Science.gov

Sample records for active beam spectroscopy

  1. Beam-foil spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.; Hass, M.

    1982-01-01

    A brief survey of some applications of beam-foil spectroscopy is presented. Among the topics covered are lifetime and magnetic moment measurements, nuclear alignment, and polarized light production. (AIP)

  2. Photoelectron photoion molecular beam spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trevor, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    The use of supersonic molecular beams in photoionization mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy to assist in the understanding of photoexcitation in the vacuum ultraviolet is described. Rotational relaxation and condensation due to supersonic expansion were shown to offer new possibilities for molecular photoionization studies. Molecular beam photoionization mass spectroscopy has been extended above 21 eV photon energy by the use of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) facilities. Design considerations are discussed that have advanced the state-of-the-art in high resolution vuv photoelectron spectroscopy. To extend gas-phase studies to 160 eV photon energy, a windowless vuv-xuv beam line design is proposed.

  3. Impact of diagnostic neutral beam optimization on active spectroscopy in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiande; Nornberg, Mark. D.; den Hartog, Daniel. J.; Oliva, Steven. P.; Craig, Darren; Univ of Wisconsin, Madison Team; Wheaton College, IL Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam on MST provides local measurements of impurity ion emission through charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) and of core-localized magnetic field through the motional Stark effect (MSE). The beam has been optimized to operate at 50kV, 4A steady beam current with 20ms beam pulse and 75% primary energy ion fraction. It's achieved by tuning the beam voltage, arc current, fuel line pressure, arc and high voltage module timing, and the magnetic isolation field. Electron density measurements in the ion source revealed that ion extraction is maximized under low density conditions which are thought to affect the shape of the ion sheath at the extraction grid. The sheath may be transitioning from a planar or convex shape at high density to one which is concave which helps focus the ion trajectories and produce higher beam current. With the improvements in beam operation, the CHERS signal is expected to increase by 20%-30%, and the Stark broadening is expected to increase by 10%. These signal increases will help resolve convolved fine-structure components in both analyses. Beam voltage ripple is also measured to better quantify the accuracy of spectral MSE and CHERS measurement. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE.

  4. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonomo, F.; Ruf, B.; Barbisan, M.; Cristofaro, S.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Riedl, R.; Serianni, G.; Wünderlich, D.

    2015-04-01

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (< 0.4 °) together with a low source pressure (≤ 0.3 Pa) would permit to reduce the ion losses along the beamline, keeping the stripping particle losses below 30%. However, the attainment of such beam properties is not straightforward. At IPP, the negative ion source testbed BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the Hα light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of Hα spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  5. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Bonomo, F.; Ruf, B.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Riedl, R.; Wünderlich, D.; Barbisan, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Cristofaro, S.

    2015-04-08

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (< 0.4 °) together with a low source pressure (≤ 0.3 Pa) would permit to reduce the ion losses along the beamline, keeping the stripping particle losses below 30%. However, the attainment of such beam properties is not straightforward. At IPP, the negative ion source testbed BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the H{sub α} light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of H{sub α} spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  6. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy II

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    We are requesting support for a postdoctoral person to participate in H{sup -} studies at Los Alamos. In addition, we are requesting funding for a state-of-the-art YAG laser system that would allow us to obtain data at three times our present rate with improved beam quality.

  7. Beam-Foil Spectroscopy - Quo Vadis?

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2008-05-26

    Beam-foil spectroscopy after 45 years: what has been realized of the promises, what is the state of the art, what is the status of the field, what present atomic physics problems should the technique be applied to, where can it be done? Will it be done? Beam-foil spectroscopy and its sibling techniques have been outstandingly productive tools of atomic physics, providing both important data and insight. For some forty years, the developments have led to improvements in working range and reliability, and catalogues of desirable further measurements can be formulated. However, most of the key persons who have carried out and directed much of the development effort are nearing retirement, and with them the leading facilities. it is thus not likely that many of the desirable BFS projects discussed will presently be pursued. High-Z element, high-charge state spectroscopy and some specific long-lived level lifetime measurements will, however, be taken over by electron beam ion traps, and heavy-ion storage rings will contribute some important benchmark measurements on electric-dipole forbidden or hyperfine-induced transitions. Beam-foil spectroscopy can still be expected to solve a number of interesting atomic physics questions, but as a technique, at present, it has dropped from fashion and support.

  8. In-Beam Gamma Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayank, .; Muralithar, S.; Sihotra, S.; Kumar, S.; Mehta, D.; Singh, R. P.; Rathore, Urvashi

    2016-09-01

    In-beam Gamma ray spectroscopic techniques have been studied using Indian National Gamma Array, IUAC which has a relative photo-peak efficiency of 5%. Data of a previous experiment where high angular momentum states of various nuclides were populated in the fusion-evaporation reaction 75As (28Si, 2p2n) at Elab = 120MeV. When gammas from populated nuclides are emanated during de-excitation, they are emitted with a certain angular distribution depending upon their multipolarity. Angular distribution of dipole and quadrupole transitions in 96Ru has been obtained from this data. The efficiency corrected angular distribution plot has been compared with the theoretical angular distribution function. The distribution co-efficients A2 and A4 for dipole and quadrupole were extracted from fitting the distribution with the equation: W (θ) = 1 +A2 *P2(cosθ) +A4 *P4(cosθ) . The Directional-correlation of Oriented Nuclei method was used to assign various other transitions as quadrupole or dipole. A DCO matrix between detectors at 1480 versus 900 was created using CANDLE. Intensities of transitions that have similar multipolarity as the gated transition would be equal in both the projected spectrums. In case of different multipolarity intensities would vary by a factor of 2. RDCO plots for 96Ru transitions have been obtained. To determine the nature of transitions whether magnetic or electric, a plot between polarization asymmetry (Δ) and DCO-ratio for transitions in 96Ru has been obtained.

  9. Reconstruction of Beam Shape Using Fluctuation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charman, A.; Catravas, P.; Wurtele, J. S.

    1999-11-01

    Information about a particle beam's shape and structure can be determined from noise in or produced by the beam. Fluctuations in the incoherent radiation emitted by a particle beam during interaction with external fields or in a medium are not ``totally random'' white noise, but encode certain information about the phase space structure of the beam, which can in principle be extracted by a careful statistical analysis of the spectral properties of the noise. The frequency scale at which correlations in the spectral noise decay is inversely related to the temporal duration of the beam, and more generally, structure in the spectral covariance matrix of the radiation encodes information about both the longitudinal and transverse shape of the beam, so that certain features of the beam can be reconstructed from these data. This technique of beam reconstruction by fluctuation spectroscopy was first suggested by M. Zolotorov and G. Stupakov(M.S. Zolotorov and G.V. Stupakov, SLAC-PUB-7132, 1996; in Proceedings of the 1997 Particle Accelerator Conference) (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 1998)., and a proof-of-principle experiment and data analysis have recently been performed by P. Catravas, et al.(P. Catravas, W.P. Leemans, J.S. Wurtele, M.S. Zolotorov, M. Babzien, I. Ben-Szi, Z. Segalov, X.-J. Wang, V. Yakimenko, Phys. Rev. Lett.), 82, 5261 (1999)., where the bunch length and emittance were estimated using shot-noise driven fluctuations in the spontaneous emission of a relativistic electron microbunch in a wiggler. Here we aim to improve the accuracy of the reconstructed beam morphology by developing a more elaborate statistical analysis. This technique shows promise as a diagnostic for particle beams which is non-destructive, can work either with single shots or with averages over many shots, can maintain accuracy even at short bunch lengths, and uses avaialble technology. Only the case of spontaneous emission of an electron beam in a wiggler has been studied in depth, but the

  10. Precise Atomic Beam Spectroscopy Measurements in Thallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, David; Speck, Andrew; Majumder, Protik

    2000-06-01

    We have begun a series of new high-precision measurements of thallium atomic structure using a newly completed high-flux atomic beam apparatus. These experiments will extend our vapor cell spectroscopy work in which we have measured thallium transition amplitudes and excited-state hyperfine splittings. These experimental results provide important, independent cross-checks on the accuracy of ongoing calculations of parity nonconservation in thallium. We study two ground state transitions: the 6P_1/2-6P_3/2 M1 transition at 1283 nm, and the 6P_1/2 - 7S_1/2 E1 transition at 378 nm. Laser light at the UV wavelength is obtained via external resonant frequency doubling of a 5 mW, 755 nm laser diode system. Our atomic beam apparatus consists of a multiple slit oven source and 20 cm oven-to-interaction region distance, which provides a favorable balance of beam density and modest Doppler narrowing. Our interaction region includes a precisely constructed and calibrated electric field plate/high-voltage system. Using this apparatus in conjunction with an acousto-optic modulator to frequency shift the diode laser, we have begun a high-precision Stark shift measurement within the 378 nm transition. Future experiments that will focus on the 1283 nm M1 transition using the atomic beam apparatus include a sensitive test of long-range T-violating forces in thallium. Current experimental results will be presented.

  11. Photoelectron spectroscopy of supersonic molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, J.E.

    1982-05-01

    A new technique for performing high resolution molecular photoelectron spectroscopy is described, beginning with its conceptual development, through the construction of a prototypal apparatus, to the initial applications on a particularly favorable molecular system. The distinguishing features of this technique are: (1) the introduction of the sample in the form of a collimated supersonic molecular beam; and (2) the use of an electrostatic deflection energy analyzer which is carefully optimized in terms of sensitivity and resolution. This combination makes it possible to obtain photoelectron spectra at a new level of detail for many small molecules. Three experiments are described which rely on the capability to perform rotationally-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy on the hydrogen molecule and its isotopes. The first is a measurement of the ionic vibrational and rotational spectroscopic constants and the vibrationally-selected photoionization cross sections. The second is a determination of the photoelectron asymmetry parameter, ..beta.., for selected rotational transitions. The third is an investigation of the rotational relaxation in a free jet expansion, using photoelectron spectroscopy as a probe of the rotational state population distributions. In the closing chapter an assessment is made of the successes and limitations of the technique, and an indication is given of areas for further improvement in future spectrometers.

  12. Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R., LLNL

    1998-03-18

    Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center, the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques would play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of stockpile stewardship. The Livermore facilities now include the world`s highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. It was concluded that the positron microprobe under development at LLNL and other new instruments that would be relocated at LLNL at the high current keV source are an exciting step forward in providing results for the positron technique. These new data will impact a wide variety of applications.

  13. Optimized frequency dependent photothermal beam deflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korte, D.; Cabrera, H.; Toro, J.; Grima, P.; Leal, C.; Villabona, A.; Franko, M.

    2016-12-01

    In the letter the optimization of the experimental setup for photothermal beam deflection spectroscopy is performed by analyzing the influence of its geometrical parameters (detector and sample position, probe beam radius and its waist position etc) on the detected signal. Furthermore, the effects of the fluid’s thermo-optical properties, for optimized geometrical configuration, on the measurement sensitivity and uncertainty determination of sample thermal properties is also studied. The examined sample is a recently developed CuFeInTe3 material. It is seen from the obtained results, that it is a complex problem to choose the proper geometrical configuration as well as sensing fluid to enhance the sensitivity of the method. A signal enhancement is observed at low modulation frequencies by placing the sample in acetonitrile (ACN), while at high modulation frequencies the sensitivity is higher for measurements made in air. For both, detection in air and acetonitrile the determination of CuFeInTe3 thermal properties is performed. The determined values of thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity are (0.048  ±  0.002)  ×  10-4 m2 s-1 and 4.6  ±  0.2 W m-1 K-1 and (0.056  ±  0.005)  ×  10-4 m2 s-1 and 4.8  ±  0.4 W m-1 K-1 for ACN and air, respectively. It is seen, that the determined values agree well within the range of their measurement uncertainties for both cases, although the measurement uncertainty is two times lower for the measurements in ACN providing more accurate results. The analysis is performed by the use of recently developed theoretical description based on the complex geometrical optics. It is also shown, how the presented work fits into the current status of photothermal beam deflection spectroscopy.

  14. Modelling and Evaluation of Spectra in Beam Aided Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hellermann, M. G. von; Delabie, E.; Jaspers, R.; Lotte, P.; Summers, H. P.

    2008-10-22

    The evaluation of active beam induced spectra requires advanced modelling of both active and passive features. Three types of line shapes are addressed in this paper: Thermal spectra representing Maxwellian distribution functions described by Gaussian-like line shapes, secondly broad-band fast ion spectra with energies well above local ion temperatures, and, finally, the narrow lines shapes of the equi-spaced Motion Stark multiplet (MSE) of excited neutral beam particles travelling through the magnetic field confining the plasma. In each case additional line shape broadening caused by Gaussian-like instrument functions is taken into account. Further broadening effects are induced by collision velocity dependent effective atomic rates where the observed spectral shape is the result of a convolution of emission rate function and velocity distribution function projected into the direction of observation. In the case of Beam Emission Spectroscopy which encompasses the Motional Stark features, line broadening is also caused by the finite angular spread of injected neutrals and secondly by a ripple in the acceleration voltage associated with high energy neutral beams.

  15. In-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy at the RIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Doornenbal, Pieter

    2015-10-15

    At the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory stable primary beams are accelerated up to 345 MeV/u and incident on a primary target to produce secondary cocktail beams with the fragment separator BigRIPS ranging from the lightest nuclei up to the uranium region. For in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy, the secondary beam impinge on a reaction target at energies between 100 and 300 MeV/u. Reaction residues are identified with the ZeroDegree spectrometer and γ-rays detected with the NaI(Tl) based DALI2 array. This conference paper outlines the experimental setup and presents recent exemplary results.

  16. In-beam spectroscopy of the heaviest elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzberg, Rolf-Dietmar

    2016-12-01

    In-beam spectroscopy provides many powerful tools for the detailed study of nuclear structure. Over the past two decades the coupling of sensitive in-beam spectrometers to recoil separators has allowed the study of weakly populated reaction channels, such as the fusion-evaporation reactions leading to nuclei beyond fermium (Z = 100). The methods, observables, and limitations of this approach are discussed.

  17. Beam Cooling and Laser Spectroscopy (BECOLA) Project at NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamisono, K.; Barquest, B. R.; Bollen, G.; Mantica, P. F.; Morrissey, D. J.; Ringle, R.; Schwarz, S.

    2009-10-01

    A new beam line for beam cooling and laser spectroscopy (BECOLA) has been designed and is being installed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University. The BECOLA beam line will be capable of accepting ions of energy up to 60 keV. A linear Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) ion trap [1] will be used to cool and bunch the beam upstream of the BECOLA beam line. This beam line will have two dedicated experimental legs, one for collinear-laser spectroscopy with the bunched beam and another for polarization by optical pumping of low energy atoms/ions for β-NMR experiments. Initial studies at NSCL will include the measurement of μ, Q and of light- and medium-mass refractory isotopes, using both the laser spectroscopy and the β-NMR technique. A frequency doubled light of Ti:Sapphire ring laser pumped by diode-pumped solid state laser will be used for spectroscopy and optical pumping for polarization. The present status of BECOLA beam line as well as the laser system will be presented. [4pt] [1] G. Bollen et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 532, 203 (2004).

  18. Scrape-off layer-induced beam density fluctuations and their effect on beam emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, D.; Marandet, Y.; Tamain, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-07-01

    A statistical model is presented to calculate the magnitude of beam density fluctuations generated by a turbulent scrape-off layer (SOL). It is shown that the SOL can induce neutral beam density fluctuations of a similar magnitude to the plasma density fluctuations in the core, potentially corrupting beam emission spectroscopy measurements. The degree of corruption is quantified by combining simulations of beam and plasma density fluctuations inside a simulated measurement window. A change in pitch angle from the separatrix to the measurement window is found to reduce the effect of beam fluctuations, whose largest effect is to significantly reduce the measured correlation time.

  19. Molecular-beam spectroscopy of interhalogen molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrow, S.A.

    1983-08-01

    A molecular-beam electric-resonance spectrometer employing a supersonic nozzle source has been used to obtain hyperfine spectra of /sup 79/Br/sup 35/Cl. Analyses of these spectra and of microwave spectra published by other authors have yielded new values for the electric dipole moment and for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants in this molecule. The new constants are significantly different from the currently accepted values. Van der Waals clusters containing chlorine monofluoride have been studied under various expansion conditions by the molecular-beam electric-deflection method. The structural possibilities indicated by the results are discussed, and cluster geometries are proposed.

  20. Precise Atomic Beam Spectroscopy Measurements in Thallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, David; Friedberg, Paul; Majumder, Protik

    2001-05-01

    Current results from a series of new high-precision measurements of thallium atomic structure using a newly completed high-flux atomic beam apparatus will be presented. The experimental results provide important, independent cross-checks on the accuracy of ongoing calculations of parity nonconservation in thallium. We study two ground state transitions: the 6P_1/2-6P_3/2 M1 transition at 1283 nm, and the 6P_1/2 - 7S_1/2 E1 transition at 378 nm. Laser light at the UV wavelength is obtained via external resonant frequency doubling of a 15 mW, 755 nm laser diode system. Our atomic beam apparatus consists of a multiple slit oven source and 20 cm oven-to-interaction region distance. This arrangement can achieve an absorption linewidth of 100 MHz with 10% laser beam absorption. Our interaction region includes a precisely constructed and calibrated electric field plate/high-voltage system. Using this apparatus in conjunction with an acousto-optic modulator to frequency shift the diode laser, we have begun a high-precision Stark shift measurement within the 378 nm transition. Future experiments that will focus on the 1283 nm M1 transition using the atomic beam apparatus include a sensitive test of long-range T-violating forces in thallium.

  1. Thermal Beam Spectroscopy of 133 Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerginov, Vladislav; Tanner, Carol E.

    2001-05-01

    We report our progress towards high resolution frequency measurements of the cesium excited states hyperfine structure (HFS). A thermal beam apparatus is used to eliminate the Doppler background and collision effects present in vapor cells. A tubing array expands the beam size without increasing its divergence. The beam is collimated using thin parallel glass plate collimator. The optical detection system and the photo detector amplifier circuit allow measurements of extremely low fluorescence signals. The direct computer based measurement of the photo detector amplifier output assures a good signal linearity and no systematic line shape distortion. The estimations of different broadening effects are based on Cs D2 line HFS measurements. The spectra are fitted with exactly calculated Voigt profiles using a Fortran fitting program based on Levenberg-Marquardt method. The diode laser linewidth is determined from the beat note between two separate laser systems. The natural linewidth of Cs 6 2P3/2 is taken from our precise lifetime measurements. The residual Doppler broadening due to the finite angular beam distribution and optical alignment is estimated from the data. Financial support for this work is provided by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Energy Research at the U. S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-FG02-95ER14579.

  2. Photoelectron spectroscopy of supersonic molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, J. E.; Trevor, D. J.; Lee, Y. T.; Shirley, D. A.

    1981-12-01

    A high-resolution photoelectron spectrometer which uses molecular beam sampling is described. Photons from a rare-gas resonance lamp or UV laser are crossed with the beam from a differentially pumped supersonic nozzle source. The resulting photoelectrons are collected by an electrostatic analyzer of a unique design consisting of a 90° spherical sector preanalyzer, a system of lenses, and a 180° hemispherical deflector. A multichannel detection system based on dual microchannel plates with a resistive anode position encoder provides an increase in counting efficiency by a factor of 12 over the equivalent single channel detector. The apparatus has demonstrated an instrumental resolution of better than 10 meV FWHM, limited largely by the photon source linewidth. A quadrupole mass spectrometer is used to characterize the composition of the molecular beam. Extensive differential pumping is provided to protect the critical surfaces of the analyzer and mass spectrometer from contamination. Because of the near elimination of Doppler and rotational broadenings, the practical resolution is the highest yet obtained in molecular PES.

  3. In-Beam Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy Of Target Fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Vieitez, E.; Lee, I.Y.; Ward, D.; Fallon, P.; Clark, R.M.; Cromaz, M.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Descovich, M.; Diamond, R.M.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Stephens, F.S.; Goergen, A.; Lane, G.J.; Prussin, S.G.; Svensson, C.E.; Vetter, K.

    2005-04-05

    Fragmentation reactions, typically performed at energies {approx}E/A > 50 MeV, produce neutron-rich nuclei but leave little angular momentum in the residues. In this work we have examined the product distribution and angular momentum input for a 12C beam at 30 MeV/A on a thick (40 mg/cm2) target of 51V, testing the feasibility of in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy study of target fragments at this lower energy. This technique allows the study of some neutron-rich nuclei to moderate spins, complementing the beam fragmentation studies.

  4. Polarization Studies in Fast-Ion Beam Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2001-12-20

    In a historical review, the observations and the insight gained from polarization studies of fast ions interacting with solid targets are presented. These began with J. Macek's recognition of zero-field quantum beats in beam-foil spectroscopy as indicating alignment, and D.G. Ellis' density operator analysis that suggested the observability of orientation when using tilted foils. Lastly H. Winter's studies of the ion-beam surface interaction at grazing incidence yielded the means to produce a high degree of nuclear orientation in ion beams.

  5. Pile-up corrections in pulsed-beam spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faddegon, Bruce A.

    1990-10-01

    A previous theory for pile-up estimation, applicable when a paralyzable counter is used for pile-up rejection, is extended to pulsed beams. The variation of current within the beam pulse is dealt with explicitly. Approximate equations are developed to aid in estimating the effect of an energy-dependent resolution-time on the pile-up. Specific cases of spectroscopy with a NaI scintillation crystal are examined: 30 MV electron bremsstrahlung spectroscopy and 10 MeV electron spectroscopy. Given an 8% event loss to pile-up, the total events were estimated with this approach to better than ±2%, and the pile-up corrections to the spectral shapes were estimated to within the uncertainty due to counting statistics.

  6. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-09-15

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10{sup −5} are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 10{sup 4} atoms cm{sup −3}. The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  7. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10-5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 104 atoms cm-3. The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  8. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10(-5) are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 10(4) atoms cm(-3). The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  9. A compact atomic beam based system for Doppler-free laser spectroscopy of strontium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Gunjan; Vishwakarma, Chetan; Dharmadhikari, C. V.; Rapol, Umakant D.

    2017-03-01

    We report the construction of a simple, light weight, and compact atomic beam spectroscopy cell for strontium atoms. The cell is built using glass blowing technique and includes a simple titanium sublimation pump for the active pumping of residual and background gases to maintain ultra-high vacuum. A commercially available and electrically heated dispenser source is used to generate the beam of Sr atoms. We perform spectroscopy on the 5 s2S10 →5 s 5 pP11 transition to obtain a well resolved Doppler free spectroscopic signal for frequency stabilization of the laser source. This design can be easily extended to other alkali and alkaline earth metals.

  10. In-beam Spectroscopy of ^68Se.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, S. M.; Balamuth, D. P.; Hausladen, P.; Lister, C. J.; Blumenthal, D. J.; Schwartz, J.; Leddy, M. J.; Sarantites, D. G.; Devlin, M.

    1998-04-01

    Nuclei with N≈Z in the A=70 mass region exhibit rapid changes in shape with the addition or subtraction of one or two particles; shape coexistence has been demonstrated in slightly lighter systems. Experimental investigation of these N=Z nuclei has proven to be quite difficult, principally due to very low cross sections for relevant fusion-evaporation reactions. To date only three transitions have been reported (C.J. Lister et al.), Phys. Rev. C42, R1191 (1990). in ^68Se. In the present work, ^68Se was produced via the ^40Ca(^36Ar,2α) reaction at a beam energy of 140 MeV. The Gammasphere and Microball arrays were used to detect γ-rays of fold 3 and higher in coincidence with evaporated charged particles. Doppler corrections were applied on an event-by-event basis to γ-rays in coincidence with 2 α particles, and a careful subtraction of feedthrough channels was performed. Two previously identified transitions in ^68Se have been confirmed and at least seven new transitions have been observed. The proposed level scheme, based on coincidence relationships and γ-ray angular distributions, will be discussed.

  11. NAIS: Nuclear activation-based imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, M. M.; Britz, A.; Clarke, R. J.; Harres, K.; Hoffmeister, G.; Nürnberg, F.; Otten, A.; Pelka, A.; Roth, M.; Vogt, K.

    2013-07-01

    In recent years, the development of high power laser systems led to focussed intensities of more than 1022 W/cm2 at high pulse energies. Furthermore, both, the advanced high power lasers and the development of sophisticated laser particle acceleration mechanisms facilitate the generation of high energetic particle beams at high fluxes. The challenge of imaging detector systems is to acquire the properties of the high flux beam spatially and spectrally resolved. The limitations of most detector systems are saturation effects. These conventional detectors are based on scintillators, semiconductors, or radiation sensitive films. We present a nuclear activation-based imaging spectroscopy method, which is called NAIS, for the characterization of laser accelerated proton beams. The offline detector system is a combination of stacked metal foils and imaging plates (IP). After the irradiation of the stacked foils they become activated by nuclear reactions, emitting gamma decay radiation. In the next step, an autoradiography of the activated foils using IPs and an analysis routine lead to a spectrally and spatially resolved beam profile. In addition, we present an absolute calibration method for IPs.

  12. Two-beam interferometer for fourier spectroscopy with rigid pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, P.

    1983-05-17

    A two-beam interferometer for fourier spectroscopy includes a rigid pendulum structure mounting at least one of the movable retroreflectors in a fully compensated optical system immune to tilt and lateral movement distortions. The swing of the rotatably journaled pendulum accurately confines the retroreflector(s) to movement in a single plane during scanning and, due to the low heat generated in the pendulum bearings, the simple and compact structure is well adapted to be housed in a cryostat aboard a spacecraft.

  13. In-beam spectroscopy of 253, 254No

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzberg, R.-D.; Amzal, N.; Bastin, J. E.; Becker, F.; Brew, P. M. T.; Butler, P. A.; Chewter, A. J. C.; Cocks, J. F. C.; Dorvaux, O.; Eskola, K.; Gerl, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Hammond, N. J.; Hauschild, K.; Helariutta, K.; Heßberger, F.; Houry, M.; Hürstel, A.; Humphreys, R. D.; Jones, G. D.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kankaanpää, H.; Kettunen, H.; Khoo, T. L.; Korten, W.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Le Coz, Y.; Leino, M.; Leppänen, C. J.; Lister, A. P.; Lucas, R.; Muikku, M.; Nieminen, P.; Page, R. D.; Page, T.; Rahkila, P.; Reiter, P.; Schlegel, Ch.; Scholey, C.; Sletten, G.; Stezowski, O.; Theisen, Ch.; Trzaska, W. H.; Uusitalo, J.; Wollersheim, H. J.

    In-beam conversion electron spectroscopy experiments have been performed on the transfermium nuclei 253, 254No using the conversion electron spectrometer SACRED in nearly collinear geometry in conjunction with the gas-filled separator RITU at the University of Jyväskylä. The experimental setup is discussed and the spectra are compared to Monte Carlo simulations. The implications for the ground-state configuration of 253No are discussed.

  14. Beam line design for synchrotron spectroscopy in the VUV

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M R

    1980-01-01

    The character of the radiation source provided by an electron storage ring is briefly reviewed from the point of view of utilization for VUV spectroscopy. The design of beam line components is then considered with special reference to the problems of contamination of optical surfaces and vacuum protection. The issues involved in designing mirrors for use with storage rings are considered with emphasis on the questions of power dissipation, image quality and materials selection.

  15. The Collinear Fast Beam laser Spectroscopy (CFBS) experiment at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, A.; Procter, T. J.; Shelbaya, O.; Amaudruz, P.; Buchinger, F.; Crawford, J. E.; Daviel, S.; Mané, E.; Pearson, M. R.; Tamimi, W. Al

    2016-03-01

    Laser spectroscopy experiments at radioactive ion beam facilities around the world investigate properties of exotic nuclei for scientific endeavours such as, but not limited to, the investigation of nuclear structure. Advancements in experimental sensitivity and performance are continuously needed in order to extend the reach of nuclei that can be measured. The collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy (CFBS) setup at TRIUMF, coupled to an out-of-plane radio-frequency quadrupole Paul trap, enables measurements of some of the most fundamental nuclear properties for long-lived ground and isomeric states. The first comprehensive overview of the CFBS experiment is provided along with descriptions of key developments that extend the reach of laser spectroscopy experiments. A novel data acquisition technique structured around three-dimensional spectra is presented, where the integration of a custom multi-channel-scalar provides photon counts correlated with arrival time and acceleration voltage for post-experiment analysis. In addition, new rapid light manipulation techniques are discussed that suppress undesirable hyperfine pumping effects and regain losses in experimental efficiency.

  16. A synthetic diagnostic for beam emission spectroscopy in the helically symmetric experiment stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbins, T. J. Kumar, S. T. A.; Anderson, D. T.

    2016-11-15

    The Helically Symmetric Experiment (HSX) has a number of active spectroscopy diagnostics. Due to the relatively large beam width compared to the plasma minor radius, it is difficult to achieve good spatial resolution at the core of the HSX plasma. This is due to the fact that the optical sightline cuts through many flux surfaces with varying field vectors within the beam. In order to compare the experimental results with theoretical models it is important to accurately model the beam width effects. A synthetic diagnostic has been developed for this purpose. This synthetic diagnostic calculates the effect of spot size and beam width on the measurements of quantities of interest, including radial electric field, flow velocity, and Stark polarization.

  17. Development of beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. J.; Yu, Y.; Chen, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Yuan, B. D.; Gong, S. B.; Yu, Q. J.; Lyu, B.; Shi, Y. J.; Ye, M. Y.; Wan, B. N.

    2017-08-01

    Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic based on Neutron Beam Injection (NBI) on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak has been developed. This system consists of 16 × 8 channels which can diagnose the density fluctuation in a rectangular area of about 20 × 10 cm2 in the cross section, whose radial position is adjustable from the core to edge just by means of changing the angle of the rotation mirror. The spatial resolution is about 1-3 cm according to the diagnosed radial position. The temporal resolution is 1 μs. Space calibration of the diagnostic system is done based on the reversibility of the optical path. The NBI modulation experiment shows the success of BES development.

  18. Evaluation of two-beam spectroscopy as a plasma diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Billard, B.D.

    1980-04-01

    A two-beam spectroscopy (TBS) system is evaluated theoretically and experimentally. This new spectroscopic technique uses correlations between components of emitted light separated by a small difference in angle of propagation. It is thus a non-perturbing plasma diagnostic which is shown to provide local (as opposed to line-of-sight averaged) information about fluctuations in the density of light sources within a plasma - information not obtainable by the usual spectroscopic methods. The present design is an improvement on earlier systems proposed in a thesis by Rostler.

  19. Development of the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy and the beam emission spectroscopy on the EAST tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. Y.; Fu, J.; Lyu, B.; Du, X. W.; Li, C. Y.; Yu, Y.; Wang, Q. P.; Zhang, Y.; Yin, X. H.; Ye, M. Y.; Wan, B. N.; Hellermann, M. von; Shi, Y. J.

    2014-11-15

    Charge eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) and Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostics based on a heating neutral beam have recently been installed on EAST to provide local measurements of ion temperature, velocity, and density. The system design features common light collection optics for CXRS and BES, background channels for the toroidal views, multi-chord viewing sightlines, and high throughput lens-based spectrometers with good signal to noise ratio for high time resolution measurements. Additionally, two spectrometers each has a tunable grating to observe any wavelength of interest are used for the CXRS and one utilizes a fixed-wavelength grating to achieve higher diffraction efficiency for the BES system. A real-time wavelength correction is implemented to achieve a high-accuracy wavelength calibration. Alignment and calibration are performed. Initial performance test results are presented.

  20. Modeling and simulation of a beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic for the ITER prototype neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Barbisan, M. Zaniol, B.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2014-11-15

    A test facility for the development of the neutral beam injection system for ITER is under construction at Consorzio RFX. It will host two experiments: SPIDER, a 100 keV H{sup −}/D{sup −} ion RF source, and MITICA, a prototype of the full performance ITER injector (1 MV, 17 MW beam). A set of diagnostics will monitor the operation and allow to optimize the performance of the two prototypes. In particular, beam emission spectroscopy will measure the uniformity and the divergence of the fast particles beam exiting the ion source and travelling through the beam line components. This type of measurement is based on the collection of the H{sub α}/D{sub α} emission resulting from the interaction of the energetic particles with the background gas. A numerical model has been developed to simulate the spectrum of the collected emissions in order to design this diagnostic and to study its performance. The paper describes the model at the base of the simulations and presents the modeled H{sub α} spectra in the case of MITICA experiment.

  1. Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    What is Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM)? The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) is an expandable habitat technology demonstration on ISS; increase human-rated inflatable structure Technology Readiness Level (TRL) to level 9. NASA managed ISS payload project in partnership with Bigelow Aerospace. Launched to ISS on Space X 8 (April 8th, 2016). Fully expanded on May 28th, 2016. Jeff Williams/Exp. 48 Commander first entered BEAM on June 5th, 2016.

  2. Wide-field turbulence imaging with beam emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, G. R.; Fonck, R. J.; Uzun-Kaymak, I. U.; Yan, Z.; Shafer, M. W.

    2010-10-15

    Imaging of the size, shape, time-averaged, and time-resolved dynamics of long-wavelength density turbulence structures is accomplished with an expanded, high-sensitivity, wide-field beam emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic on DIII-D. A 64-channel BES system is configured with an 8x8 grid of discrete channels that image an approximately 7x9 cm region at the outboard midplane. The grid covers multiple correlation lengths and each channel shape matches the measured radial-poloidal correlation length asymmetry of turbulent eddies. The wide field 8x8 imaging capability allows for sampling of essentially the full two-dimensional spatial correlation function for typical plasma conditions. The sampled area can be radially scanned over 0.4

  3. In-beam γ -ray spectroscopy of S-4238

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunderberg, E.; Gade, A.; Bader, V.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Berryman, J. S.; Brown, B. A.; Hartley, D. J.; Recchia, F.; Stroberg, S. R.; Weisshaar, D.; Wimmer, K.

    2016-12-01

    The low-energy excitation level schemes of the neutron-rich S-4238 isotopes are investigated via in-beam γ -ray spectroscopy following the fragmentation of 48Ca and 46Ar projectiles on a 12C target at intermediate beam energies. Information on γ γ coincidences complemented by comparisons to shell-model calculations were used to construct level schemes for these neutron-rich nuclei. The experimental data are discussed in the context of large-scale shell-model calculations with the SDPF-MU effective interaction in the s d -p f shell. For the even-mass S isotopes, the evolution of the yrast sequence is explored as well as a peculiar change in decay pattern of the second 2+ states at N =26 . For the odd-mass 41S, a level scheme is presented that seems complete below 2.2 MeV and consistent with the predictions by the SDPF-MU shell-model Hamiltonian; this is a remarkable benchmark given the rapid shell and shape evolution at play in the S isotopes as the broken-down N =28 magic number is approached. Furthermore, the population of excited final states in projectile fragmentation is discussed.

  4. Coincidence laser spectroscopy: A new ultrasensitive technique for fast ionic or atomic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastham, D. A.; Walker, P. M.; Smith, J. R. H.; Griffith, J. A. R.; Evans, D. E.; Wells, S. A.; Fawcett, M. J.; Grant, I. S.

    1986-12-01

    A new technique for laser spectroscopy of fast ionic or atomic beams is described. This involves measuring coincidences between resonantly scattered photons and ions (or atoms) in the fast beam. Measurements on strontium ions have shown that Doppler-free spectroscopy is possible with fewer than 100 ions s -1.

  5. Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy: appendix a

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R. H., LLNL

    1997-11-05

    Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory jointly sponsored by the DOE-Division of Materials Science, The Materials Research Institute at LLNL and the University of California Presidents Office. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques will play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. There were general discussions lead by review talks on positron analysis techniques, and their applications to problems in semiconductors, polymers and composites, metals and engineering materials, surface analysis and advanced techniques. These were followed by focus sessions on positron analysis opportunities in these same areas. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of science based stockpile stewardship. There was a detailed discussion of the LLNL capabilities and a tour of the facilities. The Livermore facilities now include the worlds highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. This document is a supplement to the written summary report. It contains a complete schedule, list of attendees and the vuegraphs for the presentations in the review and focus sessions.

  6. Avalanche photodiode based detector for beam emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dunai, D; Zoletnik, S; Sárközi, J; Field, A R

    2010-10-01

    An avalanche photodiode based (APD) detector for the visible wavelength range was developed for low light level, high frequency beam emission spectroscopy (BES) experiments in fusion plasmas. This solid state detector has higher quantum efficiency than photomultiplier tubes, and unlike normal photodiodes, it has internal gain. This paper describes the developed detector as well as the noise model of the electronic circuit. By understanding the noise sources and the amplification process, the optimal amplifier and APD reverse voltage setting can be determined, where the signal-to-noise ratio is the highest for a given photon flux. The calculations are compared to the absolute calibration results of the implemented circuit. It was found that for a certain photon flux range, relevant for BES measurements (≈10(8)-10(10) photons/s), the new detector is superior to both photomultipliers and photodiodes, although it does not require cryogenic cooling of any component. The position of this photon flux window sensitively depends on the parameters of the actual experimental implementation (desired bandwidth, detector size, etc.) Several detector units based on these developments have been built and installed in various tokamaks. Some illustrative results are presented from the 8-channel trial BES system installed at Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) and the 16-channel BES system installed at the Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR).

  7. Plasmonic beaming and active control over fluorescent emission.

    PubMed

    Jun, Young Chul; Huang, Kevin C Y; Brongersma, Mark L

    2011-01-01

    Nanometallic optical antennas are rapidly gaining popularity in applications that require exquisite control over light concentration and emission processes. The search is on for high-performance antennas that offer facile integration on chips. Here we demonstrate a new, easily fabricated optical antenna design that achieves an unprecedented level of control over fluorescent emission by combining concepts from plasmonics, radiative decay engineering and optical beaming. The antenna consists of a nanoscale plasmonic cavity filled with quantum dots coupled to a miniature grating structure that can be engineered to produce one or more highly collimated beams. Electromagnetic simulations and confocal microscopy were used to visualize the beaming process. The metals defining the plasmonic cavity can be utilized to electrically control the emission intensity and wavelength. These findings facilitate the realization of a new class of active optical antennas for use in new optical sources and a wide range of nanoscale optical spectroscopy applications.

  8. RFQ beam cooler and buncher for collinear laser spectroscopy of rare isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barquest, B. R.; Bollen, G.; Mantica, P. F.; Minamisono, K.; Ringle, R.; Schwarz, S.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.

    2017-09-01

    A radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) ion beam cooler and buncher has been developed to deliver bunched beams with low transverse emittance, energy spread, and time spread to the BECOLA collinear laser spectroscopy system at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University. The beam cooler and buncher contains new features which enhance performance, especially for high count rate beams, as well as simplifying construction, maintenance, and operation. The transverse emittance, energy spread, and time spread of the bunched beam, as well as buncher efficiency are reported, showcasing the capabilities of the BECOLA facility to perform collinear laser spectroscopy measurements with bunched rare isotope beams at NSCL and at the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB).

  9. Improved Force Spectroscopy Using Focused-Ion-Beam-Modified Cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Faulk, J K; Edwards, D T; Bull, M S; Perkins, T T

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is widely used in biophysics, including force-spectroscopy studies of protein folding and protein-ligand interactions. The precision of such studies increases with improvements in the underlying quality of the data. Currently, data quality is limited by the mechanical properties of the cantilever when using a modern commercial AFM. The key tradeoff is force stability vs short-term force precision and temporal resolution. Here, we present a method that avoids this compromise: efficient focused-ion-beam (FIB) modification of commercially available cantilevers. Force precision is improved by reducing the cantilever's hydrodynamic drag, and force stability is improved by reducing the cantilever stiffness and by retaining a cantilever's gold coating only at its free end. When applied to a commonly used short cantilever (L=40μm), we achieved sub-pN force precision over 5 decades of bandwidth (0.01-1000Hz) without significantly sacrificing temporal resolution (~75μs). Extending FIB modification to an ultrashort cantilever (L=9μm) also improved force precision and stability, while maintaining 1-μs-scale temporal resolution. Moreover, modifying ultrashort cantilevers also eliminated their inherent underdamped high-frequency motion and thereby avoided applying a rapidly oscillating force across the stretched molecule. Importantly, fabrication of FIB-modified cantilevers is accessible after an initial investment in training. Indeed, undergraduate researchers routinely modify 2-4 cantilevers per hour with the protocol detailed here. Furthermore, this protocol offers the individual user the ability to optimize a cantilever for a particular application. Hence, we expect FIB-modified cantilevers to improve AFM-based studies over broad areas of biophysical research. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Overview of in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy at the RIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Doornenbal, Pieter

    2016-07-07

    At the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory stable primary beams are accelerated up to 345 MeV/u and incident on a primary target to produce cocktail secondary beams with the fragment separator BigRIPS ranging from the lightest nuclei up to the lead region. For in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy, the secondary beams impinge on a reaction target at energies between 100 and 300 MeV/u. Reaction residues are identified with the ZeroDegree spectrometer and γ-rays detected with the NaI(Tl) based DALI2 array. This conference paper outlines the experimental setup and presents recent exemplary results.

  11. Electron beam imaging and spectroscopy of plasmonic nanoantenna resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesseur, E. J. R.

    2011-07-01

    Nanoantennas are metal structures that provide strong optical coupling between a nanoscale volume and the far field. This coupling is mediated by surface plasmons, oscillations of the free electrons in the metal. Increasing the control over the resonant plasmonic field distribution opens up a wide range of applications of nanoantennas operating both in receiving and transmitting mode. This thesis presents how the dispersion and confinement of surface plasmons in nanoantennas are resolved and further engineered. Fabrication of nanostructures is done using focused ion beam milling (FIB) in metallic surfaces. We demonstrate that patterning in single-crystal substrates allows us to precisely control the geometry in which plasmons are confined. The nanoscale properties of the resonant plasmonic fields are resolved using a new technique developed in this thesis: angle- and polarization controlled cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging spectroscopy. The use of a tightly focused electron beam allows us to probe the optical antenna properties with deep subwavelength resolution. We show using this technique that nanoantennas consisting of 500-1200 nm long polycrystalline Au nanowires support standing plasmon waves. We directly observe the plasmon wavelengths which we use to derive the dispersion relation of guided nanowire plasmons. A 590-nm-long ridge-shaped nanoantenna was fabricated using FIB milling on a single-crystal Au substrate, demonstrating a level of control over the fabrication impossible with polycrystalline metals. CL experiments show that the ridge supports multiple-order resonances. The confinement of surface plasmons to the ridge is confirmed by boundary-element-method (BEM) calculations. The resonant modes in plasmonic whispering gallery cavities consisting of a FIB-fabricated circular groove are resolved. We find an excellent agreement between boundary element method calculations and the measured CL emission from the ring-shaped cavities. The calculations show

  12. Positron beam spectroscopy of defect kinetics in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirayath, Varghese Anto; Amarendra, G.

    2015-03-01

    We report here slow positron beam spectroscopy of thermally activated defect annealing mechanisms in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) which has been implanted with 200 keV carbon ions. The HOPG samples were irradiated to a dose of 1014 and 1015 ions/cm2 which are just below the dose required for amorphization. The open volume defect-sensitive positron studies have clearly shown a defect annealing mechanism at temperatures close to the Wigner energy release peak for both the lower and higher dose irradiated samples. The sample irradiated to higher dose has also shown a second defect annealing step at 723K from near the end of range of the implanted ions. This step however was not visible in the lower dose sample and has not been previously reported. Positron beam spectroscopy could also detect the presence of interstitial defects trapped at the inter-planar regions after the open volume defect recovery by 973 K. These results will be compared to the present understanding of the open volume defect structures and their migration in graphite as well as in other sp2 hybridized nanostructures like graphene. Research fellowship from Department of Atomic Energy, India

  13. Active coherent beam combining of diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Shawn M; Creedon, Kevin J; Kansky, Jan E; Augst, Steven J; Missaggia, Leo J; Connors, Michael K; Huang, Robin K; Chann, Bien; Fan, Tso Yee; Turner, George W; Sanchez-Rubio, Antonio

    2011-03-15

    We have demonstrated active coherent beam combination (CBC) of up to 218 semiconductor amplifiers with 38.5 W cw output using up to eleven one-dimensional 21-element individually addressable diode amplifier arrays operating at 960 nm. The amplifier array elements are slab-coupled-optical-waveguide semiconductor amplifiers (SCOWAs) set up in a master-oscillator-power-amplifier configuration. Diffractive optical elements divide the master-oscillator beam to seed multiple arrays of SCOWAs. A SCOWA was phase actuated by adjusting the drive current to each element and controlled using a stochastic-parallel-gradient-descent (SPGD) algorithm for the active CBC. The SPGD is a hill-climbing algorithm that maximizes on-axis intensity in the far field, providing phase locking without needing a reference beam.

  14. Monitoring electron-beam irradiation effects on graphenes by temporal Auger electron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingsheng; Fujita, Daisuke; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2010-07-02

    Because of its unique electronic transport properties, graphene has attracted an enormous amount of interest recently. By using standard Auger electron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, we have studied electron-beam irradiation effects on graphene damage. We have shown that irradiation with an electron-beam can selectively remove graphene layers and induce chemical reactions, as well as possible structural transformations. We have also demonstrated the dependence of damage in graphene on electron-beam dose. Our work provides ideas on how to optimize the experimental conditions for graphene characterization and device fabrication. The results throw light on how energy transfer from the electron beam to graphene layers leads to the removal of carbon atoms from graphene layers and on the possibility of using electron-beam irradiation to locally induce chemical reactions in a controlled manner.

  15. Double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy with Gaussian and multimode beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lednev, V. N.; Pershin, S. M.; Bunkin, A. F.; Samokhvalov, A. A.; Veiko, V. P.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Ionin, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Single vs multimode laser beams were compared for double pulse laser ablation, plasma properties and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analytical capabilities. Laser beams with Gaussian and multimode profiles were generated within the same Nd:YAG laser in single and double pulse regimes. Gaussian beam produced a small and deep crater while multimode beam formed a wide shallow crater. Greater double pulse enhancement of ablated material and plasma volume were observed for Gaussian beam sampling. The higher intensity for atomic/ionic lines in the plasma spectra was observed for multimode beam sampling due to greater laser pulse energy and larger ablated mass. Interestingly, spectra line intensity enhancement for double pulse ablation was 2-3 times greater for Gaussian than for multimode beam ablation. Background emission decreased for plasma induced by multimode beam when using double pulse mode while for Gaussian beam an opposite dependence was observed. Surprisingly, higher peak fluence at sample surface for Gaussian beam didn't provide higher plasma temperature and electron density for double pulse ablation. Analytical capabilities of LIBS method were compared for double pulse plasma induced by Gaussian and multimode beam in terms of precision, sensitivity and linearity of calibration curves. It was observed that Gaussian beam sampling leads to improvement of analysis precision while sensitivity was element dependent.

  16. Auger electron spectroscopy at high spatial resolution and nA primary beam currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, G.; Poppa, H.; Moorhead, D.; Bales, M.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental Auger microprobe system is described which incorporates a field-emission electron gun and total beam currents in the nanoampere range. The distinguishing characteristics of this system include a large multistation UHV specimen chamber, pulse counting and fully digital Auger signal-processing techniques, and digital referencing methods to eliminate the effects of beam instabilities. Some preliminary results obtained with this system are described, and it is concluded that field-emission electron sources can be used for high-resolution Auger electron spectroscopy with primary-beam spots of less than 100 nm and beam currents of the order of 1 nA.

  17. CAESAR—A high-efficiency CsI(Na) scintillator array for in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy with fast rare-isotope beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisshaar, D.; Gade, A.; Glasmacher, T.; Grinyer, G. F.; Bazin, D.; Adrich, P.; Baugher, T.; Cook, J. M.; Diget, C. Aa.; McDaniel, S.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Siwek, K. P.; Walsh, K. A.

    2010-12-01

    We report on the construction and commissioning of the high-efficiency CAESium-iodide scintillator ARray CAESAR, a device designed for in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy experiments utilizing fast beams of rare isotopes at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University (MSU). CAESAR consists of 192 CsI(Na) crystals, totaling 290 kg of active scintillator material. For 1 MeV γ rays, a full-energy-peak efficiency of 35% is achieved at an in-beam energy resolution of better than 10% FWHM after event-by-event Doppler reconstruction of the γ rays emitted by nuclei moving with velocities of v/c˜0.3-0.4. The spectral quality of the array allows for the identification of γ-ray transitions with intensities of several 10 counts in the full-energy peak and thus opens new avenues for the study of the most exotic nuclei available at the NSCL for in-beam spectroscopy.

  18. Positron beam lifetime spectroscopy of atomic scale defect distributions in bulk and microscopic volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Cowan, T.E.; Hartley, J.; Sterne, P.; Brown, B.

    1996-05-01

    We are developing a defect analysis capability based on two positron beam lifetime spectrometers: the first is based on a 3 MeV electrostatic accelerator and the second on our high current linac beam. The high energy beam lifetime spectrometer is operational and positron lifetime analysis is performed with a 3 MeV positron beam on thick samples. It is being used for bulk sample analysis and analysis of samples encapsulated in controlled environments for {ital in}{ital situ} measurements. A second, low energy, microscopically focused, pulsed positron beam for defect analysis by positron lifetime spectroscopies is under development at the LLNL high current positron source. This beam will enable defect specific, 3-D maps of defect concentration with sub-micron location resolution and when coupled with first principles calculations of defect specific positron lifetimes it will enable new levels of defect concentration mapping and defect identification.

  19. Investigation of {sup 246}Fm : in-beam spectroscopy at the limits

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, J.; Dorvaux, O.; Gall, B. J.-P.; Rubert, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Grahn, T.; Herzan, A.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nieminen, P.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Saren, J.

    2011-10-28

    The structure of {sup 246}Fm has been investigated using in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. The experiment was performed at the University of Jyvaeskylae using JUROGAM 2 coupled to RITU and GREAT. The {sup 246}Fm nuclei were produced using a 186 MeV beam of {sup 40}Ar impinging on a target of {sup 208}Pb. JUROGAM 2 was fully instrumented with TNT2D digital acquisition cards. The use of digital acquisition cards and a rotating target allowed for unprecedented beam intensities up to 71 particle-nanoamperes for prompt {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. With all these major advances for spectroscopy a rotational band is observed for the first time in {sup 246}Fm and discussed here.

  20. Applications of beam-foil spectroscopy to atomic collisions in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellin, I. A.

    1976-01-01

    Some selected papers presented at the Fourth International Conference on Beam-Foil Spectroscopy, whose results are of particular pertinence to ionic collision phenomena in solids, are reviewed. The topics discussed include solid target effects and means of surmounting them in the measurement of excited projectile ion lifetimes for low-energy heavy element ions; the electron emission accompanying the passage of heavy particles through solid targets; the collision broadening of X rays emitted from 100 keV ions moving in solids; residual K-shell excitation in chlorine ions penetrating carbon; comparison between 40 MeV Si on gaseous SiH4 targets at 300 mtorr and 40 MeV Si on Al; and the emergent surface interaction in beam-foil spectroscopy. A distinct overlap of interests between the sciences of beam-foil spectroscopy and atomic collisions in solids is pointed out.

  1. Neutral beam spectroscopy for equilibrium and stability measurements for the PEGASUS toroidal experiment (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Thorson, T.; Fonck, R.; Lewicki, B.

    1999-01-01

    An optical neutral beam spectroscopy system is being designed to provide equilibrium and stability measurements for the PEGASUS toroidal experiment. Spatially localized measurements of the electron temperature and plasma density are possible by observing the intensity of the collisionally induced neutral beam fluorescence. In a helium beam, the population of the singlet levels are relatively independent of the plasma temperature compared to the triplet levels. Therefore, the ratio of intensities of a triplet transition (e.g., 3{sup 3}S{r_arrow}2{sup 3}P, {lambda}=706.5 nm) to a singlet transition (e.g., 3{sup 1}P{r_arrow}2{sup 1}S, {lambda}=501.6 nm) provides a measure of the local plasma temperature for the range 10 eV{lt}T{sub e}{lt}1.0 keV. The plasma density profile can be inferred from the attenuation of the beam fluorescence signal as the beam passes through the plasma. Additionally in a deuterium beam, the local plasma density can be directly inferred from the local radial gradient in the observed beam fluorescence signal. Plasma stability will be studied with localized magnetohydrodynamics measurements via beam emission spectroscopy, which otherwise is problematic for low-field spherical plasmas. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Spectroscopy of ions using fast beams and ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnington, E H; Trabert, E

    2004-10-01

    A knowledge of the spectra of ionized atoms is of importance in many fields. They can be studied in a wide variety of light sources. In recent years techniques coming under the broad heatings of fast beams and ion traps have been used extensively for such investigations. This article considers the advantages that various techniques have for particular applications.

  3. Ultra-sensitive high-precision spectroscopy of a fast molecular ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Andrew A.; Siller, Brian M.; Porambo, Michael W.; Perera, Manori; Kreckel, Holger; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2011-12-14

    Direct spectroscopy of a fast molecular ion beam offers many advantages over competing techniques, including the generality of the approach to any molecular ion, the complete elimination of spectral confusion due to neutral molecules, and the mass identification of individual spectral lines. The major challenge is the intrinsic weakness of absorption or dispersion signals resulting from the relatively low number density of ions in the beam. Direct spectroscopy of an ion beam was pioneered by Saykally and co-workers in the late 1980s, but has not been attempted since that time. Here, we present the design and construction of an ion beam spectrometer with several improvements over the Saykally design. The ion beam and its characterization have been improved by adopting recent advances in electrostatic optics, along with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer that can be used simultaneously with optical spectroscopy. As a proof of concept, a noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) setup with a noise equivalent absorption of {approx}2 x 10{sup -11} cm{sup -1} Hz{sup -1/2} has been used to observe several transitions of the Meinel 1-0 band of N{sub 2}{sup +} with linewidths of {approx}120 MHz. An optical frequency comb has been used for absolute frequency calibration of transition frequencies to within {approx}8 MHz. This work represents the first direct spectroscopy of an electronic transition in an ion beam, and also represents a major step toward the development of routine infrared spectroscopy of rotationally cooled molecular ions.

  4. Expansion Discharge Source for Ion Beam Laser Spectroscopy of Cold Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porambo, Michael; Pearson, Jessica; Riccardo, Craig; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2013-06-01

    Molecular ions are important in several fields of research, and spectroscopy acts as a key tool in the study of these ions. However, problems such as low ion abundance, ion-neutral confusion, and spectral congestion due to high internal temperatures can hinder effective spectroscopic studies. To circumvent these problems, we are developing a technique called Sensitive, Cooled, Resolved, Ion BEam Spectroscopy (SCRIBES). This ion beam spectrometer will feature a continuous supersonic expansion discharge source to produce cold molecular ions, electrostatic ion optics to focus the ions into an ion beam and bend the beam away from co-produced neutral molecules, an overlap region for cavity enhanced spectroscopy, and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. When completed, SCRIBES will be an effective tool for the study of large, fluxional, and complex molecular ions that are difficult to study with other means. The ion beam spectrometer has been successfully implemented with a hot ion source. This talk will focus on the work of integrating a supersonic expansion discharge source into the instrument. To better understand how the source would work in the whole ion beam instrument, characterization studies are being performed with spectroscopy of HN_2^+ in a section of the system to ascertain the rotational temperature of the ion expansion. Attempts are also underway to measure the ion current from a beam formed from the expansion. Once the source in this environment is properly understood, we will reintegrate it to the rest of the ion beam system, completing SCRIBES. A. A. Mills, B. M. Siller, M. W. Porambo, M. Perera, H. Kreckel and B. J. McCall J. Chem. Phys., 135, 224201, (2011). K. N. Crabtree, C. A. Kauffman and B. J. McCall Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 086103, (2010).

  5. Optical spectroscopy using mass-separated beams: Nuclear properties of unstable indium and tin isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehl, T.; Kirchner, R.; Klepper, O.; Marx, D.; Dinger, U.; Eberz, J.; Huber, G.; Lochmann, H.; Menges, R.; Ulm, G.

    1987-05-01

    Collinear fast-beam laser-spectroscopy has been used to measure the hyperfine structure and isotope shift of several indium and tin isotopes. The related experimental techniques are described, including the preparation of mass-separated beams of neutron-deficient indium and tin isotopes at the GSI on-line mass separator following fusion-evaporation reactions. The deviation of the observed dependence of the charge radii upon the neutron number from the expected behaviour is briefly discussed.

  6. Ultrafast spectroscopy of super high frequency mechanical modes of doubly clamped beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristow, Oliver; Merklein, Moritz; Grossmann, Martin; Hettich, Mike; Schubert, Martin; Bruchhausen, Axel; Grebing, Jochen; Erbe, Artur; Mounier, Denis; Gusev, Vitalyi; Scheer, Elke; Dekorsy, Thomas; Barretto, Elaine C. S.

    2013-12-01

    We use ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy to study the mechanical vibrations in the time domain of doubly clamped silicon nitride beams. Beams with two different clamping conditions are investigated. Finite element method calculations are performed to analyse the mode spectra of both structures. By calculating the strain integral on the surface of the resonators, we are able to reproduce the effect of the detection mechanism and identify all the measured modes. We show that our spectroscopy technique combined with our modelling tools allow the investigation of several different modes in the super high frequency range (3-30 GHz) and above, bringing more information about the vibration modes of nanomechanical resonators.

  7. The Oxford electron-beam ion trap: A device for spectroscopy of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, J. D.; Varney, A. J.; Margolis, H. S.; Baird, P. E. G.; Grant, I. P.; Groves, P. D.; Hallett, W. A.; Handford, A. T.; Hirst, P. J.; Holmes, A. R.; Howie, D. J. H.; Hunt, R. A.; Nobbs, K. A.; Roberts, M.; Studholme, W.; Wark, J. S.; Williams, M. T.; Levine, M. A.; Dietrich, D. D.; Graham, W. G.; Williams, I. D.; O'Neil, R.; Rose, S. J.

    1994-04-01

    An electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) has just been completed in the Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford. The design is similar to the devices installed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is intended that the Oxford EBIT will be used for x-ray and UV spectroscopy of hydrogenic and helium-like ions, laser resonance spectroscopy of hydrogenic ions and measurements of dielectronic recombination cross sections, in order to test current understanding of simple highly charged ions.

  8. Spectroscopy of Argon Excited in an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2005-04-18

    Argon is one of the gases best investigated and most widely used in plasma discharge devices for a multitude of applications that range from wavelength reference standards to controlled fusion experiments. Reviewing atomic physics and spectroscopic problems in various ionization stages of Ar, the past use and future options of employing an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) for better and more complete Ar data in the x-ray, EUV and visible spectral ranges are discussed.

  9. A Molecular Beam Source for Electron Spectroscopy of Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Marburger, Simon P.; Kugeler, Oliver; Hergenhahn, Uwe

    2004-05-12

    We describe the construction and testing of a supersonic jet apparatus to carry out electron spectroscopy on Van-der-Waals clusters using Synchrotron Radiation as an excitation source. The cluster source works with a conical nozzle that can be cooled with LHe as well as with LN2. The system has been optimized for mechanical and thermal stability, for low residual magnetic fields and is of a compact design.

  10. In situ observation on electron beam induced chemical vapor deposition by Auger electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, S.; Mori, K.

    1987-08-31

    W deposition, using WF/sub 6/ gas source by electron beam induced surface reaction, has been studied by Auger electron spectroscopy. W Auger electron signals have been observed for WF/sub 6/ adlayer by Auger electron spectroscopy. Moreover, initial growth for W deposition has been observed in situ by Auger electron spectroscopy. As a result, it became clear that a growth rate for W deposition is proportional to WF/sub 6/ gas pressure and can be --1 A/min at 2 x 10/sup -7/ Torr.

  11. Pulsed Electron Beam Spectroscopy for Temperature Measurements in Hypersonic Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    atmospheric pr essures wit hin the fligh t envelope of scramjet-powered flight vehicles. Because of the pressure disparity between measured flow and me...represents what might be o btained from the pulse d e-beam s ystem if it were used in the high-te mperature (but high-pr essure ) st agnation cha...di fferential pressure pump has been developed for pressure separations up to approximately 1 torr. F or higher pr essures , a f ast act ion r otary

  12. Laser spectroscopy and laser cooling of relativistic stored ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühl, T.; Neumann, R.; Marx, D.; Poth, H.; Boos, K.; Grieser, R.; Huber, G.; Klein, R.; Schröder, S.; Balykin, V.; Habs, D.; Petrich, W.; Wanner, B.; Wolf, A.; Schwalm, D.

    1991-05-01

    Experiments with relativistic ions at the test storage ring TSR [P. Baumann et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A268 (1988) 531] demonstrate the potential of the interaction of laser light with energetic stored ions for spectroscopic purposes as well as for manipulation of the ion velocity. Latest results for Li + ions are reported. At the ion energies available at ESR [B. Franzke, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. {B24}/{B25} (1987) 19] it will become possible to prepare and store bare ions up to U 92+. Experiments using these exotic beams are discussed and an outlook to the situation at even higher energies is given.

  13. Delayed and In-beam Spectroscopy on Francium and Astatine Nuclei at the Proton Drip Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uusitalo, J.; Jakobsson, U.

    2011-11-01

    Delayed and in-beam spectroscopy on francium and astatine nuclei at and beyond the proton drip line has been performed. In neutron deficient astatine nuclei a shift to deformed shapes as a function of decreasing neutron has been obtained. In neutron deficient francium isotope the same shift is evident.

  14. Delayed and In-beam Spectroscopy on Francium and Astatine Nuclei at the Proton Drip Line

    SciTech Connect

    Uusitalo, J.; Jakobsson, U.; Collaboration: RITU-Gamma Gollaboration

    2011-11-30

    Delayed and in-beam spectroscopy on francium and astatine nuclei at and beyond the proton drip line has been performed. In neutron deficient astatine nuclei a shift to deformed shapes as a function of decreasing neutron has been obtained. In neutron deficient francium isotope the same shift is evident.

  15. Laser fluorescence spectroscopy on fast ion beams at the Marburg separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, H.; Dörschel, K.; Höhle, C.; Hühnermann, H.; Meier, Th.

    Optical hyperfine structure and isotope shift measurements have been performed on Xe +, Ba + and La +-ions using an electromagnetic mass separator for the preselection of the isotopes by fast ion beam laser spectroscopy. The different measuring techniques used are described and their precision and sensitivity are discussed.

  16. X-ray spectroscopy of highly-ionized atoms in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R.E.; Bennett, C.; Chen, M.H.; Cowan, T.; Dietrich, D.; Henderson, J.R.; Knapp, D.A.; Levine, M.A.; Schneider, M.B.; Scofield, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    An Electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged-ions (q /le/ 70+) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of dielectronic recombination, electron impact excitation and transition energies are presented. 15 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Molecular Beam Optical Stark Spectroscopy of Magnesium Deuteride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimle, Timothy; Zhang, Ruohan; Wang, Hailing

    2014-06-01

    Light polar, paramagnetic molecules, such as magnesium hydride, MgH, are attractive for slowing and trapping experiments because these molecules have both non-zero permanent electric dipole, μel, and magnetic dipole, μm moments. The permanent electric dipole moment is particularly relevant to Stark deceleration which depends on the ratio of the Stark shift to molecular mass. Here we report on the Stark effect in the (0,0) A2Π - X 2Σ+ band system of a cold molecular beam sample of magnesium deuteride, MgD. The lines associated with the lowest rotational levels are detected for the first time. The field-free spectrum was analyzed to produce an improved set of fine structure parameters for the A2Π(v = 0) state. The observed electric field induced splittings and shifts were analyzed to produce permanent electric dipole moments, μel,of 2.561(10)D and 1.34(8)D for A2Π(v = 0) and X2Σ+(v=0)states, respectively. This is the first molecular beam study of MgD.

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: Progress in laser spectroscopy at radioactive ion beam facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheal, B.; Flanagan, K. T.

    2010-11-01

    In the last decade there has been a renaissance in laser spectroscopy at on-line facilities. This has included the introduction of ion traps and the use of laser ion sources to study the hyperfine structure of exotic nuclei far from stability and produce selective enhancement of isomeric beams. In-source spectroscopy has allowed the study of rare isotopes with yields as low as 0.1 atoms per second. In the case of high-resolution spectroscopy, cooling and trapping the ions has dramatically improved the sensitivity. Some elements that were previously inaccessible to laser spectroscopy are now available for study through the technique of in-trap optical pumping. This paper reviews the field of laser spectroscopy at on-line facilities, with an emphasis on new techniques. A summary of experimental data is presented.

  19. Active Beam Shaping System and Method Using Sequential Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A. (Inventor); Pueyo, Laurent A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active optical beam shaping system includes a first deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept an entrance beam of light and to provide a first reflected beam of light, a second deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept the first reflected beam of light from the first deformable mirror and to provide a second reflected beam of light, and a signal processing and control system configured to communicate with the first and second deformable mirrors. The first deformable mirror, the second deformable mirror and the signal processing and control system together provide a large amplitude light modulation range to provide an actively shaped optical beam.

  20. Active-beam cross-sectional modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Ortega-Morales, Miguel

    2000-06-01

    A finite-element based analysis for modeling active composite beams with embedded anisotropic actuation is presented. It is derived from three-dimensional electroelasticity, where the original problem is reduced via the variational asymptotic method. The resulting cross-sectional analysis takes into consideration passive and active anisotropic and nonhomogeneous materials, and represents general (thin-walled, thick-walled, solid) cross-sectional geometries. The formulation requires neither the costly use of 3-D finite element discretization nor the loss of accuracy inherent to any simplified representation of the cross section. The developed formulation is numerically implemented in VABS-A, and several numerical and experimental tests cases are used to support validation of the proposed theory. Also, the effect of the presence of a core in originally hallow configurations is presented and counter-intuitive conclusions are discussed. The generality of the method and accuracy of the results increase confidence at the design stage that the active beam structure will perform as expected and, consequently, should lower costs from experimental tests and further adjustments.

  1. Simultaneous multi-beam planar array IR (pair) spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Elmore, Douglas L.; Rabolt, John F.; Tsao, Mei-Wei

    2005-09-13

    An apparatus and method capable of providing spatially multiplexed IR spectral information simultaneously in real-time for multiple samples or multiple spatial areas of one sample using IR absorption phenomena requires no moving parts or Fourier Transform during operation, and self-compensates for background spectra and degradation of component performance over time. IR spectral information and chemical analysis of the samples is determined by using one or more IR sources, sampling accessories for positioning the samples, optically dispersive elements, a focal plane array (FPA) arranged to detect the dispersed light beams, and a processor and display to control the FPA, and display an IR spectrograph. Fiber-optic coupling can be used to allow remote sensing. Portability, reliability, and ruggedness is enhanced due to the no-moving part construction. Applications include determining time-resolved orientation and characteristics of materials, including polymer monolayers. Orthogonal polarizers may be used to determine certain material characteristics.

  2. Design of a beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic for negative ions radio frequency source SPIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Zaniol, B.; Pasqualotto, R.; Barbisan, M.

    2012-04-15

    A facility will be built in Padova (Italy) to develop, commission, and optimize the neutral beam injection system for ITER. The full scale prototype negative ion radio frequency source SPIDER, featuring up to 100 kV acceleration voltage, includes a full set of diagnostics, required for safe operation and to measure and optimize the beam performance. Among them, beam emission spectroscopy (BES) will be used to measure the line integrated beam uniformity, divergence, and neutralization losses inside the accelerator (stripping losses). In the absence of the neutralization stage, SPIDER beam is mainly composed by H{sup -} or D{sup -} particles, according to the source filling gas. The capability of a spectroscopic diagnostic of an H{sup -} (D{sup -}) beam relies on the interaction of the beam particles with the background gas particles. The BES diagnostic will be able to acquire the H{sub {alpha}} (D{sub {alpha}}) spectrum from up to 40 lines of sight. The system is capable to resolve stripping losses down to 2 keV and to measure beam divergence with an accuracy of about 10%. The design of this diagnostic is reported, with discussion of the layout and its components, together with simulations of the expected performance.

  3. Supersonic Molecular Beam Optical Stark Spectroscopy of MnH.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gengler, Jamie; Ma, Tongmei; Harrison, Jeremy; Steimle, Timothy

    2006-03-01

    The large moment of inertia, large magnetic moment, and possible large permanent electric dipole moment of manganese monohydride, MnH, makes it a prime candidate for ultra-cold molecule production via Stark deceleration and magnetic trapping. Here we report the first molecular beam production of MnH and the analysis of the Stark effect in the (0,0) A^7 π -- X^ 7σ^+ band. The sample was prepared by laser ablation of solid Mn in an H2 supersonic expansion. The low rotational temperature (<50 K) and near natural linewidth resolution (˜50 MHz) facilitated analysis of the ^55Mn (I=5/2) and ^1H (I=1/2) hyperfine structure. A comparison of the derived field-free parameters with those obtained from sub- Doppler optical measurements will be made. Progress on the analysis of the Stark effect will be given. J.R. Bochinski, E.R. Hudson, H.J. Lewandowski, and J. Ye, Phys. Rev. A 70, 043410 (2004). S.Y.T. van de Meerakker, R.T. Jongma, H.L. Bethlem, and G. Meijer, Phys. Rev. A 64, 041401(R) (2001) report the first molecular beam production of MnH and the analysis of T.D. Varberg, J.A. Gray, R.W. Field, and A.J. Merer, J. Mol. Spec. 156, 296-318 (1992). I.E. Gordon, D.R.T. Appadoo, A. Shayesteh, K.A. Walker, and P.F. Bernath, J. Mol. Spec., 229, 145-149 (2005).

  4. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus.

    PubMed

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2013-02-01

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s(2)(1)S0↔ 6s7s (1)S0) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm(3) and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s(1)S0 state via the intercombination 6s6p(3)P1 state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 °C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle.

  5. Deconvolution-based correction of alkali beam emission spectroscopy density profile measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pusztai, I.; Pokol, G.; Refy, D.; Por, G.; Dunai, D.; Anda, G.; Zoletnik, S.; Schweinzer, J.

    2009-08-15

    A deconvolution-based correction method of the beam emission spectroscopy (BES) density profile measurement is demonstrated by its application to simulated measurements of the COMPASS and TEXTOR tokamaks. If the line of sight is far from tangential to the flux surfaces, and the beam width is comparable to the scale length on which the light profile varies, the observation may cause an undesired smoothing of the light profile, resulting in a non-negligible underestimation of the calculated density profile. This effect can be reduced significantly by the emission reconstruction method, which gives an estimate of the emissivity along the beam axis from the measured light profile, taking the finite beam width and the properties of the measurement into account in terms of the transfer function of the observation. Characteristics and magnitude of the mentioned systematic error and its reduction by the introduced method are studied by means of the comprehensive alkali BES simulation code RENATE.

  6. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2013-02-01

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s2 1S0↔ 6s7s 1S0) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm3 and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s1S0 state via the intercombination 6s6p3P1 state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 °C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle.

  7. Overview of the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. R.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Schoenbeck, N.; Uzun-Kaymak, I.; Winz, G.; Feder, H.; Feder, R.; Labik, G.; Stratton, B. C.

    2010-10-15

    A beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system has been installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to study ion gyroscale fluctuations. The BES system measures D{sub {alpha}} emission from a deuterium neutral heating beam. The system includes two optical views centered at r/a{approx_equal}0.45 and 0.85 and aligned to magnetic field pitch angles at the neutral beam. f/1.5 collection optics produce 2-3 cm spot sizes at the neutral beam. The initial channel layout includes radial arrays, poloidal arrays, and two-dimensional grids. Radial arrays provide coverage from r/a{approx_equal}0.1 to beyond the last-closed flux surface. Photodetectors and digital filters provide high-sensitivity, low-noise measurements at frequencies of up to 1 MHz. The BES system will be a valuable tool for investigating ion gyroscale turbulence and Alfven/energetic particle modes on NSTX.

  8. Molecular Beam Optical Zeeman Spectroscopy of Vanadium Monoxide, VO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Trung; Zhang, Ruohan; Steimle, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Like almost all astronomical studies, exoplanet investigations are observational endeavors that rely primarily on remote spectroscopic sensing to infer the physical properties of planets. Most exoplanet related information is inferred from to temporal variation of luminosity of the parent star. An effective method of monitoring this variation is via Magnetic Doppler Imaging (MDI), which uses optical polarimetry of paramagnetic molecules or atoms. One promising paramagnetic stellar absorption is the near infrared spectrum of VO. With this in mind, we have begun a project to record and analyze the field-free and Zeeman spectrum of the band. A cold (approx. 20 K) beam of VO was probed with a single frequency laser and detected using laser induced fluorescence. The determined spectral parameters will be discussed and compared to those extracted from the analysis of a hot spectrum. Supported by the National Science Foundation under the Grant No. CHE-1265885. O. Kochukhov, N. Rusomarov, J. A. Valenti, H. C. Stempels, F. Snik, M. Rodenhuis, N. Piskunov, V. Makaganiuk, C. U. Keller and C. M. Johns-Krull, Astron. Astrophys. 574 (Pt. 2), A79/71-A79/12 (2015). S. V. Berdyugina, Astron. Soc. Pac. Conf. Ser. 437 (Solar Polarization 6), 219-235 (2011). S. V. Berdyugina, P. A. Braun, D. M. Fluri and S. K. Solanki, Astron. Astrophys. 444 (3), 947-960 (2005). A. S. C. Cheung, P. G. Hajigeorgiou, G. Huang, S. Z. Huang and A. J. Merer, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 163 (2), 443-458 (1994)

  9. Group velocity delay spectroscopy technique for industrial monitoring of electron beam induced vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Benterou, J J; Berzins, L V; Sharma, M N

    1998-09-24

    Spectroscopic techniques are ideal for characterization and process control of electron beam generated vapor plumes. Absorption based techniques work well for a wide variety of applications, but are difficult to apply to optically dense or opaque vapor plumes. We describe an approach for monitoring optically dense vapor plumes that is based on measuring the group velocity delay of a laser beam near an optical transition to determine the vapor density. This technique has a larger dynamic range than absorption spectroscopy. We describe our progress towards a robust system to monitor aluminum vaporization in an industrial environment. Aluminum was chosen because of its prevalence in high performance aircraft alloys. In these applications, composition control of the alloy constituents is critical to the deposition process. Data is presented demonstrating the superior dynamic range of the measurement. In addition, preliminary data demonstrating aluminum vapor rate control in an electron beam evaporator is presented. Alternative applications where this technique could be useful are discussed. Keywords: Group velocity delay spectroscopy, optical beat signal, optical heterodyne, index of refraction, laser absorption spectroscopy, external cavity diode laser (ECDL), electron beam vaporization, vapor density, vapor phase manufacturing, process control

  10. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, M.; Anda, G.; Réfy, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Czopf, A.; Erdei, G.; Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I.; Nam, Y. U.

    2015-07-15

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera’s measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  11. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research.

    PubMed

    Lampert, M; Anda, G; Czopf, A; Erdei, G; Guszejnov, D; Kovácsik, Á; Pokol, G I; Réfy, D; Nam, Y U; Zoletnik, S

    2015-07-01

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera's measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  12. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, M.; Anda, G.; Czopf, A.; Erdei, G.; Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I.; Réfy, D.; Nam, Y. U.; Zoletnik, S.

    2015-07-01

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera's measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  13. High resolution Raman spectroscopy of complexes and clusters in molecular beams. Performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, P.M.

    1991-12-31

    The DOE-sponsored project in this laboratory has two facets. The first is the development of methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. The second is the application of such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species in supersonic molecular beams. The progress we have made in both of these areas is described in this paper. The report is divided into five remaining sections. The first pertains to theoretical and experimental developments in Fourier transform stimulated emission spectroscopy and Fourier transform hole-burning spectroscopy. The second deals with progress in the development of ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS). The third describes results from the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The fourth describes IDSRS results from studies of hydrogen-bonded complexes containing phenols. The fifth relates to studies of carbazole-(Ar){sub n} clusters.

  14. High resolution Raman spectroscopy of complexes and clusters in molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    The DOE-sponsored project in this laboratory has two facets. The first is the development of methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. The second is the application of such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species in supersonic molecular beams. The progress we have made in both of these areas is described in this paper. The report is divided into five remaining sections. The first pertains to theoretical and experimental developments in Fourier transform stimulated emission spectroscopy and Fourier transform hole-burning spectroscopy. The second deals with progress in the development of ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS). The third describes results from the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The fourth describes IDSRS results from studies of hydrogen-bonded complexes containing phenols. The fifth relates to studies of carbazole-(Ar){sub n} clusters.

  15. MO-AB-BRA-07: Prompt Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Range Verification of Clinical Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Verburg, J; Bortfeld, T; Seco, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We developed a pre-clinical prototype system for range verification of proton pencil-beam scanning fields. The system was evaluated using phantom treatment plans delivered with a clinical dose rate. Methods: The absolute range of proton pencil-beams was verified through an optimization procedure, which matches energy- and time-resolved prompt gamma-ray measurements with models, based on cross sections for discrete prompt gamma-ray line excitations. Phantom experiments were performed with a pre-clinical prototype detector, using treatment plans delivered with a clinical pencil-beam scanning system. The detector consisted of an actively shielded lanthanum(III) bromide scintillator. Tungsten was used to collimate the gamma-rays. To support high event rates, the detector readout featured custom amplifiers and an active voltage divider for the photomultiplier. The detector signals were acquired by fast analog-to-digital converters and processed using digital algorithms. The data acquisition was also synchronized with the pencil-beam scanning and dosimetry systems. Results: We successfully acquired prompt gamma-ray spectra during the delivery of proton pencil-beams with a clinical beam current of 2 nA at the exit of the treatment head. The number of events in the primary detector ranged from 1 x 10{sup 6} to 2 x 10{sup 6} per second. In phantom experiments, non-uniform range errors were introduced by placing strips of plastic in the beam path. The magnitudes and positions of these range errors were correctly detected in two-dimensional range maps that were generated from the measurements. With our small scale prototype, a 1.0 mm standard deviation on the absolute range required about 5 x 10{sup 8} protons per delivered pencil-beam. Conclusions: Prompt gamma-ray spectroscopy to verify the absolute range of proton beams was demonstrated under clinical pencil-beam delivery conditions. A 1 mm to 2 mm range verification accuracy for a field delivering 1 Gy, appears

  16. Upgrading the sensitivity of spectroscopy gas analysis with application of supersonic molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Vaks, V.; Domracheva, E.; Sobakinskaya, E.; Chernyaeva, M.

    2012-04-01

    We propose an approach to increase a sensitivity of microwave and THz spectroscopy, that involves application of supersonic molecular beams. The key advantage offered by such an approach is that a gas temperature can be decreased along with an increase in the gas density, which results in a much greater number of molecules interacting with radiation and, hence, in a higher absorption coefficient. This effect has been demonstrated experimentally on supersonic CO and NO beams, using a phase manipulation microwave spectrometer. The absorption coefficient was found to be three orders of magnitude higher than the value of gas absorption coefficient in a standard 1-m long cell at room temperature.

  17. Quadrupole contribution to the third-order optical activity spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2007-07-01

    Time-resolved nonlinear optical activity measurement spectroscopy can be a useful tool for studying biomolecular and chemical reaction dynamics of chiral molecules. Only recently, the two-dimensional (2D) circularly polarized photon echo (CP-PE) spectroscopy of polypeptides and a photosynthetic light-harvesting complex were discussed, where the beam configuration was specifically controlled in such a way to eliminate the quadrupole contribution to the CP-PE signal. In this paper, we generalize the CP-PE spectroscopy by including the transition quadrupole contributions from peptide amide I vibrational transition and chlorophyll electronic transition. By using a density functional theory calculation method, the corresponding amide I vibrational and chlorophyll Qy electronic transition quadrupole tensor elements are determined. Amplitude of nonlinear optical transition pathway involving a quadrupole transition is found to be comparable to those of magnetic dipole terms for two different cases considered, i.e., dipeptides and photosynthetic antenna complex. However, due to the rotational averaging factors, the overall quadrupole contribution is an order of magnitude smaller than the magnetic dipole contribution. This suggests that the conventional 2D photon echo method and experimental scheme can be directly used to measure the 2D CP-PE signal from proteins and molecular complexes and that the 2D CP-PE signal is mainly dictated by the magnetic dipole contribution.

  18. Quadrupole contribution to the third-order optical activity spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2007-07-14

    Time-resolved nonlinear optical activity measurement spectroscopy can be a useful tool for studying biomolecular and chemical reaction dynamics of chiral molecules. Only recently, the two-dimensional (2D) circularly polarized photon echo (CP-PE) spectroscopy of polypeptides and a photosynthetic light-harvesting complex were discussed, where the beam configuration was specifically controlled in such a way to eliminate the quadrupole contribution to the CP-PE signal. In this paper, we generalize the CP-PE spectroscopy by including the transition quadrupole contributions from peptide amide I vibrational transition and chlorophyll electronic transition. By using a density functional theory calculation method, the corresponding amide I vibrational and chlorophyll Q(y) electronic transition quadrupole tensor elements are determined. Amplitude of nonlinear optical transition pathway involving a quadrupole transition is found to be comparable to those of magnetic dipole terms for two different cases considered, i.e., dipeptides and photosynthetic antenna complex. However, due to the rotational averaging factors, the overall quadrupole contribution is an order of magnitude smaller than the magnetic dipole contribution. This suggests that the conventional 2D photon echo method and experimental scheme can be directly used to measure the 2D CP-PE signal from proteins and molecular complexes and that the 2D CP-PE signal is mainly dictated by the magnetic dipole contribution.

  19. Organic semiconductor distributed feedback laser as excitation source in Raman spectroscopy using free-beam and fibre coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Lebedkin, Sergei; Mappes, Timo; Köber, Sebastian; Koos, Christian; Kappes, Manfred; Lemmer, Uli

    2014-05-01

    Enabled by the broad spectral gain and the efficient energy conversion in the active material, organic semiconductor lasers are promising for spectroscopic applications and have been recently applied for high resolution absorption and transmission spectroscopy. Here, we present the application of organic semiconductor DFB laser (DFB-OSL) as excitation source in Raman spectroscopy. Utilizing an efficient small molecule blend of tris (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) doped with the laser dye 4-(dicyano-methylene)-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM), our encapsulated DFB-OSL achieved a high slope efficiency of 7.6%. The organic lasers were tested in the inverted and upright Raman microscope setups, using free-beam and fibre coupling, respectively. In the free-beam configuration, the emission beam was guided directly into an inverted microscope. Employing a spectrally tunable DFBOSL as the excitation source, we measured the Raman spectra of sulfur and improved the Raman signals for a given optical filter configuration. In the fibre coupling configuration, the organic laser was coupled into a 50 μm multi-mode optical fibre with an efficiency of 70 %. We utilized a round-to-line fibre-bundle for an efficient collection and transfer of Raman light to a spectrograph, by keeping a sufficient spectral resolution. Raman tests were performed on cadmium sulfide and cyclohexane. Our novel fibre-coupled organic laser provides a modular laboratory Raman system.

  20. Towards combining in-beam {gamma}-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Papadakis, P.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Pakarinen, J.; Butler, P. A.; Cresswell, J. R.; Page, R. D.; Parr, E.; Seddon, D. A.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D.; Coleman-Smith, P. J.; Lazarus, I. H.; Letts, S. C.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Simpson, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.

    2009-01-28

    The SAGE spectrometer will combine a segmented Si-detector with a Ge-detector array aiming to take the simultaneous in-beam {gamma}-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy to the next level. It will be coupled with the GREAT focal plane spectrometer and the RITU gas-filled recoil separator at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland. Its high efficiency and resolution will open the door to a new era of complete spectroscopy directed, amongst others, at the study of superheavy nuclei aiming to investigate the properties of the next spherical proton shell above Z = 82.

  1. Ultra high resolution molecular beam cars spectroscopy with application to planetary atmospheric molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The measurement of high resolution pulsed and continuous wave (CW) coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements in pulsed and steady state supersonic expansions were demonstrated. Pulsed molecular beam sources were characterized, and saturation of a Raman transition and, for the first time, the Raman spectrum of a complex molecular cluster were observed. The observation of CW CARS spectra in a molecular expansion and the effects of transit time broadening is described. Supersonic expansion is established as a viable technique for high resolution Raman spectroscopy of cold molecules with resolutions of 100 MH2.

  2. Helium implanted Eurofer97 characterized by positron beam Doppler broadening and Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, I.; Schut, H.; Fedorov, A.; Luzginova, N.; Desgardin, P.; Sietsma, J.

    2013-11-01

    Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steels are being extensively studied because of their foreseen application in fusion and Generation IV fission reactors. To produce irradiation induced defects, Eurofer97 samples were implanted with helium at energies of 500 keV and 2 MeV and doses of 1 × 1015-1016 He/cm2, creating atomic displacements in the range 0.07-0.08 dpa. The implantation induced defects were characterized by positron beam Doppler Broadening (DB) and Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS). Results show that up to ˜600 K peaks that can be attributed to He desorption from overpressured HenVm (n > m) clusters and vacancy assisted mechanism in the case of helium in the substitutional position. The temperature range 600-1200 K is related to the formation of larger clusters HenVm (n < m). The dissociation of the HeV and the phase transition attributed to a sharp peak in the TDS spectra at 1200 K. Above this temperature, the release of helium from bubbles is observed.

  3. Isotope shifts and hyperfine structure in polonium isotopes by atomic-beam laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewska, D.; Bekk, K.; Göring, S.; Hanser, A.; Kälber, W.; Meisel, G.; Rebel, H.

    1991-08-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in a collimated atomic beam has been applied to determine isotope shifts and the hyperfine structure of an isotopic chain of the radioactive element polonium (200Po, 202Po, 204-210Po). The relative isotope shifts show a striking similarity with results for other elements in the vicinity of Pb, even reproducing details of the odd-even staggering.

  4. Coherent multi-dimensional spectroscopy at optical frequencies in a single beam with optical readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, Hélène; Palato, Samuel; Kambhampati, Patanjali

    2017-09-01

    Ultrafast coherent multi-dimensional spectroscopies form a powerful set of techniques to unravel complex processes, ranging from light-harvesting, chemical exchange in biological systems to many-body interactions in quantum-confined materials. Yet these spectroscopies remain complex to implement at the high frequencies of vibrational and electronic transitions, thereby limiting their widespread use. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of two-dimensional spectroscopy at optical frequencies in a single beam. Femtosecond optical pulses are spectrally broadened to a relevant bandwidth and subsequently shaped into phase coherent pulse trains. By suitably modulating the phases of the pulses within the beam, we show that it is possible to directly read out the relevant optical signals. This work shows that one needs neither complex beam geometries nor complex detection schemes in order to measure two-dimensional spectra at optical frequencies. Our setup provides not only a simplified experimental design over standard two-dimensional spectrometers but its optical readout also enables novel applications in microscopy.

  5. Characterization and control of tunable quantum cascade laser beam parameters for stand-off spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, Christopher A.; Papantonakis, Michael R.; Nguyen, Viet; McGill, R. Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Infrared active stand-off detection techniques often employ high power tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) for target illumination. Due to the distances involved, any fluctuation of the laser beam direction and/or beam profile is amplified at the sample position. If not accounted for, this leads to diminished performance (both sensitivity and selectivity) of the detection technique as a direct result of uncertainties in laser irradiance at each imaged pixel of the sample. This is especially true for detection approaches which illuminate a relatively small footprint at the target since the laser beam profile spatial fluctuations are often comparable to the (focused) laser spot size. Also, there is often a necessary trade-off between high output QCL power and beam quality. Therefore, precise characterization of the laser beam profile and direction as a function of laser properties (tuning wavelength, current and operating mode: pulsed or CW) is imperative. We present detailed measurements of beam profiles, beam wander and power fluctuations and their reproducibility as function of laser wavelength and stand-off distance for a commercially available tunable quantum cascade laser. We present strategies for improving beam quality by compensating for fluctuations using a motorized mirror and a pair of motorized lenses. We also investigate QCL mode hops and how they affect laser beam properties at the sample. Detailed mode-hop stability maps were measured.

  6. High resolution EUV spectroscopy of xenon ions with a compact electron beam ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Safdar; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2017-09-01

    We performed high resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectroscopy measurements of highly charged xenon ions with a compact electron beam ion trap. The spectra were recorded with a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer while varying the electron beam energy between 200 and 890 eV. We measured the wavelengths for several lines of Rh-like Xe9+ - Cd-like Xe6+ and Cu-like Xe25+- Se-like Xe20+ in the range of 150-200 Å with an uncertainty of 0.05 Å. Previously, most of these lines have been reported from EBITs with a wavelength uncertainty of 0.2 Å. Additionally, based on the electron beam energy dependence of the observed spectra we tentatively identified three new lines, which were reported as unidentified lines in the previous studies.

  7. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Based on Single Beam Splitting and Geometric Configuration for Effective Signal Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Qingyu; Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-01

    A new laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on single-beam-splitting (SBS) and proper optical geometric configuration has been initially explored in this work for effective signal enhancement. In order to improve the interaction efficiency of laser energy with the ablated material, a laser beam operated in pulse mode was divided into two streams to ablate/excite the target sample in different directions instead of the conventional one beam excitation in single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS). In spatial configuration, the laser beam geometry plays an important role in the emission signal enhancement. Thus, an adjustable geometric configuration with variable incident angle between the two splitted laser beams was constructed for achieving maximum signal enhancement. With the optimized angles of 60° and 70° for Al and Cu atomic emission lines at 396.15 nm and 324.75 nm respectively, about 5.6- and 4.8-folds signal enhancements were achieved for aluminum alloy and copper alloy samples compared to SP-LIBS. Furthermore, the temporal analysis, in which the intensity of atomic lines in SP-LIBS decayed at least ten times faster than the SBS-LIBS, proved that the energy coupling efficiency of SBS-LIBS was significantly higher than that of SP-LIBS. PMID:25557721

  8. Lithium atomic beam spectroscopy and phase sensitive detection using a diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, Jack; Peplinski, Brandon; Otto, Lauren; Klemme, Daniel; Greenlee, Tom; Hoyt, Chad

    2011-04-01

    We describe spectroscopy of a collimated lithium atomic beam using a home-built external cavity diode laser (ECDL) at 671 nm. The atomic beam is formed from an effusive oven containing Li at T ~ 450°C and a series of apertures. The ECDL light is split into two beams that counter-propagate at right angles to the atomic beam. Fluorescence spectra from the unresolved 2S1/2 F = 2 --> 2P3/2 D2 line of 7Li were recorded over a large range of saturation parameters (0.1s0 - 50s0, where s0 is the ratio of laser intensity to the saturation intensity). We modeled the effects of transverse atomic velocities (residual Doppler broadening), power broadening, and the saturation feature at high s0. We calibrated the spectra by modulating the laser current at ~ 110 MHz and observing the sideband spectra. We locked the frequency of the ECDL to the transition at low and high values of s0 by phase sensitive detection in the fluorescence. The laser beam was electro-optically modulated at 100 kHz and the fluorescence signal was demodulated with a lock-in amplifier. The locked ECDL will be used for laser cooling and trapping experiments. Funding from MN NASA Space Grant Consortium and CID, Inc.

  9. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy based on single beam splitting and geometric configuration for effective signal enhancement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Qingyu; Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-05

    A new laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on single-beam-splitting (SBS) and proper optical geometric configuration has been initially explored in this work for effective signal enhancement. In order to improve the interaction efficiency of laser energy with the ablated material, a laser beam operated in pulse mode was divided into two streams to ablate/excite the target sample in different directions instead of the conventional one beam excitation in single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS). In spatial configuration, the laser beam geometry plays an important role in the emission signal enhancement. Thus, an adjustable geometric configuration with variable incident angle between the two splitted laser beams was constructed for achieving maximum signal enhancement. With the optimized angles of 60° and 70° for Al and Cu atomic emission lines at 396.15 nm and 324.75 nm respectively, about 5.6- and 4.8-folds signal enhancements were achieved for aluminum alloy and copper alloy samples compared to SP-LIBS. Furthermore, the temporal analysis, in which the intensity of atomic lines in SP-LIBS decayed at least ten times faster than the SBS-LIBS, proved that the energy coupling efficiency of SBS-LIBS was significantly higher than that of SP-LIBS.

  10. Rydberg Spectroscopy of Zeeman-Decelerated Beams of Metastable Helium Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Paul; Motsch, Michael; Sprecher, Daniel; Merkt, Frederic

    2014-06-01

    Having three and four electrons, respectively, He_2^+ and He_2 represent systems for which highly accurate ab-initio calculations might become feasible in the near future. With the goal of performing accurate measurements of the rovibrational energy-level structure of He_2^+ by Rydberg spectroscopy of He_2 and multichannel quantum-defect theory extrapolation techniques, we have produced samples of helium molecules in the a ^3Σu^+ state in supersonic beams with velocities tunable down to 100 m/s by combining a cryogenic supersonic-beam source with a multistage Zeeman decelerator. The molecules are formed at an initial velocity of 500 m/s by striking a discharge in the pulsed expansion of helium gas from a reservoir kept at a cryogenic temperature of 10 K. Using rotationally-resolved PFI-ZEKE (pulsed-field-ionization zero-kinetic-energy) photoelectron spectroscopy, we have probed the rotational-state distribution of the molecules produced in the discharge and found vibrational levels up to ν" = 2 and rotational levels up to N"=21 to be populated. The molecular beam is coupled to a multistage Zeeman decelerator that employs pulsed inhomogeneous magnetic fields to further reduce the beam velocity. By measuring the quantum-state distribution of the decelerated sample using photoelectron and photoionization spectroscopy we observed no rotational or vibrational state-selectivity of the deceleration process, but found that one of the three spin-rotation components of the He_2 a ^3Σu^+ rotational levels is eliminated. W.-C. Tung, M. Pavanello, L. Adamowicz, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 104309 (2012). D. Sprecher, J. Liu, T. Krähenmann, M. Schäfer, and F. Merkt, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 064304 (2014). M. Motsch, P. Jansen, J. A. Agner, H. Schmutz, and F. Merkt, arXiv:1401.7774. N. Vanhaecke, U. Meier, M. Andrist, B. H. Meier, and F. Merkt, Phys. Rev. A 75, 031402(R) (2007).

  11. Atomic Beam Spectroscopy of the 1283 nm M1 Transition in Thallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, P. K.; Holmes, C. D.; Green, Michael

    2003-05-01

    Using a new thallium atomic beam apparatus, we are undertaking a series of laser spectroscopy measurements with the goal of providing precise, independent cross-checks on the accuracy of new calculations of parity nonconservation in thallium(M. Kozlov et al.), Phys Rev. A64, 053107 (2001). In our apparatus, a laser beam interacts transversely with a 2-cm-wide thallium beam of density 4x10^11 cm-3 and reveals roughly tenfold Doppler narrowing of the absorption profile. Having completed a new 0.4% measurement of the scalar Stark shift within the 378 nm 6P_1/2-7S_1/2 E1transition(S.C. Doret et al.), Phys. Rev. A66, 052504 (2002), we have now begun to study the very weak 1283 nm 6P_1/2-6P_3/2 transition in the atomic beam environment. We will determine both the scalar and tensor Stark shift components, as well as the various components of the Stark-induced amplitude within this mixed M1/E2 transition. To enhance the visibility of the weak absorption signal, we are employing an FM spectroscopy technique. The demodulated laser transmission spectrum provides a zero-background signal with high signal/noise and includes copies of the atomic absorption spectrum separated by well-known RF sideband frequencies, offering built-in frequency scale calibration. In the longer term, we are developing an atomic beam experiment using this same 1283 nm laser to search for a long-range T-odd, but P-even interaction in thallium.

  12. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Olynick, D.L.; Cord, B.; Schipotinin, A.; Ogletree, D.F.; Schuck, P.J.

    2009-11-13

    Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) is used as a high-resolution resist with resolution down below 10nm half-pitch. This material or materials with related functionalities could have widespread impact in nanolithography and nanoscience applications if the exposure mechanism was understood and instabilities controlled. Here we have directly investigated the exposure mechanism using vibrational spectroscopy (both Raman and Fourier transform Infrared) and electron beam desorption spectrocscopy (EBDS). In the non-networked HSQ system, silicon atoms sit at the corners of a cubic structure. Each silicon is bonded to a hydrogen atom and bridges 3 oxygen atoms (formula: HSiO3/2). For the first time, we have shown, via changes in the Si-H2 peak at ~;;2200 cm -1 in the Raman spectra and the release of SiHx products in EBID, that electron-bam exposed materials crosslinks via a redistribution reaction. In addition, we observe the release of significantly more H2 than SiH2 during EBID, which is indicative of additional reaction mechanisms. Additionally, we compare the behavior of HSQ in response to both thermal and electron-beam induced reactions.

  13. Rapid analysis of the chemical composition of agricultural fibers using near infrared spectroscopy and pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry

    Treesearch

    Stephen S. Kelley; Roger M. Rowell; Mark Davis; Cheryl K. Jurich; Rebecca Ibach

    2004-01-01

    The chemical composition of a variety of agricultural biomass samples was analyzed with near infrared spectroscopy and pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectroscopy. These samples were selected from a wide array of agricultural residue samples and included residues that had been subjected to a variety of di2erent treatments including solvent extractions and chemical...

  14. Theoretical analysis of off beam quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongming; Liu, Kun; Sun, Shanwen; Zhang, Weijun; Gao, Xiaoming

    2012-11-01

    Off beam quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (OB-QEPAS) sensors are based on a recently developed approach to off-beam photoacoustic (PA) detection which employs a quartz tuning fork (QTF) as an acoustic transducer. A microresonator (mR) with a side slit in the middle is used to enhance PA signal. This paper describes a theoretical model of an OB-QEPAS-based sensor. By deriving the acoustic impedances of the mR at two ends and the side slit in the middle in the model, we obtain a formula for numerically calculating the optimal mRs' parameters of OB-QEPAS-based sensor. We use the model to calculate the optimal mRs' lengths with respect to the resonant frequency of the QTF, acoustic velocities inside mRs, inner diameters of mRs, and acoustic conductivities of the mRs' side slits, and found out that the calculated results closely match experimental data. We also investigated the relationship between the mR selected in "on beam" QEPAS, OB-QEPAS, and an acoustic resonator (AR) excited in its first longitudinal mode used in conventional photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS).

  15. Synthetic diagnostic for the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic using a full optical integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausammann, L.; Churchill, R. M.; Shi, L.

    2017-02-01

    The beam emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic is used to measure fluctuations of electron density in the edge and core of fusion plasmas, and is a key in understanding turbulence in a plasma reactor. A synthetic BES diagnostic for the turbulence simulation code XGC1 has been developed using a realistic neutral beam model and an optical system easily adaptable to different kinds of tokamaks. The beam is modeled using multiple beam energy components, each one with a fraction of the total energy and their own mass and energy (mono-energetic components). The optical system consists of a lens focusing a bundle of optical fibers and resulting in a 2D measurement. The synthetic diagnostic gives similar correlation functions and behaviour of the turbulences than the usual methods that do not take into account the full 3D optical effects. The results, based on a simulation of XGC1, contain an analysis of the correlation (in space and time), a comparison of different approximations possible and their importance in accurately modeling the BES diagnostic.

  16. TRACING ELECTRON BEAMS IN THE SUN'S CORONA WITH RADIO DYNAMIC IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bin; Bastian, T. S.; White, S. M.; Gary, D. E.; Perley, R.; Rupen, M.; Carlson, B.

    2013-01-20

    We report observations of type III radio bursts at decimeter wavelengths (type IIIdm bursts)-signatures of suprathermal electron beams propagating in the low corona-using the new technique of radio dynamic imaging spectroscopy provided by the recently upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. For the first time, type IIIdm bursts were imaged with high time and frequency resolution over a broad frequency band, allowing electron beam trajectories in the corona to be deduced. Together with simultaneous hard X-ray and extreme ultraviolet observations, we show that these beams emanate from an energy release site located in the low corona at a height below {approx}15 Mm, and propagate along a bundle of discrete magnetic loops upward into the corona. Our observations enable direct measurements of the plasma density along the magnetic loops, and allow us to constrain the diameter of these loops to be less than 100 km. These overdense and ultra-thin loops reveal the fundamentally fibrous structure of the Sun's corona. The impulsive nature of the electron beams, their accessibility to different magnetic field lines, and the detailed structure of the magnetic release site revealed by the radio observations indicate that the localized energy release is highly fragmentary in time and space, supporting a bursty reconnection model that involves secondary magnetic structures for magnetic energy release and particle acceleration.

  17. Three-dimensional modeling of beam emission spectroscopy measurements in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guszejnov, D.; Pokol, G. I.; Pusztai, I.; Refy, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Nam, Y. U.

    2012-11-15

    One of the main diagnostic tools for measuring electron density profiles and the characteristics of long wavelength turbulent wave structures in fusion plasmas is beam emission spectroscopy (BES). The increasing number of BES systems necessitated an accurate and comprehensive simulation of BES diagnostics, which in turn motivated the development of the Rate Equations for Neutral Alkali-beam TEchnique (RENATE) simulation code that is the topic of this paper. RENATE is a modular, fully three-dimensional code incorporating all key features of BES systems from the atomic physics to the observation, including an advanced modeling of the optics. Thus RENATE can be used both in the interpretation of measured signals and the development of new BES systems. The most important components of the code have been successfully benchmarked against other simulation codes. The primary results have been validated against experimental data from the KSTAR tokamak.

  18. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of organic materials irradiated with gas cluster ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagiri, Motohiro; Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2011-01-07

    Irradiation effect of gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) on organic materials were studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy by comparison to that with Ar-monomer ions. In the case of polyimide, the intensity of both N-C = O and -C-O- bond decreased with 500 eV Ar monomer ion irradiation. On the other hand, there was no significant change in the XPS spectra after Ar-GCIB irradiation. From the size-selected GCIB irradiation study, the damages in polyimide decreased with increasing the cluster size owing to the reduction of energy per atoms.

  19. In-Beam Gamma-ray Spectroscopy in the sdpf 37Ar Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, M. A. G.; Medina, N. H.; Seale, W. A.; Ribas, R. V.; de Oliveira, J. R. B.; Zilio, S.; Lenzi, S. M.; Napoli, D. R.; Marginean, N.; Vedova, F. Della; Farnea, E.; Ionescu-Bujor, M.; Iordachescu, A.

    2007-10-01

    The nucleus 37Ar has been studied with γ-ray spectroscopy in the 24Mg(16O,2pn) reaction at a beam energy of 70 MeV. Twenty two new excited states up to an excitation energy of 13 MeV have been observed. We compare the first negative and positive parity yrast states with large-scale-shell-model calculations using the Antoine code and the SDPF interaction, considering the excitation of the 1d5/2,2s1/2 and 1d3/2 nucleons to 1f7/2 and 2p3/2 in the sdpf valence space.

  20. Precessed electron beam electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene: Beyond channelling effects

    SciTech Connect

    Yedra, Ll.; Estradé, S.; Torruella, P.; Eljarrat, A.; Peiró, F.; Darbal, A. D.; Weiss, J. K.

    2014-08-04

    The effects of beam precession on the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) signal of the carbon K edge in a 2 monolayer graphene sheet are studied. In a previous work, we demonstrated the use of precession to compensate for the channeling-induced reduction of EELS signal when in zone axis. In the case of graphene, no enhancement of EELS signal is found in the usual experimental conditions, as graphene is not thick enough to present channeling effects. Interestingly, though it is found that precession makes it possible to increase the collection angle, and, thus, the overall signal, without a loss of signal-to-background ratio.

  1. Real-time reflectance-difference spectroscopy of GaAs molecular beam epitaxy homoepitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lastras-Martínez, A. E-mail: alastras@gmail.com; Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Guevara-Macías, L. E.; Nuñez-Olvera, O.; Balderas-Navarro, R. E.; Lastras-Martínez, L. F.; Lastras-Montaño, L. A.; Lastras-Montaño, M. A.

    2014-03-01

    We report on real time-resolved Reflectance-difference (RD) spectroscopy of GaAs(001) grown by molecular beam epitaxy, with a time-resolution of 500 ms per spectrum within the 2.3–4.0 eV photon energy range. Through the analysis of transient RD spectra we demonstrated that RD line shapes are comprised of two components with different physical origins and determined their evolution during growth. Such components were ascribed to the subsurface strain induced by surface reconstruction and to surface stoichiometry. Results reported in this paper render RD spectroscopy as a powerful tool for the study of fundamental processes during the epitaxial growth of zincblende semiconductors.

  2. Femtosecond electron spectroscopy in an electron microscope with high brightness beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Faran; Williams, Joseph; Ruan, Chong-Yu

    2017-09-01

    A concept of performing femtosecond electron spectroscopy in an electron microscope with adaptive optics to handle space-charge-dominated beams is presented. Improved temporal-spectral resolutions are obtained through a combination of time and energy compression optics to disentangle the spectral information buried in temporally compressed pulses. A combined ∼1 eV-sub-ps performance with 105 electrons in single pulses, and femtosecond core-level spectroscopy at single-shots with higher doses are demonstrated. This strategy provides several orders of magnitude improvement in sensitivity compared to the state-of-the-art ultrafast electron microscopes, representing a flexible solution for studying electronic and chemical dynamics in complex systems overcoming the collective space-charge limitations.

  3. In-beam measurement of the hydrogen hyperfine splitting and prospects for antihydrogen spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diermaier, M.; Jepsen, C. B.; Kolbinger, B.; Malbrunot, C.; Massiczek, O.; Sauerzopf, C.; Simon, M. C.; Zmeskal, J.; Widmann, E.

    2017-06-01

    Antihydrogen, the lightest atom consisting purely of antimatter, is an ideal laboratory to study the CPT symmetry by comparison with hydrogen. With respect to absolute precision, transitions within the ground-state hyperfine structure (GS-HFS) are most appealing by virtue of their small energy separation. ASACUSA proposed employing a beam of cold antihydrogen atoms in a Rabi-type experiment, to determine the GS-HFS in a field-free region. Here we present a measurement of the zero-field hydrogen GS-HFS using the spectroscopy apparatus of ASACUSA's antihydrogen experiment. The measured value of νHF=1,420,405,748.4(3.4) (1.6) Hz with a relative precision of 2.7 × 10-9 constitutes the most precise determination of this quantity in a beam and verifies the developed spectroscopy methods for the antihydrogen HFS experiment to the p.p.b. level. Together with the recently presented observation of antihydrogen atoms 2.7 m downstream of the production region, the prerequisites for a measurement with antihydrogen are now available within the ASACUSA collaboration.

  4. Multiple track Doppler-shift spectroscopy system for TFTR neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Kugel, H.W.; Reale, M.A.; Hayes, S.L.; Johnson, G.A.; Lowrance, J.L.; Shah, P.A.; Sichta, P.; Sleaford, B.W.; Williams, M.D.; Zucchino, P.M.

    1986-09-01

    A Doppler-shift spectroscopy system has been installed on the TFTR neutral beam injection system to measure species composition during both conditioning and injection pulses. Two intensified vidicon detectors and two spectrometers are utilized in a system capable of resolving data from up to twelve ion sources simultaneously. By imaging the light from six ion sources onto one detector, a cost-effective system has been achieved. Fiber optics are used to locate the diagnostic in an area remote from the hazards of the tokamak test cell allowing continuous access, and eliminating the need for radiation shielding of electronic components. Automatic hardware arming and interactive data analysis allow beam composition to be computed between tokamak shots for use in analyzing plasma heating experiments. Measurements have been made using lines of sight into both the neutralizer and the drift duct. Analysis of the data from the drift duct is both simpler and more accurate since only neutral particles are present in the beam at this location. Comparison of the data taken at these two locations reveals the presence of partially accelerated particles possessing an estimated 1/e half-angle divergence of 15/sup 0/ and accounting for up to 30% of the extracted power.

  5. Characterization of ion beam modified ceramic wear surfaces using Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, W.; Lankford, J.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of the surface chemistry and morphology of the wear surfaces of ceramic material surfaces modified by ion beam mixing has been conducted using Auger electron spectroscopy and secondary electron microscopy. Studies have been conducted on ceramic/ceramic friction and wear couples made up of TiC and NiMo-bonded TiC cermet pins run against Si3N4 and partially stabilized zirconia disc surfaces modified by the ion beam mixing of titanium and nickel, as well as ummodified ceramic/ceramic couples in order to determine the types of surface changes leading to the improved friction and wear behavior of the surface modified ceramics in simulated diesel environments. The results of the surface analyses indicate that the formation of a lubricating oxide layer of titanium and nickel, is responsible for the improvement in ceramic friction and wear behavior. The beneficial effect of this oxide layer depends on several factors, including the adherence of the surface modified layer or subsequently formed oxide layer to the disc substrate, the substrate materials, the conditions of ion beam mixing, and the environmental conditions.

  6. Characterization of ion beam modified ceramic wear surfaces using Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, W.; Lankford, J.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of the surface chemistry and morphology of the wear surfaces of ceramic material surfaces modified by ion beam mixing has been conducted using Auger electron spectroscopy and secondary electron microscopy. Studies have been conducted on ceramic/ceramic friction and wear couples made up of TiC and NiMo-bonded TiC cermet pins run against Si3N4 and partially stabilized zirconia disc surfaces modified by the ion beam mixing of titanium and nickel, as well as ummodified ceramic/ceramic couples in order to determine the types of surface changes leading to the improved friction and wear behavior of the surface modified ceramics in simulated diesel environments. The results of the surface analyses indicate that the formation of a lubricating oxide layer of titanium and nickel, is responsible for the improvement in ceramic friction and wear behavior. The beneficial effect of this oxide layer depends on several factors, including the adherence of the surface modified layer or subsequently formed oxide layer to the disc substrate, the substrate materials, the conditions of ion beam mixing, and the environmental conditions.

  7. Active control of flexural vibrations in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Rocha, Rodney

    1989-01-01

    An analytical model of the feedback control system which estimates the voltage generated by the piezoelectric sensor as a function of the dynamic stress at the sensor location and the force exerted by the driver piezoelectric as a function of signal gain is developed. The analytical results are compared to measured results for a cantilever beam excited to vibrate in its first natural mode. The estimated increase in the first mode damping factor is in good agreement with the measured results.

  8. Deep level transient spectroscopy study of electron traps in n-type GaAs after pulsed electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Marrakchi, G.; Barbier, D.; Guillot, G.; Nouailhat, A.

    1987-10-01

    Electrical and deep level transient spectroscopy measurements on Schottky barriers were performed in order to characterize electrically active defects in n-type GaAs (Bridgman substrates or liquid-phase epitaxial layers) after pulsed electron beam annealing. Both surface damage and bulk defects were observed in the Bridgman substrates depending on the pulse energy density. No electron traps were detected in the liquid-phase epitaxial layers before and after annealing for an energy density of 0.4 J/cm/sup 2/. The existence of an interfacial insulating layer at the metal-semiconductor interface, associated with As out-diffusion during the pulsed electron irradiation, was revealed by the abnormally high values of the Schottky barrier diffusion potential. Moreover, two new electron traps with activation energy of 0.35 and 0.43 eV, called EP1 and EP2, were introduced in the Bridgman substrates after pulsed electron beam annealing. The presence of these traps, related to the As evaporation, was tentatively attributed to the decrease of the EL2 electron trap signal after 0.4-J/cm/sup 2/ annealing. It is proposed that these new defects states are due to the decomposition of the As/sub Ga/-As/sub i/ complex recently considered as the most probable defect configuration for the dominant EL2 electron trap usually detected in as-grown GaAs substrates.

  9. Note: Diagnostic deuterium beam with an ultra-small energy spread for plasma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savkin, V. Ya.; Lizunov, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    The DINA-5M diagnostic atomic beam has been upgraded to reduce the energy spread down to 50 eV. An active voltage stabilization system introduces a chain of varistors connected in series that can be switched with the time constant of 70 μs to minimize the deviation from the reference to the high-voltage level. Using deuterium, the enhanced diagnostic beam has the current of four atomic amperes and the energy of 50 keV ± 50 eV. The primary considered application is a motional Stark effect diagnostic combined with laser-induced fluorescence, where the beam energy spread is an ultimate parameter determining the measurement performance.

  10. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  11. Active control of buckling of flexible beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Tampe, L.

    1989-01-01

    Mathematical models are presented that simulate the dynamic characteristics of shape memory alloy actuators made of nickel-titanium alloy (Nitinol) controlling the buckling of compressive structural members. A closed-loop computer-controlled system has been designed, based on the proposed mathematical models, and has been implemented to control the buckling of simple beams. The performance of the computer-controlled system is evaluated experimentally and compared with the theoretical predictions to validate the developed models. The results emphasized the importance of buckling control and suggest the potential of shape memory alloy actuators as attractive means for controlling structural deformation in a simple and reliable way.

  12. Kinetic modeling of active plasma resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberrath, Jens

    2016-09-01

    The term ``active plasma resonance spectroscopy'' (APRS) refers to a plasma diagnostic method which employs the natural ability of plasmas to resonate close to the plasma frequency. Essential for this method is an appropriate model to determine the relation between the resonance parameters and demanded plasma parameters. Measurements with these probes in plasmas of a few Pa typically show a broadening of the spectrum that cannot be predicted by a fluid model. Thus, a kinetic model is necessary. A general kinetic model of APRS probes, which can be described in electorstatic approximation, valid for all pressures has been presented. This model is used to analyze the dynamic behavior of such probes by means of functional analytic methods. One of the main results is, that the system response function Y (ω) is given in terms of the matrix elements of the resolvent of the dynamic operator evaluated for values on the imaginary axis. The spectrum of this operator is continuous which implies a new phenomenon related to anomalous or non-collisional dissipation. Based on the scalar product, which is motivated by the kinetic free energy, the non-collisional damping can be interpreted: In a periodic state, the probe constantly emits plasma waves which propagate to ``infinity''. The free energy simply leaves the ``observation range'' of the probe which is recorded as damping. The kinetic damping, which depends on the mean kinetic energy of the electrons, is responsible for the broadening of a resonance peak in the measured spectrum of APRS probes. The ultimate goal is to determine explicit formulas for the relation between the broadening of the resonance peak and the ``equivalent electron temperature'', especially in the case of the spherical Impedance Probe and the Multipole Resonance Probe. Gratitude is expressed to the internal funding of Leuphana University, the BMBF via PluTO+, the DFG via Collaborative Research Center TR 87, and the Ruhr University Research School.

  13. Active control of flexural vibrations in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using piezoelectric actuators to control the flexural oscillations of large structures in space is investigated. Flexural oscillations are excited by impulsive loads. The vibratory response can degrade the pointing accuracy of cameras and antennae, and can cause high stresses at structural node points. Piezoelectric actuators have the advantage of exerting localized bending moments. In this way, vibration is controlled without exciting rigid body modes. The actuators are used in collocated sensor/driver pairs to form a feedback control system. The sensor produces a voltage that is proportional to the dynamic stress at the sensor location, and the driver produces a force that is proportional to the voltage applied to it. The analog control system amplifies and phase shifts the sensor signal to produce the voltage signal that is applied to the driver. The feedback control is demonstrated to increase the first mode damping in a cantilever beam by up to 100 percent, depending on the amplifier gain. The damping efficiency of the control system when the piezoelectrics are not optimally positioned at points of high stress in the beam is evaluated.

  14. Electron beam injection during active experiments. I - Electromagnetic wave emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The wave emissions produced in Echo 7 experiment by active injections of electron beams were investigated to determine the properties of the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields for both the field-aligned and cross-field injection in such experiments and to evaluate the sources of free energy and relative efficiencies for the generation of the VLF and HF emissions. It is shown that, for typical beam energies in active experiments, electromagnetic effects do not substantially change the bulk properties of the beam, spacecraft charging, and plasma particle acceleration. Through simulations, beam-generated whistlers; fundamental z-mode and harmonic x-mode radiation; and electrostatic electron-cyclotron, upper-hybrid, Langmuir, and lower-hybrid waves were identified. The characteristics of the observed wave spectra were found to be sensitive to both the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the cyclotron frequency and the angle of injection relative to the magnetic field.

  15. Electron beam injection during active experiments. I - Electromagnetic wave emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The wave emissions produced in Echo 7 experiment by active injections of electron beams were investigated to determine the properties of the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields for both the field-aligned and cross-field injection in such experiments and to evaluate the sources of free energy and relative efficiencies for the generation of the VLF and HF emissions. It is shown that, for typical beam energies in active experiments, electromagnetic effects do not substantially change the bulk properties of the beam, spacecraft charging, and plasma particle acceleration. Through simulations, beam-generated whistlers; fundamental z-mode and harmonic x-mode radiation; and electrostatic electron-cyclotron, upper-hybrid, Langmuir, and lower-hybrid waves were identified. The characteristics of the observed wave spectra were found to be sensitive to both the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the cyclotron frequency and the angle of injection relative to the magnetic field.

  16. Determining Linac Beam Energy from C-11/O-15 Activity Ratios in Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardman, Ryan; Shepherd, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    A method for precisely measuring the beam energy of 20-25 MeV electron linear accelerator was developed. Polyoxymethylene (Delrin) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (acrylic) samples were irradiated with an electron linac at several energy settings of the accelerator simultaneously producing C-11 and O-15 via photonuclear reactions within each of the polymers. Using gamma-ray spectroscopy the activity ratios of C-11/O-15 were measured by analyzing the decay of activity vs. time. The C-11/O-15 ratio exhibits an energy dependence due to differences in the production cross section vs. energy. The observed dependence can be matched to predictions of the activity ratio vs. energy, developed from GEANT4 Monte Carlo models of an electromagnetic shower and knowledge of the cross sections, in order to determine the energy of the beam at a sub-MeV level of precision. National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates.

  17. Application of activity pencil beam algorithm using measured distribution data of positron emitter nuclei for therapeutic SOBP proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Aya; Nishio, Teiji

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Recently, much research on imaging the clinical proton-irradiated volume using positron emitter nuclei based on target nuclear fragment reaction has been carried out. The purpose of this study is to develop an activity pencil beam (APB) algorithm for a simulation system for proton-activated positron-emitting imaging in clinical proton therapy using spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) beams.Methods: The target nuclei of activity distribution calculations are {sup 12}C nuclei, {sup 16}O nuclei, and {sup 40}Ca nuclei, which are the main elements in a human body. Depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were obtained from the material information of ridge filter (RF) and depth activity distributions of compounds of the three target nuclei measured by BOLPs-RGp (beam ON-LINE PET system mounted on a rotating gantry port) with mono-energetic Bragg peak (MONO) beam irradiations. The calculated data of depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were sorted in terms of kind of nucleus, energy of proton beam, SOBP width, and thickness of fine degrader (FD), which were verified. The calculated depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were compared with the measured ones. APB kernels were made from the calculated depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations to construct a simulation system using the APB algorithm for SOBP beams.Results: The depth activity distributions were prepared using the material information of RF and the measured depth activity distributions with MONO beam irradiations for clinical therapy using SOBP beams. With the SOBP width widening, the distal fall-offs of depth activity distributions and the difference from the depth dose distributions were large. The shapes of the calculated depth activity distributions nearly agreed with those of the measured ones upon comparison between the two. The APB kernels of SOBP beams were prepared by making use of the data on depth activity distributions with SOBP

  18. Antimicrobial Activity and Stability of Electron Beam Irradiated Dental Irrigants

    PubMed Central

    Geethashri, A; Palaksha, K.J.; Sridhar, K. R.; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The electron beam (e-beam) radiation is considered as an effective means of sterilization of healthcare products as well as to induce the structural changes in the pharmaceutical agents/drug molecules. In addition to structural changes of pharmaceutical it also induces the formation of low molecular weight compounds with altered microbiological, physicochemical and toxicological properties. Among the several known medicaments, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) are used as irrigants in dentistry to kill the pathogenic microorganisms like Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans inhabiting the oral cavity. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and stability of e-beam irradiated dental irrigants, NaOCl and CHX. Materials and Methods: Two dental irrigants NaOCl (1.25% and 2.5%) and CHX (1% and 2%) were exposed to various doses of e-beam radiation. The antimicrobial activities of e-beam irradiated irrigants were compared with the non-irradiated (control) irrigants against E. faecalis, S. aureus, S. mutans and C. albicans by disc diffusion method. Following the storage, physico-chemical properties of the irrigants were recorded and the cytotoxic effect was evaluated on human gingival fibroblast cells. Result: The irrigants, 1.25% NaOCl and 1% CHX showed significantly increased antimicrobial activity against both E. faecalis, (16+0.0) and S. aureus (25+0.0) after irradiation with 1 kGy e-beam. Whereas, 2.5% NaOCl and 2% CHX showed slightly increased antimicrobial activity only against S. aureus (28+0.0). The significant difference was noticed in the antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity of irradiated and non-irradiated irrigants following the storage for 180 d at 40C. Conclusion: The e-beam irradiation increased the antimicrobial activity of irrigants without altering the biocompatibility. PMID:25584220

  19. Development of beam emission spectroscopy for turbulence transport study in Heliotron J

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Ohshima, S.; Matsuda, H.; Lu, X. X.; Kokubu, D.; Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Yoshinuma, M.; Kado, S.; Oishi, T.; Nagasaki, K.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Ishizawa, A.; Kenmochi, N.; Otani, Y.; Konoshima, S.; Mizuuchi, T.

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes the development study of the beam emission spectroscopy (BES) for the turbulent transport study in Heliotron J. Modification of the sightlines (10 × 4 for edge and 10 × 2 for edge) enables us to obtain 2-dimensional BES imaging. The cooling effect on the reduction in the electrical noise of avalanche photodiode (APD) assembly has been investigated using a refrigerant cooling system. When the temperature of the APD element has set to be -20 °C, the electrical noise can be reduced more than 50%. The measurement error of the phase difference in the case of low signal level has been tested by two light-emitting diode lamps. The APD cooling has an effect to improve the measurement error at the low signal level of APD.

  20. Comparison endpoint study of process plasma and secondary electron beam exciter optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan Thamban, P. L.; Yun, Stuart; Padron-Wells, Gabriel; Hosch, Jimmy W.; Goeckner, Matthew J.

    2012-11-15

    Traditionally process plasmas are often studied and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. Here, the authors compare experimental measurements from a secondary electron beam excitation and direct process plasma excitation to discuss and illustrate its distinctiveness in the study of process plasmas. They present results that show excitations of etch process effluents in a SF{sub 6} discharge and endpoint detection capabilities in dark plasma process conditions. In SF{sub 6} discharges, a band around 300 nm, not visible in process emission, is observed and it can serve as a good indicator of etch product emission during polysilicon etches. Based on prior work reported in literature the authors believe this band is due to SiF{sub 4} gas phase species.

  1. Communication: Global minimum search of Ag{sub 10}{sup +} with molecular beam optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shayeghi, A. Schäfer, R.; Johnston, R. L.

    2014-11-14

    The present study is focused on the optical properties of the Ag{sub 10}{sup +} cluster in the photon energy range ℏω = 1.9–4.4 eV. Absorption spectra are recorded by longitudinal molecular beam depletion spectroscopy and compared to optical response calculations using time-dependent density functional theory. Several cluster isomers obtained by the new pool-based parallel implementation of the Birmingham Cluster Genetic Algorithm, coupled with density functional theory, are used in excited state calculations. The experimental observations, together with additional simulations of ion mobilities for the several geometries found within this work using different models, clearly identify the ground state isomer of Ag{sub 10}{sup +} to be composed of two orthogonal interpenetrating pentagonal bipyramids, having overall D{sub 2d} symmetry.

  2. Development of beam emission spectroscopy for turbulence transport study in Heliotron J

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, S. Ohshima, S.; Kado, S.; Nagasaki, K.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Konoshima, S.; Mizuuchi, T.; Matsuda, H.; Lu, X. X.; Kokubu, D.; Nakamura, Y.; Ishizawa, A.; Otani, Y.; Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Yoshinuma, M.; Oishi, T.; Kenmochi, N.

    2016-11-15

    This paper describes the development study of the beam emission spectroscopy (BES) for the turbulent transport study in Heliotron J. Modification of the sightlines (10 × 4 for edge and 10 × 2 for edge) enables us to obtain 2-dimensional BES imaging. The cooling effect on the reduction in the electrical noise of avalanche photodiode (APD) assembly has been investigated using a refrigerant cooling system. When the temperature of the APD element has set to be −20 °C, the electrical noise can be reduced more than 50%. The measurement error of the phase difference in the case of low signal level has been tested by two light-emitting diode lamps. The APD cooling has an effect to improve the measurement error at the low signal level of APD.

  3. Analysis of edge density fluctuation measured by trial KSTAR beam emission spectroscopy system

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Y. U.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Kovacsik, A.

    2012-10-15

    A beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system based on direct imaging avalanche photodiode (APD) camera has been designed for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) and a trial system has been constructed and installed for evaluating feasibility of the design. The system contains two cameras, one is an APD camera for BES measurement and another is a fast visible camera for position calibration. Two pneumatically actuated mirrors were positioned at front and rear of lens optics. The front mirror can switch the measurement between edge and core region of plasma and the rear mirror can switch between the APD and the visible camera. All systems worked properly and the measured photon flux was reasonable as expected from the simulation. While the measurement data from the trial system were limited, it revealed some interesting characteristics of KSTAR plasma suggesting future research works with fully installed BES system. The analysis result and the development plan will be presented in this paper.

  4. Dual beam photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy of solids using an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghany, M.; Michaelian, K. H.

    2012-06-01

    Quantum cascade laser-based instrumentation for dual beam photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy is described in this article. Experimental equipment includes a 4.55 μm (2141-2265 cm-1) continuous wave external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL), two gas-microphone PA cells, and two lock-in amplifiers. Correction for the time and wavenumber dependence of the laser output is effected through real-time division of the PA signals derived from the sample and reference channels. Source-compensated mid-infrared absorption spectra of carbon black powder and aromatic hydrocarbon solids were obtained to confirm the reliability of the method. Absorption maxima in the EC-QCL PA spectra of hydrocarbons are better defined than those in Fourier transform infrared spectra acquired under similar conditions, enabling the detection of several previously unknown bands.

  5. A trap-based pulsed positron beam optimised for positronium laser spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B. S. Alonso, A. M.; Deller, A.; Wall, T. E.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2015-10-15

    We describe a pulsed positron beam that is optimised for positronium (Ps) laser-spectroscopy experiments. The system is based on a two-stage Surko-type buffer gas trap that produces 4 ns wide pulses containing up to 5 × 10{sup 5} positrons at a rate of 0.5-10 Hz. By implanting positrons from the trap into a suitable target material, a dilute positronium gas with an initial density of the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup −3} is created in vacuum. This is then probed with pulsed (ns) laser systems, where various Ps-laser interactions have been observed via changes in Ps annihilation rates using a fast gamma ray detector. We demonstrate the capabilities of the apparatus and detection methodology via the observation of Rydberg positronium atoms with principal quantum numbers ranging from 11 to 22 and the Stark broadening of the n = 2 → 11 transition in electric fields.

  6. Diagnostic performance of the beam emission spectroscopy system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. R.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Thompson, D. S.

    2012-10-15

    The beam emission spectroscopy system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment measures localized density fluctuations on the ion gyroscale. Optical sightlines provide core to edge radial coverage, and the sightlines are aligned to typical pitch angles to maximize cross-field spatial resolution. Sightline images are 2-3 cm, and point spread function calculations indicate image distortion from pitch angle misalignment and atomic state finite lifetimes is minor with a 15% increase in the image size. New generation photodetectors achieve photon noise limited measurements at frequencies up to 400 kHz with refrigerant cooling at -20 Degree-Sign C. Measurements near the pedestal show broadband turbulence up to 100 kHz, and poloidal correlation lengths are about 10 cm. Plasma turbulence signals can be 2-3 orders of magnitude above photon noise and amplifier thermal noise.

  7. Raman spectroscopy of individual monocytes reveals that single-beam optical trapping of mononuclear cells occurs by their nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Fore, Samantha; Chan, James; Taylor, Douglas; Huser, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We show that laser-tweezers Raman spectroscopy of eukaryotic cells with a significantly larger diameter than the tight focus of a single beam laser trap leads to optical trapping of the cell by its optically densest part, i.e. typically the cell’s nucleus. Raman spectra of individual optically trapped monocytes are compared with location-specific Raman spectra of monocytes adhered to a substrate. When the cell’s nucleus is stained with a fluorescent live cell stain, the Raman spectrum of the DNA-specific stain is observed only in the nucleus of individual monocytes. Optically trapped monocytes display the same behavior. We also show that the Raman spectra of individual monocytes exhibit the characteristic Raman signature of cells that have not yet fully differentiated and that individual primary monocytes can be distinguished from transformed monocytes based on their Raman spectra. This work provides further evidence that laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy of individual cells provides meaningful biochemical information in an entirely nondestructive fashion that permits discerning differences between cell types and cellular activity. PMID:21984959

  8. Vibration control of flexible beams using an active hinge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cudney, H. H., Jr.; Inman, D. J.; Horner, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    The use of an active hinge to attenuate the transverse vibrations of a flexible beam is examined. A slender aluminum beam is suspended vertically, cantilevered at the top. An active hinge is placed at the node of the second vibration mode. The active hinge consists of a torque motor, strain gauge, and tachometer. A control law is implemented using both beam-bending strain and the relative angular velocity measured at this hinge, thereby configuring the hinge to act as an active damper. Results from implementing this control law show little improvement in the first mode damping ratio, 130 percent increase in the second mode damping ratio, and 180 percent increase in the third mode damping ratio. The merits of using a motor with a gearbox are discussed.

  9. The applications of in situ electron energy loss spectroscopy to the study of electron beam nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiahn J; Howitt, David G; Gierhart, Brian C; Smith, Rosemary L; Collins, Scott D

    2009-06-01

    An in situ electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) technique has been developed to investigate the dynamic processes associated with electron-beam nanofabrication on thin membranes. In this article, practical applications germane to e-beam nanofabrication are illustrated with a case study of the drilling of nanometer-sized pores in silicon nitride membranes. This technique involves successive acquisitions of the plasmon-loss and the core-level ionization-loss spectra in real time, both of which provide the information regarding the hole-drilling kinetics, including two respective rates for total mass loss, individual nitrogen and silicon element depletion, and the change of the atomic bonding environment. In addition, the in situ EELS also provides an alternative method for endpoint detection with a potentially higher time resolution than by imaging. On the basis of the time evolution of in situ EELS spectra, a qualitative working model combining knock-on sputtering, irradiation-induced mass transport, and phase separation can be proposed.

  10. Initial density fluctuation measurements from the NSTX Beam Emission Spectroscopy diagnostic system*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. R.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Schoenbeck, N. L.; Thompson, D.; Uzun-Kaymak, I. U.; Stratton, B. C.

    2010-11-01

    Density fluctuation measurements on the ion gyroscale have been obtained on NSTX with a newly commissioned beam emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic system. The BES system measures red-shifted Dα emission near 660 nm from deuterium neutral beams with high throughput optics and high efficiency detectors. The system presently employs 16 detection channels arranged in radial and poloidal arrays, and an expansion to 32 channels is planned. Radial arrays can measure fluctuations from r/a 0.1 to beyond the last closed flux surface and resolve fluctuations with kρi<=1.5. Initial BES measurements reveal broadband turbulence and coherent modes below 300 kHz for r/a>=0.4. The broadband turbulence appears in high gradient regions and increases at H-L transitions. The frequency characteristics of the coherent modes correlate with Alfvén/energetic particle modes in Mirnov probe measurements, but some coherent modes appear in BES measurements only. *Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract Nos. DE-FG02-89ER53296, DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-SC0001288.

  11. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1997-01-01

    A pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode is described. The goal is to produce a {approximately}10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately}10 ns full width at half-maximum (FWHM), 1.06 {mu}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately}1 {mu}s FWHM dye laser beam tuned to 5890 {Angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the NaI resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated charge-coupled-device camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately}0.1 {Angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5{endash}2 eV. Laser-induced fluorescence from {approximately}1{times}10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} NaI 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately}{plus_minus}0.06 {Angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Concentrated atmospheric nanoparticle beams in vacuum for X-ray and optical spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinen, J.; Khasminskaya, S.; Leisner, T.

    2009-04-01

    The IPCC AR4 points out the important role of aerosol in the radiation budget of the earth. In the model prediction, direct and indirect contribution of the atmospheric aerosol causes a net cooling of the earth. Understanding the fundamental physical and chemical processes of heterogeneous nucleation of water on nanoparticles could help improving the models. On our poster we present the first stage of the TRAPS apparatus (Trapped Reactive Atmospheric Particle Spectrometer). The apparatus comprises as nanoparticle sources atomizers, electrospray and plasma reactors in order to produce nanoparticle sizes from 20-50nm, 10-20nm and 5-10nm respectively. The nanoparticles are dispersed in helium as carrier gas at high pressure. After passing a critical orifice into rough vacuum a tunable aerodynamic lens is used to focus the particles into a differential pumping stage. We put high effort in optimizing the aerodynamic lens for particle beams close to the diffusion limit by CFD calculations. Downstream the differential pumping the particle beam is used to continuously refill a linear ion trap. For the trapping of particles in the size range of several kDa to MDa, a radio frequency from 10-150 kHz is. In contrast to the work of other groups, which are using digital ion traps, we developed an amplifier capable to provide an appropriate sinusoidal voltage with amplitude up to 3kV. This assembly is capable to inject nanoparticles into vacuum chambers in a highly efficient way. The dilution of the particle number concentration arising from the gas expansion from room pressure into vacuum is compensated by concentrating the particles in a small cylindrical volume by electrodynamic trapping. The enlargement of the target density compared to a free molecular beam provides a tool for various techniques of spectroscopy used on smaller ions by routine.

  13. Activation of cells using femtosecond laser beam (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batabyal, Subrata; Satpathy, Sarmishtha; Kim, Young-tae; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2016-03-01

    Study of communication in cellular systems requires precise activation of targeted cell(s) in the network. In contrast to chemical, electrical, thermal, mechanical stimulation, optical stimulation is non-invasive and is better suited for stimulation of targeted cells. As compared to visible lasers, the near infrared (NIR) microsecond/nanosecond pulsed laser beams are being used as preferred stimulation tool as they provide higher penetration depth in tissues. Femotosecond (FS) laser beams in NIR are also being used for direct and indirect (i.e. via two-photon optogenetics) stimulation of cells. Here, we present a comparative evaluation of efficacy of NIR FS laser beam for direct (no optogenetic sensitization) and 2ph optogenetic stimulation of cells. Further, for the first time, we demonstrate the use of blue (~450 nm, obtained by second harmonic generation) FS laser beam for stimulation of cells with and without Channelrhodopisn-2 (ChR2) expression. Comparative analysis of photocurrent generated by blue FS laser beam and continuous wave blue light for optogenetics stimulation of ChR2 transfected HEK cells will be presented. The use of ultrafast laser micro-beam for focal, non-contact, and repeated stimulation of single cells in a cellular circuitry allowed us to study the communication between different cell types.

  14. Carbon Beam Radio-Therapy and Research Activities at HIMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Mitsutaka

    2007-05-01

    Radio-therapy with carbon ion beam has been carried out since 1994 at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) in NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences). Now, many types of tumors can be treated with carbon beam with excellent local controls of the tumors. Stimulated with good clinical results, requirement of the dedicated compact facility for carbon beam radio-therapy is increased. To realize this requirement, design study of the facility and the R&D's of the key components in this design are promoted by NIRS. According successful results of these activities, the dedicated compact facility will be realized in Gunma University. In this facility, the established irradiation method is expected to use, which is passive irradiation method with wobbler magnets and ridge filter. In this presentation, above R&D's will be presented together with clinical results and basic research activities at HIMAC.

  15. Improved spectral data unfolding for radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy of laser-accelerated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Schollmeier, M; Geissel, M; Sefkow, A B; Flippo, K A

    2014-04-01

    An improved method to unfold the space-resolved proton energy distribution function of laser-accelerated proton beams using a layered, radiochromic film (RCF) detector stack has been developed. The method takes into account the reduced RCF response near the Bragg peak due to a high linear energy transfer (LET). This LET dependence of the active RCF layer has been measured, and published data have been re-interpreted to find a nonlinear saturation scaling of the RCF response with stopping power. Accounting for the LET effect increased the integrated particle yield by 25% after data unfolding. An iterative, analytical, space-resolved deconvolution of the RCF response functions from the measured dose was developed that does not rely on fitting. After the particle number unfold, three-dimensional interpolation is performed to determine the spatial proton beam distribution for proton energies in-between the RCF data points. Here, image morphing has been implemented as a novel interpolation method that takes into account the energy-dependent, changing beam topology.

  16. Parameters Optimization of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Experimental Setup for the Case with Beam Expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Zhang, Lei; Fan, Juanjuan; Li, Yufang; Gong, Yao; Dong, Lei; Ma, Weiguang; Yin, Wangbao; Jia, Suotang

    2015-11-01

    Improvement of measurement precision and repeatability is one of the issues currently faced by the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique, which is expected to be capable of precise and accurate quantitative analysis. It was found that there was great potential to improve the signal quality and repeatability by reducing the laser beam divergence angle using a suitable beam expander (BE). In the present work, the influences of several experimental parameters for the case with BE are studied in order to optimize the analytical performances: the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the relative standard deviation (RSD). We demonstrate that by selecting the optimal experimental parameters, the BE-included LIBS setup can give higher SNR and lower RSD values of the line intensity normalized by the whole spectrum area. For validation purposes, support vector machine (SVM) regression combined with principal component analysis (PCA) was used to establish a calibration model to realize the quantitative analysis of the ash content. Good agreement has been found between the laboratory measurement results from the LIBS method and those from the traditional method. The measurement accuracy presented here for ash content analysis is estimated to be 0.31%, while the average relative error is 2.36%. supported by the 973 Program of China (No. 2012CB921603), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61475093, 61127017, 61178009, 61108030, 61378047, 61275213, 61475093, and 61205216), the National Key Technology R&D Program of China (No. 2013BAC14B01), the Shanxi Natural Science Foundation (Nos. 2013021004-1 and 2012021022-1), the Shanxi Scholarship Council of China (Nos. 2013-011 and 2013-01), and the Program for the Outstanding Innovative Teams of Higher Learning Institutions of Shanxi, China

  17. Spectroscopy and photocatalytic activity of tetracene nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hee-Young; Bjorklund, Thomas; Lim, Sang-Hyun; Bardeen, Christopher

    2003-03-01

    Tetracene nanoparticles are synthesized using a reprecipitation technique to form a suspension in wateer. The nanoparticles are plate-like and have a broad size distribution, centered at around 50 nm in diameter as measured using AFM. The optical spectroscopy is similar to what is observed in polycrystalline tetracene films, so the tetracene is not chemically modified even in water. The chemical stability of tetracene nanoparticles in solution is enhanced by roughly one order of magnitude as compared to monomeric tetracene. Under visible illumination, these nanoparticles catalyze the destruction of various organic molecules in water. The reaction does not depend on the presence of oxygen, and the kinetics are consistent with a heterogeneous reaction mechanism where the molecules adsorb onto the surface of the particle and undergo photo-oxidation. The high surface-to-volume ratio of these particles may provide an efficient way to transform absorbed photons into chemically reactive surface states.

  18. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Elastic Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, Richard J.; Fuller, Chris R.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    1993-01-01

    Pairs of colocated piezoelectric transducers, independently controlled by multichannel adaptive controller, employed as actuators and sensors to achieve simultaneous attenuation of both extensional and flexural motion. Single pair used to provide simultaneous control of flexural and extensional waves, or two pairs used to control torsional motion also. Capability due to nature of piezoelectric transducers, when bonded to surfaces of structures and activated by oscillating voltages, generate corresponding oscillating distributions of stresses in structures. Phases and amplitudes of actuator voltages adjusted by controller to impede flow of vibrational energy simultaneously, in waves of various forms, beyond locations of actuators. Concept applies equally to harmonic or random response of structure and to multiple responses of structure to transverse bending, torsion, and compression within structural element. System has potential for many situations in which predominant vibration transmission path through framelike structure.

  19. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Elastic Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, Richard J.; Fuller, Chris R.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    1993-01-01

    Pairs of colocated piezoelectric transducers, independently controlled by multichannel adaptive controller, employed as actuators and sensors to achieve simultaneous attenuation of both extensional and flexural motion. Single pair used to provide simultaneous control of flexural and extensional waves, or two pairs used to control torsional motion also. Capability due to nature of piezoelectric transducers, when bonded to surfaces of structures and activated by oscillating voltages, generate corresponding oscillating distributions of stresses in structures. Phases and amplitudes of actuator voltages adjusted by controller to impede flow of vibrational energy simultaneously, in waves of various forms, beyond locations of actuators. Concept applies equally to harmonic or random response of structure and to multiple responses of structure to transverse bending, torsion, and compression within structural element. System has potential for many situations in which predominant vibration transmission path through framelike structure.

  20. Investigation of VUV/XUV spectroscopy and stimulated radiation of clusters (or exciters) in a noble gas beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Dounan; Lei, Shizhan; Huang, Rongkai; Yu, Guiqiu; Ma, Jinmin

    1992-10-01

    A beam machine with a VUV/XUV monochromator scanned by a stepping motor controlled by a micro-computer has been built during the last 3 years in our lab. The experiment of the spectroscopy radiated from the beam has been started. The spectra of Arn around 105 - 126 nm and Hen around 584 - 601 nm have been found. An improving of the experiment is on going. The second purpose of our experiment is to look for more cluster spectra and to explore the possibility of their lasing, and the third purpose is exploring a method of observing cluster by measuring its radiated spectra.

  1. An atomic beam of 6Li — 7Li for high resolution spectroscopy from matrix isolation sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. N.; Sacramento, R. L.; Silva, B. A.; Uhlmann, F. O.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L.

    2016-07-01

    We propose the Matrix Isolation Sublimation (MlSu) technique for generating cold lithium atoms for the measurement of the 6Li - 7Li isotope shift in D1 and D2 transitions. The technique is capable of generating cold 6Li and 7Li beams at 4 K with forward velocity of 125 m/s. Using this beam we offer a distinguished source of lithium atoms for transitions measurements, adding a new possibility to make high resolution spectroscopy towards improving the experimental checks of the theory.

  2. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-15

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of D{sub α} or H{sub α} lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ∼10{sup 6} s{sup −1} per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of D{sub α} light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  3. Overview of the current spectroscopy effort on the Livermore electron beam ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Lopez-Urrutia, J.C.; Brown, G.

    1995-06-29

    An overview is given of the current spectroscopic effort on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facilities. The effort focuses on four aspects: spectral line position, line intensity, temporal evolution, and line shape. Examples of line position measurements include studies of the K-shell transitions in heliumlike Kr{sup 34+} and the 2s-2p intrashell transitions in lithiumlike Th{sup 87+} and U{sup 89+}, which provide benchmark values for testing the theory of relativistic and quantum electrodynamical contributions in high-Z ions. Examples of line intensity measurements are provided by measurements of the electron-impact excitation and dielectronic recombination cross sections of heliumlike transition-metal ions Ti{sup 20+} through CO{sup 25+}. A discussion of radiative lifetime measurements of metastable levels in heliumlike ions is given to illustrate the time-resolved spectroscopy techniques in the microsecond range. The authors also present a measurement of the spectral lineshape that illustrates the very low ion temperatures that can be achieved in an EBIT.

  4. Simultaneous multielement detection in particle beam/hollow cathode-optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, C. Derrick, Jr.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2009-11-01

    Presented here is the development of a particle beam/hollow cathode-optical emission spectroscopy source that has been interfaced with a high resolution polychromator for use as a species-specific detector for chromatographic separations. Use of the high resolution JY RF-5000 polychromator allows simultaneous, multielement analysis; a necessary requirement for comprehensive speciation analysis. Parametric optimization was performed for the nebulization conditions, desolvation temperature, glow discharge current and pressure, and the source block temperature (vaporization) using nitrate salts containing lead, nickel, and silver. Peak area, height, and width were recorded for optical emission of Pb (I) 220.35 nm, Ni (I) 341.41 nm, and Ag (I) 338.28 nm in order to determine optimal peak characteristics under chromatographic separation conditions. Response curves for a multielement salt solution containing Pb, Ni, and Ag were obtained using the optimized conditions, with detection limits for triplicate injections of 2.2, 0.17, and 0.19 ng, respectively. The ability to monitor multiple elements simultaneously reveals the existence of interelement matrix effects that have not been noted previously in hollow cathode devices. The ability to monitor metals and non-metals is demonstrated towards the future application of this system as a tool for metallomic studies.

  5. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-01

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of Dα or Hα lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ˜106 s-1 per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of Dα light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  6. Strain determination in silicon microstructures by combined convergent beam electron diffraction, process simulation, and micro-Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senez, Vincent; Armigliato, Aldo; De Wolf, Ingrid; Carnevale, Gianpietro; Balboni, Roberto; Frabboni, Stefano; Benedetti, Alessandro

    2003-11-01

    Test structures consisting of shallow trench isolation (STI) structures are fabricated using advanced silicon (Si) technology. Different process parameters and geometrical features are implemented to investigate the residual mechanical stress in the structures. A technology computer aided design homemade tool, IMPACT, is upgraded and optimized to yield strain fields in deep submicron complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices. Residual strain in the silicon substrate is measured with micro-Raman spectroscopy (μ-RS) and/or convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) for large (25 μm) and medium size (2 μm), while only CBED is used for deep submicron STI (0.22 μm). We propose a methodology combining CBED and technology computer aided design (TCAD) with μ-RS to assess the accuracy of the CBED measurements and TCAD calculations on the widest structures. The method is extended to measure (by CBED) and calculate (by TCAD) the strain tensor in the smallest structures, out of the reach of the μ-RS technique. The capability of determining, by both measurement and calculation, the strain field distribution in the active regions of deep submicron devices is demonstrated. In particular, it is found that for these structures an elastoplastic model for Si relaxation must be assumed.

  7. Spatially-Resolved Temperature Diagnostic for Supersonic Flow Using Cross-Beam Doppler-Limited Laser Saturation Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    58 Cross-Beam Inter-Modulated Fluorescence Spectroscopy .................................... 61 B. Spectral Profiles for I2 Ro...intensity of the i th I2 hyperfine spectral line ( )νg spectral profile (in general) ( )νg lineshape normalized to unity at line center, i.e...L C I L CS ν νννα ναν (132) for a single Doppler-broadened transition. B. Spectral Profiles for I2 Ro-vibrational Lines To represent

  8. Compact, accurate description of diagnostic neutral beam propagation and attenuation in a high temperature plasma for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Bespamyatnov, Igor O; Rowan, William L; Granetz, Robert S

    2008-10-01

    Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on Alcator C-Mod relies on the use of the diagnostic neutral beam injector as a source of neutral particles which penetrate deep into the plasma. It employs the emission resulting from the interaction of the beam atoms with fully ionized impurity ions. To interpret the emission from a given point in the plasma as the density of emitting impurity ions, the density of beam atoms must be known. Here, an analysis of beam propagation is described which yields the beam density profile throughout the beam trajectory from the neutral beam injector to the core of the plasma. The analysis includes the effects of beam formation, attenuation in the neutral gas surrounding the plasma, and attenuation in the plasma. In the course of this work, a numerical simulation and an analytical approximation for beam divergence are developed. The description is made sufficiently compact to yield accurate results in a time consistent with between-shot analysis.

  9. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Y.; Droubay, T. C.; Liyu, A. V.; Li, G.; Chambers, S. A.

    2014-04-01

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  10. Revised Landé gJ-factors of some 141Pr II levels using collinear laser ion beam spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werbowy, S.; Windholz, L.

    2017-01-01

    The Zeeman effect of singly ionized praseodymium spectral lines was studied at small magnetic fields up to 334 G, using the high-resolution spectroscopic method of collinear laser-ion-beam spectroscopy (CLIBS), where a collimated fast ion beam is superimposed with a counter propagating laser beam tuned to the desired transition. This nearly Doppler-effect-free technique enables to observe linewidths as low as 100 MHz and thus to record the Zeeman patterns of the hyperfine structure of the investigated spectral lines. From the Zeeman patterns of 21 lines of Pr II lines in the range 570.45-609.038 nm we have re-determined the Landé gJ-factors of 14 levels of the f3 dodd and 16 levels of the f3 p and f2d2even configurations. The obtained experimental Landé factors are compared with available earlier measurements as well as with theoretical calculations.

  11. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Y. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Liyu, A. V.; Droubay, T. C.; Chambers, S. A. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Li, G.

    2014-04-21

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  12. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of trihalide ionic liquids: Comparison to halide-based analogues, anion basicity and beam damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Shuang; Lovelock, Kevin R. J.; Licence, Peter

    2017-07-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to investigate two 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium trihalide ionic liquids, with anions including triiodide and iododibromide. The electronic environment of each element present in ionic liquids studied herein is analysed and compared to their halide-based analogous. The anion basicity is compared based upon the measured N 1s binding energy. The iododibromide ionic liquid is studied as a representative sample to illustrate the beam damage effect. Due to the beam damage, there is a new formed bromine component observed. This effect is calculated and demonstrated for all elements present within the ionic liquid. It suggests that the beam induced decomposition caused a stoichiometric loss of bromine atom and iodine atom.

  13. Using Ambient Ion Beams to Write Nanostructured Patterns for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Anyin; Baird, Zane; Bag, Soumabha; Sarkar, Depanjan; Prabhath, Anupama; Pradeep, Thalappil; Cooks, Robert G.

    2014-11-10

    Electrolytic spray deposition was used to pattern surfaces with 2D metallic nanostructures. Spots that contain silver nanoparticles (AgNP) were created by landing solvated silver ions at desired locations using electrically floated masks to focus the metal ions to an area as little as 20 mm in diameter. The AgNPs formed are unprotected and their aggregates can be used for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The morphology and SERS activity of the NP structures were controlled by the surface coverage of landed silver ions. The NP structures created could be used as substrates onto which SERS samples were deposited or prepared directly on top of predeposited samples of interest. The evenly distributed hot spots in the micron-sized aggregates had an average SERS enhancement factor of 108. The surfaces showed SERS activity when using lasers of different wavelengths (532, 633, and 785 nm) and were stable in air.

  14. Microwave spectroscopy of the active sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurford, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    In studies of solar active regions and bursts, the ability to obtain spatially resolved radio spectra (brightness temperature spectra) opens a whole new range of possibilities for study of the solar corona. For active regions, two-dimensional maps of brightness temperature over a wide range of frequencies allows one to determine temperature, column density, and magnetic field strength over the entire region in a straightforward, unambiguous way. For flares, the time-dependent electron energy distribution, number of accelerated electrons, and magnetic field strength and direction can be found. In practice, obtaining complete radio images at a large number of frequencies is a significant technical challenge, especially while keeping costs down. Our instrument at Owens Valley Radio Observatory provided the starting point for a modest attempt at meeting this goal. We proposed to build three additional, very low-cost 2-m antennas which, when combined with our existing two 27-m dishes, expands the array to 5 elements. This modest increase in number of solar dedicated antennas, from 2 to 5, increases our maximum number of physical baselines from 1 to 10 and allows the instrument to do true imaging of solar microwave sources, both bursts and active regions. Combined with the technique of frequency synthesis, the new array has up to 450 effective baselines, giving imaging capability that approaches that of a sub-arrayed VLA. The prototype antenna design was finalized and the antenna was put into operation in Nov. 1989.

  15. Light on the 3 μm Emission Band from Space with Molecular Beam Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltseva, Elena; Mackie, Cameron J.; Candian, Alessandra; Petrignani, Annemieke; Tielens, Xander; Oomens, Jos; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy; Buma, Wybren Jan

    2016-06-01

    The majority of interstellar objects shows IR emission features also known as unidentified infrared (UIR) emission bands. These UIR bands are attributed to IR emission of highly-excited gaseous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). To understand the physical conditions and chemical evolution of the interstellar environment a precise identification of the emission carriers is desired. The 3 μm UIR feature is represented by a strong band at 3040 cm-1, a plateau from 3150 to 2700 cm-1 and a number of weak features within this plateau. The 3040 cm-1 component is assigned to fundamental CH-stretch vibrations of PAHs, but there still remain many questions on the origin of the other features. In this work we have studied experimentally the 3 μm region of regular, hydrogenated and methylated PAHs (up to 5 rings), combining molecular beam techniques with IR-UV ion dip spectroscopy, and theoretically by density functional theory (DFT) calculations within the harmonic and anharmonic approximation. We find that (a) the 3 μm region of PAHs is dominated by Fermi resonances and thereby cannot be treated within the harmonic approximation; (b) the periphery structure of the molecules strongly affects the shape of the 3 μm band. In particular, the two-component emission interpretation can be explained by the presence of molecules with and without bay-hydrogens; (c) due to strong Fermi resonances of fundamental modes with combination bands regular PAHs can significantly contribute to the 3 μm plateau in the 3150-2950 cm-1, while hydrogenated and methylated species are primarily responsible for features in the 2950-2750 cm-1 region.

  16. Passive and active plasma deceleration for the compact disposal of electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bonatto, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-08-15

    Plasma-based decelerating schemes are investigated as compact alternatives for the disposal of high-energy beams (beam dumps). Analytical solutions for the energy loss of electron beams propagating in passive and active (laser-driven) schemes are derived. These solutions, along with numerical modeling, are used to investigate the evolution of the electron distribution, including energy chirp and total beam energy. In the active beam dump scheme, a laser-driver allows a more homogeneous beam energy extraction and drastically reduces the energy chirp observed in the passive scheme. These concepts could benefit applications requiring overall compactness, such as transportable light sources, or facilities operating at high beam power.

  17. Passive and active plasma deceleration for the compact disposal of electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonatto, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-08-01

    Plasma-based decelerating schemes are investigated as compact alternatives for the disposal of high-energy beams (beam dumps). Analytical solutions for the energy loss of electron beams propagating in passive and active (laser-driven) schemes are derived. These solutions, along with numerical modeling, are used to investigate the evolution of the electron distribution, including energy chirp and total beam energy. In the active beam dump scheme, a laser-driver allows a more homogeneous beam energy extraction and drastically reduces the energy chirp observed in the passive scheme. These concepts could benefit applications requiring overall compactness, such as transportable light sources, or facilities operating at high beam power.

  18. The Young Astrophysicist: A Very Inexpensive Activity to Discuss Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockington, Guilherme; Testoni, Leonardo André; Pietrocola, Maurício

    2015-01-01

    The continuing fascination of young people with celestial bodies leads them to pose challenging questions to their science teachers, such as how was the universe born? How were the stars formed? In this paper we present an extremely inexpensive but highly engaging activity to teach the basics of spectroscopy. Guided by the question "how do…

  19. The Young Astrophysicist: A Very Inexpensive Activity to Discuss Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockington, Guilherme; Testoni, Leonardo André; Pietrocola, Maurício

    2015-01-01

    The continuing fascination of young people with celestial bodies leads them to pose challenging questions to their science teachers, such as how was the universe born? How were the stars formed? In this paper we present an extremely inexpensive but highly engaging activity to teach the basics of spectroscopy. Guided by the question "how do…

  20. Sample exchange by beam scanning with applications to noncollinear pump-probe spectroscopy at kilohertz repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hill, Robert J.; Peters, William K.; Baranov, Dmitry; Cho, Byungmoon; Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Carollo, Alexa R.; Curtis, Anna C.; Jonas, David M.

    2017-06-01

    In laser spectroscopy, high photon flux can perturb the sample away from thermal equilibrium, altering its spectroscopic properties. Here, we describe an optical beam scanning apparatus that minimizes repetitive sample excitation while providing shot-to-shot sample exchange for samples such as cryostats, films, and air-tight cuvettes. In this apparatus, the beam crossing point is moved within the focal plane inside the sample by scanning both tilt angles of a flat mirror. A space-filling spiral scan pattern was designed that efficiently utilizes the sample area and mirror scanning bandwidth. Scanning beams along a spiral path is shown to increase the average number of laser shots that can be sampled before a spot on the sample cell is resampled by the laser to ˜1700 (out of the maximum possible 2500 for the sample area and laser spot size) while ensuring minimal shot-to-shot spatial overlap. Both an all-refractive version and an all-reflective version of the apparatus are demonstrated. The beam scanning apparatus does not measurably alter the time delay (less than the 0.4 fs measurement uncertainty), the laser focal spot size (less than the 2 μ m measurement uncertainty), or the beam overlap (less than the 3.3% measurement uncertainty), leading to pump-probe and autocorrelation signal transients that accurately characterize the equilibrium sample.

  1. Time-resolved thermal lens spectroscopy with a single-pulsed laser excitation beam: an analytical model for dual-beam mode-mismatched experiments.

    PubMed

    Sabaeian, Mohammad; Rezaei, Hamidreza; Ghalambor-Dezfouli, Abdolmohammad

    2017-02-01

    Pulsed laser beam excitations are more commonly used in thermal lens spectroscopy (TLS) than continuous-wave (CW) ones, because CW excitations limit the measurement to linear absorption processes [J. Opt. A5, 256 (2003)]. In this work, we present a new and full analytical model for a single-pulsed laser excitation dual-beam mode-mismatched TLS for low absorption solid-state and liquid samples. Our model has been based on a new solution of time-dependent heat equation for a finite-radius cylindrical sample exposed to a single-pulsed excitation laser beam. For low absorbent samples, unlike previous models, all aberration terms associated in the thermal lens were taken into account in Fresnel integration. Besides, the model provides a full analytical mathematical expression for the temperature rise, normalized signal intensity, and Z-scan photothermal lens signal. The model was confirmed with experimental data of distilled deionized water with excellent agreement. Therefore, the model allows us to extract thermo-optical properties of samples in an analytical and more accurate way.

  2. Krypton and argon isotope analysis by collinear fast beam diode laser spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, Bernhard; Ludin, Andrea; Tschannen, Thomas

    1995-04-01

    Argon and Krypton ions are accelerated and focused through a Cs-vapour charge exchange cell. Neutral atoms in the emerging beam are optically excited from the metastable 1s5 state to the 2pg state by tunable cw diode lasers at 811.5nm. At 10keV beam energy the spectra of Ar and Kr are separated by {approx}0.5nm with counterpropagating beams and by less than 0.1 nm with copropagating beams. The absorption lines of the individual isotopes cover a spectral range of {approx}10GHz for each element. Linewidths of less than 100 MHz were observed.

  3. Photocatalytic activity of nanostructured TiO2 films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Foglia, Flavio; Losco, Tonia; Piseri, Paolo; Milani, Paolo; Selli, Elena

    2009-08-01

    The photocatalytic activity of thin, nanostructured films of titanium dioxide, synthesized by supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD) from the gas phase, has been investigated employing the photodegradation of salicylic acid as test reaction. Because of the low deposition energy, the so-deposited highly porous TiO2 films are composed of nanoparticles maintaining their original properties in the film, which can be fully controlled by tuning the deposition and post-deposition treatment conditions. A systematic investigation on the evolution of light absorption properties and photoactivity of the films in relation to their morphology, determined by AFM analysis, and phase composition, determined by Raman spectroscopy, has been performed. The absorption and photocatalytic activity of the nanostructured films in the visible region could be enhanced either through post-deposition annealing treatment in ammonia containing atmosphere or employing mild oxidation conditions, followed by annealing in N2 at 600 °C.

  4. A field programmable gate array-based time-resolved scaler for collinear laser spectroscopy with bunched radioactive potassium beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, D. M. Davis, M.; Ringle, R.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Ryder, C. A.; Schwarz, S.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Zhao, S.; Minamisono, K. Barquest, B. R.; Bollen, G.; Hughes, M.; Strum, R.; Tarazona, D.; Cooper, K.; Hammerton, K.; Mantica, P. F.; Morrissey, D. J.

    2014-09-15

    A new data acquisition system including a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based time-resolved scaler was developed for laser-induced fluorescence and beam bunch coincidence measurements. The FPGA scaler was tested in a collinear laser-spectroscopy experiment on radioactive {sup 37}K at the BEam COoler and LAser spectroscopy (BECOLA) facility at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. A 1.29 μs bunch width from the buncher and a bunch repetition rate of 2.5 Hz led to a background suppression factor of 3.1 × 10{sup 5} in resonant photon detection measurements. The hyperfine structure of {sup 37}K and its isotope shift relative to the stable {sup 39}K were determined using 5 × 10{sup 4} s{sup −1} {sup 37}K ions injected into the BECOLA beam line. The obtained hyperfine coupling constants A({sup 2}S{sub 1/2}) = 120.3(1.4) MHz, A({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) = 15.2(1.1) MHz, and A({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) = 1.4(8) MHz, and the isotope shift δν{sup 39,} {sup 37} = −264(3) MHz are consistent with the previously determined values, where available.

  5. A field programmable gate array-based time-resolved scaler for collinear laser spectroscopy with bunched radioactive potassium beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, D. M.; Minamisono, K.; Barquest, B. R.; Bollen, G.; Cooper, K.; Davis, M.; Hammerton, K.; Hughes, M.; Mantica, P. F.; Morrissey, D. J.; Ringle, R.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Ryder, C. A.; Schwarz, S.; Strum, R.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Tarazona, D.; Zhao, S.

    2014-09-01

    A new data acquisition system including a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based time-resolved scaler was developed for laser-induced fluorescence and beam bunch coincidence measurements. The FPGA scaler was tested in a collinear laser-spectroscopy experiment on radioactive 37K at the BEam COoler and LAser spectroscopy (BECOLA) facility at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. A 1.29 μs bunch width from the buncher and a bunch repetition rate of 2.5 Hz led to a background suppression factor of 3.1 × 105 in resonant photon detection measurements. The hyperfine structure of 37K and its isotope shift relative to the stable 39K were determined using 5 × 104 s-1 37K ions injected into the BECOLA beam line. The obtained hyperfine coupling constants A(2S1/2) = 120.3(1.4) MHz, A(2P1/2) = 15.2(1.1) MHz, and A(2P3/2) = 1.4(8) MHz, and the isotope shift δν39, 37 = -264(3) MHz are consistent with the previously determined values, where available.

  6. Active retrodirective arrays for SPS beam pointing. [phase conjugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R.

    1980-01-01

    The basic requirement of the SPS beam pointing system is that it deliver a certain amount of S-band (lambda = 12.5 cm) power to a 9.6 km diameter receiving rectenna on the ground. The power is transmitted from a 1.0 km diameter antenna array on the SPS, which is, for a rectenna at about plus or minus 40 deg. latitude, some 37.5x10 to the 6th power km distant. At the present time ARA's appear to be the best bet to realize this very stringent beam pointing requirement. An active retrodirective array (ARA) transmits a beam towards the apparent source of an illuminating signal called the pilot. The array produces, not merely reflects, RF power. Retrodirectivity is achieved by retransmitting from each element of the array a signal whose phase is the "conjugate" of that received by the element. Phase conjugate circuits and pointing errors in ARA's are described. Results obtained using a 2-element X-band ARA and an 8-element S-band ARA are included.

  7. Simultaneous active control of flexural and extensional waves in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.; Gibbs, G. P.; Silcox, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The simultaneous active control of flexural and extensional vibrations in elastic beams is experimentally investigated. The results demonstrate that using pairs of piezoceramic transducers, whose elements are symmetrically located and independently controlled by a multichannel adaptive controller, enables the high attenuation of both flexural and extensional response. This capability is due to the nature of the piezoceramic element, which when bonded to the surface of the structure and electrically excited, exerts a surface strain on the structure. This strain enables input of both shear forces and moments into the structural system. The results are applicable to many situations where extensional vibrations couple to large flexural vibrations and subsequently radiate significant sound levels.

  8. Comparative Studies on Effects of Acid Solutions on Aquatic Plants by Beam Deflection and Absorbance Spectroscopy Methods.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xing-Zheng; Nie, Liangjiao; Inoue, Tomomi

    2015-01-01

    The beam deflection method and absorbance spectroscopy were applied to study effects of acid solutions on aquatic plants, and their results were compared. Aquatic plants Egeria densa and Ceratophyllum demersum L were used as model plants. In absorbance experiments, a piece of the plants was put in a beaker with 20 mL HCl solution, and absorbance of the HCl solution was measured every 30 min. In beam deflection experiments, a probe beam from a He-Ne laser was focused to a vicinity of the plants in a culture dish with HCl solution by an objective lens, and deflection signals of the probe beam were monitored by a position sensor. Absorbance spectra of the HCl solutions with immersing of the plants showed absorbance below 410 nm, suggesting that some compounds leaked from the plants into the HCl solutions. Changes of absorbance and deflection signals with immersion time were examined for different pH levels. The changing trends of the absorbance and deflection signals with time were similar, but the absorbance changes were delayed for about 2 - 3 h. The absorbance method could not detect the effect of the pH 5.0 HCl solutions on the aquatic plants, while the deflection method could.

  9. High-resolution optical spectroscopy with a buffer-gas-cooled beam of BaH molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, G. Z.; McNally, R. L.; Zelevinsky, T.

    2017-08-01

    Barium monohydride (BaH) is an attractive candidate for extending laser cooling and trapping techniques to diatomic hydrides. The apparatus and high-resolution optical spectroscopy presented here demonstrate progress toward this goal. A cryogenic buffer-gas-cooled molecular beam of BaH was constructed and characterized. Pulsed laser ablation into cryogenic helium buffer gas delivers ˜1 ×1010 molecules/sr/pulse in the X +2Σ (v''=0 ,N''=1 ) state of primary interest. More than 1 ×107 of these molecules per pulse enter the downstream science region with forward velocities below 100 m/s and transverse temperature of 0.1 K. This molecular beam enabled high-resolution optical spectra of BaH in quantum states relevant to laser slowing and cooling. The reported measurements include hyperfine structure and magnetic g factors in the X +2Σ , B +2Σ , and A 1/2 2Π states.

  10. Two-beam ultrabroadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy for high resolution gas-phase multiplex imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    We propose and develop a method for wideband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) in the gas phase and demonstrate the single-shot measurement of N2, H2, CO2, O2, and CH4. Pure-rotational and vibrational O-, Q-, and S- branch spectra are collected simultaneously, with high spectral and spatial resolution, and within a single-laser-shot. The relative intensity of the rotational and vibrational signals can be tuned arbitrarily using polarization techniques. The ultrashort 7 fs pump and Stokes pulses are automatically overlapped temporally and spatially using a two-beam CARS technique, and the crossed probe beam allows for excellent spatial sectioning of the probed location.

  11. Two-beam ultrabroadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy for high resolution gas-phase multiplex imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2014-01-20

    We propose and develop a method for wideband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) in the gas phase and demonstrate the single-shot measurement of N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4}. Pure-rotational and vibrational O-, Q-, and S- branch spectra are collected simultaneously, with high spectral and spatial resolution, and within a single-laser-shot. The relative intensity of the rotational and vibrational signals can be tuned arbitrarily using polarization techniques. The ultrashort 7 fs pump and Stokes pulses are automatically overlapped temporally and spatially using a two-beam CARS technique, and the crossed probe beam allows for excellent spatial sectioning of the probed location.

  12. The design of multi-megawatt actively cooled beam dumps for the Neutral-Beam Engineering Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, J. A.; Koehler, G.; Wells, R. P.

    1981-10-01

    To test neutral beam sources up to 170 keV, 65 Amps, with 30 second beam on times, actively cooled beam dumps for both the neutral and ionized particles are required. The dumps should be able to dissipate a wide range of power density profiles by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure. The thermal hydraulic design of the panels permit the dissipation of 2 kW/sq cm anywhere on the panel surface. The water requirements of the dumps are optimized by restricting the flow to panel sections where the heat flux falls short of the design value. The mechanical design of the beam-dump structures is described along with tests performed on two different panel designs. The dissipation capabilities of the panels were tested at the critical regions to verify their use in the beam dump assemblies.

  13. Single-beam coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy of N 2 using a shaped 7 fs laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sukesh; Wrzesinski, Paul; Pestov, Dmitry; Gunaratne, Tissa; Dantus, Marcos; Gord, James R.

    2009-08-01

    The feasibility is explored by single-beam coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy of gas-phase diatomic molecules related to combusting flows, with implications for gas-phase thermometry. We demonstrate CARS of gas-phase N 2 using a shaped ˜ 7 fs laser pulse, investigate the dependence of the CARS signal on the total pressure of the probed environment, both in pure N 2 and in mixtures with Ar, discuss the observed signal-to-noise ratio, and suggest improvements to be considered for reliable single-shot measurements at flame temperatures.

  14. Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Kappatou, A.; Delabie, E.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Jakobs, M. A.; Marchuk, O.; Biel, W.

    2012-10-15

    Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

  15. Mid-IR beam direction stabilization scheme for vibrational spectroscopy, including dual-frequency 2DIR.

    PubMed

    Nyby, Clara M; Leger, Joel D; Tang, Jianan; Varner, Clyde; Kireev, Victor V; Rubtsov, Igor V

    2014-03-24

    A compact laser beam direction stabilization scheme is developed that provides the angular stability of better than 50 μrad over a wide range of frequencies from 800 to 4000 cm-1. The schematic is fully automated and features a single MCT quadrant detector. The schematic was tested to stabilize directions of the two IR beams used for dual-frequency two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) measurements and showed excellent results: automatic tuning of the beam direction allowed achieving the alignment quality within 10% of the optimal alignment obtained manually. The schematic can be easily implemented to any nonlinear spectroscopic measurements in the mid-IR spectral region.

  16. Laser-ablated active doping technique for visible spectroscopy measurements on Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Matthew Robert

    2013-09-01

    Visible spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic, allowing plasma parameters ranging from temperature and density to electric and magnetic fields to be measured. Spectroscopic dopants are commonly introduced to make these measurements. On Z, dopants are introduced passively (i.e. a salt deposited on a current-carrying surface); however, in some cases, passive doping can limit the times and locations at which measurements can be made. Active doping utilizes an auxiliary energy source to disperse the dopant independently from the rest of the experiment. The objective of this LDRD project was to explore laser ablation as a method of actively introducing spectroscopic dopants. Ideally, the laser energy would be delivered to the dopant via fiber optic, which would eliminate the need for time-intensive laser alignments in the Z chamber. Experiments conducted in a light lab to assess the feasibility of fibercoupled and open-beam laser-ablated doping are discussed.

  17. High-power continuous-wave tunable 544- and 272-nm beams based on a diode-oscillator fiber-amplifier for calcium spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Kwang-Hoon; Kim, Yonghee; Park, Hyunmin; Cha, Yong-Ho; Kim, Taek-Soo; Lee, Lim; Lim, Gwon; Han, Jaemin; Ko, Kwang-Hee; Jeong, Do-Young

    2015-08-01

    Continuous-wave single-frequency tunable 544- and 272-nm beams have been demonstrated by the second- and fourth-harmonic conversions of a 1088-nm fundamental beam from a diode-oscillator fiber-amplifier. The single-pass second-harmonic generation with a MgO-doped periodically poled stoichiometric LiTaO3 crystal and the external-cavity frequency-doubling technique with a bulk BBO crystal were employed to achieve an approximately 6-W 544-nm beam and a 1.5-W 272-nm beam, respectively. We characterized the second- and fourth-harmonic generations and discussed their applications to calcium spectroscopy.

  18. Group velocity delay spectroscopy technique for industrial monitoring of electron-beam-induced vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benterou, Jerry J.; Berzins, Leon V.; Sharma, Manish N.

    1999-01-01

    Spectroscopic techniques are ideal for characterization and process control of electron beam generated beam generated vapor plumes. Absorption based techniques work well for a wide variety of applications, but are difficult to apply to optically dense or opaque vapor plumes. We describe an approach for monitoring optically dense vapor plumes that is based on measuring the group velocity delay of a laser beam near an optical transition to determine the vapor density. This technique has a larger dynamic range than absorption environment. Aluminum as chosen because of its prevalence in high performance aircraft alloys. In these applications, composition control of the alloy constituents is critical to the deposition process. Data is presented demonstrating the superior dynamic range of the measurement. In addition, preliminary data demonstrating aluminum vapor rate control in an electron beam evaporator is presented. Alternative applications where this technique could be useful are discussed.

  19. {gamma}-Spectroscopy and Radioactive Beams: How To Perform Channel Selection ?

    SciTech Connect

    Rosse, B.; Redon, N.; Stezowski, O.; Schmitt, Ch.; Guinet, D.; Meyer, M.; Lautesse, Ph.; De France, G.; Bhattachasyya, S.; Mukherjee, G.

    2006-04-26

    An experiment has been performed using a SPIRAL 76Kr radioactive beam at GANIL to investigate rare-earth nuclei near the proton drip-line. The EXOGAM gamma array was coupled with the DIAMANT light charged-particle detector and the VAMOS spectrometer. We report here on the powerful of this setup to extract fusion-evaporation {gamma}-rays from a large beam contamination.

  20. Standoff Spectroscopy via Remote Generation of a Backward-Propagating Laser Beam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-04

    of a backward- propagating coherent optical probe. This probe will be used in combination with a tunable forward-propagating laser beam(s) for a...femtosecond laser filaments potentially useful as light sources in LIDAR , but it cannot be used in our SOS scheme because the supercontinuum emission by...Yin GY, Harris SE (2006) Coherent control of laser -induced breakdown. Opt Lett 31:1331–1333. 22. Liu W, et al. (2006) An efficient control of

  1. A single-beam titration method for the quantification of open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Lung-Yu; Lu, Chia-Jung

    2014-09-01

    This study introduced a quantitative method that can be used to measure the concentration of analytes directly from a single-beam spectrum of open-path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (OP-FTIR). The peak shapes of the analytes in a single-beam spectrum were gradually canceled (i.e., "titrated") by dividing an aliquot of a standard transmittance spectrum with a known concentration, and the sum of the squared differential synthetic spectrum was calculated as an indicator for the end point of this titration. The quantity of a standard transmittance spectrum that is needed to reach the end point can be used to calculate the concentrations of the analytes. A NIST traceable gas standard containing six known compounds was used to compare the quantitative accuracy of both this titration method and that of a classic least square (CLS) using a closed-cell FTIR spectrum. The continuous FTIR analysis of industrial exhausting stack showed that concentration trends were consistent between the CLS and titration methods. The titration method allowed the quantification to be performed without the need of a clean single-beam background spectrum, which was beneficial for the field measurement of OP-FTIR. Persistent constituents of the atmosphere, such as NH3, CH4 and CO, were successfully quantified using the single-beam titration method with OP-FTIR data that is normally inaccurate when using the CLS method due to the lack of a suitable background spectrum. Also, the synthetic spectrum at the titration end point contained virtually no peaks of analytes, but it did contain the remaining information needed to provide an alternative means of obtaining an ideal single-beam background for OP-FTIR.

  2. Optical pumping spectroscopy of Rb vapour with co-propagating laser beams: line identification by a simple theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krmpot, Aleksandar J.; Rabasović, Mihailo D.; Jelenković, Branislav M.

    2010-07-01

    In this paper the saturation spectra of rubidium vapour at room temperature, obtained with overlapped co-propagating laser beams, were examined. Unlike the standard saturation spectroscopy, here the transmission of the pump laser beam was detected. The pump laser was locked to an atomic transition of the D2 line, while the probe laser frequency was scanned in a wide frequency range. The pump and probe beams had approximately the same intensities; thus the probe laser can saturate transitions and contribute to optical pumping. This, together with Doppler broadening, leads to rich pump transmission spectra, with many lines appearing due to the interaction of lasers with atoms in different velocity groups. The advantages of this method are well-resolved structures and appearance of spectral lines on a flat, Doppler-free background. Agreement between experimental and theoretical results shows the usefulness of this simple model, based on the rate equations, for identification of lines and determination of relative contribution to the observed line intensity from atoms with different velocities. Theoretical spectra are a useful tool for the calibration of experimental spectra obtained by a nonlinear dependence of the laser frequency on the voltage applied to the piezo used for the laser diode frequency scanning.

  3. Exotic and Stable Nuclear Beam Neutron Spectroscopy without Time-of-Flight: A DSP-Based Deuterated Scintillator Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febbraro, Michael; Becchetti, Frederick; Torres-Isea, Ramon; Howard, Alan; Roberts, Amy; Kolata, Jim

    2012-10-01

    Due to the limited beam intensity and other factors associated with exotic, short-lived secondary radioactive nuclear beams (RNB), we have developed a multi-element deuterated liquid scintillator array for the study of reactions involving neutrons. The system is well suited for RNB experiments involving neutrons such as the study of (p,n), (d,n), and (3He, n) reactions with neutron energy above 5 MeV and well separated states of interest. Because time-of-flight (ToF) is not necessary [1], the detectors can be located in close proximity to the reaction chamber allowing for good angular coverage and absolute detector efficiency compared to traditional ToF systems. The use of Digital Pulse Shape Discrimination (DPSD) for neutron spectroscopy experiments without ToF has been demonstrated and preliminary results from stable and exotic beam testing conducted at the UM-UND Twin-Sol LE-RNB facility lat UND will be reported. In addition, preliminary results from the new hydrogen-plastic scintillator Eljen-399 capable of neutron/gamma discrimination will also be discussed. This work is supported by NSF grant PHY 0969456. [4pt] [1] ``Evaluation of Large Deuterated Scintillators for Fast Neutron Detection ....,'' M. Ojaruega, et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods A652 (2011) 397-399.

  4. Computational and experimental characterization of high-brightness beams for femtosecond electron imaging and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Portman, J.; Zhang, H.; Tao, Z.; Makino, K.; Berz, M.; Duxbury, P. M.; Ruan, C.-Y.

    2013-12-16

    Using a multilevel fast multipole method, coupled with the shadow imaging of femtosecond photoelectron pulses for validation, we quantitatively elucidate the photocathode, space charge, and virtual cathode physics, which fundamentally limit the spatiotemporal and spectroscopic resolution and throughput of ultrafast electron microscope (UEM) systems. We present a simple microscopic description to capture the nonlinear beam dynamics based on a two-fluid picture and elucidate an unexpected dominant role of image potential pinning in accelerating the emittance growth process. These calculations set theoretical limits on the performance of UEM systems and provide useful guides for photocathode design for high-brightness electron beam systems.

  5. In-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy in the vicinity of {sup 100}Sn.

    SciTech Connect

    Seweryniak, D.

    1998-09-29

    In recent years, in-beam x-ray experiments supplied a vast amount of data on high-spin states in nuclei in the vicinity of {sup 100}Sn. The present contribution reviews spectroscopic information obtained recently for N {ge} 50 nuclei around {sup 100}Sn, with emphasis on isomer studies, and discusses selected results in the frame of the shell model.

  6. Spatially-resolved temperature diagnostic for supersonic flow using cross-beam Doppler-limited laser saturation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Grady T.

    Optical techniques for measuring the temperature in three-dimensional supersonic reactive flows have typically depended on lineshape measurements using single-beam laser absorption spectroscopy. However, absorption over extended path lengths in flows with symmetric, turbulent eddies can lead to systematically high extracted temperatures due to Doppler shifts resulting from flow along the absorption path. To eliminate these problems and provide full three-dimensional spatial resolution, two variants of laser saturation spectroscopy have been developed and demonstrated, for the first time, which utilize two crossed and nearly copropogating laser beams. Individual rotational lines in the visible I2 X 1Sigma 0+g → B 3pi 0+u transition were used to develop the two diagnostic to support research on the Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser (COIL), the weapon aboard the USAF Airborne Laser. Cross-Beam Saturation Absorption Spectroscopy (CBSAS) and Cross-Beam Inter-Modulated Fluorescence (CBIMF) were demonstrated as viable methods for recording the spectral signal of an I2 ro-vibrational line in a small three-dimensional volume using a tunable CW dye laser. Temperature is extracted by fitting the recorded signal with a theoretical signal constructed from the Doppler-broadened hyperfine components of the ro-vibrational line. The CBIMF technique proved successful for extracting the temperature of an I2-seeded, Ar gas flow within a small, Mach 2, Laval nozzle where the overlap volume of the two 1 mm diameter laser beams was 2.4 mm 3. At a test point downstream of the nozzle throat, the average temperature of 146 K +/- 1.5 K extracted from measurements of the I2 P(46) 17-1 spectral line compared favorably with the 138 K temperature calculated from isentropic, one-dimensional flow theory. CBIMF provides sufficient accuracy for characterizing the temperature of the gas flow in a COIL device, and could be applied to other areas of flow-field characterization and nozzle design. In

  7. Simulations of pulsed electron beam injection during active experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    Two-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulations are used to investigate the characteristics of the spacecraft charging, particle acceleration, and wave emissions during beam injection, turnoff and subsequent pulsing of the beam. It is shown that, during beam injection, the beam current is neutralized by a spatially separate return current region extending several tens of meters from the beam region, with the currents being closed across the field lines by the perpendicular acceleration of ambient plasma ions into the beam region. After beam turnoff, this current system reverses after a time lag of about an ion plasma period. The current reversal is accompanied by prolonged electron collection by the spacecraft near the beam region, preferential ion collection by sections of the spacecraft magnetically connected to the initial return current regions, and the creation of hot plasma extending well into the return current regions. Because of the time lag, the currents induced in the plasma during periodic beam injection can be strongly modified from the imposed beam current.

  8. Persistence of N = 50 Shell Closure in the Vicinity of 78Ni Studied by In-Beam γ-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiga, Yoshiaki; Yoneda, Ken-ichiro; Steppenbeck, David; Aoi, Nori; Doornenbal, Pieter; Lee, Jenny; Liu, Hongna; Matushita, Masafumi; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Wang, He; Baba, Hidetada; Bednarczyk, Piotr; Dombradi, Zsolt; Fulop, Zsolt; Go, Shintaro; Hashimoto, Takashi; Ideguchi, Eiji; Ieki, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Kota; Kondo, Yosuke; Minakata, Ryogo; Motobayashi, Tohru; Nisimura, Daiki; Otsu, Hideaki; Sakurai, Hiroyoshi; Sohler, Dora; Sun, Yelei; Tamii, Atsushi; Tanaka, Ryuki; Tian, Zhengyang; Vajta, Zsolt; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Yang, Xiaofei; Yang, Zaihong; Ye, Yanlin; Yokoyama, Rin; Zenihiro, Juzo

    In-beam γ-ray spectroscopy of nuclei in the vicinity of 78Ni was performed at Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF), RIKEN. De-excitation γ rays were detected in coincidence with the reaction residues, including the N = 50 nucleus 80Zn, produced by secondary reactions of radioactive isotopes. The analysis is in progress to study the low-lying excited states in 80Zn.

  9. Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) - ISS Inflatable Module Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, Rajib; Munday, Steve; Valle, Gerard D.

    2014-01-01

    INNOVATION: BEAM is a pathway project demonstrating the design, fabrication, test, certification, integration, operation, on-orbit performance, and disposal of the first ever man-rated space inflatable structure. The groundwork laid through the BEAM project will support developing and launching a larger inflatable space structure with even greater mass per volume (M/V) advantages need for longer space missions. OVERVIEW: Inflatable structures have been shown to have much lower mass per volume ratios (M/V) when compared with conventional space structures. BEAM is an expandable structure, launched in a packed state, and then expanded once on orbit. It is a temporary experimental module to be used for gathering structural, thermal, and radiation data while on orbit. BEAM will be launched on Space X-8, be extracted from the dragon trunk, and will attach to ISS at Node 3- Aft. BEAM performance will be monitored over a two-year period and then BEAM will be jettison using the SSRMS.

  10. Proton induced quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams for soft x-ray spectroscopy studies and selective x-ray fluorescence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sokaras, D.; Zarkadas, Ch.; Fliegauf, R.; Beckhoff, B.; Karydas, A. G.

    2012-12-15

    We present the analytical features and performance of an x-ray spectroscopy end station of moderate energy resolution operating with proton-induced quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams. The apparatus was designed, installed and operated at the 5.5 MV Tandem VdG Accelerator Laboratory of the Institute of Nuclear Physics, N.C.S.R. 'Demokritos,' Athens. The setup includes a two-level ultrahigh vacuum chamber that hosts in the lower level up to six primary targets in a rotatable holder; there, the irradiation of pure element materials-used as primary targets-with few-MeV high current ({approx}{mu}A) proton beams produces intense quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams of selectable energy. In the chamber's upper level, a six-position rotatable sample holder hosts the targets considered for x-ray spectroscopy studies. The proton-induced x-ray beam, after proper collimation, is guided to the sample position whereas various filters can be also inserted along the beam's path to eliminate the backscattered protons or/and to absorb selectively components of the x-ray beam. The apparatus incorporates an ultrathin window Si(Li) spectrometer (FWHM 136 eV at 5.89 keV) coupled with low-noise electronics capable of efficiently detecting photons down to carbon K{alpha}. Exemplary soft x-ray spectroscopy studies and results of selective x-ray fluorescence analysis are presented.

  11. Design of multi-megawatt actively cooled beam dumps for the Neutral-Beam Engineering Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, J.A.; Koehler, G.; Wells, R.P.

    1981-10-01

    The Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility will test Neutral Beam Sources up to 170 keV, 65 Amps, with 30 second beam-on times. For this application actively cooled beam dumps for both the neutral and ionized particles will be required. The dumps will be able to dissipate a wide range of power density profiles by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure. The thermal hydraulic design of the panels permit the dissipation of 2 kW/cm/sup 2/ anywhere on the panel surface. The water requirements of the dumps are optimized by restricting the flow to panel sections where the heat flux falls short of the design value. The mechanical design of the beam-dump structures is described along with tests performed on a prototype panel. The prototype tests were performed on two different panel designs, one manufactured by Mc Donnell Douglas (MDAC) the other by United Technologies (UT). The dissipation capabilities of the panels were tested at the critical regions to verify their use in the beam dump assemblies.

  12. Working group report on beam plasmas, electronic propulsion, and active experiments using beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, J. M.; Eastman, T.; Gabriel, S.; Hawkins, J.; Matossian, J.; Raitt, J.; Reeves, G.; Sasaki, S.; Szuszczewicz, E.; Winkler, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The JPL Workshop addressed a number of plasma issues that bear on advanced spaceborne technology for the years 2000 and beyond. Primary interest was on the permanently manned space station with a focus on identifying environmentally related issues requiring early clarification by spaceborne plasma experimentation. The Beams Working Group focused on environmentally related threats that platform operations could have on the conduct and integrity of spaceborne beam experiments and vice versa. Considerations were to include particle beams and plumes. For purposes of definition it was agreed that the term particle beams described a directed flow of charged or neutral particles allowing single-particle trajectories to represent the characteristics of the beam and its propagation. On the other hand, the word plume was adopted to describe a multidimensional flow (or expansion) of a plasma or neutral gas cloud. Within the framework of these definitions, experiment categories included: (1) Neutral- and charged-particle beam propagation, with considerations extending to high powers and currents. (2) Evolution and dynamics of naturally occurring and man-made plasma and neutral gas clouds. In both categories, scientific interest focused on interactions with the ambient geoplasma and the evolution of particle densities, energy distribution functions, waves, and fields.

  13. In situ synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy study of the oxidation of the Ge(100)-2 × 1 surface by supersonic molecular oxygen beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Teraoka, Yuden; Okada, Ryuta; Yamada, Yoichi; Sasaki, Masahiro

    2014-11-07

    In situ synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy was performed during the oxidation of the Ge(100)-2 × 1 surface induced by a molecular oxygen beam with various incident energies up to 2.2 eV from the initial to saturation coverage of surface oxides. The saturation coverage of oxygen on the clean Ge(100) surface was much lower than one monolayer and the oxidation state of Ge was +2 at most. This indicates that the Ge(100) surface is so inert toward oxidation that complete oxidation cannot be achieved with only pure oxygen (O{sub 2}) gas, which is in strong contrast to Si surfaces. Two types of dissociative adsorption, trapping-mediated and direct dissociation, were confirmed by oxygen uptake measurements depending on the incident energy of O{sub 2}. The direct adsorption process can be activated by increasing the translational energy, resulting in an increased population of Ge{sup 2+} and a higher final oxygen coverage. We demonstrated that hyperthermal O{sub 2} beams remarkably promote the room-temperature oxidation with novel atomic configurations of oxides at the Ge(100) surface. Our findings will contribute to the fundamental understanding of oxygen adsorption processes at 300 K from the initial stages to saturated oxidation.

  14. Upgrade of beamline BL25SU for soft x-ray imaging and spectroscopy of solid using nano- and micro-focused beams at SPring-8

    SciTech Connect

    Senba, Yasunori Ohashi, Haruhiko; Kotani, Yoshinori; Muro, Takayuki; Ohkochi, Takuo; Tsuji, Naruki; Kishimoto, Hikaru; Miura, Takanori; Tanaka, Masayuki; Higashiyama, Masahiro; Takahashi, Sunao; Ishizawa, Yasuhide; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Furukawa, Yukito; Ohata, Toru; Nariyama, Nobuteru; Takeshita, Kunikazu; Kinoshita, Toyohiko; Goto, Shunji [JASRI Nakamura, Tetsuya [JASRI ESICMM and others

    2016-07-27

    Substantial upgrades have been made to the beamline BL25SU at SPring-8 for soft X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of solid-state materials. The upgraded beamline consists of two branches: a micro-beam branch with high energy resolution, and a nano-beam branch with small angular divergence. The beamline has been available for use since October 2014, following a half year commissioning period. We present here the beamline performance parameters, including resolving power, photon flux, and focused beam size, which are consistent with designed specifications.

  15. Absolute infrared vibrational band intensities of molecular ions determined by direct laser absorption spectroscopy in fast ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Keim, E.R.; Polak, M.L.; Owrutsky, J.C.; Coe, J.V.; Saykally, R.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The technique of direct laser absorption spectroscopy in fast ion beams has been employed for the determination of absolute integrated band intensities ({ital S}{sup 0}{sub {ital v}}) for the {nu}{sub 3} fundamental bands of H{sub 3}O{sup +} and NH{sup +}{sub 4}. In addition, the absolute band intensities for the {nu}{sub 1} fundamental bands of HN{sup +}{sub 2} and HCO{sup +} have been remeasured. The values obtained in units of cm{sup {minus}2} atm{sup {minus}1} at STP are 1880(290) and 580(90) for the {nu}{sub 1} fundamentals of HN{sup +}{sub 2} and HCO{sup +}, respectively; and 4000(800) and 1220(190) for the {nu}{sub 3} fundamentals of H{sub 3}O{sup +} and NH{sup +}{sub 4}, respectively. Comparisons with {ital ab} {ital initio} results are presented.

  16. Measurement of free radical kinetics in pulsed plasmas by UV and VUV absorption spectroscopy and by modulated beam mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunge, G.; Bodart, P.; Brihoum, M.; Boulard, F.; Chevolleau, T.; Sadeghi, N.

    2012-04-01

    This paper reviews recent progress in the development of time-resolved diagnostics to probe high-density pulsed plasma sources. We focus on time-resolved measurements of radicals' densities in the afterglow of pulsed discharges to provide useful information on production and loss mechanisms of free radicals. We show that broad-band absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet spectral domain and threshold ionization modulated beam mass spectrometry are powerful techniques for the determination of the time variation of the radicals' densities in pulsed plasmas. The combination of these complementary techniques allows detection of most of the reactive species present in industrial etching plasmas, giving insights into the physico-chemistry reactions involving these species. As an example, we discuss briefly the radicals' kinetics in the afterglow of a SiCl4/Cl2/Ar discharge.

  17. Study on the effect of beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence on standoff nanosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed

    Laserna, J J; Reyes, R Fernández; González, R; Tobaria, L; Lucena, P

    2009-06-08

    We report on an experimental study of the effect of atmospheric turbulence on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements. The characteristics of the atmosphere dictate specific performance constraints to this technology. Unlike classical laboratory LIBS systems where the distance to the sample is well known and characterized, LIBS systems working at several tens of meters to the target have specific atmospheric propagation conditions that cause the quality of the LIBS signals to be affected to a significant extent. Using a new LIBS based sensor system fitted with a nanosecond laser emitting at 1064 nm, propagation effects at distances of up to 120 m were investigated. The effects observed include wander and scintillation in the outgoing laser beam and in the return atomic emission signal. Plasmas were formed on aluminium targets. Average signal levels and signal fluctuations are measured so the effect of atmospheric turbulence on LIBS measurements is quantified.

  18. The young astrophysicist: a very inexpensive activity to discuss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockington, Guilherme; André Testoni, Leonardo; Pietrocola, Maurício

    2015-09-01

    The continuing fascination of young people with celestial bodies leads them to pose challenging questions to their science teachers, such as how was the universe born? How were the stars formed? In this paper we present an extremely inexpensive but highly engaging activity to teach the basics of spectroscopy. Guided by the question ‘how do scientists know what a star is made of?’, this simple activity allows a wide range of physical content to be taught, based on the analysis of the emission spectrum of a star’s light. It is possible to see the configuration of lines of each chemical element as a fingerprint, thereby inferring each one’s presence in the composition of the celestial body. As many countries do not have access to even inexpensive technologies, such as simple computers or digital cameras, this alternative could teach and motivate students of different ages to understand and enjoy the beauty of the nature of light.

  19. Surface intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy of proteins using a UV linearly polarized pulsed laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapoudjian, S.; Ivanova, M.; Uteza, Olivier P.; Marine, Vladimir I.; Sentis, Marc L.

    2000-04-01

    The proposed new interfacial spectroscopic method allows to measure the fluorescence emission spectra of the two tryptophans of the Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) during its adsorption at the air/water and egg-lecithin (egg-PC)/water interfaces, using an UV excimer laser. Surface fluorescence spectroscopy shows changes in the spectroscopic properties of adsorbed BSA, spread BSA and mixed egg-PC/BSA films. These results are related to the surface pressure measurements which characterize the different BSA surface organizations.

  20. Edge electron density profiles and fluctuations measured by two-dimensional beam emission spectroscopy in the KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Y. U. Wi, H. M.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Kovácsik, Ákos

    2014-11-15

    Beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) has recently been upgraded. The background intensity was reduced from 30% to 2% by suppressing the stray lights. This allows acquisition of the relative electron density profiles on the plasma edge without background subtraction from the beam power modulation signals. The KSTAR BES system has its spatial resolution of 1 cm, the temporal resolution of 2 MHz, and a total 32 channel (8 radial × 4 poloidal) avalanche photo diode array. Most measurements were done on the plasma edge, r/a ∼ 0.9, with 8 cm radial measurement width that covers the pedestal range. High speed density profile measurements reveal temporal behaviors of fast transient events, such as the precursors of edge localized modes and the transitions between confinement modes. Low background level also allows analysis of the edge density fluctuation patterns with reduced background fluctuations. Propagation of the density structures can be investigated by comparing the phase delays between the spatially distributed channels.

  1. CZT strip detectors for imaging and spectroscopy: collimated beam and ASIC readout experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurczynski, P.; Krizmanic, J. F.; Stahle, C. M.; Parsons, A.; Palmer, D. M.; Bartlett, L. M.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Birsa, F.; Gehrels, N.; Odom, J.; Hanchak, C.; Shu, P.; Teegarden, B. J.; Tueller, J.; Barbier, L. M.

    The authors report the status of ongoing investigations into Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) strip detectors for application in hard X-ray astronomy. They have instrumented a nine strip by nine strip region of a two sided strip detector. In order to measure the position resolution of the detectors, they have implemented a collimated beam that concentrates radiation to a spot size less than the strip width of the detector. The detectors exhibited excellent strip uniformity in terms of photon count rate and spectroscopic information.

  2. Automatic laser beam alignment using blob detection for an environment monitoring spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khidir, Jarjees; Chen, Youhua; Anderson, Gary

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes a fully automated system to align an infra-red laser beam with a small retro-reflector over a wide range of distances. The component development and test were especially used for an open-path spectrometer gas detection system. Using blob detection under OpenCV library, an automatic alignment algorithm was designed to achieve fast and accurate target detection in a complex background environment. Test results are presented to show that the proposed algorithm has been successfully applied to various target distances and environment conditions.

  3. Process analytical technology (PAT) in insect and mammalian cell culture processes: dielectric spectroscopy and focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM).

    PubMed

    Druzinec, Damir; Weiss, Katja; Elseberg, Christiane; Salzig, Denise; Kraume, Matthias; Pörtner, Ralf; Czermak, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Modern bioprocesses demand for a careful definition of the critical process parameters (CPPs) already during the early stages of process development in order to ensure high-quality products and satisfactory yields. In this context, online monitoring tools can be applied to recognize unfavorable changes of CPPs during the production processes and to allow for early interventions in order to prevent losses of production batches due to quality issues. Process analytical technologies such as the dielectric spectroscopy or focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) are possible online monitoring tools, which can be applied to monitor cell growth as well as morphological changes. Since the dielectric spectroscopy only captures cells with intact cell membranes, even information about dead cells with ruptured or leaking cell membranes can be derived. The following chapter describes the application of dielectric spectroscopy on various virus-infected and non-infected cell lines with respect to adherent as well as suspension cultures in common stirred tank reactors. The adherent mammalian cell lines Vero (African green monkey kidney cells) and hMSC-TERT (telomerase-immortalized human mesenchymal stem cells) are thereby cultured on microcarrier, which provide the required growth surface and allow the cultivation of these cells even in dynamic culture systems. In turn, the insect-derived cell lines S2 and Sf21 are used as examples for cells typically cultured in suspension. Moreover, the FBRM technology as a further monitoring tool for cell culture applications has been included in this chapter using the example of Drosophila S2 insect cells.

  4. Characterizing a multi-MeV e-beam induced plasma through visible spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Almeida, Thierry; Ribiere, Maxime; Maisonny, Rémi; Ritter, Sandra; Plouhinec, Damien; Auriel, Gérard

    2016-10-01

    High energy electrons interaction and propagation mechanisms in solid targets have a broad range of applications in high energy density physics. The latter include fast ignition for inertial fusion research, production of ultra-high mechanical stress levels, plasma interactions with e-beam particles in electron diodes, radiative hydrodynamic models...This paper presents the results from recent experiments conducted on the multi-MeV generator ASTERIX operated at CEA-Gramat. This high flux density electron beam was launched from an aluminum cathode onto an aluminum-tantalum target for voltage and current of 2.4 MeV and 55 kA, respectively. A set of optical diagnostics were fielded in all of the experiments, including a UV-visible spectrometers and a fast imaging. The imaging data obtained during the experiment allowed for the ablated species velocity to be determined. based on spectroscopic analysis, the light emission was attributed to aluminum and tantalum excited atoms and ions. The analysis of this time-integrated spectrum based on radiative transfer model clearly unveiled two distinct regions of the plasma over its expansion: a hot core surrounded by a cold vapor. A quantitative analysis of these results is presented.

  5. Investigation of reactions relevant for the γ process using in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netterdon, L.; Endres, J.; Mayer, J.; Sauerwein, A.; Scholz, P.; Zilges, A.

    2016-01-01

    The reaction 89Y(p, γ)90Zr was studied at five proton energies close to the Gamow window. This reaction is of astrophysical importance, since it is located in a mass region, where the p-nuclei abundances are not well reproduced by network calculations. For this purpose, the in-beam technique utilizing the high-efficiency high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector array HORUS at the Tandem ion accelerator at the University of Cologne was used. The excellent agreement of the measured total cross sections with previous data shows, that the setup in Cologne is well suited for such measurements. An additional interesting outcome of this measurement are partial cross sections of the de-excitation of the 90 Zr compund nucleus up to the 15th excited state, an observable only accessible in this kind of high-resolution inbeam experiments. The experimental setup and preliminary results of the total and partial cross sections obtained for the 89Y(p, γ) reaction are presented. Additionally, we show results of a first test measurement of the a-capture reaction on the p-nucleus 92Mo using the in-beam technique with HPGe detectors.

  6. Simulation of XenArm Cluster Formation in a Molecular Beam: Comparison with Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amar, Francois G.; Preston, Thomas J.

    2006-03-01

    We perform direct MD simulations of the formation of mixed XenArm clusters (500beam as a function of initial beam conditions. We then model the 4d5/2 (Xe) and 2p3/2 (Ar) core hole photoelectron spectra of these clusters and compare them to the experimental spectra of Tchaplyguine et al[1]. The predicted spectra are calculated as the sum of final state energy shifts of the ionized atoms (within the cluster) relative to the isolated gas phase ion using a self-consistent polarization formalism. We use the results of our earlier calculations on pure argon and xenon clusters [2] to determine the appropriate inelastic mean free path value for the signal electrons leaving the mixed clusters. These results allow us to gain a refined understanding of the size, stoichiometry, and core/shell structure of these mixed clusters. [1] M. Tchaplyguine, et al, Phys. Rev A 69, 031201 (2004); [2] F. Amar, et al, JCP 122, 244717 (2005).

  7. In-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of {sup 35}Mg and {sup 33}Na

    SciTech Connect

    Gade, A.; Brown, B. A.; Campbell, C. M.; Cook, J. M.; Glasmacher, T.; McDaniel, S.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Terry, J. R.; Bazin, D.; Ettenauer, S.; Obertelli, A.; Weisshaar, D.; Kemper, K. W.; Otsuka, T.; Utsuno, Y.

    2011-04-15

    Excited states in the very neutron-rich nuclei {sup 35}Mg and {sup 33}Na were populated in the fragmentation of a {sup 38}Si projectile beam on a Be target at 83 MeV/u beam energy. We report on the first observation of {gamma}-ray transitions in {sup 35}Mg, the odd-N neighbor of {sup 34}Mg and {sup 36}Mg, which are known to be part of the 'island of inversion' around N=20. The results are discussed in the framework of large-scale shell-model calculations. For the A=3Z nucleus {sup 33}Na, a new {gamma}-ray transition was observed that is suggested to complete the {gamma}-ray cascade 7/2{sup +}{yields}5/2{sup +}{yields}3/2{sub gs}{sup +} connecting three neutron two-particle-two-hole intruder states that are predicted to form a close-to-ideal K=3/2 rotational band in the strong-coupling limit.

  8. Analysis of active closed cross-section slender beams based on asymptotically correct thin-wall beam theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouli, F.; Langlois, R. G.; Afagh, F. F.

    2007-02-01

    An asymptotically correct theory for multi-cell thin-wall anisotropic slender beams that includes the shell bending strain measures is extended to include embedded active fibre composites (AFCs). A closed-form solution of the asymptotically correct cross-sectional actuation force and moments is obtained. Active thin-wall beam theories found in the literature neglect the shell bending strains, which lead to incorrect predictions for certain cross-sections, while the theory presented is shown to overcome this shortcoming. The theory is implemented and verified against single-cell examples that were solved using the University of Michigan/Variational Beam Sectional Analysis (UM/VABS) software. The stiffness constants and the actuation vector are obtained for two-cell and three-cell active cross-sections. The theory is argued to be reliable for efficient initial design analysis and interdisciplinary parametric or optimization studies of thin-wall closed cross-section slender beams with no initial twist or obliqueness.

  9. Highly sensitive detection of molecules at the liquid/liquid interface using total internal reflection-optical beam deflection based on photothermal spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujinami, Masanori; Murakawa, Hiromi; Sawada, Tsuguo

    2003-01-01

    In this study, a highly sensitive and versatile method based on photothermal spectroscopy has been developed to monitor the molecular density at a liquid/liquid interface. The excitation under the total internal reflection (TIR) condition results in a formation of a thin thermal lens elongated along the interface. In order to measure the thermal lens effects effectively and to reduce the background, the probe beam is irradiated parallel to the interface and its deflection is detected, which is called an TIR-optical beam deflection (TIR-OBD). As a result, the detection limit in TIR-OBD is about 2 orders lower than that of TIR-thermal lens spectroscopy, in which the irradiation of the probe beam is perpendicular to the interface.

  10. Status of LHC crab activity simulations and beam studies

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga,R.; Assman, R.; Barranco, J.; Barranco, J.; Calaga, R.; Caspers, F.; Ciapala, E.; De-Maria, R.; Koutchouk, J. P.; Linnecar, T.; Metral, E.; Morita, A.; Solyak, N.; Sun, Y.; Tomas, R.; Tuckmantel, J.; Weiler, T.; Zimmermann, F.

    2009-05-04

    The LHC crab cavity program is advancing rapidly towards a first prototype which is anticipated to be tested during the early stages of the LHC phase I upgrade and commissioning. The general project status and some aspects related to crab optics, collimation, aperture constraints, impedances, noise effects. beam transparency and machine protection critical for a safe and robust operation of LHC beams with crab cavities are addressed here.

  11. A new X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for extraterrestrial materials using a muon beam

    PubMed Central

    Terada, K.; Ninomiya, K.; Osawa, T.; Tachibana, S.; Miyake, Y.; Kubo, M. K.; Kawamura, N.; Higemoto, W.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Ebihara, M.; Uesugi, M.

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of the intense pulsed muon source at J-PARC MUSE, Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex/MUon Science Establishment (106 s−1 for a momentum of 60 MeV/c), enabled us to pioneer a new frontier in analytical sciences. Here, we report a non-destructive elemental analysis using µ− capture. Controlling muon momentum from 32.5 to 57.5 MeV/c, we successfully demonstrate a depth-profile analysis of light elements (B, C, N, and O) from several mm-thick layered materials and non-destructive bulk analyses of meteorites containing organic materials. Muon beam analysis, enabling a bulk analysis of light to heavy elements without severe radioactivation, is a unique analytical method complementary to other non-destructive analyses. Furthermore, this technology can be used as a powerful tool to identify the content and distribution of organic components in future asteroidal return samples. PMID:24861282

  12. High-resolution electronic spectroscopy of the BODIPY chromophore in supersonic beam and superfluid helium droplets.

    PubMed

    Stromeck-Faderl, Anja; Pentlehner, Dominik; Kensy, Uwe; Dick, Bernhard

    2011-07-11

    We present the fluorescence excitation and dispersed emission spectra of the parent compound of the boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dye class measured in a supersonic beam and isolated in superfluid helium nanodroplets. The gas-phase spectrum of the isolated molecules displays many low-frequency transitions that are assigned to a symmetry-breaking mode with a strongly nonharmonic potential, presumably the out-of-plane wagging mode of the BF(2) group. The data are in good agreement with transition energies and Franck-Condon factors calculated for a double minimum potential in the upper electronic state. The corresponding transitions do not appear in the helium droplet. This is explained with the quasi-rigid first layer of helium atoms attached to the dopant molecule by van der Waals forces. The spectral characteristics are those of a cyanine dye rather than that of an aromatic chromophore. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A new X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for extraterrestrial materials using a muon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, K.; Ninomiya, K.; Osawa, T.; Tachibana, S.; Miyake, Y.; Kubo, M. K.; Kawamura, N.; Higemoto, W.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Ebihara, M.; Uesugi, M.

    2014-05-01

    The recent development of the intense pulsed muon source at J-PARC MUSE, Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex/MUon Science Establishment (106 s-1 for a momentum of 60 MeV/c), enabled us to pioneer a new frontier in analytical sciences. Here, we report a non-destructive elemental analysis using µ- capture. Controlling muon momentum from 32.5 to 57.5 MeV/c, we successfully demonstrate a depth-profile analysis of light elements (B, C, N, and O) from several mm-thick layered materials and non-destructive bulk analyses of meteorites containing organic materials. Muon beam analysis, enabling a bulk analysis of light to heavy elements without severe radioactivation, is a unique analytical method complementary to other non-destructive analyses. Furthermore, this technology can be used as a powerful tool to identify the content and distribution of organic components in future asteroidal return samples.

  14. A new X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for extraterrestrial materials using a muon beam.

    PubMed

    Terada, K; Ninomiya, K; Osawa, T; Tachibana, S; Miyake, Y; Kubo, M K; Kawamura, N; Higemoto, W; Tsuchiyama, A; Ebihara, M; Uesugi, M

    2014-05-27

    The recent development of the intense pulsed muon source at J-PARC MUSE, Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex/MUon Science Establishment (10(6) s(-1) for a momentum of 60 MeV/c), enabled us to pioneer a new frontier in analytical sciences. Here, we report a non-destructive elemental analysis using µ(-) capture. Controlling muon momentum from 32.5 to 57.5 MeV/c, we successfully demonstrate a depth-profile analysis of light elements (B, C, N, and O) from several mm-thick layered materials and non-destructive bulk analyses of meteorites containing organic materials. Muon beam analysis, enabling a bulk analysis of light to heavy elements without severe radioactivation, is a unique analytical method complementary to other non-destructive analyses. Furthermore, this technology can be used as a powerful tool to identify the content and distribution of organic components in future asteroidal return samples.

  15. Provenance studies of Central European Neolithic obsidians using external beam milli-PIXE spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, B.; Cristea-Stan, D.; Kovács, I.; Szőkefalvi-Nagy, Z.

    2014-01-01

    External beam milli-PIXE technique was used for the determination of the elemental concentration ratios in some Prehistoric obsidian tools found in Transylvania, in the Iron Gates region near Danube, as well as on a few relevant geological obsidian samples from Slovak Tokaj Mountains, Lipari, Armenia. As provenance "fingerprints" the Ti to Mn and Rb to Zr ratios were used. The results confirm that the Transylvanian Neolithic samples have a Slovak Tokaj Mountains provenance. For Iron Gates samples, there are at least two different geological sources: for Late Neolithic tools, the origin is also the Slovak Tokaj Mountains but for Late Mesolithic-Early Neolithic samples, the sources are clearly different, possibly of the Hungarian Tokaj Mountains or the Balkan-Aegean origin.

  16. Extreme-ultraviolet beam-foil spectroscopy of highly ionized neon and argon. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Demarest, J.A.

    1986-08-01

    A study of the extreme-ultraviolet radiation emitted by ion beams of highly ionized neon and argon after passage through thin foils was conducted. A grazing-incidence spectrometer was equipped with a position-sensitive microchannel plate (MCP) detector, which improved the detection efficiency by two orders of magnitude. The position information of the MCP was determined to be linear over 90% of the 50-mm-wide detector. Spectra spanning regions of over 100 A were accumulated at a resolution of less than 1 A. A wavelength calibration based on a second order equation of spectrometer position was found to result in an accuracy of - 0.1 A. Over 40 transitions of Ne VIII, Ne IX, and Ne X were observed in the wavelength region from 350 to 30 A from n=2-3,4,5; n=3-4,5,6,7,8; n=4-6,7; and n=5-9. An intensity calibration of the detection system allowed the determination of the relative populations of n=3 states of Ne VIII and Ne IX. An overpopulation of states with low orbital angular momenta support electron-capture predictions by the first-order Born approximation. The argon beam-foil data confirmed the wavelength predictions of 30 previously unobserved transitions in the wavlength region from 355 to 25 A from n=2-2; n=3-4; n=4-5,6,7; and n=6-8. Lifetime determinations were made by the simultaneous measurement of 26 argon lines in the spectral region from 295-180 A. Many of the n=2-2 transitions agreed well with theory.

  17. Internal rotation in methyl silane by avoided-crossing molecular-beam spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerts, W. Leo; Ozier, Irving

    1982-07-01

    The avoided-crossing molecular-beam electric-resonance technique was applied to methyl silane in the ground torsional state. A new type of anticrossing is introduced which breaks the torsional symmetry and obeys the selection rules Δ J = 0, K = +1 / a3 -1. For these "barrier" anticrossings, the values of the crossing fields Ec yield directly the internal rotation splittings; the Ec are independent of the difference ( A- B) in the rotational constants. Such anticrossings were observed for J from 1 to 6. Studies were also conducted of several "rotational" anticrossings ( J, K) = (1, ±1) / a3 (2, 0) for which Ec does depend on ( A- B). The normal rotational transition ( J, K) = (1, 0) ← (0, 0) was observed in the ground torsional state using the molecular beam spectrometer. The present data on CH 328SiH 3 were combined with Hirota's microwave spectra and analyzed with the torsion-rotation Hamiltonian including all quartic centrifugal distortion terms. In addition to evaluating B and several distortion constants, determinations were made of the moment of inertia of the methyl top Iα = 3.165(5) amu-Å 2, the effective rotational constant Aeff = 56 189.449(32) MHz, and the effective height of the threefold barrier to internal rotation V3eff = 592.3359(73) cm -1. The correlations leading to these two effective constants are discussed and the true values of A and V3 are determined within certain approximations. For the isotopic species CH 330SiH 3, barrier and rotational anticrossings were observed. The isotopic changes in A and V3 were determined, as well as an upper limit to the corresponding change in Iα.

  18. Methanogenic activity tests by Infrared Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Cruz, Karla; Sepulveda-Jauregui, Armando; Escobar-Orozco, Nayeli; Thalasso, Frederic

    2012-10-01

    Methanogenic activity (MA) tests are commonly carried out to estimate the capability of anaerobic biomass to treat effluents, to evaluate anaerobic activity in bioreactors or natural ecosystems, or to quantify inhibitory effects on methanogenic activity. These activity tests are usually based on the measurement of the volume of biogas produced by volumetric, pressure increase or gas chromatography (GC) methods. In this study, we present an alternative method for non-invasive measurement of methane produced during activity tests in closed vials, based on Infrared Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (MA-TDLAS). This new method was tested during model acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity tests and was compared to a more traditional method based on gas chromatography. From the results obtained, the CH(4) detection limit of the method was estimated to 60 ppm and the minimum measurable methane production rate was estimated to 1.09(.)10(-3) mg l(-1) h(-1), which is below CH(4) production rate usually reported in both anaerobic reactors and natural ecosystems. Additionally to sensitivity, the method has several potential interests compared to more traditional methods among which short measurements time allowing the measurement of a large number of MA test vials, non-invasive measurements avoiding leakage or external interferences and similar cost to GC based methods. It is concluded that MA-TDLAS is a promising method that could be of interest not only in the field of anaerobic digestion but also, in the field of environmental ecology where CH(4) production rates are usually very low. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and femtosecond intramolecular dynamics using supersonic molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, B.

    1992-09-01

    High resolution He I[alpha] photoelectron spectroscopy of formaldehyde and ketene and their deuterated compounds, are reported. The combination of a (H2CO) double-pass high-resolution electron-energy analyzer and effective rotational cooling of the sample by supersonic expansion enable the spectroscopy of these molecular cations. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated from the high-resolution photoelectron spectra, shedding light on the ultrafast intramolecular dynamics of the molecular cations. This study reveals much more vibrational structural detail in the first electronic excited state of H2CO cations. The first electronic excited state of H2CO cations may have nonplanar equilibrium geometry. Strong isotope effects on vibronic (vibrational) coupling are observed in the second electronic excited state of H2CO. Vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for all four observed electronic states of H2CO. The correlation function of the first electronic excited state of H2CO shows a slow decay rate on the femtosecond time scale. The ultrafast decay of the H2CO cations in the third electronic excited state implies that dissociation and intramolecular processes are the main decay pathways. The present spectra of the ground states of ketene cations have more fine structure than before. The AIEs of the first and fifth excited states are determined unambiguously more accurately. The doublet-like fine structures present in the lint excited state of ketene implies the excitation of a soft'' mode not observed before. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for 4 of the 6 observed electronic states. The dynamics of the ground states of the cations are characterized by a wave packet oscillating with small amplitude around the minimum on the upper PES. The decay dynamics of the first and the fifth excited states of ketene are characterized by ultra-fast intramolecular processes like predissociation.

  20. High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and femtosecond intramolecular dynamics using supersonic molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, B.

    1992-09-01

    High resolution He I{alpha} photoelectron spectroscopy of formaldehyde and ketene and their deuterated compounds, are reported. The combination of a (H2CO) double-pass high-resolution electron-energy analyzer and effective rotational cooling of the sample by supersonic expansion enable the spectroscopy of these molecular cations. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated from the high-resolution photoelectron spectra, shedding light on the ultrafast intramolecular dynamics of the molecular cations. This study reveals much more vibrational structural detail in the first electronic excited state of H2CO cations. The first electronic excited state of H2CO cations may have nonplanar equilibrium geometry. Strong isotope effects on vibronic (vibrational) coupling are observed in the second electronic excited state of H2CO. Vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for all four observed electronic states of H2CO. The correlation function of the first electronic excited state of H2CO shows a slow decay rate on the femtosecond time scale. The ultrafast decay of the H2CO cations in the third electronic excited state implies that dissociation and intramolecular processes are the main decay pathways. The present spectra of the ground states of ketene cations have more fine structure than before. The AIEs of the first and fifth excited states are determined unambiguously more accurately. The doublet-like fine structures present in the lint excited state of ketene implies the excitation of a ``soft`` mode not observed before. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for 4 of the 6 observed electronic states. The dynamics of the ground states of the cations are characterized by a wave packet oscillating with small amplitude around the minimum on the upper PES. The decay dynamics of the first and the fifth excited states of ketene are characterized by ultra-fast intramolecular processes like predissociation.

  1. Diagnostics and Monitoring of a Plasma Beam Source based on Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harhausen, Jens; Foest, Rüdiger; Loffhagen, Detlef; Ohl, Andreas; Schäfer, Jan

    2013-09-01

    Plasma ion assisted deposition (PIAD) is employed for the production of high performance optical coatings. Here, the assist-source is a hot cathode DC discharge (Advanced Plasma Source APS) which generates an ion beam (ion energy Ei ~ 50 - 150eV) based on an expansion process at a chamber pressure of p ~ 20mPa . Efforts in plasma characterization have been made to improve the PIAD concept in terms of quality and reproducibility. In this contribution results on the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and local emission of argon neutral and ion species in the plasma plume are presented. The interpretation of emission is supported by collisional radiative modeling. Main findings are the occurrence of a nonlocal EEDF and an inhomogeneous distribution of emission which is sensitive to the conditioning of the APS, like the cathode temperature. This detailed view allows a novel approach to monitor the plasma state in this particular deposition environment along with employing a control scheme for PIAD. First results obtained for oxide layers (TiO2, Al2O3) are discussed. Funded by the German Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF, Fkz. 13N10462).

  2. Electric and Magnetic Field Measurements in High Energy Electron Beam Diode Plasmas using Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark; Patel, Sonal; Kiefer, Mark; Biswas, S.; Doron, R.; Stambulchik, E.; Bernshtam, V.; Maron, Yitzhak

    2016-10-01

    The RITS accelerator (5-11MV, 100-200kA) at Sandia National Laboratories is being used to evaluate the Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode as a potential flash x-ray radiography source. This diode consists of a small, hollowed metal cathode and a planar, high atomic mass anode, with a small vacuum gap of approximately one centimeter. The electron beam is focused, due to its self-field, to a few millimeters at the target, generating bremsstrahlung x-rays. During this process, plasmas form on the electrode surfaces and propagate into the vacuum gap, with a velocity of a 1-10 cm's/microseconds. These plasmas are measured spectroscopically using a Czerny-Turner spectrometer with a gated, ICCD detector, and input optical fiber array. Local magnetic and electric fields of several Tesla and several MV/cm were measured through Zeeman splitting and Stark shifting of spectral lines. Specific transitions susceptible to quantum magnetic and electric field effects were utilized through the application of dopants. Data was analyzed using detailed, time-dependent, collisional-radiative (CR) and radiation transport modeling. Recent results will be presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Actively triggered 4d cone-beam CT acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Martin F.; Wisotzky, Eric; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: 4d cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans are usually reconstructed by extracting the motion information from the 2d projections or an external surrogate signal, and binning the individual projections into multiple respiratory phases. In this “after-the-fact” binning approach, however, projections are unevenly distributed over respiratory phases resulting in inefficient utilization of imaging dose. To avoid excess dose in certain respiratory phases, and poor image quality due to a lack of projections in others, the authors have developed a novel 4d CBCT acquisition framework which actively triggers 2d projections based on the forward-predicted position of the tumor.Methods: The forward-prediction of the tumor position was independently established using either (i) an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system based on implanted EM-transponders which act as a surrogate for the tumor position, or (ii) an external motion sensor measuring the chest-wall displacement and correlating this external motion to the phase-shifted diaphragm motion derived from the acquired images. In order to avoid EM-induced artifacts in the imaging detector, the authors devised a simple but effective “Faraday” shielding cage. The authors demonstrated the feasibility of their acquisition strategy by scanning an anthropomorphic lung phantom moving on 1d or 2d sinusoidal trajectories.Results: With both tumor position devices, the authors were able to acquire 4d CBCTs free of motion blurring. For scans based on the EM tracking system, reconstruction artifacts stemming from the presence of the EM-array and the EM-transponders were greatly reduced using newly developed correction algorithms. By tuning the imaging frequency independently for each respiratory phase prior to acquisition, it was possible to harmonize the number of projections over respiratory phases. Depending on the breathing period (3.5 or 5 s) and the gantry rotation time (4 or 5 min), between ∼90 and 145

  4. Defect study of molecular beam epitaxy grown undoped GaInNAsSb thin film using junction-capacitance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Monirul Islam, Muhammad; Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Okada, Yoshitaka

    2013-02-18

    Defects in undoped GaInNAsSb thin film (i-GaInNAsSb) were investigated by junction-capacitance technique using admittance and transient photocapacitance (TPC) spectroscopy. An electron trap D2 was identified at 0.34 eV below the conduction band (E{sub C}) of i-GaInNAsSb using admittance spectroscopy. Optical transition of valance band (E{sub V}) electrons to a localized state OH1 (E{sub V} + 0.75 eV) was manifested in negative TPC signal. Combined activation energy of OH1 and D2 defect corresponds to the band-gap of i-GaInNAsSb, suggesting that OH1/D2 acts as an efficient recombination center. TPC signal at {approx}1.59 eV above E{sub V} was attributed to the nitrogen-induced localized state in GaInNAsSb.

  5. Plasma effects of active ion beam injections in the ionosphere at rocket altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldy, R. L.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Kintner, P. M.; Moore, T. E.; Pollock, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    Data from ARCS rocket ion beam injection experiments are primarily discussed. There are three results from this series of active experiments that are of particular interest in space plasma physics. These are the transverse acceleration of ambient ions in the large beam volume, the scattering of beam ions near the release payload, and the possible acceleration of electrons very close to the plasma generator which produce intense high frequency waves. The ability of 100 ma ion beam injections into the upper E and F regions of the ionosphere to produce these phenomena appear to be related solely to the process by which the plasma release payload and the ion beam are neutralized. Since the electrons in the plasma release do not convect with the plasma ions, the neutralization of both the payload and beam must be accomplished by large field-aligned currents (milliamperes/square meter) which are very unstable to wave growth of various modes.

  6. Active echolocation beam focusing in the false killer whale, Pseudorca crassidens.

    PubMed

    Kloepper, Laura N; Nachtigall, Paul E; Donahue, Megan J; Breese, Marlee

    2012-04-15

    The odontocete sound production system is highly complex and produces intense, directional signals that are thought to be focused by the melon and the air sacs. Because odontocete echolocation signals are variable and the emitted click frequency greatly affects the echolocation beam shape, investigations of beam focusing must account for frequency-related beam changes. In this study we tested whether the echolocation beam of a false killer whale changed depending on target difficulty and distance while also accounting for frequency-related changes in the echolocation beam. The data indicate that the false killer whale changes its beam size according to target distance and difficulty, which may be a strategy of maximizing the energy of the target echo. We propose that the animal is using a strategy of changing the focal region according to target distance and that this strategy is under active control.

  7. Tin re-deposition and erosion measured by cavity-ring-down-spectroscopy under a high flux plasma beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvon, V.; Al, R.; Bystrov, K.; Peeters, F. J. J.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Morgan, T. W.

    2017-08-01

    Cavity-ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) was implemented to measure the re-deposition of liquid tin under a high flux plasma beam in the linear plasma device Pilot-PSI. A capillary porous system (CPS) consisting of a molybdenum cup and tungsten meshes (pores diameters of 0.2 mm and 0.44 mm) was filled with tin and exposed to argon plasma. The absorption of a UV laser-beam at 286.331 nm was used to determine a number of sputtered neutral tin atoms. The incoming flux of argon ions of ~50 eV was 1.6-2.7  ×  1023 m-2 s-1, and the sample temperature measured by pyrometry varied from 850 °C to 1200 °C during exposures. The use of CRDS for measuring absolute number of particles under such plasma exposure was demonstrated for the first time. The number of sputtered tin particles in the cavity region assuming no losses would be expected to be 5.5  ×  1011-1.2  ×  1012 while CRDS measurements showed only 5.7-9.9  ×  108. About 98-99.8% of sputtered particles were therefore found to not reach the CRDS observation volume. Spectroscopic ratios of Sn I to Sn II ions, as well as equilibrium considerations, indicate that fast ionization as well as plasma entrainment of neutrals is responsible for the discrepancy. This would lead to high re-deposition rates, implying a lowered contamination rate of core plasma and lower required replenishment rates at high-flux conditions than would otherwise be expected.

  8. Active Signal Propagation and Imaging Using Vortex Beams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    waist , and 2p+ l+1( )arctan(z / zR ) is the Gouy phase where zR is the Rayleigh range. The order of the Laguerre-Gaussian mode is given by N = 2p...cause them to rotate around the circumference of the optical vortex . 1.1. Guide-probe experiment Implementation of OV-GP imaging is based on...polarized Gaussian beam from a Helium-Neon laser cavity (633nm, ~5mW) is expanded and collimated to a beam waist of ~5mm and converted into an OV baring

  9. Optical activities of micro-spiral photonic crystals fabricated by multi-beam holographic lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Jenny; Gao, Wensheng; Tam, Wing Yim

    2011-09-01

    We report on the optical activities of left- and right-handed micro-spirals fabricated in dichromate gelatin emulsions using a holographic interference technique involving six linearly polarized side beams and one circularly polarized central beam. Photonic bandgaps in the visible range are observed. More importantly, opposite optical activities—a polarization rotation of a few degrees and a circular dichroism (CD) of about 20% at the photonic band edges—are observed for the left- and right-handed spirals. Furthermore, the transmittance of circularly polarized light obeys the Lorentz reciprocity lemma for forward and backward incidence. However neither polarization rotation nor CD is observed for achiral split rings and hollow rods fabricated using all linearly polarized beams and six side beams without the central beam, respectively; this indicates that the chiral nature of the spirals is essential for the observed optical activities.

  10. A mask for high-intensity heavy-ion beams in the MAYA active target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Pancin, J.; Damoy, S.; Roger, T.; Babo, M.; Caamaño, M.; Farget, F.; Grinyer, G. F.; Jacquot, B.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; Ramos, D.; Suzuki, D.

    2014-12-01

    The use of high-intensity and/or heavy-ion beams in active targets and time-projection chambers is often limited by the strong ionization produced by the beam. Besides the difficulties associated with the saturation of the detector and electronics, beam-related signals may hide the physical events of interest or reduce the detector performance. In addition, space-charge effects may deteriorate the homogeneity of the electric drift field and distort the subsequent reconstruction of particle trajectories. In anticipation of future projects involving such conditions, a dedicated beam mask has been developed and tested in the MAYA active target. Experimental results with a 136Xe beam are presented.

  11. Pseudo-single beam FM spectroscopy for fast, minimally destructive, high SNR detection of Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fertig, Chad; Locke, Mary; Kansky, Ken

    2009-05-01

    Frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) is a sensitive method of detecting dilute atomic gases. In FMS, the refractive index of an atomic cloud is sensed by an interferometric measurement of the differential phase shift between upper and lower sidebands of a frequency modulated probe laser. In the standard configuration, the probe beam's carrier component acts as both phase reference and amplifier---the electronic beat signal being proportional to √Icarrier. This creates a dilemma for using FMS for minimally destructive measurements: a brighter carrier produces a larger signal, but at the cost of greater spontaneous heating. We have developed a new method of FMS which solves the dilemma with an optical analog of a PLL FM-radio receiver. We extract the atomic density information encoded in the probe sidebands by beating the probe against a separately synthesized ``local-oscillator'' (LO) laser that is optically phase-locked to the probe's carrier component. Here, we report a demonstration of this scheme using an optical cavity as a stable, tunable, stand-in for cold atoms.

  12. Optical Spectroscopy Results for the Self-Magnetic Pinch Electron Beam Diode on the ITS-6 Accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Mark D.; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Hahn, Kelly Denise; Droemer, Darryl W.; Crain, Marlon D.; Welch, Dale Robert; Yitzhak, Maron

    2012-06-01

    Experiments have been conducted at Sandia National Laboratories' RITS-6 accelerator facility [1] (operating at 7.5 MV and 180 kA) investigating plasma formation and propagation in relativistic electron beam diodes used for flash x-ray radiography. High resolution, visible and ultraviolet spectra were collected in the anode-cathode (A-K) vacuum gap of the Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode [2-4]. Time and space resolved spectra are compared with time-dependent, collisional-radiative (CR) calculations [5-7] and Lsp, hybrid particle-in-cell code simulations [8,9]. Results indicate the presence of a dense (>1x1017cm-3), low temperature (few eV), on-axis plasma, composed of hydrocarbon and metal ion species, which expands at a rate of several cm/s from the anode to the cathode. In addition, cathode plasmas are observed which extend several millimeters into the A-K gap [10]. It is believed that the interaction of these electrode plasmas cause premature impedance collapse of the diode and subsequent reduction in the total radiation output. Diagnostics include high speed imaging and spectroscopy using nanosecond gated ICCD cameras, streak cameras, and photodiode arrays.

  13. (Electron-beam induced spectroscopies at very high spatial resolution): Foreign trip report, April 26--March 12, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, J.

    1988-03-28

    At the Workshop on ''Electron-Beam Induced Spectroscopies at Very High Spatial Resolution,'' held in Aussois, France, the state of the art and where the field is (or should be) going was treated in depth. At the workshop the traveler made oral presentations on ionization localization effects on ALCHEMI measurements of Ni/sub 3/Al-based alloys, the complementary use of atom-probe field-ion microscopy, a rapporteur summary of the session on X-ray detectors, and a poster presentation on EXELFS characterization of amorphous and crystalline SiC and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Much useful information was obtained at the workshop that will directly influence the analytical electron microscopy research at ORNL. In visits to the Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne, Switzerland, the the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, France, and to the Universite Paris-Sud, Centre d'Orsay, France, the performance of and research conducted with Philips EM430ST, JEM 4000EX, and VG HB5 instruments with various attachments and modifications were discussed. Demonstration provided by the hosts on these special instruments were particularly useful.

  14. Initial Active MHD Spectroscopy Experiments on Alcator C-MOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittdiel, D. A.; Snipes, J. A.; Granetz, R. S.; Parker, R. R.; Wolfe, S. M.; Fasoli, A.

    2002-11-01

    The Active MHD Spectroscopy system is a new diagnostic on C-MOD that will be used to study low frequency MHD modes and TAE's present at high B_tor, n_e, and Te ˜= T_i. The present system consists of two antennas, power amplifiers, and an impedance matching network. Each antenna is 15 × 25 cm with five turns, an inductance of ˜10 μH, and is covered by boron nitride tiles. The two antennas are placed at the same toroidal location, symmetrically above and below the midplane. Each antenna is driven by a ˜1 kW power amplifier in the range of 1 kHz - 1 MHz with an expected antenna current ˜10 A, which will produce a vacuum field of ˜0.5 G at the q = 1.5 surface. This diagnostic is designed to excite high n ( ˜20) stable TAE's and initial results regarding their frequency, mode structure, and damping rate will be presented. Evolution of these modes could also provide information on the q profile to compare with MSE measurements, which will be important for planned lower hybrid current drive operation in 2003.

  15. Microwave and Beam Activation of Nanostructured Catalysts for Environmentally Friendly, Energy Efficient Heavy Crude Oil Processing

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a study whose goal is initial evaluation and development of energy efficient processes which take advantage of the benefits offered by nanostructured catalysts which can be activated by microwave, RF, or radiation beams.

  16. SU-E-J-49: Distal Edge Activity Fall Off Of Proton Therapy Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Elmekawy, A; Ewell, L; Butuceanu, C; Zhu, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize and quantify the distal edge activity fall off, created in a phantom by a proton therapy beam Method and Materials: A 30x30x10cm polymethylmethacrylate phantom was irradiated with a proton therapy beam using different ranges and beams. The irradiation volume is approximated by a right circular cylinder of diameter 7.6cm and varying lengths. After irradiation, the phantom was scanned via a Philips Gemini Big Bore™ PET-CT for isotope activation. Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system as well as ImageJ™ were used to analyze the resulting PET and CT scans. The region of activity within the phantom was longitudinally measured as a function of PET slice number. Dose estimations were made via Monte Carlo (GATE) simulation. Results: For both the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) and the mono-energetic pristine Bragg peak proton beams, the proximal activation rise was steep: average slope −0.735 (average intensity/slice number) ± 0.091 (standard deviation) for the pristine beams and −1.149 ± 0.117 for the SOBP beams. In contrast, the distal fall offs were dissimilar. The distal fall off in activity for the pristine beams was fit well by a linear curve: R{sup 2} (Pierson Product) was 0.9968, 0.9955 and 0.9909 for the 13.5, 17.0 and 21.0cm range beams respectively. The good fit allows for a slope comparison between the different ranges. The slope varied as a function of range from 1.021 for the 13.5cm beam to 0.8407 (average intensity/slice number) for the 21.0cm beam. This dependence can be characterized: −0.0234(average intensity/slice number/cm range). For the SOBP beams, the slopes were significantly less and were also less linear: average slope 0.2628 ± 0.0474, average R{sup 2}=0.9236. Conclusion: The distal activation fall off edge for pristine proton beams was linear and steep. The corresponding quantities for SOBP beams were shallower and less linear. Philips has provided support for this work.

  17. Electron-beam activated thermal sputtering of thermoelectric materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; He, J.; Han, M-K.; Sootsman, J. R.; Girard, S.; Arachchige, I. U.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Dravid, V. P.

    2011-08-01

    Thermoelectricity and Seebeck effect have long been observed and validated in bulk materials. With the development of advanced tools of materials characterization, here we report the first observation of such an effect in the nanometer scale: in situ directional sputtering of several thermoelectric materials inside electron microscopes. The temperature gradient introduced by the electron beam creates a voltage-drop across the samples, which enhances spontaneous sputtering of specimen ions. The sputtering occurs along a preferential direction determined by the direction of the temperature gradient. A large number of nanoparticles form and accumulate away from the beam location as a result. The sputtering and re-crystallization are found to occur at temperatures far below the melting points of bulk materials. The sputtering occurs even when a liquid nitrogen cooling holder is used to keep the overall temperature at -170 C. This unique phenomenon that occurred in the nanometer scale may provide useful clues to understanding the mechanism of thermoelectric effect.

  18. Electron-beam activated thermal sputtering of thermoelectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jinsong; Dravid, Vinayak P.; He Jiaqing; Han, Mi-Kyung; Sootsman, Joseph R.; Girard, Steven; Arachchige, Indika U.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2011-08-15

    Thermoelectricity and Seebeck effect have long been observed and validated in bulk materials. With the development of advanced tools of materials characterization, here we report the first observation of such an effect in the nanometer scale: in situ directional sputtering of several thermoelectric materials inside electron microscopes. The temperature gradient introduced by the electron beam creates a voltage-drop across the samples, which enhances spontaneous sputtering of specimen ions. The sputtering occurs along a preferential direction determined by the direction of the temperature gradient. A large number of nanoparticles form and accumulate away from the beam location as a result. The sputtering and re-crystallization are found to occur at temperatures far below the melting points of bulk materials. The sputtering occurs even when a liquid nitrogen cooling holder is used to keep the overall temperature at -170 deg. C. This unique phenomenon that occurred in the nanometer scale may provide useful clues to understanding the mechanism of thermoelectric effect.

  19. A diagnostic neutral beam system for the MST reversed-field pinch: Charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy and Rutherford scattering (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den Hartog, D. J.; Fiksel, G.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Mishagin, V.

    1999-01-01

    A diagnostic neutral beam system is being purchased for the MST reversed-field pinch. Initially, this beam will be used for charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) to measure impurity ion velocity and temperature, both equilibrium and fluctuating. This work is an extension of an existing MST spectroscopic diagnostic which has successfully measured chord-averaged flow with 10 μs time resolution [D. J. Den Hartog and R. J. Fonck, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 65, 3238 (1994)]. CHERS will provide high spatial resolution, critically needed for the investigation of fluctuations associated with the dynamo and transport. This beam will also be applied to Rutherford scattering for local measurements of majority ion velocity and temperature. Ion velocity is determined by the shift of the energy spectrum of the scattered neutral beam; ion temperature by the width of the energy spectrum. The scattered spectrum will be detected by two multichannel neutral particle analyzers. In order to achieve a time resolution of about 10 μs, the neutral beam equivalent current density and current must be high; both of these characteristics are hallmarks of the DINA beam design.

  20. Broadband active vibration control of a beam using experimentally obtained impulse functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghshineh, Koorosh; Gellrich, C. A.

    A flexible beam is used to demonstrate wideband active vibration control using a single sensor/actuator pair. The beam vibrations are controlled using a shaker, located between the primary vibration source and the free end of the beam such that the vibration amplitude at the free end of the beam is minimized. A PC-based controller is used to compute the control shaker driving voltage. This feedforward controller also compensates for the coupling between the control shaker and the control sensor. An overall reduction of 15 dB is achieved within the 20-1000 Hz frequency range. Not only do we observe reductions at the beam resonances, but we also observe reductions at the off-resonance frequencies. In addition to reductions in vibration amplitude at the free end of the beam, drastic reductions (10 to 15 dB) are obtained between the control shaker and the free end of the beam. Wideband control is demonstrated for two different types of disturbances (random and burst chip). This demonstration clearly shows the applicability of active control technology to active vibration control. This technology is available for multichannel, wideband applications in real-world problems for both sound and structural control.

  1. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    This NASA grant covered EUVE observing and data analysis programs during EUVE Cycle 5 GO observing. The research involved a single Guest Observer project 97-EUVE-061 "Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars". The grant provided funding that covered 1.25 months of the PI's salary. The activities undertaken included observation planning and data analysis (both temporal and spectral). This project was awarded 910 ksec of observing time to study seven active binary stars, all but one of which were actually observed. Lambda-And was observed on 1997 Jul 30 - Aug 3 and Aug 7-14 for a total of 297 ksec; these observations showed two large complex flares that were analyzed by Osten & Brown (1999). AR Psc, observed for 350 ksec on 1997 Aug 27 - Sep 13, showed only relatively small flares that were also discussed by Osten & Brown (1999). EUVE observations of El Eri were obtained on 1994 August 24-28, simultaneous with ASCA X-ray spectra. Four flares were detected by EUVE with one of these also observed simultaneously, by ASCA. The other three EUVE observations were of the stars BY Dra (1997 Sep 22-28), V478 Lyr (1998 May 18-27), and sigma Gem (1998 Dec 10-22). The first two stars showed a few small flares. The sigma Gem data shows a beautiful complete flare with a factor of ten peak brightness compared to quiescence. The flare rise and almost all the decay phase are observed. Unfortunately no observations in other spectral regions were obtained for these stars. Analysis of the lambda-And and AR Psc observations is complete and the results were published in Osten & Brown (1999). Analysis of the BY Dra, V478 Lyr and sigma Gem EUVE data is complete and will be published in Osten (2000, in prep.). The El Eri EUV analysis is also completed and the simultaneous EUV/X-ray study will be published in Osten et al. (2000, in prep.). Both these latter papers will be submitted in summer 2000. All these results will form part of Rachel Osten's PhD thesis.

  2. Scattered neutron dose equivalent from an active scanning proton beam delivery system.

    PubMed

    Hecksel, Draik; Sandison, George A; Farr, Jonathan B; Edwards, Andrew C

    2007-12-01

    A study of neutron production from a novel active scanning proton beam delivery system at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute (MPRI) has been performed. The neutron dose equivalent was determined using a neutron rem (roentgen equivalent in man) detector which has an upper energy limit of 10 MeV. Measurement were taken at 0, 45, and 90 degrees from the proton beam central axis and for various proton beam energies (127-208 MeV) and scanned field sizes (25-144 cm2). The maximum neutron dose observed was 0.43 mSv / (proton treatment Gy) at 90 degrees from the beam axis for a beam energy of 208.4 MeV and a scanned field size of 144 cm2. It is still possible to further mitigate this secondary neutron dose during treatment by optimizing parameters within the treatment nozzle and using shielding.

  3. Ground-water activation from the upcoming operation of MI40 beam absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; Read, A.L.

    1996-09-01

    During the course of normal operation, a particle accelerator can produce radionuclides in the adjacent soil and in the beam line elements through the interactions of accelerated particles and/or secondary particles produced in the beam absorbers, targets, and sometimes elsewhere through routine beam losses. The production and concentration of these radionuclides depends on the beam parameters such as energy, intensity, particle type, and target configuration. The radionuclides produced in the soil can potentially migrate to the ground water. Soil activation and migration to the ground water depends on the details of the local hydrogeology. Generally, very few places such as the beam stops, target stations, injection and extraction sectors can have high enough radiation fields to produce radionuclides in the soil outside the enclosures. During the design, construction, or an upgrade in the intensity of existing beams, measures are taken to minimize the production of activated soil. The only leachable radionuclides known to be produced in the Fermilab soil are {sup 3}H, {sup 7}Be , {sup 22}Na, {sup 45}Ca and {sup 54}Mn and it has been determined that only {sup 3}H, and {sup 22}Na, because of their longer half lives and greater leachabilities, may significantly impact ground water resources.In the past, Fermilab has developed and used the Single Resident Well Model (SRWM) to estimate the ground water activation. Recently, the Concentration Model (CM), a more realistic method which depends on the site hydrogeology has been developed to decide the shielding requirements of the high radiation sites, and to calculate the ground water activation and its subsequent migration to the aquifer. In this report, the concentration of radionuclide released to the surface waters and the aquifer around the MI40 beam absorber are calculated. Subsequently, the ultimate limit on the primary proton beam intensity to be aborted on the Main Injector beam absorber is determined.

  4. The performance of the γ-ray tracking array GRETINA for γ-ray spectroscopy with fast beams of rare isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisshaar, D.; Bazin, D.; Bender, P. C.; Campbell, C. M.; Recchia, F.; Bader, V.; Baugher, T.; Belarge, J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Crawford, H. L.; Cromaz, M.; Elman, B.; Fallon, P.; Forney, A.; Gade, A.; Harker, J.; Kobayashi, N.; Langer, C.; Lauritsen, T.; Lee, I. Y.; Lemasson, A.; Longfellow, B.; Lunderberg, E.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Miki, K.; Momiyama, S.; Noji, S.; Radford, D. C.; Scott, M.; Sethi, J.; Stroberg, S. R.; Sullivan, C.; Titus, R.; Wiens, A.; Williams, S.; Wimmer, K.; Zhu, S.

    2017-03-01

    The γ-ray tracking array GRETINA was coupled to the S800 magnetic spectrometer for spectroscopy with fast beams of rare isotopes at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory on the campus of Michigan State University. We describe the technical details of this powerful setup and report on GRETINA's performance achieved with source and in-beam measurements. The γ-ray multiplicity encountered in experiments with fast beams is usually low, allowing for a simplified and efficient treatment of the data in the γ-ray analysis in terms of Doppler reconstruction and spectral quality. The results reported in this work were obtained from GRETINA consisting of 8 detector modules hosting four high-purity germanium crystals each. Currently, GRETINA consists of 10 detector modules.

  5. The performance of the γ-ray tracking array GRETINA for γ-ray spectroscopy with fast beams of rare isotopes

    DOE PAGES

    Weisshaar, D.; Bazin, D.; Bender, P. C.; ...

    2016-12-03

    The gamma-ray tracking array GRETINA was coupled to the S800 magnetic spectrometer for spectroscopy with fast beams of rare isotopes at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory on the campus of Michigan State University. We describe the technical details of this powerful setup and report on GRETINA's performance achieved with source and in-beam measurements. The gamma-ray multiplicity encountered in experiments with fast beams is usually low, allowing for a simplified and efficient treatment of the data in the gamma-ray analysis in terms of Doppler reconstruction and spectral quality. Finally, the results reported in this work were obtained from GRETINA consisting ofmore » 8 detector modules hosting four high-purity germanium crystals each. Currently, GRETINA consists of 10 detector modules.« less

  6. The performance of the γ-ray tracking array GRETINA for γ-ray spectroscopy with fast beams of rare isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Weisshaar, D.; Bazin, D.; Bender, P. C.; Campbell, C. M.; Recchia, F.; Bader, V.; Baugher, T.; Belarge, J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Crawford, H. L.; Cromaz, M.; Elman, B.; Fallon, P.; Forney, A.; Gade, A.; Harker, J.; Kobayashi, N.; Langer, C.; Lauritsen, T.; Lee, I. Y.; Lemasson, A.; Longfellow, B.; Lunderberg, E.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Miki, K.; Momiyama, S.; Noji, S.; Radford, D. C.; Scott, M.; Sethi, J.; Stroberg, S. R.; Sullivan, C.; Titus, R.; Wiens, A.; Williams, S.; Wimmer, K.; Zhu, S.

    2016-12-03

    The gamma-ray tracking array GRETINA was coupled to the S800 magnetic spectrometer for spectroscopy with fast beams of rare isotopes at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory on the campus of Michigan State University. We describe the technical details of this powerful setup and report on GRETINA's performance achieved with source and in-beam measurements. The gamma-ray multiplicity encountered in experiments with fast beams is usually low, allowing for a simplified and efficient treatment of the data in the gamma-ray analysis in terms of Doppler reconstruction and spectral quality. Finally, the results reported in this work were obtained from GRETINA consisting of 8 detector modules hosting four high-purity germanium crystals each. Currently, GRETINA consists of 10 detector modules.

  7. a Study of the Role of Large-Amplitude Motions in Unimolecular Energy Transfer Using Molecular Beam Optothermal Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Carl Cameron

    1995-01-01

    The role of molecular structure in energy transfer reactions in the ground and excited electronic states was explored using optothermal spectroscopy. In the ground state, the relationship between intramolecular van der Waals interactions and vibrational mode coupling was explored in a homologous series of disubstituted ethanes, including Gg^' -2-fluoroethanol, g-1,2-difluoroethane, g-1-chloro-2-fluoroethane, t-1-chloro-2-fluoroethane, and 1,1,2-trifluoroethane. This series of substituted ethanes varies in degree of van der Waals interactions that hinder internal rotation about the C-C bond. High resolution infrared molecular beam spectroscopy was used to determine the extent of vibrational mode coupling. Perturbations in the rotational structure of these molecules provided a measure of vibrational mode coupling. We have observed that the degree of intramolecular interaction, which is dependent on the van der Waals separation of the substituents and the shape of the potential well, correlates with the extent of vibrational mode coupling. The extent of vibrational mode coupling in this series of molecules did not correlate with the density of states available for coupling. Therefore, density of states alone is insufficient to explain the observed trend. In the excited electronic state, optothermal detection has been used to observe non-radiative relaxation channels in aniline, p-bromoaniline and trans-stilbene. p-Bromoaniline has no detectable fluorescence due to a heavy atom effect which increases the rate of intersystem crossing to the triplet state. An optothermal spectrum of p-bromoaniline was observed with the origin at 32625 cm^ {-1}. For trans-stilbene the differences between the laser excitation spectrum and the optothermal spectrum of the S_1 state clearly show the onset of isomerization at ~1250 cm^{-1} above the origin. Absolute quantum yields of fluorescence, Frank-Condon factors, non -radiative rates, and radiative rates have been obtained for a series

  8. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy measurements in the extreme ultraviolet region of central carbon concentrations during high power neutral beam heating in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B.C.; Fonck, R.J.; Ramsey, A.T.; Synakowski, E.J.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Johnson, D.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.; Taylor, G.; Valanju, P.M. . Plasma Physics Lab.; Texas Univ., Austin, TX . Fusion Research Center)

    1989-09-01

    The carbon concentration in the central region of TFTR discharges with high power neutral beam heating has been measured by charge-extracted recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) of the C{sup +5} n = 3--4 transition in the extreme ultraviolet region. The carbon concentrations were deduced from absolute measurements of the line brightness using a calculation of the beam attenuation and the appropriate cascade-corrected line excitation rates. As a result of the high ion temperatures in most of the discharges, the contribution of beam halo neutrals to the line brightness was significant and therefore had to be included in the modeling of the data. Carbon concentrations have been measured in discharges with I{sub p} = 1.0-1.6 MA and beam power in the range of 2.6-30 MW, including a number of supershots. The results are in good agreement with carbon concentrations deduced from the visible bremsstrahlung Z{sub eff} and metallic impurity concentrations measured by x-ray pulse-height analysis, demonstrating the reliability of the atomic rates used in the beam attenuation and line excitation calculations. Carbon is the dominant impurity species in these discharges; the oxygen concentration measured via CXRS in a high beam power case was 0.0006 of n{sub e}, compard to 0.04 for carbon. Trends with I{sub p} and beam power in the carbon concentration and the inferred deuteron concentration are presented. The carbon concentration is independent of I{sub p} and decreases from 0.13 at 2.6 MW beam power to 0.04 at 30 MW, while the deuteron concentration increases from 0.25 to 0.75 over the same range of beam power. These changes are primarily the result of beam particle fueling, as the carbon density did not vary significantly with beam power. The time evolutions of the carbon and deuteron concentrations during two high power beam pulses, one which exhibited a carbon bloom and one which did not, are compared. 30 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Active buckling control of beams using piezoelectric actuators and strain gauge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. S.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, a finite element model incorporating active control techniques has been developed to stabilize the first two buckling modes of both a simply supported and a cantilevered beam. The goal is to increase the corresponding beam buckling loads by using piezoelectric actuators along with optimal feedback control. The uniform beams are bonded with two pairs of segmented piezoelectric actuators at the top and bottom. Resistive strain gauges are attached to the centres of the actuators as sensors. Measurements are taken using these, to estimate the system states. The beams are simply supported or cantilevered and subjected to a slowly increasing axial compressive load. Finite element formulations based on the classical Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and linear piezoelectric constitutive equations for the actuators are presented. The associated reduced-order modal equations and the state-space equations are derived for the design of a standard linear quadratic regulator (LQR). The finite element analysis and the active control simulation results are consistent with both theoretical analysis results and experimental data. The designed full state feedback LQR controller is shown to be successful in stabilizing the first two buckling modes of the beams. Also the control simulation shows that the present optimally located segmented actuator pairs along the beam are more effective for buckling control.

  10. Preliminary Findings of The Brief Everyday Activities Measurement (BEAM) in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Scharaga, Elyssa A.; Holtzer, Roee

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Functional losses are common in healthy and cognitively impaired older adults. However, subtle declines in instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) are not always detected in self-reports. Performance IADL measurements are financially and time burdensome, restricting their use in varied settings. To address these limitations, we developed the Brief Everyday Activities Measure (BEAM), a short (< 5 minutes) objective IADL measure that assesses medication and finance management. Design & Participants The BEAM was administered to 209 cognitively non-demented community-dwellers (ages 65–95 years). Measurements Participants completed standardized motor, neuropsychological, psychological, and self-report functional assessments. Results BEAM completion time ranged from 54.16 to 259.31 seconds. Interclass correlations (ICC) for total BEAM completion time was moderate (0.65, 95% CI [.43 –.78]). Accuracy for total BEAM performance was in the low-moderate range (Kappa = 0.38, p < .001, 95% CI [.18 –.54]). As predicted, lower accuracy and longer time to complete the BEAM were both associated with worse executive functions, attention, and processing speed. Conclusions Medication and finance management can be efficiently assessed within five minutes. The BEAM may be a valuable screening tool to evaluate these functional abilities. PMID:26482695

  11. Nuclear structure studies of 19O, 27 Mg, and 29Al using in-beam -ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, Rutger

    This dissertation reports the study of three nuclei 19O, 29Al, and 27Mg at high angular momentum using gamma-ray spectroscopy. These experiments were performed at the John D. Fox Superconducting Linear Accelerator at Florida State University (FSU). gamma-radiation and charged particles were detected in coincidence by employing the Compton suppressed FSU gamma-detector array in conjunction with a silicon DeltaE-E particle telescope. The 9Be(14C, alphagamma) reaction at beam energies of 30 and 35 MeV were used to populate excited levels of 19O. The data were sorted for alpha-gamma and alpha-gamma- coincidences. A total of eight new gamma transitions and the addition of one new state in 19O were identified. Six of these gamma transitions correspond to neutron unbound states. These results are compared to shell model calculations using the USDA, WBP, and PSDU interactions. The neutron unbound gamma decaying states are best identified with states having higher spin and small spectroscopic factors. Excited levels were populated in 29Al and 27Mg using the reactions 18O(14C,p2n) and 18O(14C,alpha n) at 40 MeV. The data were sorted for p-gamma-gamma and alpha-gamma-gamma coincidences for 29Al and 27Mg respectively. The level and decay schemes of both nuclei have been expanded with the addition of several new levels and electromagnetic transitions. The results for both nuclei are compared to shell model calculations using the USDA and WBP interactions.

  12. Active Plasma Lensing for Relativistic Laser-Plasma-Accelerated Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tilborg, J.; Steinke, S.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Shaw, B. H.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Huijts, J. V.; Nakamura, K.; Daniels, J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Bulanov, S. S.; Bobrova, N. A.; Sasorov, P. V.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-10-01

    Compact, tunable, radially symmetric focusing of electrons is critical to laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) applications. Experiments are presented demonstrating the use of a discharge-capillary active plasma lens to focus 100-MeV-level LPA beams. The lens can provide tunable field gradients in excess of 3000 T /m , enabling cm-scale focal lengths for GeV-level beam energies and allowing LPA-based electron beams and light sources to maintain their compact footprint. For a range of lens strengths, excellent agreement with simulation was obtained.

  13. Active laser radar systems with stochastic electromagnetic beams in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yangjian; Korotkova, Olga; Eyyuboğlu, Halil T; Baykal, Yahya

    2008-09-29

    Propagation of stochastic electromagnetic beams through paraxial ABCD optical systems operating through turbulent atmosphere is investigated with the help of the ABCD matrices and the generalized Huygens-Fresnel integral. In particular, the analytic formula is derived for the cross-spectral density matrix of an electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model (EGSM) beam. We applied our analysis for the ABCD system with a single lens located on the propagation path, representing, in a particular case, the unfolded double-pass propagation scenario of active laser radar. Through a number of numerical examples we investigated the effect of local turbulence strength and lens' parameters on spectral, coherence and polarization properties of the EGSM beam.

  14. Active Plasma Lensing for Relativistic Laser-Plasma-Accelerated Electron Beams.

    PubMed

    van Tilborg, J; Steinke, S; Geddes, C G R; Matlis, N H; Shaw, B H; Gonsalves, A J; Huijts, J V; Nakamura, K; Daniels, J; Schroeder, C B; Benedetti, C; Esarey, E; Bulanov, S S; Bobrova, N A; Sasorov, P V; Leemans, W P

    2015-10-30

    Compact, tunable, radially symmetric focusing of electrons is critical to laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) applications. Experiments are presented demonstrating the use of a discharge-capillary active plasma lens to focus 100-MeV-level LPA beams. The lens can provide tunable field gradients in excess of 3000 T/m, enabling cm-scale focal lengths for GeV-level beam energies and allowing LPA-based electron beams and light sources to maintain their compact footprint. For a range of lens strengths, excellent agreement with simulation was obtained.

  15. Broadband active tuning of unidirectional scattering from nanoantenna using combined radially and azimuthally polarized beams.

    PubMed

    Xi, Z; Wei, L; Adam, A J L; Urbach, H P

    2016-01-01

    We propose an approach to actively tune the scattering pattern of a Mie-type spherical antenna. The scheme is based on separate control over the induced electric dipole and induced magnetic dipole using two coherent focused beams of radial polarization and azimuthal polarization, respectively. By carefully tuning the amplitude and phase relation of the two beams, a broadband unidirectional scattering can be achieved, even at the antenna's resonant wavelength where the antenna scatters efficiently. By moving the focus of one beam, a drastic switch of the unidirectional scattering can be observed. Such a scheme enables the design of ultra-compact optical switches and directional couplers based on nanoantennas.

  16. High active nitrogen flux growth of GaN by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    McSkimming, Brian M. Speck, James S.; Chaix, Catherine

    2015-09-15

    In the present study, the authors report on a modified Riber radio frequency (RF) nitrogen plasma source that provides active nitrogen fluxes more than 30 times higher than those commonly used for plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) growth of gallium nitride (GaN) and thus a significantly higher growth rate than has been previously reported. GaN films were grown using N{sub 2} gas flow rates between 5 and 25 sccm while varying the plasma source's RF forward power from 200 to 600 W. The highest growth rate, and therefore the highest active nitrogen flux, achieved was ∼7.6 μm/h. For optimized growth conditions, the surfaces displayed a clear step-terrace structure with an average RMS roughness (3 × 3 μm) on the order of 1 nm. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy impurity analysis demonstrates oxygen and hydrogen incorporation of 1 × 10{sup 16} and ∼5 × 10{sup 17}, respectively. In addition, the authors have achieved PAMBE growth of GaN at a substrate temperature more than 150 °C greater than our standard Ga rich GaN growth regime and ∼100 °C greater than any previously reported PAMBE growth of GaN. This growth temperature corresponds to GaN decomposition in vacuum of more than 20 nm/min; a regime previously unattainable with conventional nitrogen plasma sources. Arrhenius analysis of the decomposition rate shows that samples with a flux ratio below stoichiometry have an activation energy greater than decomposition of GaN in vacuum while samples grown at or above stoichiometry have decreased activation energy. The activation energy of decomposition for GaN in vacuum was previously determined to be ∼3.1 eV. For a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼1.5, this activation energy was found to be ∼2.8 eV, while for a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼0.5, it was found to be ∼7.9 eV.

  17. Determination of the absolute stereochemistry of limonene and alpha-santalol by Raman optical activity spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Akira; Ohya, Nao; Hasegawa, Toshio; Izumi, Hiroaki; Tokita, Nakako; Hamada, Yoshiaki

    2012-04-01

    Determining the absolute stereochemistry of organic compounds in solution remains a challenge. We investigated the use of Raman optical activity (ROA) spectroscopy to address this problem. The absolute configurations of (+)-(R)- and (-)-(S)-limonene were determined by ROA spectroscopy, which can be applied to smaller amounts of sample as compared with vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy. This ROA method was also applied to (+)-(E)-alpha-santalol and shown to be successful in the determination of the absolute configuration of this compound. ROA spectroscopy shows promise as a useful tool for determining the absolute stereochemistry of many natural compounds.

  18. Analysis and Parametric Investigation of Active Open Cross Section Thin Wall Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, James

    The static behaviour of active Open Cross Section Thin Wall Beams (OCSTWB) with embedded Active/Macro Fibre Composites (AFCs/MFCs) has been investigated for the purpose of advancing the fundamental theory needed in the development of advanced smart structures. An efficient code that can analyze active OCSTWB using analytical equations has been studied. Various beam examples have been investigated in order to verify this recently developed analytical active OCSTWB analysis tool. The cross sectional stiffness constants and induced force, moments and bimoment predicted by this analytical code have been compared with those predicted by the 2-D finite element beam cross section analysis codes called the Variational Asymptotic Beam Sectional (VABS) analysis and the University of Michigan VABS (UM/VABS). Good agreement was observed between the results obtained from the analytical tool and VABS. The calculated cross sectional stiffness constants and induced force/moments, the constitutive relation and the six intrinstic static equilibrium equations for OCSTWB were all used together in a first-order accurate forward difference scheme in order to determine the average twist and deflections along the beam span. In order to further verify the analytical code, the static behaviour of a number of beam examples was investigated using 3-D Finite Element Analysis (FEA). For a particular cross section, the rigid body twist and displacements were minimized with the displacements of all the nodes in the 3-D FEA model that compose the cross section. This was done for a number of cross sections along the beam span in order to recover the global beam twist and displacement profiles from the 3-D FEA results. The global twist and deflections predicted by the analytical code agreed closely with those predicted by UM/VABS and 3-D FEA. The study was completed by a parametric investigation to determine the boundary conditions and the composite ply lay-ups of the active and passive plies that

  19. Method of active charge and current neutralization of intense ion beams for ICF

    SciTech Connect

    Guiragossian, Z.G.T.; Orthel, J.L.; Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of generating the beam neutralization electrons with required properties are given in the context of a Light Ion Fusion Experiment (LIFE) designed accelerator. Recently derived envelope equations for neutralized and ballistically focused intense ion beams are applied to the LIFE geometry in which 10 MeV He/sup +/ multiple beamlets coalesce and undergo 45:1 radial compression while beam pulses experience a 20:1 axial compression in the propagation range of 10 m. Both active and auto-neutralization methods are examined and found to produce initial electron temperatures consistent with the requirement of the envelope equation for both radial and axial adiabatic beam pulse compressions. The stability of neutralized beam propagation is also examined concerning the Pierce type electrostatic instability and for the case of LIFE beams it is found to have insignificant effect. A scaled experimental setup is presented which can serve to perform near term tests on the ballistically focused propagation of neutralized light ion beams.

  20. Application of a passive/active autoparametric cantilever beam absorber with PZT actuator for Duffing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Navarro, G.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.; Vazquez-Gonzalez, B.

    2013-04-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out on a cantilever-type passive/active autoparametric vibration absorber, with a PZT patch actuator, to be used in a primary damped Duffing system. The primary system consists of a mass, viscous damping and a cubic stiffness provided by a soft helical spring, over which is mounted a cantilever beam with a PZT patch actuator actively controlled to attenuate harmonic and resonant excitation forces. With the PZT actuator on the cantilever beam absorber, cemented to the base of the beam, the auto-parametric vibration absorber is made active, thus enabling the possibility to control the effective stiffness and damping associated to the passive absorber and, as a consequence, the implementation of an active vibration control scheme able to preserve, as possible, the autoparametric interaction as well as to compensate varying excitation frequencies and parametric uncertainty. This active vibration absorber employs feedback information from a high resolution optical encoder on the primary Duffing system and an accelerometer on the tip beam absorber, a strain gage on the base of the beam, feedforward information from the excitation force and on-line computations from the nonlinear approximate frequency response, parameterized in terms of a proportional gain provided by a voltage input to the PZT actuator, thus modifying the closed-loop dynamic stiffness and providing a mechanism to asymptotically track an optimal, robust and stable attenuation solution on the primary Duffing system. Experimental results are included to describe the dynamic and robust performance of the overall closed-loop system.

  1. Shell structure studies in the vicinity of the doubly-magic 78Ni by in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiga, Yoshiaki; RIBF030 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    In-beam γ-ray spectroscopy in the vicinity of 78Ni is reported. In order to pin down the shell evolution on and beyond N = 50 in neutron-rich nucleus, the energies of low-lying excited states in the isotopes around 78Ni were measured. The experiment was performed at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science. The secondary beams of isotopes around 78Ni were produced by in-flight fission reactions of 345 MeV/u 238U primary beam on a 925 mg/cm2 beryllium target. The secondary beams then impinged on a 1889 mg/cm2 thick beryllium target to produce the isotopes of interest. The de-excitation γ-rays were measured with the NaI(Tl) detector array DALI2 in coincidence with the reaction products which were analyzed in the ZeroDegree spectrometer. Doppler corrected γ-ray energy spectra obtained for the reaction residues Zn, Cu and Ni isotopes will be shown. The nuclear structure in this region will be discussed by the level scheme obtained, e.g. the vibrational mode in 80Zn, as well as the energy trends of the low-lying states in the isotope chains. In-beam γ-ray spectroscopy in the vicinity of 78Ni is reported. In order to pin down the shell evolution on and beyond N = 50 in neutron-rich nucleus, the energies of low-lying excited states in the isotopes around 78Ni were measured. The experiment was performed at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science. The secondary beams of isotopes around 78Ni were produced by in-flight fission reactions of 345 MeV/u 238U primary beam on a 925 mg/cm2 beryllium target. The secondary beams then impinged on a 1889 mg/cm2 thick beryllium target to produce the isotopes of interest. The de-excitation γ-rays were measured with the NaI(Tl) detector array DALI2 in coincidence with the reaction products which were analyzed in the ZeroDegree spectrometer. Doppler corrected γ-ray energy spectra obtained for the reaction residues Zn, Cu and Ni isotopes will be shown. The nuclear structure in this region will be discussed

  2. Review of atomic data needs for active charge-exchange spectroscopy on ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Marchuk, O.; Bertschinger, G.; Biel, W.; Reiter, D.; Delabie, E.; Hellermann, M. G. von; Jaspers, R.

    2008-10-15

    The quantitative exploitation of active beam spectra is largely based on an advanced atomic modeling. Under the ITER operating conditions the penetration depth of a diagnostic beam into the plasma core crucially affects the intensities of spectral lines and hence the uncertainties of derived plasma parameters. A critical review of atomic data and an assessment of its error margins are, therefore, urgently needed. The aim of the present work is to verify the existing beam-stopping and beam-emission data for hydrogen beam in fusion plasmas. The agreement between the ADAS database and the present calculations is found to be within 5% for the beam-stopping data in a H-plasma. The calculation of beam attenuation in the presence of He-ash (4%) and Be ions (2%) demonstrates the agreement between the present data and the ADAS database within 10%. Finally, the maximum deviation of 15% is found only for beam-emission data at the electron density of 1x10{sup 12}-2x10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}, which is significantly below the ITER density of 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}.

  3. Power beaming to a micro aerial vehicle using an active phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawahara, Hironori; Oda, Akinori; Alseny, Diallo; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2010-04-01

    A power beaming system to a Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) using 5.8GHz microwaves has been developed. The system consists of three sub-systems; a pointing system, a tracking system, and a receiving system. The MAV is tracked using the phase information of pilot signal. Software retro-directive function has been realized through a PC control and a microwave beam is pointed to the MAV using an active phased array. The beam divergence was about 9deg and the beam steering angle was from -9deg to +9deg. Light-weight flexible rectenna array made of cupper tapes and a thin polyimide film was mounted on a wing of the MAV model, and the electric motor was driven by the received power. The weight per unit reception area was 26mg/cm2.

  4. Gold nano-particle formation from crystalline AuCN: Comparison of thermal, plasma- and ion-beam activated decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Mihály T.; Bertóti, Imre; Mohai, Miklós; Németh, Péter; Jakab, Emma; Szabó, László; Szépvölgyi, János

    2017-02-01

    In this work, in addition to the conventional thermal process, two non-conventional ways, the plasma and ion beam activations are described for preparing gold nanoparticles from microcrystalline AuCN precursor. The phase formation at plasma and ion beam treatments was compared with that at thermal treatments and the products and transformations were characterized by thermogravimetry-mass-spectrometry (TG-MS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TG-MS measurements in Ar atmosphere revealed that AuCN decomposition starts at 400 °C and completes at ≈700 °C with evolution of gaseous (CN)2. XPS and TEM show that in heat treatment at 450 °C for 1 h in Ar, loss of nitrogen and carbon occurs and small, 5-30 nm gold particles forms. Heating at 450 °C for 10 h in sealed ampoule, much larger, 60-200 nm size and well faceted Au particles develop together with a fibrous (CN)n polymer phase, and the Au crystallites are covered by a 3-5 nm thick polymer shell. Low pressure Ar plasma treatment at 300 eV energy results in 4-20 nm size Au particles and removes most of the nitrogen and part of carbon. During Ar+ ion bombardment with 2500 eV energy, 5-30 nm size Au crystallites form already in 10 min, with preferential loss of nitrogen and with increased amount of carbon residue. The results suggest that plasma and ion beam activation, acting similarly to thermal treatment, may be used to prepare Au nanoparticles from AuCN on selected surface areas either by depositing AuCN precursors on selected regions or by focusing the applied ionized radiation. Thus they may offer alternative ways for preparing tailor-made catalysts, electronic devices and sensors for different applications.

  5. Identification of active fluorescence stained bacteria by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Mario; Beyer, Beatrice; Pietsch, Christian; Radt, Benno; Harz, Michaela; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2008-04-01

    Microorganisms can be found everywhere e.g. in food both as useful ingredients or harmful contaminations causing food spoilage. Therefore, a fast and easy to handle analysis method is needed to detect bacteria in different kinds of samples like meat, juice or air to decide if the sample is contaminated by harmful microorganisms. Conventional identification methods in microbiology require always cultivation and therefore are time consuming. In this contribution we present an analysis approach to identify fluorescence stained bacteria on strain level by means of Raman spectroscopy. The stained bacteria are highlighted and can be localized easier against a complex sample environment e.g. in food. The use of Raman spectroscopy in combination with chemometrical methods allows the identification of single bacteria within minutes.

  6. Anti-angiogenic activity in metastasis of human breast cancer cells irradiated by a proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyu-Shik; Shin, Jin-Sun; Nam, Kyung-Soo; Shon, Yun-Hee

    2012-07-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process of metastasis in human breast cancer. We investigated the effects of proton beam irradiation on angiogenic enzyme activities and their expressions in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The regulation of angiogenic regulating factors, of transforming growth factor- β (TGF- β) and of vesicular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in breast cancer cells irradiated with a proton beam was studied. Aromatase activity and mRNA expression, which is correlated with metastasis, were significantly decreased by irradiation with a proton beam in a dose-dependent manner. TGF- β and VEGF transcriptions were also diminished by proton beam irradiation. In contrast, transcription of tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), also known as biological inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), was dose-dependently enhanced. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of TIMPs caused th MMP-9 activity to be diminished and the MMP-9 and the MMP-2 expressions to be decreased. These results suggest that inhibition of angiogenesis by proton beam irradiation in breast cancer cells is closely related to inhibitions of aromatase activity and transcription and to down-regulation of TGF- β and VEGF transcription.

  7. Inferring deep-brain activity from cortical activity using functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Cui, Xu; Bryant, Daniel M; Glover, Gary H; Reiss, Allan L

    2015-03-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an increasingly popular technology for studying brain function because it is non-invasive, non-irradiating and relatively inexpensive. Further, fNIRS potentially allows measurement of hemodynamic activity with high temporal resolution (milliseconds) and in naturalistic settings. However, in comparison with other imaging modalities, namely fMRI, fNIRS has a significant drawback: limited sensitivity to hemodynamic changes in deep-brain regions. To overcome this limitation, we developed a computational method to infer deep-brain activity using fNIRS measurements of cortical activity. Using simultaneous fNIRS and fMRI, we measured brain activity in 17 participants as they completed three cognitive tasks. A support vector regression (SVR) learning algorithm was used to predict activity in twelve deep-brain regions using information from surface fNIRS measurements. We compared these predictions against actual fMRI-measured activity using Pearson's correlation to quantify prediction performance. To provide a benchmark for comparison, we also used fMRI measurements of cortical activity to infer deep-brain activity. When using fMRI-measured activity from the entire cortex, we were able to predict deep-brain activity in the fusiform cortex with an average correlation coefficient of 0.80 and in all deep-brain regions with an average correlation coefficient of 0.67. The top 15% of predictions using fNIRS signal achieved an accuracy of 0.7. To our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the feasibility of using cortical activity to infer deep-brain activity. This new method has the potential to extend fNIRS applications in cognitive and clinical neuroscience research.

  8. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of strontium lanthanum copper oxide thin films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harter, John Wallace

    Among the multitude of known cuprate material families and associated structures, the archetype is "infinite-layer" ACuO2, where perfectly square and flat CuO2 planes are separated by layers of alkaline earth atoms. The infinite-layer structure is free of magnetic rare earth ions, oxygen chains, orthorhombic distortions, incommensurate superstructures, ordered vacancies, and other complications that abound among the other material families. Furthermore, it is the only cuprate that can be made superconducting by both electron and hole doping, making it a potential platform for decoding the complex many-body interactions responsible for high-temperature superconductivity. Research on the infinite-layer compound has been severely hindered by the inability to synthesize bulk single crystals, but recent progress has led to high-quality superconducting thin film samples. Here we report in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements of epitaxially-stabilized Sr1-chiLa chiCuO2 thin films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. At low doping, the material exhibits a dispersive lower Hubbard band typical of other cuprate parent compounds. As carriers are added to the system, a continuous evolution from Mott insulator to superconducting metal is observed as a coherent low-energy band develops on top of a concomitant remnant lower Hubbard band, gradually filling in the Mott gap. For chi = 0.10, our results reveal a strong coupling between electrons and (pi,pi) anti-ferromagnetism, inducing a Fermi surface reconstruction that pushes the nodal states below the Fermi level and realizing nodeless superconductivity. Electron diffraction measurements indicate the presence of a surface reconstruction that is consistent with the polar nature of Sr1-chiLachiCuO2. Most knowledge about the electron-doped side of the cuprate phase diagram has been deduced by generalizing from a single material family, Re2-chi CechiCuO4, where robust antiferromagnetism has been observed past chi

  9. Total and partial cross sections of the 112Sn(α ,γ ) 116Te reaction measured via in-beam γ -ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netterdon, L.; Mayer, J.; Scholz, P.; Zilges, A.

    2015-03-01

    Background: The nucleosynthesis of the neutron-deficient p nuclei remains an open question in nuclear astrophysics. Beside uncertainties on the astrophysical side, the nuclear-physics input parameters entering Hauser-Feshbach calculations for the nucleosynthesis of the p nuclei must be put on a firm basis. Purpose: An extended database of experimental data is needed to address uncertainties of the nuclear-physics input parameters for Hauser-Feshbach calculations. Especially α + nucleus optical model potentials at low energies are not well known. The in-beam technique with an array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors was successfully applied to the measurement of absolute cross sections of an (α ,γ ) reaction on a heavy nucleus at sub-Coulomb energies. Method: The total and partial cross-section values were measured by means of in-beam γ -ray spectroscopy. For this purpose, the absolute reaction yield was measured using the HPGe detector array HORUS at the FN tandem accelerator at the University of Cologne. Total and partial cross sections were measured at four different α -particle energies from Eα=10.5 MeV to Eα=12 MeV . Results: The measured total cross-section values are in excellent agreement with previous results obtained with the activation technique, which proves the validity of the applied method. With the present measurement, the discrepancy between two older data sets is removed. The experimental data was compared to Hauser-Feshbach calculations using the nuclear reaction code talys. With a modification of the semi-microscopic α + nucleus optical model potential OMP 3, the measured cross-section values are reproduced well. Moreover, partial cross sections could be measured for the first time for an (α ,γ ) reaction. Conclusions: A modified version of the semimicroscopic α + nucleus optical model potential OMP3, as well as modified proton and γ widths, are needed in order to obtain a good agreement between experimental data and theory. It

  10. Induction of antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level in ion-beam-bombarded rice seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semsang, Nuananong; Yu, LiangDeng

    2013-07-01

    Low-energy ion beam bombardment has been used to mutate a wide variety of plant species. To explore the indirect effects of low-energy ion beam on biological damage due to the free radical production in plant cells, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level was investigated in ion-bombarded rice seeds. Local rice seeds were bombarded with nitrogen or argon ion beams at energies of 29-60 keV and ion fluences of 1 × 1016 ions cm-2. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation level were assayed in the germinated rice seeds after ion bombardment. The results showed most of the enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation levels in both the argon and nitrogen bombarded samples were higher than those in the natural control. N-ion bombardment could induce higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activities in the rice samples than the Ar-ion bombardment. Additional effects due to the vacuum condition were found to affect activities of some antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation level. This study demonstrates that ion beam bombardment and vacuum condition could induce the antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level which might be due to free radical production in the bombarded rice seeds.

  11. Active vibration control of a smart pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer I-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, G.; Qiao, P.; Sethi, V.; Prasad, A.

    2004-08-01

    Advanced and innovative materials and structures are increasingly used in civil infrastructure applications. By combining the advantages of composites and smart sensors and actuators, active or smart composite structures can be created and be efficiently adopted in practical structural applications. This paper presents results on active vibration control of pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite thin-walled I-beams using smart sensors and actuators. The FRP I-beams are made of E-glass fibers and polyester resins. The FRP I-beam is in a cantilevered configuration. The PZT (lead zirconate titanate) type of piezoelectric ceramic patches are used as smart sensors and actuators. These patches are surface bonded near the cantilevered end of the I-beam. Utilizing results from modal analyses and experimental modal testing, several active vibration control methods, such as position feedback control, strain rate feedback control and lead compensation, are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods achieve effective vibration control of FRP I-beams. For instance, the modal damping ratio of the strong direction first bending mode increases by more than 1000% with positive position feedback control.

  12. Active vibration control of a smart pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer I-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gangbing; Qiao, Pizhong; Sethi, Vineet; Prasad, A.

    2002-06-01

    Advanced and innovative materials and structures are increasingly used in civil infrastructure applications. By combining the advantages of composites and smart sensors and actuators, active or smart composite structures can be created and be efficiently adopted in practical structural applications. This paper presents results of active vibration control of a pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites thin-walled I-beams using smart sensors and actuators. The FRP I-beams are made of E-glass fibers and polyester resins. The FRP I-beam is in a cantilevered configuration. PZT (Lead zirconate titanate) type of piezoelectric ceramic patches are used as smart sensors and actuators. These patches are surface-bonded near the cantilevered end of the I-beam. Utilizing results from modal analyses and experimental modal testing, several active vibration control methods, such as position feedback control, strain rate feedback control and lead compensator, are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods achieve effective vibration control of FRP I-beams. For instance, the modal damping ratio of the strong direction first bending mode increases by more than 1000 percent with a positive position feedback control.

  13. Steady state performance test analysis of actively cooled extractor grids for SST-1 neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, M. R.; Mattoo, S. K.; Khan, M.

    2010-11-15

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) system is a workhorse to heat magnetically confined tokamak fusion plasma. The heart of any NBI system is an ion extractor system. Steady State Superconducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) needs 0.5 MW of hydrogen beam power at 30 kV to raise the plasma ion temperature to {approx}1 keV and 1.7 MW of hydrogen beam power at 55 kV for future upgradation. To meet this requirement, an ion extractor system consisting of three actively cooled grids has been designed, fabricated, and its performance test has been done at MARION test stand, IPP, Julich, Germany. During long pulse (14 s) operation, hydrogen ion beam of energy 31 MJ has been extracted at 41 kV. In this paper, we have presented detailed analysis of calorimetric data of actively cooled extractor grids and showed that by monitoring outlet water temperature, grid material temperature can be monitored for safe steady state operation of a NBI system. Steady state operation of NBI is the present day interest of fusion research. In the present experimental case, performance test analysis indicates that the actively cooled grids attain steady state heat removal condition and the grid material temperature rise is {approx}18 deg. C and saturates after 10 s of beam pulse.

  14. Steady state performance test analysis of actively cooled extractor grids for SST-1 neutral beam injector.

    PubMed

    Jana, M R; Mattoo, S K; Khan, M

    2010-11-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) system is a workhorse to heat magnetically confined tokamak fusion plasma. The heart of any NBI system is an ion extractor system. Steady State Superconducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) needs 0.5 MW of hydrogen beam power at 30 kV to raise the plasma ion temperature to ~1 keV and 1.7 MW of hydrogen beam power at 55 kV for future upgradation. To meet this requirement, an ion extractor system consisting of three actively cooled grids has been designed, fabricated, and its performance test has been done at MARION test stand, IPP, Julich, Germany. During long pulse (14 s) operation, hydrogen ion beam of energy 31 MJ has been extracted at 41 kV. In this paper, we have presented detailed analysis of calorimetric data of actively cooled extractor grids and showed that by monitoring outlet water temperature, grid material temperature can be monitored for safe steady state operation of a NBI system. Steady state operation of NBI is the present day interest of fusion research. In the present experimental case, performance test analysis indicates that the actively cooled grids attain steady state heat removal condition and the grid material temperature rise is ~18°C and saturates after 10 s of beam pulse.

  15. Beam damage suppression of low-kappa porous Si-O-C films by cryo-electron-energy loss spectroscopy (EELS).

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yuji; Shimizu, Yumiko; Tanaka, Isao

    2009-04-01

    Porous Si-O-C films with lower dielectric constant (kappa) relative to silicon dioxide have been widely studied as inter-layer dielectrics in new-generation microelectronic devices. On the analysis of the film by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), it is susceptible of beam damage during both sample preparation by a focused ion beam (FIB) technique and TEM observation. We use electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to quantify the magnitude of the beam damage during these processes. The intensity of the 285-eV peak in C-K electron energy loss near edge structures (ELNES) is enhanced by the damage, which can be ascribed to the formation of the C=C double bonds as a result of the decomposition of the methyl groups by the beam. The use of cryo-holder for TEM at 100 K is found to be essential to reduce the damage of the low-kappa layers. The lowering of the acceleration voltage of FIB down to 5 keV does not change the spectra. Since the FIB damage is localized at the surface, the use of thick regions in the TEM foil such as 130 nm is preferred to reduce the superposition of EELS of the damaged region on those from the sample of interest.

  16. In-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy of {sup 248,250,252}Cf by neutron-transfer reactions using a Cf target

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, R.; Ishii, T.; Asai, M.; Nagae, D.; Makii, H.; Tsukada, K.; Toyoshima, A.; Ishii, Y.; Matsuda, M.; Makishima, A.; Shizuma, T.; Kohno, T.; Ogawa, M.

    2010-05-15

    The ground-state bands of {sup 248,250,252}Cf have been established up to the 10{sup +}, 12{sup +}, and 10{sup +} states, respectively, by in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy using neutron-transfer reactions with a 153-MeV {sup 18}O beam and a highly radioactive Cf target. The deexcitation gamma rays in {sup 248,250,252}Cf were identified by taking coincidences with outgoing particles of {sup 16-19}O measured with Si DELTAE-E detectors, and by selecting their kinetic energies. Moments of inertia of {sup 248,250,252}Cf were discussed in terms of the N=152 deformed shell gap.

  17. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1990-01-01

    After a brief review of the principal problems of AGN research, selected potential high-resolution observations are discussed with a view toward assessing their scientific value and the degree of resolution they will require. Two classes of observations pertaining directly to AGNs are discussed. Fe K-alpha spectroscopy relevant to the dynamical and thermal character of the emission line zones; and measurement of resonance line absorption by highly-ionized species in BL Lac objects, which should provide information about entrainment of interstellar material by relativistic jets. A third class of potentially important observations uses AGNs as background light sources in order to directly measure the distance to clusters of galaxies.

  18. Pulsed supersonic molecular beam for characterization of chemically active metal-organic complexes at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lear, Amanda M.

    Metal-organic coordination networks (MOCNs) at surfaces consist of a complex of organic ligands bound to an atomic metal center. The MOCNs, when chosen appropriately, can form highly-ordered arrays at surfaces. Ultra-high vacuum surface studies allow control of surface composition and provide 2D growth restrictions, which lead to under-coordinated metal centers. These systems provide an opportunity to tailor the chemical function of the metal centers due to the steric restrictions imposed by the surface. Tuning the adsorption/desorption energy at a metal center and developing a cooperative environment for catalysis are the key scientific questions that motivate the construction of a molecular beam surface analysis system. Characterization of the created systems can be performed utilizing a pulsed supersonic molecular beam (PSMB) in unison with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A PSMB allows for the highly controlled delivery of reactants with well-defined energy to a given platform making it possible to elucidate detailed chemical tuning information. In this thesis, a summary of prior theoretical molecular beam derivations is provided. Design considerations and an overview of the construction procedure for the current molecular beam apparatus, including initial characterization experiments, are presented. By impinging an Ar beam on a Ag(111) surface, the location of the specular angle (˜65°) and rough sample perimeter coordinates were determined. Additionally, surface analysis experiments, mainly Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), were performed to investigate the oxidation of epitaxial graphene on the SiC(0001) surface utilizing an oxygen cracking method. The AES experiments are described in detail and highlight the challenges that were faced when several different graphene samples were used for the oxygen adsorption/desorption experiments.

  19. Assessing electron beam sensitivity for SrTiO3 and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 using electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nord, Magnus; Vullum, Per Erik; Hallsteinsen, Ingrid; Tybell, Thomas; Holmestad, Randi

    2016-10-01

    Thresholds for beam damage have been assessed for La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 and SrTiO3 as a function of electron probe current and exposure time at 80 and 200kV acceleration voltage. The materials were exposed to an intense electron probe by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with simultaneous acquisition of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data. Electron beam damage was identified by changes of the core loss fine structure after quantification by a refined and improved model based approach. At 200kV acceleration voltage, damage in SrTiO3 was identified by changes both in the EEL fine structure and by contrast changes in the STEM images. However, the changes in the STEM image contrast as introduced by minor damage can be difficult to detect under several common experimental conditions. No damage was observed in SrTiO3 at 80kV acceleration voltage, independent of probe current and exposure time. In La0.7Sr0.3MnO3, beam damage was observed at both 80 and 200kV acceleration voltages. This damage was observed by large changes in the EEL fine structure, but not by any detectable changes in the STEM images. The typical method to validate if damage has been introduced during acquisitions is to compare STEM images prior to and after spectroscopy. Quantifications in this work show that this method possibly can result in misinterpretation of beam damage as changes of material properties.

  20. Study of the evolution of the atomic composition of thin NbN films under irradiation with mixed ion beams by methods of electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dement'eva, M. M.; Prikhod'ko, K. E.; Gurovich, B. A.; Kutuzov, L. V.; Komarov, D. A.

    2016-11-01

    The variation in the atomic composition of ultrathin NbN films under irradiation by mixed ion beams to a doze of 4 dpa (for nitrogen) is experimentally studied by methods of electron energy loss spectroscopy with a transmission electron microscope in the transmission scan mode on cross-cut samples. The behavior of the substitution of nitrogen atoms by oxygen atoms has been established; it is characterized by changing the composition of the conducting part of the film from NbN to NbNO.

  1. Low-energy operation of the Livermore electron beam ion traps: Atomic spectroscopy of Si V, S VII, and Ar IX

    SciTech Connect

    Lepson, J K; Beiersdorfer, P

    2004-01-02

    As part of a project to compile a comprehensive catalog of astrophysically relevant emission lines, we used the low-energy capability of the Lawrence Livermore electron beam ion traps to extend the spectroscopy of neon-like ions and the neighboring charge states to silicon, sulfur, and argon. They present wavelength data of Si V and demonstrate the effect of collisional deexcitation of electric dipole forbidden lines on the 2-3 L-shell spectra of Si V, S VII, and Ar IX.

  2. Off-beam quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy-based sensor for hydrogen sulfide trace gas detection using a mode-hop-free external cavity quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helman, Marek; Moser, Harald; Dudkowiak, Alina; Lendl, Bernhard

    2017-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) trace gas detection based on off-beam quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy using a continuous wave (CW), mode-hop-free external cavity (EC) quantum cascade laser tunable from 1310 to 1210 cm-1 was performed. A 1 σ minimum detection limit of 492 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) using a 1 s lock-in time constant was obtained by targeting the line centered at 1234.58 cm-1. This value corresponds to a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient for H2S of 3.05 × 10-9 W cm-1 Hz-1/2.

  3. Structural properties of rutile TiO2 nanoparticles accumulated in a model of gastrointestinal epithelium elucidated by micro-beam x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veronesi, G.; Brun, E.; Fayard, B.; Cotte, M.; Carrière, M.

    2012-05-01

    Micro-beam x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was used to investigate rutile TiO2 nanoparticles internalized into gastrointestinal cells during their crossing of a gut model barrier. Nanoparticles diluted in culture medium tend to accumulate in cells after 48 h exposure; however, no spectral differences arise between particles in cellular and in acellular environments, as corroborated by quantitative analysis. This finding establishes that no modification of the lattice properties of the nanoparticles occurs upon interaction with the barrier. These measurements demonstrate the possibility of interrogating nanoparticles in situ within cells, suggesting a way to investigate their fate when incorporated in biological hosts.

  4. Optimization of nuclear-pumped laser active media by electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, V.F.; Fedenev, A.V.

    1996-05-01

    In present report there are assumed the results of nuclear pumped laser (NPL) active media experimental studying with electron beam excitation and the analysis is made for emission characteristics and kinetic processes of more perspective lasers, which are operating at low pumping power close to NPL excitation conditions. Basic attention is paying to experimental data, obtained for e-beam pumped low-threshold active media, which have allowed to accelerate the understanding of the inversion population creation processes in NPL and which have predetermined new future experiments with NPL. It has been shown that in spit of same differences in plasma creation processes for e-beam pumping and fission fragment excitation, operating level and inversion population creation processes in nonequilibrium recombinant plasma are similar for both types of excitation at compatible pumping power and pulse duration. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Measurement of angular divergence and ion species ratios of an rf-driven multicusp ion source for diagnostic neutral beam by Doppler shift spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, S. J.; Yang, H. L.; Hwang, S. M.

    2000-03-01

    The ion species ratios as well as the angular divergences are measured by using a Doppler shift spectroscopy of Hα spectral lines, which originate from several different ions, such as H2+ and H3+ as well as H+, and are spectrally well resolvable from each other on the measured spectral window of detection system. The angular divergences of the ion beam components are determined from the linewidths of the measured emission lines, and the ratio of mixed species is deduced from the intensity ratio of each peak. The ion species ratios measured by the Doppler shift spectroscopy are cross checked by a mass analyzing magnet. The measurements are performed varying the input rf power and the operating source pressure.

  6. Surface diffusion activation energy determination using ion beam microtexturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossnagel, S. M.; Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The activation energy for impurity atom (adatom) surface diffusion can be determined from the temperature dependence of the spacing of sputter cones. These cones are formed on the surface during sputtering while simultaneously adding impurities. The impurities form clusters by means of surface diffusion, and these clusters in turn initiate cone formation. Values are given for the surface diffusion activation energies for various materials on polycrystalline Cu, Al, Pb, Au, and Ni. The values for different impurity species on each of these substrates are approximately independent of impurity species within the experimental uncertainty, suggesting the absence of strong chemical bonding effects on the diffusion.

  7. Stark spectroscopy of a probe lithium beam excited with two dye lasers as a technique to study a high-power ion-beam diode.

    PubMed

    Knyazev, B A; An, W; Bluhm, H

    2012-03-01

    A non-disturbing measurement of electric field distributions is a subject of special interest in plasma physics and high-voltage devices. In this paper we describe a diagnostic technique for remote sensing of electric fields via injection of a probe beam of lithium atoms and cascade excitation of resonance fluorescence with two broadband dye lasers. The fluorescence spectrum was recorded using a monochromator equipped with an optical multi-channel analyser. The magnitude of the local electric field was retrieved from the Stark-shifted components of the 3d-2p lithium spectral line. The technique was applied to measurements of the electric field in the applied-B-field high-voltage diode of the 1 TW KALIF ion-beam accelerator.

  8. Non-mechanical optical path switching and its application to dual beam spectroscopy including gas filter correlation radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor); Wang, Liang-Guo (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A non-mechanical optical switch is developed for alternately switching a monochromatic or quasi-monochromatic light beam along two optical paths. A polarizer polarizes light into a single, e.g., vertical component which is then rapidly modulated into vertical and horizontal components by a polarization modulator. A polarization beam splitter then reflects one of these components along one path and transmits the other along the second path. In the specific application of gas filter correlation radiometry, one path is directed through a vacuum cell and one path is directed through a gas correlation cell containing a desired gas. Reflecting mirrors cause these two paths to intersect at a second polarization beam splitter which reflects one component and transmits the other to recombine them into a polarization modulated beam which can be detected by an appropriate single sensor.

  9. Low energy proton beam induces tumor cell apoptosis through reactive oxygen species and activation of caspases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kheun Byeol; Lee, Jong-Soo; Park, Jin-Woo; Huh, Tae-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Proton beam is useful to target tumor tissue sparing normal cells by allowing precise dose only into tumor cells. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which proton beam induces tumor cell death are still undefined. We irradiated three different tumor cells (LLC, HepG2, and Molt-4) with low energy proton beam (35 MeV) with spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) in vitro, and investigated cell death by MTT or CCK-8 assay at 24 h after irradiation. LLC and HepG2 cells were sensitive to proton beam at over 10 Gy to induce apoptosis whereas Molt-4 showed rather low sensitivity. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for the death rate relative to γ-ray were ranged from 1.1 to 2.3 in LLC and HepG2 but from 0.3 to 0.7 in Molt-4 at 11 d after irradiation by colony formation assay. The typical apoptotic nuclear DNA morphological pattern was observed by staining with 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). Tiny fragmented DNA was observed in HepG2 but not in Molt-4 by the treatment of proton in apoptotic DNA fragment assay. By FACS analysis after stained with FITC-Annexin-V, early as well as median apoptotic fractions were clearly increased by proton treatment. Proton beam-irradiated tumor cells induced a cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and procaspases-3 and -9. Activity of caspases was highly enhanced after proton beam irradiation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were significantly increased and N-acetyl cysteine pretreatment restored the apoptotic cell death induced by proton beam. Furthermore, p38 and JNK but not ERK were activated by proton and dominant negative mutants of p38 and JNK revived proton-induced apoptosis, suggesting that p38 and JNK pathway may be activated through ROS to activate apoptosis. In conclusion, our data clearly showed that single treatment of low energy proton beam with SOBP increased ROS and induced cell death of solid tumor cells (LLC and HepG2) in an apoptotic cell death program by the induction of caspases

  10. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; Nikoleav, P.; Amama, P. B.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; Maruyama, B.

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only in the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.

  11. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, A. E.; Nikolaev, P.; Amama, P. B.; Zakharov, D.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; Stach, E. A.; Maruyama, B.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only in the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. With the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.

  12. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    DOE PAGES

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; ...

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only inmore » the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.« less

  13. Engineering the Activity and Lifetime of Heterogeneous Catalysts for Carbon Nanotube Growth via Substrate Ion Beam Bombardment (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-31

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2014-0159 ENGINEERING THE ACTIVITY AND LIFETIME OF HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSTS FOR CARBON NANOTUBE GROWTH VIA SUBSTRATE ION BEAM...July 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ENGINEERING THE ACTIVITY AND LIFETIME OF HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSTS FOR CARBON NANOTUBE GROWTH VIA SUBSTRATE ION BEAM... heterogeneous catalyst, catalyst support, ion beam bombardment 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 11

  14. Observations of the plasma environment during an active ionospheric ion beam injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldy, R. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Erlandson, R. E.; Kintner, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    Several sounding rocket flights have been used to clarify the electrodynamics of neutral beam releases of Ar ions in the upper ionosphere, by varying the Ar's point of release with respect to the diagnostic payload. A volume of 10-m radius centered on the Ar release payload is measured for broadband wave activity; the superthermal neutralizing beam electrons become magnetized in this volume for across-field plasma releases, and ambient electrons are accelerated to energies of several hundred eV. This is speculated to be due to wave turbulence rather than payload-neutralization.

  15. Active and passive compensation of APPLE II-introduced multipole errors through beam-based measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Ting-Yi; Huang, Szu-Jung; Fu, Huang-Wen; Chang, Ho-Ping; Chang, Cheng-Hsiang; Hwang, Ching-Shiang

    2016-08-01

    The effect of an APPLE II-type elliptically polarized undulator (EPU) on the beam dynamics were investigated using active and passive methods. To reduce the tune shift and improve the injection efficiency, dynamic multipole errors were compensated using L-shaped iron shims, which resulted in stable top-up operation for a minimum gap. The skew quadrupole error was compensated using a multipole corrector, which was located downstream of the EPU for minimizing betatron coupling, and it ensured the enhancement of the synchrotron radiation brightness. The investigation methods, a numerical simulation algorithm, a multipole error correction method, and the beam-based measurement results are discussed.

  16. Activities on heavy ion inertial fusion and beam-driven high energy density science in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horioka, K.; Kawamura, T.; Nakajima, M.; Kondo, K.; Ogawa, M.; Oguri, Y.; Hasegawa, J.; Kawata, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Sasaki, T.; Murakami, M.; Takayama, K.

    2009-07-01

    Recent research activities in Japan relevant to heavy ion fusion (HIF) are presented. During the past two years, significant progress in HIF and high energy density (HED) physics research has been made by a number of research groups in universities and accelerator facilities. Evolutions in phase space during the longitudinal compression of intense beams were investigated at UU-NUT-TIT. Beam-plasma interaction experiments and related theoretical studies are in progress at RLNR-TIT. In the study, shock-heated hydrogen was used for the interaction experiments as a well-defined non-ideal-plasma target. In the beam-plasma interaction experiments, a special emphasis is placed on an evaluation of non-linear effects on the stopping power in a beam-heated plasma target. A direct-indirect hybrid scheme of a beam-driven ICF target has been proposed and discussed at UU. In the same group, a method for controlling the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in imploding fuel target has been proposed using oscillating heavy ion beams (HIBs). Core dynamics of the impact ignition has been investigated both experimentally and numerically at ILE—Osaka. Dense plasmas driven by intense ion beams and/or a pulse powered device, were evaluated by a group of DES-TIT, concerning the researches on HED and warm dense matter (WDM) physics. A quasi-statically tamped target was proposed to make a well-defined, warm dense state for equation-of-state (EOS) studies based on ion accelerators. The potentiality of the new facility planned at KEK was evaluated by a collaborating group of TIT-UU-KEK, which can extend the parameter regime for laboratory experiments to study the properties of matter under extreme conditions. A possible method to make a high-pressure condition for study of the planetary science was discussed as a short-term subject of intense HIBs.

  17. Modeling Extraction of VLF Energy from Localized Ion Ring Beams for Space Based Active Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scales, Wayne; Ganguli, Gurudas; Crabtree, Chris; Rudakov, Leonid; Mithaiwala, Manish

    2012-07-01

    Waves in the VLF range are of considerable interest in the magnetosphere since they are responsible for transporting energy and momentum and therefore impacting space weather. Ion ring beams can efficiently generate waves in the VLF frequency range between the electron and ion gyro-frequency (Mithaiwala et al., 2010). Generation of VLF waves by infinite extent ion ring beams have been extensively treated for a broad range of space plasma applications. However, ion ring distributions created by chemical release experiments in the ionosphere (Koons and Pongratz, 1981) and those that occur naturally during storms/substorms or solar-wind comet interactions are localized over a spatial extent. This presentation will consider a new computational model for the nonlinear evolution of VLF waves generated by a spatially localized ion ring beam. The model, though quite general, will have application to generation of VLF waves in the radiation belts by localized creation of an ion ring beam. The model includes the convective loss of energy through phenomenological electron-ion collisions, which models nonlinear scattering of electrostatic lower hybrid waves into large group velocity electromagnetic whistler/magnetosonic waves (Ganguli et al., 2010). Therefore the model, though electrostatic, includes critical electromagnetic effects in a computationally efficient fashion. An emphasis is placed on the determining the efficiency of extraction of VLF energy from the ion ring beam due to the spatial localization of the ion ring beam. It is shown that due to the convection of the VLF waves out of the source region, the efficiency of wave energy extraction is greatly enhanced. This is accompanied by a reduction in background and ion ring beam heating. The results will be used to highlight the importance of non-linear scattering to future active experiments in space. Mithaiwala et al. Phys. Plasma, doi.org/10.1063/1.3372842, 2010 Koons and Pongratz, JGR, 1981. Ganguli et al., Phys

  18. Activated vibrational modes and Fermi resonance in tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengtao; Fang, Yurui; Zhang, Zhenyu; Xu, Hongxing

    2013-02-01

    Using p-aminothiophenol (PATP) molecules on a gold substrate and high-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS), we show that the vibrational spectra of these molecules are distinctly different from those in typical surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Detailed first-principles calculations help to assign the Raman peaks in the TERS measurements as Raman-active and IR-active vibrational modes of dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB), providing strong spectroscopic evidence for the dimerization of PATP molecules to DMAB under the TERS setup. The activation of the IR-active modes is due to enhanced electromagnetic field gradient effects within the gap region of the highly asymmetric tip-surface geometry. Fermi resonances are also observed in HV-TERS. These findings help to broaden the versatility of TERS as a promising technique for ultrasensitive molecular spectroscopy.

  19. Control of flexible beams using a free-free active truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, W. W.; Kimiavi, B.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical and experimental study involving controlling flexible beams using a free-free active truss is presented. This work extends previous work in controlling flexible continua with active trusses which were configured with fixed-free boundary conditions. The following describes the Lagrangian approach used to derive the equations of motion for the active truss and the beams attached to it. A partial-state feedback control law is derived for this system based on a full-state feedback Linear Quadratic Regulator method. The analytical model is examined via numerical simulations and the results are compared to a similar experimental apparatus described herein. The results show that control of a flexible continua is possible with a free-free active truss.

  20. Effect of electron-beam irradiation on antimicrobial, antibiofilm activity, and cytotoxicity of mouth rinses.

    PubMed

    Geethashri, A; Kumar, B Mohana; Palaksha, K J; Sridhar, K R; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Shetty, A Veena

    2016-01-01

    Oral health diseases are common in all regions of the world. Mouth rinses are widely used generally by population as a port of daily oral care regimen. In addition to antimicrobial activity, mouth rinses possess certain cytotoxic effects. Electron-beam (E-beam) radiation is a form of ionizing energy known to induce structural, physical, and chemical changes in irradiated products. In this study, the modulatory effects of E-beam in irradiated mouth rinses were evaluated for its biological activities. The antimicrobial activities of nonirradiated and irradiated mouth rinses were evaluated for its antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities against oral pathogens, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated by disc diffusion method and antibiofilm activity was evaluated by O'Toole method. The cytotoxicity was evaluated against human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells by 3-(4, 5 Dimethythiazol-yl)-2,5-Diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Colgate Plax (CP) exhibited the antimicrobial activity against the tested pathogens, and a significant (P< 0.05) increase was observed against S. aureus at 750 Gy irradiation. Further, CP significantly (P< 0.05) suppressed S. mutans, S. aureus, and C. albicans biofilm. Listerine (LS) inhibited S. mutans and C. albicans biofilm. Whereas irradiated CP and LS significantly (P< 0.05) suppressed the biofilm formed by oral pathogens. The suppression of biofilm by irradiated mouth rinses was dose- and species-dependent. There was no significant (P > 0.05) difference in the cytotoxicity of irradiated and nonirradiated mouth rinses on HGF cells. However, an increased percentage viability of HGF cells was observed by mouth rinses irradiated at 750 Gy.xs The E-beam irradiation enhanced the antibiofilm activity of mouth rinses without modifying the cytotoxicity.

  1. Active control of the forced and transient response of a finite beam. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, John T.

    1990-01-01

    Structural vibrations from a point force are modelled on a finite beam. This research explores the theoretical limit on controlling beam vibrations utilizing another point source as an active controller. Three different types of excitation are considered, harmonic, random, and transient. For harmonic excitation, control over the entire beam length is possible only when the excitation frequency is near a resonant frequency of the beam. Control over a subregion may be obtained even between resonant frequencies at the cost of increasing the vibration outside of the control region. For random excitation, integrating the expected value of the displacement squared over the required interval, is shown to yield the identical cost function as obtained by integrating the cost function for harmonic excitation over all excitation frequencies. As a result, it is always possible to reduce the cost function for random excitation whether controlling the entire beam or just a subregion, without ever increasing the vibration outside the region in which control is desired. The last type of excitation considered is a single, transient pulse. The form of the controller is specified as either one or two delayed pulses, thus constraining the controller to be casual. The best possible control is examined while varying the region of control and the controller location. It is found that control is always possible using either one or two control pulses.

  2. Human brain activity with near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qingming; Chance, Britton

    1999-09-01

    Human brain activity was studied with a real time functional Near-InfraRed Imager (fNIRI). The imager has 16 measurement channels and covers 4 cm by 9 cm detection area. Brain activities in occipital, motor and prefrontal area were studied with the fNIRI. In prefrontal stimulation, language cognition, analogies, forming memory for new associations, emotional thinking, and mental arithmetic were carried out. Experimental results measured with fNIRI are demonstrated in this paper. It was shown that fNIRI technique is able to reveal the occipital activity during visual stimulation, and co-register well with results of fMRI in the motor cortex activity during finger tapping. In the studies of the effects of left prefrontal lobe on forming memory for new associations, it is shown that left prefrontal lobe activated more under deep conditions than that under shallow encoding, especially the dorsal part. In the studies of emotional thinking, it was shown that the responses were different between positive- negative emotional thinking and negative-positive emotional thinking. In mental arithmetic studies, higher activation was found in the first task than in the second, regardless of the difficulty, and higher activation was measured in subtraction of 17 than in subtraction of 3.

  3. The CO oxidation kinetics on supported Pd model catalysts: A molecular beam/in situ time-resolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libuda, J.; Meusel, I.; Hoffmann, J.; Hartmann, J.; Piccolo, L.; Henry, C. R.; Freund, H.-J.

    2001-03-01

    Combining molecular beam techniques and time-resolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (TR-IRAS) we have studied the kinetics of the CO oxidation reaction on an alumina-supported Pd model catalyst. The Pd particles are deposited by metal evaporation under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions onto a well-ordered alumina film, prepared on a NiAl(110) single crystal. Particle size, density and structure of the Pd deposits have been characterized in previous studies. In the low temperature region, transient and steady-state experiments have been performed over a wide range of CO and oxygen fluxes by crossing two effusive molecular beams on the sample surface. We determine the steady-state CO2 production rate as a function of the CO fraction in the impinging gas flux. Simultaneously, the occupation of CO adsorption sites under steady-state conditions is monitored by in situ IR spectroscopy. The origin of different types of CO2 transients is discussed. In particular we focus on the transient CO2 production after switching off the CO beam. For the model catalyst investigated, detailed reaction rate measurements in combination with time-resolved IRAS show that the origin of the particular transient behavior of the supported model system is not due to the presence of specific adsorption sites on small particles, as has been proposed previously. Instead, we show that the transient behavior can be semiquantitatively simulated on the basis of a simple kinetic model considering a homogeneous surface, and accounting for the inhibition of the dissociative adsorption of O2 at high CO coverage. Moreover, it is discussed how the inherent heterogeneity of the supported particle system can additionally enhance the observed effect.

  4. Beam Collapse and Polarization Self-Modulation in an Optically Active Photorefractive Crystal in an Alternating Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Hernández, C. A.; Khomenko, A. V.

    1999-08-01

    Consistent experimental and numerical simulation studies of the propagation of a one-dimensional Gaussian beam in optically active BSO crystal in the presence of an alternating external field are presented. We have observed three forms of the beam evolution: (i) polarization-dependent self-bending, in which the crystal acts as a nonlinear polarization beam splitter; (ii) spatially nonuniform self-modulation of the state of polarization; (iii) formation of narrow inclined waveguides within the Gaussian beam. The effects of optical activity and the crystal orientation are discussed.

  5. "Reagent-free" L-asparaginase activity assay based on CD spectroscopy and conductometry.

    PubMed

    Kudryashova, Elena V; Sukhoverkov, Kirill V

    2016-02-01

    A new method to determine the catalytic parameters of L-asparaginase using circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD spectroscopy) has been developed. The assay is based on the difference in CD signal between the substrate (L-asparagine) and the product (L-aspartic acid) of enzymatic reaction. CD spectroscopy, being a direct method, enables continuous measurement, and thus differentiates from multistage and laborious approach based on Nessler's method, and overcomes limitations of conjugated enzymatic reaction methods. In this work, we show robust measurements of L-asparaginase activity in conjugates with PEG-chitosan copolymers, which otherwise would not have been possible. The main limitation associated with the CD method is that the analysis should be performed at substrate saturation conditions (V max regime). For K M measurement, the conductometry method is suggested, which can serve as a complimentary method to CD spectroscopy. The activity assay based on CD spectroscopy and conductometry was successfully implicated to examine the catalytic parameters of L-asparaginase conjugates with chitosan and its derivatives, and for optimization of the molecular architecture and composition of such conjugates for improving biocatalytic properties of the enzyme in the physiological conditions. The approach developed is potentially applicable to other enzymatic reactions where the spectroscopic properties of substrate and product do not enable direct measurement with absorption or fluorescence spectroscopy. This may include a number of amino acid or glycoside-transforming enzymes.

  6. Active Control of the Forced and Transient Response of a Finite Beam. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, John Theodore

    1989-01-01

    When studying structural vibrations resulting from a concentrated source, many structures may be modelled as a finite beam excited by a point source. The theoretical limit on cancelling the resulting beam vibrations by utilizing another point source as an active controller is explored. Three different types of excitation are considered, harmonic, random, and transient. In each case, a cost function is defined and minimized for numerous parameter variations. For the case of harmonic excitation, the cost function is obtained by integrating the mean squared displacement over a region of the beam in which control is desired. A controller is then found to minimize this cost function in the control interval. The control interval and controller location are continuously varied for several frequencies of excitation. The results show that control over the entire beam length is possible only when the excitation frequency is near a resonant frequency of the beam, but control over a subregion may be obtained even between resonant frequencies at the cost of increasing the vibration outside of the control region. For random excitation, the cost function is realized by integrating the expected value of the displacement squared over the interval of the beam in which control is desired. This is shown to yield the identical cost function as obtained by integrating the cost function for harmonic excitation over all excitation frequencies. As a result, it is always possible to reduce the cost function for random excitation whether controlling the entire beam or just a subregion, without ever increasing the vibration outside the region in which control is desired. The last type of excitation considered is a single, transient pulse. A cost function representative of the beam vibration is obtained by integrating the transient displacement squared over a region of the beam and over all time. The form of the controller is chosen a priori as either one or two delayed pulses. Delays

  7. Very-high-resolution tandem Fabry-Perot etalon cylindrical beam volume hologram spectrometer for diffuse source spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Badieirostami, Majid; Momtahan, Omid; Hsieh, Chaoray; Adibi, Ali; Brady, David J

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a compact and slitless spectrometer with high resolution formed by cascading a Fabry-Perot etalon (FPE) and a cylindrical beam volume hologram (CBVH). The most significant advantage of this combined spectrometer is that we can independently encode spectral information of a diffuse beam in a 2D plane. Also, we show that in this slitless configuration we can simultaneously benefit from the advantages of both elements: the high resolution of the FPE and the large spectral range of the CBVH. Here, we report on the experimental demonstration of a spectrometer with better than 0.2 nm resolution.

  8. Determination of antioxidant content and antioxidant activity in foods using infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics: a review.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaonan; Rasco, Barbara A

    2012-01-01

    Developing rapid analytical methods for bioactive components and predicting both the concentration and biological availability of nutraceutical components in foods is a topic of growing interest. Here, analysis of bioactive components and total antioxidant activity in food matrices using infrared spectroscopy coupled with chemometric predictive models is described. Infrared spectroscopy offers an alternative to wet chemistry, chromatographic determination of antioxidants, and in vitro biochemical assays for assessment of antioxidant activity. Spectroscopic methods provide a technique that can be used with biological tissues without extraction, which can often lead to degradation of the antioxidant components. Sample preparation time greatly decreases and analysis time is very short once a predictive model has been developed. Spectroscopic methods can have a high degree of precision when applied to analysis of nutraceutical compound concentration and antioxidant activity in foods. This article summarizes recent advances in vibrational spectroscopy and chemometrics and applications of these methods for antioxidant detection in foods.

  9. Active Target-Time Projection Chambers for Reactions Induced by Rare Isotope Beams: Physics and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittig, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Weakly bound nuclear systems can be considered to represent a good testing-ground of our understanding of non-perturbative quantum systems. Great progress in experimental sensitivity has been attained by increase in rare isotope beam intensities and by the development of new high efficiency detectors. It is now possible to study reactions leading to bound and unbound states in systems with very unbalanced neutron to proton ratios. Application of Active Target-Time Projection Chambers to this domain of physics will be illustrated by experiments performed with existing detectors. The NSCL is developing an Active Target-Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC) to be used to study reactions induced by rare isotope beams at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Facility (NSCL) and at the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The AT-TPC counter gas acts as both a target and detector, allowing investigations of fusion, isobaric analog states, cluster structure of light nuclei and transfer reactions to be conducted without significant loss in resolution due to the thickness of the target. The high efficiency and low threshold of the AT-TPC will allow investigations of fission barriers and giant resonances with fast fragmentation rare isotope beams. This detector type needs typically a large number of electronic channels (order of magnitude 10,000) and a high speed DAQ. A reduced size prototype detector with prototype electronics has been realized and used in several experiments. A short description of other detectors of this type under development will be given.

  10. The eclipse of Epsilon Aurigae visible spectroscopy and ultraviolet activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferluga, S.; Hack, M.

    1985-01-01

    The preliminary results of the study of several high resolution spectrograms (lambda 3500 - lambda 7000 A), obtained at the Haute Provence Observatory (OHP) in France, at different epochs before, during and after the eclipse are reported. Some of these spectrograms are compared with corresponding IUE high resolution observations, in order to study the effects of the intrinsic UV activity, towards the longer wavelengths.

  11. Raman spectroscopy based measurements of carrier concentration in n-type GaN nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, L. H.; Horneber, E.; Sanford, N. A.; Bertness, K. A.; Brubaker, M. D.; Schlager, J. B.

    2016-09-01

    The carrier concentration in as-grown ensembles of n-type GaN nanowires was determined by Raman spectroscopy of the coupled longitudinal phonon-plasmon (LPP+) mode and modeling of the carrier concentration dependence of the LPP+ frequency. The Raman measurements and analyses enabled estimation of the carrier concentration in single-nanowire devices fabricated from the as-grown ensembles. The nanowires were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy in either of the two growth systems. Twelve samples were examined, of which 11 samples were Si-doped and one was undoped. The Raman-measured carrier concentrations in the Si-doped samples ranged from (5.28 ± 1.19) × 1016 cm-3 to (6.16 ± 0.35) × 1017 cm-3. For a subset of samples grown with varying Si cell temperature, from 1125 °C to 1175 °C, the carrier concentration was found to be an Arrhenius function of Si cell temperature, with activation energy of 6.281 ± 0.011 eV . Co-illumination by an above band gap UV laser (325 nm, excitation intensity = 0.7 W/cm2 or 4.5 W/cm2) induced small increases in carrier concentration, relative to illumination by the Raman excitation laser alone (633 nm, excitation intensity ≈100 kW/cm2). The lowest Si-doped sample showed the largest increase in carrier concentration, (6.3 ± 4.8) × 1015 cm-3 with UV excitation intensity of 0.7 W/cm2. These results imply that, even in the absence of UV illumination, surface depletion does not have a significant effect on the Raman carrier concentration measurements. Immersion in a high-dielectric-constant oil (ɛ = 2.24) caused downshifts of similar magnitude in the LPP+ frequencies of undoped and doped nanowires. This result implies that the LPP+ mode has bulk plasmon rather than surface plasmon character, because immersion in a high-dielectric-constant medium is predicted to cause a large decrease in the surface plasmon frequency, which would induce a larger LPP+ downshift in doped than undoped nanowires. A surface optical (SO) phonon

  12. Active-passive vibration absorber of beam-cart-seesaw system with piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Huang, C. J.; Chang, Julian; Wang, S.-W.

    2010-09-01

    In contrast with fully controllable systems, a super articulated mechanical system (SAMS) is a controlled underactuated mechanical system in which the dimensions of the configuration space exceed the dimensions of the control input space. The objectives of the research are to develop a novel SAMS model which is called beam-cart-seesaw system, and renovate a novel approach for achieving a high performance active-passive piezoelectric vibration absorber for such system. The system consists of two mobile carts, which are coupled via rack and pinion mechanics to two parallel tracks mounted on pneumatic rodless cylinders. One cart carries an elastic beam, and the other cart acts as a counterbalance. One adjustable counterweight mass is also installed underneath the seesaw to serve as a passive damping mechanism to absorb impact and shock energy. The motion and control of a Bernoulli-Euler beam subjected to the modified cart/seesaw system are analyzed first. Moreover, gray relational grade is utilized to investigate the sensitivity of tuning the active proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller to achieve desired vibration suppression performance. Consequently, it is shown that the active-passive vibration absorber can not only provide passive damping, but can also enhance the active action authority. The proposed software/hardware platform can also be profitable for the standardization of laboratory equipment, as well as for the development of entertainment tools.

  13. Improvement of the gas cluster ion beam-(GCIB)-based molecular secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) depth profile with O2(+) cosputtering.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yi-Hsuan; Liao, Hua-Yang; Lin, Kang-Yi; Chang, Hsun-Yun; Kao, Wei-Lun; Kuo, Ding-Yuan; You, Yun-Wen; Chu, Kuo-Jui; Wu, Chen-Yi; Shyue, Jing-Jong

    2016-04-21

    Over the last decade, cluster ion beams have displayed their capability to analyze organic materials and biological specimens. Compared with atomic ion beams, cluster ion beams non-linearly enhance the sputter yield, suppress damage accumulation and generate high mass fragments during sputtering. These properties allow successful Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis of soft materials beyond the static limit. Because the intensity of high mass molecular ions is intrinsically low, enhancing the intensity of these secondary ions while preserving the sample in its original state is the key to highly sensitive molecular depth profiles. In this work, bulk poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) was used as a model material and analyzed using Time-of-Flight SIMS (ToF-SIMS) with a pulsed Bi3(2+) primary ion. The optimized hardware of a 10 kV Ar2500(+) Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) with a low kinetic energy (200-500 V) oxygen ion (O2(+)) as a cosputter beam was employed for generating depth profiles and for examining the effect of beam parameters. The results were then quantitatively analyzed using an established erosion model. It was found that the ion intensity of the PET monomer ([M + H](+)) and its large molecular fragment ([M - C2H4O + H](+)) steadily declined during single GCIB sputtering, with distortion of the distribution information. However, under an optimized GCIB-O2(+) cosputter, the secondary ion intensity quickly reached a steady state and retained >95% intensity with respect to the pristine surface, although the damage cross-section was larger than that of single GCIB sputtering. This improvement was due to the oxidation of molecules and the formation of -OH groups that serve as proton donors to particles emitted from the surface. As a result, the ionization yield was enhanced and damage to the chemical structure was masked. Although O2(+) is known to alter the chemical structure and cause damage accumulation, the concurrently used GCIB could

  14. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency and the like, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  15. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  16. A new single crystal diamond dosimeter for small beam: comparison with different commercial active detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsolat, F.; Tromson, D.; Tranchant, N.; Pomorski, M.; Le Roy, M.; Donois, M.; Moignau, F.; Ostrowsky, A.; De Carlan, L.; Bassinet, C.; Huet, C.; Derreumaux, S.; Chea, M.; Cristina, K.; Boisserie, G.; Bergonzo, P.

    2013-11-01

    Recent developments of new therapy techniques using small photon beams, such as stereotactic radiotherapy, require suitable detectors to determine the delivered dose with a high accuracy. The dosimeter has to be as close as possible to tissue equivalence and to exhibit a small detection volume compared to the size of the irradiation field, because of the lack of lateral electronic equilibrium in small beam. Characteristics of single crystal diamond (tissue equivalent material Z = 6, high density) make it an ideal candidate to fulfil most of small beam dosimetry requirements. A commercially available Element Six electronic grade synthetic diamond was used to develop a single crystal diamond dosimeter (SCDDo) with a small detection volume (0.165 mm3). Long term stability was studied by irradiating the SCDDo in a 60Co beam over 14 h. A good stability (deviation less than ± 0.1%) was observed. Repeatability, dose linearity, dose rate dependence and energy dependence were studied in a 10 × 10 cm2 beam produced by a Varian Clinac 2100 C linear accelerator. SCDDo lateral dose profile, depth dose curve and output factor (OF) measurements were performed for small photon beams with a micro multileaf collimator m3 (BrainLab) attached to the linac. This study is focused on the comparison of SCDDo measurements to those obtained with different commercially available active detectors: an unshielded silicon diode (PTW 60017), a shielded silicon diode (Sun Nuclear EDGE), a PinPoint ionization chamber (PTW 31014) and two natural diamond detectors (PTW 60003). SCDDo presents an excellent spatial resolution for dose profile measurements, due to its small detection volume. Low energy dependence (variation of 1.2% between 6 and 18 MV photon beam) and low dose rate dependence of the SCDDo (variation of 1% between 0.53 and 2.64 Gy min-1) are obtained, explaining the good agreement between the SCDDo and the efficient unshielded diode (PTW 60017) in depth dose curve measurements. For

  17. A new single crystal diamond dosimeter for small beam: comparison with different commercial active detectors.

    PubMed

    Marsolat, F; Tromson, D; Tranchant, N; Pomorski, M; Le Roy, M; Donois, M; Moignau, F; Ostrowsky, A; De Carlan, L; Bassinet, C; Huet, C; Derreumaux, S; Chea, M; Cristina, K; Boisserie, G; Bergonzo, P

    2013-11-07

    Recent developments of new therapy techniques using small photon beams, such as stereotactic radiotherapy, require suitable detectors to determine the delivered dose with a high accuracy. The dosimeter has to be as close as possible to tissue equivalence and to exhibit a small detection volume compared to the size of the irradiation field, because of the lack of lateral electronic equilibrium in small beam. Characteristics of single crystal diamond (tissue equivalent material Z = 6, high density) make it an ideal candidate to fulfil most of small beam dosimetry requirements. A commercially available Element Six electronic grade synthetic diamond was used to develop a single crystal diamond dosimeter (SCDDo) with a small detection volume (0.165 mm(3)). Long term stability was studied by irradiating the SCDDo in a (60)Co beam over 14 h. A good stability (deviation less than ± 0.1%) was observed. Repeatability, dose linearity, dose rate dependence and energy dependence were studied in a 10 × 10 cm(2) beam produced by a Varian Clinac 2100 C linear accelerator. SCDDo lateral dose profile, depth dose curve and output factor (OF) measurements were performed for small photon beams with a micro multileaf collimator m3 (BrainLab) attached to the linac. This study is focused on the comparison of SCDDo measurements to those obtained with different commercially available active detectors: an unshielded silicon diode (PTW 60017), a shielded silicon diode (Sun Nuclear EDGE), a PinPoint ionization chamber (PTW 31014) and two natural diamond detectors (PTW 60003). SCDDo presents an excellent spatial resolution for dose profile measurements, due to its small detection volume. Low energy dependence (variation of 1.2% between 6 and 18 MV photon beam) and low dose rate dependence of the SCDDo (variation of 1% between 0.53 and 2.64 Gy min(-1)) are obtained, explaining the good agreement between the SCDDo and the efficient unshielded diode (PTW 60017) in depth dose curve

  18. Proton therapy treatment monitoring with in-beam PET: Investigating space and time activity distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brombal, L.; Barbosa, D.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M. G.; Camarlinghi, N.; Cristoforetti, L.; Guerra, A. Del; Fracchiolla, F.; Morrocchi, M.; Sportelli, G.; Righetto, R.; Schwarz, M.; Topi, A.; Rosso, V.

    2017-07-01

    In this study the possibility of retrieving composition information in proton therapy with a planar in-beam PET scanner is investigated. The analysis focuses both on spatial activity distributions and time dependence of the recorded signal. The experimental data taking was performed at the Trento Proton Therapy Center (IT) by irradiating three different phantoms. We show that different phantom compositions reflect into different activity profile shapes. We demonstrate that the analysis of the event rate can provide significant information on the phantom elemental composition, suggesting that elemental analysis could be used along with activity profile analysis to achieve a more accurate treatment monitoring.

  19. Raman spectroscopy applied to identify metabolites in urine of physically active subjects.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Letícia Parada; Silveira, Landulfo; da Silva, Alexandre Galvão; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu Tavares; Rocco, Débora Dias Ferraretto Moura

    2017-09-22

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid and non-destructive technique suitable for biological fluids analysis. In this work, dispersive Raman spectroscopy has been employed as a rapid and nondestructive technique to detect the metabolites in urine of physically active subjects before and after vigorous 30min pedaling or running compared to sedentary subjects. For so, urine samples from 9 subjects were obtained before and immediately after physical activities and submitted to Raman spectroscopy (830nm excitation, 250mW laser power, 20s integration time) and compared to urine from 5 sedentary subjects. The Raman spectra of urine from sedentary showed peaks related to urea, creatinine, ketone bodies, phosphate and other nitrogenous compounds. These metabolic biomarkers presented peaks with different intensities in the urine of physically active individuals after exercises compared to before, measured by the intensity of selected peaks the Raman spectra, which means different concentrations after training. These peaks presented different intensity values for each subject before physical activity, also behaving differently compared to the post-training: some subjects presented increase while others decrease the intensity. Raman spectroscopy may allow the development of a rapid and non-destructive test for metabolic evaluation of the physical training in active and trained subjects using urine samples, allowing nutrition adjustment with the sport's performance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Beam foil spectroscopy of N = 3 to N = 2 transitions in highly stripped heavy ions. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, D.D.; Chandler, G.A.; Egan, P.O.; Ziock, K.P.; Mokler, P.H.; Reusch, S.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.

    1986-09-01

    The spectroscopy of very highly ionized atoms provides an important testing ground for multi-electron atomic theory. We report preliminary experimental results on the n = 3 ..-->.. 2 spectra of Bi/sup +73/ and A/sup +69/ obtained at the GSI UNILAC accelerator. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Experimental Study on Full-Scale Beams Made by Reinforced Alkali Activated Concrete Undergoing Flexure.

    PubMed

    Monfardini, Linda; Minelli, Fausto

    2016-08-30

    Alkali Activated Concrete (AAC) is an alternative kind of concrete that uses fly ash as a total replacement of Portland cement. Fly ash combined with alkaline solution and cured at high temperature reacts to form a binder. Four point bending tests on two full scale beams made with AAC are described in this paper. Companion small material specimens were also casted with the aim of properly characterizing this new tailored material. The beam's length was 5000 mm and the cross section was 200 mm × 300 mm. The AAC consisted of fly ash, water, sand 0-4 mm and coarse aggregate 6-10 mm; and the alkaline solution consisted of sodium hydroxide mixed with sodium silicate. No cement was utilized. The maximum aggregate size was 10 mm; fly ash was type F, containing a maximum calcium content of 2%. After a rest period of two days, the beam was cured at 60 °C for 24 h. Data collected and critically discussed included beam deflection, crack patterns, compressive and flexural strength and elastic modulus. Results show how AAC behavior is comparable with Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) based materials. Nonlinear numerical analyses are finally reported, promoting a better understanding of the structural response.

  2. Determination of Flow Orientation of an Optically Active Turbulent Field by Means of a Single Beam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-18

    optically active turbulent field was determined by Fourier transforming the wander of a laser beam propagating in the ocean. A simple physical model... Fourier transform for the situation depicted on the right and on the left, respectively. July 1, 2013 / Vol. 38, No. 13 / OPTICS LETTERS 2185 0146-9592/13...132185-03$15.00/0 © 2013 Optical Society of America to the flow (see top row of Fig. 3). However, the magni- tude of the Fourier transform, in

  3. Near Infrared Spectroscopy of Active Galactic Nuclei Using FSpec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frechem, Joshua; Pessev, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Using data from the 2.3 meter Bok telescope on Kitt Peak and the FRANKENSpec spectrograph, we aim to investigate the circumnuclear region of over twenty active galaxies in the J, H, and K passbands in order to obtain high signal to noise spectra with reasonable investment of observing time. The sample is selected to cover a wide range of AGN types of activity in luminous nearby galaxies. The primary goal of this project was to sort and process the 9,000+ spectra, including dark subtraction, flat fielding, and creation of and application of bad pixel masks. The 2-D spectra were processed to a 1-D spectra and wavelength calibrated to reveal the exact wavelength of each peak in the spectra. Using standard stars is of utmost importance so the atmospheric lines can be corrected for and the data can be used for precise analysis. With the reduced and calibrated spectra, we measure the Paschen α, β, and γ Hydrogen lines, the Brackett γ Hydrogen line and the FeII line in the near infrared emitted from the circumnuclear regions of the galaxies. These data unveil details of what the environment is like in the area surrounding the supermassive black holes that are found in the heart of each of these galaxies.

  4. {gamma}-ray Spectroscopy of Proton Drip-Line Nuclei in the A{approx}130 Region using SPIRAL beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stezowski, O.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph.; Meyer, M.; Redon, N.; Rosse, B.; Schmitt, Ch.; De France, G.; Bhattachasyya, S.; Mukherjee, G.

    2008-11-11

    A fusion-evaporation experiment has been performed with a SPIRAL {sup 76}Kr radioactive beam in order to study the deformation of rare-earth nuclei near the proton drip-line. The experimental setup consisted in the EXOGAM {gamma}-array, coupled to the light-charged particles (LCP) DIAMANT detector and to the VAMOS heavy-ion spectrometer. The difficulties inherent to such measurements are enlightened. The coupling between EXOGAM and DIAMANT has been used to decrease the huge background caused by the radioactivity of the beam. It further permits assigning new {gamma}-ray transitions to specific residual nuclei. A {gamma}-ray belonging to the {sup 130}Pm level scheme has thus been observed for the first time.

  5. Modeling activities on the negative-ion-based Neutral Beam Injectors of the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Agostinetti, P.; Antoni, V.; Chitarin, G.; Pilan, N.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Nakano, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Tsumori, K.

    2011-09-26

    At the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) large-scaled negative ion sources have been widely used for the Neutral Beam Injectors (NBIs) mounted on the Large Helical Device (LHD), which is the world-largest superconducting helical system. These injectors have achieved outstanding performances in terms of beam energy, negative-ion current and optics, and represent a reference for the development of heating and current drive NBIs for ITER.In the framework of the support activities for the ITER NBIs, the PRIMA test facility, which includes a RF-drive ion source with 100 keV accelerator (SPIDER) and a complete 1 MeV Neutral Beam system (MITICA) is under construction at Consorzio RFX in Padova.An experimental validation of the codes has been undertaken in order to prove the accuracy of the simulations and the soundness of the SPIDER and MITICA design. To this purpose, the whole set of codes have been applied to the LHD NBIs in a joint activity between Consorzio RFX and NIFS, with the goal of comparing and benchmarking the codes with the experimental data. A description of these modeling activities and a discussion of the main results obtained are reported in this paper.

  6. Active solute effects on surface ripples in electron-beam welding solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, P. S.; Chen, Y. H.; Ku, J. S.; Ho, C. Y.

    2003-08-01

    Surface rippling on workpieces containing surface-active solutes after solidification, during electron-beam welding or melting, is experimentally and analytically investigated. Most alloys contain one or more surface-active solutes such as O, S, Se, and Te. This leads to surface-tension coefficients being positive at low temperatures. In this work, the accelerating voltage and welding currents of the electron-beam welder used are 50 kV and 10 and 15 mA, respectively, with welding speeds of 20, 30, and 40 mm/s, while the workpieces are different steels containing sulfur of 0.0035, 0.008, and 0.014 wt pct and oxygen of 0.002 wt pct. The average amplitudes of ripples are measured for different beam powers, welding speeds, and sulfur contents. Extending a previous work studying rippling on alloys having negative surface-tension coefficients, the present work predicts average amplitudes of ripples by accounting for heat transfer and fluid flow induced by a positive temperature-dependent surface-tension gradient in the molten pool near the solidification front. It is found for the first time that dimensionless average amplitudes are increased by increasing the product of the Prandtl and Marangoni numbers, the product of the adsorption coefficient and the active solute content, and the elasticity number. The predicted results show good agreement with experimental data.

  7. Monolithic crystalline cladding microstructures for efficient light guiding and beam manipulation in passive and active regimes.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuechen; Cheng, Chen; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Castillo, Gabriel R; Rabes, Blanca del Rosal; Tan, Yang; Jaque, Daniel; Chen, Feng

    2014-08-07

    Miniature laser sources with on-demand beam features are desirable devices for a broad range of photonic applications. Lasing based on direct-pump of miniaturized waveguiding active structures offers a low-cost but intriguing solution for compact light-emitting devices. In this work, we demonstrate a novel family of three dimensional (3D) photonic microstructures monolithically integrated in a Nd:YAG laser crystal wafer. They are produced by the femtosecond laser writing, capable of simultaneous light waveguiding and beam manipulation. In these guiding systems, tailoring of laser modes by both passive/active beam splitting and ring-shaped transformation are achieved by an appropriate design of refractive index patterns. Integration of graphene thin-layer as saturable absorber in the 3D laser structures allows for efficient passive Q-switching of tailored laser radiations which may enable miniature waveguiding lasers for broader applications. Our results pave a way to construct complex integrated passive and active laser circuits in dielectric crystals by using femtosecond laser written monolithic photonic chips.

  8. Monolithic crystalline cladding microstructures for efficient light guiding and beam manipulation in passive and active regimes

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yuechen; Cheng, Chen; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R.; Castillo, Gabriel R.; Rabes, Blanca del Rosal; Tan, Yang; Jaque, Daniel; Chen, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Miniature laser sources with on-demand beam features are desirable devices for a broad range of photonic applications. Lasing based on direct-pump of miniaturized waveguiding active structures offers a low-cost but intriguing solution for compact light-emitting devices. In this work, we demonstrate a novel family of three dimensional (3D) photonic microstructures monolithically integrated in a Nd:YAG laser crystal wafer. They are produced by the femtosecond laser writing, capable of simultaneous light waveguiding and beam manipulation. In these guiding systems, tailoring of laser modes by both passive/active beam splitting and ring-shaped transformation are achieved by an appropriate design of refractive index patterns. Integration of graphene thin-layer as saturable absorber in the 3D laser structures allows for efficient passive Q-switching of tailored laser radiations which may enable miniature waveguiding lasers for broader applications. Our results pave a way to construct complex integrated passive and active laser circuits in dielectric crystals by using femtosecond laser written monolithic photonic chips. PMID:25100561

  9. Beam Damage of Poly(Vinyl Chloride) [PVC] Film as Observed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhard, Mark H.; Krishna, Abhilash; Kulkarni, Pranita B.; Lee, Chi-Ying M.; Baer, Donald R.

    2003-03-08

    XPS spectra of a spin-coated film poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) were collected over a period of 243 minutes at 303 K to determine specimen damage during long exposures to monochromatic Al Ka x-rays. For this PVC film we measured the loss of chlorine as a function of time by rastering a focused 104.6 w 100 um diameter x-ray beam over a 1.4 mm x 0.2 mm area on the sample.

  10. Nanoscale mapping of catalytic activity using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N.; Stephanidis, B.; Zenobi, R.; Wain, A. J.; Roy, D.

    2015-04-01

    Chemical mapping of a photocatalytic reaction with nanoscale spatial resolution is demonstrated for the first time using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). An ultrathin alumina film applied to the Ag-coated TERS tip blocks catalytic interference whilst maintaining near-field electromagnetic enhancement, thus enabling spectroscopic imaging of catalytic activity on nanostructured Ag surfaces.

  11. Near-infrared spectroscopy can reveal increases in brain activity related to animal-assisted therapy.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuka; Ebara, Fumio; Morita, Yoshimitsu; Horikawa, Etsuo

    2017-08-01

    [Purpose] Previous studies have indicated that animal-assisted therapy can promote recovery of psychological, social, and physiological function in mental disorders. This study was designed as a pilot evaluation of the use of near-infrared spectroscopy to objectively identify changes in brain activity that could mediate the effect of animal-assisted therapy. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were 20 healthy students (10 males and 10 females; age 19-21 years) of the Faculty of Agriculture, Saga University. Participants were shown a picture of a Tokara goat or shack (control) while prefrontal cortical oxygenated haemoglobin levels (representing neural activity) were measured by near-infrared spectroscopy. [Results] The prefrontal cortical near-infrared spectroscopy signal was significantly higher during viewing of the animal picture than during a rest condition or during viewing of the control picture. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that near-infrared spectroscopy can be used to objectively identify brain activity changes during human mentation regarding animals; furthermore, these preliminary results suggest the efficacy of animal-assisted therapy could be related to increased activation of the prefrontal cortex.

  12. Rotational state selection of a CH3I+ ion beam using vacuum ultraviolet-mass-analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy: Characterization using photodissociation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Yong Jin; Kim, Myung Soo

    2008-03-01

    The ÃA12←X˜E3/22 transition of CH3I + was investigated by photodissociation (PD) of the cation generated by one-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI). Compared to the PD spectrum obtained by excitation of the cation in the main 0-0 band in the MATI spectrum, those obtained by excitation of the cations in the satellite structures showed substantially simplified rotational structures for nondegenerate vibronic bands. Spectral simplification occurred because each satellite consisted mostly of cations with one K quantum number. Spectroscopic constants in the ground vibronic state and in the 2135, 2138, 39, and 313 nondegenerate vibrational states in ÃA12 were determined via spectral fitting. Also, those in the 213n61 (n=1?) degenerate state, which had been reported previously, was improved. The K quantum number in each satellite determined by the present high resolution study was compatible with the prediction by the symmetry selection rule for photoionization. That is, the K quantum number of the ion core in high Rydberg states accessed by one-photon excitation was found to be conserved upon pulsed field ionization. This work demonstrates generation of mass-selected, vibronically selected, and K-selected ion beam by one-photon MATI.

  13. Analysis of the fine structure of Sn11 +-Sn14 + ions by optical spectroscopy in an electron-beam ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windberger, A.; Torretti, F.; Borschevsky, A.; Ryabtsev, A.; Dobrodey, S.; Bekker, H.; Eliav, E.; Kaldor, U.; Ubachs, W.; Hoekstra, R.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Versolato, O. O.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally re-evaluate the fine structure of Sn11 +-Sn14 + ions. These ions are essential in bright extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) plasma-light sources for next-generation nanolithography, but their complex electronic structure is an open challenge for both theory and experiment. We combine optical spectroscopy of magnetic dipole M 1 transitions, in a wavelength range covering 260 to 780 nm, with charge-state selective ionization in an electron beam ion trap. Our measurements confirm the predictive power of ab initio calculations based on Fock space coupled cluster theory. We validate our line identification using semiempirical cowan calculations with adjustable wave-function parameters. Available Ritz combinations further strengthen our analysis. Comparison with previous work suggests that line identifications in the EUV need to be revisited.

  14. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study of GaAs (001) and InP (001) Cleaning Procedures Prior to Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contour, J. P.; Massies, J.; Saletes, A.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of chemical etching by H2S04/H202/H20 (5/1/1) mixtures and of mechanopolishing by bromine-methanol diluted solution on GaAs (001) and InP (001) substrates for molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The final rinse in running deionized water does not produce any passivating oxide layer on the substrate surface. Oxidation observed on GaAs and InP after these cleaning procedures occurs during substrate handling in air. The H2S04/H202/H20 mixture produces arsenic rich surface layers having an atomic ratio As/Ga of 1.15, whereas the bromine-methanol mechanopolishing leads to an arsenic or phosphorus depleted surface with atomic ratios As/Ga=0.7 and P/In=0.65.

  15. High-resolution spectroscopy of He2+ using Rydberg-series extrapolation and Zeeman-decelerated supersonic beams of metastable He2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Paul; Semeria, Luca; Merkt, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Recently, high-resolution spectroscopy of slow beams of metastable helium molecules (He2∗) generated by multistage Zeeman deceleration was used in combination with Rydberg-series extrapolation techniques to obtain the lowest rotational interval in the molecular helium ion at a precision of 18 MHz (Jansen et al., 2015), limited by the temporal width of the Fourier-transform-limited laser pulses used to record the spectra. We present here an extension of these measurements in which we have (1) measured higher rotational intervals of He2+, (2) replaced the pulsed UV laser by a cw UV laser and improved the resolution of the spectra by a factor of more than five, and (3) studied MJ redistribution processes in regions of low magnetic fields of the Zeeman decelerator and shown how these processes can be exploited to assign transitions originating from specific spin-rotational levels (N″,J″) of He2∗ .

  16. In-beam γ-ray Spectroscopy of {sup 30}P via the {sup 28}Si({sup 3}He,pγ){sup 30}P Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mcneice, E.; Setoodehnia, K.; Singh, B.; Abe, Y.; Binh, D.N.; Chen, A.A.; Chen, J.; Cherubini, S.; Fukuoka, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, T.; Ishibashi, Y.; Ito, Y.; Kahl, D.; Komatsubara, T.; Kubono, S.; Moriguchi, T.; Nagae, D.; Nishikiori, R.; Niwa, T.; and others

    2014-06-15

    The level structure of {sup 30}P up to 8.25 MeV was investigated via in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy using the {sup 28}Si({sup 3}He,pγ){sup 30}P reaction at 9 MeV at the University of Tsukuba Tandem Accelerator Complex in Japan. An energy level scheme was deduced from γ-γ coincidence measurements. 47 new transitions have been observed from the previously known states (mostly resonances), thereby reducing the uncertainties in the excitation energies of 17 states from 3 to 10 keV to values of < 1 keV. Furthermore, spin assignments based on measurements of γ-ray angular distributions and γ-γ directional correlation of oriented nuclei (DCO ratios) were made for several observed levels of {sup 30}P.

  17. In-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy of very neutron-rich nuclei: excited states in 46S and 48Ar.

    PubMed

    Gade, A; Adrich, P; Bazin, D; Brown, B A; Cook, J M; Diget, C Aa; Glasmacher, T; McDaniel, S; Ratkiewicz, A; Siwek, K; Weisshaar, D

    2009-05-08

    We report on the first in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy study of the very neutron-rich nucleus 46S. The N=30 isotones 46S and 48Ar were produced in a novel way in two steps that both necessarily involve nucleon exchange and neutron pickup reactions 9Be(48Ca,48K)X followed by 9Be(48K,48Ar+gamma)X at 85.7 MeV/u midtarget energy and 9Be(48Ca,46Cl)X followed by 9Be(46Cl,46S+gamma)X at 87.0 MeV/u midtarget energy, respectively. The results are compared to large-scale shell-model calculations in the sd-pf shell using the SDPF-NR effective interaction and Z-dependent modifications.

  18. In-Beam {gamma}-Ray Spectroscopy of Very Neutron-Rich Nuclei: Excited States in {sup 46}S and {sup 48}Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Gade, A.; Brown, B. A.; Cook, J. M.; Glasmacher, T.; McDaniel, S.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Siwek, K.; Adrich, P.; Bazin, D.; Diget, C. A.; Weisshaar, D.

    2009-05-08

    We report on the first in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy study of the very neutron-rich nucleus {sup 46}S. The N=30 isotones {sup 46}S and {sup 48}Ar were produced in a novel way in two steps that both necessarily involve nucleon exchange and neutron pickup reactions {sup 9}Be({sup 48}Ca,{sup 48}K)X followed by {sup 9}Be({sup 48}K,{sup 48}Ar+{gamma})X at 85.7 MeV/u midtarget energy and {sup 9}Be({sup 48}Ca,{sup 46}Cl)X followed by {sup 9}Be({sup 46}Cl,{sup 46}S+{gamma})X at 87.0 MeV/u midtarget energy, respectively. The results are compared to large-scale shell-model calculations in the sd-pf shell using the SDPF-NR effective interaction and Z-dependent modifications.

  19. Auger electron nanoscale mapping and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with gas cluster ion beam sputtering to study an organic bulk heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Heon Kim, Seong; Heo, Sung; Ihn, Soo-Ghang; Yun, Sungyoung; Hwan Park, Jong; Chung, Yeonji; Lee, Eunha; Park, Gyeongsu; Yun, Dong-Jin

    2014-06-16

    The lateral and vertical distributions of organic p/n bulk heterojunctions for an organic solar cell device are, respectively, investigated using nanometer-scale Auger electron mapping and using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with Ar gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) sputtering. The concentration of sulfur, present only in the p-type material, is traced to verify the distribution of p-type (donor) and n-type (acceptor) materials in the blended structure. In the vertical direction, a considerable change in atomic sulfur concentration is observed using XPS depth profiling with Ar GCIB sputtering. In addition, Auger electron mapping of sulfur reveals the lateral 2-dimensional distribution of p- and n-type materials. The combination of Auger electron mapping with Ar GCIB sputtering should thereby allow the construction of 3-dimensional distributions of p- and n-type materials in organic photovoltaic cells.

  20. Active tuning of vibration and wave propagation in elastic beams with periodically placed piezoelectric actuator/sensor pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fengming; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Liu, Chunchuan

    2017-04-01

    A novel strategy is proposed to actively tune the vibration and wave propagation properties in elastic beams. By periodically placing the piezoelectric actuator/sensor pairs along the beam axis, an active periodic beam structure which exhibits special vibration and wave propagation properties such as the frequency pass-bands and stop-bands (or band-gaps) is developed. Hamilton's principle is applied to establish the equations of motion of the sub-beam elements i.e. the unit-cells, bonded by the piezoelectric patches. A negative proportional feedback control strategy is employed to design the controllers which can provide a positive active stiffness to the beam for a positive feedback control gain, which can increase the stability of the structural system. By means of the added positive active stiffness, the periodicity or the band-gap property of the beam with periodically placed piezoelectric patches can be actively tuned. From the investigation, it is shown that better band-gap characteristics can be achieved by using the negative proportional feedback control. The band-gaps can be obviously broadened by properly increasing the control gain, and they can also be greatly enlarged by appropriately designing the structural sizes of the controllers. The control voltages applied on the piezoelectric actuators are in reasonable and controllable ranges, especially, they are very low in the band-gaps. Thus, the vibration and wave propagation behaviors of the elastic beam can be actively controlled by the periodically placed piezoelectric patches.

  1. Chromospherically active stars. X - Spectroscopy and photometry of HD 212280

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Browning, Jared C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Morton, Mary D.; Hall, Douglas S.

    1993-01-01

    The system HD 212280 is a chromospherically active double lined spectroscopic binary with an orbital period of 45.284 days and an eccentricity of 0.50. The spectrum is composite with spectral types of G8 IV and F5-8 V for the components. An estimated inclination of 78 +/- 8 deg results in masses of 1.7 and 1.4 solar mass for the G subgiant and mid-F star, respectively. The distance to the system is estimated to be 112 pc. Photometric observations obtained between 1987 November and 1992 June reveal that HD 212280 is a newly identified variable star with a V amplitude of about 0.15 mag and a mean period of 29.46 days. Our V data were divided into 11 sets and in all but one case two spots were required to fit the data. Lifetimes of 650 days and a minimum of 1350 days have been determined for two of the four spots. The differential rotation coefficient of 0.05 is relatively small. The age of the system is about 1.9 X 10 exp 9 yrs. The G subgiant is rotating slower than pseudosynchronously while the F-type star is rotating faster.

  2. Beta-particle spectroscopy with active gamma-ray discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbotham, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    A spectrometer was developed which was capable of measuring a beta-particle energy distribution while simultaneously (actively) rejecting the system's response to gamma rays. A two detector configuration was used, where the first detector was a thin, pancake type, gas-flow counter, positioned in front of the entrance window to a BC-400 plastic scintillator. The gas-flow counter was designed to be insensitive to gamma rays so that it could act as a sensor which would gate the spectrometer to accept only those pulses induced by beta-particle interactions in the scintillator. The gamma-ray rejection capability of the spectrometer was a linear function of gamma-ray energy. Various spectrometer design and response considerations were investigated to determine their effect on either the spectrometer's discrimination capabilities or on its ability to accurately measure the incident beta-particle energy distribution. The spectrometer was used to measure the energy distribution of the photoelectric and Compton recoil electrons which are produced by gamma ray interaction in thin metal foils. In addition, the energy distributions of each component of a radiation field consisting of beta particles and gamma rays were measured for several radiation sources.

  3. High Resolution Spectroscopy of 1,2-Difluoroethane in a Molecular Beam: A Case Study of Vibrational Mode-Coupling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-29

    excited electronic potential surfaces. Pyrazine , for example, has been studied extensively using rotationally resolved electronic spectroscopy, providing...parameters were varied to optimize the fit of the calculated spectrum to the experimental spectrum. A modified simulated annealing algorithm was employed... simulate vibrational mode coupling from a degenerate bright state to a split dark state in 15 ==..==, .asl lailml t ia m m . M Mi an effort to reproduce

  4. Optical spectroscopy and imaging of colour centres in lithium fluoride crystals and thin films irradiated by 3 MeV proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccinini, M.; Ambrosini, F.; Ampollini, A.; Carpanese, M.; Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Bonfigli, F.; Libera, S.; Vincenti, M. A.; Montereali, R. M.

    2014-05-01

    Lithium fluoride is a well-known dosimeter material and it is currently under investigation also for high-resolution radiation imaging detectors based on colour centre photoluminescence. In order to extend their applications, proton beams of 3 MeV energy, produced by a linear accelerator, were used to irradiate LiF crystals and thin films in the fluence range of 1010-1015 protons/cm2. The irradiation induces the formation of colour centres, mainly the primary F centre and the aggregate F2 and F3+ defects, which are stable at room temperature. By optical pumping in the blue spectral region, the F2 and F3+ centres emit broad photoluminescence bands in the visible spectral range. By conventional fluorescence microscopy, the integrated photoluminescence intensity was carefully measured in LiF crystals and thin films as a function of the irradiation fluence: a linear optical response was obtained in a large range of fluence, which is dependent on the used LiF samples. Colour centres concentrations were estimated in LiF crystals by optical absorption spectroscopy. It was possible to record the transversal proton beam intensity profile by acquiring the photoluminescence image of the irradiated spots on LiF films.

  5. Active vibration control of a thin walled beam by neural networks and piezo-actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Lecce, L.; Sorrentino, A.; Concilio, A.

    1994-12-31

    In turboprop aircraft, vibration of the fuselage frame (typically a thin-walled beam) has been identified as the main cause of interior noise. Passive methods, based essentially on the use of DVA (Dynamic Vibration Absorbers) have been shown to be not entirely satisfactory, due to the significant weight increase. The use of active control systems based on piezoceramic sensors and actuators integrated into the frame seems to be a valid alternative to attenuate interior noise. In this paper, the use of a MIMO feedforward active control system with piezoceramic actuators is proposed, in order to reduce the vertical vibration levels of a rectified, typical fuselage frame. A numerical FEM model of the rectified frame has been experimentally validated and has been used in order to evaluate the dynamic response of the beam, both with regard to piezoceramic actuators and to a point force, representing the primary disturbance. A neural network (NN) controller has been used to simultaneously compute amplitudes and phases of the control force for the 6 piezo actuators, so as to minimize the accelerometric responses acquired in 30 points of the beam (6 at each of 5 different transversal sections).

  6. Polymorph characterization of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) using low-frequency Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Peter J; Dabros, Marta; Sarsfield, Beth; Chan, Eric; Carriere, James T; Smith, Brian C

    2014-01-01

    Polymorph detection, identification, and quantitation in crystalline materials are of great importance to the pharmaceutical industry. Vibrational spectroscopic techniques used for this purpose include Fourier transform mid-infrared (FT-MIR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and terahertz (THz) and far-infrared (FIR) spectroscopy. Typically, the fundamental molecular vibrations accessed using high-frequency Raman and MIR spectroscopy or the overtone and combination of bands in the NIR spectra are used to monitor the solid-state forms of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). The local environmental sensitivity of the fundamental molecular vibrations provides an indirect probe of the long-range order in molecular crystals. However, low-frequency vibrational spectroscopy provides access to the lattice vibrations of molecular crystals and, hence, has the potential to more directly probe intermolecular interactions in the solid state. Recent advances in filter technology enable high-quality, low-frequency Raman spectra to be acquired using a single-stage spectrograph. This innovation enables the cost-effective collection of high-quality Raman spectra in the 200-10 cm(-1) region. In this study, we demonstrate the potential of low-frequency Raman spectroscopy for the polymorphic characterization of APIs. This approach provides several benefits over existing techniques, including ease of sampling and more intense, information-rich band structures that can potentially discriminate among crystalline forms. An improved understanding of the relationship between the crystalline structure and the low-frequency vibrational spectrum is needed for the more widespread use of the technique.

  7. Influence of perturbative phase noise on active coherent polarization beam combining system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Pengfei; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Ma, Yanxing; Su, Rongtao; Liu, Zejin

    2013-12-02

    In this manuscript, the influence of perturbative phase noise on active coherent polarization beam combining (CPBC) system is studied theoretically and experimentally. By employing a photo-detector to obtain phase error signal for feedback loop, actively coherent polarization beam combining of two 20 W-level single mode polarization-maintained (PM) fiber amplifiers are demonstrated with more than 94% combining efficiency. Then the influence of perturbative phase noise on active CPBC system is illustrated by incorporating a simulated phase noise signal in one of the two amplifiers. Experimental results show that the combining efficiency of the CPBC system is susceptible to the frequency or amplitude of the perturbative phase noise. In order to ensure the combining efficiency of the unit of CPBC system higher than 90%, the competence of our active phase control module for high power operation is discussed, which suggests that it could be worked at 100s W power level. The relationship between residual phase noise of the active controller and the normalized voltage signal of the photo-detector is developed and validated experimentally. Experimental results correspond exactly with the theoretically analyzed combining efficiency. Our method offers a useful approach to estimate the influence of phase noise on CPBC system.

  8. Radioactivity of Potassium Solutions: A Comparison of Calculated Activity to Measured Activity from Gross Beta Counting and Gamma Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gaylord, R F

    2005-07-26

    In order to determine if the measured beta activity for a solution containing potassium was exactly as predicted, particularly since the CES gas counter is not calibrated specifically with K-40, an experiment was conducted to compare measured activities from two radioanalytical methods (gamma spectroscopy and gas proportional counting) to calculated activities across a range of potassium concentrations. Potassium, being ubiquitous and naturally radioactive, is a well-known and common interference in gross beta counting methods. By measuring the observed beta activity due to K-40 in potassium-containing solutions across a wide range of concentrations, it was found that the observed beta activity agrees well with the beta activity calculated from the potassium concentration measured by standard inorganic analytical techniques, such as ICP-OES, and that using the measured potassium concentration to calculate the expected beta activity, and comparing this to the observed beta activity to determine if potassium can account for all the observed activity in a sample, is a valid technique. It was also observed that gamma spectroscopy is not an effective means of measuring K-40 activity below approximately 700 pCi/L, which corresponds to a solution with approximately 833 mg/L total potassium. Gas proportional counting for gross beta activity has a much lower detection limit, typically 20-50 picoCi/L for a liquid low in total dissolved solids, which corresponds to a potassium concentration of approximately 30-70 ppm K.

  9. Structure-Activity Relations In Enzymes: An Application Of IR-ATR Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fringeli, Urs P.; Ahlstrom, Peter; Vincenz, Claudius; Fringeli, Marianna

    1985-12-01

    Relations between structure and specific activity in immobilized acetylcholinesterase (ACNE) have been studied by means of pH- and Ca++-modulation technique combined with attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared (IR) spectroscopy and enzyme activity measurement. Periodic modulation of pH and Ca++-concentration enabled a periodic on-off switching of about 40% of the total enzyme activity. It was found that about 0.5 to 1% of the amino acids were involved in this process. These 15 to 30 amino acids assumed antiparallel pleated sheet structure in the inhibited state and random and/or helical structure in the activated state.

  10. Activators of photoluminescence in calcite: evidence from high-resolution, laser-excited luminescence spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pedone, V.A.; Cercone, K.R.; Burruss, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-excited luminescence spectroscopy of a red-algal, biogenic calcite and a synthetic Mn-calcite can make the distinction between organic and trace-element activators of photoluminescence. Organic-activated photoluminescence in biogenic calcite is characterized by significant peak shifts and increasing intensity with shorter-wavelength excitation and by significant decreases in intensity after heating to ??? 400??C. In contrast, Mn-activated photoluminescence shows no peak shift, greatest intensity under green excitation and limited changes after heating. Examination of samples with a high-sensitivity spectrometer using several wavelengths of exciting light is necessary for identification of photoluminescence activators. ?? 1990.

  11. Monte Carlo simulations of ripple filters designed for proton and carbon ion beams in hadrontherapy with active scanning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourhaleb, F.; Attili, A.; Cirio, R.; Cirrone, P.; Marchetto, F.; Donetti, M.; Garella, M. A.; Giordanengo, S.; Givehchi, N.; Iliescu, S.; La Rosa, A.; Pardo, J.; Pecka, A.; Peroni, C.

    2008-02-01

    Proton and carbon ion beams have a very sharp Bragg peak. For proton beams of energies smaller than 100 MeV, fitting with a gaussian the region of the maximum of the Bragg peak, the sigma along the beam direction is smaller than 1 mm, while for carbon ion beams, the sigma derived with the same technique is smaller than 1 mm for energies up to 360 MeV. In order to use low energy proton and carbon ion beams in hadrontherapy and to achieve an acceptable homogeneity of the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) either the peak positions along the beam have to be quite close to each other or the longitudinal peak shape needs to be broaden at least few millimeters by means of a properly designed ripple filter. With a synchrotron accelerator in conjunction with active scanning techniques the use of a ripple filter is necessary to reduce the numbers of energy switches necessary to obtain a smooth SOBP, leading also to shorter overall irradiation times. We studied the impact of the design of the ripple filter on the dose uniformity in the SOBP region by means of Monte Carlo simulations, implemented using the package Geant4. We simulated the beam delivery line supporting both proton and carbon ion beams using different energies of the beams. We compared the effect of different kind of ripple filters and their advantages.

  12. Annihilation detector for an in-beam spectroscopy apparatus to measure the ground state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauerzopf, Clemens; Capon, Aaron A.; Diermaier, Martin; Fleck, Markus; Kolbinger, Bernadette; Malbrunot, Chloé; Massiczek, Oswald; Simon, Martin C.; Vamosi, Stefan; Zmeskal, Johann; Widmann, Eberhard

    2017-02-01

    The matter-antimatter asymmetry observed in the universe today still lacks a quantitative explanation. One possible mechanism that could contribute to the observed imbalance is a violation of the combined Charge-, Parity- and Time symmetries (CPT). A test of CPT symmetry using anti-atoms is being carried out by the ASACUSA-CUSP collaboration at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator using a low temperature beam of antihydrogen-the most simple atomic system built only of antiparticles. While hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, antihydrogen is produced in very small quantities in a laboratory framework. A detector for in-beam measurements of the ground state hyperfine structure of antihydrogen has to be able to detect very low signal rates within high background. To fulfil this challenging task, a two layer barrel hodoscope detector was developed. It is built of plastic scintillators with double sided readout via Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). The SiPM readout is done using novel, compact and cost efficient electronics that incorporate power supply, amplifier and discriminator on a single board. This contribution will evaluate the performance of the new hodoscope detector.

  13. Range extension in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using femtosecond-nanosecond dual-beam laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wei; Zeng, Bin; Li, Ziting; Yao, Jinping; Xie, Hongqiang; Li, Guihua; Wang, Zhanshan; Cheng, Ya

    2017-06-01

    We extend the detection range of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy by combining high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses with high-energy nanosecond CO2 laser pulses. The femtosecond laser pulses ionize the molecules and generate filament in air. The free electrons generated in the self-confined plasma channel by the femtosecond laser serve as the seed electrons which cause efficient avalanche ionization in the nanosecond CO2 laser field. We show that the detection distance has been extended by three times with the assistance of femtosecond laser filamentation.

  14. Polarization dependence of n = 2 positronium transition rates to Stark-split n = 30 levels via crossed-beam spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. C. L.; Hisakado, T. H.; Goldman, H. J.; Tom, H. W. K.; Mills, A. P., Jr.

    2016-03-01

    We produce Rydberg Ps by a two-step laser excitation from {1}3S\\to {2}3P and from {2}3P to states of principal quantum level n=30+/- 1 that are Stark split by a motionally induced electric field. Our measurements are largely free of first-order Doppler shifts such that we are able to investigate the impact of laser polarization on the population of the closely spaced Stark levels. We find a variation in the distribution that is primarily dependent on the IR laser polarization with respect to the direction of the motionally induced electric field. With the IR light polarized parallel to the electric field F, the ratio of excitation probability to the levels of maximal Stark splitting compared to that of excitation to the states of minimal Stark splitting is found to be 3.37 ± 0.51, whereas with the IR light polarized perpendicular to F, the excitation ratio is 0.87 ± 0.64. Our results agree with those of Wall et al (2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 173001) obtained with n = 11 and will be useful in the preparation of high-n states of Ps for a variety of experiments, including measuring the interaction of Ps with gravity, in precision time-of-flight (TOF) energy spectroscopy, and precision optical spectroscopy of Ps.

  15. Focused-ion-beam post-processing technology for active devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tee, Chyng Wen; Lau, Fat Kit; Zhao, Xin; Penty, Richard; White, Ian

    2006-09-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) etching technology is a highly efficient post-processing technique with the functionality to perform sputter etching and deposition of metals or insulators by means of a computer-generated mask. The high resolution and the ability to remove material directly from the sample in-situ make FIB etching the ideal candidate for device prototyping of novel micro-size photonic component design. Furthermore, the fact that arbitrary profile can be etched directly onto a sample without the need to prepare conventional mask and photolithography process makes novel device research with rapid feedback from characterisation to design activities possible. In this paper, we present a concise summary of the research work in Cambridge based on FIB technology. We demonstrate the applicability of focussed ion beam post processing technology to active photonic devices research. Applications include the integration of advanced waveguide architectures onto active photonic components. We documents details on the integration of lens structure on tapered lasers, photonic crystals on active SOA-integrated waveguides and surface profiling of low-cost gain-guided vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. Furthermore, we discuss additional functions of FIB in the measurement of buried waveguide structures or the integration of total-internal-reflection (TIR) mirror in optical interconnect structures.

  16. Experimental Study on Full-Scale Beams Made by Reinforced Alkali Activated Concrete Undergoing Flexure

    PubMed Central

    Monfardini, Linda; Minelli, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Alkali Activated Concrete (AAC) is an alternative kind of concrete that uses fly ash as a total replacement of Portland cement. Fly ash combined with alkaline solution and cured at high temperature reacts to form a binder. Four point bending tests on two full scale beams made with AAC are described in this paper. Companion small material specimens were also casted with the aim of properly characterizing this new tailored material. The beam’s length was 5000 mm and the cross section was 200 mm × 300 mm. The AAC consisted of fly ash, water, sand 0–4 mm and coarse aggregate 6–10 mm; and the alkaline solution consisted of sodium hydroxide mixed with sodium silicate. No cement was utilized. The maximum aggregate size was 10 mm; fly ash was type F, containing a maximum calcium content of 2%. After a rest period of two days, the beam was cured at 60 °C for 24 h. Data collected and critically discussed included beam deflection, crack patterns, compressive and flexural strength and elastic modulus. Results show how AAC behavior is comparable with Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) based materials. Nonlinear numerical analyses are finally reported, promoting a better understanding of the structural response. PMID:28773861

  17. Construction of a surface positronium lifetime spectroscopy apparatus with a spin-polarized low energy positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, M.; Wada, K.; Miyashita, A.; Kawasuso, A.

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a surface positronium (Ps) lifetime spectrometer. A spin-polarized slow positron beam is generated by a sodium-22 source and a solid krypton moderator and transported to the sample chamber by electrostatic lenses. The incident energy is adjusted by a retarding potential using a deceleration tube. For the lifetime measurement, the start signal is obtained from a secondary-electron detector installed in front of the sample. The stop signal is detected by a scintillation detector for annihilation gamma rays. As a performance test, Ps lifetime measurements were carried out and clear decay curves derived from ortho-Ps self-annihilation were successfully observed. This system might be used for the estimation of the spin polarization at the surface of ferromagnetic materials.

  18. Cross-Section Measurements for (n,xn) Reactions by In-Beam Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlik, A.; Baumann, P.; Kerveno, M.; Rudolf, G.; Borcea, C.; Mihailescu, L.C.; Jericha, E.; Raskinyte, I.; Jokic, S.; Lukic, S.; Meulders, J.P.; Nolte, R.; Plompen, A.J.M.

    2005-05-24

    The nuclear reactions 207Pb(n,2n)206Pb and 232Th(n,5n)228Th were studied by measuring prompt gamma-ray emission spectra from the interaction of neutrons with an enriched 207Pb sample and a natTh sample. For 207Pb the measurements were performed at the white neutron beam of the GELINA neutron source at IRMM Geel in the neutron energy range up to 20 MeV. The Th measurements were done at the quasi-monoenergetic 7Li(p,n)7Be neutron source at the Universite Catholique de Louvain for five peak neutron energies in the range 29 MeV to 42 MeV. The measurements were complemented by model calculations using the code system EMPIRE-II.

  19. In-beam γ -ray spectroscopy studies of medium-spin states in the odd-odd nucleus 186Re

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matters, D. A.; Kondev, F. G.; Aoi, N.; Ayyad, Y.; Byrne, A. P.; Carpenter, M. P.; Carroll, J. J.; Chiara, C. J.; Davidson, P. M.; Dracoulis, G. D.; Fang, Y. D.; Hoffman, C. R.; Hughes, R. O.; Ideguchi, E.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Kanaya, S.; Kay, B. P.; Kibédi, T.; Lane, G. J.; Lauritsen, T.; McClory, J. W.; Nieminen, P.; Noji, S.; Odahara, A.; Ong, H. J.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Tran, D. T.; Watanabe, H.; Wilson, A. N.; Yamamoto, Y.; Zhu, S.

    2017-07-01

    Excited states in 186Re with spins up to J =12 ℏ were investigated in two separate experiments using 186W(d ,2 n ) reactions at beam energies of 12.5 and 14.5 MeV. Two- and threefold γ -ray coincidence data were collected using the CAESAR and CAGRA spectrometers, respectively, each composed of Compton-suppressed high-purity germanium detectors. Analysis of the data revealed rotational bands built on several two-quasiparticle intrinsic states, including a long-lived Kπ=(8+) isomer. Configuration assignments were supported by an analysis of in-band properties, such as |gK-gR| values. The excitation energies of the observed intrinsic states were compared with results from multi-quasiparticle blocking calculations, based on the Lipkin-Nogami pairing approach, that included contributions from the residual proton-neutron interactions.

  20. Study of heavy element structure with in-beam. cap alpha. /sup -/,. beta. /sup -/ and. gamma. -ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.A.; Decman, D.J.; Henry, E.A.; Hoff, R.W.; Mann, L.G.; Struble, G.L.; Ussery, L.E.

    1984-05-10

    We describe our in-beam superconducting conversion electron spectrometer and its use in a (t,p) proton-conversion electron coincidence mode. Several examples of completed and on-going investigations are presented. These include: E0 strength from the /sup 238/U fission isomer; electromagnetic properties of the J/sup ..pi../ = 6/sup +/ and 8/sup +/ states of /sup 210/Pb; single particle and cluster states of /sup 213/Fr; the J/sup ..pi../ = 21/2/sup +/ isomer in /sup 197/Au and /sup 199/Au; and the cluster states of /sup 199/Au. Results of the study of odd-odd deformed /sup 244/Am are presented. The latter results performed using neutron-capture gamma-ray and conversion electron techniques are compared to recent developments in the modeling of deformed odd-odd nuclei. 23 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Evaluation of uncertainty in experimental active buckling control of a slender beam-column with disturbance forces using Weibull analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enss, Georg C.; Platz, Roland

    2016-10-01

    Buckling of slender load-bearing beam-columns is a crucial failure scenario in light-weight structures as it may result in the collapse of the entire structure. If axial load and load capacity are unknown, stability becomes uncertain. To compensate this uncertainty, the authors successfully developed and evaluated an approach for active buckling control for a slender beam-column, clamped at the base and pinned at the upper end. Active lateral forces are applied with two piezoelectric stack actuators in opposing directions near the beam-column' clamped base to prevent buckling. A Linear Quadratic Regulator is designed and implemented on the experimental demonstrator and statistical tests are conducted to prove effectivity of the active approach. The load capacity of the beam-column could be increased by 40% and scatter of buckling occurrences for increasing axial loads is reduced. Weibull analysis is used to evaluate the increase of the load capacity and its related uncertainty compensation.

  2. Improvement of chaperone activity of 2-Cys peroxiredoxin using electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung Hyun; An, Byung Chull; Lee, Seung Sik; Lee, Jae Taek; Cho, Jae-Hyun; Jung, Hyun Suk; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2012-08-01

    The peroxiredoxin protein expressed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaPrx) is a typical 2-cysteine peroxiredoxin that has dual functions as both a thioredoxin-dependent peroxidase and molecular chaperone. As the function of PaPrx is regulated by its structural status, in the present study, we examined the effects of electron beam radiation on the structural modifications of PaPrx, as well as changes to PaPrx peroxidase and chaperone functions. It was found that the chaperone activity of PaPrx was increased approximately 3- to 4-fold at 2 kGy when compared to non-irradiated PaPrx, while its peroxidase activity decreased. This corresponded to a shift from the low molecular weight PaPrx species that acts as a peroxidase to the high molecular weight complex that functions as a chaperone, as detected using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We also investigated the influence of the electron beam on physical protein properties such as hydrophobicity and secondary structure. The exposure of the PaPrx hydrophobic domains in response to irradiation reached a peak at 2 kGy and then decreased in a dose-dependent manner at higher doses. In addition, the exposure of β-sheet and random coil elements on the surface of PaPrx was significantly increased following irradiation with an electron beam, whereas exposure of α-helix and turn elements was decreased. These results suggest that irradiated PaPrx may be a potential candidate for use in bio-engineering systems and various industrial applications, due to its enhanced chaperone activity.

  3. Functional cerebral activation detected by an integrated system combining CW-NIR spectroscopy and EEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovati, Luigi; Fonda, Sergio; Bulf, L.; Ferrari, Renata; Biral, Gianpaolo; Salvatori, Giorgia; Bandera, Andrea; Corradini, M.

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the possibility of correlating hemodynamic changes and neural activities in the brain by using an integrated system combining Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) and electroencephalographic activity (EEG). We present brain hemodynamic changes and EEG recordings obtained from four volunteers during the performance of two different sequential thumb-finger opposition tasks, with and without a related mental activity. The optical and electrical signals were recorded simultaneously on the subject forehead. The coupling of the two systems could be useful to demonstrate correlation between cognitive paradigms and hemodynamic signals.

  4. Diode-laser absorption spectroscopy of supersonic carbon cluster beams: the nu 3 spectrum of C5.

    PubMed

    Heath, J R; Cooksy, A L; Gruebele, M H; Schmuttenmaer, C A; Saykally, R J

    1989-05-05

    A new spectroscopic experiment has been developed in which rovibrational transitions of supersonically cooled carbon clusters, which were produced by laser vaporization of graphite, have been measured by direct-absorption diode-laser spectroscopy. Thirty-six sequential rovibrational lines of the nu 3 band of the C5 carbon cluster have been measured with Doppler-limited resolution. The absorption spectrum is characteristic of a linear molecule with a center of symmetry. Least-squares analysis of the spectrum indicates an effective carbon-carbon bond length of 1.283 angstroms, in good agreement with ab initio quantum chemical calculations. This work confirms the detection of C5 in IRC + 10216 reported in the accompanying paper.

  5. Diagnostics of reactive pulsed plasmas by UV and VUV absorption spectroscopy and by modulated beam Mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunge, Gilles

    2011-10-01

    Pulsed plasmas are promising for etching applications in the microelectronic industry. However, many new phenomena are involved when a high density discharge is pulsed. To better understand these processes it is necessary to probe the radicals' kinetics with a microsecond resolution. We have developed several diagnostics to reach this goal including broad band absorption spectroscopy with UV LEDs to detect small polyatomic radicals and with a deuterium VUV source to detect larger closed shell molecules and the modulated mass spectrometry to monitor atomic species. We will discuss the impact of the plasma pulsing frequency and duty cycle on the radical densities in Cl2 based plasmas, and the consequences on plasma processes. Work done in collaboration with Paul Bodart, Melisa Brihoum, Maxime Darnon, Erwin Pargon, Olivier Joubert, and Nader Sadeghi, CNRS/LTM.

  6. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the probe fluorescence in the study of human blood protein dynamic structure on SR beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobretsov, G. E.; Kurek, N. K.; Syrejshchikova, T. I.; Yakimenko, M. N.; Clarke, D. T.; Jones, G. R.; Munro, I. H.

    2000-06-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopy on the SRS of the Daresbury Laboratory was used for the study of the human serum lipoproteins and human blood albumins with fluorescent probes K-37 and K-35, developed in Russia. The probe K-37 was found sensitive to the difference in dynamic properties of the lipid objects. Two sets of the parameters were used for the description of lipid dynamic structure: (1) time-resolved fluorescence spectra and (2) time-resolved fluorescence depolarization as a function of rotational mobility of lipid molecules. Each measured dynamic parameter reflected the monotonous changes of dynamic properties in the range: lipid spheres-very low density lipoproteins-low density lipoproteins-high density lipoproteins-phospholipid liposomes. The range is characterized by the increase of the ratio polar/ nonpolar lipids. Thus, time-resolved fluorescence could be used to detect some structural modifications in lipoproteins related to atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular diseases development.

  7. Beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-08-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the {open_quotes}Booster{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ATLAS{close_quotes} linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates.

  8. Crystallographic dependence of photocatalytic activity of WO3 thin films prepared by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqiang; Varga, Tamas; Yan, Pengfei; Wang, Zhiguo; Wang, Chongmin; Chambers, Scott A; Du, Yingge

    2015-06-21

    We investigated the impact of crystallographic orientation on the photocatalytic activity of single crystalline WO3 thin films prepared by molecular beam epitaxy on the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB). A clear effect is observed, with (111) being the most reactive surface, followed by (110) and (001). Photoreactivity is directly correlated with the surface free energy determined by density functional theory calculations. The RhB photodegradation mechanism is found to involve hydroxyl radicals in solution formed from photo-generated holes and differs from previous studies performed on nanoparticles and composites.

  9. Application of terahertz spectroscopy for characterization of biologically active organic molecules in natural environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaliūnas, Mindaugas; Jakštas, Vytautas; Nasser, Kinan E.; Venckevičius, Rimvydas; Urbanowicz, Andrzej; Kašalynas, Irmantas; Valušis, Gintaras

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a comparative research of biologically active organic molecules in its natural environment using the terahertz (THz) time domain spectroscopy (TDS) and Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS) systems is carried out. Absorption coefficient and refractive index of Nicotiana tabacum L. leaves containing nicotine, Cannabis sativa L. leaves containing tetrahydrocannabinol, and Humulu lupulus L. leaves containing α-acids, active organic molecules that obtain in natural environment, were measured in broad frequency range from 0.1 to 13 THz at room temperature. In the spectra of absorption coefficient the features were found to be unique for N. tabacum, C. sativa and H. lupulus. Moreover, those features can be exploited for identification of C. sativa sex and N. tabacum origin. The refractive index can be also used to characterize different species.

  10. An X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) Study of Activated Carbons Impregnated with some Organocopper Complexes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    AD-A282 721 l lllllll a Dfene Defence nationals AN X.RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY (XPS) STUDY OF ACTIVATED CARBONS IMPREGNATED WITH SOME... ammoniacal solution as a carrier into which all impregnants (except TEDA) were dissolved. Without a suitable carrier, and with the inherent low vapor...and will not be repeated here. All five complexes were synthesized at DREO using known methods. 2 2.2 IMPREGNATING PROCEDURES Two impregnating

  11. Measurement of brain activation difference during different mathematical tasks by near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Naoko; Kuroda, Yasufumi; Chance, Britton; Nioka, Shoko; Eda, Hideo; Maesako, Takanori

    2009-02-01

    This study examines differences in concentration changes of hemoglobin in the brain while finding algebraic solutions versus geometrical solutions. We use Near Infrared Spectroscopy imaging system to measure the hemoglobin changes while subjects are solving algebraic task and geometrical task. NIRS imaging system can measure changes in the concentration of hemoglobin. This brain activity data shows a difference between the two different experimental tasks which helps us to identify the characteristics of thinking processes.

  12. Measurements of right / left hemisphere activation using functional near-infrared spectroscopy during incongruent Stroop test.

    PubMed

    Hiroyasu, Tomoyuki; Fukuhara, Michihiro; Yokouchi, Hisatake; Miki, Mitsunori; Yoshimi, Masato

    2011-01-01

    The human brain automatically processes information at multiple sites when recognizing various types of information at the same time, such as color, shape, etc. Cognitive conflict may occur when conflicting information is recognized at the same time. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is often used to examine the brain activity associated with this phenomenon. To examine activation of the visual system, we measured brain activity in the right / left hemispheres during cognitive conflict in the Stroop test. Consistent with the results reported previously by Ehlis, the brain activity in the near inferior-frontal gyrus of the left hemisphere was increased during the incongruent task. The brain activity also increased in the near inferior-frontal gyrus of the right hemisphere during the incongruent task. These results indicated that fNIRS can be used to detect brain activity in the inferior-frontal gyrus of the right / left hemispheres during the Stroop test.

  13. Electron Beam Damage in Poly(Vinyl Chloride) and Poly(Acrylonitrile) as Observed by Auger Electron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, Alan S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Baer, Donald R.

    2003-03-07

    AES spectra of spun-cast films of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) were collected over a period of time to determine specimen damage during exposure to a 10kV electron beam. For the PVC, loss of chlorine was observed over a period of 203 minutes to the extent that the final chlorine concentration was only 20% of its original value. PAN exhibited a loss in nitrogen content over a period of 120 minutes, but the rate of damage to the polymer was significantly less than PVC. Figure 1 shows the atomic concentration in the PVC film as a function of dose (time). It takes a dose of approximately 7.0x10-5 Ccm-5 for the chlorine concentration to fall from its original value by 10% (one definition of critical dose). Figure 2 shows a similar drop in nitrogen concentration in the PAN film as a function of dose. For this polymer, it takes a dose of 1.3x10-3 Ccm-2 for the nitrogen concentration to fall by 10%.

  14. High resolution spectroscopy of 1,2-difluoroethane in a molecular beam: A case study of vibrational mode-coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mork, Steven W.; Miller, C. Cameron; Philips, Laura A.

    1992-09-01

    The high resolution infrared spectrum of 1,2-difluoroethane (DFE) in a molecular beam has been obtained over the 2978-2996 cm-1 spectral region. This region corresponds to the symmetric combination of asymmetric C-H stretches in DFE. Observed rotational fine structure indicates that this C-H stretch is undergoing vibrational mode coupling to a single dark mode. The dark mode is split by approximately 19 cm-1 due to tunneling between the two identical gauche conformers. The mechanism of the coupling is largely anharmonic with a minor component of B/C plane Coriolis coupling. Effects of centrifugal distortion along the molecular A-axis are also observed. Analysis of the fine structure identifies the dark state as being composed of C-C torsion, CCF bend, and CH2 rock. Coupling between the C-H stretches and the C-C torsion is of particular interest because DFE has been observed to undergo vibrationally induced isomerization from the gauche to trans conformer upon excitation of the C-H stretch.

  15. Active suppression of a beam under a moving mass using a pointwise fiber Bragg grating displacement sensing system.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Kuo-Chih; Ma, Chien-Ching; Wu, Rong-Hua

    2012-10-01

    This paper investigates active vibration control of a beam under a moving mass using a pointwise fiber Bragg grating (FBG) displacement sensing system. Dynamic responses of the proposed FBG displacement sensor are demodulated with an FBG filter and verified with measurement results obtained from a noncontact fiber-optic displacement sensor. System identification of the beam is first performed with a piezoceramic actuator and positive position feedback (PPF) controllers are designed based on the identified results. Then, transient responses of the beam under a moving mass with different moving conditions are measured using the FBG displacement sensor. A high-speed camera is used to detect the speed of the moving mass for further discussions about its influence on the transient response. Finally, active vibration control of the beam under the moving mass is performed and fast Fourier transform (FFT) as well as short-time Fourier transform (STFT) are employed to demonstrate control performances. For the case in which a rolling steel ball is directed from a slide to the beam to generate the moving mass, reductions of the vibration up to 50% and 60% are achieved in the frequency domain for the first and second modes of the beam, respectively. Based on the control experiments on the smallscale beam, results in this work show that the proposed FBG displacement sensing system can be used in research on the moving mass problem.

  16. Simultaneous Counter-Ion Co-Deposition a Technique Enabling Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy Studies Using Low-Energy Beams of Mass-Selected Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Ryan M.; Moore, David T.

    2014-06-01

    Matrix isolation spectroscopy was first developed in Pimentel's group during the 1950's to facilitate spectroscopic studies of transient species. Cryogenic matrices of condensed rare gases provide an inert chemical environment with facile energy dissipation and are transparent at all wavelengths longer than vacuum UV, making them ideal for studying labile and reactive species such as radicals, weakly bound complexes, and ions. Since frozen rare gases are poor electrolytes, studies of ions require near-equal populations of anions and cations in order to stabilize the number densities required for spectroscopic experiments. Many techniques for generation of ions for using in matrix isolation studies satisfy this criterion intrinsically, however when ion beams generated in external sources are deposited, the counter-ions typically arise via secondary processes that are at best loosely controlled. It has long been recognized that it would be desirable to stabilize deposition of mass-selected ions generated in an external source using simultaneous co-deposition of a beam of counter-ions, however previous attempts to achieve this have been reported as unsuccessful. The Moore group at Lehigh has demonstrated successful experiments of this type, using mass-selected anions generated from a metal cluster source, co-deposited with a balanced current of cations generated in a separate electron ionization source. This talk will focus on the details of the technique, and present some results from proof-of-concept studies on anionic copper carbonyl complexes formed in argon matrices following co-deposition of Cu- with Ar+ or Kr+. Funding support from NSF CAREER Award CHE-0955637 is gratefully acknowledged. Whittle et al., J. Chem. Phys. 22, p.1943 (1954); Becker et al., J. Chem. Phys. 25, p.224 (1956). Godbout et al., J. Chem. Phys. 96, p.2892 (1996). Sabo et al., Appl. Spectrosc. 45, p. 535 (1991).

  17. Effect of N+ Beam Exposure on Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Activities and Induction of Mn-SOD in Deinococcus Radiodurans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dao-jun; Chen, Ruo-lei; Shao, Chun-lin; Wu, Li-jun; Yu, Zeng-liang

    2000-10-01

    Though bacteria of the radiation-resistant Deinococcus radiodurans have a high resistance to the lethal and mutagenic effects of many DNA-damaging agents, the mechanisms involved in the response of these bacteria to oxidative stress are poorly understood. In this report, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities produced by these bacteria were measured, and the change of SOD and CAT activities by 20 keV N+ beam exposure was examined. Their activities were increased by N+ beam exposure from 8×1014 ions/cm2 to 6×1015 ions/cm2. The treatment of H2O2 and [CHCl3 +CH3CH2OH] and the measurement of absorption spectrum showed that the increase in SOD activity was resulted from inducible activities of Mn-SOD in D. radiodurans AS1.633 by N+ beam exposure. These results suggested that this bacteria possess inducible defense mechanisms against the deleterious effects of oxidization.

  18. Chicken, beams, and Campylobacter: rapid differentiation of foodborne bacteria via vibrational spectroscopy and MALDI-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Muhamadali, Howbeer; Weaver, Danielle; Subaihi, Abdu; AlMasoud, Najla; Trivedi, Drupad K; Ellis, David I; Linton, Dennis; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-01-07

    Campylobacter species are one of the main causes of food poisoning worldwide. Despite the availability of established culturing and molecular techniques, due to the fastidious nature of these microorganisms, simultaneous detection and species differentiation still remains challenging. This study focused on the differentiation of eleven Campylobacter strains from six species, using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopies, together with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), as physicochemical approaches for generating biochemical fingerprints. Cluster analysis of data from each of the three analytical approaches provided clear differentiation of each Campylobacter species, which was generally in agreement with a phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. Notably, although C. fetus subspecies fetus and venerealis are phylogenetically very closely related, using FT-IR and MALDI-TOF-MS data these subspecies were readily differentiated based on differences in the lipid (2920 and 2851 cm(-1)) and fingerprint regions (1500-500 cm(-1)) of the FT-IR spectra, and the 500-2000 m/z region of the MALDI-TOF-MS data. A finding that was further investigated with targeted lipidomics using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Our results demonstrate that such metabolomics approaches combined with molecular biology techniques may provide critical information and knowledge related to the risk factors, virulence, and understanding of the distribution and transmission routes associated with different strains of foodborne Campylobacter spp.

  19. Semi-active control of a sandwich beam partially filled with magnetorheological elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyniewicz, Bartłomiej; Bajkowski, Jacek M.; Bajer, Czesław I.

    2015-08-01

    The paper deals with the semi-active control of vibrations of structural elements. Elastomer composites with ferromagnetic particles that act as magnetorheological fluids are used. The damping coefficient and the shear modulus of the elastomer increases when it is exposed to an electro-magnetic field. The control of this process in time allows us to reduce vibrations more effectively than if the elastomer is permanently exposed to a magnetic field. First the analytical solution for the vibrations of a sandwich beam filled with an elastomer is given. Then the control problem is defined and applied to the analytical formula. The numerical solution of the minimization problem results in a periodic, perfectly rectangular control function if free vibrations are considered. Such a temporarily acting magnetic field is more efficient than a constantly acting one. The surplus reaches 20-50% or more, depending on the filling ratio of the elastomer. The resulting control was verified experimentally in the vibrations of a cantilever sandwich beam. The proposed semi-active control can be directly applied to engineering vibrating structural elements, for example helicopter rotors, aircraft wings, pads under machines, and vehicles.

  20. Electron beam/γ-ray irradiation synthesis of gold nanoparticles and investigation of antioxidant activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duy Nguyen, Ngoc; Phu Dang, Van; Le, Anh Quoc; Hien Nguyen, Quoc

    2014-12-01

    Colloidal solutions of 1 mM gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized by γ-ray Co-60 and electron beam irradiation using 1% water soluble chitosan (WSC) with different molecular weight (Mw) as stabilizer. The AuNPs size measured from TEM images was of 7.1 and 15.1 nm for electron beam and γ-ray Co-60, respectively. The AuNPs sizes of 9.8, 15.1 and 22.4 nm stabilized by different WSC Mw of 155 × 103, 78 × 103 and 29 × 103 g mol-1, respectively, were also synthesized by γ-ray Co-60 irradiation. Antioxidant activity of AuNPs with different size from 7.1 to 20.0 nm was investigated using free radical 2,2‧-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS•+). Results indicated that the smaller size of AuNPs exhibited higher antioxidant activity. In particular, the antioxidant efficiency was of nearly 100, 75, 65, 52 and 30% for 7.1, 9.8, 15.1, 20.0 nm AuNPs and WSC 0.1%, respectively, at the same reaction time of 270 min. Thus, due to the compatibility of WSC and the unique property of AuNPs, the pure colloidal AuNPs/WSC solutions synthesized by irradiation method can be potentially applied in biomedicine, cosmetics and in other fields as well.

  1. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy of Air Exposure Effects on Molecular Beam Epitaxy Grown WSe2 Monolayers and Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Hong; Vishwanath, Suresh; Liu, Xinyu; Zhou, Huawei; Eichfeld, Sarah M; Fullerton-Shirey, Susan K; Robinson, Joshua A; Feenstra, Randall M; Furdyna, Jacek; Jena, Debdeep; Xing, Huili Grace; Kummel, Andrew C

    2016-04-26

    The effect of air exposure on 2H-WSe2/HOPG is determined via scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). WSe2 was grown by molecular beam epitaxy on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), and afterward, a Se adlayer was deposited in situ on WSe2/HOPG to prevent unintentional oxidation during transferring from the growth chamber to the STM chamber. After annealing at 773 K to remove the Se adlayer, STM images show that WSe2 layers nucleate at both step edges and terraces of the HOPG. Exposure to air for 1 week and 9 weeks caused air-induced adsorbates to be deposited on the WSe2 surface; however, the band gap of the terraces remained unaffected and nearly identical to those on decapped WSe2. The air-induced adsorbates can be removed by annealing at 523 K. In contrast to WSe2 terraces, air exposure caused the edges of the WSe2 to oxidize and form protrusions, resulting in a larger band gap in the scanning tunneling spectra compared to the terraces of air-exposed WSe2 monolayers. The preferential oxidation at the WSe2 edges compared to the terraces is likely the result of dangling edge bonds. In the absence of air exposure, the dangling edge bonds had a smaller band gap compared to the terraces and a shift of about 0.73 eV in the Fermi level toward the valence band. However, after air exposure, the band gap of the oxidized WSe2 edges became about 1.08 eV larger than that of the WSe2 terraces, resulting in the electronic passivation of the WSe2.

  2. Beam sensorimotor learning and habituation to motor activity in lurcher mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, R; Joyal, C C; Thifault, S

    1996-01-01

    Lurcher mutant mice lose cerebellar granule cells and Purkinje cells. The mutants were compared to normal mice in a beam-walking task. Normal mice were placed on a slippery bridge while lurchers, because of their severe ataxia, were placed on a bridge with the same diameter, but enveloped with surgical tape to improve traction. The performance of both groups improved with repeated trials. In an activity box, lurcher mutants were as active as normal mice, showed normal intrasession habituation, and emerged from a toy object as easily as normal mice. These results indicate that the cerebellar damage in lurchers does not prevent the acquisition of a motor skill task requiring balance in an immobile apparatus. Ataxia was not accompanied by hypoactivity, inhibition or disturbances in intrasession habituation.

  3. Investigations of electron helicity in optically active molecules using polarized beams of electrons and positrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gidley, D. W.; Rich, A.; Van House, J. C.; Zitzewitz, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    A positronium-formation experiment with a high sensitivity to a possible relation between the helicity of beta particles emitted in nuclear beta decay and the optical asymmetry of biological molecules is presented. The experiment is based on a mechanism in which the electrons in optically active molecules possess a helicity of less than 0.001, too weak to detect in radiolysis experiments, the sign of which depends on the chirality of the isomer. A helicity-dependent asymmetry is sought in the formation of the triplet ground state of positronium when a low-energy beam of polarized positrons of reversible helicity interacts with an optically active substance coating a channel electron multiplier. Asymmetries between positronium decays observed at positive and negative helicities for the same substance can thus be determined with a sensitivity of 0.0001, which represents a factor of 100 improvement over previous positronium experiments.

  4. Mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of an actively stabilized beam-column with circular cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffner, Maximilian; Enss, Georg C.; Platz, Roland

    2014-04-01

    Buckling of axially loaded beam-columns represents a critical design constraint for light-weight structures. Besides passive solutions to increase the critical buckling load, active buckling control provides a possibility to stabilize slender elements in structures. So far, buckling control by active forces or bending moments has been mostly investigated for beam-columns with rectangular cross-section and with a preferred direction of buckling. The proposed approach investigates active buckling control of a beam-column with circular solid cross-section which is fixed at its base and pinned at its upper end. Three controlled active lateral forces are applied near the fixed base with angles of 120° to each other to stabilize the beam-column and allow higher critical axial loads. The beam-column is subject to supercritical static axial loads and lateral disturbance forces with varying directions and offsets. Two independent modal state space systems are derived for the bending planes in the lateral y- and z-directions of the circular cross-section. These are used to design two linear-quadratic regulators (LQR) that determine the necessary control forces which are transformed into the directions of the active lateral forces. The system behavior is simulated with a finite element model using one-dimensional beam elements with six degrees of freedom at each node. With the implemented control, it is possible to actively stabilize a beam-column with circular cross-section in arbitrary buckling direction for axial loads significantly above the critical axial buckling load.

  5. Fast crystallization of amorphous Gd2Zr2O7 induced by thermally activated electron-beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhangyi; Qi, Jianqi; Zhou, Li; Feng, Zhao; Yu, Xiaohe; Gong, Yichao; Yang, Mao; Shi, Qiwu; Wei, Nian; Lu, Tiecheng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the ionization and displacement effects of an electron-beam (e-beam) on amorphous Gd2Zr2O7 synthesized by the co-precipitation and calcination methods. The as-received amorphous specimens were irradiated under electron beams at different energies (80 keV, 120 keV, and 2 MeV) and then characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. A metastable fluorite phase was observed in nanocrystalline Gd2Zr2O7 and is proposed to arise from the relatively lower surface and interface energy compared with the pyrochlore phase. Fast crystallization could be induced by 120 keV e-beam irradiation (beam current = 0.47 mA/cm2). The crystallization occurred on the nanoscale upon ionization irradiation at 400 °C after a dose of less than 1017 electrons/cm2. Under e-beam irradiation, the activation energy for the grain growth process was approximately 10 kJ/mol, but the activation energy was 135 kJ/mol by calcination in a furnace. The thermally activated ionization process was considered the fast crystallization mechanism. PMID:26648597

  6. Active FTIR-based stand-off spectroscopy using a femtosecond optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaowei; Clewes, Rhea J; Howle, Christopher R; Reid, Derryck T

    2014-10-15

    We presented the first demonstration of stand-off Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy using a broadband mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator, with spectral coverage over 2700-3200  cm⁻¹. For vapor-phase water and nitromethane (NM), stand-off spectra was recorded using a concrete target at from 1-m to 2-m range and showed good agreement with reference spectra, and in NM a normalized detection sensitivity of 15  ppm·m·Hz(-1/2) was obtained. Spectra from 50-μL droplets of liquid thiodiglycol were detected at a stand-off distance of 2 m from aluminum, concrete and painted metal surfaces. Our results imply that OPO-based active FTIR stand-off spectroscopy is a promising new technique for the detection of industrial pollutants and the identification of chemical agents, explosives or other hazardous materials.

  7. In situ Raman and X-ray spectroscopies to monitor microbial activities under high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Oger, Phil M; Daniel, Isabelle; Picard, Aude

    2010-02-01

    Until recently, monitoring of cells and cellular activities at high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) was mainly limited to ex situ observations. Samples were analyzed prior to and following the depressurization step to evaluate the effect of the pressure treatment. Such ex situ measurements have several drawbacks: (i) it does not allow for kinetic measurements and (ii) the depressurization step often leads to artifactual measurements. Here, we describe recent advances in diamond anvil cell (DAC) technology to adapt it to the monitoring of microbial processes in situ. The modified DAC is asymmetrical, with a single anvil and a diamond window to improve imaging quality and signal collection. Using this novel DAC combined to Raman and X-ray spectroscopy, we monitored the metabolism of glucose by baker's yeast and the reduction of selenite by Agrobacterium tumefaciens in situ under HHP. In situ spectroscopy is also a promising tool to study piezophilic microorganisms.

  8. Actively coupled cavity ringdown spectroscopy with low-power broadband sources.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Christian; Fischer, Peer

    2011-05-23

    We demonstrate a coupling scheme for cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy that makes use of an intracavity acousto-optical modulator to actively switch light into (and out of) a resonator. This allows cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) to be implemented with broadband nonlaser light sources with spectral power densities of less than 30μW/nm. Although the acousto-optical element reduces the ultimate detection limit by introducing additional losses, it permits absorptivities to be measured with a high dynamic range, especially in lossy environments. Absorption measurements for the forbidden transition of gaseous oxygen in air at ∼760nm are presented using a low-coherence cw-superluminescent diode. The same setup was electronically configured to cover absorption losses from 1.8×10-8cm-1 to 7.5% per roundtrip. This could be of interest in process analytical applications.

  9. Dissociation Pathways of Benzylpyridinium "Thermometer" Ions Depend on the Activation Regime: An IRMPD Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Morsa, Denis; Gabelica, Valérie; Rosu, Frédéric; Oomens, Jos; De Pauw, Edwin

    2014-11-06

    The dissociation of benzylpyridinium "thermometer" ions is widely used to calibrate the internal energy of ions produced in mass spectrometry. The fragmentation mechanism is usually believed to yield a benzylium cation, although recent studies suggest the possibility of a rearrangement leading to the tropylium isomer, which would compromise the accuracy of energy calibrations. In this study, we used IRMPD spectroscopy to probe the dissociation pathways of the p-(tert-butyl)benzylpyridinium ion. Our results show that the formation of both benzylium and tropylium products is feasible depending on the activation regime and on the reaction time scale. Varying the trapping delays in the hexapole gives insight into a rearrangement mechanism occurring through consecutive reactions with an isomerization from benzylium to tropylium. Our work provides experimental validations for the established calibration procedure and highlights the adequacy of IRMPD spectroscopy to qualitatively resolve gas-phase rearrangement kinetics.

  10. Activation detection in functional near-infrared spectroscopy by wavelet coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Yu, Jian; Zhao, Ruirui; Xu, Wenting; Niu, Haijing; Zhang, Yujin; Zuo, Nianming; Jiang, Tianzi

    2015-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) detects hemodynamic responses in the cerebral cortex by transcranial spectroscopy. However, measurements recorded by fNIRS not only consist of the desired hemodynamic response but also consist of a number of physiological noises. Because of these noises, accurately detecting the regions that have an activated hemodynamic response while performing a task is a challenge when analyzing functional activity by fNIRS. In order to better detect the activation, we designed a multiscale analysis based on wavelet coherence. In this method, the experimental paradigm was expressed as a binary signal obtained while either performing or not performing a task. We convolved the signal with the canonical hemodynamic response function to predict a possible response. The wavelet coherence was used to investigate the relationship between the response and the data obtained by fNIRS at each channel. Subsequently, the coherence within a region of interest in the time-frequency domain was summed to evaluate the activation level at each channel. Experiments on both simulated and experimental data demonstrated that the method was effective for detecting activated channels hidden in fNIRS data.

  11. Design of an ultrahigh vacuum transfer mechanism to interconnect an oxide molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber and an x-ray photoemission spectroscopy analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowski, M. M.; McNicholas, K. M.; Zeng, Zhaoquan; Brillson, L. J.

    2013-06-01

    We designed a mechanism and the accompanying sample holders to transfer between a VEECO 930 oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and a PHI Versa Probe X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) chamber within a multiple station growth, processing, and analysis system through ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). The mechanism consists of four parts: (1) a platen compatible with the MBE growth stage, (2) a platen compatible with the XPS analysis stage, (3) a sample coupon that is transferred between the two platens, and (4) the accompanying UHV transfer line. The mechanism offers a robust design that enables transfer back and forth between the growth chamber and the analysis chamber, and yet is flexible enough to allow transfer between standard sample holders for thin film growth and masked sample holders for making electrical contacts and Schottky junctions, all without breaking vacuum. We used this mechanism to transfer a barium strontium titanate thin film into the XPS analysis chamber and performed XPS measurements before and after exposing the sample to the air. After air exposure, a thin overlayer of carbon was found to form and a significant shift (˜1 eV) in the core level binding energies was observed.

  12. Design of an ultrahigh vacuum transfer mechanism to interconnect an oxide molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber and an x-ray photoemission spectroscopy analysis system.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, M M; McNicholas, K M; Zeng, Zhaoquan; Brillson, L J

    2013-06-01

    We designed a mechanism and the accompanying sample holders to transfer between a VEECO 930 oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and a PHI Versa Probe X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) chamber within a multiple station growth, processing, and analysis system through ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). The mechanism consists of four parts: (1) a platen compatible with the MBE growth stage, (2) a platen compatible with the XPS analysis stage, (3) a sample coupon that is transferred between the two platens, and (4) the accompanying UHV transfer line. The mechanism offers a robust design that enables transfer back and forth between the growth chamber and the analysis chamber, and yet is flexible enough to allow transfer between standard sample holders for thin film growth and masked sample holders for making electrical contacts and Schottky junctions, all without breaking vacuum. We used this mechanism to transfer a barium strontium titanate thin film into the XPS analysis chamber and performed XPS measurements before and after exposing the sample to the air. After air exposure, a thin overlayer of carbon was found to form and a significant shift (~1 eV) in the core level binding energies was observed.

  13. Study on vibrational relaxation dynamics of phenol-water complex by picosecond time-resolved IR-UV pump-probe spectroscopy in a supersonic molecular beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Yasunori; Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Ebata, Takayuki; Petković, Milena

    2013-06-01

    A comparative study of vibrational energy relaxation (VER) between the monohydrated complexes of phenol-d0 and phenol-d1 is investigated in a supersonic molecular beam. The direct time-resolved measurement of energy redistribution from the phenolic OH/OD stretching mode of the phenol-d0-H2O/phenol-d1-D2O is performed by picosecond IR-UV pump-probe spectroscopy. Two complexes follow the same relaxation process that begins with the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) and the intermolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR), which is followed by the vibrational predissociation (VP). The difference in the relaxation lifetimes between them is discussed by anharmonic force field and RRKM calculations. Anharmonic analysis implies that intra- (IVR) and intermolecular (IVR) relaxations occur in parallel in the complexes. The RRKM-predicted dissociation (VP) lifetimes show qualitative agreement with the observed results, suggesting that VP takes place after the statistical energy distribution in the complexes.

  14. In-beam γ -ray spectroscopy of the neutron-rich platinum isotope 200Pt toward the N =126 shell gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, P. R.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Mengoni, D.; Modamio, V.; Lunardi, S.; Bazzacco, D.; Gadea, A.; Wheldon, C.; Rodríguez, T. R.; Alexander, T.; de Angelis, G.; Ashwood, N.; Barr, M.; Benzoni, G.; Birkenbach, B.; Bizzeti, P. G.; Bizzeti-Sona, A. M.; Bottoni, S.; Bowry, M.; Bracco, A.; Browne, F.; Bunce, M.; Camera, F.; Corradi, L.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Melon, B.; Farnea, E.; Fioretto, E.; Gottardo, A.; Grente, L.; Hess, H.; Kokalova, Tz.; Korten, W.; Kuşoǧlu, A.; Lenzi, S.; Leoni, S.; Ljungvall, J.; Menegazzo, R.; Michelagnoli, C.; Mijatović, T.; Montagnoli, G.; Montanari, D.; Napoli, D. R.; Podolyák, Zs.; Pollarolo, G.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Roberts, O. J.; Şahin, E.; Salsac, M.-D.; Scarlassara, F.; Sferrazza, M.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stefanini, A. M.; Szilner, S.; Ur, C. A.; Vogt, A.; Walshe, J.

    2017-06-01

    The neutron-rich nucleus 200Pt is investigated via in-beam γ -ray spectroscopy to study the shape evolution in the neutron-rich platinum isotopes towards the N =126 shell closure. The two-neutron transfer reaction 198Pt(82Se, 80Se)200Pt is used to populate excited states of 200Pt. The Advanced Gamma Ray Tracking Array (AGATA) demonstrator coupled with the PRISMA spectrometer detects γ rays coincident with the 80Se recoils, the binary partner of 200Pt. The binary partner method is applied to extract the γ -ray transitions and build the level scheme of 200Pt. The level at 1884 keV reported by Yates et al. [S. W. Yates, E. M. Baum, E. A. Henry, L. G. Mann, N. Roy, A. Aprahamian, R. A. Meyer, and R. Estep, Phys. Rev. C 37, 1889 (1988)] was confirmed to be at 1882.1 keV and assigned as the (61+) state. An additional γ ray was found and it presumably deexcites the (81+) state. The results are compared with state-of-the-art beyond mean-field calculations, performed for the even-even 190 -204Pt isotopes, revealing that 200Pt marks the transition from the γ -unstable behavior of lighter Pt nuclei towards a more spherical one when approaching the N =126 shell closure.

  15. Exposure and analysis of microparticles embedded in silica aerogel keystones using NF3-mediated electron beam-induced etching and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Aiden A.; Lin, Ting; Toth, Milos; Westphal, Andrew J.; Vicenzi, Edward P.; Beeman, Jeffrey; Silver, Eric H.

    2016-07-01

    In 2006, NASA's Stardust spacecraft delivered to Earth dust particles collected from the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2, with the goal of furthering the understanding of solar system formation. Stardust cometary samples were collected in a low-density, nanoporous silica aerogel making their study technically challenging. This article demonstrates the identification, exposure, and elemental composition analysis of particles analogous to those collected by NASA's Stardust mission using in-situ SEM techniques. Backscattered electron imaging is shown by experimental observation and Monte Carlo simulation to be suitable for locating particles of a range of sizes relevant to Stardust (down to submicron diameters) embedded within silica aerogel. Selective removal of the silica aerogel encapsulating an embedded particle is performed by cryogenic NF3-mediated electron beam-induced etching. The porous, low-density nature of the aerogel results in an enhanced etch rate compared with solid material, making it an effective, nonmechanical method for the exposure of particles. After exposure, elemental composition of the particle was analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy using a high spectral resolution microcalorimeter. Signals from fluorine contamination are shown to correspond to nonremoved silica aerogel and only in residual concentrations.

  16. Beam dynamics activities at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab)

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, D.R.

    1997-12-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has been funded by the US Navy to build an infra-red FEL driven by an energy-recovering compact SRF-based linear accelerator. The machine is to produce a 1 kW IR photon beam. The Jefferson Lab Accelerator Division is presently engaged in detailed design and beam dynamics studies for the driver accelerator. Principle beam dynamics and beam transport considerations include: (1) generation and transport of a high-quality, high-current, space-charge dominated beam; (2) the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) during beam recirculation transport; (3) low-loss transport of a large momentum spread, high-current beam; (4) beam break up (BBU) instabilities in the recirculating accelerator; (5) impedance policing of transport system components; and (6) RF drive system control during energy recovery and FEL operation.

  17. Overview of the activities at the low-energy beam separator CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Yang, L.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Abe, K.; Shimizu, H.; CRIB Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    CRIB (CNS Radio-Isotope Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator of Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. Studies on nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, and other interests have been performed using the RI beams at CRIB, forming international collaborations. Measurements of proton and α resonant scatterings have been performed at CRIB for many nuclides using RI beams. Projects to study astrophysical reactions with direct and indirect methods are also in progress.

  18. Free radical scavenging activity of erdosteine metabolite I investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Braga, Pier Carlo; Culici, Maria; Dal Sasso, Monica; Falchi, Mario; Spallino, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the antiradical activity of Met I (an active metabolite of erdosteine) containing a pharmacologically active sulphydryl group, by means of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy which has not previously been used to characterize the antiradical activity of Met I. The effects of concentrations of 20, 10, 5, 2.5, 1.25 and 0.625 microg/ml of Met I were tested against: (a) the Fenton reaction model system with EPR detection of HO.; (b) the KO2-crown ether system with EPR detection of O2-.; (c) the EPR assay based on the reduction of the Tempol radical, and (d) the EPR assay based on the reduction of Fremy's salt radical. Our findings show that the intensity of 4 different free radicals was significantly reduced in the presence of Met I, thus indicating the presence of a termination reaction between the free radicals and Met I.

  19. 100 s extraction of negative ion beams by using actively temperature-controlled plasma grid

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, A. Hanada, M.; Yoshida, M.; Tobari, H.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Watanabe, K.; Grisham, L. R.

    2014-02-15

    Long pulse beam extraction with a current density of 120 A/m{sup 2} for 100 s has been achieved with a newly developed plasma grid (PG) for the JT-60SA negative ion source which is designed to produce high power and long pulse beams with a negative ion current of 130 A/m{sup 2} (22 A) and a pulse length of 100 s. The PG temperature is regulated by fluorinated fluids in order to keep the high PG temperature for the cesium-seeded negative ion production. The time constant for temperature controllability of the PG was measured to be below 10 s, which was mainly determined by the heat transfer coefficient of the fluorinated fluid. The measured decay time of the negative ion current extracted from the actively temperature-controlled PG was 430 s which was sufficient for the JT-60SA requirement, and much longer than that by inertial-cooling PG of 60 s. Obtained results of the long pulse capability are utilized to design the full size PG for the JT-60SA negative ion source.

  20. Fluorescence activated cell sorting via a focused traveling surface acoustic beam.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhichao; Zhou, Yinning; Collins, David J; Ai, Ye

    2017-09-12

    Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) has become an essential technique widely exploited in biological studies and clinical applications. However, current FACS systems are quite complex, expensive, bulky, and pose potential sample contamination and biosafety issues due to the generation of aerosols in an open environment. Microfluidic technology capable of precise cell manipulation has great potential to reinvent and miniaturize conventional FACS systems. In this work, we demonstrate a benchtop scale FACS system that makes use of a highly focused traveling surface acoustic wave beam to sort out micron-sized particles and biological cells upon fluorescence interrogation at ∼kHz rates. The highly focused acoustic wave beam has a width of ∼50 μm that enables highly accurate sorting of individual particles and cells. We have applied our acoustic FACS system to isolate fluorescently labeled MCF-7 breast cancer cells from diluted whole blood samples with the purity of sorted MCF-7 cells higher than 86%. The cell viability before and after acoustic sorting is higher than 95%, indicating excellent biocompatibility that should enable a variety of cell sorting applications in biomedical research.

  1. A Study of the Effect of Preschool Children's Participation in Sensorimotor Activities on Their Understanding of the Mechanical Equilibrium of a Balance Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Anastasiou, Leonidas; Konsolas, Manos; Prevezanou, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether participation in sensorimotor activities by preschool children involving their own bodily balance while walking on a beam over the floor has an effect on their understanding of the mechanical equilibrium of a balance beam. The balance beam consisted of a horizontal stick balancing around its…

  2. A Study of the Effect of Preschool Children's Participation in Sensorimotor Activities on Their Understanding of the Mechanical Equilibrium of a Balance Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Anastasiou, Leonidas; Konsolas, Manos; Prevezanou, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether participation in sensorimotor activities by preschool children involving their own bodily balance while walking on a beam over the floor has an effect on their understanding of the mechanical equilibrium of a balance beam. The balance beam consisted of a horizontal stick balancing around its…

  3. Monitoring Photosynthetic Activity in Microalgal Cells by Raman Spectroscopy with Deuterium Oxide as a Tracking Probe.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Yusuke; Suzuki, Yuta; Ito, Takuro; Miura, Yoshiko; Goda, Keisuke; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Hoshino, Yu

    2017-08-14

    Microalgae offer great potential for the production of biofuel, but high photosynthetic activity is demanded for the practical realisation of microalgal biofuels. To this end, it is essential to evaluate the photosynthetic activity of single microalgal cells in a heterogeneous population. In this study, we present a method to monitor the photosynthetic activity of microalgae (in particular Euglena gracilis, a microalgal species of unicellular, photosynthetic, flagellate protists as our model organism) at single-cell resolution by Raman spectroscopy with deuterium from deuterium oxide (D2 O) as a tracking probe. Specifically, we replaced H2 O in culture media with D2 O up to a concentration of 20 % without disturbing the growth rate of E. gracilis cells and evaluated C-D bond formation as a consequence of photosynthetic reactions by Raman spectroscopy. We used the probe to monitor the kinetics of the C-D bond formation in E. gracilis cells by incubating them in D2 O media under light irradiation. Furthermore, we demonstrated Raman microscopy imaging of each single E. gracilis cell to discriminate deuterated cells from normal cells. Our results hold great promise for Raman-based screening of E. gracilis and potentially other microalgae with high photosynthetic activity by using D2 O as a tracking probe. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Neurofeedback-based functional near-infrared spectroscopy upregulates motor cortex activity in imagined motor tasks.

    PubMed

    Lapborisuth, Pawan; Zhang, Xian; Noah, Adam; Hirsch, Joy

    2017-04-01

    Neurofeedback is a method for using neural activity displayed on a computer to regulate one's own brain function and has been shown to be a promising technique for training individuals to interact with brain-machine interface applications such as neuroprosthetic limbs. The goal of this study was to develop a user-friendly functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS)-based neurofeedback system to upregulate neural activity associated with motor imagery, which is frequently used in neuroprosthetic applications. We hypothesized that fNIRS neurofeedback would enhance activity in motor cortex during a motor imagery task. Twenty-two participants performed active and imaginary right-handed squeezing movements using an elastic ball while wearing a 98-channel fNIRS device. Neurofeedback traces representing localized cortical hemodynamic responses were graphically presented to participants in real time. Participants were instructed to observe this graphical representation and use the information to increase signal amplitude. Neural activity was compared during active and imaginary squeezing with and without neurofeedback. Active squeezing resulted in activity localized to the left premotor and supplementary motor cortex, and activity in the motor cortex was found to be modulated by neurofeedback. Activity in the motor cortex was also shown in the imaginary squeezing condition only in the presence of neurofeedback. These findings demonstrate that real-time fNIRS neurofeedback is a viable platform for brain-machine interface applications.

  5. Analysis of Neutron Induced Gamma Activity in Lowbackground Ge - Spectroscopy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovančević, Nikola; Krmar, Midrag

    Neutron interactions with materials of Ge-spectroscopy systems are one of the main sources of background radiation in low-level gamma spectroscopy measurements. Because of that detailed analysis of neutron induced gamma activity in low-background Ge-spectroscopy systems was done. Two HPGe detectors which were located in two different passive shields: one in pre-WW II made iron and the second in commercial low background lead were used in the experiment. Gamma lines emitted after neutron capture, as well as after inelastic scattering on the germanium crystal and shield materials (lead, iron, hydrogen, NaI) were detected and then analyzed. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes were calculated and their values were compared for the two different kinds of detector shield. The relative intensities of several gamma lines emitted after the inelastic scattering of neutrons (created by cosmic muons) in 56Fe were report. These relative intensities of detected gamma lines of 56Fe are compared with the results collected in the same iron shield by the use of the 252Cf neutrons.

  6. Ce-PROMOTED Bond Activation of Ethylene Probed by Mass-Analyzed Threshold Ionization Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuchen; Kumari, Sudesh; Cao, Wenjin; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2015-06-01

    Ce(C_2H_2) and Ce(C_4H_6) complexes were observed in the reaction of Ce atom with ethylene in a supersonic molecular beam source and investigated by mass-analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy (MATI) and theoretical calculations. Preliminary data analysis shows that Ce(C_2H_2) has a triangle structure (C2v) with Ce binding to C_2H_2 in a two-fold mode and Ce(C_4H_6) has a five-membered metallacyclic structure (Cs) with Ce binding to the two terminal carbon atoms of butadiene. The ground states of both species are triplets with a 4f16s1 Ce-based electron configuration and those of the corresponding ions are doublets from the removal of the 6s1 electron. The Ce(C_2H_2) complex is formed by ethylene dehydrogenation, whereas Ce(C_4H_6) by ethylene dehydrogenation and carbon-carbon bond coupling. The MATI spectra of Ce(C_2H_2) and Ce(C_4H_6) are rather similar to those of the corresponding La complexes previously observed by our group, except that the spectra of the Ce complexes exhibit two electronic transitions with almost identical vibrational intervals. This observation suggests that the existence of a 4f electron results in an increased complexity of the electronic spectra and states of the lanthanide hydrocarbons.

  7. Three-dimensional analysis of optical forces generated by an active tractor beam using radial polarization.

    PubMed

    Carretero, Luis; Acebal, Pablo; Blaya, Salvador

    2014-02-10

    We theoretically study the three-dimensional behavior of nanoparticles in an active optical conveyor. To do this, we solved the Langevin equation when the forces are generated by a focusing system at the near field. Analytical expressions for the optical forces generated by the optical conveyor were obtained by solving the Richards and Wolf vectorial diffraction integrals in an approximated form when a mask of two annular pupils is illuminated by a radially polarized Hermite-Gauss beam. Trajectories, in both the transverse plane and the longitudinal direction, are analyzed showing that the behavior of the optical conveyor can be optimized by conveniently choosing the configuration of the mask of the two annular pupils (inner and outer radius of the two rings) in order to trap and transport all particles at the focal plane.

  8. Active vibration control of beams using filtered-velocity feedback controllers with moment pair actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Changjoo; Hong, Chinsuk; Jeong, Weui Bong

    2013-06-01

    In this study, filtered-velocity feedback (FVF) control is proposed to stabilize a control system with a non-collocated sensor/actuator configuration. This method is applied to actively control a clamped beam with a sensor/moment pair actuator. Since the sensor/moment pair actuator is a non-collocated configuration, the control system experiences structural instability at high frequencies. Due to the roll-off property of the FVF controller, the high frequency structural instability problem can be overcome. Due to the second-order filter characteristics of the FVF controller, similar to a low pass filter, multimode disturbances can be controlled at the modes below the cut-off frequency. To verify the performance of the controller, the FVF controller is tuned to around 2 kHz, and the structural responses are successfully reduced by numerical and experimental approaches.

  9. Biological effects of passive versus active scanning proton beams on human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gridley, Daila S; Pecaut, Michael J; Mao, Xiao W; Wroe, Andrew J; Luo-Owen, Xian

    2015-02-01

    The goal was to characterize differences in cell response after exposure to active beam scanning (ABS) protons compared to a passive delivery system. Human lung epithelial (HLE) cells were evaluated at various locations along the proton depth dose profile. The dose delivered at the Bragg peak position was essentially identical (∼4 Gy) with the two techniques, but depth dose data showed that ABS resulted in lower doses at entry and more rapid drop-off after the peak. Average dose rates for the passive and ABS beams were 1.1 Gy/min and 5.1 Gy/min, respectively; instantaneous dose rates were 19.2 Gy/min and 2,300 Gy/min (to a 0.5 × 0.5 mm(2) voxel). Analysis of DNA synthesis was based on (3)H-TdR incorporation. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was done to determine expression of genes related to p53 signaling and DNA damage; a total of 152 genes were assessed. Spectral karyotyping and analyses of the Golgi apparatus and cytokines produced by the HLE cells were also performed. At or near the Bragg peak position, ABS protons resulted in a greater decrease in DNA synthesis compared to passively delivered protons. Genes with >2-fold change (P < 0.05 vs. 0 Gy) after passive proton irradiation at one or more locations within the Bragg curve were BTG2, CDKN1A, IFNB1 and SIAH1. In contrast, many more genes had >2-fold difference with ABS protons: BRCA1, BRCA2, CDC25A, CDC25C, CCNB2, CDK1, DMC1, DNMT1, E2F1, EXO1, FEN1, GADD45A, GTSE1, IL-6, JUN, KRAS, MDM4, PRC1, PTTG1, RAD51, RPA1, TNF, WT1, XRCC2, XRCC3 and XRCC6BP1. Spectral karyotyping revealed numerous differences in chromosomal abnormalities between the two delivery systems, especially at or near the Bragg peak. Percentage of cells staining for the Golgi apparatus was low after exposure to passive and active proton beams. Studies such as this are needed to ensure patient safety and make modifications in ABS delivery, if necessary.

  10. A new analysis method using Bragg curve spectroscopy for a Multi-purpose Active-target Particle Telescope for radiation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losekamm, M. J.; Milde, M.; Pöschl, T.; Greenwald, D.; Paul, S.

    2017-02-01

    Traditional radiation detectors can either measure the total radiation dose omnidirectionally (dosimeters), or determine the incoming particles characteristics within a narrow field of view (spectrometers). Instantaneous measurements of anisotropic fluxes thus require several detectors, resulting in bulky setups. The Multi-purpose Active-target Particle Telescope (MAPT), employing a new detection principle, is designed to measure particle fluxes omnidirectionally and be simultaneously a dosimeter and spectrometer. It consists of an active core of scintillating fibers whose light output is measured by silicon photomultipliers, and fits into a cube with an edge length of 10 cm. It identifies particles using extended Bragg curve spectroscopy, with sensitivity to charged particles with kinetic energies above 25 MeV. MAPT's unique layout results in a geometrical acceptance of approximately 800 cm2 sr and an angular resolution of less than 6°, which can be improved by track-fitting procedures. In a beam test of a simplified prototype, the energy resolution was found to be less than 1 MeV for protons with energies between 30 and 70 MeV. Possible applications of MAPT include the monitoring of radiation environments in spacecraft and beam monitoring in medical facilities.

  11. Very high resolution UV and X-ray spectroscopy and imagery of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M.; Brown, W. A.; Haisch, B. M.

    1987-01-01

    A scientific investigation of the physics of the solar atmosphere, which uses the techniques of high resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy and high resolution UV imagery, is described. The experiments were conducted during a series of three sounding rocket flights. All three flights yielded excellent images in the UV range, showing unprecedented spatial resolution. The second flight recorded the X-ray spectrum of a solar flare, and the third that of an active region. A normal incidence multi-layer mirror was used during the third flight to make the first astronomical X-ray observations using this new technique.

  12. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  13. PSR J1023+0038: phase-resolved optical spectroscopy and continued X-ray activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares, M.; Casares, J.; Rodriguez-Gil, P.; Shahbaz, T.

    2014-02-01

    After the state change of the binary millisecond pulsar PSR J1023+0038 in mid 2013 (ATels #5513, #5514, #5515, #5516, #5534), we performed orbital phase resolved optical spectroscopy in order to study the evolution of the emission lines and constrain the properties of the accretion disk during the ongoing active period. We obtained 22 low-resolution (ACAM, spectral resolution ~ 400 km/s) spectra of the system using the 4-meter William Herschel Telescope on La Palma on 2013-12-16 starting at 02:34 UTC, covering about 85% of the (4.8 hr) binary orbit.

  14. Design of active temperature compensated composite free-free beam MEMS resonators in a standard process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xereas, George; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.

    2014-03-01

    Frequency references are used in almost every modern electronic device including mobile phones, personal computers, and scientific and medical instrumentation. With modern consumer mobile devices imposing stringent requirements of low cost, low complexity, compact system integration and low power consumption, there has been significant interest to develop batch-manufactured MEMS resonators. An important challenge for MEMS resonators is to match the frequency and temperature stability of quartz resonators. We present 1MHz and 20MHz temperature compensated Free-Free beam MEMS resonators developed using PolyMUMPS, which is a commercial multi-user process available from MEMSCAP. We introduce a novel temperature compensation technique that enables high frequency stability over a wide temperature range. We used three strategies: passive compensation by using a structural gold (Au) layer on the resonator, active compensation through using a heater element, and a Free-Free beam design that minimizes the effects of thermal mismatch between the vibrating structure and the substrate. Detailed electro-mechanical simulations were performed to evaluate the frequency response and Quality Factor (Q). Specifically, for the 20MHz device, a Q of 10,000 was obtained for the passive compensated design. Finite Element Modeling (FEM) simulations were used to evaluate the Temperature Coefficient of frequency (TCf) of the resonators between -50°C and 125°C which yielded +0.638 ppm/°C for the active compensated, compared to -1.66 ppm/°C for the passively compensated design and -8.48 ppm/°C for uncompensated design for the 20MHz device. Electro-thermo-mechanical simulations showed that the heater element was capable of increasing the temperature of the resonators by approximately 53°C with an applied voltage of 10V and power consumption of 8.42 mW.

  15. Chemical stability of plasmon-active silver tips for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalbacova, Jana; Rodriguez, Raul D.; Desale, Vivek; Schneider, Maximilian; Amin, Ihsan; Jordan, Rainer; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanostructures are used in tip- and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy due to their high electric field enhancement over almost the entire visible spectral range. However, the low chemical stability of silver, compared to other noble metals, promotes silver sulfide and sulfate formation which decreases its plasmonic activity. This is why silver tips are usually prepared on the same day of the experiments or are disregarded in favour of gold that is chemically more stable. Since silver degradation cannot be avoided, we hypothesized that a protection layer may be able to minimize or control degradation. In this contribution, we report the successful preparation of 4-biphenylthiol and 4'-nitro-4-biphenylthiol self-assembled monolayers on silver tips in order to protect them against tarnishing and to investigate the effect on the life-time of the plasmonic activity. The electrochemically etched wire surface was probed via Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The best long term stability and resistance against corrosion was shown by a monolayer of 4-biphenylthiol formed from dimethylformamide which did not display any degradation of the metallic tip during the observed period. Here, we demonstrate an easy and straightforward approach towards increasing the chemical stability of silver TERS-active probes.

  16. Evolution of anatase surface active sites probed by in situ sum-frequency phonon spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yue; Chen, Shiyou; Li, Yadong; Gao, Yi; Yang, Deheng; Shen, Yuen Ron; Liu, Wei-Tao

    2016-09-01

    Surface active sites of crystals often govern their relevant surface chemistry, yet to monitor them in situ in real atmosphere remains a challenge. Using surface-specific sum-frequency spectroscopy, we identified the surface phonon mode associated with the active sites of undercoordinated titanium ions and conjoint oxygen vacancies, and used it to monitor them on anatase (TiO2) (101) under ambient conditions. In conjunction with theory, we determined related surface structure around the active sites and tracked the evolution of oxygen vacancies under ultraviolet irradiation. We further found that unlike in vacuum, the surface oxygen vacancies, which dominate the surface reactivity, are strongly regulated by ambient gas molecules, including methanol and water, as well as weakly associated species, such as nitrogen and hydrogen. The result revealed a rich interplay between prevailing ambient species and surface reactivity, which can be omnipresent in environmental and catalytic applications of titanium dioxides.

  17. Evolution of anatase surface active sites probed by in situ sum-frequency phonon spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Chen, Shiyou; Li, Yadong; Gao, Yi; Yang, Deheng; Shen, Yuen Ron; Liu, Wei-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Surface active sites of crystals often govern their relevant surface chemistry, yet to monitor them in situ in real atmosphere remains a challenge. Using surface-specific sum-frequency spectroscopy, we identified the surface phonon mode associated with the active sites of undercoordinated titanium ions and conjoint oxygen vacancies, and used it to monitor them on anatase (TiO2) (101) under ambient conditions. In conjunction with theory, we determined related surface structure around the active sites and tracked the evolution of oxygen vacancies under ultraviolet irradiation. We further found that unlike in vacuum, the surface oxygen vacancies, which dominate the surface reactivity, are strongly regulated by ambient gas molecules, including methanol and water, as well as weakly associated species, such as nitrogen and hydrogen. The result revealed a rich interplay between prevailing ambient species and surface reactivity, which can be omnipresent in environmental and catalytic applications of titanium dioxides. PMID:27704049

  18. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of He{_2}^+ Using Rydberg-Series Extrapolation and Zeeman-Decelerated Supersonic Beams of Metastable He_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Paul; Semeria, Luca; Merkt, Frederic

    2016-06-01

    Having only three electrons, He{_2}^+ represents a system for which highly accurate ab initio calculations are possible. The latest calculations of rovibrational energies in He{_2}^+ do not include relativistic or QED corrections but claim an accuracy of 120 MHz We have performed high-resolution Rydberg spectroscopy of metastable He_2 molecules and employed multichannel-quantum-defect-theory extrapolation techniques to determine the rotational energy-level structure in the He{_2}^+ ion. To this end, we have produced samples of metastable helium molecules in supersonic beams with velocities tunable down to 100 m/s by combining a cryogenic supersonic-beam source with a multistage Zeeman decelerator. The metastable He_2 molecules are excited to np Rydberg states using the frequency-doubled output of a pulse-amplified ring dye laser. Although the bandwidth of the laser system is too large to observe the reduction of the Doppler width resulting from deceleration, the deceleration greatly simplifies the spectral assignments because of its spin-rotational state selectivity. Our approach enabled us to determine the rotational structure of He_2 with an unprecedented accuracy of 18 MHz, to quantify the size of the relativistic and QED corrections by comparison with the results of Tung et al. and to precisely measure the rotational structure of the metastable state for comparison with the results of Focsa et al. Here, we present an extension of these measurements in which we have measured higher rotational intervals of He{_2}^+. In addition, we have replaced the pulsed UV laser by a cw UV laser and improved the resolution of the spectra by a factor of more than five. W.-C. Tung, M. Pavanello and L. Adamowicz, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 104309 (2012). P. Jansen, L. Semeria, L. Esteban Hofer, S. Scheidegger, J.A. Agner, H. Schmutz, and F. Merkt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 133202 (2015). D. Sprecher, J. Liu, T. Krähenmann, M. Schäfer, and F. Merkt, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 064304 (2014). M

  19. Experimental Observations of Nuclear Activity in Deuterated Materials Subjected to a Low-Energy Photon Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Benyo, Theresa L.; Pines, Vladimir; Pines, Marianna; Forsley, Lawrence P.; Westmeyer, Paul A.; Chait, Arnon; Becks, Michael D.; Martin, Richard E.; Hendricks, Robert C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Exposure of highly deuterated materials to a low-energy (nom. 2 MeV) photon beam resulted in nuclear activity of both the parent metals of hafnium and erbium and a witness material (molybdenum) mixed with the reactants. Gamma spectral analysis of all deuterated materials, ErD2.8+C36D74+Mo and HfD2+C36D74+Mo, showed that nuclear processes had occurred as shown by unique gamma signatures. For the deuterated erbium specimens, posttest gamma spectra showed evidence of radioisotopes of erbium ((163)Er and (171)Er) and of molybdenum ((99)Mo and (101)Mo) and by beta decay, technetium (99mTc and 101Tc). For the deuterated hafnium specimens, posttest gamma spectra showed evidence of radioisotopes of hafnium (180mHf and 181Hf) and molybdenum ((99)Mo and (101)Mo), and by beta decay, technetium ((99m)Tc and (101)Tc). In contrast, when either the hydrogenated or non-gas-loaded erbium or hafnium materials were exposed to the gamma flux, the gamma spectra revealed no new isotopes. Neutron activation materials showed evidence of thermal and epithermal neutrons. CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors showed evidence of fast neutrons with energies between 1.4 and 2.5 MeV and several instances of triple tracks, indicating (is) greater than 10 MeV neutrons. Further study is required to determine the mechanism causing the nuclear activity.

  20. Measurement of activation of helium gas by 238U beam irradiation at about 11 A MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashio, A.; Tanaka, K.; Imao, H.; Uwamino, Y.

    2017-09-01

    A new helium-gas stripper system has been applied at the 11 A MeV uranium beam of the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory of the RIKEN accelerator facility. Although the gas stripper is important for the heavy-ion accelerator facility, the residual radiation that is generated is a serious problem for maintenance work. The residual dose was evaluated by using three-layered activation samples of aluminium and bismuth. The γ-rays from produced radionuclides with in-flight fission of the 238U beam and from the material of the chamber activated by neutrons were observed by using a Ge detector and compared with the values calculated by using the Monte-Carlo simulation code PHITS.

  1. Combined passive and active shimming for in vivo MR spectroscopy at high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juchem, Christoph; Muller-Bierl, Bernd; Schick, Fritz; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Pfeuffer, Josef

    2006-12-01

    The use of high magnetic fields increases the sensitivity and spectral dispersion in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of brain metabolites. Practical limitations arise, however, from susceptibility-induced field distortions, which are increased at higher magnetic field strengths. Solutions to this problem include optimized shimming, provided that active, i.e., electronic, shimming can operate over a sufficient range. To meet our shim requirements, which were an order of magnitude greater than the active shim capacity of our 7 T MR system, we developed a combined passive and active shim approach. Simple geometries of ferromagnetic shim elements were derived and numerically optimized to generate a complete set of second-order spherical harmonic shim functions in a modular manner. The major goals of the shim design were maximization of shim field accuracy and ease of practical implementation. The theoretically optimized ferro-shim geometries were mounted on a cylindrical surface and placed inside the magnet bore, surrounding the subject's head and the RF coil. Passive shimming generated very strong shim fields and eliminated the worst of the field distortions, after which the field was further optimized by flexible and highly accurate active shimming. Here, the passive-shimming procedure was first evaluated theoretically, then applied in phantom studies and subsequently validated for in vivo1H MRS in the macaque visual cortex. No artifacts due to the passive shim setup were observed; adjustments were reproducible between sessions. The modularity and the reduction to two pieces per shim term in this study is an important simplification that makes the method applicable also for passive shimming within single sessions. The feasibility of very strong, flexible and high-quality shimming via a combined approach of passive and active shimming is of great practical relevance for MR imaging and spectroscopy at high field strengths where shim power is limited or where

  2. Potential of electron beam computed tomography for coronary artery calcium screening to evaluate fatty liver: comparison with 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Matulevicius, Susan; Huff, Laura C; Szczepaniak, Lidia S; Ayers, Colby R; Budoff, Matthew; McColl, Roderick; Khera, Amit; Peshock, Ronald M

    2011-06-01

    Electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) for coronary artery calcification can potentially evaluate liver fat, another marker of cardiovascular risk. We compared quantitative estimates of hepatic steatosis measured by EBCT with those obtained by a well-validated, accurate-measure, magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS). EBCT and (1)H MRS were performed in 2159 subjects from the Dallas Heart Study. Forty subjects were randomly selected from each of 5 subgroups of liver fat percent by (1)H MRS (n = 200). EBCT average liver attenuation (HU) was determined in a 1- to 2-cm circular region of interest over the liver lobes. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated. Using a previously defined (1)H MRS hepatic steatosis cut point (>5.5%), an optimized EBCT liver attenuation cut point was determined by receiver operating characteristic analysis. (1)H MRS liver fat content and EBCT average right lobe liver attenuation were moderately negatively correlated (r = -0.64, P < 0.0001) in all subjects and in those with (1)H MRS hepatic steatosis (r = -0.71, P < 0.0001). This correlation did not improve with attenuation correction of the EBCT data using a standard calcium phantom or statistical transformation. Using an optimized receiver operating characteristic EBCT cut point (64.5 HU), sensitivity was 78% and specificity was 72% for detecting (1)H MRS hepatic steatosis, with a high false negative rate. Risk factors for hepatic steatosis (obesity, diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome) were more strongly correlated with (1)H MRS than EBCT liver fat measures. Liver attenuation on EBCT acquired for coronary artery calcification screening correlates modestly with (1)H MRS measures of liver fat content, with a high false negative rate.

  3. Spectroscopy study of silver nanoparticles fabrication using synthetic humic substances and their antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Litvin, Valentina A; Minaev, Boris F

    2013-05-01

    In this present study, silver nanoparticles were synthesized using synthetic humic substances (HSs) as reducing and stabilizing agents. Preference of synthetic HSs over natural humic matter is determined by a standardization problem resolution of the product due to the strict control of conditions of the synthetic HSs formation. It allows to receive the silver nanoparticles with the standardized biologically-active protective shell that is very important for their use, mainly in medicine. The concentration of sodium hydroxide, synthetic HSs, silver nitrate and temperature employed in the synthesis process are optimized to attain better yield, controlled size and stability by means of UV-visible technique. In the optimal reaction conditions the concentrated silver colloids (55 mM) with 99.99% yield are obtained which were stable for more than 1 year under ambient conditions. The received silver nanoparticles are characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles against fungal and bacterial strains is also shown.

  4. Spectroscopy study of silver nanoparticles fabrication using synthetic humic substances and their antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvin, Valentina A.; Minaev, Boris F.

    2013-05-01

    In this present study, silver nanoparticles were synthesized using synthetic humic substances (HSs) as reducing and stabilizing agents. Preference of synthetic HSs over natural humic matter is determined by a standardization problem resolution of the product due to the strict control of conditions of the synthetic HSs formation. It allows to receive the silver nanoparticles with the standardized biologically-active protective shell that is very important for their use, mainly in medicine. The concentration of sodium hydroxide, synthetic HSs, silver nitrate and temperature employed in the synthesis process are optimized to attain better yield, controlled size and stability by means of UV-visible technique. In the optimal reaction conditions the concentrated silver colloids (55 mM) with 99.99% yield are obtained which were stable for more than 1 year under ambient conditions. The received silver nanoparticles are characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles against fungal and bacterial strains is also shown.

  5. Mapping inhibitor binding modes on an active cysteine protease via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gregory M; Balouch, Eaman; Goetz, David H; Lazic, Ana; McKerrow, James H; Craik, Charles S

    2012-12-18

    Cruzain is a member of the papain/cathepsin L family of cysteine proteases, and the major cysteine protease of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. We report an autoinduction methodology that provides soluble cruzain in high yields (>30 mg/L in minimal medium). These increased yields provide sufficient quantities of active enzyme for use in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based ligand mapping. Using circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy, we also examined the solution-state structural dynamics of the enzyme in complex with a covalently bound vinyl sulfone inhibitor (K777). We report the backbone amide and side chain carbon chemical shift assignments of cruzain in complex with K777. These resonance assignments were used to identify and map residues located in the substrate binding pocket, including the catalytic Cys25 and His162. Selective [(15)N]Cys, [(15)N]His, and [(13)C]Met labeling was performed to quickly assess cruzain-ligand interactions for a set of eight low-molecular weight compounds exhibiting micromolar binding or inhibition. Chemical shift perturbation mapping verified that six of the eight compounds bind to cruzain at the active site. Three different binding modes were delineated for the compounds, namely, covalent, noncovalent, and noninteracting. These results provide examples of how NMR spectroscopy can be used to screen compounds for fast evaluation of enzyme-inhibitor interactions to facilitate lead compound identification and subsequent structural studies.

  6. Early detection of cell activation events by means of attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, Jitto; Filfili, Chadi; Hilliard, Julia K.; Ward, John A.; Unil Perera, A. G.

    2014-06-01

    Activation of Jurkat T-cells in culture following treatment with anti-CD3 (Cluster of Differentiation 3) antibody is detectable by interrogating the treated T-cells using the Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) Spectroscopy technique. Cell activation was detected within 75 min after the cells encountered specific immunoglobulin molecules. Spectral markers noted following ligation of the CD3 receptor with anti CD3 antibody provides proof-of-concept that ATR-FTIR spectroscopy is a sensitive measure of molecular events subsequent to cells interacting with anti-CD3 Immunoglobulin G. The resultant ligation of the CD3 receptor results in the initiation of well defined, specific signaling pathways that parallel the measurable molecular events detected using ATR-FTIR. Paired t-test with post-hoc Bonferroni corrections for multiple comparisons has resulted in the identification of statistically significant spectral markers (p < 0.02) at 1367 and 1358 cm-1. Together, these data demonstrate that early treatment-specific cellular events can be measured by ATR-FTIR and that this technique can be used to identify specific agents via the responses of the cell biosensor at different time points postexposure.

  7. Analysis of Chuanxiong Rhizoma and its active components by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy combined with two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yizhen; Lv, Beiran; Wang, Jingjuan; Liu, Yang; Sun, Suqin; Xiao, Yao; Lu, Lina; Xiang, Li; Yang, Yanfang; Qu, Lei; Meng, Qinghong

    2016-01-15

    As complicated mixture systems, active components of Chuanxiong Rhizoma are very difficult to identify and discriminate. In this paper, the macroscopic IR fingerprint method including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), the second derivative infrared spectroscopy (SD-IR) and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2DCOS-IR), was applied to study and identify Chuanxiong raw materials and its different segmented production of HPD-100 macroporous resin. Chuanxiong Rhizoma is rich in sucrose. In the FT-IR spectra, water eluate is more similar to sucrose than the powder and the decoction. Their second derivative spectra amplified the differences and revealed the potentially characteristic IR absorption bands and combined with the correlation coefficient, concluding that 50% ethanol eluate had more ligustilide than other eluates. Finally, it can be found from 2DCOS-IR spectra that proteins were extracted by ethanol from Chuanxiong decoction by HPD-100 macroporous resin. It was demonstrated that the above three-step infrared spectroscopy could be applicable for quick, non-destructive and effective analysis and identification of very complicated and similar mixture systems of traditional Chinese medicines.

  8. Analysis of Chuanxiong Rhizoma and its active components by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy combined with two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yizhen; Lv, Beiran; Wang, Jingjuan; Liu, Yang; Sun, Suqin; Xiao, Yao; Lu, Lina; Xiang, Li; Yang, Yanfang; Qu, Lei; Meng, Qinghong

    2016-01-01

    As complicated mixture systems, active components of Chuanxiong Rhizoma are very difficult to identify and discriminate. In this paper, the macroscopic IR fingerprint method including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), the second derivative infrared spectroscopy (SD-IR) and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2DCOS-IR), was applied to study and identify Chuanxiong raw materials and its different segmented production of HPD-100 macroporous resin. Chuanxiong Rhizoma is rich in sucrose. In the FT-IR spectra, water eluate is more similar to sucrose than the powder and the decoction. Their second derivative spectra amplified the differences and revealed the potentially characteristic IR absorption bands and combined with the correlation coefficient, concluding that 50% ethanol eluate had more ligustilide than other eluates. Finally, it can be found from 2DCOS-IR spectra that proteins were extracted by ethanol from Chuanxiong decoction by HPD-100 macroporous resin. It was demonstrated that the above three-step infrared spectroscopy could be applicable for quick, non-destructive and effective analysis and identification of very complicated and similar mixture systems of traditional Chinese medicines.

  9. Countering Beam Divergence Effects with Focused Segmented Scintillators for High DQE Megavoltage Active Matrix Imagers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Langechuan; Antonuk, Larry E; Zhao, Qihua; El-Mohri, Youcef; Jiang, Hao

    2012-01-01

    The imaging performance of active matrix flat-panel imagers designed for megavoltage imaging (MV AMFPIs) is severely constrained by relatively low x-ray detection efficiency, which leads to a detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of only ~1%. Previous theoretical and empirical studies by our group have demonstrated the potential for addressing this constraint through utilization of thick, two-dimensional, segmented scintillators with optically isolated crystals. However, this strategy is constrained by degradation of high-frequency DQE resulting from spatial resolution loss at locations away from the central beam axis due to oblique incidence of radiation. To address this challenge, segmented scintillators constructed so that the crystals are individually focused toward the radiation source are proposed and theoretically investigated. The study was performed using Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport to examine the modulation transfer function and DQE of focused segmented scintillators with thicknesses ranging from 5 to 60 mm. The results demonstrate that, independent of scintillator thickness, the introduction of focusing largely restores spatial resolution and DQE performance otherwise lost in thick, unfocused segmented scintillators. For the case of a 60 mm thick BGO scintillator and at a location 20 cm off the central beam axis, use of focusing improves DQE by up to a factor of ~130 at non-zero spatial frequencies. The results also indicate relatively robust tolerance of such scintillators to positional displacements, of up to 10 cm in the source-to-detector direction and 2 cm in the lateral direction, from their optimal focusing position, which could potentially enhance practical clinical use of focused segmented scintillators in MV AMFPIs. PMID:22854009

  10. Active-passive correlation spectroscopy - A new technique for identifying ocean color algorithm spectral regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1986-01-01

    A new active-passive airborne data correlation technique has been developed which allows the validation of existing in-water oceoan color algorithms and the rapid search, identification, and evaluation of new sensor band locations and algorithm wavelength intervals. Thus far, applied only in conjunction with the spectral curvature algorithm (SCA), the active-passive correlation spectroscopy (APCS) technique shows that (1) the usual 490-nm (center-band) chlorophyll SCA could satisfactorily be placed anywhere within the nominal 460-510-nm interval, and (2) two other spectral regions, 645-660 and 680-695 nm, show considerable promise for chlorophyll pigment measurement. Additionally, the APCS method reveals potentially useful wavelength regions (at 600 and about 670 nm) of very low chlorophyll-in-water spectral curvature into which accessory pigment algorithms for phycoerythrin might be carefully positioned. In combination, the APCS and SCA methods strongly suggest that significant information content resides within the seemingly featureless ocean color spectrum.

  11. Infrared spectroscopy as a rapid tool to detect methylglyoxal and antibacterial activity in Australian honeys.

    PubMed

    Sultanbawa, Yasmina; Cozzolino, Daniel; Fuller, Steve; Cusack, Andrew; Currie, Margaret; Smyth, Heather

    2015-04-01

    Methylglyoxal (2-oxopropanal) is a compound known to contribute to the non-peroxide antimicrobial activity of honeys. The feasibility of using infrared spectroscopy as a predictive tool for honey antibacterial activity and methylglyoxal content was assessed. A linear relationship was found between methylglyoxal content (279-1755 mg/kg) in Leptospermum polygalifolium honeys and bacterial inhibition for Escherichiacoli (R(2) = 0.80) and Staphylococcusaureus (R(2) = 0.64). A good prediction of methylglyoxal (R(2) 0.75) content in honey was achieved using spectroscopic data from the mid infrared (MIR) range in combination with partial least squares regression. These results indicate that robust predictive equations could be developed using MIR for commercial application where the prediction of bacterial inhibition is needed to 'value' honeys with methylglyoxal contents in excess of 200mg/kg.

  12. DFT calculations, spectroscopy and antioxidant activity studies on (E)-2-nitro-4-[(phenylimino)methyl]phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temel, Ersin; Alaşalvar, Can; Gökçe, Halil; Güder, Aytaç; Albayrak, Çiğdem; Alpaslan, Yelda Bingöl; Alpaslan, Gökhan; Dilek, Nefise

    2015-02-01

    We have reported synthesis and characterization of (E)-2-nitro-4-[(phenylimino)methyl]phenol by using X-ray crystallographic method, FT-IR and UV-vis spectroscopies and density functional theory (DFT). Optimized geometry and vibrational frequencies of the title compound in the ground state have been computed by using B3LYP with the 6-311G+(d,p) basis set. HOMO-LUMO energy gap, Non-linear optical properties and NBO analysis of the compound are performed at B3LYP/6-311G+(d,p) level. Additionally, as remarkable properties, antioxidant activity of the title compound (CMPD) has been determined by using different antioxidant test methods i.e. ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), hydrogen peroxide scavenging (HPSA), free radical scavenging (FRSA) and ferrous ion chelating activities (FICA). When compared with standards (BHA, BHT, and α-tocopherol), we have concluded that CPMD has effective FRAP, HPSA, FRSA and FICA.

  13. Active Vibration Control of Elastic Beam by Means of Shape Memory Alloy Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Q.; Levy, C.

    1996-01-01

    The mathematical model of a flexible beam covered with shape memory alloy (SMA) layers is presented. The SMA layers are used as actuators, which are capable of changing their elastic modulus and recovery stress, thus changing the natural frequency of, and adjusting the excitation to, the vibrating beam. The frequency factor variation as a function of SMA Young's modulus, SMA layer thickness and beam thickness is discussed. Also control of the beam employing an optimal linear control law is evaluated. The control results indicate how the system reacts to various levels of excitation input through the non-homogeneous recovery shear term of the governing differential equation.

  14. Measurement of polyphenol oxidase activity using optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy-based immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namsoo; Kim, Woo-Yeon

    2015-02-15

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is an important quality index during food processing involving heat-treatment and sensitive determination of PPO activity has been a critical concern in the food industry. In this study, a new measurement of PPO activity exploiting an optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy-based immunosensor is presented using a polyclonal anti-PPO antibody that was immobilized in situ to the surface of a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane-treated optical grating coupler activated with glutaraldehyde. When analysed with a purified PPO fraction from potato tubers, a linear relationship was found between PPO activities of 0.0005607-560.7U/mL and the sensor responses obtained. The sensor was applicable to measurement of PPO activity in real samples that were prepared from potato tubers, grapes and Kimchi cabbage, and the analytical results were compared with those obtained by a conventional colorimetric assay measuring PPO activity. When tested for long-term stability, the sensor was reusable up to 10th day after preparation.

  15. Purposeful Co-Curricular Activities Designed to Increase Engagement: A Practice Brief Based on BEAMS Project Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazeur, Camille

    2008-01-01

    One of a series highlighting key practices undertaken by some of the many successful BEAMS (Building Engagement and Attainment for Minority Students) schools during the project's five years of data collection and action plan implementation, this practice brief demonstrates how emphasis on co-curricular activities can ultimately result in increased…

  16. Active vibration control for piezoelectricity cantilever beam: an adaptive feedforward control method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiao; Yue, Jun-Zhou; Liu, Wei-Qun; Wang, Xu-Dong; Chen, Jun; Hu, Guang-Di

    2017-04-01

    This work is focused on the active vibration control of piezoelectric cantilever beam, where an adaptive feedforward controller (AFC) is utilized to reject the vibration with unknown multiple frequencies. First, the experiment setup and its mathematical model are introduced. Due to that the channel between the disturbance and the vibration output is unknown in practice, a concept of equivalent input disturbance (EID) is employed to put an equivalent disturbance into the input channel. In this situation, the vibration control can be achieved by setting the control input be the identified EID. Then, for the EID with known multiple frequencies, the AFC is introduced to perfectly reject the vibration but is sensitive to the frequencies. In order to accurately identify the unknown frequencies of EID in presence of the random disturbances and un-modeled nonlinear dynamics, the time-frequency-analysis (TFA) method is employed to precisely identify the unknown frequencies. Consequently, a TFA-based AFC algorithm is proposed to the active vibration control with unknown frequencies. Finally, four cases are given to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed TFA-based AFC algorithm by experiment.

  17. SPIDER beam dump as diagnostic of the particle beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaupa, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Sartori, E.; Brombin, M.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2016-11-01

    The beam power produced by the negative ion source for the production of ion of deuterium extracted from RF plasma is mainly absorbed by the beam dump component which has been designed also for measuring the temperatures on the dumping panels for beam diagnostics. A finite element code has been developed to characterize, by thermo-hydraulic analysis, the sensitivity of the beam dump to the different beam parameters. The results prove the capability of diagnosing the beam divergence and the horizontal misalignment, while the entity of the halo fraction appears hardly detectable without considering the other foreseen diagnostics like tomography and beam emission spectroscopy.

  18. SPIDER beam dump as diagnostic of the particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zaupa, M. Sartori, E.; Dalla Palma, M.; Brombin, M.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2016-11-15

    The beam power produced by the negative ion source for the production of ion of deuterium extracted from RF plasma is mainly absorbed by the beam dump component which has been designed also for measuring the temperatures on the dumping panels for beam diagnostics. A finite element code has been developed to characterize, by thermo-hydraulic analysis, the sensitivity of the beam dump to the different beam parameters. The results prove the capability of diagnosing the beam divergence and the horizontal misalignment, while the entity of the halo fraction appears hardly detectable without considering the other foreseen diagnostics like tomography and beam emission spectroscopy.

  19. SPATIALLY RESOLVED IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF CANDIDATE DUAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    McGurk, R. C.; Max, C. E.; Medling, A. M.; Shields, G. A.; Comerford, J. M. E-mail: max@ucolick.org E-mail: shields@lfastro.org

    2015-09-20

    When galaxies merge, both central supermassive black holes are immersed in a dense and chaotic environment. If there is sufficient gas in the nuclear regions, one expects to see close pairs of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), or dual AGNs, in a fraction of galaxy mergers. However, finding them remains a challenge. The presence of double-peaked [O iii] emission lines has been proposed as a technique to select dual AGNs efficiently. We studied a sample of double-peaked narrow [O iii] emitting AGNs from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7. By obtaining new and archival high spatial resolution images taken with the Keck II Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system and the near-infrared camera NIRC2, we show that 30% of 140 double-peaked [O iii] emission line SDSS AGNs have two spatial components within a 3″ radius. However, spatially resolved spectroscopy or X-ray observations are needed to confirm these galaxy pairs as systems containing two AGNs. We followed up three spatially double candidate dual AGNs with integral field spectroscopy from Keck OSIRIS and 10 candidates with long-slit spectroscopy from the Shane Kast Double Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. We find that the double-peaked emission lines in our sample of 12 candidates are caused by: one dual AGN (SDSS J114642.47+511029.6), one confirmed outflow and four likely outflows, two pairs of star-forming galaxies, one candidate indeterminate due to sky line interference, and three AGNs with spatially coincident double [O iii] peaks, likely due to unresolved complex narrow line kinematics, outflows, binary AGN, or small-scale jets.

  20. Spatially Resolved Imaging and Spectroscopy of Candidate Dual Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGurk, R. C.; Max, C. E.; Medling, A. M.; Shields, G. A.; Comerford, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    When galaxies merge, both central supermassive black holes are immersed in a dense and chaotic environment. If there is sufficient gas in the nuclear regions, one expects to see close pairs of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), or dual AGNs, in a fraction of galaxy mergers. However, finding them remains a challenge. The presence of double-peaked [O iii] emission lines has been proposed as a technique to select dual AGNs efficiently. We studied a sample of double-peaked narrow [O iii] emitting AGNs from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7. By obtaining new and archival high spatial resolution images taken with the Keck II Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system and the near-infrared camera NIRC2, we show that 30% of 140 double-peaked [O iii] emission line SDSS AGNs have two spatial components within a 3″ radius. However, spatially resolved spectroscopy or X-ray observations are needed to confirm these galaxy pairs as systems containing two AGNs. We followed up three spatially double candidate dual AGNs with integral field spectroscopy from Keck OSIRIS and 10 candidates with long-slit spectroscopy from the Shane Kast Double Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. We find that the double-peaked emission lines in our sample of 12 candidates are caused by: one dual AGN (SDSS J114642.47+511029.6), one confirmed outflow and four likely outflows, two pairs of star-forming galaxies, one candidate indeterminate due to sky line interference, and three AGNs with spatially coincident double [O iii] peaks, likely due to unresolved complex narrow line kinematics, outflows, binary AGN, or small-scale jets.

  1. Drivers' detection of roadside targets when driving vehicles with three headlight systems during high beam activation.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Ian J; Brumbelow, Matthew L

    2017-02-01

    A previous open-road experiment indicated that curve-adaptive HID headlights driven with low beams improved drivers' detection of low conspicuity targets compared with fixed halogen and fixed HID low beam systems. The current study used the same test environment and targets to assess whether drivers' detection of targets was affected by the same three headlight systems when using high beams. Twenty drivers search and responded for 60 8×12inch targets of high or low reflectance that were distributed evenly across straight and curved road sections as they drove at 30 mph on an unlit two-lane rural road. The results indicate that target detection performance was generally similar across the three systems. However, one interaction indicated that drivers saw low reflectance targets on straight road sections from further away when driving with the fixed halogen high beam condition compared with curve-adaptive HID high beam headlights and also indicated a possible benefit for the curve-adaptive HID high beams for high reflectance targets placed on the inside of curves. The results of this study conflict with the previous study of low beams, which showed a consistent benefit for the curve-adaptive HID low beams for targets placed on curves compared with fixed HID and fixed halogen low beam conditions. However, a comparison of mean detection distances from the two studies indicated uniformly longer mean target detection distances for participants driving with high beams and implicates the potential visibility benefits for systems that optimize proper high beam use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Ce-PROMOTED Bond Activation of Propene Probed by Mass-Analyzed Threshold Ionization Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuchen; Kumari, Sudesh; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2016-06-01

    The reaction of Ce + propene (CH2=CH-CH3) was carried out in a laser-ablation supersonic molecular beam source. CeC_2H_2, CeC_3H_4, CeC_3H_6, CeC_4H_6, CeC_6H10, and CeC_6H12 were identified by photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric measurements, and their structures and electronic states were investigated with mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. The metal complexes containing two or three carbon atoms were formed by the C-C bond breakage (CeC_2H_2), dehydrogenation (CeC_3H_4), or metal insertion into a C-H bond (CeC_3H_6) of a propene molecule. The larger complexes with four to six carbons are formed through secondary reactions involving C-C bond coupling and dehydrogenation. The ground electronic states of the neutral CeC_2H_2, CeC_3H_4, CeC_3H_6, and CeC_4H_6 complexes are triplets with a 4f16s1 electron configuration on the Ce center, and those of the corresponding ions are doublet with a 4f1 configuration. Their MATI spectra are much more complex than those of the corresponding La species formed in the La + propene reaction previously observed by our group. The spectral complexity arises from possibly multiple electronic transitions due to the existence of a 4f electron of the Ce atom which could be located in any one of the seven f-atomic orbitals or involved in considerable spin-orbit interactions.

  3. Effect of Exogenous Phytase Addition on Soil Phosphatase Activities: a Fluorescence Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-zhu; Chen, Zhen-hua; Zhang, Yu-lan; Chen, Li-jun

    2015-05-01

    The utilization of organic phosphorus (P) has directly or indirectly improved after exogenous phytase was added to soil. However, the mechanism by which exogenous phytase affected the soil phosphatases (phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase) activities was not clear. The present work was aimed to study red soil, brown soil and cinnamon soil phosphomonoesterase (acid and alkaline) (AcP and AlP) and phosphodiesterase (PD) activities responding to the addition of exogenous phytase (1 g phytase/50 g air dry soil sample) based on the measurements performed via a fluorescence detection method combined with 96 microplates using a TECAN Infinite 200 Multi-Mode Microplate Reader. The results indicated that the acid phosphomonoesterase activity was significantly enhanced in red soil (p≤0. 01), while it was significantly reduced in cinnamon soil; alkaline phosphomonoesterase activity was significantly enhanced in cinnamon soil (p≤ 0. 01), while it was significantly reduced in red soil; phosphodiesterase activity was increased in three soils but it was significantly increased in brown soil (p≤0. 01) after the addition of exogenous phytase. The activities still remained strong after eight days in different soils, which indicated that exogenous phytase addition could be enhance soil phosphatases activities effectively. This effect was not only related to soil properties, such as pH and phosphorus forms, but might also be related to the excreted enzyme amount of the stimulating microorganism. Using fluorescence spectroscopy to study exogenous phytase addition influence on soil phosphatase activities was the first time at home and abroad. Compared with the conventional spectrophotometric method, the fluorescence microplate method is an accurate, fast and simple to use method to determine the relationships among the soil phosphatases activities.

  4. Changes in Self-Regulation-Related Prefrontal Activities in Eating Disorders: A Near Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Sutoh, Chihiro; Nakazato, Michiko; Matsuzawa, Daisuke; Tsuru, Kadushi; Niitsu, Tomihisa; Iyo, Masaomi; Shimizu, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to clarify the symptomatology of the eating disorders examining the prefrontal function and activity associated with self-regulation among participants with or without eating disorders. Methods Ten patients with anorexia nervosa, fourteen with bulimia nervosa, and fourteen healthy control participants performed two cognitive tasks assessing self-regulatory functions, an auditorily distracted word fluency task and a rock-paper-scissors task under the measurements on prefrontal oxyhemoglobin concentration with near infrared spectroscopy. The psychiatric symptoms of patient groups were assessed with several questionnaires. Results Patients with bulimia nervosa showed decreased performances and prefrontal hyper activation patterns. Prefrontal activities showed a moderate negative correlation with task performances not in the patient groups but only in the healthy participants. The prefrontal activities of the patient groups showed positive correlations with some symptom scale aspects. Conclusions The decreased cognitive abilities and characteristic prefrontal activation patterns associated with self-regulatory functions were shown in patients with bulimia nervosa, which correlated with their symptoms. These findings suggest inefficient prefrontal self-regulatory function of bulimia nervosa that associate with its symptoms. PMID:23527162

  5. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy II

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-31

    The negative ion of H is one of the simplest 3-body atomic systems. The techniques we have developed for experimental study of atoms moving near speed of light have been productive. This proposal request continuing support for experimental studies of the H{sup -} system, principally at the 800 MeV linear accelerator (LAMPF) at Los Alamos. Four experiments are currently planned: photodetachment of H{sup -} near threshold in electric field, interaction of relativistic H{sup -} ions with matter, high excitations and double charge escape in H{sup -}, and multiphoton detachment of electrons from H{sup -}.

  6. Precision Atomic Beam Laser Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-20

    postdoctoral, and visiting faculty researchers. The organizing principles of our work are to enhance the coherence and general utility of laser sources by... utilizing some million atoms, namely -1000:1. The optimum servo control of the laser using this signal could evidently produce a laser linewidth in the...Lett. 22,184-186 (1997), P. Dube, M. D. Levenson, and J. L. Hall. 10. "Real-time precision refractometry : new approaches," Appl. Opt. 36,1223- 1234

  7. Effects of Cycling Conditions of Active Material From Discharged Ni Positive Plates Studied by Inelastic Neutron Scattering Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, Juergen; Varma, Ravi; Diebolt, Lisa; Reid, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of this presentation are: identify atomic-level signatures of electrochemical activity of the active material on the Ni positive plates of Ni-H2 batteries, relate finding to cycling conditions and histories, and develop INS spectroscopy as a non-destructive testing technique for the evaluation of Ni-positive plates of Ni-H2 batteries.

  8. Active buckling control of an imperfect beam-column with circular cross-section using piezo-elastic supports and integral LQR control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffner, Maximilian; Platz, Roland

    2016-09-01

    For slender beam-columns loaded by axial compressive forces, active buckling control provides a possibility to increase the maximum bearable axial load above that of a purely passive structure. In this paper, the potential of active buckling control of an imperfect beam-column with circular cross-section using piezo-elastic supports is investigated numerically. Imperfections are given by an initial deformation of the beam-column caused by a constant imperfection force. With the piezo-elastic supports, active bending moments in arbitrary directions orthogonal to the beam-column's longitudinal axis can be applied at both beam- column's ends. The imperfect beam-column is loaded by a gradually increasing axial compressive force resulting in a lateral deformation of the beam-column. First, a finite element model of the imperfect structure for numerical simulation of the active buckling control is presented. Second, an integral linear-quadratic regulator (LQR) that compensates the deformation via the piezo-elastic supports is derived for a reduced modal model of the ideal beam-column. With the proposed active buckling control it is possible to stabilize the imperfect beam-column in arbitrary lateral direction for axial loads above the theoretical critical buckling load and the maximum bearable load of the passive structure.

  9. Determination of aldose reductase activity in the eye by localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lizak, M J; Mori, K; Kador, P F

    2001-10-01

    The polyol pathway plays an important role in the formation of diabetic complications of the eye. Due to variations in the pharmacokinetic properties of aldose reductase inhibitors and variations in the degradation of the blood-ocular barrier, it is often difficult to determine the proper intraocular levels of aldose reductase inhibitor required for inhibition of aldose reductase activity in ocular tissues. Utilizing localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), the present method can determine adequate inhibition of aldose reductase activity in the lens by noninvasively measuring polyol pathway activity in the eye. New Zealand White rabbits, under anesthesia, were administered an intravitreal injection of 3-fluoro-3-deoxy-D-glucose (3FDG). Localized MRS was then used to assess polyol pathway activity by determining the levels of 3-fluoro-3-deoxy-D-sorbitol (3FS) and 3-fluoro-3-deoxy-D-fructose (3FF) metabolite formation from 3FDG in the eye. MRS was able to follow the loss of 3FDG from the vitreous into the anterior segment of the eye and particularly into the lens and aqueous. The primary metabolism of 3FDG observed by MRS was the formation of 3FS in the lens that is catalyzed by aldose reductase. Production of 3FS was linear in time and decreased with the oral administration of an aldose reductase inhibitor.

  10. Amino acid conservation and interactions in rhodopsin: Probing receptor activation by NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Andreyah; Eilers, Markus; Reeves, Philip J.; Smith, Steven O.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a classical two-state G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In the dark, its 11-cis retinal chromophore serves as an inverse agonist to lock the receptor in an inactive state. Retinal-protein and protein-protein interactions have evolved to reduce the basal activity of the receptor in order to achieve low dark noise in the visual system. In contrast, absorption of light triggers rapid isomerization of the retinal, which drives the conversion of the receptor to a fully active conformation. Several specific protein-protein interactions have evolved that maintain the lifetime of the active state in order to increase the sensitivity of this receptor for dim-light vision in vertebrates. In this article, we review the molecular interactions that stabilize rhodopsin in the dark-state and describe the use of solid-state NMR spectroscopy for probing the structural changes that occur upon light-activation. Amino acid conservation provides a guide for those interactions that are common in the class A GPCRs as well as those that are unique to the visual system. PMID:24183693

  11. Neutron activation analysis via nuclear decay kinetics using gamma-ray spectroscopy at SFU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo, Thomas; Chester, Aaron; Starosta, Krzysztof; Williams, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool used in a variety of fields including nuclear and analytical chemistry, environmental science, and health risk management. At SFU, the Germanium detector for Elemental Analysis and Radiation Studies (GEARS), a low-background shielded high-purity germanium gamma-ray detector, has been used recently in all of the above fields. The current project aims to expand upon the number of applications for which GEARS can be used while enhancing its current functionality. A recent addition to the SFU Nuclear Science laboratory is the Thermo Scientific P 385 neutron generator. This device provides a nominal yield of 3 ×108 neutrons/s providing the capacity for neutron activation analysis, opening a major avenue of research at SFU which was previously unavailable. The isotopes created via neutron activation have a wide range of half-lives. To measure and study isotopes with half-lives above a second, a new analogue data acquisition system has been installed on GEARS allowing accurate measurements of decay kinetics. This new functionality enables identification and quantification of the products of neutron activation. Results from the neutron activation analysis of pure metals will be presented.

  12. Force Spectroscopy of Substrate Molecules En Route to the Proteasome's Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Classen, Mirjam; Breuer, Sarah; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Guckenberger, Reinhard; Witt, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    We used an atomic force microscope to study the mechanism underlying the translocation of substrate molecules inside the proteasome. Our specific experimental setup allowed us to measure interaction forces between the 20S proteasome and its substrates. The substrate (β-casein) was covalently bound either via a thiol-Au bond or by a PEG-based binding procedure to the atomic force microscope cantilever tip and offered as bait to proteasomes from Methanosarcina mazei. The proteasomes were immobilized densely in an upright orientation on mica, which made their upper pores accessible for substrates to enter. Besides performing conventional single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments, we developed a three-step procedure that allows the detection of specific proteasome-substrate single-molecule events without tip-sample contact. Using the active 20S wild type and an inactive active-site mutant, as well as two casein mutants bound with opposite termini to the microscope tip, we detected no directional preference of the proteasome-substrate interactions. By comparing the distribution of the measured forces for the proteasome-substrate interactions, were observed that a significant proportion of interaction events occurred at higher forces for the active versus the inactive proteasome. These forces can be attributed to the translocation of substrate en route to the active sites that are harbored deep inside the proteasome. PMID:21244845

  13. Active versus passive listening to auditory streaming stimuli: a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Remijn, Gerard B; Kojima, Haruyuki

    2010-01-01

    We use near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to assess listeners' cortical responses to a 10-s series of pure tones separated in frequency. Listeners are instructed to either judge the rhythm of these "streaming" stimuli (active-response listening) or to listen to the stimuli passively. Experiment 1 shows that active-response listening causes increases in oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) in response to all stimuli, generally over the (pre)motor cortices. The oxy-Hb increases are significantly larger over the right hemisphere than over the left for the final 5 s of the stimulus. Hemodynamic levels do not vary with changes in the frequency separation between the tones and corresponding changes in perceived rhythm ("gallop," "streaming," or "ambiguous"). Experiment 2 shows that hemodynamic levels are strongly influenced by listening mode. For the majority of time windows, active-response listening causes significantly larger oxy-Hb increases than passive listening, significantly over the left hemisphere during the stimulus and over both hemispheres after the stimulus. This difference cannot be attributed to physical motor activity and preparation related to button pressing after stimulus end, because this is required in both listening modes.

  14. Active versus passive listening to auditory streaming stimuli: a near-infrared spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remijn, Gerard B.; Kojima, Haruyuki

    2010-05-01

    We use near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to assess listeners' cortical responses to a 10-s series of pure tones separated in frequency. Listeners are instructed to either judge the rhythm of these ``streaming'' stimuli (active-response listening) or to listen to the stimuli passively. Experiment 1 shows that active-response listening causes increases in oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) in response to all stimuli, generally over the (pre)motor cortices. The oxy-Hb increases are significantly larger over the right hemisphere than over the left for the final 5 s of the stimulus. Hemodynamic levels do not vary with changes in the frequency separation between the tones and corresponding changes in perceived rhythm (``gallop,'' ``streaming,'' or ``ambiguous''). Experiment 2 shows that hemodynamic levels are strongly influenced by listening mode. For the majority of time windows, active-response listening causes significantly larger oxy-Hb increases than passive listening, significantly over the left hemisphere during the stimulus and over both hemispheres after the stimulus. This difference cannot be attributed to physical motor activity and preparation related to button pressing after stimulus end, because this is required in both listening modes.

  15. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang-Hwan

    2003-01-01

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms.

  16. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  17. Arrangement of RecA protein in its active filament determined by polarized-light spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Morimatsu, Katsumi; Takahashi, Masayuki; Nordén, Bengt

    2002-01-01

    Linear dichroism (LD) polarized-light spectroscopy is used to determine the arrangement of RecA in its large filamentous complex with DNA, active in homologous recombination. Angular orientation data for two tryptophan and seven tyrosine residues, deduced from differential LD of wild-type RecA vs. mutants that were engineered to attenuate the UV absorption of selected residues, revealed a rotation by some 40° of the RecA subunits relative to the arrangement in crystal without DNA. In addition, conformational changes are observed for tyrosine residues assigned to be involved in DNA binding and in RecA–RecA contacts, thus potentially related to the global structure of the filament and its biological function. The presented spectroscopic approach, called “Site-Specific Linear Dichroism” (SSLD), may find forceful applications also to other biologically important fibrous complexes not amenable to x-ray crystallographic or NMR structural analysis. PMID:12193645

  18. Delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy combined with active neutron interrogation for nuclear security and safeguards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Mitsuo; Rossi, Fabiana; Rodriguez, Douglas C.; Takamine, Jun; Seya, Michio; Bogucarska, Tatjana; Crochemore, Jean-Michel; Varasano, Giovanni; Abbas, Kamel; Pederson, Bent; Kureta, Masatoshi; Heyse, Jan; Paradela, Carlos; Mondelaers, Willy; Schillebeeckx, Peter

    2017-09-01

    For the purpose of nuclear security and safeguards, an active neutron interrogation non-destructive assay technique, Delayed Gamma-ray Spectroscopy (DGS), is under development. The technique of DGS uses the detection of decay γ rays from fission products to determine ratios of fissile nuclides in a sample. A proper evaluation of such γ-ray spectra requires integration of nuclear data such as fission cross-sections, fission yields, half-lives, decay-chain patterns, and decay γ-ray yields. Preliminary DGS experiments with the Pulsed Neutron Interrogation Test Assembly, named PUNITA, of the European Commissions' Joint Research Center have been performed. Signals of delayed γ ray from nuclear materials were successfully observed.

  19. Prefrontal hemodynamic activity predicts false memory--a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yasutaka; Toichi, Motomi; Shimizu, Mitsue; Mason, Richard A; Findling, Robert L; Yamamoto, Kokichi; Calabrese, Joseph R

    2006-07-15

    Evidence from lesion studies suggests an important role of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in the reconstructive processes of episodic memory or memory distortion. Results from functional imaging studies imply PFC involvement during the illusionary recollection of non-experienced events. Here, we used a two-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system and conducted real-time monitoring of PFC hemodynamics, while subjects studied word lists and subsequently recognized unstudied items (false recognition). Bilateral increases in the oxygenated hemoglobin concentration ([oxy-Hb]) were observed during false recognition compared to true recognition, and a left PFC dominant increase of [oxy-Hb] was observed during encoding phases where subjects later claimed that they recognized unstudied words. Traces of semantic processing, reflected primarily in the left PFC activity, could eventually predict whether subjects falsely recognize non-experienced events.

  20. Conformational study of chiral penicillamine ligand on optically active silver nanoclusters with IR and VCD spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Hiroshi; Nishida, Naoki; Kimura, Keisaku

    2010-02-01

    The conformation of chiral D-/ L-penicillamine ( D-/ L-Pen) adsorbed on optically active silver nanoclusters with a mean core diameter of about 1.1 nm was investigated by infrared (IR) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy. IR spectra of the D-/ L-Pen-protected nanoclusters in D 2O/CD 3OD solution are essentially identical, but the VCD exhibits a mirror image relationship indicating that these species have enantiomeric relationship. The experimental IR and VCD spectra are compared with the calculated ones for different model conformers at the DFT/B3PW91 level. The analysis in the spectral region of ν asym(COO -) and δ sym(NH 2) modes reveals significant shortcomings when comparing with vacuum calculations. We then take a bulk solvent effect into account in the theoretical calculations to obtain better agreement, resulting in the establishment of a preferential conformation of chiral penicillamine on the silver nanocluster surface.

  1. The Modelling and Vibration Control of Beams with Active Constrained Layer Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SHI, Y. M.; LI, Z. F.; HUA, H. X.; FU, Z. F.; LIU, T. X.

    2001-08-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is combined with the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) model of viscoelastic materials (VEM) to model a cantilever beam with active constrained layer damping treatments. This approach avoids time-consuming iteration in solving modal frequencies, modal damping ratios and responses. But the resultant finite element (FE) model has too many degrees of freedom (d.o.f.s) from the point of view of control, nor is it observable and controllable. A new model reduction procedure is proposed. An iterative dynamic condensation is performed in the physical space, and Guyan condensation is taken as an initial iteration approximation. A reduced order model (ROM) of suitable size emerges, but it is still not observable and controllable. Accordingly, a robust model reduction method is then employed in the state space. A numerical example proves that this procedure reduces the model and assures the stability, controllability and observability of the final reduced order model (FROM). Finally, a controller is designed by linear-quadratic Gaussian (LQG) method based on the FROM. The vibration attenuation is evident

  2. Low-Frequency Mode Activity of Heme: Femtosecond Coherence Spectroscopy of Iron Porphine Halides and Nitrophorin

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Minoru; Gruia, Flaviu; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Barabanschikov, Alexander; Montfort, William R.; Maes, Estelle M.; Champion, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    The low-frequency mode activity of metalloporphyrins has been studied for iron porphine-halides (Fe(P)(X), X = Cl, Br) and nitrophorin 4 (NP4) using femtosecond coherence spectroscopy (FCS) in combination with polarized resonance Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT). It is confirmed that the mode symmetry selection rules for FCS are the same as for Raman scattering and that both Franck-Condon and Jahn-Teller mode activities are observed for Fe(P)(X) under Soret resonance conditions. The DFT-calculated low-frequency (20-400 cm-1) modes, and their frequency shifts upon halide substitution, are in good agreement with experimental Raman and coherence data, so that mode assignments can be made. The doming mode is located at ~80 cm-1 for Fe(P)(Cl) and at ~60 cm-1 for Fe(P)(Br). NP4 is also studied with coherence techniques, and the NO-bound species of ferric and ferrous NP4 display a mode at ~30-40 cm-1 that is associated with transient heme doming motion following NO photolysis. The coherence spectra of three ferric derivatives of NP4 with different degrees of heme ruffling distortion are also investigated. We find a mode at ~60 cm-1 whose relative intensity in the coherence spectra depends quadratically on the magnitude of the ruffling distortion. To quantitatively account for this correlation, a new “distortion-induced” Raman enhancement mechanism is presented. This mechanism is unique to low-frequency “soft modes” of the molecular framework that can be distorted by environmental forces. These results demonstrate the potential of FCS as a sensitive probe of dynamic and functionally important nonplanar heme vibrational excitations that are induced by the protein environmental forces or by the chemical reactions in the aqueous phase. PMID:18597456

  3. LANSCE beam current limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1996-06-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the Beam Current Limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beam line below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described.

  4. Active metamaterial: Gain and stability, and microfluidic chip for THz cell spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qi

    Metamaterials are artificially designed composite materials which can exhibit unique and unusual properties such as the negative refractive index, negative phase velocity, etc. The concept of metamaterials becomes prevalent in the electromagnetic society since the first experimental implementation in the early 2000s. Many fascinated potential applications, e.g. super lens, invisibility cloaking, and novel antennas that are electrically small, have been proposed based on metamaterials. However, most of the applications still remain in theory and are not suitable for practical applications mainly due to the intrinsic loss and narrow bandwidth (large dispersion) determined by the fundamental physics of metamaterials. In this dissertation, we incorporate active gain devices into conventional passive metamaterials to overcome loss and even provide gain. Two types of active gain negative refractive index metamaterials are proposed, designed and experimentally demonstrated, including an active composite left-/right-handed transmission line and an active volumetric metamaterial. In addition, we investigate the non-Foster circuits for broadband matching of electrically small antennas. A rigorous way of analyzing the stability of non-Foster circuits by normalized determinant function is proposed. We study the practical factors that may affect the stability of non-Foster circuits, including the device parasitics, DC biasing, layouts and load impedance. A stable floating negative capacitor is designed, fabricated and tested. Moreover, it is important to resolve the sign of refractive index for active gain media which can be quite challenging. We investigate the analytical solution of a gain slab system, and apply the Nyquist criterion to analyze the stability of a causal gain medium. We then emphasize that the result of frequency domain simulation has to be treated with care. Lastly, this dissertation discusses another interesting topic about THz spectroscopy of live cells

  5. How gamma-rays and electron-beam irradiation would affect the antimicrobial activity of differently processed wild mushroom extracts?

    PubMed

    Alves, M J; Fernandes, Â; Barreira, J C M; Lourenço, I; Fernandes, D; Moura, A; Ribeiro, A R; Salgado, J; Antonio, A; Ferreira, I C F R

    2015-03-01

    The effects of irradiation (gamma-rays and electron-beams), up to 10 kGy, in the antimicrobial activity of mushroom species (Boletus edulis, Hydnum repandum, Macrolepiota procera and Russula delica) differently processed (fresh, dried, freeze) were evaluated. Clinical isolates with different resistance profiles from hospitalized patients in Local Health Unit of Mirandela, Northeast of Portugal, were used as target micro-organisms. The mushrooms antimicrobial activity did not suffer significant changes that might compromise applying irradiation as a possible mushroom conservation technology. Two kGy dose (independently of using gamma-rays or electron-beams) seemed to be the most suitable choice to irradiate mushrooms. This study provides important results in antimicrobial activity of extracts prepared from irradiated mushroom species. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Quantitative determination of dimethicone in commercial tablets and capsules by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and antifoaming activity test.

    PubMed

    Torrado, G; García-Arieta, A; de los Ríos, F; Menéndez, J C; Torrado, S

    1999-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and antifoaming activity test have been employed for the quantitative analysis of dimethicone. Linearity, accuracy and precision are presented for both methods. These methods have been also used to compare different dimethicone-containing proprietary medicines. FTIR spectroscopy has shown to be adequate for quantitation of dimethicone in commercial tablets and capsules in order to comply with USP requirements. The antifoaming activity test is able to detect incompatibilities between dimethicone and other constituents. The presence of certain enzymes in some medicinal products increases the defoaming properties of these formulations.

  7. Analytical optimization of active bandwidth and quality factor for TOCSY experiments in NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Coote, Paul; Bermel, Wolfgang; Wagner, Gerhard; Arthanari, Haribabu

    2016-09-01

    Active bandwidth and global quality factor are the two main metrics used to quantitatively compare the performance of TOCSY mixing sequences. Active bandwidth refers to the spectral region over which at least 50 % of the magnetization is transferred via a coupling. Global quality factor scores mixing sequences according to the worst-case transfer over a range of possible mixing times and chemical shifts. Both metrics reward high transfer efficiency away from the main diagonal of a two-dimensional spectrum. They can therefore be used to design mixing sequences that will function favorably in experiments. Here, we develop optimization methods tailored to these two metrics, including precise control of off-diagonal cross peak buildup rates. These methods produce square shaped transfer efficiency profiles, directly matching the desirable properties that the metrics are intended to measure. The optimization methods are analytical, rather than numerical. The two resultant shaped pulses have significantly higher active bandwidth and quality factor, respectively, than all other known sequences. They are therefore highly suitable for use in NMR spectroscopy. We include experimental verification of these improved waveforms on small molecule and protein samples.

  8. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of four active galaxies - Probing the intercloud medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, Kenneth S. K.; Canizares, Claude R.; Markert, Thomas H.; Arnaud, Keith A.

    1990-01-01

    The focal plane crystal spectrometer (FPCS) on the Einstein Observatory has been used to perform a high-resolution spectroscopic search for oxygen X-ray line emission from four active galaxies: Fairall 9, Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and PKS 0548 - 322. Specifically, O VIII Ly-alpha and Ly-beta, whose unredshifted energies are 653 and 775 eV, respectively, were sought. No narrow-line emission was detected within the energy bands searched. Upper limits are calculated on the line flux from these sources of 30 eV equivalent width and use a photoionization model to place corresponding upper limits on the densities of diffuse gas surrounding the active nuclei. The upper limits on gas density range from about 0.02-50/cu cm and probe various radial distances from the central source. This is the first time high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy has been used to place constraints on the intercloud medium in active galaxies.

  9. Brain activity during the flow experience: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazuki; Sawamura, Daisuke; Inagaki, Yuji; Ogawa, Keita; Ikoma, Katsunori; Sakai, Shinya

    2014-06-24

    Flow is the holistic experience felt when an individual acts with total involvement. Although flow is likely associated with many functions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), such as attention, emotion, and reward processing, no study has directly investigated the activity of the PFC during flow. The objective of this study was to examine activity in the PFC during the flow state using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Twenty right-handed university students performed a video game task under conditions designed to induce psychological states of flow and boredom. During each task and when completing the flow state scale for occupational tasks, change in oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) concentration in frontal brain regions was measured using fNIRS. During the flow condition, oxy-Hb concentration was significantly increased in the right and left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. Oxy-Hb concentration tended to decrease in the boredom condition. There was a significant increase in oxy-Hb concentration in the right and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right and left frontal pole areas, and left ventrolateral PFC when participants were completing the flow state scale after performing the task in the flow condition. In conclusion, flow is associated with activity of the PFC, and may therefore be associated with functions such as cognition, emotion, maintenance of internal goals, and reward processing.

  10. Simultaneous measurement of neuronal activity and cortical hemodynamics by unshielded magnetoencephalography and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yusuke; Miyashita, Tsuyoshi; Kandori, Akihiko; Maki, Atsushi; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2012-10-01

    The correlation between neuronal activity and cortical hemodynamics, namely, neurovascular coupling (NVC), is important to shed light on the mechanism of a variety of brain functions or neuronal diseases. NVC can be studied by simultaneously measuring neuronal activity and cortical hemodynamics. Consequently, noninvasive measurements of the NVC have been widely studied using both electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, electromagnetic interference between EEG and fMRI is still a major problem. On the other hand, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is another promising tool for detecting cortical hemodynamics because it can be combined with EEG or magnetoencephalography (MEG) without any electromagnetic interference. Accordingly, in the present study, a simultaneous measurement system-combining an unshielded MEG using a two-dimensional gradiometer based on a low-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and an NIRS using nonmagnetic thin probes-was developed. This combined system was used to simultaneously measure both an auditory-evoked magnetic field and blood flow change in the auditory cortex. It was experimentally demonstrated that the combined unshielded MEG/NIRS system can simultaneously measure neuronal activity and cortical hemodynamics.

  11. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy based Neurofeedback of Prefrontal Cortex Activity: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Beatrix; Strehl, Ute; Fallgatter, Andreas J.; Ehlis, Ann-Christine

    2016-01-01

    Neurofeedback is a promising tool for treatment and rehabilitation of several patient groups. In this proof of principle study, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) based neurofeedback of frontal cortical areas was investigated in healthy adults. Main aims were the assessment of learning, the effects on performance in a working memory (n-back) task and the impact of applied strategies on regulation. 13 healthy participants underwent eight sessions of NIRS based neurofeedback within 2 weeks to learn to voluntarily up-regulate hemodynamic activity in prefrontal areas. An n-back task in pre-/post measurements was used to monitor neurocognitive changes. Mean oxygenated hemoglobin (O2Hb) amplitudes over the course of the sessions as well as during the n-back task were evaluated. 12 out of 13 participants were able to regulate their frontal hemodynamic response via NIRS neurofeedback. However, no systematic learning effects were observed in frontal O2Hb amplitudes over the training course in our healthy sample. We found an impact of applied strategies in only 5 out of 13 subjects. Regarding the n-back task, neurofeedback appeared to induce more focused and specific brain activation compared to pre-training measurement. NIRS based neurofeedback is a feasible and potentially effective method, with an impact on activation patterns in a working memory task. Ceiling effects might explain the lack of a systematic learning pattern in healthy subjects. Clinical studies are needed to show effects in patients exhibiting pathological deviations in prefrontal function. PMID:28018199

  12. Simultaneous measurement of neuronal activity and cortical hemodynamics by unshielded magnetoencephalography and near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Yusuke; Miyashita, Tsuyoshi; Kandori, Akihiko; Maki, Atsushi; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2012-10-01

    The correlation between neuronal activity and cortical hemodynamics, namely, neurovascular coupling (NVC), is important to shed light on the mechanism of a variety of brain functions or neuronal diseases. NVC can be studied by simultaneously measuring neuronal activity and cortical hemodynamics. Consequently, noninvasive measurements of the NVC have been widely studied using both electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, electromagnetic interference between EEG and fMRI is still a major problem. On the other hand, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is another promising tool for detecting cortical hemodynamics because it can be combined with EEG or magnetoencephalography (MEG) without any electromagnetic interference. Accordingly, in the present study, a simultaneous measurement system-combining an unshielded MEG using a two-dimensional gradiometer based on a low-T superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and an NIRS using nonmagnetic thin probes-was developed. This combined system was used to simultaneously measure both an auditory-evoked magnetic field and blood flow change in the auditory cortex. It was experimentally demonstrated that the combined unshielded MEG/NIRS system can simultaneously measure neuronal activity and cortical hemodynamics.

  13. Analytical optimization of active bandwidth and quality factor for TOCSY experiments in NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Coote, Paul; Bermel, Wolfgang; Wagner, Gerhard; Arthanari, Haribabu

    2016-01-01

    Active bandwidth and global quality factor are the two main metrics used to quantitatively compare the performance of TOCSY mixing sequences. Active bandwidth refers to the spectral region over which at least 50% of the magnetization is transferred via a coupling. Global quality factor scores mixing sequences according to the worst-case transfer over a range of possible mixing times and chemical shifts. Both metrics reward high transfer efficiency away from the main diagonal of a two-dimensional spectrum. They can therefore be used to design mixing sequences that will function favorably in experiments. Here, we develop optimization methods tailored to these two metrics, including precise control of off-diagonal cross peak buildup rates. These methods produce square shaped transfer efficiency profiles, directly matching the desirable properties that the metrics are intended to measure. The optimization methods are analytical, rather than numerical. The two resultant shaped pulses have significantly higher active bandwidth and quality factor, respectively, than all other known sequences. They are therefore highly suitable for use in NMR spectroscopy. We include experimental verification of these improved waveforms on small molecule and protein samples. PMID:27515670

  14. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of four active galaxies - Probing the intercloud medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lum, Kenneth S. K.; Canizares, Claude R.; Markert, Thomas H.; Arnaud, Keith A.

    1990-07-01

    The focal plane crystal spectrometer (FPCS) on the Einstein Observatory has been used to perform a high-resolution spectroscopic search for oxygen X-ray line emission from four active galaxies: Fairall 9, Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and PKS 0548 - 322. Specifically, O VIII Ly-alpha and Ly-beta, whose unredshifted energies are 653 and 775 eV, respectively, were sought. No narrow-line emission was detected within the energy bands searched. Upper limits are calculated on the line flux from these sources of 30 eV equivalent width and use a photoionization model to place corresponding upper limits on the densities of diffuse gas surrounding the active nuclei. The upper limits on gas density range from about 0.02-50/cu cm and probe various radial distances from the central source. This is the first time high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy has been used to place constraints on the intercloud medium in active galaxies.

  15. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates a major conformational rearrangement in the activation of rhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Quintana, D; Francesch, A; Garriga, P; de Lera, A R; Padrós, E; Manyosa, J

    1995-01-01

    The study of the structural differences between rhodopsin and its active form (metarhodopsin II) has been carried out by means of deconvolution analysis of infrared spectra. Deconvolution techniques allow the direct identification of the spectral changes that have occurred, which results in a significantly different view of the conformational changes occurring after activation of the receptor as compared with previous difference spectroscopy analysis. Thus, a number of changes in the bands assigned to solvent-exposed domains of the receptor are detected, indicating significant decreases in extended (beta) sequences and in reverse turns, and increases in irregular/aperiodic sequences and in helices with a non-alpha geometry, whereas there is no decrease in alpha-helices. In addition to secondary structure conversions, qualitative alterations within a given secondary structure type are detected. These are seen to occur in both reverse turns and helices. The nature of this spectral change is of great importance, since a clear alteration in the helices bundle core is detected. All these changes indicate that the rhodopsin --> metarhodopsin II transition involves not a minor but a major conformational rearrangement, reconciling the infrared data with the energetics of the activation process. PMID:8519961

  16. Apparatus and process for active pulse intensity control of laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1992-01-01

    An optically controlled laser pulse energy control apparatus and process is disclosed wherein variations in the energy of a portion of the laser beam are used to vary the resistance of a photodetector such as a photoresistor through which a control voltage is fed to a light intensity controlling device through which a second portion of the laser beam passes. Light attenuation means are provided to vary the intensity of the laser light used to control the resistance of the photodetector. An optical delay path is provided through which the second portion of the beam travels before reaching the light intensity controlling device. The control voltage is supplied by a variable power supply. The apparatus may be tuned to properly attenuate the laser beam passing through the intensity controlling device by adjusting the power supply, the optical delay path, or the light attenuating means.

  17. Sensitive monitoring of photocarrier densities in the active layer of a photovoltaic device with time-resolved terahertz reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Genki; Matsubara, Eiichi; Nagai, Masaya; Kim, Changsu; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko; Ashida, Masaaki

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate the sensitive measurement of photocarriers in an active layer of a GaAs-based photovoltaic device using time-resolved terahertz reflection spectroscopy. We found that the reflection dip caused by Fabry-Pérot interference is strongly affected by the carrier profile in the active layer of the p-i-n structure. The experimental results show that this method is suitable for quantitative evaluation of carrier dynamics in active layers of solar cells under operating conditions.

  18. Zeolite-supported Ni and Mo catalysts for hydrotreatments. 1: Catalytic activity and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D. |; Nishijima, A.; Morris, D.E.

    1999-03-10

    The catalytic hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT) and hydrocracking (HC) of decalin, tetralin, and diphenylmethan (DMP) over Ni-Mo sulfide catalysts supported on ultrastable Y-type (USY) zeolite have been studied. The catalysts are characterized using NH{sub 3} temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), and Na and Al K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). Ni-Mo sulfide catalyst supported on USY zeolite has an unusually high catalytic activity for the hydrotreating reactions of the model compounds compared with other zeolites and their supported catalysts. NH{sub 3} TPD shows the presence of a strong acid site at about 430 C in USY zeolite and its supported Ni-Mo catalyst, which is dominantly characterized by Broensted acidity. The surface concentrations of Ni and Mo in both calcined and sulfided Ni-Mo/USY zeolite catalysts are very low, indicating that the Ni and Mo phases are present in the crystal structure of USY zeolite. The diffuse reflectance spectra of calcined Ni-Mo/USY catalyst show that Mo is dominantly four-coordinate with oxygen and Ni is six-coordinate, consistent with the Ni and MO species being present in the crystal structure of USY zeolite. Al K-edge XANES spectra of calcined Ni-Mo/USY catalyst also indicate the presence of extra-framework Al, and the content of the extra-framework Al is much higher in Ni-Mo/USY than in Ni-Mo/NaY catalyst. However, there is no evidence that the extra-framework Al contributes to the acidity and the increased catalytic activity. Thus, the high catalytic HDS and HC activities of Ni-Mo/USY compared with other zeolites and their supported Ni-Mo catalysts are attributed to the synergistic effect between the strong Broensted acid sites and the Ni and Mo sulfide phases in the sodalite cage and/or supercage of USY zeolite.

  19. Quality and accuracy of cone beam computed tomography gated by active breathing control

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Bria P.; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2008-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality and accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) gated by active breathing control (ABC), which may be useful for image guidance in the presence of respiration. Comparisons were made between conventional ABC-CBCT (stop and go), fast ABC-CBCT (a method to speed up the acquisition by slowing the gantry instead of stopping during free breathing), and free breathing respiration correlated CBCT. Image quality was assessed in phantom. Accuracy of reconstructed voxel intensity, uniformity, and root mean square error were evaluated. Registration accuracy (bony and soft tissue) was quantified with both an anthropomorphic and a quality assurance phantom. Gantry angle accuracy was measured with respect to gantry speed modulation. Conventional ABC-CBCT scan time ranged from 2.3 to 5.8 min. Fast ABC-CBCT scan time ranged from 1.4 to 1.8 min, and respiratory correlated CBCT scans took 2.1 min to complete. Voxel intensity value for ABC gated scans was accurate relative to a normal clinical scan with all projections. Uniformity and root mean square error performance degraded as the number of projections used in the reconstruction of the fast ABC-CBCT scans decreased (shortest breath hold, longest free breathing segment). Registration accuracy for small, large, and rotational corrections was within 1 mm and 1 degree sign . Gantry angle accuracy was within 1 degree sign for all scans. For high-contrast targets, performance for image-guidance purposes was similar for fast and conventional ABC-CBCT scans and respiration correlated CBCT.

  20. Quality and accuracy of cone beam computed tomography gated by active breathing control.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Bria P; Hugo, Geoffrey D

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality and accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) gated by active breathing control (ABC), which may be useful for image guidance in the presence of respiration. Comparisons were made between conventional ABC-CBCT (stop and go), fast ABC-CBCT (a method to speed up the acquisition by slowing the gantry instead of stopping during free breathing), and free breathing respiration correlated CBCT. Image quality was assessed in phantom. Accuracy of reconstructed voxel intensity, uniformity, and root mean square error were evaluated. Registration accuracy (bony and soft tissue) was quantified with both an anthropomorphic and a quality assurance phantom. Gantry angle accuracy was measured with respect to gantry speed modulation. Conventional ABC-CBCT scan time ranged from 2.3 to 5.8 min. Fast ABC-CBCT scan time ranged from 1.4 to 1.8 min, and respiratory correlated CBCT scans took 2.1 min to complete. Voxel intensity value for ABC gated scans was accurate relative to a normal clinical scan with all projections. Uniformity and root mean square error performance degraded as the number of projections used in the reconstruction of the fast ABC-CBCT scans decreased (shortest breath hold, longest free breathing segment). Registration accuracy for small, large, and rotational corrections was within 1 mm and 1 degrees. Gantry angle accuracy was within 1 degrees for all scans. For high-contrast targets, performance for image-guidance purposes was similar for fast and conventional ABC-CBCT scans and respiration correlated CBCT.