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a key player in the event. On a relevant in vitro model of primary rat brain endothelial cells co-cultured with primary rat astroglia cells lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced changes in several BBB functions have been investigated. LPS-treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent decrease in the integrity of endothelial monolayers: transendothelial electrical resistance dropped, while flux of permeability markers fluorescein and albumin significantly increased. Immunostaining for junctional proteins ZO-1, claudin-5 and beta-catenin was significantly weaker in LPS-treated endothelial cells than in control monolayers. LPS also reduced the intensity and changed the pattern of ZO-1 immunostaining in freshly isolated rat brain microvessels. The activity of P-glycoprotein, an important efflux pump at the BBB, was also inhibited by LPS. At the same time production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide was increased in brain endothelial cells treated with LPS. Pentosan polysulfate, a polyanionic polysaccharide could reduce the deleterious effects of LPS on BBB permeability, and P-glycoprotein activity. LPS-stimulated increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide was also decreased by pentosan treatment. The protective effect of pentosan for brain endothelium can be of therapeutical significance in bacterial infections affecting the BBB.

  19. Improvement of antimicrobial activity of graphene oxide/bacterial cellulose nanocomposites through the electrostatic modification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Ning; Xue, Dong-Dong; Li, Jia-Ying; Liu, Miao; Jia, Shi-Ru; Chu, Li-Qiang; Wahid, Fazli; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Zhong, Cheng

    2016-01-20

    Graphene oxide (GO) has an attracting and ever-growing interest in various research fields for its fascinating nanostructures. In this study, bacterial cellulose (BC) was used as a matrix to synthesize GO-based materials by a mechanical mixing method. The modification of GO with PEI significantly improved the bonding force between GO nanofillers and BC matrix. The morphology of the nanocomposites had a significant effect on the mechanical properties, hydrophilic properties as well as the antibacterial activity. After the modification, the GO-PEI/BC showed a strong antimicrobial effect on Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to the effective direct contacts between the nanofillers of the composites and the cell surfaces. This study demonstrates that the morphology of the nanocomposites has a great effect on physiochemical properties and the interactions between the microorganism and the nanocomposites. PMID:26572458

  20. Improvement of antimicrobial activity of graphene oxide/bacterial cellulose nanocomposites through the electrostatic modification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Ning; Xue, Dong-Dong; Li, Jia-Ying; Liu, Miao; Jia, Shi-Ru; Chu, Li-Qiang; Wahid, Fazli; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Zhong, Cheng

    2016-01-20

    Graphene oxide (GO) has an attracting and ever-growing interest in various research fields for its fascinating nanostructures. In this study, bacterial cellulose (BC) was used as a matrix to synthesize GO-based materials by a mechanical mixing method. The modification of GO with PEI significantly improved the bonding force between GO nanofillers and BC matrix. The morphology of the nanocomposites had a significant effect on the mechanical properties, hydrophilic properties as well as the antibacterial activity. After the modification, the GO-PEI/BC showed a strong antimicrobial effect on Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to the effective direct contacts between the nanofillers of the composites and the cell surfaces. This study demonstrates that the morphology of the nanocomposites has a great effect on physiochemical properties and the interactions between the microorganism and the nanocomposites.

  1. MAIT cells are activated during human viral infections.

    PubMed

    van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Scherwitzl, Iris; Hutchinson, Edward C; Leng, Tianqi; Kurioka, Ayako; Kulicke, Corinna; de Lara, Catherine; Cole, Suzanne; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Limpitikul, Wannee; Malasit, Prida; Young, Duncan; Denney, Laura; Moore, Michael D; Fabris, Paolo; Giordani, Maria Teresa; Oo, Ye Htun; Laidlaw, Stephen M; Dustin, Lynn B; Ho, Ling-Pei; Thompson, Fiona M; Ramamurthy, Narayan; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Willberg, Christian B; Screaton, Gavin R; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are abundant in humans and recognize bacterial ligands. Here, we demonstrate that MAIT cells are also activated during human viral infections in vivo. MAIT cells activation was observed during infection with dengue virus, hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This activation-driving cytokine release and Granzyme B upregulation-is TCR-independent but dependent on IL-18 in synergy with IL-12, IL-15 and/or interferon-α/β. IL-18 levels and MAIT cell activation correlate with disease severity in acute dengue infection. Furthermore, HCV treatment with interferon-α leads to specific MAIT cell activation in vivo in parallel with an enhanced therapeutic response. Moreover, TCR-independent activation of MAIT cells leads to a reduction of HCV replication in vitro mediated by IFN-γ. Together these data demonstrate MAIT cells are activated following viral infections, and suggest a potential role in both host defence and immunopathology. PMID:27337592

  2. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides induce in vitro degradation of cartilage matrix through chondrocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Jasin, H E

    1983-12-01

    The present studies demonstrate that bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induce cartilage matrix degradation in live explants in organ culture. Quintuplicate bovine nasal fibrocartilage explants cultured for 8 d with three different purified LPS preparations derived from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhosa at concentrations ranging from 1.0 to 25.0 micrograms/ml resulted in matrix proteoglycan depletion of 33.3 +/- 5.8 to 92.5 +/- 2.0% (medium control depletion 17.7 +/- 0.7 to 32.4 +/- 1.4%). Matrix degradation depended on the presence of live chondrocytes because frozen-thawed explants incubated with LPS failed to show any proteoglycan release. Moreover, the addition of Polymyxin B (25 micrograms/ml) to live explants incubated with LPS abolished matrix release, whereas Polymyxin B had no effect on the matrix-degrading activity provided by blood mononuclear cell factors. A highly purified Lipid A preparation induced matrix degradation at a concentration of 0.01 micrograms/ml. Cartilage matrix collagen and proteoglycan depletion also occurred with porcine articular cartilage explants (collagen release: 18.3 +/- 3.5%, medium control: 2.1 +/- 0.5%; proteoglycan release: 79.0 +/- 5.9%, medium control: 28.8 +/- 4.8%). Histochemical analysis of the cultured explants confirmed the results described above. Gel chromatography of the proteoglycans released in culture indicated that LPS induced significant degradation of the high molecular weight chondroitin sulfate-containing aggregates. These findings suggest that bacterial products may induce cartilage damage by direct stimulation of chondrocytes. This pathogenic mechanism may play a role in joint damage in septic arthritis and in arthropathies resulting from the presence of bacterial products derived from the gastrointestinal tract.

  3. Distributed Classifier Based on Genetically Engineered Bacterial Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe a conceptual design of a distributed classifier formed by a population of genetically engineered microbial cells. The central idea is to create a complex classifier from a population of weak or simple classifiers. We create a master population of cells with randomized synthetic biosensor circuits that have a broad range of sensitivities toward chemical signals of interest that form the input vectors subject to classification. The randomized sensitivities are achieved by constructing a library of synthetic gene circuits with randomized control sequences (e.g., ribosome-binding sites) in the front element. The training procedure consists in reshaping of the master population in such a way that it collectively responds to the “positive” patterns of input signals by producing above-threshold output (e.g., fluorescent signal), and below-threshold output in case of the “negative” patterns. The population reshaping is achieved by presenting sequential examples and pruning the population using either graded selection/counterselection or by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). We demonstrate the feasibility of experimental implementation of such system computationally using a realistic model of the synthetic sensing gene circuits. PMID:25349924

  4. Composition and Metabolic Activities of Bacterial Biofilms Colonizing Food Residues in the Human Gut

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Sandra; Macfarlane, George T.

    2006-01-01

    Bacteria growing in the human large intestine live in intimate association with the host and play an important role in host digestive processes, gut physiology, and metabolism. Fecal bacteria have been investigated extensively, but few studies have been done on biofilms that form on digestive wastes in the large bowel. The aims of this investigation were to investigate the composition and metabolic activities of bacterial communities that colonize the surfaces of food residues in fecal material, with respect to their role in the fermentation of complex carbohydrates. Fresh stools were obtained from 15 healthy donors, and food residues were separated by filtration. Adherent bacteria were removed by surfactant treatment for microbiological analysis and fermentation studies. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent in situ hybridization in conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were used to visualize intact biofilms. Results showed that bacterial populations strongly adhering to particulate matter were phenotypically similar in composition to unattached communities, with bacteroides and bifidobacteria predominating. Biofilms comprised a mixture of living and dead bacteria, and CLSM showed that bifidobacteria in the biofilms occurred as isolated dispersed cells and in microcolonies near the interface with the substratum. Fermentation experiments with a variety of complex carbohydrates demonstrated that biofilm populations were more efficient in digesting polysaccharides, while nonadhering communities fermented oligosaccharides most rapidly. Acetate was the principal fermentation product formed by biofilm bacteria, whereas higher levels of butyrate were produced by nonadherent populations, showing that the two communities were metabolically distinct. PMID:16957247

  5. [Algicidal activity against red-tide algaes by marine bacterial strain N3 isolated from a HABs area, southern China].

    PubMed

    Shi, Rong-jun; Huang, Hong-hui; Qi, Zhan-hui; Hu, Wei-an; Tian, Zi-yang; Dai, Ming

    2013-05-01

    A marine algicidal bacterium N3 was isolated from a HABs area in Mirs Bay, a subtropical bay, in southern China. Algicidal activity and algicidal mode against Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Scrippsiella trochoidea, Prorocentrum micans and Skeletonema costatum were observed by the liquid infection method. The results showed that there were no algicidal activities against P. tricornutum and S. costatum. However, when the bacterial volume fractions were 2% and 10% , S. trochoidea and P. micans could be killed, respectively. S. trochoidea cells which were exposed to strain N3 became irregular in shape and the cellular components lost their integrity and were decomposed. While, the P. micans cells became inflated and the cellular components aggregated, followed by cell lysis. Strain N3 killed S. trochoidea and P. micans directly, and the algicidal activities of the bacterial strain N3 was concentration-dependent. To S. trochoidea, 2% (V/V) of bacteria in algae showed the strongest algicidal activity, all of the S. trochoidea cells were killed within 120 h. But the growth rates of cells, in the 1% and 0. 1% treatment groups, were only slightly lower than that in the control group. In all treatment groups, the densities of strain N3 were in declining trends. While, to P. micans, 10% and 5% of bacteria in algae showed strong algicidal activities, 78% and 70% of the S. trochoidea were killed within 120 h, respectively. However, the number of S. trochoidea after exposure to 1% of bacterial cultures still increased up to 5 incubation days. And in the three treatment groups, the densities of strain N3 experienced a decrease process. The isolated strain N3 was identified as Bacillus sp. by morphological observation, physiological and biochemical characterization, and homology comparisons based on 16S rRNA sequences. PMID:23914549

  6. [Algicidal activity against red-tide algaes by marine bacterial strain N3 isolated from a HABs area, southern China].

    PubMed

    Shi, Rong-jun; Huang, Hong-hui; Qi, Zhan-hui; Hu, Wei-an; Tian, Zi-yang; Dai, Ming

    2013-05-01

    A marine algicidal bacterium N3 was isolated from a HABs area in Mirs Bay, a subtropical bay, in southern China. Algicidal activity and algicidal mode against Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Scrippsiella trochoidea, Prorocentrum micans and Skeletonema costatum were observed by the liquid infection method. The results showed that there were no algicidal activities against P. tricornutum and S. costatum. However, when the bacterial volume fractions were 2% and 10% , S. trochoidea and P. micans could be killed, respectively. S. trochoidea cells which were exposed to strain N3 became irregular in shape and the cellular components lost their integrity and were decomposed. While, the P. micans cells became inflated and the cellular components aggregated, followed by cell lysis. Strain N3 killed S. trochoidea and P. micans directly, and the algicidal activities of the bacterial strain N3 was concentration-dependent. To S. trochoidea, 2% (V/V) of bacteria in algae showed the strongest algicidal activity, all of the S. trochoidea cells were killed within 120 h. But the growth rates of cells, in the 1% and 0. 1% treatment groups, were only slightly lower than that in the control group. In all treatment groups, the densities of strain N3 were in declining trends. While, to P. micans, 10% and 5% of bacteria in algae showed strong algicidal activities, 78% and 70% of the S. trochoidea were killed within 120 h, respectively. However, the number of S. trochoidea after exposure to 1% of bacterial cultures still increased up to 5 incubation days. And in the three treatment groups, the densities of strain N3 experienced a decrease process. The isolated strain N3 was identified as Bacillus sp. by morphological observation, physiological and biochemical characterization, and homology comparisons based on 16S rRNA sequences.

  7. NAIPs: building an innate immune barrier against bacterial pathogens. NAIPs function as sensors that initiate innate immunity by detection of bacterial proteins in the host cell cytosol.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Eric M; Vance, Russell E

    2012-07-01

    The innate immune system of mammals encodes several families of immune detector proteins that monitor the cytosol for signs of pathogen invasion. One important but poorly understood family of cytosolic immunosurveillance proteins is the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing) proteins. Recent work has demonstrated that one subfamily of NLRs, the NAIPs (NLR family, apoptosis inhibitory proteins), are activated by specific interaction with bacterial ligands, such as flagellin. NAIP activation leads to assembly of a large multiprotein complex called the inflammasome, which initiates innate immune responses by activation of the Caspase-1 protease. NAIPs therefore appear to detect pathogen molecules via a simple and direct receptor-ligand mechanism. Interestingly, other NLR family members appear to detect pathogens indirectly, perhaps by responding to host cell "stress" caused by the pathogen. Thus, the NLR family may have evolved surprisingly diverse mechanisms for detecting pathogens. PMID:22513803

  8. Bacterial diversity is strongly associated with historical penguin activity in an Antarctic lake sediment profile.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Renbin; Shi, Yu; Ma, Dawei; Wang, Can; Xu, Hua; Chu, Haiyan

    2015-11-25

    Current penguin activity in Antarctica affects the geochemistry of sediments and their microbial communities; the effects of historical penguin activity are less well understood. Here, bacterial diversity in ornithogenic sediment was investigated using high-throughput pyrosequencing. The relative abundances of dominant phyla were controlled by the amount of historical penguin guano deposition. Significant positive correlations were found between both the bacterial richness and diversity, and the relative penguin number (p < 0.01); this indicated that historical penguin activity drove the vertical distribution of the bacterial communities. The lowest relative abundances of individual phyla corresponded to lowest number of penguin population at 1,800-2,300 yr BP during a drier and colder period; the opposite was observed during a moister and warmer climate (1,400-1,800 yr BP). This study shows that changes in the climate over millennia affected penguin populations and the outcomes of these changes affect the sediment bacterial community today.

  9. Determination of bacterial activity by use of an evanescent-wave fiber-optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, M. Shelly; Kishen, Anil; Sing, Lim Chu; Asundi, Anand

    2002-12-01

    A novel technique based on fiber-optic evanescent-wave spectroscopy is proposed for the detection of bacterial activity in human saliva. The sensor determines the specific concentration of Streptococcus mutans in saliva, which is a major causative factor in dental caries. In this design, one prepares the fiber-optic bacterial sensor by replacing a portion of the cladding region of a multimode fiber with a dye-encapsulated xerogel, using the solgel technique. The exponential decay of the evanescent wave at the core-cladding interface of a multimode fiber is utilized for the determination of bacterial activity in saliva. The acidogenic profile of Streptococcus mutans is estimated by use of evanescent-wave absorption spectra at various levels of bacterial activity.

  10. Bacterial diversity is strongly associated with historical penguin activity in an Antarctic lake sediment profile.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Renbin; Shi, Yu; Ma, Dawei; Wang, Can; Xu, Hua; Chu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Current penguin activity in Antarctica affects the geochemistry of sediments and their microbial communities; the effects of historical penguin activity are less well understood. Here, bacterial diversity in ornithogenic sediment was investigated using high-throughput pyrosequencing. The relative abundances of dominant phyla were controlled by the amount of historical penguin guano deposition. Significant positive correlations were found between both the bacterial richness and diversity, and the relative penguin number (p < 0.01); this indicated that historical penguin activity drove the vertical distribution of the bacterial communities. The lowest relative abundances of individual phyla corresponded to lowest number of penguin population at 1,800-2,300 yr BP during a drier and colder period; the opposite was observed during a moister and warmer climate (1,400-1,800 yr BP). This study shows that changes in the climate over millennia affected penguin populations and the outcomes of these changes affect the sediment bacterial community today. PMID:26601753

  11. Bacterial whole-cell biocatalysts by surface display of enzymes: toward industrial application.

    PubMed

    Schüürmann, Jan; Quehl, Paul; Festel, Gunter; Jose, Joachim

    2014-10-01

    Despite the first report on the bacterial display of a recombinant peptide appeared almost 30 years ago, industrial application of cells with surface-displayed enzymes is still limited. To display an enzyme on the surface of a living cell bears several advantages. First of all, neither the substrate nor the product of the enzymatic reaction needs to cross a membrane barrier. Second, the enzyme being linked to the cell can be separated from the reaction mixture and hence the product by simple centrifugation. Transfer to a new substrate preparation results in multiple cycles of enzymatic conversion. Finally, the anchoring in a matrix, in this case, the cell envelope stabilizes the enzyme and makes it less accessible to proteolytic degradation and material adsorption resulting in continuous higher activities. These advantages in common need to balance some disadvantages before this application can be taken into account for industrial processes, e.g., the exclusion of the enzyme from the cellular metabolome and hence from redox factors or other co-factors that need to be supplied. Therefore, this digest describes the different systems in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that have been used for the surface display of enzymes so far and focuses on examples among these which are suitable for industrial purposes or for the production of valuable resources, not least in order to encourage a broader application of whole-cell biocatalysts with surface-displayed enzymes.

  12. Peptidoglycan at its peaks: how chromatographic analyses can reveal bacterial cell-wall structure and assembly

    PubMed Central

    Desmarais, Samantha M.; De Pedro, Miguel A.; Cava, Felipe; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2013-01-01

    The peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall is a unique macromolecule responsible for both shape determination and cellular integrity under osmotic stress in virtually all bacteria. A quantitative understanding of the relationships between PG architecture, morphogenesis, immune system activation, and pathogenesis can provide molecular-scale insights into the function of proteins involved in cell-wall synthesis and cell growth. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) has played an important role in our understanding of the structural and chemical complexity of the cell wall by providing an analytical method to quantify differences in chemical composition. Here, we present a primer on the basic chemical features of wall structure that can be revealed through HPLC, along with a description of the applications of HPLC PG analyses for interpreting the effects of genetic and chemical perturbations to a variety of bacterial species in different environments. We describe the physical consequences of different PG compositions on cell shape, and review complementary experimental and computational methodologies for PG analysis. Finally, we present a partial list of future targets of development for HPLC and related techniques. PMID:23679048

  13. Sclerotiamide: The First Non-Peptide-Based Natural Product Activator of Bacterial Caseinolytic Protease P.

    PubMed

    Lavey, Nathan P; Coker, Jesse A; Ruben, Eliza A; Duerfeldt, Adam S

    2016-04-22

    Caseinolytic protease P (ClpP) maintains essential roles in bacterial homeostasis. As such, both the inhibition and activation of this enzyme result in bactericidal activity, making ClpP a promising target for antibacterial drug development. Herein, we report the results of a fluorescence-based screen of ∼450 structurally diverse fungal and bacterial secondary metabolites. Sclerotiamide (1), a paraherquamide-related indolinone, was identified as the first non-peptide-based natural product activator of ClpP. Structure-activity relationships arising from the initial screen, preliminary biochemical evaluation of 1, and rationale for the exploitation of this chemotype to develop novel ClpP activators are presented.

  14. Attachment of bacterial pathogens to a bacterial cellulose-derived plant cell wall model: a proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Tan, Michelle S F; Wang, Yi; Dykes, Gary A

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to establish, as a proof of concept, whether bacterial cellulose (BC)-derived plant cell wall models could be used to investigate foodborne bacterial pathogen attachment. Attachment of two strains each of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes to four BC-derived plant cell wall models (namely, BC, BC-pectin [BCP], BC-xyloglucan [BCX], and BC-pectin-xyloglucan [BCPX]) was investigated. Chemical analysis indicated that the BCPX composite (31% cellulose, 45.6% pectin, 23.4% xyloglucan) had a composition typical of plant cell walls. The Salmonella strains attached in significantly (p<0.05) higher numbers (~6 log colony-forming units [CFU]/cm(2)) to the composites than the Listeria strains (~5 log CFU/cm(2)). Strain-specific differences were also apparent with one Salmonella strain, for example, attaching in significantly (p<0.05) higher numbers to the BCX composite than to the other composites. This study highlights the potential usefulness of these composites to understand attachment of foodborne bacteria to fresh produce.

  15. Different binarization processes validated against manual counts of fluorescent bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Tamminga, Gerrit G; Paulitsch-Fuchs, Astrid H; Jansen, Gijsbert J; Euverink, Gert-Jan W

    2016-09-01

    State of the art software methods (such as fixed value approaches or statistical approaches) to create a binary image of fluorescent bacterial cells are not as accurate and precise as they should be for counting bacteria and measuring their area. To overcome these bottlenecks, we introduce biological significance to obtain a binary image from a greyscale microscopic image. Using our biological significance approach we are able to automatically count about the same number of cells as an individual researcher would do by manual/visual counting. Using the fixed value or statistical approach to obtain a binary image leads to about 20% less cells in automatic counting. In our procedure we included the area measurements of the bacterial cells to determine the right parameters for background subtraction and threshold values. In an iterative process the threshold and background subtraction values were incremented until the number of particles smaller than a typical bacterial cell is less than the number of bacterial cells with a certain area. This research also shows that every image has a specific threshold with respect to the optical system, magnification and staining procedure as well as the exposure time. The biological significance approach shows that automatic counting can be performed with the same accuracy, precision and reproducibility as manual counting. The same approach can be used to count bacterial cells using different optical systems (Leica, Olympus and Navitar), magnification factors (200× and 400×), staining procedures (DNA (Propidium Iodide) and RNA (FISH)) and substrates (polycarbonate filter or glass). PMID:27380963

  16. Lysozyme-coated silver nanoparticles for differentiating bacterial strains on the basis of antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, Sumaira; Chatha, Mariyam Asghar; Ejaz, Wardah; Janjua, Hussnain Ahmed; Hussain, Irshad

    2014-10-01

    Lysozyme, an antibacterial enzyme, was used as a stabilizing ligand for the synthesis of fairly uniform silver nanoparticles adopting various strategies. The synthesized particles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, FTIR, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and TEM to observe their morphology and surface chemistry. The silver nanoparticles were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against several bacterial species and various bacterial strains within the same species. The cationic silver nanoparticles were found to be more effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa 3 compared to other bacterial species/strains investigated. Some of the bacterial strains of the same species showed variable antibacterial activity. The difference in antimicrobial activity of these particles has led to the conclusion that antimicrobial products formed from silver nanoparticles may not be equally effective against all the bacteria. This difference in the antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles for different bacterial strains from the same species may be due to the genome islands that are acquired through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). These genome islands are expected to possess some genes that may encode enzymes to resist the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles. These silver nanoparticles may thus also be used to differentiate some bacterial strains within the same species due to variable silver resistance of these variants, which may not possible by simple biochemical tests.

  17. Diversity of dominant bacterial taxa in activated sludge promotes functional resistance following toxic shock loading.

    PubMed

    Saikaly, Pascal E; Oerther, Daniel B

    2011-04-01

    Examining the relationship between biodiversity and functional stability (resistance and resilience) of activated sludge bacterial communities following disturbance is an important first step towards developing strategies for the design of robust biological wastewater treatment systems. This study investigates the relationship between functional resistance and biodiversity of dominant bacterial taxa by subjecting activated sludge samples, with different levels of biodiversity, to toxic shock loading with cupric sulfate (Cu[II]), 3,5-dichlorophenol (3,5-DCP), or 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). Respirometric batch experiments were performed to determine the functional resistance of activated sludge bacterial community to the three toxicants. Functional resistance was estimated as the 30 min IC(50) or the concentration of toxicant that results in a 50% reduction in oxygen utilization rate compared to a referential state represented by a control receiving no toxicant. Biodiversity of dominant bacterial taxa was assessed using polymerase chain reaction-terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-T-RFLP) targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene. Statistical analysis of 30 min IC(50) values and PCR-T-RFLP data showed a significant positive correlation (P < 0.05) between functional resistance and microbial diversity for each of the three toxicants tested. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing a positive correlation between biodiversity of dominant bacterial taxa in activated sludge and functional resistance. In this system, activated sludge bacterial communities with higher biodiversity are functionally more resistant to disturbance caused by toxic shock loading.

  18. Lysozyme-coated silver nanoparticles for differentiating bacterial strains on the basis of antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lysozyme, an antibacterial enzyme, was used as a stabilizing ligand for the synthesis of fairly uniform silver nanoparticles adopting various strategies. The synthesized particles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, FTIR, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and TEM to observe their morphology and surface chemistry. The silver nanoparticles were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against several bacterial species and various bacterial strains within the same species. The cationic silver nanoparticles were found to be more effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa 3 compared to other bacterial species/strains investigated. Some of the bacterial strains of the same species showed variable antibacterial activity. The difference in antimicrobial activity of these particles has led to the conclusion that antimicrobial products formed from silver nanoparticles may not be equally effective against all the bacteria. This difference in the antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles for different bacterial strains from the same species may be due to the genome islands that are acquired through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). These genome islands are expected to possess some genes that may encode enzymes to resist the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles. These silver nanoparticles may thus also be used to differentiate some bacterial strains within the same species due to variable silver resistance of these variants, which may not possible by simple biochemical tests. PMID:25435831

  19. Lysozyme-coated silver nanoparticles for differentiating bacterial strains on the basis of antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Sumaira; Chatha, Mariyam Asghar; Ejaz, Wardah; Janjua, Hussnain Ahmed; Hussain, Irshad

    2014-01-01

    Lysozyme, an antibacterial enzyme, was used as a stabilizing ligand for the synthesis of fairly uniform silver nanoparticles adopting various strategies. The synthesized particles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, FTIR, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and TEM to observe their morphology and surface chemistry. The silver nanoparticles were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against several bacterial species and various bacterial strains within the same species. The cationic silver nanoparticles were found to be more effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa 3 compared to other bacterial species/strains investigated. Some of the bacterial strains of the same species showed variable antibacterial activity. The difference in antimicrobial activity of these particles has led to the conclusion that antimicrobial products formed from silver nanoparticles may not be equally effective against all the bacteria. This difference in the antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles for different bacterial strains from the same species may be due to the genome islands that are acquired through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). These genome islands are expected to possess some genes that may encode enzymes to resist the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles. These silver nanoparticles may thus also be used to differentiate some bacterial strains within the same species due to variable silver resistance of these variants, which may not possible by simple biochemical tests. PMID:25435831

  20. Identification of individual biofilm-forming bacterial cells using Raman tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Šiler, Martin; Šerý, Mojmir; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Hrubanová, Kamila; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, Veronika; Růžička, Filip

    2015-05-01

    A method for in vitro identification of individual bacterial cells is presented. The method is based on a combination of optical tweezers for spatial trapping of individual bacterial cells and Raman microspectroscopy for acquisition of spectral "Raman fingerprints" obtained from the trapped cell. Here, Raman spectra were taken from the biofilm-forming cells without the influence of an extracellular matrix and were compared with biofilm-negative cells. Results of principal component analyses of Raman spectra enabled us to distinguish between the two strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis. Thus, we propose that Raman tweezers can become the technique of choice for a clearer understanding of the processes involved in bacterial biofilms which constitute a highly privileged way of life for bacteria, protected from the external environment.

  1. Identification of individual biofilm-forming bacterial cells using Raman tweezers.

    PubMed

    Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Šiler, Martin; Šerý, Mojmir; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Hrubanová, Kamila; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, Veronika; Růžička, Filip

    2015-05-01

    A method for in vitro identification of individual bacterial cells is presented. The method is based on a combination of optical tweezers for spatial trapping of individual bacterial cells and Raman microspectroscopy for acquisition of spectral “Raman fingerprints” obtained from the trapped cell. Here, Raman spectra were taken from the biofilm-forming cells without the influence of an extracellular matrix and were compared with biofilm-negative cells. Results of principal component analyses of Raman spectra enabled us to distinguish between the two strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis. Thus, we propose that Raman tweezers can become the technique of choice for a clearer understanding of the processes involved in bacterial biofilms which constitute a highly privileged way of life for bacteria, protected from the external environment.

  2. Characteristics of mast cells in normal bladder, bacterial cystitis and interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T J; Rode, J

    1991-11-01

    An analysis was made of the numbers and characteristics of mast cells in lateral bladder wall biopsies from 22 patients with interstitial cystitis, 6 with bacterial cystitis and 8 normal controls, using toluidine blue stains and computerised video image analysis techniques. A significantly greater number of mast cells were found within the detrusor muscle in interstitial cystitis than in bacterial cystitis or normal controls. Within the urothelium and submucosa, mast cell numbers were significantly greater than in normal controls in both interstitial and bacterial cystitis. In interstitial cystitis mast cells were significantly larger within the detrusor than in the urothelium/submucosa and they appeared to degranulate predominantly within the superficial layers. Differential staining techniques, using long and short toluidine blue stains, failed to reveal statistically significant evidence of mast cell heterogeneity within the bladder wall in interstitial cystitis.

  3. Guidelines for monitoring bulk tank milk somatic cell and bacterial counts.

    PubMed

    Jayarao, B M; Pillai, S R; Sawant, A A; Wolfgang, D R; Hegde, N V

    2004-10-01

    This study was conducted to establish guidelines for monitoring bulk tank milk somatic cell count and bacterial counts, and to understand the relationship between different bacterial groups that occur in bulk tank milk. One hundred twenty-six dairy farms in 14 counties of Pennsylvania participated, each providing one bulk tank milk sample every 15 d for 2 mo. The 4 bulk tank milk samples from each farm were examined for bulk tank somatic cell count and bacterial counts including standard plate count, preliminary incubation count, laboratory pasteurization count, coagulase-negative staphylococcal count, environmental streptococcal count, coliform count, and gram-negative noncoliform count. The milk samples were also examined for presence of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Mycoplasma. The bacterial counts of 4 bulk tank milk samples examined over an 8-wk period were averaged and expressed as mean bacterial count per milliliter. The study revealed that an increase in the frequency of isolation of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae was significantly associated with an increased bulk tank somatic cell count. Paired correlation analysis showed that there was low correlation between different bacterial counts. Bulk tank milk with low (<5000 cfu/mL) standard plate count also had a significantly low level of mean bulk tank somatic cell count (<200,000 cells/mL), preliminary incubation count (<10,000 cfu/mL), laboratory pasteurization count (<100 cfu/mL), coagulase-negative staphylococci and environmental streptococcal counts (<500 cfu/mL), and noncoliform count (<200 cfu/mL). Coliform count was less likely to be associated with somatic cell or other bacterial counts. Herd size and farm management practices had considerable influence on somatic cell and bacterial counts in bulk tank milk. Dairy herds that used automatic milking detachers, sand as bedding material, dip cups for teat dipping instead of spraying, and practiced pre

  4. MAIT Cells Detect and Efficiently Lyse Bacterially-Infected Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bohineust, Armelle; Bessoles, Stéphanie; Martin, Emmanuel; Premel, Virginie; Coré, Maxime; Sleurs, David; Serriari, Nacer-Eddine; Treiner, Emmanuel; Hivroz, Claire; Sansonetti, Philippe; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Soudais, Claire; Lantz, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal associated invariant T cells (MAIT) are innate T lymphocytes that detect a large variety of bacteria and yeasts. This recognition depends on the detection of microbial compounds presented by the evolutionarily conserved major-histocompatibility-complex (MHC) class I molecule, MR1. Here we show that MAIT cells display cytotoxic activity towards MR1 overexpressing non-hematopoietic cells cocultured with bacteria. The NK receptor, CD161, highly expressed by MAIT cells, modulated the cytokine but not the cytotoxic response triggered by bacteria infected cells. MAIT cells are also activated by and kill epithelial cells expressing endogenous levels of MRI after infection with the invasive bacteria Shigella flexneri. In contrast, MAIT cells were not activated by epithelial cells infected by Salmonella enterica Typhimurium. Finally, MAIT cells are activated in human volunteers receiving an attenuated strain of Shigella dysenteriae-1 tested as a potential vaccine. Thus, in humans, MAIT cells are the most abundant T cell subset able to detect and kill bacteria infected cells. PMID:24130485

  5. MAIT cells are activated during human viral infections

    PubMed Central

    van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Scherwitzl, Iris; Hutchinson, Edward C.; Leng, Tianqi; Kurioka, Ayako; Kulicke, Corinna; de Lara, Catherine; Cole, Suzanne; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Limpitikul, Wannee; Malasit, Prida; Young, Duncan; Denney, Laura; Barnes, Eleanor; Ball, Jonathan; Burgess, Gary; Cooke, Graham; Dillon, John; Gore, Charles; Foster, Graham; Guha, Neil; Halford, Rachel; Herath, Cham; Holmes, Chris; Howe, Anita; Hudson, Emma; Irving, William; Khakoo, Salim; Koletzki, Diana; Martin, Natasha; Mbisa, Tamyo; McKeating, Jane; McLauchlan, John; Miners, Alec; Murray, Andrea; Shaw, Peter; Simmonds, Peter; Spencer, Chris; Targett-Adams, Paul; Thomson, Emma; Vickerman, Peter; Zitzmann, Nicole; Moore, Michael D.; Fabris, Paolo; Giordani, Maria Teresa; Oo, Ye Htun; Laidlaw, Stephen M.; Dustin, Lynn B.; Ho, Ling-Pei; Thompson, Fiona M.; Ramamurthy, Narayan; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Willberg, Christian B.; Screaton, Gavin R.; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are abundant in humans and recognize bacterial ligands. Here, we demonstrate that MAIT cells are also activated during human viral infections in vivo. MAIT cells activation was observed during infection with dengue virus, hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This activation—driving cytokine release and Granzyme B upregulation—is TCR-independent but dependent on IL-18 in synergy with IL-12, IL-15 and/or interferon-α/β. IL-18 levels and MAIT cell activation correlate with disease severity in acute dengue infection. Furthermore, HCV treatment with interferon-α leads to specific MAIT cell activation in vivo in parallel with an enhanced therapeutic response. Moreover, TCR-independent activation of MAIT cells leads to a reduction of HCV replication in vitro mediated by IFN-γ. Together these data demonstrate MAIT cells are activated following viral infections, and suggest a potential role in both host defence and immunopathology. PMID:27337592

  6. Bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan prevents DSS-induced IBD by restoring the reduced population of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Ho; Park, Min; Ji, Kon-Young; Lee, Hwa-Youn; Jang, Ji-Hun; Yoon, Il-Joo; Oh, Seung-Su; Kim, Su-Man; Jeong, Yun-Hwa; Yun, Chul-Ho; Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Lee, In-Young; Choi, Ha-Rim; Ko, Ki-sung; Kang, Hyung-Sik

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan has more advantages in terms of cost, yield and efficiency than that derived from mushrooms, plants, yeasts and fungi. We have previously developed a novel and high-yield β-(1,3)-glucan produced by Agrobacterium sp. R259. This study aimed to elucidate the functional mechanism and therapeutic efficacy of bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).Mice were orally pretreated with bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan at daily doses of 2.5 or 5mg/kg for 2 weeks. After 6 days of DSS treatment, clinical assessment of IBD severity and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines were evaluated. In vivo cell proliferation was examined by immunohistochemistry using Ki-67 and ER-TR7 antibodies. The frequency of regulatory T cells (Tregs) was analyzed by flow cytometry. Natural killer (NK) activity and IgA level were evaluated using NK cytotoxicity assay and ELISA.The deterioration of body weight gain, colonic architecture, disease score and histological score was recovered in DSS-induced IBD mice when pretreated with bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan. The recruitment of macrophages and the gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-17A/F, were markedly decreased in the colon of β-(1,3)-glucan-pretreated mice. β-(1,3)-Glucan induced the recovery of Tregs in terms of their frequency in DSS-induced IBD mice. Intriguingly, β-(1,3)-glucan reversed the functional defects of NK cells and excessive IgA production in DSS-induced IBD mice.We conclude that bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan prevented the progression of DSS-induced IBD by recovering the reduction of Tregs, functional defect of NK cells and excessive IgA production.

  7. Bacterial CD1d-restricted glycolipids induce IL-10 production by human regulatory T cells upon cross-talk with invariant NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Venken, Koen; Decruy, Tine; Aspeslagh, Sandrine; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Lambrecht, Bart N; Elewaut, Dirk

    2013-09-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells and CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important immune regulatory T cells with Ag reactivity to glycolipids and peptides, respectively. However, the functional interplay between these cells in humans is poorly understood. We show that Tregs suppress iNKT cell proliferation induced by CD1d-restricted glycolipids, including bacterial-derived diacylglycerols, as well as by innate-like activation. Inhibition was related to the potency of iNKT agonists, making diacylglycerol iNKT responses very prone to suppression. Cytokine production by iNKT cells was differentially modulated by Tregs because IL-4 production was reduced more profoundly compared with IFN-γ. A compelling observation was the significant production of IL-10 by Tregs after cell contact with iNKT cells, in particular in the presence of bacterial diacylglycerols. These iNKT-primed Tregs showed increased FOXP3 expression and superior suppressive function. Suppression of iNKT cell responses, but not conventional T cell responses, was IL-10 dependent, suggesting that there is a clear difference in mechanism between the Treg-mediated inhibition of these cell types. Our data highlight a physiologically relevant interaction between human iNKT and Tregs upon pathogen-derived glycolipid recognition that has a significant impact on the design of iNKT cell-based therapeutics.

  8. Predominance of single bacterial cells in composting bioaerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galès, Amandine; Bru-Adan, Valérie; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Delabre, Karine; Catala, Philippe; Ponthieux, Arnaud; Chevallier, Michel; Birot, Emmanuel; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Wéry, Nathalie

    2015-04-01

    Bioaerosols emitted from composting plants have become an issue because of their potential harmful impact on public or workers' health. Accurate knowledge of the particle-size distribution in bioaerosols emitted from open-air composting facilities during operational activity is a requirement for improved modeling of air dispersal. In order to investigate the aerodynamic diameter of bacteria in composting bioaerosols this study used an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor for sampling and quantitative real-time PCR for quantification. Quantitative PCR results show that the size of bacteria peaked between 0.95 μm and 2.4 μm and that the geometric mean diameter of the bacteria was 1.3 μm. In addition, total microbial cells were counted by flow cytometry and revealed that these qPCR results corresponded to single whole bacteria. Finally, the enumeration of cultivable thermophilic microorganisms allowed us to set the upper size limit for fragments at an aerodynamic diameter of ∼0.3 μm. Particle-size distributions of microbial groups previously used to monitor composting bioaerosols were also investigated. In collected the bioaerosols, the aerodynamic diameter of the actinomycetes Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula-and-relatives and also of the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, appeared to be consistent with a majority of individual cells. Together, this study provides the first culture-independent data on particle-size distribution of composting bioaerosols and reveals that airborne single bacteria were emitted predominantly from open-air composting facilities.

  9. Cationic amphipathic peptides KT2 and RT2 are taken up into bacterial cells and kill planktonic and biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed

    Anunthawan, Thitiporn; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Hancock, Robert E W; Klaynongsruang, Sompong

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of two tryptophan-rich antibacterial peptides (KT2 and RT2) obtained in a previous optimization screen for increased killing of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria pathogens. At their minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), these peptides completely killed cells of multidrug-resistant, enterohemorrhagic pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 within 1-5 min. In addition, both peptides exhibited anti-biofilm activity at sub-MIC levels. Indeed, these peptides prevented biofilm formation and triggered killing of cells in mature E. coli O157:H7 biofilms at 1 μM. Both peptides bound to bacterial surface LPS as assessed using the dansyl-polymyxin displacement assay, and were able to interact with the lipids of liposomes as determined by observing a tryptophan blue shift. Interestingly, even though these peptides were highly antimicrobial, they did not induce pore formation or aggregates in bacterial cell membranes. Instead these peptides readily penetrated into bacterial cells as determined by confocal microscopy of labeled peptides. DNA binding assays indicated that both peptides bound to DNA with higher affinity than the positive control peptide buforin II. We propose that cationic peptides KT2 and RT2 bind to negatively-charged LPS to enable self-promoted uptake and, subsequently interact with cytoplasmic membrane phospholipids through their hydrophobic domains enabling translocation across the bacterial membrane and entry into cells within minutes and binding to DNA and other cytoplasmic membrane. Due to their dual antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activities, these peptides may find use as an alternative to (or in conjunction with) conventional antibiotics to treat acute infections caused by planktonic bacteria and chronic, biofilm-related infections. PMID:25767037

  10. Cationic amphipathic peptides KT2 and RT2 are taken up into bacterial cells and kill planktonic and biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed

    Anunthawan, Thitiporn; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Hancock, Robert E W; Klaynongsruang, Sompong

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of two tryptophan-rich antibacterial peptides (KT2 and RT2) obtained in a previous optimization screen for increased killing of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria pathogens. At their minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), these peptides completely killed cells of multidrug-resistant, enterohemorrhagic pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 within 1-5 min. In addition, both peptides exhibited anti-biofilm activity at sub-MIC levels. Indeed, these peptides prevented biofilm formation and triggered killing of cells in mature E. coli O157:H7 biofilms at 1 μM. Both peptides bound to bacterial surface LPS as assessed using the dansyl-polymyxin displacement assay, and were able to interact with the lipids of liposomes as determined by observing a tryptophan blue shift. Interestingly, even though these peptides were highly antimicrobial, they did not induce pore formation or aggregates in bacterial cell membranes. Instead these peptides readily penetrated into bacterial cells as determined by confocal microscopy of labeled peptides. DNA binding assays indicated that both peptides bound to DNA with higher affinity than the positive control peptide buforin II. We propose that cationic peptides KT2 and RT2 bind to negatively-charged LPS to enable self-promoted uptake and, subsequently interact with cytoplasmic membrane phospholipids through their hydrophobic domains enabling translocation across the bacterial membrane and entry into cells within minutes and binding to DNA and other cytoplasmic membrane. Due to their dual antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activities, these peptides may find use as an alternative to (or in conjunction with) conventional antibiotics to treat acute infections caused by planktonic bacteria and chronic, biofilm-related infections.

  11. In vitro effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide on the cytotoxicity of human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Miranda, D; Puente, J; Blanco, L; Wolf, M E; Mosnaim, A D

    1998-04-01

    Preincubation with a number of mediators of infection, such as Gram negative bacteria (S. typhi), bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrotic factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-2 (IL-2), significantly increases natural killer (NK) cell activity in samples of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), without changing the levels of either the phenotypic CD16/56 or stimulatory CD25 marker. We now report similar results after preincubation of highly purified NK cell preparations (CD16 + 56 > 95%; the rest corresponding to CD3+ T-cells) with either S. typhi, TNF-alpha or IL-2. However, in similar experiments, LPS inhibits, in a dose-dependent manner (final conc. 2.5, 5.0 or 10.0 micrograms/mL), NK cell cytotoxicity against K-562 tumor cells. Preincubation of purified NK cells with LPS (25 micrograms/mL; 10 and 30 min) produced significant alterations in the tyrosine phosphorylation/dephosphorylation pattern of several intracellular proteins, including a significant increase (10 min) in the phosphorylation of the 120; 100; 72 and 59 kDa proteins, followed (30 min) by the essentially complete desphosphorylation of the p59 protein. Qualitatively similar results were obtained at lower LPS concentrations e.g., range 2.5 to 20 micrograms/mL. The absence of phosphoproteins in the 40-44 kDa range, known to be present after incubation of monocytes with LPS, raises the possibility that these "class" of proteins may be critical in explaining the LPS inhibitory effect on NK lytic function. Our finding may contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the complex in vivo interaction between LPS, monocytes and NK cells.

  12. Bacterial cell wall composition and the influence of antibiotics by cell-wall and whole-cell NMR.

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Joseph A H; Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-10-01

    The ability to characterize bacterial cell-wall composition and structure is crucial to understanding the function of the bacterial cell wall, determining drug modes of action and developing new-generation therapeutics. Solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool to quantify chemical composition and to map cell-wall architecture in bacteria and plants, even in the context of unperturbed intact whole cells. In this review, we discuss solid-state NMR approaches to define peptidoglycan composition and to characterize the modes of action of old and new antibiotics, focusing on examples in Staphylococcus aureus. We provide perspectives regarding the selected NMR strategies as we describe the exciting and still-developing cell-wall and whole-cell NMR toolkit. We also discuss specific discoveries regarding the modes of action of vancomycin analogues, including oritavancin, and briefly address the reconsideration of the killing action of β-lactam antibiotics. In such chemical genetics approaches, there is still much to be learned from perturbations enacted by cell-wall assembly inhibitors, and solid-state NMR approaches are poised to address questions of cell-wall composition and assembly in S. aureus and other organisms.

  13. Bacterial cell wall composition and the influence of antibiotics by cell-wall and whole-cell NMR

    PubMed Central

    Romaniuk, Joseph A. H.; Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-01-01

    The ability to characterize bacterial cell-wall composition and structure is crucial to understanding the function of the bacterial cell wall, determining drug modes of action and developing new-generation therapeutics. Solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool to quantify chemical composition and to map cell-wall architecture in bacteria and plants, even in the context of unperturbed intact whole cells. In this review, we discuss solid-state NMR approaches to define peptidoglycan composition and to characterize the modes of action of old and new antibiotics, focusing on examples in Staphylococcus aureus. We provide perspectives regarding the selected NMR strategies as we describe the exciting and still-developing cell-wall and whole-cell NMR toolkit. We also discuss specific discoveries regarding the modes of action of vancomycin analogues, including oritavancin, and briefly address the reconsideration of the killing action of β-lactam antibiotics. In such chemical genetics approaches, there is still much to be learned from perturbations enacted by cell-wall assembly inhibitors, and solid-state NMR approaches are poised to address questions of cell-wall composition and assembly in S. aureus and other organisms. PMID:26370936

  14. Effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on Kupffer cell phagosomal motility, bacterial clearance, and liver function

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Christa Y; Molina, Ramon M; Louzada, Andressa; Murdaugh, Kimberly M; Donaghey, Thomas C; Brain, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Background Zinc oxide engineered nanoparticles (ZnO ENPs) have potential as nanomedicines due to their inherent properties. Studies have described their pulmonary impact, but less is known about the consequences of ZnO ENP interactions with the liver. This study was designed to describe the effects of ZnO ENPs on the liver and Kupffer cells after intravenous (IV) administration. Materials and methods First, pharmacokinetic studies were conducted to determine the tissue distribution of neutron-activated 65ZnO ENPs post-IV injection in Wistar Han rats. Then, a noninvasive in vivo method to assess Kupffer cell phagosomal motility was employed using ferromagnetic iron particles and magnetometry. We also examined whether prior IV injection of ZnO ENPs altered Kupffer cell bactericidal activity on circulating Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Serum and liver tissues were collected to assess liver-injury biomarkers and histological changes, respectively. Results We found that the liver was the major site of initial uptake of 65ZnO ENPs. There was a time-dependent decrease in tissue levels of 65Zn in all organs examined, refecting particle dissolution. In vivo magnetometry showed a time-dependent and transient reduction in Kupffer cell phagosomal motility. Animals challenged with P. aeruginosa 24 hours post-ZnO ENP injection showed an initial (30 minutes) delay in vascular bacterial clearance. However, by 4 hours, IV-injected bacteria were cleared from the blood, liver, spleen, lungs, and kidneys. Seven days post-ZnO ENP injection, creatine phosphokinase and aspartate aminotransferase levels in serum were significantly increased. Histological evidence of hepatocyte damage and marginated neutrophils were observed in the liver. Conclusion Administration of ZnO ENPs transiently inhibited Kupffer cell phagosomal motility and later induced hepatocyte injury, but did not alter bacterial clearance from the blood or killing in the liver, spleen, lungs, or kidneys. Our data show that

  15. A miniature porous aluminum oxide-based flow-cell for online water quality monitoring using bacterial sensor cells.

    PubMed

    Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Schreuder, Erik; Ingham, Colin J; Heideman, René; Rosen, Rachel; Belkin, Shimshon

    2015-02-15

    The use of live bacterial reporters as sensing entities in whole-cell biosensors allows the investigation of the biological effects of a tested sample, as well as the bioavailability of its components. Here we present a proof of concept for a new design for online continuous water monitoring flow-cell biosensor, incorporating recombinant reporter bacteria, engineered to generate an optical signal (fluorescent or bioluminescent) in the presence of the target compound(s). At the heart of the flow-cell is a disposable chip made of porous aluminum oxide (PAO), which retains the sensor microorganisms on its rigid planar surface, while its high porosity allows an undisturbed access both to the sample and to essential nutrients. The ability of the bacterial reporters to detect model toxic chemicals was first demonstrated using a "naked" PAO chip placed on solid agar, and later in a chip encased in a specially designed flow-through configuration which enables continuous on-line monitoring. The applicability of the PAO chip to simultaneous online detection of diverse groups of chemicals was demonstrated by the incorporation of a 6-member sensor array into the flow-through chip. The selective response of the array was also confirmed in spiked municipal wastewater effluents. Sensing activity was retained by the bacteria after 12-weeks storage of freeze-dried biochips, demonstrating the biochip potential as a simple minimal maintenance "plug-in" cartridge. This low-cost and easy to handle PAO-based flow-cell biosensor may serve as a basis for a future platform for water quality monitoring.

  16. Bacterial porin disrupts mitochondrial membrane potential and sensitizes host cells to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Dian-Lothrop, Elke A; Meinecke, Michael; Kepp, Oliver; Ross, Katharina; Rajalingam, Krishnaraj; Harsman, Anke; Hauf, Eva; Brinkmann, Volker; Günther, Dirk; Herrmann, Ines; Hurwitz, Robert; Rassow, Joachim; Wagner, Richard; Rudel, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    The bacterial PorB porin, an ATP-binding beta-barrel protein of pathogenic Neisseria gonorrhoeae, triggers host cell apoptosis by an unknown mechanism. PorB is targeted to and imported by host cell mitochondria, causing the breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)). Here, we show that PorB induces the condensation of the mitochondrial matrix and the loss of cristae structures, sensitizing cells to the induction of apoptosis via signaling pathways activated by BH3-only proteins. PorB is imported into mitochondria through the general translocase TOM but, unexpectedly, is not recognized by the SAM sorting machinery, usually required for the assembly of beta-barrel proteins in the mitochondrial outer membrane. PorB integrates into the mitochondrial inner membrane, leading to the breakdown of DeltaPsi(m). The PorB channel is regulated by nucleotides and an isogenic PorB mutant defective in ATP-binding failed to induce DeltaPsi(m) loss and apoptosis, demonstrating that dissipation of DeltaPsi(m) is a requirement for cell death caused by neisserial infection. PMID:19851451

  17. New method for estimating bacterial cell abundances in natural samples by use of sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Cleaves, H. James; Schubert, Michael; Aubrey, Andrew; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new method based on the sublimation of adenine from Escherichia coli to estimate bacterial cell counts in natural samples. To demonstrate this technique, several types of natural samples, including beach sand, seawater, deep-sea sediment, and two soil samples from the Atacama Desert, were heated to a temperature of 500 degrees C for several seconds under reduced pressure. The sublimate was collected on a cold finger, and the amount of adenine released from the samples was then determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV absorbance detection. Based on the total amount of adenine recovered from DNA and RNA in these samples, we estimated bacterial cell counts ranging from approximately 10(5) to 10(9) E. coli cell equivalents per gram. For most of these samples, the sublimation-based cell counts were in agreement with total bacterial counts obtained by traditional DAPI (4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining.

  18. New method for estimating bacterial cell abundances in natural samples by use of sublimation.

    PubMed

    Glavin, Daniel P; Cleaves, H James; Schubert, Michael; Aubrey, Andrew; Bada, Jeffrey L

    2004-10-01

    We have developed a new method based on the sublimation of adenine from Escherichia coli to estimate bacterial cell counts in natural samples. To demonstrate this technique, several types of natural samples, including beach sand, seawater, deep-sea sediment, and two soil samples from the Atacama Desert, were heated to a temperature of 500 degrees C for several seconds under reduced pressure. The sublimate was collected on a cold finger, and the amount of adenine released from the samples was then determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV absorbance detection. Based on the total amount of adenine recovered from DNA and RNA in these samples, we estimated bacterial cell counts ranging from approximately 10(5) to 10(9) E. coli cell equivalents per gram. For most of these samples, the sublimation-based cell counts were in agreement with total bacterial counts obtained by traditional DAPI (4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining.

  19. A microfluidic device for physical trapping and electrical lysis of bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Ning; Lu, Chang

    2008-05-01

    In this letter, we report a simple microfluidic device that integrates the capture of bacterial cells using a microscale bead array and the rapid electrical lysis for release of intracellular materials. We study the retention of Escherichia coli cells with different concentrations in this type of bead array and the optimal electrical parameters for the electroporative release of intracellular proteins. Our design provides a simple solution to the extraction of intracellular materials from a bacterial cell population based entirely on physical methods without applying chemical or biological reagents.

  20. A constant size extension drives bacterial cell size homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Manuel; Surovtsev, Ivan V.; Kato, Setsu; Paintdakhi, Ahmad; Beltran, Bruno; Ebmeier, Sarah E.; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Cell size control is an intrinsic feature of the cell cycle. In bacteria, cell growth and division are thought to be coupled through a cell size threshold. Here, we provide direct experimental evidence disproving the critical size paradigm. Instead, we show through single-cell microscopy and modeling that the evolutionarily distant bacteria Escherichia coli and Caulobacter crescentus achieve cell size homeostasis by growing on average the same amount between divisions, irrespective of cell length at birth. This simple mechanism provides a remarkably robust cell size control without the need of being precise, abating size deviations exponentially within a few generations. This size homeostasis mechanism is broadly applicable for symmetric and asymmetric divisions as well as for different growth rates. Furthermore, our data suggest that constant size extension is implemented at or close to division. Altogether, our findings provide fundamentally distinct governing principles for cell size and cell cycle control in bacteria. PMID:25480302

  1. Bacterial diversity and active biomass in full-scale granular activated carbon filters operated at low water temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kaarela, Outi E; Härkki, Heli A; Palmroth, Marja R T; Tuhkanen, Tuula A

    2015-01-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration enhances the removal of natural organic matter and micropollutants in drinking water treatment. Microbial communities in GAC filters contribute to the removal of the biodegradable part of organic matter, and thus help to control microbial regrowth in the distribution system. Our objectives were to investigate bacterial community dynamics, identify the major bacterial groups, and determine the concentration of active bacterial biomass in full-scale GAC filters treating cold (3.7-9.5°C), physicochemically pretreated, and ozonated lake water. Three sampling rounds were conducted to study six GAC filters of different operation times and flow modes in winter, spring, and summer. Total organic carbon results indicated that both the first-step and second-step filters contributed to the removal of organic matter. Length heterogeneity analysis of amplified 16S rRNA genes illustrated that bacterial communities were diverse and considerably stable over time. α-Proteobacteria, β-Proteobacteria, and Nitrospira dominated in all of the GAC filters, although the relative proportion of dominant phylogenetic groups in individual filters differed. The active bacterial biomass accumulation, measured as adenosine triphosphate, was limited due to low temperature, low flux of nutrients, and frequent backwashing. The concentration of active bacterial biomass was not affected by the moderate seasonal temperature variation. In summary, the results provided an insight into the biological component of GAC filtration in cold water temperatures and the operational parameters affecting it. PMID:25242545

  2. Bacterial diversity and active biomass in full-scale granular activated carbon filters operated at low water temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kaarela, Outi E; Härkki, Heli A; Palmroth, Marja R T; Tuhkanen, Tuula A

    2015-01-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration enhances the removal of natural organic matter and micropollutants in drinking water treatment. Microbial communities in GAC filters contribute to the removal of the biodegradable part of organic matter, and thus help to control microbial regrowth in the distribution system. Our objectives were to investigate bacterial community dynamics, identify the major bacterial groups, and determine the concentration of active bacterial biomass in full-scale GAC filters treating cold (3.7-9.5°C), physicochemically pretreated, and ozonated lake water. Three sampling rounds were conducted to study six GAC filters of different operation times and flow modes in winter, spring, and summer. Total organic carbon results indicated that both the first-step and second-step filters contributed to the removal of organic matter. Length heterogeneity analysis of amplified 16S rRNA genes illustrated that bacterial communities were diverse and considerably stable over time. α-Proteobacteria, β-Proteobacteria, and Nitrospira dominated in all of the GAC filters, although the relative proportion of dominant phylogenetic groups in individual filters differed. The active bacterial biomass accumulation, measured as adenosine triphosphate, was limited due to low temperature, low flux of nutrients, and frequent backwashing. The concentration of active bacterial biomass was not affected by the moderate seasonal temperature variation. In summary, the results provided an insight into the biological component of GAC filtration in cold water temperatures and the operational parameters affecting it.

  3. Non-canonical inflammasome activation of caspase-4/caspase-11 mediates epithelial defenses against enteric bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Knodler, Leigh A.; Crowley, Shauna M.; Sham, Ho Pan; Yang, Hyungjun; Wrande, Marie; Ma, Caixia; Ernst, Robert K.; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia; Celli, Jean; Vallance, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Inflammasome-mediated host defenses have been extensively studied in innate immune cells. Whether inflammasomes function for innate defense in intestinal epithelial cells, which represent the first line of defense against enteric pathogens, remains unknown. We observed enhanced Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium colonization in the intestinal epithelium of caspase-11 deficient mice, but not at systemic sites. In polarized epithelial monolayers, siRNA-mediated depletion of caspase-4, a human orthologue of caspase-11, also led to increased bacterial colonization. Decreased rates of pyroptotic cell death, a host defense mechanism that extrudes S. Typhimurium infected cells from the polarized epithelium, accounted for increased pathogen burdens. The caspase-4 inflammasome also governs activation of the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL)-18, in response to intracellular (S. Typhimurium) and extracellular (enteropathogenic Escherichia coli) enteric pathogens, via intracellular LPS sensing. Therefore an epithelial cell intrinsic non-canonical inflammasome plays a critical role in antimicrobial defense at the intestinal mucosal surface. PMID:25121752

  4. Anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and cytotoxic activity of fibrous clays.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio-; Ramírez-Apan, María Teresa; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención; Ronquillo de Jesús, Elba

    2015-05-01

    Produced worldwide at 1.2m tons per year, fibrous clays are used in the production of pet litter, animal feed stuff to roof parcels, construction and rheological additives, and other applications needing to replace long-fiber length asbestos. To the authors' knowledge, however, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and cytotoxic activity by sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejon El Rubio, Spain). The anti-inflammatory activity was determined using the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) methods. Histological cuts were obtained for quantifying leukocytes found in the epidermis. Palygorkite and sepiolite caused edema inhibition and migration of neutrophils ca. 68.64 and 45.54%, and 80 and 65%, respectively. Fibrous clays yielded high rates of infiltration, explained by cleavage of polysomes and exposure of silanol groups. Also, fibrous clays showed high inhibition of myeloperoxidase contents shortly after exposure, but decreased sharply afterwards. In contrast, tubular clays caused an increasing inhibition of myeloperoxidase with time. Thus, clay structure restricted the kinetics and mechanism of myeloperoxidase inhibition. Fibrous clays were screened in vitro against human cancer cell lines. Cytotoxicity was determined using the protein-binding dye sulforhodamine B (SRB). Exposing cancer human cells to sepiolite or palygorskite showed growth inhibition varying with cell line. This study shows that fibrous clays served as an effective anti-inflammatory, limited by chemical transfer and cellular-level signals responding exclusively to an early exposure to clay, and cell viability decreasing significantly only after exposure to high concentrations of sepiolite.

  5. Anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and cytotoxic activity of fibrous clays.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio-; Ramírez-Apan, María Teresa; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención; Ronquillo de Jesús, Elba

    2015-05-01

    Produced worldwide at 1.2m tons per year, fibrous clays are used in the production of pet litter, animal feed stuff to roof parcels, construction and rheological additives, and other applications needing to replace long-fiber length asbestos. To the authors' knowledge, however, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and cytotoxic activity by sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejon El Rubio, Spain). The anti-inflammatory activity was determined using the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) methods. Histological cuts were obtained for quantifying leukocytes found in the epidermis. Palygorkite and sepiolite caused edema inhibition and migration of neutrophils ca. 68.64 and 45.54%, and 80 and 65%, respectively. Fibrous clays yielded high rates of infiltration, explained by cleavage of polysomes and exposure of silanol groups. Also, fibrous clays showed high inhibition of myeloperoxidase contents shortly after exposure, but decreased sharply afterwards. In contrast, tubular clays caused an increasing inhibition of myeloperoxidase with time. Thus, clay structure restricted the kinetics and mechanism of myeloperoxidase inhibition. Fibrous clays were screened in vitro against human cancer cell lines. Cytotoxicity was determined using the protein-binding dye sulforhodamine B (SRB). Exposing cancer human cells to sepiolite or palygorskite showed growth inhibition varying with cell line. This study shows that fibrous clays served as an effective anti-inflammatory, limited by chemical transfer and cellular-level signals responding exclusively to an early exposure to clay, and cell viability decreasing significantly only after exposure to high concentrations of sepiolite. PMID:25819359

  6. Nanoscale Cell Wall Deformation Impacts Long-Range Bacterial Adhesion Forces on Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Harapanahalli, Akshay K.; Busscher, Henk J.; Norde, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion of bacteria occurs on virtually all natural and synthetic surfaces and is crucial for their survival. Once they are adhering, bacteria start growing and form a biofilm, in which they are protected against environmental attacks. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is mediated by a combination of different short- and long-range forces. Here we present a new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based method to derive long-range bacterial adhesion forces from the dependence of bacterial adhesion forces on the loading force, as applied during the use of AFM. The long-range adhesion forces of wild-type Staphylococcus aureus parent strains (0.5 and 0.8 nN) amounted to only one-third of these forces measured for their more deformable isogenic Δpbp4 mutants that were deficient in peptidoglycan cross-linking. The measured long-range Lifshitz-Van der Waals adhesion forces matched those calculated from published Hamaker constants, provided that a 40% ellipsoidal deformation of the bacterial cell wall was assumed for the Δpbp4 mutants. Direct imaging of adhering staphylococci using the AFM peak force-quantitative nanomechanical property mapping imaging mode confirmed a height reduction due to deformation in the Δpbp4 mutants of 100 to 200 nm. Across naturally occurring bacterial strains, long-range forces do not vary to the extent observed here for the Δpbp4 mutants. Importantly, however, extrapolating from the results of this study, it can be concluded that long-range bacterial adhesion forces are determined not only by the composition and structure of the bacterial cell surface but also by a hitherto neglected, small deformation of the bacterial cell wall, facilitating an increase in contact area and, therewith, in adhesion force. PMID:24212582

  7. Interpretation of biological activity data of bacterial endotoxins by simple molecular models of mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Frecer, V; Ho, B; Ding, J L

    2000-02-01

    Lipid A moiety has been identified as the bioactive component of bacterial endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides). However, the molecular mechanism of biological activity of lipid A is still not fully understood. This paper contributes to understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of bacterial endotoxins by comparing molecular modelling results for two possible mechanisms with the underlying experimental data. Mechanisms of action involving specific binding of lipid A to a protein receptor as well as nonspecific intercalation into phospholipid membrane of a host cell were modelled and analysed. As the cellular receptor for endotoxin has not been identified, a model of a peptidic pseudoreceptor was proposed, based on molecular structure, symmetry of the lipid A moiety and the observed character of endotoxin-binding sites in proteins. We have studied the monomeric form of lipid A from Escherichia coli and its seven synthetic analogues with varying numbers of phosphate groups and correlated them with known biological activities determined by the Limulus assay. Gibbs free energies associated with the interaction of lipid A with the pseudoreceptor model and intercalation into phospholipid membrane calculated by molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics methods were used to compare the two possible mechanisms of action. The results suggest that specific binding of lipid A analogues to the peptidic pseudoreceptor carrying an amphipathic cationic binding pattern BHPHB (B, basic; H, hydrophobic; P, polar residue, respectively) is energetically more favourable than intercalation into the phospholipid membrane. In addition, binding affinities of lipid A analogues to the best minimum binding sequence KFSFK of the pseudoreceptor correlated with the experimental Limulus activity parameter. This correlation enabled us to rationalize the observed relationship between the number and position of the phosphate groups in the lipid A moiety and its biological activity in terms of

  8. Bacterial cell wall-induced arthritis: chemical composition and tissue distribution of four Lactobacillus strains.

    PubMed

    Simelyte, E; Rimpiläinen, M; Lehtonen, L; Zhang, X; Toivanen, P

    2000-06-01

    To study what determines the arthritogenicity of bacterial cell walls, cell wall-induced arthritis in the rat was applied, using four strains of Lactobacillus. Three of the strains used proved to induce chronic arthritis in the rat; all were Lactobacillus casei. The cell wall of Lactobacillus fermentum did not induce chronic arthritis. All arthritogenic bacterial cell walls had the same peptidoglycan structure, whereas that of L. fermentum was different. Likewise, all arthritogenic cell walls were resistant to lysozyme degradation, whereas the L. fermentum cell wall was lysozyme sensitive. Muramic acid was observed in the liver, spleen, and lymph nodes in considerably larger amounts after injection of an arthritogenic L. casei cell wall than following injection of a nonarthritogenic L. fermentum cell wall. The L. casei cell wall also persisted in the tissues longer than the L. fermentum cell wall. The present results, taken together with those published previously, underline the possibility that the chemical structure of peptidoglycan is important in determining the arthritogenicity of the bacterial cell wall. PMID:10816508

  9. Dynamics of phenotypic reversibility of bacterial cells with oscillating hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepal, Sudip; Kumar, Pradeep

    Bacterial cells encounter and respond to physiochemical fluctuations. The response depends on the extent and type of the stresses applied. The response of bacterial cells to the fluctuating stress is relatively unknown. Here, we have studied the response of wild type Escherichia coli (E. coli) under fluctuating hydrostatic pressures ranging from 1 atm to 500 atm. High pressure acts as a stress to E. coli since these bacteria are adapted to grow optimally at atmospheric pressure. Cell division of E. coli is inhibited at high pressures resulting in increase in the length of the cells. Cell-length is reversible in nature and bacterial cells revert back to normal size on a time scale that is proportional to the strength and time of continuous pressure applied upon relaxing the high pressure condition. We have studied the dynamics of cellular reversibility of E. coli under the conditions in which continuous pressure is applied and subsequently relaxed over different time scales. We have quantified the dynamics of cellular reversibility with different relaxation times. Furthermore, we propose a model to describe the reversibility of the bacterial cell with the relaxation time. Our theoretical model fits well to the experimental data. We further

  10. Cell-to-Cell Propagation of the Bacterial Toxin CNF1 via Extracellular Vesicles: Potential Impact on the Therapeutic Use of the Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Alessia; Cori, Sara; Zanetti, Cristiana; Guidotti, Marco; Sargiacomo, Massimo; Loizzo, Stefano; Fiorentini, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells secrete extracellular vesicles (EVs), either constitutively or in a regulated manner, which represent an important mode of intercellular communication. EVs serve as vehicles for transfer between cells of membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids and RNA. Furthermore, certain bacterial protein toxins, or possibly their derived messages, can be transferred cell to cell via EVs. We have herein demonstrated that eukaryotic EVs represent an additional route of cell-to-cell propagation for the Escherichia coli protein toxin cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1). Our results prove that EVs from CNF1 pre-infected epithelial cells can induce cytoskeleton changes, Rac1 and NF-κB activation comparable to that triggered by CNF1. The observation that the toxin is detectable inside EVs derived from CNF1-intoxicated cells strongly supports the hypothesis that extracellular vesicles can offer to the toxin a novel route to travel from cell to cell. Since anthrax and tetanus toxins have also been reported to engage in the same process, we can hypothesize that EVs represent a common mechanism exploited by bacterial toxins to enhance their pathogenicity. PMID:26556375

  11. Disinfection byproduct formation from chlorination of pure bacterial cells and pipeline biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Jian; Liu, Xin; Ng, Tsz Wai; Xiao, Jie-Wen; Chow, Alex T; Wong, Po Keung

    2013-05-15

    Disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation is commonly attributed to the reaction between natural organic matters and disinfectants, yet few have considered the contribution from disinfecting bacterial materials - the essential process of water disinfection. Here, we explored the DBP formation from chlorination and chloramination of Escherichia coli and found that most selected DBPs were detectable, including trihalomethanes, haloacetonitriles, chloral hydrate, chloropicrin, and 1,1,1-trichloro-2-propanone. A positive correlation (P = 0.08-0.09) between DBP formation and the log reduction of E. coli implied that breaking down of bacterial cells released precursors for DBP formation. As Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a dominant bacterial species in pipeline biofilms, the DBP formation potentials (DBPFPs) from its planktonic cells and biofilms were characterized. Planktonic cells formed 7-11 times greater trihalomethanes per carbon of those from biofilms but significantly lower (P < 0.05) chloral hydrate, highlighting the bacterial phenotype's impact on the bacteria-derived DBPFP. Pipe material appeared to affect the DBPFP of bacteria, with 4-28% lower bromine incorporation factor for biofilms on polyvinyl chloride compared to that on galvanized zinc. This study revealed both the in situ disinfection of bacterial planktonic cells in source water and ex situ reaction between biofilms and residual chlorine in pipeline networks as hitherto unknown DBP sources in drinking water.

  12. Microspectrometric insights on the uptake of antibiotics at the single bacterial cell level.

    PubMed

    Cinquin, Bertrand; Maigre, Laure; Pinet, Elizabeth; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Stavenger, Robert A; Mills, Scott; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2015-12-11

    Bacterial multidrug resistance is a significant health issue. A key challenge, particularly in Gram-negative antibacterial research, is to better understand membrane permeation of antibiotics in clinically relevant bacterial pathogens. Passing through the membrane barrier to reach the required concentration inside the bacterium is a pivotal step for most antibacterials. Spectrometric methodology has been developed to detect drugs inside bacteria and recent studies have focused on bacterial cell imaging. Ultimately, we seek to use this method to identify pharmacophoric groups which improve penetration, and therefore accumulation, of small-molecule antibiotics inside bacteria. We developed a method to quantify the time scale of antibiotic accumulation in living bacterial cells. Tunable ultraviolet excitation provided by DISCO beamline (synchrotron Soleil) combined with microscopy allows spectroscopic analysis of the antibiotic signal in individual bacterial cells. Robust controls and measurement of the crosstalk between fluorescence channels can provide real time quantification of drug. This technique represents a new method to assay drug translocation inside the cell and therefore incorporate rational drug design to impact antibiotic uptake.

  13. Microspectrometric insights on the uptake of antibiotics at the single bacterial cell level

    PubMed Central

    Cinquin, Bertrand; Maigre, Laure; Pinet, Elizabeth; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Stavenger, Robert A.; Mills, Scott; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial multidrug resistance is a significant health issue. A key challenge, particularly in Gram-negative antibacterial research, is to better understand membrane permeation of antibiotics in clinically relevant bacterial pathogens. Passing through the membrane barrier to reach the required concentration inside the bacterium is a pivotal step for most antibacterials. Spectrometric methodology has been developed to detect drugs inside bacteria and recent studies have focused on bacterial cell imaging. Ultimately, we seek to use this method to identify pharmacophoric groups which improve penetration, and therefore accumulation, of small-molecule antibiotics inside bacteria. We developed a method to quantify the time scale of antibiotic accumulation in living bacterial cells. Tunable ultraviolet excitation provided by DISCO beamline (synchrotron Soleil) combined with microscopy allows spectroscopic analysis of the antibiotic signal in individual bacterial cells. Robust controls and measurement of the crosstalk between fluorescence channels can provide real time quantification of drug. This technique represents a new method to assay drug translocation inside the cell and therefore incorporate rational drug design to impact antibiotic uptake. PMID:26656111

  14. Bacterial Infection of Fly Ovaries Reduces Egg Production and Induces Local Hemocyte Activation

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Stephanie M.; Schneider, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Morbidity, the state of being diseased, is an important aspect of pathogenesis that has gone relatively unstudied in fruit flies. Our interest is in characterizing how bacterial pathogenesis affects various physiologies of the fly. We chose to examine the fly ovary because we found bacterial infection had a striking effect on fly reproduction. We observed decreased egg laying after bacterial infection that correlated with increased bacterial virulence. We also found that bacteria colonized the ovary in a previously undescribed manner; bacteria were found in the posterior of the ovary, adjacent to the lateral oviduct. This local infection in the ovary resulted in melanization and activation of the cellular immune response at the site of infection. PMID:17400292

  15. Mechanisms of bacterial morphogenesis: Evolutionary cell biology approaches provide new insights

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chao; Caccamo, Paul D.; Brun, Yves V.

    2015-01-01

    How Darwin’s “endless forms most beautiful” have evolved remains one of the most exciting questions in biology. The significant variety of bacterial shapes is most likely due to the specific advantages they confer with respect to the diverse environments they occupy. While our understanding of the mechanisms generating relatively simple shapes has improved tremendously in the last few years, the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of complex shapes and the evolution of shape diversity are largely unknown. The emerging field of bacterial evolutionary cell biology provides a novel strategy to answer this question in a comparative phylogenetic framework. This relatively novel approach provides hypotheses and insights into cell biological mechanisms, such as morphogenesis, and their evolution that would have been difficult to obtain by studying only model organisms. We discuss the necessary steps, challenges, and impact of integrating “evolutionary thinking” into bacterial cell biology in the genomic era. PMID:25664446

  16. Mechanisms of bacterial morphogenesis: evolutionary cell biology approaches provide new insights.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chao; Caccamo, Paul D; Brun, Yves V

    2015-04-01

    How Darwin's "endless forms most beautiful" have evolved remains one of the most exciting questions in biology. The significant variety of bacterial shapes is most likely due to the specific advantages they confer with respect to the diverse environments they occupy. While our understanding of the mechanisms generating relatively simple shapes has improved tremendously in the last few years, the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of complex shapes and the evolution of shape diversity are largely unknown. The emerging field of bacterial evolutionary cell biology provides a novel strategy to answer this question in a comparative phylogenetic framework. This relatively novel approach provides hypotheses and insights into cell biological mechanisms, such as morphogenesis, and their evolution that would have been difficult to obtain by studying only model organisms. We discuss the necessary steps, challenges, and impact of integrating "evolutionary thinking" into bacterial cell biology in the genomic era.

  17. Single-bacterium nanomechanics in biomedicine: unravelling the dynamics of bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, S; Donos, N; Spratt, D; Bozec, L

    2015-02-13

    The use of the atomic force microscope (AFM) in microbiology has progressed significantly throughout the years since its first application as a high-resolution imaging instrument. Modern AFM setups are capable of characterizing the nanomechanical behaviour of bacterial cells at both the cellular and molecular levels, where elastic properties and adhesion forces of single bacterium cells can be examined under different experimental conditions. Considering that bacterial and biofilm-mediated infections continue to challenge the biomedical field, it is important to understand the biophysical events leading towards bacterial adhesion and colonization on both biological and non-biological substrates. The purpose of this review is to present the latest findings concerning the field of single-bacterium nanomechanics, and discuss future trends and applications of nanoindentation and single-cell force spectroscopy techniques in biomedicine.

  18. Measuring bacterial activity and community composition at high hydrostatic pressure using a novel experimental approach: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wannicke, Nicola; Frindte, Katharina; Gust, Giselher; Liskow, Iris; Wacker, Alexander; Meyer, Andreas; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2015-05-01

    In this pilot study, we describe a high-pressure incubation system allowing multiple subsampling of a pressurized culture without decompression. The system was tested using one piezophilic (Photobacterium profundum), one piezotolerant (Colwellia maris) bacterial strain and a decompressed sample from the Mediterranean deep sea (3044 m) determining bacterial community composition, protein production (BPP) and cell multiplication rates (BCM) up to 27 MPa. The results showed elevation of BPP at high pressure was by a factor of 1.5 ± 1.4 and 3.9 ± 2.3 for P. profundum and C. maris, respectively, compared to ambient-pressure treatments and by a factor of 6.9 ± 3.8 fold in the field samples. In P. profundum and C. maris, BCM at high pressure was elevated (3.1 ± 1.5 and 2.9 ± 1.7 fold, respectively) compared to the ambient-pressure treatments. After 3 days of incubation at 27 MPa, the natural bacterial deep-sea community was dominated by one phylum of the genus Exiguobacterium, indicating the rapid selection of piezotolerant bacteria. In future studies, our novel incubation system could be part of an isopiestic pressure chain, allowing more accurate measurement of bacterial activity rates which is important both for modeling and for predicting the efficiency of the oceanic carbon pump.

  19. Transcriptional Activation of c3 and hsp70 as Part of the Immune Response of Acropora millepora to Bacterial Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tanya; Bourne, David; Rodriguez-Lanetty, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    The impact of disease outbreaks on coral physiology represents an increasing concern for the fitness and resilience of reef ecosystems. Predicting the tolerance of corals to disease relies on an understanding of the coral immune response to pathogenic interactions. This study explored the transcriptional response of two putative immune genes (c3 and c-type lectin) and one stress response gene (hsp70) in the reef building coral, Acropora millepora challenged for 48 hours with bacterial strains, Vibrio coralliilyticus and Alteromonas sp. at concentrations of 106 cells ml-1. Coral fragments challenged with V. coralliilyticus appeared healthy while fragments challenged with Alteromonas sp. showed signs of tissue lesions after 48 hr. Coral-associated bacterial community profiles assessed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis changed after challenge by both bacterial strains with the Alteromonas sp. treatment demonstrating the greatest community shift. Transcriptional profiles of c3 and hsp70 increased at 24 hours and correlated with disease signs in the Alteromonas sp. treatment. The expression of hsp70 also showed a significant increase in V. coralliilyticus inoculated corals at 24 h suggesting that even in the absence of disease signs, the microbial inoculum activated a stress response in the coral. C-type lectin did not show a response to any of the bacterial treatments. Increase in gene expression of c3 and hsp70 in corals showing signs of disease indicates their potential involvement in immune and stress response to microbial challenges. PMID:23861754

  20. The Balance of Apoptotic and Necrotic Cell Death in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infected Macrophages Is Not Dependent on Bacterial Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Rachel E.; Brodin, Priscille; Jang, Jichan; Jang, Mi-Seon; Robertson, Brian D.; Gicquel, Brigitte; Stewart, Graham R.

    2012-01-01

    Background An important mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis is the ability to control cell death pathways in infected macrophages: apoptotic cell death is bactericidal, whereas necrotic cell death may facilitate bacterial dissemination and transmission. Methods We examine M.tuberculosis control of spontaneous and chemically induced macrophage cell death using automated confocal fluorescence microscopy, image analysis, flow cytometry, plate-reader based vitality assays, and M.tuberculosis strains including H37Rv, and isogenic virulent and avirulent strains of the Beijing lineage isolate GC1237. Results We show that bacterial virulence influences the dynamics of caspase activation and the total level of cytotoxicity. We show that the powerful ability of M.tuberculosis to inhibit exogenously stimulated apoptosis is abrogated by loss of virulence. However, loss of virulence did not influence the balance of macrophage apoptosis and necrosis – both virulent and avirulent isogenic strains of GC1237 induced predominantly necrotic cell death compared to H37Rv which induced a higher relative level of apoptosis. Conclusions This reveals that macrophage necrosis and apoptosis are independently regulated during M. tuberculosis infection of macrophages. Virulence affects the level of host cell death and ability to inhibit apoptosis but other strain-specific characteristics influence the ultimate mode of host cell death and alter the balance of apoptosis and necrosis. PMID:23118880

  1. Desialylation of Spermatozoa and Epithelial Cell Glycocalyx Is a Consequence of Bacterial Infection of the Epididymis.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Farhad; Michel, Vera; Galuska, Christina E; Bhushan, Sudhanshu; Christian, Philipp; Schuppe, Hans-Christian; Pilatz, Adrian; Galuska, Sebastian P; Meinhardt, Andreas

    2016-08-19

    Urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) pathovars belong to the most frequent infections in humans. In men, pathogens can also spread to the genital tract via the continuous ductal system, eliciting bacterial prostatitis and/or epididymo-orchitis. Antibiotic treatment usually clears pathogens in acute epididymitis; however, the fertility of patients can be permanently impaired. Because a premature acrosome reaction was observed in an UPEC epididymitis mouse model, and sialidases on the sperm surface are considered to be activated via proteases of the acrosome, we aimed to investigate whether alterations of the sialome of epididymal spermatozoa and surrounding epithelial cells occur during UPEC infection. In UPEC-elicited acute epididymitis in mice, a substantial loss of N-acetylneuraminic acid residues was detected in epididymal spermatozoa and epithelial cells using combined laser microdissection/HPLC-ESI-MS analysis. In support, a substantial reduction of sialic acid residues bound to the surface of spermatozoa was documented in men with a recent history of E. coli-associated epididymitis. In vitro, such an UPEC induced N-acetylneuraminic acid release from human spermatozoa was effectively counteracted by a sialidase inhibitor. These findings strongly suggest a substantial remodeling of the glycocalyx of spermatozoa and epididymal epithelial cells by endogenous sialidases after a premature acrosome reaction during acute epididymitis. PMID:27339898

  2. A Simple and Rapid Method for Preparing a Cell-Free Bacterial Lysate for Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kaduri, Maya; Shainsky-Roitman, Janna; Goldfeder, Mor; Ivanir, Eran; Benhar, Itai; Shoham, Yuval; Schroeder, Avi

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) systems are important laboratory tools that are used for various synthetic biology applications. Here, we present a simple and inexpensive laboratory-scale method for preparing a CFPS system from E. coli. The procedure uses basic lab equipment, a minimal set of reagents, and requires less than one hour to process the bacterial cell mass into a functional S30-T7 extract. BL21(DE3) and MRE600 E. coli strains were used to prepare the S30-T7 extract. The CFPS system was used to produce a set of fluorescent and therapeutic proteins of different molecular weights (up to 66 kDa). This system was able to produce 40–150 μg-protein/ml, with variations depending on the plasmid type, expressed protein and E. coli strain. Interestingly, the BL21-based CFPS exhibited stability and increased activity at 40 and 45°C. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most rapid and affordable lab-scale protocol for preparing a cell-free protein synthesis system, with high thermal stability and efficacy in producing therapeutic proteins. PMID:27768741

  3. [Disinfectants - bacterial cells interactions in the view of hygiene and public health].

    PubMed

    Książczyk, Marta; Krzyżewska, Eva; Futoma-Kołoch, Bożena; Bugla-Płoskońska, Gabriela

    2015-09-20

    In recent years, the use of biocides has increased rapidly. One common example is triclosan, with wide application in households as well as medical and industrial fields, especially food industry and animal husbandry. Chemical disinfection is a major mean to control and eliminate pathogenic bacteria, particularly those with multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. However, exposition to biocides results in an adaptive response in microorganisms, causing them to display a wide range of resistance mechanisms. Numerous microorganisms are characterized by either natural resistance to chemical compounds or an ability to adapt to biocides using various strategies, such as: modification of cell surface structures (lipopolisaccharide), membrane fatty acids), over-expression of efflux pumps (a system for active transport of toxic compounds out of bacterial cell), enzymatic inactivation of biocides or altering biocide targets. For instance, it was shown that in vitro exposition of Salmonella Typhimurium to subinhibitory concentration of biocides (triclosan, quaternary ammonium compounds [QACs]) resulted in selection of variants resistant to tested biocides and, additionally, to acridine dyes and antibiotics. Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus strains isolated from chlorine dioxide containing disinfection devices were found to be resistant to chlorine dioxide and also to other oxidizing compounds, such as peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Interaction between chemical compounds, including disinfectants and microbial cells, can create a serious threat to public health and sanitary-hygienic security. This phenomenon is connected with factor risk that intensify the probability of selection and dissemination of multidrug resistance among pathogenic bacteria.

  4. [Disinfectants - bacterial cells interactions in the view of hygiene and public health].

    PubMed

    Książczyk, Marta; Krzyżewska, Eva; Futoma-Kołoch, Bożena; Bugla-Płoskońska, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the use of biocides has increased rapidly. One common example is triclosan, with wide application in households as well as medical and industrial fields, especially food industry and animal husbandry. Chemical disinfection is a major mean to control and eliminate pathogenic bacteria, particularly those with multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. However, exposition to biocides results in an adaptive response in microorganisms, causing them to display a wide range of resistance mechanisms. Numerous microorganisms are characterized by either natural resistance to chemical compounds or an ability to adapt to biocides using various strategies, such as: modification of cell surface structures (lipopolisaccharide), membrane fatty acids), over-expression of efflux pumps (a system for active transport of toxic compounds out of bacterial cell), enzymatic inactivation of biocides or altering biocide targets. For instance, it was shown that in vitro exposition of Salmonella Typhimurium to subinhibitory concentration of biocides (triclosan, quaternary ammonium compounds [QACs]) resulted in selection of variants resistant to tested biocides and, additionally, to acridine dyes and antibiotics. Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus strains isolated from chlorine dioxide containing disinfection devices were found to be resistant to chlorine dioxide and also to other oxidizing compounds, such as peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Interaction between chemical compounds, including disinfectants and microbial cells, can create a serious threat to public health and sanitary-hygienic security. This phenomenon is connected with factor risk that intensify the probability of selection and dissemination of multidrug resistance among pathogenic bacteria. PMID:26400890

  5. Ankyrin-mediated self-protection during cell invasion by the bacterial predator Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Carey; Cadby, Ian T; Till, Rob; Bui, Nhat Khai; Lerner, Thomas R; Hughes, William S; Lee, David J; Alderwick, Luke J; Vollmer, Waldemar; Sockett, R Elizabeth; Sockett, Elizabeth R; Lovering, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Predatory Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus are natural antimicrobial organisms, killing other bacteria by whole-cell invasion. Self-protection against prey-metabolizing enzymes is important for the evolution of predation. Initial prey entry involves the predator's peptidoglycan DD-endopeptidases, which decrosslink cell walls and prevent wasteful entry by a second predator. Here we identify and characterize a self-protection protein from B. bacteriovorus, Bd3460, which displays an ankyrin-based fold common to intracellular pathogens of eukaryotes. Co-crystal structures reveal Bd3460 complexation of dual targets, binding a conserved epitope of each of the Bd3459 and Bd0816 endopeptidases. Complexation inhibits endopeptidase activity and cell wall decrosslinking in vitro. Self-protection is vital - ΔBd3460 Bdellovibrio deleteriously decrosslink self-peptidoglycan upon invasion, adopt a round morphology, and lose predatory capacity and cellular integrity. Our analysis provides the first mechanistic examination of self-protection in Bdellovibrio, documents protection-multiplicity for products of two different genomic loci, and reveals an important evolutionary adaptation to an invasive predatory bacterial lifestyle. PMID:26626559

  6. A silicon cell cycle in a bacterial model of calcium phosphate mineralogenesis.

    PubMed

    Linton, Kathryn M; Tapping, Charles R; Adams, David G; CarterR, D Howard; Shore, Roger C; Aaron, Jean E

    2013-01-01

    The prokaryote Corynebacterium matruchotii produces calcium phosphate (bone salt) and may serve as a convenient model for examining individual factors relevant to vertebrate calcification. A factor of current clinical uncertainty is silicon. To investigate its possible role in biomineralisation advanced optical (digital deconvolution and 3D fluorescent image rendering) and electron microscopy (EDX microanalysis and elemental mapping) were applied to calcifying microbial colonies grown in graded Si concentrations (0-60mM). Cell viability was confirmed throughout by TO-PRO-3-iodide and SYTO-9 nucleic acid staining. It was observed that calcium accumulated in dense intracellular microspherical objects (types i-iii) as nanoparticles (5 nm, type i), nanospheres (30-50 nm, type ii) and filamentous clusters (0.1-0.5 μm, type iii), with a regular transitory Si content evident. With bacterial colony development (7-28 days) the P content increased from 5 to 60%, while Si was displaced from 60 to 5%, distinguishing the phenomenon from random contamination, and with a significant relationship (p<0.001) found between calcified object number and Si supplementation (optimum 0.01mM). The Si-containing, intracellular calcified objects (also positive for Mg and negative with Lysensor blue DND-167 for acidocalcisomes) were extruded naturally in bubble-like chains to complete the cycle by coating the cell surface with discrete mineral particles. These could be harvested by lysis, French press and density fractionation when Si was confirmed in a proportion. It was concluded that the unexplained orthopaedic activity of Si may derive from its special property to facilitate calcium phosphorylation in biological systems, thereby recapitulating an ancient and conserved bacterial cycle of calcification via silicification. PMID:23098642

  7. Active viscoelastic matter: from bacterial drag reduction to turbulent solids.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, E J; Maitra, A; Banerjee, S; Marchetti, M C; Ramaswamy, S; Fielding, S M; Cates, M E

    2015-03-01

    A paradigm for internally driven matter is the active nematic liquid crystal, whereby the equations of a conventional nematic are supplemented by a minimal active stress that violates time-reversal symmetry. In practice, active fluids may have not only liquid-crystalline but also viscoelastic polymer degrees of freedom. Here we explore the resulting interplay by coupling an active nematic to a minimal model of polymer rheology. We find that adding a polymer can greatly increase the complexity of spontaneous flow, but can also have calming effects, thereby increasing the net throughput of spontaneous flow along a pipe (a "drag-reduction" effect). Remarkably, active turbulence can also arise after switching on activity in a sufficiently soft elastomeric solid. PMID:25793858

  8. Active Viscoelastic Matter: From Bacterial Drag Reduction to Turbulent Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemingway, E. J.; Maitra, A.; Banerjee, S.; Marchetti, M. C.; Ramaswamy, S.; Fielding, S. M.; Cates, M. E.

    2015-03-01

    A paradigm for internally driven matter is the active nematic liquid crystal, whereby the equations of a conventional nematic are supplemented by a minimal active stress that violates time-reversal symmetry. In practice, active fluids may have not only liquid-crystalline but also viscoelastic polymer degrees of freedom. Here we explore the resulting interplay by coupling an active nematic to a minimal model of polymer rheology. We find that adding a polymer can greatly increase the complexity of spontaneous flow, but can also have calming effects, thereby increasing the net throughput of spontaneous flow along a pipe (a "drag-reduction" effect). Remarkably, active turbulence can also arise after switching on activity in a sufficiently soft elastomeric solid.

  9. Active viscoelastic matter: from bacterial drag reduction to turbulent solids.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, E J; Maitra, A; Banerjee, S; Marchetti, M C; Ramaswamy, S; Fielding, S M; Cates, M E

    2015-03-01

    A paradigm for internally driven matter is the active nematic liquid crystal, whereby the equations of a conventional nematic are supplemented by a minimal active stress that violates time-reversal symmetry. In practice, active fluids may have not only liquid-crystalline but also viscoelastic polymer degrees of freedom. Here we explore the resulting interplay by coupling an active nematic to a minimal model of polymer rheology. We find that adding a polymer can greatly increase the complexity of spontaneous flow, but can also have calming effects, thereby increasing the net throughput of spontaneous flow along a pipe (a "drag-reduction" effect). Remarkably, active turbulence can also arise after switching on activity in a sufficiently soft elastomeric solid.

  10. Disturbance of the bacterial cell wall specifically interferes with biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Tabitha; Oppenheimer-Shaanan, Yaara; Savidor, Alon; Bloom-Ackermann, Zohar; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana

    2015-12-01

    In nature, bacteria communicate via chemical cues and establish complex communities referred to as biofilms, wherein cells are held together by an extracellular matrix. Much research is focusing on small molecules that manipulate and prevent biofilm assembly by modifying cellular signalling pathways. However, the bacterial cell envelope, presenting the interface between bacterial cells and their surroundings, is largely overlooked. In our study, we identified specific targets within the biosynthesis pathways of the different cell wall components (peptidoglycan, wall teichoic acids and teichuronic acids) hampering biofilm formation and the anchoring of the extracellular matrix with a minimal effect on planktonic growth. In addition, we provide convincing evidence that biofilm hampering by transglycosylation inhibitors and D-Leucine triggers a highly specific response without changing the overall protein levels within the biofilm cells or the overall levels of the extracellular matrix components. The presented results emphasize the central role of the Gram-positive cell wall in biofilm development, resistance and sustainment.

  11. Microfluidic pretreatment of bacterial cells for analysis of intracellular contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsiang-Yu; Lu, Chang; Banada, Padmapriya P.; Jagadeesan, Balamurugan; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2005-11-01

    Electrical lysis of biological cells on a microfluidic platform has been raising a lot of interests due to its applications in rapid recovering intracellular contents without introducing lytic agents. In this study, we demonstrated a simple microfluidic device which lysed green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing E. coli cells under continuous DC voltage while cells flowed through. The cell lysis only happened in a defined section of a microfluidic channel due to the local field amplification by geometric modification. The geometric modification also effectively decreased the required voltage for lysis by several folds. We found that a local field strength of 1500V/cm was required for lysis of nearly 100% of E. coli cells. This lysis field strength was considerably lower than the value reported in the literature, possibly due to the longer duration of the field. The lysis was witnessed by plate count and fluorescence spectroscopy. The devices were fabricated using low-cost soft lithography with channel widths considerably larger than the cell size to avoid clogging and ensure stable performance. Our tool will be ideal for high throughput processing of a large number of cells. Furthermore, the application of continuous DC field makes it straightforward to couple our cell lysis device with on-chip electrophoresis to realize the integration of cell pretreatment and chemical analysis. In principle, the same approach can also be applied for the lysis of mammalian cells and for the electroporation and transfection.

  12. Modelling and analysis of bacterial tracks suggest an active reorientation mechanism in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, Gabriel; Baker, Ruth E.; Armitage, Judith P.; Fletcher, Alexander G.

    2014-01-01

    Most free-swimming bacteria move in approximately straight lines, interspersed with random reorientation phases. A key open question concerns varying mechanisms by which reorientation occurs. We combine mathematical modelling with analysis of a large tracking dataset to study the poorly understood reorientation mechanism in the monoflagellate species Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The flagellum on this species rotates counterclockwise to propel the bacterium, periodically ceasing rotation to enable reorientation. When rotation restarts the cell body usually points in a new direction. It has been assumed that the new direction is simply the result of Brownian rotation. We consider three variants of a self-propelled particle model of bacterial motility. The first considers rotational diffusion only, corresponding to a non-chemotactic mutant strain. Two further models incorporate stochastic reorientations, describing ‘run-and-tumble’ motility. We derive expressions for key summary statistics and simulate each model using a stochastic computational algorithm. We also discuss the effect of cell geometry on rotational diffusion. Working with a previously published tracking dataset, we compare predictions of the models with data on individual stopping events in R. sphaeroides. This provides strong evidence that this species undergoes some form of active reorientation rather than simple reorientation by Brownian rotation. PMID:24872500

  13. In Vitro Activity of Gepotidacin, a Novel Triazaacenaphthylene Bacterial Topoisomerase Inhibitor, against a Broad Spectrum of Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Bouchillon, S. K.; Hackel, M.; Miller, L. A.; Scangarella-Oman, N. E.; Jakielaszek, C.; Sahm, D. F.

    2016-01-01

    Gepotidacin inhibits bacterial DNA replication through a mode different from that of fluoroquinolones. Gepotidacin and comparators were tested by broth and agar dilution against clinical isolates. The in vitro activities of gepotidacin were comparable against methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA, respectively) isolates (MIC90, 0.5 μg/ml). The gepotidacin MIC90s were as follows (in micrograms per milliliter) for the indicated bacteria: Streptococcus pyogenes, 0.25; Escherichia coli, 2; Moraxella catarrhalis, ≤0.06; Streptococcus pneumoniae (0.25), Haemophilus influenzae, 1; Clostridium perfringens, 0.5; and Shigella spp., 1, including levofloxacin-resistant subsets. Gepotidacin warrants further investigation for clinical development. PMID:26729499

  14. Bacterial biomass and activity in the deep waters of the eastern Atlantic—evidence of a barophilic community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patching, J. W.; Eardly, D.

    1997-09-01

    Bacterial biomass and activity were investigated in deep waters at two sites in the eastern Atlantic, of similar depth (4560-4800 m), but varying in their nutritional status. The Northern (N) site was eutrophic and subject to a strong seasonal input of surface derived organic matter (phytodetritus) to the sediment. The Southern (S) site was oligotrophic. Deep water at this site does not appear to receive any strong seasonal input. Bacterial numbers in the deep water column at the N site showed no significant seasonal variation but were greater than those at the S site. Deep water bacteria were typically small and free-living. From biovolume determinations, it was estimated that mean concentrations of bacterial organic carbon at depths greater than 500 m were 0.12 (0.03-0.29) μg C 1 -1 and 0.02 (0.01-0.04) μg C 1 -1 at the N and S sites, respectively. Rates of thymidine and leucine incorporation were used as indicators of bacterial activity. Bacterial communities in water in contact with the sediment (SCW; sediment contact water) at both sites (but especially at the S site) were strongly barophilic at in situ temperatures (2.5-4.1°C). The barophilic response of thymidine incorporation was enhanced when SCW samples from the N site were incubated at 11.5°C. It is proposed that this result indicated an elevating effect of pressure on cardinal temperatures and that the SCW community was obligately psychrophilic when unpressurised. Comparison of cell-specific incorporation rates determined under in situ conditions showed bacteria in the SCW to have levels of activity comparable with bacteria from a depth of 150 m. Thymidine incorporation rates were highest in SCW samples taken at the N site in May 1988 and September 1989. Thymidine incorporation by SCW samples taken immediately before (10 April 1994) the main spring-bloom-associated deposition of phytodetritus was significantly lower and comparable with that determined for the oligotrophic S site. The attributes

  15. Slight Pro-Inflammatory Immunomodulation Properties of Dendritic Cells by Gardnerella vaginalis: The “Invisible Man” of Bacterial Vaginosis?

    PubMed Central

    Bertran, Thomas; Brachet, Patrick; Vareille-Delarbre, Marjolaine; Falenta, Julie; Dosgilbert, Annie; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Forestier, Christiane; Tridon, Arlette; Evrard, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), the most common genital infection in reproductive-aged women, is associated with increased risk of sexually transmitted infections. Its etiology remains unclear, especially the role of Gardnerella (G.) vaginalis, an anaerobic bacterium characteristic of the BV-alteration of the vaginal ecosystem. In the genital mucosa, dendritic cells (DCs) sense bacteria of the microenvironment via receptors and then orchestrate the immune response by induction of different T cell subtypes. We investigated the interactions between G. vaginalis and human monocyte-derived DCs using a wide range of bacterial concentrations (multiplicity of infection from 0.01 to 100), and the effects of this pathogen on PHA-induced lymphocyte proliferation. As observed by electron microscopy and cytometry, G. vaginalis reduced the internalization ability of DCs by forming extracellular clusters and induced neither DC maturation, nor DC secretion of cytokines, except at the highest dose with a very early DC maturation state. The same profile was observed on lymphocytes with significant increases of proliferation and cytokine secretion only at the highest bacterial concentration. Our findings indicate that G. vaginalis possesses slight immune-stimulating activities against DCs and T cells, reflecting thus a defective inflammatory response and giving rise to the atypical, non- or low-grade, inflammatory clinical disease profile. PMID:26989700

  16. Cell motility and antibiotic tolerance of bacterial swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Wenlong

    Many bacteria species can move across moist surfaces in a coordinated manner known as swarming. It is reported that swarm cells show higher tolerance to a wide variety of antibiotics than planktonic cells. We used the model bacterium E. coli to study how motility affects the antibiotic tolerance of swarm cells. Our results provide new insights for the control of pathogenic invasion via regulating cell motility. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: zwlong@live.com.

  17. Production Model Press for the Preparation of Bacterial Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Perrine, T. D.; Ribi, E.; Maki, W.; Miller, B.; Oertli, E.

    1962-01-01

    A modification of the apparatus previously described permits the preparation of cell walls in quantity. This consists of a heavy duty, double-acting hydraulic press with motor-driven pump, and a superstrength alloy steel pressure cell which is corrosion resistant. Liquid cooling of the jet is substituted for the previously used gas cooling to minimize aerosol formation and to facilitate subsequent treatment of the products. The device produces cell walls of excellent quality in good yield. The pressure cell has been used satisfactorily up to about 60,000 psi. Design details are given. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 6 PMID:14485524

  18. Photodynamic induction of a bacterial cell surface polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Hoober, J K

    1977-01-01

    The photodynamic action of several dyes on cells of a bacterium, tentatively identified as a species of Arthrobacter, resulted in remarkable stimulation of synthesis of a polypeptide 21,000 daltons in mass. This polypeptide resides on the cell surface and can be solubilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate without lysis of the cells. Chlorophyllin and rose bengal are effective in inducing synthesis of the polypeptide in proportion to their ability to sensitize the photooxidation of histidine. Etiolated cells of the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii y-1 excrete a substance into the medium that also sensitized the photoinduction of the polypeptide. Images PMID:885841

  19. On the chronology and topography of bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Vicente, M; Palacios, P; Dopazo, A; Garrido, T; Pla, J; Aldea, M

    1991-01-01

    Gene products that play a role in the formation of cell septum should be expected to be endowed with a set of specific properties. In principle, septal proteins should be located at the cell envelope. The expression of division genes should ensure the synthesis of septal proteins at levels commensurate with the needs of cell division at different rates of cell duplication. We have results indicating that some fts genes located within the 2.5-min cluster in the Escherichia coli chromosome conform to these predictions.

  20. Interaction of Francisella tularensis bacterial cells with dynamic speckles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulianova, Onega V.; Ulyanov, Sergey S.; Sazanova, Elena V.; Zudina, Irina; Zhang, Zhihong; Sibo, Zhou; Luo, Qingming

    2006-08-01

    Influence of low-coherent speckles on the colonies grows is investigated. It has been demonstrated that effects of light on the inhibition of cells (Francisella Tularensis) are caused by speckle dynamics. The regimes of illumination of cell suspension with purpose of devitalization of hazard bacteria, caused very dangerous infections, such as tularemia, are found. Mathematical model of interaction of low-coherent laser radiation with bacteria suspension has been proposed. Computer simulations of the processes of laser-cells interaction have been carried out. Role of coherence of light in the processes of laser-cell interaction is analyzed.

  1. Re-Evaluation of a Bacterial Antifreeze Protein as an Adhesin with Ice-Binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shuaiqi; Garnham, Christopher P.; Whitney, John C.; Graham, Laurie A.; Davies, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    A novel role for antifreeze proteins (AFPs) may reside in an exceptionally large 1.5-MDa adhesin isolated from an Antarctic Gram-negative bacterium, Marinomonas primoryensis. MpAFP was purified from bacterial lysates by ice adsorption and gel electrophoresis. We have previously reported that two highly repetitive sequences, region II (RII) and region IV (RIV), divide MpAFP into five distinct regions, all of which require mM Ca2+ levels for correct folding. Also, the antifreeze activity is confined to the 322-residue RIV, which forms a Ca2+-bound beta-helix containing thirteen Repeats-In-Toxin (RTX)-like repeats. RII accounts for approximately 90% of the mass of MpAFP and is made up of ∼120 tandem 104-residue repeats. Because these repeats are identical in DNA sequence, their number was estimated here by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Structural homology analysis by the Protein Homology/analogY Recognition Engine (Phyre2) server indicates that the 104-residue RII repeat adopts an immunoglobulin beta-sandwich fold that is typical of many secreted adhesion proteins. Additional RTX-like repeats in RV may serve as a non-cleavable signal sequence for the type I secretion pathway. Immunodetection shows both repeated regions are uniformly distributed over the cell surface. We suggest that the development of an AFP-like domain within this adhesin attached to the bacterial outer surface serves to transiently bind the host bacteria to ice. This association would keep the bacteria within the upper reaches of the water column where oxygen and nutrients are potentially more abundant. This novel envirotactic role would give AFPs a third function, after freeze avoidance and freeze tolerance: that of transiently binding an organism to ice. PMID:23144980

  2. Bacterial growth, detachment and cell size control on polyethylene terephthalate surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liyun; Fan, Daming; Chen, Wei; Terentjev, Eugene M.

    2015-01-01

    In medicine and food industry, bacterial colonisation on surfaces is a common cause of infections and severe illnesses. However, the detailed quantitative information about the dynamics and the mechanisms involved in bacterial proliferation on solid substrates is still lacking. In this study we investigated the adhesion and detachment, the individual growth and colonisation, and the cell size control of Escherichia coli (E. coli) MG1655 on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surfaces. The results show that the bacterial growth curve on PET exhibits the distinct lag and log phases, but the generation time is more than twice longer than in bulk medium. Single cells in the lag phase are more likely to detach than clustered ones in the log phase; clustered bacteria in micro-colonies have stronger adhesive bonds with surfaces and their neighbours with the progressing colonisation. We show that the cell size is under the density-dependent pathway control: when the adherent cells are at low density, the culture medium is responsible for coordinating cell division and cell size; when the clustered cells are at high population density, we demonstrate that the effect of quorum sensing causes the cell size decrease as the cell density on surfaces increases. PMID:26464114

  3. Bacterial growth, detachment and cell size control on polyethylene terephthalate surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyun; Fan, Daming; Chen, Wei; Terentjev, Eugene M

    2015-10-14

    In medicine and food industry, bacterial colonisation on surfaces is a common cause of infections and severe illnesses. However, the detailed quantitative information about the dynamics and the mechanisms involved in bacterial proliferation on solid substrates is still lacking. In this study we investigated the adhesion and detachment, the individual growth and colonisation, and the cell size control of Escherichia coli (E. coli) MG1655 on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surfaces. The results show that the bacterial growth curve on PET exhibits the distinct lag and log phases, but the generation time is more than twice longer than in bulk medium. Single cells in the lag phase are more likely to detach than clustered ones in the log phase; clustered bacteria in micro-colonies have stronger adhesive bonds with surfaces and their neighbours with the progressing colonisation. We show that the cell size is under the density-dependent pathway control: when the adherent cells are at low density, the culture medium is responsible for coordinating cell division and cell size; when the clustered cells are at high population density, we demonstrate that the effect of quorum sensing causes the cell size decrease as the cell density on surfaces increases.

  4. Effect of cell physicochemical characteristics and motility on bacterial transport in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Becker, Matthew W; Collins, Samantha A; Metge, David W; Harvey, Ronald W; Shapiro, Allen M

    2004-04-01

    The influence of physicochemical characteristics and motility on bacterial transport in groundwater were examined in flow-through columns. Four strains of bacteria isolated from a crystalline rock groundwater system were investigated, with carboxylate-modified and amidine-modified latex microspheres and bromide as reference tracers. The bacterial isolates included a gram-positive rod (ML1), a gram-negative motile rod (ML2), a nonmotile mutant of ML2 (ML2m), and a gram-positive coccoid (ML3). Experiments were repeated at two flow velocities, in a glass column packed with glass beads, and in another packed with iron-oxyhydroxide coated glass beads. Bacteria breakthrough curves were interpreted using a transport equation that incorporates a sorption model from microscopic observation of bacterial deposition in flow-cell experiments. The model predicts that bacterial desorption rate will decrease exponentially with the amount of time the cell is attached to the solid surface. Desorption kinetics appeared to influence transport at the lower flow rate, but were not discernable at the higher flow rate. Iron-oxyhydroxide coatings had a lower-than-expected effect on bacterial breakthrough and no effect on the microsphere recovery in the column experiments. Cell wall type and shape also had minor effects on breakthrough. Motility tended to increase the adsorption rate, and decrease the desorption rate. The transport model predicts that at field scale, desorption rate kinetics may be important to the prediction of bacteria transport rates.

  5. Effect of cell physicochemical characteristics and motility on bacterial transport in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, M.W.; Collins, S.A.; Metge, D.W.; Harvey, R.W.; Shapiro, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of physicochemical characteristics and motility on bacterial transport in groundwater were examined in flow-through columns. Four strains of bacteria isolated from a crystalline rock groundwater system were investigated, with carboxylate-modified and amidine-modified latex microspheres and bromide as reference tracers. The bacterial isolates included a gram-positive rod (ML1), a gram-negative motile rod (ML2), a nonmotile mutant of ML2 (ML2m), and a gram-positive coccoid (ML3). Experiments were repeated at two flow velocities, in a glass column packed with glass beads, and in another packed with iron-oxyhydroxide coated glass beads. Bacteria breakthrough curves were interpreted using a transport equation that incorporates a sorption model from microscopic observation of bacterial deposition in flow-cell experiments. The model predicts that bacterial desorption rate will decrease exponentially with the amount of time the cell is attached to the solid surface. Desorption kinetics appeared to influence transport at the lower flow rate, but were not discernable at the higher flow rate. Iron-oxyhydroxide coatings had a lower-than-expected effect on bacterial breakthrough and no effect on the microsphere recovery in the column experiments. Cell wall type and shape also had minor effects on breakthrough. Motility tended to increase the adsorption rate, and decrease the desorption rate. The transport model predicts that at field scale, desorption rate kinetics may be important to the prediction of bacteria transport rates. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Differences in activity profile of bacterial cultures studied by dynamic speckle patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Miquet, E. E.; Otero, I.; Rodríguez, D.; Darias, J. G.; Combarro, A. M.; Contreras, O. R.

    2013-02-01

    We outline the main differences in the activity profile of bacterial cultures studied by dynamic laser speckle (or biospeckle) patterns. The activity is detected in two sorts of culture mediums. The optical setup and the experimental procedure are presented. The experimentally obtained images are processed by the temporal difference method and a qualitative assessment is made with the time history of speckle patterns of the sample. The main differences are studied after changing the culture medium composition. We conclude that the EC medium is suitable to detect the E. coli bacterial presence in early hours and that Mueller Hinton agar delays some additional hours to make possible the assessment of bacteria in time.

  7. Relationship between Milk Microbiota, Bacterial Load, Macronutrients, and Human Cells during Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Boix-Amorós, Alba; Collado, Maria C.; Mira, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Human breast milk is considered the optimal nutrition for infants, providing essential nutrients and a broad range of bioactive compounds, as well as its own microbiota. However, the interaction among those components and the biological role of milk microorganisms is still uncovered. Thus, our aim was to identify the relationships between milk microbiota composition, bacterial load, macronutrients, and human cells during lactation. Bacterial load was estimated in milk samples from a total of 21 healthy mothers through lactation time by bacteria-specific qPCR targeted to the single-copy gene fusA. Milk microbiome composition and diversity was estimated by 16S-pyrosequencing and the structure of these bacteria in the fluid was studied by flow cytometry, qPCR, and microscopy. Fat, protein, lactose, and dry extract of milk as well as the number of somatic cells were also analyzed. We observed that milk bacterial communities were generally complex, and showed individual-specific profiles. Milk microbiota was dominated by Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Streptococcus, and Acinetobacter. Staphylococcus aureus was not detected in any of these samples from healthy mothers. There was high variability in composition and number of bacteria per milliliter among mothers and in some cases even within mothers at different time points. The median bacterial load was 106 bacterial cells/ml through time, higher than those numbers reported by 16S gene PCR and culture methods. Furthermore, milk bacteria were present in a free-living, “planktonic” state, but also in equal proportion associated to human immune cells. There was no correlation between bacterial load and the amount of immune cells in milk, strengthening the idea that milk bacteria are not sensed as an infection by the immune system. PMID:27148183

  8. Relationship between Milk Microbiota, Bacterial Load, Macronutrients, and Human Cells during Lactation.

    PubMed

    Boix-Amorós, Alba; Collado, Maria C; Mira, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Human breast milk is considered the optimal nutrition for infants, providing essential nutrients and a broad range of bioactive compounds, as well as its own microbiota. However, the interaction among those components and the biological role of milk microorganisms is still uncovered. Thus, our aim was to identify the relationships between milk microbiota composition, bacterial load, macronutrients, and human cells during lactation. Bacterial load was estimated in milk samples from a total of 21 healthy mothers through lactation time by bacteria-specific qPCR targeted to the single-copy gene fusA. Milk microbiome composition and diversity was estimated by 16S-pyrosequencing and the structure of these bacteria in the fluid was studied by flow cytometry, qPCR, and microscopy. Fat, protein, lactose, and dry extract of milk as well as the number of somatic cells were also analyzed. We observed that milk bacterial communities were generally complex, and showed individual-specific profiles. Milk microbiota was dominated by Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Streptococcus, and Acinetobacter. Staphylococcus aureus was not detected in any of these samples from healthy mothers. There was high variability in composition and number of bacteria per milliliter among mothers and in some cases even within mothers at different time points. The median bacterial load was 10(6) bacterial cells/ml through time, higher than those numbers reported by 16S gene PCR and culture methods. Furthermore, milk bacteria were present in a free-living, "planktonic" state, but also in equal proportion associated to human immune cells. There was no correlation between bacterial load and the amount of immune cells in milk, strengthening the idea that milk bacteria are not sensed as an infection by the immune system.

  9. Relationship between Milk Microbiota, Bacterial Load, Macronutrients, and Human Cells during Lactation.

    PubMed

    Boix-Amorós, Alba; Collado, Maria C; Mira, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Human breast milk is considered the optimal nutrition for infants, providing essential nutrients and a broad range of bioactive compounds, as well as its own microbiota. However, the interaction among those components and the biological role of milk microorganisms is still uncovered. Thus, our aim was to identify the relationships between milk microbiota composition, bacterial load, macronutrients, and human cells during lactation. Bacterial load was estimated in milk samples from a total of 21 healthy mothers through lactation time by bacteria-specific qPCR targeted to the single-copy gene fusA. Milk microbiome composition and diversity was estimated by 16S-pyrosequencing and the structure of these bacteria in the fluid was studied by flow cytometry, qPCR, and microscopy. Fat, protein, lactose, and dry extract of milk as well as the number of somatic cells were also analyzed. We observed that milk bacterial communities were generally complex, and showed individual-specific profiles. Milk microbiota was dominated by Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Streptococcus, and Acinetobacter. Staphylococcus aureus was not detected in any of these samples from healthy mothers. There was high variability in composition and number of bacteria per milliliter among mothers and in some cases even within mothers at different time points. The median bacterial load was 10(6) bacterial cells/ml through time, higher than those numbers reported by 16S gene PCR and culture methods. Furthermore, milk bacteria were present in a free-living, "planktonic" state, but also in equal proportion associated to human immune cells. There was no correlation between bacterial load and the amount of immune cells in milk, strengthening the idea that milk bacteria are not sensed as an infection by the immune system. PMID:27148183

  10. Active bacterial community structure along vertical redox gradients in Baltic Sea sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Janet; Edlund, Anna; Hardeman, Fredrik; Jansson, Janet K.; Sjoling, Sara

    2008-05-15

    Community structures of active bacterial populations were investigated along a vertical redox profile in coastal Baltic Sea sediments by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone library analysis. According to correspondence analysis of T-RFLP results and sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA genes, the microbial community structures at three redox depths (179 mV, -64 mV and -337 mV) differed significantly. The bacterial communities in the community DNA differed from those in bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled DNA, indicating that the growing members of the community that incorporated BrdU were not necessarily the most dominant members. The structures of the actively growing bacterial communities were most strongly correlated to organic carbon followed by total nitrogen and redox potentials. Bacterial identification by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from clones of BrdU-labeled DNA and DNA from reverse transcription PCR (rt-PCR) showed that bacterial taxa involved in nitrogen and sulfur cycling were metabolically active along the redox profiles. Several sequences had low similarities to previously detected sequences indicating that novel lineages of bacteria are present in Baltic Sea sediments. Also, a high number of different 16S rRNA gene sequences representing different phyla were detected at all sampling depths.

  11. Cell sedimentation with gravity activation.

    PubMed

    Czerlinski, G; Goldman-Leikin, R; Reid, D

    1988-12-01

    Murine monoclonal antibody T101 has been coupled to thinly polymer-coated heavy alloy particles (LaMn2Ge2). These conjugates are coupled to cultured cells of the human T-cell leukemia line RPMI 8402 (T8402). The sedimentation velocities of cells, of particles, and of cells with particles attached are measured. After determining the mean radii of cells, of particles, and of cells with particles attached, one may compute a mean number of 33 particles attached to a cell. Independently one may compute a mean number of 144 particles/cell for surface saturation. The Appendix handles the underlying theory in three parts: number of particles/cell, saturation number of particles/cell, and resolution for gravity activation. Regarding the latter, cell radii from 4 to 10 microns and particle radii from 0.01 to 1 micron are considered.

  12. Comparison of bacterial communities of conventional and A-stage activated sludge systems

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Alejandro; Lotti, Tommaso; Garcia-Ruiz, Maria-Jesus; Osorio, Francisco; Gonzalez-Lopez, Jesus; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial community structure of 10 different wastewater treatment systems and their influents has been investigated through pyrosequencing, yielding a total of 283486 reads. These bioreactors had different technological configurations: conventional activated sludge (CAS) systems and very highly loaded A-stage systems. A-stage processes are proposed as the first step in an energy producing municipal wastewater treatment process. Pyrosequencing analysis indicated that bacterial community structure of all influents was similar. Also the bacterial community of all CAS bioreactors was similar. Bacterial community structure of A-stage bioreactors showed a more case-specific pattern. A core of genera was consistently found for all influents, all CAS bioreactors and all A-stage bioreactors, respectively, showing that different geographical locations in The Netherlands and Spain did not affect the functional bacterial communities in these technologies. The ecological roles of these bacteria were discussed. Influents and A-stage bioreactors shared several core genera, while none of these were shared with CAS bioreactors communities. This difference is thought to reside in the different operational conditions of the two technologies. This study shows that bacterial community structure of CAS and A-stage bioreactors are mostly driven by solids retention time (SRT) and hydraulic retention time (HRT), as suggested by multivariate redundancy analysis. PMID:26728449

  13. Effect of Condensed Tannins on Bacterial Diversity and Metabolic Activity in the Rat Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alexandra H.; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of dietary condensed tannins (proanthocyanidins) on rat fecal bacterial populations was ascertained in order to determine whether the proportion on tannin-resistant bacteria increased and if there was a change in the predominant bacterial populations. After 3 weeks of tannin diets the proportion of tannin-resistant bacteria increased significantly (P < 0.05) from 0.3% ± 5.5% to 25.3% ± 8.3% with a 0.7% tannin diet and to 47.2% ± 5.1% with a 2% tannin diet. The proportion of tannin-resistant bacteria returned to preexposure levels in the absence of dietary tannins. A shift in bacterial populations was confirmed by molecular fingerprinting of fecal bacterial populations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Posttreatment samples were generally still distinguishable from controls after 3.5 weeks. Sequence analysis of DGGE bands and characterization of tannin-resistant isolates indicated that tannins selected for Enterobacteriaceae and Bacteroides species. Dot blot quantification confirmed that these gram-negative bacterial groups predominated in the presence of dietary tannins and that there was a corresponding decrease in the gram-positive Clostridium leptum group and other groups. Metabolic fingerprint patterns revealed that functional activities of culturable fecal bacteria were affected by the presence of tannins. Condensed tannins of Acacia angustissima altered fecal bacterial populations in the rat gastrointestinal tract, resulting in a shift in the predominant bacteria towards tannin-resistant gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae and Bacteroides species. PMID:14766594

  14. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division

    PubMed Central

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A.; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-01-01

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size. PMID:27456660

  15. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-01-01

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size. PMID:27456660

  16. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-07-26

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size.

  17. A widespread family of bacterial cell wall assembly proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Yoshikazu; Marles-Wright, Jon; Cleverley, Robert M; Emmins, Robyn; Ishikawa, Shu; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Heinz, Nadja; Bui, Nhat Khai; Hoyland, Christopher N; Ogasawara, Naotake; Lewis, Richard J; Vollmer, Waldemar; Daniel, Richard A; Errington, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Teichoic acids and acidic capsular polysaccharides are major anionic cell wall polymers (APs) in many bacteria, with various critical cell functions, including maintenance of cell shape and structural integrity, charge and cation homeostasis, and multiple aspects of pathogenesis. We have identified the widespread LytR–Cps2A–Psr (LCP) protein family, of previously unknown function, as novel enzymes required for AP synthesis. Structural and biochemical analysis of several LCP proteins suggest that they carry out the final step of transferring APs from their lipid-linked precursor to cell wall peptidoglycan (PG). In Bacillus subtilis, LCP proteins are found in association with the MreB cytoskeleton, suggesting that MreB proteins coordinate the insertion of the major polymers, PG and AP, into the cell wall. PMID:21964069

  18. Modulation of Toll-Like Receptor Activity by Leukocyte Ig-Like Receptors and Their Effects during Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pilsbury, Louise E.; Allen, Rachel L.; Vordermeier, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a potent trigger for inflammatory immune responses. Without tight regulation their activation could lead to pathology, so it is imperative to extend our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that govern TLR expression and function. One family of immunoregulatory proteins which can provide a balancing effect on TLR activity are the Leukocyte Ig-like receptors (LILRs), which act as innate immune receptors for self-proteins. Here we describe the LILR family, their inhibitory effect on TLR activity in cells of the monocytic lineage, their signalling pathway, and their antimicrobial effects during bacterial infection. Agents have already been identified which enhances or inhibits LILR activity raising the future possibility that modulation of LILR function could be used as a means to modulate TLR activity. PMID:20634939

  19. Nanoscale Electric Permittivity of Single Bacterial Cells at Gigahertz Frequencies by Scanning Microwave Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Biagi, Maria Chiara; Fabregas, Rene; Gramse, Georg; Van Der Hofstadt, Marc; Juárez, Antonio; Kienberger, Ferry; Fumagalli, Laura; Gomila, Gabriel

    2016-01-26

    We quantified the electric permittivity of single bacterial cells at microwave frequencies and nanoscale spatial resolution by means of near-field scanning microwave microscopy. To this end, calibrated complex admittance images have been obtained at ∼19 GHz and analyzed with a methodology that removes the nonlocal topographic cross-talk contributions and thus provides quantifiable intrinsic dielectric images of the bacterial cells. Results for single Escherichia coli cells provide a relative electric permittivity of ∼4 in dry conditions and ∼20 in humid conditions, with no significant loss contributions. Present findings, together with the ability of microwaves to penetrate the cell membrane, open an important avenue in the microwave label-free imaging of single cells with nanoscale spatial resolution. PMID:26643251

  20. A novel bacterial artificial chromosome-transgenic podoplanin-cre mouse targets lymphoid organ stromal cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Onder, Lucas; Scandella, Elke; Chai, Qian; Firner, Sonja; Mayer, Christian T; Sparwasser, Tim; Thiel, Volker; Rülicke, Thomas; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    Stromal cells provide the structural foundation of secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs), and regulate leukocyte access and cell migration within the different compartments of spleen and lymph nodes (LNs). Furthermore, several stromal cell subsets have been implied in shaping of T cell responses through direct presentation of antigen. Despite significant gain of knowledge on the biology of different SLO-resident stromal cell subsets, their molecular and functional characterization has remained incomplete. To address this need, we have generated a bacterial artificial chromosome-transgenic mouse model that utilizes the podoplanin (pdpn) promoter to express the Cre-recombinase exclusively in stromal cells of SLOs. The characterization of the Pdpn-Cre mouse revealed transgene expression in subsets of fibroblastic reticular cells and lymphatic endothelial cells in LNs. Furthermore, the transgene facilitated the identification of a novel splenic perivascular stromal cell subpopulation that forms web-like structures around central arterioles. Assessment of the in vivo antigen expression in the genetically tagged stromal cells in Pdpn-Cre mice revealed activation of both MHC I and II-restricted TCR transgenic T cells. Taken together, stromal pdpn-Cre expression is well-suited to characterize the phenotype and to dissect the function of lymphoid organ stromal cells.

  1. Degradation of endogenous bacterial cell wall polymers by the muralytic enzyme mutanolysin prevents hepatobiliary injury in genetically susceptible rats with experimental intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    PubMed Central

    Lichtman, S N; Okoruwa, E E; Keku, J; Schwab, J H; Sartor, R B

    1992-01-01

    Jejunal self-filling blind loops with subsequent small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SBBO) induce hepatobiliary injury in genetically susceptible Lewis rats. Lesions consist of portal tract inflammation, bile duct proliferation, and destruction. To determine the pathogenesis of SBBO-induced hepatobiliary injury, we treated Lewis rats with SBBO by using several agents with different mechanisms of activity. Buffer treatment, ursodeoxycholic acid, prednisone, methotrexate, and cyclosporin A failed to prevent SBBO-induced injury as demonstrated by increased plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and elevated histology scores. However, hepatic injury was prevented by mutanolysin, a muralytic enzyme whose only known activity is to split the beta 1-4 N-acetylmuramyl-N-acetylglucosamine linkage of peptidoglycan-polysaccharide (PG-PS), a bacterial cell wall polymer with potent inflammatory and immunoregulatory properties. Mutanolysin therapy started on the day blind loops were surgically created and continued for 8 wk significantly diminished AST (101 +/- 37 U/liter) and liver histology scores (2.2 +/- 2.7) compared to buffer-treated rats (228 +/- 146 U/liter, P < 0.05, 8.2 +/- 1.9, P < 0.001 respectively). Mutanolysin treatment started during the early phase of hepatic injury, 16-21 d after surgery, decreased AST in 7 of 11 rats from 142 +/- 80 to 103 +/- 24 U/liter contrasted to increased AST in 9 of 11 buffer-treated rats from 108 +/- 52 to 247 +/- 142 U/liter, P < 0.05. Mutanolysin did not change total bacterial numbers within the loop, eliminate Bacteroides sp., have in vitro antibiotic effects, or diminish mucosal PG-PS transport. However, mutanolysin treatment prevented elevation of plasma anti-PG antibodies and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) levels which occurred in buffer treated rats with SBBO and decreased TNF alpha production in isolated Kupffer cells stimulated in vitro with PG-PS. Based on the preventive and therapeutic activity of this highly specific

  2. Effect of Micro- and Nanoscale Topography on the Adhesion of Bacterial Cells to Solid Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Lillian C.; Fang, Jean; Borca-Tasciuc, Diana A.; Worobo, Randy W.

    2013-01-01

    Attachment and biofilm formation by bacterial pathogens on surfaces in natural, industrial, and hospital settings lead to infections and illnesses and even death. Minimizing bacterial attachment to surfaces using controlled topography could reduce the spreading of pathogens and, thus, the incidence of illnesses and subsequent human and financial losses. In this context, the attachment of key microorganisms, including Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua, and Pseudomonas fluorescens, to silica and alumina surfaces with micron and nanoscale topography was investigated. The results suggest that orientation of the attached cells occurs preferentially such as to maximize their contact area with the surface. Moreover, the bacterial cells exhibited different morphologies, including different number and size of cellular appendages, depending on the topographical details of the surface to which they attached. This suggests that bacteria may utilize different mechanisms of attachment in response to surface topography. These results are important for the design of novel microbe-repellant materials. PMID:23416997

  3. Label-free isolation and deposition of single bacterial cells from heterogeneous samples for clonal culturing.

    PubMed

    Riba, J; Gleichmann, T; Zimmermann, S; Zengerle, R; Koltay, P

    2016-01-01

    The isolation and analysis of single prokaryotic cells down to 1 μm and less in size poses a special challenge and requires micro-engineered devices to handle volumes in the picoliter to nanoliter range. Here, an advanced Single-Cell Printer (SCP) was applied for automated and label-free isolation and deposition of bacterial cells encapsulated in 35 pl droplets by inkjet-like printing. To achieve this, dispenser chips to generate micro droplets have been fabricated with nozzles 20 μm in size. Further, the magnification of the optical system used for cell detection was increased. Redesign of the optical path allows for collision-free addressing of any flat substrate since no compartment protrudes below the nozzle of the dispenser chip anymore. The improved system allows for deterministic isolation of individual bacterial cells. A single-cell printing efficiency of 93% was obtained as shown by printing fluorescent labeled E. coli. A 96-well plate filled with growth medium is inoculated with single bacteria cells on average within about 8 min. Finally, individual bacterial cells from a heterogeneous sample of E. coli and E. faecalis were isolated for clonal culturing directly on agar plates in user-defined array geometry. PMID:27596612

  4. Label-free isolation and deposition of single bacterial cells from heterogeneous samples for clonal culturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riba, J.; Gleichmann, T.; Zimmermann, S.; Zengerle, R.; Koltay, P.

    2016-09-01

    The isolation and analysis of single prokaryotic cells down to 1 μm and less in size poses a special challenge and requires micro-engineered devices to handle volumes in the picoliter to nanoliter range. Here, an advanced Single-Cell Printer (SCP) was applied for automated and label-free isolation and deposition of bacterial cells encapsulated in 35 pl droplets by inkjet-like printing. To achieve this, dispenser chips to generate micro droplets have been fabricated with nozzles 20 μm in size. Further, the magnification of the optical system used for cell detection was increased. Redesign of the optical path allows for collision-free addressing of any flat substrate since no compartment protrudes below the nozzle of the dispenser chip anymore. The improved system allows for deterministic isolation of individual bacterial cells. A single-cell printing efficiency of 93% was obtained as shown by printing fluorescent labeled E. coli. A 96-well plate filled with growth medium is inoculated with single bacteria cells on average within about 8 min. Finally, individual bacterial cells from a heterogeneous sample of E. coli and E. faecalis were isolated for clonal culturing directly on agar plates in user-defined array geometry.

  5. The percentage of living bacterial cells related to organic carbon release from senescent oceanic phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasternas, S.; Agustí, S.

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria recycle vast amounts of organic carbon, playing key biogeochemical and ecological roles in the ocean. Bacterioplankton dynamics are expected to be dependent on phytoplankton primary production, but there is a high diversity of processes (e.g., sloppy feeding, cell exudation, viral lysis) involved in the transfer of primary production to dissolved organic carbon available to bacteria. Here, we show the percentage of living heterotrophic bacterioplankton in the subtropical NE Atlantic Ocean in relation to phytoplankton extracellular carbon release (PER). PER represents the fraction of primary production released as dissolved organic carbon. PER variability was explained by phytoplankton cell death, with communities experiencing higher phytoplankton cell mortality showing a larger proportion of phytoplankton extracellular carbon release. Both PER and the percentage of dead phytoplankton cells increased from eutrophic to oligotrophic waters, while abundance of heterotrophic bacteria was highest in the intermediate waters. The percentage of living heterotrophic bacterial cells (range: 60-95%) increased with increasing phytoplankton extracellular carbon release from productive to oligotrophic waters in the subtropical NE Atlantic. The lower PERs, observed at the upwelling waters, have resulted in a decrease in the flux of phytoplankton dissolved organic carbon (DOC) per bacterial cell. The results highlight phytoplankton cell death as a process influencing the flow of dissolved photosynthetic carbon in this region of the subtropical NE Atlantic Ocean, and suggest a close coupling between the fraction of primary production released and heterotrophic bacterial cell survival.

  6. Vehicles, Replicators, and Intercellular Movement of Genetic Information: Evolutionary Dissection of a Bacterial Cell

    PubMed Central

    Jalasvuori, Matti

    2012-01-01

    Prokaryotic biosphere is vastly diverse in many respects. Any given bacterial cell may harbor in different combinations viruses, plasmids, transposons, and other genetic elements along with their chromosome(s). These agents interact in complex environments in various ways causing multitude of phenotypic effects on their hosting cells. In this discussion I perform a dissection for a bacterial cell in order to simplify the diversity into components that may help approach the ocean of details in evolving microbial worlds. The cell itself is separated from all the genetic replicators that use the cell vehicle for preservation and propagation. I introduce a classification that groups different replicators according to their horizontal movement potential between cells and according to their effects on the fitness of their present host cells. The classification is used to discuss and improve the means by which we approach general evolutionary tendencies in microbial communities. Moreover, the classification is utilized as a tool to help formulating evolutionary hypotheses and to discuss emerging bacterial pathogens as well as to promote understanding on the average phenotypes of different replicators in general. It is also discussed that any given biosphere comprising prokaryotic cell vehicles and genetic replicators may naturally evolve to have horizontally moving replicators of various types. PMID:22567533

  7. Label-free isolation and deposition of single bacterial cells from heterogeneous samples for clonal culturing

    PubMed Central

    Riba, J.; Gleichmann, T.; Zimmermann, S.; Zengerle, R.; Koltay, P.

    2016-01-01

    The isolation and analysis of single prokaryotic cells down to 1 μm and less in size poses a special challenge and requires micro-engineered devices to handle volumes in the picoliter to nanoliter range. Here, an advanced Single-Cell Printer (SCP) was applied for automated and label-free isolation and deposition of bacterial cells encapsulated in 35 pl droplets by inkjet-like printing. To achieve this, dispenser chips to generate micro droplets have been fabricated with nozzles 20 μm in size. Further, the magnification of the optical system used for cell detection was increased. Redesign of the optical path allows for collision-free addressing of any flat substrate since no compartment protrudes below the nozzle of the dispenser chip anymore. The improved system allows for deterministic isolation of individual bacterial cells. A single-cell printing efficiency of 93% was obtained as shown by printing fluorescent labeled E. coli. A 96-well plate filled with growth medium is inoculated with single bacteria cells on average within about 8 min. Finally, individual bacterial cells from a heterogeneous sample of E. coli and E. faecalis were isolated for clonal culturing directly on agar plates in user-defined array geometry. PMID:27596612

  8. Heterotrophic free-living and particle-bound bacterial cell size in the river Cauvery and its downstream tributaries.

    PubMed

    Harsha, T S; Yamakanamardi, Sadanand M; Mahadevaswamy, M

    2007-03-01

    This is the first comprehensive study on planktonic heterotrophic bacterial cell size in the river Cauvery and its important tributaries in Karnataka State, India. The initial hypothesis that the mean cell size of planktonic heterotrophic bacteria in the four tributaries are markedly different from each other and also from that in the main river Cauvery was rejected, because all five watercourses showed similar planktonic heterotrophic bacterial cell size. Examination of the correlation between mean heterotrophic bacterial cell size and environmental variables showed four correlations in the river Arkavathy and two in the river Shimsha. Regression analysis revealed that 18%of the variation in mean heterotrophic free-living bacterial cell size was due to biological oxygen demand (BOD)in the river Arkavathy, 11% due to surface water velocity (SWV)in the river Cauvery and 11% due to temperature in the river Kapila. Heterotrophic particle-bound bacterial cell size variation was 28% due to chloride and BOD in the river Arkavathy, 11% due to conductivity in the river Kapila and 8% due to calcium in the river Cauvery. This type of relationship between heterotrophic bacterial cell size and environmental variables suggests that,though the mean heterotrophic bacterial cell size was similar in all the five water courses, different sets of environmental variables apparently control the heterotrophic bacterial cell size in the various water bodies studied in this investigation. The possible cause for this environmental (bottom -up) control is discussed. PMID:17435327

  9. Synchronization of Caulobacter crescentus for investigation of the bacterial cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Jared M; Shapiro, Lucy

    2015-04-08

    The cell cycle is important for growth, genome replication, and development in all cells. In bacteria, studies of the cell cycle have focused largely on unsynchronized cells making it difficult to order the temporal events required for cell cycle progression, genome replication, and division. Caulobacter crescentus provides an excellent model system for the bacterial cell cycle whereby cells can be rapidly synchronized in a G0 state by density centrifugation. Cell cycle synchronization experiments have been used to establish the molecular events governing chromosome replication and segregation, to map a genetic regulatory network controlling cell cycle progression, and to identify the establishment of polar signaling complexes required for asymmetric cell division. Here we provide a detailed protocol for the rapid synchronization of Caulobacter NA1000 cells. Synchronization can be performed in a large-scale format for gene expression profiling and western blot assays, as well as a small-scale format for microscopy or FACS assays. The rapid synchronizability and high cell yields of Caulobacter make this organism a powerful model system for studies of the bacterial cell cycle.

  10. Bacterial exudate effects on Cu2+ sorption by cells: Quantifying significant ternary interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swedlund, Peter J.; Moreau, Magali; Daughney, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria exude a range of ligands which have diverse effects on trace metal geochemistry. This study evaluated the effect of ligands exuded by the bacterium Anoxybacillus flavithermus on the aqueous geochemistry of Cu2+. Proton and Cu2+ binding by the exudate ligands were investigated via potentiometric titrations and polarographic studies, respectively. Despite the apparent complexity of the system the Cu2+-exudate interaction was well described by a single model reaction H2L + Cu2+ ⇔ LCu + 2H+. In a bacterial cell suspension the aqueous phase concentration of exudate ligands increased almost linearly with the age of the suspension. After 48 h the exuded ligands had roughly the same total binding capacity for Cu2+ as the cells from which they were derived. To investigate the significance of the exudate on Cu2+ uptake by the bacterial cells sorption experiments were conducted in ternary systems with bacterial cells and a range of concentrations of a well characterized exudate. The systems were modeled with the parameters derived from the binary Cu2+-cells and Cu2+-exudate experiments. Under conditions where the binary model parameters predicted that the exudate ligand would hold all of the Cu2+ in solution there was unexpectedly appreciable Cu2+ sorption by the cells. This indicated the presence of significant ternary interactions involving the Cu2+, the cell surface sites and the exudate. The observations could be reasonably well described by adding to the binary model reactions a single reaction for a ternary complex with stoichiometry R2CuLH0 where R2 represents a cell wall binding site. The exudate ligands produced by bacterial cells had a significant effect on Cu2+ partitioning between the solution and solid phases under the experimental conditions employed. However, the study shows that the strong complexes that exudate ligands can form with trace metals do not necessarily inhibit trace metal uptake by cells to the extent expected from first principles.

  11. Do bacterial cell numbers follow a theoretical Poisson distribution? Comparison of experimentally obtained numbers of single cells with random number generation via computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kento; Hokunan, Hidekazu; Hasegawa, Mayumi; Kawamura, Shuso; Koseki, Shigenobu

    2016-12-01

    We investigated a bacterial sample preparation procedure for single-cell studies. In the present study, we examined whether single bacterial cells obtained via 10-fold dilution followed a theoretical Poisson distribution. Four serotypes of Salmonella enterica, three serotypes of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli and one serotype of Listeria monocytogenes were used as sample bacteria. An inoculum of each serotype was prepared via a 10-fold dilution series to obtain bacterial cell counts with mean values of one or two. To determine whether the experimentally obtained bacterial cell counts follow a theoretical Poisson distribution, a likelihood ratio test between the experimentally obtained cell counts and Poisson distribution which parameter estimated by maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) was conducted. The bacterial cell counts of each serotype sufficiently followed a Poisson distribution. Furthermore, to examine the validity of the parameters of Poisson distribution from experimentally obtained bacterial cell counts, we compared these with the parameters of a Poisson distribution that were estimated using random number generation via computer simulation. The Poisson distribution parameters experimentally obtained from bacterial cell counts were within the range of the parameters estimated using a computer simulation. These results demonstrate that the bacterial cell counts of each serotype obtained via 10-fold dilution followed a Poisson distribution. The fact that the frequency of bacterial cell counts follows a Poisson distribution at low number would be applied to some single-cell studies with a few bacterial cells. In particular, the procedure presented in this study enables us to develop an inactivation model at the single-cell level that can estimate the variability of survival bacterial numbers during the bacterial death process.

  12. Do bacterial cell numbers follow a theoretical Poisson distribution? Comparison of experimentally obtained numbers of single cells with random number generation via computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kento; Hokunan, Hidekazu; Hasegawa, Mayumi; Kawamura, Shuso; Koseki, Shigenobu

    2016-12-01

    We investigated a bacterial sample preparation procedure for single-cell studies. In the present study, we examined whether single bacterial cells obtained via 10-fold dilution followed a theoretical Poisson distribution. Four serotypes of Salmonella enterica, three serotypes of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli and one serotype of Listeria monocytogenes were used as sample bacteria. An inoculum of each serotype was prepared via a 10-fold dilution series to obtain bacterial cell counts with mean values of one or two. To determine whether the experimentally obtained bacterial cell counts follow a theoretical Poisson distribution, a likelihood ratio test between the experimentally obtained cell counts and Poisson distribution which parameter estimated by maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) was conducted. The bacterial cell counts of each serotype sufficiently followed a Poisson distribution. Furthermore, to examine the validity of the parameters of Poisson distribution from experimentally obtained bacterial cell counts, we compared these with the parameters of a Poisson distribution that were estimated using random number generation via computer simulation. The Poisson distribution parameters experimentally obtained from bacterial cell counts were within the range of the parameters estimated using a computer simulation. These results demonstrate that the bacterial cell counts of each serotype obtained via 10-fold dilution followed a Poisson distribution. The fact that the frequency of bacterial cell counts follows a Poisson distribution at low number would be applied to some single-cell studies with a few bacterial cells. In particular, the procedure presented in this study enables us to develop an inactivation model at the single-cell level that can estimate the variability of survival bacterial numbers during the bacterial death process. PMID:27554145

  13. Biosynthesis of a Fully Functional Cyclotide inside Living Bacterial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Camarero, J A; Kimura, R H; Woo, Y; Cantor, J; Shekhtman, A

    2007-04-05

    The cyclotide MCoTI-II is a powerful trypsin inhibitor recently isolated from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis, a plant member of cucurbitaceae family. We report for the first time the in vivo biosynthesis of natively-folded MCoTI-II inside live E. coli cells. Our biomimetic approach involves the intracellular backbone cyclization of a linear cyclotide-intein fusion precursor mediated by a modified protein splicing domain. The cyclized peptide then spontaneously folds into its native conformation. The use of genetically engineered E. coli cells containing mutations in the glutathione and thioredoxin reductase genes considerably improves the production of folded MCoTI-II in vivo. Biochemical and structural characterization of the recombinant MCoTI-II confirmed its identity. Biosynthetic access to correctly-folded cyclotides allows the possibility of generating cell-based combinatorial libraries that can be screened inside living cells for their ability to modulate or inhibit cellular processes.

  14. Induction of apoptosis in cancer cell lines by the Red Sea brine pool bacterial extracts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Marine microorganisms are considered to be an important source of bioactive molecules against various diseases and have great potential to increase the number of lead molecules in clinical trials. Progress in novel microbial culturing techniques as well as greater accessibility to unique oceanic habitats has placed the marine environment as a new frontier in the field of natural product drug discovery. Methods A total of 24 microbial extracts from deep-sea brine pools in the Red Sea have been evaluated for their anticancer potential against three human cancer cell lines. Downstream analysis of these six most potent extracts was done using various biological assays, such as Caspase-3/7 activity, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), PARP-1 cleavage and expression of γH2Ax, Caspase-8 and -9 using western blotting. Results In general, most of the microbial extracts were found to be cytotoxic against one or more cancer cell lines with cell line specific activities. Out of the 13 most active microbial extracts, six extracts were able to induce significantly higher apoptosis (>70%) in cancer cells. Mechanism level studies revealed that extracts from Chromohalobacter salexigens (P3-86A and P3-86B(2)) followed the sequence of events of apoptotic pathway involving MMP disruption, caspase-3/7 activity, caspase-8 cleavage, PARP-1 cleavage and Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, whereas another Chromohalobacter salexigens extract (K30) induced caspase-9 mediated apoptosis. The extracts from Halomonas meridiana (P3-37B), Chromohalobacter israelensis (K18) and Idiomarina loihiensis (P3-37C) were unable to induce any change in MMP in HeLa cancer cells, and thus suggested mitochondria-independent apoptosis induction. However, further detection of a PARP-1 cleavage product, and the observed changes in caspase-8 and -9 suggested the involvement of caspase-mediated apoptotic pathways. Conclusion Altogether, the study offers novel findings regarding the anticancer

  15. Homeostatic Interplay between Bacterial Cell-Cell Signaling and Iron in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Hazan, Ronen; He, Jianxin; Xiao, Gaoping; Dekimpe, Valérie; Apidianakis, Yiorgos; Lesic, Biliana; Astrakas, Christos; Déziel, Eric; Lépine, François; Rahme, Laurence G.

    2010-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria use interconnected multi-layered regulatory networks, such as quorum sensing (QS) networks to sense and respond to environmental cues and external and internal bacterial cell signals, and thereby adapt to and exploit target hosts. Despite the many advances that have been made in understanding QS regulation, little is known regarding how these inputs are integrated and processed in the context of multi-layered QS regulatory networks. Here we report the examination of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa QS 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs) MvfR regulatory network and determination of its interaction with the QS acyl-homoserine-lactone (AHL) RhlR network. The aim of this work was to elucidate paradigmatically the complex relationships between multi-layered regulatory QS circuitries, their signaling molecules, and the environmental cues to which they respond. Our findings revealed positive and negative homeostatic regulatory loops that fine-tune the MvfR regulon via a multi-layered dependent homeostatic regulation of the cell-cell signaling molecules PQS and HHQ, and interplay between these molecules and iron. We discovered that the MvfR regulon component PqsE is a key mediator in orchestrating this homeostatic regulation, and in establishing a connection to the QS rhlR system in cooperation with RhlR. Our results show that P. aeruginosa modulates the intensity of its virulence response, at least in part, through this multi-layered interplay. Our findings underscore the importance of the homeostatic interplay that balances competition within and between QS systems via cell-cell signaling molecules and environmental cues in the control of virulence gene expression. Elucidation of the fine-tuning of this complex relationship offers novel insights into the regulation of these systems and may inform strategies designed to limit infections caused by P. aeruginosa and related human pathogens. PMID:20300606

  16. The Active Bacterial Community in a Pristine Confined Aquifer

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study of the active bacteria residing in a pristine confined aquifer provides unexpected insights into the ecology of iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the subsurface. At 18 wells in east-central Illinois, we trapped the microbes that attached to aquifer sedimen...

  17. Soil-Borne Bacterial Structure and Diversity Does Not Reflect Community Activity in Pampa Biome

    PubMed Central

    Lupatini, Manoeli; Suleiman, Afnan Khalil Ahmad; Jacques, Rodrigo Josemar Seminoti; Antoniolli, Zaida Inês; Kuramae, Eiko Eurya; de Oliveira Camargo, Flávio Anastácio; Roesch, Luiz Fernando Würdig

    2013-01-01

    The Pampa biome is considered one of the main hotspots of the world’s biodiversity and it is estimated that half of its original vegetation was removed and converted to agricultural land and tree plantations. Although an increasing amount of knowledge is being assembled regarding the response of soil bacterial communities to land use change, to the associated plant community and to soil properties, our understanding about how these interactions affect the microbial community from the Brazilian Pampa is still poor and incomplete. In this study, we hypothesized that the same soil type from the same geographic region but under distinct land use present dissimilar soil bacterial communities. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the soil bacterial communities from four land-uses within the same soil type by 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene and by soil microbial activity analyzes. We found that the same soil type under different land uses harbor similar (but not equal) bacterial communities and the differences were controlled by many microbial taxa. No differences regarding diversity and richness between natural areas and areas under anthropogenic disturbance were detected. However, the measures of microbial activity did not converge with the 16S rRNA data supporting the idea that the coupling between functioning and composition of bacterial communities is not necessarily correlated. PMID:24146873

  18. The bacterial cytoplasm has glass-like properties and is fluidized by metabolic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, Brad; Surovtsev, Ivan; Cabeen, Matthew; O'Hern, Corey; Dufresne, Eric; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2014-03-01

    In eukaryotes, active transport involves motor proteins and cytoskeletal filaments. In contrast, bacteria (which lack cytoskeletal motor proteins) are thought to rely on diffusion for molecular transport, though the physical properties of the bacterial cytoplasm are poorly understood. Through single particle tracking of foreign particles of different sizes, we have found that the bacterial cytoplasm exhibits striking similarities to glass-forming liquids. Glass-forming liquids are noted for their metastability near the glass transition where their behavior changes from liquid-like to amorphous solid with even small perturbations. Particles of different sizes exhibit distinct dynamics and their mobility changes from fluid-like to glassy with increasing size. This size dependency provides an explanation for previous reports of both normal and anomalous diffusion in the bacterial cytoplasm. Moreover, we find that cellular metabolism attenuates the glassy properties of the bacterial cytoplasm. As a result, components that would otherwise be caged in narrow regions of confinement are able to explore the cytoplasmic space under metabolically active conditions. These findings have broad implications for our understanding of bacterial physiology as the glassy behavior of the cytoplasm impacts all intracellular processes involving large cellular components. Supported by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

  19. Live-cell superresolution microscopy reveals the organization of RNA polymerase in the bacterial nucleoid

    PubMed Central

    Stracy, Mathew; Lesterlin, Christian; Garza de Leon, Federico; Uphoff, Stephan; Zawadzki, Pawel; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fundamental importance of transcription, a comprehensive analysis of RNA polymerase (RNAP) behavior and its role in the nucleoid organization in vivo is lacking. Here, we used superresolution microscopy to study the localization and dynamics of the transcription machinery and DNA in live bacterial cells, at both the single-molecule and the population level. We used photoactivated single-molecule tracking to discriminate between mobile RNAPs and RNAPs specifically bound to DNA, either on promoters or transcribed genes. Mobile RNAPs can explore the whole nucleoid while searching for promoters, and spend 85% of their search time in nonspecific interactions with DNA. On the other hand, the distribution of specifically bound RNAPs shows that low levels of transcription can occur throughout the nucleoid. Further, clustering analysis and 3D structured illumination microscopy (SIM) show that dense clusters of transcribing RNAPs form almost exclusively at the nucleoid periphery. Treatment with rifampicin shows that active transcription is necessary for maintaining this spatial organization. In faster growth conditions, the fraction of transcribing RNAPs increases, as well as their clustering. Under these conditions, we observed dramatic phase separation between the densest clusters of RNAPs and the densest regions of the nucleoid. These findings show that transcription can cause spatial reorganization of the nucleoid, with movement of gene loci out of the bulk of DNA as levels of transcription increase. This work provides a global view of the organization of RNA polymerase and transcription in living cells. PMID:26224838

  20. Recruitment of dendritic cells to the cerebrospinal fluid in bacterial neuroinfections.

    PubMed

    Pashenkov, Mikhail; Teleshova, Natalia; Kouwenhoven, Mathilde; Smirnova, Tatiana; Jin, Ya Ping; Kostulas, Vasilios; Huang, Yu Min; Pinegin, Boris; Boiko, Alexey; Link, Hans

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) accumulate in the CNS during inflammation and may contribute to local immune responses. Two DC subsets present in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are probably recruited from myeloid (CD11c(+)CD123(dim)) and plasmacytoid (CD11c(-)CD123(high)) blood DC. In bacterial meningitis and especially in Lyme meningoencephalitis, numbers of myeloid and plasmacytoid DC in CSF were increased, compared to non-inflammatory neurological diseases, and correlated with chemotactic activity of CSF for immature monocyte-derived DC (moDC). Multiple DC chemoattractants, including macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1beta, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, MCP-3, RANTES and stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1alpha were elevated in CSF in these two neuroinfections. Chemotaxis of immature moDC induced by these CSFs could be partially inhibited by mAbs against CXCR4, the receptor for SDF-1alpha, and CD88, the receptor for C5a. SDF-1alpha present in CSF also chemoattracted mature moDC, which in vivo could correspond to a diminished migration of antigen-bearing DC from the CSF to secondary lymphoid organs. Regulation of DC trafficking to and from the CSF may represent a mechanism of controlling the CNS inflammation.

  1. Effects of bacterial cells and two types of extracellular polymers on bioclogging of sand columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Lu; Zheng, Xilai; Shao, Haibing; Xin, Jia; Sun, Zhaoyue; Wang, Leyun

    2016-04-01

    Microbially induced reductions in the saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, of natural porous media, conventionally called bioclogging, occurs frequently in natural and engineered subsurface systems. Bioclogging can affect artificial groundwater recharge, in situ bioremediation of contaminated aquifers, or permeable reactive barriers. In this study, we designed a series of percolation experiments to simulate the growth and metabolism of bacteria in sand columns. The experimental results showed that the bacterial cell amount gradually increased to a maximum of 8.91 log10 CFU/g sand at 144 h during the bioclogging process, followed by a decrease to 7.89 log10 CFU/g sand until 336 h. The same variation pattern was found for the concentration of tightly bound extracellular polymeric substances (TB-EPS), which had a peak value of 220.76 μg/g sand at 144 h. In the same experiments, the concentration of loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS) increased sharply from 54.45 to 575.57 μg/g sand in 192 h, followed by a slight decline to 505.04 μg/g sand. The increase of the bacterial cell amount along with the other two concentrations could reduce the Ks of porous media, but their relative contributions varied to a large degree during different percolation stages. At the beginning of the tests (e.g., 48 h before), bacterial cells were likely responsible for the Ks reduction of porous media because no increase was found for the other two concentrations. With the accumulation of cells and EPS production from 48 to 144 h, both were important for the reduction of Ks. However, in the late period of percolation tests from 144 to 192 h, LB-EPS was probably responsible for the further reduction of Ks, as the bacterial cell amount and TB-EPS concentration decreased. Quantitative contributions of bacterial cell amount and the two types of extracellular polymers to Ks reductions were also evaluated.

  2. Development and validation of a whole-cell inhibition assay for bacterial methionine aminopeptidase by surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Greis, Kenneth D; Zhou, Songtao; Siehnel, Richard; Klanke, Chuck; Curnow, Alan; Howard, Jeremy; Layh-Schmitt, Gerlinde

    2005-08-01

    Bacterial methionine aminopeptidase (MAP) is a protease that removes methionine from the N termini of newly synthesized bacterial proteins after the peptide deformylase enzyme cleaves the formyl group from the initiator formylmethionine. MAP is an essential bacterial gene product and thus represents a potential target for therapeutic intervention. A fundamental challenge in the antibacterial drug discovery field is demonstrating conclusively that compounds with in vitro enzyme inhibition activity produce the desired antibacterial effect by interfering with the same target in whole bacterial cells. One way to address the activity of inhibitor compounds is by profiling cellular biomarkers in whole bacterial cells using compounds that are known inhibitors of a particular target. However, in the case of MAP, no specific inhibitors were available for such studies. Instead, a genetically attenuated MAP strain was generated in which MAP expression was placed under the control of an inducible arabinose promoter. Thus, MAP inhibition in whole cells could be mimicked by growth in the absence of arabinose. This genetically attenuated strain was used as a benchmark for MAP inhibition by profiling whole-cell lysates for unprocessed proteins using surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MS). Eight proteins between 4 and 14 kDa were confirmed as being unprocessed and containing the initiator methionine by adding back purified MAP to the preparations prior to MS analysis. Upon establishing these unprocessed proteins as biomarkers for MAP inhibition, the assay was used to screen small-molecule chemical inhibitors of purified MAP for whole-cell activity. Fifteen compound classes yielded three classes of compound with whole-cell activity for further optimization by chemical expansion. This report presents the development, validation, and implementation of a whole-cell inhibition assay for MAP.

  3. The antimicrobial polymer PHMB enters cells and selectively condenses bacterial chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Chindera, Kantaraja; Mahato, Manohar; Kumar Sharma, Ashwani; Horsley, Harry; Kloc-Muniak, Klaudia; Kamaruzzaman, Nor Fadhilah; Kumar, Satish; McFarlane, Alexander; Stach, Jem; Bentin, Thomas; Good, Liam

    2016-01-01

    To combat infection and antimicrobial resistance, it is helpful to elucidate drug mechanism(s) of action. Here we examined how the widely used antimicrobial polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) kills bacteria selectively over host cells. Contrary to the accepted model of microbial membrane disruption by PHMB, we observed cell entry into a range of bacterial species, and treated bacteria displayed cell division arrest and chromosome condensation, suggesting DNA binding as an alternative antimicrobial mechanism. A DNA-level mechanism was confirmed by observations that PHMB formed nanoparticles when mixed with isolated bacterial chromosomal DNA and its effects on growth were suppressed by pairwise combination with the DNA binding ligand Hoechst 33258. PHMB also entered mammalian cells, but was trapped within endosomes and excluded from nuclei. Therefore, PHMB displays differential access to bacterial and mammalian cellular DNA and selectively binds and condenses bacterial chromosomes. Because acquired resistance to PHMB has not been reported, selective chromosome condensation provides an unanticipated paradigm for antimicrobial action that may not succumb to resistance. PMID:26996206

  4. Increased electrical output when a bacterial ABTS oxidizer is used in a microbial fuel cell

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a technology that provides electrical energy from the microbial oxidation of organic compounds. Most MFCs use oxygen as the oxidant in the cathode chamber. The present study examined the formation in culture of an unidentified bacterial oxidant and investigated the ...

  5. A portable immunomagnetic cell capture system to accelerate culture diagnosis of bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saurabh; Upadhyay, Mohita; Sharma, Jyoti; Gupta, Shalini; Vivekanandan, Perumal; Elangovan, Ravikrishnan

    2016-05-23

    Bacterial infections continue to be a major cause of deaths globally, particularly in resource-poor settings. In the absence of rapid and affordable diagnostic solutions, patients are mostly administered broad spectrum antibiotics leading to antibiotics resistance and poor recovery. Culture diagnosis continues to be a gold standard for diagnosis of bacterial infection, despite its long turnaround time of 24 to 48 h. We have developed a portable immunomagnetic cell capture (iMC(2)) system that allows rapid culture diagnosis of bacterial pathogens. Our approach involves the culture growth of the blood samples in broth media for 6 to 8 h, followed by immunomagnetic enrichment of the target cells using the iMC(2) device. The device comprises a disposable capture chip that has two chambers of 5 ml and 50 μl volume connected through a channel with a manual valve. Bacterial cells bound to antibody coated magnetic nanoparticles are swept from the 5 ml sample chamber into the 50 μl recovery chamber by moving an external magnetic field with respect to the capture chip using a linear positioner. This enables specific isolation and up to 100× enrichment of the target cells. The presence of bacteria in the recovered sample is confirmed visually using a lateral flow immunoassay. The system is demonstrated in buffer and blood samples spiked with S. typhi. The method has high sensitivity (10 CFU ml(-1)), specificity and a rapid turnaround time of less than 7 h, a significant improvement over conventional methods. PMID:27118505

  6. [Detection of cell death markers as a tool for bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility testing].

    PubMed

    Mlynárčik, P; Kolář, M

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance among nosocomial pathogens has emerged as one of the most important health care problems in the new millennium. In this review, we present new methods for bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility testing, based on the detection of antibiotic-mediated cell death markers that could provide valuable alternatives to existing phenotypic approaches in the very near future. PMID:27467325

  7. Reaction of germinal centers in the T-cell-independent response to the bacterial polysaccharide alpha(1-->6)dextran.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, D; Wells, S M; Stall, A M; Kabat, E A

    1994-01-01

    Primary immunization of BALB/c mice with alpha(1-->6)dextran (DEX), a native bacterial polysaccharide, induces an unexpected pattern of splenic B-cell responses. After a peak of antibody-secreting B-cell response at day 4, deposition of dextran-anti-dextran immune complexes, as revealed by staining with both dextran and antibodies to dextran, occurs and persists in splenic follicles until at least the fourth week after immunization. Antigen-specific B cells appear and proliferate in such follicles, leading by day 11 to development of DEX-specific germinal centers as characterized by the presence of distinct regions of DEX+ peanut agglutinin-positive (PNA+) cells. At this time, fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis also reveals the appearance of a distinct population of DEX+ PNA+ splenic B cells. In contrast, DEX+ PNA- cells, characterized by intense cytoplasmic staining, are present outside of splenic follicles, peak at day 4 to day 5, and persist until at least day 28. The frequency of these cells correlates with DEX-specific antibody-secreting cells, as detected by the ELISA-spot assay. Thus, in addition to the expected plasma cellular response, the typical T-cell-independent type II antigen, DEX, surprisingly also elicits the formation of antigen-specific germinal centers. These observations raise fundamental questions about the roles of germinal centers in T-cell-independent immune responses. Images PMID:7511812

  8. In situ probing the interior of single bacterial cells at nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Boyin; Hemayet Uddin, Md; Ng, Tuck Wah; Paterson, David L.; Velkov, Tony; Li, Jian; Fu, Jing

    2014-10-01

    We report a novel approach to probe the interior of single bacterial cells at nanometre resolution by combining focused ion beam (FIB) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). After removing layers of pre-defined thickness in the order of 100 nm on the target bacterial cells with FIB milling, AFM of different modes can be employed to probe the cellular interior under both ambient and aqueous environments. Our initial investigations focused on the surface topology induced by FIB milling and the hydration effects on AFM measurements, followed by assessment of the sample protocols. With fine-tuning of the process parameters, in situ AFM probing beneath the bacterial cell wall was achieved for the first time. We further demonstrate the proposed method by performing a spatial mapping of intracellular elasticity and chemistry of the multi-drug resistant strain Klebsiella pneumoniae cells prior to and after it was exposed to the ‘last-line’ antibiotic polymyxin B. Our results revealed increased stiffness occurring in both surface and interior regions of the treated cells, suggesting loss of integrity of the outer membrane from polymyxin treatments. In addition, the hydrophobicity measurement using a functionalized AFM tip was able to highlight the evident hydrophobic portion of the cell such as the regions containing cell membrane. We expect that the proposed FIB-AFM platform will help in gaining deeper insights of bacteria-drug interactions to develop potential strategies for combating multi-drug resistance.

  9. Bacterial Cell Surface Adsorption of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Y.; Park, D.; Reed, D.; Fujita, Y.; Yung, M.; Anderko, A.; Eslamimanesh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) play a critical role in many emerging clean energy technologies, including high-power magnets, wind turbines, solar panels, hybrid/electric vehicle batteries and lamp phosphors. In order to sustain demand for such technologies given current domestic REE shortages, there is a need to develop new approaches for ore processing/refining and recycling of REE-containing materials. To this end, we have developed a microbially-mediated bioadsorption strategy with application towards enrichment of REE from complex mixtures. Specifically, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was genetically engineered to display lanthanide binding tags (LBTs), short peptides that possess high affinity and specificity for rare earth elements, on its cell surface S-layer protein. Under optimal conditions, LBT-displayed cells adsorbed greater than 5-fold more REE than control cells lacking LBTs. Competition binding experiments with a selection of REEs demonstrated that our engineered cells could facilitate separation of light- from heavy- REE. Importantly, binding of REE onto our engineered strains was much more favorable compared to non-REE metals. Finally, REE bound to the cell surface could be stripped off using citrate, providing an effective and non-toxic REE recovery method. Together, this data highlights the potential of our approach for selective REE enrichment from REE containing mixtures.

  10. Antibacterial Activity of Cinnamaldehyde and Estragole Extracted from Plant Essential Oils against Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Causing Bacterial Canker Disease in Kiwifruit

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yu-Rim; Choi, Min-Seon; Choi, Geun-Won; Park, Il-Kwon; Oh, Chang-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) causes bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit. Antibacterial activity of plant essential oils (PEOs) originating from 49 plant species were tested against Psa by a vapor diffusion and a liquid culture assays. The five PEOs from Pimenta racemosa, P. dioica, Melaleuca linariifolia, M. cajuputii, and Cinnamomum cassia efficiently inhibited Psa growth by either assays. Among their major components, estragole, eugenol, and methyl eugenol showed significant antibacterial activity by only the liquid culture assay, while cinnamaldehyde exhibited antibacterial activity by both assays. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of estragole and cinnamaldehyde by the liquid culture assay were 1,250 and 2,500 ppm, respectively. The MIC of cinnamaldehyde by the vapor diffusion assay was 5,000 ppm. Based on the formation of clear zones or the decrease of optical density caused by these compounds, they might kill the bacterial cells and this feature might be useful for managing the bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit. PMID:27493612

  11. Antibacterial Activity of Cinnamaldehyde and Estragole Extracted from Plant Essential Oils against Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Causing Bacterial Canker Disease in Kiwifruit.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu-Rim; Choi, Min-Seon; Choi, Geun-Won; Park, Il-Kwon; Oh, Chang-Sik

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) causes bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit. Antibacterial activity of plant essential oils (PEOs) originating from 49 plant species were tested against Psa by a vapor diffusion and a liquid culture assays. The five PEOs from Pimenta racemosa, P. dioica, Melaleuca linariifolia, M. cajuputii, and Cinnamomum cassia efficiently inhibited Psa growth by either assays. Among their major components, estragole, eugenol, and methyl eugenol showed significant antibacterial activity by only the liquid culture assay, while cinnamaldehyde exhibited antibacterial activity by both assays. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of estragole and cinnamaldehyde by the liquid culture assay were 1,250 and 2,500 ppm, respectively. The MIC of cinnamaldehyde by the vapor diffusion assay was 5,000 ppm. Based on the formation of clear zones or the decrease of optical density caused by these compounds, they might kill the bacterial cells and this feature might be useful for managing the bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit. PMID:27493612

  12. Penicillin Use in Meningococcal Disease Management: Active Bacterial Core Surveillance Sites, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Blain, Amy E.; Mandal, Sema; Wu, Henry; MacNeil, Jessica R.; Harrison, Lee H.; Farley, Monica M.; Lynfield, Ruth; Miller, Lisa; Nichols, Megin; Petit, Sue; Reingold, Arthur; Schaffner, William; Thomas, Ann; Zansky, Shelley M.; Anderson, Raydel; Harcourt, Brian H.; Mayer, Leonard W.; Clark, Thomas A.; Cohn, Amanda C.

    2016-01-01

    In 2009, in the Active Bacterial Core surveillance sites, penicillin was not commonly used to treat meningococcal disease. This is likely because of inconsistent availability of antimicrobial susceptibility testing and ease of use of third-generation cephalosporins. Consideration of current practices may inform future meningococcal disease management guidelines. PMID:27704009

  13. Antagonistic activity of Bacillus subtilis SB1 and its biocontrol effect on tomato bacterial wilt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A potential biocontrol agent of bacterial wilt, Bacillus subtilis SB1, isolated from tomato roots, showed a broad-spectrum of antimicrobial activity in in vitro experiments. It inhibited the growth of many plant pathogens, including Ralstonia solanacearum, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Fusarium ox...

  14. Antimicrobials for bacterial bioterrorism agents.

    PubMed

    Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Atkins, Helen S

    2011-06-01

    The limitations of current antimicrobials for highly virulent pathogens considered as potential bioterrorism agents drives the requirement for new antimicrobials that are suitable for use in populations in the event of a deliberate release. Strategies targeting bacterial virulence offer the potential for new countermeasures to combat bacterial bioterrorism agents, including those active against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Although early in the development of antivirulence approaches, inhibitors of bacterial type III secretion systems and cell division mechanisms show promise for the future.

  15. Membrane fluidity as a factor in production and stability of bacterial ice nuclei active at high subfreezing temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lindow, S E

    1995-06-01

    Detailed measurements were made of the rate of appearance of bacterial ice nuclei upon cooling of suspensions of Pseudomonas syringae cells and the disappearance of ice nuclei upon warming of the cells before assay for ice nucleation activity. While no substantial change in numbers of ice nuclei active at either -5 or at -9 degrees C was observed in cells that were grown at temperatures lower than 24 degrees C and cooled to 21 degrees C before assay, large increases in -5 but not -9 degrees C ice nuclei were observed in cells grown at temperatures greater than 24 degrees C. Ice nucleation activity of cells subjected to a decrease in temperature before assay increased immediately upon temperature shift, but 8 to 12 min was required before maximum rates of increase in numbers of ice nuclei were observed. The rate of appearance of ice nuclei in cell suspensions incubated at relatively cold temperatures prior to assay was substantially less than those incubated at temperatures approaching 24 degrees C. Cells rapidly lost ice nucleation activity when warmed to above 27 degrees C before assay; the rate of loss of ice nuclei in cells grown at a given temperature increased rapidly as the temperature to which they were warmed before assay increased. Ice nuclei disappeared most rapidly when cells grown at low temperatures were warmed before assay, suggesting that ice nucleus stability was lower in highly fluid membranes. The logarithm of the half-life of ice nuclei in cells was directly related to the concentration of the membrane fluidizing agent, 2-phenethyl alcohol, in which they were suspended. PMID:7781327

  16. Uranium biomineralization as a result of bacterial phosphatase activity: insights from bacterial isolates from a contaminated subsurface.

    PubMed

    Beazley, Melanie J; Martinez, Robert J; Sobecky, Patricia A; Webb, Samuel M; Taillefert, Martial

    2007-08-15

    Uranium contamination is an environmental concern at the Department of Energy's Field Research Center in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In this study, we investigated whether phosphate biomineralization, or the aerobic precipitation of U(VI)-phosphate phases facilitated by the enzymatic activities of microorganisms, offers an alternative to the more extensively studied anaerobic U(VI) bioreduction. Three heterotrophic bacteria isolated from FRC soils were studied for their ability to grow and liberate phosphate in the presence of U(VI) and an organophosphate between pH 4.5 and 7.0. The objectives were to determine whether the strains hydrolyzed sufficient phosphate to precipitate uranium, to determine whether low pH might have an effect on U(VI) precipitation, and to identify the uranium solid phase formed during biomineralization. Two bacterial strains hydrolyzed sufficient organophosphate to precipitate 7395% total uranium after 120 h of incubation in simulated groundwater. The highest rates of uranium precipitation and phosphatase activity were observed between pH 5.0 and 7.0. EXAFS spectra identified the uranyl phosphate precipitate as an autunite/meta-autunite group mineral. The results of this study indicate that aerobic heterotrophic bacteria within a uranium-contaminated environment that can hydrolyze organophosphate, especially in low pH conditions, may play an important role in the bioremediation of uranium.

  17. From protozoa to mammalian cells: a new paradigm in the life cycle of intracellular bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Harb, O S; Gao, L Y; Abu Kwaik, Y

    2000-06-01

    It is becoming apparent that several intracellular bacterial pathogens of humans can also survive within protozoa. This interaction with protozoa may protect these pathogens from harsh conditions in the extracellular environment and enhance their infectivity in mammals. This relationship has been clearly established in the case of the interaction between Legionella pneumophila and its protozoan hosts. In addition, the adaptation of bacterial pathogens to the intracellular life within the primitive eukaryotic protozoa may have provided them with the means to infect the more evolved mammalian cells. This is evident from the existence of several similarities, at both the phenotypic and the molecular levels, between the infection of mammalian and protozoan cells by L. pneumophila. Thus, protozoa appear to play a central role in the transition of bacteria from the environment to mammals. In essence, protozoa may be viewed as a 'biological gym', within which intracellular bacterial pathogens train for their encounters with the more evolved mammalian cells. Thus, intracellular bacterial pathogens have benefited from the structural and biochemical conservation of cellular processes in eukaryotes. The interaction of intracellular bacterial pathogens and protozoa highlights this conservation and may constitute a simplified model for the study of these pathogens and the evolution of cellular processes in eukaryotes. Furthermore, in addition to being environmental reservoirs for known intracellular pathogens of humans and animals, protozoa may be sources of emerging pathogenic bacteria. It is thus critical to re-examine the relationship between bacteria and protozoa to further our understanding of current human bacterial pathogenesis and, possibly, to predict the appearance of emerging pathogens. PMID:11200426

  18. A Novel Mechanism of Bacterial Toxin Transfer within Host Blood Cell-Derived Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Ståhl, Anne-lie; Arvidsson, Ida; Johansson, Karl E.; Chromek, Milan; Rebetz, Johan; Loos, Sebastian; Kristoffersson, Ann-Charlotte; Békássy, Zivile D.; Mörgelin, Matthias; Karpman, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is the main virulence factor of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, which are non-invasive strains that can lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), associated with renal failure and death. Although bacteremia does not occur, bacterial virulence factors gain access to the circulation and are thereafter presumed to cause target organ damage. Stx was previously shown to circulate bound to blood cells but the mechanism by which it would potentially transfer to target organ cells has not been elucidated. Here we show that blood cell-derived microvesicles, shed during HUS, contain Stx and are found within patient renal cortical cells. The finding was reproduced in mice infected with Stx-producing Escherichia coli exhibiting Stx-containing blood cell-derived microvesicles in the circulation that reached the kidney where they were transferred into glomerular and peritubular capillary endothelial cells and further through their basement membranes followed by podocytes and tubular epithelial cells, respectively. In vitro studies demonstrated that blood cell-derived microvesicles containing Stx undergo endocytosis in glomerular endothelial cells leading to cell death secondary to inhibited protein synthesis. This study demonstrates a novel virulence mechanism whereby bacterial toxin is transferred within host blood cell-derived microvesicles in which it may evade the host immune system. PMID:25719452

  19. Spatial Patterning of Newly-Inserted Material during Bacterial Cell Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursell, Tristan

    2012-02-01

    In the life cycle of a bacterium, rudimentary microscopy demonstrates that cell growth and elongation are essential characteristics of cellular reproduction. The peptidoglycan cell wall is the main load-bearing structure that determines both cell shape and overall size. However, simple imaging of cellular growth gives no indication of the spatial patterning nor mechanism by which material is being incorporated into the pre-existing cell wall. We employ a c