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Sample records for active bacterial core

  1. Twenty Years of Active Bacterial Core Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Schaffner, William; Farley, Monica M.; Lynfield, Ruth; Bennett, Nancy M.; Reingold, Arthur; Thomas, Ann; Harrison, Lee H.; Nichols, Megin; Petit, Susan; Miller, Lisa; Moore, Matthew R.; Schrag, Stephanie J.; Lessa, Fernanda C.; Skoff, Tami H.; MacNeil, Jessica R.; Briere, Elizabeth C.; Weston, Emily J.; Van Beneden, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs) was established in 1995 as part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Emerging Infections Program (EIP) network to assess the extent of invasive bacterial infections of public health importance. ABCs is distinctive among surveillance systems because of its large, population-based, geographically diverse catchment area; active laboratory-based identification of cases to ensure complete case capture; detailed collection of epidemiologic information paired with laboratory isolates; infrastructure that allows for more in-depth investigations; and sustained commitment of public health, academic, and clinical partners to maintain the system. ABCs has directly affected public health policies and practices through the development and evaluation of vaccines and other prevention strategies, the monitoring of antimicrobial drug resistance, and the response to public health emergencies and other emerging infections. PMID:26292067

  2. Active bacterial core surveillance of the emerging infections program network.

    PubMed Central

    Schuchat, A.; Hilger, T.; Zell, E.; Farley, M. M.; Reingold, A.; Harrison, L.; Lefkowitz, L.; Danila, R.; Stefonek, K.; Barrett, N.; Morse, D.; Pinner, R.

    2001-01-01

    Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs) is a collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and several state health departments and universities participating in the Emerging Infections Program Network. ABCs conducts population-based active surveillance, collects isolates, and performs studies of invasive disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, group A and group B Streptococcus, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae for a population of 17 to 30 million. These pathogens caused an estimated 97,000 invasive cases, resulting in 10,000 deaths in the United States in 1998. Incidence rates of these pathogens are described. During 1998, 25% of invasive pneumococcal infections in ABCs areas were not susceptible to penicillin, and 13.3% were not susceptible to three classes of antibiotics. In 1998, early-onset group B streptococcal disease had declined by 65% over the previous 6 years. More information on ABCs is available at www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dbmd/abcs. ABCs specimens will soon be available to researchers through an archive. PMID:11266299

  3. Penicillin Use in Meningococcal Disease Management: Active Bacterial Core Surveillance Sites, 2009.

    PubMed

    Blain, Amy E; Mandal, Sema; Wu, Henry; MacNeil, Jessica R; Harrison, Lee H; Farley, Monica M; Lynfield, Ruth; Miller, Lisa; Nichols, Megin; Petit, Sue; Reingold, Arthur; Schaffner, William; Thomas, Ann; Zansky, Shelley M; Anderson, Raydel; Harcourt, Brian H; Mayer, Leonard W; Clark, Thomas A; Cohn, Amanda C

    2016-09-01

    In 2009, in the Active Bacterial Core surveillance sites, penicillin was not commonly used to treat meningococcal disease. This is likely because of inconsistent availability of antimicrobial susceptibility testing and ease of use of third-generation cephalosporins. Consideration of current practices may inform future meningococcal disease management guidelines.

  4. Penicillin Use in Meningococcal Disease Management: Active Bacterial Core Surveillance Sites, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Blain, Amy E.; Mandal, Sema; Wu, Henry; MacNeil, Jessica R.; Harrison, Lee H.; Farley, Monica M.; Lynfield, Ruth; Miller, Lisa; Nichols, Megin; Petit, Sue; Reingold, Arthur; Schaffner, William; Thomas, Ann; Zansky, Shelley M.; Anderson, Raydel; Harcourt, Brian H.; Mayer, Leonard W.; Clark, Thomas A.; Cohn, Amanda C.

    2016-01-01

    In 2009, in the Active Bacterial Core surveillance sites, penicillin was not commonly used to treat meningococcal disease. This is likely because of inconsistent availability of antimicrobial susceptibility testing and ease of use of third-generation cephalosporins. Consideration of current practices may inform future meningococcal disease management guidelines. PMID:27704009

  5. Investigation of antimicrobial activity of photothermal therapeutic gold/copper sulfide core/shell nanoparticles to bacterial spores and cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Au/CuS core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) were designed as a new type of transducer agent for photothermal therapy (PTT), with attractive features of easy preparation, low cost and small size for targeting. This paper studied for the first time the intrinsic antimicrobial activity of Au/CuS NPs to B. anthracis spores and cells in addition to its PTT effect. Results It was found that Au/CuS NPs were highly efficient in inactivating B. anthracis cells, but not effective to the spores. Treatment with NPs at ~0.83 μM for 30 min achieved a 7 log reduction in viable cells. The antimicrobial effect was both NPs concentration and treatment time dependent. SEM imaging and the efflux of DNA test demonstrated the damage of cell membrane after NPs treatment, yet further research is necessary to fully understand the precise inactivation mechanism. Conclusions The Au/CuS NPs had strong antimicrobial activity to B. anthracis cells, which showed a great potential to be an effective antimicrobial agent to bacterial cells. PMID:24963345

  6. Bacterial Fouling in a Model Core System

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, J. C.; Bramhill, B.; Wardlaw, N. C.; Costerton, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    We have used a sintered glass bead core to simulate the spaces and surfaces of reservoir rock in studies of the bacterial plugging phenomenon that affects waterflood oil recovery operations. The passage of pure or mixed natural populations of bacteria through this solid matrix was initially seen to promote the formation of adherent bacterial microcolonies on available surfaces. Bacteria within these microcolonies produced huge amounts of exopolysaccharides and coalesced to form a confluent plugging biofilm that eventually caused a >99% decrease in core permeability. Aerobic bacteria developed a plugging biofilm on the inlet face of the core, facultative anaerobes plugged throughout the core, and dead bacteria did not effectively plug the narrow (33-μm) spaces of this solid matrix because they neither adhered extensively to surfaces nor produced the extensive exopolysaccharides characteristic of living cells. The presence of particles in the water used in these experiments rapidly decreased the core permeability because they became trapped in the developing biofilm and accelerated the plugging of pore spaces. Once established, cells within the bacterial biofilm could be killed by treatment with a biocide (isothiazalone), but their essentially inert carbohydrate biofilm matrix persisted and continued to plug the pore spaces, whereas treatment with 5% sodium hypochlorite killed the bacteria, dissolved the exopolysaccharide biofilm matrix, and restored permeability to these plugged glass bead cores. Images PMID:16346760

  7. Core Principles of Bacterial Autoinducer Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Autoinduction (AI), the response to self-produced chemical signals, is widespread in the bacterial world. This process controls vastly different target functions, such as luminescence, nutrient acquisition, and biofilm formation, in different ways and integrates additional environmental and physiological cues. This diversity raises questions about unifying principles that underlie all AI systems. Here, we suggest that such core principles exist. We argue that the general purpose of AI systems is the homeostatic control of costly cooperative behaviors, including, but not limited to, secreted public goods. First, costly behaviors require preassessment of their efficiency by cheaper AI signals, which we encapsulate in a hybrid “push-pull” model. The “push” factors cell density, diffusion, and spatial clustering determine when a behavior becomes effective. The relative importance of each factor depends on each species' individual ecological context and life history. In turn, “pull” factors, often stress cues that reduce the activation threshold, determine the cellular demand for the target behavior. Second, control is homeostatic because AI systems, either themselves or through accessory mechanisms, not only initiate but also maintain the efficiency of target behaviors. Third, AI-controlled behaviors, even seemingly noncooperative ones, are generally cooperative in nature, when interpreted in the appropriate ecological context. The escape of individual cells from biofilms, for example, may be viewed as an altruistic behavior that increases the fitness of the resident population by reducing starvation stress. The framework proposed here helps appropriately categorize AI-controlled behaviors and allows for a deeper understanding of their ecological and evolutionary functions. PMID:25694124

  8. Core principles of bacterial autoinducer systems.

    PubMed

    Hense, Burkhard A; Schuster, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Autoinduction (AI), the response to self-produced chemical signals, is widespread in the bacterial world. This process controls vastly different target functions, such as luminescence, nutrient acquisition, and biofilm formation, in different ways and integrates additional environmental and physiological cues. This diversity raises questions about unifying principles that underlie all AI systems. Here, we suggest that such core principles exist. We argue that the general purpose of AI systems is the homeostatic control of costly cooperative behaviors, including, but not limited to, secreted public goods. First, costly behaviors require preassessment of their efficiency by cheaper AI signals, which we encapsulate in a hybrid "push-pull" model. The "push" factors cell density, diffusion, and spatial clustering determine when a behavior becomes effective. The relative importance of each factor depends on each species' individual ecological context and life history. In turn, "pull" factors, often stress cues that reduce the activation threshold, determine the cellular demand for the target behavior. Second, control is homeostatic because AI systems, either themselves or through accessory mechanisms, not only initiate but also maintain the efficiency of target behaviors. Third, AI-controlled behaviors, even seemingly noncooperative ones, are generally cooperative in nature, when interpreted in the appropriate ecological context. The escape of individual cells from biofilms, for example, may be viewed as an altruistic behavior that increases the fitness of the resident population by reducing starvation stress. The framework proposed here helps appropriately categorize AI-controlled behaviors and allows for a deeper understanding of their ecological and evolutionary functions. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Antarctic ice core samples: culturable bacterial diversity.

    PubMed

    Shivaji, Sisinthy; Begum, Zareena; Shiva Nageswara Rao, Singireesu Soma; Vishnu Vardhan Reddy, Puram V; Manasa, Poorna; Sailaja, Buddi; Prathiba, Mambatta S; Thamban, Meloth; Krishnan, Kottekkatu P; Singh, Shiv M; Srinivas, Tanuku N R

    2013-01-01

    Culturable bacterial abundance at 11 different depths of a 50.26 m ice core from the Tallaksenvarden Nunatak, Antarctica, varied from 0.02 to 5.8 × 10(3) CFU ml(-1) of the melt water. A total of 138 bacterial strains were recovered from the 11 different depths of the ice core. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses, the 138 isolates could be categorized into 25 phylotypes belonging to phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. All isolates had 16S rRNA sequences similar to previously determined sequences (97.2-100%). No correlation was observed in the distribution of the isolates at the various depths either at the phylum, genus or species level. The 25 phylotypes varied in growth temperature range, tolerance to NaCl, growth pH range and ability to produce eight different extracellular enzymes at either 4 or 18 °C. Iso-, anteiso-, unsaturated and saturated fatty acids together constituted a significant proportion of the total fatty acid composition. Copyright © 2012 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. BcsA and BcsB form the catalytically active core of bacterial cellulose synthase sufficient for in vitro cellulose synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Omadjela, Okako; Narahari, Adishesh; Strumillo, Joanna; Mélida, Hugo; Mazur, Olga; Bulone, Vincent; Zimmer, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose is a linear extracellular polysaccharide. It is synthesized by membrane-embedded glycosyltransferases that processively polymerize UDP-activated glucose. Polymer synthesis is coupled to membrane translocation through a channel formed by the cellulose synthase. Although eukaryotic cellulose synthases function in macromolecular complexes containing several different enzyme isoforms, prokaryotic synthases associate with additional subunits to bridge the periplasm and the outer membrane. In bacteria, cellulose synthesis and translocation is catalyzed by the inner membrane-associated bacterial cellulose synthase (Bcs)A and BcsB subunits. Similar to alginate and poly-β-1,6 N-acetylglucosamine, bacterial cellulose is implicated in the formation of sessile bacterial communities, termed biofilms, and its synthesis is likewise stimulated by cyclic-di-GMP. Biochemical studies of exopolysaccharide synthesis are hampered by difficulties in purifying and reconstituting functional enzymes. We demonstrate robust in vitro cellulose synthesis reconstituted from purified BcsA and BcsB proteins from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Although BcsA is the catalytically active subunit, the membrane-anchored BcsB subunit is essential for catalysis. The purified BcsA-B complex produces cellulose chains of a degree of polymerization in the range 200–300. Catalytic activity critically depends on the presence of the allosteric activator cyclic-di-GMP, but is independent of lipid-linked reactants. Our data reveal feedback inhibition of cellulose synthase by UDP but not by the accumulating cellulose polymer and highlight the strict substrate specificity of cellulose synthase for UDP-glucose. A truncation analysis of BcsB localizes the region required for activity of BcsA within its C-terminal membrane-associated domain. The reconstituted reaction provides a foundation for the synthesis of biofilm exopolysaccharides, as well as its activation by cyclic-di-GMP. PMID:24127606

  11. One core, two shells: bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Melnikov, Sergey; Ben-Shem, Adam; Garreau de Loubresse, Nicolas; Jenner, Lasse; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2012-06-05

    Ribosomes are universally conserved enzymes that carry out protein biosynthesis. Bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes, which share an evolutionarily conserved core, are thought to have evolved from a common ancestor by addition of proteins and RNA that bestow different functionalities to ribosomes from different domains of life. Recently, structures of the eukaryotic ribosome, determined by X-ray crystallography, have allowed us to compare these structures to previously determined structures of bacterial ribosomes. Here we describe selected bacteria- or eukaryote-specific structural features of the ribosome and discuss the functional implications of some of them.

  12. Bacterial activation of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Chi, David S; Walker, Elaine S; Hossler, Fred E; Krishnaswamy, Guha

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells often are found in a perivascular location but especially in mucosae, where they may response to various stimuli. They typically associate with immediate hypersensitive responses and are likely to play a critical role in host defense. In this chapter, a common airway pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis, and a commensal bacterium, Neiserria cinerea, are used to illustrate activation of human mast cells. A human mast cell line (HMC-1) derived from a patient with mast cell leukemia was activated with varying concentrations of heat-killed bacteria. Active aggregation of bacteria over mast cell surfaces was detected by scanning electron microscopy. The activation of mast cells was analyzed by nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and cytokine production in culture supernatants. Both M. catarrhalis and N. cinerea induce mast cell activation and the secretion of two key inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-6 and MCP-1. This is accompanied by NF-kappaB activation. Direct bacterial contact with mast cells appears to be essential for this activation because neither cell-free bacterial supernatants nor bacterial lipopolysaccharide induce cytokine secretion.

  13. On the core bacterial flora of Ixodes persulcatus (Taiga tick).

    PubMed

    Sui, Shuo; Yang, Yu; Sun, Yi; Wang, Xumin; Wang, Guoliang; Shan, Guangle; Wang, Jiancheng; Yu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Ixodes persulcatus is a predominant hard tick species that transmits a wide range of human and animal pathogens. Since bacterial flora of the tick dwelling in the wild always vary according to their hosts and the environment, it is highly desirable that species-associated microbiomes are fully determined by using next-generation sequencing and based on comparative metagenomics. Here, we examine such metagenomic changes of I. persulcatus starting with samples collected from the wild ticks and followed by the reared animals under pathogen-free laboratory conditions over multiple generations. Based on high-coverage genomic sequences from three experimental groups-wild, reared for a single generation or R1, and reared for eight generations or R8 -we identify the core bacterial flora of I. persulcatus, which contains 70 species that belong to 69 genera of 8 phyla; such a core is from the R8 group, which is reduced from 4625 species belonging to 1153 genera of 29 phyla in the wild group. Our study provides a novel example of tick core bacterial flora acquired based on wild-to-reared comparison, which paves a way for future research on tick metagenomics and tick-borne disease pandemics.

  14. On the core bacterial flora of Ixodes persulcatus (Taiga tick)

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Wang, Xumin; Wang, Guoliang; Shan, Guangle; Wang, Jiancheng; Yu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Ixodes persulcatus is a predominant hard tick species that transmits a wide range of human and animal pathogens. Since bacterial flora of the tick dwelling in the wild always vary according to their hosts and the environment, it is highly desirable that species-associated microbiomes are fully determined by using next-generation sequencing and based on comparative metagenomics. Here, we examine such metagenomic changes of I. persulcatus starting with samples collected from the wild ticks and followed by the reared animals under pathogen-free laboratory conditions over multiple generations. Based on high-coverage genomic sequences from three experimental groups–wild, reared for a single generation or R1, and reared for eight generations or R8 –we identify the core bacterial flora of I. persulcatus, which contains 70 species that belong to 69 genera of 8 phyla; such a core is from the R8 group, which is reduced from 4625 species belonging to 1153 genera of 29 phyla in the wild group. Our study provides a novel example of tick core bacterial flora acquired based on wild-to-reared comparison, which paves a way for future research on tick metagenomics and tick-borne disease pandemics. PMID:28692666

  15. A bacterial ice-binding protein from the Vostok ice core.

    PubMed

    Raymond, James A; Christner, Brent C; Schuster, Stephan C

    2008-09-01

    Bacterial and yeast isolates recovered from a deep Antarctic ice core were screened for proteins with ice-binding activity, an indicator of adaptation to icy environments. A bacterial strain recovered from glacial ice at a depth of 3,519 m, just above the accreted ice from Subglacial Lake Vostok, was found to produce a 54 kDa ice-binding protein (GenBank EU694412) that is similar to ice-binding proteins previously found in sea ice diatoms, a snow mold, and a sea ice bacterium. The protein has the ability to inhibit the recrystallization of ice, a phenotype that has clear advantages for survival in ice.

  16. Autoproteolytic activation of bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Aimee

    2010-05-01

    Protease domains within toxins typically act as the primary effector domain within target cells. By contrast, the primary function of the cysteine protease domain (CPD) in Multifunctional Autoprocessing RTX-like (MARTX) and Clostridium sp. glucosylating toxin families is to proteolytically cleave the toxin and release its cognate effector domains. The CPD becomes activated upon binding to the eukaryotic-specific small molecule, inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP(6)), which is found abundantly in the eukaryotic cytosol. This property allows the CPD to spatially and temporally regulate toxin activation, making it a prime candidate for developing anti-toxin therapeutics. In this review, we summarize recent findings related to defining the regulation of toxin function by the CPD and the development of inhibitors to prevent CPD-mediated activation of bacterial toxins.

  17. Autoproteolytic Activation of Bacterial Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Aimee

    2010-01-01

    Protease domains within toxins typically act as the primary effector domain within target cells. By contrast, the primary function of the cysteine protease domain (CPD) in Multifunctional Autoprocessing RTX-like (MARTX) and Clostridium sp. glucosylating toxin families is to proteolytically cleave the toxin and release its cognate effector domains. The CPD becomes activated upon binding to the eukaryotic-specific small molecule, inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6), which is found abundantly in the eukaryotic cytosol. This property allows the CPD to spatially and temporally regulate toxin activation, making it a prime candidate for developing anti-toxin therapeutics. In this review, we summarize recent findings related to defining the regulation of toxin function by the CPD and the development of inhibitors to prevent CPD-mediated activation of bacterial toxins. PMID:22069620

  18. Comparative Bacterial Proteomics: Analysis of the Core Genome Concept

    PubMed Central

    Callister, Stephen J.; McCue, Lee Ann; Turse, Joshua E.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2008-01-01

    While comparative bacterial genomic studies commonly predict a set of genes indicative of common ancestry, experimental validation of the existence of this core genome requires extensive measurement and is typically not undertaken. Enabled by an extensive proteome database developed over six years, we have experimentally verified the expression of proteins predicted from genomic ortholog comparisons among 17 environmental and pathogenic bacteria. More exclusive relationships were observed among the expressed protein content of phenotypically related bacteria, which is indicative of the specific lifestyles associated with these organisms. Although genomic studies can establish relative orthologous relationships among a set of bacteria and propose a set of ancestral genes, our proteomics study establishes expressed lifestyle differences among conserved genes and proposes a set of expressed ancestral traits. PMID:18253490

  19. Comparative Bacterial Proteomics: Analysis of the Core Genome Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Callister, Stephen J.; McCue, Lee Ann; Turse, Josh E.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2008-02-06

    Comparative bacterial genomic studies commonly predict a set of genes indicative of common ancestry. Experimental validation of the existence of this core genome requires extensive measurement and is not typically undertaken. Enabled by an extensive proteome database development over a six year period, we experimentally verified the expression of proteins predicted from genomic ortholog comparisons among 17 environmental and pathogenic bacteria. More exclusive relationships were observed among the expressed protein content of phenotypically related bacteria, which is indicative of the specific lifestyles associated with these organisms. While genomic studies establish relative orthologous relationships among a set of bacteria and propose a set of ancestral genes, our proteomics study establishes expressed lifestyle differences among conserved genes and proposes a set of expressed ancestral traits.

  20. Pyrosequencing Reveals a Core Community of Anodic Bacterial Biofilms in Bioelectrochemical Systems from China

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yong; Zheng, Yue; Wu, Song; Zhang, En-Hua; Chen, Zheng; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Ng, I-Son; Chen, Bor-Yann; Zhao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) are promising technologies for energy and product recovery coupled with wastewater treatment, and the core microbial community in electrochemically active biofilm in BESs remains controversy. In the present study, 7 anodic communities from 6 bioelectrochemical systems in 4 labs in southeast, north and south-central of China are explored by 454 pyrosequencing. A total of 251,225 effective sequences are obtained for 7 electrochemically active biofilm samples at 3% cutoff level. While Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria are the most abundant classes (averaging 16.0–17.7%), Bacteroidia and Clostridia are the two sub-dominant and commonly shared classes. Six commonly shared genera i.e., Azospira, Azospirillum, Acinetobacter, Bacteroides, Geobacter, Pseudomonas, and Rhodopseudomonas dominate the electrochemically active communities and are defined as core genera. A total of 25 OTUs with average relative abundance >0.5% were selected and designated as core OTUs, and some species relating to these OTUs have been reported electrochemically active. Furthermore, cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry tests show that two strains from Acinetobacter guillouiae and Stappia indica, bacteria relate to two core OTUs, are electrochemically active. Using randomly selected bioelectrochemical systems, the study has presented extremely diverse bacterial communities in anodic biofilms, though, we still can suggest some potentially microbes for investigating the electrochemical mechanisms in bioelectrochemical systems. PMID:26733958

  1. Optical fiber sensor having an active core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An optical fiber is provided. The fiber is comprised of an active fiber core which produces waves of light upon excitation. A factor ka is identified and increased until a desired improvement in power efficiency is obtained. The variable a is the radius of the active fiber core and k is defined as 2 pi/lambda wherein lambda is the wavelength of the light produced by the active fiber core. In one embodiment, the factor ka is increased until the power efficiency stabilizes. In addition to a bare fiber core embodiment, a two-stage fluorescent fiber is provided wherein an active cladding surrounds a portion of the active fiber core having an improved ka factor. The power efficiency of the embodiment is further improved by increasing a difference between the respective indices of refraction of the active cladding and the active fiber core.

  2. Functional Screening of Core Promoter Activity.

    PubMed

    Even, Dan Y; Kedmi, Adi; Ideses, Diana; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2017-01-01

    The core promoter is the DNA sequence that recruits the basal transcription machinery and directs accurate initiation of transcription. It is an active contributor to gene expression that can be rationally designed to manipulate the levels of expression. Core promoter function can be analyzed using different experimental approaches. Here, we describe the qualitative and quantitative analysis of engineered core promoter functions using the EGFP reporter gene that is driven by distinct core promoters. Expression plasmids are transfected into different mammalian cell lines, and the resulting fluorescence is monitored by live cell imaging , as well as by flow cytometry. In order to verify that the transcriptional activity of the examined core promoters is indeed a function of their activity, as opposed to differences in DNA uptake, real-time quantitative PCR analysis is performed. Importantly, the described methodology for functional screening of core promoter activity has enabled the analysis of engineered potent core promoters for extended time periods.

  3. Assessing the complex sponge microbiota: core, variable and species-specific bacterial communities in marine sponges.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Susanne; Tsai, Peter; Bell, James; Fromont, Jane; Ilan, Micha; Lindquist, Niels; Perez, Thierry; Rodrigo, Allen; Schupp, Peter J; Vacelet, Jean; Webster, Nicole; Hentschel, Ute; Taylor, Michael W

    2012-03-01

    Marine sponges are well known for their associations with highly diverse, yet very specific and often highly similar microbiota. The aim of this study was to identify potential bacterial sub-populations in relation to sponge phylogeny and sampling sites and to define the core bacterial community. 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing was applied to 32 sponge species from eight locations around the world's oceans, thereby generating 2567 operational taxonomic units (OTUs at the 97% sequence similarity level) in total and up to 364 different OTUs per sponge species. The taxonomic richness detected in this study comprised 25 bacterial phyla with Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi and Poribacteria being most diverse in sponges. Among these phyla were nine candidate phyla, six of them found for the first time in sponges. Similarity comparison of bacterial communities revealed no correlation with host phylogeny but a tropical sub-population in that tropical sponges have more similar bacterial communities to each other than to subtropical sponges. A minimal core bacterial community consisting of very few OTUs (97%, 95% and 90%) was found. These microbes have a global distribution and are probably acquired via environmental transmission. In contrast, a large species-specific bacterial community was detected, which is represented by OTUs present in only a single sponge species. The species-specific bacterial community is probably mainly vertically transmitted. It is proposed that different sponges contain different bacterial species, however, these bacteria are still closely related to each other explaining the observed similarity of bacterial communities in sponges in this and previous studies. This global analysis represents the most comprehensive study of bacterial symbionts in sponges to date and provides novel insights into the complex structure of these unique associations.

  4. Defining the Estimated Core Genome of Bacterial Populations Using a Bayesian Decision Model

    PubMed Central

    van Tonder, Andries J.; Mistry, Shilan; Bray, James E.; Hill, Dorothea M. C.; Cody, Alison J.; Farmer, Chris L.; Klugman, Keith P.; von Gottberg, Anne; Bentley, Stephen D.; Parkhill, Julian; Jolley, Keith A.; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Brueggemann, Angela B.

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial core genome is of intense interest and the volume of whole genome sequence data in the public domain available to investigate it has increased dramatically. The aim of our study was to develop a model to estimate the bacterial core genome from next-generation whole genome sequencing data and use this model to identify novel genes associated with important biological functions. Five bacterial datasets were analysed, comprising 2096 genomes in total. We developed a Bayesian decision model to estimate the number of core genes, calculated pairwise evolutionary distances (p-distances) based on nucleotide sequence diversity, and plotted the median p-distance for each core gene relative to its genome location. We designed visually-informative genome diagrams to depict areas of interest in genomes. Case studies demonstrated how the model could identify areas for further study, e.g. 25% of the core genes with higher sequence diversity in the Campylobacter jejuni and Neisseria meningitidis genomes encoded hypothetical proteins. The core gene with the highest p-distance value in C. jejuni was annotated in the reference genome as a putative hydrolase, but further work revealed that it shared sequence homology with beta-lactamase/metallo-beta-lactamases (enzymes that provide resistance to a range of broad-spectrum antibiotics) and thioredoxin reductase genes (which reduce oxidative stress and are essential for DNA replication) in other C. jejuni genomes. Our Bayesian model of estimating the core genome is principled, easy to use and can be applied to large genome datasets. This study also highlighted the lack of knowledge currently available for many core genes in bacterial genomes of significant global public health importance. PMID:25144616

  5. Defining the estimated core genome of bacterial populations using a Bayesian decision model.

    PubMed

    van Tonder, Andries J; Mistry, Shilan; Bray, James E; Hill, Dorothea M C; Cody, Alison J; Farmer, Chris L; Klugman, Keith P; von Gottberg, Anne; Bentley, Stephen D; Parkhill, Julian; Jolley, Keith A; Maiden, Martin C J; Brueggemann, Angela B

    2014-08-01

    The bacterial core genome is of intense interest and the volume of whole genome sequence data in the public domain available to investigate it has increased dramatically. The aim of our study was to develop a model to estimate the bacterial core genome from next-generation whole genome sequencing data and use this model to identify novel genes associated with important biological functions. Five bacterial datasets were analysed, comprising 2096 genomes in total. We developed a Bayesian decision model to estimate the number of core genes, calculated pairwise evolutionary distances (p-distances) based on nucleotide sequence diversity, and plotted the median p-distance for each core gene relative to its genome location. We designed visually-informative genome diagrams to depict areas of interest in genomes. Case studies demonstrated how the model could identify areas for further study, e.g. 25% of the core genes with higher sequence diversity in the Campylobacter jejuni and Neisseria meningitidis genomes encoded hypothetical proteins. The core gene with the highest p-distance value in C. jejuni was annotated in the reference genome as a putative hydrolase, but further work revealed that it shared sequence homology with beta-lactamase/metallo-beta-lactamases (enzymes that provide resistance to a range of broad-spectrum antibiotics) and thioredoxin reductase genes (which reduce oxidative stress and are essential for DNA replication) in other C. jejuni genomes. Our Bayesian model of estimating the core genome is principled, easy to use and can be applied to large genome datasets. This study also highlighted the lack of knowledge currently available for many core genes in bacterial genomes of significant global public health importance.

  6. Partitioning core and satellite taxa from within cystic fibrosis lung bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    van der Gast, Christopher J; Walker, Alan W; Stressmann, Franziska A; Rogers, Geraint B; Scott, Paul; Daniels, Thomas W; Carroll, Mary P; Parkhill, Julian; Bruce, Kenneth D

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffer from chronic bacterial lung infections that lead to death in the majority of cases. The need to maintain lung function in these patients means that characterising these infections is vital. Increasingly, culture-independent analyses are expanding the number of bacterial species associated with CF respiratory samples; however, the potential significance of these species is not known. Here, we applied ecological statistical tools to such culture-independent data, in a novel manner, to partition taxa within the metacommunity into core and satellite species. Sputa and clinical data were obtained from 14 clinically stable adult CF patients. Fourteen rRNA gene libraries were constructed with 35 genera and 82 taxa, identified in 2139 bacterial clones. Shannon–Wiener and taxa-richness analyses confirmed no undersampling of bacterial diversity. By decomposing the distribution using the ratio of variance to the mean taxon abundance, we partitioned objectively the species abundance distribution into core and satellite species. The satellite group comprised 67 bacterial taxa from 33 genera and the core group, 15 taxa from 7 genera (including Pseudomonas (1 taxon), Streptococcus (2), Neisseria (2), Catonella (1), Porphyromonas (1), Prevotella (5) and Veillonella (3)], the last four being anaerobes). The core group was dominated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Other recognised CF pathogens were rare. Mantel and partial Mantel tests assessed which clinical factors influenced the composition observed. CF transmembrane conductance regulator genotype and antibiotic treatment correlated with all core taxa. Lung function correlated with richness. The clinical significance of these core and satellite species findings in the CF lung is discussed. PMID:21151003

  7. Partitioning core and satellite taxa from within cystic fibrosis lung bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    van der Gast, Christopher J; Walker, Alan W; Stressmann, Franziska A; Rogers, Geraint B; Scott, Paul; Daniels, Thomas W; Carroll, Mary P; Parkhill, Julian; Bruce, Kenneth D

    2011-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffer from chronic bacterial lung infections that lead to death in the majority of cases. The need to maintain lung function in these patients means that characterising these infections is vital. Increasingly, culture-independent analyses are expanding the number of bacterial species associated with CF respiratory samples; however, the potential significance of these species is not known. Here, we applied ecological statistical tools to such culture-independent data, in a novel manner, to partition taxa within the metacommunity into core and satellite species. Sputa and clinical data were obtained from 14 clinically stable adult CF patients. Fourteen rRNA gene libraries were constructed with 35 genera and 82 taxa, identified in 2139 bacterial clones. Shannon-Wiener and taxa-richness analyses confirmed no undersampling of bacterial diversity. By decomposing the distribution using the ratio of variance to the mean taxon abundance, we partitioned objectively the species abundance distribution into core and satellite species. The satellite group comprised 67 bacterial taxa from 33 genera and the core group, 15 taxa from 7 genera (including Pseudomonas (1 taxon), Streptococcus (2), Neisseria (2), Catonella (1), Porphyromonas (1), Prevotella (5) and Veillonella (3)], the last four being anaerobes). The core group was dominated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Other recognised CF pathogens were rare. Mantel and partial Mantel tests assessed which clinical factors influenced the composition observed. CF transmembrane conductance regulator genotype and antibiotic treatment correlated with all core taxa. Lung function correlated with richness. The clinical significance of these core and satellite species findings in the CF lung is discussed. GenBank accession numbers: FM995625–FM997761

  8. Development of radiographic and microscopic techniques for the characterization of bacterial transport in intact sediment cores from Oyster, Virginia.

    PubMed

    Dong, H; Onstott, T C; DeFlaun, M F; Fuller, M E; Gillespie, K M; Fredrickson, J K

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the physical and mineralogical properties responsible for the retention of bacteria in subsurface sediments. The sediment core chosen for this study was a fine-grained, quartz-rich sand with minor amounts of Fe and Al hydroxides. A bacterial transport experiment was performed using an intact core collected from a recent excavation of the Butler's Bluff member of the Nassawadox formation in the borrow pit at Oyster, VA. and a 14C-labeled bacterial strain OYS2-A was selected for its relatively low adhesion. After the bacterial breakthrough was observed in the effluent, the intact core was dissected to determine the internal distribution of the injected bacteria retained in the sediment. The sediment was dried, epoxy fixed, and thin sectioned. The distribution of 14C activity in the thin sections was mapped using a phosphor screen and X-ray film. The remainder of the core was subsampled and the 14C activity of the subsamples was determined by liquid scintillation counting. The phosphor imaging technique was capable of directly imaging the distribution of radiolabeled bacteria in thin sections, because of its high sensitivity and linear response over a large activity range. The phosphor imaging signal intensity was utilized as a measure of bacterial concentration. The distribution of bacteria at the millimeter scale in the thin sections was compared to the grain size, porosity, and mineralogy as measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) analyses. No apparent correlation was observed between the retention or collision efficiency of bacteria in the sediment and the amount of Fe and Al hydroxides. This apparent lack of correlation can be qualitatively explained by combination of several factors including a nearly neutral surface charge of the bacterial strain, and texture of the Fe and Al hydroxides in the sediment. The combination of phosphor imaging with SEM-EDS proved to be a robust

  9. Gamma-irradiated bacterial preparation having anti-tumor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Vass, A.A.; Tyndall, R.L.; Terzaghi-Howe, P.

    1999-11-16

    This application describes a bacterial preparation from Pseudomonas species isolated {number{underscore}sign}15 ATCC 55638 that has been exposed to gamma radiation exhibits cytotoxicity that is specific for neoplastic carcinoma cells. A method for obtaining a bacterial preparation having antitumor activity consists of suspending a bacterial isolate in media and exposing the suspension to gamma radiation. A bacterial preparation of an aged culture of an amoeba-associated bacteria exhibits anti-reverse transcriptase activity. A method for obtaining a bacterial preparation having anti-reverse transcriptase activity from an amoeba-associated bacterial isolate grown to stationary phase is disclosed.

  10. Gamma-irradiated bacterial preparation having anti-tumor activity

    DOEpatents

    Vass, Arpad A.; Tyndall, Richard L.; Terzaghi-Howe, Peggy

    1999-01-01

    A bacterial preparation from Pseudomonas species isolated #15 ATCC 55638 that has been exposed to gamma radiation exhibits cytotoxicity that is specific for neoplastic carcinoma cells. A method for obtaining a bacterial preparation having antitumor activity consists of suspending a bacterial isolate in media and exposing the suspension to gamma radiation. A bacterial preparation of an aged culture of an amoeba-associated bacteria exhibits anti-reverse transcriptase activity. A method for obtaining a bacterial preparation having anti-reverse transcriptase activity from an amoeba-associated bacterial isolate grown to stationary phase is disclosed.

  11. 12 CFR 940.3 - Core mission activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Core mission activities. 940.3 Section 940.3 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK MISSION CORE MISSION ACTIVITIES § 940.3 Core mission activities. The following Bank activities qualify as core mission activities:...

  12. Unique core genomes of the bacterial family vibrionaceae: insights into niche adaptation and speciation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The criteria for defining bacterial species and even the concept of bacterial species itself are under debate, and the discussion is apparently intensifying as more genome sequence data is becoming available. However, it is still unclear how the new advances in genomics should be used most efficiently to address this question. In this study we identify genes that are common to any group of genomes in our dataset, to determine whether genes specific to a particular taxon exist and to investigate their potential role in adaptation of bacteria to their specific niche. These genes were named unique core genes. Additionally, we investigate the existence and importance of unique core genes that are found in isolates of phylogenetically non-coherent groups. These groups of isolates, that share a genetic feature without sharing a closest common ancestor, are termed genophyletic groups. Results The bacterial family Vibrionaceae was used as the model, and we compiled and compared genome sequences of 64 different isolates. Using the software orthoMCL we determined clusters of homologous genes among the investigated genome sequences. We used multilocus sequence analysis to build a host phylogeny and mapped the numbers of unique core genes of all distinct groups of isolates onto the tree. The results show that unique core genes are more likely to be found in monophyletic groups of isolates. Genophyletic groups of isolates, in contrast, are less common especially for large groups of isolate. The subsequent annotation of unique core genes that are present in genophyletic groups indicate a high degree of horizontally transferred genes. Finally, the annotation of the unique core genes of Vibrio cholerae revealed genes involved in aerotaxis and biosynthesis of the iron-chelator vibriobactin. Conclusion The presented work indicates that genes specific for any taxon inside the bacterial family Vibrionaceae exist. These unique core genes encode conserved metabolic functions

  13. Simulating activity of the bacterial ribosome.

    PubMed

    Trylska, Joanna

    2009-11-01

    Computational modeling studies that investigate activity of the bacterial ribosome were reviewed. Computational approaches became possible with the availability of three-dimensional atomic resolution structures of the ribosomal subunits. However, due to the enormous size of the system, theoretical efforts to study the ribosome are few and challenging. For example, to extend the simulation timescales to biologically relevant ones, often, reduced models that require tedious parameterizations need to be applied. To that end, modeling of the ribosome focused on its internal dynamics, electrostatic properties, inhibition by antibiotics, polypeptide folding in the ribosome tunnel and assembly mechanisms driving the formation of the small ribosomal subunit.

  14. Bacterial activity in cystic fibrosis lung infections

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Geraint B; Carroll, Mary P; Serisier, David J; Hockey, Peter M; Kehagia, Valia; Jones, Graeme R; Bruce, Kenneth D

    2005-01-01

    Background Chronic lung infections are the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. Recent molecular biological based studies have identified a surprisingly wide range of hitherto unreported bacterial species in the lungs of CF patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether the species present were active and, as such, worthy of further investigation as potential pathogens. Methods Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiles were generated from PCR products amplified from 16S rDNA and Reverse Transcription Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RT-T-RFLP) profiles, a marker of metabolic activity, were generated from PCR products amplified from 16S rRNA, both extracted from the same CF sputum sample. To test the level of activity of these bacteria, T-RFLP profiles were compared to RT-T-RFLP profiles. Results Samples from 17 individuals were studied. Parallel analyses identified a total of 706 individual T-RF and RT-T-RF bands in this sample set. 323 bands were detected by T-RFLP and 383 bands were detected by RT-T-RFLP (statistically significant; P ≤ 0.001). For the group as a whole, 145 bands were detected in a T-RFLP profile alone, suggesting metabolically inactive bacteria. 205 bands were detected in an RT-T-RFLP profile alone and 178 bands were detected in both, suggesting a significant degree of metabolic activity. Although Pseudomonas aeruginosa was present and active in many patients, a low occurrence of other species traditionally considered to be key CF pathogens was detected. T-RFLP profiles obtained for induced sputum samples provided by healthy individuals without CF formed a separate cluster indicating a low level of similarity to those from CF patients. Conclusion These results indicate that a high proportion of the bacterial species detected in the sputum from all of the CF patients in the study are active. The widespread activity of bacterial species in these samples

  15. Bacterial community structure in the hyperarid core of the Atacama Desert, Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drees, Kevin P.; Neilson, Julia W.; Betancourt, Julio L.; Quade, Jay; Henderson, David A.; Pryor, Barry M.; Maier, Raina M.

    2006-01-01

    Soils from the hyperarid Atacama Desert of northern Chile were sampled along an east-west elevational transect (23.75 to 24.70 degrees S) through the driest sector to compare the relative structure of bacterial communities. Analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles from each of the samples revealed that microbial communities from the extreme hyperarid core of the desert clustered separately from all of the remaining communities. Bands sequenced from DGGE profiles of two samples taken at a 22-month interval from this core region revealed the presence of similar populations dominated by bacteria from the Gemmatimonadetes and Planctomycetes phyla.

  16. Bacterial Community Structure in the Hyperarid Core of the Atacama Desert, Chile▿

    PubMed Central

    Drees, Kevin P.; Neilson, Julia W.; Betancourt, Julio L.; Quade, Jay; Henderson, David A.; Pryor, Barry M.; Maier, Raina M.

    2006-01-01

    Soils from the hyperarid Atacama Desert of northern Chile were sampled along an east-west elevational transect (23.75 to 24.70°S) through the driest sector to compare the relative structure of bacterial communities. Analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles from each of the samples revealed that microbial communities from the extreme hyperarid core of the desert clustered separately from all of the remaining communities. Bands sequenced from DGGE profiles of two samples taken at a 22-month interval from this core region revealed the presence of similar populations dominated by bacteria from the Gemmatimonadetes and Planctomycetes phyla. PMID:17028238

  17. Recognition of Heptoses and the Inner Core of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides by Surfactant Protein D

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,H.; Head, J.; Kosma, P.; Brade, H.; Muller-Loennies, S.; Sheikh, S.; McDonald, B.; Smith, K.; Cafarella, T.; et al

    2008-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria are important mediators of bacterial virulence that can elicit potent endotoxic effects. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) shows specific interactions with LPS, both in vitro and in vivo. These interactions involve binding of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) to LPS oligosaccharides (OS); however, little is known about the mechanisms of LPS recognition. Recombinant neck+CRDs (NCRDs) provide an opportunity to directly correlate binding interactions with a crystallographic analysis of the binding mechanism. In these studies, we examined the interactions of wild-type and mutant trimeric NCRDs with rough LPS (R-LPS). Although rat NCRDs bound more efficiently than human NCRDs to Escherichia coli J-5 LPS, both proteins exhibited efficient binding to solid-phase Rd2-LPS and to Rd2-LPS aggregates presented in the solution phase. Involvement of residues flanking calcium at the sugar binding site was demonstrated by reciprocal exchange of lysine and arginine at position 343 of rat and human CRDs. The lectin activity of hNCRDs was inhibited by specific heptoses, including l-glycero-{alpha}-d-manno-heptose (l, d-heptose), but not by 3-deoxy-{alpha}-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo). Crystallographic analysis of the hNCRD demonstrated a novel binding orientation for l, d-heptose, involving the hydroxyl groups of the side chain. Similar binding was observed for a synthetic {alpha}1{yields}3-linked heptose disaccharide corresponding to heptoses I and II of the inner core region in many LPS. 7-O-Carbamoyl-l, d-heptose and d-glycero-{alpha}-d-manno-heptose were bound via ring hydroxyl groups. Interactions with the side chain of inner core heptoses provide a potential mechanism for the recognition of diverse types of LPS by SP-D.

  18. Core Muscle Activation in Suspension Training Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Cugliari, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A quantitative observational laboratory study was conducted to characterize and classify core training exercises executed in a suspension modality on the base of muscle activation. In a prospective single-group repeated measures design, seventeen active male participants performed four suspension exercises typically associated with core training (roll-out, bodysaw, pike and knee-tuck). Surface electromyographic signals were recorded from lower and upper parts of rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, lower and upper parts of erector spinae muscles using concentric bipolar electrodes. The average rectified values of electromyographic signals were normalized with respect to individual maximum voluntary isometric contraction of each muscle. Roll-out exercise showed the highest activation of rectus abdominis and oblique muscles compared to the other exercises. The rectus abdominis and external oblique reached an activation higher than 60% of the maximal voluntary contraction (or very close to that threshold, 55%) in roll-out and bodysaw exercises. Findings from this study allow the selection of suspension core training exercises on the basis of quantitative information about the activation of muscles of interest. Roll-out and bodysaw exercises can be considered as suitable for strength training of rectus abdominis and external oblique muscles. PMID:28469744

  19. Core Muscle Activation in Suspension Training Exercises.

    PubMed

    Cugliari, Giovanni; Boccia, Gennaro

    2017-02-01

    A quantitative observational laboratory study was conducted to characterize and classify core training exercises executed in a suspension modality on the base of muscle activation. In a prospective single-group repeated measures design, seventeen active male participants performed four suspension exercises typically associated with core training (roll-out, bodysaw, pike and knee-tuck). Surface electromyographic signals were recorded from lower and upper parts of rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, lower and upper parts of erector spinae muscles using concentric bipolar electrodes. The average rectified values of electromyographic signals were normalized with respect to individual maximum voluntary isometric contraction of each muscle. Roll-out exercise showed the highest activation of rectus abdominis and oblique muscles compared to the other exercises. The rectus abdominis and external oblique reached an activation higher than 60% of the maximal voluntary contraction (or very close to that threshold, 55%) in roll-out and bodysaw exercises. Findings from this study allow the selection of suspension core training exercises on the basis of quantitative information about the activation of muscles of interest. Roll-out and bodysaw exercises can be considered as suitable for strength training of rectus abdominis and external oblique muscles.

  20. Humpback Whale Populations Share a Core Skin Bacterial Community: Towards a Health Index for Marine Mammals?

    PubMed Central

    Apprill, Amy; Robbins, Jooke; Eren, A. Murat; Pack, Adam A.; Reveillaud, Julie; Mattila, David; Moore, Michael; Niemeyer, Misty; Moore, Kathleen M. T.; Mincer, Tracy J.

    2014-01-01

    Microbes are now well regarded for their important role in mammalian health. The microbiology of skin – a unique interface between the host and environment - is a major research focus in human health and skin disorders, but is less explored in other mammals. Here, we report on a cross-population study of the skin-associated bacterial community of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae), and examine the potential for a core bacterial community and its variability with host (endogenous) or geographic/environmental (exogenous) specific factors. Skin biopsies or freshly sloughed skin from 56 individuals were sampled from populations in the North Atlantic, North Pacific and South Pacific oceans and bacteria were characterized using 454 pyrosequencing of SSU rRNA genes. Phylogenetic and statistical analyses revealed the ubiquity and abundance of bacteria belonging to the Flavobacteria genus Tenacibaculum and the Gammaproteobacteria genus Psychrobacter across the whale populations. Scanning electron microscopy of skin indicated that microbial cells colonize the skin surface. Despite the ubiquity of Tenacibaculum and Psychrobater spp., the relative composition of the skin-bacterial community differed significantly by geographic area as well as metabolic state of the animals (feeding versus starving during migration and breeding), suggesting that both exogenous and endogenous factors may play a role in influencing the skin-bacteria. Further, characteristics of the skin bacterial community from these free-swimming individuals were assembled and compared to two entangled and three dead individuals, revealing a decrease in the central or core bacterial community members (Tenacibaculum and Psychrobater spp.), as well as the emergence of potential pathogens in the latter cases. This is the first discovery of a cross-population, shared skin bacterial community. This research suggests that the skin bacteria may be connected to humpback health and immunity and could possibly

  1. Humpback whale populations share a core skin bacterial community: towards a health index for marine mammals?

    PubMed

    Apprill, Amy; Robbins, Jooke; Eren, A Murat; Pack, Adam A; Reveillaud, Julie; Mattila, David; Moore, Michael; Niemeyer, Misty; Moore, Kathleen M T; Mincer, Tracy J

    2014-01-01

    Microbes are now well regarded for their important role in mammalian health. The microbiology of skin--a unique interface between the host and environment--is a major research focus in human health and skin disorders, but is less explored in other mammals. Here, we report on a cross-population study of the skin-associated bacterial community of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae), and examine the potential for a core bacterial community and its variability with host (endogenous) or geographic/environmental (exogenous) specific factors. Skin biopsies or freshly sloughed skin from 56 individuals were sampled from populations in the North Atlantic, North Pacific and South Pacific oceans and bacteria were characterized using 454 pyrosequencing of SSU rRNA genes. Phylogenetic and statistical analyses revealed the ubiquity and abundance of bacteria belonging to the Flavobacteria genus Tenacibaculum and the Gammaproteobacteria genus Psychrobacter across the whale populations. Scanning electron microscopy of skin indicated that microbial cells colonize the skin surface. Despite the ubiquity of Tenacibaculum and Psychrobater spp., the relative composition of the skin-bacterial community differed significantly by geographic area as well as metabolic state of the animals (feeding versus starving during migration and breeding), suggesting that both exogenous and endogenous factors may play a role in influencing the skin-bacteria. Further, characteristics of the skin bacterial community from these free-swimming individuals were assembled and compared to two entangled and three dead individuals, revealing a decrease in the central or core bacterial community members (Tenacibaculum and Psychrobater spp.), as well as the emergence of potential pathogens in the latter cases. This is the first discovery of a cross-population, shared skin bacterial community. This research suggests that the skin bacteria may be connected to humpback health and immunity and could possibly serve

  2. Industrial activated sludge exhibit unique bacterial community composition at high taxonomic ranks.

    PubMed

    Ibarbalz, Federico M; Figuerola, Eva L M; Erijman, Leonardo

    2013-07-01

    Biological degradation of domestic and industrial wastewater by activated sludge depends on a common process of separation of the diverse self-assembled and self-sustained microbial flocs from the treated wastewater. Previous surveys of bacterial communities indicated the presence of a common core of bacterial phyla in municipal activated sludge, an observation consistent with the concept of ecological coherence of high taxonomic ranks. The aim of this work was to test whether this critical feature brings about a common pattern of abundance distribution of high bacterial taxa in industrial and domestic activated sludge, and to relate the bacterial community structure of industrial activated sludge with relevant operational parameters. We have applied 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to evaluate bacterial communities in full-scale biological wastewater treatment plants sampled at different times, including seven systems treating wastewater from different industries and one plant that treats domestic wastewater, and compared our datasets with the data from municipal wastewater treatment plants obtained by three different laboratories. We observed that each industrial activated sludge system exhibited a unique bacterial community composition, which is clearly distinct from the common profile of bacterial phyla or classes observed in municipal plants. The influence of process parameters on the bacterial community structure was evaluated using constrained analysis of principal coordinates (CAP). Part of the differences in the bacterial community structure between industrial wastewater treatment systems were explained by dissolved oxygen and pH. Despite the ecological relevance of floc formation for the assembly of bacterial communities in activated sludge, the wastewater characteristics are likely to be the major determinant that drives bacterial composition at high taxonomic ranks.

  3. Bacterial Etiologies of Five Core Syndromes: Laboratory-Based Syndromic Surveillance Conducted in Guangxi, China

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Baiqing; Liang, Dabin; Lin, Mei; Wang, Mingliu; Zeng, Jun; Liao, Hezhuang; Zhou, Lingyun; Huang, Jun; Wei, Xiaolin; Zou, Guanyang; Jing, Huaiqi

    2014-01-01

    Background Under the existing national surveillance system in China for selected infectious diseases, bacterial cultures are performed for only a small percentage of reported cases. We set up a laboratory-based syndromic surveillance system to elucidate bacterial etiologic spectrum and detect infection by rare etiologies (or serogroups) for five core syndromes in the given study area. Methods Patients presenting with one of five core syndromes at nine sentinel hospitals in Guagnxi, China were evaluated using laboratory-based syndrome surveillance to elucidate bacterial etiologies. We collected respiratory and stool specimens, as well as CSF, blood and other related samples for bacterial cultures and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) assays. Results From February 2009 to December 2011, 2,964 patients were enrolled in the study. Etiologies were identified in 320 (10.08%) patients. Streptococcus pneumonia (37 strains, 24.18%), Klebsiella pneumonia (34, 22.22%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (19, 12.42%) and Haemophilus influenza (18, 11.76%) were the most frequent pathogens for fever and respiratory syndrome, while Salmonella (77, 81.05%) was most often seen in diarrhea syndrome cases. Salmonella paratyphi A (38, 86.36%) occurred in fever and rash syndrome, with Cryptococcus neoformans (20, 35.09%), Streptococcus pneumonia (5, 8.77%), Klebsiella pneumonia (5, 8.77%),streptococcus suis (3, 5.26%) and Neisseria meningitides group B (2, 3.51%) being the most frequently detected in encephalitis-meningitis syndrome. To date no pathogen was isolated from the specimens from fever and hemorrhage patients. Conclusions In addition to common bacterial pathogens, opportunistic pathogens and fungal infections require more attention. Our study contributes to the strengthening of the existing national surveillance system and provides references for other regions that are similar to the study area. PMID:25360596

  4. Determination of bacterial activity by use of an evanescent-wave fiber-optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, M. Shelly; Kishen, Anil; Sing, Lim Chu; Asundi, Anand

    2002-12-01

    A novel technique based on fiber-optic evanescent-wave spectroscopy is proposed for the detection of bacterial activity in human saliva. The sensor determines the specific concentration of Streptococcus mutans in saliva, which is a major causative factor in dental caries. In this design, one prepares the fiber-optic bacterial sensor by replacing a portion of the cladding region of a multimode fiber with a dye-encapsulated xerogel, using the solgel technique. The exponential decay of the evanescent wave at the core-cladding interface of a multimode fiber is utilized for the determination of bacterial activity in saliva. The acidogenic profile of Streptococcus mutans is estimated by use of evanescent-wave absorption spectra at various levels of bacterial activity.

  5. bcgTree: automatized phylogenetic tree building from bacterial core genomes.

    PubMed

    Ankenbrand, Markus J; Keller, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    The need for multi-gene analyses in scientific fields such as phylogenetics and DNA barcoding has increased in recent years. In particular, these approaches are increasingly important for differentiating bacterial species, where reliance on the standard 16S rDNA marker can result in poor resolution. Additionally, the assembly of bacterial genomes has become a standard task due to advances in next-generation sequencing technologies. We created a bioinformatic pipeline, bcgTree, which uses assembled bacterial genomes either from databases or own sequencing results from the user to reconstruct their phylogenetic history. The pipeline automatically extracts 107 essential single-copy core genes, found in a majority of bacteria, using hidden Markov models and performs a partitioned maximum-likelihood analysis. Here, we describe the workflow of bcgTree and, as a proof-of-concept, its usefulness in resolving the phylogeny of 293 publically available bacterial strains of the genus Lactobacillus. We also evaluate its performance in both low- and high-level taxonomy test sets. The tool is freely available at github ( https://github.com/iimog/bcgTree ) and our institutional homepage ( http://www.dna-analytics.biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de ).

  6. Metabolic labelling of the carbohydrate core in bacterial peptidoglycan and its applications

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hai; DeMeester, Kristen E.; Hou, Ching-Wen; Parent, Michelle A.; Caplan, Jeffrey L.; Grimes, Catherine L.

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial cells are surrounded by a polymer known as peptidoglycan (PG), which protects the cell from changes in osmotic pressure and small molecule insults. A component of this material, N-acetyl-muramic acid (NAM), serves as a core structural element for innate immune recognition of PG fragments. We report the synthesis of modifiable NAM carbohydrate derivatives and the installation of these building blocks into the backbone of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial PG utilizing metabolic cell wall recycling and biosynthetic machineries. Whole cells are labelled via click chemistry and visualized using super-resolution microscopy, revealing higher resolution PG structural details and allowing the cell wall biosynthesis, as well as its destruction in immune cells, to be tracked. This study will assist in the future identification of mechanisms that the immune system uses to recognize bacteria, glean information about fundamental cell wall architecture and aid in the design of novel antibiotics. PMID:28425464

  7. Relative Roles of Deterministic and Stochastic Processes in Driving the Vertical Distribution of Bacterial Communities in a Permafrost Core from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian; Li, Dingyao; Cheng, Gang; Mu, Jing; Wu, Qingbai; Niu, Fujun; Stegen, James C.; An, Lizhe; Feng, Huyuan

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the processes that influence the structure of biotic communities is one of the major ecological topics, and both stochastic and deterministic processes are expected to be at work simultaneously in most communities. Here, we investigated the vertical distribution patterns of bacterial communities in a 10-m-long soil core taken within permafrost of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. To get a better understanding of the forces that govern these patterns, we examined the diversity and structure of bacterial communities, and the change in community composition along the vertical distance (spatial turnover) from both taxonomic and phylogenetic perspectives. Measures of taxonomic and phylogenetic beta diversity revealed that bacterial community composition changed continuously along the soil core, and showed a vertical distance-decay relationship. Multiple stepwise regression analysis suggested that bacterial alpha diversity and phylogenetic structure were strongly correlated with soil conductivity and pH but weakly correlated with depth. There was evidence that deterministic and stochastic processes collectively drived bacterial vertically-structured pattern. Bacterial communities in five soil horizons (two originated from the active layer and three from permafrost) of the permafrost core were phylogenetically random, indicator of stochastic processes. However, we found a stronger effect of deterministic processes related to soil pH, conductivity, and organic carbon content that were structuring the bacterial communities. We therefore conclude that the vertical distribution of bacterial communities was governed primarily by deterministic ecological selection, although stochastic processes were also at work. Furthermore, the strong impact of environmental conditions (for example, soil physicochemical parameters and seasonal freeze-thaw cycles) on these communities underlines the sensitivity of permafrost microorganisms to climate change and potentially subsequent

  8. Relative Roles of Deterministic and Stochastic Processes in Driving the Vertical Distribution of Bacterial Communities in a Permafrost Core from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weigang; Zhang, Qi; Tian, Tian; Li, Dingyao; Cheng, Gang; Mu, Jing; Wu, Qingbai; Niu, Fujun; Stegen, James C; An, Lizhe; Feng, Huyuan

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the processes that influence the structure of biotic communities is one of the major ecological topics, and both stochastic and deterministic processes are expected to be at work simultaneously in most communities. Here, we investigated the vertical distribution patterns of bacterial communities in a 10-m-long soil core taken within permafrost of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. To get a better understanding of the forces that govern these patterns, we examined the diversity and structure of bacterial communities, and the change in community composition along the vertical distance (spatial turnover) from both taxonomic and phylogenetic perspectives. Measures of taxonomic and phylogenetic beta diversity revealed that bacterial community composition changed continuously along the soil core, and showed a vertical distance-decay relationship. Multiple stepwise regression analysis suggested that bacterial alpha diversity and phylogenetic structure were strongly correlated with soil conductivity and pH but weakly correlated with depth. There was evidence that deterministic and stochastic processes collectively drived bacterial vertically-structured pattern. Bacterial communities in five soil horizons (two originated from the active layer and three from permafrost) of the permafrost core were phylogenetically random, indicator of stochastic processes. However, we found a stronger effect of deterministic processes related to soil pH, conductivity, and organic carbon content that were structuring the bacterial communities. We therefore conclude that the vertical distribution of bacterial communities was governed primarily by deterministic ecological selection, although stochastic processes were also at work. Furthermore, the strong impact of environmental conditions (for example, soil physicochemical parameters and seasonal freeze-thaw cycles) on these communities underlines the sensitivity of permafrost microorganisms to climate change and potentially subsequent

  9. Effect of antibiotic use on bacterial flora of tonsil core in patients with recurrent tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Yildizoglu, Uzeyir; Polat, Bahtiyar; Gumral, Ramazan; Kilic, Abdullah; Tosun, Fuat; Gerek, Mustafa

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of commonly used antibiotics on bacterial flora of the tonsil core. Patients who underwent tonsillectomy for recurrent chronic tonsillitis were included in the study. Three groups were formed: group 1 was treated for 10 days preoperatively with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid; group 2 was treated for 10 days preoperatively with clarithromycin; and group 3 included patients who underwent tonsillectomy without preoperative antibiotic use. The removed palatine tonsils were sent to our microbiology department in sterile tubes for bacteriological analysis. Seventy-three patients (group 1 = 19, group 2 = 20, group 3 = 34 patients) aged 3-18 years (mean 7 years) were included in the study. At least one bacterium was isolated from all tonsils, except for two cases in group 1; the difference in single bacterial growth among groups was not significant (p = 0.06). On the other hand, the numbers of patients with pathogenic bacterial growth was significantly lower in group 2 (n = 2) compared with group 1 (n = 10) and group 3 (n = 27) (p < 0.001). The bacterium isolated most frequently from the tonsils was Streptococcus viridans. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the only pathogenic bacterium that grew in all three groups. Clarithromycin was more effective than amoxicillin/clavulanic acid in eradicating pathogenic bacteria in the tonsil core. Pseudomonas aeruginosa might be responsible for resistant or recurrent tonsil infections. To prevent endocarditis, antibiotic prophylaxis toward S. viridians, which is the most prevalent bacterium in the tonsil core, should be kept in mind for patients with heart valve damage.

  10. Copper effects on bacterial activity of estuarine silty sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Ângela; Fernandes, Sandra; Sobral, Paula; Alcântara, Fernanda

    2007-07-01

    Bacteria of silty estuarine sediments were spiked with copper to 200 μg Cu g -1 dry weight sediment in order to assess the impact of copper on bacterial degradation of organic matter and on bacterial biomass production. Bacterial density was determined by direct counting under epifluorescence microscopy and bacterial production by the incorporation of 3H-Leucine. Leucine turnover rate was evaluated by 14C-leucine incorporation and ectoenzymatic activities were estimated as the hydrolysis rate of model substrates for β-glucosidase and leucine-aminopeptidase. The presence of added copper in the microcosms elicited, after 21 days of incubation, generalised anoxia and a decrease in organic matter content. The non-eroded surface of the copper-spiked sediment showed, when compared to the control, a decrease in bacterial abundance and significant lower levels of bacterial production and of leucine turnover rate. Bacterial production and leucine turnover rate decreased to 1.4% and 13% of the control values, respectively. Ectoenzymatic activities were also negatively affected but by smaller factors. After erosion by the water current in laboratory flume conditions, the eroded surface of the control sediment showed a generalised decline in all bacterial activities. The erosion of the copper-spiked sediment showed, however, two types of responses with respect to bacterial activities at the exposed surface: positive responses of bacterial production and leucine turnover rate contrasting with slight negative responses of ectoenzymatic activities. The effects of experimental erosion in the suspended cells were also different in the control and in the copper-spiked sediment. Bacterial cells in the control microcosm exhibited, when compared to the non-eroded sediment cells, decreases in all activities after the 6-h suspension. The response of the average suspended copper-spiked sediment cell differed from the control by a less sharp decrease in ectoenzymatic activities and

  11. Recombination produces coherent bacterial species clusters in both core and accessory genomes

    PubMed Central

    Croucher, Nicholas J.; Gutmann, Michael U.; Corander, Jukka; Hanage, William P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Population samples show bacterial genomes can be divided into a core of ubiquitous genes and accessory genes that are present in a fraction of isolates. The ecological significance of this variation in gene content remains unclear. However, microbiologists agree that a bacterial species should be ‘genomically coherent’, even though there is no consensus on how this should be determined. Results: We use a parsimonious model combining diversification in both the core and accessory genome, including mutation, homologous recombination (HR) and horizontal gene transfer (HGT) introducing new loci, to produce a population of interacting clusters of strains with varying genome content. New loci introduced by HGT may then be transferred on by HR. The model fits well to a systematic population sample of 616 pneumococcal genomes, capturing the major features of the population structure with parameter values that agree well with empirical estimates. Conclusions: The model does not include explicit selection on individual genes, suggesting that crude comparisons of gene content may be a poor predictor of ecological function. We identify a clearly divergent subpopulation of pneumococci that are inconsistent with the model and may be considered genomically incoherent with the rest of the population. These strains have a distinct disease tropism and may be rationally defined as a separate species. We also find deviations from the model that may be explained by recent population bottlenecks or spatial structure.

  12. Identifying the core seed bank of a complex boreal bacterial metacommunity.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-González, Clara; Niño-García, Juan Pablo; Kembel, Steven W; Del Giorgio, Paul A

    2017-09-01

    Seed banks are believed to contribute to compositional changes within and across microbial assemblages, but the application of this concept to natural communities remains challenging. Here we describe the core seed bank of a bacterial metacommunity from a boreal watershed, using the spatial distribution of bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) across 223 heterogeneous terrestrial, aquatic and phyllosphere bacterial assemblages. Taxa were considered potential seeds if they transitioned from rare to abundant somewhere within the metacommunity and if they were ubiquitous and able to persist under unfavorable conditions, the latter assessed by checking their presence in three deeply sequenced samples (one soil, one river and one lake, 2.2-3 million reads per sample). We show that only a small fraction (13%) of all detected OTUs constitute a metacommunity seed bank that is shared between all terrestrial and aquatic communities, but not by phyllosphere assemblages, which seem to recruit from a different taxa pool. Our results suggest directional recruitment driven by the flow of water in the landscape, since most aquatic sequences were associated to OTUs found in a single deeply-sequenced soil sample, but only 45% of terrestrial sequences belonged to OTUs found in the two deeply-sequenced aquatic communities. Finally, we hypothesize that extreme rarity, and its interplay with water residence time and growth rates, may further constrain the size of the potential seed bank.

  13. Comparison of bacterial communities of conventional and A-stage activated sludge systems

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Alejandro; Lotti, Tommaso; Garcia-Ruiz, Maria-Jesus; Osorio, Francisco; Gonzalez-Lopez, Jesus; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial community structure of 10 different wastewater treatment systems and their influents has been investigated through pyrosequencing, yielding a total of 283486 reads. These bioreactors had different technological configurations: conventional activated sludge (CAS) systems and very highly loaded A-stage systems. A-stage processes are proposed as the first step in an energy producing municipal wastewater treatment process. Pyrosequencing analysis indicated that bacterial community structure of all influents was similar. Also the bacterial community of all CAS bioreactors was similar. Bacterial community structure of A-stage bioreactors showed a more case-specific pattern. A core of genera was consistently found for all influents, all CAS bioreactors and all A-stage bioreactors, respectively, showing that different geographical locations in The Netherlands and Spain did not affect the functional bacterial communities in these technologies. The ecological roles of these bacteria were discussed. Influents and A-stage bioreactors shared several core genera, while none of these were shared with CAS bioreactors communities. This difference is thought to reside in the different operational conditions of the two technologies. This study shows that bacterial community structure of CAS and A-stage bioreactors are mostly driven by solids retention time (SRT) and hydraulic retention time (HRT), as suggested by multivariate redundancy analysis. PMID:26728449

  14. Biogeographic comparison of Lophelia-associated bacterial communities in the Western Atlantic reveals conserved core microbiome

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, Christina A.; Goldsmith, Dawn; Gray, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, publications on deep-sea corals have tripled. Most attention has been paid to Lophelia pertusa, a globally distributed scleractinian coral that creates critical three-dimensional habitat in the deep ocean. The bacterial community associated with L. pertusa has been previously described by a number of studies at sites in the Mediterranean Sea, Norwegian fjords, off Great Britain, and in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). However, use of different methodologies prevents direct comparisons in most cases. Our objectives were to address intra-regional variation and to identify any conserved bacterial core community. We collected samples from three distinct colonies of L. pertusa at each of four locations within the western Atlantic: three sites within the GOM and one off the east coast of the United States. Amplicon libraries of 16S rRNA genes were generated using primers targeting the V4–V5 hypervariable region and 454 pyrosequencing. The dominant phylum was Proteobacteria (75–96%). At the family level, 80–95% of each sample was comprised of five groups: Pirellulaceae, Pseudonocardiaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, Sphingomonadaceae, and unclassified Oceanospirillales. Principal coordinate analysis based on weighted UniFrac distances showed a clear distinction between the GOM and Atlantic samples. Interestingly, the replicate samples from each location did not always cluster together, indicating there is not a strong site-specific influence. The core bacterial community, conserved in 100% of the samples, was dominated by the operational taxonomic units of genera Novosphingobium and Pseudonocardia, both known degraders of aromatic hydrocarbons. The sequence of another core member, Propionibacterium, was also found in prior studies of L. pertusa from Norway and Great Britain, suggesting a role as a conserved symbiont. By examining more than 40,000 sequences per sample, we found that GOM samples were dominated by the identified conserved core sequences, whereas

  15. Biogeographic Comparison of Lophelia-Associated Bacterial Communities in the Western Atlantic Reveals Conserved Core Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Kellogg, Christina A.; Goldsmith, Dawn B.; Gray, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, publications on deep-sea corals have tripled. Most attention has been paid to Lophelia pertusa, a globally distributed scleractinian coral that creates critical three-dimensional habitat in the deep ocean. The bacterial community associated with L. pertusa has been previously described by a number of studies at sites in the Mediterranean Sea, Norwegian fjords, off Great Britain, and in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). However, use of different methodologies prevents direct comparisons in most cases. Our objectives were to address intra-regional variation and to identify any conserved bacterial core community. We collected samples from three distinct colonies of L. pertusa at each of four locations within the western Atlantic: three sites within the GOM and one off the east coast of the United States. Amplicon libraries of 16S rRNA genes were generated using primers targeting the V4–V5 hypervariable region and 454 pyrosequencing. The dominant phylum was Proteobacteria (75–96%). At the family level, 80–95% of each sample was comprised of five groups: Pirellulaceae, Pseudonocardiaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, Sphingomonadaceae, and unclassified Oceanospirillales. Principal coordinate analysis based on weighted UniFrac distances showed a clear distinction between the GOM and Atlantic samples. Interestingly, the replicate samples from each location did not always cluster together, indicating there is not a strong site-specific influence. The core bacterial community, conserved in 100% of the samples, was dominated by the operational taxonomic units of genera Novosphingobium and Pseudonocardia, both known degraders of aromatic hydrocarbons. The sequence of another core member, Propionibacterium, was also found in prior studies of L. pertusa from Norway and Great Britain, suggesting a role as a conserved symbiont. By examining more than 40,000 sequences per sample, we found that GOM samples were dominated by the identified conserved core sequences, whereas

  16. Biogeographic Comparison of Lophelia-Associated Bacterial Communities in the Western Atlantic Reveals Conserved Core Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Christina A; Goldsmith, Dawn B; Gray, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, publications on deep-sea corals have tripled. Most attention has been paid to Lophelia pertusa, a globally distributed scleractinian coral that creates critical three-dimensional habitat in the deep ocean. The bacterial community associated with L. pertusa has been previously described by a number of studies at sites in the Mediterranean Sea, Norwegian fjords, off Great Britain, and in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). However, use of different methodologies prevents direct comparisons in most cases. Our objectives were to address intra-regional variation and to identify any conserved bacterial core community. We collected samples from three distinct colonies of L. pertusa at each of four locations within the western Atlantic: three sites within the GOM and one off the east coast of the United States. Amplicon libraries of 16S rRNA genes were generated using primers targeting the V4-V5 hypervariable region and 454 pyrosequencing. The dominant phylum was Proteobacteria (75-96%). At the family level, 80-95% of each sample was comprised of five groups: Pirellulaceae, Pseudonocardiaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, Sphingomonadaceae, and unclassified Oceanospirillales. Principal coordinate analysis based on weighted UniFrac distances showed a clear distinction between the GOM and Atlantic samples. Interestingly, the replicate samples from each location did not always cluster together, indicating there is not a strong site-specific influence. The core bacterial community, conserved in 100% of the samples, was dominated by the operational taxonomic units of genera Novosphingobium and Pseudonocardia, both known degraders of aromatic hydrocarbons. The sequence of another core member, Propionibacterium, was also found in prior studies of L. pertusa from Norway and Great Britain, suggesting a role as a conserved symbiont. By examining more than 40,000 sequences per sample, we found that GOM samples were dominated by the identified conserved core sequences, whereas open

  17. Bacterial activity in plant (Schoenoplectus validus) biofilms of constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Peter C

    2010-12-01

    Biofilm-bacterial communities have been exploited in the treatment of wastewater in 'fixed-film' processes. Our understanding of biofilm dynamics requires a quantitative knowledge of bacterial growth-kinetics in these microenvironments. The aim of this paper was to apply the thymidine assay to quantify bacterial growth without disturbing the biofilm on the surfaces of emergent macrophytes (Schoenoplectus validus) of a constructed wetland. The isotope was rapidly and efficiently taken-up and incorporated into dividing biofilm-bacteria. Isotope diffusion into the biofilm did not limit the growth rate measurement. Isotope dilution was inhibited at >12 μM thymidine. Biofilm-bacterial biomass and growth rates were not correlated to the plant surface area (r(2) < 0.02). The measurements of in situ biofilm-bacterial growth rates both displayed, and accommodated, the inherent heterogeneity of the complex wetland ecosystem. Biofilm-bacterial respiratory activities, measured using the redox dye CTC, and growth rates were measured simultaneously. The dye did not interfere with bacterial growth. Biofilm-bacterial specific growth rates ranged from 1.4 ± 0.6 d(-1) to 3.3 ± 1.3 d(-1). In the constructed wetlands of this study biofilm-bacterial specific growth rates, compared to those of natural ecosystems, could be markedly improved through changes in wetland design that increased bacterial respiration while minimising biofilm growth.

  18. Bacterial study of Vostok drilling fluid: the tool to make ice core finding confident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhina, I. A.; Petit, J. R.; Lukin, V. V.; Bulat, S. A.

    2003-04-01

    Decontamination of Vostok ice core is a critical issue in molecular biology studies. Core surface contains a film of hardly removable 'dirty' drilling fluid representing a mixture of polyhydrocarbons (PHC) including polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and freon. To make ice microbial finding more confident the original Vostok drilling fluid sampled from different depths (110m - 3600m) was analyzed for bacterial content by ribosomal DNA sequencing. Total, 33 clones of 16S ribosomal DNA were recovered from four samples of drilling fluid at 110, 2750, 3400, and 3600m leading to identification of 8 bacterial species. No overlapping was observed even for neighboring samples (3400m and 3600m). At present four major bacteria with the titer more than 103-104 cells per ml (as estimated from PCR results) are identified. Among them we found: unknown representative of Desulfobacteraceae which are able to oxidize sulphates and degrade benzenes (110m); PAH-degrading alpha-proteobacterium Sphingomonas natatoria (3400m); alpha-proteobacterium representing closely-related group of Sphingomonas sp. (e.g., S. aurantiaca) which are able to degrade PAH as well, and human pathogen closely related to Haloanella gallinarum of CFB group (3600m). Four additional species were revealed as single clones and showed relatedness to human pathogens and saprophytes as well as soil bacteria. These bacteria may represent drilling fluid contaminants introduced during its sampling or DNA extraction procedure. Of four major bacteria revealed, one species, Sphingomonas natatoria, has been met by us in the Vostok core from 3607 m depth (AF532054) whereas another Sphingomonas sp. which we refer to as S. aurantiaca was found in Antarctic microbial endolithic community (AF548567), hydrocarbon-containing soil near Scott Base in Antarctica (AF184221) and even isolated from 3593m Vostok accretion ice (AF324199) and Taylor Dome core (AF395031). The source for major human pathogen-related bacteria is rather uncertain

  19. Identification of DNA Motifs Implicated in Maintenance of Bacterial Core Genomes by Predictive Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, David; Chiapello, Hélène; Schbath, Sophie; Robin, Stéphane; Hennequet-Antier, Christelle; Gruss, Alexandra; El Karoui, Meriem

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial biodiversity at the species level, in terms of gene acquisition or loss, is so immense that it raises the question of how essential chromosomal regions are spared from uncontrolled rearrangements. Protection of the genome likely depends on specific DNA motifs that impose limits on the regions that undergo recombination. Although most such motifs remain unidentified, they are theoretically predictable based on their genomic distribution properties. We examined the distribution of the “crossover hotspot instigator,” or Chi, in Escherichia coli, and found that its exceptional distribution is restricted to the core genome common to three strains. We then formulated a set of criteria that were incorporated in a statistical model to search core genomes for motifs potentially involved in genome stability in other species. Our strategy led us to identify and biologically validate two distinct heptamers that possess Chi properties, one in Staphylococcus aureus, and the other in several streptococci. This strategy paves the way for wide-scale discovery of other important functional noncoding motifs that distinguish core genomes from the strain-variable regions. PMID:17941709

  20. Identification of DNA motifs implicated in maintenance of bacterial core genomes by predictive modeling.

    PubMed

    Halpern, David; Chiapello, Hélène; Schbath, Sophie; Robin, Stéphane; Hennequet-Antier, Christelle; Gruss, Alexandra; El Karoui, Meriem

    2007-09-01

    Bacterial biodiversity at the species level, in terms of gene acquisition or loss, is so immense that it raises the question of how essential chromosomal regions are spared from uncontrolled rearrangements. Protection of the genome likely depends on specific DNA motifs that impose limits on the regions that undergo recombination. Although most such motifs remain unidentified, they are theoretically predictable based on their genomic distribution properties. We examined the distribution of the "crossover hotspot instigator," or Chi, in Escherichia coli, and found that its exceptional distribution is restricted to the core genome common to three strains. We then formulated a set of criteria that were incorporated in a statistical model to search core genomes for motifs potentially involved in genome stability in other species. Our strategy led us to identify and biologically validate two distinct heptamers that possess Chi properties, one in Staphylococcus aureus, and the other in several streptococci. This strategy paves the way for wide-scale discovery of other important functional noncoding motifs that distinguish core genomes from the strain-variable regions.

  1. Bacterial recognition pathways that lead to inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Storek, Kelly M; Monack, Denise M

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multi-protein signaling platforms that upon activation trigger the maturation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18, and cell death. Inflammasome sensors detect microbial and host-derived molecules. Here, we review the mechanisms of inflammasome activation triggered by bacterial infection, primarily focusing on two model intracellular bacterial pathogens, Francisella novicida and Salmonella typhimurium. We discuss the complex relationship between bacterial recognition through direct and indirect detection by inflammasome sensors. We highlight regulation mechanisms that potentiate or limit inflammasome activation. We discuss the importance of caspase-1 and caspase-11 in host defense, and we examine the downstream consequences of inflammasome activation within the context of bacterial infections. PMID:25879288

  2. Conservation and Covariance in Small Bacterial Phosphoglycosyltransferases Identify the Functional Catalytic Core.

    PubMed

    Lukose, Vinita; Luo, Lingqi; Kozakov, Dima; Vajda, Sandor; Allen, Karen N; Imperiali, Barbara

    2015-12-22

    Phosphoglycosyltransferases (PGTs) catalyze the transfer of a C1'-phosphosugar from a soluble sugar nucleotide diphosphate to a polyprenol phosphate. These enzymes act at the membrane interface, forming the first membrane-associated intermediates in the biosynthesis of cell-surface glycans and glycoconjugates, including glycoproteins, glycolipids, and the peptidoglycan in bacteria. PGTs vary greatly in both their membrane topologies and their substrate preferences. PGTs, such as MraY and WecA, are polytopic, while other families of uniquely prokaryotic enzymes have only a single predicted transmembrane helix. PglC, a PGT involved in the biosynthesis of N-linked glycoproteins in the enteropathogen Campylobacter jejuni, is representative of one of the structurally most simple members of the diverse family of small bacterial PGT enzymes. Herein, we apply bioinformatics and covariance-weighted distance constraints in geometry- and homology-based model building, together with mutational analysis, to investigate monotopic PGTs. The pool of 15000 sequences that are analyzed include the PglC-like enzymes, as well as sequences from two other related PGTs that contain a "PglC-like" domain embedded in their larger structures (namely, the bifunctional PglB family, typified by PglB from Neisseria gonorrheae, and WbaP-like enzymes, typified by WbaP from Salmonella enterica). Including these two subfamilies of PGTs in the analysis highlights key residues conserved across all three families of small bacterial PGTs. Mutagenesis analysis of these conserved residues provides further information about the essentiality of many of these residues in catalysis. Construction of a structural model of the cytosolic globular domain utilizing three-dimensional distance constraints, provided by conservation covariance analysis, provides additional insight into the catalytic core of these families of small bacterial PGT enzymes.

  3. Broadcast Spawning Coral Mussismilia hispida Can Vertically Transfer its Associated Bacterial Core.

    PubMed

    Leite, Deborah C A; Leão, Pedro; Garrido, Amana G; Lins, Ulysses; Santos, Henrique F; Pires, Débora O; Castro, Clovis B; van Elsas, Jan D; Zilberberg, Carla; Rosado, Alexandre S; Peixoto, Raquel S

    2017-01-01

    The hologenome theory of evolution (HTE), which is under fierce debate, presupposes that parts of the microbiome are transmitted from one generation to the next [vertical transmission (VT)], which may also influence the evolution of the holobiont. Even though bacteria have previously been described in early life stages of corals, these early life stages (larvae) could have been inoculated in the water and not inside the parental colony (through gametes) carrying the parental microbiome. How Symbiodinium is transmitted to offspring is also not clear, as only one study has described this mechanism in spawners. All other studies refer to incubators. To explore the VT hypothesis and the key components being transferred, colonies of the broadcast spawner species Mussismilia hispida were kept in nurseries until spawning. Gamete bundles, larvae and adult corals were analyzed to identify their associated microbiota with respect to composition and location. Symbiodinium and bacteria were detected by sequencing in gametes and coral planula larvae. However, no cells were detected using microscopy at the gamete stage, which could be related to the absence of those cells inside the oocytes/dispersed in the mucus or to a low resolution of our approach. A preliminary survey of Symbiodinium diversity indicated that parental colonies harbored Symbiodinium clades B, C and G, whereas only clade B was found in oocytes and planula larvae [5 days after fertilization (a.f.)]. The core bacterial populations found in the bundles, planula larvae and parental colonies were identified as members of the genera Burkholderia, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Ralstonia, Inquilinus and Bacillus, suggesting that these populations could be vertically transferred through the mucus. The collective data suggest that spawner corals, such as M. hispida, can transmit Symbiodinium cells and the bacterial core to their offspring by a coral gamete (and that this gamete, with its bacterial load, is released into

  4. Broadcast Spawning Coral Mussismilia hispida Can Vertically Transfer its Associated Bacterial Core

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Deborah C. A.; Leão, Pedro; Garrido, Amana G.; Lins, Ulysses; Santos, Henrique F.; Pires, Débora O.; Castro, Clovis B.; van Elsas, Jan D.; Zilberberg, Carla; Rosado, Alexandre S.; Peixoto, Raquel S.

    2017-01-01

    The hologenome theory of evolution (HTE), which is under fierce debate, presupposes that parts of the microbiome are transmitted from one generation to the next [vertical transmission (VT)], which may also influence the evolution of the holobiont. Even though bacteria have previously been described in early life stages of corals, these early life stages (larvae) could have been inoculated in the water and not inside the parental colony (through gametes) carrying the parental microbiome. How Symbiodinium is transmitted to offspring is also not clear, as only one study has described this mechanism in spawners. All other studies refer to incubators. To explore the VT hypothesis and the key components being transferred, colonies of the broadcast spawner species Mussismilia hispida were kept in nurseries until spawning. Gamete bundles, larvae and adult corals were analyzed to identify their associated microbiota with respect to composition and location. Symbiodinium and bacteria were detected by sequencing in gametes and coral planula larvae. However, no cells were detected using microscopy at the gamete stage, which could be related to the absence of those cells inside the oocytes/dispersed in the mucus or to a low resolution of our approach. A preliminary survey of Symbiodinium diversity indicated that parental colonies harbored Symbiodinium clades B, C and G, whereas only clade B was found in oocytes and planula larvae [5 days after fertilization (a.f.)]. The core bacterial populations found in the bundles, planula larvae and parental colonies were identified as members of the genera Burkholderia, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Ralstonia, Inquilinus and Bacillus, suggesting that these populations could be vertically transferred through the mucus. The collective data suggest that spawner corals, such as M. hispida, can transmit Symbiodinium cells and the bacterial core to their offspring by a coral gamete (and that this gamete, with its bacterial load, is released into

  5. Bacterial Activity in South Pole Snow

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Edward J.; Lin, Senjie; Capone, Douglas G.

    2000-01-01

    Large populations (200 to 5,000 cells ml−1 in snowmelt) of bacteria were present in surface snow and firn from the south pole sampled in January 1999 and 2000. DNA isolated from this snow yielded ribosomal DNA sequences similar to those of several psychrophilic bacteria and a bacterium which aligns closely with members of the genus Deinococcus, an ionizing-radiation- and desiccation-resistant genus. We also obtained evidence of low rates of bacterial DNA and protein synthesis which indicates that the organisms were metabolizing at ambient subzero temperatures (−12 to −17°C). PMID:11010907

  6. Bacterial activity in South Pole snow.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, E J; Lin, S; Capone, D G

    2000-10-01

    Large populations (200 to 5,000 cells ml(-1) in snowmelt) of bacteria were present in surface snow and firn from the south pole sampled in January 1999 and 2000. DNA isolated from this snow yielded ribosomal DNA sequences similar to those of several psychrophilic bacteria and a bacterium which aligns closely with members of the genus Deinococcus, an ionizing-radiation- and desiccation-resistant genus. We also obtained evidence of low rates of bacterial DNA and protein synthesis which indicates that the organisms were metabolizing at ambient subzero temperatures (-12 to -17 degrees C).

  7. Rho GTPase-activating bacterial toxins: from bacterial virulence regulation to eukaryotic cell biology.

    PubMed

    Lemonnier, Marc; Landraud, Luce; Lemichez, Emmanuel

    2007-09-01

    Studies on the interactions of bacterial pathogens with their host have provided an invaluable source of information on the major functions of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell biology. In addition, this expanding field of research, known as cellular microbiology, has revealed fascinating examples of trans-kingdom functional interplay. Bacterial factors actually exploit eukaryotic cell machineries using refined molecular strategies to promote invasion and proliferation within their host. Here, we review a family of bacterial toxins that modulate their activity in eukaryotic cells by activating Rho GTPases and exploiting the ubiquitin/proteasome machineries. This family, found in human and animal pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, encompasses the cytotoxic necrotizing factors (CNFs) from Escherichia coli and Yersinia species as well as dermonecrotic toxins from Bordetella species. We survey the genetics, biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology of these bacterial factors from the standpoint of the CNF1 toxin, the paradigm of Rho GTPase-activating toxins produced by urinary tract infections causing pathogenic Escherichia coli. Because it reveals important connections between bacterial invasion and the host inflammatory response, the mode of action of CNF1 and its related Rho GTPase-targetting toxins addresses major issues of basic and medical research and constitutes a privileged experimental model for host-pathogen interaction.

  8. Enhanced antibacterial activity of bimetallic gold-silver core-shell nanoparticles at low silver concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Madhuchanda; Sharma, Shilpa; Chattopadhyay, Arun; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar

    2011-12-01

    Herein we report the development of bimetallic Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) where gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) served as the seeds for continuous deposition of silver atoms on its surface. The core-shell structure and morphology were examined by UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The core-shell NPs showed antibacterial activity against both Gram negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram positive (Enterococcus faecalis and Pediococcus acidilactici) bacteria at low concentration of silver present in the shell, with more efficacy against Gram negative bacteria. TEM and flow cytometric studies showed that the core-shell NPs attached to the bacterial surface and caused membrane damage leading to cell death. The enhanced antibacterial properties of Au@Ag core-shell NPs was possibly due to the more active silver atoms in the shell surrounding gold core due to high surface free energy of the surface Ag atoms owing to shell thinness in the bimetallic NP structure.Herein we report the development of bimetallic Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) where gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) served as the seeds for continuous deposition of silver atoms on its surface. The core-shell structure and morphology were examined by UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The core-shell NPs showed antibacterial activity against both Gram negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram positive (Enterococcus faecalis and Pediococcus acidilactici) bacteria at low concentration of silver present in the shell, with more efficacy against Gram negative bacteria. TEM and flow cytometric studies showed that the core-shell NPs attached to the bacterial surface and caused membrane damage leading to cell death. The enhanced antibacterial properties of Au@Ag core-shell NPs was

  9. Intracellular activity of azithromycin against bacterial enteric pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Rakita, R M; Jacques-Palaz, K; Murray, B E

    1994-01-01

    Azithromycin, a new azalide antibiotic, is active in vitro against a variety of enteric bacterial pathogens. Since it is concentrated inside human neutrophils and other cells, it might be particularly useful in the treatment of infections caused by enteropathogens that invade host tissues. The intracellular activity of azithromycin against several enteric pathogens that had been phagocytosed by neutrophils was determined. Azithromycin was effective in reducing the intracellular viabilities of almost all strains tested, including representative strains of Salmonella, Shigella, and enteroinvasive, enteropathogenic, enterotoxigenic, and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. Erythromycin was also effective in this model system, although azithromycin was generally more effective than erythromycin against strains of invasive enteric pathogens. Cefotaxime reduced intracellular bacterial viability to a lesser extent than either azithromycin or erythromycin. The presence of neutrophils did not significantly affect the activity of azithromycin in this system. Azithromycin may be a useful agent for the treatment of bacterial diarrhea, and clinical trials should be considered. PMID:7810998

  10. Bacterial protease triggered release of biocides from microspheres with an oily core.

    PubMed

    Craig, Marina; Amiri, Mona; Holmberg, Krister

    2015-03-01

    This study deals with controlled release of drugs to a Staphylococcus aureus infected site from microspheres with an oily core and a polymeric shell. The intended use of the microspheres is for chronic wounds and the microspheres may be administered in the form of a wash liquid or incorporated in a gel. Chronic wounds often carry infection, and the use of microspheres with drug release triggered by the bacterial infection is therefore of interest. A lipophilic drug or a model of the drug was dissolved in an oil and the oil phase was dispersed into an o/w emulsion. A nanofilm shell was then assembled around the oil droplets with the layer-by-layer technique using the two biodegradable polypeptides anionic poly-L-glutamic acid (PLGA) and cationic poly-L-lysine (PLL). Since S. aureus exudes proteases such as glutamyl endopeptidase (V8) during colonization and infection, its substrate specificity was key when assembling the nanofilm. Since V8 is known to be substrate specific to the Glu-X bond, PLGA was chosen as the terminating layer of the nanofilm. Crosslinking the nanofilm after assembly lead to increased stability of the microspheres. It was shown that in a non-infectious environment, i.e. when a human wound enzyme, HNE (human neutrophile elastase), was present, the microspheres remained intact. The staphylococcal protease V8, on the other hand, readily catalyzed degradation of the microspheres, thus releasing the drug when triggered by the infectious environment.

  11. Isolation of biologically active nanomaterial (inclusion bodies) from bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In recent years bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) were recognised as highly pure deposits of active proteins inside bacterial cells. Such active nanoparticles are very interesting for further downstream protein isolation, as well as for many other applications in nanomedicine, cosmetic, chemical and pharmaceutical industry. To prepare large quantities of a high quality product, the whole bioprocess has to be optimised. This includes not only the cultivation of the bacterial culture, but also the isolation step itself, which can be of critical importance for the production process. To determine the most appropriate method for the isolation of biologically active nanoparticles, three methods for bacterial cell disruption were analyzed. Results In this study, enzymatic lysis and two mechanical methods, high-pressure homogenization and sonication, were compared. During enzymatic lysis the enzyme lysozyme was found to attach to the surface of IBs, and it could not be removed by simple washing. As this represents an additional impurity in the engineered nanoparticles, we concluded that enzymatic lysis is not the most suitable method for IBs isolation. During sonication proteins are released (lost) from the surface of IBs and thus the surface of IBs appears more porous when compared to the other two methods. We also found that the acoustic output power needed to isolate the IBs from bacterial cells actually damages proteins structures, thereby causing a reduction in biological activity. High-pressure homogenization also caused some damage to IBs, however the protein loss from the IBs was negligible. Furthermore, homogenization had no side-effects on protein biological activity. Conclusions The study shows that among the three methods tested, homogenization is the most appropriate method for the isolation of active nanoparticles from bacterial cells. PMID:20831775

  12. Systematic review of core muscle activity during physical fitness exercises.

    PubMed

    Martuscello, Jason M; Nuzzo, James L; Ashley, Candi D; Campbell, Bill I; Orriola, John J; Mayer, John M

    2013-06-01

    A consensus has not been reached among strength and conditioning specialists regarding what physical fitness exercises are most effective to stimulate activity of the core muscles. Thus, the purpose of this article was to systematically review the literature on the electromyographic (EMG) activity of 3 core muscles (lumbar multifidus, transverse abdominis, quadratus lumborum) during physical fitness exercises in healthy adults. CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, PubMed, SPORTdiscus, and Web of Science databases were searched for relevant articles using a search strategy designed by the investigators. Seventeen studies enrolling 252 participants met the review's inclusion/exclusion criteria. Physical fitness exercises were partitioned into 5 major types: traditional core, core stability, ball/device, free weight, and noncore free weight. Strength of evidence was assessed and summarized for comparisons among exercise types. The major findings of this review with moderate levels of evidence indicate that lumbar multifidus EMG activity is greater during free weight exercises compared with ball/device exercises and is similar during core stability and ball/device exercises. Transverse abdominis EMG activity is similar during core stability and ball/device exercises. No studies were uncovered for quadratus lumborum EMG activity during physical fitness exercises. The available evidence suggests that strength and conditioning specialists should focus on implementing multijoint free weight exercises, rather than core-specific exercises, to adequately train the core muscles in their athletes and clients.

  13. Changes of the Bacterial Abundance and Communities in Shallow Ice Cores from Dunde and Muztagata Glaciers, Western China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Li, Xiang-Kai; Si, Jing; Wu, Guang-Jian; Tian, Li-De; Xiang, Shu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, six bacterial community structures were analyzed from the Dunde ice core (9.5-m-long) using 16S rRNA gene cloning library technology. Compared to the Muztagata mountain ice core (37-m-long), the Dunde ice core has different dominant community structures, with five genus-related groups Blastococcus sp./Propionibacterium, Cryobacterium-related., Flavobacterium sp., Pedobacter sp., and Polaromas sp. that are frequently found in the six tested ice layers from 1990 to 2000. Live and total microbial density patterns were examined and related to the dynamics of physical-chemical parameters, mineral particle concentrations, and stable isotopic ratios in the precipitations collected from both Muztagata and Dunde ice cores. The Muztagata ice core revealed seasonal response patterns for both live and total cell density, with high cell density occurring in the warming spring and summer months indicated by the proxy value of the stable isotopic ratios. Seasonal analysis of live cell density for the Dunde ice core was not successful due to the limitations of sampling resolution. Both ice cores showed that the cell density peaks were frequently associated with high concentrations of particles. A comparison of microbial communities in the Dunde and Muztagata glaciers showed that similar taxonomic members exist in the related ice cores, but the composition of the prevalent genus-related groups is largely different between the two geographically different glaciers. This indicates that the micro-biogeography associated with geographic differences was mainly influenced by a few dominant taxonomic groups.

  14. Bacterial vectors for active immunotherapy reach clinical and industrial stages

    PubMed Central

    Le Gouëllec, Audrey; Chauchet, Xavier; Polack, Benoit; Buffat, Laurent; Toussaint, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Active immunotherapy based on live attenuated bacterial vectors has matured in terms of industrial development and develops through a combination of three phenomena. First, active immunotherapy that stimulates an antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell immune response has become a reality after several years of work. Second, there is still a need to identify vectors that can deliver antigens to the cytosol of antigen-presenting cells in vivo. Third, the recent progress in the understanding of bacterial lifestyle and in developing genetic engineering tools has enabled the design of bioengineered bugs that are capable of delivering antigens. Here, we review the mechanisms by which clinical bacterial vectors deliver antigens into the cytosol of antigen-presenting cells and summarize the development strategy of the three identified firms in this field. PMID:22894945

  15. Collective chemotaxis and segregation of active bacterial colonies

    PubMed Central

    Amar, M. Ben

    2016-01-01

    Still recently, bacterial fluid suspensions have motivated a lot of works, both experimental and theoretical, with the objective to understand their collective dynamics from universal and simple rules. Since some species are active, most of these works concern the strong interactions that these bacteria exert on a forced flow leading to instabilities, chaos and turbulence. Here, we investigate the self-organization of expanding bacterial colonies under chemotaxis, proliferation and eventually active-reaction. We propose a simple model to understand and quantify the physical properties of these living organisms which either give cohesion or on the contrary dispersion to the colony. Taking into account the diffusion and capture of morphogens complicates the model since it induces a bacterial density gradient coupled to bacterial density fluctuations and dynamics. Nevertheless under some specific conditions, it is possible to investigate the pattern formation as a usual viscous fingering instability. This explains the similarity and differences of patterns according to the physical bacterial suspension properties and explain the factors which favor compactness or branching. PMID:26888040

  16. Collective chemotaxis and segregation of active bacterial colonies.

    PubMed

    Ben Amar, M

    2016-02-18

    Still recently, bacterial fluid suspensions have motivated a lot of works, both experimental and theoretical, with the objective to understand their collective dynamics from universal and simple rules. Since some species are active, most of these works concern the strong interactions that these bacteria exert on a forced flow leading to instabilities, chaos and turbulence. Here, we investigate the self-organization of expanding bacterial colonies under chemotaxis, proliferation and eventually active-reaction. We propose a simple model to understand and quantify the physical properties of these living organisms which either give cohesion or on the contrary dispersion to the colony. Taking into account the diffusion and capture of morphogens complicates the model since it induces a bacterial density gradient coupled to bacterial density fluctuations and dynamics. Nevertheless under some specific conditions, it is possible to investigate the pattern formation as a usual viscous fingering instability. This explains the similarity and differences of patterns according to the physical bacterial suspension properties and explain the factors which favor compactness or branching.

  17. The active bacterial community in a pristine confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Theodore M.; Sanford, Robert A.; Santo Domingo, Jorge W.; Ashbolt, Nicholas J.; Levine, Audrey D.; Bethke, Craig M.

    2012-09-01

    This study of the active bacteria residing in a pristine confined aquifer provides unexpected insights into the ecology of iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the subsurface. At 18 wells, we trapped the microbes that attached to aquifer sediment and used molecular techniques to examine the bacterial populations. We used multivariate statistics to compare the composition of bacterial communities among the wells with respect to the chemistry of the groundwater. We found groundwater at each well was considerably richer in ferrous iron than sulfide, indicating iron-reducing bacteria should, by established criteria, dominate the sulfate reducers. Our results show, however, that areas where groundwater contains more than a negligible amount of sulfate (>0.03 mM), populations related to sulfate reducers of the generaDesulfobacter and Desulfobulbus were of nearly equal abundance with putative iron reducers related to Geobacter, Geothrix, and Desulfuromonas. Whereas sulfate is a key discriminant of bacterial community structure, we observed no statistical relationship between the distribution of bacterial populations in this aquifer and the concentration of either ferrous iron or dissolved sulfide. These results call into question the validity of using the relative concentration of these two ions to predict the nature of bacterial activity in an aquifer. Sulfate reducers and iron reducers do not appear to be segregated into discrete zones in the aquifer, as would be predicted by the theory of competitive exclusion. Instead, we find the two groups coexist in the subsurface in what we suggest is a mutualistic relationship.

  18. Collective chemotaxis and segregation of active bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amar, M. Ben

    2016-02-01

    Still recently, bacterial fluid suspensions have motivated a lot of works, both experimental and theoretical, with the objective to understand their collective dynamics from universal and simple rules. Since some species are active, most of these works concern the strong interactions that these bacteria exert on a forced flow leading to instabilities, chaos and turbulence. Here, we investigate the self-organization of expanding bacterial colonies under chemotaxis, proliferation and eventually active-reaction. We propose a simple model to understand and quantify the physical properties of these living organisms which either give cohesion or on the contrary dispersion to the colony. Taking into account the diffusion and capture of morphogens complicates the model since it induces a bacterial density gradient coupled to bacterial density fluctuations and dynamics. Nevertheless under some specific conditions, it is possible to investigate the pattern formation as a usual viscous fingering instability. This explains the similarity and differences of patterns according to the physical bacterial suspension properties and explain the factors which favor compactness or branching.

  19. Bacterial expression of human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: solubility, activity, purification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K; Mole, D J; Binnie, M; Homer, N Z M; Zheng, X; Yard, B A; Iredale, J P; Auer, M; Webster, S P

    2014-03-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme central to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. KMO has been implicated as a therapeutic target in several disease states, including Huntington's disease. Recombinant human KMO protein production is challenging due to the presence of transmembrane domains, which localise KMO to the outer mitochondrial membrane and render KMO insoluble in many in vitro expression systems. Efficient bacterial expression of human KMO would accelerate drug development of KMO inhibitors but until now this has not been achieved. Here we report the first successful bacterial (Escherichia coli) expression of active FLAG™-tagged human KMO enzyme expressed in the soluble fraction and progress towards its purification.

  20. Analysis of Structure and Composition of Bacterial Core Communities in Mature Drinking Water Biofilms and Bulk Water of a Citywide Network in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Henne, Karsten; Kahlisch, Leila; Brettar, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial core communities of bulk water and corresponding biofilms of a more than 20-year-old drinking water network were compared using 16S rRNA single-strand confirmation polymorphism (SSCP) fingerprints based on extracted DNA and RNA. The structure and composition of the bacterial core community in the bulk water was highly similar (>70%) across the city of Braunschweig, Germany, whereas all biofilm samples contained a unique community with no overlapping phylotypes from bulk water. Biofilm samples consisted mainly of Alphaproteobacteria (26% of all phylotypes), Gammaproteobacteria (11%), candidate division TM6 (11%), Chlamydiales (9%), and Betaproteobacteria (9%). The bulk water community consisted primarily of Bacteroidetes (25%), Betaproteobacteria (20%), Actinobacteria (16%), and Alphaproteobacteria (11%). All biofilm communities showed higher relative abundances of single phylotypes and a reduced richness compared to bulk water. Only biofilm communities sampled at nearby sampling points showed similar communities irrespective of support materials. In all of our bulk water studies, the community composition determined from 16S rRNA was completely different from the 16S rRNA gene-based community composition, whereas in biofilms both molecular fractions resulted in community compositions that were similar to each other. We hypothesize that a higher fraction of active bacterial phylotypes and a better protection from oxidative stress in drinking water biofilms are responsible for this higher similarity. PMID:22389373

  1. Analysis of structure and composition of bacterial core communities in mature drinking water biofilms and bulk water of a citywide network in Germany.

    PubMed

    Henne, Karsten; Kahlisch, Leila; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred G

    2012-05-01

    The bacterial core communities of bulk water and corresponding biofilms of a more than 20-year-old drinking water network were compared using 16S rRNA single-strand confirmation polymorphism (SSCP) fingerprints based on extracted DNA and RNA. The structure and composition of the bacterial core community in the bulk water was highly similar (>70%) across the city of Braunschweig, Germany, whereas all biofilm samples contained a unique community with no overlapping phylotypes from bulk water. Biofilm samples consisted mainly of Alphaproteobacteria (26% of all phylotypes), Gammaproteobacteria (11%), candidate division TM6 (11%), Chlamydiales (9%), and Betaproteobacteria (9%). The bulk water community consisted primarily of Bacteroidetes (25%), Betaproteobacteria (20%), Actinobacteria (16%), and Alphaproteobacteria (11%). All biofilm communities showed higher relative abundances of single phylotypes and a reduced richness compared to bulk water. Only biofilm communities sampled at nearby sampling points showed similar communities irrespective of support materials. In all of our bulk water studies, the community composition determined from 16S rRNA was completely different from the 16S rRNA gene-based community composition, whereas in biofilms both molecular fractions resulted in community compositions that were similar to each other. We hypothesize that a higher fraction of active bacterial phylotypes and a better protection from oxidative stress in drinking water biofilms are responsible for this higher similarity.

  2. Enhanced Efflux Activity Facilitates Drug Tolerance in Dormant Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Yingying; Zhao, Zhilun; Li, Yingxing; Zou, Jin; Ma, Qi; Zhao, Yanna; Ke, Yuehua; Zhu, Yun; Chen, Huiyi; Baker, Matthew A.B.; Ge, Hao; Sun, Yujie; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Bai, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Natural variations in gene expression provide a mechanism for multiple phenotypes to arise in an isogenic bacterial population. In particular, a sub-group termed persisters show high tolerance to antibiotics. Previously, their formation has been attributed to cell dormancy. Here we demonstrate that bacterial persisters, under β-lactam antibiotic treatment, show less cytoplasmic drug accumulation as a result of enhanced efflux activity. Consistently, a number of multi-drug efflux genes, particularly the central component TolC, show higher expression in persisters. Time-lapse imaging and mutagenesis studies further establish a positive correlation between tolC expression and bacterial persistence. The key role of efflux systems, among multiple biological pathways involved in persister formation, indicates that persisters implement a positive defense against antibiotics prior to a passive defense via dormancy. Finally, efflux inhibitors and antibiotics together effectively attenuate persister formation, suggesting a combination strategy to target drug tolerance. PMID:27105118

  3. Bacterial Exposure Induces and Activates Matrilysin in Mucosal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    López-Boado, Yolanda S.; Wilson, Carole L.; Hooper, Lora V.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Hultgren, Scott J.; Parks, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Matrilysin, a matrix metalloproteinase, is expressed and secreted lumenally by intact mucosal and glandular epithelia throughout the body, suggesting that its regulation and function are shared among tissues. Because matrilysin is produced in Paneth cells of the murine small intestine, where it participates in innate host defense by activation of prodefensins, we speculated that its expression would be influenced by bacterial exposure. Indeed, acute infection (10–90 min) of human colon, bladder, and lung carcinoma cells, primary human tracheal epithelial cells, and human tracheal explants with type 1–piliated Escherichia coli mediated a marked (25–50-fold) and sustained (>24 h) induction of matrilysin production. In addition, bacterial infection resulted in activation of the zymogen form of the enzyme, which was selectively released at the apical surface. Induction of matrilysin was mediated by a soluble, non-LPS bacterial factor and correlated with the release of defensin-like bacteriocidal activity. Bacteria did not induce matrilysin in other cell types, and expression of other metalloproteinases by epithelial cells was not affected by bacteria. Matrilysin was not detected in germ-free mice, but the enzyme was induced after colonization with Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. These findings indicate that bacterial exposure is a potent and physiologically relevant signal regulating matrilysin expression in epithelial cells. PMID:10725342

  4. Metatranscriptomics reveals overall active bacterial composition in caries lesions

    PubMed Central

    Simón-Soro, Aurea; Guillen-Navarro, Miriam; Mira, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying the microbial species in caries lesions is instrumental to determine the etiology of dental caries. However, a significant proportion of bacteria in carious lesions have not been cultured, and the use of molecular methods has been limited to DNA-based approaches, which detect both active and inactive or dead microorganisms. Objective To identify the RNA-based, metabolically active bacterial composition of caries lesions at different stages of disease progression in order to provide a list of potential etiological agents of tooth decay. Design Non-cavitated enamel caries lesions (n=15) and dentin caries lesions samples (n=12) were collected from 13 individuals. RNA was extracted and cDNA was constructed, which was used to amplify the 16S rRNA gene. The resulting 780 bp polymerase chain reaction products were pyrosequenced using Titanium-plus chemistry, and the sequences obtained were used to determine the bacterial composition. Results A mean of 4,900 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene with an average read length of 661 bp was obtained per sample, giving a comprehensive view of the active bacterial communities in caries lesions. Estimates of bacterial diversity indicate that the microbiota of cavities is highly complex, each sample containing between 70 and 400 metabolically active species. The composition of these bacterial consortia varied among individuals and between caries lesions of the same individuals. In addition, enamel and dentin lesions had a different bacterial makeup. Lactobacilli were found almost exclusively in dentin cavities. Streptococci accounted for 40% of the total active community in enamel caries, and 20% in dentin caries. However, Streptococcus mutans represented only 0.02–0.73% of the total bacterial community. Conclusions The data indicate that the etiology of dental caries is tissue dependent and that the disease has a clear polymicrobial origin. The low proportion of mutans streptococci detected confirms that they

  5. Bacterial Community Composition and Extracellular Enzyme Activity in Temperate Streambed Sediment during Drying and Rewetting

    PubMed Central

    Pohlon, Elisabeth; Ochoa Fandino, Adriana; Marxsen, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Droughts are among the most important disturbance events for stream ecosystems; they not only affect stream hydrology but also the stream biota. Although desiccation of streams is common in Mediterranean regions, phases of dryness in headwaters have been observed more often and for longer periods in extended temperate regions, including Central Europe, reflecting global climate change and enhanced water withdrawal. The effects of desiccation and rewetting on the bacterial community composition and extracellular enzyme activity, a key process in the carbon flow of streams and rivers, were investigated in a typical Central European stream, the Breitenbach (Hesse, Germany). Wet streambed sediment is an important habitat in streams. It was sampled and exposed in the laboratory to different drying scenarios (fast, intermediate, slow) for 13 weeks, followed by rewetting of the sediment from the fast drying scenario via a sediment core perfusion technique for 2 weeks. Bacterial community structure was analyzed using CARD-FISH and TGGE, and extracellular enzyme activity was assessed using fluorogenic model substrates. During desiccation the bacterial community composition shifted toward composition in soil, exhibiting increasing proportions of Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria and decreasing proportions of Bacteroidetes and Betaproteobacteria. Simultaneously the activities of extracellular enzymes decreased, most pronounced with aminopeptidases and less pronounced with enzymes involved in the degradation of polymeric carbohydrates. After rewetting, the general ecosystem functioning, with respect to extracellular enzyme activity, recovered after 10 to 14 days. However, the bacterial community composition had not yet achieved its original composition as in unaffected sediments within this time. Thus, whether the bacterial community eventually recovers completely after these events remains unknown. Perhaps this community undergoes permanent changes, especially after

  6. Antibiofilm activity of Dendrophthoe falcata against different bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Alagarsamy; Rameshkumar, Ramakrishnan; Sivakumar, Nallusamy; Al Amri, Issa S; Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah; Ramesh, Manikandan

    2012-12-01

    Dendrophthoe falcata is a hemiparasitic plant commonly used for ailments such as ulcers, asthma, impotence, paralysis, skin diseases, menstrual troubles, pulmonary tuberculosis, and wounds. In this context, the validations of the traditional claim that the leaf extract of D. falcata possesses antibiofilm and anti-quorum sensing activity against different bacterial pathogens were assessed. The bacterial biofilms were quantified by crystal violet staining. Among the 17 bacterial pathogens screened, the methanolic fraction of the leaf extract clearly demonstrated antibiofilm activity for Proteus mirabilis, Vibrio vulnificus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Shigella sonnei, Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio cholerae, and Proteus vulgaris. At biofilm inhibitory concentrations, biofilm formation was reduced by up to 70-90 %. Furthermore, the potential quorum-sensing activity of the leaf extract was tested by agar well diffusion using Chromobacterium violaceum (ATCC 12472 & CV O26) reporter strains. The inhibition of violacein production may be due to direct or indirect interference on QS by active constituents or the interactive effect of different phytocompounds present in the extracts. This is the first report on antibiofilm and QS activity of D. falcata leaf extracts, signifying the scope for development of complementary medicine for biofilm-associated infections.

  7. Plants Assemble Species Specific Bacterial Communities from Common Core Taxa in Three Arcto-Alpine Climate Zones

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Brader, Günter; Sessitsch, Angela; Mäki, Anita; van Elsas, Jan D.; Nissinen, Riitta

    2017-01-01

    Evidence for the pivotal role of plant-associated bacteria to plant health and productivity has accumulated rapidly in the last years. However, key questions related to what drives plant bacteriomes remain unanswered, among which is the impact of climate zones on plant-associated microbiota. This is particularly true for wild plants in arcto-alpine biomes. Here, we hypothesized that the bacterial communities associated with pioneer plants in these regions have major roles in plant health support, and this is reflected in the formation of climate and host plant specific endophytic communities. We thus compared the bacteriomes associated with the native perennial plants Oxyria digyna and Saxifraga oppositifolia in three arcto-alpine regions (alpine, low Arctic and high Arctic) with those in the corresponding bulk soils. As expected, the bulk soil bacterial communities in the three regions were significantly different. The relative abundances of Proteobacteria decreased progressively from the alpine to the high-arctic soils, whereas those of Actinobacteria increased. The candidate division AD3 and Acidobacteria abounded in the low Arctic soils. Furthermore, plant species and geographic region were the major determinants of the structures of the endophere communities. The plants in the alpine region had higher relative abundances of Proteobacteria, while plants from the low- and high-arctic regions were dominated by Firmicutes. A highly-conserved shared set of ubiquitous bacterial taxa (core bacteriome) was found to occur in the two plant species. Burkholderiales, Actinomycetales and Rhizobiales were the main taxa in this core, and they were also the main contributors to the differences in the endosphere bacterial community structures across compartments as well as regions. We postulate that the composition of this core is driven by selection by the two plants. PMID:28174556

  8. EGFR regulates macrophage activation and function in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Hardbower, Dana M; Singh, Kshipra; Asim, Mohammad; Verriere, Thomas G; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Barry, Daniel P; Allaman, Margaret M; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard M; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Wilson, Keith T

    2016-09-01

    EGFR signaling regulates macrophage function, but its role in bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we assessed the role of macrophage EGFR signaling during infection with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that causes persistent inflammation and gastric cancer. EGFR was phosphorylated in murine and human macrophages during H. pylori infection. In human gastric tissues, elevated levels of phosphorylated EGFR were observed throughout the histologic cascade from gastritis to carcinoma. Deleting Egfr in myeloid cells attenuated gastritis and increased H. pylori burden in infected mice. EGFR deficiency also led to a global defect in macrophage activation that was associated with decreased cytokine, chemokine, and NO production. We observed similar alterations in macrophage activation and disease phenotype in the Citrobacter rodentium model of murine infectious colitis. Mechanistically, EGFR signaling activated NF-κB and MAPK1/3 pathways to induce cytokine production and macrophage activation. Although deletion of Egfr had no effect on DC function, EGFR-deficient macrophages displayed impaired Th1 and Th17 adaptive immune responses to H. pylori, which contributed to decreased chronic inflammation in infected mice. Together, these results indicate that EGFR signaling is central to macrophage function in response to enteric bacterial pathogens and is a potential therapeutic target for infection-induced inflammation and associated carcinogenesis.

  9. Bacterial and Fungal Activities of Northern Peatland Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsborough, C.; Basiliko, N.

    2009-05-01

    High latitude peatlands play a unique role in global climate through the long-term net sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide in organic soils. Fungi and bacteria dominate microfloral communities in soils and typically are responsible for the majority of direct organic matter decomposition and mineralization, yet each of these groups of microorganisms, with physiological and metabolic differences, potentially plays unique roles in nutrient and carbon cycling in soils. The ability to characterize fungal v bacterial decomposition in peatlands is therefore exceptionally important to understand and predict peatland carbon dynamics, particularly under changing environmental conditions. Here, we demonstrate for the first time, the potential of applying the glucose induced selective inhibition technique, previously used in partitioning bacterial and fungal respiration in forest and agricultural systems, to peatland soils. Using 3 ecologically and hydrologically diverse and spatially dispersed peatlands ranging from a bog to a rich fen, we demonstrated a slight bacterial dominance in a bog and a poor fen both with acidic and primarily Sphagnum peat and a strong bacterial dominance in a near pH neutral, wetter rich fen with sedge peat. This is interesting, as it was expected that microbial respiration in the surface peat profile would be dominated by fungi owing to the acidic and better drained conditions, as is the case with upland riparian forest soils. Furthermore, the maximum non-target inhibition was only 20%, indicating that the SI approach in organic wetland soils works as well as, or better than in, many upland agricultural and forest soils. As the overall importance of fungal and bacterial activities in peatland carbon cycling is still not fully understood, further applications of this technique can develop our understanding of microbial activity in peatland soils.

  10. Comparative Antimicrobial Activity of Granulysin against Bacterial Biothreat Agents

    PubMed Central

    Endsley, Janice J; Torres, Alfredo G; Gonzales, Christine M; Kosykh, Valeri G; Motin, Vladimir L; Peterson, Johnny W; Estes, D. Mark; Klimpel, Gary R

    2009-01-01

    Granulysin is a cationic protein produced by human T cells and natural killer cells that can kill bacterial pathogens through disruption of microbial membrane integrity. Herein we demonstrate antimicrobial activity of the granulysin peptide derived from the active site against Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, and Burkholderia mallei, and show pathogen-specific differences in granulysin peptide effects. The susceptibility of Y. pestis to granulysin is temperature dependent, being less susceptible when grown at the flea arthropod vector temperature (26°C) than when grown at human body temperature. These studies suggest that augmentation of granulysin expression by cytotoxic lymphocytes, or therapeutic application of granulysin peptides, could constitute important strategies for protection against select agent bacterial pathogens. Investigations of the microbial surface molecules that determine susceptibility to granulysin may identify important mechanisms that contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:19587798

  11. Late Holocene fire activity recorded in a Greenland ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zennaro, P.; Barbante, C.; Kehrwald, N.; Zangrando, R.; Gambaro, A.; Gabrieli, J.

    2012-04-01

    The pyrolysis compounds from the thermal decomposition of cellulose during burning events are the dominant smoke tracers in continental airsheds. Important compounds from biomass burning include monosaccharide anhydrides (MAs). Levoglucosan is a MA produced by combusing cellulose at a temperatures of 300°C or greater. Ice cores contain these specific molecular markers and other pyrochemical evidence that provides much-needed information on the role of fire in regions with no existing data of past fire activity. Here, we use atmospheric and snow levoglucosan concentrations to trace fire emissions from a boreal forest fire source in the Canadian Shield through transport and deposition at Summit, Greenland (72°35'N 38°25' W, 3048 masl). Atmospheric and surface samples suggest that levoglucosan in snow can record biomass burning events up to 1000s of kilometers away. Levoglucosan does degrade by interacting with hydroxyl radicals in the atmosphere, but it is emitted in large quantities, allowing the use as a biomass burning tracer. These quantified atmospheric biomass burning emissions and associated parallel oxalate and levoglucosan peaks in snow pit samples validates levoglucosan as a proxy for past biomass burning in snow records and by extension in ice cores. The temporal and spatial resolution of chemical markers in ice cores matches the core in which they are measured. The spatial resolution of chemical markers in ice cores depends on the core location where low-latitude ice cores primarily reflect regional climate parameters, and polar ice cores integrate hemispheric signals. We present levoglucosan flux, and hence past fire activity, measured during the late Holocene in the NEEM, Greenland (77°27' N; 51°3'W, 2454 masl) ice core. We compare the NEEM results with multiple major Northern Hemisphere climate and cultural parameters.

  12. Changes of the Bacterial Abundance and Communities in Shallow Ice Cores from Dunde and Muztagata Glaciers, Western China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Li, Xiang-Kai; Si, Jing; Wu, Guang-Jian; Tian, Li-De; Xiang, Shu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, six bacterial community structures were analyzed from the Dunde ice core (9.5-m-long) using 16S rRNA gene cloning library technology. Compared to the Muztagata mountain ice core (37-m-long), the Dunde ice core has different dominant community structures, with five genus-related groups Blastococcus sp./Propionibacterium, Cryobacterium-related., Flavobacterium sp., Pedobacter sp., and Polaromas sp. that are frequently found in the six tested ice layers from 1990 to 2000. Live and total microbial density patterns were examined and related to the dynamics of physical-chemical parameters, mineral particle concentrations, and stable isotopic ratios in the precipitations collected from both Muztagata and Dunde ice cores. The Muztagata ice core revealed seasonal response patterns for both live and total cell density, with high cell density occurring in the warming spring and summer months indicated by the proxy value of the stable isotopic ratios. Seasonal analysis of live cell density for the Dunde ice core was not successful due to the limitations of sampling resolution. Both ice cores showed that the cell density peaks were frequently associated with high concentrations of particles. A comparison of microbial communities in the Dunde and Muztagata glaciers showed that similar taxonomic members exist in the related ice cores, but the composition of the prevalent genus-related groups is largely different between the two geographically different glaciers. This indicates that the micro-biogeography associated with geographic differences was mainly influenced by a few dominant taxonomic groups. PMID:27847503

  13. Nonrandom assembly of bacterial populations in activated sludge flocs.

    PubMed

    Ayarza, Joaquín M; Guerrero, Leandro D; Erijman, Leonardo

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the dynamics of assembly of bacterial populations in activated sludge flocs. We approached this question by following the development of active bacterial populations during floc development in four replicated lab-scale activated sludge reactors, in which solid retention time (SRT) was set at 4 days. The null hypothesis was that the similarities in community composition could be accounted for by the probability that the same organisms occur in more than one replicated reactor. Microscopic imaging showed that the size of flocs in reactors with biomass retention increased during the first few days until a steady-state size was reached. The diversity and community structure of the sludge in all reactors were analyzed during a period of up to ten SRT, using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rRNA. High rates of change in DGGE profiles from consecutive sampling points suggested a high level of dynamics in all reactors. This conclusion was confirmed by the application of the Raup and Crick probability-based similarity index (S(RC)) for the comparison of rRNA-based fingerprinting patterns, which indicated that bacterial communities within reactors were not significantly similar after three SRT (0.05 < S(RC) < 0.95) and became significantly dissimilar after five SRT (S(RC) < 0.05). More importantly, significant similarity between replicate reactors was observed at all times analyzed (S(RC) > 0.95). The fact that the patterns between replicates were more reproducible than expected by chance under highly dynamic conditions allowed us to reject the null hypothesis that activated sludge floc communities assemble randomly from the available source pool of bacteria. We suggest that communities progressively recruit from the available pool of bacterial species, each with particular ecological requirements that determine their time of emergence into the community.

  14. Determination and variation of core bacterial community in a two-stage full-scale anaerobic reactor treating high-strength pharmaceutical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ma, Haijun; Ye, Lin; Hu, Haidong; Zhang, Lulu; Ding, Lili; Ren, Hongqiang

    2017-08-25

    The functional characterization and temporal variation of anaerobic bacterial population is important to better understanding of microbial process of two-stage anaerobic reactor. However, due to the high diversity of anaerobic bacteria, close attention should be prioritized to be paid to the frequently abundant bacteria that were defined as core bacteria and putatively functionally important. Here in this study, using Miseq sequencing technology, the core bacterial community of 98 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) was determined in a two-stage upflow blanket filter reactors treating pharmaceutical wastewater. The core bacterial community accounted for 61.66% of the total sequences and accurately predicted the sample location in the principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) scatter plot as the total bacterial OTUs did. The core bacterial community in the first-stage (FS) and second-stage (SS) reactors were generally distinct that FS core bacterial community was indicated to be more related to higher-level fermentation process and SS core bacterial community contained more microbes in syntrophic cooperation with methanogens. Moreover, the different responses of FS and SS core bacterial community to the temperature shock and influent disturbance caused by solid contamination were fully investigated. Co-occurring analysis at the order level implied that Bacteroidales, Selenomonadales, Anaerolineales, Syneristales and Thermotogales might play keystone roles in anaerobic digestion due to their high abundance and tight correlation with other microbes. These findings advanced our knowledge about the core bacteria community and its temporal variability for future comparative research and the improvement of the two-stage anaerobic system operation.

  15. Hydrophobic core flexibility modulates enzyme activity in HIV-1 protease

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.; Bolon, Daniel N. A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity. PMID:22295904

  16. Hydrophobic Core Flexibility Modulates Enzyme Activity in HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Bolon, Daniel N.A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-09-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from the active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity.

  17. Thiophene-Core Estrogen Receptor Ligands Having Superagonist Activity

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jian; Wang, Pengcheng; Srinivasan, Sathish; Nwachukwu, Jerome C.; Guo, Pu; Huang, Minjian; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Nettles, Kendall W.; Zhou, Hai-Bing

    2013-01-01

    To probe the importance of the heterocyclic core of estrogen receptor (ER) ligands, we prepared a series of thiophene-core ligands by Suzuki cross-coupling of aryl boronic acids with bromo-thiophenes, and we assessed their receptor binding and cell biological activities. The disposition of the phenol substituents on the thiophene core, at alternate or adjacent sites, and the nature of substituents on these phenols all contribute to binding affinity and subtype selectivity. Most of the bis(hydroxyphenyl)-thiophenes were ERβ selective, whereas the tris(hydroxyphenyl)-thiophenes were ERα selective; analogous furan-core compounds generally have lower affinity and less selectivity. Some diarylthiophenes show distinct superagonist activity in reporter gene assays, giving maximal activities 2–3 times that of estradiol, and modeling suggests that these ligands have a different interaction with a hydrogen-bonding residue in helix-11. Ligand-core modification may be a new strategy for developing ER ligands whose selectivity is based on having transcriptional activity greater than that of estradiol. PMID:23586645

  18. Bacterial Effector Activates Jasmonate Signaling by Directly Targeting JAZ Transcriptional Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shushu; Yao, Jian; Ma, Ka-Wai; Zhou, Huanbin; Song, Jikui; He, Sheng Yang; Ma, Wenbo

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial pathogens deliver a variety of virulence proteins through the type III secretion system (T3SS) directly into the host cytoplasm. These type III secreted effectors (T3SEs) play an essential role in bacterial infection, mainly by targeting host immunity. However, the molecular basis of their functionalities remains largely enigmatic. Here, we show that the Pseudomonas syringae T3SE HopZ1a, a member of the widely distributed YopJ effector family, directly interacts with jasmonate ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins through the conserved Jas domain in plant hosts. JAZs are transcription repressors of jasmonate (JA)-responsive genes and major components of the jasmonate receptor complex. Upon interaction, JAZs can be acetylated by HopZ1a through a putative acetyltransferase activity. Importantly, P. syringae producing the wild-type, but not a catalytic mutant of HopZ1a, promotes the degradation of HopZ1-interacting JAZs and activates JA signaling during bacterial infection. Furthermore, HopZ1a could partially rescue the virulence defect of a P. syringae mutant that lacks the production of coronatine, a JA-mimicking phytotoxin produced by a few P. syringae strains. These results highlight a novel example by which a bacterial effector directly manipulates the core regulators of phytohormone signaling to facilitate infection. The targeting of JAZ repressors by both coronatine toxin and HopZ1 effector suggests that the JA receptor complex is potentially a major hub of host targets for bacterial pathogens. PMID:24204266

  19. Bacterial Activity at -2 to -20 degrees C in Arctic wintertime sea ice.

    PubMed

    Junge, Karen; Eicken, Hajo; Deming, Jody W

    2004-01-01

    Arctic wintertime sea-ice cores, characterized by a temperature gradient of -2 to -20 degrees C, were investigated to better understand constraints on bacterial abundance, activity, and diversity at subzero temperatures. With the fluorescent stains 4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole 2HCl (DAPI) (for DNA) and 5-cyano-2,3-ditoyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) (for O(2)-based respiration), the abundances of total, particle-associated (>3- micro m), free-living, and actively respiring bacteria were determined for ice-core samples melted at their in situ temperatures (-2 to -20 degrees C) and at the corresponding salinities of their brine inclusions (38 to 209 ppt). Fluorescence in situ hybridization was applied to determine the proportions of Bacteria, Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides (CFB), and Archaea. Microtome-prepared ice sections also were examined microscopically under in situ conditions to evaluate bacterial abundance (by DAPI staining) and particle associations within the brine-inclusion network of the ice. For both melted and intact ice sections, more than 50% of cells were found to be associated with particles or surfaces (sediment grains, detritus, and ice-crystal boundaries). CTC-active bacteria (0.5 to 4% of the total) and cells detectable by rRNA probes (18 to 86% of the total) were found in all ice samples, including the coldest (-20 degrees C), where virtually all active cells were particle associated. The percentage of active bacteria associated with particles increased with decreasing temperature, as did the percentages of CFB (16 to 82% of Bacteria) and Archaea (0.0 to 3.4% of total cells). These results, combined with correlation analyses between bacterial variables and measures of particulate matter in the ice as well as the increase in CFB at lower temperatures, confirm the importance of particle or surface association to bacterial activity at subzero temperatures. Measuring activity down to -20 degrees C adds to the concept that liquid inclusions in

  20. Bacterial Activity at −2 to −20°C in Arctic Wintertime Sea Ice

    PubMed Central

    Junge, Karen; Eicken, Hajo; Deming, Jody W.

    2004-01-01

    Arctic wintertime sea-ice cores, characterized by a temperature gradient of −2 to −20°C, were investigated to better understand constraints on bacterial abundance, activity, and diversity at subzero temperatures. With the fluorescent stains 4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole 2HCl (DAPI) (for DNA) and 5-cyano-2,3-ditoyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) (for O2-based respiration), the abundances of total, particle-associated (>3-μm), free-living, and actively respiring bacteria were determined for ice-core samples melted at their in situ temperatures (−2 to −20°C) and at the corresponding salinities of their brine inclusions (38 to 209 ppt). Fluorescence in situ hybridization was applied to determine the proportions of Bacteria, Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides (CFB), and Archaea. Microtome-prepared ice sections also were examined microscopically under in situ conditions to evaluate bacterial abundance (by DAPI staining) and particle associations within the brine-inclusion network of the ice. For both melted and intact ice sections, more than 50% of cells were found to be associated with particles or surfaces (sediment grains, detritus, and ice-crystal boundaries). CTC-active bacteria (0.5 to 4% of the total) and cells detectable by rRNA probes (18 to 86% of the total) were found in all ice samples, including the coldest (−20°C), where virtually all active cells were particle associated. The percentage of active bacteria associated with particles increased with decreasing temperature, as did the percentages of CFB (16 to 82% of Bacteria) and Archaea (0.0 to 3.4% of total cells). These results, combined with correlation analyses between bacterial variables and measures of particulate matter in the ice as well as the increase in CFB at lower temperatures, confirm the importance of particle or surface association to bacterial activity at subzero temperatures. Measuring activity down to −20°C adds to the concept that liquid inclusions in frozen environments

  1. Core Muscle Activity, Exercise Preference, and Perceived Exertion during Core Exercise with Elastic Resistance versus Machine.

    PubMed

    Vinstrup, Jonas; Sundstrup, Emil; Brandt, Mikkel; Jakobsen, Markus D; Calatayud, Joaquin; Andersen, Lars L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate core muscle activity, exercise preferences, and perceived exertion during two selected core exercises performed with elastic resistance versus a conventional training machine. Methods. 17 untrained men aged 26-67 years participated in surface electromyography (EMG) measurements of five core muscles during torso-twists performed from left to right with elastic resistance and in the machine, respectively. The order of the exercises was randomized and each exercise consisted of 3 repetitions performed at a 10 RM load. EMG amplitude was normalized (nEMG) to maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVC). Results. A higher right erector spinae activity in the elastic exercise compared with the machine exercise (50% [95% CI 36-64] versus 32% [95% CI 18-46] nEMG) was found. By contrast, the machine exercise, compared with the elastic exercise, showed higher left external oblique activity (77% [95% CI 64-90] versus 54% [95% CI 40-67] nEMG). For the rectus abdominis, right external oblique, and left erector spinae muscles there were no significant differences. Furthermore, 76% preferred the torso-twist with elastic resistance over the machine exercise. Perceived exertion (Borg CR10) was not significantly different between machine (5.8 [95% CI 4.88-6.72]) and elastic exercise (5.7 [95% CI 4.81-6.59]). Conclusion. Torso-twists using elastic resistance showed higher activity of the erector spinae, whereas torso-twist in the machine resulted in higher activity of the external oblique. For the remaining core muscles the two training modalities induced similar muscular activation. In spite of similar perceived exertion the majority of the participants preferred the exercise using elastic resistance.

  2. Microbial population, activity, and phylogenetic diversity in the subseafloor core sediment from the Sea of Okhotsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, F.; Suzuki, M.; Takai, K.; Nealson, K. H.; Horikoshi, K.

    2002-12-01

    Subseafloor environments has already been recognized as the largest biosphere on the planet Earth, however, the microbial diversity and activity has been still poorly understood, even in their impacts on biogeochemical processes, tectonic settings, and paleoenvironmental events. We demonstrate here the evaluation of microbial community structure and active habitats in deeply buried cold marine sediments collected from the Sea of Okhotsk by a combined use of molecular ecological surveys and culturing assays. The piston core sediment (MD01-2412) was collected by IMAGES (International Marine Global Change Study) Project from the southeastern Okhotsk Sea, June 2001. The total recovered length was about 58m. The lithology of the core sediment was mainly constructed from pelagic clay (PC) and volcanic ash layers (Ash). We collected aseptically the most inside core parts from 16 sections at different depths for microbiological study. The direct count of DAPI-stained cells revealed that the cells in Ash samples were present 1.2 to 2.2 times higher than in PC samples. The quantitative-PCR of 16S rDNA between bacterial and archaeal rDNA suggested that the increased population density in Ash layers was caused by the bacterial components. We studied approximately 650 and 550 sequences from bacterial and archaeal rDNA clone libraries, respectively. The similarity and phylogenetic analyses revealed that the microbial community structures were apparently different between in Ash layers and PC samples. From bacterial rDNA clone libraries, the members within gamma-Proteobacteria such as genera Halomonas, Shewanella, Psychromonas and Methylosinus were predominantly detected in Ash layers whereas the Dehalococcoides group and delta-Proteobacteria were major bacterial components in PC samples. From archaeal libraries, the sequences from Ash and PC samples were affiliated into the clusters represented by the environmental sequences obtained from terrestrial and deep-sea environments

  3. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems.

  4. Simultaneous spatiotemporal mapping of in situ pH and bacterial activity within an intact 3D microcolony structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Geelsu; Liu, Yuan; Kim, Dongyeop; Sun, Victor; Aviles-Reyes, Alejandro; Kajfasz, Jessica K.; Lemos, Jose A.; Koo, Hyun

    2016-09-01

    Biofilms are comprised of bacterial-clusters (microcolonies) enmeshed in an extracellular matrix. Streptococcus mutans can produce exopolysaccharides (EPS)-matrix and assemble microcolonies with acidic microenvironments that can cause tooth-decay despite the surrounding neutral-pH found in oral cavity. How the matrix influences the pH and bacterial activity locally remains unclear. Here, we simultaneously analyzed in situ pH and gene expression within intact biofilms and measured the impact of damage to the surrounding EPS-matrix. The spatiotemporal changes of these properties were characterized at a single-microcolony level following incubation in neutral-pH buffer. The middle and bottom-regions as well as inner-section within the microcolony 3D structure were resistant to neutralization (vs. upper and peripheral-region), forming an acidic core. Concomitantly, we used a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter to monitor expression of the pH-responsive atpB (PatpB::gfp) by S. mutans within microcolonies. The atpB expression was induced in the acidic core, but sharply decreased at peripheral/upper microcolony regions, congruent with local pH microenvironment. Enzymatic digestion of the surrounding matrix resulted in nearly complete neutralization of microcolony interior and down-regulation of atpB. Altogether, our data reveal that biofilm matrix facilitates formation of an acidic core within microcolonies which in turn activates S. mutans acid-stress response, mediating both the local environment and bacterial activity in situ.

  5. Simultaneous spatiotemporal mapping of in situ pH and bacterial activity within an intact 3D microcolony structure

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Geelsu; Liu, Yuan; Kim, Dongyeop; Sun, Victor; Aviles-Reyes, Alejandro; Kajfasz, Jessica K.; Lemos, Jose A.; Koo, Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are comprised of bacterial-clusters (microcolonies) enmeshed in an extracellular matrix. Streptococcus mutans can produce exopolysaccharides (EPS)-matrix and assemble microcolonies with acidic microenvironments that can cause tooth-decay despite the surrounding neutral-pH found in oral cavity. How the matrix influences the pH and bacterial activity locally remains unclear. Here, we simultaneously analyzed in situ pH and gene expression within intact biofilms and measured the impact of damage to the surrounding EPS-matrix. The spatiotemporal changes of these properties were characterized at a single-microcolony level following incubation in neutral-pH buffer. The middle and bottom-regions as well as inner-section within the microcolony 3D structure were resistant to neutralization (vs. upper and peripheral-region), forming an acidic core. Concomitantly, we used a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter to monitor expression of the pH-responsive atpB (PatpB::gfp) by S. mutans within microcolonies. The atpB expression was induced in the acidic core, but sharply decreased at peripheral/upper microcolony regions, congruent with local pH microenvironment. Enzymatic digestion of the surrounding matrix resulted in nearly complete neutralization of microcolony interior and down-regulation of atpB. Altogether, our data reveal that biofilm matrix facilitates formation of an acidic core within microcolonies which in turn activates S. mutans acid-stress response, mediating both the local environment and bacterial activity in situ. PMID:27604325

  6. Role of the σ54 Activator Interacting Domain in Bacterial Transcription Initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Alexander R.; Wemmer, David E.

    2016-10-11

    Bacterial sigma factors are subunits of RNA polymerase that direct the holoenzyme to specific sets of promoters in the genome and are a central element of regulating transcription. Most polymerase holoenzymes open the promoter and initiate transcription rapidly after binding. However, polymerase containing the members of the σ54 family must be acted on by a transcriptional activator before DNA opening and initiation occur. A key domain in these transcriptional activators forms a hexameric AAA + ATPase that acts through conformational changes brought on by ATP hydrolysis. Contacts between the transcriptional activator and σ54 are primarily made through an N-terminal σ54 activator interacting domain (AID). To better understand this mechanism of bacterial transcription initiation, we characterized the σ54 AID by NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical methods and show that it is an intrinsically disordered domain in σ54 alone. In this paper, we identified a minimal construct of the Aquifex aeolicus σ54 AID that consists of two predicted helices and retains native-like binding affinity for the transcriptional activator NtrC1. Using the NtrC1 ATPase domain, bound with the non-hydrolyzable ATP analog ADP-beryllium fluoride, we studied the NtrC1–σ54 AID complex using NMR spectroscopy. We show that the σ54 AID becomes structured after associating with the core loops of the transcriptional activators in their ATP state and that the primary site of the interaction is the first predicted helix. Finally, understanding this complex, formed as the first step toward initiation, will help unravel the mechanism of σ54 bacterial transcription initiation.

  7. Active core rewarming avoids bioelectrical impedance changes in postanesthetic patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Postoperative hypothermia is a common cause of complications in patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Hypothermia is known to elicit electrophysiological, biochemical, and cellular alterations thus leading to changes in the active and passive membrane properties. These changes might influence the bioelectrical impedance (BI). Our aim was to determine whether the BI depends on the core temperature. Methods We studied 60 patients (52 female and 8 male) age 40 to 80 years with an ASA I-II classification that had undergone laparoscopic cholecystectomy under balanced inhalation anesthesia. The experimental group (n = 30) received active core rewarming during the transanesthetic and postanesthesic periods. The control group (n = 30) received passive external rewarming. The BI was recorded by using a 4-contact electrode system to collect dual sets of measurements in the deltoid muscle. The body temperature, hemodynamic variables, respiratory rate, blood-gas levels, biochemical parameters, and shivering were also measured. The Mann-Whitney unpaired t-test was used to determine the differences in shivering between each group at each measurement period. Measurements of body temperature, hemodynamics variables, respiratory rate, and BI were analyzed using the two-way repeated-measures ANOVA. Results The gradual decrease in the body temperature was followed by the BI increase over time. The highest BI values (95 ± 11 Ω) appeared when the lowest values of the temperature (35.5 ± 0.5°C) were reached. The active core rewarming kept the body temperature within the physiological range (over 36.5°C). This effect was accompanied by low stable values (68 ± 3 Ω) of BI. A significant decrease over time in the hemodynamic values, respiratory rate, and shivering was seen in the active core-rewarming group when compared with the controls. The temporal course of shivering was different from those of body temperatue and BI. The control patients showed a

  8. Discordant temporal development of bacterial phyla and the emergence of core in the fecal microbiota of young children.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing; Ringel-Kulka, Tamar; Heikamp-de Jong, Ineke; Ringel, Yehuda; Carroll, Ian; de Vos, Willem M; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Satokari, Reetta

    2016-04-01

    The colonization pattern of intestinal microbiota during childhood may impact health later in life, but children older than 1 year are poorly studied. We followed healthy children aged 1-4 years (n=28) for up to 12 months, during which a synbiotic intervention and occasional antibiotics intake occurred, and compared them with adults from the same region. Microbiota was quantified with the HITChip phylogenetic microarray and analyzed with linear mixed effects model and other statistical approaches. Synbiotic administration increased the stability of Actinobacteria and antibiotics decreased Clostridium cluster XIVa abundance. Bacterial diversity did not increase in 1- to 5-year-old children and remained significantly lower than in adults. Actinobacteria, Bacilli and Clostridium cluster IV retained child-like abundances, whereas some other groups were converting to adult-like profiles. Microbiota stability increased, with Bacteroidetes being the main contributor. The common core of microbiota in children increased with age from 18 to 25 highly abundant genus-level taxa, including several butyrate-producing organisms, and developed toward an adult-like composition. In conclusion, intestinal microbiota is not established before 5 years of age and diversity, core microbiota and different taxa are still developing toward adult-type configuration. Discordant development patterns of bacterial phyla may reflect physiological development steps in children.

  9. In situ protein folding and activation in bacterial inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Montalban, Nuria; Natalello, Antonino; García-Fruitós, Elena; Villaverde, Antonio; Doglia, Silvia Maria

    2008-07-01

    Recent observations indicate that bacterial inclusion bodies formed in absence of the main chaperone DnaK result largely enriched in functional, properly folded recombinant proteins. Unfortunately, the molecular basis of this intriguing fact, with obvious biotechnological interest, remains unsolved. We have explored here two non-excluding physiological mechanisms that could account for this observation, namely selective removal of inactive polypeptides from inclusion bodies or in situ functional activation of the embedded proteins. By combining structural and functional analysis, we have not observed any preferential selection of inactive and misfolded protein species by the dissagregating machinery during inclusion body disintegration. Instead, our data strongly support that folding intermediates aggregated as inclusion bodies could complete their natural folding process once deposited in protein clusters, which conduces to significant functional activation. In addition, in situ folding and protein activation in inclusion bodies is negatively regulated by the chaperone DnaK.

  10. Nuclear factor Y regulates ancient budgerigar hepadnavirus core promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhongliang; Liu, Yanfeng; Luo, Mengjun; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wei; Pan, Shaokun; Xie, Youhua

    2016-09-16

    Endogenous viral elements (EVE) in animal genomes are the fossil records of ancient viruses and provide invaluable information on the origin and evolution of extant viruses. Extant hepadnaviruses include avihepadnaviruses of birds and orthohepadnaviruses of mammals. The core promoter (Cp) of hepadnaviruses is vital for viral gene expression and replication. We previously identified in the budgerigar genome two EVEs that contain the full-length genome of an ancient budgerigar hepadnavirus (eBHBV1 and eBHBV2). Here, we found eBHBV1 Cp and eBHBV2 Cp were active in several human and chicken cell lines. A region from nt -85 to -11 in eBHBV1 Cp was critical for the promoter activity. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a putative binding site of nuclear factor Y (NF-Y), a ubiquitous transcription factor, at nt -64 to -50 in eBHBV1 Cp. The NF-Y core binding site (ATTGG, nt -58 to -54) was essential for eBHBV1 Cp activity. The same results were obtained with eBHBV2 Cp and duck hepatitis B virus Cp. The subunit A of NF-Y (NF-YA) was recruited via the NF-Y core binding site to eBHBV1 Cp and upregulated the promoter activity. Finally, the NF-Y core binding site is conserved in the Cps of all the extant avihepadnaviruses but not of orthohepadnaviruses. Interestingly, a putative and functionally important NF-Y core binding site is located at nt -21 to -17 in the Cp of human hepatitis B virus. In conclusion, our findings have pinpointed an evolutionary conserved and functionally critical NF-Y binding element in the Cps of avihepadnaviruses.

  11. Bacterial activities driving arsenic speciation and solubility in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia-Brunet, F.; Seby, F.; Crouzet, C.; Joulian, C.; Mamindy-Pajany, Y.; Guezennec, A. G.; Hurel, C.; Marmier, N.; Bataillard, P.

    2012-04-01

    Harbour and marina sediments represent particular environments, with high concentrations in organic carbon and pollutants. Over 50 million m3 of marine sediments are dredged every year in French maritime and commercial ports, to maintain the water depth suitable for navigation, and the most part of them is discharged in deeper sea zones. The present study aimed to elucidate, using a range of complementary approaches, the influence of bacterial activity on arsenic speciation and mobility in marina sediments. Two sites were considered: L'Estaque, impacted by metallurgical activities and by the commercial port of Marseille, and St-Mandrier, less polluted, affected by classical chemical pollutants associated to professional and recreational boating. Arsenic concentration was noticeably higher in l'Estaque sediment (200-350 mg/kg) than in St-Mandrier sediment (15-50 mg/kg). In the solid phases, As(III) was the dominant species in L'Estaque sediment, whereas As(V) was the main form in St Mandrier sediment. At both sites, arsenic was the major trace element detected in interstitial water. Free sulfide and thio-arsenic complexes were detected in the interstitial water of l'Estaque sediment, suggesting a role of sulfate-reduction bacterial activity on arsenic solubility. Anaerobic microcosm experiments confirmed this hypothesis, as stimulation of sulfate-reduction induced a dramatic increase of arsenic concentration in the liquid phase, linked to the formation of soluble thio-arsenic complexes. Nevertheless, microcosms performed in aerobic conditions showed that bacterial activity globally decreased the transfer of arsenic from the sediment toward the overlying water. A red-brown fine layer developed at the sediment-water interface. Altogether, these results suggest that the sediment-water interface zone and the close transition area between aerobic and anaerobic conditions host intense biogeochemical reactions involving As, Fe and S species. These reactions most probably

  12. Body heat transfer during hip surgery using active core warming.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, P; Webster, J; Carli, F

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of core warming on heat redistribution from the core to the periphery as manifested by changes in core, mean skin temperature and mean body heat, investigated in a group of 30 patients undergoing total hip replacement. The control group (n = 10) had no active warming. Core warming was achieved in the humidifier group (n = 10) by using humidified and warmed gases at 40 degrees C, whilst in the oesophageal group (n = 10), an oesophageal heat exchanger was used to achieve active warming. Operating room temperature and relative humidity was standardised. Aural canal and skin temperatures (15 sites) were measured before induction of anaesthesia, at the end of surgery and one hour of recovery after anaesthesia. Mean skin temperatures were calculated for a weighted four and unweighted 15 points, and mean body heat were calculated to quantify the distribution of body heat. Core temperature decreased in the control and the oesophageal groups, but not in the humidifier group at the end of surgery; by mean values +/- SD of 1.9 degrees C +/- 0.6, 1.2 degrees C +/- 0.6 and 0.4 degree C +/- 0.2 degree C, respectively (P < 0.01). Mean skin temperature (MST15) decreased in the control group by 1.0 degree C +/- 1.0, but not in the actively warmed groups where the mean increased by 0.1 degree C +/- 1.4 and 0.2 degree C +/- 0.2 in the oesophageal and humidifier groups, respectively (P < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. THE COLD SHOULDER: EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTIONS OF ACTIVE REGION CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.

    2012-09-10

    The coronal heating mechanism for active region core loops is difficult to determine because these loops are often not resolved and cannot be studied individually. Rather, we concentrate on the 'inter-moss' areas between loop footpoints. We use observations from the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer and the X-Ray Telescope to calculate the emission measure distributions of eight inter-moss areas in five different active regions. The combined data sets provide both high- and low-temperature constraints and ensure complete coverage in the temperature range appropriate for active regions. For AR 11113, the emission can be modeled with heating events that occur on timescales less than the cooling time. The loops in the core regions appear to be close to equilibrium and are consistent with steady heating. The other regions studied, however, appear to be dominated by nanoflare heating. Our results are consistent with the idea that active region age is an important parameter in determining whether steady or nanoflare heating is primarily responsible for the core emission, that is, older regions are more likely to be dominated by steady heating, while younger regions show more evidence of nanoflares.

  14. A bacterial tyrosine phosphatase inhibits plant pattern recognition receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Brutus, Alexandre; Segonzac, Cécile; Roy, Sonali; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Oh, Man-Ho; Sklenar, Jan; Derbyshire, Paul; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro; Monaghan, Jacqueline; Menke, Frank L; Huber, Steven C; He, Sheng Yang; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-03-28

    Innate immunity relies on the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) located on the host cell's surface. Many plant PRRs are kinases. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis receptor kinase EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR), which perceives the elf18 peptide derived from bacterial elongation factor Tu, is activated upon ligand binding by phosphorylation on its tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of a single tyrosine residue, Y836, is required for activation of EFR and downstream immunity to the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. A tyrosine phosphatase, HopAO1, secreted by P. syringae, reduces EFR phosphorylation and prevents subsequent immune responses. Thus, host and pathogen compete to take control of PRR tyrosine phosphorylation used to initiate antibacterial immunity.

  15. Antiplasmid activity: loss of bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Molnár, J; Földeák, S; Nakamura, M J; Rausch, H; Domonkos, K; Szabó, M

    1992-01-01

    The antiplasmid activity of tricyclic compounds, e.g. phenothiazines, dibenzoazepines, dibenzocykloheptene derivatives and some stereoisomers, was shown on E. coli in vitro. Some ring-substituted phenothiazine and cannabis derivatives had only an antibacterial effect. Promethazine, a selected phenothiazine, cured antibiotic resistance and lactose fermentation of E.coli, tumour inducing ability of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and nodule formation of Rhizobium meliloti. Plasmids of different E.coli strains were eliminated with varying frequency. The antiplasmid activity of the compounds can be due to the increased membrane permeability. Inhibition of DNA gyrase and complex formation with the supercoiled form of plasmid DNA can lead to the cessation of plasmid replication in the bacterial cells. In addition, in vivo plasmid curing was demonstrated at a low frequency.

  16. Structural Analysis of the Bacterial Proteasome Activator Bpa in Complex with the 20S Proteasome.

    PubMed

    Bolten, Marcel; Delley, Cyrille L; Leibundgut, Marc; Boehringer, Daniel; Ban, Nenad; Weber-Ban, Eilika

    2016-12-06

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis harbors proteasomes that recruit substrates for degradation through an ubiquitin-like modification pathway. Recently, a non-ATPase activator termed Bpa (bacterial proteasome activator) was shown to support an alternate proteasomal degradation pathway. Here, we present the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of Bpa in complex with the 20S core particle (CP). For docking into the cryo-EM density, we solved the X-ray structure of Bpa, showing that it forms tight four-helix bundles arranged into a 12-membered ring with a 40 Å wide central pore and the C-terminal helix of each protomer protruding from the ring. The Bpa model was fitted into the cryo-EM map of the Bpa-CP complex, revealing its architecture and striking symmetry mismatch. The Bpa-CP interface was resolved to 3.5 Å, showing the interactions between the C-terminal GQYL motif of Bpa and the proteasome α-rings. This docking mode is related to the one observed for eukaryotic activators with features specific to the bacterial complex. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sample storage for soil enzyme activity and bacterial community profiles.

    PubMed

    Wallenius, K; Rita, H; Simpanen, S; Mikkonen, A; Niemi, R M

    2010-04-01

    Storage of samples is often an unavoidable step in environmental data collection, since available analytical capacity seldom permits immediate processing of large sample sets needed for representative data. In microbiological soil studies, sample pretreatments may have a strong influence on measurement results, and thus careful consideration is required in the selection of storage conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the suitability of prolonged (up to 16 weeks) frozen or air-dried storage for divergent soil materials. The samples selected to this study were mineral soil (clay loam) from an agricultural field, humus from a pine forest and compost from a municipal sewage sludge composting field. The measured microbiological parameters included functional profiling with ten different hydrolysing enzyme activities determined by artificial fluorogenic substrates, and structural profiling with bacterial 16S rDNA community fingerprints by amplicon length heterogeneity analysis (LH-PCR). Storage of samples affected the observed fluorescence intensity of the enzyme assay's fluorophor standards dissolved in soil suspension. The impact was highly dependent on the soil matrix and storage method, making it important to use separate standardisation for each combination of matrix type, storage method and time. Freezing proved to be a better storage method than air-drying for all the matrices and enzyme activities studied. The effect of freezing on the enzyme activities was small (<20%) in clay loam and forest humus and moderate (generally 20-30%) in compost. The most dramatic decreases (>50%) in activity were observed in compost after air-drying. The bacterial LH-PCR community fingerprints were unaffected by frozen storage in all matrices. The effect of storage treatments was tested using a new statistical method based on showing similarity rather than difference of results.

  18. Robustness of nuclear core activity reconstruction by data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouriquet, Bertrand; Argaud, Jean-Philippe; Erhard, Patrick; Massart, Sébastien; Ponçot, Angélique; Ricci, Sophie; Thual, Olivier

    2011-02-01

    We apply a data assimilation technique, inspired from meteorological applications, to perform an optimal reconstruction of the neutronic activity field in a nuclear core. Both measurements and information coming from a numerical model are used. We first study the robustness of the method when the amount of measured information decreases. We then study the influence of the nature of the instruments and their spatial repartition on the efficiency of the field reconstruction.

  19. Cooperativity of peptidoglycan synthases active in bacterial cell elongation.

    PubMed

    Banzhaf, Manuel; van den Berg van Saparoea, Bart; Terrak, Mohammed; Fraipont, Claudine; Egan, Alexander; Philippe, Jules; Zapun, André; Breukink, Eefjan; Nguyen-Distèche, Martine; den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Vollmer, Waldemar

    2012-07-01

    Growth of the bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan sacculus requires the co-ordinated activities of peptidoglycan synthases, hydrolases and cell morphogenesis proteins, but the details of these interactions are largely unknown. We now show that the Escherichia coli peptidoglycan glycosyltrasferase-transpeptidase PBP1A interacts with the cell elongation-specific transpeptidase PBP2 in vitro and in the cell. Cells lacking PBP1A are thinner and initiate cell division later in the cell cycle. PBP1A localizes mainly to the cylindrical wall of the cell, supporting its role in cell elongation. Our in vitro peptidoglycan synthesis assays provide novel insights into the cooperativity of peptidoglycan synthases with different activities. PBP2 stimulates the glycosyltransferase activity of PBP1A, and PBP1A and PBP2 cooperate to attach newly synthesized peptidoglycan to sacculi. PBP2 has peptidoglycan transpeptidase activity in the presence of active PBP1A. Our data also provide a possible explanation for the depletion of lipid II precursors in penicillin-treated cells.

  20. Fluorogenic Peptide Substrate for Quantification of Bacterial Enzyme Activities

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abdullah, Ismail H.; Bagramyan, Karine; Bilbao, Shiela; Qi, Meirigeng; Kalkum, Markus

    2017-01-01

    A novel peptide substrate (A G G P L G P P G P G G) was developed for quantifying the activities of bacterial enzymes using a highly sensitive Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) based assay. The peptide substrate was cleaved by collagenase class I, II, Liberase MTF C/T, collagenase NB1, and thermolysin/neutral protease, which was significantly enhanced in the presence of CaCl2. However, the activities of these enzymes were significantly decreased in the presence of ZnSO4 or ZnCl2. Collagenase I, II, Liberase MTF C/T, thermolysin/neutral protease share similar cleavage sites, L↓G and P↓G. However, collagenase NB1 cleaves the peptide substrate at G↓P and P↓L, in addition to P↓G. The enzyme activity is pH dependent, within a range of 6.8 to 7.5, but was significantly diminished at pH 8.0. Interestingly, the peptide substrate was not cleaved by endogenous pancreatic protease such as trypsin, chymotrypsin, and elastase. In conclusion, the novel peptide substrate is collagenase, thermolysin/neutral protease specific and can be applied to quantify enzyme activities from different microbes. Furthermore, the assay can be used for fine-tuning reaction mixtures of various agents to enhance the overall activity of a cocktail of multiple enzymes and achieve optimal organ/tissue digestion, while protecting the integrity of the target cells. PMID:28287171

  1. The Bacterial Signature of Leptospermum scoparium (Mānuka) Reveals Core and Accessory Communities with Bioactive Properties

    PubMed Central

    Wicaksono, Wisnu Adi; Jones, E. Eirian; Monk, Jana; Ridgway, Hayley J.

    2016-01-01

    Leptospermum scoparium or mānuka is a New Zealand native medicinal plant that produces an essential oil with antimicrobial properties. This is the first study to investigate the structure and bioactivity of endophytic bacteria in mānuka by using a combination of cultivation-independent (DGGE) and dependent approaches. A total of 23 plants were sampled across three sites. Plants were considered either immature (3–8 years) or mature (>20 years). The endophyte community structure and richness was affected by plant tissue and bacterial communities became more stable and uniform as plant maturity increased. A total of 192 culturable bacteria were recovered from leaves, stems and roots. Some bacterial isolates showed in vitro biocontrol activity against two fungal pathogens, Ilyonectria liriodendri and Neofusicoccum luteum and a bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae. A high proportion of bacterial endophytes could produce siderophores and solubilise phosphate in vitro. Gammaproteobacteria was the most variable class, representing the majority of cultivated bacteria with bioactivity. PMID:27676607

  2. Activity and bacterial diversity of snow around Russian Antarctic stations.

    PubMed

    Lopatina, Anna; Krylenkov, Vjacheslav; Severinov, Konstantin

    2013-11-01

    The diversity and temporal dynamics of bacterial communities in pristine snow around two Russian Antarctic stations was investigated. Taxonomic analysis of rDNA libraries revealed that snow communities were dominated by bacteria from a small number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that underwent dramatic swings in abundance between the 54th (2008-2009) and 55th (2009-2010) Russian Antarctic expeditions. Moreover, analysis of the 55th expedition samples indicated that there was very little, if any, correspondence in abundance of clones belonging to the same OTU present in rDNA and rRNA libraries. The latter result suggests that most rDNA clones originate from bacteria that are not alive and/or active and may have been deposited on the snow surface from the atmosphere. In contrast, clones most abundant in rRNA libraries (mostly belonging to Variovorax, Janthinobacterium, Pseudomonas, and Sphingomonas genera) may be considered as endogenous Antarctic snow inhabitants.

  3. Simultaneous Transport of Two Bacterial Strains in Intact Cores from Oyster, Virginia: Biological Effects and Numerical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hailiang; Rothmel, Randi; Onstott, Tullis C.; Fuller, Mark E.; DeFlaun, Mary F.; Streger, Sheryl H.; Dunlap, Robb; Fletcher, Madilyn

    2002-01-01

    The transport characteristics of two adhesion-deficient, indigenous groundwater strains, Comamonas sp. strain DA001 and Erwinia herbicola OYS2-A, were studied by using intact sediment cores (7 by 50 cm) from Oyster, Va. Both strains are gram-negative rods (1.10 by 0.56 and 1.56 by 0.46 μm, respectively) with strongly hydrophilic membranes and a slightly negative surface charge. The two strains exhibited markedly different behaviors when they were transported through granular porous sediment. To eliminate any effects of physical and chemical heterogeneity on bacterial transport and thus isolate the biological effect, the two strains were simultaneously injected into the same core. DA001 cells were metabolically labeled with 35S and tagged with a vital fluorescent stain, while OYS2-A cells were metabolically labeled with 14C. The fast decay of 35S allowed deconvolution of the two isotopes (and therefore the two strains). Dramatic differences in the transport behaviors were observed. The breakthrough of DA001 and the breakthrough of OYS2-A both occurred before the breakthrough of a conservative tracer (termed differential advection), with effluent recoveries of 55 and 30%, respectively. The retained bacterial concentration of OYS2-A in the sediment was twofold higher than that of DA001. Among the cell properties analyzed, the statistically significant differences between the two strains were cell length and diameter. The shorter, larger-diameter DA001 cells displayed a higher effluent recovery than the longer, smaller-diameter OYS2-A cells. CXTFIT modeling results indicated that compared to the DA001 cells, the OYS2-A cells experienced lower pore velocity, higher porosity, a higher attachment rate, and a lower detachment rate. All these factors may contribute to the observed differences in transport. PMID:11976080

  4. Origin and ecological selection of core and food-specific bacterial communities associated with meat and seafood spoilage.

    PubMed

    Chaillou, Stéphane; Chaulot-Talmon, Aurélie; Caekebeke, Hélène; Cardinal, Mireille; Christieans, Souad; Denis, Catherine; Desmonts, Marie Hélène; Dousset, Xavier; Feurer, Carole; Hamon, Erwann; Joffraud, Jean-Jacques; La Carbona, Stéphanie; Leroi, Françoise; Leroy, Sabine; Lorre, Sylvie; Macé, Sabrina; Pilet, Marie-France; Prévost, Hervé; Rivollier, Marina; Roux, Dephine; Talon, Régine; Zagorec, Monique; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    2015-05-01

    The microbial spoilage of meat and seafood products with short shelf lives is responsible for a significant amount of food waste. Food spoilage is a very heterogeneous process, involving the growth of various, poorly characterized bacterial communities. In this study, we conducted 16S ribosomal RNA gene pyrosequencing on 160 samples of fresh and spoiled foods to comparatively explore the bacterial communities associated with four meat products and four seafood products that are among the most consumed food items in Europe. We show that fresh products are contaminated in part by a microbiota similar to that found on the skin and in the gut of animals. However, this animal-derived microbiota was less prevalent and less abundant than a core microbiota, psychrotrophic in nature, mainly originated from the environment (water reservoirs). We clearly show that this core community found on meat and seafood products is the main reservoir of spoilage bacteria. We also show that storage conditions exert strong selective pressure on the initial microbiota: alpha diversity in fresh samples was 189±58 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) but dropped to 27±12 OTUs in spoiled samples. The OTU assemblage associated with spoilage was shaped by low storage temperatures, packaging and the nutritional value of the food matrix itself. These factors presumably act in tandem without any hierarchical pattern. Most notably, we were also able to identify putative new clades of dominant, previously undescribed bacteria occurring on spoiled seafood, a finding that emphasizes the importance of using culture-independent methods when studying food microbiota.

  5. Origin and ecological selection of core and food-specific bacterial communities associated with meat and seafood spoilage

    PubMed Central

    Chaillou, Stéphane; Chaulot-Talmon, Aurélie; Caekebeke, Hélène; Cardinal, Mireille; Christieans, Souad; Denis, Catherine; Hélène Desmonts, Marie; Dousset, Xavier; Feurer, Carole; Hamon, Erwann; Joffraud, Jean-Jacques; La Carbona, Stéphanie; Leroi, Françoise; Leroy, Sabine; Lorre, Sylvie; Macé, Sabrina; Pilet, Marie-France; Prévost, Hervé; Rivollier, Marina; Roux, Dephine; Talon, Régine; Zagorec, Monique; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    The microbial spoilage of meat and seafood products with short shelf lives is responsible for a significant amount of food waste. Food spoilage is a very heterogeneous process, involving the growth of various, poorly characterized bacterial communities. In this study, we conducted 16S ribosomal RNA gene pyrosequencing on 160 samples of fresh and spoiled foods to comparatively explore the bacterial communities associated with four meat products and four seafood products that are among the most consumed food items in Europe. We show that fresh products are contaminated in part by a microbiota similar to that found on the skin and in the gut of animals. However, this animal-derived microbiota was less prevalent and less abundant than a core microbiota, psychrotrophic in nature, mainly originated from the environment (water reservoirs). We clearly show that this core community found on meat and seafood products is the main reservoir of spoilage bacteria. We also show that storage conditions exert strong selective pressure on the initial microbiota: alpha diversity in fresh samples was 189±58 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) but dropped to 27±12 OTUs in spoiled samples. The OTU assemblage associated with spoilage was shaped by low storage temperatures, packaging and the nutritional value of the food matrix itself. These factors presumably act in tandem without any hierarchical pattern. Most notably, we were also able to identify putative new clades of dominant, previously undescribed bacteria occurring on spoiled seafood, a finding that emphasizes the importance of using culture-independent methods when studying food microbiota. PMID:25333463

  6. Prokaryotic RNA Associated to Bacterial Viability Induces Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Activation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Rodrigues, Nahuel; Castillo, Luis A; Landoni, Verónica I; Martire-Greco, Daiana; Milillo, M Ayelén; Barrionuevo, Paula; Fernández, Gabriela C

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) are the first cellular line of antibacterial host defense. They sense pathogens through recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by innate pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLR). The aim of this study was to investigate whether PMN sense bacterial viability and explore which viability factor could be involved in this phenomenon. For this purpose, different functions were evaluated in isolated human PMN using live Escherichia coli (Ec) and heat-killed Ec (HK-Ec). We found that bacterial viability was indispensable to induce PMN activation, as measured by forward-scatter (FSC) increase, CD11b surface expression, chemotaxis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. As uncapped non-polyadenylated prokaryotic mRNA has been recognized as a PAMP associated to bacterial viability by macrophages and dendritic cells, total prokaryotic RNA (pRNA) from live Ec was purified and used as a stimulus for PMN. pRNA triggered similar responses to those observed with live bacteria. No RNA could be isolated from HK-Ec, explaining the lack of effect of dead bacteria. Moreover, the supernatant of dead bacteria was able to induce PMN activation, and this was associated with the presence of pRNA in this supernatant, which is released in the killing process. The induction of bactericidal functions (ROS and NETosis) by pRNA were abolished when the supernatant of dead bacteria or isolated pRNA were treated with RNAse. Moreover, endocytosis was necessary for pRNA-induced ROS generation and NETosis, and priming was required for the induction of pRNA-induced ROS in whole blood. However, responses related to movement and degranulation (FSC increase, CD11b up-regulation, and chemotaxis) were still triggered when pRNA was digested with RNase, and were not dependent on pRNA endocytosis or PMN priming. In conclusion, our results indicate that PMN sense live bacteria

  7. Prokaryotic RNA Associated to Bacterial Viability Induces Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Rodrigues, Nahuel; Castillo, Luis A.; Landoni, Verónica I.; Martire-Greco, Daiana; Milillo, M. Ayelén; Barrionuevo, Paula; Fernández, Gabriela C.

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) are the first cellular line of antibacterial host defense. They sense pathogens through recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by innate pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLR). The aim of this study was to investigate whether PMN sense bacterial viability and explore which viability factor could be involved in this phenomenon. For this purpose, different functions were evaluated in isolated human PMN using live Escherichia coli (Ec) and heat-killed Ec (HK-Ec). We found that bacterial viability was indispensable to induce PMN activation, as measured by forward-scatter (FSC) increase, CD11b surface expression, chemotaxis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. As uncapped non-polyadenylated prokaryotic mRNA has been recognized as a PAMP associated to bacterial viability by macrophages and dendritic cells, total prokaryotic RNA (pRNA) from live Ec was purified and used as a stimulus for PMN. pRNA triggered similar responses to those observed with live bacteria. No RNA could be isolated from HK-Ec, explaining the lack of effect of dead bacteria. Moreover, the supernatant of dead bacteria was able to induce PMN activation, and this was associated with the presence of pRNA in this supernatant, which is released in the killing process. The induction of bactericidal functions (ROS and NETosis) by pRNA were abolished when the supernatant of dead bacteria or isolated pRNA were treated with RNAse. Moreover, endocytosis was necessary for pRNA-induced ROS generation and NETosis, and priming was required for the induction of pRNA-induced ROS in whole blood. However, responses related to movement and degranulation (FSC increase, CD11b up-regulation, and chemotaxis) were still triggered when pRNA was digested with RNase, and were not dependent on pRNA endocytosis or PMN priming. In conclusion, our results indicate that PMN sense live bacteria

  8. Microelectrode Measurements of the Activity Distribution in Nitrifying Bacterial Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    de Beer, D.; van den Heuvel, J. C.; Ottengraf, S. P. P.

    1993-01-01

    Microelectrodes for ammonium, oxygen, nitrate, and pH were used to study nitrifying aggregates grown in a fluidized-bed reactor. Local reactant fluxes and distribution of microbial activity could be determined from the microprofiles. The interfacial fluxes of the reactants closely reflected the stoichiometry of bacterial nitrification. Both ammonium consumption and nitrate production were localized in the outer shells, with a thickness of approximately 100 to 120 μm, of the aggregates. Under conditions in which ammonium and oxygen penetrated the whole aggregate, nitrification was restricted to this zone; oxygen was consumed in the central parts of the aggregates as well, probably because of oxidation of dead biomass. A sudden increase of the oxygen concentration to saturation (pure oxygen) was inhibitory to nitrification. The pH profiles showed acidification in the aggregates, but not to an inhibitory level. The distribution of activity was determined by the penetration depth of oxygen during aggregate development in the reactor. Mass transfer was significantly limited by the boundary layer surrounding the aggregates. Microelectrode measurements showed that the thickness of this layer was correlated with the diffusion coefficient of the species. Determination of the distribution of nitrifying activity required the use of ammonium or nitrate microelectrodes, whereas the use of oxygen microelectrodes alone would lead to erroneous results. Images PMID:16348875

  9. Core muscle activation during Swiss ball and traditional abdominal exercises.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Lewis, Clare; Bell, Duncan; Bramblet, Gwen; Daffron, Jason; Lambert, Steve; Pecson, Amanda; Imamura, Rodney; Paulos, Lonnie; Andrews, James R

    2010-05-01

    Controlled laboratory study using a repeated-measures, counterbalanced design. To test the ability of 8 Swiss ball exercises (roll-out, pike, knee-up, skier, hip extension right, hip extension left, decline push-up, and sitting march right) and 2 traditional abdominal exercises (crunch and bent-knee sit-up) on activating core (lumbopelvic hip complex) musculature. Numerous Swiss ball abdominal exercises are employed for core muscle strengthening during training and rehabilitation, but there are minimal data to substantiate the ability of these exercises to recruit core muscles. It is also unknown how core muscle recruitment in many of these Swiss ball exercises compares to core muscle recruitment in traditional abdominal exercises such as the crunch and bent-knee sit-up. A convenience sample of 18 subjects performed 5 repetitions for each exercise. Electromyographic (EMG) data were recorded on the right side for upper and lower rectus abdominis, external and internal oblique, latissimus dorsi, lumbar paraspinals, and rectus femoris, and then normalized using maximum voluntary isometric contractions (MVICs). EMG signals during the roll-out and pike exercises for the upper rectus abdominis (63% and 46% MVIC, respectively), lower rectus abdominis (53% and 55% MVIC, respectively), external oblique (46% and 84% MVIC, respectively), and internal oblique (46% and 56% MVIC, respectively) were significantly greater compared to most other exercises, where EMG signals ranged between 7% to 53% MVIC for the upper rectus abdominis, 7% to 44% MVIC for the lower rectus abdominis, 14% to 73% MVIC for the external oblique, and 16% to 47% MVIC for the internal oblique. The lowest EMG signals were consistently found in the sitting march right exercise. Latissimus dorsi EMG signals were greatest in the pike, knee-up, skier, hip extension right and left, and decline push-up (17%-25% MVIC), and least with the sitting march right, crunch, and bent-knee sit-up exercises (7%-8% MVIC

  10. Increasing and Decreasing the Ultrastability of Bacterial Chemotaxis Core Signaling Complexes by Modifying Protein−Protein Contacts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The chemosensory signaling array of bacterial chemotaxis is composed of functional core units containing two receptor trimers of dimers, a homodimeric CheA kinase, and two CheW adaptor proteins. In vitro reconstitutions generate individual, functional core units and larger functional assemblies, including dimers, hexagons, and hexagonal arrays. Such reconstituted complexes have been shown to have both quasi-stable and ultrastable populations that decay with lifetimes of 1–2 days and ∼3 weeks at 22 °C, respectively, where decay results primarily from proteolysis of the bound kinase [Erbse, A. H., and Falke, J. J. (2009) Biochemistry 48, 6975–6987; Slivka, P. F., and Falke, J. J. (2012) Biochemistry 51, 10218–10228]. In this work, we show that the ultrastable population can be destabilized to the quasi-stable level via the introduction of a bulky tryptophan residue at either one of two essential protein–protein interfaces within the core unit: the receptor–kinase contact or kinase–adaptor interface 1. Moreover, we demonstrate that the quasi-stable population can be made ultrastable via the introduction of a disulfide bond that covalently stabilizes the latter interface. The resulting disulfide at least doubles the functional lifetime of the ultrastable population, to ≥5.9 weeks at 22 °C, by protecting the kinase from endogenous and exogenous proteases. Together, these results indicate that the ultrastability of reconstituted core complexes requires well-formed contacts among the receptor, kinase, and adaptor proteins, whereas quasi-stability arises from less perfect contacts that allow slow proteolysis of the bound kinase. Furthermore, the results reveal that ultrastability, and perhaps the size or order of chemosensory complexes and arrays, can be increased by an engineered disulfide bond that covalently cross-links a key interface. Overall, it appears that native ultrastability has evolved to provide an optimal rather than maximal level of kinetic

  11. Emission Measure Distribution and Heating of Two Active Region Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Durgesh; Klimchuk, James A.; Mason, Helen E.

    2011-01-01

    Using data from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer aboard Hinode, we have studied the coronal plasma in the core of two active regions. Concentrating on the area between opposite polarity moss, we found emission measure distributions having an approximate power-law form EM/T(exp 2.4) from log T = 5.55 up to a peak at log T = 6.57. The observations are explained extremely well by a simple nanoflare model. However, in the absence of additional constraints, the observations could possibly also be explained by steady heating.

  12. Bacterial Cyclic AMP-Phosphodiesterase Activity Coordinates Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kalivoda, Eric J.; Brothers, Kimberly M.; Stella, Nicholas A.; Schmitt, Matthew J.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm-related infections are a major contributor to human disease, and the capacity for surface attachment and biofilm formation are key attributes for the pathogenesis of microbes. Serratia marcescens type I fimbriae-dependent biofilms are coordinated by the adenylate cyclase, CyaA, and the cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex. This study uses S. marcescens as a model system to test the role of cAMP-phosphodiesterase activity in controlling biofilm formation. Herein we describe the characterization of a putative S. marcescens cAMP-phosphodiesterase gene (SMA3506), designated as cpdS, and demonstrated to be a functional cAMP-phosphodiesterase both in vitro and in vivo. Deletion of cpdS resulted in defective biofilm formation and reduced type I fimbriae production, whereas multicopy expression of cpdS conferred a type I fimbriae-dependent hyper-biofilm. Together, these results support a model in which bacterial cAMP-phosphodiesterase activity modulates biofilm formation. PMID:23923059

  13. Coevolved Mutations Reveal Distinct Architectures for Two Core Proteins in the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Rasool, Shafqat; Khan, Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Switching of bacterial flagellar rotation is caused by large domain movements of the FliG protein triggered by binding of the signal protein CheY to FliM. FliG and FliM form adjacent multi-subunit arrays within the basal body C-ring. The movements alter the interaction of the FliG C-terminal (FliGC) “torque” helix with the stator complexes. Atomic models based on the Salmonella entrovar C-ring electron microscopy reconstruction have implications for switching, but lack consensus on the relative locations of the FliG armadillo (ARM) domains (amino-terminal (FliGN), middle (FliGM) and FliGC) as well as changes during chemotaxis. The generality of the Salmonella model is challenged by the variation in motor morphology and response between species. We studied coevolved residue mutations to determine the unifying elements of switch architecture. Residue interactions, measured by their coevolution, were formalized as a network, guided by structural data. Our measurements reveal a common design with dedicated switch and motor modules. The FliM middle domain (FliMM) has extensive connectivity most simply explained by conserved intra and inter-subunit contacts. In contrast, FliG has patchy, complex architecture. Conserved structural motifs form interacting nodes in the coevolution network that wire FliMM to the FliGC C-terminal, four-helix motor module (C3-6). FliG C3-6 coevolution is organized around the torque helix, differently from other ARM domains. The nodes form separated, surface-proximal patches that are targeted by deleterious mutations as in other allosteric systems. The dominant node is formed by the EHPQ motif at the FliMMFliGM contact interface and adjacent helix residues at a central location within FliGM. The node interacts with nodes in the N-terminal FliGc α-helix triad (ARM-C) and FliGN. ARM-C, separated from C3-6 by the MFVF motif, has poor intra-network connectivity consistent with its variable orientation revealed by structural data. ARM-C could

  14. Assembly and stoichiometry of the core structure of the bacterial flagellar type III export gate complex.

    PubMed

    Fukumura, Takuma; Makino, Fumiaki; Dietsche, Tobias; Kinoshita, Miki; Kato, Takayuki; Wagner, Samuel; Namba, Keiichi; Imada, Katsumi; Minamino, Tohru

    2017-08-01

    The bacterial flagellar type III export apparatus, which is required for flagellar assembly beyond the cell membranes, consists of a transmembrane export gate complex and a cytoplasmic ATPase complex. FlhA, FlhB, FliP, FliQ, and FliR form the gate complex inside the basal body MS ring, although FliO is required for efficient export gate formation in Salmonella enterica. However, it remains unknown how they form the gate complex. Here we report that FliP forms a homohexameric ring with a diameter of 10 nm. Alanine substitutions of conserved Phe-137, Phe-150, and Glu-178 residues in the periplasmic domain of FliP (FliPP) inhibited FliP6 ring formation, suppressing flagellar protein export. FliO formed a 5-nm ring structure with 3 clamp-like structures that bind to the FliP6 ring. The crystal structure of FliPP derived from Thermotoga maritia, and structure-based photo-crosslinking experiments revealed that Phe-150 and Ser-156 of FliPP are involved in the FliP-FliP interactions and that Phe-150, Arg-152, Ser-156, and Pro-158 are responsible for the FliP-FliO interactions. Overexpression of FliP restored motility of a ∆fliO mutant to the wild-type level, suggesting that the FliP6 ring is a functional unit in the export gate complex and that FliO is not part of the final gate structure. Copurification assays revealed that FlhA, FlhB, FliQ, and FliR are associated with the FliO/FliP complex. We propose that the assembly of the export gate complex begins with FliP6 ring formation with the help of the FliO scaffold, followed by FliQ, FliR, and FlhB and finally FlhA during MS ring formation.

  15. Improved microbial growth inhibition activity of bio-surfactant induced Ag-TiO2 core shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nithyadevi, D.; Kumar, P. Suresh; Mangalaraj, D.; Ponpandian, N.; Viswanathan, C.; Meena, P.

    2015-02-01

    Surfactant induced silver-titanium dioxide core shell nanoparticles within the size range of 10-50 nm were applied in the antibacterial agent to inhibit the growth of bacterial cells. The single crystalline silver was located in the core part of the composite powder and the titanium dioxide components were uniformly distributed in the shell part. HRTEM and XRD results indicated that silver was completely covered by titanium dioxide and its crystal structure was not affected after being coated by titanium dioxide. The effect of silver-titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the inhibition of bacterial cell growth was studied by means of disk diffusion method. The inhibition zone results reveal that sodium alginate induced silver-titanium dioxide nanoparticles exhibit 100% more antibacterial activity than that with cetyltrimethylbromide or without surfactant. UV-vis spectroscopic analysis showed a large concentration of silver was rapidly released into phosphate buffer solution (PBS) within a period of 1 day, with a much smaller concentration being released after this 1-day period. It was concluded that sodium alginate induced silver-titanium dioxide core shell nanoparticles could enhance long term cell growth inhibition in comparison with cetyltrimethylbromide or without surfactant. The surfactant mediated core shell nanoparticles have comparatively rapid, less expensive and wider applications in modern antibacterial therapy.

  16. Minimum core genome sequence typing of bacterial pathogens: a unified approach for clinical and public health microbiology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Zhang, Wen; Zheng, Han; Lan, Ruiting; Wang, Haiyin; Du, Pengcheng; Bai, Xuemei; Ji, Shaobo; Meng, Qiong; Jin, Dong; Liu, Kai; Jing, Huaiqi; Ye, Changyun; Gao, George F; Wang, Lei; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Xu, Jianguo

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial pathogens impose a heavy health burden worldwide. In the new era of high-throughput sequencing and online bioinformatics, real-time genome typing of infecting agents, and in particular those with potential severe clinical outcomes, holds promise for guiding clinical care to limit the detrimental effects of infections and to prevent potential local or global outbreaks. Here, we sequenced and compared 85 isolates of Streptococcus suis, a zoonotic human and swine pathogen, wherein we analyzed 32 recognized serotypes and 75 sequence types representing the diversity of the species and the human clinical isolates with high public health significance. We found that 1,077 of the 2,469 genes are shared by all isolates. Excluding 201 common but mobile genes, 876 genes were defined as the minimum core genome (MCG) of the species. Of 190,894 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified, 58,501 were located in the MCG genes and were referred to as MCG SNPs. A population structure analysis of these MCG SNPs classified the 85 isolates into seven MCG groups, of which MCG group 1 includes all isolates from human infections and outbreaks. Our MCG typing system for S. suis provided a clear separation of groups containing human-associated isolates from those containing animal-associated isolates. It also separated the group containing outbreak isolates, including those causing life-threatening streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome, from sporadic or less severe meningitis or bacteremia-only isolates. The typing system facilitates the application of genome data to the fields of clinical medicine and epidemiology and to the surveillance of S. suis. The MCG groups may also be used as the taxonomical units of S. suis to define bacterial subpopulations with the potential to cause severe clinical infections and large-scale outbreaks.

  17. Minimum Core Genome Sequence Typing of Bacterial Pathogens: a Unified Approach for Clinical and Public Health Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Zhang, Wen; Zheng, Han; Lan, Ruiting; Wang, Haiyin; Du, Pengcheng; Bai, Xuemei; Ji, Shaobo; Meng, Qiong; Jin, Dong; Liu, Kai; Jing, Huaiqi; Ye, Changyun; Gao, George F.; Wang, Lei; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens impose a heavy health burden worldwide. In the new era of high-throughput sequencing and online bioinformatics, real-time genome typing of infecting agents, and in particular those with potential severe clinical outcomes, holds promise for guiding clinical care to limit the detrimental effects of infections and to prevent potential local or global outbreaks. Here, we sequenced and compared 85 isolates of Streptococcus suis, a zoonotic human and swine pathogen, wherein we analyzed 32 recognized serotypes and 75 sequence types representing the diversity of the species and the human clinical isolates with high public health significance. We found that 1,077 of the 2,469 genes are shared by all isolates. Excluding 201 common but mobile genes, 876 genes were defined as the minimum core genome (MCG) of the species. Of 190,894 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified, 58,501 were located in the MCG genes and were referred to as MCG SNPs. A population structure analysis of these MCG SNPs classified the 85 isolates into seven MCG groups, of which MCG group 1 includes all isolates from human infections and outbreaks. Our MCG typing system for S. suis provided a clear separation of groups containing human-associated isolates from those containing animal-associated isolates. It also separated the group containing outbreak isolates, including those causing life-threatening streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome, from sporadic or less severe meningitis or bacteremia-only isolates. The typing system facilitates the application of genome data to the fields of clinical medicine and epidemiology and to the surveillance of S. suis. The MCG groups may also be used as the taxonomical units of S. suis to define bacterial subpopulations with the potential to cause severe clinical infections and large-scale outbreaks. PMID:23720795

  18. Therapeutic activity of modified U1 core spliceosomal particles.

    PubMed

    Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Tajnik, Mojca; Licastro, Danilo; Bussani, Erica; Camparini, Luca; Mattioli, Chiara; Pagani, Franco

    2016-04-04

    Modified U1 snRNAs bound to intronic sequences downstream of the 5' splice site correct exon skipping caused by different types of mutations. Here we evaluate the therapeutic activity and structural requirements of these exon-specific U1 snRNA (ExSpeU1) particles. In a severe spinal muscular atrophy, mouse model, ExSpeU1, introduced by germline transgenesis, increases SMN2 exon 7 inclusion, SMN protein production and extends life span. In vitro, RNA mutant analysis and silencing experiments show that while U1A protein is dispensable, the 70K and stem loop IV elements mediate most of the splicing rescue activity through improvement of exon and intron definition. Our findings indicate that precise engineering of the U1 core spliceosomal RNA particle has therapeutic potential in pathologies associated with exon-skipping mutations.

  19. Therapeutic activity of modified U1 core spliceosomal particles

    PubMed Central

    Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Tajnik, Mojca; Licastro, Danilo; Bussani, Erica; Camparini, Luca; Mattioli, Chiara; Pagani, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Modified U1 snRNAs bound to intronic sequences downstream of the 5′ splice site correct exon skipping caused by different types of mutations. Here we evaluate the therapeutic activity and structural requirements of these exon-specific U1 snRNA (ExSpeU1) particles. In a severe spinal muscular atrophy, mouse model, ExSpeU1, introduced by germline transgenesis, increases SMN2 exon 7 inclusion, SMN protein production and extends life span. In vitro, RNA mutant analysis and silencing experiments show that while U1A protein is dispensable, the 70K and stem loop IV elements mediate most of the splicing rescue activity through improvement of exon and intron definition. Our findings indicate that precise engineering of the U1 core spliceosomal RNA particle has therapeutic potential in pathologies associated with exon-skipping mutations. PMID:27041075

  20. Active Marine Subsurface Bacterial Population Composition in Low Organic Carbon Environments from IODP Expedition 320

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, A.; Reese, B. K.; Mills, H. J.; IODP Expedition 320 Shipboard Science Party

    2011-12-01

    The marine subsurface environment contains abundant and active microorganisms. These microbial populations are considered integral players in the marine subsurface biogeochemical system with significance in global geochemical cycles and reservoirs. However, variations in microbial community structure, activity and function associated with the wide-ranging sedimentary and geochemical environments found globally have not been fully resolved. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 320 recovered sediments from site U1332. Two sampling depths were selected for analysis that spanned differing lithological units in the sediment core. Sediments were composed of mostly clay with zeolite minerals at 8 meters below sea floor (mbsf). At 27 mbsf, sediments were composed of alternating clayey radiolarian ooze and nannofossil ooze. The concentration of SO42- had little variability throughout the core and the concentration of Fe2+ remained close to, or below, detection limits (0.4 μM). Total organic carbon content ranged from a low of 0.03 wt% to a high of 0.07 wt% between 6 and 30 mbsf providing an opportunity to evaluate marine subsurface microbial communities under extreme electron donor limiting conditions. The metabolically active fraction of the bacterial population was isolated by the extraction and amplification of 16S ribosomal RNA. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA transcripts and subsequent bioinformatic analyses provided a robust data set (15,931 total classified sequences) to characterize the community at a high resolution. As observed in other subsurface environments, the overall diversity of active bacterial populations decreased with depth. The population shifted from a diverse but evenly distributed community at approximately 8 mbsf to a Firmicutes dominated population at 27 mbsf (80% of sequences). A total of 95% of the sequences at 27 mbsf were grouped into three genera: Lactobacillus (phylum Firmicutes) at 80% of the total sequences, Marinobacter (phylum

  1. pH-responsive release behavior and anti-bacterial activity of bacterial cellulose-silver nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Liu, Hui; Liu, Xiufeng; Sun, Haijun; Wang, Shuxia; Zhang, Rui

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) has been extensively explored as some of the most promising biomaterials for biomedical applications due to their unique properties, such as high crystallinity, high mechanical strength, ultrafine fiber network structure, good water holding capacity and biocompatibility. However, BC is lack of anti-bacterial activity which is the main issue to be solved. In the study, BC-Ag nanocomposites were prepared in situ by introducing silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) into BC acting as the templates. The BC and as-prepared BC-Ag nanocomposites were characterized by several techniques including scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectra, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analyses. These results indicate AgNPs successfully impregnated into BC. The releases of Ag(+) at different pH values were studied, which showed pH-responsive release behaviors of BC-Ag nanocomposites. The anti-bacterial performances of BC-Ag nanocomposites were evaluated with Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 9372 and Candida albicans CMCC(F) 98001, which frequently causes medical associated infections. The experimental results showed BC-Ag nanocomposites have excellent anti-bacterial activities, thus confirming its utility as potential wound dressings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Seven-core active fibre for application in telecommunication satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipowicz, Marta; Napierała, Marek; Murawski, Michał; Ostrowski, Łukasz; Szostkiewicz, Łukasz; Szymański, Michał; Tenderenda, Tadeusz; Anders, Krzysztof; Piramidowicz, Ryszard; Wójcik, Grzegorz; Makara, Mariusz; Poturaj, Krzysztof; Mergo, Paweł; Nasiłowski, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    The use of optical elements and other photonic components makes it possible to overcome telecommunication satellite's bottleneck problems such as size and weight reduction. Despite the unquestionable potential of such elements, nowadays they are not widely used in systems operating in space. This is due to many factors, including the fact that space radiation has disruptive influence on optical fibre. Namely it introduces additional radiation induced attenuation (RIA) that significantly lowers efficiency of optical fibre based systems. However, there is a possibility to produce radiation-hardened (rad-hard) components. One of them is seven core erbium-doped active fibre (MC-EDF) for fibre amplifiers in satellites that we have been developing. In this paper we present a detailed description of seven core structure design as well as experimental results. We report that average gain of 20 dB in C-band with noise figure of 5.8 dB was obtained. We also confirmed that low crosstalk value for a multicore fibre amplifier based on our fibre can be achieved.

  3. Identification of chicken cathelicidin-2 core elements involved in antibacterial and immunomodulatory activities.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Albert; Molhoek, E Margo; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Bokhoven, Johanna L M Tjeerdsma-van; Wagendorp, Eveline; Bikker, Floris; Haagsman, Henk P

    2009-08-01

    Chicken host defense peptide cathelicidin-2 (CATH-2) is known to exert antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities and consists of two alpha-helices connected by a hinge region. Here we report the biological properties of the separate alpha-helical segments and the importance of the proline residue in the hinge region. Substitution of proline-14 in the CATH-2 hinge region by leucine, but not by glycine, strongly reduced antibacterial and hemolytic activity. Furthermore, substitution by leucine strongly reduced the neutralization of LPS-induced cytokine production and peptide-induced monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This indicates that the hinge region is important for rapid penetration of the bacterial membrane as well as indirect and direct immunomodulatory activities. The highly cationic and amphipathic N-terminal segment (C1-15) exhibited very potent antibacterial activity and fast killing kinetics, while displaying low cytotoxicity towards chicken erythrocytes and PBMCs. The N-terminal and, to a lesser extent, the C-terminal helical regions potently neutralized LPS-induced release of TNFalpha, IL-6 and IL-10 by PBMCs, while IL-8 production was only moderately affected. These results indicate that core elements within mature CATH-2 can be identified that are linked to antibacterial and/or immunomodulatory activities. Further studies may lead to the development of peptide antibiotics with specific properties that can be used for prophylactic and/or therapeutic applications.

  4. Unencumbered Pol β lyase activity in nucleosome core particles.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Yesenia; Howard, Michael J; Cuneo, Matthew J; Prasad, Rajendra; Wilson, Samuel H

    2017-09-06

    Packaging of DNA into the nucleosome core particle (NCP) is considered to exert constraints to all DNA-templated processes, including base excision repair where Pol β catalyzes two key enzymatic steps: 5'-dRP lyase gap trimming and template-directed DNA synthesis. Despite its biological significance, knowledge of Pol β activities on NCPs is still limited. Here, we show that removal of the 5'-dRP block by Pol β is unaffected by NCP constraints at all sites tested and is even enhanced near the DNA ends. In contrast, strong inhibition of DNA synthesis is observed. These results indicate 5'-dRP gap trimming proceeds unperturbed within the NCP; whereas, gap filling is strongly limited. In the absence of additional factors, base excision repair in NCPs will stall at the gap-filling step. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2017.

  5. Metatranscriptomic Analysis of Groundwater Reveals an Active Anammox Bacterial Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, T. N. M.; Karaoz, U.; Thomas, B. C.; Banfield, J. F.; Brodie, E.; Williams, K. H.; Beller, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater is a major natural resource, yet little is known about the contribution of microbial anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) activity to subsurface nitrogen cycling. During anammox, energy is generated as ammonium is oxidized under anaerobic conditions to dinitrogen gas, using nitrite as the final electron acceptor. This process is a global sink for fixed nitrogen. Only a narrow range of monophyletic bacteria within the Planctomycetes carries out anammox, and the full extent of their metabolism, and subsequent impact on nitrogen cycling and microbial community structure, is still unknown. Here, we employ a metatranscriptomic analysis on enriched mRNA to identify the abundance and activity of a population of anammox bacteria within an aquifer at Rifle, CO. Planktonic biomass was collected over a two-month period after injection of up to 1.5 mM nitrate. Illumina-generated sequences were mapped to a phylogenetically binned Rifle metagenome database. We identified transcripts for genes with high protein sequence identities (81-98%) to those of anammox strain KSU-1 and to two of the five anammox bacteria genera, Brocadia and Kuenenia, suggesting an active, if not diverse, anammox population. Many of the most abundant anammox transcripts mapped to a single scaffold, indicative of a single dominant anammox species. Transcripts of the genes necessary for the anammox pathway were present, including an ammonium transporter (amtB), nitrite/formate transporter, nitrite reductase (nirK), and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzoB). The form of nitrite reductase encoded by anammox is species-dependent, and we only identified nirK, with no evidence of anammox nirS. In addition to the anammox pathway we saw evidence of the anammox bacterial dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium pathway (narH, putative nrfA, and nrfB), which provides an alternate means of generating substrates for anammox from nitrate, rather than relying on an external pool. Transcripts for hydroxylamine

  6. Active Heave-Compensated Coring On The New Jersey Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, D. L.; Pardey, M.; Austin, J. A.; Goff, J. A.; Alexander, C.; Christensen, B. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Fulthorpe, C. S.; Nordfjord, S.; Sommerfield, C.; Venherm, C.

    2003-12-01

    The continental shelves are of obvious scientific and strategic importance. However, the ability to cost-effectively collect core samples of continental shelf sediments has been limited by technical difficulties. Many sites of scientific interest are too shallow to be drilled by large drill ships, and they are too deep to be drilled economically from jack-up platforms. DOSECC has developed an Active Heave Compensated (AHC800) drilling system under sponsorship of the Office of Naval Research to overcome these obstacles by building a small active heave compensated drilling rig that can be used to collect high-quality core from selected vessels of opportunity. The AHC800 drilling rig is designed to collect continuous core to a total drill string length of 800 m. Water depths of 200 m and less are optimal; however, with some modification operation in deeper water is possible. The AHC800 senses vessel heave using a constantly tensioned low-stretch taut line attached to a seafloor weight. A linear position transducer is attached to this taut line and through the data acquisition system, the ship's distance from the bottom is communicated to the heave compensation computer running Labview RT operating system and object-based software language. This real-time control system is used to achieve a 10-ms control loop for both data gathering and output functions. The Labview RT system continuously controls two hydraulic cylinders that keep the heave carriage and the drill string at the same reference distance from the bottom. The AHC800 system was used on the R/V Knorr on the New Jersey continental shelf in water depths from 74 to 130 m from 25 Sep to 15 Oct 2002. The AHC800 system performed up to and beyond its design specifications. The rig was designed to compensate for 2.44 m of heave with an 8 s period. However, the Knorr's response was a 6 s period resulting in a significant increase in the required acceleration as well as a faster response time for the system as a whole

  7. Extracellular enzyme activity in anaerobic bacterial cultures: evidence of pullulanase activity among mesophilic marine bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Arnosti, C; Repeta, D J

    1994-01-01

    The extracellular enzymatic activity of a mixed culture of anaerobic marine bacteria enriched on pullulan [alpha(1,6)-linked maltotriose units] was directly assessed with a combination of gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Hydrolysis products of pullulan were separated by GPC into three fractions with molecular weights of > or = 10,000, approximately 5,000, and < or = 1,200. NMR spectra of these fractions demonstrated that pullulan was rapidly and specifically hydrolyzed at alpha(1,6) linkages by pullulanase enzymes, most likely type II pullulanase. Although isolated pullulanase enzymes have been shown to hydrolyze pullulan completely to maltotriose (S. H. Brown, H. R. Costantino, and R. M. Kelly, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 56:1985-1991, 1990; M. Klingeberg, H. Hippe, and G. Antranikian, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 69:145-152, 1990; R. Koch, P. Zablowski, A. Spreinat, and G. Antranikian, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 71:21-26, 1990), the smallest carbohydrate detected in the bacterial cultures consisted of two maltotriose units linked through one alpha(1,6) linkage. Either the final hydrolysis step was closely linked to substrate uptake, or specialized porins similar to maltoporin might permit direct transport of large oligosaccharides into the bacterial cell. This is the first report of pullulanase activity among mesophilic marine bacteria. The combination of GPC and NMR could easily be used to assess other types of extracellular enzyme activity in bacterial cultures. PMID:8161177

  8. EVIDENCE OF IMPULSIVE HEATING IN ACTIVE REGION CORE LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Durgesh; Mason, Helen E.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2010-11-01

    Using a full spectral scan of an active region from the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) we have obtained emission measure EM(T) distributions in two different moss regions within the same active region. We have compared these with theoretical transition region EMs derived for three limiting cases, namely, static equilibrium, strong condensation, and strong evaporation from Klimchuk et al. The EM distributions in both the moss regions are strikingly similar and show a monotonically increasing trend from log T[K] = 5.15-6.3. Using photospheric abundances, we obtain a consistent EM distribution for all ions. Comparing the observed and theoretical EM distributions, we find that the observed EM distribution is best explained by the strong condensation case (EM{sub con}), suggesting that a downward enthalpy flux plays an important and possibly dominant role in powering the transition region moss emission. The downflows could be due to unresolved coronal plasma that is cooling and draining after having been impulsively heated. This supports the idea that the hot loops (with temperatures of 3-5 MK) seen in the core of active regions are heated by nanoflares.

  9. Grazing activity and ruminal bacterial population associated with frothy bloat in steers grazing winter wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two grazing experiments were designed to elucidate the shifts in rumen bacterial populations (Exp. 1) and grazing activities (Exp. 2) in wheat forage diets between bloated and non-bloated steers. In Exp. 1, the bacterial DNA density was greatest for Ruminococcus flavefaciens, Streptococcus bovis, a...

  10. Profiling of core fucosylated N-glycans using a novel bacterial lectin that specifically recognizes α1,6 fucosylated chitobiose

    PubMed Central

    Vainauskas, Saulius; Duke, Rebecca M.; McFarland, James; McClung, Colleen; Ruse, Cristian; Taron, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    A novel fucose-binding lectin (SL2-1) from the bacterium Streptomyces rapamycinicus was identified by analysis of metagenomic DNA sequences. SL2-1 belongs to a new group of bacterial fucose-specific lectins that have no similarity to known bacterial fucose-binding proteins, but are related to certain eukaryotic fucose-binding lectins. The 17 kDa protein was expressed recombinantly in E. coli and purified by affinity chromatography. Glycan microarray analysis with fluorescently labeled recombinant SL2-1 demonstrated its ability to bind to core α1-6 fucosylated N-glycans, but not to core α1-3 fucosylated N-glycans, or other α1-2, α1-3 and α1-4 fucosylated oligosaccharides. The minimal high affinity binding epitope of SL2-1 was α1-6 fucosylated di-n-acetylchitobiose. The recombinant lectin was efficient in detection of N-glycan core fucosylation using lectin blotting and lectin ELISA assays. Finally, a workflow using SL2-1 for selective and quantitative profiling of core fucosylated N-glycans using UPLC-HILIC-FLR analysis was established. The approach was validated for selective capture and analysis of core fucosylated N-glycans present in complex glycan mixtures derived from mammalian serum IgG. PMID:27678371

  11. HPA axis activation and neurochemical responses to bacterial translocation from the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Adrian J; Ando, Tetsuya; Brown, Rhonda F; Berg, Rodney D

    2003-05-01

    Stress can cause migration of indigenous bacterial flora from the gut to the peritoneum, a phenomenon known as bacterial translocation. Destruction of the cell walls of gram-negative bacteria can result in the production of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS), which is the likely cause of sepsis. Exogenously administered LPS can activate the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis as well as brain noradrenergic and indoleaminergic systems. Thus, it is possible that activations of these systems associated with laboratory stressors in rats and mice could be attributed to bacterial translocation and LPS production. To test this hypothesis we conducted experiments on the time course of bacterial translocation in response to restraint in mice, while measuring HPA and neurochemical responses. These experiments failed to show good correlations between the occurrence of bacterial translocation and HPA and neurochemical activations, suggesting that the later responses were not linked to bacterial translocation. This conclusion was supported by the observation of normal neurochemical responses to restraint in germ-free mice. In further experiments, translocation of Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that readily translocates in unstressed animals, was associated with HPA activation and noradrenergic and indoleaminergic responses, indicating that bacterial translocation can indeed activate the HPA axis and brain amines. However, the above experiments suggest that this is not the mechanism by which restraint activates these systems.

  12. The Impact of Handling and Storage of Human Fecal Material on Bacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Karatza, Eleni; Vertzoni, Maria; Muenster, Uwe; Reppas, Christos

    2016-11-01

    Fecal material prepared from human stools is frequently used for the assessment of bacterial degradation of active pharmaceutical ingredients as relevant data are useful for evaluating the potential for colonic drug delivery. The impact of handling and storage of human fecal material on bacterial activity was assessed by evaluating the degradation characteristics of metronidazole and olsalazine. Multiple freeze (-70°C)-thaw cycles should be avoided. Incubation of frozen material for about 2 h in the anaerobic workstation ensures regeneration of the highest possible bacterial activity. Material could be stored at -70°C for at least 12 months.

  13. Combined Analysis of Variation in Core, Accessory and Regulatory Genome Regions Provides a Super-Resolution View into the Evolution of Bacterial Populations

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Alan; Oren, Yaara; Kelly, Darren; Sreecharan, Tristan; Vehkala, Minna; Välimäki, Niko; Prentice, Michael B.; Ashour, Amgad; Avram, Oren; Pupko, Tal; Literak, Ivan; Guenther, Sebastian; Schaufler, Katharina; Wieler, Lothar H.; Zhiyong, Zong; Sheppard, Samuel K.; Corander, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The use of whole-genome phylogenetic analysis has revolutionized our understanding of the evolution and spread of many important bacterial pathogens due to the high resolution view it provides. However, the majority of such analyses do not consider the potential role of accessory genes when inferring evolutionary trajectories. Moreover, the recently discovered importance of the switching of gene regulatory elements suggests that an exhaustive analysis, combining information from core and accessory genes with regulatory elements could provide unparalleled detail of the evolution of a bacterial population. Here we demonstrate this principle by applying it to a worldwide multi-host sample of the important pathogenic E. coli lineage ST131. Our approach reveals the existence of multiple circulating subtypes of the major drug–resistant clade of ST131 and provides the first ever population level evidence of core genome substitutions in gene regulatory regions associated with the acquisition and maintenance of different accessory genome elements. PMID:27618184

  14. 454 Pyrosequencing reveals bacterial diversity of activated sludge from 14 sewage treatment plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Shao, Ming-Fei; Ye, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Activated sludge (AS) contains highly complex microbial communities. In this study, PCR-based 454 pyrosequencing was applied to investigate the bacterial communities of AS samples from 14 sewage treatment plants of Asia (mainland China, Hong Kong, and Singapore), and North America (Canada and the United States). A total of 259 K effective sequences of 16S rRNA gene V4 region were obtained from these AS samples. These sequences revealed huge amount of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in AS, that is, 1183–3567 OTUs in a sludge sample, at 3% cutoff level and sequencing depth of 16 489 sequences. Clear geographical differences among the AS samples from Asia and North America were revealed by (1) cluster analyses based on abundances of OTUs or the genus/family/order assigned by Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) and (2) the principal coordinate analyses based on OTUs abundances, RDP taxa abundances and UniFrac of OTUs and their distances. In addition to certain unique bacterial populations in each AS sample, some genera were dominant, and core populations shared by multiple samples, including two commonly reported genera of Zoogloea and Dechloromonas, three genera not frequently reported (i.e., Prosthecobacter, Caldilinea and Tricoccus) and three genera not well described so far (i.e., Gp4 and Gp6 in Acidobacteria and Subdivision3 genera incertae sedis of Verrucomicrobia). Pyrosequencing analyses of multiple AS samples in this study also revealed the minority populations that are hard to be explored by traditional molecular methods and showed that a large proportion of sequences could not be assigned to taxonomic affiliations even at the phylum/class levels. PMID:22170428

  15. Core functional traits of bacterial communities in the Upper Mississippi River show limited variation in response to land cover.

    PubMed

    Staley, Christopher; Gould, Trevor J; Wang, Ping; Phillips, Jane; Cotner, James B; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Taxonomic characterization of environmental microbial communities via high-throughput DNA sequencing has revealed that patterns in microbial biogeography affect community structure. However, shifts in functional diversity related to variation in taxonomic composition are poorly understood. To overcome limitations due to the prohibitive cost of high-depth metagenomic sequencing, tools to infer functional diversity based on phylogenetic distributions of functional traits have been developed. In this study we characterized functional microbial diversity at 11 sites along the Mississippi River in Minnesota using both metagenomic sequencing and functional-inference-based (PICRUSt) approaches. This allowed us to determine how distance and variation in land cover throughout the river influenced the distribution of functional traits, as well as to validate PICRUSt inferences. The distribution and abundance of functional traits, by metagenomic analysis, were similar among sites, with a median standard deviation of 0.0002% among tier 3 functions in KEGG. Overall inferred functional variation was significantly different (P ≤ 0.035) between two water basins surrounded by agricultural vs. developed land cover, and abundances of bacterial orders that correlated with functional traits by metagenomic analysis were greater where abundances of the trait were inferred to be higher. PICRUSt inferences were significantly correlated (r = 0.147, P = 1.80 × 10(-30)) with metagenomic annotations. Discrepancies between metagenomic and PICRUSt taxonomic-functional relationships, however, suggested potential functional redundancy among abundant and rare taxa that impeded the ability to accurately assess unique functional traits among rare taxa at this sequencing depth. Results of this study suggest that a suite of "core functional traits" is conserved throughout the river and distributions of functional traits, rather than specific taxa, may shift in response to environmental heterogeneity.

  16. Core functional traits of bacterial communities in the Upper Mississippi River show limited variation in response to land cover

    PubMed Central

    Staley, Christopher; Gould, Trevor J.; Wang, Ping; Phillips, Jane; Cotner, James B.; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Taxonomic characterization of environmental microbial communities via high-throughput DNA sequencing has revealed that patterns in microbial biogeography affect community structure. However, shifts in functional diversity related to variation in taxonomic composition are poorly understood. To overcome limitations due to the prohibitive cost of high-depth metagenomic sequencing, tools to infer functional diversity based on phylogenetic distributions of functional traits have been developed. In this study we characterized functional microbial diversity at 11 sites along the Mississippi River in Minnesota using both metagenomic sequencing and functional-inference-based (PICRUSt) approaches. This allowed us to determine how distance and variation in land cover throughout the river influenced the distribution of functional traits, as well as to validate PICRUSt inferences. The distribution and abundance of functional traits, by metagenomic analysis, were similar among sites, with a median standard deviation of 0.0002% among tier 3 functions in KEGG. Overall inferred functional variation was significantly different (P ≤ 0.035) between two water basins surrounded by agricultural vs. developed land cover, and abundances of bacterial orders that correlated with functional traits by metagenomic analysis were greater where abundances of the trait were inferred to be higher. PICRUSt inferences were significantly correlated (r = 0.147, P = 1.80 × 10−30) with metagenomic annotations. Discrepancies between metagenomic and PICRUSt taxonomic-functional relationships, however, suggested potential functional redundancy among abundant and rare taxa that impeded the ability to accurately assess unique functional traits among rare taxa at this sequencing depth. Results of this study suggest that a suite of “core functional traits” is conserved throughout the river and distributions of functional traits, rather than specific taxa, may shift in response to environmental

  17. Synthesis of biotin-labelled core glycans of GPI anchors and their application in the study of GPI interaction with pore-forming bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Zhou, Zhifang; Guo, Jiatong; Guo, Zhongwu

    2017-06-06

    A convergent strategy was developed for the first-time synthesis of biotin-labeled GPI core glycans. These GPI conjugates are useful for various biological studies showcased by their application in the scrutiny of pore-forming bacterial toxin-GPI interaction, revealing that the phosphate group at the GPI inositol 1-O-position had a significant impact on GPI-toxin binding.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of bacterial isolates from different floral sources of honey.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungjae; Churey, John J; Worobo, Randy W

    2008-08-15

    More than two thousand bacterial strains isolated from six US domestic honeys and two manuka honeys from New Zealand were screened for production of antimicrobial compounds. A high incidence of antimicrobial inhibition determined by deferred inhibition assays was observed with the bacterial isolates from all eight honey samples. In total, 2217 isolates out of 2398 strains (92.5% of total isolates) exhibited antimicrobial activity against at least one of the tested microorganisms. Antifungal activity by bacterial isolates originating from the eight honeys ranged from 44.4% to 98.0%. Bacterial isolates from manuka honey (MH1) exhibited antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 and Bacillus cereus F4552, at 51.5% and 53.3% of the isolates, respectively. However, less than 30% of the bacterial isolates from the other manuka honey (MH2) and six domestic honey sources exhibited anti-Bacillus activity. Listeria monocytogenes F2-586 1053 showed higher overall rates of sensitivity to between 11 and 66% of the bacterial isolates. The high rate of antimicrobial activity exhibited by the bacterial strains isolated from different honey sources could provide potential sources of novel antimicrobial compounds.

  19. Who Can You Turn to? Tie Activation within Core Business Discussion Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renzulli, Linda A.; Aldrich, Howard

    2005-01-01

    We examine the connection between personal network characteristics and the activation of ties for access to resources during routine times. We focus on factors affecting business owners' use of their core network ties to obtain legal, loan, financial and expert advice. Owners rely more on core business ties when their core networks contain a high…

  20. Who Can You Turn to? Tie Activation within Core Business Discussion Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renzulli, Linda A.; Aldrich, Howard

    2005-01-01

    We examine the connection between personal network characteristics and the activation of ties for access to resources during routine times. We focus on factors affecting business owners' use of their core network ties to obtain legal, loan, financial and expert advice. Owners rely more on core business ties when their core networks contain a high…

  1. Effect of flow and active mixing on bacterial growth in a colon-like geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Jonas; Segota, Igor; Arnoldini, Markus; Groisman, Alex; Hwa, Terence

    The large intestine harbors bacteria from hundreds of species, with bacterial densities reaching up to 1012 cells per gram. Many different factors influence bacterial growth dynamics and thus bacterial density and microbiota composition. One dominant force is flow which can in principle lead to a washout of bacteria from the proximal colon. Active mixing by Contractions of the colonic wall together with bacterial growth might counteract such flow-forces and allow high bacterial densities to occur. As a step towards understanding bacterial growth in the presence of mixing and flow, we constructed an in-vitro setup where controlled wall-deformations of a channel emulate Contractions. We investigate growth along the channel under a steady nutrient inflow. In the limits of no or very frequent Contractions, the device behaves like a plug-flow reactor and a chemostat respectively. Depending on mixing and flow, we observe varying spatial gradients in bacterial density along the channel. Active mixing by deformations of the channel wall is shown to be crucial in maintaining a steady-state bacterial population in the presence of flow. The growth-dynamics is quantitatively captured by a simple mathematical model, with the effect of mixing described by an effective diffusion term.

  2. Predicting Activation of Experiments Inside the Annular Core Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Joseph Isaac

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this thesis is to create a program to quickly estimate the radioactivity and decay of experiments conducted inside of the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories and eliminate the need for users to write code. This is achieved by model the neutron fluxes in the reactor’s central cavity where experiments are conducted for 4 different neutron spectra using MCNP. The desired neutron spectrum, experiment material composition, and reactor power level are then input into CINDER2008 burnup code to obtain activation and decay information for every isotope generated. DREAD creates all of the files required for CINDER2008 through user selected inputs in a graphical user interface and executes the program for the user and displays the resulting estimation for dose rate at various distances. The DREAD program was validated by weighing and measuring various experiments in the different spectra and then collecting dose rate information after they were irradiated and comparing it to the dose rates that DREAD predicted. The program provides results with an average of 17% higher estimates than the actual values and takes seconds to execute.

  3. Computational Design of Strain in Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Optimizing Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Philip; Curtin, W A

    2015-06-10

    Surface strains in core-shell nanoparticles modify catalytic activity. Here, a continuum-based strategy enables accurate surface-strain-based screening and design of core-shell systems using minimal input as a means to enhance catalytic activity. The approach is validated here for Pt shells on Cu(x)Pt(1-x) cores and used to interpret experimental results on the oxygen reduction reaction in the same system. The analysis shows that precise control of particle sizes and shell thicknesses is required to achieve peak activity, rationalizing the limited increases in activity observed in experiments. The method is also applied to core-shell nanorods to demonstrate its wide applicability.

  4. Microbial activity and phylogeny in ice cores retrieved from Lake Paula, a newly detected freshwater lake in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattler, Birgit I.; Waldhuber, Sebastian; Fischer, Helgard; Semmler, Hans; Sipiera, Paul P.; Psenner, Roland

    2004-11-01

    A permanent ice covered water body, called Lake Paula, was detected in Patriot Hills in the West Antarctic and sampled for the first time ever for microbial life. The ice sheet measured approximately 2,5m thickness and the water body has a depth of about 10m. The lake is situated near a moraine which partly ablates from snow and provides meltwater from the slopes to the lake during austral summer. These running waters which are kept liquid by the heating up of the dark soil are penetrating the lower ice cover and thus softening up the lakeside part if the ice core. It is inoculated by nutrients, active microbes and diatoms of terrestrial origin. A distinct gradient concerning bacterial numbers, biomass and production which is 10 fold at the ice-water interface compared to the exposed part is observable. Temperature sensitivity of the embedded microbes reflect the gradient as well: Bacteria isolated from the upper part showed growth optima at 10°C, the lower part at 25°C, phylogenetic properties done by 16s rDNA reveal distinct communities depending on their vertical position, some clones are similar to those retrieved in Lake Vostok ice cores. These results offer the conclusion that even in this harsh environment like the Antarctic continent a dynamic system like microbial ice aggregates can be sustained as long as the supply of liquid water which is essential for an active bacterial metabolism is provided at least for a small time frame.

  5. Bacterial diversity is strongly associated with historical penguin activity in an Antarctic lake sediment profile.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Renbin; Shi, Yu; Ma, Dawei; Wang, Can; Xu, Hua; Chu, Haiyan

    2015-11-25

    Current penguin activity in Antarctica affects the geochemistry of sediments and their microbial communities; the effects of historical penguin activity are less well understood. Here, bacterial diversity in ornithogenic sediment was investigated using high-throughput pyrosequencing. The relative abundances of dominant phyla were controlled by the amount of historical penguin guano deposition. Significant positive correlations were found between both the bacterial richness and diversity, and the relative penguin number (p < 0.01); this indicated that historical penguin activity drove the vertical distribution of the bacterial communities. The lowest relative abundances of individual phyla corresponded to lowest number of penguin population at 1,800-2,300 yr BP during a drier and colder period; the opposite was observed during a moister and warmer climate (1,400-1,800 yr BP). This study shows that changes in the climate over millennia affected penguin populations and the outcomes of these changes affect the sediment bacterial community today.

  6. Sclerotiamide: The First Non-Peptide-Based Natural Product Activator of Bacterial Caseinolytic Protease P.

    PubMed

    Lavey, Nathan P; Coker, Jesse A; Ruben, Eliza A; Duerfeldt, Adam S

    2016-04-22

    Caseinolytic protease P (ClpP) maintains essential roles in bacterial homeostasis. As such, both the inhibition and activation of this enzyme result in bactericidal activity, making ClpP a promising target for antibacterial drug development. Herein, we report the results of a fluorescence-based screen of ∼450 structurally diverse fungal and bacterial secondary metabolites. Sclerotiamide (1), a paraherquamide-related indolinone, was identified as the first non-peptide-based natural product activator of ClpP. Structure-activity relationships arising from the initial screen, preliminary biochemical evaluation of 1, and rationale for the exploitation of this chemotype to develop novel ClpP activators are presented.

  7. Effect of detached/re-suspended solids from sewer sediment on the sewage phase bacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Leung, H D; Chen, G; Sharma, K

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to make an assessment of the effects of the detached/re-suspended solids on the bacterial activity in the sewage phase of a gravity sewer. A physical sewer-model was used to simulate two extreme conditions: sewage flow without the presence of sewer sediment, and filtered sewage flow with the sediment. The first scenario was to evaluate the effect of the settling of solids on the bacterial activity, while the second scenario was to examine the effect of purely re-suspended or detached solids. The water media were aerated to obtain an initial DO level at about 6 mg/L, and the bacterial activity was monitored at a regular time interval during each operation. Two bacterial cell staining techniques, one using 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenyl indole (DAPI), and another using 5-cyano 2, 3-ditoyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC), were employed to measure the amount of total and respiring bacteria, respectively. Both the DAPI and CTC counts decreased with time in the first case, while that increased with time in the second case. The bacterial activity in a sewer phase was observed to be contributed by smaller sized particles. Also, the solids originated from the sewer sediment through re-suspension or detachment demonstrated a higher bacterial activity than the solids originally present in the sewage.

  8. Lysozyme-coated silver nanoparticles for differentiating bacterial strains on the basis of antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lysozyme, an antibacterial enzyme, was used as a stabilizing ligand for the synthesis of fairly uniform silver nanoparticles adopting various strategies. The synthesized particles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, FTIR, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and TEM to observe their morphology and surface chemistry. The silver nanoparticles were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against several bacterial species and various bacterial strains within the same species. The cationic silver nanoparticles were found to be more effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa 3 compared to other bacterial species/strains investigated. Some of the bacterial strains of the same species showed variable antibacterial activity. The difference in antimicrobial activity of these particles has led to the conclusion that antimicrobial products formed from silver nanoparticles may not be equally effective against all the bacteria. This difference in the antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles for different bacterial strains from the same species may be due to the genome islands that are acquired through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). These genome islands are expected to possess some genes that may encode enzymes to resist the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles. These silver nanoparticles may thus also be used to differentiate some bacterial strains within the same species due to variable silver resistance of these variants, which may not possible by simple biochemical tests. PMID:25435831

  9. Bacterial Secretant from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dampens Inflammasome Activation in a Quorum Sensing-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jungmin; Lee, Kang-Mu; Park, Sangjun; Cho, Yoeseph; Lee, Eunju; Park, Jong-Hwan; Shin, Ok Sarah; Son, Junghyun; Yoon, Sang Sun; Yu, Je-Wook

    2017-01-01

    Inflammasome signaling can contribute to host innate immune defense against bacterial pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, bacterial evasion of host inflammasome activation is still poorly elucidated. Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial communication mechanism that promotes coordinated adaptation by triggering expression of a wide range of genes. QS is thought to strongly contribute to the virulence of P. aeruginosa, but the molecular impact of bacterial QS on host inflammasome defense is completely unknown. Here, we present evidence that QS-related factors of the bacterial secretant (BS) from P. aeruginosa can dampen host inflammasome signaling in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. We found that BS from QS-defective ΔlasR/rhlR mutant, but not from wild-type (WT) P. aeruginosa, induces robust activation of the NLRC4 inflammasome. P. aeruginosa-released flagellin mediates this inflammasome activation by ΔlasR/rhlR secretant, but QS-regulated bacterial proteases in the WT BS impair extracellular flagellin to attenuate NLRC4 inflammasome activation. P. aeruginosa-secreted proteases also degrade inflammasome components in the extracellular space to inhibit the propagation of inflammasome-mediated responses. Furthermore, QS-regulated virulence factor pyocyanin and QS autoinducer 3-oxo-C12-homoserine lactone directly suppressed NLRC4- and even NLRP3-mediated inflammasome assembly and activation. Taken together, our data indicate that QS system of P. aeruginosa facilitates bacteria to evade host inflammasome-dependent sensing machinery. PMID:28396663

  10. Lysozyme-coated silver nanoparticles for differentiating bacterial strains on the basis of antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, Sumaira; Chatha, Mariyam Asghar; Ejaz, Wardah; Janjua, Hussnain Ahmed; Hussain, Irshad

    2014-10-01

    Lysozyme, an antibacterial enzyme, was used as a stabilizing ligand for the synthesis of fairly uniform silver nanoparticles adopting various strategies. The synthesized particles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, FTIR, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and TEM to observe their morphology and surface chemistry. The silver nanoparticles were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against several bacterial species and various bacterial strains within the same species. The cationic silver nanoparticles were found to be more effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa 3 compared to other bacterial species/strains investigated. Some of the bacterial strains of the same species showed variable antibacterial activity. The difference in antimicrobial activity of these particles has led to the conclusion that antimicrobial products formed from silver nanoparticles may not be equally effective against all the bacteria. This difference in the antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles for different bacterial strains from the same species may be due to the genome islands that are acquired through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). These genome islands are expected to possess some genes that may encode enzymes to resist the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles. These silver nanoparticles may thus also be used to differentiate some bacterial strains within the same species due to variable silver resistance of these variants, which may not possible by simple biochemical tests.

  11. Bacterial Proteasome Activator Bpa (Rv3780) Is a Novel Ring-Shaped Interactor of the Mycobacterial Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Delley, Cyrille L.; Laederach, Juerg; Ziemski, Michal; Bolten, Marcel; Boehringer, Daniel; Weber-Ban, Eilika

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of the proteasome in bacteria is limited to the phylum of actinobacteria, where it is maintained in parallel to the usual bacterial compartmentalizing proteases. The role it plays in these organisms is still not fully understood, but in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) the proteasome supports persistence in the host. In complex with the ring-shaped ATPase Mpa (called ARC in other actinobacteria), the proteasome can degrade proteins that have been post-translationally modified with the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup. Unlike for the eukaryotic proteasome core particle, no other bacterial proteasome interactors have been identified to date. Here we describe and characterize a novel bacterial proteasome activator of Mycobacterium tuberculosis we termed Bpa (Rv3780), using a combination of biochemical and biophysical methods. Bpa features a canonical C-terminal proteasome interaction motif referred to as the HbYX motif, and its orthologs are only found in those actinobacteria encoding the proteasomal subunits. Bpa can inhibit degradation of Pup-tagged substrates in vitro by competing with Mpa for association with the proteasome. Using negative-stain electron microscopy, we show that Bpa forms a ring-shaped homooligomer that can bind coaxially to the face of the proteasome cylinder. Interestingly, Bpa can stimulate the proteasomal degradation of the model substrate β-casein, which suggests it could play a role in the removal of non-native or damaged proteins. PMID:25469515

  12. Characterization of CCN and IN activity of bacterial isolates collected in Atlanta, GA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdue, Sara; Waters, Samantha; Karthikeyan, Smruthi; Konstantinidis, Kostas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Characterization of CCN activity of bacteria, other than a few select types such as Pseudomonas syringae, is limited, especially when looked at in conjunction with corresponding IN activity. The link between these two points is especially important for bacteria as those that have high CCN activity are likely to form an aqueous phase required for immersion freezing. Given the high ice nucleation temperature of bacterial cells, especially in immersion mode, it is important to characterize the CCN and IN activity of many different bacterial strains. To this effect, we developed a droplet freezing assay (DFA) which consists of an aluminum cold plate, cooled by a continuous flow of an ethylene glycol-water mixture, in order to observe immersion freezing of the collected bacteria. Here, we present the initial results on the CCN and IN activities of bacterial samples we have collected in Atlanta, GA. Bacterial strains were collected and isolated from rainwater samples taken from different storms throughout the year. We then characterized the CCN activity of each strain using a DMT Continuous Flow Streamwise Thermal Gradient CCN Counter by exposing the aerosolized bacteria to supersaturations ranging from 0.05% to 0.6%. Additionally, using our new DFA, we characterized the IN activity of each bacterial strain at temperatures ranging from -20oC to 0oC. The combined CCN and IN activity gives us valuable information on how some uncharacterized bacteria contribute to warm and mixed-phase cloud formation in the atmosphere.

  13. Single-domain intrabodies against hepatitis C virus core inhibit viral propagation and core-induced NFκB activation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryosuke; Saito, Kenji; Matsuda, Mami; Sato, Mitsuru; Kanegae, Yumi; Shi, Guoli; Watashi, Koichi; Aizaki, Hideki; Chiba, Joe; Saito, Izumu; Wakita, Takaji; Suzuki, Tetsuro

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core plays a key role in viral particle formation and is involved in viral pathogenesis. Here, constructs for single-domain intrabodies consisting of variable regions derived from mouse mAbs against HCV core were established. Expressed single-domain intrabodies were shown to bind to HCV core, and inhibit the growth of cell culture-produced HCV derived from JFH-1 (genotype 2a) and a TH (genotype 1b)/JFH-1 chimera. Adenovirus vectors expressing intrabodies were also capable of reducing HCV propagation. Intrabody expression did not affect viral entry or genome replication of single-round infectious trans-complemented HCV particles. However, intrabody expression reduced intracellular and extracellular infectious titres in CD81-defective Huh7-25 cells transfected with the HCV genome, suggesting that these intrabodies impair HCV assembly. Furthermore, intrabody expression suppressed HCV core-induced NFκB promoter activity. These intrabodies may therefore serve as tools for elucidating the role of core in HCV pathogenesis.

  14. The effects of therapeutic hip exercise with abdominal core activation on recruitment of the hip muscles.

    PubMed

    Chan, Mandy Ky; Chow, Ka Wai; Lai, Alfred Ys; Mak, Noble Kc; Sze, Jason Ch; Tsang, Sharon Mh

    2017-07-21

    Core stabilization has been utilized for rehabilitation and prevention of lower limb musculoskeletal injuries. Previous studies showed that activation of the abdominal core muscles enhanced the hip muscle activity in hip extension and abduction exercises. However, the lack of the direct measurement and quantification of the activation level of the abdominal core muscles during the execution of the hip exercises affect the level of evidence to substantiate the proposed application of core exercises to promote training and rehabilitation outcome of the hip region. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of abdominal core activation, which is monitored directly by surface electromyography (EMG), on hip muscle activation while performing different hip exercises, and to explore whether participant characteristics such as gender, physical activity level and contractile properties of muscles, which is assessed by tensiomyography (TMG), have confounding effect to the activation of hip muscles in enhanced core condition. Surface EMG of bilateral internal obliques (IO), upper gluteus maximus (UGMax), lower gluteus maximus (LGMax), gluteus medius (GMed) and biceps femoris (BF) of dominant leg was recorded in 20 young healthy subjects while performing 3 hip exercises: Clam, side-lying hip abduction (HABD), and prone hip extension (PHE) in 2 conditions: natural core activation (NC) and enhanced core activation (CO). EMG signals normalized to percentage of maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) were compared between two core conditions with the threshold of the enhanced abdominal core condition defined as >20%MVIC of IO. Enhanced abdominal core activation has significantly promoted the activation level of GMed in all phases of clam exercise (P < 0.05), and UGMax in all phases of PHE exercise (P < 0.05), LGMax in eccentric phases of all 3 exercises (P < 0.05), and BF in all phases of all 3 exercises except the eccentric phase of PHE exercise (P

  15. Electro-active hybrid actuators based on freeze-dried bacterial cellulose and PEDOT:PSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Si-Seup; Jeon, Jin-Han; Kee, Chang-Doo; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2013-08-01

    We report a high-performance electro-active hybrid actuator based on freeze-dried bacterial cellulose and conducting polymer electrodes. The freeze-dried bacterial cellulose, which has a sponge form, can absorb a much greater amount of ionic liquid, which is a prerequisite for dry-type and high-performance electro-active polymers. In addition, the poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) conducting layers are deposited on the top and bottom surfaces of the freeze-dried bacterial cellulose using a simple dipping and drying method. The results show that the freeze-dried bacterial cellulose actuator with conducting polymer electrodes has a much larger tip displacement under electrical stimuli than pure bacterial cellulose actuators with metallic electrodes. The large bending displacement of the freeze-dried bacterial cellulose actuator under low input voltage is due to the synergistic effects of the ion migration of the dissociated ionic liquids inside the bacterial cellulose and the electrochemical doping processes of the PEDOT:PSS electrode layers.

  16. In Vitro Characterization and Concerted Function of Three Core Enzymes of a Glycyl Radical Enzyme - Associated Bacterial Microcompartment

    PubMed Central

    Zarzycki, Jan; Sutter, Markus; Cortina, Niña Socorro; Erb, Tobias J.; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2017-01-01

    Many bacteria encode proteinaceous bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) that encapsulate sequential enzymatic reactions of diverse metabolic pathways. Well-characterized BMCs include carboxysomes for CO2-fixation, and propanediol- and ethanolamine-utilizing microcompartments that contain B12-dependent enzymes. Genes required to form BMCs are typically organized in gene clusters, which promoted their distribution across phyla by horizontal gene transfer. Recently, BMCs associated with glycyl radical enzymes (GREs) were discovered; these are widespread and comprise at least three functionally distinct types. Previously, we predicted one type of these GRE-associated microcompartments (GRMs) represents a B12-independent propanediol-utilizing BMC. Here we functionally and structurally characterize enzymes of the GRM of Rhodopseudomonas palustris BisB18 and demonstrate their concerted function in vitro. The GRM signature enzyme, the GRE, is a dedicated 1,2-propanediol dehydratase with a new type of intramolecular encapsulation peptide. It forms a complex with its activating enzyme and, in conjunction with an aldehyde dehydrogenase, converts 1,2-propanediol to propionyl-CoA. Notably, homologous GRMs are also encoded in pathogenic Escherichia coli strains. Our high-resolution crystal structures of the aldehyde dehydrogenase lead to a revised reaction mechanism. The successful in vitro reconstitution of a part of the GRM metabolism provides insights into the metabolic function and steps in the assembly of this BMC. PMID:28202954

  17. Genetic Screening for Bacterial Mutants in Liquid Growth Media By Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Abuaita, Basel H.; Withey, Jeffrey H.

    2010-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens have defined in vitro virulence inducing conditions in liquid media which lead to production of virulence factors important during an infection. Identifying mutants that no longer respond to virulence inducing conditions will increase our understanding of bacterial pathogenesis. However, traditional genetic screens require growth on solid media. Bacteria in a single colony are in every phase of the growth curve, which complicates the analysis and make screens for growth phase-specific mutants problematic. Here, we utilize fluorescence-activated cell sorting in conjunction with random transposon mutagenesis to isolate bacteria grown in liquid media that are defective in virulence activation. This method permits analysis of an entire bacterial population in real time and selection of individual bacterial mutants with the desired gene expression profile at any time point after induction. We have used this method to identify Vibrio cholerae mutants defective in virulence induction. PMID:21094189

  18. Bacterial vaginosis presence in sexually active women in Tuzla Canton area.

    PubMed

    Numanović, Fatima; Hukić, Mirsada; Gegić, Merima; Nukić, Mahmud; Delibegović, Zineta; Pasić, Selma; Cicko, Elsada

    2008-11-01

    The goal of our research was to determine the presence of bacterial vaginosis in sexually active women in Tuzla Canton area. Diagnosis determination for bacterial vaginosis was conducted on the basis of three out of four internationally accepted criteria according to Amsel and isolation and identification of Gardnerella vaginalis (G. vaginalis) by standard microbiological procedures. Bacterial vaginosis was diagnosed in 20,5 % (41/200) women who asked for gynaecologist's help due to their personal discomfort, since significantly higher percentage of diagnosed bacterial vaginosis of 48,80% (41/84) was determined in women with personal discomfort typical for this disease. All relevant factors, according to available literature, for genesis of bacterial vaginosis were processed in this research. In respect to the obtained outputs, bacterial vaginosis is significantly more frequent occurrence in women who are not married, since the number of sexual partners, the time of the first sexual intercourse, the use of intrauterine contraceptive device and smoking do not cause the genesis of bacterial vaginosis. According to Nugent, an increased vaginal discharge with unpleasant odour after sexual discourse, its pH>4,5, a positive amino odour test, an occurrence of clue cells in a direct microscopic concoction of vaginal discharge and assessment of the state of vaginal flora for bacterial vaginosis are significantly more frequent occurrences in women with individual discomforts. It was proved that G. vaginalis is a dominant micro organism in 95% of women with clinical signs of vaginosis although it was isolated from vaginal discharge in 40 to 50% of healthy women. In our research, G. vaginalis was isolated in 63,41% of examined women with all signs of bacterial vaginosis, in 36,59% of examined women with one or more clinical signs of bacterial vaginosis and in 2,58% of examined women of control group without clinical signs.

  19. Interactive effects of solar radiation and dissolved organic matter on bacterial activity and community structure

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, María Teresa; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2007-01-01

    We studied the interactive effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and solar radiation on the activity and community structure of bacteria from an alpine lake. Activity was assessed both at the community level as leucine incorporation rates and at the single-cell level by microautoradiography. Fluorescent in situ hybridization and signal amplification by catalysed reporter deposition (CARD-FISH) was used to track changes in the bacterial community composition. Bacteria-free filtrates of different DOM sources (lake, algae or soil) were incubated either in the dark or exposed to solar radiation. Afterwards, the natural bacterial assemblage was inoculated and the cultures incubated in the dark for 24–48 h. Bacterial activity was enhanced in the first 24 h in the soil and algal DOM amendments kept in the dark. After 48 h, the enhancement effect was greatly reduced. The initial bacterial community was dominated by Betaproteobacteria followed by Actinobacteria. The relative abundance (expressed as a percentage of DAPI-stained cells) of Betaproteobacteria increased first in dark incubated DOM amendments, but after 48 h no significant differences were detected among treatments. In contrast, the relative abundance of Actinobacteria increased in pre-irradiated DOM treatments. Although Betaproteobacteria dominated at the end of the experiment, the relative abundance of their R-BT subgroup differed among treatments. Changes in bacterial community activity were significantly correlated with those of the relative abundance and activity of Betaproteobacteria, whereas the contribution of Actinobacteria to the bulk activity was very modest. Our results indicate a negative effect of DOM photoalteration on the bulk bacterial activity. The magnitude of this effect was time-dependent and related to rapid changes in the bacterial assemblage composition. PMID:17686018

  20. Regulation of bacterial metabolic activity by dissolved organic carbon and viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jie; Jing, Hongmei; Sun, Mingming; Harrison, Paul J.; Liu, Hongbin

    2013-12-01

    regulation of bacterial metabolic activity by viruses and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was examined using natural microbial communities in three treatments (active viruses, inactive viruses, and virus free) at two contrasting coastal sites (pristine vs. eutrophic) with substantial differences in environmental conditions during the wet and dry seasons. Our results showed that net growth rates and production of bacterioplankton were reduced primarily by viruses via repressing metabolically active bacteria with high nucleic acid (HNA) content which had a high capacity for incorporating carbon, while bacterial respiration was primarily regulated by DOC lability. The quality of organic matter played a more important role in regulating bacterial growth efficiency (BGE) than the supply of organic matter in eutrophic coastal waters. The lack of HMW-DOC and high carbon demand in the virus-free treatment resulted in a significant increase in cell-specific bacterial respiration, which was responsible for the lowest bacterial growth efficiency among the three treatments. The presence of viruses did not necessarily lower bacterial growth efficiency since virus-induced mortality alleviated bacterial carbon demand and enhanced carbon cycling. Virus-induced mortality was greater in relatively pristine waters than eutrophic waters, likely since the high supply of substrates alleviated the pressure of viral infection, through extracellular proteases produced by bacteria, which might result in the hydrolytic destruction or modification of viral capsids. An important implication of our results was that the input of riverine DOC and nutrients improved bacterial metabolic activity by alleviating virus-induced mortality of bacteria in estuarine and coastal waters.

  1. Distinct summer and winter bacterial communities in the active layer of Svalbard permafrost revealed by DNA- and RNA-based analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Schostag, Morten; Stibal, Marek; Jacobsen, Carsten S.; Bælum, Jacob; Taş, Neslihan; Elberling, Bo; Jansson, Janet K.; Semenchuk, Philipp; Priemé, Anders

    2015-04-30

    The active layer of soil overlaying permafrost in the Arctic is subjected to dramatic annual changes in temperature and soil chemistry, which likely affect bacterial activity and community structure. We studied seasonal variations in the bacterial community of active layer soil from Svalbard (78°N) by co-extracting DNA and RNA from 12 soil cores collected monthly over a year. PCR amplicons of 16S rRNA genes (DNA) and reverse transcribed transcripts (cDNA) were quantified and sequenced to test for the effect of low winter temperature and seasonal variation in concentration of easily degradable organic matter on the bacterial communities. The copy number of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts revealed no distinct seasonal changes indicating potential bacterial activity during winter despite soil temperatures well below -10°C. Multivariate statistical analysis of the bacterial diversity data (DNA and cDNA libraries) revealed a season-based clustering of the samples, and, e.g., the relative abundance of potentially active Cyanobacteria peaked in June and Alphaproteobacteria increased over the summer and then declined from October to November. The structure of the bulk (DNA-based) community was significantly correlated with pH and dissolved organic carbon, while the potentially active (RNA-based) community structure was not significantly correlated with any of the measured soil parameters. A large fraction of the 16S rRNA transcripts was assigned to nitrogen-fixing bacteria (up to 24% in June) and phototrophic organisms (up to 48% in June) illustrating the potential importance of nitrogen fixation in otherwise nitrogen poor Arctic ecosystems and of phototrophic bacterial activity on the soil surface.

  2. Distinct summer and winter bacterial communities in the active layer of Svalbard permafrost revealed by DNA- and RNA-based analyses

    DOE PAGES

    Schostag, Morten; Stibal, Marek; Jacobsen, Carsten S.; ...

    2015-04-30

    The active layer of soil overlaying permafrost in the Arctic is subjected to dramatic annual changes in temperature and soil chemistry, which likely affect bacterial activity and community structure. We studied seasonal variations in the bacterial community of active layer soil from Svalbard (78°N) by co-extracting DNA and RNA from 12 soil cores collected monthly over a year. PCR amplicons of 16S rRNA genes (DNA) and reverse transcribed transcripts (cDNA) were quantified and sequenced to test for the effect of low winter temperature and seasonal variation in concentration of easily degradable organic matter on the bacterial communities. The copy numbermore » of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts revealed no distinct seasonal changes indicating potential bacterial activity during winter despite soil temperatures well below -10°C. Multivariate statistical analysis of the bacterial diversity data (DNA and cDNA libraries) revealed a season-based clustering of the samples, and, e.g., the relative abundance of potentially active Cyanobacteria peaked in June and Alphaproteobacteria increased over the summer and then declined from October to November. The structure of the bulk (DNA-based) community was significantly correlated with pH and dissolved organic carbon, while the potentially active (RNA-based) community structure was not significantly correlated with any of the measured soil parameters. A large fraction of the 16S rRNA transcripts was assigned to nitrogen-fixing bacteria (up to 24% in June) and phototrophic organisms (up to 48% in June) illustrating the potential importance of nitrogen fixation in otherwise nitrogen poor Arctic ecosystems and of phototrophic bacterial activity on the soil surface.« less

  3. Distinct summer and winter bacterial communities in the active layer of Svalbard permafrost revealed by DNA- and RNA-based analyses

    PubMed Central

    Schostag, Morten; Stibal, Marek; Jacobsen, Carsten S.; Bælum, Jacob; Taş, Neslihan; Elberling, Bo; Jansson, Janet K.; Semenchuk, Philipp; Priemé, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The active layer of soil overlaying permafrost in the Arctic is subjected to dramatic annual changes in temperature and soil chemistry, which likely affect bacterial activity and community structure. We studied seasonal variations in the bacterial community of active layer soil from Svalbard (78°N) by co-extracting DNA and RNA from 12 soil cores collected monthly over a year. PCR amplicons of 16S rRNA genes (DNA) and reverse transcribed transcripts (cDNA) were quantified and sequenced to test for the effect of low winter temperature and seasonal variation in concentration of easily degradable organic matter on the bacterial communities. The copy number of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts revealed no distinct seasonal changes indicating potential bacterial activity during winter despite soil temperatures well below −10°C. Multivariate statistical analysis of the bacterial diversity data (DNA and cDNA libraries) revealed a season-based clustering of the samples, and, e.g., the relative abundance of potentially active Cyanobacteria peaked in June and Alphaproteobacteria increased over the summer and then declined from October to November. The structure of the bulk (DNA-based) community was significantly correlated with pH and dissolved organic carbon, while the potentially active (RNA-based) community structure was not significantly correlated with any of the measured soil parameters. A large fraction of the 16S rRNA transcripts was assigned to nitrogen-fixing bacteria (up to 24% in June) and phototrophic organisms (up to 48% in June) illustrating the potential importance of nitrogen fixation in otherwise nitrogen poor Arctic ecosystems and of phototrophic bacterial activity on the soil surface. PMID:25983731

  4. A method for isolating RNA from metabolically active bacterial flora associated with octopus.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz-Leyva, M C; Zamudio-Maya, M; Corona-Cruz, A I; González-de la Cruz, J U; Rojas-Herrera, R

    2011-07-01

    Development of a method for the isolation and purification of metagenomic RNA (mgRNA) from the ectopic bacterial flora of octopus. Modifications were made to the methods of Valenzuela-Avendaño et al. (Plant Mol Biol Rep, 2005, 23, 199a) and Chomczynski and Sacchi (Anal Biochem, 1987, 162, 156) to develop a protocol based on chemical lysis with Trizol. This proposed protocol effectively isolated mgRNA. The resulting bacterial RNA transcripts were amplified with universal primers directed to the hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene by complementary DNA synthesis. Protocol efficacy in the study of metabolically active bacterial flora was proven using DGGE, which produced a banding pattern that recovered sequences mainly related to the Vibrionaceae family. The analysed samples were clearly complex, and the proposed protocol was proven to effectively isolate mgRNA from the metabolically active bacterial flora associated with octopus. This is the first protocol proposed for the isolation of bacterial mgRNA that allows identification and study of metabolically active bacterial flora associated with octopus. This is an important step forward in understanding and controlling the microbial community of this economically important fishery resource, aimed at detecting its potentially pathogenic bacteria. © 2011 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Bacterial diversity and active biomass in full-scale granular activated carbon filters operated at low water temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kaarela, Outi E; Härkki, Heli A; Palmroth, Marja R T; Tuhkanen, Tuula A

    2015-01-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration enhances the removal of natural organic matter and micropollutants in drinking water treatment. Microbial communities in GAC filters contribute to the removal of the biodegradable part of organic matter, and thus help to control microbial regrowth in the distribution system. Our objectives were to investigate bacterial community dynamics, identify the major bacterial groups, and determine the concentration of active bacterial biomass in full-scale GAC filters treating cold (3.7-9.5°C), physicochemically pretreated, and ozonated lake water. Three sampling rounds were conducted to study six GAC filters of different operation times and flow modes in winter, spring, and summer. Total organic carbon results indicated that both the first-step and second-step filters contributed to the removal of organic matter. Length heterogeneity analysis of amplified 16S rRNA genes illustrated that bacterial communities were diverse and considerably stable over time. α-Proteobacteria, β-Proteobacteria, and Nitrospira dominated in all of the GAC filters, although the relative proportion of dominant phylogenetic groups in individual filters differed. The active bacterial biomass accumulation, measured as adenosine triphosphate, was limited due to low temperature, low flux of nutrients, and frequent backwashing. The concentration of active bacterial biomass was not affected by the moderate seasonal temperature variation. In summary, the results provided an insight into the biological component of GAC filtration in cold water temperatures and the operational parameters affecting it.

  6. Analysis of bacterial core communities in the central Baltic by comparative RNA-DNA-based fingerprinting provides links to structure-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Brettar, Ingrid; Christen, Richard; Höfle, Manfred G

    2012-01-01

    Understanding structure-function links of microbial communities is a central theme of microbial ecology since its beginning. To this end, we studied the spatial variability of the bacterioplankton community structure and composition across the central Baltic Sea at four stations, which were up to 450 km apart and at a depth profile representative for the central part (Gotland Deep, 235 m). Bacterial community structure was followed by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)- and 16S rRNA gene-based fingerprints using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) electrophoresis. Species composition was determined by sequence analysis of SSCP bands. High similarities of the bacterioplankton communities across several hundred kilometers were observed in the surface water using RNA- and DNA-based fingerprints. In these surface communities, the RNA- and DNA-based fingerprints resulted in very different pattern, presumably indicating large difference between the active members of the community as represented by RNA-based fingerprints and the present members represented by the DNA-based fingerprints. This large discrepancy changed gradually over depth, resulting in highly similar RNA- and DNA-based fingerprints in the anoxic part of the water column below 130 m depth. A conceivable mechanism explaining this high similarity could be the reduced oxidative stress in the anoxic zone. The stable communities on the surface and in the anoxic zone indicate the strong influence of the hydrography on the bacterioplankton community structure. Comparative analysis of RNA- and DNA-based community structure provided criteria for the identification of the core community, its key members and their links to biogeochemical functions.

  7. Bacterial pathogens activate plasminogen to breach tissue barriers and escape from innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Peetermans, Marijke; Vanassche, Thomas; Liesenborghs, Laurens; Lijnen, Roger H; Verhamme, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Both coagulation and fibrinolysis are tightly connected with the innate immune system. Infection and inflammation cause profound alterations in the otherwise well-controlled balance between coagulation and fibrinolysis. Many pathogenic bacteria directly exploit the host's hemostatic system to increase their virulence. Here, we review the capacity of bacteria to activate plasminogen. The resulting proteolytic activity allows them to breach tissue barriers and evade innate immune defense, thus promoting bacterial spreading. Yersinia pestis, streptococci of group A, C and G and Staphylococcus aureus produce a specific bacterial plasminogen activator. Moreover, surface plasminogen receptors play an established role in pneumococcal, borrelial and group B streptococcal infections. This review summarizes the mechanisms of bacterial activation of host plasminogen and the role of the fibrinolytic system in infections caused by these pathogens.

  8. Core promoter specificities of the Sp1 and VP16 transcriptional activation domains.

    PubMed Central

    Emami, K H; Navarre, W W; Smale, S T

    1995-01-01

    The core promoter compositions of mammalian protein-coding genes are highly variable; some contain TATA boxes, some contain initiator (Inr) elements, and others contain both or neither of these basal elements. The underlying reason for this heterogeneity remains a mystery, as recent studies have suggested that TATA-containing and Inr-containing core promoters direct transcription initiation by similar mechanisms and respond similarly to a wide variety of upstream activators. To analyze in greater detail the influence of core promoter structure on transcriptional activation, we compared activation by GAL4-VP16 and Sp1 through synthetic core promoters containing a TATA box, an Inr, or both TATA and Inr. Striking differences were found between the two activators, most notably in the relative strengths of the TATA/Inr and Inr core promoters: the TATA/Inr promoter was much stronger than the Inr promoter when transcription was activated by GAL4-VP16, but the strengths of the two promoters were more comparable when transcription was activated by Sp1. To define the domains of Sp1 responsible for efficient activation through an Inr, several Sp1 deletion mutants were tested as GAL4 fusion proteins. The results reveal that the glutamine-rich activation domains, which previously were found to interact with Drosophila TAF110, preferentially stimulate Inr-containing core promoters. In contrast, efficient activation through TATA appears to require additional domains of Sp1. These results demonstrate that activation domains differ in their abilities to function with specific core promoters, suggesting that the core promoter structure found in a given gene may reflect a preference of the regulators of that gene. Furthermore, the core promoter preference of an activation domain may be related to a specific mechanism of action, which may provide a functional criterion for grouping activation domains into distinct classes. PMID:7565743

  9. HCV core protein induces hepatic lipid accumulation by activating SREBP1 and PPAR{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kook Hwan; Hong, Sung Pyo; Kim, KyeongJin; Park, Min Jung; Kim, Kwang Jin; Cheong, JaeHun . E-mail: molecule85@pusan.ac.kr

    2007-04-20

    Hepatic steatosis is a common feature in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. HCV core protein plays an important role in the development of hepatic steatosis in HCV infection. Because SREBP1 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 1) and PPAR{gamma} (peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor {gamma}) are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism of hepatocyte, we sought to determine whether HCV core protein may impair the expression and activity of SREBP1 and PPAR{gamma}. In this study, it was demonstrated that HCV core protein increases the gene expression of SREBP1 not only in Chang liver, Huh7, and HepG2 cells transiently transfected with HCV core protein expression plasmid, but also in Chang liver-core stable cells. Furthermore, HCV core protein enhanced the transcriptional activity of SREBP1. In addition, HCV core protein elevated PPAR{gamma} transcriptional activity. However, HCV core protein had no effect on PPAR{gamma} gene expression. Finally, we showed that HCV core protein stimulates the genes expression of lipogenic enzyme and fatty acid uptake associated protein. Therefore, our finding provides a new insight into the mechanism of hepatic steatosis by HCV infection.

  10. Core temperature and heart rate response to repeated bouts of firefighting activities.

    PubMed

    Horn, Gavin P; Blevins, Sue; Fernhall, Bo; Smith, Denise L

    2013-01-01

    During live-fire firefighting operations and training evolutions, firefighters often consume multiple cylinders of air and continue to wear their personal protective equipment even after fire suppression activities have ceased. However, most studies have only reported core temperature changes during short-term firefighting activities and have shown a very modest increase in core temperature. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to evaluate core temperature and heart rate (HR) during repeated bouts of firefighting activity over ∼3 h. The results of this study show that core temperatures increase by an average of 1.9°C--to a larger magnitude than previously reported--and continue to increase during subsequent work cycles (38.4 vs. 38.7) even after long breaks of more than 30 min. The rate of core temperature increase during work continues to increase later in the training exercise (from 0.036 to 0.048°C/min), increasing the risk for exertional heat stress particularly if long-duration firefighting activity is required at these later times. To date, core temperature and HR changes during firefighting have been reported for short-term studies, which may significantly underestimate the physiological burden of typical firefighting activities. Firefighter core temperatures are shown to increase to a larger magnitude than previously observed and the rate of rise in core temperature increases during subsequent firefighting activities.

  11. Determination of the neutron activation profile of core drill samples by gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gurau, D; Boden, S; Sima, O; Stanga, D

    2017-08-04

    This paper provides guidance for determining the neutron activation profile of core drill samples taken from the biological shield of nuclear reactors using gamma spectrometry measurements. Thus, it provides guidance for selecting a model of the right form to fit data and using least squares methods for model fitting. The activity profiles of two core samples taken from the biological shield of a nuclear reactor were determined. The effective activation depth and the total activity of core samples along with their uncertainties were computed by Monte Carlo simulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Potential bacterial core species associated with digital dermatitis in cattle herds identified by molecular profiling of interdigital skin samples.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Martin W; Strube, Mikael L; Isbrand, Anastasia; Al-Medrasi, Worood D H M; Boye, Mette; Jensen, Tim K; Klitgaard, Kirstine

    2016-04-15

    Although treponemes are consistently identified in tissue from bovine digital dermatitis (DD) lesions, the definitive etiology of this debilitating polymicrobial disease is still unresolved. To study the microbiomes of 27 DD-infected and 10 healthy interdigital skin samples, we used a combination of different molecular methods. Deep sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene variable regions V1-V2 showed that Treponema, Mycoplasma, Fusobacterium and Porphyromonas were the genera best differentiating the DD samples from the controls. Additional deep sequencing analysis of the most abundant genus, Treponema, targeting another variable region of the 16S rRNA gene, V3-V4, identified 15 different phylotypes, among which Treponema phagedenis-like and Treponema refringens-like species were the most abundant. Although the presence of Treponema spp., Fusobacterium necrophorum and Porphyromonas levii was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the results for Mycoplasma spp. were inconclusive. Extensive treponemal epidermal infiltration, constituting more than 90% of the total bacterial population, was observed in 24 of the 27 DD samples. F. necrophorum and P. levii were superficially located in the epidermal lesions and were present in only a subset of samples. RT-qPCR analysis showed that treponemes were also actively expressing a panel of virulence factors at the site of infection. Our results further support the hypothesis that species belonging to the genus Treponema are major pathogens of DD and also provide sufficient clues to motivate additional research into the role of M. fermentans, F. necrophorum and P. levii in the etiology of DD. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hyperforin Exhibits Antigenotoxic Activity on Human and Bacterial Cells.

    PubMed

    Imreova, Petronela; Feruszova, Jana; Kyzek, Stanislav; Bodnarova, Kristina; Zduriencikova, Martina; Kozics, Katarina; Mucaji, Pavel; Galova, Eliska; Sevcovicova, Andrea; Miadokova, Eva; Chalupa, Ivan

    2017-01-21

    Hyperforin (HF), a substance that accumulates in the leaves and flowers of Hypericum perforatum L. (St. John's wort), consists of a phloroglucinol skeleton with lipophilic isoprene chains. HF exhibits several medicinal properties and is mainly used as an antidepressant. So far, the antigenotoxicity of HF has not been investigated at the level of primary genetic damage, gene mutations, and chromosome aberrations, simultaneously. The present work is designed to investigate the potential antigenotoxic effects of HF using three different experimental test systems. The antigenotoxic effect of HF leading to the decrease of primary/transient promutagenic genetic changes was detected by the alkaline comet assay on human lymphocytes. The HF antimutagenic effect leading to the reduction of gene mutations was assessed using the Ames test on the standard Salmonella typhimurium (TA97, TA98, and TA100) bacterial strains, and the anticlastogenic effect of HF leading to the reduction of chromosome aberrations was evaluated by the in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test on the human tumor cell line HepG2 and the non-carcinogenic cell line VH10. Our findings provided evidence that HF showed antigenotoxic effects towards oxidative mutagen zeocin in the comet assay and diagnostic mutagen (4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide) in the Ames test. Moreover, HF exhibited an anticlastogenic effect towards benzo(a)pyrene and cisplatin in the chromosome aberration test.

  14. Colorimetric enumeration of bacterial contamination in water based on β-galactosidase gold nanoshell activity.

    PubMed

    Tanvir, Fouzia; Yaqub, Atif; Tanvir, Shazia; Anderson, William A

    2017-04-01

    In this study we report a method for the rapid and sensitive estimation of bacterial cell concentration in solution based on a colorimetric enzyme/gold nanoshells conjugate system. The CTAB capped gold nanoshells are electrostatically attracted by both the bacterial surface and the enzyme β-galactosidase. The preferential binding of cationic (CTAB)-functionalized gold nanoshells to the more negative bacterial surfaces leaves active β-galactosidase in solution, providing an enzyme-amplified colorimetric response of the binding event. A progressive increase in the enzyme activity is evidenced by the conversion of the yellow-orange CPRG substrate into the red chromophore chlorophenol red, which can be correlated with increasing bacterial cell numbers. Using this strategy, the quantification of bacteria at concentrations as low as 10 bacteria/mL of solution has been achieved. The present method of bacterial cell load assessment offers a distinct potential advantage over other conventional methods such as plate counting in terms of ease of operation, rapidity, high sensitivity and quantitative detection of bacterial cells.

  15. The bacterial cytoplasm has glass-like properties and is fluidized by metabolic activity

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Bradley R.; Surovtsev, Ivan V.; Cabeen, Matthew T.; O’Hern, Corey S.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The physical nature of the bacterial cytoplasm is poorly understood even though it determines cytoplasmic dynamics and hence cellular physiology and behavior. Through single-particle tracking of protein filaments, plasmids, storage granules and foreign particles of different sizes, we find that the bacterial cytoplasm displays properties characteristic of glass-forming liquids and changes from liquid-like to solid-like in a component size-dependent fashion. As a result, the motion of cytoplasmic components becomes disproportionally constrained with increasing size. Remarkably, cellular metabolism fluidizes the cytoplasm, allowing larger components to escape their local environment and explore larger regions of the cytoplasm. Consequently, cytoplasmic fluidity and dynamics dramatically change as cells shift between metabolically active and dormant states in response to fluctuating environments. Our findings provide insight into bacterial dormancy and have broad implications to our understanding of bacterial physiology as the glassy behavior of the cytoplasm impacts all intracellular processes involving large components. PMID:24361104

  16. Bacterial Infection of Fly Ovaries Reduces Egg Production and Induces Local Hemocyte Activation

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Stephanie M.; Schneider, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Morbidity, the state of being diseased, is an important aspect of pathogenesis that has gone relatively unstudied in fruit flies. Our interest is in characterizing how bacterial pathogenesis affects various physiologies of the fly. We chose to examine the fly ovary because we found bacterial infection had a striking effect on fly reproduction. We observed decreased egg laying after bacterial infection that correlated with increased bacterial virulence. We also found that bacteria colonized the ovary in a previously undescribed manner; bacteria were found in the posterior of the ovary, adjacent to the lateral oviduct. This local infection in the ovary resulted in melanization and activation of the cellular immune response at the site of infection. PMID:17400292

  17. Active viscoelastic matter: from bacterial drag reduction to turbulent solids.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, E J; Maitra, A; Banerjee, S; Marchetti, M C; Ramaswamy, S; Fielding, S M; Cates, M E

    2015-03-06

    A paradigm for internally driven matter is the active nematic liquid crystal, whereby the equations of a conventional nematic are supplemented by a minimal active stress that violates time-reversal symmetry. In practice, active fluids may have not only liquid-crystalline but also viscoelastic polymer degrees of freedom. Here we explore the resulting interplay by coupling an active nematic to a minimal model of polymer rheology. We find that adding a polymer can greatly increase the complexity of spontaneous flow, but can also have calming effects, thereby increasing the net throughput of spontaneous flow along a pipe (a "drag-reduction" effect). Remarkably, active turbulence can also arise after switching on activity in a sufficiently soft elastomeric solid.

  18. Electrochromic polyoxometalate material as a sensor of bacterial activity.

    PubMed

    González, Ana; Gálvez, Natividad; Clemente-León, Miguel; Dominguez-Vera, Jose M

    2015-06-25

    Lactobacillus fermentum, a bacterium of human microbiota, acts as an electron donor for the electrochromic [P2Mo(VI)18O62](6-). Since the reductive capacity of L. fermentum correlates with its metabolic activity, the reaction with [P2Mo(VI)18O62](6-) affords a means of evaluating its activity. Following this logic, we have concluded that vancomycin severely affects the activity of L. fermentum whereas omeprazole does not.

  19. Discovery of a proteolytic flagellin family in diverse bacterial phyla that assembles enzymatically active flagella.

    PubMed

    Eckhard, Ulrich; Bandukwala, Hina; Mansfield, Michael J; Marino, Giada; Cheng, Jiujun; Wallace, Iain; Holyoak, Todd; Charles, Trevor C; Austin, John; Overall, Christopher M; Doxey, Andrew C

    2017-09-12

    Bacterial flagella are cell locomotion and occasional adhesion organelles composed primarily of the polymeric protein flagellin, but to date have not been associated with any enzymatic function. Here, we report the bioinformatics-driven discovery of a class of enzymatic flagellins that assemble to form proteolytically active flagella. Originating by a metallopeptidase insertion into the central flagellin hypervariable region, this flagellin family has expanded to at least 74 bacterial species. In the pathogen, Clostridium haemolyticum, metallopeptidase-containing flagellin (which we termed flagellinolysin) is the second most abundant protein in the flagella and is localized to the extracellular flagellar surface. Purified flagellar filaments and recombinant flagellin exhibit proteolytic activity, cleaving nearly 1000 different peptides. With ~ 20,000 flagellin copies per  ~ 10-μm flagella this assembles the largest proteolytic complex known. Flagellum-mediated extracellular proteolysis expands our understanding of the functional plasticity of bacterial flagella, revealing this family as enzymatic biopolymers that mediate interactions with diverse peptide substrates.So far no enzymatic activity has been attributed to flagellin, the major component of bacterial flagella. Here the authors use bioinformatic analysis and identify a metallopeptidase insertion in flagellins from 74 bacterial species and show that recombinant flagellin and flagellar filaments have proteolytic activity.

  20. Fluorescent assay based on resazurin for detection of activity of disinfectants against bacterial biofilm.

    PubMed

    Mariscal, Alberto; Lopez-Gigosos, Rosa M; Carnero-Varo, Manuel; Fernandez-Crehuet, Joaquin

    2009-03-01

    A new, quick method, using the resazurin dye test as a bacterial respiration indicator, has been developed to assay the antibacterial activity of various substances used as disinfectants against bacterial biofilm growth on clinical devices. Resazurin was used to measure the presence of active biofilm bacteria, after adding disinfectant, in relation to a standard curve generated from inocula in suspension of the same organism used to grow the biofilm. The biofilm was quantified indirectly by measuring the fluorescent, water-soluble resorufin product produced when resazurin is reduced by reactions associated with respiration. Four products used as disinfectants and the biofilm growth of five bacterial species on carriers made of materials commonly found in clinical devices were studied. Under test conditions, chlorhexidine, NaOCl, ethanol, and Perasafe at concentrations of 0.2, 0.01, 350, and 0.16 mg/ml, respectively, all produced 5-log reductions in biofilm cell numbers on the three different carriers. The redox-driven test depends on bacterial catabolism, for which reason resazurin reduction produces an analytic signal of the bacterial activity in whole cells, and therefore could be used for determining disinfectant efficacy in an assay based on the metabolic activity of microorganisms grown as biofilm or in suspension.

  1. Robustness of Nuclear Core Activity Reconstruction by Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouriquet, Bertrand; Argaud, Jean-Philippe; Erhard, Patrick; Massart, Sébastien; Ponçot, Angélique; Ricci, Sophie; Thual, Olivier

    Inspired from meteorological applications, data assimilation techniques can be used to perform an optimal reconstruction of the neutronic field in a nuclear reactor core. Measurements and simulation information, coming from a numerical model, are merged together to build a better estimation of the whole field. In this paper, we first study the robustness of the method when the amount of measured information varies. We then study the influence of the nature of the instruments and their spatial repartition on the efficiency of the field reconstruction. This study also highlights the instruments providing most information within a data assimilation procedure. The study of various network configurations of instruments in the nuclear core establishes that the influence of each instrument depends both on the individual instrumentation location as well as on the chosen network.

  2. Analysis of the Raman spectra of Ca(2+)-dipicolinic acid alone and in the bacterial spore core in both aqueous and dehydrated environments.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingbo; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-qing

    2012-08-21

    The core of dormant bacterial spores suspended in water contains a large depot of dipicolinic acid (DPA) chelated with divalent cations, predominantly Ca(2+) (CaDPA), and surrounded by water molecules. Since the intensities of the vibration bands of CaDPA molecules depend significantly on the water content in the CaDPA's environment, the Raman spectra of CaDPA in spores may allow the determination of the spore core's hydration state. We have measured Raman spectra of single spores of three Bacillus species in different hydration states including the spores suspended in water, air-dried and vacuum-dried. As a comparison, we also measured the Raman spectra of CaDPA and DPA in different forms including in aqueous solution, and as amorphous powder and crystalline form. We also monitored changes in Raman spectra of an individual spore during dehydration under vacuum. The results indicated that (1) the state of CaDPA in the core of a spore suspended in water is close to an amorphous solid or a glassy state, but still mixed with water molecules; (2) the ratio of intensities of Raman bands at 1575 and 1017 cm(-1) (I(1575)/I(1017)) is sensitive to the water content in the CaDPA's environment; (3) variations in I(1575)/I(1017) are small (∼4%) in a population of dormant Bacillus spores suspended in water; and (4) the I(1575)/I(1017) ratio increases significantly during dehydration under vacuum. Consequently, measurement of the I(1575)/I(1017) ratio of CaDPA in spores may allow a qualitative estimation of the degree of hydration of the bacterial spore's core.

  3. Sequential laser and ultrasonic wave generation of TiO2@Ag core-shell nanoparticles and their anti-bacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Abubaker Hassan; Li, Lin; Liu, Zhu; Zhong, Xiang Li; Wang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles have unusual physical, chemical and biological properties. Until now, for the Ag and TiO2 combination, only Ag core and TiO2 shell nanoparticles have been practically demonstrated. In this investigation, novel TiO2@Ag core-shell (TiO2 core and Ag shell) nanoparticles were produced via ultrasonic vibration of Ag-TiO2 compound nanoparticles. A bulk Ti/Ag alloy plate was used to generate colloidal Ag-TiO2 compound nanoparticles via picosecond laser ablation in deionised water. The colloidal nanoparticles were then sonicated in an ultrasonic bath to generate TiO2@Ag core-shell nanoparticles. They were characterised using a UV-VIS spectrometer, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-angle annular dark-field-Scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The Ag-TiO2 compound and the TiO2@Ag core-shell nanoparticles were examined for their antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) JM109 strain bacteria and compared with those of Ag and TiO2 nanoparticles. The antibacterial activity of the core-shell nanoparticles was slightly better than that of the compound nanoparticles at the same concentration under standard laboratory light conditions and both were better than the TiO2 nanoparticles but not as good as the Ag nanoparticles.

  4. Differences in activity profile of bacterial cultures studied by dynamic speckle patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Miquet, E. E.; Otero, I.; Rodríguez, D.; Darias, J. G.; Combarro, A. M.; Contreras, O. R.

    2013-02-01

    We outline the main differences in the activity profile of bacterial cultures studied by dynamic laser speckle (or biospeckle) patterns. The activity is detected in two sorts of culture mediums. The optical setup and the experimental procedure are presented. The experimentally obtained images are processed by the temporal difference method and a qualitative assessment is made with the time history of speckle patterns of the sample. The main differences are studied after changing the culture medium composition. We conclude that the EC medium is suitable to detect the E. coli bacterial presence in early hours and that Mueller Hinton agar delays some additional hours to make possible the assessment of bacteria in time.

  5. Teaching the Common Core Math Standards with Hands-On Activities, Grades 6-8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muschla, Judith A.; Muschla, Gary Robert; Muschla, Erin

    2012-01-01

    The new Common Core State Standards for Mathematics have been formulated to provide students with instruction that will help them acquire a thorough knowledge of math at their grade level, which will in turn enable them to move on to higher mathematics with competence and confidence. "Hands-on Activities for Teaching the Common Core Math…

  6. Teaching the Common Core Math Standards with Hands-On Activities, Grades 6-8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muschla, Judith A.; Muschla, Gary Robert; Muschla, Erin

    2012-01-01

    The new Common Core State Standards for Mathematics have been formulated to provide students with instruction that will help them acquire a thorough knowledge of math at their grade level, which will in turn enable them to move on to higher mathematics with competence and confidence. "Hands-on Activities for Teaching the Common Core Math…

  7. Aerobic Heterotrophic Bacterial Populations of Sewage and Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Prakasam, T. B. S.; Dondero, N. C.

    1970-01-01

    Two procedures, the confidence interval method and Mountford's index, were tested in analyses of the microbial populations of 11 laboratory activated sludges acclimated to aromatic compounds. The two methods gave somewhat different results but indicated that the populations were quite dissimilar. The activity of seven of the sludges correlated well with the population structure. Some considerations in analysis of microbial population structure are discussed. PMID:5418947

  8. Active bacterial community structure along vertical redox gradients in Baltic Sea sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Janet; Edlund, Anna; Hardeman, Fredrik; Jansson, Janet K.; Sjoling, Sara

    2008-05-15

    Community structures of active bacterial populations were investigated along a vertical redox profile in coastal Baltic Sea sediments by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone library analysis. According to correspondence analysis of T-RFLP results and sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA genes, the microbial community structures at three redox depths (179 mV, -64 mV and -337 mV) differed significantly. The bacterial communities in the community DNA differed from those in bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled DNA, indicating that the growing members of the community that incorporated BrdU were not necessarily the most dominant members. The structures of the actively growing bacterial communities were most strongly correlated to organic carbon followed by total nitrogen and redox potentials. Bacterial identification by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from clones of BrdU-labeled DNA and DNA from reverse transcription PCR (rt-PCR) showed that bacterial taxa involved in nitrogen and sulfur cycling were metabolically active along the redox profiles. Several sequences had low similarities to previously detected sequences indicating that novel lineages of bacteria are present in Baltic Sea sediments. Also, a high number of different 16S rRNA gene sequences representing different phyla were detected at all sampling depths.

  9. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacterial diversity, abundance, and activity in marsh sediments of the Yangtze Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lijun; Zheng, Yanling; Liu, Min; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yin, Guoyu; You, Li

    2013-07-01

    ammonium oxidation (anammox) as an important process of nitrogen cycle has been studied in estuarine environments. However, knowledge about the dynamics of anammox bacteria and their interactions with associated activity remains scarce in these environments. Here we report the anammox bacterial diversity, abundance, and activity in the Yangtze Estuary, using molecular and isotope-tracing techniques. The phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA indicated that high anammox bacterial diversity occurred in this estuary, including Scalindua, Brocadia, Kuenenia, and two novel clusters. The patterns of community composition and diversity of anammox bacteria differed across the estuary. Salinity was a key environmental factor defining the geographical distribution and diversity of the anammox bacterial community at the estuarine ecosystem. Temperature and organic carbon also had significant influences on anammox bacterial biodiversity. The abundance of anammox bacteria ranged from 2.63 × 106 and 1.56 × 107 gene copies g-1, and its spatiotemporal variations were related significantly to salinity, temperature, and nitrite content. The anammox activity was related to temperature, nitrite, and anammox bacterial abundance, with values of 0.94-6.61 nmol N g-1 h-1. The tight link between the anammox and denitrification processes implied that denitrifying bacteria may be a primary source of nitrite for the anammox bacteria in the estuarine marshes. On the basis of the 15N tracing experiments, the anammox process was estimated to contribute 6.6%-12.9% to the total nitrogen loss whereas the remainder was attributed to denitrification.

  10. The relationship of core strength and activation and performance on three functional movement screens.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Caleb D; Whitehead, Paul N; Pletcher, Erin R; Faherty, Mallory S; Lovaleka, Mita T; Eagle, Shawn R; Keenan, Karen A

    2017-04-18

    Current measures of core stability utilized by clinicians and researchers suffer from several shortcomings. Three functional movement screens appear, at face-value, to be dependent on the ability to activate and control core musculature. These three screens may present a viable alternative to current measures of core stability. Thirty-nine subjects completed a deep squat, trunk stability push-up, and rotary stability screen. Scores on the three screens were summed to calculate a composite score (COMP). During the screens, muscle activity was collected to determine the length of time that the bilateral erector spinae, rectus abdominus, external oblique, and gluteus medius muscles were active. Strength was assessed for core muscles (trunk flexion/extension, trunk rotation, hip abduction/adduction) and accessory muscles (knee flexion/extension, and pectoralis major). Two ordinal logistic regression equations were calculated with COMP as the outcome variable, and: 1) core strength and accessory strength, 2) only core strength. The first model was significant in predicting COMP (p=.004) (Pearson's Chi-Square=149.132, p=.435; Nagelkerke's R-Squared=.369). The second model was significant in predicting COMP (p=.001) (Pearson's Chi Square=148.837, p=.488; Nagelkerke's R-Squared=.362). The core muscles were found to be active for the majority of screens, with percentages of "time active" for each muscle ranging from 54%-86%. In conclusion, performance on the three screens is predicted by core strength, even when accounting for "accessory" strength variables. Further, it appears the screens elicit wide-ranging activation of core muscles. While more investigation is needed, these screens, collectively, appear to be a good assessment of core strength.

  11. Effects of opsonization of Rhodococcus equi on bacterial viability and phagocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Dominic R; Nydam, Daryl V; Price, Christopher T; Graham, James E; Cynamon, Michael H; Divers, Thomas J; Felippe, Maria Julia B

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the effect of opsonization of Rhodococcus equi with R. equi-specific antibodies in plasma on bacterial viability and phagocyte activation in a cell culture model of infection. Neutrophils and monocyte-derived macrophages from 6 healthy 1-week-old foals and 1 adult horse. Foal and adult horse phagocytes were incubated with either opsonized or nonopsonized bacteria. Opsonization was achieved by use of plasma containing high or low concentrations of R. equi-specific antibodies. Phagocyte oxidative burst activity was measured by use of flow cytometry, and macrophage tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production was measured via an ELISA. Extracellular and intracellular bacterial viability was measured with a novel R. equi-luciferase construct that used a luminometer. Opsonized bacteria increased oxidative burst activity in adult horse phagocytes, and neutrophil activity was dependent on the concentration of specific antibody. Secretion of TNF-α was higher in macrophages infected with opsonized bacteria. Opsonization had no significant effect on bacterial viability in macrophages; however, extracellular bacterial viability was decreased in broth containing plasma with R. equi-specific antibodies, compared with viability in broth alone. The use of plasma enriched with specific antibodies for the opsonization of R. equi increased the activation of phagocytes and decreased bacterial viability in the extracellular space. Although opsonized R. equi increased TNF-α secretion and oxidative burst in macrophages, additional factors may be necessary for effective intracellular bacterial killing. These data have suggested a possible role of plasma antibody in protection of foals from R. equi pneumonia.

  12. NF-κB activation is critical for bacterial lipoprotein tolerance-enhanced bactericidal activity in macrophages during microbial infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinghua; Xiang, Jing; Li, Xue; Blankson, Siobhan; Zhao, Shuqi; Cai, Junwei; Jiang, Yong; Redmond, H. Paul; Wang, Jiang Huai

    2017-01-01

    Tolerance to bacterial components represents an essential regulatory mechanism during bacterial infection. Bacterial lipoprotein (BLP)-induced tolerance confers protection against microbial sepsis by attenuating inflammatory responses and augmenting antimicrobial activity in innate phagocytes. It has been well-documented that BLP tolerance-attenuated proinflammatory cytokine production is associated with suppressed TLR2 signalling pathway; however, the underlying mechanism(s) involved in BLP tolerance-enhanced antimicrobial activity is unclear. Here we report that BLP-tolerised macrophages exhibited accelerated phagosome maturation and enhanced bactericidal activity upon bacterial infection, with upregulated expression of membrane-trafficking regulators and lysosomal enzymes. Notably, bacterial challenge resulted in a strong activation of NF-κB pathway in BLP-tolerised macrophages. Importantly, activation of NF-κB pathway is critical for BLP tolerance-enhanced antimicrobial activity, as deactivation of NF-κB in BLP-tolerised macrophages impaired phagosome maturation and intracellular killing of the ingested bacteria. Finally, activation of NF-κB pathway in BLP-tolerised macrophages was dependent on NOD1 and NOD2 signalling, as knocking-down NOD1 and NOD2 substantially inhibited bacteria-induced activation of NF-κB and overexpression of Rab10 and Acp5, two membrane-trafficking regulators and lysosomal enzymes contributed to BLP tolerance-enhanced bactericidal activity. These results indicate that activation of NF-κB pathway is essential for BLP tolerance-augmented antimicrobial activity in innate phagocytes and depends primarily on both NOD1 and NOD2. PMID:28079153

  13. Formation of active bacterial luciferase between interspecific subunits in vivo.

    PubMed

    Almashanu, S; Tuby, A; Hadar, R; Einy, R; Kuhn, J

    1995-01-01

    Interspecific complementation between luxAs and luxBs from Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio fischeri, Photobacterium leiognathi and Xenorhabdus luminescens was examined in vivo. The individual genes from these species were cloned on different compatible plasmids or amplified by PCR and brought together to yield cis combinations without extraneous DNA. The beta subunits from V. harveyi and X. luminescens form active enzyme only with alpha subunits from one of these species. All other combinations yield active enzymes. The lack of activity of the V. harveyi and X. luminescens beta subunits with the alpha subunits from V. fischeri and P. leiognathi results from a lack of association. This was shown by in vivo competition in which these beta subunits were overproduced in comparison with the beta and alpha of V. fischeri. No reduction in light was found. Overall, the in vivo results parallel those found in vitro using isolated denatured subunits and renaturation by removal of the denaturant.

  14. Bacterial Growth in Amniotic Fluid Is Dependent on the Iron-Availability and the Activity of Bacterial Iron-Uptake System

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Young-Joon; Park, Sang-Kee; Oh, Jae-Wook; Sun, Hui-Yu

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, the relationship among iron-availability, antibacterial activity, role of meconium as an iron source and the activity of bacterial iron-uptake system (IUS) for bacterial growth in amniotic fluid (AF) were investigated. Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 and its streptonigrin-resistant (SR) mutant with defective IUS were used as the test strains. The growth of S. aureus in AF was stimulated dosedependently by addition of meconium. Bacterial growth stimulated by meconium was re-inhibited dose-dependently by addition of iron-chelator, dipyridyl and apotransferrin. Iron concentration was correlated with the meconium content in AF (r2=0.989, p=0.001). High-affinity IUS of S. aureus was expressed only in AF but not in AF with meconium. The growth of SR strain was more retarded than that of the parental strain in the iron-deficient brain heart infusion (ID-BHI), clear AF and AF containing apotransferrin. The retarded growth of both strains in the ID-BHI and AF was recovered by addition of holotransferrin, hemoglobin and FeCl3. Taken together, the antibacterial activity of AF is closely related with low iron-availability. Bacterial growth in AF considerably depends on the activity of bacterial IUS. Meconium acts as one of the exogenous iron-sources and thus can stimulate bacterial growth in AF. PMID:15201496

  15. Bacterial sphingophospholipids containing non-hydroxy fatty acid activate murine macrophages via Toll-like receptor 4 and stimulate bacterial clearance.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Porcelli, Steven A; Naka, Takashi; Yano, Ikuya; Maeda, Shinji; Kuwata, Hirotaka; Akira, Shizuo; Uematsu, Satoshi; Takii, Takemasa; Ogura, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Kazuo

    2013-06-01

    Sphingobacterium spiritivorum has five unusual sphingophospholipids (SPLs). Our previous study determined the complete chemical structures of these SPLs. The compositions of the long-chain bases/fatty acids in the ceramide portion, isoheptadecasphingosine/isopentadecanoate or isoheptadecasphingosine/2-hydroxy isopentadecanoate, are characteristic. The immune response against bacterial lipid components is considered to play important roles in microbial infections. It is reported that several bacterial sphingolipids composed of ceramide are recognized by CD1-restricted T and NKT cells and that a non-peptide antigen is recognized by γδ T cells. In this study, we demonstrated that these bacterial SPLs activated murine bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) via Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 but not TLR2, although they slightly activated CD1d-restricted NKT and γδT cells. Interestingly, this TLR 4-recognition pathway of bacterial SPLs involves the fatty acid composition of ceramide in addition to the sugar moiety. A non-hydroxy fatty acid composed of ceramide was necessary to activate murine BMMs. The bacterial survival was significantly higher in TLR4-KO mice than in TLR2-KO and wild-type mice. The results indicate that activation of the TLR4-dependent pathway of BMMs by SPLs induced an innate immune response and contributed to bacterial clearance.

  16. Aerobic Heterotrophic Bacterial Populations of Sewage and Activated Sludge1

    PubMed Central

    Prakasam, T. B. S.; Dondero, Norman C.

    1967-01-01

    The nature and behavior of the microbial population developed on a synthetic waste containing salts and sorbitol are compared to that of a treatment-plant activated sludge. The population of the adapted sludge developed on the synthetic waste consisted approximately of only six kinds of bacteria. Experiments with radioactive sorbitol indicate that the microbial population developed on the synthetic waste showed the effects of repression by glucose on the metabolism of sorbitol; in contrast, the activated sludge from a plant treating primarily domestic waste was able to attack both substrates immediately and simultaneously. PMID:16349727

  17. Probiotic Activity of a Bacterial Strain Isolated from Ancient Permafrost Against Salmonella Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Fursova, O; Potapov, V; Brouchkov, A; Pogorelko, G; Griva, G; Fursova, N; Ignatov, S

    2012-09-01

    Bacillus cereus strain F, collected from relict permafrost located in Siberia, was analyzed for probiotic activity in the mouse Salmonella enterica model. Viable bacterial cells were found in frozen soils taken at Mammoth Mountain in Yakutia from a depth below the level of seasonal thawing. Geological data indicated the absence of a thawing within millions of years of deposited soils, which helped to ensure the ancient origin of our sample. According to DNA analysis, bacterial cells collected from the relict permafrost appeared to be B. cereus strain F. The morphology of these bacteria was analyzed using atomic force microscopy. B. cereus strain F was assessed as a nonpathogenic bacterium by evaluation of its pathogenicity. A S. enterica model is described in mice after per oral inoculation and serves as a model for the human carrier state. Using this model, probiotic activity by the bacterial strain isolated from the ancient permafrost has been shown against Salmonella infection in mice.

  18. Phage displayed HBV core antigen with immunogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Bahadir, Aylin Ozdemir; Balcioglu, Bertan Koray; Uzyol, Kamil Serkan; Hatipoglu, Ibrahim; Sogut, Ibrahim; Basalp, Aynur; Erdag, Berrin

    2011-12-01

    Hepatitis B is a major public health problem worldwide, which may lead to chronic liver diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) is one of the major viral proteins, which forms the inner core of hepatitis B virus (HBV) particles. In this study, filamentous bacteriophage M13 was genetically modified to display the polypeptides of HBcAg in order to develop an alternative carrier system. HBcAg gene was inserted into the minor coat protein (pIII) gene of M13, and HBcAg was expressed on the phage surface as a whole protein. Antigenicity and immunogenicity of HBcAg were tested by immunizing BALB/c mice three times with HBcAg-displaying recombinant phages. After successful immunization, one of the mice with high antibody titer to HBcAg was selected for fusion, and four monoclonal antibodies specific for HBcAg were developed. This result showed that HBcAg-displaying recombinant bacteriophages are immunogenic and can potentially be used for the development of monoclonal antibodies.

  19. The Active Bacterial Community in a Pristine Confined Aquifer

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study of the active bacteria residing in a pristine confined aquifer provides unexpected insights into the ecology of iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the subsurface. At 18 wells in east-central Illinois, we trapped the microbes that attached to aquifer sedimen...

  20. The Active Bacterial Community in a Pristine Confined Aquifer

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study of the active bacteria residing in a pristine confined aquifer provides unexpected insights into the ecology of iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the subsurface. At 18 wells in east-central Illinois, we trapped the microbes that attached to aquifer sedimen...

  1. Activation mechanism of the nuclear chaperone nucleoplasmin: role of the core domain.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, Sonia; Hierro, Aitor; Arizmendi, Jesús M; Montoya, Guillermo; Prado, Adelina; Muga, Arturo

    2003-11-28

    Nucleoplasmin (NP) mediates nucleosome assembly by removing basic proteins from sperm chromatin and exchanging them with histones. This function is modulated by phosphorylation of NP at multiple sites. NP is pentameric, each monomer consisting of two domains: a core, which forms a stable ring-like pentamer, and a tail, that holds a polyglutamic tract and the nuclear localization signal. In the present study, we have explored the role of the core domain in the functionality of NP. Despite lacking the poly-Glu region, a putative binding site for basic proteins, the isolated core domain of the hyperphosphorylated protein isolated from eggs of Xenopus laevis is able to bind sperm basic proteins and decondense chromatin, in contrast to the inactive, non-phosphorylated recombinant core. This activity can be reproduced artificially in the recombinant core domain through mutation of putative phosphorylation sites to aspartate, thus mimicking the charge effect of phosphorylation. The mutated residues locate in flexible or loop regions exposed on the "distal face" of the core pentamer, where a short acidic region is also found, indicating that phosphorylation might activate the core domain of NP by generating a strong localized negative potential. Our results show that the phosphorylated core domain of NP is active in chromatin decondensation, thus it could contribute together with the poly-Glu containing tail in displaying a binding surface for sperm basic proteins on the NP pentamer.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and bactericidal activity of silica/silver core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Devi, Pooja; Patil, Supriya Deepak; Jeevanandam, P; Navani, Naveen K; Singla, M L

    2014-05-01

    Silica/silver core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by coating silver NPs on silica core particles (size ~300 ± 10 nm) via electro less reduction method. The core-shell NPs were characterized for their structural, morphological, compositional and optical behavior using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and UV-Visible spectroscopy, respectively. The size (16-35 nm) and loaded amount of silver NPs on the silica core were found to be dependent upon reaction time and activation method of silica. The bactericidal activity of the NPs was tested by broth micro dilution method against both Bacillus subtilis (gram positive) and Escherichia coli ATCC25922 (gram negative) bacterium. The bactericidal activity of silica/silver core-shell NPS is more against E. coli ATCC25922, when compared to B. subtilis. The minimal inhibitory concentration of the core-shell NPs ranged from 7.8 to 250 μg/mL and is found to be dependent upon the amount of silver on silica, the core. These results suggest that silica/silver core-shell NPs can be utilized as a strong substitutional candidate to control pathogenic bacterium, which are otherwise resistant to antibiotics, making them applicable in diverse medical devices.

  3. Bacterial succession in glacial forefield soils characterized by community structure, activity and opportunistic growth dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sigler, W V; Crivii, S; Zeyer, J

    2002-11-01

    The succession of bacterial communities inhabiting the forefield of the Dammaglacier (Switzerland) was investigated in soils ranging in successional age from 0 to 100 years since deglaciation. Overall activity per bacterial cell was estimated by the amount of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolyzed per DAPI-stained cell, and an index of "opportunism" was determined from the ratio of culturable to total cells (C:T ratio). Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) was used to estimate the richness of dominant phylotypes and to construct rank-abundance plots of the dominant populations. We observed a biphasic trend in specific cellular activity, which exhibited minima in the 0- and 100-year-old soils while a maximum activity per cell was reached in the 70-y soil. On average, the C:T ratio showed the same trend as the specific activity, although we observed some differences between the two sampling transects. RISA revealed a decrease in dominant phylotype richness as successional age increased, and rank-abundance plots indicated that the evenness of the dominant bacterial phylotypes significantly decreased with successional age. The combination of specific cellular activity and C:T ratio results suggested the presence of an r-K continuum of bacteria while RISA showed that richness and evenness of dominant phylotypes decreased with successional age. We conclude that bacterial succession in the glacier forefield was a dynamic process with adaptation to the differing stages of succession occurring on both the individual and community levels.

  4. Antimicrobial activity and interference of tobramycin and chloramphenicol on bacterial adhesion to intraocular lenses.

    PubMed

    Drago, L; De Vecchi, E; Nicola, L; Gismondo, M R

    2003-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of tobramycin and chloramphenicol were evaluated by determining minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, group A, group B and group G streptococci, Klebsiella spp., Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and ciprofloxacin-resistant and -susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as by evaluating interference on adhesion of slime producer strains of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa to intraocular lens from tobramycin and chloramphenicol pharmaceutical products by scanning electron microscopy. Chloramphenicol was more active against Gram-positive bacteria than was tobramycin, which instead showed higher activity against ciprofloxacin-susceptible P. aeruginosa. Treatment of lenses with the antimicrobial products eradicated the bacterial biofilm, which was already notably reduced after 5 min. This activity was more pronounced for chloramphenicol against S. aureus and for tobramycin against P. aeruginosa. Bacterial adhesion was also significantly reduced when lenses colonized by P. aeruginosa were treated with chloramphenicol, even if they were resistant to this drug. In conclusion, the tested drugs showed marked antibacterial activity, particularly by interfering with bacterial biofilms. The data obtained in this study suggest a specific use of chloramphenicol in topical prophylaxis aimed at avoiding bacterial contaminations. However, further specific in vivo studies are needed to confirm these data.

  5. Soil-borne bacterial structure and diversity does not reflect community activity in Pampa biome.

    PubMed

    Lupatini, Manoeli; Suleiman, Afnan Khalil Ahmad; Jacques, Rodrigo Josemar Seminoti; Antoniolli, Zaida Inês; Kuramae, Eiko Eurya; de Oliveira Camargo, Flávio Anastácio; Roesch, Luiz Fernando Würdig

    2013-01-01

    The Pampa biome is considered one of the main hotspots of the world's biodiversity and it is estimated that half of its original vegetation was removed and converted to agricultural land and tree plantations. Although an increasing amount of knowledge is being assembled regarding the response of soil bacterial communities to land use change, to the associated plant community and to soil properties, our understanding about how these interactions affect the microbial community from the Brazilian Pampa is still poor and incomplete. In this study, we hypothesized that the same soil type from the same geographic region but under distinct land use present dissimilar soil bacterial communities. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the soil bacterial communities from four land-uses within the same soil type by 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene and by soil microbial activity analyzes. We found that the same soil type under different land uses harbor similar (but not equal) bacterial communities and the differences were controlled by many microbial taxa. No differences regarding diversity and richness between natural areas and areas under anthropogenic disturbance were detected. However, the measures of microbial activity did not converge with the 16S rRNA data supporting the idea that the coupling between functioning and composition of bacterial communities is not necessarily correlated.

  6. The Effect of Light on Bacterial Activity in a Seaweed Holobiont.

    PubMed

    Coelho-Souza, Sergio A; Jenkins, Stuart R; Casarin, Antonio; Baeta-Neves, Maria Helena; Salgado, Leonardo T; Guimaraes, Jean R D; Coutinho, Ricardo

    2017-06-17

    Holobionts are characterized by the relationship between host and their associated organisms such as the biofilm associated with macroalgae. Considering that light is essential to macroalgae survival, the aim of this study was to verify the effect of light on the heterotrophic activity in biofilms of the brown macroalgae Sargassum furcatum during its growth cycle. Measurements of heterotrophic activity were done under natural light levels at different times during a daily cycle and under an artificial extinction of natural light during the afternoon. We also measured Sargassum primary production under these light levels in the afternoon. Both measurements were done with and without photosynthesis inhibitor and antibiotics. Biofilm composition was mainly represented by bacteria but diatoms, cyanobacteria, and other organisms were also common. When a peak of diatom genera was recorded, the heterotrophic activity of the biofilm was higher. Heterotrophic activity was usually highest during the afternoon and the presence of a photosynthesis inhibitor caused an average reduction of 17% but there was no relationship with Sargassum primary production. These results indicate that autotrophic production in the biofilm was reduced by the inhibitor with consequences on bacterial activity. Heterotrophic activity was mainly bacterial and the antibiotics chloramphenicol and penicillin were more effective than streptomycin. We suggest primary producers in the biofilm are more important to increase bacterial activity than the macroalgae itself because of coherence of the peaks of heterotrophic and autotrophic activity in biofilm during the afternoon and the effects of autotrophic inhibitors on heterotrophic activity.

  7. Bacterial biomass and activity in the marginal ice zone of the northern Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammert, Helen; Olli, Kalle; Sturluson, Maria; Hodal, Helene

    2008-10-01

    Bacteria in the Arctic Waters are well adapted to low temperatures and play a key role in the transformation of organic matter. However, the activity of planktonic bacteria at cellular level remains poorly understood. In this study, we use fluorescent markers (4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC), Live/Dead BacLight viability kit) to discriminate between bacterial cells with a variety of physiological activities in the 0-200 m water column and sinking particles. During two field studies (July 2003 and 2004), we covered nine stations in the northern Barents Sea. The median bacterial abundance (DAPI staining) in the upper 50 m layer was 0.9×10 6 cells ml -1 (range 0.2-3.2×10 6 cells ml -1) in 2003 and 0.5×10 6 cells ml -1 (range 0.2-1.0×10 6 cells ml -1) in 2004. Bacteria with sufficient electron transport activity to be stained with CTC were on average 10% of the total count and ca. 20% of the total cells had intact cell membranes. In the water column, proxies of substrate availability (POC, PON, chlorophyll a, primary production) and bacterial production (thymidine and leucine uptake) correlated strongly with total bacterial count, CTC-stained cells and cells with 'leaky' membrane (stained with propidium iodine), but not with the concentration of cells with intact cell membrane. Contrary to expectations, the proportion of CTC-stained bacteria was not higher in the sinking particles (captured with sediment traps) compared to the ambient water. However, out of the bacteria with intact cell membranes, a higher proportion scored as CTC positive in the aggregates compared to the ambient water. Bacterial cells with 'leaky' cell membranes formed the largest part of total cell count in all samples, and accumulated in sites with high microbial activity (sinking aggregates, chlorophyll maxima, layers of high primary and bacterial production). We hypothesize that the source of the bacterial cells with 'leaky' cell membranes

  8. Differential influence of instruments in nuclear core activity evaluation by data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouriquet, Bertrand; Argaud, Jean-Philippe; Erhard, Patrick; Massart, Sébastien; Ponçot, Angélique; Ricci, Sophie; Thual, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    The global neutronic activity fields of a nuclear core can be reconstructed using data assimilation. Indeed, data assimilation allows to combine both measurements from instruments and information from a model, to evaluate the best possible neutronic activity within the core. We present and apply a specific procedure which evaluates the influence of measures by adding or removing instruments in a given measurement network (possibly empty). The study of various network configurations for the instruments in the nuclear core establishes that the influence of the instruments depends both on the independent instrumentation location and on the chosen network.

  9. Antagonistic activity of Bacillus subtilis SB1 and its biocontrol effect on tomato bacterial wilt

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A potential biocontrol agent of bacterial wilt, Bacillus subtilis SB1, isolated from tomato roots, showed a broad-spectrum of antimicrobial activity in in vitro experiments. It inhibited the growth of many plant pathogens, including Ralstonia solanacearum, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Fusarium ox...

  10. Effects of Prochloraz fungicide on soil enzymatic activities and bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Tejada, Manuel; Gómez, Isidoro; García-Martínez, Ana María; Osta, Paloma; Parrado, Juan

    2011-09-01

    We studied in the laboratory the effect of Prochloraz fungicide on the biological properties (soil enzymatic activities and soil bacterial communities) of a Plaggic Anthrosol. Five hundred grams of soil (<2mm) was mixed with three dosages of Prochloraz (1, 2, and 4 l ha(-1)) for 83 days. A non-Prochloraz polluted soil was used as control. Following commercial recommendations, fungicide was applied four times during the incubation experiment. For all treatments, the soil ergosterol and levels of dehydrogenase, urease, β-glucosidase, and phosphatase activity were measured at nine different times (0, 1, 21, 22, 41, 42, 62, 63, and 83 days). The 16S rDNA-DGGE profiles in all treatments were determined at the beginning and end of the incubation period. At the end of the experiment, a significant decrease in ergosterol by 72.3%, 80.8%, and 83.1%, compared with control soil, was observed when 1, 2, and 4 l ha(-1), respectively, was added. Soil enzymatic activities increased when the Prochloraz applied to the soil increased, possibly because the fungicide is used by bacterial communities as a source of energy and nutrients. The 16S rDNA-DGGE profiles indicated that the fungicide did not negatively affect soil bacterial biodiversity. These results suggested that the fungicide Prochloraz has a very interesting agronomic effect, possibly due to the negative effect on soil fungal population stimulating the growth of soil bacterial activity.

  11. Discovery of bacterial NAD+-dependent DNA ligase inhibitors: optimization of antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Suzanne S; Huynh, Hoan; Gowravaram, Madhusudhan; Albert, Robert; Cavero-Tomas, Marta; Chen, Brendan; Harang, Jenna; Loch, James T; Lu, Min; Mullen, George B; Zhao, Shannon; Liu, Ce-Feng; Mills, Scott D

    2011-08-01

    Optimization of adenosine analog inhibitors of bacterial NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase is discussed. Antibacterial activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus was improved by modification of the 2-position substituent on the adenine ring and 3'- and 5'-substituents on the ribose. Compounds with logD values 1.5-2.5 maximized potency and maintained drug-like physical properties.

  12. Activation of a bacterial lipase by its chaperone.

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, A H; Buckley, C M; Aamand, J L; Jørgensen, S T; Diderichsen, B; McConnell, D J

    1993-01-01

    The gene lipA of Pseudomonas cepacia DSM 3959 encodes a prelipase from which a signal peptide is cleaved during secretion, producing a mature extracellular lipase. Expression of lipase in several heterologous hosts depends on the presence of another gene, limA, in cis or in trans. Lipase protein has been overproduced in Escherichia coli in the presence and absence of the lipase modulator gene limA. Therefore, limA is not required for the transcription of lipA or for the translation of the lipA mRNA. However, no lipase activity is observed in the absence of limA. limA has been overexpressed and encodes a 33-kDa protein, Lim. If lipase protein is denatured in 8 M urea and the urea is removed by dialysis, lipase activity is quantitatively recovered provided Lim protein is present during renaturation. Lip and Lim proteins form a complex precipitable either by an anti-lipase or anti-Lim antibody. The Lim protein has therefore the properties of a chaperone. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7685908

  13. Bacterial activity and bacterioplankton diversity in the eutrophic River Warnow--direct measurement of bacterial growth efficiency and its effect on carbon utilization.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, Mareike; Freese, Heike M; Schumann, Rhena

    2011-01-01

    The influence of bacterial activity and diversity on bacterial growth efficiency was investigated in a flatland river. Eutrophic River Warnow drains predominantly agricultural land and is heavily loaded with nutrients, dissolved and particulate organic matter (DOM and POM), especially humic substances. Although the water column bacterial community consists of many inactive or damaged cells, bacterioplankton sustained a high bacterial secondary production of 0.2-14.5 μg C L(-1) h(-1) and a high DNA synthesis (thymidine uptake) of 6.1-15.5 μg C L(-1) h(-1). The direct and short-term measurement of bacterial respiration (by optodes) revealed high respiration rates especially in summer leading to directly estimated bacterial growth efficiencies (BGE) of 2-28%. These values are compared to calculations based only on bacterial production, which considerably overestimated BGEs. From all these data, River Warnow can be characterized as a strongly remineralizing system. River Warnow was dominated among others by Cytophaga/Flavobacteria and Actinobacteria which are typical for organic rich waters because of their ability to degrade high molecular weight compounds. However, community composition did not significantly affect BGE.

  14. Bacterial community dynamics and taxa-time relationships within two activated sludge bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Hai, Reti; Wang, Yulin; Wang, Xiaohui; Li, Yuan; Du, Zhize

    2014-01-01

    Biological activated sludge process must be functionally stable to continuously remove contaminants while relying upon the activity of complex microbial communities. However the dynamics of these communities are as yet poorly understood. A macroecology metric used to quantify community dynamic is the taxa-time relationship (TTR). Although the TTR of animal and plant species has been well documented, knowledge is still lacking in regard to TTR of microbial communities in activated sludge bioreactors. 1) To characterize the temporal dynamics of bacterial taxa in activated sludge from two bioreactors of different scale and investigate factors affecting such dynamics; 2) to evaluate the TTRs of activated sludge microbial communities in two bioreactors of different scale. Temporal variation of bacterial taxa in activated sludge collected from a full- and lab-scale activated sludge bioreactor was monitored over a one-year period using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. TTR was employed to quantify the bacterial taxa shifts based on the power law equation S = cTw. The power law exponent w for the full-scale bioreactor was 0.43 (R2 = 0.970), which is lower than that of the lab-scale bioreactor (w = 0.55, R2 = 0.971). The exponents for the dominant phyla were generally higher than that of the rare phyla. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) result showed that the bacterial community variance was significantly associated with water temperature, influent (biochemical oxygen demand) BOD, bioreactor scale and dissolved oxygen (DO). Variance partitioning analyses suggested that wastewater characteristics had the greatest contribution to the bacterial community variance, explaining 20.3% of the variance of bacterial communities independently, followed by operational parameters (19.9%) and bioreactor scale (3.6%). Results of this study suggest bacterial community dynamics were likely driven partly by wastewater and operational parameters and provide evidence that

  15. Bacterial Community Dynamics and Taxa-Time Relationships within Two Activated Sludge Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Reti; Wang, Yulin; Wang, Xiaohui; Li, Yuan; Du, Zhize

    2014-01-01

    Background Biological activated sludge process must be functionally stable to continuously remove contaminants while relying upon the activity of complex microbial communities. However the dynamics of these communities are as yet poorly understood. A macroecology metric used to quantify community dynamic is the taxa-time relationship (TTR). Although the TTR of animal and plant species has been well documented, knowledge is still lacking in regard to TTR of microbial communities in activated sludge bioreactors. Aims 1) To characterize the temporal dynamics of bacterial taxa in activated sludge from two bioreactors of different scale and investigate factors affecting such dynamics; 2) to evaluate the TTRs of activated sludge microbial communities in two bioreactors of different scale. Methods Temporal variation of bacterial taxa in activated sludge collected from a full- and lab-scale activated sludge bioreactor was monitored over a one-year period using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. TTR was employed to quantify the bacterial taxa shifts based on the power law equation S = cTw. Results The power law exponent w for the full-scale bioreactor was 0.43 (R2 = 0.970), which is lower than that of the lab-scale bioreactor (w = 0.55, R2 = 0.971). The exponents for the dominant phyla were generally higher than that of the rare phyla. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) result showed that the bacterial community variance was significantly associated with water temperature, influent (biochemical oxygen demand) BOD, bioreactor scale and dissolved oxygen (DO). Variance partitioning analyses suggested that wastewater characteristics had the greatest contribution to the bacterial community variance, explaining 20.3% of the variance of bacterial communities independently, followed by operational parameters (19.9%) and bioreactor scale (3.6%). Conclusions Results of this study suggest bacterial community dynamics were likely driven partly by wastewater and

  16. Anti-bacterial activity of Achatina CRP and its mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sandip; Barman, Soma; Mandal, Narayan Chandra; Bhattacharya, Shelley

    2014-07-01

    The physiological role of C-reactive protein (CRP), the classical acute-phase protein, is not well documented, despite many reports on biological effects of CRP in vitro and in model systems in vivo. It has been suggested that CRP protects mice against lethal toxicity of bacterial infections by implementing immunological responses. In Achatina fulica CRP is a constitutive multifunctional protein in haemolymph and considered responsible for their survival in the environment for millions of years. The efficacy of Achatina CRP (ACRP) was tested against both Salmonella typhimurium and Bacillus subtilis infections in mice where endogenous CRP level is negligible even after inflammatory stimulus. Further, growth curves of the bacteria revealed that ACRP (50 microg/mL) is bacteriostatic against gram negative salmonellae and bactericidal against gram positive bacilli. ACRP induced energy crises in bacterial cells, inhibited key carbohydrate metabolic enzymes such as phosphofructokinase in glycolysis, isocitrate dehydrogenase in TCA cycle, isocitrate lyase in glyoxylate cycle and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase in gluconeogenesis. ACRP disturbed the homeostasis of cellular redox potential as well as reduced glutathione status, which is accompanied by an enhanced rate of lipid peroxidation. Annexin V-Cy3/CFDA dual staining clearly showed ACRP induced apoptosis-like death in bacterial cell population. Moreover, immunoblot analyses also indicated apoptosis-like death in ACRP treated bacterial cells, where activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP) and caspase-3 was noteworthy. It is concluded that metabolic impairment by ACRP in bacterial cells is primarily due to generation of reactive oxygen species and ACRP induced anti-bacterial effect is mediated by metabolic impairment leading to apoptosis-like death in bacterial cells.

  17. The Effect of Lipopolysaccharide Core Oligosaccharide Size on the Electrostatic Binding of Antimicrobial Proteins to Models of the Gram Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the electrostatic interactions between bacterial membranes and exogenous proteins is crucial to designing effective antimicrobial agents against Gram-negative bacteria. Here we study, using neutron reflecometry under multiple isotopic contrast conditions, the role of the uncharged sugar groups in the outer core region of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in protecting the phosphate-rich inner core region from electrostatic interactions with antimicrobial proteins. Models of the asymmetric Gram negative outer membrane on silicon were prepared with phopshatidylcholine (PC) in the inner leaflet (closest to the silicon), whereas rough LPS was used to form the outer leaflet (facing the bulk solution). We show how salt concentration can be used to reversibly alter the binding affinity of a protein antibiotic colicin N (ColN) to the anionic LPS confirming that the interaction is electrostatic in nature. By examining the interaction of ColN with two rough LPS types with different-sized core oligosaccharide regions we demonstrate the role of uncharged sugars in blocking short-range electrostatic interactions between the cationic antibiotics and the vulnerable anionic phosphate groups. PMID:27003358

  18. Drivers shaping the diversity and biogeography of total and active bacterial communities in the South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yao; Zhao, Zihao; Dai, Minhan; Jiao, Nianzhi; Herndl, Gerhard J

    2014-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that different drivers shape the diversity and biogeography of the total and active bacterial community, we examined the bacterial community composition along two transects, one from the inner Pearl River estuary to the open waters of the South China Sea (SCS) and the other from the Luzon Strait to the SCS basin, using 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene (V1-3 regions) and thereby characterizing the active and total bacterial community, respectively. The diversity and biogeographic patterns differed substantially between the active and total bacterial communities. Although the composition of both the total and active bacterial community was strongly correlated with environmental factors and weakly correlated with geographic distance, the active bacterial community displayed higher environmental sensitivity than the total community and particularly a greater distance effect largely caused by the active assemblage from deep waters. The 16S rRNA vs. rDNA relationships indicated that the active bacteria were low in relative abundance in the SCS. This might be due to a high competition between active bacterial taxa as indicated by our community network models. Based on these analyses, we speculate that high competition could cause some dispersal limitation of the active bacterial community resulting in a distinct distance-decay relationship. Altogether, our results indicated that the biogeographic distribution of bacteria in the SCS is the result of both environmental control and distance decay. PMID:24684298

  19. Active and Secretory IgA-Coated Bacterial Fractions Elucidate Dysbiosis in Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Andrés; Vázquez-Castellanos, Jorge F.; Artacho, Alejandro; Chen, Xinhua; Kelly, Ciaran

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The onset of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been associated with treatment with wide-spectrum antibiotics. Antibiotic treatment alters the activity of gut commensals and may result in modified patterns of immune responses to pathogens. To study these mechanisms during CDI, we separated bacteria with high cellular RNA content (the active bacteria) and their inactive counterparts by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of the fecal bacterial suspension. The gut dysbiosis due to the antibiotic treatment may result in modification of immune recognition of intestinal bacteria. The immune recognition patterns were assessed by FACS of bacterial fractions either coated or not with intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA). We described the taxonomic distributions of these four bacterial fractions (active versus inactive and SIgA coated versus non-SIgA coated) by massive 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and quantified the proportion of C. difficile toxin genes in the samples. The overall gut microbiome composition was more robustly influenced by antibiotics than by the C. difficile toxins. Bayesian networks revealed that the C. difficile cluster was preferentially SIgA coated during CDI. In contrast, in the CDI-negative group Fusobacterium was the characteristic genus of the SIgA-opsonized fraction. Lactobacillales and Clostridium cluster IV were mostly inactive in CDI-positive patients. In conclusion, although the proportion of C. difficile in the gut is very low, it is able to initiate infection during the gut dysbiosis caused by environmental stress (antibiotic treatment) as a consequence of decreased activity of the protective bacteria. IMPORTANCE C. difficile is a major enteric pathogen with worldwide distribution. Its expansion is associated with broad-spectrum antibiotics which disturb the normal gut microbiome. In this study, the DNA sequencing of highly active bacteria and bacteria opsonized by intestinal secretory immunoglobulin

  20. Impedance spectroscopy of micro-Droplets reveals activation of Bacterial Mechanosensitive Channels in Hypotonic Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Aida; Alam, Muhammad A.

    Rapid detection of bacterial pathogens is of great importance in healthcare, food safety, environmental monitoring, and homeland security. Most bacterial detection platforms rely on binary fission (i.e. cell growth) to reach a threshold cell population that can be resolved by the sensing method. Since cell division depends on the bacteria type, the detection time of such methods can vary from hours to days. In contrast, in this work, we show that bacteria cells can be detected within minutes by relying on activation of specific protein channels, i.e. mechanosensitive channels (MS channels). When cells are exposed to hypotonic solutions, MS channels allow efflux of solutes to the external solution which leads to release the excessive membrane tension. Release of the cytoplasmic solutes, in turn, results in increase of the electrical conductance measured by droplet-based impedance sensing. The approach can be an effective technique for fast, pre-screening of bacterial contamination at ultra-low concentration.

  1. Bacterial community composition and chitinase gene diversity of vermicompost with antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Yasir, Muhammad; Aslam, Zubair; Kim, Seon Won; Lee, Seon-Woo; Jeon, Che Ok; Chung, Young Ryun

    2009-10-01

    Bacterial communities and chitinase gene diversity of vermicompost (VC) were investigated to clarify the influence of earthworms on the inhibition of plant pathogenic fungi in VC. The spore germination of Fusarium moniliforme was reduced in VC aqueous extracts prepared from paper sludge and dairy sludge (fresh sludge, FS). The bacterial communities were examined by culture-dependent and -independent analyses. Unique clones selected from 16S rRNA libraries of FS and VC on the basis of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) fell into the major lineages of the domain bacteria Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. Among culture isolates, Actinobacteria dominated in VC, while almost equal numbers of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria were present in FS. Analysis of chitinolytic isolates and chitinase gene diversity revealed that chitinolytic bacterial communities were enriched in VC. Populations of bacteria that inhibited plant fungal pathogens were higher in VC than in FS and particularly chitinolytic isolates were most active against the target fungi.

  2. Bacterial Manipulation of NK Cell Regulatory Activity Increases Susceptibility to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Brandon S.; Schmidt, Rebecca L.; Jamieson, Amanda; Merkel, Patricia; Knight, Vijaya; Cole, Caroline M.; Raulet, David H.; Lenz, Laurel L.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells produce interferon (IFN)-γ and thus have been suggested to promote type I immunity during bacterial infections. Yet, Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) and some other pathogens encode proteins that cause increased NK cell activation. Here, we show that stimulation of NK cell activation increases susceptibility during Lm infection despite and independent from robust NK cell production of IFNγ. The increased susceptibility correlated with IL-10 production by responding NK cells. NK cells produced IL-10 as their IFNγ production waned and the Lm virulence protein p60 promoted induction of IL-10 production by mouse and human NK cells. NK cells consequently exerted regulatory effects to suppress accumulation and activation of inflammatory myeloid cells. Our results reveal new dimensions of the role played by NK cells during Lm infection and demonstrate the ability of this bacterial pathogen to exploit the induction of regulatory NK cell activity to increase host susceptibility. PMID:27295349

  3. Bacterial β-glucosidase function and metabolic activity depend on soil management in semiarid rainfed agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Cañizares, Rosa; Moreno, Beatriz; Benitez, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    Genomic and transcriptomic approaches were used to gain insights into the relationship between soil management and bacterial-mediated functions in an olive orchard agroecosystem. Four management practices were assessed in a 30-year trial in a semiarid Mediterranean region. Transcriptional activity of bacterial 16S rRNA genes increased in noncovered soils, indicating higher microbial maintenance requirements to thrive in less favorable environmental conditions. The 16S rRNA transcript:gene copy ratio confirmed this assumption and pointed toward a much higher constitutive expression from rRNA operons in noncovered soils and to even higher expression levels when spontaneous vegetation was removed chemically. As described for 16S rRNA, potential transcription did not reveal the real transcription of bacterial β-glucosidase genes, and higher gene expression in noncovered soils plus herbicides was evidenced. Since no relationship between total or soluble organic carbon and bacterial β-glucosidase transcription was found, the above hypothesis could indicate either that soluble organic carbon is not the main pool of enzyme-inducing substrates or that constitutive production of bacterial β-glucosidase enzymes increases as soil conditions worsen. PMID:22837821

  4. A Systems Biological Approach Reveals Multiple Crosstalk Mechanism between Gram-Positive and Negative Bacterial Infections: An Insight into Core Mechanism and Unique Molecular Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Thangam, Berla; Ahmed, Shiek S. S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial infections remain a major threat and a leading cause of death worldwide. Most of the bacterial infections are caused by gram-positive and negative bacteria, which are recognized by Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 4, respectively. Activation of these TLRs initiates multiple pathways that subsequently lead to effective immune response. Although, both the TLRs share common signaling mechanism yet they may exhibit specificity as well, resulting in the release of diverse range of inflammatory mediators which could be used as candidate biomolecules for bacterial infections. Results We adopted systems biological approach to identify signaling pathways mediated by TLRs to determine candidate molecules associated with bacterial infections. We used bioinformatics concepts, including literature mining to construct protein-protein interaction network, prioritization of TLRs specific nodes using microarray data and pathway analysis. Our constructed PPI network for TLR 2 (nodes: 4091 and edges: 66068) and TLR 4 (node: 4076 and edges: 67898) showed 3207 common nodes, indicating that both the TLRs might share similar signaling events that are attributed to cell migration, MAPK pathway and several inflammatory cascades. Our results propose the potential collaboration between the shared signaling pathways of both the receptors may enhance the immune response against invading pathogens. Further, to identify candidate molecules, the TLRs specific nodes were prioritized using microarray differential expressed genes. Of the top prioritized TLR 2 molecules, 70% were co-expressed. A similar trend was also observed within TLR 4 nodes. Further, most of these molecules were preferentially found in blood plasma for feasible diagnosis. Conclusions The analysis reveals the common and unique mechanism regulated by both the TLRs that provide a broad perspective of signaling events in bacterial infections. Further, the identified candidate biomolecules could potentially aid

  5. Nano-engineered living bacterial motors for active microfluidic mixing.

    PubMed

    Al-Fandi, M; Jaradat, M A K; Fandi, K; Beech, J P; Tegenfeldt, J O; Yih, T C

    2010-09-01

    Active micromixers with rotating elements are attractive microfluidic actuators in many applications because of their mixing ability at a short distance. However, miniaturising the impeller design poses technical challenges including the fabrication and driving means. As a possible solution inspired by macro magnetic bar-stirrers, this study proposes the use of tethered, rotating bacteria as mixing elements. A tethered cell is a genetically engineered, harmless Escherichia coli (E. coli) attached to a surface by a single, shortened flagellum. The tethered flagellum acts as a pivot around which the entire cell body smoothly rotates. Videomicroscopy, image analysis and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are utilised to demonstrate a proof-of-concept for the micro mixing process. Flow visualisation experiments show that a approximately 3 microm long tethered E. coli rotating at approximately 240 rpm can circulate a 1 microm polystyrene bead in the adjacent area at an average speed of nearly 4 microm/s. The Peclet (Peb) number for the stirred bead is evaluated to approximately 4. CFD simulations show that the rotary motion of a tethered E. coli rotating at 240 rpm can generate fluid velocities, up to 37 microm/s bordering the cell envelop. Based on these simulations, the Strouhal number (St) is calculated to about 2. This hybrid bio-inorganic micromxer could be used as a local, disposable mixer.

  6. Highly bacterial resistant silver nanoparticles: synthesis and antibacterial activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudasama, Bhupendra; Vala, Anjana K.; Andhariya, Nidhi; Mehta, R. V.; Upadhyay, R. V.

    2010-06-01

    In this article, we describe a simple one-pot rapid synthesis route to produce uniform silver nanoparticles by thermal reduction of AgNO3 using oleylamine as reducing and capping agent. To enhance the dispersal ability of as-synthesized hydrophobic silver nanoparticles in water, while maintaining their unique properties, a facile phase transfer mechanism has been developed using biocompatible block co-polymer pluronic F-127. Formation of silver nanoparticles is confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis spectroscopy. Hydrodynamic size and its distribution are obtained from dynamic light scattering (DLS). Hydrodynamic size and size distribution of as-synthesized and phase transferred silver nanoparticles are 8.2 ± 1.5 nm (σ = 18.3%) and 31.1 ± 4.5 nm (σ = 14.5%), respectively. Antimicrobial activities of hydrophilic silver nanoparticles is tested against two Gram positive ( Bacillus megaterium and Staphylococcus aureus), and three Gram negative ( Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris and Shigella sonnei) bacteria. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values obtained in the present study for the tested microorganisms are found much better than those reported for commercially available antibacterial agents.

  7. Inhibition of bacterial activity in acid mine drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurdeep; Bhatnagar, Miss Mridula

    1988-12-01

    Acid mine drainage water give rise to rapid growth and activity of an iron- and sulphur- oxidizing bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidians which greatly accelerate acid producing reactions by oxidation of pyrite material associated with coal and adjoining strata. The role of this bacterium in production of acid mine drainage is described. This study presents the data which demonstrate the inhibitory effect of certain organic acids, sodium benzoate, sodium lauryl sulphate, quarternary ammonium compounds on the growth of the acidophilic aerobic autotroph Thiobacillus ferrooxidians. In each experiment, 10 milli-litres of laboratory developed culture of Thiobacillus ferrooxidians was added to 250 milli-litres Erlenmeyer flask containing 90 milli-litres of 9-k media supplemented with FeSO4 7H2O and organic compounds at various concentrations. Control experiments were also carried out. The treated and untreated (control) samples analysed at various time intervals for Ferrous Iron and pH levels. Results from this investigation showed that some organic acids, sodium benzoate, sodium lauryl sulphate and quarternary ammonium compounds at low concentration (10-2 M, 10-50 ppm concentration levels) are effective bactericides and able to inhibit and reduce the Ferrous Iron oxidation and acidity formation by inhibiting the growth of Thiobacillus ferrooxidians is also discussed and presented

  8. Critical Thoughts About the Core Entrustable Professional Activities in Undergraduate Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Krupat, Edward

    2017-08-29

    The Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency (Core EPAs) have taken a strong hold on undergraduate medical education (UME). This Perspective questions their value added and considers the utility of the Core EPAs along two separate dimensions: (1) the ways they change the content and focus of the goals of UME; and (2) the extent to which entrustable professional activity (EPA)-based assessment conforms to basic principles of measurement theory as practiced in the social sciences. Concerning content and focus, the author asks whether the 13 Core EPAs frame UME too narrowly, putting competencies into the background and overlooking certain aspirational, but important and measurable, objectives of UME. The author also discusses the unevenness of EPAs in terms of their breadth and their developmental status as core activities. Regarding measurement and assessment, the author raises concerns that the EPA metric introduces layers of inference that may cause distortions and hinder accuracy and rater agreement. In addition, the use of weak anchors and multidimensional scales is also of concern. The author concludes with a proposal for reframing the Core EPAs and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies into broadly defined sets of behaviors, referred to as "Tasks of Medicine," and calls for the development of a systematic and longitudinal research agenda. The author asserts that "slowing down when you should" applies to medical education as well as patient care, and calls for a reevaluation of the Core EPAs before further commitment to them.

  9. Antibacterial activities against rice bacterial leaf blight and tomato bacterial wilt of 2-mercapto-5-substituted-1,3,4-oxadiazole/thiadiazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Li, Pei; Shi, Li; Gao, Man-Ni; Yang, Xia; Xue, Wei; Jin, Lin-Hong; Hu, De-Yu; Song, Bao-An

    2015-02-01

    In this study, a series of 2-mercapto-5-substituted-1,3,4-oxadiazole/thiadiazole derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their antibacterial activities against rice bacterial leaf blight and tomato bacterial wilt caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) and Ralstonia solanacearum (R. solanacearum) via the turbidimeter test in vitro. Antibacterial bioassays indicated that most compounds demonstrated appreciable antibacterial bioactivities against Xoo and R. solanacearum. Among the title compounds, compound 4i demonstrated the best inhibitory effect against Xoo and R. solanacearum with half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) values of 14.69 and 15.14μg/mL, respectively, which were even better than those of commercial agents Bismerthiazol and Thiodiazole Copper. In vivo antibacterial activities tests under greenhouse conditions revealed that the control efficiency of compound 4i against rice bacterial leaf blight and tobacco bacterial wilt were better than those of Bismerthiazol and Thiodiazole Copper. Meanwhile, field trials also indicated that compound 4i demonstrated appreciable control efficiency against rice bacterial leaf blight and tomato bacterial wilt.

  10. Human caspase-4 mediates noncanonical inflammasome activation against gram-negative bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Casson, Cierra N.; Yu, Janet; Reyes, Valeria M.; Taschuk, Frances O.; Yadav, Anjana; Copenhaver, Alan M.; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Collman, Ronald G.; Shin, Sunny

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasomes are critical for host defense against bacterial pathogens. In murine macrophages infected by gram-negative bacteria, the canonical inflammasome activates caspase-1 to mediate pyroptotic cell death and release of IL-1 family cytokines. Additionally, a noncanonical inflammasome controlled by caspase-11 induces cell death and IL-1 release. However, humans do not encode caspase-11. Instead, humans encode two putative orthologs: caspase-4 and caspase-5. Whether either ortholog functions similar to caspase-11 is poorly defined. Therefore, we sought to define the inflammatory caspases in primary human macrophages that regulate inflammasome responses to gram-negative bacteria. We find that human macrophages activate inflammasomes specifically in response to diverse gram-negative bacterial pathogens that introduce bacterial products into the host cytosol using specialized secretion systems. In primary human macrophages, IL-1β secretion requires the caspase-1 inflammasome, whereas IL-1α release and cell death are caspase-1–independent. Instead, caspase-4 mediates IL-1α release and cell death. Our findings implicate human caspase-4 as a critical regulator of noncanonical inflammasome activation that initiates defense against bacterial pathogens in primary human macrophages. PMID:25964352

  11. Disconnect of microbial structure and function: enzyme activities and bacterial communities in nascent stream corridors

    PubMed Central

    Frossard, Aline; Gerull, Linda; Mutz, Michael; Gessner, Mark O

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental issue in microbial and general ecology is the question to what extent environmental conditions dictate the structure of communities and the linkages with functional properties of ecosystems (that is, ecosystem function). We approached this question by taking advantage of environmental gradients established in soil and sediments of small stream corridors in a recently created, early successional catchment. Specifically, we determined spatial and temporal patterns of bacterial community structure and their linkages with potential microbial enzyme activities along the hydrological flow paths of the catchment. Soil and sediments were sampled in a total of 15 sites on four occasions spread throughout a year. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to characterize bacterial communities, and substrate analogs linked to fluorescent molecules served to track 10 different enzymes as specific measures of ecosystem function. Potential enzyme activities varied little among sites, despite contrasting environmental conditions, especially in terms of water availability. Temporal changes, in contrast, were pronounced and remarkably variable among the enzymes tested. This suggests much greater importance of temporal dynamics than spatial heterogeneity in affecting specific ecosystem functions. Most strikingly, bacterial community structure revealed neither temporal nor spatial patterns. The resulting disconnect between bacterial community structure and potential enzyme activities indicates high functional redundancy within microbial communities even in the physically and biologically simplified stream corridors of early successional landscapes. PMID:22030674

  12. Antibacterial activity and mechanism of action of auranofin against multi-drug resistant bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F. N.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Paul, Lake N.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional methods employed to discover new antibiotics are both a time-consuming and financially-taxing venture. This has led researchers to mine existing libraries of clinical molecules in order to repurpose old drugs for new applications (as antimicrobials). Such an effort led to the discovery of auranofin, a drug initially approved as an anti-rheumatic agent, which also possesses potent antibacterial activity in a clinically achievable range. The present study demonstrates auranofin’s antibacterial activity is a complex process that involves inhibition of multiple biosynthetic pathways including cell wall, DNA, and bacterial protein synthesis. We also confirmed that the lack of activity of auranofin observed against Gram-negative bacteria is due to the permeability barrier conferred by the outer membrane. Auranofin’s ability to suppress bacterial protein synthesis leads to significant reduction in the production of key methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) toxins. Additionally, auranofin is capable of eradicating intracellular MRSA present inside infected macrophage cells. Furthermore, auranofin is efficacious in a mouse model of MRSA systemic infection and significantly reduces the bacterial load in murine organs including the spleen and liver. Collectively, this study provides valuable evidence that auranofin has significant promise to be repurposed as a novel antibacterial for treatment of invasive bacterial infections. PMID:26936660

  13. Impact of freshwater inflow on bacterial abundance and activity in the estuarine system Ria de Aveiro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Luísa; Vaz, Leandro; Marcial Gomes, Newton C.; Vaz, Nuno; Dias, João Miguel; Cunha, Ângela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2014-02-01

    The influence of freshwater flow on bacterial communities in the estuarine system Ria de Aveiro (Portugal) was investigated at two sites differently impacted by river inputs, representative of the marine and brackish water zones of the estuary. Sampling events were clustered based on hydrological features. The hydrodynamic was simulated with a Lagrangian model and related to microbiological parameters. Estuarine bacteria responded to different freshwater regimes developing distinct patterns of abundance and activity at the marine and brackish water zones. A circulation pattern induced by high river inflow produced vertical stratification in the marine zone, promoting a seaward flux of bacterioplankton, and stimulating the import of riverine phytoplankton and particle-attached bacteria to the brackish water zone. Advective transport and resuspension processes contributed to a 3-times increase in abundance of particle-attached bacteria during intense freshwater inputs. Additionally, bacterial activity in the estuary was controlled by inorganic nitrogen, responding to different freshwater inputs, which, in association with different prevailing sources of organic substrates induced significant changes in bacterial production. The dynamic and main controlling factors of bacterial communities are clearly impacted by freshwater inputs. Therefore, significant changes in the recycling of nutrients by microbial activities can be expected from alterations in freshwater inputs either related to global climate change or regional hydrological regimes.

  14. Surface-Active Agents for Isolation of the Core Component of Avian Myeloblastosis Virus 1

    PubMed Central

    Stromberg, Kurt

    1972-01-01

    Sixty-one surface-active agents were evaluated in a procedure designed to assess their ability to remove the envelope from the core component of avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV). The procedure consisted of centrifugation of intact AMV through a series of sucrose gradients each containing an upper layer of agent at one of eight concentrations between 0.01 and 10%. The effectiveness of an agent in producing AMV cores was indicated by (i) the appearance of light-scattering bands in the region of core buoyant density in gradient tubes; (ii) the range of surfactant concentration over which these bands appeared; and (iii) an electron microscopy assessment by the negative-staining technique of the relative proportion of core to non-core material in each of these bands. Six nonionic surfactants were selected by this screening method for comparison in regard to recovery of core protein and endogenous ribonucleic acid (RNA)-dependent deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) polymerase activity, as well as further morphologic evaluation by electron microscopy. The nonionic surfactants of the polyoxyethylene alcohol class (particularly, Sterox SL) were most effective. Nonionic surfactants of the polyoxyethylene alkylphenol class (particularly, Nonidet P-40) were also effective. Sterox SL and Nonidet P-40 each gave a more than fivefold increase in specific activity of endogenous RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, and each gave a low recovery of core protein. Sterox SL did not interfere to the extent that Nonidet P-40 did in procedures which involved spectrophotometric assay at 260 nm. The use of Sterox SL resulted in the least envelope contamination of core preparations by electron microscopy examination, the most recovery of protein and endogenous RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity, and a core buoyant density in sucrose of 1.27 g/ml. Images PMID:4112071

  15. Bacterial community and function of biological activated carbon filter in drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, DuoYing; Li, WeiGuang; Zhang, ShuMei; Liu, Miao; Zhao, XiaoYu; Zhang, XianCheng

    2011-04-01

    It aims to investigate the changes in composition and structure of bacterial communities developing on biological activated carbon (BAC) particles, and the bacterial functions. A pilot plant had been in service for 180 days, aiming to develop bacterial communities on activated carbon naturally. After 180 days of operation, the bacterial communities were determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes. The study on community composition and the phylogenetic relationships of the organisms was complemented by a sequence analysis of cloned PCR products from 16S rRNA genes. Gas chromatography-mass (GC-MS) measurement was used to determine organic chemical composition of inflow and outflow water on the 300th day. TOC and NH(4)(+)-N were also tested in this experiment. It showed that the stable bacterial structure did not develop on BAC particles until the 9th month during running time of the BAC filter. The communities were finally dominated by Pseudomonas sp., Ba-cillus sp., Nitrospira sp., and an uncultured bacterium. Stable bacterial communities played an important role in removal of NH(4)(+)-N and total organic carbon (TOC). Results from gas chromatography-mass (GC-MS) showed that 36 kinds of chemicals in feed water were eliminated, and concentrations of 5 kinds of chemicals decreased. These chemicals served as nutrients for the dominant bacteria. The findings from the study suggested that the stability of microbial structure was beneficial for improving NH(4)(+)-N and TOC removal efficiencies. The dominant bacteria had the advantage of biode-grading a wide range of organic chemicals and NH(4)(+)-N. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Thermal analysis of HTS air-core transformer used in voltage compensation type active SFCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, M.; Tang, Y.; Li, J.; Zhou, Y.; Chen, L.; Ren, L.

    2010-11-01

    The three-phase voltage compensation type active superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) is composed of three HTS air-core transformers and a three-phase four-wire Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) converter. The primary winding of the each phase HTS air-core transformer is in series with the main system, and the second winding is connected with the PWM converter. The single-phase conduction-cooled HTS air-core transformer is consisting of four double-pancakes wound by the Bi2223/Ag tape. In this paper, according to the electromagnetic analysis on the single-phase HTS air-core transformer, its AC loss corresponding to different operation modes is calculated. Furthermore, the thermal behaviors are studied by the time-stepping numerical simulations. On the basis of the simulation results, the related problems with the HTS air-core transformer's thermal stability are discussed.

  17. Core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles with enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction via core-shell Au@Ag/Pd constructions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Li, Chengyin; Liu, Hui; Ye, Feng; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles often exhibit improved catalytic properties due to the lattice strain created in these core-shell particles. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles from their core-shell Au@Ag/Pd parents. This strategy begins with the preparation of core-shell Au@Ag nanoparticles in an organic solvent. Then, the pure Ag shells are converted into the shells made of Ag/Pd alloy by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shells and Pd2+ precursors. Subsequently, the Ag component is removed from the alloy shell using saturated NaCl solution to form core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles with an Au core and a Pd shell. In comparison with the core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles upon directly depositing Pd shell on the Au seeds and commercial Pd/C catalysts, the core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles via their core-shell Au@Ag/Pd templates display superior activity and durability in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction, mainly due to the larger lattice tensile effect in Pd shell induced by the Au core and Ag removal. PMID:26144550

  18. Microfluidic synthesis of Ag@Cu2O core-shell nanoparticles with enhanced photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Tao, Sha; Yang, Mei; Chen, Huihui; Ren, Mingyue; Chen, Guangwen

    2017-01-15

    A microfluidic-based method for the continuous synthesis of Ag@Cu2O core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) has been developed. It only took 32s to obtain Ag@Cu2O core-shell NPs, indicating a high efficiency of this microfluidic-based method. Triangular Ag nanoprisms were employed as the cores for the overgrowth of Cu2O through the reduction of Cu(OH)4(2-) with ascorbic acid. The as-synthesized samples were characterized by XRD, TEM, SEM, HAADF-STEM, EDX, HRTEM, UV-vis spectra and N2 adsorption-desorption. The characterization results revealed that the as-synthesized Ag@Cu2O core-shell NPs exhibited a well-defined core-shell nanostructure with a polycrystalline shell, which was composed of numbers of Cu2O domains epitaxially growing on the triangular Ag nanoprism. It was concluded that the synthesis parameters such as the molar ratio of trisodium citrate to AgNO3, H2O2 to AgNO3, NaOH to CuSO4, ascorbic acid to CuSO4 and AgNO3 to CuSO4 had significant effect on the synthesis of Ag@Cu2O core-shell NPs. Moreover, Ag@Cu2O core-shell NPs exhibited superior catalytic activity in comparison with pristine Cu2O NPs towards the visible light-driven degradation of methyl orange. This enhanced photocatalytic activity of Ag@Cu2O core-shell NPs was attributed to the larger BET surface area and improved charge separation efficiency. The trapping experiment indicated that holes and superoxide anion radicals were the major reactive species in the photodegradation of methyl orange over Ag@Cu2O core-shell NPs. In addition, Ag@Cu2O core-shell NPs showed no obvious deactivation in the cyclic test.

  19. Screening of anti-bacterial activity of medicinal plants from Belize (Central America).

    PubMed

    Camporese, A; Balick, M J; Arvigo, R; Esposito, R G; Morsellino, N; De Simone, F; Tubaro, A

    2003-07-01

    Twenty-one extracts from seven herbal drugs, Aristolochia trilobata (Aristolochiaceae) leaves and bark, Bursera simaruba (Burseraceae) bark, Guazuma ulmifolia (Sterculiaceae) bark, Hamelia patens (Rubiaceae) leaves and Syngonium podophyllum (Araceae) leaves and bark, used in traditional medicine of Belize (Central America) as deep and superficial wound healers, were evaluated for their anti-bacterial properties. Activity was tested against standard strains of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212. Almost all the extracts were able to inhibit the growth of one or more of the bacterial strains, except that of Enterococcus faecalis. For the first time an anti-microbial activity is reported for Aristolochia trilobata as well as for Syngonium podophyllum. The hexane extracts of Aristolochia trilobata leaves and bark were the most active extracts against Staphylococcus aureus (MIC=0.31 and 0.625mg/ml, respectively).

  20. In Vitro Activity of Delafloxacin against Contemporary Bacterial Pathogens from the United States and Europe, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M. A.; Sader, H. S.; Rhomberg, P. R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The in vitro activities of delafloxacin and comparator antimicrobial agents against 6,485 bacterial isolates collected from medical centers in Europe and the United States in 2014 were tested. Delafloxacin was the most potent agent tested against methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, viridans group streptococci, and beta-hemolytic streptococci and had activity similar to that of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin against certain members of the Enterobacteriaceae. Overall, the broadest coverage of the tested pathogens (Gram-positive cocci and Gram-negative bacilli) was observed with meropenem and tigecycline in both Europe and the United States. Delafloxacin was shown to be active against organisms that may be encountered in acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections, respiratory infections, and urinary tract infections. PMID:28167542

  1. Measurements of Bacterial Concentrations on a Millimeter Scale in Ice Cores With a Scanning Laser Fluorescence Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, P.; Rohde, R. A.; Bramall, N. E.; Bay, R. C.

    2006-12-01

    We report non-destructive detection of variability on a mm depth scale in the organic content of ice cores at NICL, as determined by the fluorescence spectrum measured by a Targeted Ultraviolet Chemical Sensor (TUCS). Many of the spectra we obtained are consistent with the amino acid tryptophan, a strongly fluorescing constituent in microbes. Identification with native fluorescence of microbes is supported by previous measurements of varying microbial concentration in samples from selected regions of the GISP2 core (Tung et al., 2005; 2006) that are consistent with our observations at the same depths. Sub-mm depth resolution was achieved and structure at this scale was observed. At each depth the fluorescence emission spectrum was measured at 5 wavelengths using 20-nm narrow band filters plus a long pass channel. The spectrum of microbes was calibrated by making lab measurements of fluorescence of various species and is distinguishable from mineral dust and metals due to differences in spectral shape. In bulk ice samples from 3 depths in the GISP2 core, where a table of methane concentrations (Ed Brook, unpublished) had shown several excesses above the atmospheric contribution, Tung et al. (2005) found 10-fold excesses of microbial concentrations at 2954 m and 3036 m and a 3-fold excess at 3018 m. In the present work we found strong, rapidly varying organic signals at all three depths. At 3018 m the peak value was much stronger than that obtained by Brook and occurred in the core section below the one he studied. Since he measured methane at several-meter depth intervals, and since we found the microbial excesses to be concentrated in 0.3 m intervals, we conclude that of order 30 microbe-rich regions may be present in GISP2. The 3 microbe-rich depths found by Tung et al. (2005) were less than 90 m above the basal ice at 3041-3053 m. The large fluctuations in apparent tryptophan concentrations that we found at 2954, 3018, and 3036 m are consistent with microbe

  2. Development and application of the active surveillance of pathogens microarray to monitor bacterial gene flux

    PubMed Central

    Stabler, Richard A; Dawson, Lisa F; Oyston, Petra CF; Titball, Richard W; Wade, Jim; Hinds, Jason; Witney, Adam A; Wren, Brendan W

    2008-01-01

    Background Human and animal health is constantly under threat by emerging pathogens that have recently acquired genetic determinants that enhance their survival, transmissibility and virulence. We describe the construction and development of an Active Surveillance of Pathogens (ASP) oligonucleotide microarray, designed to 'actively survey' the genome of a given bacterial pathogen for virulence-associated genes. Results The microarray consists of 4958 reporters from 151 bacterial species and include genes for the identification of individual bacterial species as well as mobile genetic elements (transposons, plasmid and phage), virulence genes and antibiotic resistance genes. The ASP microarray was validated with nineteen bacterial pathogens species, including Francisella tularensis, Clostridium difficile, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The ASP microarray identified these bacteria, and provided information on potential antibiotic resistance (eg sufamethoxazole resistance and sulfonamide resistance) and virulence determinants including genes likely to be acquired by horizontal gene transfer (e.g. an alpha-haemolysin). Conclusion The ASP microarray has potential in the clinic as a diagnostic tool, as a research tool for both known and emerging pathogens, and as an early warning system for pathogenic bacteria that have been recently modified either naturally or deliberately. PMID:18844996

  3. A teleost complement factor Ba possesses antimicrobial activity and inhibits bacterial infection in fish.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Peng; Sun, Li

    2017-01-24

    Complement factor B (Bf) is a component of the complement system. Following activation of the alternative pathway of the complement system, factor B is cleaved into Ba and Bb fragments. In fish, the Bf of rainbow trout is known to act as a C3 convertase, but the function of the Ba fragment is essentially unknown. In this study, we examined the expression patterns of tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis Bf (named CsBf) and the biological activity of the Ba fragment of CsBf (named CsBa). CsBf possesses the conserved domains of Bf and shares 39.9%-56.4% sequence identities with other fish Bf. CsBf expression was high in liver, muscle, and heart, and low in intestine, blood, and kidney. Bacterial infection significantly induced CsBf expression in kidney, spleen, and liver in a time-dependent manner. Recombinant CsBa (rCsBa) exhibited apparent binding capacities to bacteria and tongue sole peripheral blood leukocytes, and binding of rCsBa to bacteria inhibited bacterial growth. When overexpressed in tongue sole, CsBa significantly reduced bacterial dissemination in fish tissues. Together these results indicate for the first time that a fish Ba possesses antibacterial effect as well as immune cell-binding capacity, and thus probably plays a role in host immune defense against bacterial infection.

  4. Electrosprayed core-shell polymer-lipid nanoparticles for active component delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltayeb, Megdi; Stride, Eleanor; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2013-11-01

    A key challenge in the production of multicomponent nanoparticles for healthcare applications is obtaining reproducible monodisperse nanoparticles with the minimum number of preparation steps. This paper focus on the use of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) techniques to produce core-shell polymer-lipid structures with a narrow size distribution in a single step process. These nanoparticles are composed of a hydrophilic core for active component encapsulation and a lipid shell. It was found that core-shell nanoparticles with a tunable size range between 30 and 90 nm and a narrow size distribution could be reproducibly manufactured. The results indicate that the lipid component (stearic acid) stabilizes the nanoparticles against collapse and aggregation and improves entrapment of active components, in this case vanillin, ethylmaltol and maltol. The overall structure of the nanoparticles produced was examined by multiple methods, including transmission electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, to confirm that they were of core-shell form.

  5. Electrosprayed core-shell polymer-lipid nanoparticles for active component delivery.

    PubMed

    Eltayeb, Megdi; Stride, Eleanor; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2013-11-22

    A key challenge in the production of multicomponent nanoparticles for healthcare applications is obtaining reproducible monodisperse nanoparticles with the minimum number of preparation steps. This paper focus on the use of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) techniques to produce core-shell polymer-lipid structures with a narrow size distribution in a single step process. These nanoparticles are composed of a hydrophilic core for active component encapsulation and a lipid shell. It was found that core-shell nanoparticles with a tunable size range between 30 and 90 nm and a narrow size distribution could be reproducibly manufactured. The results indicate that the lipid component (stearic acid) stabilizes the nanoparticles against collapse and aggregation and improves entrapment of active components, in this case vanillin, ethylmaltol and maltol. The overall structure of the nanoparticles produced was examined by multiple methods, including transmission electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, to confirm that they were of core-shell form.

  6. Dye-Sensitized Core/Active Shell Upconversion Nanoparticles for Optogenetics and Bioimaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiang; Zhang, Yuanwei; Takle, Kendra; Bilsel, Osman; Li, Zhanjun; Lee, Hyungseok; Zhang, Zijiao; Li, Dongsheng; Fan, Wei; Duan, Chunying; Chan, Emory M; Lois, Carlos; Xiang, Yang; Han, Gang

    2016-01-26

    Near-infrared (NIR) dye-sensitized upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) can broaden the absorption range and boost upconversion efficiency of UCNPs. Here, we achieved significantly enhanced upconversion luminescence in dye-sensitized core/active shell UCNPs via the doping of ytterbium ions (Yb(3+)) in the UCNP shell, which bridged the energy transfer from the dye to the UCNP core. As a result, we synergized the two most practical upconversion booster effectors (dye-sensitizing and core/shell enhancement) to amplify upconversion efficiency. We demonstrated two biomedical applications using these UCNPs. By using dye-sensitized core/active shell UCNP embedded poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer implantable systems, we successfully shifted the optogenetic neuron excitation window to a biocompatible and deep tissue penetrable 800 nm wavelength. Furthermore, UCNPs were water-solubilized with Pluronic F127 with high upconversion efficiency and can be imaged in a mouse model.

  7. Dye-Sensitized Core/Active Shell Upconversion Nanoparticles for Optogenetics and Bioimaging Applications

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Xiang; Zhang, Yuanwei; Takle, Kendra; ...

    2016-01-06

    A near-infrared (NIR) dye-sensitized upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) can broaden the absorption range and boost upconversion efficiency of UCNPs. We achieved significantly enhanced upconversion luminescence in dye-sensitized core/active shell UCNPs via the doping of ytterbium ions (Yb 3+ ) in the UCNP shell, which bridged the energy transfer from the dye to the UCNP core. As a result, we synergized the two most practical upconversion booster effectors (dye-sensitizing and core/shell enhancement) to amplify upconversion efficiency. We also demonstrated two biomedical applications using these UCNPs. By using dye-sensitized core/active shell UCNP embedded poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer implantable systems, we successfully shifted the optogeneticmore » neuron excitation window to a biocompatible and deep tissue penetrable 800 nm wavelength. Furthermore, UCNPs were water-solubilized with Pluronic F127 with high upconversion efficiency and can be imaged in a mouse model.« less

  8. Dye-Sensitized Core/Active Shell Upconversion Nanoparticles for Optogenetics and Bioimaging Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xiang; Zhang, Yuanwei; Takle, Kendra; Bilsel, Osman; Li, Zhanjun; Lee, Hyungseok; Zhang, Zijiao; Li, Dongsheng; Fan, Wei; Duan, Chunying; Chan, Emory M.; Lois, Carlos; Xiang, Yang; Han, Gang

    2016-01-06

    A near-infrared (NIR) dye-sensitized upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) can broaden the absorption range and boost upconversion efficiency of UCNPs. We achieved significantly enhanced upconversion luminescence in dye-sensitized core/active shell UCNPs via the doping of ytterbium ions (Yb 3+ ) in the UCNP shell, which bridged the energy transfer from the dye to the UCNP core. As a result, we synergized the two most practical upconversion booster effectors (dye-sensitizing and core/shell enhancement) to amplify upconversion efficiency. We also demonstrated two biomedical applications using these UCNPs. By using dye-sensitized core/active shell UCNP embedded poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer implantable systems, we successfully shifted the optogenetic neuron excitation window to a biocompatible and deep tissue penetrable 800 nm wavelength. Furthermore, UCNPs were water-solubilized with Pluronic F127 with high upconversion efficiency and can be imaged in a mouse model.

  9. Core-shell TiO2 microsphere with enhanced photocatalytic activity and improved lithium storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hong; Tian, Dongxue; Liu, Lixiang; Wang, Yapeng; Guo, Yuan; Yang, Xiangjun

    2013-05-01

    Inorganic hollow core-shell spheres have attracted considerable interest due to their singular properties and wide range of potential applications. Herein a novel facile generic strategy of combining template assisted and solvothermal alcoholysis is employed to prepare core-void-shell anatase TiO2 nanoparticle aggregates with an excellent photocatalytic activity, and enhanced lithium storage in large quantities. Amorphous carbon can be loaded on the TiO2 nanoparticles uniformly under a suitably formulated ethanol/water system in the solvothermal alcoholysis process, and the subsequent calcination results of the formation of core-shell-shell anatase TiO2 nanoparticle aggregates. The intrinsic core-void-shell nature as well as high porosity of the unique nanostructures contributes greatly to the superior photocatalytic activity and improved performance as anode materials for lithium ion batteries.

  10. Isolation of a lead tolerant novel bacterial species, Achromobacter sp. TL-3: assessment of bioflocculant activity.

    PubMed

    Batta, Neha; Subudhi, Sanjukta; Lal, Banwari; Devi, Arundhuti

    2013-11-01

    Lead is one of the four heavy metals that has a profound damaging effects on human health. In the recent past there has been an increasing global concern for development of sustainable bioremediation technologies for detoxification of lead contaminant. Present investigation highlights for lead biosorption by a newly isolated novel bacterial species; Achromobacter sp. TL-3 strain, isolated from activated sludge samples contaminated with heavy metals (collected from oil refinery, Assam, North-East India). For isolation of lead tolerant bacteria, sludge samples were enriched into Luria Broth medium supplemented separately with a range of lead nitrate; 250, 500, 750, 1000, 1250 and 1500 ppm respectively. The bacterial consortium that could tolerate 1500 ppm of lead nitrate was selected further for purification of lead tolerant bacterial isolates. Purified lead tolerant bacterial isolates were then eventually inoculated into production medium supplemented with ethanol and glycerol as carbon and energy source to investigate for bioflocculant production. Bioflocculant production was estimated by monitoring the potential of lead tolerant bacterial isolate to flocculate Kaolin clay in presence of 1% CaCl2. Compared to other isolates, TL-3 isolate demonstrated for maximum bioflocculant activity of 95% and thus was identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. TL3 isolate revealed maximum homology (98%) with Achromobacter sp. and thus designated as Achromobacter sp. TL-3. Bioflocculant activity of TL-3 isolate was correlated with the change in pH and growth. Achromobacter sp. TL-3 has significant potential for lead biosorption and can be effectively employed for detoxification of lead contaminated waste effluents/waste waters.

  11. Role of Pore Size Location in Determining Bacterial Activity during Predation by Protozoa in Soil.

    PubMed

    Wright, D A; Killham, K; Glover, L A; Prosser, J I

    1995-10-01

    The predation of a luminescence-marked strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens by the soil ciliate Colpoda steinii was studied in soil microcosms. Bacterial cells were introduced in either small (neck diameter, <6 (mu)m) or intermediate-sized (neck diameter, 6 to 30 (mu)m) pores in the soil by inoculation at appropriate matric potentials, and ciliates were introduced into large pores (neck diameter, 30 to 60 (mu)m). Viable cell concentrations of bacteria introduced into intermediate-sized pores decreased at a greater rate than those in small pores, with reductions in bacterial populations being accompanied by an increase in viable cell numbers of the ciliate. The data indicate that the location of bacteria in small pores provides significant protection from predation. In the absence of C. steinii, the level of metabolic activity of the bacterial population, measured by luminometry, decreased at a greater rate than cell number, and the level of luminescence cell(sup-1) consequently decreased. The decrease in levels of luminescence indicates a loss of activity due to starvation. During predation by C. steinii, the level of the activity of cells introduced into small pores fell in a similar manner. The level of cell activity was, however, significantly greater for cells introduced into intermediate-sized pores, despite their greater susceptibility to predation. The data suggest that increased activity arises from a release of nutrients by the predator and the greater accessibility of bacteria to nutrients in larger pores. Nutrient amendment of microcosms resulted in increases in bacterial populations to sustained, higher levels, while levels of luminescence increased transiently. The predation of cells introduced into intermediate-sized pores was greater, and there was also evidence that the level of activity of surviving bacteria was greater for bacteria in intermediate-sized but not small pores.

  12. Muralytic activity of Micrococcus luteus Rpf and its relationship to physiological activity in promoting bacterial growth and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Mukamolova, Galina V; Murzin, Alexey G; Salina, Elena G; Demina, Galina R; Kell, Douglas B; Kaprelyants, Arseny S; Young, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The culturability of several actinobacteria is controlled by resuscitation-promoting factors (Rpfs). These are proteins containing a c. 70-residue domain that adopts a lysozyme-like fold. The invariant catalytic glutamate residue found in lysozyme and various bacterial lytic transglycosylases is also conserved in the Rpf proteins. Rpf from Micrococcus luteus, the founder member of this protein family, is indeed a muralytic enzyme, as revealed by its activity in zymograms containing M. luteus cell walls and its ability to (i) cause lysis of Escherichia coli when expressed and secreted into the periplasm; (ii) release fluorescent material from fluorescamine-labelled cell walls of M. luteus; and (iii) hydrolyse the artificial lysozyme substrate, 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-N,N',N''-triacetylchitotrioside. Rpf activity was reduced but not completely abolished when the invariant glutamate residue was altered. Moreover, none of the other acidic residues in the Rpf domain was absolutely required for muralytic activity. Replacement of one or both of the cysteine residues that probably form a disulphide bridge within Rpf impaired but did not completely abolish muralytic activity. The muralytic activities of the Rpf mutants were correlated with their abilities to stimulate bacterial culturability and resuscitation, consistent with the view that the biological activity of Rpf results directly or indirectly from its ability to cleave bonds in bacterial peptidoglycan.

  13. Baseplate assembly of phage Mu: Defining the conserved core components of contractile-tailed phages and related bacterial systems

    PubMed Central

    Büttner, Carina R.; Wu, Yingzhou; Maxwell, Karen L.; Davidson, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    Contractile phage tails are powerful cell puncturing nanomachines that have been co-opted by bacteria for self-defense against both bacteria and eukaryotic cells. The tail of phage T4 has long served as the paradigm for understanding contractile tail-like systems despite its greater complexity compared with other contractile-tailed phages. Here, we present a detailed investigation of the assembly of a “simple” contractile-tailed phage baseplate, that of Escherichia coli phage Mu. By coexpressing various combinations of putative Mu baseplate proteins, we defined the required components of this baseplate and delineated its assembly pathway. We show that the Mu baseplate is constructed through the independent assembly of wedges that are organized around a central hub complex. The Mu wedges are comprised of only three protein subunits rather than the seven found in the equivalent structure in T4. Through extensive bioinformatic analyses, we found that homologs of the essential components of the Mu baseplate can be identified in the majority of contractile-tailed phages and prophages. No T4-like prophages were identified. The conserved simple baseplate components were also found in contractile tail-derived bacterial apparatuses, such as type VI secretion systems, Photorhabdus virulence cassettes, and R-type tailocins. Our work highlights the evolutionary connections and similarities in the biochemical behavior of phage Mu wedge components and the TssF and TssG proteins of the type VI secretion system. In addition, we demonstrate the importance of the Mu baseplate as a model system for understanding bacterial phage tail-derived systems. PMID:27555589

  14. Baseplate assembly of phage Mu: Defining the conserved core components of contractile-tailed phages and related bacterial systems.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Carina R; Wu, Yingzhou; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2016-09-06

    Contractile phage tails are powerful cell puncturing nanomachines that have been co-opted by bacteria for self-defense against both bacteria and eukaryotic cells. The tail of phage T4 has long served as the paradigm for understanding contractile tail-like systems despite its greater complexity compared with other contractile-tailed phages. Here, we present a detailed investigation of the assembly of a "simple" contractile-tailed phage baseplate, that of Escherichia coli phage Mu. By coexpressing various combinations of putative Mu baseplate proteins, we defined the required components of this baseplate and delineated its assembly pathway. We show that the Mu baseplate is constructed through the independent assembly of wedges that are organized around a central hub complex. The Mu wedges are comprised of only three protein subunits rather than the seven found in the equivalent structure in T4. Through extensive bioinformatic analyses, we found that homologs of the essential components of the Mu baseplate can be identified in the majority of contractile-tailed phages and prophages. No T4-like prophages were identified. The conserved simple baseplate components were also found in contractile tail-derived bacterial apparatuses, such as type VI secretion systems, Photorhabdus virulence cassettes, and R-type tailocins. Our work highlights the evolutionary connections and similarities in the biochemical behavior of phage Mu wedge components and the TssF and TssG proteins of the type VI secretion system. In addition, we demonstrate the importance of the Mu baseplate as a model system for understanding bacterial phage tail-derived systems.

  15. Neutrophils to the ROScue: Mechanisms of NADPH Oxidase Activation and Bacterial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Giang T.; Green, Erin R.; Mecsas, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by NADPH oxidase play an important role in antimicrobial host defense and inflammation. Their deficiency in humans results in recurrent and severe bacterial infections, while their unregulated release leads to pathology from excessive inflammation. The release of high concentrations of ROS aids in clearance of invading bacteria. Localization of ROS release to phagosomes containing pathogens limits tissue damage. Host immune cells, like neutrophils, also known as PMNs, will release large amounts of ROS at the site of infection following the activation of surface receptors. The binding of ligands to G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), toll-like receptors, and cytokine receptors can prime PMNs for a more robust response if additional signals are encountered. Meanwhile, activation of Fc and integrin directly induces high levels of ROS production. Additionally, GPCRs that bind to the bacterial-peptide analog fMLP, a neutrophil chemoattractant, can both prime cells and trigger low levels of ROS production. Engagement of these receptors initiates intracellular signaling pathways, resulting in activation of downstream effector proteins, assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex, and ultimately, the production of ROS by this complex. Within PMNs, ROS released by the NADPH oxidase complex can activate granular proteases and induce the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Additionally, ROS can cross the membranes of bacterial pathogens and damage their nucleic acids, proteins, and cell membranes. Consequently, in order to establish infections, bacterial pathogens employ various strategies to prevent restriction by PMN-derived ROS or downstream consequences of ROS production. Some pathogens are able to directly prevent the oxidative burst of phagocytes using secreted effector proteins or toxins that interfere with translocation of the NADPH oxidase complex or signaling pathways needed for its activation. Nonetheless, these

  16. DNA-based stable isotope probing enables the identification of active bacterial endophytes in potatoes.

    PubMed

    Rasche, Frank; Lueders, Tillmann; Schloter, Michael; Schaefer, Sabine; Buegger, Franz; Gattinger, Andreas; Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca C; Sessitsch, Angela

    2009-03-01

    A (13)CO2 (99 atom-%, 350 ppm) incubation experiment was performed to identify active bacterial endophytes in two cultivars of Solanum tuberosum, cultivars Desirée and Merkur. We showed that after the assimilation and photosynthetic transformation of (13)CO2 into (13)C-labeled metabolites by the plant, the most directly active, cultivar specific heterotrophic endophytic bacteria that consume these labeled metabolite scan be identified by DNA stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP).Density-resolved DNA fractions obtained from SIP were subjected to 16S rRNA gene-based community analysis using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and sequencing of generated gene libraries.Community profiling revealed community compositions that were dominated by plant chloroplast and mitochondrial 16S rRNA genes for the 'light' fractions of (13)CO2-incubated potato cultivars and of potato cultivars not incubated with (13)CO2. In the 'heavy' fractions of the (13)CO2-incubated endophyte DNA, a bacterial 492-bp terminal restriction fragment became abundant, which could be clearly identified as Acinetobacter and Acidovorax spp. in cultivars Merkur and Desirée,respectively, indicating cultivar-dependent distinctions in (13)C-label flow. These two species represent two common potato endophytes with known plant-beneficial activities.The approach demonstrated the successful detection of active bacterial endophytes in potato. DNA-SIP therefore offers new opportunities for exploring the complex nature of plant-microbe interactions and plant-dependent microbial metabolisms within the endosphere.

  17. Human NAIP and mouse NAIP1 recognize bacterial type III secretion needle protein for inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jieling; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Jianjin; Shao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Inflammasome mediated by central nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) protein is critical for defense against bacterial infection. Here we show that type III secretion system (T3SS) needle proteins from several bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella typhimurium, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, and Burkholderia spp., can induce robust inflammasome activation in both human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow macrophages. Needle protein activation of human NRL family CARD domain containing 4 (NLRC4) inflammasome requires the sole human neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (hNAIP). Among the seven mouse NAIPs, NAIP1 functions as the mouse counterpart of hNAIP. We found that NAIP1 recognition of T3SS needle proteins was more robust in mouse dendritic cells than in bone marrow macrophages. Needle proteins, as well as flagellin and rod proteins from five different bacteria, exhibited differential and cell type-dependent inflammasome-stimulating activity. Comprehensive profiling of the three types of NAIP ligands revealed that NAIP1 sensing of the needle protein dominated S. flexneri-induced inflammasome activation, particularly in dendritic cells. hNAIP/NAIP1 and NAIP2/5 formed a large oligomeric complex with NLRC4 in the presence of corresponding bacterial ligands, and could support reconstitution of the NLRC4 inflammasome in a ligand-specific manner. PMID:23940371

  18. Comparative biocidal activity of peracetic acid, benzalkonium chloride and ortho-phthalaldehyde on 77 bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Bridier, A; Briandet, R; Thomas, V; Dubois-Brissonnet, F

    2011-07-01

    Despite numerous reports on biocide activities, it is often difficult to have a reliable and relevant overview of bacterial resistance to disinfectants because each work challenges a limited number of strains and tested methods are often different. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal activity of three different disinfectants commonly used in industrial or medical environments (peracetic acid, benzalkonium chloride and ortho-phthalaldehyde) against 77 bacterial strains from different origins using one standard test method (NF EN 1040). Results highlight the existence of high interspecific variability of resistance to disinfectants and, contrary to widespread belief, Gram-positive strains generally appeared more resistant than Gram-negative strains. Resistance was also variable among strains of the same species such as Bacillus subtilis to peracetic acid, Pseudomonas aeruginosa to benzalkonium chloride and Staphylococcus aureus to ortho-phthalaldehyde.

  19. A Stable Bacterial Peroxidase with Novel Halogenating Activity and an Autocatalytically Linked Heme Prosthetic Group*

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Markus; Gruber, Clemens; Bellei, Marzia; Pirker, Katharina F.; Zamocky, Marcel; Kroiss, Daniela; Teufer, Stefan A.; Hofbauer, Stefan; Soudi, Monika; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Obinger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Reconstructing the phylogenetic relationships of the main evolutionary lines of the mammalian peroxidases lactoperoxidase and myeloperoxidase revealed the presence of novel bacterial heme peroxidase subfamilies. Here, for the first time, an ancestral bacterial heme peroxidase is shown to possess a very high bromide oxidation activity (besides conventional peroxidase activity). The recombinant protein allowed monitoring of the autocatalytic peroxide-driven formation of covalent heme to protein bonds. Thereby, the high spin ferric rhombic heme spectrum became similar to lactoperoxidase, the standard reduction potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple shifted to more positive values (−145 ± 10 mV at pH 7), and the conformational and thermal stability of the protein increased significantly. We discuss structure-function relationships of this new peroxidase in relation to its mammalian counterparts and ask for its putative physiological role. PMID:23918925

  20. Biomarker indicators of bacterial activity and organic fluxes during end Triassic mass extinction event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Dan; Perry, Randall S.; Engel, Mike H.; Sephton, Mark A.

    2008-08-01

    Lipid biomarker analyses of sedimentary organic matter from a marine Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) section at Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia reveal significant bacterial activity and microbial community changes that coincide with faunal extinctions across the T-J boundary. Bacterial activity is indicated by the 25-norhopane biodegradation index (25-norhopanes / 25-norhopanes+regular hopanes). Microbial community changes is revealed by variations in relative abundance of 2-methylhopane which is mainly generated from cyanobacteria. The 2-methylhopane index (2-methyl hopane/ C30 hopane + C29 25-norhopane) increases above the radiolarian based T-J boundary, and coincides with changes in the 25-norhopane index. The data reveal a complex microbial event involving both autotrophic and heteorotrophic bacteria responding to variations in allochthonous organic matter and nutrient supply.

  1. Controlled release and antibacterial activity of tetracycline hydrochloride-loaded bacterial cellulose composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Liu, Hui; Wang, Shuxia; Wu, Jimin; Huang, Min; Min, Huihua; Liu, Xiufeng

    2016-07-10

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is widely used in biomedical applications. In this study, we prepared an antibiotic drug tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH)-loaded bacterial cellulose (BC) composite membranes, and evaluated the drug release, antibacterial activity and biocompatibility. The structure and morphology of the fabricated BC-TCH composite membranes were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The TCH release results show that the incorporation of BC matrix to load TCH is able to control the release. In vitro antibacterial assay demonstrate that the developed BC-TCH composites displayed excellent antibacterial activity solely associated with the loaded TCH drug. More importantly, the BC-TCH composite membranes display good biocompatibility. These characteristics of BC-TCH composite membranes indicate that they may successfully serve as wound dressings and other medical biomaterials.

  2. Possible interactions between bacterial diversity, microbial activity and supraglacial hydrology of cryoconite holes in Svalbard

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Arwyn; Anesio, Alexandre M; Rassner, Sara M; Sattler, Birgit; Hubbard, Bryn; Perkins, William T; Young, Michael; Griffith, Gareth W

    2011-01-01

    The diversity of highly active bacterial communities in cryoconite holes on three Arctic glaciers in Svalbard was investigated using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of the 16S rRNA locus. Construction and sequencing of clone libraries allowed several members of these communities to be identified, with Proteobacteria being the dominant one, followed by Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes. T-RFLP data revealed significantly different communities in holes on the (cold) valley glacier Austre Brøggerbreen relative to two adjacent (polythermal) valley glaciers, Midtre Lovénbreen and Vestre Brøggerbreen. These population compositions correlate with differences in organic matter content, temperature and the metabolic activity of microbial communities concerned. No within-glacier spatial patterns were observed in the communities identified over the 2-year period and with the 1 km-spaced sampling. We infer that surface hydrology is an important factor in the development of cryoconite bacterial communities. PMID:20664552

  3. Combined effects of bacterial-feeding nematodes and prometryne on the soil microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jihai; Li, Xuechao; Jiang, Ying; Wu, Yue; Chen, Jiandong; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin

    2011-09-15

    Microcosm experiments were carried out to study the effects of bacterial-feeding nematodes and indigenous microbes and their interactions on the degradation of prometryne and soil microbial activity in contaminated soil. The results showed that soil indigenous microbes could degrade prometryne up to 59.6-67.9%; bacterial-feeding nematodes accelerated the degradation of prometryne in contaminated soil, and prometryne degradation was raised by 8.36-10.69%. Soil microbial biomass C (C(mic)), basal soil respiration (BSR), and respiratory quotient (qCO(2)) increased in the beginning of the experiment and decreased in the later stage of the experiment. Nematodes grew and reproduced quite fast, and did increase the growth of soil microbes and enhance soil microbial activity in prometryne contaminated soil during the incubation period.

  4. Possible interactions between bacterial diversity, microbial activity and supraglacial hydrology of cryoconite holes in Svalbard.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Arwyn; Anesio, Alexandre M; Rassner, Sara M; Sattler, Birgit; Hubbard, Bryn; Perkins, William T; Young, Michael; Griffith, Gareth W

    2011-01-01

    The diversity of highly active bacterial communities in cryoconite holes on three Arctic glaciers in Svalbard was investigated using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of the 16S rRNA locus. Construction and sequencing of clone libraries allowed several members of these communities to be identified, with Proteobacteria being the dominant one, followed by Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes. T-RFLP data revealed significantly different communities in holes on the (cold) valley glacier Austre Brøggerbreen relative to two adjacent (polythermal) valley glaciers, Midtre Lovénbreen and Vestre Brøggerbreen. These population compositions correlate with differences in organic matter content, temperature and the metabolic activity of microbial communities concerned. No within-glacier spatial patterns were observed in the communities identified over the 2-year period and with the 1 km-spaced sampling. We infer that surface hydrology is an important factor in the development of cryoconite bacterial communities.

  5. Bi-functional optimization of actively cooled, pressurized hollow sandwich cylinders with prismatic cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.; Deng, Z. C.; Lu, T. J.

    2007-12-01

    All metallic, hollow sandwich cylinders having ultralight two-dimensional (2D) prismatic cores are optimally designed for maximum thermo-mechanical performance at minimum mass. The heated cylinder is subjected to uniform internal pressure and actively cooled by forced air convection. The use of two different core topologies is exploited: square- and triangular-celled cores. The minimum mass design model is so defined that three failure modes are prevented: facesheet yielding, core member yielding, and core member buckling. The intersection-of-asymptotes method, in conjunction with the fin analogy model, is employed to build the optimization model for maximum heat transfer rate. A non-dimensional parameter is introduced to couple the two objectives—structural and thermal—in a single cost function. It is found that the geometry corresponding to maximum heat transfer rate is not unique, and square-celled core sandwich cylinders outperform those having triangular cells. The eight-layered sandwich cylinders with square cells have the best overall performance in comparison with other core topologies. Whilst a sandwich cylinder with shorter length is preferred for enhanced thermo-mechanical performance, the influence of the outer radius of the cylinder is rather weak.

  6. Inactivation of bacterial biofilms using visible-light-activated unmodified ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aponiene, Kristina; Serevičius, Tomas; Luksiene, Zivile; Juršėnas, Saulius

    2017-09-01

    Various zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures are widely used for photocatalytic antibacterial applications. Since ZnO possesses a wide bandgap, it is believed that only UV light may efficiently assist bacterial inactivation, and diverse crystal lattice modifications should be applied in order to narrow the bandgap for efficient visible-light absorption. In this work we show that even unmodified ZnO nanorods grown by an aqueous chemical growth technique are found to possess intrinsic defects that can be activated by visible light (λ = 405 nm) and successfully applied for total inactivation of various highly resistant bacterial biofilms rather than more sensitive planktonic bacteria. Time-resolved fluorescence analysis has revealed that visible-light excitation creates long-lived charge carriers (τ > 1 μs), which might be crucial for destructive biochemical reactions achieving significant bacterial biofilm inactivation. ZnO nanorods covered with bacterial biofilms of Enterococcus faecalis MSCL 302 after illumination by visible light (λ = 405 nm) were inactivated by 2 log, and Listeria monocytogenes ATCL3C 7644 and Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilms by 4 log. Heterogenic waste-water microbial biofilms, consisting of a mixed population of mesophilic bacteria after illumination with visible light were also completely destroyed.

  7. Antibacterial activity of Lansiumamide B to tobacco bacterial wilt (Ralstonia solanacearum).

    PubMed

    Li, Lichun; Feng, Xiujie; Tang, Ming; Hao, Wenbo; Han, Yun; Zhang, Guobin; Wan, Shuqing

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the most serious diseases of tobacco in the area of tobacco cultivation. As there is no effective control method for tobacco bacterial wilt diseases, developing new antibacterial agents in tobacco will make great practical sense. The antibacterial activity against R. solanacearum of Lansiumamide B which is isolated from the seeds of Clausena lansium is reported in this paper for the first time. The bioassay results indicate that Lansiumamide B could completely inhibit the growth of R. solanacearum at the concentration of 125 mg/L in vitro, the EC50 and EC90 are 48.82 mg/L and 86.26 mg/L, respectively. The result of pot experiments indicates that the control efficiency of the Lansiumamide B on tobacco bacterial wilt are 95.84%, 91.67% and 86.38% at 7 days, 14 days and 21 days after treatment at the concentration of 100mg/kg, respectively, nearly 40 times higher than Streptomycin, a special fungicide to the disease, at 21 days after treatment with root irrigation method. These results suggest that Lansiumamide B has the potential of developing as a new type of plant-type fungicide on controlling the diseases of tobacco bacterial wilt. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. The bacterial cytoplasm has glass-like properties and is fluidized by metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Parry, Bradley R; Surovtsev, Ivan V; Cabeen, Matthew T; O'Hern, Corey S; Dufresne, Eric R; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2014-01-16

    The physical nature of the bacterial cytoplasm is poorly understood even though it determines cytoplasmic dynamics and hence cellular physiology and behavior. Through single-particle tracking of protein filaments, plasmids, storage granules, and foreign particles of different sizes, we find that the bacterial cytoplasm displays properties that are characteristic of glass-forming liquids and changes from liquid-like to solid-like in a component size-dependent fashion. As a result, the motion of cytoplasmic components becomes disproportionally constrained with increasing size. Remarkably, cellular metabolism fluidizes the cytoplasm, allowing larger components to escape their local environment and explore larger regions of the cytoplasm. Consequently, cytoplasmic fluidity and dynamics dramatically change as cells shift between metabolically active and dormant states in response to fluctuating environments. Our findings provide insight into bacterial dormancy and have broad implications to our understanding of bacterial physiology, as the glassy behavior of the cytoplasm impacts all intracellular processes involving large components. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Inactivation of bacterial biofilms using visible-light-activated unmodified ZnO nanorods.

    PubMed

    Aponiene, Kristina; Serevičius, Tomas; Luksiene, Zivile; Juršėnas, Saulius

    2017-09-08

    Various zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures are widely used for photocatalytic antibacterial applications. Since ZnO possesses a wide bandgap, it is believed that only UV light may efficiently assist bacterial inactivation, and diverse crystal lattice modifications should be applied in order to narrow the bandgap for efficient visible-light absorption. In this work we show that even unmodified ZnO nanorods grown by an aqueous chemical growth technique are found to possess intrinsic defects that can be activated by visible light (λ = 405 nm) and successfully applied for total inactivation of various highly resistant bacterial biofilms rather than more sensitive planktonic bacteria. Time-resolved fluorescence analysis has revealed that visible-light excitation creates long-lived charge carriers (τ > 1 μs), which might be crucial for destructive biochemical reactions achieving significant bacterial biofilm inactivation. ZnO nanorods covered with bacterial biofilms of Enterococcus faecalis MSCL 302 after illumination by visible light (λ = 405 nm) were inactivated by 2 log, and Listeria monocytogenes ATCL3C 7644 and Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilms by 4 log. Heterogenic waste-water microbial biofilms, consisting of a mixed population of mesophilic bacteria after illumination with visible light were also completely destroyed.

  10. Bacterial skin infections, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    From 2000 through 2012, health care records of the Military Health System documented 998,671 incident cases of bacterial skin infections among active component members of the U.S. Armed Forces. Most cases (97.3%) were identified from records of outpatient medical encounters rather than hospitalizations. Cellulitis accounted for half (50.9%) of all cases of bacterial skin infection but 96 percent of associated hospital bed days. Of all cases, 42.3 percent were "other" skin infections (i.e., folliculitis, impetigo, pyoderma, pyogenic granuloma, other and unspecified infections). The remainder were attributable to carbuncles/furuncles (6.6%) and erysipelas (0.1%). Rates of infection were higher among female service members except for "other" skin infections. In general, the highest rates were associated with youth, recruit trainee status, and junior enlisted rank; however, rates of erysipelas were highest among those 50 years and older. Annual incidence rates of all bacterial skin infections have increased greatly since 2000. During the entire period, such infections required more than 1.4 million health care encounters and 94,000 hospital bed-days (equivalent to 257 years of lost duty time). The prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of bacterial skin infections, particularly in high risk settings, deserve continued emphasis.

  11. Carbon-Supported IrNi Core-Shell Nanoparticles: Synthesis Characterization and Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    K Sasaki; K Kuttiyiel; L Barrio; D Su; A Frenkel; N Marinkovic; D Mahajan; R Adzic

    2011-12-31

    We synthesized carbon-supported IrNi core-shell nanoparticles by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing in H{sub 2}, and verified the formation of Ir shells on IrNi solid solution alloy cores by various experimental methods. The EXAFS analysis is consistent with the model wherein the IrNi nanoparticles are composed of two-layer Ir shells and IrNi alloy cores. In situ XAS revealed that the Ir shells completely protect Ni atoms in the cores from oxidation or dissolution in an acid electrolyte under elevated potentials. The formation of Ir shell during annealing due to thermal segregation is monitored by time-resolved synchrotron XRD measurements, coupled with Rietveld refinement analyses. The H{sub 2} oxidation activity of the IrNi nanoparticles was found to be higher than that of a commercial Pt/C catalyst. This is predominantly due to Ni-core-induced Ir shell contraction that makes the surface less reactive for IrOH formation, and the resulting more metallic Ir surface becomes more active for H{sub 2} oxidation. This new class of core-shell nanoparticles appears promising for application as hydrogen anode fuel cell electrocatalysts.

  12. Structure and activity of bacterial community inhabiting rice roots and the rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yahai; Rosencrantz, Dirk; Liesack, Werner; Conrad, Ralf

    2006-08-01

    Root-derived carbon provides a major source for microbial production and emission of CH4 from rice field soils. Therefore, we characterized the structure and activity of the bacterial community inhabiting rice roots and the rhizosphere. In the first experiment, DNA retrieved from rice roots was analysed for bacterial 16S rRNA genes using cloning, sequencing and in situ hybridization. In the second experiment, rice plants were pulse-labelled with 13CO2 (99% of atom 13C) for 7 days, and the bacterial RNA was isolated from rhizosphere soil and subjected to density gradient centrifugation. RNA samples from density fractions were analysed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting, cloning and sequencing. The experiments showed that the dominant bacteria inhabiting rice roots and the rhizosphere particularly belonged to the Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria and Firmicutes. The RNA stable isotope probing revealed that the bacteria actively assimilating C derived from the pulse-labelled rice plants were Azospirillum spp. (Alphaproteobacteria) and members of Burkholderiaceae (Betaproteobacteria). Both anaerobic (e.g. Clostridia) and aerobic (e.g. Comamonas) degraders were present at high abundance, indicating that root environments and degradation processes were highly heterogeneous. The relative importance of iron and sulfate reducers suggested that cycling of iron and sulfur is active in the rhizosphere.

  13. Influence of macrophage activation on their capacity to bind bacterial antigens studied with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Targosz, Marta; Labuda, Aleksander; Czuba, Pawel; Biedroń, Rafal; Strus, Magdalena; Gamian, Andrzej; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Szymoński, Marek

    2006-06-01

    In this work we studied interactions between bacterial antigens and receptors on the surface of macrophages using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We used two bacterial cell wall components: lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from gram-negative Escherichia coli and exopolysaccharide (EPS) derived from gram-positive Lactobacillus rhamnosus. Interactions between these bacterial antigens and immune cell receptors were studied in peritoneal macrophages derived from two strains of mice, CBA and C3H/J, in which the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is genetically disabled. We collected 500 force-distance curves for LPS-activated cells using an EPS-covered AFM tip, and for EPS-activated cells using an LPS-covered AFM tip. Nonactivated cells were tested as reference cells. The results show that LPS-primed macrophages decrease their ability to bind EPS. Surprisingly, EPS-activated macrophages maintain or even increase their ability to bind LPS. This may suggest that in vivo commensal enteric bacteria, such as lactobacilli, will enhance the defense potential of local macrophages against pathogens expressing LPS.

  14. Multisubstrate Isotope Labeling and Metagenomic Analysis of Active Soil Bacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Verastegui, Y.; Cheng, J.; Engel, K.; Kolczynski, D.; Mortimer, S.; Lavigne, J.; Montalibet, J.; Romantsov, T.; Hall, M.; McConkey, B. J.; Rose, D. R.; Tomashek, J. J.; Scott, B. R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Soil microbial diversity represents the largest global reservoir of novel microorganisms and enzymes. In this study, we coupled functional metagenomics and DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) using multiple plant-derived carbon substrates and diverse soils to characterize active soil bacterial communities and their glycoside hydrolase genes, which have value for industrial applications. We incubated samples from three disparate Canadian soils (tundra, temperate rainforest, and agricultural) with five native carbon (12C) or stable-isotope-labeled (13C) carbohydrates (glucose, cellobiose, xylose, arabinose, and cellulose). Indicator species analysis revealed high specificity and fidelity for many uncultured and unclassified bacterial taxa in the heavy DNA for all soils and substrates. Among characterized taxa, Actinomycetales (Salinibacterium), Rhizobiales (Devosia), Rhodospirillales (Telmatospirillum), and Caulobacterales (Phenylobacterium and Asticcacaulis) were bacterial indicator species for the heavy substrates and soils tested. Both Actinomycetales and Caulobacterales (Phenylobacterium) were associated with metabolism of cellulose, and Alphaproteobacteria were associated with the metabolism of arabinose; members of the order Rhizobiales were strongly associated with the metabolism of xylose. Annotated metagenomic data suggested diverse glycoside hydrolase gene representation within the pooled heavy DNA. By screening 2,876 cloned fragments derived from the 13C-labeled DNA isolated from soils incubated with cellulose, we demonstrate the power of combining DNA-SIP, multiple-displacement amplification (MDA), and functional metagenomics by efficiently isolating multiple clones with activity on carboxymethyl cellulose and fluorogenic proxy substrates for carbohydrate-active enzymes. PMID:25028422

  15. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles mediate cytosolic localization of LPS and caspase-11 activation

    PubMed Central

    Vanaja, Sivapriya Kailasan; Russo, Ashley J.; Behl, Bharat; Banerjee, Ishita; Yankova, Maya; Deshmukh, Sachin D.; Rathinam, Vijay A.K.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Sensing of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the cytosol triggers caspase-11 activation and is central to host defense against Gram-negative bacterial infections and to the pathogenesis of sepsis. Most Gram-negative bacteria that activate caspase-11 however are not cytosolic and the mechanism by which LPS from these bacteria gains access to caspase-11 in the cytosol remains elusive. Here we identify outer membrane vesicles (OMV) produced by Gram-negative bacteria as a vehicle that delivers LPS into the cytosol triggering caspase-11-dependent effector responses in vitro and in vivo. OMV are internalized via endocytosis, and LPS is released into the cytosol from early endosomes. The use of hypovesiculating bacterial mutants, compromised in their ability to generate OMV, reveal the importance of OMV in mediating the cytosolic localization of LPS. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a critical role for OMV in enabling the cytosolic entry of LPS and consequently caspase-11 activation during Gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:27156449

  16. Neutrophil secretion products regulate anti-bacterial activity in monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Soehnlein, O; Kenne, E; Rotzius, P; Eriksson, E E; Lindbom, L

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages represent a multi-functional cell type in innate immunity that contributes to bacterial clearance by recognition, phagocytosis and killing. In acute inflammation, infiltrating neutrophils release a wide array of preformed granule proteins which interfere functionally with their environment. Here, we present a novel role for neutrophil-derived granule proteins in the anti-microbial activity of macrophages. Neutrophil secretion obtained by antibody cross-linking of the integrin subunit CD18 (X-link secretion) or by treatment with N-Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP secretion) induced a several-fold increase in bacterial phagocytosis by monocytes and macrophages. This response was associated with a rapid activation of the monocytes and macrophages as depicted by an increase in cytosolic free Ca(2+). Interestingly, fMLP secretion had a more pronounced effect on monocytes than the X-link secretion, while the opposite was observed for macrophages. In addition, polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) secretion caused a strong enhancement of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation compared to incubation with bacteria. Thus, secretion of neutrophil granule proteins activates macrophages to increase the phagocytosis of bacteria and to enhance intracellular ROS formation, indicating pronounced intracellular bacterial killing. Both mechanisms attribute novel microbicidal properties to PMN granule proteins, suggesting their potential use in anti-microbial therapy.

  17. Distinguishing activity decay and cell death from bacterial decay for two types of methanogens.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaodi; Cai, Zhengqing; Fu, Kunming; Zhao, Dongye

    2012-03-15

    As bacterial decay consists of cell death and activity decay, and the corresponding information about AOB/NOB, OHO, PAOs and GAOs has been experimentally acquired, another functional type of bacteria in biological wastewater treatment, methanogens, remains to be investigated, to gather the same information, which is extremely important for such bacteria with low growth rates. With successfully selection and enrichment of both aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens, and by means of measuring specific methane activity (SMA) and hydrogen consumption rate (HCR), a series of decay experiments and molecular techniques such as FISH verification and LIVE/DEAD staining revealed, identified and calculated the decay and death rates of both aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens respectively. The results indicated that the decay rates of aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens were 0.070 and 0.034 d(-1) respectively, and the death rates were thus calculated at 0.022 and 0.016 d(-1) respectively. For this reason, cell deaths were only responsible for 31% and 47% of the total bacterial decay of aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens, and activity decays actually contributed significantly to the total bacterial decay, respectively at 69% and 53%.

  18. Multiple-shell ZnSe core-shell spheres and their improved photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lijuan; Sun, Chengcheng; Tian, Gang; Pang, Qi

    2017-09-15

    Multiple-shell ZnSe core-shell microspheres were synthesized on a large scale by a facile solvothermal method in ethylene glycol (EG) with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) assisted. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) were used to characterize the structures and optical properties of these core-shell spheres with multiple shells. XRD and SEM analyses show that the as-grown ZnSe samples are zinc-blende core-shell structures with multiple shells. The possible growth mechanism is investigated. The results of photocatalysis of methyl red (MR) indicate that the multiple-shell ZnSe core-shell microspheres possess remarkable photocatalytic activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fcgamma receptor-like activity of hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Patrick; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Sibéril, Sophie; Faure, Grazyna; Roohvand, Farzin; Petres, Stephane; Teillaud, Jean Luc; Budkowska, Agata

    2004-01-23

    We have previously demonstrated that viral particles with the properties of nonenveloped hepatitis C virus (HCV) nucleocapsids occur in the serum of HCV-infected individuals (1). We show here that nucleocapsids purified directly from serum or isolated from HCV virions have FcgammaR-like activity and bind "nonimmune" IgG via its Fcgamma domain. HCV core proteins produced in Escherichia coli and in the baculovirus expression system also bound "nonimmune" IgG and their Fcgamma fragments. Folded conformation was required for IgG binding because the FcgammaR-like site of the core protein was inactive in denaturing conditions. Studies with synthetic core peptides showed that the region spanning amino acids 3-75 was essential for formation of the IgG-binding site. The interaction between the HCV core and human IgG is more efficient in acidic (pH 6.0) than in neutral conditions. The core protein-binding site on the IgG molecule differs from those for C1q, FcgammaRII (CD32), and FcgammaRIII (CD16) but overlaps with that for soluble protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (SpA), which is located in the CH2-CH3 interface of IgG. These characteristics of the core-IgG interaction are very similar to those of the neonatal FcRn. Surface plasmon resonance studies suggested that the binding of an anti-core antibody to HCV core protein might be "bipolar" through its paratope to the corresponding epitope and by its Fcgamma region to the FcgammaR-like motif on this protein. These features of HCV nucleocapsids and HCV core protein may confer an advantage for HCV in terms of survival by interfering with host defense mechanisms mediated by the Fcgamma part of IgG.

  20. Ion Channels Activated by Mechanical Forces in Bacterial and Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Sokabe, Masahiro; Sawada, Yasuyuki; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Since the first discovery of mechanosensitive ion channel (MSC) in non-sensory cells in 1984, a variety of MSCs has been identified both in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. One of the central issues concerning MSCs is to understand the molecular and biophysical mechanisms of how mechanical forces activate/open MSCs. It has been well established that prokaryotic (mostly bacterial) MSCs are activated exclusively by membrane tension. Thus the problem to be solved with prokaryotic MSCs is the mechanisms how the MSC proteins receive tensile forces from the lipid bilayer and utilize them for channel opening. On the other hand, the activation of many eukaryotic MSCs crucially depends on tension in the actin cytoskeleton. By using the actin cytoskeleton as a force sensing antenna, eukaryotic MSCs have obtained sophisticated functions such as remote force sensing and force-direction sensing, which bacterial MSCs do not have. Actin cytoskeletons also give eukaryotic MSCs an interesting and important function called "active touch sensing", by which cells can sense rigidity of their substrates. The contractile actin cytoskeleton stress fiber (SF) anchors its each end to a focal adhesion (FA) and pulls the substrate to generate substrate-rigidity-dependent stresses in the FA. It has been found that those stresses are sensed by some Ca2+-permeable MSCs existing in the vicinity of FAs, thus the MSCs work as a substrate rigidity sensor that can transduce the rigidity into intracellular Ca2+ levels. This short review, roughly constituting of two parts, deals with molecular and biophysical mechanisms underlying the MSC activation process mostly based on our recent studies; (1) structure-function in bacterial MSCs activation at the atomic level, and (2) roles of actin cytoskeletons in the activation of eukaryotic MSCs.

  1. TPN-induced sympathetic activation is related to diet, bacterial translocation, and an intravenous line.

    PubMed

    Helton, W S; Rockwell, M; Garcia, R M; Maier, R V; Heitkemper, M

    1995-02-01

    To investigate the effects of an intravenous line and the administration of a total parenteral nutrition (TPN) formula by the parenteral and oral routes on bacterial translocation and urinary catecholamine excretion in rodents. Rats were fed chow with or without an intravenous line and a fat-free TPN solution either orally or intravenously for 5 consecutive days. Urine was collected on the first, third, and fifth days of feeding and quantitatively analyzed for norepinephrine and epinephrine excretion. Mesenteric lymph nodes were cultured for bacteria at the end of the study (day 5). Oral and intravenous TPN diets significantly increased norepinephrine excretion over time (P < .0001) compared with excretion in rats fed chow. Oral TPN diets increased epinephrine secretion after 5 days of feeding. The route of feeding TPN solution had no effect on norepinephrine or epinephrine excretion. Chow-fed rats with intravenous lines tended to have increased norepinephrine excretion over 5 days of feeding compared with chow-fed rats without intravenous lines (55% vs 13%, P = .08). Rats with bacterial translocation had greater norepinephrine excretion (mean +/- SEM, 136 +/- 23 pmol/mumol of creatinine) than rats without bacterial translocation (64 +/- 14 pmol/mumol of creatinine) (P < .05). Intravenous and oral fat-free, hypertonic glucose diets increase sympathetic nervous activity. This diet-induced sympathetic activity may be related to the presence of an intravenous line, bacterial translocation, the thermic effects of hypertonic glucose, and/or the absence of orally ingested food substances in rodent chow. In this model of rodent feeding, increased sympathetic activity may account for alterations in intestinal and immunologic defenses.

  2. Psychometric evaluation of the Sinonasal Outcome Test-16 and activity impairment assessment in acute bacterial sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Quadri, Nuz; Lloyd, Andrew; Keating, Karen N; Nafees, Beenish; Piccirillo, Jay; Wild, Diane

    2013-07-01

    To validate the Sinonasal Outcome Test-16 and Activity Impairment Assessment in patients with acute bacterial sinusitis. Data were used from a phase III clinical trial designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of moxifloxacin 400 mg once daily for 5 consecutive days in the treatment of acute bacterial sinusitis. The psychometric properties and factor structure of the 2 measures were assessed. Participants were given the measures to self-complete using either a telephone voice response system or a paper-and-pencil format. Three hundred seventy-four patients with acute bacterial sinusitis were used in the analysis. Patients received either a placebo or 400 mg moxifloxacin once daily. Patients were then reviewed at test of cure and follow-up. All analyses were conducted on a combined sample of placebo and active treatment patients. The Sinonasal Outcome Test-16 was associated with minimal missing data at baseline but a higher proportion by test of cure. There was no evidence of floor or ceiling effects and no significant skew. The Activity Impairment Assessment also had low missing data at baseline and no obvious floor or ceiling effects, but the data were not normally distributed. Both measures had good internal consistency. Convergent and divergent validity as well as sensitivity and the minimally important difference are also reported. The measures both have good psychometric properties and are suitable for use with patients with acute bacterial sinusitis. Both instruments are sensitive. The minimal important difference estimates for the Sinonasal Outcome Test-16 are quite high but are similar to estimates reported previously.

  3. Lipid biomarkers and bacterial lipase activities as indicators of organic matter and bacterial dynamics in contrasted regimes at the DYFAMED site, NW Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourguet, Nicolas; Goutx, Madeleine; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Pujo-Pay, Mireille; Mével, Geneviève; Momzikoff, André; Mousseau, Laure; Guigue, Catherine; Garcia, Nicole; Raimbault, Patrick; Pete, Romain; Oriol, Louise; Lefèvre, Dominique

    2009-08-01

    This study investigated the relationships between dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition and bacterial dynamics on short time scale during spring mesotrophic (March 2003) and summer oligotrophic (June 2003) regimes, in a 0-500 m depth water column with almost no advection, at the DYFAMED site, NW Mediterranean. DOM was characterized by analyzing dissolved organic carbon (DOC), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and lipid class biotracers. Bacterial dynamic was assessed through the measurement of in situ bacterial lipase activity, abundance, production and bacterial community structure. We made the assumption that by coupling the ambient concentration of hydrolysable acyl-lipids with the measurement of their in situ bacterial hydrolysis rates (i.e. the free fatty acids release rate) would provide new insights about bacterial response to change in environmental conditions. The seasonal transition from spring to summer was accompanied by a significant accumulation of excess DOC (+5 μM) (ANOVA, p<0.05, n=8) in the upper layer (0-50 m). In this layer, the free fatty acids release rate to the bacterial carbon demand (BCD) ratio increased from 0.6±0.3 in March to 1.3±1.0 in June (ANOVA, p<0.05, n=8) showing that more uncoupling between the hydrolysis of the acyl-lipids and the BCD occurred during the evolution of the season, and that free fatty acids contributed to the excess DOC. The increase of lipolysis index and CDOM absorbance (from 0.24±0.17 to 0.39±0.13 and from 0.076±0.039 to 0.144±0.068; ANOVA, p<0.05, n=8, respectively), and the higher contribution of triglycerides, wax esters and phospholipids (from <5% to 12-31%) to the lipid pool reflected the change in the DOM quality. In addition to a strong increase of bacterial lipase activity per cell (51.4±29.4-418.3±290.6 Ag C cell -1 h -1), a significant percentage of ribotypes (39%) was different between spring and summer in the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) layer in particular, suggesting a shift

  4. Antimicrobial Activity of Common Mouthwash Solutions on Multidrug-Resistance Bacterial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Masadeh, Majed M.; Gharaibeh, Shadi F.; Alzoubi, Karem H.; Al-Azzam, Sayer I.; Obeidat, Wasfi M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Periodontal bacteria occur in both planktonic and biofilm forms. While poor oral hygiene leads to accumulation of bacteria, reducing these microbes is the first step toward good oral hygiene. This is usually achieved through the use of mouthwash solutions. However, the exact antibacterial activity of mouthwash solution, especially when bacteria form biofilms, is yet to be determined. In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial activity of common mouthwash solutions against standard bacteria in their planktonic and biofilm states. Methods Standard bacterial strains were cultured, and biofilm were formrd. Thereafter, using standard method for determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) values of various mouthwash solutions were determined. Results Results show that common mouthwash solutions have variable antibacterial activity depending on their major active components. Only mouthwash solutions containing chlorohexidine gluconate or cetylpyridinum chloride exhibited activity against majority, but not all tested bacterial strains in their biofilm state. Additionally, bacteria are generally less susceptible to all mouthwash solutions in their biofilm as compared to planktonic state. Conclusions While mouthwash solutions have variable antibacterial activity, bacteria in their biofilm state pose a challenge to dental hygiene/care where bacteria become not susceptible to majority of available mouthwash solutions. PMID:23976912

  5. In vitro activity of U-63196E, a new cephalosporin, against clinical bacterial isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Eliopoulos, G M; Gardella, A; DeGirolami, P; Moellering, R C

    1984-01-01

    The in vitro activity of U-63196E, a new cephalosporin, was compared with those of other extended-spectrum cephalosporins and penicillins against clinical bacterial isolates. Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the activity of U-63196E was comparable to those of cefoperazone and piperacillin, each of which inhibited 90% of strains at concentrations of less than or equal to 16 micrograms/ml. The new drug also demonstrated activity against a variety of other bacterial species, but it was generally less active than cefotaxime, moxalactam, and cefoperazone against members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and staphylococci. The presence of any 1 of 10 plasmid-mediated beta-lactamases in a series of otherwise isogenic laboratory strains of P. aeruginosa resulted in a significant reduction in the activity of U-63196E in comparison with its activity against the parent strain, which lacks these enzymes. Combinations of U-63196E with tobramycin demonstrated bacteriostatic synergism against 11 of 20 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. PMID:6610385

  6. Nano-TiO2 affects Cu speciation, extracellular enzyme activity, and bacterial communities in sediments.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenhong; Liu, Tong; Li, Xiaomin; Peng, Ruishuang; Zhang, Yilin

    2016-11-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) coexist with heavy metals and influence the existing forms and toxicities of the metal in water. However, limited information is available regarding the ecological risk of this coexistence in sediments. In this study, the effect of nano-TiO2 on Cu speciation in sediments was investigated using sequential extraction. The microcosm approach was also employed to analyze the effects of the coexistence of nano-TiO2 and Cu on extracellular enzyme activity and bacterial communities in sediments. Results showed that nano-TiO2 decreased the organic matter-bound fraction of Cu and increased the corresponding residual fraction Cu. As a result, speciation of exogenous Cu in sediments changed. During the course of the 30-day experiment, the presence of nano-TiO2 did not affect Cu-induced changes in bacterial community structure. However, the coexistence of nano-TiO2 and Cu restrained the activity of bacterial extracellular enzymes, such as alkaline phosphatase and β-glucosidase. The degree of inhibition also varied because of the different properties of extracellular enzymes. This research highlighted the importance of understanding and predicting the effects of the coexistence of nanomaterials and other pollutants in sediments.

  7. Bacterial community structure and activity in different Cd-treated forest soils.

    PubMed

    Lazzaro, Anna; Hartmann, Martin; Blaser, Peter; Widmer, Franco; Schulin, Rainer; Frey, Beat

    2006-11-01

    In this study we compared indicators of Cd bioavailability (water extracts, Lakanen extracts, free ions) and ecotoxicity in forest soils with contrasting physico-chemical characteristics. Soil samples were treated with CdCl(2) solutions (0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 mM) and incubated for 30 days. Microbial activity indexes (acid phosphatase, beta-glucosidase, basal respiration) and changes in bacterial community structure using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprinting were investigated. The Cd concentrations measured ranged from 1% to 37% of the total additions in water extracts, to higher levels in Lakanen extracts. Effects of Cd were observed at bioavailable concentrations exceeding United Nations/European Economic Commission UN/ECE guidelines for total Cd in the soil solution. Basal respiration was the most affected index, while enzymatic activities showed variable responses to the Cd treatments. We also noticed that soils with pH higher than 6.7 and clay content higher than 50% showed inhibition of basal respiration but no marked shift in bacterial community structure. Soils with lower pH (pH <5.8) with less clay content (<50%) showed in addition strong changes in the bacterial community structure. Our results provide evidence for the importance of relating the effects of Cd on the soil communities to soil properties and to bioavailability.

  8. Targeting Bacterial Cell Wall Peptidoglycan Synthesis by Inhibition of Glycosyltransferase Activity.

    PubMed

    Mesleh, Michael F; Rajaratnam, Premraj; Conrad, Mary; Chandrasekaran, Vasu; Liu, Christopher M; Pandya, Bhaumik A; Hwang, You Seok; Rye, Peter T; Muldoon, Craig; Becker, Bernd; Zuegg, Johannes; Meutermans, Wim; Moy, Terence I

    2016-02-01

    Synthesis of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan requires glycosyltransferase enzymes that transfer the disaccharide-peptide from lipid II onto the growing glycan chain. The polymerization of the glycan chain precedes cross-linking by penicillin-binding proteins and is essential for growth for key bacterial pathogens. As such, bacterial cell wall glycosyltransferases are an attractive target for antibiotic drug discovery. However, significant challenges to the development of inhibitors for these targets include the development of suitable assays and chemical matter that is suited to the nature of the binding site. We developed glycosyltransferase enzymatic activity and binding assays using the natural products moenomycin and vancomycin as model inhibitors. In addition, we designed a library of disaccharide compounds based on the minimum moenomycin fragment with peptidoglycan glycosyltransferase inhibitory activity and based on a more drug-like and synthetically versatile disaccharide building block. A subset of these disaccharide compounds bound and inhibited the glycosyltransferase enzymes, and these compounds could serve as chemical entry points for antibiotic development.

  9. Active depinning of bacterial droplets: the collective surfing of Bacillus subtilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennes, Marc; Tailleur, Julien; Daerr, Adrian

    2016-11-01

    How systems are endowed with migration capacity is a fascinating question with implications ranging from the design of novel active systems to the control of microbial populations. Bacteria, which can be found in a variety of environments, have developed among the richest set of locomotion mechanisms both at the microscopic and collective levels. Here, we uncover experimentally a new mode of collective bacterial motility in humid environment through the depinning of bacterial droplets. While capillary forces are notoriously enormous at the bacterial scale, even capable of pinning water droplets of millimetric size on inclined surfaces, we show that bacteria are able to harness a variety of mechanisms to unpin contact lines, hence inducing a collective sliding of the colony. Contrary to flagella-dependent migration modes like swarming we show that this much faster colony surfing still occurs in mutant strains of Bacillus subtilis lacking flagella. The diversity of mechanisms involved in the active unpinning seen in our experiments suggests that collective surfing should be a generic mode of migration of microorganisms in humid environments. Bacttern Grant.

  10. Surface activation of graphene oxide nanosheets by ultraviolet irradiation for highly efficient anti-bacterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerapandian, Murugan; Zhang, Linghe; Krishnamoorthy, Karthikeyan; Yun, Kyusik

    2013-10-01

    A comprehensive investigation of anti-bacterial properties of graphene oxide (GO) and ultraviolet (UV) irradiated GO nanosheets was carried out. Microscopic characterization revealed that the GO nanosheet-like structures had wavy features and wrinkles or thin grooves. Fundamental surface chemical states of GO nanosheets (before and after UV irradiation) were investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) results revealed that UV irradiated GO nanosheets have more pronounced anti-bacterial behavior than GO nanosheets and standard antibiotic, kanamycin. The MIC of UV irradiated GO nanosheets was 0.125 μg ml-1 for Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, 0.25 μg ml-1 for Bacillus subtilis and 0.5 μg ml-1 for Enterococcus faecalis, ensuring its potential as an anti-infective agent for controlling the growth of pathogenic bacteria. The minimum bactericidal concentration of normal GO nanosheets was determined to be two-fold higher than its corresponding MIC value, indicating promising bactericidal activity. The mechanism of anti-bacterial action was evaluated by measuring the enzymatic activity of β-d-galactosidase for the hydrolysis of o-nitrophenol-β-d-galactopyranoside.

  11. Bactericidal activity of curcumin I is associated with damaging of bacterial membrane.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Poonam; Singh, Madhuri; Kumari, Himani; Kumari, Anita; Mukhopadhyay, Kasturi

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, an important constituent of turmeric, is known for various biological activities, primarily due to its antioxidant mechanism. The present study focused on the antibacterial activity of curcumin I, a significant component of commercial curcumin, against four genera of bacteria, including those that are Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). These represent prominent human pathogens, particularly in hospital settings. Our study shows the strong antibacterial potential of curcumin I against all the tested bacteria from Gram-positive as well as Gram-negative groups. The integrity of the bacterial membrane was checked using two differential permeabilization indicating fluorescent probes, namely, propidium iodide and calcein. Both the membrane permeabilization assays confirmed membrane leakage in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria on exposure to curcumin I. In addition, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy were employed to confirm the membrane damages in bacterial cells on exposure to curcumin I. The present study confirms the broad-spectrum antibacterial nature of curcumin I, and its membrane damaging property. Findings from this study could provide impetus for further research on curcumin I regarding its antibiotic potential against rapidly emerging bacterial pathogens.

  12. Bactericidal Activity of Curcumin I Is Associated with Damaging of Bacterial Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Anita; Mukhopadhyay, Kasturi

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, an important constituent of turmeric, is known for various biological activities, primarily due to its antioxidant mechanism. The present study focused on the antibacterial activity of curcumin I, a significant component of commercial curcumin, against four genera of bacteria, including those that are Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). These represent prominent human pathogens, particularly in hospital settings. Our study shows the strong antibacterial potential of curcumin I against all the tested bacteria from Gram-positive as well as Gram-negative groups. The integrity of the bacterial membrane was checked using two differential permeabilization indicating fluorescent probes, namely, propidium iodide and calcein. Both the membrane permeabilization assays confirmed membrane leakage in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria on exposure to curcumin I. In addition, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy were employed to confirm the membrane damages in bacterial cells on exposure to curcumin I. The present study confirms the broad-spectrum antibacterial nature of curcumin I, and its membrane damaging property. Findings from this study could provide impetus for further research on curcumin I regarding its antibiotic potential against rapidly emerging bacterial pathogens. PMID:25811596

  13. Bio-Prospecting Laccases in the Bacterial Diversity of Activated Sludge From Pulp and Paper Industry.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vijaya; Capalash, Neena; Gupta, Naveen; Sharma, Prince

    2017-03-01

    Activated sludge is an artificial ecosystem known to harbor complex microbial communities. Bacterial diversity in activated sludge from pulp and paper industry was studied to bioprospect for laccase, the multicopper oxidase applicable in a large number of industries due to its ability to utilize a wide range of substrates. Bacterial diversity using 454 pyrosequencing and laccase diversity using degenerate primers specific to conserved copper binding domain of laccase like multicopper oxidase (LMCO) genes were investigated. 1231 OTUs out of 11,425 sequence reads for bacterial diversity and 11 OTUs out of 15 reads for LMCO diversity were formed. Phylum Proteobacteria (64.95 %) with genus Thauera (13.65 %) was most abundant followed by phylum Bacteriodetes (11.46 %) that included the dominant genera Paludibacter (1.93 %) and Lacibacter (1.32 %). In case of LMCOs, 40 % sequences showed affiliation with Proteobacteria and 46.6 % with unculturable bacteria, indicating considerable novelty, and 13.3 % with Bacteroidetes. LMCOs belonged to H and J families.

  14. Diversity, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of culturable bacterial endophyte communities in Aloe vera.

    PubMed

    Akinsanya, Mushafau Adewale; Goh, Joo Kheng; Lim, Siew Ping; Ting, Adeline Su Yien

    2015-12-01

    Twenty-nine culturable bacterial endophytes were isolated from surface-sterilized tissues (root, stem and leaf) of Aloe vera and molecularly characterized to 13 genera: Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Enterobacter, Pantoea, Chryseobacterium, Sphingobacterium, Aeromonas, Providencia, Cedecea, Klebsiella, Cronobacter, Macrococcus and Shigella. The dominant genera include Bacillus (20.7%), Pseudomonas (20.7%) and Enterobacter (13.8%). The crude and ethyl acetate fractions of the metabolites of six isolates, species of Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Chryseobacterium and Shigella, have broad spectral antimicrobial activities against pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella Typhimurium, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pyogenes and Candida albicans, with inhibition zones ranging from 6.0 ± 0.57 to 16.6 ± 0.57 mm. In addition, 80% of the bacterial endophytes produced 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) with scavenging properties of over 75% when their crude metabolites were compared with ascorbic acid (92%). In conclusion, this study revealed for the first time the endophytic bacteria communities from A. vera (Pseudomonas hibiscicola, Macrococcus caseolyticus, Enterobacter ludwigii, Bacillus anthracis) that produce bioactive compounds with high DPPH scavenging properties (75-88%) and (Bacillus tequilensis, Pseudomonas entomophila, Chryseobacterium indologenes, Bacillus aerophilus) that produce bioactive compounds with antimicrobial activities against bacterial pathogens. Hence, we suggest further investigation and characterization of their bioactive compounds. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. [BACILLUS STRAINS'S SCREENING--ACTIVE ANTAGONISTS OF BACTERIAL AND FUNGAL PHYTOPATHOGENS].

    PubMed

    Grabova, A Yu; Dragovoz, I V; Kruchkova, L A; Pasichnik, L A; Avdeeva, L V

    2015-01-01

    Antagonistic activity 100 strains of Bacillus bacteria towards to museum and actual strains of phytopathogenic bacteria and fungy was defined. Relation between level of antagonistic activity to phytopathogenic bacteria and genus accessory of the last was shown. The medium level of antagonism to fungal phytopathogens at 30% of the studied strains of Bacillus bacteria was shown. 5 strains of Bacillus sp. with high and medium levels of antagonism to phytopathogens bacterial and fungy nature was selected and considered as perspective for creation of biological preparations for plant protection.

  16. Phylogenetic relationship and antifouling activity of bacterial epiphytes from the marine alga Ulva lactuca.

    PubMed

    Egan, S; Thomas, T; Holmström, C; Kjelleberg, S

    2000-06-01

    It is widely accepted that bacterial epiphytes can inhibit the colonization of surfaces by common fouling organisms. However, little information is available regarding the diversity and properties of these antifouling bacteria. This study assessed the antifouling traits of five epiphytes of the common green alga, Ulva lactuca. All isolates were capable of preventing the settlement of invertebrate larvae and germination of algal spores. Three of the isolates also inhibited the growth of a variety of bacteria and fungi. Their phylogenetic positions were determined by 16S ribosomal subunit DNA sequencing. All isolates showed a close affiliation with the genus Pseudoalteromonas and, in particular, with the species P. tunicata. Strains of this bacterial species also display a variety of antifouling activities, suggesting that antifouling ability may be an important trait for members of this genus to be highly successful colonizers of animate surfaces and for such species to protect their host against fouling.

  17. In vitro activity of secnidazole against Atopobium vaginae, an anaerobic pathogen involved in bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    De Backer, E; Dubreuil, L; Brauman, M; Acar, J; Vaneechoutte, M

    2010-05-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a polymicrobial syndrome. The most important marker for bacterial vaginosis is the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae. In this study, the in vitro susceptibilities to metronidazole and secnidazole of 16 strains of A. vaginae were tested with the agar dilution method. We observed an MIC range for metronidazole of 4-64 mg/L (MIC(50), 8 mg/L; MIC(90), 32 mg/L) and an MIC range for secnidazole of 4-128 mg/L (MIC(50), 16 mg/L; MIC(90), 64 mg/L). According to these findings, we can conclude that the activity of secnidazole is similar to that of metronidazole.

  18. Mantle compensation of active metamorphic core complexes at Woodlark rift in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Abers, Geoffrey A; Ferris, Aaron; Craig, Mitchell; Davies, Hugh; Lerner-Lam, Arthur L; Mutter, John C; Taylor, Brian

    2002-08-22

    In many highly extended rifts on the Earth, tectonic removal of the upper crust exhumes mid-crustal rocks, producing metamorphic core complexes. These structures allow the upper continental crust to accommodate tens of kilometres of extension, but it is not clear how the lower crust and underlying mantle respond. Also, despite removal of the upper crust, such core complexes remain both topographically high and in isostatic equilibrium. Because many core complexes in the western United States are underlain by a flat Moho discontinuity, it has been widely assumed that their elevation is supported by flow in the lower crust or by magmatic underplating. These processes should decouple upper-crust extension from that in the mantle. In contrast, here we present seismic observations of metamorphic core complexes of the western Woodlark rift that show the overall crust to be thinned beneath regions of greatest surface extension. These core complexes are actively being exhumed at a rate of 5-10 km Myr(-1), and the thinning of the underlying crust appears to be compensated by mantle rocks of anomalously low density, as indicated by low seismic velocities. We conclude that, at least in this case, the development of metamorphic core complexes and the accommodation of high extension is not purely a crustal phenomenon, but must involve mantle extension.

  19. Tgif1 Counterbalances the Activity of Core Pluripotency Factors in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bum-Kyu; Shen, Wenwen; Lee, Jiwoon; Rhee, Catherine; Chung, Haewon; Kim, Kun-Yong; Park, In-Hyun; Kim, Jonghwan

    2015-10-06

    Core pluripotency factors, such as Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog, play important roles in maintaining embryonic stem cell (ESC) identity by autoregulatory feedforward loops. Nevertheless, the mechanism that provides precise control of the levels of the ESC core factors without indefinite amplification has remained elusive. Here, we report the direct repression of core pluripotency factors by Tgif1, a previously known terminal repressor of TGFβ/activin/nodal signaling. Overexpression of Tgif1 reduces the levels of ESC core factors, whereas its depletion leads to the induction of the pluripotency factors. We confirm the existence of physical associations between Tgif1 and Oct4, Nanog, and HDAC1/2 and further show the level of Tgif1 is not significantly altered by treatment with an activator/inhibitor of the TGFβ/activin/nodal signaling. Collectively, our findings establish Tgif1 as an integral member of the core regulatory circuitry of mouse ESCs that counterbalances the levels of the core pluripotency factors in a TGFβ/activin/nodal-independent manner. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Systematic mining of analog series with related core structures in multi-target activity space.

    PubMed

    Gupta-Ostermann, Disha; Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2013-08-01

    We have aimed to systematically extract analog series with related core structures from multi-target activity space to explore target promiscuity of closely related analogous. Therefore, a previously introduced SAR matrix structure was adapted and further extended for large-scale data mining. These matrices organize analog series with related yet distinct core structures in a consistent manner. High-confidence compound activity data yielded more than 2,300 non-redundant matrices capturing 5,821 analog series that included 4,288 series with multi-target and 735 series with multi-family activities. Many matrices captured more than three analog series with activity against more than five targets. The matrices revealed a variety of promiscuity patterns. Compound series matrices also contain virtual compounds, which provide suggestions for compound design focusing on desired activity profiles.

  1. The antimicrobial activity of honey against common equine wound bacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Carnwath, R; Graham, E M; Reynolds, K; Pollock, P J

    2014-01-01

    Delayed healing associated with distal limb wounds is a particular problem in equine clinical practice. Recent studies in human beings and other species have demonstrated the beneficial wound healing properties of honey, and medical grade honey dressings are available commercially in equine practice. Equine clinicians are reported to source other non-medical grade honeys for the same purpose. This study aimed to assess the antimicrobial activity of a number of honey types against common equine wound bacterial pathogens. Twenty-nine honey products were sourced, including gamma-irradiated and non-irradiated commercial medical grade honeys, supermarket honeys, and honeys from local beekeepers. To exclude contaminated honeys from the project, all honeys were cultured aerobically for evidence of bacterial contamination. Aerobic bacteria or fungi were recovered from 18 products. The antimicrobial activity of the remaining 11 products was assessed against 10 wound bacteria, recovered from the wounds of horses, including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Eight products were effective against all 10 bacterial isolates at concentrations varying from <2% to 16% (v/v). Overall, the Scottish Heather Honey was the best performing product, and inhibited the growth of all 10 bacterial isolates at concentrations ranging from <2% to 6% (v/v). Although Manuka has been the most studied honey to date, other sources may have valuable antimicrobial properties. Since some honeys were found to be contaminated with aerobic bacteria or fungi, non-sterile honeys may not be suitable for wound treatment. Further assessment of gamma-irradiated honeys from the best performing honeys would be useful.

  2. Bacterial Activity and Organic Matter Turnover in Oxygen Deficient Waters of the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piontek, J.; Massmig, M.; Endres, S.; Le Moigne, F. A. C.; Bange, H. W.; Engel, A.

    2016-02-01

    The Baltic Sea is an enclosed marine system that suffers from expanding zones of oxygen deficiency due to limited ventilation by the episodic inflow of oxygenated North Sea water combined with high anthropogenic nutrient loads. In particular coastal areas are strongly influenced by eutrophication that leads to enhanced microbial oxygen consumption and sporadic anoxia even at shallow sites. It has been shown that oxygen availability is a powerful determinant of the taxonomic composition of prokaryotic communities in deep waters of the Baltic Sea. However, it remains unclear if community changes in response to low oxygen impact carbon remineralization or if functional redundancy prevents effects on major biogeochemical processes driven by bacterial activity. Our study includes monthly samplings at a coastal time series station over three annual cycles with recurring anoxic periods in late summer. Furthermore, sampling was accomplished in the deep Gotland Basin, where a permanent pycnocline prevents vertical mixing. We determined rates of extracellular glucosidase, aminopeptidase and phosphatase, as well as bacterial protein production using fluorescent and radioactive labelled substrate analogues, respectively. The rate measurements were combined with the analysis of organic matter concentration and composition by different analytical tools. Field data and experimental work show that enzymatic polymer hydrolysis, bacterial biomass production and growth rates in oxygen deficient waters of the Baltic Sea are not inherently lower than in oxic waters. Instead, results reveal that the reactivity of organic carbon and the availability of inorganic nutrients are more powerful constraints on organic matter turnover in oxygen deficient zones of the Baltic Sea. Our results imply that oxygen availability alone is not the decisive factor for heterotrophic bacterial activity in deep waters, instead it is part of a multiple environmental control of carbon remineralization.

  3. Core-shell column Tanaka characterization and additional tests using active pharmaceutical ingredients.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsson, Jufang Wu; Karlsson, Anders; Kjellberg, Viktor

    2016-12-01

    In the last decade, core-shell particles have gained more and more attention in fast liquid chromatography separations due to their comparable performance with fully porous sub-2 μm particles and their significantly lower back pressure. Core-shell particles are made of a solid core surrounded by a shell of classic fully porous material. To embrace the developed core-shell column market and use these columns in pharmaceutical analytical applications, 17 core-shell C18 columns purchased from various vendors with various dimensions (50 mm × 2.1 mm to 100 mm × 3 mm) and particle sizes (1.6-2.7 μm) were characterized using Tanaka test protocols. Furthermore, four selected active pharmaceutical ingredients were chosen as test probes to investigate the batch to batch reproducibility for core-shell columns of particle size 2.6-2.7 μm, with dimension of 100 × 3 mm and columns of particle size 1.6 μm, with dimension 100 × 2.1 mm under isocratic elution. Columns of particle size 2.6-2.7 μm were also tested under gradient elution conditions. To confirm the claimed comparable efficiency of 2.6 μm core-shell particles as sub-2 μm fully porous particles, column performances of the selected core-shell columns were compared with BEH C18 , 1.7 μm, a fully porous column material as well.

  4. Variations in archaeal and bacterial diversity associated with the anaerobic oxidation of methane in the active mud volcanoes of the Canadian Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. M.; Lee, D. H.; Hwang, K.; Hong, S. G.; Jin, Y. K.

    2016-12-01

    The prokaryotic microorganisms inhabiting Mud Volcanoes (MVs) play an important role for mitigation of methane (CH4) emission. Despite the identification of active MVs in the continental slope of the Canadian Beaufort Sea, little is known about the distribution and functions of prokaryotic community in this region. Hence, we investigated the prokaryotic diversity of four sediment cores (three from the active MVs and one from a non-methane influenced reference site) of the Canadian Beaufort Sea using 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes as the first step to understand the prokaryotic roles in controlling outgassing methane. Bacterial and archaeal communities of MVs were distinctive from those of the reference site, and the communities of MVs were similar to each other at deeper depth levels. Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, unclassified bacterial groups, and MCG_c of Crenarchaeota were predominant in the MVs, while Firmicutes, Deltaproteobacteria, and unclassified class of Thaumarchaeota were dominant in reference site. The relative abundance of dominant bacterial groups varied at sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) of individual MVs. However, certain microbial taxa such as members of SAGMEG_o or Methanosarcinales of Euryarcheaota and Dehalococcoidales of Chloroflexi were predominant at SMTZs. Since they are not the classical representative taxa known to be involved in anaerobic oxidation of methane, their dominance implicates that they could be playing important roles in methane cycling using unrevealed mechanisms. We will further perform the phylogenetic and network analyses to infer mechanisms and interactions of dominant operational taxonomic units in controlling methane flux.

  5. Caspase Activation as a Versatile Assay Platform for Detection of Cytotoxic Bacterial Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Zorman, Julie; Horton, Melanie; Dubey, Sheri; ter Meulen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria produce several virulence factors that help them establish infection in permissive hosts. Bacterial toxins are a major class of virulence factors and hence are attractive therapeutic targets for vaccine development. Here, we describe the development of a rapid, sensitive, and high-throughput assay that can be used as a versatile platform to measure the activities of bacterial toxins. We have exploited the ability of these toxins to cause cell death via apoptosis of sensitive cultured cell lines as a readout for measuring toxin activity. Caspases (cysteine-aspartic proteases) are induced early in the apoptotic pathway, and so we used their induction to measure the activities of Clostridium difficile toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB) and binary toxin (CDTa-CDTb), Corynebacterium diphtheriae toxin (DT), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (PEA). Caspase induction in the cell lines, upon exposure to toxins, was optimized by toxin concentration and intoxication time, and the specificity of caspase activity was established using a genetically mutated toxin and a pan-caspase inhibitor. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of the caspase assay for measuring toxin potency, as well as neutralizing antibody (NAb) activity against C. difficile toxins. Furthermore, the caspase assay showed excellent correlation with the filamentous actin (F-actin) polymerization assay for measuring TcdA and TcdB neutralization titers upon vaccination of hamsters. These results demonstrate that the detection of caspase induction due to toxin exposure using a chemiluminescence readout can support potency and clinical immunogenicity testing for bacterial toxin vaccine candidates in development. PMID:23824772

  6. Caspase activation as a versatile assay platform for detection of cytotoxic bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Payne, Angela M; Zorman, Julie; Horton, Melanie; Dubey, Sheri; ter Meulen, Jan; Vora, Kalpit A

    2013-09-01

    Pathogenic bacteria produce several virulence factors that help them establish infection in permissive hosts. Bacterial toxins are a major class of virulence factors and hence are attractive therapeutic targets for vaccine development. Here, we describe the development of a rapid, sensitive, and high-throughput assay that can be used as a versatile platform to measure the activities of bacterial toxins. We have exploited the ability of these toxins to cause cell death via apoptosis of sensitive cultured cell lines as a readout for measuring toxin activity. Caspases (cysteine-aspartic proteases) are induced early in the apoptotic pathway, and so we used their induction to measure the activities of Clostridium difficile toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB) and binary toxin (CDTa-CDTb), Corynebacterium diphtheriae toxin (DT), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (PEA). Caspase induction in the cell lines, upon exposure to toxins, was optimized by toxin concentration and intoxication time, and the specificity of caspase activity was established using a genetically mutated toxin and a pan-caspase inhibitor. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of the caspase assay for measuring toxin potency, as well as neutralizing antibody (NAb) activity against C. difficile toxins. Furthermore, the caspase assay showed excellent correlation with the filamentous actin (F-actin) polymerization assay for measuring TcdA and TcdB neutralization titers upon vaccination of hamsters. These results demonstrate that the detection of caspase induction due to toxin exposure using a chemiluminescence readout can support potency and clinical immunogenicity testing for bacterial toxin vaccine candidates in development.

  7. Methods for the Measurement of a Bacterial Enzyme Activity in Cell Lysates and Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Mendz, George; Hazell, Stuart

    1998-01-01

    The kinetic characteristics and regulation of aspartate carbamoyltransferase activity were studied in lysates and cell extracts of Helicobacter pylori by three diffirent methods. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, radioactive tracer analysis, and spectrophotometry were employed in conjunction to identify the properties of the enzyme activity and to validate the results obtained with each assay. NMR spectroscopy was the most direct method to provide proof of ACTase activity; radioactive tracer analysis was the most sensitive technique and a microtitre-based colorimetric assay was the most cost-and time-efficient for large scale analyses. Freeze-thawing was adopted as the preferred method for cell lysis in studying enzyme activity in situ. This study showed the benefits of employing several different complementary methods to investigate bacterial enzyme activity. PMID:12734591

  8. Germa-gamma-lactones as novel inhibitors of bacterial urease activity.

    PubMed

    Amtul, Zareen; Follmer, Cristian; Mahboob, Sumera; Atta-Ur-Rahman; Mazhar, Muhammad; Khan, Khalid M; Siddiqui, Rafat A; Muhammad, Sajjad; Kazmi, Syed A; Choudhary, Mohammad Iqbal

    2007-05-04

    Organogermanium compounds have been used as pharmacological agents. However, very few reports are available on the synthesis and antibacterial activities of lactones containing organogermaniums. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the effects of different lactone-substituted organogermaniums on bacterial growth and their urease activity. We report synthesis of 12 germa-gamma-lactones (GeL) and their antimicrobial activities against several bacterial pathogens. Antibacterial action of all GeL was highly selective against Gram-negative bacilli, particularly Proteus mirabilis, an important pathogen infecting the urinary tract. Furthermore, our data indicate that 8-quinoline derivatives were more potent against P. mirabilis than 2-methyl-8-quinoline. For example, the beta-(o-methylphenyl)-gamma,gamma-bis(8-quinolinoxy)germa-gamma-lactone and beta-(o-methoxyphenyl)-gamma,gamma-bis(8-quinolinoxy)germa-gamma-lactone were maximally active with MIC(90) of 61 and 94 microM, respectively. In vitro studies demonstrated a linear correlation between antibacterial activity and inhibition of P. mirabilis urease enzyme. Further kinetic analyses revealed that inhibition occurred in a noncompetitive and concentration-dependent manner with the minimum IC(50) of 31 microM for beta-(o-methoxyphenyl)-gamma,gamma-bis(8-quinolinoxy)germa-gamma-lactone. In conclusion, these findings suggest that GeL have potential to be developed as antimicrobial agents against P. mirabilis infection.

  9. Core-shell structured TiO2@polydopamine for highly active visible-light photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wen-Xin; Lin, Xi-Jie; Zhang, Wei; Chi, Zi-Xiang; Lyu, Rong-Wen; Cao, An-Min; Wan, Li-Jun

    2016-06-04

    This communication reports that the TiO2@polydopamine nanocomposite with a core-shell structure could be a highly active photocatalyst working under visible light. A very thin layer of polydopamine at around 1 nm was found to be critical for the degradation of Rhodamine B.

  10. PeV Neutrinos Observed by IceCube from Cores of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2013-01-01

    I show that the high energy neutrino flux predicted to arise from active galactic nuclei cores can explain the PeV neutrinos detected by IceCube without conflicting with the constraints from the observed extragalactic cosmic-ray and gamma-ray backgrounds.

  11. Effect of optical pumping on the refractive index and temperature in the core of active fibre

    SciTech Connect

    Gainov, V V; Ryabushkin, Oleg A

    2011-09-30

    This paper examines the refractive index change (RIC) induced in the core of Yb{sup 3+}-doped active silica fibres by pulsed pumping. RIC kinetic measurements with a Mach - Zehnder interferometer make it possible to separately assess the contributions of the electronic and thermal mechanisms to the RIC and evaluate temperature nonuniformities in the fibre.

  12. Influence of salt marsh on bacterial activity in two estuaries with different hydrodynamic characteristics (Ria de Aveiro and Tagus Estuary).

    PubMed

    Santos, Luísa; Cunha, Angela; Silva, Helena; Caçador, Isabel; Dias, Joao M; Almeida, Adelaide

    2007-06-01

    The influence of salt marsh on estuarine bacterioplankton was investigated in two estuaries with different hydrodynamic characteristics (Ria de Aveiro and Tagus Estuary). In the Ria de Aveiro, bacteria in the flood water overlying the marsh were two times more abundant and five to six times more active than in the main channel. In the Tagus Estuary, bacterial abundance was similar in flooding and channel water, but bacterial activity was up to two times higher in the main channel. The two salt marshes have distinct influences on estuarine bacterioplankton abundance and activity. In the Ria de Aveiro, salt marsh enhanced estuarine bacterial communities, increasing their size and stimulating their activity. By contrast, the salt marsh in the Tagus Estuary does not seem to increase the bacterial abundance and production in the channel water. These distinct influences may be explained by the hydrodynamic characteristics of the salt marshes, which were confirmed by the hydrodynamic model implemented for both systems.

  13. Flow and active mixing have a strong impact on bacterial growth dynamics in the proximal large intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Jonas; Segota, Igor; Yang, Chih-Yu; Arnoldini, Markus; Groisman, Alex; Hwa, Terence

    2016-11-01

    More than half of fecal dry weight is bacterial mass with bacterial densities reaching up to 1012 cells per gram. Mostly, these bacteria grow in the proximal large intestine where lateral flow along the intestine is strong: flow can in principal lead to a washout of bacteria from the proximal large intestine. Active mixing by contractions of the intestinal wall together with bacterial growth might counteract such a washout and allow high bacterial densities to occur. As a step towards understanding bacterial growth in the presence of mixing and flow, we constructed an in-vitro setup where controlled wall-deformations of a channel emulate contractions. We investigate growth along the channel under a steady nutrient inflow. Depending on mixing and flow, we observe varying spatial gradients in bacterial density along the channel. Active mixing by deformations of the channel wall is shown to be crucial in maintaining a steady-state bacterial population in the presence of flow. The growth-dynamics is quantitatively captured by a simple mathematical model, with the effect of mixing described by an effective diffusion term. Based on this model, we discuss bacterial growth dynamics in the human large intestine using flow- and mixing-behavior having been observed for humans.

  14. In vitro and in vivo activities of novel, semisynthetic thiopeptide inhibitors of bacterial elongation factor Tu.

    PubMed

    Leeds, J A; LaMarche, M J; Brewer, J T; Bushell, S M; Deng, G; Dewhurst, J M; Dzink-Fox, J; Gangl, E; Jain, A; Lee, L; Lilly, M; Manni, K; Mullin, S; Neckermann, G; Osborne, C; Palestrant, D; Patane, M A; Raimondi, A; Ranjitkar, S; Rann, E M; Sachdeva, M; Shao, J; Tiamfook, S; Whitehead, L; Yu, D

    2011-11-01

    Recently, we identified aminothiazole derivatives of GE2270 A. These novel semisynthetic congeners, like GE2270 A, target the essential bacterial protein elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu). Medicinal chemistry optimization of lead molecules led to the identification of preclinical development candidates 1 and 2. These cycloalklycarboxylic acid derivatives show activity against difficult to treat Gram-positive pathogens and demonstrate increased aqueous solubility compared to GE2270 A. We describe here the in vitro and in vivo activities of compounds 1 and 2 compared to marketed antibiotics. Compounds 1 and 2 were potent against clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (MIC(90) ≤ 0.25 μg/ml) but weaker against the streptococci (MIC(90) ≥ 4 μg/ml). Like GE2270 A, the derivatives inhibited bacterial protein synthesis and selected for spontaneous loss of susceptibility via mutations in the tuf gene, encoding EF-Tu. The mutants were not cross-resistant to other antibiotic classes. In a mouse systemic infection model, compounds 1 and 2 protected mice from lethal S. aureus infections with 50% effective doses (ED(50)) of 5.2 and 4.3 mg/kg, respectively. Similarly, compounds 1 and 2 protected mice from lethal systemic E. faecalis infections with ED(50) of 0.56 and 0.23 mg/kg, respectively. In summary, compounds 1 and 2 are active in vitro and in vivo activity against difficult-to-treat Gram-positive bacterial infections and represent a promising new class of antibacterials for use in human therapy.

  15. Insights into the amplification of bacterial resistance to erythromycin in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei-Ting; Yuan, Qing-Bin; Yang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are significant reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance. However, little is known about wastewater treatment effects on the variation of antibiotic resistance. The shifts of bacterial resistance to erythromycin, a macrolide widely used in human medicine, on a lab-scale activated sludge system fed with real wastewater was investigated from levels of bacteria, community and genes, in this study. The resistance variation of total heterotrophic bacteria was studied during the biological treatment process, based on culture dependent method. The alterations of bacterial community resistant to erythromycin and nine typical erythromycin resistance genes were explored with molecular approaches, including high-throughput sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed that the total heterotrophs tolerance level to erythromycin concentrations (higher than 32 mg/L) was significantly amplified during the activated sludge treatment, with the prevalence increased from 9.6% to 21.8%. High-throughput sequencing results demonstrated an obvious increase of the total heterotrophic bacterial diversity resistant to erythromycin. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the two dominant phyla in the influent and effluent of the bioreactor. However, the prevalence of Proteobacteria decreased from 76% to 59% while the total phyla number increased greatly from 18 to 29 through activated sludge treatment. The gene proportions of erm(A), mef(E) and erm(D) were greatly amplified after biological treatment. It is proposed that the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes through the variable mixtures of bacteria in the activated sludge might be the reason for the antibiotic resistance amplification. The amplified risk of antibiotic resistance in wastewater treatment needs to be paid more attention.

  16. Enhancing absorption in coated semiconductor nanowire/nanorod core-shell arrays using active host matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jule, Leta; Dejene, Francis; Roro, Kittessa

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, we investigated theoretically and experimentally the interaction of radiation field phenomena interacting with arrays of nanowire/nanorod core-shell embedded in active host matrices. The optical properties of composites are explored including the case when the absorption of propagating wave by dissipative component is completely compensated by amplification in active (lasing) medium. On the basis of more elaborated modeling approach and extended effective medium theory, the effective polarizability and the refractive index of electromagnetic mode dispersion of the core-shell nanowire arrays are derived. ZnS(shell)-coated by sulphidation process on ZnO(shell) nanorod arrays grown on (100) silicon substrate by chemical bath deposition (CBD) has been used for theoretical comparison. Compared with the bare ZnO nanorods, ZnS-coated core/shell nanorods exhibit a strongly reduced ultraviolet (UV) emission and a dramatically enhanced deep level (DL) emission. Obviously, the UV and DL emission peaks are attributed to the emissions of ZnO nanorods within ZnO/ZnS core/shell nanorods. The reduction of UV emission after ZnS coating seems to agree with the charge separation mechanism of type-II band alignment that holes transfer from the core to shell, which would quench the UV emission to a certain extent. Our theoretical calculations and numerical simulation demonstrate that the use of active host (amplifying) medium to compensate absorption at metallic inclusions. Moreover the core-shell nanorod/nanowire arrays create the opportunity for broad band absorption and light harvesting applications.

  17. Dye-Sensitized Core/Active Shell Upconversion Nanoparticles for Optogenetics and Bioimaging Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xiang; Zhang, Yuanwei; Takle, Kendra; Bilsel, Osman; Li, Zhanjun; Lee, Hyungseok; Zhang, Zijiao; Li, Dongsheng; Fan, Wei; Duan, Chunying; Chan, Emory M.; Lois, Carlos; Xiang, Yang; Han, Gang

    2016-01-26

    Near Infrared (NIR) dye-sensitized upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have recently been proposed in order to broaden the absorption range and to boost upconversion efficiency. However, implementing this strategy has been limited only to bare core UCNP structures that are faintly luminescent. Herein, we report on an approach to achieve significantly enhanced upconversion luminescence in dye-sensitized core-active shell UCNPs with a broadened absorption range via the doping of ytterbium ions in the UCNP shell in order to bridge the energy transfer from the dye to the UCNP core. As a result, we have been able to synergize the two most practical upconversion booster effectors (dye-sensitizing and core/shell enhancement). The absolute quantum yield of our dye-sensitized core/active shell UCNPs at 800 nm was determined to be ~6% at 2 W/cm2, about 33 times larger than the highest value reported to date for existing 800 nm excitable UCNPs. Moreover, for the first time, by using dye-sensitized core/active shell UCNP embedded poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer implantable systems, we successfully shifted the optogenetic neuron excitation window to a wavelength that is compatible with deep tissue penetrable near the infrared wavelength at 800 nm. Finally, amphiphilic triblock copolymer, Pluronic F127 coatings permit the transfer of hydrophobic UCNPs into water, resulting in water-soluble nanoparticles with well-preserved optical property in aqueous solution. We believe that this research offers a new solution to enhance upconversion efficiency for photonic and biophotonic purposes and opens up new opportunities to use UCNPs as a NIR relay for optogenetic applications.

  18. Bacterial Community Structure Shifted by Geosmin in Granular Activated Carbon System of Water Treatment Plants.

    PubMed

    Pham, Ngoc Dung; Lee, Eun-Hee; Chae, Seon-Ha; Cho, Yongdeok; Shin, Hyejin; Son, Ahjeong

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relation between the presence of geosmin in water and the bacterial community structure within the granular activated carbon (GAC) system of water treatment plants in South Korea. GAC samples were collected in May and August of 2014 at three water treatment plants (Sungnam, Koyang, and Yeoncho in Korea). Dissolved organic carbon and geosmin were analyzed before and after GAC treatment. Geosmin was found in raw water from Sungnam and Koyang water treatment plants but not in that from Yeoncho water treatment plant. Interestingly, but not surprisingly, the 16S rRNA clone library indicated that the bacterial communities from the Sungnam and Koyang GAC systems were closely related to geosmin-degrading bacteria. Based on the phylogenetic tree and multidimensional scaling plot, bacterial clones from GAC under the influence of geosmin were clustered with Variovorax paradoxus strain DB 9b and Comamonas sp. DB mg. In other words, the presence of geosmin in water might have inevitably contributed to the growth of geosmin degraders within the respective GAC system.

  19. Isolation and characterization of a bacterial strain of the genus Ochrobactrum with methyl parathion mineralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Qiu, X-H; Bai, W-Q; Zhong, Q-Z; Li, M; He, F-Q; Li, B-T

    2006-11-01

    To isolate and characterize a methyl parathion (MP)-mineralizing bacterium, and to elucidate the degradative pathway of MP and localize the responsible degrading genes. A bacterial strain, designated B2, capable of mineralizing MP was isolated from the MP-polluted soil. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence and phenotypic analysis suggested that strain B2 had a close relationship with Ochrobactrum anthropi. B2 could totally degrade MP and four metabolites [p-nitrophenol (PNP), 4-nitrocatechol (4-NC), 1,2,4-benzenetriol (BT) and hydroquinone (HQ)] were identified by HPLC and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Plasmid curing of strain B2 resulted in the loss of ability of B2 to degrade PNP, but not the ability to hydrolyse MP. Ochrobactrum sp. B2 can mineralize MP rapidly via PNP, 4-NC, BT and HQ pathway. B2 harbours a plasmid encoding the ability to degrade PNP, while MP-hydrolysing activity is encoded on the bacterial chromosome. This new bacterial strain (B2) capable of mineralizing MP will be useful in a pure-culture remediation process of organophosphate pesticides and their metabolites such as nitroaromatics.

  20. Activation of brain endothelium by pneumococcal neuraminidase NanA promotes bacterial internalization.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Anirban; Van Sorge, Nina M; Sheen, Tamsin R; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Mitchell, Tim J; Doran, Kelly S

    2010-11-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (SPN), the leading cause of meningitis in children and adults worldwide, is associated with an overwhelming host inflammatory response and subsequent brain injury. Here we examine the global response of the blood-brain barrier to SPN infection and the role of neuraminidase A (NanA), an SPN surface anchored protein recently described to promote central nervous system tropism. Microarray analysis of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMEC) during infection with SPN or an isogenic NanA-deficient (ΔnanA) mutant revealed differentially activated genes, including neutrophil chemoattractants IL-8, CXCL-1, CXCL-2. Studies using bacterial mutants, purified recombinant NanA proteins and in vivo neutrophil chemotaxis assays indicated that pneumococcal NanA is necessary and sufficient to activate host chemokine expression and neutrophil recruitment during infection. Chemokine induction was mapped to the NanA N-terminal lectin-binding domain with a limited contribution of the sialidase catalytic activity, and was not dependent on the invasive capability of the organism. Furthermore, pretreatment of hBMEC with recombinant NanA protein significantly increased bacterial invasion, suggesting that NanA-mediated activation of hBMEC is a prerequisite for efficient SPN invasion. These findings were corroborated in an acute murine infection model where we observed less inflammatory infiltrate and decreased chemokine expression following infection with the ΔnanA mutant. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Bacterial RNA:DNA hybrids are activators of the NLRP3 inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Kailasan Vanaja, Sivapriya; Rathinam, Vijay A. K.; Atianand, Maninjay K.; Kalantari, Parisa; Skehan, Brian; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Leong, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is an extracellular pathogen that causes hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. The proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β, has been linked to hemolytic uremic syndrome. Here we identify the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine rich repeat containing family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome as an essential mediator of EHEC-induced IL-1β. Whereas EHEC-specific virulence factors were dispensable for NLRP3 activation, bacterial nucleic acids such as RNA:DNA hybrids and RNA gained cytosolic access and mediated inflammasome-dependent responses. Consistent with a direct role for RNA:DNA hybrids in inflammasome activation, delivery of synthetic EHEC RNA:DNA hybrids into the cytosol triggered NLRP3-dependent responses, and introduction of RNase H, which degrades such hybrids, into infected cells specifically inhibited inflammasome activation. Notably, an E. coli rnhA mutant, which is incapable of producing RNase H and thus harbors increased levels of RNA:DNA hybrid, induced elevated levels of NLRP3-dependent caspase-1 activation and IL-1β maturation. Collectively, these findings identify RNA:DNA hybrids of bacterial origin as a unique microbial trigger of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:24828532

  2. Legionella pneumophila infection activates bystander cells differentially by bacterial and host cell vesicles.

    PubMed

    Jung, Anna Lena; Herkt, Christina Elena; Schulz, Christine; Bolte, Kathrin; Seidel, Kerstin; Scheller, Nicoletta; Sittka-Stark, Alexandra; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Schmeck, Bernd

    2017-07-24

    Extracellular vesicles from eukaryotic cells and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released from gram-negative bacteria have been described as mediators of pathogen-host interaction and intercellular communication. Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) is a causative agent of severe pneumonia. The differential effect of bacterial and host cell vesicles in L. pneumophila infection is unknown so far. We infected THP-1-derived or primary human macrophages with L. pneumophila and isolated supernatant vesicles by differential centrifugation. We observed an increase of exosomes in the 100 k pellet by nanoparticle tracking analysis, electron microscopy, and protein markers. This fraction additionally contained Legionella LPS, indicating also the presence of OMVs. In contrast, vesicles in the 16 k pellet, representing microparticles, decreased during infection. The 100 k vesicle fraction activated uninfected primary human alveolar epithelial cells, A549 cells, and THP-1 cells. Epithelial cell activation was reduced by exosome depletion (anti-CD63, or GW4869), or blocking of IL-1β in the supernatant. In contrast, the response of THP-1 cells to vesicles was reduced by a TLR2-neutralizing antibody, UV-inactivation of bacteria, or - partially - RNase-treatment of vesicles. Taken together, we found that during L. pneumophila infection, neighbouring epithelial cells were predominantly activated by exosomes and cytokines, whereas myeloid cells were activated by bacterial OMVs.

  3. Enhanced cell-wall damage mediated, antibacterial activity of core-shell ZnO@Ag heterojunction nanorods against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ponnuvelu, Dinesh Veeran; Suriyaraj, Shanmugam Prema; Vijayaraghavan, Thiruvenkatam; Selvakumar, Rajendran; Pullithadathail, Biji

    2015-07-01

    Hybrid ZnO@Ag core-shell nanorods have been synthesized by a synthetic strategy based on seed mediated growth. Formation of core-shell nanostructures was confirmed by UV- diffused reflectance spectroscopy (UV-DRS), X-ray diffraction studies, field emission scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. UV-DRS analysis of hybrid core-shell nanorods suggests the possibility of interfacial electron transfer between surface anchored Ag nanoclusters and ZnO nanorods. Successful decoration of Ag nanoclusters with an average diameter of ~7 ± 0.5 nm was observed forming the heterojunctions on the surface of the ZnO nanorods. An enhanced antibacterial property was observed for the ZnO@Ag core-shell nanorods against both Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa lbacteria. The synergetic antibacterial activity of ZnO@Ag nanorods was found to be more prominent against Gram-positive bacteria than Gram-negative bacteria. The plausible reason for this enhanced antibacterial activity of the core-shell nanorods can be attributed to the physical damage caused by the interaction of the material with outer cell wall layer due to the production of reactive oxygen species by interfacial electron transfer between ZnO nanorods and plasmonic Ag nanoclusters. Overall, the ZnO@Ag core-shell nanorods were found to be promising materials that could be developed further as an effective antibacterial agent against wide range of microorganisms to control spreading and persistence of bacterial infections.

  4. Activation of the Jasmonic Acid Plant Defence Pathway Alters the Composition of Rhizosphere Bacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Carvalhais, Lilia C.; Dennis, Paul G.; Badri, Dayakar V.; Tyson, Gene W.; Vivanco, Jorge M.; Schenk, Peer M.

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) signalling plays a central role in plant defences against necrotrophic pathogens and herbivorous insects, which afflict both roots and shoots. This pathway is also activated following the interaction with beneficial microbes that may lead to induced systemic resistance. Activation of the JA signalling pathway via application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) alters the composition of carbon containing compounds released by roots, which are implicated as key determinants of rhizosphere microbial community structure. In this study, we investigated the influence of the JA defence signalling pathway activation in Arabidopsis thaliana on the structure of associated rhizosphere bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing. Application of MeJA did not directly influence bulk soil microbial communities but significant changes in rhizosphere community composition were observed upon activation of the jasmonate signalling pathway. Our results suggest that JA signalling may mediate plant-bacteria interactions in the soil upon necrotrophic pathogen and herbivorous insect attacks. PMID:23424661

  5. Macrophage activation induced by Brucella DNA suppresses bacterial intracellular replication via enhancing NO production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Lin; Sun, Changjiang; Yang, Li; Tang, Bin; Sun, Wanchun; Peng, Qisheng

    2015-12-01

    Brucella DNA can be sensed by TLR9 on endosomal membrane and by cytosolic AIM2-inflammasome to induce proinflammatory cytokine production that contributes to partially activate innate immunity. Additionally, Brucella DNA has been identified to be able to act as a major bacterial component to induce type I IFN. However, the role of Brucella DNA in Brucella intracellular growth remains unknown. Here, we showed that stimulation with Brucella DNA promote macrophage activation in TLR9-dependent manner. Activated macrophages can suppresses wild type Brucella intracellular replication at early stage of infection via enhancing NO production. We also reported that activated macrophage promotes bactericidal function of macrophages infected with VirB-deficient Brucella at the early or late stage of infection. This study uncovers a novel function of Brucella DNA, which can help us further elucidate the mechanism of Brucella intracellular survival.

  6. Heterotrophic bacterial activities and treatment performance of surface flow constructed wetlands receiving woodwaste leachate.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wendong; Hall, Ken J; Duff, Sheldon J B

    2006-07-01

    Heterotrophic activities were investigated by measuring 3H-leucine incorporation to bacterial protein and 14C-glucose turnover in surface flow constructed wetlands receiving woodwaste leachate. No significant longitudinal variation was found in heterotrophic activities of bacterioplankton. An open wetland, a vegetated wetland, and a fertilized vegetated wetland were used to examine the effects of vegetation and ammonium nitrate amendment. There was not a significant difference in treatment performance among the three wetlands, except for a significant pH increase and more efficient volatile fatty acids removal in the fertilized wetland. The fertilized wetland had the highest leucine incorporation rate and shortest glucose turnover time accompanied by the lowest glucose mineralization percentage, followed by the open wetland, then the vegetated wetland. Planktonic and sedimentary bacteria contributed to the majority of the total heterotrophic activities; epiphytic bacteria played a minor role. Heterotrophic activities were influenced by the availability of nutrient, electron acceptor, and organic substrate.

  7. Extracellular enzyme activity and dynamics of bacterial community in mucilaginous aggregates of the northern Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Zoppini, Annamaria; Puddu, Alberto; Fazi, Stefano; Rosati, Michela; Sist, Paola

    2005-12-15

    Bacterial degradation of mucilaginous aggregates (creamy layers, stringers and macroflocs) collected during two summer events (2001-2002) was tested. The objective was to describe the temporal trend of the bacterial activity, abundance and composition in the aggregated and dissolved organic matter under different trophic conditions. In the native aggregates proteins and organic phosphorous were actively hydrolyzed as aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase activities represented up to 87% and 25% of total activity, respectively; polysaccharides were less hydrolyzed and the highest activities were observed for beta-glucosidase (5% of the total). This hydrolysation pattern tends to a progressive accumulation of long persistent polysaccharides. During short term incubations nutrient addition (P, N and Glucose) differently stimulated bacterial growth in the seawater: P played the main role in stimulating bacterial production from 3 to 6 folds higher than in the control, whereas a secondary C-limitation was observed only for bacteria growing on seawater from macroflocs. This scarce dissolved organic carbon (DOC) bioavailability was confirmed by the lower DOC removal (13% macroflocs, 36% stringers). The total amount of carbon incorporated by bacteria living on aggregates was similar (0.58 mg C L(-1)) both in the control and under P enrichments showing a more balanced condition with respect to the seawater. Hence the well-known P limitation in the Northern Adriatic Sea affects only dissolved organic carbon uptake without influencing the uptake of aggregated organic matter. Organic matter limitation was observed only on stringers--total C incorporated raised to 0.96 mg C L(-1) after PNG addition. Macroflocs release of refractory compounds leads to DOC accumulation (73 microM DOC) contributing to inflate the pool of refractory DOC in the surrounding waters. Several evidences, including different monosaccharide composition of stringers and macroflocs (glucose 15% and 56% on

  8. Peptidomimetic Small Molecules Disrupt Type IV Secretion System Activity in Diverse Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Carrie L.; Good, James A. D.; Kumar, Santosh; Krishnan, K. Syam; Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Loh, John T.; Chappell, Joseph; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria utilize complex type IV secretion systems (T4SSs) to translocate diverse effector proteins or DNA into target cells. Despite the importance of T4SSs in bacterial pathogenesis, the mechanism by which these translocation machineries deliver cargo across the bacterial envelope remains poorly understood, and very few studies have investigated the use of synthetic molecules to disrupt T4SS-mediated transport. Here, we describe two synthetic small molecules (C10 and KSK85) that disrupt T4SS-dependent processes in multiple bacterial pathogens. Helicobacter pylori exploits a pilus appendage associated with the cag T4SS to inject an oncogenic effector protein (CagA) and peptidoglycan into gastric epithelial cells. In H. pylori, KSK85 impedes biogenesis of the pilus appendage associated with the cag T4SS, while C10 disrupts cag T4SS activity without perturbing pilus assembly. In addition to the effects in H. pylori, we demonstrate that these compounds disrupt interbacterial DNA transfer by conjugative T4SSs in Escherichia coli and impede vir T4SS-mediated DNA delivery by Agrobacterium tumefaciens in a plant model of infection. Of note, C10 effectively disarmed dissemination of a derepressed IncF plasmid into a recipient bacterial population, thus demonstrating the potential of these compounds in mitigating the spread of antibiotic resistance determinants driven by conjugation. To our knowledge, this study is the first report of synthetic small molecules that impair delivery of both effector protein and DNA cargos by diverse T4SSs. PMID:27118587

  9. Changes of soil bacterial activities and functions after different N additions in a temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peng; Han, Tiwen; Zhang, Li; Li, Shushan; Ma, Dongzhu; Du, Yuhan

    2017-02-01

    It has been shown that different nitrogen (N) addition led to various influences on soil microbial activities in forest ecosystems; however, the changes of bacteria were still unclear. In this work, inorganic N (NH4NO3) and organic N (urea and glycine) were fertilized with different ratios (5:0, 1:4, 3:2, 2:3, and 1:4) on temperate forest soils, while fungicide (cycloheximide) was simultaneously added on half of each treatment to inhibit fungal activities (leaving only bacteria). After a 3-year field experiment, soil samples were harvested, then microbial enzymatic activities involved in carbon (C), and N and phosphorus (P) cycles were determined. Under laboratory conditions, four purified bacteria which were isolated from sample site had been inoculated in sterilized soils under different N types and enzymatic activities were assayed after 90-day incubation. The results showed that cellulase and polyphenol oxidase activities of non-fungicide-added treatments increased after N addition and greater organic N accelerated the increases. However, these enzymatic activities of fungicide-added treatments were not significantly influenced by N addition and N types. It may be due to the insufficient ability of bacteria to synthesize enough enzymes to decompose complex organic C (such as cellulose and lignin) into available compound, although N-limitation was alleviated. Alkaline phosphatase activities increased after N addition in both non-fungicide-added and fungicide-added treatments, and the acceleration on bacterial alkaline phosphatase activities was even greater. Furthermore, organic N showed at least 2.5 times promotion on bacteria alkaline phosphatase than those of inorganic N, which indicated greater alleviation of bacterial P-limitation after the addition of organic N. All the results indicated that soil bacteria may be seriously limited by soil available C but become the dominant decomposer of the complex P compounds after N addition, particularly greater

  10. Linearmycins Activate a Two-Component Signaling System Involved in Bacterial Competition and Biofilm Morphology.

    PubMed

    Stubbendieck, Reed M; Straight, Paul D

    2017-09-15

    Bacteria use two-component signaling systems to adapt and respond to their competitors and changing environments. For instance, competitor bacteria may produce antibiotics and other bioactive metabolites and sequester nutrients. To survive, some species of bacteria escape competition through antibiotic production, biofilm formation, or motility. Specialized metabolite production and biofilm formation are relatively well understood for bacterial species in isolation. How bacteria control these functions when competitors are present is not well studied. To address fundamental questions relating to the competitive mechanisms of different species, we have developed a model system using two species of soil bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Streptomyces sp. strain Mg1. Using this model, we previously found that linearmycins produced by Streptomyces sp. strain Mg1 cause lysis of B. subtilis cells and degradation of colony matrix. We identified strains of B. subtilis with mutations in the two-component signaling system yfiJK operon that confer dual phenotypes of specific linearmycin resistance and biofilm morphology. We determined that expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter yfiLMN operon, particularly yfiM and yfiN, is necessary for biofilm morphology. Using transposon mutagenesis, we identified genes that are required for YfiLMN-mediated biofilm morphology, including several chaperones. Using transcriptional fusions, we found that YfiJ signaling is activated by linearmycins and other polyene metabolites. Finally, using a truncated YfiJ, we show that YfiJ requires its transmembrane domain to activate downstream signaling. Taken together, these results suggest coordinated dual antibiotic resistance and biofilm morphology by a single multifunctional ABC transporter promotes competitive fitness of B. subtilisIMPORTANCE DNA sequencing approaches have revealed hitherto unexplored diversity of bacterial species in a wide variety of environments that includes the

  11. Pattern reactivation co-varies with activity in the core recollection network during source memory.

    PubMed

    Leiker, Emily K; Johnson, Jeffrey D

    2015-08-01

    Neuroimaging studies of episodic memory have consistently demonstrated that memory retrieval involves reactivating patterns of neural activity that were present during encoding, and these effects are thought to reflect the qualitative retrieval (recollection) of information that is specific to the content of an episode. By contrast, recollection is also accompanied by other neural correlates that generalize across episodic content and are consequently referred to as the "core recollection network". The neural mechanism by which these specific and core effects interact to give rise to episodic memory retrieval is largely unknown. The current study addressed this issue by testing for correlations (connectivity) between pattern reactivation and activity in the core recollection network. Subjects encoded a series of words with different tasks and then completed a two-step source memory test, whereby they identified the task (source) previously associated with the word and the confidence of that judgment. Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) was used in combination with fMRI to first identify encoding-related neural patterns and then test for their reactivation during retrieval. Consistent with prior findings, the magnitude of reactivation increased with source-memory confidence. Moreover, individual-trial measures of reactivation exhibited positive correlations with activity in multiple regions of the core recollection network. Importantly, evidence of functional connectivity between pattern reactivation and a region of left posterior parietal cortex supports the role of this region in tracking the retrieval of episodic information in service of making subjective memory decisions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. CORE MUSCLE ACTIVITY DURING THE CLEAN AND JERK LIFT WITH BARBELL VERSUS SANDBAGS AND WATER BAGS.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Colado, Juan C; Martin, Fernando; Casaña, José; Jakobsen, Markus D; Andersen, Lars L

    2015-11-01

    While the traditional clean and jerk maneuver implies simultaneous participation of a large number of muscle groups, the use of this exercise with some variations to enhance core muscle activity remains uninvestigated. The purpose of this study was to compare the muscle activity during clean and jerk lift when performed with a barbell, sandbag and a water bag at same absolute load. Descriptive, repeated-measures study. Twenty-one young fit male university students (age: 25 ± 2.66 years; height: 180.71 ± 5.42 cm; body mass: 80.32 ± 9.8 kg; body fat percentage: 12.41 ± 3.56 %) participated. Surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from the anterior deltoid (AD), external oblique (OBLIQ), lumbar erector spinae (LUMB), and gluteus medius (GM) and were expressed as a percentage of the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). There were no significantly significant differences for AD muscle activity between conditions, whereas muscle activation values for OBLIQ (60%MVIC), GM (29%MVIC) and LUMB (85%MVIC) were significantly higher during the water bag power clean and jerk maneuver when compared with the other conditions. The clean and jerk is an exercise that may be used to enhance core muscle activity. Performing the maneuver with water bags resulted in higher core muscle activity compared with sandbag and standard barbell versions. 3.

  13. The presence and role of bacterial quorum sensing in activated sludge

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Grace; Kimyon, Onder; Rice, Scott A.; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Manefield, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Summary Activated sludge used for wastewater treatment globally is composed of a high‐density microbial community of great biotechnological significance. In this study the presence and purpose of quorum sensing via N‐acylated‐l‐homoserine lactones (AHLs) in activated sludge was explored. The presence of N‐heptanoyl‐l‐homoserine lactone in organic extracts of sludge was demonstrated along with activation of a LuxR‐based AHL monitor strain deployed in sludge, indicating AHL‐mediated gene expression is active in sludge flocculates but not in the bulk aqueous phase. Bacterial isolates from activated sludge were screened for AHL production and expression of phenotypes commonly but not exclusively regulated by AHL‐mediated gene transcription. N‐acylated‐l‐homoserine lactone and exoenzyme production were frequently observed among the isolates. N‐acylated‐l‐homoserine lactone addition to sludge upregulated chitinase activity and an AHL‐ and chitinase‐producing isolate closely related to Aeromonas hydrophila was shown to respond to AHL addition with upregulation of chitinase activity. N‐acylated‐l‐homoserine lactones produced by this strain were identified and genes ahyI/R and chiA, encoding AHL production and response and chitinase activity respectively, were sequenced. These experiments provide insight into the relationship between AHL‐mediated gene expression and exoenzyme activity in activated sludge and may ultimately create opportunities to improve sludge performance. PMID:22583685

  14. The presence and role of bacterial quorum sensing in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Chong, Grace; Kimyon, Onder; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Manefield, Mike

    2012-09-01

    Activated sludge used for wastewater treatment globally is composed of a high-density microbial community of great biotechnological significance. In this study the presence and purpose of quorum sensing via N-acylated-l-homoserine lactones (AHLs) in activated sludge was explored. The presence of N-heptanoyl-l-homoserine lactone in organic extracts of sludge was demonstrated along with activation of a LuxR-based AHL monitor strain deployed in sludge, indicating AHL-mediated gene expression is active in sludge flocculates but not in the bulk aqueous phase. Bacterial isolates from activated sludge were screened for AHL production and expression of phenotypes commonly but not exclusively regulated by AHL-mediated gene transcription. N-acylated-l-homoserine lactone and exoenzyme production were frequently observed among the isolates. N-acylated-l-homoserine lactone addition to sludge upregulated chitinase activity and an AHL- and chitinase-producing isolate closely related to Aeromonas hydrophila was shown to respond to AHL addition with upregulation of chitinase activity. N-acylated-l-homoserine lactones produced by this strain were identified and genes ahyI/R and chiA, encoding AHL production and response and chitinase activity respectively, were sequenced. These experiments provide insight into the relationship between AHL-mediated gene expression and exoenzyme activity in activated sludge and may ultimately create opportunities to improve sludge performance. © 2012 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Laccase activity is proportional to the abundance of bacterial laccase-like genes in soil from subtropical arable land.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shuzhen; Su, Yirong; Dong, Mingzhe; He, Xunyang; Kumaresan, Deepak; O'Donnell, Anthony G; Wu, Jinshui; Chen, Xiangbi

    2015-12-01

    Laccase enzymes produced by both soil bacteria and fungi play important roles in refractory organic matter turnover in terrestrial ecosystems. We investigated the abundance and diversity of fungal laccase genes and bacterial laccase-like genes in soil from subtropical arable lands, and identified which microbial group was associated with laccase activity. Compared with fungal laccase genes, the bacterial laccase-like genes had greater abundance, richness and Shannon-Wiener diversity. More importantly, laccase activity can be explained almost exclusively by the bacterial laccase-like genes, and their abundance had significant linear relationship with laccase activity. Thus, bacterial laccase-like gene has great potential to be used as a sensitive indicator of laccase enzyme for refractory organic matter turnover in subtropical arable lands.

  16. Calcium Regulates the Activity and Structural Stability of Tpr, a Bacterial Calpain-like Peptidase*

    PubMed Central

    Staniec, Dominika; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Enghild, Jan J.; Sroka, Aneta; Bryzek, Danuta; Bogyo, Matthew; Abrahamson, Magnus; Potempa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a peptide-fermenting asaccharolytic periodontal pathogen. Its genome contains several genes encoding cysteine peptidases other than gingipains. One of these genes (PG1055) encodes a protein called Tpr (thiol protease) that has sequence similarity to cysteine peptidases of the papain and calpain families. In this study we biochemically characterize Tpr. We found that the 55-kDa Tpr inactive zymogen proteolytically processes itself into active forms of 48, 37, and 33 kDa via sequential truncations at the N terminus. These processed molecular forms of Tpr are associated with the bacterial outer membrane where they are likely responsible for the generation of metabolic peptides required for survival of the pathogen. Both autoprocessing and activity were dependent on calcium concentrations >1 mm, consistent with the protein's activity within the intestinal and inflammatory milieus. Calcium also stabilized the Tpr structure and rendered the protein fully resistant to proteolytic degradation by gingipains. Together, our findings suggest that Tpr is an example of a bacterial calpain, a calcium-responsive peptidase that may generate substrates required for the peptide-fermenting metabolism of P. gingivalis. Aside from nutrient generation, Tpr may also be involved in evasion of host immune response through degradation of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and complement proteins C3, C4, and C5. Taken together, these results indicate that Tpr likely represents an important pathogenesis factor for P. gingivalis. PMID:26385924

  17. The Role of Bacterial Enhancer Binding Proteins as Specialized Activators of σ54-Dependent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Bacterial enhancer binding proteins (bEBPs) are transcriptional activators that assemble as hexameric rings in their active forms and utilize ATP hydrolysis to remodel the conformation of RNA polymerase containing the alternative sigma factor σ54. We present a comprehensive and detailed summary of recent advances in our understanding of how these specialized molecular machines function. The review is structured by introducing each of the three domains in turn: the central catalytic domain, the N-terminal regulatory domain, and the C-terminal DNA binding domain. The role of the central catalytic domain is presented with particular reference to (i) oligomerization, (ii) ATP hydrolysis, and (iii) the key GAFTGA motif that contacts σ54 for remodeling. Each of these functions forms a potential target of the signal-sensing N-terminal regulatory domain, which can act either positively or negatively to control the activation of σ54-dependent transcription. Finally, we focus on the DNA binding function of the C-terminal domain and the enhancer sites to which it binds. Particular attention is paid to the importance of σ54 to the bacterial cell and its unique role in regulating transcription. PMID:22933558

  18. Bacterial pollution, activity and heterotrophic diversity of the northern part of the Aegean Sea, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Çiftçi Türetken, Pelin S; Altuğ, Gülşen

    2016-02-01

    Isolation and characterization studies of marine heterotrophic bacteria are important to describe and understand eco-metobolism of the marine environments. In this study, diversity and community structures of the culturable heterotrophic bacteria, metabollicaly active bacteria and bacterial pollution in the coastal and offshore areas of Gökçeada Island, in the Northern Aegean Sea, Turkey were investigated from March 2012 to November 2013. The primary hydrographic parameters were recorded in situ. The frequency of the metabolically active bacteria was determined by using a modified staining technique. The indicator bacteria were determined by using membrane filtration technique; 126 bacteria isolates, 24 of them first records for this region, were identified using an automated micro-identification system, VITEK2 Compact30. The results showed that detected bacterial community profiles were significantly different when compared with previous studies conducted in polluted marine areas of Turkey. High frequency of faecal bacteria detected at station 2 indicated that increasing human activities and terrestrial pollution sources are shaping factors for possible risks, regarding recreational uses of this region, in the summer seasons.

  19. Carboxyl-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes negatively affect bacterial growth and denitrification activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Wei, Yuanyuan; Huang, Haining

    2014-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been used in a wide range of fields, and the surface modification via carboxyl functionalization can further improve their physicochemical properties. However, whether carboxyl-modified SWNT poses potential risks to microbial denitrification after its release into the environment remains unknown. Here we present the possible effects of carboxyl-modified SWNT on the growth and denitrification activity of Paracoccus denitrificans (a model denitrifying bacterium). It was found that carboxyl-modified SWNT were present both outside and inside the bacteria, and thus induced bacterial growth inhibition at the concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/L. After 24 h of exposure, the final nitrate concentration in the presence of 50 mg/L carboxyl-modified SWNT was 21-fold higher than that in its absence, indicating that nitrate reduction was substantially suppressed by carboxyl-modified SWNT. The transcriptional profiling revealed that carboxyl-modified SWNT led to the transcriptional activation of the genes encoding ribonucleotide reductase in response to DNA damage and also decreased the gene expressions involved in glucose metabolism and energy production, which was an important reason for bacterial growth inhibition. Moreover, carboxyl-modified SWNT caused the significant down-regulation and lower activity of nitrate reductase, which was consistent with the decreased efficiency of nitrate reduction.

  20. mTORC1-Activated Monocytes Increase Tregs and Inhibit the Immune Response to Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Huaijun; Guo, Wei; Wang, Shixuan; Xue, Ting; Yang, Fei; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yazhi; Wan, Qian; Shi, Zhexin; Zhan, Xulong

    2016-01-01

    The TSC1/2 heterodimer, a key upstream regulator of the mTOR, can inhibit the activation of mTOR, which plays a critical role in immune responses after bacterial infections. Monocytes are an innate immune cell type that have been shown to be involved in bacteremia. However, how the mTOR pathway is involved in the regulation of monocytes is largely unknown. In our study, TSC1 KO mice and WT mice were infected with E. coli. When compared to WT mice, we found higher mortality, greater numbers of bacteria, decreased expression of coactivators in monocytes, increased numbers of Tregs, and decreased numbers of effector T cells in TSC1 KO mice. Monocytes obtained from TSC1 KO mice produced more ROS, IL-6, IL-10, and TGF-β and less IL-1, IFN-γ, and TNF-α. Taken together, our results suggest that the inhibited immune functioning in TSC1 KO mice is influenced by mTORC1 activation in monocytes. The reduced expression of coactivators resulted in inhibited effector T cell proliferation. mTORC1-activated monocytes are harmful during bacterial infections. Therefore, inhibiting mTORC1 signaling through rapamycin administration could rescue the harmful aspects of an overactive immune response, and this knowledge provides a new direction for clinical therapy. PMID:27746591

  1. The inhibitory activity of pomelo essential oil on the bacterial biofilms development on soft contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Saviuc, Crina; Dascălu, Luminita; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Rădulescu, Valeria; Oprea, Eliza; Popa, Marcela; Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, George; Lazăr, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    The aim of present study was to investigate the microbial colonization of worn contact lenses (CLs) and to evaluate the inhibitory effect of pomelo (Citrus maxima) peels essential oil on the biofilm development on unworn CLs. The essential oil was isolated by steam distillation and analyzed by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, twenty compounds being isolated. The antimicrobial activity of pomelo oil was tested against S. epidermidis and P. aeruginosa strains, known for their ability to develop biofilms on prosthetic devices, by qualitative screening methods and quantitative assay of the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) in order to evaluate the antibiofilm activity. Our study revealed that all worn CLs where 100% colonized by staphylococci and Enterobacteriaceae strains. The pomelo essential oil inhibited the development of bacterial biofilms formed by Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms on soft CLs, its antibiofilm activity being specific and dependent on different physical parameters (contact time and temperature). The architecture of bacterial biofilms developed on soft contact lenses was analyzed using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM).

  2. Antibacterial Activity of Polyphenolic Fraction of Kombucha Against Enteric Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Debanjana; Bhattacharya, Semantee; Patra, Madhu Manti; Chakravorty, Somnath; Sarkar, Soumyadev; Chakraborty, Writachit; Koley, Hemanta; Gachhui, Ratan

    2016-12-01

    The emergence of multi-drug-resistant enteric pathogens has prompted the scientist community to explore the therapeutic potentials of traditional foods and beverages. The present study was undertaken to investigate the efficacy of Kombucha, a fermented beverage of sugared black tea, against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae, Shigella flexneri and Salmonella Typhimurium followed by the identification of the antibacterial components present in Kombucha. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by determining the inhibition zone diameter, minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration. Kombucha fermented for 14 days showed maximum activity against the bacterial strains. Its ethyl acetate extract was found to be the most effective upon sequential solvent extraction of the 14-day Kombucha. This potent ethyl acetate extract was then subjected to thin layer chromatography for further purification of antibacterial ingredients which led to the isolation of an active polyphenolic fraction. Catechin and isorhamnetin were detected as the major antibacterial compounds present in this polyphenolic fraction of Kombucha by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Catechin, one of the primary antibacterial polyphenols in tea was also found to be present in Kombucha. But isorhamnetin is not reported to be present in tea, which may thereby suggest the role of fermentation process of black tea for its production in Kombucha. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the presence of isorhamnetin in Kombucha. The overall study suggests that Kombucha can be used as a potent antibacterial agent against entero-pathogenic bacterial infections, which mainly is attributed to its polyphenolic content.

  3. In vitro anti-biofilm and anti-bacterial activity of Junceella juncea for its biomedical application

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, P; Selvi, S Senthamil; Govindaraju, M

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the anti-biofilm and anti-bacterial activity of Junceella juncea (J. juncea) against biofilm forming pathogenic strains. Methods Gorgonians were extracted with methanol and analysed with fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Biofilm forming pathogens were identified by Congo red agar supplemented with sucrose. A quantitative spectrophotometric method was used to monitor in vitro biofilm reduction by microtitre plate assay. Anti-bacterial activity of methanolic gorgonian extract (MGE) was carried out by disc diffusion method followed by calculating the percentage of increase with crude methanol (CM). Results The presence of active functional group was exemplified by FT-IR spectroscopy. Dry, black, crystalline colonies confirm the production of extracellular polymeric substances responsible for biofilm formation in Congo red agar. MGE exhibited potential anti-biofilm activity against all tested bacterial strains. The anti-bacterial activity of methanolic extract was comparably higher in Salmonella typhii followed by Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae and Shigella flexneri. The overall percentage of increase was higher by 50.2% to CM. Conclusions To conclude, anti-biofilm and anti-bacterial efficacy of J. juncea is impressive over biofilm producing pathogens and are good source for novel anti-bacterial compounds. PMID:23593571

  4. Effects of Fertilization and Sampling Time on Composition and Diversity of Entire and Active Bacterial Communities in German Grassland Soils

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Sarah; Wemheuer, Franziska; Wemheuer, Bernd; Daniel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Soil bacteria are major players in driving and regulating ecosystem processes. Thus, the identification of factors shaping the diversity and structure of these communities is crucial for understanding bacterial-mediated processes such as nutrient transformation and cycling. As most studies only target the entire soil bacterial community, the response of active community members to environmental changes is still poorly understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fertilizer application and sampling time on structure and diversity of potentially active (RNA-based) and the entire (DNA-based) bacterial communities in German grassland soils. Analysis of more than 2.3 million 16S rRNA transcripts and gene sequences derived from amplicon-based sequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed that fertilizer application and sampling time significantly altered the diversity and composition of entire and active bacterial communities. Although the composition of both the entire and the active bacterial community was correlated with environmental factors such as pH or C/N ratio, the active community showed a higher sensitivity to environmental changes than the entire community. In addition, functional analyses were performed based on predictions derived from 16S rRNA data. Genes encoding the uptake of nitrate/nitrite, nitrification, and denitrification were significantly more abundant in fertilized plots compared to non-fertilized plots. Hence, this study provided novel insights into changes in dynamics and functions of soil bacterial communities as response to season and fertilizer application. PMID:26694644

  5. Responses of Active Bacterial and Fungal Communities in Soils under Winter Wheat to Different Fertilizer and Pesticide Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Girvan, Martina S.; Bullimore, Juliet; Ball, Andrew S.; Pretty, Jules N.; Osborn, A. Mark

    2004-01-01

    The composition of the active microbial (bacterial and fungal) soil community in an arable wheat field subjected to different management practices was examined at five times during a 1-year period. Field sections were fertilized either at good agricultural practice (GAP) levels or at reduced levels (0.5× GAP) and were inoculated with vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizae (VAM) at the same time. Field subsections were treated either with or without pesticides. Changes in the active microbial communities were investigated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of reverse transcription-PCR-amplified 16S and 18S rRNA. Microbial community structure was primarily determined by season, and the seasonal trends were similar for the fungal and bacterial components. Between-sample microbial heterogeneity decreased under a mature crop in the summer but increased following harvesting and plowing. Although similar overall trends were seen for the two microbial components, sample variability was greater for the fungal community than for the bacterial community. The greatest management effects were due to GAP fertilization, which caused increases in the bacterial numbers in the total and culturable communities. Microbial biomass similarly increased. GAP fertilization also caused large shifts in both the active bacterial community structure and the active fungal community structure and additionally resulted in a decrease in the heterogeneity of the active bacterial community. Pesticide addition did not significantly affect bacterial numbers or heterogeneity, but it led to major shifts in the active soil bacterial community structure. PCR primers specific for Glomales 25S rRNA genes were used to monitor the VAM population following inoculation. Glomales were detected initially only in VAM-inoculated field sections but were subsequently detected in noninoculated field sections as the season progressed. After plowing, the level of Glomales was reduced in noninoculated field

  6. Palladium–platinum core-shell icosahedra with substantially enhanced activity and durability towards oxygen reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue; Choi, Sang-Il; Roling, Luke T.; Luo, Ming; Ma, Cheng; Zhang, Lei; Chi, Miaofang; Liu, Jingyue; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2015-07-02

    Conformal deposition of platinum as ultrathin shells on facet-controlled palladium nanocrystals offers a great opportunity to enhance the catalytic performance while reducing its loading. Here we report such a system based on palladium icosahedra. Owing to lateral confinement imposed by twin boundaries and thus vertical relaxation only, the platinum overlayers evolve into a corrugated structure under compressive strain. For the core-shell nanocrystals with an average of 2.7 platinum overlayers, their specific and platinum mass activities towards oxygen reduction are enhanced by eight- and sevenfold, respectively, relative to a commercial catalyst. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the enhancement can be attributed to the weakened binding of hydroxyl to the compressed platinum surface supported on palladium. After 10,000 testing cycles, the mass activity of the core-shell nanocrystals is still four times higher than the commercial catalyst. Ultimately, these results demonstrate an effective approach to the development of electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity and durability.

  7. Palladium-platinum core-shell icosahedra with substantially enhanced activity and durability towards oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Choi, Sang-Il; Roling, Luke T; Luo, Ming; Ma, Cheng; Zhang, Lei; Chi, Miaofang; Liu, Jingyue; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Herron, Jeffrey A; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2015-07-02

    Conformal deposition of platinum as ultrathin shells on facet-controlled palladium nanocrystals offers a great opportunity to enhance the catalytic performance while reducing its loading. Here we report such a system based on palladium icosahedra. Owing to lateral confinement imposed by twin boundaries and thus vertical relaxation only, the platinum overlayers evolve into a corrugated structure under compressive strain. For the core-shell nanocrystals with an average of 2.7 platinum overlayers, their specific and platinum mass activities towards oxygen reduction are enhanced by eight- and sevenfold, respectively, relative to a commercial catalyst. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the enhancement can be attributed to the weakened binding of hydroxyl to the compressed platinum surface supported on palladium. After 10,000 testing cycles, the mass activity of the core-shell nanocrystals is still four times higher than the commercial catalyst. These results demonstrate an effective approach to the development of electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity and durability.

  8. Unexpected reactivity and mechanism of carboxamide activation in bacterial N-linked protein glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Lizak, Christian; Gerber, Sabina; Michaud, Gaëlle; Schubert, Mario; Fan, Yao-Yun; Bucher, Monika; Darbre, Tamis; Aebi, Markus; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Locher, Kaspar P

    2013-01-01

    The initial glycan transfer in asparagine-linked protein glycosylation is catalysed by the integral membrane enzyme oligosaccharyltransferase (OST). Here we study the mechanism of the bacterial PglB protein, a single-subunit OST, using chemically synthesized acceptor peptide analogues. We find that PglB can glycosylate not only asparagine but also glutamine, homoserine and the hydroxamate Asp(NHOH), although at much lower rates. In contrast, N-methylated asparagine or 2,4-diaminobutanoic acid (Dab) are not glycosylated. We find that of the various peptide analogues, only asparagine- or Dab-containing peptides bind tightly to PglB. Glycopeptide products are unable to bind, providing the driving force of product release. We find no suitably positioned residues near the active site of PglB that can activate the acceptor asparagine by deprotonation, making a general base mechanism unlikely and leaving carboxamide twisting as the most likely mechanistic proposal for asparagine activation.

  9. Design and composition of synthetic fungal-bacterial microbial consortia that improve lignocellulolytic enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiajun; Xue, Yiyun; Guo, Hongcheng; Gao, Min-Tian; Li, Jixiang; Zhang, Shiping; Tsang, Yiu Fai

    2017-03-01

    Microbial interactions are important for metabolism as they can improve or reduce metabolic efficiency. To improve lignocellulolytic enzyme activity, a series of synergistic microbial consortia of increasing diversity and complexity were devised using fungal strains, including Trichoderma reesei, Penicillium decumbens, Aspergillus tubingensis, and Aspergillus niger. However, when a screened microbial community with cellulolytic capacity was added to the consortia to increase the number of strains, it engendered more microbial interactions with the above strains and universally improved the β-glucosidase activity of the consortia. Analysis of the microbial community structure revealed that the bacteria in the consortia are more important for lignocellulolytic enzyme activity than the fungi. One fungal and 16 bacterial genera in the consortia may interact with T. reesei and are potential members of a devised synergistic microbial consortium. Such devised microbial consortia may potentially be applied to effectively and economically degrade lignocellulose.

  10. The Majority of In Vitro Macrophage Activation Exhibited by Extracts of Some Immune Enhancing Botanicals is Due to Bacterial Lipoproteins and Lipopolysaccharides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have identified potent monocyte/macrophage activating bacterial lipoproteins within commonly used immune enhancing botanicals such as Echinacea, American ginseng and alfalfa sprouts. These bacterial lipoproteins, along with lipopolysaccharides, were substantially more potent than other bacteriall...

  11. In Search of Alternative Antibiotic Drugs: Quorum-Quenching Activity in Sponges and their Bacterial Isolates.

    PubMed

    Saurav, Kumar; Bar-Shalom, Rinat; Haber, Markus; Burgsdorf, Ilia; Oliviero, Giorgia; Costantino, Valeria; Morgenstern, David; Steindler, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the extensive development of drug resistance in pathogens against the available antibiotic arsenal, antimicrobial resistance is now an emerging major threat to public healthcare. Anti-virulence drugs are a new type of therapeutic agent aiming at virulence factors rather than killing the pathogen, thus providing less selective pressure for evolution of resistance. One promising example of this therapeutic concept targets bacterial quorum sensing (QS), because QS controls many virulence factors responsible for bacterial infections. Marine sponges and their associated bacteria are considered a still untapped source for unique chemical leads with a wide range of biological activities. In the present study, we screened extracts of 14 sponge species collected from the Red and Mediterranean Sea for their quorum-quenching (QQ) potential. Half of the species showed QQ activity in at least 2 out of 3 replicates. Six out of the 14 species were selected for bacteria isolation, to test for QQ activity also in isolates, which, once cultured, represent an unlimited source of compounds. We show that ≈20% of the isolates showed QQ activity based on a Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 screen, and that the presence or absence of QQ activity in a sponge extract did not correlate with the abundance of isolates with the same activity from the same sponge species. This can be explained by the unknown source of QQ compounds in sponge-holobionts (host or symbionts), and further by the possible non-symbiotic nature of bacteria isolated from sponges. The potential symbiotic nature of the isolates showing QQ activity was tested according to the distribution and abundance of taxonomically close bacterial Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) in a dataset including 97 sponge species and 178 environmental samples (i.e., seawater, freshwater, and marine sediments). Most isolates were found not to be enriched in sponges and may simply have been trapped in the filtration channels of the

  12. In Search of Alternative Antibiotic Drugs: Quorum-Quenching Activity in Sponges and their Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Saurav, Kumar; Bar-Shalom, Rinat; Haber, Markus; Burgsdorf, Ilia; Oliviero, Giorgia; Costantino, Valeria; Morgenstern, David; Steindler, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the extensive development of drug resistance in pathogens against the available antibiotic arsenal, antimicrobial resistance is now an emerging major threat to public healthcare. Anti-virulence drugs are a new type of therapeutic agent aiming at virulence factors rather than killing the pathogen, thus providing less selective pressure for evolution of resistance. One promising example of this therapeutic concept targets bacterial quorum sensing (QS), because QS controls many virulence factors responsible for bacterial infections. Marine sponges and their associated bacteria are considered a still untapped source for unique chemical leads with a wide range of biological activities. In the present study, we screened extracts of 14 sponge species collected from the Red and Mediterranean Sea for their quorum-quenching (QQ) potential. Half of the species showed QQ activity in at least 2 out of 3 replicates. Six out of the 14 species were selected for bacteria isolation, to test for QQ activity also in isolates, which, once cultured, represent an unlimited source of compounds. We show that ≈20% of the isolates showed QQ activity based on a Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 screen, and that the presence or absence of QQ activity in a sponge extract did not correlate with the abundance of isolates with the same activity from the same sponge species. This can be explained by the unknown source of QQ compounds in sponge-holobionts (host or symbionts), and further by the possible non-symbiotic nature of bacteria isolated from sponges. The potential symbiotic nature of the isolates showing QQ activity was tested according to the distribution and abundance of taxonomically close bacterial Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) in a dataset including 97 sponge species and 178 environmental samples (i.e., seawater, freshwater, and marine sediments). Most isolates were found not to be enriched in sponges and may simply have been trapped in the filtration channels of the

  13. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide suppresses the production of catalytically active lysosomal acid hydrolases in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Sub-microgram quantities of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been found to substantially reduce the intracellular catalytic activities of three representative lysosomal enzymes (namely, acid phosphatase, hexosaminidase, and beta-glucuronidase) in human monocyte- derived macrophages. This response was not associated with a concurrent increase in enzyme catalytic activity in the culture supernatant, and hence, could not be explained by mobilization of preformed material. By conducting experiments in the presence and absence of indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, the reduction in lysosomal enzyme catalytic activities was shown not to be dependent on the ability of LPS to induce prostaglandin E2 production. The response was not found to be the result of a more generalized LPS-dependent reduction in the ability of the cells to synthesize protein, since the presence of LPS in macrophage cultures did not appreciably affect the amount of [35S]methionine incorporated into total cellular proteins. A kinetic analysis of the effect of LPS on the down-regulation of enzyme catalytic activities indicated that this was an early response of the cells to LPS exposure. An investigation of the effects of blockade of enzyme catabolism (using the lysosomotropic weak-base, methylamine) indicated that the reduction of catalytic enzyme activities in response to LPS was probably due to a decreased rate of production of active product, rather than an enhanced rate of enzyme catabolism. This suggestion was confirmed by experiments in which the synthesis of pro- hexosaminidase (measured by biosynthetic labeling with [35S]methionine and specific immunoprecipitation of labeled pro-hexosaminidase) was found to be reduced by 42% after a 24-h exposure to LPS (although the synthesis of complement component C3 was stimulated by a factor of 4.5). It is suggested that the ability of LPS to regulate the functional expression of protein products contributes to changes in the overall

  14. Multisubstrate isotope labeling and metagenomic analysis of active soil bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Verastegui, Y; Cheng, J; Engel, K; Kolczynski, D; Mortimer, S; Lavigne, J; Montalibet, J; Romantsov, T; Hall, M; McConkey, B J; Rose, D R; Tomashek, J J; Scott, B R; Charles, T C; Neufeld, J D

    2014-07-15

    Soil microbial diversity represents the largest global reservoir of novel microorganisms and enzymes. In this study, we coupled functional metagenomics and DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) using multiple plant-derived carbon substrates and diverse soils to characterize active soil bacterial communities and their glycoside hydrolase genes, which have value for industrial applications. We incubated samples from three disparate Canadian soils (tundra, temperate rainforest, and agricultural) with five native carbon ((12)C) or stable-isotope-labeled ((13)C) carbohydrates (glucose, cellobiose, xylose, arabinose, and cellulose). Indicator species analysis revealed high specificity and fidelity for many uncultured and unclassified bacterial taxa in the heavy DNA for all soils and substrates. Among characterized taxa, Actinomycetales (Salinibacterium), Rhizobiales (Devosia), Rhodospirillales (Telmatospirillum), and Caulobacterales (Phenylobacterium and Asticcacaulis) were bacterial indicator species for the heavy substrates and soils tested. Both Actinomycetales and Caulobacterales (Phenylobacterium) were associated with metabolism of cellulose, and Alphaproteobacteria were associated with the metabolism of arabinose; members of the order Rhizobiales were strongly associated with the metabolism of xylose. Annotated metagenomic data suggested diverse glycoside hydrolase gene representation within the pooled heavy DNA. By screening 2,876 cloned fragments derived from the (13)C-labeled DNA isolated from soils incubated with cellulose, we demonstrate the power of combining DNA-SIP, multiple-displacement amplification (MDA), and functional metagenomics by efficiently isolating multiple clones with activity on carboxymethyl cellulose and fluorogenic proxy substrates for carbohydrate-active enzymes. Importance: The ability to identify genes based on function, instead of sequence homology, allows the discovery of genes that would not be identified through sequence alone. This

  15. Serum lipoproteins attenuate macrophage activation and Toll-Like Receptor stimulation by bacterial lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chlamydia trachomatis was previously shown to express a lipoprotein, the macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip), exposed at the bacterial surface, and able to stimulate human primary monocytes/macrophages through Toll Like Receptor (TLR)2/TLR1/TLR6, and CD14. In PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells the proinflammatory activity of Mip was significantly higher in the absence than in the presence of serum. The present study aims to investigate the ability of different serum factors to attenuate Mip proinflammatory activity in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells and in primary human differentiated macrophages. The study was also extend to another lipoprotein, the Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein (Osp)A. The proinflammatory activity was studied through Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α) and Interleukin (IL)-8 release. Finally, TLR1/2 human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK-293) transfected cells were used to test the ability of the serum factors to inhibit Mip and OspA proinflammatory activity. Results In the absence of any serum and in the presence of 10% delipidated FBS, production of Mip-induced TNF-α and IL-8 in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells were similar whereas they were significantly decreased in the presence of 10% FBS suggesting an inhibiting role of lipids present in FBS. In the presence of 10% human serum, the concentrations of TNF-α and IL-8 were 2 to 5 times lower than in the presence of 10% FBS suggesting the presence of more potent inhibitor(s) in human serum than in FBS. Similar results were obtained in primary human differentiated macrophages. Different lipid components of human serum were then tested (total lipoproteins, HDL, LDL, VLDL, triglyceride emulsion, apolipoprotein (apo)A-I, B, E2, and E3). The most efficient inhibitors were LDL, VLDL, and apoB that reduced the mean concentration of TNF-α release in Mip-induced macrophages to 24, 20, and 2%, respectively (p < 0.0001). These lipid components were also able to prevent TLR1/2 induced

  16. Biodegradable core-shell carriers for simultaneous encapsulation of synergistic actives.

    PubMed

    Windbergs, Maike; Zhao, Yuanjin; Heyman, John; Weitz, David A

    2013-05-29

    Simultaneous encapsulation of multiple active substances in a single carrier is essential for therapeutic applications of synergistic combinations of drugs. However, traditional carrier systems often lack efficient encapsulation and release of incorporated substances, particularly when combinations of drugs must be released in concentrations of a prescribed ratio. We present a novel biodegradable core-shell carrier system fabricated in a one-step, solvent-free process on a microfluidic chip; a hydrophilic active (doxorubicin hydrochloride) is encapsulated in the aqueous core, while a hydrophobic active (paclitaxel) is encapsulated in the solid shell. Particle size and composition can be precisely controlled, and core and shell can be individually loaded with very high efficiency. Drug-loaded particles can be dried and stored as a powder. We demonstrate the efficacy of this system through the simultaneous encapsulation and controlled release of two synergistic anticancer drugs using two cancer-derived cell lines. This solvent-free platform technology is also of high potential value for encapsulation of other active ingredients and chemical reagents.

  17. Insights into microstructure and chemistry of active fiber core material produced by the granulated silica method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, H.; Etissa, D.; Romano, V.

    2014-05-01

    The production of special fibers relies on new methods and materials to incorporate new functionalities into optical fibers by virtues of dopants and structure. In particular, the granulated silica method allows to rapidly produce active fibers with high dopant content and with virtually any microstructure. The implementation of this production method requires a multitude of process steps at various temperatures and temperature gradients that can significantly influence the optical properties of the produced preforms and fibers. To better understand and optimize the processes of active material production and fiber drawing parameters we have done a thorough analysis of microstructure, phase development, crystallinity and chemical mapping of active fiber cores produced by a combination of sol-gel process and granulated silica method with and without employment of a CO2 laser treatment. The microstructure of fibers have been analyzed with a diverse suite of techniques in Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), revealing formation of various silica polymorphs and distribution of active elements (i.e. Yb and P) into the core structure. Our results show the presence of another polymorph of silica with low crystallinity dispersed in the main amorphous polymorph (i.e. quartz). We conclude that in spite of importance of homogeneous distribution of Yb and P into the core, the formation of various silica polymorphs resulting from materials processing has to be considered.

  18. Gram-positive bacterial cell envelopes: The impact on the activity of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Malanovic, Nermina; Lohner, Karl

    2016-05-01

    A number of cationic antimicrobial peptides, effectors of innate immunity, are supposed to act at the cytoplasmic membrane leading to permeabilization and eventually membrane disruption. Thereby, interaction of antimicrobial peptides with anionic membrane phospholipids is considered to be a key factor in killing of bacteria. Recently, evidence was provided that killing takes place only when bacterial cell membranes are completely saturated with peptides. This adds to an ongoing debate, which role cell wall components such as peptidoglycan, lipoteichoic acid and lipopolysaccharide may play in the killing event, i.e. if they rather entrap or facilitate antimicrobial peptides access to the cytoplasmic membrane. Therefore, in this review we focused on the impact of Gram-positive cell wall components for the mode of action and activity of antimicrobial peptides as well as in innate immunity. This led us to conclude that interaction of antimicrobial peptides with peptidoglycan may not contribute to a reduction of their antimicrobial activity, whereas interaction with anionic lipoteichoic acids may reduce the local concentration of antimicrobial peptides on the cytoplasmic membrane necessary for sufficient destabilization of the membranes and bacterial killing. Further affinity studies of antimicrobial peptides toward the different cell wall as well as membrane components will be needed to address this problem on a quantitative level. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert.

  19. High Frequency and Diversity of Antimicrobial Activities Produced by Nasal Staphylococcus Strains against Bacterial Competitors

    PubMed Central

    Janek, Daniela; Zipperer, Alexander; Kulik, Andreas; Krismer, Bernhard; Peschel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The human nasal microbiota is highly variable and dynamic often enclosing major pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. The potential roles of bacteriocins or other mechanisms allowing certain bacterial clones to prevail in this nutrient-poor habitat have hardly been studied. Of 89 nasal Staphylococcus isolates, unexpectedly, the vast majority (84%) was found to produce antimicrobial substances in particular under habitat-specific stress conditions, such as iron limitation or exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Activity spectra were generally narrow but highly variable with activities against certain nasal members of the Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, or several groups of bacteria. Staphylococcus species and many other Firmicutes were insusceptible to most of the compounds. A representative bacteriocin was identified as a nukacin-related peptide whose inactivation reduced the capacity of the producer Staphylococcus epidermidis IVK45 to limit growth of other nasal bacteria. Of note, the bacteriocin genes were found on mobile genetic elements exhibiting signs of extensive horizontal gene transfer and rearrangements. Thus, continuously evolving bacteriocins appear to govern bacterial competition in the human nose and specific bacteriocins may become important agents for eradication of notorious opportunistic pathogens from human microbiota. PMID:27490492

  20. PHACOS, a functionalized bacterial polyester with bactericidal activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Dinjaski, Nina; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Mar; Selvam, Shivaram; Parra-Ruiz, Francisco J.; Lehman, Susan M.; Román, Julio San; García, Ernesto; García, José L.; García, Andrés J.; Prieto, María Auxiliadora

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial-associated infections represent a significant clinical problem, and treatment of these microbial infections is becoming troublesome due to the increasing number of antibiotic-resistant strains. Here, we report a naturally functionalized bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHACOS) with antibacterial properties. We demonstrate that PHACOS selectively and efficiently inhibits the growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) both in vitro and in vivo. This ability has been ascribed to the functionalized side chains containing thioester groups. Significantly less (3.2-fold) biofilm formation of S. aureus was detected on PHACOS compared to biofilms formed on control poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate-co-hydroxyhexanoate) and poly(ethylene terephthalate), but no differences were observed in bacterial adhesion among these polymers. PHACOS elicited minimal cytotoxic and inflammatory effects on murine macrophages and supported normal fibroblast adhesion. In vivo fluorescence imaging demonstrated minimal inflammation and excellent antibacterial activity for PHACOS compared to controls in an in vivo model of implant-associated infection. Additionally, reductions in neutrophils and macrophages in the vicinity of sterile PHACOS compared to sterile PHO implant were observed by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, a similar percentage of inflammatory cells was found in the tissue surrounding sterile PHACOS and S. aureus pre-colonized PHACOS implants, and these levels were significantly lower than S. aureus pre-colonized control polymers. These findings support a contact active surface mode of antibacterial action for PHACOS and establish this functionalized polyhydroxyalkanoate as an infection-resistant biomaterial. PMID:24094939

  1. Combined geochemical and electrochemical methodology to quantify corrosion of carbon steel by bacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Marta K; Moreira, Rebeca; Bildstein, Olivier; Lartigue, Jean-Eric; Schlegel, Michel L; Tribollet, Bernard; Vivier, Vincent; Libert, Marie

    2014-06-01

    The availability of respiratory substrates, such as H2 and Fe(II,III) solid corrosion products within nuclear waste repository, will sustain the activities of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria (HOB) and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB). This may have a direct effect on the rate of carbon steel corrosion. This study investigates the effects of Shewanella oneidensis (an HOB and IRB model organism) on the corrosion rate by looking at carbon steel dissolution in the presence of H2 as the sole electron donor. Bacterial effect is evaluated by means of geochemical and electrochemical techniques. Both showed that the corrosion rate is enhanced by a factor of 2-3 in the presence of bacteria. The geochemical experiments indicated that the composition and crystallinity of the solid corrosion products (magnetite and vivianite) are modified by bacteria. Moreover, the electrochemical experiments evidenced that the bacterial activity can be stimulated when H2 is generated in a small confinement volume. In this case, a higher corrosion rate and mineralization (vivianite) on the carbon steel surface were observed. The results suggest that the mechanism likely to influence the corrosion rate is the bioreduction of Fe(III) from magnetite coupled to the H2 oxidation.

  2. Colorimetric detection of Shewanella oneidensis based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Junlin; Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Junhua

    2014-06-01

    Rapid detection and enumeration of target microorganisms is considered as a powerful tool for monitoring bioremediation process that typically involves cleaning up polluted environments with functional microbes. A novel colorimetric assay is presented based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity for rapidly detecting Shewanella oneidensis, an important model organism for environmental bioremediation because of its remarkably diverse respiratory abilities. Analyte bacteria captured on the immunomagnetic beads provided a bacterial out-membrane peroxidase-amplified colorimetric readout of the immunorecognition event by oxidizing 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the present of hydrogen peroxide. The high-efficiency of immunomagnetic capture and signal amplification of peroxidase activity offers an excellent detection performance with a wide dynamic range between 5.0 × 103 and 5.0 × 106 CFU/mL toward target cells. Furthermore, this method was demonstrated to be feasible in detecting S. oneidensis cells spiked in environmental samples. The proposed colorimetric assay shows promising environmental applications for rapid detection of target microorganisms.

  3. Toll-like receptor 2 activation depends on lipopeptide shedding by bacterial surfactants.

    PubMed

    Hanzelmann, Dennis; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Hertlein, Tobias; Stevanovic, Stefan; Macek, Boris; Wolz, Christiane; Götz, Friedrich; Otto, Michael; Kretschmer, Dorothee; Peschel, Andreas

    2016-07-29

    Sepsis caused by Gram-positive bacterial pathogens is a major fatal disease but its molecular basis remains elusive. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) has been implicated in the orchestration of inflammation and sepsis but its role appears to vary for different pathogen species and clones. Accordingly, Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates differ substantially in their capacity to activate TLR2. Here we show that strong TLR2 stimulation depends on high-level production of phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) peptides in response to the global virulence activator Agr. PSMs are required for mobilizing lipoproteins, the TLR2 agonists, from the staphylococcal cytoplasmic membrane. Notably, the course of sepsis caused by PSM-deficient S. aureus is similar in wild-type and TLR2-deficient mice, but TLR2 is required for protection of mice against PSM-producing S. aureus. Thus, a crucial role of TLR2 depends on agonist release by bacterial surfactants. Modulation of this process may lead to new therapeutic strategies against Gram-positive infections.

  4. Toll-like receptor 2 activation depends on lipopeptide shedding by bacterial surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Hanzelmann, Dennis; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Hertlein, Tobias; Stevanovic, Stefan; Macek, Boris; Wolz, Christiane; Götz, Friedrich; Otto, Michael; Kretschmer, Dorothee; Peschel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis caused by Gram-positive bacterial pathogens is a major fatal disease but its molecular basis remains elusive. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) has been implicated in the orchestration of inflammation and sepsis but its role appears to vary for different pathogen species and clones. Accordingly, Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates differ substantially in their capacity to activate TLR2. Here we show that strong TLR2 stimulation depends on high-level production of phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) peptides in response to the global virulence activator Agr. PSMs are required for mobilizing lipoproteins, the TLR2 agonists, from the staphylococcal cytoplasmic membrane. Notably, the course of sepsis caused by PSM-deficient S. aureus is similar in wild-type and TLR2-deficient mice, but TLR2 is required for protection of mice against PSM-producing S. aureus. Thus, a crucial role of TLR2 depends on agonist release by bacterial surfactants. Modulation of this process may lead to new therapeutic strategies against Gram-positive infections. PMID:27470911

  5. Antimicrobial activity of aqueous extracts from four plants on bacterial isolates from periodontitis patients.

    PubMed

    Arbia, Leila; Chikhi-Chorfi, Nassima; Betatache, Ilhem; Pham-Huy, Chuong; Zenia, Selma; Mameri, Nabil; Drouiche, Nadjib; Lounici, Hakim

    2017-04-06

    Four aqueous extracts of different plant organs are the following: Artemisia herba-alba, Opuntia ficus-indica, Camellia sinensis and Phlomis crinita were evaluated against two bacterial strains: Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, which are implicated in periodontal diseases. By using a disc method, these plant extracts demonstrated powerful bacterial activity against these Gram-negative strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration values of the four plant extracts varied between 0.03 and 590.82 mg/ml for the microbes. Another assay using commercial antibiotics and antibacterials as positive controls was also conducted. Values obtained after statistical analysis of inhibition diameters of all plant extracts demonstrated that for P. gingivalis, the aqueous extracts of A. herba-alba and O. ficus-indica were most effective, followed by those of C. sinensis and P. crinita. For P. intermedia, aqueous extracts of O. ficus-indica and C. sinensis appeared to be more efficient with significantly different (P > 0.05) inhibition diameters, followed by those of O. ficus-indica and P. crinita. In summary, the statistical results reveal that these plant extracts exert stronger antibacterial activity on P. intermedia germ as compared to P. gingivalis.

  6. Methanol removal efficiency and bacterial diversity of an activated carbon biofilter.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Callie W; Pacheco, Adriana; Lindner, Angela S

    2009-12-01

    Motivated by the need to establish an economical and environmentally friendly methanol control technology for the pulp and paper industry, a bench-scale activated carbon biofiltration system was developed. This system was evaluated for its performance in removing methanol from an artificially contaminated air stream and characterized for its bacterial diversity over time, under varied methanol loading rates, and in different spatial regions of the filter. The biofilter system, composed of a novel packing mixture, provided an excellent support for growth and activity of methanol-degrading bacteria, resulting in approximately 100% methanol removal efficiency for loading rates of 1-17 g/m(3) packing/h, when operated both with and without inoculum containing enriched methanol-degrading bacteria. Although bacterial diversity and abundance varied over the length of the biofilter, the populations present rapidly formed a stable community that was maintained over the entire 138-day operation of the system and through variable operating conditions, as observed by PCR-DGGE methods that targeted all bacteria as well as specific methanol-oxidizing microorganisms. Phylogenetic analysis of bands excised and sequenced from DGGE gels indicated that the biofilter system supported a diverse community of methanol-degrading bacteria, with high similarity to species in the genera Methylophilus (beta-proteobacteria), Hyphomicrobium and Methylocella (both alpha-proteobacteria).

  7. Gustatory-mediated avoidance of bacterial lipopolysaccharides via TRPA1 activation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Soldano, Alessia; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Boonen, Brett; Franco, Luis; López-Requena, Alejandro; Liu, Guangda; Mora, Natalia; Yaksi, Emre; Voets, Thomas; Vennekens, Rudi; Hassan, Bassem A; Talavera, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Detecting pathogens and mounting immune responses upon infection is crucial for animal health. However, these responses come at a high metabolic price (McKean and Lazzaro, 2011, Kominsky et al., 2010), and avoiding pathogens before infection may be advantageous. The bacterial endotoxins lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are important immune system infection cues (Abbas et al., 2014), but it remains unknown whether animals possess sensory mechanisms to detect them prior to infection. Here we show that Drosophila melanogaster display strong aversive responses to LPS and that gustatory neurons expressing Gr66a bitter receptors mediate avoidance of LPS in feeding and egg laying assays. We found the expression of the chemosensory cation channel dTRPA1 in these cells to be necessary and sufficient for LPS avoidance. Furthermore, LPS stimulates Drosophila neurons in a TRPA1-dependent manner and activates exogenous dTRPA1 channels in human cells. Our findings demonstrate that flies detect bacterial endotoxins via a gustatory pathway through TRPA1 activation as conserved molecular mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13133.001 PMID:27296646

  8. Gustatory-mediated avoidance of bacterial lipopolysaccharides via TRPA1 activation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Soldano, Alessia; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Boonen, Brett; Franco, Luis; López-Requena, Alejandro; Liu, Guangda; Mora, Natalia; Yaksi, Emre; Voets, Thomas; Vennekens, Rudi; Hassan, Bassem A; Talavera, Karel

    2016-06-14

    Detecting pathogens and mounting immune responses upon infection is crucial for animal health. However, these responses come at a high metabolic price (McKean and Lazzaro, 2011, Kominsky et al., 2010), and avoiding pathogens before infection may be advantageous. The bacterial endotoxins lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are important immune system infection cues (Abbas et al., 2014), but it remains unknown whether animals possess sensory mechanisms to detect them prior to infection. Here we show that Drosophila melanogaster display strong aversive responses to LPS and that gustatory neurons expressing Gr66a bitter receptors mediate avoidance of LPS in feeding and egg laying assays. We found the expression of the chemosensory cation channel dTRPA1 in these cells to be necessary and sufficient for LPS avoidance. Furthermore, LPS stimulates Drosophila neurons in a TRPA1-dependent manner and activates exogenous dTRPA1 channels in human cells. Our findings demonstrate that flies detect bacterial endotoxins via a gustatory pathway through TRPA1 activation as conserved molecular mechanism.

  9. Nitrate reducing bacterial activity in concrete cells of nuclear waste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alquier, M.; Kassim, C.; Bertron, A.; Rafrafi, Y.; Sablayrolles, C.; Albrecht, A.; Erable, B.

    2013-07-01

    Leaching experiments of solid matrices (bitumen and cement pastes) have been first implemented to define the physicochemical conditions that microorganisms are likely to meet at the bitumen-concrete interface (see the paper of Bertron et al.). Of course, as might be suspected, the cement matrix imposes highly alkaline pH conditions (10 bacterial strains led us to select Halomonas desiderata as a model bacterium capable of catalyzing the reaction of nitrate reduction in these extreme conditions of pH. The denitrifying activity of Halomonas desiderata was quantified in batch bioreactor in the presence of solid matrices and / or leachate from bitumen and cement matrices. Denitrification was relatively fast in the presence of cement matrix (<100 hours) and 2 to 3 times slower in the presence of bituminous matrix. Overall, the presence of solid cement promoted the kinetics of denitrification. The observation of solid surfaces at the end of the experiment revealed the presence of a biofilm of Halomonas desiderata on the cement paste surface. These attached bacteria showed a denitrifying activity comparable to planktonic bacterial culture. On the other side, no colonization of bitumen could be highlighted as either by SEM or epifluorescence microscopy. Now, we are currently developing a continuous experimental bioreactor which should allow us a more rational understanding of the bitumen-cement-microbe interactions.

  10. High Frequency and Diversity of Antimicrobial Activities Produced by Nasal Staphylococcus Strains against Bacterial Competitors.

    PubMed

    Janek, Daniela; Zipperer, Alexander; Kulik, Andreas; Krismer, Bernhard; Peschel, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The human nasal microbiota is highly variable and dynamic often enclosing major pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. The potential roles of bacteriocins or other mechanisms allowing certain bacterial clones to prevail in this nutrient-poor habitat have hardly been studied. Of 89 nasal Staphylococcus isolates, unexpectedly, the vast majority (84%) was found to produce antimicrobial substances in particular under habitat-specific stress conditions, such as iron limitation or exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Activity spectra were generally narrow but highly variable with activities against certain nasal members of the Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, or several groups of bacteria. Staphylococcus species and many other Firmicutes were insusceptible to most of the compounds. A representative bacteriocin was identified as a nukacin-related peptide whose inactivation reduced the capacity of the producer Staphylococcus epidermidis IVK45 to limit growth of other nasal bacteria. Of note, the bacteriocin genes were found on mobile genetic elements exhibiting signs of extensive horizontal gene transfer and rearrangements. Thus, continuously evolving bacteriocins appear to govern bacterial competition in the human nose and specific bacteriocins may become important agents for eradication of notorious opportunistic pathogens from human microbiota.

  11. Isotropic Heating of Galaxy Cluster Cores via Rapidly Reorienting Active Galactic Nucleus Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babul, Arif; Sharma, Prateek; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2013-05-01

    Active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets carry more than sufficient energy to stave off catastrophic cooling of the intracluster medium (ICM) in the cores of cool-core clusters. However, in order to prevent catastrophic cooling, the ICM must be heated in a near-isotropic fashion and narrow bipolar jets with P jet = 1044 - 45 erg s-1, typical of radio AGNs at cluster centers, are inefficient in heating the gas in the transverse direction to the jets. We argue that due to existent conditions in cluster cores, the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) will, in addition to accreting gas via radiatively inefficient flows, experience short stochastic episodes of enhanced accretion via thin disks. In general, the orientation of these accretion disks will be misaligned with the spin axis of the black holes (BHs) and the ensuing torques will cause the BH's spin axis (and therefore the jet axis) to slew and rapidly change direction. This model not only explains recent observations showing successive generations of jet-lobes-bubbles in individual cool-core clusters that are offset from each other in the angular direction with respect to the cluster center, but also shows that AGN jets can heat the cluster core nearly isotropically on the gas cooling timescale. Our model does require that the SMBHs at the centers of cool-core clusters be spinning relatively slowly. Torques from individual misaligned disks are ineffective at tilting rapidly spinning BHs by more than a few degrees. Additionally, since SMBHs that host thin accretion disks will manifest as quasars, we predict that roughly 1-2 rich clusters within z < 0.5 should have quasars at their centers.

  12. Surface-engineered core-shell nano-size ferrites and their antimicrobial activity

    SciTech Connect

    Baraliya, Jagdish D. Joshi, Hiren H.

    2014-04-24

    We report the results of biological study on core-shell structured MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (where M = Co, Mn, Ni) nanoparticles and influence of silica- DEG dual coating on their antimicrobial activity. Spherical MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were prepared via a Co-precipitation method. The microstructures and morphologies of these nanoparticles were studied by x-ray diffraction and FTIR. The antimicrobial activity study carried out in nutrient agar medium with addition of antimicrobial synthesis compound which is tested for its activity against different types of bacteria.

  13. Crystal structures of bacterial peptidoglycan amidase AmpD and an unprecedented activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-López, Cesar; Rojas-Altuve, Alzoray; Zhang, Weilie; Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Barbe, Sophie; André, Isabelle; Ferrer, Pilar; Silva-Martin, Noella; Castro, German R; Martínez-Ripoll, Martín; Mobashery, Shahriar; Hermoso, Juan A

    2011-09-09

    AmpD is a cytoplasmic peptidoglycan (PG) amidase involved in bacterial cell-wall recycling and in induction of β-lactamase, a key enzyme of β-lactam antibiotic resistance. AmpD belongs to the amidase_2 family that includes zinc-dependent amidases and the peptidoglycan-recognition proteins (PGRPs), highly conserved pattern-recognition molecules of the immune system. Crystal structures of Citrobacter freundii AmpD were solved in this study for the apoenzyme, for the holoenzyme at two different pH values, and for the complex with the reaction products, providing insights into the PG recognition and the catalytic process. These structures are significantly different compared with the previously reported NMR structure for the same protein. The NMR structure does not possess an accessible active site and shows the protein in what is proposed herein as an inactive "closed" conformation. The transition of the protein from this inactive conformation to the active "open" conformation, as seen in the x-ray structures, was studied by targeted molecular dynamics simulations, which revealed large conformational rearrangements (as much as 17 Å) in four specific regions representing one-third of the entire protein. It is proposed that the large conformational change that would take the inactive NMR structure to the active x-ray structure represents an unprecedented mechanism for activation of AmpD. Analysis is presented to argue that this activation mechanism might be representative of a regulatory process for other intracellular members of the bacterial amidase_2 family of enzymes.

  14. Crystal Structures of Bacterial Peptidoglycan Amidase AmpD and an Unprecedented Activation Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-López, Cesar; Rojas-Altuve, Alzoray; Zhang, Weilie; Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Barbe, Sophie; André, Isabelle; Ferrer, Pilar; Silva-Martin, Noella; Castro, German R.; Martínez-Ripoll, Martín; Mobashery, Shahriar; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2011-01-01

    AmpD is a cytoplasmic peptidoglycan (PG) amidase involved in bacterial cell-wall recycling and in induction of β-lactamase, a key enzyme of β-lactam antibiotic resistance. AmpD belongs to the amidase_2 family that includes zinc-dependent amidases and the peptidoglycan-recognition proteins (PGRPs), highly conserved pattern-recognition molecules of the immune system. Crystal structures of Citrobacter freundii AmpD were solved in this study for the apoenzyme, for the holoenzyme at two different pH values, and for the complex with the reaction products, providing insights into the PG recognition and the catalytic process. These structures are significantly different compared with the previously reported NMR structure for the same protein. The NMR structure does not possess an accessible active site and shows the protein in what is proposed herein as an inactive “closed” conformation. The transition of the protein from this inactive conformation to the active “open” conformation, as seen in the x-ray structures, was studied by targeted molecular dynamics simulations, which revealed large conformational rearrangements (as much as 17 Å) in four specific regions representing one-third of the entire protein. It is proposed that the large conformational change that would take the inactive NMR structure to the active x-ray structure represents an unprecedented mechanism for activation of AmpD. Analysis is presented to argue that this activation mechanism might be representative of a regulatory process for other intracellular members of the bacterial amidase_2 family of enzymes. PMID:21775432

  15. Localization of the active site of an enzyme, bacterial luciferase, using two-quantum affinity modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benimetskaya, L. Z.; Gitelzon, I. I.; Kozionov, Andrew L.; Novozhilov, S. Y.; Petushkov, V. N.; Rodionova, N. S.; Stockman, Mark I.

    1991-11-01

    For the first time the method of two-quantum affinity modification has been employed to probe the structure of an enzyme, bacterial luciferase. Position of the flavin-binding site of this enzyme, which was previously unknown, has been established. The obtained data indicate that the flavin site is positioned on the (alpha) -subunit. The closest contact of the protein chain of the enzyme with the chromophoric group of the flavin takes place near 80 +/- 10 and 120 +/- 10 amino acid residues; the regions 50 +/- 10 and 215 +/- 10 are also close to the flavin. The established localization does not contradict suggestions on positions of the flavin and phosphate sites of the bacterial luciferase, which had earlier been made from the data on evolutionary stability of various luciferases. The present method can, in principle, be applied to a great number of enzymes, including all flavin-dependent enzymes. Enzymatic catalysis has high speed and specificity. Creation of a method of determination of the elements of the primary structure of a protein, making up the active site (in which substratum conversion occurs), could be a significant advance in clearing up mechanisms of enzymatic catalysis. It was proposed to localize active sites of the enzymes, whose substrata are chromophores, using this method of two-quantum affinity modification. An enzyme- substratum complex is irradiated with laser light of sufficiently long wavelength ((lambda) 300 nm) which is not directly absorbed by the enzyme. Two-quantum quasiresonant excitation of the substratum activates it to the state with energy 5-7 eV, which is then radiativelessly transferred to neighboring protein groups. This energy exceeds the energy of activation of peptide bond breakage. Therefore, the enzyme will be disrupted in the vicinity of its active site. In the present paper the above approach has been implemented for the first time. Information has been obtained about the position of the flavin-binding site of bacterial

  16. Nutrient regulation of bacterial production and ectoenzyme activities in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donachie, Stuart P.; Christian, James R.; Karl, David M.

    Interactions between Bacteria and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the open ocean are poorly understood. While it is likely that particular compounds may disproportionately regulate heterotrophic activity, very little is known about the underlying processes. Through 10 cruises between December 1996 and April 1998 we investigated how heterotrophic (non-pigmented) Bacteria cell production, per cell α- and β-glucosidase and leucine aminopeptidase (LAPase) activities, and 14C-glucose uptake in 0.8 μm filtered seawater (fsw) cultures at Station ALOHA (22°45'N, 158°W) responded to organic and inorganic nutrient additions (glucose, single amino acids, NH 4+, NO 3-). Bacterial cell production did not change significantly in fsw with glucose (1 μM) or single exogenous N sources (1 μM N) compared to that in fsw alone. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in heterotrophic bacterial cell production in fsw amended with organic or inorganic N, nor between that in fsw with organic N and glucose, or inorganic N and glucose. Cell production did increase significantly, however, in fsw with exogenous glucose (0.38 μM) plus 1 μM inorganic N (NH 4+) relative to that in fsw only, in fsw with glucose, and in fsw with 1 μM N as amino acids (His, Tyr, Leu). There was no significant difference between heterotrophic bacterial cell production in fsw with glucose, glucose plus amino acids, and that in fsw alone. Cell-specific LAPase activity increased significantly relative to that in unamended fsw when exogenous glucose plus NH 4+ or NO 3- were provided, but amino acids, glucose, NH 4+ or NO 3- alone had little or no effect. α-Glucosidase activity tended to increase with exogenous His and Tyr additions. Our results suggest that heterotrophic activity at Station ALOHA can be regulated by the abundance of particular compounds, regardless of their total concentrations. It appears that auxotrophy and de novo synthesis of cell protein from glucose may coexist among Bacteria

  17. SGLT1 activity in lung alveolar cells of diabetic rats modulates airway surface liquid glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Tales Lyra; Candeia-Medeiros, Návylla; Cavalcante-Araújo, Polliane M.; Melo, Igor Santana; Fávaro-Pípi, Elaine; Fátima, Luciana Alves; Rocha, Antônio Augusto; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Machado, Ubiratan Fabres; Campos, Ruy R.; Sabino-Silva, Robinson

    2016-01-01

    High glucose concentration in the airway surface liquid (ASL) is an important feature of diabetes that predisposes to respiratory infections. We investigated the role of alveolar epithelial SGLT1 activity on ASL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation. Non-diabetic and diabetic rats were intranasally treated with saline, isoproterenol (to increase SGLT1 activity) or phlorizin (to decrease SGLT1 activity); 2 hours later, glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation (methicillin-resistant Sthaphylococcus aureus, MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. aeruginosa) were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL); and alveolar SGLT1 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. BAL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation increased in diabetic animals: isoproterenol stimulated SGLT1 migration to luminal membrane, and reduced (50%) the BAL glucose concentration; whereas phlorizin increased the BAL glucose concentration (100%). These regulations were accompanied by parallel changes of in vitro MRSA and P. aeruginosa proliferation in BAL (r = 0.9651 and r = 0.9613, respectively, Pearson correlation). The same regulations were observed in in vivo P. aeruginosa proliferation. In summary, the results indicate a relationship among SGLT1 activity, ASL glucose concentration and pulmonary bacterial proliferation. Besides, the study highlights that, in situations of pulmonary infection risk, such as in diabetic subjects, increased SGLT1 activity may prevent bacterial proliferation whereas decreased SGLT1 activity can exacerbate it. PMID:26902517

  18. Detection of bacterial phosphatase activity by means of an original and simple test.

    PubMed Central

    Satta, G; Grazi, G; Varaldo, P E; Fontana, R

    1979-01-01

    A new test for the detection of bacterial phosphatase activity has been devised. The test is performed using agar media containing both methyl green (MG) and phenolphthalein diphosphate (PDP); in these media phosphatase-producing strains grow deep-green-stained colonies whereas non-producing strains do not. A total of 739 different strains were tested, including 593 staphylococci, 95 micrococci, 11 streptococci, 10 corynebacteria, 14 enterobacteria, and 16 candidae. All strains found phosphatase-positive according to the conventional phosphatase test displayed deep-green-stained colonies on MG-PDP media, whereas all phosphatase-negative strains showed unstained colonies on the same media. The main advantages of the present phosphatase test as compared with other conventional ones are that it is more simple to perform, it can reveal the phosphatase activity of colonies grown in deep agar, and can be incorporated into commercial multitest kits. PMID:87403

  19. The antimicrobial activity of thyme essential oil against multidrug resistant clinical bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz, Monika; Łysakowska, Monika; Denys, Paweł; Kowalczyk, Edward

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of thyme essential oil against clinical multidrug resistant strains of Staphylococcus, Enterococcus, Escherichia, and Pseudomonas genus. The antibacterial activity of oil was tested against standard strains of bacteria and 120 clinical strains isolated from patients with infections of the oral cavity, abdominal cavity, respiratory and genitourinary tracts, skin, and from the hospital environment. Agar diffusion was used to determine the microbial growth inhibition of bacterial growth at various concentrations of oil from Thymus vulgaris. Susceptibility testing to antibiotics was carried out using disk diffusion. Thyme essential oil strongly inhibited the growth of the clinical strains of bacteria tested. The use of phytopharmaceuticals based on an investigated essential oil from thyme in the prevention and treatment of various human infections may be reasonable.

  20. Characterisation and in vitro antimicrobial activity of biosynthetic silver-loaded bacterial cellulose hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Abhishek; Low, Wan Li; Radecka, Iza; Britland, Stephen T; Mohd Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal; Martin, Claire

    2016-12-01

    Wounds that remain in the inflammatory phase for a prolonged period of time are likely to be colonised and infected by a range of commensal and pathogenic microorganisms. Treatment associated with these types of wounds mainly focuses on controlling infection and providing an optimum environment capable of facilitating re-epithelialisation, thus promoting wound healing. Hydrogels have attracted vast interest as moist wound-responsive dressing materials. In the current study, biosynthetic bacterial cellulose hydrogels synthesised by Gluconacetobacter xylinus and subsequently loaded with silver were characterised and investigated for their antimicrobial activity against two representative wound infecting pathogens, namely S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. Silver nitrate and silver zeolite provided the source of silver and loading parameters were optimised based on experimental findings. The results indicate that both AgNO3 and AgZ loaded biosynthetic hydrogels possess antimicrobial activity (p < .05) against both S. aureus and P. aeruginosa and may therefore be suitable for wound management applications.

  1. INNATE IMMUNITY. Cytosolic detection of the bacterial metabolite HBP activates TIFA-dependent innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Ryan G; Sintsova, Anna; Buckwalter, Carolyn M; Leung, Nelly; Cochrane, Alan; Li, Jianjun; Cox, Andrew D; Moffat, Jason; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2015-06-12

    Host recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) initiates an innate immune response that is critical for pathogen elimination and engagement of adaptive immunity. Here we show that mammalian cells can detect and respond to the bacterial-derived monosaccharide heptose-1,7-bisphosphate (HBP). A metabolic intermediate in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, HBP is highly conserved in Gram-negative bacteria, yet absent from eukaryotic cells. Detection of HBP within the host cytosol activated the nuclear facto κB pathway in vitro and induced innate and adaptive immune responses in vivo. Moreover, we used a genome-wide RNA interference screen to uncover an innate immune signaling axis, mediated by phosphorylation-dependent oligomerization of the TRAF-interacting protein with forkhead-associated domain (TIFA) that is triggered by HBP. Thus, HBP is a PAMP that activates TIFA-dependent immunity to Gram-negative bacteria.

  2. Core muscle activity in a series of balance exercises with different stability conditions.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Borreani, Sebastien; Martin, Julio; Martin, Fernando; Flandez, Jorge; Colado, Juan C

    2015-07-01

    Literature that provides progression models based on core muscle activity and postural manipulations is scarce. The purpose of this study was to investigate the core muscle activity in a series of balance exercises with different stability levels and additional elastic resistance. A descriptive study of electromyography (EMG) was performed with forty-four healthy subjects that completed 12 exercises in a random order. Exercises were performed unipedally or bipedally with or without elastic tubing as resistance on various unstable (uncontrolled multiaxial and uniaxial movement) and stable surfaces. Surface EMG on the lumbar multífidus spinae (LM), thoracic multífidus spinae (TM), lumbar erector spinae (LE), thoracic erector spinae (TE) and gluteus maximus (GM), on the dominant side of the body were collected to quantify the amount of muscle activity and were expressed as a % of the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Significant differences (p<.001) were found between exercises. The three unipedal standing exercises with additional elastic resistance generated the greatest EMG values, ranging from 19% MVIC to 30% MVIC. Postural manipulations with additional elastic resistance and/or unstable devices increase core muscle activity. An adequate exercise progression based on global core EMG could start with seated positions, progressing to bipedal standing stance (i.e., from either multiaxial or stable surface to uniaxial surface). Following this, unipedal standing positions may be performed (i.e., from either multiaxial or stable surface to uniaxial surface) and finally, elastic resistance must be added in order to increase EMG levels (i.e., from stable surface progressing to any of the used unstable surfaces). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence Of Scapular Position On The Core Musculature Activation In The Prone Plank Exercise.

    PubMed

    Cortell-Tormo, Juan M; García-Jaén, Miguel; Chulvi-Medrano, Iván; Hernández-Sánchez, Sergio; Lucas-Cuevas, Ángel G; Tortosa-Martínez, Juan

    2016-10-26

    Prone plank is a widely used exercise in core stability training. Research has shown that pelvic tilt plays an important role on the electromyographical (EMG) activation of core musculature. However, the influence of scapular position on EMG activation is currently unknown. Therefore, this study evaluated the influence of scapular position on the core muscles during a prone plank. Surface electromyography of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO) and erector spinae (ES) was collected in fifteen participants (10 men, 5 women). Four variations of the prone plank were evaluated: scapular abduction with anterior (ABANT) and posterior (ABRET) pelvic tilt; and scapular adduction with anterior (ADANT) and posterior (ADRET) pelvic tilt. Individual muscle EMG and overall EMG for each plank exercise was analyzed. Joint positions were controlled with a 2D kinematic analysis. Ratings of perceived effort (RPE) were also registered. ADRET resulted in higher overall EMG activity compared to ABANT (p=0.04) and ADANT (p=0.04). Moreover, ADRET resulted in greater EMG activity compared to ADANT, ABANT, and ABRET for EO (p=0.000; p=0.000; p=0.035), IO (p=0.000; p=0.000; p=0.005) and ES (p=0.019; p=0.001; p=0.014). Regarding RA, ADRET was significantly higher compared to ADANT (p=0.002) and ABANT (p=0.005). Finally, ADRET provoked a higher RPE compared to ABANT (p=0.000), ABRET (p=0.001) and ADANT (p=0.015). These findings demonstrate the influence of the scapular and pelvic position on the EMG response of the core muscle groups analyzed in this study, and highlight the greater contribution of these muscles to the postural stabilizing demands during posterior pelvic tilt positions, particularly when the scapulae are in adduction.

  4. Surface active properties of bacterial strains isolated from petroleum hydrocarbon-bioremediated soil.

    PubMed

    Płaza, Grazyna A; Ulfig, Krzysztof; Brigmon, Robin L

    2005-01-01

    Two bacterial strains identified as Ralstonia picketti (BP 20) and Alcaligenes piechaudii (CZOR L-1B) were isolated from petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil following bioremediation treatment. The surface active properties, e.g. surface tension, emulsification and foamability of their culture filtrates were evaluated. Bacterial cell-surface hydrophobicity (BAH) as measured by analyzing cell affinity towards aliphatic and aromatic compounds was also determinated. The bacteria grew in liquid cultures containing 1% (v/v) of crude oil as carbon and energy source at 30 degrees C under aerobic conditions. The surface tensions were reduced to 61 mN/m and 55 mN/m by Ralstonia picketti and Alcaligenes piechaudii, respectively. The emulsification index (EI24) was almost 100% for all tested compounds except diesel oil. The stability of the emulsions was deteminated at 4 degrees C, 45 degrees C and 65 degrees C. The emulsions were stable at 4 degrees C. Ralstonia picketti was better foam inducer (FV = 50 ml) compared to Alcaligenes piechaudii (FV = 10 ml). The BAH measurements revealed higher adhesion of Alcaligenes piechaudii cells towards different hydrocarbons compared to Ralstonia picketti cells. The strains were found to have a surface hydrophobicity in the following order: aliphatic hydrocarbons, BTEX, and PAHs. The ability to adhere to bulk hydrocarbon is mostly a characteristic of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. The strains were found to be better emulsifiers than surface tension reducers. They produce water-soluble extracellular bioemulsifiers. Both bacterial isolates have good properties to use them, mainly in the petroleum industry, e.g. in enhanced oil recovery and in bioremediation processes-primarily due to their emulsification property, i.e. emulsion forming and stabilizing capacity.

  5. Dissolved organic nitrogen release and bacterial activity in the upper layers of the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Varela, Marta M; Bode, Antonio; Morán, Xosé Anxelu G; Valencia, Joaquín

    2006-05-01

    The variability of the percentage of extracellular dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) release (PER), along with the relationship between DON release and bacterioplankton activity, was examined during five oceanographic cruises, carried out in the upwelling region of the NW Iberian Peninsula, the SW Bay of Biscay, and a latitudinal transect in the Atlantic Ocean (50 degrees N-35 degrees S). Rates of nitrogen uptake, DON release, and bacterial production were measured at 66 stations and sampled between August 1998 and October 2000. The percentage of DON release relative to the gross uptake of ammonium (PERNH4+) ranged from 3 to 46%, whereas that relative to total nitrogen (NH4+ + NO3- + urea) gross uptake (PERtotal) varied between 21 and 82%. The highest values for both PERNH4+ and PER(total) were found in oligotrophic oceanic waters (< 0.25 mg chlorophyll a m(-3)). In oceanic environments, a positive relationship was found between nitrogen uptake and DON release rates, with a log-log linear regression slope significantly lower than 1, suggesting an inverse relationship between PER and gross nitrogen uptake rates. In contrast, in areas with higher productivity levels (> 6 mg chlorophyll a m(-3)), such as the continental shelf off the NW Iberian Peninsula, PER held constant as nitrogen uptake increased. These results suggest the dominance of different processes controlling DON release in oceanic and neritic zones. DON release rates accounted for less than 15% of the variability observed in bacterial production rates, suggesting a weak response of bacterioplankton to phytoplankton on short time scales (hours). Furthermore, nitrogen budgets showed an excess of DON release in relation to bacterial requirements.

  6. Rapid impact of phenanthrene and arsenic on bacterial community structure and activities in sand batches.

    PubMed

    Cébron, A; Arsène-Ploetze, F; Bauda, P; Bertin, P N; Billard, P; Carapito, C; Devin, S; Goulhen-Chollet, F; Poirel, J; Leyval, C

    2014-01-01

    The impact of both organic and inorganic pollution on the structure of soil microbial communities is poorly documented. A short-time batch experiment (6 days) was conducted to study the impact of both types of pollutants on the taxonomic, metabolic and functional diversity of soil bacteria. For this purpose sand spiked with phenanthrene (500 mg kg(-1) sand) or arsenic (arsenite 0.66 mM and arsenate 12.5 mM) was supplemented with artificial root exudates and was inoculated with bacteria originated from an aged PAH and heavy-metal-polluted soil. The bacterial community was characterised using bacterial strain isolation, TTGE fingerprinting and proteomics. Without pollutant, or with phenanthrene or arsenic, there were no significant differences in the abundance of bacteria and the communities were dominated by Pseudomonas and Paenibacillus genera. However, at the concentrations used, both phenanthrene or arsenic were toxic as shown by the decrease in mineralisation activities. Using community-level physiological profiles (Biolog Ecoplates™) or differential proteomics, we observed that the pollutants had an impact on the community physiology, in particular phenanthrene induced a general cellular stress response with changes in the central metabolism and membrane protein synthesis. Real-time PCR quantification of functional genes and transcripts revealed that arsenic induced the transcription of functional arsenic resistance and speciation genes (arsB, ACR3 and aioA), while no transcription of PAH-degradation genes (PAH-dioxygenase and catechol-dioxygenase) was detected with phenanthrene. Altogether, in our tested conditions, pollutants do not have a major effect on community abundance or taxonomic composition but rather have an impact on metabolic and functional bacterial properties.

  7. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides induce in vitro degradation of cartilage matrix through chondrocyte activation.

    PubMed Central

    Jasin, H E

    1983-01-01

    The present studies demonstrate that bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induce cartilage matrix degradation in live explants in organ culture. Quintuplicate bovine nasal fibrocartilage explants cultured for 8 d with three different purified LPS preparations derived from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhosa at concentrations ranging from 1.0 to 25.0 micrograms/ml resulted in matrix proteoglycan depletion of 33.3 +/- 5.8 to 92.5 +/- 2.0% (medium control depletion 17.7 +/- 0.7 to 32.4 +/- 1.4%). Matrix degradation depended on the presence of live chondrocytes because frozen-thawed explants incubated with LPS failed to show any proteoglycan release. Moreover, the addition of Polymyxin B (25 micrograms/ml) to live explants incubated with LPS abolished matrix release, whereas Polymyxin B had no effect on the matrix-degrading activity provided by blood mononuclear cell factors. A highly purified Lipid A preparation induced matrix degradation at a concentration of 0.01 micrograms/ml. Cartilage matrix collagen and proteoglycan depletion also occurred with porcine articular cartilage explants (collagen release: 18.3 +/- 3.5%, medium control: 2.1 +/- 0.5%; proteoglycan release: 79.0 +/- 5.9%, medium control: 28.8 +/- 4.8%). Histochemical analysis of the cultured explants confirmed the results described above. Gel chromatography of the proteoglycans released in culture indicated that LPS induced significant degradation of the high molecular weight chondroitin sulfate-containing aggregates. These findings suggest that bacterial products may induce cartilage damage by direct stimulation of chondrocytes. This pathogenic mechanism may play a role in joint damage in septic arthritis and in arthropathies resulting from the presence of bacterial products derived from the gastrointestinal tract. Images PMID:6358260

  8. Bacterial Endotoxin Activity in Human Serum Is Associated With Dyslipidemia, Insulin Resistance, Obesity, and Chronic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lassenius, Mariann I.; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Kaartinen, Kati; Pussinen, Pirkko J.; Syrjänen, Jaana; Forsblom, Carol; Pörsti, Ilkka; Rissanen, Aila; Kaprio, Jaakko; Mustonen, Jukka; Groop, Per-Henrik; Lehto, Markku

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate whether bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activity in human serum is associated with the components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in type 1 diabetic patients with various degrees of kidney disease and patients with IgA glomerulonephritis (IgAGN). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Serum LPS activity was determined with the Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate chromogenic end point assay in type 1 diabetic patients with a normal albumin excretion rate (n = 587), microalbuminuria (n = 144), macroalbuminuria (n = 173); patients with IgAGN (n = 98); and in nondiabetic control subjects (n = 345). The relationships of the LPS/HDL ratio and MetS-associated variables were evaluated with Pearson correlation. RESULTS The MetS was more prevalent in type 1 diabetic patients (48%) than in patients with IgAGN (15%). Diabetic patients with macroalbuminuria had a significantly higher serum LPS/HDL ratio than patients with IgAGN. In the normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetic group, patients in the highest LPS/HDL quartile were diagnosed as having the MetS three times more frequently than patients in the lowest quartile (69 vs. 22%; P < 0.001). High LPS activity was associated with higher serum triglyceride concentration, earlier onset of diabetes, increased diastolic blood pressure, and elevated urinary excretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. CONCLUSIONS High serum LPS activity is strongly associated with the components of the MetS. Diabetic patients with kidney disease seem to be more susceptible to metabolic endotoxemia than patients with IgAGN. Bacterial endotoxins may thus play an important role in the development of the metabolic and vascular abnormalities commonly seen in obesity and diabetes-related diseases. PMID:21636801

  9. 9,400 years of cosmic radiation and solar activity from ice cores and tree rings

    PubMed Central

    Steinhilber, Friedhelm; Beer, Jürg; Brunner, Irene; Christl, Marcus; Fischer, Hubertus; Heikkilä, Ulla; Kubik, Peter W.; Mann, Mathias; McCracken, Ken G.; Miller, Heinrich; Miyahara, Hiroko; Oerter, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the temporal variation of cosmic radiation and solar activity during the Holocene is essential for studies of the solar-terrestrial relationship. Cosmic-ray produced radionuclides, such as 10Be and 14C which are stored in polar ice cores and tree rings, offer the unique opportunity to reconstruct the history of cosmic radiation and solar activity over many millennia. Although records from different archives basically agree, they also show some deviations during certain periods. So far most reconstructions were based on only one single radionuclide record, which makes detection and correction of these deviations impossible. Here we combine different 10Be ice core records from Greenland and Antarctica with the global 14C tree ring record using principal component analysis. This approach is only possible due to a new high-resolution 10Be record from Dronning Maud Land obtained within the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica in Antarctica. The new cosmic radiation record enables us to derive total solar irradiance, which is then used as a proxy of solar activity to identify the solar imprint in an Asian climate record. Though generally the agreement between solar forcing and Asian climate is good, there are also periods without any coherence, pointing to other forcings like volcanoes and greenhouse gases and their corresponding feedbacks. The newly derived records have the potential to improve our understanding of the solar dynamics and to quantify the solar influence on climate. PMID:22474348

  10. 9,400 years of cosmic radiation and solar activity from ice cores and tree rings.

    PubMed

    Steinhilber, Friedhelm; Abreu, Jose A; Beer, Jürg; Brunner, Irene; Christl, Marcus; Fischer, Hubertus; Heikkilä, Ulla; Kubik, Peter W; Mann, Mathias; McCracken, Ken G; Miller, Heinrich; Miyahara, Hiroko; Oerter, Hans; Wilhelms, Frank

    2012-04-17

    Understanding the temporal variation of cosmic radiation and solar activity during the Holocene is essential for studies of the solar-terrestrial relationship. Cosmic-ray produced radionuclides, such as (10)Be and (14)C which are stored in polar ice cores and tree rings, offer the unique opportunity to reconstruct the history of cosmic radiation and solar activity over many millennia. Although records from different archives basically agree, they also show some deviations during certain periods. So far most reconstructions were based on only one single radionuclide record, which makes detection and correction of these deviations impossible. Here we combine different (10)Be ice core records from Greenland and Antarctica with the global (14)C tree ring record using principal component analysis. This approach is only possible due to a new high-resolution (10)Be record from Dronning Maud Land obtained within the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica in Antarctica. The new cosmic radiation record enables us to derive total solar irradiance, which is then used as a proxy of solar activity to identify the solar imprint in an Asian climate record. Though generally the agreement between solar forcing and Asian climate is good, there are also periods without any coherence, pointing to other forcings like volcanoes and greenhouse gases and their corresponding feedbacks. The newly derived records have the potential to improve our understanding of the solar dynamics and to quantify the solar influence on climate.

  11. (129)I record of nuclear activities in marine sediment core from Jiaozhou Bay in China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yukun; Hou, Xiaolin; Zhou, Weijian; Liu, Guangshan

    2016-04-01

    Iodine-129 has been used as a powerful tool for environmental tracing of human nuclear activities. In this work, a sediment core collected from Jiaozhou Bay, the east coast of China, in 2002 was analyzed for (129)I to investigate the influence of human nuclear activities in this region. Significantly enhanced (129)I level was observed in upper 70 cm of the sediment core, with peak values in the layer corresponding to 1957, 1964, 1974, 1986, and after 1990. The sources of (129)I and corresponding transport processes in this region are discussed, including nuclear weapons testing at the Pacific Proving Grounds, global fallout from a large numbers of nuclear weapon tests in 1963, the climax of Chinese nuclear weapons testing in the early 1970s, the Chernobyl accident in 1986, and long-distance dispersion of European reprocessing derived (129)I. The very well (129)I records of different human nuclear activities in the sediment core illustrate the potential application of (129)I in constraining ages and sedimentation rates of the recent sediment. The releases of (129)I from the European nuclear fuel reprocessing plants at La Hague (France) and Sellafield (UK) were found to dominate the inventory of (129)I in the Chinese sediments after 1990, not only the directly atmospheric releases of these reprocessing plants, but also re-emission of marine discharged (129)I of these reprocessing plants in the highly contaminated European seas.

  12. The activated sludge ecosystem contains a core community of abundant organisms.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Aaron M; Albertsen, Mads; Vollertsen, Jes; Nielsen, Per H

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the microbial ecology of a system requires that the observed population dynamics can be linked to their metabolic functions. However, functional characterization is laborious and the choice of organisms should be prioritized to those that are frequently abundant (core) or transiently abundant, which are therefore putatively make the greatest contribution to carbon turnover in the system. We analyzed the microbial communities in 13 Danish wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal in consecutive years and a single plant periodically over 6 years, using Illumina sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA amplicons of the V4 region. The plants contained a core community of 63 abundant genus-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that made up 68% of the total reads. A core community consisting of abundant OTUs was also observed within the incoming wastewater to three plants. The net growth rate for individual OTUs was quantified using mass balance, and it was found that 10% of the total reads in the activated sludge were from slow or non-growing OTUs, and that their measured abundance was primarily because of immigration with the wastewater. Transiently abundant organisms were also identified. Among them the genus Nitrotoga (class Betaproteobacteria) was the most abundant putative nitrite oxidizer in a number of activated sludge plants, which challenges previous assumptions that Nitrospira (phylum Nitrospirae) are the primary nitrite-oxidizers in activated sludge systems with nutrient removal.

  13. Shell-anchor-core structures for enhanced stability and catalytic oxygen reduction activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Caballero, Gustavo E.; Hirunsit, Pussana; Balbuena, Perla B.

    2010-10-01

    Density functional theory is used to evaluate activity and stability properties of shell-anchor-core structures. The structures consist of a Pt surface monolayer and a composite core having an anchor bilayer where C atoms in the interstitial sites lock 3d metals in their locations, thus avoiding their surface segregation and posterior dissolution. The modified subsurface geometry induces less strain on the top surface, thus exerting a favorable effect on the surface catalytic activity where the adsorption strength of the oxygenated species becomes more moderate: weaker than on pure Pt(111) but stronger than on a Pt monolayer having a 3d metal subsurface. Here we analyze the effect of changing the nature of the 3d metal in the subsurface anchor bilayer, and we also test the use of a Pd monolayer instead of Pt on the surface. It is found that a subsurface constituted by two layers with an approximate composition of M2C (M=Fe, Ni, and Co) provides a barrier for the migration of subsurface core metal atoms to the surface. Consequently, an enhanced resistance against dissolution in parallel to improved oxygen reduction activity is expected, as given by the values of adsorption energies of reaction intermediates, delayed onset of water oxidation, and/or low coverage of oxygenated species at surface oxidation potentials.

  14. The activated sludge ecosystem contains a core community of abundant organisms

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Aaron M; Albertsen, Mads; Vollertsen, Jes; Nielsen, Per H

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the microbial ecology of a system requires that the observed population dynamics can be linked to their metabolic functions. However, functional characterization is laborious and the choice of organisms should be prioritized to those that are frequently abundant (core) or transiently abundant, which are therefore putatively make the greatest contribution to carbon turnover in the system. We analyzed the microbial communities in 13 Danish wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal in consecutive years and a single plant periodically over 6 years, using Illumina sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA amplicons of the V4 region. The plants contained a core community of 63 abundant genus-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that made up 68% of the total reads. A core community consisting of abundant OTUs was also observed within the incoming wastewater to three plants. The net growth rate for individual OTUs was quantified using mass balance, and it was found that 10% of the total reads in the activated sludge were from slow or non-growing OTUs, and that their measured abundance was primarily because of immigration with the wastewater. Transiently abundant organisms were also identified. Among them the genus Nitrotoga (class Betaproteobacteria) was the most abundant putative nitrite oxidizer in a number of activated sludge plants, which challenges previous assumptions that Nitrospira (phylum Nitrospirae) are the primary nitrite-oxidizers in activated sludge systems with nutrient removal. PMID:26262816

  15. Diversity of active microbial communities subjected to long-term exposure to chemical contaminants along a 40-year-old sediment core.

    PubMed

    Kaci, Assia; Petit, Fabienne; Fournier, Matthieu; Cécillon, Sébastien; Boust, Dominique; Lesueur, Patrick; Berthe, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    In estuarine ecosystems, metallic and organic contaminants are mainly associated with fine grain sediments which settle on mudflats. Over time, the layers of sediment accumulate and are then transformed by diagenetic processes mainly controlled by microbial activity, recording the history of the estuary's chemical contamination. In an environment of this specific type, we investigated the evolution of the chemical contamination and the structure of both total and active microbial communities, based on PhyloChip analysis of a 4.6-m core corresponding to a 40-year sedimentary record. While the archaeal abundance remained constant along the core, a decrease by one order of magnitude in the bacterial abundance was observed with depth. Both total and active microbial communities were dominated by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes in all sediment samples. Among Proteobacteria, alpha-Proteobacteria dominated both total (from 37 to 60 %) and metabolically active (from 19.7 to 34.6 %) communities, including the Rhizobiales, Rhodobacter, Caulobacterales, and Sphingomonadales orders. Co-inertia analysis revealed a relationship between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, zinc and some polychlorobiphenyls concentrations, and the structure of total and active microbial communities in the oldest and most contaminated sediments (from 1970 to 1975), suggesting that long-term exposure to chemicals shaped the structure of the microbial community.

  16. The antimutagenic activity of Lavandula angustifolia (lavender) essential oil in the bacterial reverse mutation assay.

    PubMed

    Evandri, M G; Battinelli, L; Daniele, C; Mastrangelo, S; Bolle, P; Mazzanti, G

    2005-09-01

    Essential oils from Melaleuca alternifolia (tea-tree oil) and Lavandula angustifolia (lavender oil) are commonly used to treat minor health problems. Tea-tree oil possesses broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, and is increasingly used for skin problems. Lavender oil, traditionally used as an antiseptic agent, is now predominantly used as a relaxant, carminative, and sedative in aromatherapy. Despite their growing use no data are available on their mutagenic potential. In this study, after determining the chemical composition of tea-tree oil and lavender oil, by gas-chromatography and mass spectrometry, we investigated their mutagenic and antimutagenic activities by the bacterial reverse mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains and in Escherichia coli WP2 uvrA strain, with and without an extrinsic metabolic activation system. Neither essential oil had mutagenic activity on the two tested Salmonella strains or on E. coli, with or without the metabolic activation system. Conversely, lavender oil exerted strong antimutagenic activity, reducing mutant colonies in the TA98 strain exposed to the direct mutagen 2-nitrofluorene. Antimutagenicity was concentration-dependent: the maximal concentration (0.80 mg/plate) reduced the number of histidine-independent revertant colonies by 66.4%. Lavender oil (0.80 mg/plate) also showed moderate antimutagenicity against the TA98 strain exposed to the direct mutagen 1-nitropyrene. Its antimutagenic property makes lavender oil a promising candidate for new applications in human healthcare.

  17. Ribonucleoprotein particles of bacterial small non-coding RNA IsrA (IS61 or McaS) and its interaction with RNA polymerase core may link transcription to mRNA fate

    PubMed Central

    van Nues, Rob W.; Castro-Roa, Daniel; Yuzenkova, Yulia; Zenkin, Nikolay

    2016-01-01

    Coupled transcription and translation in bacteria are tightly regulated. Some small RNAs (sRNAs) control aspects of this coupling by modifying ribosome access or inducing degradation of the message. Here, we show that sRNA IsrA (IS61 or McaS) specifically associates with core enzyme of RNAP in vivo and in vitro, independently of σ factor and away from the main nucleic-acids-binding channel of RNAP. We also show that, in the cells, IsrA exists as ribonucleoprotein particles (sRNPs), which involve a defined set of proteins including Hfq, S1, CsrA, ProQ and PNPase. Our findings suggest that IsrA might be directly involved in transcription or can participate in regulation of gene expression by delivering proteins associated with it to target mRNAs through its interactions with transcribing RNAP and through regions of sequence-complementarity with the target. In this eukaryotic-like model only in the context of a complex with its target, IsrA and its associated proteins become active. In this manner, in the form of sRNPs, bacterial sRNAs could regulate a number of targets with various outcomes, depending on the set of associated proteins. PMID:26609136

  18. Effect of long-term industrial waste effluent pollution on soil enzyme activities and bacterial community composition.

    PubMed

    Subrahmanyam, Gangavarapu; Shen, Ju-Pei; Liu, Yu-Rong; Archana, Gattupalli; Zhang, Li-Mei

    2016-02-01

    Although numerous studies have addressed the influence of exogenous pollutants on microorganisms, the effect of long-term industrial waste effluent (IWE) pollution on the activity and diversity of soil bacteria was still unclear. Three soil samples characterized as uncontaminated (R1), moderately contaminated (R2), and highly contaminated (R3) receiving mixed organic and heavy metal pollutants for more than 20 years through IWE were collected along the Mahi River basin, Gujarat, western India. Basal soil respiration and in situ enzyme activities indicated an apparent deleterious effect of IWE on microbial activity and soil function. Community composition profiling of soil bacteria using 16S rRNA gene amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method indicated an apparent bacterial community shift in the IWE-affected soils. Cloning and sequencing of DGGE bands revealed that the dominated bacterial phyla in polluted soil were affiliated with Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria, indicating that these bacterial phyla may have a high tolerance to pollutants. We suggested that specific bacterial phyla along with soil enzyme activities could be used as relevant biological indicators for long-term pollution assessment on soil quality. Graphical Abstract Bacterial community profiling and soil enzyme activities in long-term industrial waste effluent polluted soils.

  19. Desulfurization activity and reusability of magnetite nanoparticle-coated Rhodococcus erythropolis FMF and R. erythropolis IGTS8 bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Bardania, Hassan; Raheb, Jamshid; Mohammad-Beigi, Hossein; Rasekh, Behnam; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2013-01-01

    The application of Fe3 O4 nanoparticles to the separation of desulfurizing bacterial cells and their influence on the desulfurization activity and reusability of the two bacterial strains Rhodococcus erythropolis FMF and R. erythropolis IGTS8 were investigated. Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized via the reverse coprecipitation method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that the magnetite nanoparticles had sizes of 5.35 ± 1.13 (F1 nanoparticles) and 8.74 ± 1.18 nm (F2 nanoparticles) when glycine was added during the synthesis of nanoparticles and when it was absent from the reaction mixture, respectively. Glycine was added after the synthesis of both F1 and F2 nanoparticles to stabilize the nanoparticle dispersion. TEM images of cells treated with magnetite nanoparticles indicated that F1 nanoparticles were immobilized on the surface of bacterial cells more evenly than the F2 nanoparticles. Desulfurization activities of the F1 magnetite nanoparticle-coated R. erythropolis FMF and R. erythropolis IGTS8 cells (with sulfur-removal percentage values of 70 ± 4 and 73 ± 3, respectively), as examined with the spectrophotometric Gibbs assay (based on dibenzothiophene degradation and sulfur-removal percentage), were not significantly different from those for the free bacterial cells (67 ± 3 and 69 ± 4, respectively). These results indicate that magnetite nanoparticles cannot affect the desulfurization activity of cells examined in this work. Isolation of bacterial cells from the suspension using a magnet and evaluation of desulfurization activity of separated cells showed that Fe3 O4 nanoparticles can provide a high-efficiency recovery of bacterial cells from a suspension, with the reused magnetite nanoparticle-coated bacterial cells being able to maintain their desulfurization activity efficiently. © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. The impact of zinc oxide nanoparticles on the bacterial microbiome of activated sludge systems

    PubMed Central

    Meli, K.; Kamika, I.; Keshri, J.; Momba, M. N. B.

    2016-01-01

    The expected growth in nanomaterial applications could result in increased amounts of nanoparticles entering municipal sewer systems, eventually ending up in wastewater treatment plants and therefore negatively affecting microbial populations and biological nutrient removal. The aim of this study was to ascertain the impact of zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) on the bacterial microbiome of an activated sludge system. A metagenomic approach combined with the latest generation Illumina MiSeq platform and RDP pipeline tools were used to identify and classify the bacterial microbiome of the sludge. Results revealed a drastic decrease in the number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from 27 737 recovered in the nZnO-free sample to 23 743, 17 733, and 13 324 OTUs in wastewater samples exposed to various concentrations of nZnO (5, 10 and 100 mg/L nZnO, respectively). These represented 12 phyla, 21 classes, 30 orders, 54 families and 51 genera, completely identified at each taxonomic level in the control samples; 7-15-25-28-20 for wastewater samples exposed to 5 mg/L nZnO; 9-15-24-31-23 for those exposed to 10 mg/L and 7-11-19-26-17 for those exposed 100 mg/L nZnO. A large number of sequences could not be assigned to specific taxa, suggesting a possibility of novel species to be discovered. PMID:27966634

  1. Perturbation of bacterial ice nucleation activity by a grass antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Tomalty, Heather E; Walker, Virginia K

    2014-09-26

    Certain plant-associating bacteria produce ice nucleation proteins (INPs) which allow the crystallization of water at high subzero temperatures. Many of these microbes are considered plant pathogens since the formed ice can damage tissues, allowing access to nutrients. Intriguingly, certain plants that host these bacteria synthesize antifreeze proteins (AFPs). Once freezing has occurred, plant AFPs likely function to inhibit the growth of large damaging ice crystals. However, we postulated that such AFPs might also serve as defensive mechanisms against bacterial-mediated ice nucleation. Recombinant AFP derived from the perennial ryegrass Lolium perenne (LpAFP) was combined with INP preparations originating from the grass epiphyte, Pseudomonas syringae. The presence of INPs had no effect on AFP activity, including thermal hysteresis and ice recrystallization inhibition. Strikingly, the ice nucleation point of the INP was depressed up to 1.9°C in the presence of LpAFP, but a recombinant fish AFP did not lower the INP-imposed freezing point. Assays with mutant LpAFPs and the visualization of bacterially-displayed fluorescent plant AFP suggest that INP and LpAFP can interact. Thus, we postulate that in addition to controlling ice growth, plant AFPs may also function as a defensive strategy against the damaging effects of ice-nucleating bacteria. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Glycoside Hydrolase Activities of Thermophilic Bacterial Consortia Adapted to Switchgrass ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gladden, John M.; Allgaier, Martin; Miller, Christopher S.; Hazen, Terry C.; VanderGheynst, Jean S.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Simmons, Blake A.; Singer, Steven W.

    2011-01-01

    Industrial-scale biofuel production requires robust enzymatic cocktails to produce fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass. Thermophilic bacterial consortia are a potential source of cellulases and hemicellulases adapted to harsher reaction conditions than commercial fungal enzymes. Compost-derived microbial consortia were adapted to switchgrass at 60°C to develop thermophilic biomass-degrading consortia for detailed studies. Microbial community analysis using small-subunit rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing and short-read metagenomic sequencing demonstrated that thermophilic adaptation to switchgrass resulted in low-diversity bacterial consortia with a high abundance of bacteria related to thermophilic paenibacilli, Rhodothermus marinus, and Thermus thermophilus. At lower abundance, thermophilic Chloroflexi and an uncultivated lineage of the Gemmatimonadetes phylum were observed. Supernatants isolated from these consortia had high levels of xylanase and endoglucanase activities. Compared to commercial enzyme preparations, the endoglucanase enzymes had a higher thermotolerance and were more stable in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][OAc]), an ionic liquid used for biomass pretreatment. The supernatants were used to saccharify [C2mim][OAc]-pretreated switchgrass at elevated temperatures (up to 80°C), demonstrating that these consortia are an excellent source of enzymes for the development of enzymatic cocktails tailored to more extreme reaction conditions. PMID:21724886

  3. Algal and Bacterial Activities in Acidic (pH 3) Strip Mine Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Gyure, Ruth A.; Konopka, Allan; Brooks, Austin; Doemel, William

    1987-01-01

    Reservoir 29 and Lake B are extremely acid lakes (epilimnion pHs of 2.7 and 3.2, respectively), because they receive acidic discharges from coal refuse piles. They differ in that the pH of profundal sediments in Reservoir 29 increased from 2.7 to 3.8 during the period of thermal stratification, whereas permanently anoxic sediments in Lake B had a pH of 6.2. The pH rise in Reservoir 29 sediments was correlated with a temporal increase in H2S concentration in the anaerobic hypolimnion from 0 to >1 mM. The chlorophyll a levels in the epilimnion of Reservoir 29 were low, and the rate of primary production was typical of an oligotrophic system. However, there was a dense 10-cm layer of algal biomass at the bottom of the metalimnion. Production by this layer was low owing to light limitation and possibly H2S toxicity. The specific photosynthetic rates of epilimnetic algae were low, which suggests that nutrient availability is more important than pH in limiting production. The highest photosynthetic rates were obtained in water samples incubated at pH 2.7 to 4. Heterotrophic bacterial activity (measured by [14C]glucose metabolism) was greatest at the sediment/water interface. Bacterial production (assayed by thymidine incorporation) was as high in Reservoir 29 as in a nonacid mesotrophic Indiana lake. PMID:16347430

  4. Endogenous bacterial toxins are required for the injurious action of platelet-activating factor in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, X M; MacKendrick, W; Tien, J; Huang, W; Caplan, M S; Hsueh, W

    1995-07-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), an endogenous mediator for experimental sepsis, has been shown to induce shock and intestinal necrosis in vivo. However, it is unclear whether PAF exerts its injurious effects on the intestinal tissue directly or via synergism with other endogenous products. The aim of this study was to examine the role of endogenous bacterial products, such as endotoxin, in PAF-induced intestinal injury. PAF (3 micrograms/kg) was injected intravenously into normally colonized rats, germfree rats, and normal rats pretreated with a combination of antibiotics, and the systemic response and intestinal injury were assessed. PAF did not cause prolonged shock, leukopenia, hemoconcentration, and bowel necrosis in germfree rats. When germfree rats were primed with a low dose (0.5 mg/kg) of endotoxin, the protection was lost. Combined treatment of the normally colonized rats with neomycin, polymyxin B, and metronidazole for 7 days largely protected the animal from PAF-induced shock and intestinal necrosis. PAF does not directly induce prolonged hypotension, hemoconcentration, persistent leukopenia, and gross intestinal necrosis but causes these changes via a synergism with endogenous bacterial toxins, presumably from the gut flora.

  5. Green synthesis of silk sericin-capped silver nanoparticles and their potent anti-bacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramwit, Pornanong; Bang, Nipaporn; Ratanavaraporn, Juthamas; Ekgasit, Sanong

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a `green chemistry' approach was introduced to synthesize silk sericin (SS)-capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) under an alkaline condition (pH 11) using SS as a reducing and stabilizing agent instead of toxic chemicals. The SS-capped AgNPs were successfully synthesized at various concentrations of SS and AgNO3, but the yields were different. A higher yield of SS-capped AgNPs was obtained when the concentrations of SS and AgNO3 were increased. The SS-capped AgNPs showed a round shape and uniform size with diameter at around 48 to 117 nm. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy result proved that the carboxylate groups obtained from alkaline degradation of SS would be a reducing agent for the generation of AgNPs while COO- and NH2 + groups stabilized the AgNPs and prevented their precipitation or aggregation. Furthermore, the SS-capped AgNPs showed potent anti-bacterial activity against various gram-positive bacteria (minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) 0.008 mM) and gram-negative bacteria (MIC ranging from 0.001 to 0.004 mM). Therefore, the SS-capped AgNPs would be a safe candidate for anti-bacterial applications.

  6. Community dynamics and glycoside hydrolase activities of thermophilic bacterial consortia adapted to switchgrass

    SciTech Connect

    Gladden, J.M.; Allgaier, M.; Miller, C.S.; Hazen, T.C.; VanderGheynst, J.S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Simmons, B.A.; Singer, S.W.

    2011-05-01

    Industrial-scale biofuel production requires robust enzymatic cocktails to produce fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass. Thermophilic bacterial consortia are a potential source of cellulases and hemicellulases adapted to harsher reaction conditions than commercial fungal enzymes. Compost-derived microbial consortia were adapted to switchgrass at 60 C to develop thermophilic biomass-degrading consortia for detailed studies. Microbial community analysis using small-subunit rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing and short-read metagenomic sequencing demonstrated that thermophilic adaptation to switchgrass resulted in low-diversity bacterial consortia with a high abundance of bacteria related to thermophilic paenibacilli, Rhodothermus marinus, and Thermus thermophilus. At lower abundance, thermophilic Chloroflexi and an uncultivated lineage of the Gemmatimonadetes phylum were observed. Supernatants isolated from these consortia had high levels of xylanase and endoglucanase activities. Compared to commercial enzyme preparations, the endoglucanase enzymes had a higher thermotolerance and were more stable in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][OAc]), an ionic liquid used for biomass pretreatment. The supernatants were used to saccharify [C2mim][OAc]-pretreated switchgrass at elevated temperatures (up to 80 C), demonstrating that these consortia are an excellent source of enzymes for the development of enzymatic cocktails tailored to more extreme reaction conditions.

  7. Algal and bacterial activities in acidic (pH 3) strip mine lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Gyure, R.A.; Konopka, A.; Brooks, A.; Doemel, W.

    1987-09-01

    Reservoir 29 and Lake B are extremely acid lakes (epilimnion pHs of 2.7 and 3.2, respectively), because they receive acidic discharges from coal refuse piles. They differ in that the pH of profundal sediments in Reservoir 29 increased from 2.7 to 3.8 during the period of thermal stratification, whereas permanently anoxic sediments in Lake B had a pH of 6.2. The pH rise in Reservoir 29 sediments was correlated with a temporal increase in H/sub 2/S concentration in the anaerobic hypolimnion from 0 to >1 mM. The chlorophyll a levels in the epilimnion of Reservoir 29 were low, and the rate of primary production was typical of an oligotrophic system. However, there was a dense 10-cm layer of algal biomass at the bottom of the metalimnion. Production by this layer was low owing to light limitation and possibly H/sub 2/S toxicity. The specific photosynthetic rates of epilimnetic algae were low, which suggests that nutrient availability is more important than pH in limiting production. The highest photosynthetic rates were obtained in water samples incubated at pH 2.7 to 4. Heterotrophic bacterial activity (measured by (/sup 14/C)glucose metabolism) was greatest at the sediment/water interface. Bacterial production (assayed by thymidine incorporation) was as high in Reservoir 29 as in a nonacid mesotrophic Indiana lake.

  8. The impact of zinc oxide nanoparticles on the bacterial microbiome of activated sludge systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meli, K.; Kamika, I.; Keshri, J.; Momba, M. N. B.

    2016-12-01

    The expected growth in nanomaterial applications could result in increased amounts of nanoparticles entering municipal sewer systems, eventually ending up in wastewater treatment plants and therefore negatively affecting microbial populations and biological nutrient removal. The aim of this study was to ascertain the impact of zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) on the bacterial microbiome of an activated sludge system. A metagenomic approach combined with the latest generation Illumina MiSeq platform and RDP pipeline tools were used to identify and classify the bacterial microbiome of the sludge. Results revealed a drastic decrease in the number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from 27 737 recovered in the nZnO-free sample to 23 743, 17 733, and 13 324 OTUs in wastewater samples exposed to various concentrations of nZnO (5, 10 and 100 mg/L nZnO, respectively). These represented 12 phyla, 21 classes, 30 orders, 54 families and 51 genera, completely identified at each taxonomic level in the control samples; 7-15-25-28-20 for wastewater samples exposed to 5 mg/L nZnO; 9-15-24-31-23 for those exposed to 10 mg/L and 7-11-19-26-17 for those exposed 100 mg/L nZnO. A large number of sequences could not be assigned to specific taxa, suggesting a possibility of novel species to be discovered.

  9. A 17-mer Membrane-Active MSI-78 Derivative with Improved Selectivity toward Bacterial Cells.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Claudia; Pinheiro, Marina; Fernandes, Mariana; Maia, Sílvia; Seabra, Catarina L; Ferreira-da-Silva, Frederico; Reis, Salette; Gomes, Paula; Martins, M Cristina L

    2015-08-03

    Antimicrobial peptides are widely recognized as an excellent alternative to conventional antibiotics. MSI-78, a highly effective and broad spectrum AMP, is one of the most promising AMPs for clinical application. In this study, we have designed shorter derivatives of MSI-78 with the aim of improving selectivity while maintaining antimicrobial activity. Shorter 17-mer derivatives were created by truncating MSI-78 at the N- and/or C-termini, while spanning MSI-78 sequence. Despite the truncations made, we found a 17-mer peptide, MSI-78(4-20) (KFLKKAKKFGKAFVKIL), which was demonstrated to be as effective as MSI-78 against the Gram-positive Staphylococcus strains tested and the Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This shorter derivative is more selective toward bacterial cells as it was less toxic to erythrocytes than MSI-78, representing an improved version of the lead peptide. Biophysical studies support a mechanism of action for MSI-78(4-20) based on the disruption of the bacterial membrane permeability barrier, which in turn leads to loss of membrane integrity and ultimately to cell death. These features point to a mechanism of action similar to the one described for the lead peptide MSI-78.

  10. Particle-associated extracellular enzyme activity and bacterial community composition across the Canadian Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Colleen T E; Deming, Jody W

    2014-08-01

    Microbial enzymatic hydrolysis of marine-derived particulate organic carbon (POC) can be a dominant mechanism for attenuating carbon flux in cold Arctic waters during spring and summer. Whether this mechanism depends on composition of associated microbial communities and extends into other seasons is not known. Bacterial community composition (BCC) and extracellular enzyme activity (EEA, for leucine aminopeptidases, glucosidases and chitobiases) were measured on small suspended particles and potentially sinking aggregates collected during fall from waters of the biologically productive North Water and river-impacted Beaufort Sea. Although other environmental variables appeared influential, both BCC and EEA varied along a marine productivity gradient in the two regions. Aggregates harbored the most distinctive bacterial communities, with a small number of taxa driving differences between particle-size classes (1.0-60 and > 60 μm) and free-living bacteria (0.2-1.0 μm). Significant relationships between patterns in particle-associated BCC and EEA suggest strong links between these two variables. Calculations indicated that up to 80% of POC in the euphotic zone of the North Water, and 20% in the Beaufort Sea, may be hydrolyzed enzymatically, underscoring the importance of this mechanism in attenuating carbon fluxes in Arctic waters even as winter approaches. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Antibody-Mediated Elimination of the Obligate Intracellular Bacterial Pathogen Ehrlichia chaffeensis during Active Infection

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Gary M.; Yager, Eric; Shilo, Konstantin; Volk, Erin; Reilly, Andrew; Chu, Frederick K.

    2000-01-01

    It is generally accepted that cellular, but not humoral immunity, plays an important role in host defense against intracellular bacteria. However, studies of some of these pathogens have provided evidence that antibodies can provide immunity if present during the initiation of infection. Here, we examined immunity against infection by Ehrlichia chaffeensis, an obligate intracellular bacterium that causes human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Studies with mice have demonstrated that immunocompetent strains are resistant to persistent infection but that SCID mice become persistently and fatally infected. Transfer of immune serum or antibodies obtained from immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice to C57BL/6 scid mice provided significant although transient protection from infection. Bacterial clearance was observed when administration occurred at the time of inoculation or well after infection was established. The effect was dose dependent, occurred within 2 days, and persisted for as long as 2 weeks. Weekly serum administration prolonged the survival of susceptible mice. Although cellular immunity is required for complete bacterial clearance, the data show that antibodies can play a significant role in the elimination of this obligate intracellular bacterium during active infection and thus challenge the paradigm that humoral responses are unimportant for immunity to such organisms. PMID:10722619

  12. Bacterial community structure within an activated sludge reactor added with phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Acata, Selene; Esquivel-Ríos, Ivonne; Pérez-Sandoval, Mariana Vivian; Navarro-Noya, Yendi; Rojas-Valdez, Aketzally; Thalasso, Frederic; Luna-Guido, Marco; Dendooven, Luc

    2016-12-16

    Biodegradation of phenolic compounds in bioreactors is well documented, but the changes in the bacterial populations dynamics during degradation were not that often. A glass bubble column used as reactor was inoculated with activated sludge, spiked with 2-chlorophenol, phenol and m-cresol after 28 days and maintained for an additional 56 days, while the 16S rRNA gene from metagenomic DNA was monitored. Proteobacteria (68.1%) dominated the inoculum, but the bacterial composition changed rapidly. The relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes decreased from 4.8 and 9.4 to <0.1 and 0.2% respectively, while that of Actinobacteria and TM7 increased from 4.8 and 2.0 to 19.2 and 16.1% respectively. Phenol application increased the relative abundance of Proteobacteria to 94.2% (mostly Brevundimonas 17.6%), while that of Bacteroidetes remained low (1.2%) until day 42. It then increased to 47.3% (mostly Leadbetterella 46.9%) at day 84. It was found that addition of phenolic compounds did not affect the relative abundance of the Alphaproteobacteria initially, but it decreased slowly while that of the Bacteroidetes increased towards the end.

  13. Composition and Metabolic Activities of Bacterial Biofilms Colonizing Food Residues in the Human Gut

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Sandra; Macfarlane, George T.

    2006-01-01

    Bacteria growing in the human large intestine live in intimate association with the host and play an important role in host digestive processes, gut physiology, and metabolism. Fecal bacteria have been investigated extensively, but few studies have been done on biofilms that form on digestive wastes in the large bowel. The aims of this investigation were to investigate the composition and metabolic activities of bacterial communities that colonize the surfaces of food residues in fecal material, with respect to their role in the fermentation of complex carbohydrates. Fresh stools were obtained from 15 healthy donors, and food residues were separated by filtration. Adherent bacteria were removed by surfactant treatment for microbiological analysis and fermentation studies. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent in situ hybridization in conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were used to visualize intact biofilms. Results showed that bacterial populations strongly adhering to particulate matter were phenotypically similar in composition to unattached communities, with bacteroides and bifidobacteria predominating. Biofilms comprised a mixture of living and dead bacteria, and CLSM showed that bifidobacteria in the biofilms occurred as isolated dispersed cells and in microcolonies near the interface with the substratum. Fermentation experiments with a variety of complex carbohydrates demonstrated that biofilm populations were more efficient in digesting polysaccharides, while nonadhering communities fermented oligosaccharides most rapidly. Acetate was the principal fermentation product formed by biofilm bacteria, whereas higher levels of butyrate were produced by nonadherent populations, showing that the two communities were metabolically distinct. PMID:16957247

  14. Base-modified NAD and AMP derivatives and their activity against bacterial DNA ligases.

    PubMed

    Pergolizzi, Giulia; Cominetti, Marco M D; Butt, Julea N; Field, Robert A; Bowater, Richard P; Wagner, Gerd K

    2015-06-14

    We report the chemical synthesis and conformational analysis of a collection of 2-, 6- and 8-substituted derivatives of β-NAD(+) and AMP, and their biochemical evaluation against NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases from Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Bacterial DNA ligases are validated anti-microbial targets, and new strategies for their inhibition are therefore of considerable scientific and practical interest. Our study includes several pairs of β-NAD(+) and AMP derivatives with the same substitution pattern at the adenine base. This has enabled the first direct comparison of co-substrate and inhibitor behaviour against bacterial DNA ligases. Our results suggest that an additional substituent in position 6 or 8 of the adenine base in β-NAD(+) is detrimental for activity as either co-substrate or inhibitor. In contrast, substituents in position 2 are not only tolerated, but appear to give rise to a new mode of inhibition, which targets the conformational changes these DNA ligases undergo during catalysis. Using a molecular modelling approach, we highlight that these findings have important implications for our understanding of ligase mechanism and inhibition, and may provide a promising starting point for the rational design of a new class of inhibitors against NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases.

  15. The Metabolically Active Bacterial Microbiome of Tonsils and Mandibular Lymph Nodes of Slaughter Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Evelyne; Pinior, Beate; Wetzels, Stefanie U.; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U.; Wagner, Martin; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The exploration of microbiomes in lymphatic organs is relevant for basic and applied research into explaining microbial translocation processes and understanding cross-contamination during slaughter. This study aimed to investigate whether metabolically active bacteria (MAB) could be detected within tonsils and mandibular lymph nodes (MLNs) of pigs. The hypervariable V1-V2 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes was amplified from cDNA from tonsils and MLNs of eight clinically healthy slaughter pigs. Pyrosequencing yielded 82,857 quality-controlled sequences, clustering into 576 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), which were assigned to 230 genera and 16 phyla. The actual number of detected OTUs per sample varied highly (23–171 OTUs). Prevotella zoogleoformans and Serratia proteamaculans (best type strain hits) were most abundant (10.6 and 41.8%, respectively) in tonsils and MLNs, respectively. To explore bacterial correlation patterns between samples of each tissue, pairwise Spearman correlations (rs) were calculated. In total, 194 strong positive and negative correlations |rs| ≥ 0.6 were found. We conclude that (i) lymphatic organs harbor a high diversity of MAB, (ii) the occurrence of viable bacteria in lymph nodes is not restricted to pathological processes and (iii) lymphatic tissues may serve as a contamination source in pig slaughterhouses. This study confirms the necessity of the EFSA regulation with regard to a meat inspection based on visual examinations to foster a minimization of microbial contamination. PMID:26696976

  16. Human and climate impacts on Holocene fire activity recorded in polar and mountain ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehrwald, Natalie; Zennaro, Piero; Kirchgeorg, Torben; Li, Quanlian; Wang, Ninglian; Power, Mitchell; Zangrando, Roberta; Gabrielli, Paolo; Thompson, Lonnie; Gambaro, Andrea; Barbante, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Fire is one of the major influences of biogeochemical change on local to hemispheric scales through emitting greenhouse gases, altering atmospheric chemistry, and changing primary productivity. Levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-D-glucopyranose) is a specific molecular that can only be produced by cellulose burning at temperatures > 300°C, comprises a major component of smoke plumes, and can be transported across > 1000 km distances. Levoglucosan is deposited on and archived in glaciers over glacial interglacial cycles resulting in pyrochemical evidence for exploring interactions between fire, climate and human activity. Ice core records provide records of past biomass burning from regions of the world with limited paleofire data including polar and low-latitude, high-altitude regions. Here, we present Holocene fire activity records from the NEEM, Greenland (77° 27'N; 51° 3'W; 2454 masl), EPICA Dome C, Antarctica (75° 06'S; 123° 21'E; 3233 masl), Kilimanjaro, Tanzania (3° 05'S, 21.2° E, 5893 masl) and the Muztagh, China (87.17° E; 36.35° N; 5780 masl ice cores. The NEEM ice core reflects boreal fire activity from both North American and Eurasian sources. Temperature is the dominant control of NEEM levoglucosan flux over decadal to millennial time scales, while droughts influence fire activity over sub-decadal timescales. Our results demonstrate the prominence of Siberian fire sources during intense multiannual droughts. Unlike the NEEM core, which incorporates the largest land masses in the world as potential fire sources, EPICA Dome C is located far from any possible fire source. However, EPICA Dome C levoglucosan concentrations are consistently above detection limits and demonstrate a substantial 1000-fold increase in fire activity beginning approximately 800 years ago. This significant and sustained increase coincides with Maori arrival and dispersal in New Zealand augmented by later European arrival in Australia. The EPICA Dome C levoglucosan profile is

  17. Diverse mechanisms of metaeffector activity in an intracellular bacterial pathogen, Legionella pneumophila