Science.gov

Sample records for active boundary zone

  1. 78 FR 15883 - Standard Time Zone Boundaries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... Office of the Secretary 49 CFR Part 71 RIN 2105-AE20 Standard Time Zone Boundaries AGENCY: Office of the... and amends the Department's standard time zone boundaries regulations to reflect changes that Congress made to the Uniform Time Act. The purpose of this update is to ensure that the Department's...

  2. Linking mantle dynamics, plate tectonics and surface processes in the active plate boundary zones of eastern New Guinea (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, S.; Moucha, R.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Hoke, G. D.; Bermudez, M. A.; Webb, L. E.; Braun, J.; Rowley, D. B.; Insel, N.; Abers, G. A.; Wallace, L. M.; Vervoort, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Eastern New Guinea lies within the rapidly obliquely converging Australian (AUS)- Pacific (PAC) plate boundary zone and is characterized by transient plate boundaries, rapidly rotating microplates and a globally significant geoid high. As the AUS plate moved northward in the Cenozoic, its leading edge has been a zone of subduction and arc accretion. The variety of tectonic settings in this region permits assessment of the complex interplay among mantle dynamics, plate tectonics, and surface processes. Importantly, the timescale of tectonic events (e.g., subduction, (U)HP exhumation, seafloor spreading) are within the valid bounds of mantle convection models. A record of changes in bathymetry and topography are preserved in high standing mountain belts, exhumed extensional gneiss domes and core complexes, uplifted coral terraces, and marine sedimentary basins. Global seismic tomography models indicate accumulation of subducted slabs beneath eastern New Guinea at the bottom of the upper mantle (i.e., <660km depth). Some of the deeply subducted material may indeed be buoyant subducted AUS continental margin (to depths of ~250-300 km), as well as subducted continental material that has reached the point of no return (i.e., > 250-300 km). Preliminary global-scale backward advected mantle convection models, driven by density inferred from joint seismic-geodynamic tomography models, exhibit large-scale flow associated with these subducted slab remnants and predict the timing and magnitude (up to 1500 m) of dynamic topography change (both subsidence and uplift) since the Oligocene. In this talk we will explore the effects of large-scale background mantle flow and plate tectonics on the evolution of topography and bathymetry in eastern New Guinea, and discuss possible mechanisms to explain basin subsidence and surface uplift in the region.

  3. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  4. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  5. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  6. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones. (a... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  7. Owen Fracture Zone: The Arabia-India plate boundary unveiled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, M.; Chamot-Rooke, N.; Rodriguez, M.; Huchon, P.; Petit, C.; Beslier, M. O.; Zaragosi, S.

    2011-02-01

    We surveyed the Owen Fracture Zone at the boundary between the Arabia and India plates in the NW Indian Ocean using a high-resolution multibeam echo-sounder (Owen cruise, 2009) for search of active faults. Bathymetric data reveal a previously unrecognized submarine fault scarp system running for over 800 km between the Sheba Ridge in the Gulf of Aden and the Makran subduction zone. The primary plate boundary structure is not the bathymetrically high Owen Ridge, but is instead a series of clearly delineated strike-slip fault segments separated by several releasing and restraining bends. Despite an abundant sedimentary supply by the Indus River flowing from the Himalaya, fault scarps are not obscured by recent deposits and can be followed over hundreds of kilometres, pointing to very active tectonics. The total strike-slip displacement of the fault system is 10-12 km, indicating that it has been active for the past ~ 3 to 6 Ma if its current rate of motion of 3 ± 1 mm yr- 1 has remained stable. We describe the geometry of this recent fault system, including a major pull-apart basin at the latitude 20°N, and we show that it closely follows an arc of small circle centred on the Arabia-India pole of rotation, as expected for a transform plate boundary.

  8. Gradient zone boundary control in salt gradient solar ponds

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  9. Defining the Entrainment Zone in Stratocumulus-topped Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Zhou, M.; Kalogiros, J. A.; Lenschow, D. H.; Dai, C.; Wang, S.

    2010-12-01

    The presence of an entrainment zone near the top of the stratocumulus-topped boundary layers has been identified by many early studies. However, the definition of the entrainment zone was rather vague. We have examined the fine vertical variations of cloud liquid water content, wind, temperature and humidity near the stratocumulus top and developed a new method to identify the entrainment zone objectively. Aircraft measurements from various field projects in stratocumulus-topped boundary layers are used, taking advantage of the fast sampling capability of many of the aircraft sensors. Because of the inhomogeneous mixing of two air masses with distinctively different thermodynamic properties, the magnitude of temperature perturbations within the entrainment zone is significantly larger than those above or below. This characteristics is used to define the upper and lower boundaries of the entrainment zone using a wavelet spectra analyses. The definition of the entrainment zone is further evaluated by the presence of a linear mixing line through mixing line analyses. Various other interfaces at the cloud top are also examined, including the cloud interface, temperature interface (inversion), and moisture interface. The heights of these interfaces are examined relative to the height of the entrainment zone. This study also systematically revealed the presence of turbulence above the local cloud top and/or above the entrainment zone. Wind shear near the cloud top is one possible source that generated local turbulence. Other potential sources of turbulence will also be discussed.

  10. 49 CFR 71.7 - Boundary line between central and mountain zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Boundary line between central and mountain zones... BOUNDARIES § 71.7 Boundary line between central and mountain zones. (a) Montana-North Dakota. Beginning at... upon the zone boundary line described in this section are in the mountain standard time zone,...

  11. 49 CFR 71.9 - Boundary line between mountain and Pacific zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Boundary line between mountain and Pacific zones... BOUNDARIES § 71.9 Boundary line between mountain and Pacific zones. (a) Montana-Idaho-Oregon. From the... zone boundary line described in this section are in the mountain standard time zone....

  12. 49 CFR 71.9 - Boundary line between mountain and Pacific zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Boundary line between mountain and Pacific zones... BOUNDARIES § 71.9 Boundary line between mountain and Pacific zones. (a) Montana-Idaho-Oregon. From the... zone boundary line described in this section are in the mountain standard time zone....

  13. 49 CFR 71.7 - Boundary line between central and mountain zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Boundary line between central and mountain zones... BOUNDARIES § 71.7 Boundary line between central and mountain zones. (a) Montana-North Dakota. Beginning at... upon the zone boundary line described in this section are in the mountain standard time zone,...

  14. 49 CFR 71.9 - Boundary line between mountain and Pacific zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Boundary line between mountain and Pacific zones... BOUNDARIES § 71.9 Boundary line between mountain and Pacific zones. (a) Montana-Idaho-Oregon. From the... boundary line described in this section are in the mountain standard time zone....

  15. 49 CFR 71.9 - Boundary line between mountain and Pacific zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Boundary line between mountain and Pacific zones... BOUNDARIES § 71.9 Boundary line between mountain and Pacific zones. (a) Montana-Idaho-Oregon. From the... boundary line described in this section are in the mountain standard time zone....

  16. 49 CFR 71.7 - Boundary line between central and mountain zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Boundary line between central and mountain zones... BOUNDARIES § 71.7 Boundary line between central and mountain zones. (a) Montana-North Dakota. Beginning at... located upon the zone boundary line described in this section are in the mountain standard time...

  17. 49 CFR 71.9 - Boundary line between mountain and Pacific zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Boundary line between mountain and Pacific zones... BOUNDARIES § 71.9 Boundary line between mountain and Pacific zones. (a) Montana-Idaho-Oregon. From the... boundary line described in this section are in the mountain standard time zone....

  18. 49 CFR 71.7 - Boundary line between central and mountain zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Boundary line between central and mountain zones... BOUNDARIES § 71.7 Boundary line between central and mountain zones. (a) Montana-North Dakota. Beginning at... located upon the zone boundary line described in this section are in the mountain standard time...

  19. 49 CFR 71.7 - Boundary line between central and mountain zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Boundary line between central and mountain zones... BOUNDARIES § 71.7 Boundary line between central and mountain zones. (a) Montana-North Dakota. Beginning at... mountain standard time zone, except Murdo, S. Dak., which is in the central standard time zone....

  20. Time-domain edge-diffraction calculations near zone boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calamia, Paul T.; Svensson, U. Peter

    2005-09-01

    Time-domain edge-diffraction calculations are often used in studies of acoustic scattering from objects with rigid, simple-shaped surfaces, e.g., in computer simulations of room acoustics, noise-barrier performance, and radiation from loudspeakers. Many methods for such calculations are based on the Biot-Tolstoy solution, an explicit, continuous-time expression for diffraction by an infinite wedge. However, this expression contains two onset singularities which make numerical computations difficult: one which is present for all source-receiver combinations, and a second which occurs only when a receiver crosses a specular-zone or shadow-zone boundary, i.e., a boundary where a geometrical-acoustics component has a discontinuity. The former singularity was eliminated by Svensson et al. using a formulation in which the diffraction impulse response is expressed as a line integral along the diffracting edge [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 106, 2331 (1999)]. In this paper, the latter singularity is addressed with analytical approximations of the formulation developed by Svensson et al. These approximations allow for accurate numerical computations for receivers at or near zone boundaries, and maintain a continuous total sound field when combined with geometrical-acoustics components. The approximations will be presented, along with a demonstration of modeling software into which they have been integrated.

  1. Measuring Transient Signals in Plate Boundary Faults Zones with Strainmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, Kathleen; Mencin, Dave; Phillips, David; Henderson, Brent; Gottlieb, Mike; Gallaher, Warren; Johnson, Wade; Pyatt, Chad; Van Boskirk, Elizabeth; Fox, Otina; Mattioli, Glen; Meertens, Chuck

    2014-05-01

    One of the fundamental goals the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) funded Earthscope program was to provide a high-quality, continuous geodetic data set that would allow the scientific community to study the evolution of plate boundary zones. Of particular importance was enabling investigation of the role aseismic transient deformation plays in the release of accumulated stress. For example, to allow the comparison of the amount of strain released through Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events to that released in subduction zone earthquakes or, provide the ability to geodetically illuminate the kinematics of fault creep in strike-slip fault zones. The ability to easily integrate these measurements with compatible geophysical data sets was also an essential objective. With goals such as these in mind NSF funded the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) to record the continuous deformation field across the western US Plate Boundary. PBO, built and operated by UNAVCO, now consists of over 1100 GPS stations, 76 co-located borehole strain and seismic sites, 6 long baseline strainmeters, Depending on the scientific questions being addressed sites may also have tiltmeter, meteorological, pore pressure and meteorological instrumentation. This presentation will focus on the transient deformation signals recorded by the PBO strainmeter network. PBO strainmeters, which excel in recording signals on the order of nanostrain over hours, have provided unprecedented temporal resolution of aseismic transients such as ETS events in the Cascadia subduction zone, creep signals along the central section of the San Andreas fault system and tsunami generated strain waves. UNAVCO is responsible not only for the ongoing operation of PBO but also the generation of data products associated with each instrument type. In this presentation we will highlight some of the transient signals these instruments have captured, outline the processing steps required to extract these signals data and

  2. MOLA Topography of the Crustal Dichotomy Boundary Zone, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Herbert V.; E. H., Susan; H., James

    1998-01-01

    Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) profiles frequently cross the crustal dichotomy boundary where the transition zone (TZ) between cratered highland terrain (CT) and lowland smooth plains (SP) is marked by mesas and knobby terrain. The detailed topographic character of the boundary zone is longitudinally variable, as is the geomorphology of the TZ. Some portions of the boundary are associated with an outer ring of the Utopia impact basin; MOLA topography is consistent with this. The regional character of the boundary topography is a 2-4 km step function from nearly flat SP to almost as flat CT. This rise has a regional slope of 1-2 degrees, 50-100 times that of the Cr and SP away from TZ, which suggests a significant change in crustal properties (thickness, composition or both) across the TZ. The overall topography is very similar to that at some passive continent-oceanic crustal margins on the Earth, with the seafloor allowed to adjust upward after removal of the overlying water. A possible temporal constraint on the CT/SP elevation difference comes from two MOLA profiles which pass through two large (150 km diameter) craters located at the boundary in Aeolis. The N and S rims of the more degraded crater are at the same elevation; north of the N rim the topography drops by greater than 2 km to the floor of the TZ. This crater predates the elevation offset between CT and TZ floor. The better preserved crater (Gale) has a N rim 2 km lower than its S rim, and appears to have been emplaced on a pre-existing regional slope of about I degree. Gale probably post- dates the elevation difference between CT and TZ floor. Based on the stratigraphy of the units in which these craters are found, the elevation difference appears to have been in place in the Mid to Late Noachian.

  3. The dynamics of inner dead-zone boundaries in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latter, Henrik N.; Balbus, Steven

    2012-08-01

    In protoplanetary discs, the inner radial boundary between the MRI turbulent ('active') and MRI quiescent ('dead') zones plays an important role in models of the disc evolution and in some planet formation scenarios. In reality, this boundary is not well-defined: thermal heating from the star in a passive disc yields a transition radius close to the star (<0.1 au), whereas if the disc is already MRI active, it can self-consistently maintain the requisite temperatures out to a transition radius of roughly 1 au. Moreover, the interface may not be static; it may be highly fluctuating or else unstable. In this paper, we study a reduced model of the dynamics of the active/dead zone interface that mimics several important aspects of a real disc system. We find that MRI-transition fronts propagate inwards (a 'dead front' suppressing the MRI) if they are initially at the larger transition radius, or propagate outwards (an 'active front' igniting the MRI) if starting from the smaller transition radius. In both cases, the front stalls at a well-defined intermediate radius, where it remains in a quasi-static equilibrium. We propose that it is this new, intermediate stalling radius that functions as the true boundary between the active and dead zones in protoplanetary discs. These dynamics are likely implicated in observations of variable accretion, such as FU Ori outbursts, as well as in those planet formation theories that require the accumulation of solid material at the dead/active interface.

  4. Grey zone simulations of the morning convective boundary layer development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstathiou, G. A.; Beare, R. J.; Osborne, S.; Lock, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical simulations of two cases of morning boundary layer development are conducted to investigate the impact of grid resolution on mean profiles and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) partitioning from the large eddy simulation (LES) to the mesoscale limit. Idealized LES, using the 3-D Smagorinsky scheme, is shown to be capable of reproducing the boundary layer evolution when compared against measurements. However, increasing grid spacing results in the damping of resolved TKE and the production of superadiabatic temperature profiles in the boundary layer. Turbulence initiation is significantly delayed, exhibiting an abrupt onset at intermediate resolutions. Two approaches, the bounding of vertical diffusion coefficient and the blending of the 3-D Smagorinsky with a nonlocal 1D scheme, are used to model subgrid diffusion at grey zone resolutions. Simulations are compared against the coarse-grained fields from the validated LES results for each case. Both methods exhibit particular strengths and weaknesses, indicating the compromise that needs to be made currently in high-resolution numerical weather prediction. The blending scheme is able to reproduce the adiabatic profiles although turbulence is underestimated in favor of the parametrized heat flux, and the spin-up of TKE remains delayed. In contrast, the bounding approach gives an evolution of TKE that follows the coarse-grained LES very well, relying on the resolved motions for the nonlocal heat flux. However, bounding gives unrealistic static instability in the early morning temperature profiles (similar to the 3-D Smagorinsky scheme) because model dynamics are unable to resolve TKE when the boundary layer is too shallow compared to the grid spacing.

  5. Boundaries of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone shaped by coherent mesoscale dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettencourt, João H.; López, Cristóbal; Hernández-García, Emilio; Montes, Ivonne; Sudre, Joël; Dewitte, Boris; Paulmier, Aurélien; Garçon, Véronique

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved oxygen in sea water affects marine habitats and biogeochemical cycles. Oceanic zones with oxygen deficits represent 7% of the volume and 8% of the area of the oceans, and are thought to be expanding. One of the most pronounced lies in the region off Peru, where mesoscale activity in the form of fronts and eddies is strong. Here, we study the dynamics of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone in a Lagrangian framework, using a coupled physical-biogeochemical numerical model and finite-size Lyapunov exponent fields, to evaluate the role of mesoscale activity. We find that, at depths between 380 and 600 m, mesoscale structures have two distinct roles. First, their mean positions and paths delimit and maintain the oxygen minimum zone boundaries. Second, their high-frequency fluctuations inject oxygen across the oxygen minimum zone boundaries and eddy fluxes are one order of magnitude higher than mean oxygen fluxes. We conclude that these eddy fluxes contribute to the ventilation of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone.

  6. The memory of the accreting plate boundary and the continuity of fracture zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed aeromagnetic anomaly map of the Mesozoic seafloor-spreading lineations southwest of Bermuda reveals the dominant magnetic grain of the oceanic crust and the character of the accreting boundary at the time of crustal formation. The magnetic anomaly pattern is that of a series of elongate lobes perpendicular to the fracture zone (flowline) trends. The linear sets of magnetic anomaly peaks and troughs have narrow regions of reduced amplitude anomalies associated with the fracture zones. During the period of Mesozoic geomagnetic polarity reversals (when 1200 km of central North Atlantic seafloor formed), the Atlantic accreting boundary consisted of stationary, elongate, spreading center cells that maintained their independence even though sometimes only minor spatial offsets existed between cells. Normal oceanic crustal structure was formed in the spreading center cells, but structural anomalies and discontinuities characteristic of fracture zones were formed at their boundaries, which parallel flowlines of Mesozoic relative plate motion in the central North Atlantic. We suggest that the memory for a stationary pattern of independent spreading center cells resides in the young brittle lithosphere at the accreting boundary where the lithosphere is weakest; here, each spreading center cell independently goes through its cylce of stress buildup, stress release, and crustal accretion, after which its memory is refreshed. The temporal offset between the peaks of the accretionary activity that takes place within each cell may provide the mechanism for maintaining the independence of adjacent spreading center cells through times when no spatial offset between the cells exists.

  7. Grain boundary plane orientation fundamental zones and structure-property relationships

    DOE PAGES

    Homer, Eric R.; Patala, Srikanth; Priedeman, Jonathan L.

    2015-10-26

    Grain boundary plane orientation is a profoundly important determinant of character in polycrystalline materials that is not well understood. This work demonstrates how boundary plane orientation fundamental zones, which capture the natural crystallographic symmetries of a grain boundary, can be used to establish structure-property relationships. Using the fundamental zone representation, trends in computed energy, excess volume at the grain boundary, and temperature-dependent mobility naturally emerge and show a strong dependence on the boundary plane orientation. Analysis of common misorientation axes even suggests broader trends of grain boundary energy as a function of misorientation angle and plane orientation. Due to themore » strong structure-property relationships that naturally emerge from this work, boundary plane fundamental zones are expected to simplify analysis of both computational and experimental data. This standardized representation has the potential to significantly accelerate research in the topologically complex and vast five-dimensional phase space of grain boundaries.« less

  8. Grain boundary plane orientation fundamental zones and structure-property relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Homer, Eric R.; Patala, Srikanth; Priedeman, Jonathan L.

    2015-10-26

    Grain boundary plane orientation is a profoundly important determinant of character in polycrystalline materials that is not well understood. This work demonstrates how boundary plane orientation fundamental zones, which capture the natural crystallographic symmetries of a grain boundary, can be used to establish structure-property relationships. Using the fundamental zone representation, trends in computed energy, excess volume at the grain boundary, and temperature-dependent mobility naturally emerge and show a strong dependence on the boundary plane orientation. Analysis of common misorientation axes even suggests broader trends of grain boundary energy as a function of misorientation angle and plane orientation. Due to the strong structure-property relationships that naturally emerge from this work, boundary plane fundamental zones are expected to simplify analysis of both computational and experimental data. This standardized representation has the potential to significantly accelerate research in the topologically complex and vast five-dimensional phase space of grain boundaries.

  9. Grain Boundary Plane Orientation Fundamental Zones and Structure-Property Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Homer, Eric R.; Patala, Srikanth; Priedeman, Jonathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Grain boundary plane orientation is a profoundly important determinant of character in polycrystalline materials that is not well understood. This work demonstrates how boundary plane orientation fundamental zones, which capture the natural crystallographic symmetries of a grain boundary, can be used to establish structure-property relationships. Using the fundamental zone representation, trends in computed energy, excess volume at the grain boundary, and temperature-dependent mobility naturally emerge and show a strong dependence on the boundary plane orientation. Analysis of common misorientation axes even suggests broader trends of grain boundary energy as a function of misorientation angle and plane orientation. Due to the strong structure-property relationships that naturally emerge from this work, boundary plane fundamental zones are expected to simplify analysis of both computational and experimental data. This standardized representation has the potential to significantly accelerate research in the topologically complex and vast five-dimensional phase space of grain boundaries. PMID:26498715

  10. 77 FR 23425 - Revisions of Boundaries, Regulations and Zoning Scheme for Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 1 Revisions of Boundaries, Regulations and Zoning Scheme for Florida Keys... for Submerged Lands Within Boundaries of the Key West and Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuges... Zoning Scheme for Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary and Key West and Great White Heron...

  11. Joining the Great Plains in Space, Place, and Time: Questioning a Time Zone Boundary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuper, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Standard time zone boundaries are invisible in the landscape, yet they abruptly delineate a temporal difference of one hour between two large areas located relative to one another on Earth. In most cases, standard time zone boundaries follow political ones and define areas within which daylight saving time (DST)--the seasonal advancement of…

  12. Habitable Zone Boundaries: Implications for our Solar System and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasting, J. F.; Kopparapu, R.; Harman, C.; Batalha, N. E.; Haqq-Misra, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    The successful completion of NASA's Kepler Mission has led to renewed interest in the definition and boundaries of the circumstellar habitable zone (HZ), where liquid water can be stable on a planet's surface. Goldblatt et al. [1] showed that the runaway greenhouse effect, which defines the inner edge of the HZ, depends critically on absorption coefficients of H2O obtained from the new HITEMP database. Kopparapu et al. [2,3] followed up on this observation by recalculating HZ boundaries using HITEMP coefficients. This caused the inner edge to move out to 0.99 AU in their (fully saturated, cloud-free) 1-D climate model. Leconte et al. [4] then used a 3-D climate model to show that the inner edge moves back in to 0.95 AU when relative humidity and clouds are taken into account. In their model, however, the upper stratosphere remained cold and dry, making it difficult to explain how Venus lost its water. But Leconte et al. only looked at surface temperatures up to ~330 K. At somewhat higher surface temperatures (350 K), our own 1-D model predicts that the stratosphere should indeed become wet [5]. Towards the outer edge of the HZ, it now appears that planets should undergo limit cycles involving global glaciation, CO2 buildup from volcanism, and CO2 drawdown from weathering [6,7]. If supplemented with volcanic H2 [8], such cycles could explain how early Mars could have been cold much of the time and yet have experienced enough warm periods to carve the observed fluvial features. Results from a new model of this process will be discussed. Refs: 1. Goldblatt, C., Robinson, T. D., Zahnle, K. J., & Crisp, D. 2013, Nature Geoscience, 6, 661 2. Kopparapu, R. K., et al. 2013, Astrophysical Journal, 765 3. ---. 2013, Astrophysical Journal, 770 4. Leconte, J., Forget, F., Charnay, B., Wordsworth, R., & Pottier, A. 2013, Nature, 504, 268 5. Kasting, J. F., Chen, H., & Kopparapu, R. K. in prep., Ap J Lett 6. Kadoya, S., & Tajika, E. 2014, Astrophysical Journal, 790 7. Menou, K

  13. Multiscale Modeling of Grain-Boundary Fracture: Cohesive Zone Models Parameterized From Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Saether, Erik; Phillips, Dawn R.; Yamakov, Vesselin

    2006-01-01

    A multiscale modeling strategy is developed to study grain boundary fracture in polycrystalline aluminum. Atomistic simulation is used to model fundamental nanoscale deformation and fracture mechanisms and to develop a constitutive relationship for separation along a grain boundary interface. The nanoscale constitutive relationship is then parameterized within a cohesive zone model to represent variations in grain boundary properties. These variations arise from the presence of vacancies, intersticies, and other defects in addition to deviations in grain boundary angle from the baseline configuration considered in the molecular dynamics simulation. The parameterized cohesive zone models are then used to model grain boundaries within finite element analyses of aluminum polycrystals.

  14. Tectonic lineaments in the cenozoic volcanics of southern Guatemala: Evidence for a broad continental plate boundary zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltuck, M.; Dixon, T. H.

    1984-01-01

    The northern Caribbean plate boundary has been undergoing left lateral strike slip motion since middle Tertiary time. The western part of the boundary occurs in a complex tectonic zone in the continental crust of Guatemala and southernmost Mexico, along the Chixoy-Polochic, Motogua and possibly Jocotan-Chamelecon faults. Prominent lineaments visible in radar imagery in the Neogene volcanic belt of southern Guatemala and western El Salvador were mapped and interpreted to suggest southwest extensions of this already broad plate boundary zone. Because these extensions can be traced beneath Quaternary volcanic cover, it is thought that this newly mapped fault zone is active and is accommodating some of the strain related to motion between the North American and Caribbean plates. Onshore exposures of the Motoqua-Polochic fault systems are characterized by abundant, tectonically emplaced ultramafic rocks. A similar mode of emplacement for these off shore ultramafics, is suggested.

  15. Gradient zone-boundary control in salt-gradient solar ponds

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1982-09-29

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizeable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  16. 33 CFR 3.70-20 - Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

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  17. 33 CFR 3.70-20 - Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... this part. (b) Only for this part, the boundary between Activities Far East and Activities Europe... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Activities Far East Marine... ZONES Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 3.70-20 Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone....

  18. 33 CFR 3.70-20 - Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... this part. (b) Only for this part, the boundary between Activities Far East and Activities Europe... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Activities Far East Marine... ZONES Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 3.70-20 Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone....

  19. 33 CFR 3.70-20 - Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... this part. (b) Only for this part, the boundary between Activities Far East and Activities Europe... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Activities Far East Marine... ZONES Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 3.70-20 Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone....

  20. 33 CFR 3.70-20 - Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... this part. (b) Only for this part, the boundary between Activities Far East and Activities Europe... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Activities Far East Marine... ZONES Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 3.70-20 Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone....

  1. Immersed Boundary Simulations of Active Fluid Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Rhoda J.

    2016-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of active fluid droplets immersed in an external fluid in 2-dimensions using an Immersed Boundary method to simulate the fluid droplet interface as a Lagrangian mesh. We present results from two example systems, firstly an active isotropic fluid boundary consisting of particles that can bind and unbind from the interface and generate surface tension gradients through active contractility. Secondly, a droplet filled with an active polar fluid with homeotropic anchoring at the droplet interface. These two systems demonstrate spontaneous symmetry breaking and steady state dynamics resembling cell motility and division and show complex feedback mechanisms with minimal degrees of freedom. The simulations outlined here will be useful for quantifying the wide range of dynamics observable in these active systems and modelling the effects of confinement in a consistent and adaptable way. PMID:27606609

  2. Immersed Boundary Simulations of Active Fluid Droplets.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Carl A; Hawkins, Rhoda J

    2016-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of active fluid droplets immersed in an external fluid in 2-dimensions using an Immersed Boundary method to simulate the fluid droplet interface as a Lagrangian mesh. We present results from two example systems, firstly an active isotropic fluid boundary consisting of particles that can bind and unbind from the interface and generate surface tension gradients through active contractility. Secondly, a droplet filled with an active polar fluid with homeotropic anchoring at the droplet interface. These two systems demonstrate spontaneous symmetry breaking and steady state dynamics resembling cell motility and division and show complex feedback mechanisms with minimal degrees of freedom. The simulations outlined here will be useful for quantifying the wide range of dynamics observable in these active systems and modelling the effects of confinement in a consistent and adaptable way. PMID:27606609

  3. Surface plasmons at the Brillouin zone boundary of an oblique lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Constant, Thomas J. Vukusic, Pete; Hibbins, Alastair P.; Sambles, J. Roy

    2015-03-02

    In periodic systems of low-symmetry, the Bragg condition for the complete interference of waves along the contour of the Brillouin zone (BZ) boundary is not generally satisfied. As a result, band-gaps do not necessarily occur at this boundary. This letter demonstrates this experimentally by recording the iso-frequency contours for surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) supported on a diffraction grating with an underlying 2D oblique Bravias lattice. It is shown that these contours do not intersect the BZ boundary perpendicularly, as the symmetry operations of the lattice place no conditions on the surface wave interference at this boundary.

  4. The control of float zone interfaces by the use of selected boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, L. M.; Mcintosh, J.

    1983-01-01

    The main goal of the float zone crystal growth project of NASA's Materials Processing in Space Program is to thoroughly understand the molten zone/freezing crystal system and all the mechanisms that govern this system. The surface boundary conditions required to give flat float zone solid melt interfaces were studied and computed. The results provide float zone furnace designers with better methods for controlling solid melt interface shapes and for computing thermal profiles and gradients. Documentation and a user's guide were provided for the computer software.

  5. Late middle ( ) Miocene Segmentation of an Eocene-early Miocene carbonate megabank on the Northern Nicaragua Rise tied to the tectonic activity at the North America/Caribbean plate boundary zone

    SciTech Connect

    Droxler, A.; Cunningham, A. ); Hine, A.C.; Hallock, P.; Duncan, D. ); Rosencrantz, E.; Buffler, R. ); Robinson, E. )

    1993-02-01

    The Northern Nicaragua Rise (NNR) is comprised today of the eastern Honduras/Nicaragua and southern Jamaica carbonate shelves, and a series of relatively small detached carbonate banks (i.e., Pedro, Rosalind, Serranilla, Diriangen, and Bawika Banks) separated from each other by intervening basins and seaways. The NNR basins and seaways, because of their common north trending orientation, have been previously interpreted as Paleocene, Eocene, and possibly Oligocene rifts, becoming progressively younger from the eastern to the western part of NNR. Results from three recent (1988 and 1992) high resolution seismic surveys within these major seaways and basins, (1) Walton Basin, (2) Pedro Channel, and (3) seaways and Serranilla Basin on the western side of the NNR, show that the present bank and basin configuration evolved from a once continuous megabank that covered the entire length of the NNR, including the Island of Jamaica from Eocene through early Miocene times. In the late middle ( ) Miocene, this megabank progressively broke up into a series of smaller banks, basins and seaways, mainly as the result of tectonic movements related to the overall strike-slip displacement within the North American and Caribbean Plate Boundary Zone of the Cayman Trough. At the same time (late middle Miocene), the most eastern portion of the megabank was uplifted and today forms most of central and south Jamaica. The timing of the megabank segmentation has tentatively been constrained by dating several blocks of shallow water limestone dredged from parts of the megabank outcropping on the sea floor of different seaways.

  6. Heat Transfer at the Reattachment Zone of Separated Laminar Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Paul M.; Viegas, John R.

    1961-01-01

    The flow and heat transfer are analyzed at the reattachment zone of two-dimensional separated laminar boundary layers. The fluid is considered to be flowing normal to the wall at reattachment. An approximate expression is derived for the heat transfer in the reattachment region and a calculated value is compared with an experimental measurement.

  7. Sensitivities to source-term parameters of emergency planning zone boundaries for waste management facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.J.

    1995-07-01

    This paper reviews the key parameters comprising airborne radiological and chemical release source terms, discusses the ranges over which values of these parameters occur for plausible but severe waste management facility accidents, and relates the concomitant sensitivities of emergency planning zone boundaries predicted on calculated distances to early severe health effects.

  8. Boundary control of a Timoshenko beam system with input dead-zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Meng, Tingting; Liu, Jin-Kun; Qin, Hui

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, boundary control is designed for a Timoshenko beam system with the input dead-zone. By the Hamilton's principle, the dynamics of the Timoshenko beam system is represented by a distributed parameter model with two partial differential equations and four ordinary differential equations. The bounded part is separated from the input dead-zone and then forms the disturbance-like term together with the boundary disturbance, which finally acts on the Timoshenko beam system. Boundary control, based on the Lyapunov's direct method, is proposed to ensure the Timoshenko beam converge into a small neighbourhood of zero, where stability of the system is also analysed. Besides, the existence and uniqueness of the solution of the Timoshenko beam system are proved. Simulations are provided to reveal the applicability and effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  9. Sub-layers inside the entrainment zone of a dry, shear-free convective boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Jade Rachele; Mellado, Juan Pedro

    2013-11-01

    The entrainment zone of a dry, shear-free convective boundary layer growing into a homogeneously stably-stratified fluid is studied using direct numerical simulation. Based on the self-similar analysis of the mean and variance buoyancy profiles, we identify two sub-layers within the entrainment zone, defined as the region of negative buoyancy flux: i) an upper sub-layer with a thickness comparable to the penetrative length scale based on the convective velocity and the buoyancy frequency of the free troposphere and ii) a lower sub-layer acting as a transition towards the mixed layer, with a thickness equal to a constant fraction of the boundary layer height. The capping region of the penetrative thermals belongs to the upper sub-layer of the entrainment zone, and the troughs between the penetrating thermals belong to the lower sub-layer of the entrainment zone. Correspondingly, different buoyancy scales are identified in the different regions; parametrizations thereof are provided and explained. This multiplicity of characteristic scales inside the entrainment zone helps to explain the uncertainty associated with previous analysis of entrainment zone properties and the difficulty to parametrize them based on a single length scale and a single buoyancy scale. Juelich Research Centre for the computing time.

  10. Representation of the grey zone of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honnert, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    Numerical weather prediction model forecasts at horizontal grid lengths in the range of 100 to 1 km are now possible. This range of scales is the "grey zone of turbulence". Previous studies, based on large-eddy simulation (LES) analysis from the MésoNH model, showed that some assumptions of some turbulence schemes on boundary-layer structures are not valid. Indeed, boundary-layer thermals are now partly resolved, and the subgrid remaining part of the thermals is possibly largely or completely absent from the model columns. First, some modifications of the equations of the shallow convection scheme have been tested in the MésoNH model and in an idealized version of the operational AROME model at resolutions coarser than 500 m. Secondly, although the turbulence is mainly vertical at mesoscale (> 2 km resolution), it is isotropic in LES (< 100 m resolution). It has been proved by LES analysis that, in convective boundary layers, the horizontal production of turbulence cannot be neglected at resolutions finer than half of the boundary-layer height. Thus, in the grey zone, fully unidirectional turbulence scheme should become tridirectional around 500 m resolution. At Météo-France, the dynamical turbulence is modelled by a K-gradient in LES as well as at mesoscale in both MésoNH and AROME, which needs mixing lengths in the formulation. Vertical and horizontal mixing lengths have been calculated from LES of neutral and convective cases at resolutions in the grey zone.

  11. Viscoelastic deformation near active plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Model deformations near the active plate boundaries of Western North America using space-based geodetic measurements as constraints are discussed. The first six months of this project were spent gaining familarity with space-based measurements, accessing the Crustal Dynamics Data Information Computer, and building time independent deformation models. The initial goal was to see how well the simplest elastic models can reproduce very long base interferometry (VLBI) baseline data. From the Crustal Dynamics Data Information Service, a total of 18 VLBI baselines are available which have been surveyed on four or more occasions. These data were fed into weighted and unweighted inversions to obtain baseline closure rates. Four of the better quality lines are illustrated. The deformation model assumes that the observed baseline rates result from a combination of rigid plate tectonic motions plus a component resulting from elastic strain build up due to a failure of the plate boundary to slip at the full plate tectonic rate. The elastic deformation resulting from the locked plate boundary is meant to portray interseismic strain accumulation. During and shortly after a large interplate earthquake, these strains are largely released, and points near the fault which were previously retarded suddenly catch up to the positions predicted by rigid plate models. Researchers judge the quality of fit by the sum squares of weighted residuals, termed total variance. The observed baseline closures have a total variance of 99 (cm/y)squared. When the RM2 velocities are assumed to model the data, the total variance increases to 154 (cm/y)squared.

  12. Presynaptic active zones in invertebrates and vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Frauke; Waites, Clarissa L; Garner, Craig C

    2015-08-01

    The regulated release of neurotransmitter occurs via the fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) at specialized regions of the presynaptic membrane called active zones (AZs). These regions are defined by a cytoskeletal matrix assembled at AZs (CAZ), which functions to direct SVs toward docking and fusion sites and supports their maturation into the readily releasable pool. In addition, CAZ proteins localize voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels at SV release sites, bringing the fusion machinery in close proximity to the calcium source. Proteins of the CAZ therefore ensure that vesicle fusion is temporally and spatially organized, allowing for the precise and reliable release of neurotransmitter. Importantly, AZs are highly dynamic structures, supporting presynaptic remodeling, changes in neurotransmitter release efficacy, and thus presynaptic forms of plasticity. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the study of active zones, highlighting how the CAZ molecularly defines sites of neurotransmitter release, endocytic zones, and the integrity of synapses.

  13. Presynaptic active zones in invertebrates and vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Frauke; Waites, Clarissa L; Garner, Craig C

    2015-01-01

    The regulated release of neurotransmitter occurs via the fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) at specialized regions of the presynaptic membrane called active zones (AZs). These regions are defined by a cytoskeletal matrix assembled at AZs (CAZ), which functions to direct SVs toward docking and fusion sites and supports their maturation into the readily releasable pool. In addition, CAZ proteins localize voltage-gated Ca2+ channels at SV release sites, bringing the fusion machinery in close proximity to the calcium source. Proteins of the CAZ therefore ensure that vesicle fusion is temporally and spatially organized, allowing for the precise and reliable release of neurotransmitter. Importantly, AZs are highly dynamic structures, supporting presynaptic remodeling, changes in neurotransmitter release efficacy, and thus presynaptic forms of plasticity. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the study of active zones, highlighting how the CAZ molecularly defines sites of neurotransmitter release, endocytic zones, and the integrity of synapses. PMID:26160654

  14. Asymptotics of the solution to a singularly perturbed elliptic problem with a three-zone boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloshapko, V. A.; Butuzov, V. F.

    2016-08-01

    For a singularly perturbed elliptic boundary value problem, an asymptotic expansion of the boundary-layer solution is constructed and justified in the case when the boundary layer consists of three zones with different behavior of the solution, which is caused by the multiplicity of the root of the degenerate equation.

  15. Virology Experts in the Boundary Zone Between Science, Policy and the Public: A Biographical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This article aims to open up the biographical black box of three experts working in the boundary zone between science, policy and public debate. A biographical-narrative approach is used to analyse the roles played by the virologists Albert Osterhaus, Roel Coutinho and Jaap Goudsmit in policy and public debate. These figures were among the few leading virologists visibly active in the Netherlands during the revival of infectious diseases in the 1980s. Osterhaus and Coutinho in particular are still the key figures today, as demonstrated during the outbreak of novel influenza A (H1N1). This article studies the various political and communicative challenges and dilemmas encountered by these three virologists, and discusses the way in which, strategically or not, they handled those challenges and dilemmas during the various stages of the field’s recent history. Important in this respect is their pursuit of a public role that is both effective and credible. We will conclude with a reflection on the H1N1 pandemic, and the historical and biographical ties between emerging governance arrangements and the experts involved in the development of such arrangements. PMID:20676213

  16. Detailed Seismic Velocity Structure of the Plate Boundary, Cascadia Subduction Zone, from Prestack Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, W.; Holbrook, W.; Tobin, H. J.; Keranen, K. M.; Everson, E.; Mallick, S.; Padhi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the geologic makeup of the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) has great importance for understanding seismic hazards in the coastal margin of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The Cascadia margin is a potential earthquake and tsunami threat to the many millions who live in the area, yet details of its structure and mechanics remain poorly understood. In particular, the character of the subduction interface is elusive due to the CSZ's relatively aseismic behavior and low seismic reflectivity, making imaging difficult for passive and active source methods, respectively. In July 2012 seismic data were acquired as a part of the COAST project, spanning the important transition from the Cascadia basin, across the deformation front, and into the accretionary wedge. This modern data, coupled with sophisticated pre-stack full waveform seismic inversion methods, allows us to create highly detailed velocity models. While still computationally expensive, current computing clusters can perform these inversions with enough lateral density to yield highly detailed velocity information in both the vertical and horizontal. Here we present pre-stack full waveform inversions of a seismic line from the center of the COAST survey offshore Washington state as a cross section of the velocity structure of the CSZ. This detailed velocity model is a necessary initial step toward a detailed porosity cross section to be used to determine the role of fluids in the CSZ. Using these new data we investigate the lateral variability in reflectivity of the subducting plate boundary reflection in terms of its seismic velocity.

  17. Boundaries steer the contraction of active gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuppler, Matthias; Keber, Felix C.; Kröger, Martin; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2016-10-01

    Cells set up contractile actin arrays to drive various shape changes and to exert forces to their environment. To understand their assembly process, we present here a reconstituted contractile system, comprising F-actin and myosin II filaments, where we can control the local activation of myosin by light. By stimulating different symmetries, we show that the force balancing at the boundaries determine the shape changes as well as the dynamics of the global contraction. Spatially anisotropic attachment of initially isotropic networks leads to a self-organization of highly aligned contractile fibres, being reminiscent of the order formation in muscles or stress fibres. The observed shape changes and dynamics are fully recovered by a minimal physical model.

  18. Boundaries steer the contraction of active gels

    PubMed Central

    Schuppler, Matthias; Keber, Felix C.; Kröger, Martin; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2016-01-01

    Cells set up contractile actin arrays to drive various shape changes and to exert forces to their environment. To understand their assembly process, we present here a reconstituted contractile system, comprising F-actin and myosin II filaments, where we can control the local activation of myosin by light. By stimulating different symmetries, we show that the force balancing at the boundaries determine the shape changes as well as the dynamics of the global contraction. Spatially anisotropic attachment of initially isotropic networks leads to a self-organization of highly aligned contractile fibres, being reminiscent of the order formation in muscles or stress fibres. The observed shape changes and dynamics are fully recovered by a minimal physical model. PMID:27739426

  19. Crustal deformation and volcanism at active plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geirsson, Halldor

    Most of Earth's volcanoes are located near active tectonic plate boundaries, where the tectonic plates move relative to each other resulting in deformation. Likewise, subsurface magma movement and pressure changes in magmatic systems can cause measurable deformation of the Earth's surface. The study of the shape of Earth and therefore studies of surface deformation is called geodesy. Modern geodetic techniques allow precise measurements (˜1 mm accuracy) of deformation of tectonic and magmatic systems. Because of the spatial correlation between tectonic boundaries and volcanism, the tectonic and volcanic deformation signals can become intertwined. Thus it is often important to study both tectonic and volcanic deformation processes simultaneously, when one is trying to study one of the systems individually. In this thesis, I present research on crustal deformation and magmatic processes at active plate boundaries. The study areas cover divergent and transform plate boundaries in south Iceland and convergent and transform plate boundaries in Central America, specifically Nicaragua and El Salvador. The study is composed of four main chapters: two of the chapters focus on the magma plumbing system of Hekla volcano, Iceland and the plate boundary in south Iceland; one chapter focuses on shallow controls of explosive volcanism at Telica volcano, Nicaragua; and the fourth chapter focuses on co- and post-seismic deformation from a Mw = 7.3 earthquake which occurred offshore El Salvador in 2012. Hekla volcano is located at the intersection of a transform zone and a rift zone in Iceland and thus is affected by a combination of shear and extensional strains, in addition to co-seismic and co-rifting deformation. The inter-eruptive deformation signal from Hekla is subtle, as observed by a decade (2000-2010) of GPS data in south Iceland. A simultaneous inversion of this data for parameters describing the geometry and source characteristics of the magma chamber at Hekla, and

  20. Extension and transtension in the plate boundary zone of the northeastern Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, R.C. ); Larue, D.K. )

    1991-03-01

    The authors propose that the Caribbean (Ca)-North American (NA) plate boundary zone (pbz) from the Puerto Rico Trench to the Venezuelan Basin from Mona Canyon east has been in left-transtension over the last 15-20 ma. A boundary-normal component of extension occurs throughout the pbz and is a principal cause of the Puerto Rico Trench. Such extension is due to WNW velocity of NA-Ca and the northward pullaway of NA from its S-dipping slab, which is below Puerto Rico. Strike slip motion may be taken up among terranes in the pbz by rigid CCW rotation and by oblique slip at their boundaries. Rotation of the largest terrane, Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands (PRVI), has caused such major structures as the Muertos thrust and Anegada Passage. The model implies NA-Ca velocity estimated from Cayman transforms is more accurate than that from slip vectors from seisms in the NA slab.

  1. ROSSBY WAVE INSTABILITY AT DEAD ZONE BOUNDARIES IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL RESISTIVE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL GLOBAL MODELS OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Lyra, Wladimir; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org

    2012-09-01

    It has been suggested that the transition between magnetorotationally active and dead zones in protoplanetary disks should be prone to the excitation of vortices via Rossby wave instability (RWI). However, the only numerical evidence for this has come from alpha disk models, where the magnetic field evolution is not followed, and the effect of turbulence is parameterized by Laplacian viscosity. We aim to establish the phenomenology of the flow in the transition in three-dimensional resistive-magnetohydrodynamical models. We model the transition by a sharp jump in resistivity, as expected in the inner dead zone boundary, using the PENCIL CODE to simulate the flow. We find that vortices are readily excited in the dead side of the transition. We measure the mass accretion rate finding similar levels of Reynolds stress at the dead and active zones, at the {alpha} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -2} level. The vortex sits in a pressure maximum and does not migrate, surviving until the end of the simulation. A pressure maximum in the active zone also triggers the RWI. The magnetized vortex that results should be disrupted by parasitical magneto-elliptic instabilities, yet it subsists in high resolution. This suggests that either the parasitic modes are still numerically damped or that the RWI supplies vorticity faster than they can destroy it. We conclude that the resistive transition between the active and dead zones in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, if sharp enough, can indeed excite vortices via RWI. Our results lend credence to previous works that relied on the alpha-disk approximation, and caution against the use of overly reduced azimuthal coverage on modeling this transition.

  2. Synaptic Vesicle Proteins and Active Zone Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Kittel, Robert J; Heckmann, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone (AZ). The complex molecular architecture of AZs mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of AZs vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct AZ states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the AZ. The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and AZ states, which has heretofore received little attention.

  3. Synaptic Vesicle Proteins and Active Zone Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kittel, Robert J.; Heckmann, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone (AZ). The complex molecular architecture of AZs mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of AZs vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct AZ states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the AZ. The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and AZ states, which has heretofore received little attention. PMID:27148040

  4. [Molecular mechanism at the presynaptic active zone].

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Toshihisa

    2011-07-01

    Our higher brain functions such as learning and memory, emotion, and consciousness depend on the precise regulation of complicated neural networks in the brain. Neurons communicate with each other through the synapse, which comprise 3 regions: the presynapse, synaptic cleft, and postsynapse. The active zone (AZ) beneath the presynaptic membrane is the principal site for Ca2+ -dependent neurotransmitter release: AZ is involved in determining the site for docking and synaptic vesicle fusion. Presently, the full molecular composition of AZ is unclear, but it is known to contain several AZ-specific proteins, including cytomatrix of the active zone-associated protein (CAST)/ERC2, ELKS, RIM1, Munc13-1, Piccolo/Aczonin, and Bassoon. CAST and ELKS are novel active zone proteins that directly bind to Rab3-interacting molecules (RIMs), Bassoon, and Piccolo, and are thought to play a role in neurotransmitter release by binding these to AZ proteins. In this review, current advances in studies on AZ structure and function have been summarized, and the focus is mainly on protein-protein interactions among the AZ proteins.

  5. The Evolution of Deformation-Induced Grain-Boundary Porosity and Dynamic Permeability in Crustal Fault Zones: Insights From the Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, K. M.; Toy, V.

    2015-12-01

    Fluids and minor phases have an important influence on the bulk rheology of a deforming rock mass, but they are not uniformly distributed at any scale within fault zones. Additionally, exhumed ductile shear zones show little interconnected porosity or static permeability, requiring a dynamic process at depth to allow fluids to access the deforming rock mass. It was recently recognized that reactive fluids interact with high-strain sites to generate cavities on quartz grain boundaries, increasing the grain-scale porosity and dynamic permeability of the rock and allowing for additional fluids to infiltrate the shear zone along interlinking cavities, stimulating further reaction and cavitation. Grain-boundary cavities and fine-grained secondary phases impede grain-boundary mobility and cause a transition in deformation mechanisms from grain-size insensitive dislocation creep to grain-size sensitive creep, which is recognized as a weakening mechanism that promotes strain localisation. At present, it is unclear how the distribution of grain-boundary pores within fault rocks reflects the bulk mineralogy and phase arrangement, which is a function of shear strain. We have used micro-computed x-ray tomography (μ-CT), SEM imaging, and EDS analyses to examine how the distribution of grain-boundary pores varies in relation to the arrangement of secondary phases in exhumed protomylonites, mylonites, and ultramylonites within the actively-deforming Alpine Fault zone, and in samples acquired from the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP). Additionally, EBSD is coupled with µ-CT and EDS analyses to characterise the evolution of microstructures in three dimensions across a finite strain gradient. Here we examine the relationship and competition between grain-boundary cavitation and microstructural processes during deformation in a high-strain shear zone, and discuss the implications of these grain-scale deformation processes on strain localisation and continental fault zone dynamics.

  6. Transport and separation of micron sized particles at isotachophoresis zone boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardt, Steffen; Goet, Gabriele; Baier, Tobias

    2010-11-01

    Conventionally, isotachophoresis (ITP) is used for the separation of ionic samples according to their electrophoretic mobilities. At the zone boundaries large gradients in concentration and electric field occur. These gradients may be utilized to transport and separate small particles, as we demonstrate experimentally. We show that polymer beads of 5 micron diameter dispersed in a high mobility leading electrolyte are picked up and carried along by an ITP zone boundary that is formed between a low mobility trailing electrolyte and the leading electrolyte. Additionally, it is shown that different types of beads can be separated in that way. In particular, beads of 1 micron diameter are not carried along by the transition zone, so that a separation from 5 micron sized beads is feasible. We have identified two different effects that contribute to the force acting on the particles. Firstly, there is an electric dipole force due to the electric field gradient, secondly, a electro-hydrostatic force is generated that induces a pressure gradient. Therefore, the resulting protocol for particle separation bears some resemblance with dielectrophoresis that also utilizes electric dipole forces. An apparent advantage of our technique over dielectrophoresis lies in the fact that no microstructured electrodes or other types of microstructures are needed to create the electric field gradient.

  7. INSIDE-OUT PLANET FORMATION. III. PLANET–DISK INTERACTION AT THE DEAD ZONE INNER BOUNDARY

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiao; Tan, Jonathan C.; Chatterjee, Sourav; Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2016-01-01

    The Kepler mission has discovered more than 4000 exoplanet candidates. Many of them are in systems with tightly packed inner planets. Inside-out planet formation (IOPF) has been proposed as a scenario to explain these systems. It involves sequential in situ planet formation at the local pressure maximum of a retreating dead zone inner boundary (DZIB). Pebbles accumulate at this pressure trap, which builds up a pebble ring and then a planet. The planet is expected to grow in mass until it opens a gap, which helps to both truncate pebble accretion and also induce DZIB retreat that sets the location of formation of the next planet. This simple scenario may be modified if the planet undergoes significant migration from its formation location. Thus, planet–disk interactions play a crucial role in the IOPF scenario. Here we present numerical simulations that first assess the degree of migration for planets of various masses that are forming at the DZIB of an active accretion disk, where the effective viscosity is undergoing a rapid increase in the radially inward direction. We find that torques exerted on the planet by the disk tend to trap the planet at a location very close to the initial pressure maximum where it formed. We then study gap opening by these planets to assess at what mass a significant gap is created. Finally, we present a simple model for DZIB retreat due to penetration of X-rays from the star to the disk midplane. Overall, these simulations help to quantify both the mass scale of first (“Vulcan”) planet formation and the orbital separation to the location of second planet formation.

  8. Identification of a major segment boundary between two megathrust subduction zone earthquakes from aftershock seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobiesiak, M.; Victor, P.; Eggert, S.

    2009-04-01

    Aftershock seismicity is commonly used to characterize the extent of rupture planes of megathrust earthquakes. From unique datasets, covering the two adjacent fault planes of the Mw 8.0, 1995, Antofagasta and the Mw 7.7, 2007, Tocopilla earthquakes, we were able to identify a segment boundary (SB), located beneath Mejillones Peninsula. This segment boundary hosted the onset of the Antofagasta rupture and constituted the end of the Tocopilla rupture plane. The data recorded during the mission of the German Task Force for Earthquakes after the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake is supporting our observations regarding the northern part of the SB. 34 seismological stations registered the aftershocks from November 2007 until May 2008. First hypocenter determinations show that the aftershock sequences of both events meet along this E-W oriented segment boundary. The segment boundary is furthermore conformed by the historic record of megathrust events. Evidence for long term persistency of this SB comes from geological observations as differential uplift rates across the boundary and different fault patterns. Geomorpholocical analysis defines a topographic anomaly ~ 20 km wide and oriented along strike the SB..The main shock hypocenter determinations (NEIC, local network, ISC) which are related to the start of the rupture are all located in this zone. The SB is further characterized by intermediate b-values derived from a spatial b-value study of the Antofagasta fault plane and hosts several elongated clusters of aftershock seismicity. A detailed study of the focal mechanism solutions in one of these clusters showed a number of aligned strike slip events with one E-W striking nodal plane having a strike angle which is similar to the angle of subduction obliquity of the oceanic Nazca plate in this area. In further investigations we will search for detailed information on the nature and dynamics of processes along such a segment boundary, their meaning for the initiation of large

  9. A new mechanism for fluid migration in midcrustal shear zones based on viscous grain boundary sliding and creep cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusseis, F.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Liu, J.

    2009-04-01

    associated volume changes. Deformation, pore formation and growth dissipate a total power that is the time rate of the pressure work done by the granular fluid pump minus the time rate of the energy stored in the pore surface. If the rate of dissipation is maximized and constant, pore growth is stable. Note that this granular fluid pump relies on the opening and closing of pores and consequently describes a dynamic permeability. It should occur wherever viscous grain boundary sliding is active in shear zones with a free fluid phase. This is the case in many midcrustal shear zones that are either characterized by episodic cataclastic/mylonitic deformation (during the earthquake cycle) or by reaction softening associated with retrogression. The granular fluid pump provides comparatively steady, non-episodic fluid transfer and does not require pervasive fracturing. References: Fliervoet et al., 1997, JSG 19/12, 1495-1520, Fusseis et al., in review, Nature.

  10. Rheological structure of the lithosphere in plate boundary strike-slip fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzaras, Vasileios; Tikoff, Basil; Kruckenberg, Seth C.; Newman, Julie; Titus, Sarah J.; Withers, Anthony C.; Drury, Martyn R.

    2016-04-01

    How well constrained is the rheological structure of the lithosphere in plate boundary strike-slip fault systems? Further, how do lithospheric layers, with rheologically distinct behaviors, interact within the strike-slip fault zones? To address these questions, we present rheological observations from the mantle sections of two lithospheric-scale, strike-slip fault zones. Xenoliths from ˜40 km depth (970-1100 ° C) beneath the San Andreas fault system (SAF) provide critical constraints on the mechanical stratification of the lithosphere in this continental transform fault. Samples from the Bogota Peninsula shear zone (BPSZ, New Caledonia), which is an exhumed oceanic transform fault, provide insights on lateral variations in mantle strength and viscosity across the fault zone at a depth corresponding to deformation temperatures of ˜900 ° C. Olivine recrystallized grain size piezometry suggests that the shear stress in the SAF upper mantle is 5-9 MPa and in the BPSZ is 4-10 MPa. Thus, the mantle strength in both fault zones is comparable to the crustal strength (˜10 MPa) of seismogenic strike-slip faults in the SAF system. Across the BPSZ, shear stress increases from 4 MPa in the surrounding rocks to 10 MPa in the mylonites, which comprise the core of the shear zone. Further, the BPSZ is characterized by at least one order of magnitude difference in the viscosity between the mylonites (1018 Paṡs) and the surrounding rocks (1019 Paṡs). Mantle viscosity in both the BPSZ mylonites and the SAF (7.0ṡ1018-3.1ṡ1020 Paṡs) is relatively low. To explain our observations from these two strike-slip fault zones, we propose the "lithospheric feedback" model in which the upper crust and lithospheric mantle act together as an integrated system. Mantle flow controls displacement and the upper crust controls the stress magnitude in the system. Our stress data combined with data that are now available for the middle and lower crustal sections of other transcurrent fault

  11. 77 FR 55800 - Foreign-Trade Zone 242-Boundary County, ID; Application for Subzone AREVA Enrichment Services...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 242--Boundary County, ID; Application for Subzone AREVA Enrichment Services, LLC; Bonneville County, ID An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade...

  12. Deformation partitioning in transpressional shear zones with an along-strike stretch component: An example from the Superior Boundary Zone, Manitoba, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, Yvette D.; Lin, Shoufa; Jiang, Dazhi

    2011-03-01

    The partitioning of triclinic flow into domains of apparent monoclinic and apparent orthorhombic flow is described and discussed, using the Aiken River shear zone (ARSZ) as an example. The ARSZ is a 1-1.5 km wide east-west trending, dextral, north-side-up, mylonite zone, within the northern part of the Superior Province in Manitoba. It displays a high along-strike stretch (˜10), which is most likely indicative of an escape-tectonic setting. Although the central mylonite zone exhibits an apparent monoclinic fabric symmetry, the actual flow field was probably triclinic with a high simple shearing over pure shearing ratio, which resolves potential strain compatibility problems with neighbouring domains. The simple shearing-dominated zone is relatively narrow and has well-defined boundaries. An up to ˜20 km wide zone adjacent to the ARSZ shows an apparent orthorhombic fabric symmetry with shear zone boundary-parallel horizontal stretch and shear zone-orthogonal shortening. However, the actual flow may have been triclinic with a low simple shearing over pure shearing ratio. Either way, the pure shear component of the ARSZ is distributed over a much broader area than the simple shear component and has diffuse boundaries. This is consistent with simple shearing being a softening and pure shearing a hardening process.

  13. Adrenal activity in maned wolves is higher on farmlands and park boundaries than within protected areas.

    PubMed

    Spercoski, Katherinne M; Morais, Rosana N; Morato, Ronaldo G; de Paula, Rogério C; Azevedo, Fernanda C; May-Júnior, Joares A; Santos, Jean P; Reghelin, Angela L; Wildt, David E; Songsasen, Nucharin

    2012-11-01

    In this study we measured excreted fecal corticoid metabolites (FCM) in maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) living within a protected reserve, on farmlands or in a boundary zone between the two habitats, and determined the impacts of season and reproductive status on adrenal activity. Feces were collected within a national park (n=191 samples), a park boundary zone (n=39) and on nearby farmlands (n=27), processed and analyzed by enzyme immunoassay. FCM amounts from samples collected on farmlands were higher (P<0.05) than in those collected inside the reserve and from the boundary zone. In relation to seasonality, FCM were elevated (P<0.05) in spring (September-November) when wolf pairs were raising young. We then divided the samples collected during breeding season (March-August) into cycling females and male/non-cycling females based on fecal progesterone: fecal testosterone ratio. FCM concentrations of the former collected inside the park were higher than (P<0.05) than the latter group. However, there were no differences in FCM levels between the two groups for samples collected in the boundary zone and on farmlands. Furthermore, FCM concentrations of male/non-cycling females samples collected on farmlands were 2- to 5-fold higher (P<0.05) than in counterparts collected inside the park. The consistently high FCM concentrations in samples collected on farmlands indicate that, in addition to seasonality, gender and reproductive status, anthropogenic pressures also contribute to elevating adrenal steroid for individuals living in altered habitat.

  14. Air Flow Path Dynamics In The Vadose Zone Under Various Land Surface Climate Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illangasekare, T. H.; Sakaki, T.; Schulte, P. E.; Cihan, A.; Christ, J.

    2010-12-01

    Vapor intrusion (VI) refers to the transport of volatile chemical vapors from subsurface sources to surface and subsurface structures through the vadose zone. Because of the difference in pressure between the inside of the building and the subsurface soil pores, vapor can enter the building through cracks in the foundation, slab and walls and utility openings. The processes that govern the vapor transport in the heterogeneous subsurface “outside the home” are complex, and the sampling to assess potential pathways is subjected to spatial and temporal variability. Spatial variability is a result of a number of factors that include changing soil and soil moisture conditions. Temporal variability is a result of transient heat, wind, ambient pressure and a water flux boundary conditions at the land-atmospheric interface. Fluctuating water table conditions controlled by recharge, pumping, and stream-aquifer interactions will also contribute to the transient vapor flux generation at the sources. When the soil moisture changes as a result of precipitation events and other soil surface boundary conditions, the soil moisture content changes and hence the air permeability. Therefore, the primary pathways for the vapor are preferential channels that change with the transient soil moisture distribution. Both field and laboratory studies have shown that heterogeneity has a significant influence on soil moisture conditions in unsaturated soils. Uncertainties in vapor transport predictions have been attributed to heterogeneity and spatial variability in hydraulic properties. In this study, our goal was to determine the role of soil moisture variability on vapor transport and intrusion as affected by the climate driven boundary conditions on the land surface. A series of experiments were performed to generate a comprehensive data set to understand and evaluate how the spatial and temporal variability of soil moisture affected by the mass and heat flux boundary conditions on the

  15. Paleomagnetic constraints on Cenozoic deformation along the northwest margin of the Pacific-Australian plate boundary zone through New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Gillian M.; Michalk, Daniel M.; Little, Timothy A.

    2012-02-01

    New Zealand straddles the boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates, a zone of oblique continental convergence and transform motion. The actively deforming region offers a unique opportunity to study the dynamics of deformation, including vertical-axis rotation of rigid blocks within a transcurrent plate boundary zone. We present and interpret paleomagnetic data from three new and three previously published sites from the NW part of the South Island (NW Nelson region), where sedimentary strata dated between 36 and 10 Ma overlie the crystalline Paleozoic basement assemblages of the Gondwana margin. Compared with reference directions from the Australian apparent polar wander path, none of the results provide evidence of post-Eocene vertical-axis rotation. This suggests that for the past 36 Myr NW Nelson has remained a strong, coherent block that has moved as a contiguous part of the Australian plate. This is in marked contrast to the strongly rotated nature of more outboard accreted terranes to the east. For example, the Hikurangi Margin in the North Island (NW of the Alpine Fault) and the Marlborough region in the NE of the South Island (SE of the Alpine Fault), have both undergone diverse clockwise rotations of up to 140° since the early Paleogene. The NW tip of the South Island seems to have acted as a rigid backstop relative to these more complex oroclinal deformations. We infer that, because of its relatively stiff bulk rheology, it has not been drawn into the distributed plate boundary rotational deformation associated with the New Zealand Orocline.

  16. Boundary Breakers: A Team Building Guide for Student Activity Advisers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrader, John

    Boundary breakers, the modern term for "icebreakers," tear down barriers that sometimes form within student groups and organizations, and offer a low-risk way for group members to become better acquainted. This document is a "hands on" booklet that covers such boundary-breaking activities as "Send a Letter,""The Lap Game,""One-Minute Interview,"…

  17. Evolving seismogenic plate boundary megathrust and mega-splay faults in subduction zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, G.; Hamahashi, M.; Fukuchi, R.; Yamaguchi, A.; Kameda, J.; Kitamura, Y.; Hashimoto, Y.; Hamada, Y.; Saito, S.; Kawasaki, R.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the fault mechanism and its relationship to the sesimo-tsunamigenesis is a key of the scientific targets of subduction zone and therefore NantroSEIZE project of IODP and future new drilling project of International Ocean Discovery Program keeps focusing on that. Mega-splay fault branched from plate boundary megathrust in subduction zone is located around the border between outer and inner wedges and is considered to cause great earthquake and tsunami such as 1960 Alaska earthquake, 1944 and 1946 Nankai-Tonankai earthquakes, and 2004 Sumatra earthquakes. Seismic reflection studies for the mega-splay fault in 2D and 3D in the Nankai forearc present the reflector with negative or positive polarities with various amplitudes and suggest complicated petrophysical properties and condition of the fault and its surroundings. The Nankai mega-splay fault at a depth of ~5km is going to be drilled and cored by NantroSEIZE experiments and is expected for great progress of understanding of the fault mechanics. Before drilling the really targeted seismogenic fault, we are conducting many exercises of geophysical and geological observations. The core-log-seismic integrated exercise for the exhumed mega-splay fault by drilling was operated for the Nobeoka thrust in the Shimanto Belt, Kyushu, Japan. The Nobeoka thrust was once buried in the depth >~10km and suffered maximum temperature >~300 dgree C. As the core recovery is ~99%, perfect correlation between the core and logging data is possible. Thickness of the fault zone is >200 m with a ~50 cm thick central fault core dividing the phyllitic hanging wall and the footwall of broken-melange like cataclasite. A-few-meter-thick discrete damage zones with fault cores are recognized by difference in physical properties and visual deformation textures at several horizons in the fault zone. Host rocks for those damaged zones are completely lithified cataclasites with abundant mineral veins, which record the older and deeper

  18. Presynaptic Active Zone Density during Development and Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Gwenaëlle L; Chen, Jie; Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Neural circuits transmit information through synapses, and the efficiency of synaptic transmission is closely related to the density of presynaptic active zones, where synaptic vesicles are released. The goal of this review is to highlight recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that control the number of active zones per presynaptic terminal (active zone density) during developmental and stimulus-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy. At the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), the active zone density is preserved across species, remains constant during development, and is the same between synapses with different activities. However, the NMJ active zones are not always stable, as exemplified by the change in active zone density during acute experimental manipulation or as a result of aging. Therefore, a mechanism must exist to maintain its density. In the central nervous system (CNS), active zones have restricted maximal size, exist in multiple numbers in larger presynaptic terminals, and maintain a constant density during development. These findings suggest that active zone density in the CNS is also controlled. However, in contrast to the NMJ, active zone density in the CNS can also be increased, as observed in hippocampal synapses in response to synaptic plasticity. Although the numbers of known active zone proteins and protein interactions have increased, less is known about the mechanism that controls the number or spacing of active zones. The following molecules are known to control active zone density and will be discussed herein: extracellular matrix laminins and voltage-dependent calcium channels, amyloid precursor proteins, the small GTPase Rab3, an endocytosis mechanism including synaptojanin, cytoskeleton protein spectrins and β-adducin, and a presynaptic web including spectrins. The molecular mechanisms that organize the active zone density are just beginning to be elucidated.

  19. Life on the boundary: Environmental factors as drivers of habitat distribution in the littoral zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cefalì, Maria Elena; Cebrian, Emma; Chappuis, Eglantine; Pinedo, Susana; Terradas, Marc; Mariani, Simone; Ballesteros, Enric

    2016-04-01

    The boundary between land and sea, i.e. the littoral zone, is home to a large number of habitats whose distribution is primarily driven by the distance to the sea level but also by other environmental factors such as littoral's geomorphological features, wave exposure, water temperature or orientation. Here we explore the relative importance of those major environmental factors that drive the presence of littoral rocky habitats along 1100 Km of Catalonia's shoreline (Spain, NW Mediterranean) by using Geographic Information Systems and Generalized Linear Models. The distribution of mediolittoral and upper infralittoral habitats responded to different environmental factors. Mediolittoral habitats showed regional differences drawn by sea-water temperature and substrate type. Wave exposure (hydrodynamism), slope and geological features were only relevant to those mediolittoral habitats with specific environmental needs. We did not find any regional pattern of distribution in upper infralittoral habitats, and selected factors only played a moderate role in habitat distribution at the local scale. This study shows for the first time that environmental factors determining habitat distribution differ within the mediolittoral and the upper infralittoral zones and provides the basis for further development of models oriented at predicting the distribution of littoral marine habitats.

  20. Regeneration of the active zone at the frog neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The active zone is a unique specialization of the presynaptic membrane and is believed to be the site of transmitter release. The formation of the active zone and the relationship of this process to transmitter release were studied at reinnervated neuromuscular junctions in the frog. At different times after a nerve crush, the cutaneous pectoris muscles were examined with intracellular recording recording and freeze- fracture electron microscopy. The P face of a normal active zone typically consists of two double rows of particles lined up in a continuous segment located opposite a junctional fold. In the initial stage of reinnervation, clusters of large intramembrane particles surrounding membrane elevations appeared on the P face of nerve terminals. Like normal active zones, these clusters were aligned with junctional folds. Vesicle openings, which indicate transmitter release, were seen at these primitive active zones, even though intramembrane particles were not yet organized into the normal pattern of two double rows. The length of active zones at this stage was only approximately 15% of normal. During the secondary stage, every junction was reinnervated and most active zones had begun to organize into the normal pattern with normal orientation. Unlike normal, there were often two or more discontinuous short segments of active zone aligned with the same junctional fold. The total length of active zone per junctional fold increased to one-third of normal, mainly because of the greater number of segments. In the third stage, the number of active zone segments per junctional fold showed almost no change when compared with the secondary stage. However, individual segments elongated and increased the total length of all active zone segments per junctional fold to about two-thirds of the normal length. The dynamic process culminated in the final stage, during which elongating active zones appeared to join together and the number of active zone segments per

  1. Thinking and meddling with boundaries: Critical reflections on Matthew Weinstein's narrative of street medics, red-zones and glop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, Steve

    2015-03-01

    In pursuit of more mindful notions of hybridity, this review essay provides a series of reflections on Mathew Weinstein's representations of Street Medics and `sciences for the red zones of neoliberalism'. My analysis draws on three popular ways of thinking with boundaries to offer a critical reading of the boundary-work that the essay performs with respect to three dialectics: (1) technical and political; (2) disciplinarily and multidisciplinarities; and (3) structures and agencies. I conclude with reflections on my boundary labour as a researcher, writer and pedagogue and how such cultural work might learn to live better with difference, ambiguities, hybrids and cross-hybrid learning.

  2. Longriba fault zone in eastern Tibet: An important tectonic boundary marking the westernmost edge of the Yangtze block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoyu; Gao, Rui; Xu, Xiao; Keller, G. Randy; Yin, An; Xiong, Xiaosong

    2015-05-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements across eastern Tibet reveal a sharp velocity gradient zone located about 150 km west of the Longmen Shan frontal thrust zone, where eastward block motion of Tibet decreases from ~12 mm/yr to ~3 mm/yr over a distance of less than 10 km. In order to investigate the tectonic cause for this rapid change in GPS velocity, together with systematic review on the available geological and geophysical data in easternmost Tibet, we provide new constraints on the tectonic feature of the Longriba fault zone from Advanced Land Observing Satellite Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar data. We propose that the NE striking Longriba fault zone is the key structure responsible for the observed sharp gradient in GPS velocities. In addition, the evidence indicates that the Longriba fault zone, instead of the Longmen Shan fault zone, marks the westernmost edge of the Yangtze crustal block. Given the irregular western margin of the Yangtze block, the Longriba fault zone represents part of the actual tectonic boundary between the Songpan-Ganzi terrane and the Yangtze block. The newly identified western edge of the Yangtze block implies a paleocontinent-ocean boundary at depth. This boundary was a potential weak zone and may have been exploited during the formation of the Longriba fault zone. The results of this paper should advance our understanding of the tectonic relationship between the Songpan-Ganzi terrane and Yangtze block and provide additional constraints for studies of the geodynamic response of eastern Tibet to the ongoing India-Eurasia collision.

  3. Recharge and Lateral Groundwater Flow Boundary Conditions for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    B. Arnold; T. Corbet

    2001-12-18

    The purpose of the flow boundary conditions analysis is to provide specified-flux boundary conditions for the saturated zone (SZ) site-scale flow and transport model. This analysis is designed to use existing modeling and analysis results as the basis for estimated groundwater flow rates into the SZ site-scale model domain, both as recharge at the upper (water table) boundary and as underflow at the lateral boundaries. The objective is to provide consistency at the boundaries between the SZ site-scale flow model and other groundwater flow models. The scope of this analysis includes extraction of the volumetric groundwater flow rates simulated by the SZ regional-scale flow model to occur at the lateral boundaries of the SZ site-scale flow model and the internal qualification of the regional-scale model for use in this analysis model report (AMR). In addition, the scope includes compilation of information on the recharge boundary condition taken from three sources: (1) distributed recharge as taken from the SZ regional-scale flow model, (2) recharge below the area of the unsaturated zone (UZ) site-scale flow model, and (3) focused recharge along the Fortymile Wash channel.

  4. Strain Localisation at Rift Segment Boundaries: An Example from the Bocana Transfer Zone in Central Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, C.; Gleadow, A. J.; Kohn, B. P.

    2012-12-01

    pre-rift strata in this area. The BTZ itself is characterized by two en echelon WNW-ESE striking dextral-oblique transfer faults with a significant down-to-the-NNE extensional component. Strain is transferred from the Libertad breakaway fault onto the transfer faults over a distance of >20km through a network of interacting normal, oblique and strike-slip faults. The shape, location and orientation of the main faults were strongly influenced by pre-existing rheological heterogeneities. Major normal faults are parallel to either the Mesozoic metamorphic foliation or Cretaceous intrusive contacts, and developed where the foliation was at a high angle to the extension direction. In contrast, the oblique-slip faults of the BTZ formed parallel to the metamorphic foliation where formlines are at a small angle to the regional extension direction. Compared to other, less well-understood accommodation zones in the Gulf of California rift, the BTZ shows a distinct lack of volcanic activity, which may help explain the different exposure and structural expression of the various segment boundaries.

  5. Consolidation patterns during initiation and evolution of a plate-boundary decollement zone: northern Barbados accretionary prism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.C.; Klaus, A.; Bangs, N.L.; Bekins, B.; Bucker, C.J.; Bruckmann, W.; Erickson, S.N.; Hansen, O.; Horton, T.; Ireland, P.; Major, C.O.; Moore, G.F.; Peacock, S.; Saito, S.; Screaton, E.J.; Shimeld, J.W.; Stauffer, P.H.; Taymaz, T.; Teas, P.A.; Tokunaga, T.

    1998-01-01

    Borehole logs from the northern Barbados accretionary prism show that the plate-boundary decollement initiates in a low-density radiolarian claystone. With continued thrusting, the decollement zone consolidates, but in a patchy manner. The logs calibrate a three-dimensional seismic reflection image of the decollement zone and indicate which portions are of low density and enriched in fluid, and which portions have consolidated. The seismic image demonstrates that an underconsolidated patch of the decollement zone connects to a fluid-rich conduit extending down the decollement surface. Fluid migration up this conduit probably supports the open pore structure in the underconsolidated patch.

  6. The Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone (Yunnan, China), Tertiary transform boundary of Indochina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leloup, Philippe Hervé; Lacassin, Robin; Tapponnier, Paul; Schärer, Urs; Zhong, Dalai; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Liangshang; Ji, Shaocheng; Trinh, Phan Trong

    1995-12-01

    The Red River Fault zone (RRF) is the major geological discontinuity that separates South China from Indochina. Today it corresponds to a great right-lateral fault, following for over 900 km the edges of four narrow (< 20 km wide) high-grade gneiss ranges that together form the Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) metamorphic belt: the Day Nui Con Voi in Vietnam, and the Ailao, Diancang and Xuelong Shan in Yunnan. The Ailao Shan, the longest of those ranges, is fringed to the south by a strip of low-grade schists that contain ultramafic bodies. The ASRR belt has thus commonly been viewed as a suture. A detailed study of the Ailao and Diancang Shan shows that the gneiss cores of the ranges are composed of strongly foliated and lineated mylonitic gneisses. The foliation is usually steep and the lineation nearly horizontal, both being almost parallel to the local trend of the gneissic cores. Numerous shear criteria, including asymmetric tails on porphyroclasts, C-S or C'-S structures, rolling structures, asymmetric foliation boudinage and asymmetric quartz axis fabrics, indicate that the gneisses have undergone intense, progressive left-lateral shear. P-T studies show that left-lateral strain occurred under amphibolite-facies conditions (3-7 kb and 550-780°C). In both ranges high-temperature shear was coeval with emplacement of leucocratic melts. Such deformed melts yield {U}/{Pb} ages between 22.4 and 26.3 Ma in the Ailao Shan and between 22.4 and 24.2 Ma in the Diancang Shan, implying shear in the Lower Miocene. The mylonites in either range rapidly cooled to ≈ 300°C between 22 and 17 Ma, before the end of left-lateral motion. The similarity of deformation kinematics, P-T conditions, and crystallization ages in the aligned Ailao and Diancang Shan metamorphic cores, indicate that they represent two segments of the same Tertiary shear zone, the Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) shear zone. Our results thus confirm the idea that the ASRR belt was the site of major left

  7. Cohesive-zone-model formulation and implementation using the symmetric Galerkin boundary element method for homogeneous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Távara, Luis; Mantič, Vladislav; Salvadori, Alberto; Gray, Leonard J.; París, Federico

    2013-04-01

    A new symmetric boundary integral formulation for cohesive cracks growing in the interior of homogeneous linear elastic isotropic media with a known crack path is developed and implemented in a numerical code. A crack path can be known due to some symmetry implications or the presence of a weak or bonded surface between two solids. The use of a two-dimensional exponential cohesive law and of a special technique for its inclusion in the symmetric Galerkin boundary element method allows us to develop a simple and efficient formulation and implementation of a cohesive zone model. This formulation is dependent on only one variable in the cohesive zone (relative displacement). The corresponding constitutive cohesive equations present a softening branch which induces to the problem a potential instability. The development and implementation of a suitable solution algorithm capable of following the growth of the cohesive zone and subsequent crack growth becomes an important issue. An arc-length control combined with a Newton-Raphson algorithm for iterative solution of nonlinear equations is developed. The boundary element method is very attractive for modeling cohesive crack problems as all nonlinearities are located along the boundaries (including the crack boundaries) of linear elastic domains. A Galerkin approximation scheme, applied to a suitable symmetric integral formulation, ensures an easy treatment of cracks in homogeneous media and excellent convergence behavior of the numerical solution. Numerical results for the wedge split and mixed-mode flexure tests are presented.

  8. Young tectonics of a complex plate boundary zone: Indentation, rotation, and escape in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, W. K.; Ruppert, N. A.

    2012-12-01

    Convergence of thick crust of the Yakutat block with the southern margin of Alaska is widely recognized as a dominant influence on the tectonics of Alaska since at least late Miocene time. It is less clear how this convergence relates to the distribution, type, and orientation of geologic structures, and to the boundaries between the tectonic provinces that they define. We propose that convergence of Yakutat block includes two distinct components that influence deformation and topography in different ways: 1) The crust of the exposed, southern Yakutat block is too thick to subduct, which has caused the collisional St. Elias orogen. Detachment of the upper part of the mafic basement allows delamination and sinking of the remaining mafic crust and lithospheric mantle. The collisional orogen drives rigid counterclockwise rotation of the southern Alaska block south of the arcuate, right-lateral Denali fault. The western boundary of this block is a zone of distributed contraction in the western Alaska Range and Cook Inlet. 2) The northern part of the Yakutat block is thin enough to subduct but thick and buoyant enough to cause localized flat-slab subduction orthogonal to rotation of the southern Alaska block. Consequences include the gently antiformal Talkeetna Mountains that span the forearc basin, a gap in the magmatic arc, and a basement-involved fold-and-thrust belt in the northern Alaska Range. An arcuate oroclinal hinge from southern Alaska to the northeastern Brooks Range reflects indentation since at least Paleocene time. Traction above the subducted Yakutat block along the southern part of this hinge drives current indentation. North of the subducted Yakutat block, indentation is reflected by left-lateral block rotation that accommodates shortening between the Denali and Tintina faults and by contraction farther north along the northern edge of the arcuate northeastern Brooks Range. Western Alaska accommodates both northward indentation and westward convergence

  9. Boundaries can steer active Janus spheres

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sambeeta; Garg, Astha; Campbell, Andrew I.; Howse, Jonathan; Sen, Ayusman; Velegol, Darrell; Golestanian, Ramin; Ebbens, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    The advent of autonomous self-propulsion has instigated research towards making colloidal machines that can deliver mechanical work in the form of transport, and other functions such as sensing and cleaning. While much progress has been made in the last 10 years on various mechanisms to generate self-propulsion, the ability to steer self-propelled colloidal devices has so far been much more limited. A critical barrier in increasing the impact of such motors is in directing their motion against the Brownian rotation, which randomizes particle orientations. In this context, here we report directed motion of a specific class of catalytic motors when moving in close proximity to solid surfaces. This is achieved through active quenching of their Brownian rotation by constraining it in a rotational well, caused not by equilibrium, but by hydrodynamic effects. We demonstrate how combining these geometric constraints can be utilized to steer these active colloids along arbitrary trajectories. PMID:26627125

  10. Boundaries can steer active Janus spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sambeeta; Garg, Astha; Campbell, Andrew I.; Howse, Jonathan; Sen, Ayusman; Velegol, Darrell; Golestanian, Ramin; Ebbens, Stephen J.

    2015-12-01

    The advent of autonomous self-propulsion has instigated research towards making colloidal machines that can deliver mechanical work in the form of transport, and other functions such as sensing and cleaning. While much progress has been made in the last 10 years on various mechanisms to generate self-propulsion, the ability to steer self-propelled colloidal devices has so far been much more limited. A critical barrier in increasing the impact of such motors is in directing their motion against the Brownian rotation, which randomizes particle orientations. In this context, here we report directed motion of a specific class of catalytic motors when moving in close proximity to solid surfaces. This is achieved through active quenching of their Brownian rotation by constraining it in a rotational well, caused not by equilibrium, but by hydrodynamic effects. We demonstrate how combining these geometric constraints can be utilized to steer these active colloids along arbitrary trajectories.

  11. Radioactive heat generation and its thermal effects in the Alps Apennines boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquale, V.; Verdoya, M.; Chiozzi, P.

    2001-02-01

    Radioactive heat-production data of rocks cropping out at the Alps-Apennines boundary zone (NW Italy) are presented. Samples were analysed in the laboratory by means of a gamma-ray spectrometer. They are representative of the Savona Unit and the ophiolitic sequences, with metasediments and sediments, of the Voltri Massif, the Sestri-Voltaggio Zone and the Lavagna Nappe. The heat-production rate of sedimentary rocks ranges from 1.05 (limestones) to 2.52 μW m -3 (shales). In ophiolites, it varies from 0.04 (serpentinites) to 0.24 μW m -3 (metabasalts). Orthogneisses of the Savona Unit show the highest value (2.92 μW m -3). Potassium contributes to the heat generation on average by 17%. In the metasedimentary and sedimentary rocks, thorium contribution accounts on average by 43%, except for dolomites in which 97% of the radioactive heat is produced by uranium. Calc-schists, shales, radiolarites and phyllites give a Th/U ratio ranging from 3 to 4, that is very close to that of orthogneisses. This ratio is lower in limestones, almost all ophiolites and dolomites. Most rocks show a K/Th ratio ranging between 2×10 3 and 4×10 3. These data together with available thermal conductivity information are used in a finite element simulation to analyse the effects on the heat flux and temperature distribution due to lateral variation of thermal parameters. Changes in structure and composition of the uppermost part of the crust result in small wavelength variation of surface heat flux. The low radioactive heat production of ophiolites produces a decrease of about 10 mW m -2 in the surface heat-flux on the Voltri Massif.

  12. Analysis of subgrid-scale vertical transport in convective boundary layers at gray-zone resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyeyum Hailey; Hong, Song-You

    2013-04-01

    The gray zone of a physics process in numerical models is defined as the range of model resolution in which the process is partly resolved by model dynamics and partly parameterized. In this study, we examine the effects of grid size on resolved and parameterized vertical transport for horizontal grid scales including the gray zone. To assess how stability alters the dependency on grid size, four convective boundary layer (CBL)s with different surface heating and geostrophic winds are considered. For this purpose, reference data for grid-scale (GS) and subgrid-scale (SGS) fields are constructed for 50-4000 mesh sizes by filtering 25-m large-eddy simulations (LES) data. As wind shear becomes stronger, turbulent kinetic energy and the vertical transport of potential temperature and momentum are more resolved for a given grid spacing. A passive scalar with bottom-up diffusion behaves in a similar fashion. For a top-down diffusion scalar, the cospectral peak scale of the scalar flux is larger than the horizontal size of the thermals and increases in time. For the scalar, the entrainment ratio, in conjunction with the shear, influences the mesh-size dependency of GS and SGS transport. The total vertical transport of heat and the bottom-up scalar is decomposed into a non-local mixing owing to the coherent structures and remaining local mixing. The contribution of the resolved parts is larger when roll-like structures are present than when only thermals exist, for both non-local and local fluxes. The grid-size dependency of the non-local flux and its sensitivity to stability predominantly determines the dependency of total (non-local plus local) transport.

  13. Propagation of acoustic shock waves between parallel rigid boundaries and into shadow zones

    SciTech Connect

    Desjouy, C. Ollivier, S.; Dragna, D.; Blanc-Benon, P.; Marsden, O.

    2015-10-28

    The study of acoustic shock propagation in complex environments is of great interest for urban acoustics, but also for source localization, an underlying problematic in military applications. To give a better understanding of the phenomenon taking place during the propagation of acoustic shocks, laboratory-scale experiments and numerical simulations were performed to study the propagation of weak shock waves between parallel rigid boundaries, and into shadow zones created by corners. In particular, this work focuses on the study of the local interactions taking place between incident, reflected, and diffracted waves according to the geometry in both regular or irregular – also called Von Neumann – regimes of reflection. In this latter case, an irregular reflection can lead to the formation of a Mach stem that can modify the spatial distribution of the acoustic pressure. Short duration acoustic shock waves were produced by a 20 kilovolts electric spark source and a schlieren optical method was used to visualize the incident shockfront and the reflection/diffraction patterns. Experimental results are compared to numerical simulations based on the high-order finite difference solution of the two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations.

  14. Is the Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone an ancient plate boundary of Baltica?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Stanislaw; Mikolajczak, Mateusz; Krzywiec, Piotr; Malinowski, Michal; Buffenmyer, Vinton; Lewandowski, Marek

    2015-12-01

    The Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone (TTZ) is generally regarded as a fossil plate boundary in Europe that extends 2000 km from the Baltic Sea to the Black Sea. We used an integrated approach merging potential fields and seismic data to explore crustal architecture across the TTZ in central Poland. The aim of the study was to test whether the TTZ coincides with an early Paleozoic (Caledonian) suture formed through the closure of the Tornquist Ocean along the SW Baltica margin. The suture is presumed to separate the East European Craton (EEC) from the Paleozoic terranes of Western Europe. Two seismic reflection lines from the PolandSPAN™ experiment were used to image the deep structure at the SW margin of the EEC. Lines PL-5300 and PL-5400 run NE-SW in central and northern Poland, respectively. The seismic interpretation down to top of basement was integrated with 2-D gravity and magnetic modeling to highlight the structure of the deep crust. Both the gravity and magnetic models show a suture that welds together two blocks at the base of crust. However, top of basement above the suture dips uniformly to the SW and is overlain by undisturbed lower Paleozoic and younger sediments. By implication, the suture must have developed in the Precambrian and both crustal blocks amalgamated belong to the EEC. Consequently, the Caledonian suture, formed by the closure of the Tornquist Ocean between Avalonia and Baltica, must be located farther southwest beneath thick upper Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments.

  15. Regional deformation from the 2004 Macquarie Ridge great earthquake, Australia-Pacific plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgette, R. J.; Watson, C. S.; Tregoning, P.

    2009-12-01

    The transpressional Australia-Pacific plate boundary south of New Zealand has produced some of the largest strike-slip earthquakes in the instrumental record, including the 23 December 2004 Mw ~ 8.1 earthquake. The oceanic setting of this plate boundary limits terrestrial GPS measurements to sites on Macquarie Island (the only subaerial portion of Macquarie Ridge), southeastern Australia, and New Zealand. We investigate coseismic and postseismic deformation from the 2004 earthquake by analyzing GPS data at 16 sites and compare observed GPS vertical velocity with a relative sea level dataset that spans 96 years. Horizontal coseismic offsets decrease systematically with distance from the earthquake epicenter: 24 mm at Macquarie Island (530 km south of the epicenter) to < 2 mm at mainland Australia and the North Island of New Zealand (> 1800 km from epicenter). We invert the horizontal displacements for a best fitting set of fault parameters using an elastic half-space dislocation model. The modeling results are similar to those reported from seismological techniques: predominantly lateral slip occurred on a fault within the Australian plate, west of the main plate boundary, with a moment magnitude of ~8.0. Due to the symmetry of far-field elastic deformation, the geodetic data cannot discriminate between the two possible nodal planes. We prefer left-lateral slip on a NNW-striking fault based on the orientation of the aftershock pattern and fracture zones. We observe transient postseismic horizontal velocity changes at all of the GPS sites with significant coseismic displacements. Postseismic site velocities are significantly different from the pre-earthquake tectonic velocities. Preliminary modeling suggests that most of the postseismic deformation results from viscoelastic relaxation rather than afterslip. In the four years following the earthquake, the total postseismic deformation is approximately equal in magnitude to the coseismic offset observed at each site

  16. Passive and active control of boundary layer transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosenchuck, Daniel Mark

    It is well known that laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition is initiated by the formation of Tollmien-Schlichting laminar instability waves. The amplification rates of these waves are strongly dependent on the shape of the boundary layer velocity profile. Consequently, the transition process can be controlled by modifying the velocity profile. This can be accomplished by controlling the pressure gradient (dp/dx), using boundary layer suction, installing surface roughness elements, or by surface heating or cooling. Methods used to modify the transition process through changes in the mean velocity profile are called "passive" in this paper. There exists a large set of experiments and theory on the application of passive methods for boundary layer control. In the present work only surface heating will be addressed.Transition measurements were made on a heated flat plate in water. Results are presented for several plate wall temperature distributions. An increase by a factor of 2.5 in transition Reynolds number was observed for a 5°C isothermal wall overheat. Buoyancy effects on transition were minimal due to the small Richardson and Grashof numbers encountered in the experiments.The amplification of laminar instability waves is comparatively to process, taking place over many boundary layer thicknesses. After the slow amplification of the laminar instability waves, transition occurs by a strong three dimensional dynamic instability. It appears possible to attenuate (or reinforce) the instability waves by introducing amplitude-and phase-controlled perturbations into the laminar boundary layer using feedback control system. This method is called "active" control and forms the larger part of the research reported in this thesis.A combination of sensors, activators and feedback control electronics is required for active control. The sensors used in the experiments are flush-mounted hot film wall shear robes. A new type of activator was developed using thin, flush

  17. Jupiter's Belt-Zone Boundary in Near-Infrared and Violet Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mosaics of a belt-zone boundary near Jupiter's equator in violet (top panel) and near-infrared (bottom panel) light. The four images that make up each of these mosaics were taken within a few minutes of each other. Sunlight at 757 nanometers (near-infrared) penetrates deep into Jupiter's troposphere before being absorbed or scattered by clouds to the Galileo spacecraft. This wavelength reveals the features of the lower visible cloud deck. Sunlight at 415 nanometers (violet) is a scattered or absorbed to varying degrees in different parts of Jupiter's atmosphere depending on the types and concentrations of cloud particles and chemicals that color Jupiter's atmosphere. The near-infrared mosaic primarily shows cloud features. The violet mosaic has three distinct regions: it is brightest at the latitude of the jet (horizontally across the center of the mosaic), moderately bright north of the jet, and dark and patchy south of the jet.

    North is at the top. The mosaic covers latitudes -13 to +3 degrees and is centered at longitude 282 degrees West. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. These images were taken on November 5th, 1996, at a range of 1.2 million kilometers by the Solid State Imaging system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  18. Thermochronology and tectonics of the Leeward Antilles: Evolution of the southern Caribbean Plate boundary zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van der Lelij, Roelant; Spikings, Richard A.; Kerr, Andrew C.; Kounov, Alexandre; Cosca, Michael; Chew, David; Villagomez, Diego

    2010-01-01

    Tectonic reconstructions of the Caribbean Plate are severely hampered by a paucity of geochronologic and exhumation constraints from anastomosed basement blocks along its southern margin. New U/Pb, 40Ar/39Ar, apatite fission track, and apatite (U-Th)/He data constrain quantitative thermal and exhumation histories, which have been used to propose a model for the tectonic evolution of the emergent parts of the Bonaire Block and the southern Caribbean Plate boundary zone. An east facing arc system intruded through an oceanic plateau during ~90 to ~87 Ma and crops out on Aruba. Subsequent structural displacements resulted in >80°C of cooling on Aruba during 70–60 Ma. In contrast, exhumation of the island arc sequence exposed on Bonaire occurred at 85–80 Ma and 55–45 Ma. Santonian exhumation on Bonaire occurred immediately subsequent to burial metamorphism and may have been driven by the collision of a west facing island arc with the Caribbean Plate. Island arc rocks intruded oceanic plateau rocks on Gran Roque at ~65 Ma and exhumed rapidly at 55–45 Ma. We attribute Maastrichtian-Danian exhumation on Aruba and early Eocene exhumation on Bonaire and Gran Roque to sequential diachronous accretion of their basement units to the South American Plate. Widespread unconformities indicate late Eocene subaerial exposure. Late Oligocene–early Miocene dextral transtension within the Bonaire Block drove subsidence and burial of crystalline basement rocks of the Leeward Antilles to ≤1 km. Late Miocene–recent transpression caused inversion and ≤1 km of exhumation, possibly as a result of the northward escape of the Maracaibo Block.

  19. Evidence of left-lateral active motion at the North America-Caribbean plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, S. D.; Ellouz, N.; Corbeau, J.; Rolandone, F.; Mercier De Lepinay, B. F.; Meyer, B.; Momplaisir, R.; Granja, J. L.; Battani, A.; Burov, E. B.; Clouard, V.; Deschamps, R.; Gorini, C.; Hamon, Y.; LE Pourhiet, L.; Loget, N.; Lucazeau, F.; Pillot, D.; Poort, J.; Tankoo, K.; Cuevas, J. L.; Alcaide, J.; Poix, C. J.; Mitton, S.; Rodriguez, Y.; Schmitz, J.; Munoz Martin, A.

    2014-12-01

    The North America-Caribbean plate boundary is one of the least-known among large plate boundaries. Although it was identified early on as an example of a strike-slip fault in the north of Hispaniola, its structure and rate of motion remains poorly constrained. We present the first direct evidence for active sinistral strike-slip motion along this fault, based on swath seafloor mapping of the northern Haiti area. There is evidence for ~16.5 km of apparent strike-slip motion along the mapped segment of the Septentrional fault zone off Cap Haitien town which is terminated to the east onland Dominican republic and in the west to southern Cuban margin. By evaluating these new constraints within the context of geodetic models of global plate motions, we estimate an activity of the fault since 2 Ma with an angular velocity for the Caribbean plate relative to the North America predicted 6-12 mmyr-1 sinistral motion along the Septentrional fault zone. This transform fault was initiated around 20 million years ago in its western segment and since 2 Ma in its eastern segment in response to a regional reorganization of plate velocities and directions, which induced a change in configuration of plate boundaries.

  20. Active faulting in northern Chile: ramp stacking and lateral decoupling along a subduction plate boundary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, Rolando; Thiele, Ricardo

    1990-04-01

    Two large features parallel to the coastline of northern Chile have long been suspected to be the sites of young or active deformation: (1) The 700-km long Coastal Scarp, with average height (above sea level) of about 1000 m; (2) The Atacama Fault zone, that stretches linearly for about 1100 km at an average distance of 30-50 km from the coastline. New field observations combined with extensive analysis of aerial photographs demonstrate that both the Coastal Scarp and the Atacama Fault are zones of Quaternary and current fault activity. Little-degraded surface breaks observed in the field indicate that these fault zones have recently generated large earthquakes ( M = 7-8). Normal fault offsets observed in marine terraces in the Coastal Scarp (at Mejillones Peninsula) require tectonic extension roughly orthogonal to the compressional plate boundary. Strike-slip offsets of drainage observed along the Salar del Carmen and Cerro Moreno faults (Atacama Fault system) imply left-lateral displacements nearly parallel to the plate boundary. The left-lateral movement observed along the Atacama Fault zone may be a local consequence of E-W extension along the Coastal Scarp. But if also found everywhere along strike, left-lateral decoupling along the Atacama Fault zone would be in contradiction with the right lateral component of Nazca-South America motion predicted by models of present plate kinematics. Clockwise rotation with left-lateral slicing of the Andean orogen south of the Arica bend is one way to resolve this contradiction. The Coastal Scarp and the Atacama Fault zone are the most prominent features with clear traces of activity within the leading edge of continental South America. The great length and parallelism of these features with the subduction zone suggest that they may interact with the subduction interface at depth. We interpret the Coastal Scarp to be a west-dipping normal fault or flexure and propose that it is located over an east-dipping ramp stack at

  1. Recharge and Lateral Groundwater Flow Boundary Conditions for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    S. James

    2004-10-06

    This analysis is designed to use existing modeling and analysis results as the basis for estimated groundwater flow rates into the saturated zone (SZ) site-scale model domains, both as recharge (infiltration) at the upper boundary (water table), and as underflow at the lateral boundaries. Specifically, this work compiles information on the recharge boundary conditions supplied to the base-case and alternate SZ site-scale flow models taken from (1) distributed recharge from the 1997 (D'Agnese et al. 1997 [DIRS 100131]) or 2001 (D'Agnese et al. 2002 [DIRS 158876]) SZ regional-scale (Death Valley Regional Flow System [DVRFS]) model; (2) recharge below the area of the 1997 (Wu et al. 1997 [DIRS 156453]) or 2003 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]) unsaturated zone (UZ) site-scale flow model; and (3) focused recharge along Fortymile Wash. In addition, this analysis includes extraction of the groundwater flow rates simulated by the 1997 and 2001 DVRFS models coincident with the lateral boundaries of the SZ site-scale flow models. The fluxes from the 1997 DVRFS were used to calibrate the base-case SZ site-scale flow model. The 2001 DVRFS fluxes are used in the alternate SZ site-scale flow model.

  2. Active zones of mammalian neuromuscular junctions: formation, density, and aging

    PubMed Central

    Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Presynaptic active zones are synaptic vesicle release sites that playessential roles in the function and pathology of mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). The molecular mechanisms of active zone organization utilize presynaptic voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) in NMJs as scaffolding proteins. VDCCs interact extracellularly with the muscle-derived synapse organizer, laminin β2, and interact intracellularly with active zone-specific proteins, such as Bassoon, CAST/Erc2/ELKS2alpha, ELKS, Piccolo, and RIMs. These molecular mechanisms are supported by studies in P/Q- and N-type VDCCs double-knockout mice, and they are consistent with the pathological conditions of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome and Pierson syndrome, which are caused by autoantibodies against VDCCs or by a laminin β2 mutation. During normal postnatal maturation, NMJs maintain the density of active zones, while NMJs triple their size. However, active zones become impaired during aging. Propitiously, muscle exercise ameliorates the active zone impairment in aged NMJs, which suggests the potential for therapeutic strategies. PMID:23252894

  3. Zongo-San Gaban zone: Eocene foreland boundary of the Central Andean orogen, northwest Bolivia and southeast Peru

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, E.; Clark, A.H.; Kontak, D.J.; Archibald, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Discordant muscovite and biotite K-Ar dates of samples taken in six transects through the Cordillera Oriental of southeast Peru and northwest Bolivia, combined with /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar age spectra, reveal a northwest-trending, structurally cryptic, tectonothermal zone of late Eocene age (ca. 38 Ma) that overprints Triassic and older igneous and metamorphic rocks. The zone is at least 450 km long but is less than 25 km wide; temperatures along its northeast boundary are estimated to have reached 350/sup 0/C. No Paleogene magmatism has been recognized that could account for the thermal resetting of the K-Ar isotopic system. Uplift, erosion, and southwest-verging thrusting accompanied the development of this domain, which defined the foreland boundary of the orogen prior to inception of northeast-verging Andean thrusting in Miocene time. It is proposed that this tectonothermal zone, the Zongo-San Gaban zone (ZSGZ), which involves thrusting and basement shortening, is the southerly manifestation of the Incaic compressional deformation, which produced the thin-skinned Maranon thrust and fold belt (MTFB) north of the Abancay deflection of central Peru.

  4. Activity-related redistribution of presynaptic proteins at the active zone.

    PubMed

    Tao-Cheng, J-H

    2006-09-01

    Immunogold labeling distributions of seven presynaptic proteins were quantitatively analyzed under control conditions and after high K+ depolarization in excitatory synapses from dissociated rat hippocampal cultures. Three parallel zones in presynaptic terminals were sampled: zones I and II, each about one synaptic vesicle wide extending from the active zone; and zone III, containing a distal pool of vesicles up to 200 nm from the presynaptic membrane. The distributions of SV2 and synaptophysin, two synaptic vesicle integral membrane proteins, generally followed the distribution of synaptic vesicles, which were typically evenly distributed under control conditions and had a notable depletion in zone III after stimulation. Labels of synapsin I and synuclein, two synaptic vesicle-associated proteins, were similar to each other; both were particularly sparse in zone I under control conditions but showed a prominent enrichment toward the active zone, after stimulation. Labels of Bassoon, Piccolo and RIM 1, three active zone proteins, had very different distribution profiles from one another under control conditions. Bassoon was enriched in zone II, Piccolo and RIM 1 in zone I. After stimulation, Bassoon and Piccolo remained relatively unchanged, but RIM 1 redistributed with a significant decrease in zone I, and increases in zones II and III. These results demonstrate that Bassoon and Piccolo are stable components of the active zone while RIM 1, synapsin I and synuclein undergo dynamic redistribution with synaptic activity.

  5. Relationship of quartz LPO fabrics in mylonites near the Alpine Fault, New Zealand to the attitude of the shear zone boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, T. A.; Prior, D. J.; Toy, V.

    2015-12-01

    The active Alpine fault self-exhumes its own ductile shear zone roots and has known kinematics. Within ~1 km of the fault, the foliation is subparallel to the shear zone boundary in which it formed at amphibolite-facies conditions. Using EBSD, we analysed quartz Lattice Preferred Orientations (LPOs) of mylonites along a central part of the fault. The samples were mostly taken from naturally outcropping rocks, complemented by a few sections from core from the DFDP-2B hole—rocks that accommodated a range of finite strains and that have diverse quartz contents. All the LPOs feature a single (or strongest) girdle of c-axes hat is inclined ~28 ±4° away from the pole to the shear zone boundary (SZB) in a sense that is synthetic to the bulk shear. A point maximum of a-axes is inclined at the same angle relative to the shearing direction. This girdle is perpendicular to C' extensional shear bands in the rock, not to the bulk shear zone boundary, whereas the maximum is parallel to the slip direction of the shear bands. These relationships prevail across large variations in quartz content and finite shear strain magnitude. We infer that quartz LPOs are not always reliable indicators of SZB attitude, and they do not necessarily undergo an obvious rotation relative to the SZB as a function of increasing finite strain. Both the C' shears and the LPOs formed as late-incremental features at orientations controlled by the instantaneous geometry of a non-simple shear flow. We suggest that that the C' planes were aligned to planes of maximum shear-strain-rate. The data can be explained by flow in a thinning and stretching shear zone that deforms in plane strain at a Wk of ~0.7 to ~0.85. In support of this, inversions of seismic focal mechanism data yield an orientation of σ1 for the brittle crust of the central Southern Alps "natural laboratory" that approximately coincides with the predicted orientation of the contractional instantaneous stretching axis for the above

  6. Propulsion by passive filaments and active flagella near boundaries.

    PubMed

    Evans, Arthur A; Lauga, Eric

    2010-10-01

    Confinement and wall effects are known to affect the kinematics and propulsive characteristics of swimming microorganisms. When a solid body is dragged through a viscous fluid at constant velocity, the presence of a wall increases fluid drag, and thus the net force required to maintain speed has to increase. In contrast, recent optical trapping experiments have revealed that the propulsive force generated by human spermatozoa is decreased by the presence of boundaries. Here, we use a series of simple models to analytically elucidate the propulsive effects of a solid boundary on passively actuated filaments and model flagella. For passive flexible filaments actuated periodically at one end, the presence of the wall is shown to increase the propulsive forces generated by the filaments in the case of displacement-driven actuation, while it decreases the force in the case of force-driven actuation. In the case of active filaments as models for eukaryotic flagella, we demonstrate that the manner in which a solid wall affects propulsion cannot be known a priori, but is instead a nontrivial function of the flagellum frequency, wavelength, its material characteristics, the manner in which the molecular motors self-organize to produce oscillations (prescribed activity model or self-organized axonemal beating model), and the boundary conditions applied experimentally to the tethered flagellum. In particular, we show that in some cases, the increase in fluid friction induced by the wall can lead to a change in the waveform expressed by the flagella, which results in a decrease in their propulsive force.

  7. Propulsion by passive filaments and active flagella near boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Lauga, Eric

    2010-10-01

    Confinement and wall effects are known to affect the kinematics and propulsive characteristics of swimming microorganisms. When a solid body is dragged through a viscous fluid at constant velocity, the presence of a wall increases fluid drag, and thus the net force required to maintain speed has to increase. In contrast, recent optical trapping experiments have revealed that the propulsive force generated by human spermatozoa is decreased by the presence of boundaries. Here, we use a series of simple models to analytically elucidate the propulsive effects of a solid boundary on passively actuated filaments and model flagella. For passive flexible filaments actuated periodically at one end, the presence of the wall is shown to increase the propulsive forces generated by the filaments in the case of displacement-driven actuation, while it decreases the force in the case of force-driven actuation. In the case of active filaments as models for eukaryotic flagella, we demonstrate that the manner in which a solid wall affects propulsion cannot be known a priori, but is instead a nontrivial function of the flagellum frequency, wavelength, its material characteristics, the manner in which the molecular motors self-organize to produce oscillations (prescribed activity model or self-organized axonemal beating model), and the boundary conditions applied experimentally to the tethered flagellum. In particular, we show that in some cases, the increase in fluid friction induced by the wall can lead to a change in the waveform expressed by the flagella, which results in a decrease in their propulsive force.

  8. A synthesis and review of geomorphic surfaces of the boundary zone Mt. Taylor to Lucero uplift area, West-Central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, S.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Mt. Taylor volcanic field and Lucero uplift of west-central New Mexico occur in a transitional-boundary zone between the tectonically active Basin-and Range province (Rio Grande rift) and the less tectonically active Colorado plateau. The general geomorphology and Cenozoic erosional history has been discussed primarily in terms of a qualitative, descriptive context and without the knowledge of lithospheric processes. The first discussion of geomorphic surfaces suggested that the erosional surface underlying the Mt. Taylor volcanic rocks is correlative with the Ortiz surface of the Rio Grande rift. In 1978 a study supported this hypothesis with K-Ar dates on volcanic rocks within each physiographic province. The correlation of this surface was a first step In the regional analysis of the boundary zone; however, little work has been done to verify this correlation with numerical age dates and quantitatively reconstruct the surface for neotectonic purposes. Those geomorphic surfaces inset below and younger than the ``Ortiz`` surface have been studied. This report provides a summary of this data as well as unpublished data and a conceptual framework for future studies related to the LANL ISR project.

  9. Crustal Structure of the Caribbean-South American Diffuse Plate Boundary: Subduction Zone Migration and Polarity Reversal Along BOLIVAR Profile 64W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. A.; Levander, A.; Magnani, M.; Zelt, C. A.; Sawyer, D. S.; Ave Lallemant, H. G.

    2005-12-01

    The BOLIVAR (Broadband Ocean-Land Investigation of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region) project is an NSF funded, collaborative seismic experiment in the southeast Caribbean region. The purpose of the project is to understand the diffuse plate boundary created by the oblique collision between the Caribbean and South American plates. Profile 64W of the BOLIVAR experiment, a 450 km-long, N-S transect onshore and offshore Venezuela located at ~64°W longitude, images the deep crustal structures formed by this collision. The active source components of profile 64W include 300 km of MCS reflection data, 33 coincident OBSs, and 344 land seismic stations which recorded 7500 offshore airgun shots and 2 explosive land shots. Results from the reflection and refraction seismic data along 64W show complex crustal structure across the entire span of the diffuse plate boundary. The onshore portion of 64W crosses the fold and thrust belt of the Serrania del Interior, which formed at ~16 Ma by collision of the Caribbean forearc with the northern South American passive margin. Underlying the Serrania del Interior is a south-vergent, remnant Lesser Antillean subduction zone. As this Lesser Antilles subduction impinged on continental crust, it caused a polarity reversal and jump offshore to the north. Convergence was initially localized in the closure and inversion of the Grenada Basin. However, subduction could not develop because of the ~20-km-thick crust of the Aves Ridge; instead, north-vergent subduction initiated further to the north, where ~12-km-thick Caribbean oceanic crust of the Venezuela Basin began to subduct beneath the Aves Ridge in the Pliocene (~4 Ma) and appears to continue subducting today. Between the remnant subduction zone and the modern one, the El Pilar and Coche dextral strike-slip faults accommodate most of the transform motion of the plate boundary. From the Serrania del Interior to the Aves Ridge, ~260 km of accreted orogenic float comprises the diffuse

  10. Effect of boron segregation at grain boundaries on heat-affected zone cracking in wrought INCONEL 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Chaturvedi, M. C.; Richards, N. L.

    2001-04-01

    Susceptibility to heat-affected zone (HAZ) cracking during electron-beam welding was studied in two INCONEL 718-based alloys doped with different levels of boron. By lowering the carbon, sulfur, and phosphorous concentrations to be “as low as possible,” the occurrence of HAZ cracking was related directly to the level of segregation of boron at grain boundaries, which occurred by nonequilibrium segregation during a preweld heat treatment. The study has demonstrated a direct correlation between the amount of boron segregated at grain boundaries and their susceptibility to HAZ cracking, in terms of the total crack length and number of cracks observed in the HAZ. The analysis of results suggests that both the melting and resolidification temperatures of the boron-segregated grain boundaries can be about 100 °C to 200 °C lower than those of the grain boundaries that were susceptible to constitutional liquation of Nb carbides on them, making boron more deleterious in causing HAZ cracking.

  11. Thinking and Meddling with Boundaries: Critical Reflections on Matthew Weinstein's Narrative of Street Medics, Red-Zones and Glop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsop, Steve

    2015-01-01

    In pursuit of more mindful notions of hybridity, this review essay provides a series of reflections on Mathew Weinstein's representations of Street Medics and "sciences for the red zones of neoliberalism". My analysis draws on three popular ways of thinking with boundaries to offer a critical reading of the boundary-work that the…

  12. Subsurface biological activity zone detection using genetic search algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Mahinthakumar, G.; Gwo, J.P.; Moline, G.R.; Webb, O.F.

    1999-12-01

    Use of generic search algorithms for detection of subsurface biological activity zones (BAZ) is investigated through a series of hypothetical numerical biostimulation experiments. Continuous injection of dissolved oxygen and methane with periodically varying concentration stimulates the cometabolism of indigenous methanotropic bacteria. The observed breakthroughs of methane are used to deduce possible BAZ in the subsurface. The numerical experiments are implemented in a parallel computing environment to make possible the large number of simultaneous transport simulations required by the algorithm. The results show that genetic algorithms are very efficient in locating multiple activity zones, provided the observed signals adequately sample the BAZ.

  13. Experiments on the active control of transitional boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, P. A.; Rioual, J.-L.; Fisher, M. J.

    Experimental results are presented which demonstrate that the streamwise position of the transition region of a flat plate boundary layer can be actively controlled. The means of control is through the application of suction through the surface of the plate, a progressive increase in suction rate being capable of producing transition at progressively larger distances downstream from the plate leading edge. A simple digital feedback regulator based on an integral control law is shown to be most effective in regulating the position of transition, an error signal being derived from measurements of pressure fluctuations on the surface of the plate.

  14. 49 CFR 71.5 - Boundary line between eastern and central zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... County; thence west along the north line of Pulaski County to the east line of Jasper County; thence south along the east line of Jasper County to the south line of Jasper County; thence west along the south lines of Jasper and Newton Counties to the western boundary of the State of Indiana; thence...

  15. 49 CFR 71.5 - Boundary line between eastern and central zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... County; thence west along the north line of Pulaski County to the east line of Jasper County; thence south along the east line of Jasper County to the south line of Jasper County; thence west along the south lines of Jasper and Newton Counties to the western boundary of the State of Indiana; thence...

  16. 49 CFR 71.5 - Boundary line between eastern and central zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... County; thence west along the north line of Pulaski County to the east line of Jasper County; thence south along the east line of Jasper County to the south line of Jasper County; thence west along the south lines of Jasper and Newton Counties to the western boundary of the State of Indiana; thence...

  17. What's so critical about the critical zone?: New insights at the boundaries between hydrology, pedology, geomorphology, rocks and life (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, G.

    2013-12-01

    The great promise of critical zone science and observatories (CZOs) emerging over the past decade was that real progress towards understanding the earth's near-surface environment could be made through coordinated studies of processes and interactions that occur within that thin layer between the bottom of the atmosphere and the top of competent bedrock - the critical zone. How well has this promise been realized, and where is the science now headed? Drawing on recent findings from CZOs and elsewhere, I identify a number of exciting and potentially transformative new ideas and threads at the boundaries of hydrology, geomorphology, pedology, and ecology. These include: 1). New understanding of interactions and feedbacks among soil weathering, pathways for water, tree roots, and bedrock fractures. A fundamental insight emerging from critical zone studies is that soils are far more interestingly structured than simple textbook models of homogeneous substrates with exponentially decreasing permeability with depth. Instead, the near-surface is now seen as a complex network of voids, paths, conduits, and storage zones that are both formed and exploited by the movement of water, geochemical reactions, and organisms. This evolving perspective on the critical zone has implications for a wide range of issues, including the residence time and chemistry of water, rates of weathering, slope stability, and long-term soil fertility. 2. Growing appreciation for the role of biology in conditioning and transforming its own physical environment within the critical zone. This includes the role of trees in hydraulically redistributing water, fracturing bedrock, and contributing to long-term soil erosion and landscape evolution through tree fall and throw and vegetation effects on moisture regimes. 3. Similarly, the importance of understanding linkages among soils, water, and vegetation has never been greater as a warming climate dramatically changes the 'rules of the game'. New

  18. Fault Zone along Northern Boundary of Western Snake River Plain, Idaho.

    PubMed

    Malde, H E

    1959-07-31

    Gravity, seismic, and geologic studies indicate that at least 9000 ft of aggregate throw along a zone of northwest-trending, high-angle faults has displaced the western Snake River Plain downward relative to highlands on the north. At least 5000 ft of movement occurred between the early and middle Pliocene. Progressively diminishing movement since then amounts to 4000 ft.

  19. Radiocarbon evidence for extensive plate-boundary rupture about 300 years ago at the Cascadia subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, A.R.; Atwater, B.F.; Bobrowsky, P.T.; Bradley, L.-A.; Clague, J.J.; Carver, G.A.; Darienzo, M.E.; Grant, W.C.; Krueger, H.W.; Sparks, R.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Stuiver, M.

    1995-01-01

    THE Cascadia subduction zone, a region of converging tectonic plates along the Pacific coast of North America, has a geological history of very large plate-boundary earthquakes1,2, but no such earthquakes have struck this region since Euro-American settlement about 150 years ago. Geophysical estimates of the moment magnitudes (Mw) of the largest such earthquakes range from 8 (ref. 3).to 91/2 (ref. 4). Radiocarbon dating of earthquake-killed vegetation can set upper bounds on earthquake size by constraining the length of plate boundary that ruptured in individual earthquakes. Such dating has shown that the most recent rupture, or series of ruptures, extended at least 55 km along the Washington coast within a period of a few decades about 300 years ago5. Here we report 85 new 14C ages, which suggest that this most recent rupture (or series) extended at least 900 km between southern British Columbia and northern California. By comparing the 14C ages with written records of the past 150 years, we conclude that a single magnitude 9 earthquake, or a series of lesser earthquakes, ruptured most of the length of the Cascadia subduction zone between the late 1600s and early 1800s, and probably in the early 1700s.

  20. Angular selection of incident waves by photonic crystals with position-varying Dirac points at the Brillouin zone boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Changqing; Fang, Anan; Chu, Hongchen; Luo, Jie; Chan, C. T.; Hang, Zhi Hong; Lai, Yun

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the angular selection of incident electromagnetic waves using photonic crystals (PCs) composed of a square lattice of dielectric rods which exhibit position-varying Dirac conical dispersion at the Brillouin zone boundary. At the frequency of the Dirac point, the transmittance can reach unity at a particular incident angle associated with the Dirac dispersion, while for all other incident angles the waves are reflected due to the existence of a directional photonic band gap. By changing the size of the dielectric rods, the position of the Dirac point at the Brillouin zone boundary is variable, which makes the unity transmission angle customizable. Interestingly, we show that such a scheme of angular selection is almost independent of the refractive index of the background medium, as long as it is not too large so that a diffraction effect emerges. By investigating the PC being sandwiched by two different types of media, we find it actually acts as an optical 0 or π phase modulator at that particular incident angle. By attaching a metasurface to the PC, angular selection in the reflection geometry can also be achieved. Our work establishes a systematic and efficient method to achieve angular selection of arbitrary incident waves based on Dirac dispersions.

  1. Conservation Beyond Park Boundaries: The Impact of Buffer Zones on Deforestation and Mining Concessions in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Weisse, Mikaela J; Naughton-Treves, Lisa C

    2016-08-01

    Many researchers have tested whether protected areas save tropical forest, but generally focus on parks and reserves, management units that have internationally recognized standing and clear objectives. Buffer zones have received considerably less attention because of their ambiguous rules and often informal status. Although buffer zones are frequently dismissed as ineffective, they warrant attention given the need for landscape-level approaches to conservation and their prevalence around the world-in Peru, buffer zones cover >10 % of the country. This study examines the effectiveness of buffer zones in the Peruvian Amazon to (a) prevent deforestation and (b) limit the extent of mining concessions. We employ covariate matching to determine the impact of 13 buffer zones on deforestation and mining concessions from 2007 to 2012. Despite variation between sites, these 13 buffer zones have prevented ~320 km(2) of forest loss within their borders during the study period and ~1739 km(2) of mining concessions, an outcome associated with the special approval process for granting formal concessions in these areas. However, a closer look at the buffer zone around the Tambopata National Reserve reveals the difficulties of controlling illegal and informal activities. According to interviews with NGO employees, government officials, and community leaders, enforcement of conservation is limited by uncertain institutional responsibilities, inadequate budgets, and corruption, although formal and community-based efforts to block illicit mining are on the rise. Landscape-level conservation not only requires clear legal protocol for addressing large-scale, formal extractive activities, but there must also be strategies and coordination to combat illegal activities. PMID:27179802

  2. Conservation Beyond Park Boundaries: The Impact of Buffer Zones on Deforestation and Mining Concessions in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Weisse, Mikaela J; Naughton-Treves, Lisa C

    2016-08-01

    Many researchers have tested whether protected areas save tropical forest, but generally focus on parks and reserves, management units that have internationally recognized standing and clear objectives. Buffer zones have received considerably less attention because of their ambiguous rules and often informal status. Although buffer zones are frequently dismissed as ineffective, they warrant attention given the need for landscape-level approaches to conservation and their prevalence around the world-in Peru, buffer zones cover >10 % of the country. This study examines the effectiveness of buffer zones in the Peruvian Amazon to (a) prevent deforestation and (b) limit the extent of mining concessions. We employ covariate matching to determine the impact of 13 buffer zones on deforestation and mining concessions from 2007 to 2012. Despite variation between sites, these 13 buffer zones have prevented ~320 km(2) of forest loss within their borders during the study period and ~1739 km(2) of mining concessions, an outcome associated with the special approval process for granting formal concessions in these areas. However, a closer look at the buffer zone around the Tambopata National Reserve reveals the difficulties of controlling illegal and informal activities. According to interviews with NGO employees, government officials, and community leaders, enforcement of conservation is limited by uncertain institutional responsibilities, inadequate budgets, and corruption, although formal and community-based efforts to block illicit mining are on the rise. Landscape-level conservation not only requires clear legal protocol for addressing large-scale, formal extractive activities, but there must also be strategies and coordination to combat illegal activities.

  3. Conservation Beyond Park Boundaries: The Impact of Buffer Zones on Deforestation and Mining Concessions in the Peruvian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisse, Mikaela J.; Naughton-Treves, Lisa C.

    2016-08-01

    Many researchers have tested whether protected areas save tropical forest, but generally focus on parks and reserves, management units that have internationally recognized standing and clear objectives. Buffer zones have received considerably less attention because of their ambiguous rules and often informal status. Although buffer zones are frequently dismissed as ineffective, they warrant attention given the need for landscape-level approaches to conservation and their prevalence around the world—in Peru, buffer zones cover >10 % of the country. This study examines the effectiveness of buffer zones in the Peruvian Amazon to (a) prevent deforestation and (b) limit the extent of mining concessions. We employ covariate matching to determine the impact of 13 buffer zones on deforestation and mining concessions from 2007 to 2012. Despite variation between sites, these 13 buffer zones have prevented ~320 km2 of forest loss within their borders during the study period and ~1739 km2 of mining concessions, an outcome associated with the special approval process for granting formal concessions in these areas. However, a closer look at the buffer zone around the Tambopata National Reserve reveals the difficulties of controlling illegal and informal activities. According to interviews with NGO employees, government officials, and community leaders, enforcement of conservation is limited by uncertain institutional responsibilities, inadequate budgets, and corruption, although formal and community-based efforts to block illicit mining are on the rise. Landscape-level conservation not only requires clear legal protocol for addressing large-scale, formal extractive activities, but there must also be strategies and coordination to combat illegal activities.

  4. Strain localization along the Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) zone in the Eastern Himalaya: insights from field and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subhajit; Bose, Santanu; Mandal, Nibir

    2016-04-01

    The southward tapering Himalayan tectonic wedge is sliding over the upper boundary of the subducting Indian crust that act as the basal low angle detachment fault, known as the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT). It is now established that at least four crustal-scale south verging thrust faults, such as Main Central Thrust (MCT), Daling Thrust (~ Ramgarh Thrust ~ Shumar Thrust) (DT), Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) and Main Frontal Thrust (MFT), have emerged from the MHT, striking the entire length of Himalayan mountain belts. These structures accommodated hundreds of kilometers of crustal shortening since India-Asia collision and eventually, juxtaposed different tectono-metamorphic rocks in their hanging wall. Field investigations reveal increased number of thrust faults towards the frontal Himalayan mountain belts and their spacing between the successive thrusts are relatively small in contrast to the hinterland part of the mountain belt. For example, in the Eastern Himalayan belt the MBT zone in the Lesser Himalayan Sequence is marked by several such closely spaced thrusts. The present work is aimed to delineate factors that likely to have influenced for the development of such high frequency thrusting. Employing the model of Coulomb Wedge Theory (CWT), several researchers have shown that spacing between two consecutive thrusts is a function of basal friction and pore fluid pressure ratio. However, this model does not explain the cause of closely spaced thrust localization towards the frontal mountain belts during the wedge growth. Our present study using field relations and physical modeling shows that relative strength difference between the basal low angle detachment fault and the interface-strength of the varying lithology of the cover rocks has a major role for such thrust localization with narrow thrust spacing. Moreover, our findings may become useful for structural interpretation for the localization of Main Boundary Thrust zone in the frontal Himalayan mountain

  5. Basement nappes on the NE boundary the Ossa-Morena Zone (SW Iberian Variscides)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romao, Jose Manuel; Ribeiro, Antonio; Munha, Jose; Ribeiro, Luisa

    2010-05-01

    The studied area is located in the Abrantes (W-central Portugal) region of the Ossa Morena Zone, where the NW tip of the Tomar-Badajoz-Cordoba Shear Zone (TBCSZ) stops against the Porto-Tomar-Ferreira do Alentejo Shear Zone (PTFASZ). The TBCSZ is a WNW-ESE sinistral transpressive intra-plate Variscan flower structure, whereas the PTFASZ is N-S dextral paleotransform during the Variscan Wilson cycle in SW Iberia. The NE branch of the TBCSZ, with top to NE sense of thrusting, is characterized by the following tectonic units, from top to bottom: - Paleozoic cover: Bimodal volcanics, marbles and arkoses, metamorphosed under greenschist facies (and displaying a minor thrust at the base), inferred to be of Lower Paleozoic age by stratigraphic correlation with other sectors dated as Cambrian to Silurian in the Ossa Morena Zone. - Cadomian intermediate crust: low/intermediate pressure (~ 4 - 7 kb) retrograded granulites, including a mafic (meta-gabbroic) component that yielded metamorphic zircons dated at 539±3 Ma (Henriques et al., 2009). - Cadomian upper crust: granitic gneisses, yielding prismatic, oscillatory-zoned, igneous zircons dated at 570 Ma, and 540±5 Ma metamorphic monazites (Henriques et al., 2009). - Cadomian volcano-sedimentary sequences: Greenschist facies black phyllites and greywackes, intercalated with black chert beds and bimodal metavolcanics ("Série Negra"), which are correlated with the Neoproterozoic sequences of the Ibero-Armorican Massif. All the tectonic units are separated by top to NE thrusts, operating under ductile conditions in the upper units and under a brittle regime in the lower units; thus, inverting the inherited Cadomian crust below the basal décollement of Palaeozoic cover. The tectonic units belong to the Ossa-Morena Zone and were transported towards NE, on top of the (very low-grade) Central-Iberian Zone relative autochthon (Ediacarian/Cambrian to Lower Devonian). The amount of the NE thrust displacement in the granulite

  6. Neotectonics of the Owen Fracture Zone (NW Indian Ocean): Structural evolution of an oceanic strike-slip plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Fournier, M.; Chamot-Rooke, N.; Huchon, P.; Bourget, J.; Sorbier, M.; Zaragosi, S.; Rabaute, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Owen Fracture Zone is a 800 km-long fault system that accommodates the dextral strike-slip motion between India and Arabia plates. Because of slow pelagic sedimentation rates that preserve the seafloor expression of the fault since the Early Pliocene, the fault is clearly observed on bathymetric data. It is made up of a series of fault segments separated by releasing and restraining bends, including a major pull-apart basin at latitude 20°N. Some distal turbiditic channels from the Indus deep-sea fan overlap the fault system and are disturbed by its activity, thus providing landmarks to date successive stages of fault activity and structural evolution of the Owen Fracture Zone from Pliocene to Present. We determine the durability of relay structures and the timing of their evolution along the principal displacement zone, from their inception to their extinction. We observe subsidence migration in the 20°N basin, and alternate activation of fault splays in the vicinity of the Qalhat seamount. The present-day Owen Fracture Zone is the latest stage of structural evolution of the 20-Myr-old strike-slip fault system buried under Indus turbiditic deposits whose activity started at the eastern foot of the Owen Ridge when the Gulf of Aden opened. The evolution of the Owen Fracture Zone since 3-6 Myr reflects a steady state plate motion between Arabia and India, such as inferred by kinematics for the last 20 Myr period. The structural evolution of the Owen Fracture Zone since 20 Myr, including fault segments propagation and migration, pull-apart basin opening and extinction, seems to be characterized by a progressive reorganization of the fault system, and does not require any major kinematics change.

  7. Visualizing Life Zone Boundary Sensitivities Across Climate Models and Temporal Spans

    SciTech Connect

    Sisneros, Roberto R; Huang, Jian; Ostrouchov, George; Hoffman, Forrest M

    2011-01-01

    Life zones are a convenient and quantifiable method for delineating areas with similar plant and animal communities based on bioclimatic conditions. Such ecoregionalization techniques have proved useful for defining habitats and for studying how these habitats may shift due to environmental change. The ecological impacts of climate change are of particular interest. Here we show that visualizations of the geographic projection of life zones may be applied to the investigation of potential ecological impacts of climate change using the results of global climate model simulations. Using a multi-factor classification scheme, we show how life zones change over time based on quantitative model results into the next century. Using two straightforward metrics, we identify regions of high sensitivity to climate changes from two global climate simulations under two different greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Finally, we identify how preferred human habitats may shift under these scenarios. We apply visualization methods developed for the purpose of displaying multivariate relationships within data, especially for situations that involve a large number of concurrent relationships. Our method is based on the concept of multivariate classification, and is implemented directly in VisIt, a production quality visualization package.

  8. Active Flow Control on a Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, Susan Althoff; Owens, Lewis R.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Allan, Brian G.; Schuster, Ernest P.

    2004-01-01

    Boundary layer ingestion (BLI) is explored as means to improve overall system performance for Blended Wing Body configuration. The benefits of BLI for vehicle system performance benefit are assessed with a process derived from first principles suitable for highly-integrated propulsion systems. This performance evaluation process provides framework within which to assess the benefits of an integrated BLI inlet and lays the groundwork for higher-fidelity systems studies. The results of the system study show that BLI provides a significant improvement in vehicle performance if the inlet distortion can be controlled, thus encouraging the pursuit of active flow control (AFC) as a BLI enabling technology. The effectiveness of active flow control in reducing engine inlet distortion was assessed using a 6% scale model of a 30% BLI offset, diffusing inlet. The experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel with a model inlet designed specifically for this type of testing. High mass flow pulsing actuators provided the active flow control. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow through the duct and the actuators. The distortion was determined by 120 total pressure measurements located at the aerodynamic interface plane. The test matrix was limited to a maximum freestream Mach number of 0.15 with scaled mass flows through the inlet for that condition. The data show that the pulsed actuation can reduce distortion from 29% to 4.6% as measured by the circumferential distortion descriptor DC60 using less than 1% of inlet mass flow. Closed loop control of the actuation was also demonstrated using a sidewall surface static pressure as the response sensor.

  9. Automated optic disk boundary detection by modified active contour model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Chutatape, Opas; Chew, Paul

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a novel deformable-model-based algorithm for fully automated detection of optic disk boundary in fundus images. The proposed method improves and extends the original snake (deforming-only technique) in two aspects: clustering and smoothing update. The contour points are first self-separated into edge-point group or uncertain-point group by clustering after each deformation, and these contour points are then updated by different criteria based on different groups. The updating process combines both the local and global information of the contour to achieve the balance of contour stability and accuracy. The modifications make the proposed algorithm more accurate and robust to blood vessel occlusions, noises, ill-defined edges and fuzzy contour shapes. The comparative results show that the proposed method can estimate the disk boundaries of 100 test images closer to the groundtruth, as measured by mean distance to closest point (MDCP) <3 pixels, with the better success rate when compared to those obtained by gradient vector flow snake (GVF-snake) and modified active shape models (ASM).

  10. Plate boundary forces in the vicinity of Trinidad-the-transition from transpression to transtension in the Southern Caribbean plate boundary zones

    SciTech Connect

    Algar, S.T.; Pindell, J.L. )

    1993-02-01

    Deformation in the southern Caribbean plate boundary zones as recorded in the Northern Range of Trinidad initiated in the Oligocene with northward vergent gravity sliding of Northern Range sediments due to uplift and oversteepening of the previously passive margin by the eastward migration of the Caribbean flexural forebulge. Progressive east-southeast transvergence of the Caribbean Plate with respect to South America overthrust incorporated the Northern Range sediments into the Caribbean accretionary prism, thrusting them south-southeast to produce a Middle Miocene transpressive foreland fold and thrust belt in southern Trinidad. Late Miocene deformation within Trinidad was increasingly dominated by right-lateral strike-slop (RLSS) faulting, at the expense of transpressive compressional features. Right-stepping of RLSS motion initiated the Gulf of Paria and Caroni pull-apart basins, Since Early Pliocene these basins and other areas to the north of Trinidad have undergone north-south extension in addition to east-west trending RLSS. Such extension caused the northward withdrawal of Caribbean terranes from atop of the Northern Range, Resulting in rapid isostatically induced uplift (approximately 0.5 mmyr[sup -1]). This change in deformation style may relate to a hitherto unrecognized shift in the relative motion of the eastern Caribbean Plate with respect to South America: from east-southeast-directed transpression to east-northeast-directed transtension.

  11. Lithosphere - asthenosphere boundary (LAB) around the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plomerova, J.; Babuska, V.; Vecsey, L.; Passeq Working Group

    2012-04-01

    Exploiting the long memory of the deep continental lithosphere fabric, we present the LAB as a transition between a fossil anisotropy in the lithospheric mantle and an underlying seismic anisotropy related to the present-day flow in the asthenosphere. A uniform updated model of the European LAB, recalculated from data collected during several regional studies of seismic anisotropy and other tomographic experiments (Plomerova and Babuska, 2010) is complemented by LAB depth estimates from the PASSEQ (2006-2008) field measurements, involving about 17 countries (Wilde-Piorko et al., SGG 2008). Analysis of static terms of teleseismic P-wave travel time deviations shows that the LAB topography is more distinct beneath the Phanerozoic part of Europe than beneath its Precambrian part and deepens down to ~220 km beneath the two Alpine roots, the South Carpathians and eastward of the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ), being shallowest beneath basins. The TESZ represents a distinct tectonic feature, which can be traced from north-western to south-eastern Europe in various seismic velocity tomography as well as in seismic anisotropy (Babuska et al., PAGEOPH 1998). Modelling seismic anisotropy around the western part of TESZ (Plomerova et al., Tectonophysics 2002; Babuska and Plomerova, Terra Nova 2004) delimited there three lithospheric domains of different thickness and fabrics: (1) thick Fennoscandian lithosphere north of the TESZ, (2) the sharply bounded fragment of a thinner lithosphere between the northern (Sorgenfrei-Tornquist Zone) and southern branch (Thor Suture) of the TESZ; (3) south of the TESZ, a domain belonging to a very thin lithosphere of Avalonia. Structure of the mantle around the Teisseyere-Tornquist Zone (TT), i.e., in the central part of the TESZ, is one of the main targets of the PASSEQ seismic experiment. The suture appears there as a broad transition zone on the surface and in the mantle it separates the thick lithosphere domains of the Paleozoic

  12. Fault zone structure and inferences on past activities of the active Shanchiao Fault in the Taipei metropolis, northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Lee, J.; Chan, Y.; Lu, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Taipei Metropolis, home to around 10 million people, is subject to seismic hazard originated from not only distant faults or sources scattered throughout the Taiwan region, but also active fault lain directly underneath. Northern Taiwan including the Taipei region is currently affected by post-orogenic (Penglai arc-continent collision) processes related to backarc extension of the Ryukyu subduction system. The Shanchiao Fault, an active normal fault outcropping along the western boundary of the Taipei Basin and dipping to the east, is investigated here for its subsurface structure and activities. Boreholes records in the central portion of the fault were analyzed to document the stacking of post- Last Glacial Maximum growth sediments, and a tulip flower structure is illuminated with averaged vertical slip rate of about 3 mm/yr. Similar fault zone architecture and post-LGM tectonic subsidence rate is also found in the northern portion of the fault. A correlation between geomorphology and structural geology in the Shanchiao Fault zone demonstrates an array of subtle geomorphic scarps corresponds to the branch fault while the surface trace of the main fault seems to be completely erased by erosion and sedimentation. Such constraints and knowledge are crucial in earthquake hazard evaluation and mitigation in the Taipei Metropolis, and in understanding the kinematics of transtensional tectonics in northern Taiwan. Schematic 3D diagram of the fault zone in the central portion of the Shanchiao Fault, displaying regional subsurface geology and its relation to topographic features.

  13. Partitioning of oblique convergence in the Northern Andes subduction zone: Migration history and the present-day boundary of the North Andean Sliver in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, A.; Audin, L.; Nocquet, J. M.; Jaillard, E.; Mothes, P.; Jarrín, P.; Segovia, M.; Rolandone, F.; Cisneros, D.

    2016-05-01

    Along the Ecuadorian margin, oblique subduction induces deformation of the overriding continental plate. For the last 15 Ma, both exhumation and tectonic history of Ecuador suggest that the northeastward motion of the North Andean Sliver (NAS) was accompanied by an eastward migration of its eastern boundary and successive progressively narrowing restraining bends. Here we present geologic data, earthquake epicenters, focal mechanisms, GPS results, and a revised active fault map consistent with this new kinematic model. All data sets concur to demonstrate that active continental deformation is presently localized along a single major fault system, connecting fault segments from the Gulf of Guayaquil to the eastern Andean Cordillera. Although secondary faults are recognized within the Cordillera, they accommodate a negligible fraction of relative motion compared to the main fault system. The eastern limit is then concentrated rather than distributed as first proposed, marking a sharp boundary between the NAS, the Inca sliver, and the Subandean domain overthrusting the South American craton. The NAS limit follows a northeast striking right-lateral transpressional strike-slip system from the Gulf of Guayaquil (Isla Puná) to the Andean Cordillera and with the north-south striking transpressive faults along the eastern Andes. Eastward migration of the restraining belt since the Pliocene, abandonment of the sutures and reactivation of north-south striking ancient fault zones lead to the final development of a major tectonic boundary south and east of the NAS, favoring its extrusion as a continental sliver, accommodating the oblique convergence of the Nazca oceanic plate toward South America.

  14. Geothermal Frontier: Penetrate a boundary between hydrothermal convection and heat conduction zones to create 'Beyond Brittle Geothermal Reservoir'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, N.; Asanuma, H.; Sakaguchi, K.; Okamoto, A.; Hirano, N.; Watanabe, N.; Kizaki, A.

    2013-12-01

    EGS has been highlightened as a most promising method of geothermal development recently because of applicability to sites which have been considered to be unsuitable for geothermal development. Meanwhile, some critical problems have been experimentally identified, such as low recovery of injected water, difficulties to establish universal design/development methodology, and occurrence of large induced seismicity. Future geothermal target is supercritical and superheated geothermal fluids in and around ductile rock bodies under high temperatures. Ductile regime which is estimated beyond brittle zone is target region for future geothermal development due to high enthalpy fluids and relatively weak water-rock interaction. It is very difficult to determine exact depth of Brittle-Ductile boundary due to strong dependence of temperature (geotherm) and strain rate, however, ductile zone is considered to be developed above 400C and below 3 km in geothermal fields in Tohoku District. Hydrothermal experiments associated with additional advanced technology will be conducting to understand ';Beyond brittle World' and to develop deeper and hotter geothermal reservoir. We propose a new concept of the engineered geothermal development where reservoirs are created in ductile basement, expecting the following advantages: (a)simpler design and control the reservoir, (b)nearly full recovery of injected water, (c)sustainable production, (d)cost reduction by development of relatively shallower ductile zone in compression tectonic zones, (e)large quantity of energy extraction from widely distributed ductile zones, (f)establishment of universal and conceptual design/development methodology, and (g) suppression of felt earthquakes from/around the reservoirs. In ductile regime, Mesh-like fracture cloud has great potential for heat extraction between injection and production wells in spite of single and simple mega-fracture. Based on field observation and high performance hydrothermal

  15. Seismic heating signatures in the Japan Trench subduction plate-boundary fault zone: evidence from a preliminary rock magnetic `geothermometer'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Dekkers, Mark J.; Zhang, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Frictional heating during earthquake rupture reveals important information on earthquake mechanisms and energy dissipation. The amount of annealing varies widely and is, as yet, poorly constrained. Here we use magnetic susceptibility versus temperature measurements during cycling to increasingly elevated temperatures to constrain the maximum temperature a slip zone has experienced. The case study comprises sheared clay cored from the Japan Trench subduction plate-boundary fault zone (décollement), which accommodated the large slip of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake. The décollement was cored during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 343, the Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST). Heating signatures with estimated maximum temperatures ranging from ˜300 to over 500 °C are determined close to the multiple slip surfaces within the décollement. Since it is impossible to tie a specific slip surface to a certain earthquake, thermal evidence for the cumulative effect of several earthquakes is unveiled. This as yet preliminary rock magnetic `geothermometer' would be a useful tool to detect seismic heating along faults that experienced medium temperature rise, a range which is difficult to assess with other approaches.

  16. Probing an ultra-low velocity zone at the core mantle boundary with P and S waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Sidao; Helmberger, Don V.

    Recent studies of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) have revealed some very anomalous structures interpreted in terms of ultra low velocity zones (ULVZ). However, there remains considerable uncertainties about their physical descriptions or even if they occur above or below the CMB. They have only been detected in isolated situations using rather special techniques; these includes: distortions in SKS with the development of SKPdS and SPdKS, broadband PKP precursors, distinct ScS and S beyond 100 degree, and rapid changes in differential travel times of neighboring phases. Here we report on a situation where ray paths associated with PKP precursors and SKPdS sample the same ULVZ structure. The structure lies beneath central Africa and has been detected from WWSSN analog data (SKPdS) discussed previously. This data set has been enhanced with a collection of digital records sampling an elongated North-South zone roughly 800 km long. The entire SKPdS data set can be modeled with a ridge-shaped cross section with widths of 250 to 400 km and drops in P and S velocity of 10 and 30 percent. Fortunately, a new IRIS station (MSKU) located in Western Africa provided excellent PKP data from the New Britain Region events sampling the above structure. The PKP and strong precursors can be modeled by 2D synthetics generated from the same structure (used in modeling SKP dS) which provides a strong constraint on the definition characteristics of this particular ULVZ.

  17. YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT SEARCH TOWARD THE BOUNDARY OF THE CENTRAL MOLECULAR ZONE WITH NEAR-INFRARED POLARIMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Tatsuhito; Nagata, Tetsuya; Nishiyama, Shogo; Kwon, Jungmi; Tamura, Motohide E-mail: nagata@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2014-08-01

    We have carried out near-infrared polarimetry toward the boundary of the Central Molecular Zone, in the field of (–1.°4 ≲ l ≲ –0.°3 and 1.°0 ≲ l ≲ 2.°9, |b| ≲ 0.°1), using the near-infrared polarimetric camera SIRPOL on the 1.4 m Infrared Survey Facility telescope. We have selected 112 intrinsically polarized sources on the basis of the estimate of interstellar polarization on Stokes Q/I – U/I planes. The selected sources are brighter than K{sub S} = 14.5 mag and have polarimetric uncertainty δP < 1%. Ten of these distinctive polarized sources are fit well with spectral energy distributions of young stellar objects when using the photometry in the archive of the Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared data. However, many sources have spectral energy distributions of normal stars suffering from heavy interstellar extinction; these might be stars behind dark clouds. Due to the small number of distinctive polarized sources and candidates of young stellar objects, we cannot judge if they are declining in number outside the Central Molecular Zone. Many massive candidates for young stellar objects in the literature have only small intrinsic polarization. This might suggest that their masses are 4-15 M {sub ☉}, whose intrinsic polarization has been expected to be small.

  18. Modeling volatilization of residual VOCs in unsaturated zones: a moving boundary problem.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Talib R; Yu, Jung-Hau; Fen, Chiu-Shia; Yeh, Hund-Der; Yeh, Li-Ming

    2012-06-15

    It is of practical interest to investigate the natural evaporation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) after the removal of a leaking tank situated on the top of the soil. This study aims to develop a mathematical model to predict mole fraction distributions and migration of evaporation front for two VOCs emanating from residual non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) due to the leak from the tank in a homogeneous soil. Considering the location of the front and the regions above and below the front, a numerical model for the diffusive transport of VOCs in unsaturated soils was developed using the finite difference method with a moving grid approach. The model was further simplified to the case of single VOC and solved analytically by Boltzmann's transformation with a moving boundary. Analytical expressions for the depth and moving speed of the front for a single VOC were then obtained for practical use. Finally, the developed model was used to predict the concentration distributions of VOCs below the land surface and examine the factors affecting the location and moving speed of the evaporation front. PMID:22521795

  19. Kinematics to dynamics in the New Zealand Plate boundary zone: implications for the strength of the lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Simon

    2015-05-01

    New Zealand straddles the boundary between the Australian and Pacific Plate. Cenozoic relative plate motion has resulted in a complex pattern of faulting and block rotation in a zone of continental lithosphere up to 250 km wide. I investigate the implications of the short-term kinematics for the strength of the deforming lithosphere. I use a compilation of seismic reflection/refraction studies and high quality receiver function analyses to determine both the regional structure of the crust, which ranges from 20 to 50 km thick, and fields of buoyancy stress (or GPE per unit volume). Deformation over thousands of years is quantified in terms of velocity and strain rate fields, based on an inversion of neotectonic fault slip and palaeomagnetic data, in the context of the short-term relative plate motions. Forces on the subduction megathrust, as well as deviatoric stresses in the behind subduction region, are calculated from simple 2-D force balances across the Hikurangi Margin, given negligible deviatoric stresses at the along-strike transition between backarc extension and compression. Average megathrust shear stresses are in the range 6-15 MPa, and average lithospheric stresses <20 MPa in the overriding plate. The regional lithospheric strength of the plate boundary zone, assuming a viscous rheology (Newtonian or power law), is determined from an inversion of the field of gradients of buoyancy stress (averaged over either the top 25 km of the crust, or 100-km-thick lithosphere) and strain rate, using the thin sheet stress balance equations, calibrated with the subduction force balance analysis. Effective viscosities for the deforming lithosphere and/or crust are in the range 0.1-5 × 1021 Pa s, with marked weakening in zones of high strain rate, and an abrupt transition to viscosities >1022 Pa s at the margins of the rigid plates. If lateral variations in effective viscosity are only due to non-Newtonian behaviour, these data indicate a bulk power law rheology, with

  20. Formaldehyde in the far outer galaxy: constraining the outer boundary of the galactic habitable zone.

    PubMed

    Blair, Samantha K; Magnani, Loris; Brand, Jan; Wouterloot, Jan G A

    2008-02-01

    We present results from an initial survey of the 2(12)-1(11) transition of formaldehyde (H2CO) at 140.8 GHz in giant molecular clouds in the far outer Galaxy (RG >or= 16 kpc). Formaldehyde is a key prebiotic molecule that likely plays an important role in the development of amino acids. Determining the outermost extent of the H2CO distribution can constrain the outer limit of the Galactic Habitable Zone, the region where conditions for the formation of life are thought to be most favorable. We surveyed 69 molecular clouds in the outer Galaxy, ranging from 12 to 23.5 kpc in galactocentric radius. Formaldehyde emission at 140.8 GHz was detected in 65% of the clouds. The H2CO spectral line was detected in 26 of the clouds with RG > 16 kpc (detection rate of 59%), including 6 clouds with RG > 20 kpc (detection rate of 55%). Formaldehyde is readily found in the far outer Galaxy-even beyond the edge of the old stellar disk. Determining the relatively widespread distribution of H2CO in the far outer Galaxy is a first step in establishing how favorable an environment this vast region of the Galaxy may be toward the formation of life.

  1. Rainy Lake wrench zone: An example of an Archaean subprovince boundary in northwestern Ontario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulsen, K. H.

    1986-01-01

    The Superior Province of the Canadian Shield comprises an alternation of subprovinces with contrasting lithological, structural and metamorphic styles. Rocks of the Rainly Lake area form a fault bounded wedge between two of these subprovinces, the Wabigoon granite-greenstone terrain to the north and the Quetico metasedimentary terrain to the south. The Quetico and Seine River-Rainy Lake Faults bound this wedge within which interpretation of the stratigraphy has been historically contentious. In the eastern part of the wedge, volcanic rocks and coeval tonalitic sills are unconformably overlain by fluviatile conglomerate and arenite of the Seine Group; in the western part of the wedge, metamorphosed wacke and mudstone of the Coutchiching Group are cut by granodioritic plutons. The Coutchiching Group has previously been correlated with the Seine Group and with the turbiditic Quetico metasediments of the Quetico Subprovince and these correlations are the cornerstone of earlier tectonic models which relate the subprovinces. The structural geology of the Rainy Lake area is characterized by attributes which compare favourably with the known characteristics of dextral wrench or 'transpressive zones based both on experimental data and natural examples. Much of this deformation involved the Seine Group, the youngest stratigraphic unit in the area, and predates the emplacement of late-to-post-tectonic granodioritic plutons for which radiometric data indicate a Late Archean age.

  2. Linking Plagioclase Zoning Patterns to Active Magma Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbekov, P. E.; Nicolaysen, K. P.; Neill, O. K.; Shcherbakov, V.; Plechov, P.; Eichelberger, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Plagioclase, one of the most common and abundant mineral phases in volcanic products, will vary in composition in response to changes in temperature, pressure, composition of the ambient silicate melt, and melt H2O concentration. Changes in these parameters may cause dissolution or growth of plagioclase crystals, forming characteristic textural and compositional variations (zoning patterns), the complete core-to-rim sequence of which describes events experienced by an individual crystal from its nucleation to the last moments of its growth. Plagioclase crystals in a typical volcanic rock may look drastically dissimilar despite their spatial proximity and the fact that they have erupted together. Although they shared last moments of their growth during magma ascent and eruption, their prior experiences could be very different, as plagioclase crystals often come from different domains of the same magma system. Distinguishing similar zoning patterns, correlating them across the entire population of plagioclase crystals, and linking these patterns to specific perturbations in the magmatic system may provide additional perspective on the variety, extent, and timing of magma processes at active volcanic systems. Examples of magma processes, which may be distinguished based on plagioclase zoning patterns, include (1) cooling due to heat loss, (2) heating and/or pressure build up due to an input of new magmatic material, (3) pressure drop in response to magma system depressurization, and (4) crystal transfer between different magma domains/bodies. This review will include contrasting examples of zoning patters from recent eruptions of Karymsky, Bezymianny, and Tolbachik Volcanoes in Kamchatka, Augustine and Cleveland Volcanoes in Alaska, as well as from the drilling into an active magma body at Krafla, Iceland.

  3. Active faulting south of the Himalayan Front: Establishing a new plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeats, Robert S.; Thakur, V. C.

    2008-06-01

    New tectonic uplifts south of the Salt Range Thrust and Himalayan Front Thrust (HFT) represent an outward step of the plate boundary from the principal tectonic displacement zone into the Indo-Gangetic Plain. In Pakistan, the Lilla Anticline deforms fine-grained overbank deposits of the Jhelum River floodplain 15 km south of the Salt Range. The anticline is overpressured in Eocambrian non-marine strata. In northwest India south of Dehra Dun, the Piedmont Fault (PF) lies 15 km south of the HFT. Coalescing fans derived from the Himalaya form a piedmont (Old Piedmont Zone) 15-20 km wide east of the Yamuna River. This zone is uplifted as much as 15-20 m near the PF, and bedding is tilted 5-7° northeast. Holocene thermoluminescence-optically-stimulated luminescence dates for sediments in the Old Piedmont Zone suggest that the uplift rate might be as high as several mm/a. The Old Piedmont Zone is traced northwest 200 km and southeast another 200 km to the Nepal border. These structures, analogous to protothrusts in subduction zones, indicate that the Himalayan plate boundary is not a single structure but a series of structures across strike, including reactivated parts of the Main Boundary Thrust north of the range front, the HFT sensu stricto, and stepout structures on the Indo-Gangetic Plain. Displacement rates on all these structures must be added to determine the local India-Himalaya convergence rate.

  4. Nanoscale Strain Fields Research of Boundaries between B2 Matrix and G.P. Zone in Ni-Ti Alloy Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shilei; Zhao, Chunwang

    2014-01-01

    Ti-47at.%Ni alloy films were prepared by magnetron sputtering followed by 460°C for 40 minutes heat-treatment. The strain fields between B2 phase matrix and G.P. zone were mapped by a combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and geometric phase analysis method. It was found that there is a compressive strain region parallel to the longitudinal axis of G.P. zone with 2 nm in width, −2.2% in average strain at the boundaries between B2 phase and G.P. zone. PMID:24782660

  5. Surface Manifestation of the Ste. Genevieve Fault Zone, Missouri: Polyphase Kinematics, and Landscape Rejuvenation, along the Ozark Plateau / Illinois Basin Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLucia, M. S.; Marshak, S.; Guenthner, W.; Abert, C.; Larson, T. H.; Yang, X.; Pavlis, G. L.; Hamburger, M. W.; Chen, C.; Gilbert, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Ste. Genevieve Fault Zone (SGFZ) runs from SE Missouri into SW Illinois, in the cratonic platform of North America. This NW-trending, 190 km-long belt separates the Illinois Basin from the Ozark Dome and has served as a tectonically significant crustal boundary throughout the Phanerozoic. Data obtained from OIINK (part of EarthScope), a seismometer array that extended from the central Ozark Plateau into Kentucky, indicates that the SGFZ is more seismically active than previously recognized. A subsurface DEM of the Great Unconformity (the contact between Precambrian basement and Paleozoic strata) shows that the fault zone roughly overlies 7 km of structural relief. Interpretation of OIINK data shows that there are likely deeper crustal manifestations of the SGFZ. A recompilation of surface geological mapping of the SGFZ, coupled with new mapping of structures exposed in roadcuts along the NE corner of the Ozark Plateau, suggests that the SGFZ is a broader structure than previously observed. The complex configuration of fault traces supports a model in which the fault zone has accommodated more than one phase of transpressional and transtensional reactivation during the Phanerozoic. The SGFZ includes many splays, some of which die out up-dip in monoclinal folds whose traces control local topography. The facing of the folds indicates that some of these splays dip northeast, though the pattern of regional uplift, by analogy to uplift in the Colorado Plateau, suggests that the master fault of the SGFZ dips southwest. This association supports models in which synthetic and antithetic splays of the SGFZ locally delineate positive flower structures. LIDAR-based maps suggest the plateau was rejuvenated after the establishment of meandering streams, for a set of incised meanders serve as the local base level for subsequent dendritic drainage networks. The landscape therefore may have been affected by a phase of post-Paleozoic uplift, a hypothesis currently being tested

  6. Geologic map transecting the highland/lowland boundary zone, Arabia Terra, Mars; quadrangles 30332, 35332, 40332, and 45332

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGill, George E.

    2002-01-01

    Arabia Terra is a large region of cratered terrane extending from about 20° W. longitude eastward across the prime meridian to about 300° W. longitude for an average east-west width of about 5,000 km. The northern boundary ranges from 40° N. to 45° N.; the southern boundary is a poorly defined zone at about 0° N. Thus, the north-south width is about 2,500 km. Except for the westernmost part, Arabia Terra has an albedo higher than surrounding terranes. The four quadrangles mapped (30332, 35332, 40332, 45332) provide a north-south strip from highland terrane in the south to lowland terrane in the north. The northern portion of Arabia Terra is the type region for both fretted terrane and fretted valleys and, along with the immediately adjacent northern plains, is also the site of some of the best examples of putative flow deposits present as aprons around isolated knobs and mesas or as deposits on the floors of fretted valleys and on the lowland surface. Mass wasting, eolian erosion or deposition, glacial scouring, fluvial or shoreline erosion, deposition from an ocean, hydrovolcanism, plateau volcanism, and faulting have all been proposed to account for the topography and crater characteristics in northern Arabia Terra. Although underlain by what appears to be typical highland terrane, Arabia Terra is anomalously low, with elevations generally below the planetary reference. Probably the most important question concerning the global-scale tectonic history of Mars is the origin of the crustal dichotomy. The northern lowland is not only several kilometers lower than the southern highland, it also is surfaced by materials that are significantly younger than surface materials in the southern highland. The young surface materials in the lowland rest unconformably on basement material having an age comparable to the exposed ancient highland terrane to the south. The age of the dichotomy continues to be controversial, as does the mechanism for its formation, as reviewed

  7. Active faults, stress field and plate motion along the Indo-Eurasian plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Takashi; Otsuki, Kenshiro; Khan, S. H.

    1990-09-01

    The active faults of the Himalayas and neighboring areas are direct indicators of Recent and sub-Recent crustal movements due to continental collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates. The direction of the maximum horizontal shortening or horizontal compressive stress axes deduced from the strike and type of active faulting reveals a characteristic regional stress field along the colliding boundary. The trajectories of the stress axes along the transcurrent faults and the Eastern Himalayan Front, are approximately N-S, parallel to the relative motion of the two plates. However, along the southern margin of the Eurasian plate, they are NE-SW in the Western Himalayan Front and NW-SE to E-W in the Kirthar-Sulaiman Front, which is not consistent with the direction of relative plate motion. A simple model is proposed in order to explain the regional stress pattern. In this model, the tectonic sliver between the transcurrent faults and the plate margin, is dragged northward by the oblique convergence of the Indian plate. Thus, the direction of relative motion between the tectonic sliver and the Indian plate changes regionally, causing local compressive stress fields. Judging from the long-term slip rates along the active faults, the relative motion between the Indian and Eurasian plates absorbed in the colliding zone is about one fourth of its total amount; the rest may be consumed along the extensive strike-slip faults in Tibet and China.

  8. Formation of Golgi-derived active zone precursor vesicles.

    PubMed

    Maas, Christoph; Torres, Viviana I; Altrock, Wilko D; Leal-Ortiz, Sergio; Wagh, Dhananjay; Terry-Lorenzo, Ryan T; Fejtova, Anna; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Ziv, Noam E; Garner, Craig C

    2012-08-01

    Vesicular trafficking of presynaptic and postsynaptic components is emerging as a general cellular mechanism for the delivery of scaffold proteins, ion channels, and receptors to nascent and mature synapses. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the selection of cargos and their differential transport to subneuronal compartments are not well understood, in part because of the mixing of cargos at the plasma membrane and/or within endosomal compartments. In the present study, we have explored the cellular mechanisms of active zone precursor vesicle assembly at the Golgi in dissociated hippocampal neurons of Rattus norvegicus. Our studies show that Piccolo, Bassoon, and ELKS2/CAST exit the trans-Golgi network on a common vesicle that requires Piccolo and Bassoon for its proper assembly. In contrast, Munc13 and synaptic vesicle proteins use distinct sets of Golgi-derived transport vesicles, while RIM1α associates with vesicular membranes in a post-Golgi compartment. Furthermore, Piccolo and Bassoon are necessary for ELKS2/CAST to leave the Golgi in association with vesicles, and a core domain of Bassoon is sufficient to facilitate formation of these vesicles. While these findings support emerging principles regarding active zone differentiation, the cellular and molecular analyses reported here also indicate that the Piccolo-Bassoon transport vesicles leaving the Golgi may undergo further changes in protein composition before arriving at synaptic sites.

  9. Molecular Remodeling of the Presynaptic Active Zone of Drosophila Photoreceptors via Activity-Dependent Feedback.

    PubMed

    Sugie, Atsushi; Hakeda-Suzuki, Satoko; Suzuki, Emiko; Silies, Marion; Shimozono, Mai; Möhl, Christoph; Suzuki, Takashi; Tavosanis, Gaia

    2015-05-01

    Neural activity contributes to the regulation of the properties of synapses in sensory systems, allowing for adjustment to a changing environment. Little is known about how synaptic molecular components are regulated to achieve activity-dependent plasticity at central synapses. Here, we found that after prolonged exposure to natural ambient light the presynaptic active zone in Drosophila photoreceptors undergoes reversible remodeling, including loss of Bruchpilot, DLiprin-α, and DRBP, but not of DSyd-1 or Cacophony. The level of depolarization of the postsynaptic neurons is critical for the light-induced changes in active zone composition in the photoreceptors, indicating the existence of a feedback signal. In search of this signal, we have identified a crucial role of microtubule meshwork organization downstream of the divergent canonical Wnt pathway, potentially via Kinesin-3 Imac. These data reveal that active zone composition can be regulated in vivo and identify the underlying molecular machinery.

  10. Tectonic activity evolution of the Scotia-Antarctic Plate boundary from mass transport deposit analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Lara F.; Bohoyo, Fernando; Hernández-Molina, F. Javier; Casas, David; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Ruano, Patricia; Maldonado, Andrés.

    2016-04-01

    The spatial distribution and temporal occurrence of mass transport deposits (MTDs) in the sedimentary infill of basins and submerged banks near the Scotia-Antarctic plate boundary allowed us to decode the evolution of the tectonic activity of the relevant structures in the region from the Oligocene to present day. The 1020 MTDs identified in the available data set of multichannel seismic reflection profiles in the region are subdivided according to the geographic and chronological distributions of these features. Their spatial distribution reveals a preferential location along the eastern margins of the eastern basins. This reflects local deformation due to the evolution of the Scotia-Antarctic transcurrent plate boundary and the impact of oceanic spreading along the East Scotia Ridge (ESR). The vertical distribution of the MTDs in the sedimentary record evidences intensified regional tectonic deformation from the middle Miocene to Quaternary. Intensified deformation started at about 15 Ma, when the ESR progressively replaces the West Scotia Ridge (WSR) as the main oceanic spreading center in the Scotia Sea. Coevally with the WSR demise at about 6.5 Ma, increased spreading rates of the ESR and numerous MTDs were formed. The high frequency of MTDs during the Pliocene, mainly along the western basins, is also related to greater tectonic activity due to uplift of the Shackleton Fracture Zone by tectonic inversion and extinction of the Antarctic-Phoenix Ridge and involved changes at late Pliocene. The presence of MTDs in the southern Scotia Sea basins is a relevant indicator of the interplay between sedimentary instability and regional tectonics.

  11. How to Make an Active Zone: Unexpected Universal Functional Redundancy between RIMs and RIM-BPs.

    PubMed

    Acuna, Claudio; Liu, Xinran; Südhof, Thomas C

    2016-08-17

    RIMs and RIM-binding proteins (RBPs) are evolutionary conserved multidomain proteins of presynaptic active zones that are known to recruit Ca(2+) channels; in addition, RIMs perform well-recognized functions in tethering and priming synaptic vesicles for exocytosis. However, deletions of RIMs or RBPs in mice cause only partial impairments in various active zone functions and have no effect on active zone structure, as visualized by electron micrographs, suggesting that their contribution to active zone functions is limited. Here, we show in synapses of the calyx of Held in vivo and hippocampal neurons in culture that combined, but not individual, deletions of RIMs and RBPs eliminate tethering and priming of synaptic vesicles, deplete presynaptic Ca(2+) channels, and ablate active zone complexes, as analyzed by electron microscopy of chemically fixed synapses. Thus, RBPs perform unexpectedly broad roles at the active zone that together with those of RIMs are essential for all active zone functions. PMID:27537484

  12. How to Make an Active Zone: Unexpected Universal Functional Redundancy between RIMs and RIM-BPs.

    PubMed

    Acuna, Claudio; Liu, Xinran; Südhof, Thomas C

    2016-08-17

    RIMs and RIM-binding proteins (RBPs) are evolutionary conserved multidomain proteins of presynaptic active zones that are known to recruit Ca(2+) channels; in addition, RIMs perform well-recognized functions in tethering and priming synaptic vesicles for exocytosis. However, deletions of RIMs or RBPs in mice cause only partial impairments in various active zone functions and have no effect on active zone structure, as visualized by electron micrographs, suggesting that their contribution to active zone functions is limited. Here, we show in synapses of the calyx of Held in vivo and hippocampal neurons in culture that combined, but not individual, deletions of RIMs and RBPs eliminate tethering and priming of synaptic vesicles, deplete presynaptic Ca(2+) channels, and ablate active zone complexes, as analyzed by electron microscopy of chemically fixed synapses. Thus, RBPs perform unexpectedly broad roles at the active zone that together with those of RIMs are essential for all active zone functions.

  13. 78 FR 14963 - Foreign-Trade Zone 163-Ponce, Puerto Rico; Authorization of Production Activity; Zimmer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 163--Ponce, Puerto Rico; Authorization of Production Activity; Zimmer Manufacturing BV (Medical Devices); Ponce, Puerto Rico On November 1, 2012, CODEZOL, C.D., grantee of FTZ 163, submitted a notification of proposed production activity to the Foreign-Trade Zones...

  14. 78 FR 52759 - Foreign-Trade Zone 265-Conroe, Texas: Authorization of Production Activity; Bauer Manufacturing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 265--Conroe, Texas: Authorization of Production Activity; Bauer Manufacturing Inc. (Foundation Casings and Tools/Accessories for Pile Drivers and Boring Machinery... of proposed production activity to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of...

  15. Eclogites and related metamorphism in the North America-Caribbean plate boundary: An example from the Motagua fault zone, Guatemala (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimori, T.; Hernandez Pineda, G. A.

    2009-12-01

    Active volcanic arcs and strike-slip fault systems characterize the present-day Caribbean Plate margins. The northern boundary of the Caribbean plate in Guatemala is the Motagua fault zone (MFZ). Along the MFZ in central and eastern Guatemala, eclogite- and jadeitite-bearing serpentinite-matrix mélange are exposed stretching ˜200 km on either side of the Motagua-Polochic fault system. The MFZ eclogites and related high-pressure metamorphic rocks represent key evidence for testing existing competing Caribbean plate tectonic models (e.g., Harlow et al., 2008, GSA Abs. Prog. 40:452). The presence of lawsonite-eclogite and jadeite-eclogite with lawsonite-blueschist-facies overprinting in the south of the MFZ (Tsujimori et al., 2006, GSA Spec. Paper 403:147-68) indicates that the geotherm in the paleo-subduction zone is very low. Protoliths for these high-pressure rocks consist of uppermost oceanic crust including MORB-origin greenstones and cherts with minor trench turbidites. Epidote-paragonite-eclogites of layered gabbroic origin occur in the north of the MFZ. Although some N-MFZ eclogites record amphibolite-facies hydration and new mineral growth, eclogitic garnets preserve lawsonite-pseudomorph and glaucophane, suggesting a cold subduction zone. The lack of ubiquitous lawsonite in northern eclogites may be attributed to due to water under-saturated conditions. Considering recent geochronology that implies a coeval eclogite-facies metamorphism at ˜130 Ma (Bruekener et al., 2009, EPSL284:228-35) and petrologic similarities of host serpentinized spinel-lherzolite on either side of the MFZ, we can tentatively reconstruct the succession of a fragmented eclogite-facies metamorphosed oceanic crust. However, the correct interpretation of the paleo-subduction record and further understanding of a cold subduction-zone process at paleo-Caribbean plate margin requires a more comprehensive approach to focus on in-situ geochemical and isotopic analyses of prograde metamorphic

  16. An Integrated Geospatial System for earthquake precursors assessment in Vrancea tectonic active zone in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoran, Maria A.; Savastru, Roxana S.; Savastru, Dan M.

    2015-10-01

    With the development of space-based technologies to measure surface geophysical parameters and deformation at the boundaries of tectonic plates and large faults, earthquake science has entered a new era. Using time series satellite data for earthquake prediction, it is possible to pursue the behaviors of earthquake precursors in the future and to announce early warnings when the differences between the predicted value and the observed value exceed the pre-define threshold value. Starting with almost one week prior to a moderate or strong earthquake a transient thermal infrared rise in LST of several Celsius degrees (oC) and the increased OLR values higher than the normal have been recorded around epicentral areas, function of the magnitude and focal depth, which disappeared after the main shock. Also are recorded associated geomagnetic and ionospheric distrurbances. Vrancea tectonic active zone in Romania is characterized by a high seismic hazard in European- Mediterranean region, being responsible of strong or moderate intermediate depth and normal earthquakes generation on a confined epicentral area. Based on recorded geophysical parameters anomalies was developed an integrated geospatial system for earthquake precursors assessment in Vrancea active seismic zone. This system integrates derived from time series MODIS Terra/Aqua, NOAA-AVHRR, ASTER, Landsat TM/ETM satellite data multi geophysical parameters (land surface temperature -LST, outgoing long-wave radiation- OLR, and mean air temperature- AT as well as geomagnetic and ionospheric data in synergy with in-situ data for surveillance and forecasting of seismic events.

  17. 77 FR 26737 - Foreign-Trade Zone 235-Lakewood, NJ: Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Cosmetic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 235--Lakewood, NJ: Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Cosmetic Essence Innovations, LLC (Fragrance Bottling); Holmdel, NJ Cosmetic Essence...

  18. Deformation kinematics along oblique convergent plate boundary zones in the western United States, Japanese Islands, and Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen-Tu, Bingming

    Horizontal velocity gradient tensor field in the western U.S is estimated using moment tensors of earthquakes between 1850 to 1995. The velocity vectors obtained from the integration of the seismic strain rates across the entire plate boundary lie within 5° of the NUVEL-1A Pacific-North American plate motion direction. The magnitude of the earthquake-related velocity is 62% of the NUVEL-1A total Pacific-North American plate motion. The total velocity obtained from the Quaternary fault slip rate data across the entire plate boundary is within 2 mm/yr of the NUVEL-1A predicted Pacific (PA)-North American (NA) plate motion velocity, but directions are 6° anticlockwise of directions given by NUVEL-1A. The total velocity obtained from inversion of recent geodetic data is 2°--3° anticlockwise from the NUVEL-1A NA-PA velocity, but the difference between the two is not significant at the 95% confidence level. Relative motions within the deforming Japanese Islands with respect to the Sea of Japan are determined using earthquake records over the last 414 years, slip rates on Quaternary faults, and angular change rates obtained from triangulation in the last century. The directions of the principal strain axes obtained from seismic, geological, and geodetic data are in general agreement with each other, with the maximum shortening axis oriented in a WNW direction. Intraplate deformation in southwestern Japan determined from the seismic data accommodates a velocity of 5.5 +/- 2 (1sigma) mm/yr in a direction parallel to the Nankai trough, which is about 25% of the plate motion velocity component parallel to the Nankai trough between the Philippine Sea and Eurasian plates. A comparison of shear strain rates, principal strain rates, and velocity fields determined from geodetic data with those calculated from the elastic dislocation models involving interplate motion at the Japan trench indicates that the geodetic strain field in northern Honshu is primarily elastic strain

  19. Super-resolution microscopy of the synaptic active zone.

    PubMed

    Ehmann, Nadine; Sauer, Markus; Kittel, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Brain function relies on accurate information transfer at chemical synapses. At the presynaptic active zone (AZ) a variety of specialized proteins are assembled to complex architectures, which set the basis for speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Calcium channels are pivotal for the initiation of excitation-secretion coupling and, correspondingly, capture a central position at the AZ. Combining quantitative functional studies with modeling approaches has provided predictions of channel properties, numbers and even positions on the nanometer scale. However, elucidating the nanoscopic organization of the surrounding protein network requires direct ultrastructural access. Without this information, knowledge of molecular synaptic structure-function relationships remains incomplete. Recently, super-resolution microscopy (SRM) techniques have begun to enter the neurosciences. These approaches combine high spatial resolution with the molecular specificity of fluorescence microscopy. Here, we discuss how SRM can be used to obtain information on the organization of AZ proteins.

  20. Super-resolution microscopy of the synaptic active zone

    PubMed Central

    Ehmann, Nadine; Sauer, Markus; Kittel, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Brain function relies on accurate information transfer at chemical synapses. At the presynaptic active zone (AZ) a variety of specialized proteins are assembled to complex architectures, which set the basis for speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Calcium channels are pivotal for the initiation of excitation-secretion coupling and, correspondingly, capture a central position at the AZ. Combining quantitative functional studies with modeling approaches has provided predictions of channel properties, numbers and even positions on the nanometer scale. However, elucidating the nanoscopic organization of the surrounding protein network requires direct ultrastructural access. Without this information, knowledge of molecular synaptic structure-function relationships remains incomplete. Recently, super-resolution microscopy (SRM) techniques have begun to enter the neurosciences. These approaches combine high spatial resolution with the molecular specificity of fluorescence microscopy. Here, we discuss how SRM can be used to obtain information on the organization of AZ proteins. PMID:25688186

  1. Magnetic fields over active tectonic zones in ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kopytenko, Yu. A.; Serebrianaya, P.M.; Nikitina, L.V.; Green, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of our work is to estimate the electromagnetic effects that can be detected in the submarine zones with hydrothermal activity. It is known that meso-scale flows appear in the regions over underwater volcanoes or hot rocks. Their origin is connected with heat flux and hot jets released from underwater volcanoes or faults in a sea bottom. Values of mean velocities and turbulent velocities in plumes were estimated. Quasiconstant magnetic fields induced by a hot jet and a vortex over a plume top are about 1-40 nT. Variable magnetic fields are about 0.1-1 nT. These magnetic disturbances in the sea medium create an additional natural electromagnetic background that must be considered when making detailed magnetic surveys. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Vertical tectonics at a continental crust-oceanic plateau plate boundary zone: Fission track thermochronology of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagómez, Diego; Spikings, Richard; Mora, AndréS.; GuzmáN, Georgina; Ojeda, GermáN.; CortéS, Elizabeth; van der Lelij, Roelant

    2011-08-01

    The topographically prominent Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta forms part of a faulted block of continental crust located along the northern boundary of the South American Plate, hosts the highest elevation in the world (˜5.75 km) whose local base is at sea level, and juxtaposes oceanic plateau rocks of the Caribbean Plate. Quantification of the amount and timing of exhumation constrains interpretations of the history of the plate boundary, and the driving forces of rock uplift along the active margin. The Sierra Nevada Province of the southernmost Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta exhumed at elevated rates (≥0.2 Km/My) during 65-58 Ma in response to the collision of the Caribbean Plateau with northwestern South America. A second pulse of exhumation (≥0.32 Km/My) during 50-40 Ma was driven by underthrusting of the Caribbean Plate beneath northern South America. Subsequent exhumation at 40-25 Ma (≥0.15 Km/My) is recorded proximal to the Santa Marta-Bucaramanga Fault. More northerly regions of the Sierra Nevada Province exhumed rapidly during 26-29 Ma (˜0.7 Km/My). Further northward, the Santa Marta Province exhumed at elevated rates during 30-25 Ma and 25-16 Ma. The highest exhumation rates within the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta progressed toward the northwest via the propagation of NW verging thrusts. Exhumation is not recorded after ˜16 Ma, which is unexpected given the high elevation and high erosive power of the climate, implying that rock and surface uplift that gave rise to the current topography was very recent (i.e., ≤1 Ma?), and there has been insufficient time to expose the fossil apatite partial annealing zone.

  3. Changes in the boundaries of the permafrost layer and the methane hydrate stability zone on the Eurasian Arctic shelf, 1950-2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, A. V.; Malakhova, V. V.; Arzhanov, M. M.; Golubeva, E. N.; Denisov, S. N.; Mokhov, I. I.

    2015-12-01

    By using the model for subsea sediments (SSs) (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, IAP RAS) and the general circulation model in the Arctic Ocean-North Atlantic (GCM AO-NA) (Institute of Computational Mathematics and Mathematical Geophysics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, ICMMG SB RAS), the response of the parameters of the permafrost layer and the methane hydrate stability zone (MHSZ) to external impacts in dependence on the parameters of the problem is considered: the degree of the geothermal heat flux intensity G at the lower (bottom) boundary of the computation domain of the permafrost layer of subsea sediments and the depth Z of this boundary.

  4. The Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone - early Palaeozoic strike-slip plate boundary or Ediacaran rifted margin of Baltica?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Stanislaw; Krzywiec, Piotr; Malinowski, Michal; Lewandowski, Marek; Buffenmeyer, Vinton; Green, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone (TTZ) is the longest European tectonic and geophysical lineament extending from the Baltic Sea in the northwest to the Black Sea in the southeast. This tectonic feature defines a transition between the thick crust of the East European Craton (EEC) and the thinner crust of the Palaeozoic Platform to the southwest. Being a profound zone of crustal and lithospheric thickness perturbation, the TTZ has usually been considered a Caledonian tectonic suture formed due to the closure of the Tornquist Ocean. The suture was hypothesised to originate from the collision between Baltica and Avalonia or large-scale strike-slip displacement along strike of the Caledonian Orogen. However, some minority views postulated the continuation of Baltica crystalline basement farther to the southwest up to the Elbe Lineament and the margin of the Variscan Belt. We studied the ION Geophysical PolandSPAN survey that consists of 10 regional, seismic depth profiles covering the SW margin of the EEC and the TTZ in Poland. Since the PolandSPAN profiles image to ~30 km depth their interpretation was integrated with the potential fields data and earlier results of refraction sounding to better image the deep structure of the TTZ. Our data show that the NW and central sections of the TTZ correspond, at the Moho level, to a relatively narrow crustal keel and a significant Moho step at the transition from the EEC to the Palaeozoic Platform. However, top of basement above the TTZ is smooth and moderately sloping towards the southwest. In the central part of the TTZ, top of Precambrian is covered by undisturbed lower Palaeozoic sediments. In contrast, the lower Palaeozoic sediments are involved in a latest Silurian, thin-skinned fold-and-thrust belt along the NW section of the TTZ, where the sharply defined Caledonian Deformation Front adjoins a rigid basement buttress above the TTZ. Finally, the crustal keel is mostly missing from the SE section of the TTZ. Instead, this

  5. The Ionian and Alfeo-Etna fault zones: New segments of an evolving plate boundary in the central Mediterranean Sea?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonia, A.; Torelli, L.; Artoni, A.; Carlini, M.; Faccenna, C.; Ferranti, L.; Gasperini, L.; Govers, R.; Klaeschen, D.; Monaco, C.; Neri, G.; Nijholt, N.; Orecchio, B.; Wortel, R.

    2016-04-01

    The Calabrian Arc is a narrow subduction-rollback system resulting from Africa/Eurasia plate convergence. While crustal shortening is taken up in the accretionary wedge, transtensive deformation accounts for margin segmentation along transverse lithospheric faults. One of these structures is the NNW-SSE transtensive fault system connecting the Alfeo seamount and the Etna volcano (Alfeo-Etna Fault, AEF). A second, NW-SE crustal discontinuity, the Ionian Fault (IF), separates two lobes of the CA subduction complex (Western and Eastern Lobes) and impinges on the Sicilian coasts south of the Messina Straits. Analysis of multichannel seismic reflection profiles shows that: 1) the IF and the AEF are transfer crustal tectonic features bounding a complex deformation zone, which produces the downthrown of the Western lobe along a set of transtensive fault strands; 2) during Pleistocene times, transtensive faulting reactivated structural boundaries inherited from the Mesozoic Tethyan domain which acted as thrust faults during the Messinian and Pliocene; and 3) the IF and the AEF, and locally the Malta escarpment, accommodate a recent tectonic event coeval and possibly linked to the Mt. Etna formation. Regional geodynamic models show that, whereas AEF and IF are neighboring fault systems, their individual roles are different. Faulting primarily resulting from the ESE retreat of the Ionian slab is expressed in the northwestern part of the IF. The AEF, on the other hand, is part of the overall dextral shear deformation, resulting from differences in Africa-Eurasia motion between the western and eastern sectors of the Tyrrhenian margin of northern Sicily, and accommodating diverging motions in the adjacent compartments, which results in rifting processes within the Western Lobe of the Calabrian Arc accretionary wedge. As such, it is primarily associated with Africa-Eurasia relative motion.

  6. Boundary Activities of Middle School Teacher Teams in a Global Era: Empirical Evidence from China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Shengnan; Feng, Daming

    2016-01-01

    With the tide of globalization, the external environment that schools face turns uncertain and complex. In response to the new challenges, teacher teams need to manage boundaries to maintain the sustainable development. The two studies reported in this paper, aimed to examine the boundary activities of teacher teams of middle schools in China. In…

  7. Continuity, segmentation and faulting type of active fault zones of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake inferred from analyses of a gravity gradient tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Nayuta; Yoshihiro, Hiramatsu; Sawada, Akihiro

    2016-10-01

    We analyze Bouguer anomalies in/around the focal region of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake to examine features, such as continuity, segmentation and faulting type, of the active fault zones related to the earthquake. Several derivatives and structural parameters calculated from a gravity gradient tensor are applied to highlight the features. First horizontal and vertical derivatives, as well as a normalized total horizontal derivative, characterize well the continuous subsurface fault structure along the Futagawa fault zone. On the other hand, the Hinagu fault zone is not clearly detected by these derivatives, especially in the case of the Takano-Shirahata segment, suggesting a difference of cumulative vertical displacement between the two fault zones. The normalized total horizontal derivative and the dimensionality index indicate a discontinuity of the subsurface structure of the Hinagu fault zone, that is, a segment boundary between the Takano-Shirahata and the Hinagu segments. The aftershock distribution does not extend beyond this segment boundary. In other words, this segment boundary controls the southern end of the rupture area of the foreshock. We also recognize normal fault structures dipping to the northwest in some areas of the fault zones from estimations of dip angles.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. 78 FR 20091 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity, Perkins Shibaura...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 26--Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity, Perkins Shibaura Engines, LLC (Diesel Engines), Griffin, Georgia On November 29, 2012, Georgia Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 26,...

  9. 78 FR 28801 - Foreign-Trade Zone 117-Orange, TX, Authorization of Production Activity, Signal International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (78 FR 4383, 1-22-2013). The FTZ Board has... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 117--Orange, TX, Authorization of Production Activity, Signal International Texas GP, LLC (Shipbuilding), Orange, TX On January 10, 2013, the Foreign Trade Zone of...

  10. Fold/cleavage relationships as indicator for late Variscan sinistral transpression at the Rheno-Hercynian-Saxo-Thuringian boundary zone, Central European Variscides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Tobias; Kroner, Uwe; Hahn, Torsten; Hallas, Peter; Heuse, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The boundary between the Rheno-Hercynian and the Saxo-Thuringian zones of the European Variscides is characterized by a NE-SW striking late orogenic fold-and-thrust belt affecting the intervening Rheic suture. Classical models used the first-order strike of this zone as an indicator for perpendicular plate convergence, i.e. NW-SE. We present structural data from both sides of the suture, focusing on fold-cleavage relationships. The statistical analysis reveals an orientation maximum of the youngest cleavage that deviates from the strike of the fold-and-thrust belt by c. 22°. The presence of clockwise transection of the folds by the cleavage (up to - 16°) indicates pervasive sinistral transpression. Three types of fold-cleavage relationships are observed: NE trending folds (I) with or (II) without a transecting cleavage, and (III) non-transected ENE trending folds. We explain the occurrence of different fold-cleavage types by strain partitioning due to NNW convergence obliquely to pre-existent NE trending mechanical anisotropies. In terms of plate tectonics we propose that the classical boundary of the Rheno-Hercynian and the Saxo-Thuringian Zone represents an initial transform plate boundary that was finally affected by sinistral transpression.

  11. Are boundary conditions in surface productivity at the Southern Polar Front reflected in benthic activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Angelika; Vanreusel, Ann; Bracher, Astrid; Jule Marie Hoppe, Clara; Lins, Lidia; Meyer-Löbbecke, Anna; Altenburg Soppa, Mariana; Würzberg, Laura

    2014-10-01

    In austral summer 2012, during the expedition ANT-XXVIII/3 on board RV Polarstern, two sites were sampled 1600 km apart in the South Polar Front area (52°S) at the boundary of different productivity regimes for meio- and macrobenthos using a multiple-corer and an epibenthic sledge, respectively. Patterns in density and abundance data were compared between different size classes of the benthos and interpreted in relation to surface primary productivity data and sediment oxygen consumption. We tested the hypothesis that long-term satellite-derived surface phytoplankton biomass, in situ real time biomass, and productivity measurements at the surface and throughout the euphotic zone are reflected in abyssal benthos densities, abundances and activity. Specifically, we investigated the effect of boundary conditions for lower and higher surface productivity. Surface and integrated to 100 m depth biomass and primary productivity measurements vary stations, with the lowest values at station 85 (0.083 mg Chl-a m-3 at surface, 9 mg Chl-a m-2 and 161 mg C m-2 d-1- integrated over the first 100 m depth), and the highest values at station 86 (2.231 mg Chl-a m-3 at surface, 180 mg Chl-a m-2 and 2587 mg C m-2 d-1 integrated over first 100 m depth). Total meiofaunal densities varied between 102 and 335 individuals/10 cm². Densities were the highest at station 86-30 (335 individuals) and lowest at station 81-13 (102 individuals). Total macrofaunal densities (individuals/1000 m²) varied between 26 individuals at station 81-17 and 194 individuals at station 86-24. However, three EBS hauls were taken at station 86 with a minimum of 80 and a maximum of 194 individuals. Sediment oxygen consumption did not vary significantly between stations from east to west. Bentho-pelagic coupling of meio- and macrobenthic communities could not be observed in the South Polar Front at the boundary conditions from low to high surface productivity between stations 81 and 86.

  12. Fast Activity Evoked by Intracranial 50 Hz Electrical Stimulation as a Marker of the Epileptogenic Zone.

    PubMed

    Bellistri, Elisa; Sartori, Ivana; Pelliccia, Veronica; Francione, Stefano; Cardinale, Francesco; de Curtis, Marco; Gnatkovsky, Vadym

    2015-08-01

    Epilepsy is a disease characterized by aberrant connections between brain areas. The altered activity patterns generated by epileptic networks can be analyzed with intracerebral electrodes during pre-surgical stereo-electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring in patients candidate to epilepsy surgery. The responses to high frequency stimulation (HFS) at 50 Hz performed for diagnostic purposes during SEEG were analyzed with a new algorithm, to evaluate signal parameters that are masked to visual inspection and to define the boundaries of the epileptogenic network. The analysis was focused on 60-80 Hz activity that represented the largest frequency component evoked by HFS. The distribution of HFS-evoked fast activity across all (up to 162) recording contacts allowed to define different clusters of contacts that retrospectively correlated to the epileptogenic zone identified by the clinicians on the basis of traditional visual analysis. The study demonstrates that computer-assisted analysis of HFS-evoked activities may contribute to the definition of the epileptogenic network on intracranial recordings performed in a pre-surgical setting.

  13. DYNAMICS OF NASCENT AND ACTIVE ZONE ULTRASTRUCTURE AS SYNAPSES ENLARGE DURING LTP IN MATURE HIPPOCAMPUS

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Maria Elizabeth; Bourne, Jennifer N.; Chirillo, Michael A.; Mendenhall, John M.; Kuwajima, Masaaki; Harris, Kristen M.

    2014-01-01

    Nascent zones and active zones are adjacent synaptic regions that share a postsynaptic density, but nascent zones lack the presynaptic vesicles found at active zones. Here dendritic spine synapses were reconstructed through serial section electron microscopy (3DEM) and EM tomography to investigate nascent zone dynamics during long-term potentiation (LTP) in mature rat hippocampus. LTP was induced with theta-burst stimulation and comparisons were made to control stimulation in the same hippocampal slices at 5 minutes, 30 minutes, and 2 hours post-induction and to perfusion-fixed hippocampus in vivo. Nascent zones were present at the edges of ~35% of synapses in perfusion-fixed hippocampus and as many as ~50% of synapses in some hippocampal slice conditions. By 5 minutes, small dense core vesicles known to transport active zone proteins moved into more presynaptic boutons. By 30 minutes, nascent zone area decreased without significant change in synapse area, suggesting that presynaptic vesicles were recruited to pre-existing nascent zones. By 2 hours, both nascent and active zones were enlarged. Immunogold labeling revealed that glutamate receptors can be found in nascent zones; however, average distances from nascent zones to docked presynaptic vesicles ranged from 170±5 nm in perfusion-fixed hippocampus to 251±4 nm at enlarged synapses by 2 hours during LTP. Prior stochastic modeling suggests that falloff in glutamate concentration reduces the probability of glutamate receptor activation from 0.4 at the center of release to 0.1 just 200 nm away. Thus, conversion of nascent zones to functional active zones likely requires the recruitment of presynaptic vesicles during LTP. PMID:25043676

  14. Maturation of active zone assembly by Drosophila Bruchpilot

    PubMed Central

    Fouquet, Wernher; Owald, David; Wichmann, Carolin; Mertel, Sara; Depner, Harald; Dyba, Marcus; Hallermann, Stefan; Kittel, Robert J.; Eimer, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles fuse at active zone (AZ) membranes where Ca2+ channels are clustered and that are typically decorated by electron-dense projections. Recently, mutants of the Drosophila melanogaster ERC/CAST family protein Bruchpilot (BRP) were shown to lack dense projections (T-bars) and to suffer from Ca2+ channel–clustering defects. In this study, we used high resolution light microscopy, electron microscopy, and intravital imaging to analyze the function of BRP in AZ assembly. Consistent with truncated BRP variants forming shortened T-bars, we identify BRP as a direct T-bar component at the AZ center with its N terminus closer to the AZ membrane than its C terminus. In contrast, Drosophila Liprin-α, another AZ-organizing protein, precedes BRP during the assembly of newly forming AZs by several hours and surrounds the AZ center in few discrete punctae. BRP seems responsible for effectively clustering Ca2+ channels beneath the T-bar density late in a protracted AZ formation process, potentially through a direct molecular interaction with intracellular Ca2+ channel domains. PMID:19596851

  15. Mapping of crustal scale tectonic boundaries in the Ossa-Morena Zone using reprocessed IBERSEIS reflection seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashubin, A. S.; Juhlin, C.

    2010-06-01

    The IBERSEIS deep seismic reflection profile imaged crustal scale structures in the SW Iberian Variscan belt, crossing the South Portuguese Zone, the Ossa-Morena Zone and the Central Iberian Zone in Spain. Two subsets of the profile, corresponding to the South Portuguese Zone-Ossa-Morena Zone and the Ossa-Morena Zone-Central Iberian Zone tectonic contacts, have been reprocessed with the aim of investigating the influence of cross-dip and to better image steeply dipping features. Alternative strategies for binning midpoints into common depth point (CDP) bins using different azimuths were examined for synthetic data. We show that the choice of the CDP-processing line and the bin azimuth orientation has a significant impact on the normal moveout and dip-moveout velocities and is crucial to optimizing the quality of the stacked seismic image along the crooked profile. Multi-azimuth binning, normal moveout/dip-moveout, and migration velocity analysis on synthetic and real data show the presence of clear sub-vertical upper crustal structures near the South Portuguese Zone-Ossa-Morena Zone suture, the Aroche fault. This sub-vertical reflectivity that was not imaged earlier, projects into a location in the lower crust with low reflectivity.

  16. Oblique collision and accretion of the Netherlands Leeward Antilles island arc: A structural analysis of the Caribbean-South American plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, Amanda Gail

    2007-12-01

    The Netherlands Leeward Antilles volcanic island arc is an ideal natural laboratory to study the evolution of the Caribbean-South American plate boundary. The Leeward Antilles islands (Aruba, Curacao, and Bonaire) are located offshore western Venezuela, within the obliquely convergent diffuse plate boundary zone. Outcrop analysis, microthermometry, and 2D marine seismic reflection data provide evidence of three generations of regional deformation since the Late Cretaceous. Outcrop analysis of structural features, including faults, joints, and veins, characterizes the kinematic history of the islands. Fluid inclusion analysis of quartz and calcite veins coupled with apatite fission-track dating provides the island exhumation history. Finally, marine reflection seismic data processing and interpretation of newly acquired data elucidates offshore structures to integrate with our onshore results. The oldest regional deformation, resulting in both ductile (D1) and brittle (F 1) structures, is attributed to displacement partitioning along the arcuate Caribbean plate boundary. Associated crustal thinning initiated island exhumation, at a rate of 0.18 km/my, from a maximum burial depth of 6 km in the Late Cretaceous (˜89 Ma). Coeval with D1/F1 deformation and exhumation, stretching of the island arc resulted in extensive basin rifting that separated the island blocks. At ˜55 Ma, a change in the relative motion of the Caribbean plate altered plate boundary dynamics. Displacement along the right-lateral Caribbean transform fault and Oca - San Sebastian - El Pilar strike-slip fault system created a wrench tectonic regime within the diffuse plate boundary zone. A second generation of brittle structures (F2) developed while the islands were at a maximum burial depth of 2 km during the Paleocene/Eocene. Since ˜45 Ma, continued motion along the strike-slip fault systems and oblique plate convergence resulted in the youngest generation of structural features (F3). Regional

  17. Structure and seismic activity of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evain, M.; Galve, A.; Charvis, P.; Laigle, M.; Ruiz Fernandez, M.; Kopp, H.; Hirn, A.; Flueh, E. R.; Thales Scientific Party

    2011-12-01

    Several active and passive seismic experiments conducted in 2007 in the framework of the European program "Thales Was Right" and of the French ANR program "Subsismanti" provided a unique set of geophysical data highlighting the deep structure of the central part of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone, offshore Dominica and Martinique, and its seismic activity during a period of 8 months. The region is characterized by a relatively low rate of seismicity that is often attributed to the slow (2 cm/yr) subduction of the old, 90 My, Atlantic lithosphere beneath the Caribbean Plate. Based on tomographic inversion of wide-angle seismic data, the forearc can clearly be divided into an inner forearc, characterised by a high vertical velocity gradient in the igneous crust, and an outer forearc with lower crustal velocity gradient. The thick, high velocity, inner forearc is possibly the extension at depth of the Mesozoic Caribbean crust outcropping in La Désirade Island. The outer forearc, up to 70 km wide in the northern part of the study area, is getting narrower to the south and disappears offshore Martinique. Based on its seismic velocity structure with velocities higher than 6 km/s the backstop consists, at least partly, of magmatic rocks. The outer forearc is also highly deformed and faulted within the subducting trend of the Tiburon Ridge. With respect to the inner forearc velocity structure the outer forearc basement could either correspond to an accreted oceanic terrane or made of highly fractured rocks. The inner forearc is a dense, poorly deformable crustal block, tilted southward as a whole. It acts as a rigid buttress increasing the strain within both the overriding and subducting plates. This appears clearly in the current local seismicity affecting the subducting and the overriding plates that is located beneath the inner forearc. We detected earthquakes beneath the Caribbean forearc and in the Atlantic oceanic plate as well. The main seismic activity is

  18. Compositional variations in spinel-hosted pargasite inclusions in the olivine-rich rock from the oceanic crust-mantle boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Akihiro; Morishita, Tomoaki; Ishimaru, Satoko; Hara, Kaori; Sanfilippo, Alessio; Arai, Shoji

    2016-05-01

    The crust-mantle boundary zone of the oceanic lithosphere is composed mainly of olivine-rich rocks represented by dunite and troctolite. However, we still do not fully understand the global variations in the boundary zone, and an effective classification of the boundary rocks, in terms of their petrographical features and origin, is an essential step in achieving such an understanding. In this paper, to highlight variations in olivine-rich rocks from the crust-mantle boundary, we describe the compositional variations in spinel-hosted hydrous silicate mineral inclusions in rock samples from the ocean floor near a mid-ocean ridge and trench. Pargasite is the dominant mineral among the inclusions, and all of them are exceptionally rich in incompatible elements. The host spinel grains are considered to be products of melt-peridotite reactions, because their origin cannot be ascribed to simple fractional crystallization of a melt. Trace-element compositions of pargasite inclusions are characteristically different between olivine-rich rock samples, in terms of the degree of Eu and Zr anomalies in the trace-element pattern. When considering the nature of the reaction that produced the inclusion-hosting spinel, the compositional differences between samples were found to reflect a diversity in the origin of the olivine-rich rocks, as for example in whether or not a reaction was accompanied by the fractional crystallization of plagioclase. The differences also reflect the fact that the melt flow system (porous or focused flow) controlled the melt/rock ratios during reaction. The pargasite inclusions provide useful data for constraining the history and origin of the olivine-rich rocks and therefore assist in our understanding of the crust-mantle boundary of the oceanic lithosphere.

  19. A general analytical model for pumping tests in radial finite two-zone confined aquifers with Robin-type outer boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ye-Chen; Yang, Shaw-Yang; Fen, Chiu-Shia; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2016-09-01

    This study develops a general analytical model for describing transient drawdown distribution induced by pumping at a finite-radius well in a radial two-zone confined aquifer of finite areal extent with Robin-type condition at both inner and outer boundaries. This model is also applicable to heat conduction problems for a composite hollow cylinder on the basis of the analogy between heat flow and groundwater flow. The time-domain solution of the model is derived by the methods of Laplace transform, Bromwich integral, and residue theorem. This new solution can reduce to the solution for constant-head test (CHT) or constant-rate test (CRT) problem by specifying appropriate coefficients at the Robin inner boundary condition. The solution describing the flow rate across the wellbore due to CHT is further developed by applying Darcy's law to the new solution. In addition, steady-state solutions for both CHT and CRT are also developed based on the approximation for Bessel functions with very small argument values. Many existing solutions for transient flow in homogeneous or two-zone finite aquifers with Dirichlet or no-flow condition at the outer boundary are shown to be special cases of the present solution. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis is also performed to investigate the behaviors of the wellbore flow due to CHT and the aquifer drawdown induced by CRT in response to the change in each of aquifer parameters.

  20. Active zone impact on deformation state of non-rigid pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandula, Ján

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with the design of non-rigid pavement, with emphasis on the effect of active zone on its deformation state. The concepts of determination of active zone are described. The results of numerical modelling of pavement laying on elastic subgrade are presented in the paper

  1. Redefining Medlicott-Wadia's main boundary fault from Jhelum to Yamuna: An active fault strand of the main boundary thrust in northwest Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, V. C.; Jayangondaperumal, R.; Malik, M. A.

    2010-06-01

    The MBT demarcates a tectonic boundary between the Tertiary Sub Himalaya and the pre-Tertiary Lesser Himalaya. South of the MBT, another tectonically important fault extends from Muzaffarabad and Riasi in Jammu-Kashmir to Bilaspur and Nahan in Himachal. Medlicott and Wadia had designated this fault the Main Boundary Fault (MBF) in Simla Hills and Jammu region respectively. In between these two areas, later workers gave local-area names to the MBF as the Riasi Thrust in Jammu, Palampur Thrust in Kangra, Bilaspur Thrust in Simla Hills and Nahan Thrust in Sirmur. We have reviewed and established the tectonostratigraphic framework and physical continuity of the lower Tertiary belt and the MBF. The lower Tertiary belt, lying south of the MBT, has characteristic tectonostratigraphic setting with discontinuous bodies of stromatolite-bearing Proterozoic limestone overlain with depositional contact by the Paleocene-lower part Middle Eocene marine Subathu/Patala formation which in turn overlain by the Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene non-marine Dharamsala/Murree Formation. To avoid confusion with the MBT, we designate collectively the MBF and related faults as the Medlicott-Wadia Thrust (MWT). The MWT extends east of Hazara-Kashmir syntaxis to river Yamuna, covering a distance of ˜ 700 km. Further east of Yamuna, the lower Tertiary belt pinches out and the MWT merges with the sensuo-stricto MBT. The Proterozoic limestone represents the basement over which the lower Tertiary sediments were deposited. The limestone basement with its cover was detached by the MWT, exhuming to the surface and thrusting over largely the Siwalik group. The reactivated Balakot-Bagh Fault, causative fault for the 2005 Kashmir earthquake, extends southeast with right-step to the Riasi Thrust. The Riasi Thrust shows evidence of reactivation and active tectonic activity in Jammu region. It extends further east to the Palampur Thrust in Kangra reentrant, which lies within the 1905 Kangra earthquake

  2. Fusion Competent Synaptic Vesicles Persist upon Active Zone Disruption and Loss of Vesicle Docking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan Shan H; Held, Richard G; Wong, Man Yan; Liu, Changliang; Karakhanyan, Aziz; Kaeser, Pascal S

    2016-08-17

    In a nerve terminal, synaptic vesicle docking and release are restricted to an active zone. The active zone is a protein scaffold that is attached to the presynaptic plasma membrane and opposed to postsynaptic receptors. Here, we generated conditional knockout mice removing the active zone proteins RIM and ELKS, which additionally led to loss of Munc13, Bassoon, Piccolo, and RIM-BP, indicating disassembly of the active zone. We observed a near-complete lack of synaptic vesicle docking and a strong reduction in vesicular release probability and the speed of exocytosis, but total vesicle numbers, SNARE protein levels, and postsynaptic densities remained unaffected. Despite loss of the priming proteins Munc13 and RIM and of docked vesicles, a pool of releasable vesicles remained. Thus, the active zone is necessary for synaptic vesicle docking and to enhance release probability, but releasable vesicles can be localized distant from the presynaptic plasma membrane. PMID:27537483

  3. Fusion Competent Synaptic Vesicles Persist upon Active Zone Disruption and Loss of Vesicle Docking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan Shan H; Held, Richard G; Wong, Man Yan; Liu, Changliang; Karakhanyan, Aziz; Kaeser, Pascal S

    2016-08-17

    In a nerve terminal, synaptic vesicle docking and release are restricted to an active zone. The active zone is a protein scaffold that is attached to the presynaptic plasma membrane and opposed to postsynaptic receptors. Here, we generated conditional knockout mice removing the active zone proteins RIM and ELKS, which additionally led to loss of Munc13, Bassoon, Piccolo, and RIM-BP, indicating disassembly of the active zone. We observed a near-complete lack of synaptic vesicle docking and a strong reduction in vesicular release probability and the speed of exocytosis, but total vesicle numbers, SNARE protein levels, and postsynaptic densities remained unaffected. Despite loss of the priming proteins Munc13 and RIM and of docked vesicles, a pool of releasable vesicles remained. Thus, the active zone is necessary for synaptic vesicle docking and to enhance release probability, but releasable vesicles can be localized distant from the presynaptic plasma membrane.

  4. Unc-51 controls active zone density and protein composition by downregulating ERK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wairkar, Yogesh P.; Toda, Hirofumi; Mochizuki, Hiroaki; Furukubo-Tokunaga, Katsuo; Tomoda, Toshifumi; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Efficient synaptic transmission requires the apposition of neurotransmitter release sites opposite clusters of postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. Transmitter is released at active zones, which are composed of a large complex of proteins necessary for synaptic development and function. Many active zone proteins have been identified, but little is known of the mechanisms that ensure that each active zone receives the proper complement of proteins. Here we use a genetic analysis in Drosophila to demonstrate that the serine threonine kinase Unc-51 acts in the presynaptic motoneuron to regulate the localization of the active zone protein Bruchpilot opposite to glutamate receptors at each synapse. In the absence of Unc-51, many glutamate receptor clusters are unapposed to Bruchpilot, and ultrastructural analysis demonstrates that fewer active zones contain dense body T-bars. In addition to the presence of these aberrant synapses, there is also a decrease in the density of all synapses. This decrease in synaptic density and abnormal active zone composition is associated with impaired evoked transmitter release. Mechanistically, Unc-51 inhibits the activity of the MAP kinase ERK to promote synaptic development. In the unc-51 mutant, increased ERK activity leads to the decrease in synaptic density and the absence of Bruchpilot from many synapses. Hence, activated ERK negatively regulates synapse formation, resulting in either the absence of active zones or the formation of active zones without their proper complement of proteins. The Unc-51-dependent inhibition of ERK activity provides a potential mechanism for synapse-specific control of active zone protein composition and release probability. PMID:19144852

  5. Unc-51 controls active zone density and protein composition by downregulating ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Wairkar, Yogesh P; Toda, Hirofumi; Mochizuki, Hiroaki; Furukubo-Tokunaga, Katsuo; Tomoda, Toshifumi; Diantonio, Aaron

    2009-01-14

    Efficient synaptic transmission requires the apposition of neurotransmitter release sites opposite clusters of postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. Transmitter is released at active zones, which are composed of a large complex of proteins necessary for synaptic development and function. Many active zone proteins have been identified, but little is known of the mechanisms that ensure that each active zone receives the proper complement of proteins. Here we use a genetic analysis in Drosophila to demonstrate that the serine threonine kinase Unc-51 acts in the presynaptic motoneuron to regulate the localization of the active zone protein Bruchpilot opposite to glutamate receptors at each synapse. In the absence of Unc-51, many glutamate receptor clusters are unapposed to Bruchpilot, and ultrastructural analysis demonstrates that fewer active zones contain dense body T-bars. In addition to the presence of these aberrant synapses, there is also a decrease in the density of all synapses. This decrease in synaptic density and abnormal active zone composition is associated with impaired evoked transmitter release. Mechanistically, Unc-51 inhibits the activity of the MAP kinase ERK to promote synaptic development. In the unc-51 mutant, increased ERK activity leads to the decrease in synaptic density and the absence of Bruchpilot from many synapses. Hence, activated ERK negatively regulates synapse formation, resulting in either the absence of active zones or the formation of active zones without their proper complement of proteins. The Unc-51-dependent inhibition of ERK activity provides a potential mechanism for synapse-specific control of active zone protein composition and release probability.

  6. Tsunamigenic potential of Mediterranean fault systems and active subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petricca, Patrizio; Babeyko, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Since the North East Atlantic and Mediterranean Tsunami Warning System (NEAMTWS) is under development by the European scientific community, it becomes necessary to define guidelines for the characterization of the numerous parameters must be taken into account in a fair assessment of the risk. Definition of possible tectonic sources and evaluation of their potential is one of the principal issues. In this study we systematically evaluate tsunamigenic potential of up-to-now known real fault systems and active subduction interfaces in the NEAMTWS region. The task is accomplished by means of numerical modeling of tsunami generation and propagation. We have simulated all possible uniform-slip ruptures populating fault and subduction interfaces with magnitudes ranging from 6.5 up to expected Mmax. A total of 15810 individual ruptures were processed. For each rupture, a tsunami propagation scenario was computed in linear shallow-water approximation on 1-arc minute bathymetric grid (Gebco_08) implying normal reflection boundary conditions. Maximum wave heights at coastal positions (totally - 23236 points of interest) were recorded for four hours of simulation and then classified according to currently adopted warning level thresholds. The resulting dataset allowed us to classify the sources in terms of their tsunamigenic potential as well as to estimate their minimum tsunamigenic magnitude. Our analysis shows that almost every source in the Mediterranean Sea is capable to produce local tsunami at the advisory level (i.e., wave height > 20 cm) starting from magnitude values of Mw=6.6. In respect to the watch level (wave height > 50 cm), the picture is less homogeneous: crustal sources in south-west Mediterranean as well as East-Hellenic arc need larger magnitudes (around Mw=7.0) to trigger watch levels even at the nearby coasts. In the context of the regional warning (i.e., source-to-coast distance > 100 km) faults also behave more heterogeneously in respect to the minimum

  7. Zoogeography of the San Andreas Fault system: Great Pacific Fracture Zones correspond with spatially concordant phylogeographic boundaries in western North America.

    PubMed

    Gottscho, Andrew D

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an ultimate tectonic explanation for several well-studied zoogeographic boundaries along the west coast of North America, specifically, along the boundary of the North American and Pacific plates (the San Andreas Fault system). By reviewing 177 references from the plate tectonics and zoogeography literature, I demonstrate that four Great Pacific Fracture Zones (GPFZs) in the Pacific plate correspond with distributional limits and spatially concordant phylogeographic breaks for a wide variety of marine and terrestrial animals, including invertebrates, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. These boundaries are: (1) Cape Mendocino and the North Coast Divide, (2) Point Conception and the Transverse Ranges, (3) Punta Eugenia and the Vizcaíno Desert, and (4) Cabo Corrientes and the Sierra Transvolcanica. However, discussion of the GPFZs is mostly absent from the zoogeography and phylogeography literature likely due to a disconnect between biologists and geologists. I argue that the four zoogeographic boundaries reviewed here ultimately originated via the same geological process (triple junction evolution). Finally, I suggest how a comparative phylogeographic approach can be used to test the hypothesis presented here. PMID:25521005

  8. Zoogeography of the San Andreas Fault system: Great Pacific Fracture Zones correspond with spatially concordant phylogeographic boundaries in western North America.

    PubMed

    Gottscho, Andrew D

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an ultimate tectonic explanation for several well-studied zoogeographic boundaries along the west coast of North America, specifically, along the boundary of the North American and Pacific plates (the San Andreas Fault system). By reviewing 177 references from the plate tectonics and zoogeography literature, I demonstrate that four Great Pacific Fracture Zones (GPFZs) in the Pacific plate correspond with distributional limits and spatially concordant phylogeographic breaks for a wide variety of marine and terrestrial animals, including invertebrates, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. These boundaries are: (1) Cape Mendocino and the North Coast Divide, (2) Point Conception and the Transverse Ranges, (3) Punta Eugenia and the Vizcaíno Desert, and (4) Cabo Corrientes and the Sierra Transvolcanica. However, discussion of the GPFZs is mostly absent from the zoogeography and phylogeography literature likely due to a disconnect between biologists and geologists. I argue that the four zoogeographic boundaries reviewed here ultimately originated via the same geological process (triple junction evolution). Finally, I suggest how a comparative phylogeographic approach can be used to test the hypothesis presented here.

  9. Hurricane Mountain Formation melange: history of Cambro-Ordovician accretion of the Boundary Mountains terrane within the northern Appalachian orthotectonic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, G.M.; Boudette, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Hurricane Mountain Formation (HMF) melange and associated ophiolitic and volcanogenic formations of Cambrian and lowermost Ordovician age bound the SE margin of the Precambrian Y (Helikian) Chain Lakes Massif in western Maine. HMF melange matrix, though weakly metamorphosed, contains a wide variety of exotic greenschist to amphibolite facies blocks as components of its polymictic assemblage, but blocks of high-grade cratonal rocks such as those of Chain Lakes or Grenville affinity are lacking. Formations of melange exposed in structural culminations of Cambrian and Ordovician rocks NE of the HMF in Maine and in the Fournier Group in New Brunswick are lithologically similar and probably tectonically correlative with the HMF; taken together, they may delineate a common pre-Middle Ordovician tectonic boundary. The authors infer that the Hurricane Mountain and St. Daniel melange belts define the SE and NW margins of the Boundary Mountains accreted terrane (BMT), which may consist of cratonal basement of Chain Lakes affinity extending from eastern Gaspe (deBroucker and St. Julien, 1985) to north-central New Hampshire. The Laurentian continental margin, underlain by Grenville basement, underplated the NW margin of this terrane, marked by the SDF suture zone, in late Cambrian to early Ordovician time, while terranes marked by Cambrian to Tremadocian (.) lithologies dissimilar to the Boundary Mountains terrane were accreted to its outboard margin penecontemporaneously. The docking of the Boundary Mountains terrane and the initiation of its peripheral melanges are equated to the Penobscottian disturbance.

  10. Gallbladder Boundary Segmentation from Ultrasound Images Using Active Contour Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciecholewski, Marcin

    Extracting the shape of the gallbladder from an ultrasonography (US) image allows superfluous information which is immaterial in the diagnostic process to be eliminated. In this project an active contour model was used to extract the shape of the gallbladder, both for cases free of lesions, and for those showing specific disease units, namely: lithiasis, polyps and changes in the shape of the organ, such as folds or turns of the gallbladder. The approximate shape of the gallbladder was found by applying the motion equation model. The tests conducted have shown that for the 220 US images of the gallbladder, the area error rate (AER) amounted to 18.15%.

  11. Visualization of oxygen reduction sites at Pt electrodes on YSZ by means of 18O tracer incorporation: the width of the electrochemically active zone.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Alexander Karl; Schintlmeister, Arno; Hutter, Herbert; Fleig, Jürgen

    2010-10-21

    In this study the electrochemically active region of oxygen incorporation into yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was visualized by means of (18)O tracer incorporation experiments on dense Pt thin film microelectrodes combined with ToF-SIMS analysis. The localization and the shape of the incorporation zone were found to strongly depend on the polarization of the electrode. In case of lower overpotentials the active zone next to the three phase boundary (TPB) was frame-shaped and located beneath the Pt electrode. Increases in polarization led to an extension of the incorporation zone along the free YSZ surface. Owing to the low temperature of 300-330 °C a profile-broadening caused by diffusion in YSZ could be minimized and quantitatively separated from the measured profiles. The TPB-width (i.e. the decay length of electrochemical activity) was determined to be approximately 1.0-1.3 μm at these temperatures.

  12. Are quartz LPOs predictably oriented with respect to the shear zone boundary?: A test from the Alpine Fault mylonites, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Timothy A.; Prior, David J.; Toy, Virginia G.

    2016-03-01

    The Alpine fault self-exhumes its own ductile shear zone roots and has a known slip kinematics. Within ˜1 km of the fault, the mylonitic foliation is subparallel to the boundary of the amphibolite-facies ductile shear zone in which it formed. Using EBSD, we analyzed quartz Lattice Preferred Orientations [LPOs) of mylonites along a central part of the Alpine Fault. All LPOs feature a strongest girdle of [c]-axes that is forward-inclined ˜28 ± 4° away from the pole to the fault. A maximum of axes is inclined at the same angle relative the fault. The [c]-axis girdle is perpendicular to extensional (C') shear bands and the maximum is parallel to their slip direction. [c]-axis girdles do not form perpendicular to the SZB. Schmid factor analysis suggests that σ1 was arranged at 60-80° to the Alpine Fault. These observations indicate ductile transpression in the shear zone. The inclined arrangement of [c]-axis girdles, axes, and C' planes relative to the fault can be explained by their alignment relative to planes of maximum shear-strain-rate in a general shear zone, a significant new insight regarding shear zones and how LPO fabrics may generally develop within them. For the Alpine mylonite zone, our data imply a kinematic vorticity number (Wk) of ˜0.7 to ˜0.85. Inversions of seismic focal mechanisms in the brittle crust of the Southern Alps indicate that σ1 is oriented ˜60° to the Alpine Fault; that shear bands form at ˜30° to this direction, and that σ2 and σ3 flip positions between the brittle and ductile parts of the crust.

  13. Active open boundary forcing using dual relaxation time-scales in downscaled ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzfeld, M.; Gillibrand, P. A.

    2015-05-01

    Regional models actively forced with data from larger scale models at their open boundaries often contain motion at different time-scales (e.g. tidal and low frequency). These motions are not always individually well specified in the forcing data, and one may require a more active boundary forcing while the other exert less influence on the model interior. If a single relaxation time-scale is used to relax toward these data in the boundary equation, then this may be difficult. The method of fractional steps is used to introduce dual relaxation time-scales in an open boundary local flux adjustment scheme. This allows tidal and low frequency oscillations to be relaxed independently, resulting in a better overall solution than if a single relaxation parameter is optimized for tidal (short relaxation) or low frequency (long relaxation) boundary forcing. The dual method is compared to the single relaxation method for an idealized test case where a tidal signal is superimposed on a steady state low frequency solution, and a real application where the low frequency boundary forcing component is derived from a global circulation model for a region extending over the whole Great Barrier Reef, and a tidal signal subsequently superimposed.

  14. Functional Requirements for Fab-7 Boundary Activity in the Bithorax Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wolle, Daniel; Cleard, Fabienne; Aoki, Tsutomu; Deshpande, Girish; Karch, Francois

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin boundaries are architectural elements that determine the three-dimensional folding of the chromatin fiber and organize the chromosome into independent units of genetic activity. The Fab-7 boundary from the Drosophila bithorax complex (BX-C) is required for the parasegment-specific expression of the Abd-B gene. We have used a replacement strategy to identify sequences that are necessary and sufficient for Fab-7 boundary function in the BX-C. Fab-7 boundary activity is known to depend on factors that are stage specific, and we describe a novel ∼700-kDa complex, the late boundary complex (LBC), that binds to Fab-7 sequences that have insulator functions in late embryos and adults. We show that the LBC is enriched in nuclear extracts from late, but not early, embryos and that it contains three insulator proteins, GAF, Mod(mdg4), and E(y)2. Its DNA binding properties are unusual in that it requires a minimal sequence of >65 bp; however, other than a GAGA motif, the three Fab-7 LBC recognition elements display few sequence similarities. Finally, we show that mutations which abrogate LBC binding in vitro inactivate the Fab-7 boundary in the BX-C. PMID:26303531

  15. Functional Requirements for Fab-7 Boundary Activity in the Bithorax Complex.

    PubMed

    Wolle, Daniel; Cleard, Fabienne; Aoki, Tsutomu; Deshpande, Girish; Schedl, Paul; Karch, Francois

    2015-11-01

    Chromatin boundaries are architectural elements that determine the three-dimensional folding of the chromatin fiber and organize the chromosome into independent units of genetic activity. The Fab-7 boundary from the Drosophila bithorax complex (BX-C) is required for the parasegment-specific expression of the Abd-B gene. We have used a replacement strategy to identify sequences that are necessary and sufficient for Fab-7 boundary function in the BX-C. Fab-7 boundary activity is known to depend on factors that are stage specific, and we describe a novel ∼700-kDa complex, the late boundary complex (LBC), that binds to Fab-7 sequences that have insulator functions in late embryos and adults. We show that the LBC is enriched in nuclear extracts from late, but not early, embryos and that it contains three insulator proteins, GAF, Mod(mdg4), and E(y)2. Its DNA binding properties are unusual in that it requires a minimal sequence of >65 bp; however, other than a GAGA motif, the three Fab-7 LBC recognition elements display few sequence similarities. Finally, we show that mutations which abrogate LBC binding in vitro inactivate the Fab-7 boundary in the BX-C.

  16. Crustal Thickness Variations Along the Southeastern Caribbean Plate Boundary From Teleseismic and Active Source Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezada, M. J.; Niu, F.; Baldwin, T. K.; Pavlis, G.; Vernon, F.; Rendón, H.; Zelt, C. A.; Schmitz, M.; Levander, A.

    2006-12-01

    coastal mountains, suggesting a significant portion of the high topography of the costal mountain ranges has a dynamic origin. Crustal thickness changes of more than 10km are observed crossing the coast in the plate boundary zone, but are not always directly associated with the surface expression of the strike-slip fault system.

  17. Differential expression of active zone proteins in neuromuscular junctions suggests functional diversification.

    PubMed

    Juranek, Judyta; Mukherjee, Konark; Rickmann, Michael; Martens, Henrik; Calka, Jaroslaw; Südhof, Thomas C; Jahn, Reinhard

    2006-12-01

    Nerve terminals of the central nervous system (CNS) contain specialized release sites for synaptic vesicles, referred to as active zones. They are characterized by electron-dense structures that are tightly associated with the presynaptic plasma membrane and organize vesicle docking and priming sites. Recently, major protein constituents of active zones have been identified, including the proteins Piccolo, Bassoon, RIM, Munc13, ERCs/ELKs/CASTs and liprins. While it is becoming apparent that each of these proteins is essential for synaptic function in the CNS, it is not known to what extent these proteins are involved in synaptic function of the peripheral nervous system. Somatic neuromuscular junctions contain morphologically and functionally defined active zones with similarities to CNS synapses. In contrast, sympathetic neuromuscular varicosities lack active zone-like morphological specializations. Using immunocytochemistry at the light and electron microscopic level we have now performed a systematic investigation of all five major classes of active zone proteins in peripheral neuromuscular junctions. Our results show that somatic neuromuscular endplates contain a full complement of all active zone proteins. In contrast, varicosities of the vas deferens contain a subset of active zone proteins including Bassoon and ELKS2, with the other four components being absent. We conclude that Bassoon and ELKS2 perform independent and specialized functions in synaptic transmission of autonomic synapses.

  18. Release probability of hippocampal glutamatergic terminals scales with the size of the active zone.

    PubMed

    Holderith, Noemi; Lorincz, Andrea; Katona, Gergely; Rózsa, Balázs; Kulik, Akos; Watanabe, Masahiko; Nusser, Zoltan

    2012-06-10

    Cortical synapses have structural, molecular and functional heterogeneity; our knowledge regarding the relationship between their ultrastructural and functional parameters is still fragmented. Here we asked how the neurotransmitter release probability and presynaptic [Ca(2+)] transients relate to the ultrastructure of rat hippocampal glutamatergic axon terminals. Two-photon Ca(2+) imaging-derived optical quantal analysis and correlated electron microscopic reconstructions revealed a tight correlation between the release probability and the active-zone area. Peak amplitude of [Ca(2+)] transients in single boutons also positively correlated with the active-zone area. Freeze-fracture immunogold labeling revealed that the voltage-gated calcium channel subunit Cav2.1 and the presynaptic protein Rim1/2 are confined to the active zone and their numbers scale linearly with the active-zone area. Gold particles labeling Cav2.1 were nonrandomly distributed in the active zones. Our results demonstrate that the numbers of several active-zone proteins, including presynaptic calcium channels, as well as the number of docked vesicles and the release probability, scale linearly with the active-zone area.

  19. A note on chromospheric fine structure at active region polarity boundaries.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prata, S. W.

    1971-01-01

    High resolution H-alpha filtergrams from Big Bear Solar Observatory reveal that some filamentary features in active regions have fine structure and hence magnetic field transverse to the gross structure and the zero longitudinal field line. These features are distinct from the usual active region filament, in which fine structure, magnetic field, and filament are all parallel to the zero longitudinal field line. The latter occur on boundaries between regions of weaker fields, while the former occur at boundaries between regions of stronger field.

  20. Collaborative Learning in a Boundary Zone: A Case Study of Innovative Inter-Institutional Collaboration in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabak, Edith; Margolin, Ilana

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study focused on the collaboration between a school district and a college of education in Israel and aimed to explore how the participants created common understanding in order to promote educational change. The theoretical approach involved analyzing the institutional interconnections based on boundary practices and boundary…

  1. Synchronous wildfire activity rise and mire deforestation at the triassic-jurassic boundary.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Henrik I; Lindström, Sofie

    2012-01-01

    The end-Triassic mass extinction event (∼201.4 million years ago) caused major faunal and floral turnovers in both the marine and terrestrial realms. The biotic changes have been attributed to extreme greenhouse warming across the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) boundary caused by massive release of carbon dioxide and/or methane related to extensive volcanism in the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), resulting in a more humid climate with increased storminess and lightning activity. Lightning strikes are considered the primary source of wildfires, producing charcoal, microscopically recognized as inertinite macerals. The presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of pyrolytic origin and allochthonous charcoal in siliciclastic T-J boundary strata has suggested widespread wildfire activity at the time. We have investigated largely autochthonous coal and coaly beds across the T-J boundary in Sweden and Denmark. These beds consist of predominantly organic material from the in situ vegetation in the mires, and as the coaly beds represent a substantial period of time they are excellent environmental archives. We document a remarkable increase in inertinite content in the coal and coaly beds across the T-J boundary. We show estimated burning temperatures derived from inertinite reflectance measurements coupled with palynological data and conclude that pre-boundary late Rhaetian mire wildfires included high-temperature crown fires, whereas latest Rhaetian-Sinemurian mire wildfires were more frequent but dominated by lower temperature surface fires. Our results suggest a major change in the mire ecosystems across the T-J boundary from forested, conifer dominated mires to mires with a predominantly herbaceous and shrubby vegetation. Contrary to the overall regional vegetation for which onset of recovery commenced in the early Hettangian, the sensitive mire ecosystem remained affected during the Hettangian and did not start to recover until around the Hettangian

  2. Synchronous wildfire activity rise and mire deforestation at the triassic-jurassic boundary.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Henrik I; Lindström, Sofie

    2012-01-01

    The end-Triassic mass extinction event (∼201.4 million years ago) caused major faunal and floral turnovers in both the marine and terrestrial realms. The biotic changes have been attributed to extreme greenhouse warming across the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) boundary caused by massive release of carbon dioxide and/or methane related to extensive volcanism in the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), resulting in a more humid climate with increased storminess and lightning activity. Lightning strikes are considered the primary source of wildfires, producing charcoal, microscopically recognized as inertinite macerals. The presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of pyrolytic origin and allochthonous charcoal in siliciclastic T-J boundary strata has suggested widespread wildfire activity at the time. We have investigated largely autochthonous coal and coaly beds across the T-J boundary in Sweden and Denmark. These beds consist of predominantly organic material from the in situ vegetation in the mires, and as the coaly beds represent a substantial period of time they are excellent environmental archives. We document a remarkable increase in inertinite content in the coal and coaly beds across the T-J boundary. We show estimated burning temperatures derived from inertinite reflectance measurements coupled with palynological data and conclude that pre-boundary late Rhaetian mire wildfires included high-temperature crown fires, whereas latest Rhaetian-Sinemurian mire wildfires were more frequent but dominated by lower temperature surface fires. Our results suggest a major change in the mire ecosystems across the T-J boundary from forested, conifer dominated mires to mires with a predominantly herbaceous and shrubby vegetation. Contrary to the overall regional vegetation for which onset of recovery commenced in the early Hettangian, the sensitive mire ecosystem remained affected during the Hettangian and did not start to recover until around the Hettangian

  3. Synchronous Wildfire Activity Rise and Mire Deforestation at the Triassic–Jurassic Boundary

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Henrik I.; Lindström, Sofie

    2012-01-01

    The end-Triassic mass extinction event (∼201.4 million years ago) caused major faunal and floral turnovers in both the marine and terrestrial realms. The biotic changes have been attributed to extreme greenhouse warming across the Triassic–Jurassic (T–J) boundary caused by massive release of carbon dioxide and/or methane related to extensive volcanism in the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), resulting in a more humid climate with increased storminess and lightning activity. Lightning strikes are considered the primary source of wildfires, producing charcoal, microscopically recognized as inertinite macerals. The presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of pyrolytic origin and allochthonous charcoal in siliciclastic T–J boundary strata has suggested widespread wildfire activity at the time. We have investigated largely autochthonous coal and coaly beds across the T–J boundary in Sweden and Denmark. These beds consist of predominantly organic material from the in situ vegetation in the mires, and as the coaly beds represent a substantial period of time they are excellent environmental archives. We document a remarkable increase in inertinite content in the coal and coaly beds across the T–J boundary. We show estimated burning temperatures derived from inertinite reflectance measurements coupled with palynological data and conclude that pre-boundary late Rhaetian mire wildfires included high-temperature crown fires, whereas latest Rhaetian–Sinemurian mire wildfires were more frequent but dominated by lower temperature surface fires. Our results suggest a major change in the mire ecosystems across the T–J boundary from forested, conifer dominated mires to mires with a predominantly herbaceous and shrubby vegetation. Contrary to the overall regional vegetation for which onset of recovery commenced in the early Hettangian, the sensitive mire ecosystem remained affected during the Hettangian and did not start to recover until around the

  4. A fast region-based active contour model for boundary detection of echocardiographic images.

    PubMed

    Saini, Kalpana; Dewal, M L; Rohit, Manojkumar

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the boundary detection of atrium and ventricle in echocardiographic images. In case of mitral regurgitation, atrium and ventricle may get dilated. To examine this, doctors draw the boundary manually. Here the aim of this paper is to evolve the automatic boundary detection for carrying out segmentation of echocardiography images. Active contour method is selected for this purpose. There is an enhancement of Chan-Vese paper on active contours without edges. Our algorithm is based on Chan-Vese paper active contours without edges, but it is much faster than Chan-Vese model. Here we have developed a method by which it is possible to detect much faster the echocardiographic boundaries. The method is based on the region information of an image. The region-based force provides a global segmentation with variational flow robust to noise. Implementation is based on level set theory so it easy to deal with topological changes. In this paper, Newton-Raphson method is used which makes possible the fast boundary detection.

  5. The link between strength of lattice preferred orientation, second phase content and grain boundary migration: A case study from the Alpine Fault zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Timothy A.; Prior, David J.; Toy, Virginia G.; Lindroos, Zoe Reid

    2015-12-01

    We analyse the microstructure and quartz LPOs of 36 layers of varying composition from a several-meter thick sequence of amphibolite-facies metacherts and related mica-garnet-plagioclase-quartz bearing schists from the central Southern Alps in the mylonite zone related to the Alpine Fault. Quartz contents vary from ˜10 to 100% and all of the LPO fabric skeletons are similar, featuring an asymmetric single girdle of [c]-axes inclined ˜30° away from the ZY plane. LPO strength is typically low at quartz contents <70% (M Index of ˜0.05) whereas it may be very high for nearly pure quartz rocks (M Index of up to 4.0). We attribute this change to a sparseness of interphase boundaries in the more quartzose rocks, a reduction in grain-boundary pinning, and a corresponding efficiency of grain boundary migration during dynamic recrystallization. The transition corresponds to a Zener parameter of approximately 700. In layers poor in quartz and rich in mica, the quartz grain size was kept small, and phase-boundary density, high. This may have promoted grain-size sensitive creep and dislocation glide in mica. Dislocation creep in the interspersed quartz grains was correspondingly reduced, and weaker quartz LPOs were produced. In highly quartzose layers, quartz grain boundaries experienced little drag or pinning from impurity phases and were able to migrate quickly into higher strain-energy grains. Preferential consumption of poorly oriented grains strengthened quartz LPOs, geometrically softened the dislocation creep process in these quartzose layers, and contributed to grain coarsening. The lack of evidence for instabilities in the thinly layered (<1 mm, quartz-rich vs. mica-rich) mylonite implies that a combination of deformation mechanisms, grain-size sensitive flow and dislocation creep, in the layers were able to accommodate a nearly homogeneous deformation between the different composition layers.

  6. Development and Validation of a Model to Predict Aerosol Breathing Zone Concentrations During Common Outdoor Activities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research has been conducted on aerosol emission rates during various activities as well as aerosol transport into the breathing zone under idealized conditions. However, there has been little effort to link the two into a model for predicting a person’s breathing zone concentrat...

  7. 77 FR 48127 - Foreign-Trade Zone 20-Suffolk, VA; Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Usui...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 20--Suffolk, VA; Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Usui International Corporation, (Diesel Engine Fuel Lines), Chesapeake, VA The Virginia Port Authority, grantee of FTZ 20, submitted a...

  8. Modeled temperatures and fluid source distributions for the Mexican subduction zone: Effects of hydrothermal circulation and implications for plate boundary seismic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Matthew; Spinelli, Glenn A.; Wada, Ikuko; He, Jiangheng

    2016-02-01

    In subduction zones, spatial variations in pore fluid pressure are hypothesized to control the sliding behavior of the plate boundary fault. The pressure-temperature paths for subducting material control the distributions of dehydration reactions, a primary control on the pore fluid pressure distribution. Thus, constraining subduction zone temperatures are required to understand the seismic processes along the plate interface. We present thermal models for three margin-perpendicular transects in the Mexican subduction zone. We examine the potential thermal effects of vigorous fluid circulation in a high-permeability aquifer within the basaltic basement of the oceanic crust and compare the results with models that invoke extremely high pore fluid pressures to reduce frictional heating along the megathrust. We combine thermal model results with petrological models to determine the spatial distribution of fluid release from the subducting slab and compare dewatering locations with the locations of seismicity, nonvolcanic tremor, slow-slip events, and low-frequency earthquakes. Simulations including hydrothermal circulation are most consistent with surface heat flux measurements. Hydrothermal circulation has a maximum cooling effect of 180°C. Hydrothermally cooled crust carries water deeper into the subduction zone; fluid release distributions in these models are most consistent with existing geophysical data. Our models predict focused fluid release, which could generate overpressures, coincident with an observed ultraslow layer (USL) and a region of nonvolcanic tremor. Landward of USLs, a downdip decrease in fluid source magnitude could result in the dissipation in overpressure in the oceanic crust without requiring a downdip increase in fault zone permeability, as posited in previous studies.

  9. [Differences of activations in visual and associative zones during figurative and verbal activity].

    PubMed

    Nagornova, Zh V; Shemiakina, N V

    2014-04-01

    The study considers correlates of figurative and verbal tasks performance during attention paid to visual stimuli. There are 34 subjects (20 female, mean age 21, 2.5 [SD]) took parts in the study. During subjects performance of the task, there was carried out EEG registration from 19 sites according to 10-20%. Performance of the figurative creative task in comparison with control non-creative task of the same modality was accompanied by activation of occipital and parietal zones of the cerebral cortex (decrease of EEG spectral power in alpha 1 (7.5-9.5 Hz) and alpha2 (10-12.5 Hz) frequency bands was observed) whereas performance of a verbal creative task in the similar test-control comparison was accompanied by decrease of activation in occipital zones (revealed through increase of EEG spectral in alphal and alpha2 frequency bands). As visual stimuli were shown during the whole time of the creative and control tasks fulfilment was made an assumption observed distinction can be connected with redistribution of attention focus at various types of creative activity (figurative or verbal).

  10. Joint Travel-time Inversion of Streamer and OBS Seismic Data for Improved Velocity Models and Interplate Boundary Geometry in Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begovic, S.; Ranero, C. R.; Sallares, V.; Melendez, A.; Grevemeyer, I.

    2015-12-01

    We combine wide-angle (WAS) seismic and multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data acquired in the northern Chile subduction zone during the CINCA'95 survey into a common inversion scheme to obtain high-resolution image of upper plate and inter-plate boundary, and to characterize seismic velocity (Vp) as well as tectonic structure across ~300 km long, E-W profile, 21.30°S. To illustrate the advantages of a common inversion approach we have compared the modeling results using two different travel-time inversion strategies: First, we have produced seismic velocity and inter-plate boundary geometry using the WAS data, recorded on 19 OBH (Ocean Bottom Hydrophones) and 6 land stations following a typical joint refraction and reflection travel-time tomography strategy. In particular, the WAS model is obtained using tomo2d tomographic inversion code (Korenaga et al, 2000) and applying layer-stripping method. Second, to compare structure, physical properties and rupture characteristics we jointly invert two types of seismic data sets, integrating multichannel seismic (MCS) data collected with a 3 km long streamer with the OBS wide-angle seismic (WAS) data described above into a common inversion scheme. To do so, we have adapted tomo2d to deal with streamer data. The scheme results in a joint travel time tomographic inversion based on integrated travel time information from refracted and reflected from WAS data and reflected phases from the top of the basement and the inter-plate boundaries identified in the MCS shot gathers. Our first results of the joint inversion indicate a 5 - 10 times smaller ray travel-time misfit in the deeper parts of the model around the interplate boundary, compared to models obtained inverting with just wide-angle seismic data. Interpretation of the joint WAS-MCS velocity model, and MCS images provide improved models of physical properties of the upper plate and around inter-plate boundary. In turn this will help to better understand

  11. Aeromagnetic evidence for a major strike-slip fault zone along the boundary between the Weddell Sea Rift and East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, T. A.; Ferraccioli, F.; Ross, N.; Siegert, M. J.; Corr, H.; Leat, P. T.; Bingham, R. G.; Rippin, D. M.; le Brocq, A.

    2012-04-01

    The >500 km wide Weddell Sea Rift was a major focus for Jurassic extension and magmatism during the early stages of Gondwana break-up, and underlies the Weddell Sea Embayment, which separates East Antarctica from a collage of crustal blocks in West Antarctica. Here we present new aeromagnetic data combined with airborne radar and gravity data collected during the 2010-11 field season over the Institute and Moeller ice stream in West Antarctica. Our interpretations identify the major tectonic boundaries between the Weddell Sea Rift, the Ellsworth-Whitmore Mountains block and East Antarctica. Digitally enhanced aeromagnetic data and gravity anomalies indicate the extent of Proterozoic basement, Middle Cambrian rift-related volcanic rocks, Jurassic granites, and post Jurassic sedimentary infill. Two new joint magnetic and gravity models were constructed, constrained by 2D and 3D magnetic depth-to-source estimates to assess the extent of Proterozoic basement and the thickness of major Jurassic intrusions and post-Jurassic sedimentary infill. The Jurassic granites are modelled as 5-8 km thick and emplaced at the transition between the thicker crust of the Ellsworth-Whitmore Mountains block and the thinner crust of the Weddell Sea Rift, and within the Pagano Fault Zone, a newly identified ~75 km wide left-lateral strike-slip fault system that we interpret as a major tectonic boundary between East and West Antarctica. We also suggest a possible analogy between the Pagano Fault Zone and the Dead Sea transform. In this scenario the Jurassic Pagano Fault Zone is the kinematic link between extension in the Weddell Sea Rift and convergence across the Pacific margin of West Antarctica, as the Dead Sea transform links Red Sea extension to compression within the Zagros Mountains.

  12. Dynamics and energetics of the cloudy boundary layer in simulations of off-ice flow in the marginal ice zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Peter Q.; Harrington, Jerry Y.

    2000-05-01

    The case under consideration occurred on March 4, 1993, and was observed as part of the Radiation and Eddy Flux Experiment (REFLEX II) 1993 observational campaign northwest of Spitsbergen. The off-ice flow on this day brought very cold surface air temperatures (-35°C) over a relatively warm ocean surface. The resultant latent and sensible surface heat fluxes produced intense convection and a thermal internal boundary layer (TIBL) which deepened with distance from the ice edge. Two-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations were performed to determine the impact of various cloud parameterizations on the structure and evolution of the TIBL. The model was able to reproduce the observed thermal structure of the boundary layer to within the acknowledged limitations of the CRM approach. Sensitivity studies of cloud type showed that inclusion of mixed-phase microphysics had a large impact of BL depth and structure. Radiative heating of the cloud near cloud base and cooling near cloud top along with latent heat release were found to be significant sources of turbulence kinetic energy even in the present case where very strong surface heat fluxes occur. Ice-phase precipitation processes rapidly depleted the BL of condensate, weakening the radiative thermal forcing. A further consequence of condensate depletion in the mixed-phase cloud was a less humid boundary layer that was able to maintain a larger surface latent heat flux and continuously extract heat through condensation and deposition. Not surprisingly, the presence of clouds had a profound impact on the radiative budget at the surface, with the cloudy BL reducing surface radiative losses more that 60% over clear-sky values. Inclusion of the ice phase significantly affected the radiative budget as compared to purely liquid clouds, illustrating the importance of ice-phase-radiative couplings for accurate simulations of arctic clouds and boundary layer dynamics.

  13. Presynaptic spinophilin tunes neurexin signalling to control active zone architecture and function.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Karzan; Reddy-Alla, Suneel; Driller, Jan H; Schreiner, Dietmar; Rey, Ulises; Böhme, Mathias A; Hollmann, Christina; Ramesh, Niraja; Depner, Harald; Lützkendorf, Janine; Matkovic, Tanja; Götz, Torsten; Bergeron, Dominique D; Schmoranzer, Jan; Goettfert, Fabian; Holt, Mathew; Wahl, Markus C; Hell, Stefan W; Scheiffele, Peter; Walter, Alexander M; Loll, Bernhard; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2015-10-16

    Assembly and maturation of synapses at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) depend on trans-synaptic neurexin/neuroligin signalling, which is promoted by the scaffolding protein Syd-1 binding to neurexin. Here we report that the scaffold protein spinophilin binds to the C-terminal portion of neurexin and is needed to limit neurexin/neuroligin signalling by acting antagonistic to Syd-1. Loss of presynaptic spinophilin results in the formation of excess, but atypically small active zones. Neuroligin-1/neurexin-1/Syd-1 levels are increased at spinophilin mutant NMJs, and removal of single copies of the neurexin-1, Syd-1 or neuroligin-1 genes suppresses the spinophilin-active zone phenotype. Evoked transmission is strongly reduced at spinophilin terminals, owing to a severely reduced release probability at individual active zones. We conclude that presynaptic spinophilin fine-tunes neurexin/neuroligin signalling to control active zone number and functionality, thereby optimizing them for action potential-induced exocytosis.

  14. Presynaptic spinophilin tunes neurexin signalling to control active zone architecture and function

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Karzan; Reddy-Alla, Suneel; Driller, Jan H; Schreiner, Dietmar; Rey, Ulises; Böhme, Mathias A.; Hollmann, Christina; Ramesh, Niraja; Depner, Harald; Lützkendorf, Janine; Matkovic, Tanja; Götz, Torsten; Bergeron, Dominique D.; Schmoranzer, Jan; Goettfert, Fabian; Holt, Mathew; Wahl, Markus C.; Hell, Stefan W.; Scheiffele, Peter; Walter, Alexander M.; Loll, Bernhard; Sigrist, Stephan J.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly and maturation of synapses at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) depend on trans-synaptic neurexin/neuroligin signalling, which is promoted by the scaffolding protein Syd-1 binding to neurexin. Here we report that the scaffold protein spinophilin binds to the C-terminal portion of neurexin and is needed to limit neurexin/neuroligin signalling by acting antagonistic to Syd-1. Loss of presynaptic spinophilin results in the formation of excess, but atypically small active zones. Neuroligin-1/neurexin-1/Syd-1 levels are increased at spinophilin mutant NMJs, and removal of single copies of the neurexin-1, Syd-1 or neuroligin-1 genes suppresses the spinophilin-active zone phenotype. Evoked transmission is strongly reduced at spinophilin terminals, owing to a severely reduced release probability at individual active zones. We conclude that presynaptic spinophilin fine-tunes neurexin/neuroligin signalling to control active zone number and functionality, thereby optimizing them for action potential-induced exocytosis. PMID:26471740

  15. The lateral boundary of a metamorphic core complex: The Moutsounas shear zone on Naxos, Cyclades, Greece☆

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shuyun; Neubauer, Franz; Bernroider, Manfred; Liu, Junlai

    2013-01-01

    We describe the structure, microstructures, texture and paleopiezometry of quartz-rich phyllites and marbles along N-trending Moutsounas shear zone at the eastern margin of the Naxos metamorphic core complex (MCC). Fabrics consistently indicate a top-to-the-NNE non-coaxial shear and formed during the main stage of updoming and exhumation between ca. 14 and 11 Ma of the Naxos MCC. The main stage of exhumation postdates the deposition of overlying Miocene sedimentary successions and predates the overlying Upper Miocene/Pliocene conglomerates. Detailed microstructural and textural analysis reveals that the movement along the Moutsounas shear zone is associated with a retrograde greenschist to subgreenschist facies overprint of the early higher-temperature rocks. Paleopiezometry on recrystallized quartz and calcite yields differential stresses of 20–77 MPa and a strain rate of 10−15–10−13 s−1 at 350 °C for quartz and ca. 300 °C for calcite. Chlorite geothermometry of the shear zone yields two temperature regimes, 300–360 °C, and 200–250 °C. The lower temperature group is interpreted to result from late-stage hydrothermal overprint. PMID:26523079

  16. Group Problem Solving as a Zone of Proximal Development activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewe, Eric

    2006-12-01

    Vygotsky described learning as a process, intertwined with development, which is strongly influenced by social interactions with others that are at differing developmental stages.i These interactions create a Zone of Proximal Development for each member of the interaction. Vygotsky’s notion of social constructivism is not only a theory of learning, but also of development. While teaching introductory physics in an interactive format, I have found manifestations of Vygotsky’s theory in my classroom. The source of evidence is a paired problem solution. A standard mechanics problem was solved by students in two classes as a homework assignment. Students handed in the homework and then solved the same problem in small groups. The solutions to both the group and individual problem were assessed by multiple reviewers. In many cases the group score was the same as the highest individual score in the group, but in some cases, the group score was higher than any individual score. For this poster, I will analyze the individual and group scores and focus on three groups solutions and video that provide evidence of learning through membership in a Zone of Proximal Development. Endnotes i L. Vygotsky -Mind and society: The development of higher mental processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (1978).

  17. Many-body microhydrodynamics of colloidal particles with active boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajesh; Ghose, Somdeb; Adhikari, R.

    2015-06-01

    Colloidal particles with active boundary layers—regions surrounding the particles where non-equilibrium processes produce large velocity gradients—are common in many physical, chemical and biological contexts. The velocity or stress at the edge of the boundary layer determines the exterior fluid flow and, hence, the many-body interparticle hydrodynamic interaction. Here, we present a method to compute the many-body hydrodynamic interaction between N spherical active particles induced by their exterior microhydrodynamic flow. First, we use a boundary integral representation of the Stokes equation to eliminate bulk fluid degrees of freedom. Then, we expand the boundary velocities and tractions of the integral representation in an infinite-dimensional basis of tensorial spherical harmonics and, on enforcing boundary conditions in a weak sense on the surface of each particle, obtain a system of linear algebraic equations for the unknown expansion coefficients. The truncation of the infinite series, fixed by the degree of accuracy required, yields a finite linear system that can be solved accurately and efficiently by iterative methods. The solution linearly relates the unknown rigid body motion to the known values of the expansion coefficients, motivating the introduction of propulsion matrices. These matrices completely characterize hydrodynamic interactions in active suspensions just as mobility matrices completely characterize hydrodynamic interactions in passive suspensions. The reduction in the dimensionality of the problem, from a three-dimensional partial differential equation to a two-dimensional integral equation, allows for dynamic simulations of hundreds of thousands of active particles on multi-core computational architectures. In our simulation of 104 active colloidal particle in a harmonic trap, we find that the necessary and sufficient ingredients to obtain steady-state convective currents, the so-called ‘self-assembled pump’, are (a) one

  18. Molecular organization and assembly of the presynaptic active zone of neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Fejtova, Anna; Gundelfinger, Eckart D

    2006-01-01

    At chemical synapses, neurotransmitter is released at a restricted region of the presynaptic plasma membrane, called the active zone. At the active zone, a matrix of proteins is assembled, which is termed the presynaptic grid or cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ). Components of the CAZ are thought to localize and organize the synaptic vesicle cycle, a series of membrane trafficking events underlying regulated neurotransmitter exocytosis. This review is focused on a set of specific proteins involved in the structural and functional organization of the CAZ. These include the multi-domain Rab3-effector proteins RIM1alpha and RIM2alpha; Bassoon and Piccolo, two multi-domain CAZ scaffolding proteins of enormous size; as well as members of the CAST/ERC family of CAZ-specific structural proteins. Studies on ribbon synapses of retinal photoreceptor cells have fostered understanding the molecular design of the CAZ. In addition, the analysis of the delivery pathways for Bassoon and Piccolo to presynaptic sites during development has produced new insights into assembly mechanisms of brain synapses during development. Based on these studies, the active zone transport vesicle hypothesis was formulated, which postulates that active zones, at least in part, are pre-assembled in neuronal cell bodies and transported as so-called Piccolo-Bassoon transport vesicles (PTVs) to sites of synaptogenesis. Several PTVs can fuse on demand with the presynaptic membrane to rapidly form an active zone.

  19. PP2A and GSK-3beta act antagonistically to regulate active zone development.

    PubMed

    Viquez, Natasha M; Füger, Petra; Valakh, Vera; Daniels, Richard W; Rasse, Tobias M; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2009-09-16

    The synapse is composed of an active zone apposed to a postsynaptic cluster of neurotransmitter receptors. Each Drosophila neuromuscular junction comprises hundreds of such individual release sites apposed to clusters of glutamate receptors. Here, we show that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is required for the development of structurally normal active zones opposite glutamate receptors. When PP2A is inhibited presynaptically, many glutamate receptor clusters are unapposed to Bruchpilot (Brp), an active zone protein required for normal transmitter release. These unapposed receptors are not due to presynaptic retraction of synaptic boutons, since other presynaptic components are still apposed to the entire postsynaptic specialization. Instead, these data suggest that Brp localization is regulated at the level of individual release sites. Live imaging of glutamate receptors demonstrates that this disruption to active zone development is accompanied by abnormal postsynaptic development, with decreased formation of glutamate receptor clusters. Remarkably, inhibition of the serine-threonine kinase GSK-3beta completely suppresses the active zone defect, as well as other synaptic morphology phenotypes associated with inhibition of PP2A. These data suggest that PP2A and GSK-3beta function antagonistically to control active zone development, providing a potential mechanism for regulating synaptic efficacy at a single release site.

  20. Functional heterogeneity of rat hepatocytes: predominance of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in perivenular zone.

    PubMed

    Tazawa, J; Endou, H; Sato, A; Hasumura, Y; Takeuchi, J

    1988-06-01

    To elucidate the hepatic intralobular distribution of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity biochemically, periportal (PP) and perivenular hepatocytes (PV) from male Sprague-Dawley rats were separated by a fluorescence-activated cell sorter after labeling the PP zone with fluorescein diacetate and the perivenular zone with fluorescein isothiocyanate. AHH activity was higher in PV than in PP. The enzyme activity was induced about 6-fold in hepatocytes of rats pretreated with 3-methyl-cholanthrene, and the induction was more prominent in PP than in PV. Neither phenobarbital pretreatment nor altered lipid content of the diet induced the change in the enzyme activity.

  1. Nonlinear activity of acoustically driven gas bubble near a rigid boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimov, Alexey

    2015-10-28

    The presence of a boundary can produce considerable changes in the oscillation amplitude of the bubble and its scattered echo. The present study fills a gap in the literature, in that it is concerned theoretically with the bubble activity at relatively small distances from the rigid boundary. It was shown that the bi-spherical coordinates provide separation of variables and are more suitable for analysis of the dynamics of these constrained bubbles. Explicit formulas have been derived which describe the dependence of the bubble emission near a rigid wall on its size and the separation distance between the bubble and the boundary. As applications, time reversal technique for gas leakage detection and radiation forces that are induced by an acoustic wave on a constrained bubble were analyzed.

  2. Identification and Active Exploration of Deformable Object Boundary Constraints through Robotic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Boonvisut, Pasu; Cavusoglu, M. Cenk

    2014-01-01

    Robotic motion planning algorithms for manipulation of deformable objects, such as in medical robotics applications, rely on accurate estimations of object deformations that occur during manipulation. An estimation of the tissue response (for off-line planning or real-time on-line re-planning), in turn, requires knowledge of both object constitutive parameters and boundary constraints. In this paper, a novel algorithm for estimating boundary constraints of deformable objects from robotic manipulation data is presented. The proposed algorithm uses tissue deformation data collected with a vision system, and employs a multi-stage hill climbing procedure to estimate the boundary constraints of the object. An active exploration technique, which uses an information maximization approach, is also proposed to extend the identification algorithm. The effects of uncertainties on the proposed methods are analyzed in simulation. The results of experimental evaluation of the methods are also presented. PMID:25684836

  3. Identifying active interplate and intraplate fault zones in the western Caribbean plate from seismic reflection data and the significance of the Pedro Bank fault zone in the tectonic history of the Nicaraguan Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, B.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The offshore Nicaraguan Rise in the western Caribbean Sea is an approximately 500,000 km2 area of Precambrian to Late Cretaceous tectonic terranes that have been assembled during the Late Cretaceous formation of the Caribbean plate and include: 1) the Chortis block, a continental fragment; 2) the Great Arc of the Caribbean, a deformed Cretaceous arc, and 3) the Caribbean large igneous province formed in late Cretaceous time. Middle Eocene to Recent eastward motion of the Caribbean plate has been largely controlled by strike-slip faulting along the northern Caribbean plate boundary zone that bounds the northern margin of the Nicaraguan Rise. These faults reactivate older rift structures near the island of Jamaica and form the transtensional basins of the Honduran Borderlands near Honduras. Recent GPS studies suggest that small amount of intraplate motion within the current margin of error of GPS measurements (1-3 mm/yr) may occur within the center of the western Caribbean plate at the Pedro Bank fault zone and Hess Escarpment. This study uses a database of over 54,000 km of modern and vintage 2D seismic data, combined with earthquake data and results from previous GPS studies to define the active areas of inter- and intraplate fault zones in the western Caribbean. Intraplate deformation occurs along the 700-km-long Pedro Bank fault zone that traverses the center of the Nicaraguan Rise and reactivates the paleo suture zone between the Great Arc of the Caribbean and the Caribbean large igneous province. The Pedro Bank fault zone also drives active extension at the 200-km-long San Andres rift along the southwest margin of the Nicaraguan Rise. Influence of the Cocos Ridge indentor may be contributing to reactivation of faulting along the southwesternmost, active segment of the Hess Escarpment.

  4. New evidence for active tectonics at the boundary of the Kashi Depression, China, from time series InSAR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ping; Wen, Yangmao; Xu, Caijun; Liu, Yang; Fok, H. S.

    2015-06-01

    Kashi Depression is one of the most complex active tectonic areas in the southern flank of Tianshan, China. Due to the lack of ground observations, the boundary of basin mountain transition zone and the interseismic activity of the Tianshan have not been clearly determined. In this study, 48 Envisat Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) imagery acquired from 2003 to 2010 are used to construct interferograms for measuring high-resolution interseismic deformation in the Kashi Depression area. A global atmospheric model ERA-Interim provided by the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and a global network orbital correction are applied to remove atmospheric effect, and the long-wavelength orbital errors, respectively, for the interferograms. Interferometric SAR time series with Atmospheric Estimation Model (InSAR TS + AEM) are then used to obtain a deformation rate map for the Kashi Depression area. The InSAR rate map indicates that the north part of South Atushi Fault has ~ 3 mm/year uplift relative to that of the south part. This result manifests the main tectonic deformation potentially occurs along the Southern Atushi Fault. Based on a simple edge dislocation model, the dip angle of 31 ± 0.6°, slip rate of 2.3 ± 0.1 mm/year, and locking depth of 10.6 ± 0.4 km for the Southern Atushi Fault between Tianshan Orogenic Belt and the Kashi Depression are obtained. This modeling result shows in good agreement with the InSAR derived rates. Our results show that the Southern Atushi Fault is the main active fault in block boundary region between the south of Tianshan and the Tarim Basin.

  5. Factors affecting carbon-14 activity of unsaturated zone CO2 and implications for groundwater dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Cameron; Cook, Peter G.; Harrington, Glenn A.; Meredith, Karina; Kipfer, Rolf

    2014-11-01

    Unsaturated zone processes may influence the carbon-14 (14C) activity of infiltrating groundwater and thus introduce error in derived groundwater residence times. However unsaturated zone 14C activities are rarely measured and there is little understanding of how they may vary spatially in a groundwater basin. In this study we measured 14C activity in unsaturated zone gas at five sites with different watertable depths (8.2-31.5 m) in the arid Ti Tree Basin, central Australia. We observed a relatively uniform decrease in 14C activity of unsaturated zone gas with depth at most sites, with variation in unsaturated zone depths leading to variation in 14C activities directly above the watertable at each site (ranging from 54 to 106 percent Modern Carbon (pMC)). Through modelling we show that the profiles are influenced by CO2 production at different depths from sources with different isotopic ratios, including production of ‘modern' CO2 in the root zone and production of ‘old' CO2 above the watertable. Scenario modelling showed that these processes are independent of recharge when recharge is low (0-10 mm y-1) but that higher recharge rates (>100 mm y-1) result in more advective transport of atmospheric CO2 to the watertable. The variation in 14C above the watertable was more sensitive to watertable depth and shallow and deep CO2 production rates. These findings offer insight into how unsaturated zone 14C activities may vary spatially and provide guidance as to when 14C depletion in unsaturated zone CO2 may become important for groundwater dating, particularly in arid settings.

  6. The Vincent Fault in the San Gabriel Mtns, southern California, USA: a modified plate boundary shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Haoran; Platt, John

    2015-04-01

    The Vincent Fault in southern California separates the ocean-affiliated Pelona schist of Late Cretaceous age in the footwall from a Meso-Proterozoic gneiss complex and Mesozoic granitoid rocks in the hanging wall. The Vincent fault has been regarded as the original megathrust formed during Laramide flat-slab subduction. Our new pressure, temperature and geochronologic data from the rocks in the hanging wall and the footwall indicate that the Vincent fault has undergone post-subduction modification. The Pelona schist in the San Gabriel Mtns was metamorphosed up to high-pressure greenschist facies. The peak metamorphic temperature given by laser Raman spectroscopy of carbonaceous material is 518.9 ± 19.6°C, consistent with the temperature range of 515-550°C from the quartz c-axis opening-angle thermometer. The peak pressure yielded by Si-in-muscovite barometry is 10.5 ± 1 kbar. The upper ~50 m of the Pelona schist was then mylonitized together with the lower 500-800 m of the hanging wall, which overprinted the pre-existing texture. Mylonitization produced a strong ESE-trending lineation in both rock units, with a consistent ESE sense of shear: opposite to what would be predicted by E-directed subduction. Pressure and temperature of mylonitization of the Pelona schist and the lower part of the hangingwall mylonite zone constrained by the Ti-in-quartz thermobarometer and Si-in-muscovite barometer is around ~4.7 kbar and 372 to 425°C; whereas the upper part of the mylonite zone was equilibrated at ~2.4 kbar and ~365°C. The quartz c-axis fabric opening-angle thermometer also gives a temperature range from 360 to 420°C in the entire mylonite zone. Mylonitization therefore took place during exhumation and cooling of the Pelona Schist. Fission track ages of detrital zircons from both the footwall and the hanging wall of the Vincent fault cluster around 46.7 ± 5.9 Ma, indicating that both footwall and hanging wall had cooled to ~200°C by that time. No other major

  7. Dynamic fracturing by successive coseismic loadings leads to pulverization in active fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aben, F. M.; Doan, M.-L.; Mitchell, T. M.; Toussaint, R.; Reuschlé, T.; Fondriest, M.; Gratier, J.-P.; Renard, F.

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies show that pulverized rocks observed along large faults can be created by single high-strain rate loadings in the laboratory, provided that the strain rate is higher than a certain pulverization threshold. Such loadings are analogous to large seismic events. In reality, pulverized rocks have been subject to numerous seismic events rather than one single event. Therefore, the effect of successive "milder" high-strain rate loadings on the pulverization threshold is investigated by applying loading conditions below the initial pulverization threshold. Single and successive loading experiments were performed on quartz-monzonite using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus. Damage-dependent petrophysical properties and elastic moduli were monitored by applying incremental strains. Furthermore, it is shown that the pulverization threshold can be reduced by successive "milder" dynamic loadings from strain rates of ~180 s-1 to ~90 s-1. To do so, it is imperative that the rock experiences dynamic fracturing during the successive loadings prior to pulverization. Combined with loading conditions during an earthquake rupture event, the following generalized fault damage zone structure perpendicular to the fault will develop: furthest from the fault plane, there is a stationary outer boundary that bounds a zone of dynamically fractured rocks. Closer to the fault, a pulverization boundary delimits a band of pulverized rock. Consecutive seismic events will cause progressive broadening of the band of pulverized rocks, eventually creating a wider damage zone observed in mature faults.

  8. A Method for Lung Boundary Correction Using Split Bregman Method and Geometric Active Contour Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianxun; Liang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    In order to get the extracted lung region from CT images more accurately, a model that contains lung region extraction and edge boundary correction is proposed. Firstly, a new edge detection function is presented with the help of the classic structure tensor theory. Secondly, the initial lung mask is automatically extracted by an improved active contour model which combines the global intensity information, local intensity information, the new edge information, and an adaptive weight. It is worth noting that the objective function of the improved model is converted to a convex model, which makes the proposed model get the global minimum. Then, the central airway was excluded according to the spatial context messages and the position relationship between every segmented region and the rib. Thirdly, a mesh and the fractal theory are used to detect the boundary that surrounds the juxtapleural nodule. Finally, the geometric active contour model is employed to correct the detected boundary and reinclude juxtapleural nodules. We also evaluated the performance of the proposed segmentation and correction model by comparing with their popular counterparts. Efficient computing capability and robustness property prove that our model can correct the lung boundary reliably and reproducibly. PMID:26089976

  9. A Method for Lung Boundary Correction Using Split Bregman Method and Geometric Active Contour Model.

    PubMed

    Feng, Changli; Zhang, Jianxun; Liang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    In order to get the extracted lung region from CT images more accurately, a model that contains lung region extraction and edge boundary correction is proposed. Firstly, a new edge detection function is presented with the help of the classic structure tensor theory. Secondly, the initial lung mask is automatically extracted by an improved active contour model which combines the global intensity information, local intensity information, the new edge information, and an adaptive weight. It is worth noting that the objective function of the improved model is converted to a convex model, which makes the proposed model get the global minimum. Then, the central airway was excluded according to the spatial context messages and the position relationship between every segmented region and the rib. Thirdly, a mesh and the fractal theory are used to detect the boundary that surrounds the juxtapleural nodule. Finally, the geometric active contour model is employed to correct the detected boundary and reinclude juxtapleural nodules. We also evaluated the performance of the proposed segmentation and correction model by comparing with their popular counterparts. Efficient computing capability and robustness property prove that our model can correct the lung boundary reliably and reproducibly. PMID:26089976

  10. Geomorphic Indices in the Assessment of Tectonic Activity in Forearc of the Active Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidzik, K.; Ramirez-Herrera, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid development of GIS techniques and constant advancement of digital elevation models significantly improved the accuracy of extraction of information on active tectonics from landscape features. Numerous attempts were made to quantitatively evaluate recent tectonic activity using GIS and DEMs, and a set of geomorphic indices (GI), however these studies focused mainly on sub-basins or small-scale areal units. In forearc regions where crustal deformation is usually large-scale and do not concentrate only along one specific fault, an assessment of the complete basin is more accurate. We present here the first attempt to implement thirteen GI in the assessment of active tectonics of a forearc region of an active convergent margin using the entire river basins. The GIs were divided into groups: BTAI - basin geomorphic indices (reflecting areal erosion vs. tectonics) and STAI - stream geomorphic indices (reflecting vertical erosion vs. tectonics). We calculated selected indices for 9 large (> 450 km2) drainage basins. Then we categorized the obtained results of each index into three classes of relative tectonic activity: 1 - high, 2 - moderate, and 3 - low. Finally we averaged these classes for each basin to determine the tectonic activity level (TAI). The analysis for the case study area, the Guerrero sector at the Mexican subduction zone, revealed high tectonic activity in this area, particularly in its central and, to a lesser degree, eastern part. This pattern agrees with and is supported by interpretation of satellite images and DEM, and field observations. The results proved that the proposed approach indeed allows identification and recognition of areas witnessing recent tectonic deformation. Moreover, our results indicated that, even though no large earthquake has been recorded in this sector for more than 100 years, the area is highly active and may represent a seismic hazard for the region.

  11. Repair boundary for parent tube indications within the upper joint zone of hybrid expansion joint (HEJ) sleeved tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, W.K.; Keating, R.F.

    1997-02-01

    In the Spring and Fall of 1994, and the Spring of 1995, crack-like indications were found in the upper hybrid expansion joint (HEJ) region of Steam Generator (S/G) tubes which had been sleeved using Westinghouse HEJ sleeves. As a result of these findings, analytic and test evaluations were performed to assess the effect of the degradation on the structural, and leakage, integrity of the sleeve/tube joint relative to the requirements of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) draft Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.121. The results of these evaluations demonstrated that tubes with implied or known crack-like circumferential parent tube indications (PTIs) located 1.1 inches or farther below the bottom of the hardroll upper transition, have sufficient, and significant, integrity relative to the requirements of RG 1.121. Thus, the purpose of this report is to provide background information related to the justification of the modified tube repair boundary.

  12. Geophysical and Chemical Weathering Signatures Across the Deep Weathered-Unweathered Granite Boundary of the Calhoun Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, D., Jr.; Bacon, A. R.; Brantley, S. L.; Holbrook, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the relationship between geophysical measurements and chemical weathering at Earth's surface, we combine comprehensive chemical and physical analyses of a 70-m granite weathering profile in the Southern Piedmont in the southeastern United States. The research site is in the uplands of the Calhoun Critical Zone Observatory and is similar to many geomorphically stable, ancient, and highly-weathered Ultisol soils of the region. Surface and downhole geophysical analyses suggest significant physical changes to depths of about 40 m, where geophysical properties are consistent with competent and unweathered granite. At this depth, surface refraction velocities increase to >4.5 km/s; variations in downhole sonic velocities decrease by more than two-fold; and deviations in the downhole caliper log sharply decrease as well. Forty meters depth is also the depth of initiation of plagioclase feldspar weathering, as inferred from bulk geochemical measurement of the full 70-m deep core. Specifically, element-depth profiles, cast as mass transfer coefficient profiles using Ti and Zr as immobile elements, document inferred loss of plagioclase in the depth interval between 15 and 40-m depth. Plagioclase feldspar is the most abundant of the highly reactive minerals in the granite. Such a wide reaction front is characteristic of weathering granites. Some loss of K is observed at these depths but most K loss, as well as Mg loss, occurs at shallower depths. Nearby geophysical profiles and 3D stress models have been interpreted as showing that seismic velocities decrease at 40 m depth due to opening of fractures as rock is exhumed toward the surface. Given our interpretations of both the geochemical and geophysical data, we infer that the onset of chemical weathering of feldspar coincides with the opening of these fractures. The data highlight the ability of geochemistry and geophysics to complement each other and enrich our understanding of Earth's Critical Zone.

  13. The distribution of superficial zone protein (SZP)/lubricin/PRG4 and boundary mode frictional properties of the bovine diarthrodial joint.

    PubMed

    Peng, Gordon; McNary, Sean M; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Reddi, A Hari

    2015-09-18

    The diarthrodial, knee joint is a remarkably efficient bearing system; articulating cartilage surfaces provide nearly frictionless performance with minimal wear. The low friction properties of the cartilage surfaces are due in part to the boundary lubricant, superficial zone protein (SZP); also known as lubricin or proteoglycan 4 (PRG4). In previous work, SZP localization and cartilage friction were examined across the femoral condyles. Studies in the literature have also individually investigated the other tissues that comprise the human knee and four-legged animal stifle joint, such as the meniscus or patella. However, comparisons between individual studies are limited due to the variable testing conditions employed. Friction is a system property that is dependent on the opposing articulating surface, entraining speed, and loading. A cross-comparison of the frictional properties and SZP localization across the knee/stifle joint tissues utilizing a common testing configuration is therefore needed. The objective of this investigation was to determine the friction coefficient and SZP localization of the tissues comprising the three compartments of the bovine stifle joint: patella, patellofemoral groove, femoral condyles, meniscus, tibial plateau, and anterior cruciate ligament. The boundary mode coefficient of friction was greater in tissues of the patellofemoral compartment than the lateral and medial tibiofemoral compartments. SZP immunolocalization followed this trend with reduced depth of staining and intensity in the patella and patellofemoral groove compared to the femoral condyles and tibial plateau. These results illustrate the important role of SZP in reducing friction in the tissues and compartments of the knee/stifle joint.

  14. Periodic aurora surge propagating eastward/westward at poleward boundary of aurora zone during the first 10 min intervals of Pi2 onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saka, O.; Hayashi, K.; Koga, D.

    2012-05-01

    Using magnetometer data acquired by geosynchronous satellite and all-sky images from a ground optical station in the conjugate area, we show propagation of aurora surge repeating in a thin and narrow aurora arc at the poleward boundary of the aurora zone. The surge repetition correlated with the Pi2s at the geosynchronous altitudes. One-to-one conjunctions of the surge and Pi2 pulse were not always observed. The westward or eastward propagation directions of the surge corresponded to the clockwise or counterclockwise wave polarizations in the equatorial plane. Propagation velocities of the poleward surge were in the range of 0.2-0.5°/s or 12-30 km/s at 100 km altitudes. We discuss the propagating surge at poleward boundary in conjunction with bi-directional flows in the first 10 min intervals of Pi2 onset that were inferred by Saka et al. (2010) from the Pi2 epoch analyses of magnetometer data at geosynchronous altitudes.

  15. Incipient Crustal Stretching across AN Active Collision Belt: the Case of the Siculo-Calabrian Rift Zone (central Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, S.; Tortorici, G.; Romagnoli, G.; Pavano, F.

    2012-12-01

    In the Central Mediterranean, the differential roll-back of the subducting Nubia Plate caused the Neogene-Quaternary extrusion of the Calabrian arc onto the oceanic Ionian slab, and the opening of the oceanic Tyrrhenian Basin, in the overriding Eurasia Plate. The differential motion at the edges of the arc was largely accommodated along transform faults that propagated across the orogenic belt. Since the Late Quaternary, the southern edge of the arc has been replaced by the roughly N-S oriented Siculo-Calabrian Rift Zone (SCRZ) that formed as the NNW-directed normal faults of NE Sicily, crossing the orogenic belt, have linked the NNE-oriented Tyrrhenian margin of southern Calabria with the NNW-trending Africa-Ionian boundary of southeastern Sicily. Our study focused on the Sicily shoulder of the SCRZ, where the transition zone between the extensional belt and the still active Nubia-Eurasia convergent margin is characterized by two distinct mobile crustal wedges, both lying on an upwarped Mantle, where a re-orientations of the σ1 is combined with volcanism (e.g. Etna, Aeolian islands) and a huge tectonic uplift. In southeastern Sicily, the Hyblean-Etnean region evolved, since about 0.85 Ma, as an indipendent crustal wedge, moving towards the NNW and pointing to the active Mt. Etna volcano. A local ENE crustal stretching accompanied the traslation of the block and pre-dated the ESE-oriented extension governing the propagation of the southernmost branch of the SCR, which started at about 330 ka B.P.. Similarly, the Peloritani-Aeolian region, flanked by the 125 ka-old NE-Sicily branch of the rift zone, represents a mostly submerged crustal wedge that migrates towards the NE, diverging from the rest of the Sicily collision zone and pointing to the Stromboli volcano. The Peloritani-Aeolian block is characterized by the occurrence of a wide central NE-oriented collapsed basin contoured by an actively uplifting region, whose tectonic boundaries are evidenced by a sharp

  16. Slugs and Plugs: the Role of Conduit Boundary Conditions in Shaping Strombolian Explosive Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellin, E. W.; Del Bello, E.; Mathias, S.; Lane, S. J.; James, M. R.; Taddeucci, J.; Capponi, A.; Scarlato, P.

    2015-12-01

    Strombolian activity is characterized by quasi-periodic, short-lived explosions, which vary greatly in magnitude. The explosions are understood to be driven by the bursting of large, overpressured 'slugs' of magmatic gas, which have ascended the conduit. We use scaled laboratory analogue experiments and numerical modelling to investigate the impact of varying the boundary conditions at the top and bottom of the volcanic conduit, and find that they strongly influence the character and explosivity of strombolian explosions. The presence of a viscous plug at the top of the conduit has been inferred from recent studies of strombolian pyroclasts, which indicate that degassed, crystal-rich magma, and gas-rich, crystal-poor magma co-exist and mingle in the shallow part of the volcanic conduit. We investigate the impact of the plug on eruptive behaviour experimentally, and find that the presence of a viscous plug enhances explosivity by increasing the overpressure within the ascending gas slug. We also find that the plug is prone to fluid-dynamic instability as the gas slug passes through it, causing the low and high viscosity magma analogues to intermingle, explaining the origin of the mingled pyroclasts observed in nature. The instabilities can also cause the slug to break into smaller pockets of gas, providing an explanation for pulsations in strombolian explosions, recently revealed by high-speed videography. Separate analogue experiments, and numerical modelling, are used to investigate slug ascent under contrasting lower boundary conditions: zero-flux; and constant-pressure. Analogue conduit experiments typically use a zero-flux lower boundary (i.e. the base of the pipe is sealed). We show that a more-realistic constant-pressure boundary condition dramatically changes slug ascent velocity and the development of overpressure. Together these two studies constitute a new framework for understanding the role of the boundary conditions in shaping strombolian explosive

  17. Shifting boundaries of retinoic acid activity control hindbrain segmental gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sirbu, Ioan Ovidiu; Gresh, Lionel; Barra, Jacqueline; Duester, Gregg

    2005-06-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) generated by Raldh2 in paraxial mesoderm is required for specification of the posterior hindbrain, including restriction of Hoxb1 expression to presumptive rhombomere 4 (r4). Hoxb1 expression requires 3' and 5' RA response elements for widespread induction up to r4 and for r3/r5 repression, but RA has previously been detected only from r5-r8, and vHnf1 is required for repression of Hoxb1 posterior to r4 in zebrafish. We demonstrate in mouse embryos that an RA signal initially travels from the paraxial mesoderm to r3, forming a boundary next to the r2 expression domain of Cyp26a1 (which encodes an RA-degrading enzyme). After Hoxb1 induction, the RA boundary quickly shifts to r4/r5, coincident with induction of Cyp26c1 in r4. A functional role for Cyp26c1 in RA degradation was established through examination of RA-treated embryos. Analysis of Raldh2-/- and vHnf1-/- embryos supports a direct role for RA in Hoxb1 induction up to r4 and repression in r3/r5, as well as an indirect role for RA in Hoxb1 repression posterior to r4 via RA induction of vHnf1 up to the r4/r5 boundary. Our findings suggest that Raldh2 and Cyp26 generate shifting boundaries of RA activity, such that r3-r4 receives a short pulse of RA and r5-r8 receives a long pulse of RA. These two pulses of RA activity function to establish expression of Hoxb1 and vHnf1 on opposite sides of the r4/r5 boundary.

  18. Timing of Deformation in the Central Metasedimentary Belt Boundary Thrust Zone (CMBbtz), southern Ontario, Canada, from Electron Microprobe Dating of Monazite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markley, M. J.; Dunn, S. R.; Peck, W. H.; Jercinovic, M. J.; Williams, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    In the Grenville Province of Southern Ontario, the Central Metasedimentary Belt boundary thrust zone (CMBbtz) is a crustal-scale tectonic boundary between the older, granulite-facies Central Gneiss Belt to the NW and the younger, amphibolite-facies Central Metasedimentary Belt to the SE. Although there are a range of tectonic models for the CMBbtz, most workers agree it is a major tectonic boundary that accommodated ductile thrusting and crustal shortening during the Ottawan phase of the Grenville Orogeny (~1080-1020 Ma). Some studies suggest that ductile thrusting in the CMBbtz was roughly synchronous with synorogenic extensional collapse below an orogenic lid. Previous geochronological studies also provide evidence of earlier deformation and/or metamorphic events in the CMBbtz, although the relation between deformation in the CMBbtz to the Elzeviran (~1230 Ma) and Shawinigan (~1180 Ma) orogenies is unclear. Our study is the first to report in situ electron microprobe monazite (mnz) dates from amphibolite-grade ortho- and para-gneisses of the CMBbtz. Our results are broadly consistent with other chronometers. We present dates from 132 age-domains within 83 mnz grains in 14 samples. Although our data provide strong evidence for deformation and metamorphism along the length of the CMBbtz during the Ottawan (1080-1020 Ma), we also report two other clusters of ages: 1140-1110 Ma and 1230-1170 Ma. The latter cluster falls between the widely accepted ranges for the Elzeviran and Shawinigan orogenies. In addition, some individual outcrops, particularly those in Killaloe and Minden, show mnz ages spanning over 200 m.y., and the setting and compositions of individual monazite domains allow us to link mnz growth to episodes of garnet growth during multiple events. Together these data indicate an unexpectedly continuous and long-lived period of deformation and metamorphism in the CMBbtz.

  19. Active volcanism on Venus in the Ganiki Chasma rift zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalygin, E. V.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Basilevsky, A. T.; Titov, D. V.; Ignatiev, N. I.; Head, J. W.

    2015-06-01

    Venus is known to have been volcanically resurfaced in the last third of solar system history and to have undergone a significant decrease in volcanic activity a few hundred million years ago. However, fundamental questions remain: Is Venus still volcanically active today, and if so, where and in what geological and geodynamic environment? Here we show evidence from the Venus Express Venus Monitoring Camera for transient bright spots that are consistent with the extrusion of lava flows that locally cause significantly elevated surface temperatures. The very strong spatial correlation of the transient bright spots with the extremely young Ganiki Chasma, their similarity to locations of rift-associated volcanism on Earth, provide strong evidence for their volcanic origin and suggests that Venus is currently geodynamically active.

  20. A Comparison of Active and Passive Methods for Control of Hypersonic Boundary Layers on Airbreathing Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Nowak, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    Active and passive methods for control of hypersonic boundary layers have been experimentally examined in NASA Langley Research Center wind tunnels on a Hyper-X model. Several configurations for forcing transition using passive discrete roughness elements and active mass addition, or blowing, methods were compared in two hypersonic facilities, the 20-Inch Mach 6 Air and the 31-Inch Mach 10 Air tunnels. Heat transfer distributions, obtained via phosphor thermography, shock system details, and surface streamline patterns were measured on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody. The comparisons between the active and passive methods for boundary layer control were conducted at test conditions that nearly match the nominal Mach 7 flight trajectory of an angle-of-attack of 2-deg and length Reynolds number of 5.6 million. For the passive roughness examination, the primary parametric variation was a range of trip heights within the calculated boundary layer thickness for several trip concepts. The prior passive roughness study resulted in a swept ramp configuration being selected for the Mach 7 flight vehicle that was scaled to be roughly 0.6 of the calculated boundary layer thickness. For the active jet blowing study, the blowing manifold pressure was systematically varied for each configuration, while monitoring the mass flow, to determine the jet penetration height with schlieren and transition movement with the phosphor system for comparison to the passive results. All the blowing concepts tested were adequate for providing transition onset near the trip location with manifold stagnation pressures on the order of 40 times the model static pressure or higher.

  1. A model for the termination of the Ryukyu subduction zone against Taiwan: A junction of collision, subduction/separation, and subduction boundaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, F.T.; Liang, W.-T.; Lee, J.-C.; Benz, H.; Villasenor, A.

    2009-01-01

    The NW moving Philippine Sea plate (PSP) collides with the Eurasian plate (EUP) in the vicinity of Taiwan, and at the same time, it subducts toward the north along SW Ryukyu. The Ryukyu subduction zone terminates against eastern Taiwan. While the Ryukyu Trench is a linear bathym??trie low about 100 km east of Taiwan, closer to Taiwan, it cannot be clearly identified bathymetrically owing to the deformation related to the collision, making the location of the intersection of the Ryukyu with Taiwan difficult to decipher. We propose a model for this complex of boundaries on the basis of seismicity and 3-D velocity structures. In this model the intersection is placed at the latitude of about 23.7??N, placing the northern part of the Coastal Range on EUP. As PSP gets deeper along the subduction zone it collides with EUP on the Taiwan side only where they are in direct contact. Thus, the Eurasian plate on the Taiwan side is being pushed and compressed by the NW moving Philippine Sea plate, at increasing depth toward the north. Offshore of northeastern Taiwan the wedge-shaped EUP on top of the Ryukyu subducting plate is connected to the EUP on the Ryukyu side and coupled to the NW moving PSP by friction at the plate interface. The two sides of the EUP above the western end of the subduction zone are not subjected to the same forces, and a difference in motions can be expected. The deformation of Taiwan as revealed by continuous GPS measurements, geodetic movement along the east coast of Taiwan, and the formation of the Hoping Basin can be understood in terms of the proposed model. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Topography and tectonics of the central New Madrid seismic zone: Results of numerical experiements using a three-dimensional boundary element program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomberg, Joan; Ellis, Michael

    1994-01-01

    We present results of a series of numerical experiments designed to test hypothetical mechanisms that derive deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone. Experiments are constrained by subtle topography and the distribution of seismicity in the region. We use a new boundary element algorithm that permits calcuation of the three-dimensional deformation field. Surface displacement fields are calculated for the New Madrid zone under both far-field (plate tectonics scale) and locally derived driving strains. Results demonstrate that surface displacement fields cannot distinguish between either a far-field simple or pure shear strain field or one that involves a deep shear zone beneath the upper crustal faults. Thus, neither geomorphic nor geodetic studies alone are expected to reveal the ultimate driving mechanism behind the present-day deformation. We have also tested hypotheses about strain accommodation within the New Madrid contractional step-over by including linking faults, two southwest dipping and one vertical, recently inferred from microearthquake data. Only those models with step-over faults are able to predict the observed topography. Surface displacement fields for long-term, relaxed deformation predict the distribution of uplift and subsidence in the contractional step-over remarkably well. Generation of these displacement fields appear to require slip on both the two northeast trending vertical faults and the two dipping faults in the step-over region, with very minor displacements occurring during the interseismic period when the northeast trending vertical faults are locked. These models suggest that the gently dippling central step-over fault is a reverse fault and that the steeper fault, extending to the southeast of the step-over, acts as a normal fault over the long term.

  3. Active and passive-source imaging of the Cascadia subduction zone using both onshore and offshore data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janiszewski, H. A.; Abers, G. A.; Carton, H. D.; Webb, S. C.; Gaherty, J. B.; Trehu, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Cascadia subduction zone is characterized by the subduction of young lithosphere with relatively little seismicity, despite evidence of prehistoric earthquakes, and a thick incoming sediment section that feeds the plate interface. It has been suggested that the thrust zone forms a high-porosity channel of near-lithostatic pressure to 40 km depth, but stronger metasediments may also explain many observations. To test these hypotheses, we analyze new data and integrate results from both active and passive-source seismic studies of Cascadia that sample the interplate thrust zone. In June-July 2012, fifteen seismometers were deployed in Washington from the coast to 140 km inland to record airguns from the R/V Langseth along a linear trench-perpendicular profile. We also analyze broadband data from the coincident onshore CAFE (2006-08) broadband high-density array, which provided high-resolution receiver function images of the downgoing plate, and with the offshore Grays Harbor array of the Cascadia Initiative (CI). In the active-source data, arrivals are observed at up to 140 km offset from the stations, the farthest of which are likely turning waves that travel in the slab mantle. Signals from all but the farthest inland stations are dominated by strong reverberating signals at 20-90 km offset. Preliminary calculations indicate that some of these signals have apparent velocity and timing consistent with waves that reflect off the plate interface or just above it. Bounce points for these rays map a zone of high reflectivity extending ~15-20 km on either side of the coastline. Some aspects of the signals may indicate an origin on or near the plate boundary. In addition, these reflections directly underlie CAFE stations where receiver functions have been obtained on land and the CI broadband stations where receiver functions are being obtained offshore, allowing for direct comparison and integration of all three datasets. The CI stations present several challenges

  4. Concentric zones of active RhoA and Cdc42 around single cell wounds

    PubMed Central

    Benink, Hélène A.; Bement, William M.

    2005-01-01

    Rho GTPases control many cytoskeleton-dependent processes, but how they regulate spatially distinct features of cytoskeletal function within a single cell is poorly understood. Here, we studied active RhoA and Cdc42 in wounded Xenopus oocytes, which assemble and close a dynamic ring of actin filaments (F-actin) and myosin-2 around wound sites. RhoA and Cdc42 are rapidly activated around wound sites in a calcium-dependent manner and segregate into distinct, concentric zones around the wound, with active Cdc42 in the approximate middle of the F-actin array and active RhoA on the interior of the array. These zones form before F-actin accumulation, and then move in concert with the closing array. Microtubules and F-actin are required for normal zone organization and dynamics, as is crosstalk between RhoA and Cdc42. Each of the zones makes distinct contributions to the organization and function of the actomyosin wound array. We propose that similar rho activity zones control related processes such as cytokinesis. PMID:15684032

  5. Active zone density is conserved during synaptic growth but impaired in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Mizushige, Takafumi; Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    Presynaptic active zones are essential structures for synaptic vesicle release, but the developmental regulation of their number and maintenance during aging at mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) remains unknown. Here, we analyzed the distribution of active zones in developing, mature, and aged mouse NMJs by immunohistochemical detection of the active zone-specific protein Bassoon. Bassoon is a cytosolic scaffolding protein essential for the active zone assembly in ribbon synapses and some brain synapses. Bassoon staining showed a punctate pattern in nerve terminals and axons at the nascent NMJ on embryonic days 16.5-18.5. Three-dimensional reconstruction of NMJs revealed that the majority of Bassoon puncta within an NMJ were attached to the presynaptic membrane from postnatal day 0 to adulthood, and colocalized with another active zone protein, Piccolo. During postnatal development, the number of Bassoon puncta increased as the size of the synapses increased. Importantly, the density of Bassoon puncta remained relatively constant from postnatal day 0 to 54 at 2.3 puncta/μm(2) , while the synapse size increased 3.3-fold. However, Bassoon puncta density and signal intensity were significantly attenuated at the NMJs of 27-month-old aged mice. These results suggest that synapses maintain the density of synaptic vesicle release sites while the synapse size changes, but this density becomes impaired during aging.

  6. Delineation of Active Basement Faults in the Eastern Tennessee and Charlevoix Intraplate Seismic Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. A.; Langston, C. A.; Cooley, M.

    2013-12-01

    Recognition of distinct, seismogenic basement faults within the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ) and the Charlevoix seismic zone (CSZ) is now possible using local earthquake tomography and datasets containing a sufficiently large number of earthquakes. Unlike the New Madrid seismic zone where seismicity clearly defines active fault segments, earthquake activity in the ETSZ and CSZ appears diffuse. New arrival time inversions for hypocenter relocations and 3-D velocity variations using datasets in excess of 1000 earthquakes suggest the presence of distinct basement faults in both seismic zones. In the ETSZ, relocated hypocenters align in near-vertical segments trending NE-SW, parallel to the long dimension of the seismic zone. Earthquakes in the most seismogenic portion of the ETSZ delineate another set of near-vertical faults trending roughly E-ESE. These apparent trends and steep dips are compatible with ETSZ focal mechanism solutions. The solutions are remarkably consistent and indicate strike-slip motion along the entire length of the seismic zone. Relocated hypocenter clusters in the CSZ define planes that trend and dip in directions that are compatible with known Iapitan rift faults. Seismicity defining the planes becomes disrupted where the rift faults encounter a major zone of deformation produced by a Devonian meteor impact. We will perform a joint statistical analysis of hypocenter alignments and focal mechanism nodal plane orientations in the ETSZ and the CSZ to determine the spatial orientations of dominant seismogenic basement faults. Quantifying the locations and dimensions of active basement faults will be important for seismic hazard assessment and for models addressing the driving mechanisms for these intraplate zones.

  7. Temporal Notch activation through Notch1a and Notch3 is required for maintaining zebrafish rhombomere boundaries.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xuehui; Lim, Chiaw-Hwee; Ho, Steven Hao-Kee; Lee, Kian-Hong; Jiang, Yun-Jin

    2009-07-01

    In vertebrates, hindbrain is subdivided into seven segments termed rhombomeres and the interface between each rhombomere forms the boundary. Similar to the D/V boundary formation in Drosophila, Notch activation has been shown to regulate the segregation of rhombomere boundary cells. Here we further explored the function of Notch signaling in the formation of rhombomere boundaries. By using bodipy ceramide cell-labeling technique, we found that the hindbrain boundary is formed initially in mib mutants but lost after 24 hours post-fertilization (hpf). This phenotype was more severe in mib(ta52b) allele than in mib(tfi91) allele. Similarly, injection of su(h)-MO led to boundary defects in a dosage-dependent manner. Boundary cells were recovered in mib(ta52b) mutants in the hdac1-deficient background, where neurogenesis is inhibited. Furthermore, boundary cells lost sensitivity to reduced Notch activation from 15 somite stage onwards. We also showed that knockdown of notch3 function in notch1a mutants leads to the loss of rhombomere boundary cells and causes neuronal hyperplasia, indicating that Notch1a and Notch3 play a redundant role in the maintenance of rhombomere boundary.

  8. Structural and Lithologic Characteristics of the Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Zone and its Relationship with Seismic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Li, H.; Pei, J.; Li, T.; Huang, Y.; Zhao, Z.

    2010-12-01

    the older earthquake, but rather along the edge of the gouge. According to the gouge statistics of the whole fault zone, seismic events have the obvious tendency towards the foot wall, and the thickness of gouge is proportional to the activity of the fault, indicating that the width of fault zone is directly related to the number and evolution history of earthquakes . Repeated earthquakes maybe the main cause for the formation of the Longmenshan Moutains

  9. Quantitative determination of G6Pase activity in histochemically defined zones of the liver acinus.

    PubMed

    Teutsch, H F

    1978-12-13

    Qualitative histochemical G6Pase distribution patterns obtained with an improved method (Teutsch, 1978) served as the basis for a zonal microdissection of the liver acinus. G6Pase activity was determined quantitatively in tissue samples of zones 1 and 3 by a microfluorometric method (Burch et al., 1978). Using a correlation system it could be demonstrated that the histochemical distribution pattern obtained with the improved method was in better agreement with quantitatively estimated zonal differences of G6Pase activity, both in fed and starved female rats, than with the Wachstein and Meisel medium (1956). From a total of 50 tissue samples analyzed the following average G6Pase activities were calculated: in fed animals 15.36 +/- 3.48 U/g dry weight in zone 1, and 9.28 +/- 2.15 U/g dry weight in zone 3; in starved female rats 42.50 +/- 8.20 U/g dry weight in zone 1, and 29.25 +/- 5.68 U/g dry weight in zone 3. The qualitative histochemical as well as quantitative zonal differences of G6Pase activities are taken as further support for the hypothesis of metabolic zonation of liver parenchyma.

  10. Alternative interpretation for the active zones of Cuba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Mario Octavio Cotilla

    2014-11-01

    An alternative explanation to the seismoactivity of Cuban faults is presented. The model is a consequence of the interaction between Caribbean and North American plates. It is made with 12 geodynamic cells form by a set of 13 active faults and their 14 areas of intersection. These cells are recognized morpho-structural blocks. The area between Eastern Matanzas and Western Cauto-Nipe is excluded because of the low level of seismic information. Cuba has two types of seismogenetic structures: faults and intersection of faults.

  11. Piccolo Directs Activity Dependent F-Actin Assembly from Presynaptic Active Zones via Daam1

    PubMed Central

    Wagh, Dhananjay; Terry-Lorenzo, Ryan; Waites, Clarissa L.; Leal-Ortiz, Sergio A.; Maas, Christoph; Reimer, Richard J.; Garner, Craig C.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of filamentous (F) actin plays essential roles in the assembly of presynaptic boutons, the fusion, mobilization and recycling of synaptic vesicles (SVs), and presynaptic forms of plasticity. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the temporal and spatial assembly of presynaptic F-actin remain largely unknown. Similar to other F-actin rich membrane specializations, presynaptic boutons contain a set of molecules that respond to cellular cues and trans-synaptic signals to facilitate activity-dependent assembly of F-actin. The presynaptic active zone (AZ) protein Piccolo has recently been identified as a key regulator of neurotransmitter release during SV cycling. It does so by coordinating the activity-dependent assembly of F-Actin and the dynamics of key plasticity molecules including Synapsin1, Profilin and CaMKII. The multidomain structure of Piccolo, its exquisite association with the AZ, and its ability to interact with a number of actin-associated proteins suggest that Piccolo may function as a platform to coordinate the spatial assembly of F-actin. Here we have identified Daam1, a Formin that functions with Profilin to drive F-actin assembly, as a novel Piccolo binding partner. We also found that within cells Daam1 activation promotes Piccolo binding, an interaction that can spatially direct the polymerization of F-Actin. Moreover, similar to Piccolo and Profilin, Daam1 loss of function impairs presynaptic-F-actin assembly in neurons. These data suggest a model in which Piccolo directs the assembly of presynaptic F-Actin from the AZ by scaffolding key actin regulatory proteins including Daam1. PMID:25897839

  12. Beyond the zone: protein needs of active individuals.

    PubMed

    Lemon, P W

    2000-10-01

    There has been debate among athletes and nutritionists regarding dietary protein needs for centuries. Although contrary to traditional belief, recent scientific information collected on physically active individuals tends to indicate that regular exercise increases daily protein requirements; however, the precise details remain to be worked out. Based on laboratory measures, daily protein requirements are increased by perhaps as much as 100% vs. recommendations for sedentary individuals (1.6-1.8 vs. 0.8 g/kg). Yet even these intakes are much less than those reported by most athletes. This may mean that actual requirements are below what is needed to optimize athletic performance, and so the debate continues. Numerous interacting factors including energy intake, carbohydrate availability, exercise intensity, duration and type, dietary protein quality, training history, gender, age, timing of nutrient intake and the like make this topic extremely complex. Many questions remain to be resolved. At the present time, substantial data indicate that the current recommended protein intake should be adjusted upward for those who are physically active, especially in populations whose needs are elevated for other reasons, e.g., growing individuals, dieters, vegetarians, individuals with muscle disease-induced weakness and the elderly. For these latter groups, specific supplementation may be appropriate, but for most North Americans who consume a varied diet, including complete protein foods (meat, eggs, fish and dairy products), and sufficient energy the increased protein needs induced by a regular exercise program can be met in one's diet.

  13. Postsynaptic actin regulates active zone spacing and glutamate receptor apposition at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Blunk, Aline D; Akbergenova, Yulia; Cho, Richard W; Lee, Jihye; Walldorf, Uwe; Xu, Ke; Zhong, Guisheng; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Littleton, J Troy

    2014-07-01

    Synaptic communication requires precise alignment of presynaptic active zones with postsynaptic receptors to enable rapid and efficient neurotransmitter release. How transsynaptic signaling between connected partners organizes this synaptic apparatus is poorly understood. To further define the mechanisms that mediate synapse assembly, we carried out a chemical mutagenesis screen in Drosophila to identify mutants defective in the alignment of active zones with postsynaptic glutamate receptor fields at the larval neuromuscular junction. From this screen we identified a mutation in Actin 57B that disrupted synaptic morphology and presynaptic active zone organization. Actin 57B, one of six actin genes in Drosophila, is expressed within the postsynaptic bodywall musculature. The isolated allele, act(E84K), harbors a point mutation in a highly conserved glutamate residue in subdomain 1 that binds members of the Calponin Homology protein family, including spectrin. Homozygous act(E84K) mutants show impaired alignment and spacing of presynaptic active zones, as well as defects in apposition of active zones to postsynaptic glutamate receptor fields. act(E84K) mutants have disrupted postsynaptic actin networks surrounding presynaptic boutons, with the formation of aberrant actin swirls previously observed following disruption of postsynaptic spectrin. Consistent with a disruption of the postsynaptic actin cytoskeleton, spectrin, adducin and the PSD-95 homolog Discs-Large are all mislocalized in act(E84K) mutants. Genetic interactions between act(E84K) and neurexin mutants suggest that the postsynaptic actin cytoskeleton may function together with the Neurexin-Neuroligin transsynaptic signaling complex to mediate normal synapse development and presynaptic active zone organization.

  14. Extension and gold mineralisation in the hanging walls of active convergent continental shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upton, Phaedra; Craw, Dave

    2014-07-01

    Orogenic gold-bearing quartz veins form in mountain belts adjacent to convergent tectonic boundaries. The vein systems, hosted in extensional structures within compressively deformed rocks, are a widespread feature of these orogens. In many cases the extensional structures that host gold-bearing veins have been superimposed on, and locally controlled by, compressional structures formed within the convergent orogen. Exploring these observations within the context of a three-dimensional mechanical model allows prediction of mechanisms and locations of extensional zones within convergent orogens. Our models explore the effect of convergence angle and mid-crustal strength on stress states and compare them to the Southern Alps and Taiwan. The dilatation zones coincide with the highest mountains, in the hanging walls of major plate boundary faults, and can extend as deep as the brittle-ductile transition. Extensional deformation is favoured in the topographic divide region of oblique orogens with mid-lower crustal rheology that promotes localisation rather than diffuse deformation. In the near surface, topography influences the stress state to a depth approximately equal to the topographic relief, bringing the rock closer to failure and rotating σ1 to near vertical. The distribution of gold-bearing extensional veins may indicate the general position of the topographic divide within exhumed ancient orogens.

  15. Spontaneous and Evoked Release Are Independently Regulated at Individual Active Zones

    PubMed Central

    Melom, Jan E.; Akbergenova, Yulia; Gavornik, Jeffrey P.

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release from synaptic vesicle fusion is the fundamental mechanism for neuronal communication at synapses. Evoked release following an action potential has been well characterized for its function in activating the postsynaptic cell, but the significance of spontaneous release is less clear. Using transgenic tools to image single synaptic vesicle fusion events at individual release sites (active zones) in Drosophila, we characterized the spatial and temporal dynamics of exocytotic events that occur spontaneously or in response to an action potential. We also analyzed the relationship between these two modes of fusion at single release sites. A majority of active zones participate in both modes of fusion, although release probability is not correlated between the two modes of release and is highly variable across the population. A subset of active zones is specifically dedicated to spontaneous release, indicating a population of postsynaptic receptors is uniquely activated by this mode of vesicle fusion. Imaging synaptic transmission at individual release sites also revealed general rules for spontaneous and evoked release, and indicate that active zones with similar release probability can cluster spatially within individual synaptic boutons. These findings suggest neuronal connections contain two information channels that can be spatially segregated and independently regulated to transmit evoked or spontaneous fusion signals. PMID:24174659

  16. Observing active deformation of volcanoes in North America: Geodetic data from the Plate Boundary Observatory and associated networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskas, C. M.; Phillips, D. A.; Mattioli, G. S.; Meertens, C. M.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Enders, M.; Feaux, K.; Mencin, D.; Baker, S.; Lisowski, M.; Smith, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), operated by UNAVCO, records deformation of the geologically diverse North America western plate boundary, with subnetworks of instruments concentrated at selected active and potentially active volcanoes. These sensors record deformation and earthquakes and allow monitoring agencies and researchers to analyze changes in ground motion and seismicity. The intraplate volcanoes at Yellowstone and Long Valley are characterized by uplift/subsidence cycles, high seismicity, and hydrothermal activity but there have been no historic eruptions at either volcano. PBO maintains dense GPS networks of 20-25 stations at each of these volcanoes, with an additional 5 boreholes at Yellowstone containing tensor strainmeters, short-period seismometers, and borehole tiltmeters. Subduction zone volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc have had multiple historic eruptions, and PBO maintains equipment at Augustine (8 GPS), Akutan (8 GPS, 4 tiltmeters), and Unimak Island (14 GPS, 8 tiltmeters). The Unimak stations are at the active Westdahl and Shishaldin edifices and the nearby, inactive Isanotski volcano. In the Cascade Arc, PBO maintains networks at Mount St. Helens (15 GPS, 4 borehole strainmeters and seismometers, 8 borehole tiltmeters), Shasta (7 GPS, 1 borehole strainmeter and seismometer), and Lassen Peak (8 GPS). Data from many of these stations in the Pacific Northwest and California are also provided as realtime streams of raw and processed data. Real-time GPS data, along with high-rate GPS data, will be an important new resource for detecting and studying future rapid volcanic deformation events and earthquakes. UNAVCO works closely with the USGS Volcano Hazards Program, archiving data from USGS GPS stations in Alaska, Cascadia, and Long Valley. The PBO and USGS networks combined provide more comprehensive coverage than PBO alone, particularly of the Cascade Arc, where the USGS maintains a multiple instruments near each volcano. Ground

  17. Origin of recombination activity at small angle grain boundaries in multicrystalline silicon using multi-seed casting growth method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Takuto; Tachibana, Tomihisa; Ohshita, Yoshio; Prakash, Ronit R.; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2015-08-01

    The effect of misorientation on the recombination activity of tilt small angle grain boundaries was studied by temperature-dependent electron beam induced current (EBIC) analyses of artificially induced grain boundaries in multicrystal grown by casting from multiple seeds. For small misorientation, there is no significant difference in the recombination of grain boundaries at the middle of a grown ingot, whereas moderate contamination on grain boundaries caused changes in the EBIC contrast, especially at room temperature. The EBIC contrast of moderately contaminated grain boundaries at room temperature has a peak at a misorientation of ∼3°, and for misorientation θ > 6°, the recombinative nature diminishes with increasing misorientation. The results indicate differences in the gettering ability of small angle grain boundaries.

  18. [Characteristics of soil organic carbon and enzyme activities in soil aggregates under different vegetation zones on the Loess Plateau].

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Ma, Rui-ping; An, Shao-shan; Zeng, Quan-chao; Li, Ya-yun

    2015-08-01

    In order to explore the distribution characteristics of organic carbon of different forms and the active enzymes in soil aggregates with different particle sizes, soil samples were chosen from forest zone, forest-grass zone and grass zone in the Yanhe watershed of Loess Plateau to study the content of organic carbon, easily oxidized carbon, and humus carbon, and the activities of cellulase, β-D-glucosidase, sucrose, urease and peroxidase, as well as the relations between the soil aggregates carbon and its components with the active soil enzymes were also analyzed. It was showed that the content of organic carbon and its components were in order of forest zone > grass zone > forest-grass zone, and the contents of three forms of organic carbon were the highest in the diameter group of 0.25-2 mm. The content of organic carbon and its components, as well as the activities of soil enzymes were higher in the soil layer of 0-10 cm than those in the 10-20 cm soil layer of different vegetation zones. The activities of cellulase, β-D-glucosidase, sucrose and urease were in order of forest zone > grass zone > forest-grass zone. The peroxidase activity was in order of forest zone > forest-grass zone > grass zone. The activities of various soil enzymes increased with the decreasing soil particle diameter in the three vegetation zones. The activities of cellulose, peroxidase, sucrose and urease had significant positive correlations with the contents of various forms of organic carbon in the soil aggregates.

  19. Instabilities and boundary effects in a droplet of active polar liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, Carl; Hawkins, Rhoda

    2015-03-01

    Using the active gel theoretical framework, we have performed analytical calculations and numerical simulations of a droplet of active polar liquid crystal at low Reynolds number. This system is a simplified model of a cytoskeletal network that generates internal stresses by converting chemical energy (in the form of ATP) into mechanical work via molecular motors. A physical understanding of these systems can give an insight into the complex and varied dynamics of eukaryotic cell migration and division. We perform a linear stability analysis on the system by separating the behaviour into two limits. One where the internal polarisation is dominated by the shape of the boundary and one where it is deformed by the activity. We find that the two regimes show different instability thresholds for the activity parameter suggesting interesting behaviour both in and between these limits. We also simulate the system numerically and find the resulting steady state of the droplet for a range of parameters between these two limits.

  20. The Distribution of Superficial Zone Protein (SZP)/Lubricin/PRG4 and Boundary Mode Frictional Properties of the Bovine Diarthrodial Joint

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Gordon; McNary, Sean M.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.; Reddi, A. Hari

    2015-01-01

    The diarthrodial, knee joint is a remarkably efficient bearing system; articulating cartilage surfaces provide nearly frictionless performance with minimal wear. The low friction properties of the cartilage surfaces are due in part to the boundary lubricant, superficial zone protein (SZP); also known as lubricin or proteoglycan 4 (PRG4). In previous work, SZP localization and cartilage friction were examined across the femoral condyles. Studies in the literature have also individually investigated the other tissues that comprise the human knee and four-legged animal stifle joint, such as the meniscus or patella. However, comparisons between individual studies are limited due to the variable testing conditions employed. Friction is a system property that is dependent on the opposing articulating surface, entraining speed, and loading. A cross-comparison of the frictional properties and SZP localization across the knee/stifle joint tissues utilizing a common testing configuration is therefore needed. The objective of this investigation was to determine the friction coefficient and SZP localization of the tissues comprising the three compartments of the bovine stifle joint: patella, patellofemoral groove, femoral condyles, meniscus, tibial plateau, and anterior cruciate ligament. The boundary mode coefficient of friction was greater in tissues of the patellofemoral compartment than the lateral and medial tibiofemoral compartments. SZP immunolocalization followed this trend with reduced depth of staining and intensity in the patella and patellofemoral groove compared to the femoral condyles and tibial plateau. These results illustrate the important role of SZP in reducing friction in the tissues and compartments of the knee/stifle joint. PMID:26117076

  1. Zones of Difference, Boundaries of Access: Moral Geography and Community Mapping in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Thomann, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    In Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, 18% of men who have sex with men (MSM) are HIV-positive. Based on ethnographic research conducted among HIV peer educators and activists in Abidjan, I examine their narratives and hand-drawn maps of city space. I draw on a methodological process of map-making to examine research participants' evaluations of neighborhoods and link these evaluations to debates over national and cultural belonging in Côte d'Ivoire. I suggest a moral geography emerges from the maps and narratives and ask what the bioethical implications of moral geography are in the context of service delivery and activism among sexual minorities.

  2. Inhibition of osteoclast bone resorption activity through osteoprotegerin-induced damage of the sealing zone.

    PubMed

    Song, Ruilong; Gu, Jianhong; Liu, Xuezhong; Zhu, Jiaqiao; Wang, Qichao; Gao, Qian; Zhang, Jiaming; Cheng, Laiyang; Tong, Xishuai; Qi, Xinyi; Yuan, Yan; Liu, Zongping

    2014-09-01

    Bone remodeling is dependent on the dynamic equilibrium between osteoclast-mediated bone resorption and osteoblast-mediated osteogenesis. The sealing zone is an osteoclast-specific cytoskeletal structure, the integrity of which is critical for osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. To date, studies have focused mainly on the osteoprotegerin (OPG)‑induced inhibition of osteoclast differentiation through the OPG/receptor activator of the nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)/RANK system, which affects the bone resorption of osteoclasts. However, the effects of OPG on the sealing zone have not been reported to date. In this study, the formation of the sealing zone was observed by Hoffman modulation contrast (HMC) microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The effects of OPG on the existing sealing zone and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption activity, as well as the regulatory role of genes involved in the formation of the sealing zone were examined by immunofluorescence staining, HMC microscopy, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), western blot analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The sealing zone was formed on day 5, with belt-like protuberances at the cell edge and scattered distribution of cell nuclei, but no filopodia. The sealing zone was intact in the untreated control group. However, defects in the sealing zone were observed in the OPG-treated group (20 ng/ml) and the structure was absent in the groups treated with 40 and 80 ng/ml OPG. The podosomes showed a scattered or clustered distribution between the basal surface of the osteoclasts and the well surface. Furthermore, resorption lacunae were not detected in the 20 ng/ml OPG-treated group, indicating the loss of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption activity. Treatment with OPG resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of Arhgef8/Net1 and DOCK5 Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs), 10 of 18 RhoGTPases (RhoA, RhoB, cdc42v1, cdc42v2

  3. Hot-Film and Hot-Wire Anemometry for a Boundary Layer Active Flow Control Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenahan, Keven C.; Schatzman, David M.; Wilson, Jacob Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Unsteady active flow control (AFC) has been used experimentally for many years to minimize bluff-body drag. This technology could significantly improve performance of rotorcraft by cleaning up flow separation. It is important, then, that new actuator technologies be studied for application to future vehicles. A boundary layer wind tunnel was constructed with a 1ft-x-3ft test section and unsteady measurement instrumentation to study how AFC manipulates the boundary layer to overcome adverse pressure gradients and flow separation. This unsteady flow control research requires unsteady measurement methods. In order to measure the boundary layer characteristics, both hot-wire and hot-film Constant Temperature Anemometry is used. A hot-wire probe is mounted in the flow to measure velocity while a hot-film array lays on the test surface to measure skin friction. Hot-film sensors are connected to an anemometer, a Wheatstone bridge circuit with an output that corresponds to the dynamic flow response. From this output, the time varying flow field, turbulence, and flow reversal can be characterized. Tuning the anemometers requires a fan test on the hot-film sensors to adjust each output. This is a delicate process as several variables drastically affect the data, including control resistance, signal input, trim, and gain settings.

  4. Zones of Difference, Boundaries of Access: Moral Geography and Community Mapping in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Thomann, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    In Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, 18% of men who have sex with men (MSM) are HIV-positive. Based on ethnographic research conducted among HIV peer educators and activists in Abidjan, I examine their narratives and hand-drawn maps of city space. I draw on a methodological process of map-making to examine research participants' evaluations of neighborhoods and link these evaluations to debates over national and cultural belonging in Côte d'Ivoire. I suggest a moral geography emerges from the maps and narratives and ask what the bioethical implications of moral geography are in the context of service delivery and activism among sexual minorities. PMID:26646721

  5. Modeling the cathode compartment of polymer electrolyte fuel cells: Dead and active reaction zones

    SciTech Connect

    Kulikovsky, A.A.; Divisek, J.; Kornyshev, A.A.

    1999-11-01

    A two-dimensional model of the cathode compartment of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell has been developed. The existence of gas channels in the current collector is taken into account. The model is based on continuity equations for concentrations of the gases and Poisson's equations for potentials of membrane and carbon phase, coupled by Tafel relation for reaction kinetics. Stefan-Maxwell and Knudsen diffusion of gases are taken into account. The simulations were performed for high and low values of carbon phase conductivity. The results revealed (i) for a low value of carbon phase conductivity, a dead zone in the active layer in front of the gas channel is formed, where the reaction rate is small. The catalyst may be removed from this zone without significant loss in cell performance; (ii) For a high carbon phase conductivity value, such a zone is absent, but removal of the catalyst from the same part of the active layer forces the reaction to proceed more rapidly in the remaining parts, with only marginal losses in performance. This conclusion is valid for high diffusivity of oxygen. For low diffusivity, dead zones are formed in front of the current collector, so that catalyst can be removed from these zones. The results, thus, show the possibilities for a considerable reduction of the amount of catalyst.

  6. 77 FR 47429 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Petroleum Refineries in Foreign Trade Sub-zones

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities; Petroleum Refineries... concerning the Petroleum Refineries in Foreign Trade Sub-zones. This request for comment is being made... CBP is soliciting comments concerning the following information collection: Title:...

  7. Reduced endogenous Ca2+ buffering speeds active zone Ca2+ signaling.

    PubMed

    Delvendahl, Igor; Jablonski, Lukasz; Baade, Carolin; Matveev, Victor; Neher, Erwin; Hallermann, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Fast synchronous neurotransmitter release at the presynaptic active zone is triggered by local Ca(2+) signals, which are confined in their spatiotemporal extent by endogenous Ca(2+) buffers. However, it remains elusive how rapid and reliable Ca(2+) signaling can be sustained during repetitive release. Here, we established quantitative two-photon Ca(2+) imaging in cerebellar mossy fiber boutons, which fire at exceptionally high rates. We show that endogenous fixed buffers have a surprisingly low Ca(2+)-binding ratio (∼ 15) and low affinity, whereas mobile buffers have high affinity. Experimentally constrained modeling revealed that the low endogenous buffering promotes fast clearance of Ca(2+) from the active zone during repetitive firing. Measuring Ca(2+) signals at different distances from active zones with ultra-high-resolution confirmed our model predictions. Our results lead to the concept that reduced Ca(2+) buffering enables fast active zone Ca(2+) signaling, suggesting that the strength of endogenous Ca(2+) buffering limits the rate of synchronous synaptic transmission. PMID:26015575

  8. Probabilistic secretion of quanta: spontaneous release at active zones of varicosities, boutons, and endplates.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M R; Gibson, W G; Robinson, J

    1995-01-01

    The amplitude-frequency histogram of spontaneous miniature endplate potentials follows a Gaussian distribution at mature endplates. This distribution gives the mean and variance of the quantum of transmitter. According to the vesicle hypothesis, this quantum is due to exocytosis of the contents of a single synaptic vesicle. Multimodal amplitude-frequency histograms are observed in varying degrees at developing endplates and at peripheral and central synapses, each of which has a specific active zone structure. These multimodal histograms may be due to the near synchronous exocytosis of more than one vesicle. In the present work, a theoretical treatment is given of the rise of intraterminal calcium after the stochastic opening of a calcium channel within a particular active zone geometry. The stochastic interaction of this calcium with the vesicle-associated proteins involved in exocytosis is then used to calculate the probability of quantal secretions from one or several vesicles at each active zone type. It is shown that this procedure can account for multiquantal spontaneous release that may occur at varicosities and boutons, compared with that at the active zones of motor nerve terminals. PMID:7669909

  9. 78 FR 49255 - Foreign-Trade Zone 158-Vicksburg/Jackson, Mississippi; Authorization of Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... Production Activity; Extension of Production Authority; Lane Furniture Industries, Inc. (Upholstered Furniture); Belden, Saltillo, and Verona, Mississippi On February 28, 2013, the Greater Mississippi Foreign... Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of Lane Furniture Industries, Inc., in Belden, Saltillo,...

  10. Microbial respiration and extracellular enzyme activity in sediments from the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study explores the relationship between sediment chemistry (TC, TN, TP) and microbial respiration (DHA) and extracellular enzyme activity (EEA) across the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) hypoxic zone. TC, TN, and TP were all positively correlated with each other (r=0.19-0.68). DHA was ...

  11. RIM Promotes Calcium Channel Accumulation at Active Zones of the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Ethan R.; Valakh, Vera; Wright, Christina M.; Wu, Chunlai; Liu, Zhihua; Zhang, Yong Q.; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Summary Synaptic communication requires the controlled release of synaptic vesicles from presynaptic axon terminals. Release efficacy is regulated by the many proteins that comprise the presynaptic release apparatus, including Ca2+ channels and proteins that influence Ca2+ channel accumulation at release sites. Here we identify Drosophila RIM and demonstrate that it localizes to active zones at the larval neuromuscular junction. In Drosophila RIM mutants, there is a large decrease in evoked synaptic transmission, due to a significant reduction in both the clustering of Ca2+ channels and the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles at active zones. Hence, RIM plays an evolutionarily conserved role in regulating synaptic calcium channel localization and readily releasable pool size. Since RIM has traditionally been studied as an effector of Rab3 function, we investigate whether RIM is involved in the newly identified function of Rab3 in the distribution of presynaptic release machinery components across release sites. Bruchpilot (Brp), an essential component of the active zone cytomatrix T bar, is unaffected by RIM disruption, indicating that Brp localization and distribution across active zones does not require wild type RIM. In addition, larvae containing mutations in both RIM and rab3 have reduced Ca2+ channel levels and a Brp distribution that is very similar to that of the rab3 single mutant, indicating that RIM functions to regulate Ca2+ channel accumulation but is not a Rab3 effector for release machinery distribution across release sites. PMID:23175814

  12. Dynamical Organization of Syntaxin-1A at the Presynaptic Active Zone

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Alexander; Böhme, Mathias A.; Schöneberg, Johannes; Depner, Harald; Sigrist, Stephan J.; Noé, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle fusion is mediated by SNARE proteins forming in between synaptic vesicle (v-SNARE) and plasma membrane (t-SNARE), one of which is Syntaxin-1A. Although exocytosis mainly occurs at active zones, Syntaxin-1A appears to cover the entire neuronal membrane. By using STED super-resolution light microscopy and image analysis of Drosophila neuro-muscular junctions, we show that Syntaxin-1A clusters are more abundant and have an increased size at active zones. A computational particle-based model of syntaxin cluster formation and dynamics is developed. The model is parametrized to reproduce Syntaxin cluster-size distributions found by STED analysis, and successfully reproduces existing FRAP results. The model shows that the neuronal membrane is adjusted in a way to strike a balance between having most syntaxins stored in large clusters, while still keeping a mobile fraction of syntaxins free or in small clusters that can efficiently search the membrane or be traded between clusters. This balance is subtle and can be shifted toward almost no clustering and almost complete clustering by modifying the syntaxin interaction energy on the order of only 1 kBT. This capability appears to be exploited at active zones. The larger active-zone syntaxin clusters are more stable and provide regions of high docking and fusion capability, whereas the smaller clusters outside may serve as flexible reserve pool or sites of spontaneous ectopic release. PMID:26367029

  13. Active crustal deformation of the El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ) using GPS data: Implications in seismic hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staller, Alejandra; Benito, Belen; Jesús Martínez-Díaz, José; Hernández, Douglas; Hernández-Rey, Román; Alonso-Henar, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    El Salvador, Central America, is part of the Chortis block in the northwestern boundary of the Caribbean plate. This block is interacting with a diffuse triple junction point with the Cocos and North American plates. Among the structures that cut the Miocene to Pleistocene volcanic deposits stands out the El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ): It is oriented in N90º-100ºE direction, and it is composed of several structural segments that deform Quaternary deposits with right-lateral and oblique slip motions. The ESFZ is seismically active and capable of producing earthquakes such as the February 13, 2001 with Mw 6.6 (Martínez-Díaz et al., 2004), that seriously affected the population, leaving many casualties. This structure plays an important role in the tectonics of the Chortis block, since its motion is directly related to the drift of the Caribbean plate to the east and not with the partitioning of the deformation of the Cocos subduction (here not coupled) (Álvarez-Gómez et al., 2008). Together with the volcanic arc of El Salvador, this zone constitutes a weakness area that allows the motion of forearc block toward the NW. The geometry and the degree of activity of the ESFZ are not studied enough. However their knowledge is essential to understand the seismic hazard associated to this important seismogenic structure. For this reason, since 2007 a GPS dense network was established along the ESFZ (ZFESNet) in order to obtain GPS velocity measurements which are later used to explain the nature of strain accumulation on major faults along the ESFZ. The current work aims at understanding active crustal deformation of the ESFZ through kinematic model. The results provide significant information to be included in a new estimation of seismic hazard taking into account the major structures in ESFZ.

  14. Magnetic Activity of Pre-main Sequence Stars near the Stellar-Substellar Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Principe, David; Kastner, Joel. H.; Rodriguez, David

    2016-01-01

    X-ray observations of pre-main sequence (pre-MS) stars of M-type probe coronal emission and offer a means to investigate magnetic activity at the stellar-substellar boundary. Recent observations of main sequence (MS) stars at this boundary display a decrease in fractional X-ray luminosity (L X /L bol ) by almost two orders of magnitude for spectral types M7 and later. We investigate magnetic activity and search for a decrease in X-ray emission in the pre-MS progenitors of these MS stars. We present XMM-Newton X-ray observations and preliminary results for ~10 nearby (30-70 pc), very low mass pre-MS stars in the relatively unexplored age range of 10-30 Myr. We compare the fractional X-ray luminosities of these 10-30 Myr old stars to younger (1-3 Myr) pre-MS brown dwarfs and find no dependence on spectral type or age suggesting that X-ray activity declines at an age later than ~30 Myr in these very low-mass stars.

  15. Upper plate deformation and seismic barrier in front of Nazca subduction zone: The Chololo Fault System and active tectonics along the Coastal Cordillera, southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audin, Laurence; Lacan, Pierre; Tavera, Hernando; Bondoux, Francis

    2008-11-01

    The South America plate boundary is one of the most active subduction zone. The recent Mw = 8.4 Arequipa 2001 earthquake ruptured the subduction plane toward the south over 400 km and stopped abruptly on the Ilo Peninsula. In this exact region, the subduction seismic crisis induced the reactivation of continental fault systems in the coastal area. We studied the main reactivated fault system that trends perpendicular to the trench by detailed mapping of fault related-geomorphic features. Also, at a longer time scale, a recurrent Quaternary transtensive tectonic activity of the CFS is expressed by offset river gullies and alluvial fans. The presence of such extensional fault systems trending orthogonal to the trench along the Coastal Cordillera in southern Peru is interpreted to reflect a strong coupling between the two plates. In this particular case, stress transfer to the upper plate, at least along the coastal fringe, appears to have induced crustal seismic events that were initiated mainly during and after the 2001 earthquake. The seafloor roughness of the subducting plate is usually thought to be a cause of segmentation along subduction zones. However, after comparing and discussing the role of inherited structures within the upper plate to the subduction zone segmentation in southern Peru, we suggest that the continental structure itself may exert some feedback control on the segmentation of the subduction zone and thus participate to define the rupture pattern of major subduction earthquakes along the southern Peru continental margin.

  16. Perceiving Object Shape from Specular Highlight Deformation, Boundary Contour Deformation, and Active Haptic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Jacob R.; Thomason, Kelsey E.; Ronning, Cecilia; Behari, Kriti; Kleinman, Kayla; Calloway, Autum B.; Lamirande, Davora

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that motion facilitates the visual perception of solid object shape, particularly when surface texture or other identifiable features (e.g., corners) are present. Conventional models of structure-from-motion require the presence of texture or identifiable object features in order to recover 3-D structure. Is the facilitation in 3-D shape perception similar in magnitude when surface texture is absent? On any given trial in the current experiments, participants were presented with a single randomly-selected solid object (bell pepper or randomly-shaped “glaven”) for 12 seconds and were required to indicate which of 12 (for bell peppers) or 8 (for glavens) simultaneously visible objects possessed the same shape. The initial single object’s shape was defined either by boundary contours alone (i.e., presented as a silhouette), specular highlights alone, specular highlights combined with boundary contours, or texture. In addition, there was a haptic condition: in this condition, the participants haptically explored with both hands (but could not see) the initial single object for 12 seconds; they then performed the same shape-matching task used in the visual conditions. For both the visual and haptic conditions, motion (rotation in depth or active object manipulation) was present in half of the trials and was not present for the remaining trials. The effect of motion was quantitatively similar for all of the visual and haptic conditions–e.g., the participants’ performance in Experiment 1 was 93.5 percent higher in the motion or active haptic manipulation conditions (when compared to the static conditions). The current results demonstrate that deforming specular highlights or boundary contours facilitate 3-D shape perception as much as the motion of objects that possess texture. The current results also indicate that the improvement with motion that occurs for haptics is similar in magnitude to that which occurs for vision. PMID:26863531

  17. Perceiving Object Shape from Specular Highlight Deformation, Boundary Contour Deformation, and Active Haptic Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Norman, J Farley; Phillips, Flip; Cheeseman, Jacob R; Thomason, Kelsey E; Ronning, Cecilia; Behari, Kriti; Kleinman, Kayla; Calloway, Autum B; Lamirande, Davora

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that motion facilitates the visual perception of solid object shape, particularly when surface texture or other identifiable features (e.g., corners) are present. Conventional models of structure-from-motion require the presence of texture or identifiable object features in order to recover 3-D structure. Is the facilitation in 3-D shape perception similar in magnitude when surface texture is absent? On any given trial in the current experiments, participants were presented with a single randomly-selected solid object (bell pepper or randomly-shaped "glaven") for 12 seconds and were required to indicate which of 12 (for bell peppers) or 8 (for glavens) simultaneously visible objects possessed the same shape. The initial single object's shape was defined either by boundary contours alone (i.e., presented as a silhouette), specular highlights alone, specular highlights combined with boundary contours, or texture. In addition, there was a haptic condition: in this condition, the participants haptically explored with both hands (but could not see) the initial single object for 12 seconds; they then performed the same shape-matching task used in the visual conditions. For both the visual and haptic conditions, motion (rotation in depth or active object manipulation) was present in half of the trials and was not present for the remaining trials. The effect of motion was quantitatively similar for all of the visual and haptic conditions-e.g., the participants' performance in Experiment 1 was 93.5 percent higher in the motion or active haptic manipulation conditions (when compared to the static conditions). The current results demonstrate that deforming specular highlights or boundary contours facilitate 3-D shape perception as much as the motion of objects that possess texture. The current results also indicate that the improvement with motion that occurs for haptics is similar in magnitude to that which occurs for vision. PMID:26863531

  18. 15 CFR 923.34 - Interstate boundary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM REGULATIONS Boundaries § 923.34 Interstate boundary. States...

  19. 15 CFR 923.34 - Interstate boundary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM REGULATIONS Boundaries § 923.34 Interstate boundary. States...

  20. 15 CFR 923.34 - Interstate boundary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM REGULATIONS Boundaries § 923.34 Interstate boundary. States...

  1. 15 CFR 923.34 - Interstate boundary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM REGULATIONS Boundaries § 923.34 Interstate boundary. States...

  2. 15 CFR 923.34 - Interstate boundary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM REGULATIONS Boundaries § 923.34 Interstate boundary. States...

  3. Neutron activation analysis of nickel purified by floating zone-refining and anion exchange.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, M; Yakushiji, K; Kikuchi, T; Sato, M; Yanagisawa, E; Igaki, K; Mizohata, A; Mamuro, T; Tsujimoto, T

    1981-04-01

    Nondestructive neutron activation analysis was performed on the nickel purified by floating zone-refining and anion exchange. It is found that floating zone-refining in vacuum is effective to remove Na, Sc, Cr, Zn, As, Ag, Sb and Hg through vaporization in addition to elimination of Se, Sb, Ta, Sm and Tb through segregation. Anion exchange method is also effective to separate Fe, Co, Zn, Mo, Hg, Th and U usually contained in the commercial nickel sources. It is concluded that combination of these two purification methods is required to obtain high purity nickel, since floating zone-refining is known ineffective to eliminate Fe and Co, main impurities in commercial nickel sources. PMID:7291628

  4. Blended Wing Body Systems Studies: Boundary Layer Ingestion Inlets With Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiselhart, Karl A. (Technical Monitor); Daggett, David L.; Kawai, Ron; Friedman, Doug

    2003-01-01

    A CFD analysis was performed on a Blended Wing Body (BWB) aircraft with advanced, turbofan engines analyzing various inlet configurations atop the aft end of the aircraft. The results are presented showing that the optimal design for best aircraft fuel efficiency would be a configuration with a partially buried engine, short offset diffuser using active flow control, and a D-shaped inlet duct that partially ingests the boundary layer air in flight. The CFD models showed that if active flow control technology can be satisfactorily developed, it might be able to control the inlet flow distortion to the engine fan face and reduce the powerplant performance losses to an acceptable level. The weight and surface area drag benefits of a partially submerged engine shows that it might offset the penalties of ingesting the low energy boundary layer air. The combined airplane performance of such a design might deliver approximately 5.5% better aircraft fuel efficiency over a conventionally designed, pod-mounted engine.

  5. An active contour model algorithm for tracking endocardiac boundaries in echocardiographic sequences.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, P J; Zapata, J; Ruiz, R

    2000-01-01

    The use of active contour models to track the boundaries of anatomic structures in medical images is a technique that has attracted a great number of efforts during the last decade. Segmentation techniques based in deformable active contours were proposed first by Kass et al. Because of the problems appearing using these models, some solutions have been introduced, such as balloon force or Gradient Vector Flow force (GVF), derived from the Gradient Vector Flow vectorial field. Results obtained with these forces in the tracking endocardiac task in echocardiographic sequences were not adequate. We have designed a new external force called hybrid force, which, by combining both forces, joins the main features of each one.

  6. 34 CFR 299.3 - What priority may the Secretary establish for activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? For any ESEA discretionary grant program, the Secretary may establish a priority, as authorized by 34 CFR 75.105(b), for projects that will— (a) Use a... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? 299.3 Section 299.3 Education Regulations of...

  7. 34 CFR 299.3 - What priority may the Secretary establish for activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? For any ESEA discretionary grant program, the Secretary may establish a priority, as authorized by 34 CFR 75.105(b), for projects that will— (a) Use a... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? 299.3 Section 299.3 Education Regulations of...

  8. Plume Generation Zones On The Core Mantle Boundary: their origin and what they tell about how the Earth works - and how it has worked (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    It is more than 50 years since Wilson (1963) suggested that a fixed plume of deep origin from the convecting mantle is generating the Hotspots of the Hawaiian chain on the overlying moving rigid lithosphere and nearly 45 years since Morgan (1972) followed by suggesting that the plumes which generate Hotspots rise only from the Core/Mantle Boundary (CMB). During the past ~ 15 years testing has begun of a refinement of Morgan's idea based on the observation that Plumes responsible for Hotspots, Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) and a significant fraction of other igneous rocks (including kimberlites) originate only in Plume Generation Zones (PGZs) at the edges on the CMB of one or other of TUZO and JASON the 2 antipodal, equatorial, Large Low Shear Wave Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) of the deep mantle (Garnero et al. 2007) or from similar PGZs at the edges on the CMB of ~8 smaller Low Shear Wave Velocity Provinces. Today I will: (i) demonstrate using dated Hotspot, Large Igneous Province and Kimberlite occurrence history and paleomagnetic rotations (e.g. Torsvik et al. 2010, Burke et al.2008) the stability throughout the past 0.55 Ga of the LLSVPs and LSVPs (ii) show from the history of the Earth and Mars how the LLSVPs and LSVPs are likely to have formed early in Earth history and to have been stable since ~ 4.4 Ga (Burke et al. 2012) (iii) show, following an analogy suggested by Jack Whitehead of similarity to atmospheric fronts, why plumes are generated only from PGZs on the CMB at the margins of LLSVPs and LSVPs. (iv) show from results of recent seismological studies of Iceland, Jan Mayen, Hawaii, Yellowstone, the Afar and Ontong Java, that although plumes rise vertically in the deep mantle from the CMB their fate in the top ~ 1, 000 km of the mantle is proving to be varied and to depend largely, as Wilson suggested, on how they interact with the plates above them. Properties of the Plume Generation Zones (PGZs) on the CMB and of the plumes that rise from them are

  9. Principal fault zone width and permeability of the active Neodani fault, Nobi fault system, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, A.; Nishino, S.; Mizoguchi, K.; Hirose, T.; Uehara, S.; Sato, K.; Tanikawa, W.; Shimamoto, T.

    2004-02-01

    The internal structure and permeability of the Neodani fault, which was last activated at the time of the 1891 Nobi earthquake (M8.0), were examined through field survey and experiments. A new exposure of the fault at a road construction site reveals a highly localized feature of the past fault deformation within a narrow fault core zone. The fault of the area consists of three zone units towards the fault core: (a) protolith rocks; (b) 15 to 30 m of fault breccia, and (c) 200 mm green to black fault gouge. Within the fault breccia zone, cataclastic foliation oblique to the fault has developed in a fine-grained 2-m-wide zone adjacent to the fault. Foliation is defined by subparallel alignment of intact lozenge shaped clasts, or by elongated aggregates of fine-grained chert fragments. The mean angle of 20°, between the foliation and the fault plane suggests that the foliated breccia accommodated a shear strain of γ<5 assuming simple shear for the rotation of the cataclastic foliation. Previous trench surveys have revealed that the fault has undergone at least 70 m of fault displacement within the last 20,000 years in this locality. The observed fault geometry suggests that past fault displacements have been localized into the 200-mm-wide gouge zone. Gas permeability analysis of the gouges gives low values of the order of 10 -20 m 2. Water permeability as low as 10 -20 m 2 is therefore expected for the fault gouge zone, which is two orders of magnitude lower than the critical permeability suggested for a fault to cause thermal pressurization during a fault slip.

  10. A Direct Grain-Boundary-Activity Correlation for CO Electroreduction on Cu Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Copper catalyzes the electrochemical reduction of CO to valuable C2+ products including ethanol, acetate, propanol, and ethylene. These reactions could be very useful for converting renewable energy into fuels and chemicals, but conventional Cu electrodes are energetically inefficient and have poor selectivity for CO vs H2O reduction. Efforts to design improved catalysts have been impeded by the lack of experimentally validated, quantitative structure–activity relationships. Here we show that CO reduction activity is directly correlated to the density of grain boundaries (GBs) in Cu nanoparticles (NPs). We prepared electrodes of Cu NPs on carbon nanotubes (Cu/CNT) with different average GB densities quantified by transmission electron microscopy. At potentials ranging from −0.3 V to −0.5 V vs the reversible hydrogen electrode, the specific activity for CO reduction to ethanol and acetate was linearly proportional to the fraction of NP surfaces comprised of GB surface terminations. Our results provide a design principle for CO reduction to ethanol and acetate on Cu. GB-rich Cu/CNT electrodes are the first NP catalysts with significant CO reduction activity at moderate overpotential, reaching a mass activity of up to ∼1.5 A per gram of Cu and a Faradaic efficiency >70% at −0.3 V. PMID:27163043

  11. Readily releasable vesicles recycle at the active zone of hippocampal synapses.

    PubMed

    Schikorski, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    During the synaptic vesicle cycle, synaptic vesicles fuse with the plasma membrane and recycle for repeated exo/endocytic events. By using activity-dependent N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-(4-(dibutylamino) styryl) pyridinium dibromide dye uptake combined with fast (<1 s) microwave-assisted fixation followed by photoconversion and ultrastructural 3D analysis, we tracked endocytic vesicles over time, "frame by frame." The first retrieved synaptic vesicles appeared 4 s after stimulation, and these endocytic vesicles were located just above the active zone. Second, the retrieved vesicles did not show any sign of a protein coat, and coated pits were not detected. Between 10 and 30 s, large labeled vesicles appeared that had up to 5 times the size of an individual synaptic vesicle. Starting at around 20 s, these large labeled vesicles decreased in number in favor of labeled synaptic vesicles, and after 30 s, labeled vesicles redocked at the active zone. The data suggest that readily releasable vesicles are retrieved as noncoated vesicles at the active zone.

  12. Holocene activity of the Rose Canyon fault zone in San Diego, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindvall, Scott C.; Rockwell, Thomas K.

    1995-12-01

    The Rose Canyon fault zone in San Diego, California, has many well-expressed geomorphic characteristics of an active strike-slip fault, including scarps, offset and deflected drainages and channel walls, pressure ridges, a closed depression, and vegetation lineaments. Geomorphic expression of the fault zone from Mount Soledad south to Mission Bay indicates that the Mount Soledad strand is the most active. A network of trenches excavated across the Mount Soledad strand in Rose Creek demonstrate a minimum of 8.7 m of dextral slip in a distinctive early to middle Holocene gravel-filled channel that crosses the fault zone. The gravel-filled channel was preserved within and east of the fault but was removed west of the fault zone by erosion or possibly grading during development. Consequently, the actual displacement of the channel could be greater than 8.7 m. Radiocarbon dates on detrital charcoal recovered from the sediments beneath the channel yield a maximum calibrated age of about 8.1±0.2 kyr. The minimum amount of slip along with the maximum age yield a minimum slip rate of 1.07±0.03 mm/yr on this strand of the Rose Canyon fault zone for much of Holocene time. Other strands of the Rose Canyon fault zone, which are east and west of our site, may also have Holocene activity. Based on an analysis of the geomorphology of fault traces within the Rose Canyon fault zone, along with the results of our trenching study, we estimate the maximum likely slip rate at about 2 mm/yr and a best estimate of about 1.5 mm/yr. Stratigraphie evidence of at least three events is present during the past 8.1 kyr. The most recent surface rupture displaces the modern A horizon (topsoil), suggesting that this event probably occurred within the past 500 years. Stratigraphie and structural relationships also indicate the occurrence of a scarp-forming event at about 8.1 kyr, prior to deposition of the gravel-filled channel that was used as a piercing line. A third event is indicated by the

  13. Active Control of Panel Vibrations Induced by a Boundary Layer Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, active and passive control of sound and vibration in aeroelastic structures have received a great deal of attention due to many potential applications to aerospace and other industries. There exists a great deal of research work done in this area. Recent advances in the control of sound and vibration can be found in the several conference proceedings. In this report we will summarize our research findings supported by the NASA grant NAG-1-1175. The problems of active and passive control of sound and vibration has been investigated by many researchers for a number of years. However, few of the articles are concerned with the sound and vibration with flow-structure interaction. Experimental and numerical studies on the coupling between panel vibration and acoustic radiation due to flow excitation have been done by Maestrello and his associates at NASA/Langley Research Center. Since the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations is formidable, an analytical solution to the full problem seems impossible. For this reason, we have to simplify the problem to that of the nonlinear panel vibration induced by a uniform flow or a boundary-layer flow with a given wall pressure distribution. Based on this simplified model, we have been able to study the control and stabilization of the nonlinear panel vibration, which have not been treated satisfactorily by other authors. The vibration suppression will clearly reduce the sound radiation power from the panel. The major research findings will be presented in the next three sections. In Section II we shall describe our results on the boundary control of nonlinear panel vibration, with or without flow excitation. Section III is concerned with active control of the vibration and sound radiation from a nonlinear elastic panel. A detailed description of our work on the parametric vibrational control of nonlinear elastic panel will be presented in Section IV. This paper will be submitted to the Journal

  14. Active control of panel vibrations induced by a boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1995-01-01

    The problems of active and passive control of sound and vibration has been investigated by many researchers for a number of years. However, few of the articles are concerned with the sound and vibration with flow-structure interaction. Experimental and numerical studies on the coupling between panel vibration and acoustic radiation due to flow excitation have been done by Maestrello and his associates at NASA/Langley Research Center. Since the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations is formidable, an analytical solution to the full problem seems impossible. For this reason, we have to simplify the problem to that of the nonlinear panel vibration induced by a uniform flow or a boundary-layer flow with a given wall pressure distribution. Based on this simplified model, we have been able to consider the control and stabilization of the nonlinear panel vibration, which have not been treated satisfactorily by other authors. Although the sound radiation has not been included, the vibration suppression will clearly reduce the sound radiation power from the panel. The major research findings are presented in three sections. In section two we describe results on the boundary control of nonlinear panel vibration, with or without flow excitation. Sections three and four are concerned with some analytical and numerical results in the optimal control of the linear and nonlinear panel vibrations, respectively, excited by the flow pressure fluctuations. Finally, in section five, we draw some conclusions from research findings.

  15. Remote life-detection criteria, habitable zone boundaries, and the frequency of Earth-like planets around M and late K stars

    PubMed Central

    Kasting, James F.; Kopparapu, Ravikumar; Ramirez, Ramses M.; Harman, Chester E.

    2014-01-01

    The habitable zone (HZ) around a star is typically defined as the region where a rocky planet can maintain liquid water on its surface. That definition is appropriate, because this allows for the possibility that carbon-based, photosynthetic life exists on the planet in sufficient abundance to modify the planet’s atmosphere in a way that might be remotely detected. Exactly what conditions are needed, however, to maintain liquid water remains a topic for debate. In the past, modelers have restricted themselves to water-rich planets with CO2 and H2O as the only important greenhouse gases. More recently, some researchers have suggested broadening the definition to include arid, “Dune” planets on the inner edge and planets with captured H2 atmospheres on the outer edge, thereby greatly increasing the HZ width. Such planets could exist, but we demonstrate that an inner edge limit of 0.59 AU or less is physically unrealistic. We further argue that conservative HZ definitions should be used for designing future space-based telescopes, but that optimistic definitions may be useful in interpreting the data from such missions. In terms of effective solar flux, Seff, the recently recalculated HZ boundaries are: recent Venus—1.78; runaway greenhouse—1.04; moist greenhouse—1.01; maximum greenhouse—0.35; and early Mars—0.32. Based on a combination of different HZ definitions, the frequency of potentially Earth-like planets around late K and M stars observed by Kepler is in the range of 0.4–0.5. PMID:24277805

  16. Remote life-detection criteria, habitable zone boundaries, and the frequency of Earth-like planets around M and late K stars.

    PubMed

    Kasting, James F; Kopparapu, Ravikumar; Ramirez, Ramses M; Harman, Chester E

    2014-09-01

    The habitable zone (HZ) around a star is typically defined as the region where a rocky planet can maintain liquid water on its surface. That definition is appropriate, because this allows for the possibility that carbon-based, photosynthetic life exists on the planet in sufficient abundance to modify the planet's atmosphere in a way that might be remotely detected. Exactly what conditions are needed, however, to maintain liquid water remains a topic for debate. In the past, modelers have restricted themselves to water-rich planets with CO2 and H2O as the only important greenhouse gases. More recently, some researchers have suggested broadening the definition to include arid, "Dune" planets on the inner edge and planets with captured H2 atmospheres on the outer edge, thereby greatly increasing the HZ width. Such planets could exist, but we demonstrate that an inner edge limit of 0.59 AU or less is physically unrealistic. We further argue that conservative HZ definitions should be used for designing future space-based telescopes, but that optimistic definitions may be useful in interpreting the data from such missions. In terms of effective solar flux, S(eff), the recently recalculated HZ boundaries are: recent Venus--1.78; runaway greenhouse--1.04; moist greenhouse--1.01; maximum greenhouse--0.35; and early Mars--0.32. Based on a combination of different HZ definitions, the frequency of potentially Earth-like planets around late K and M stars observed by Kepler is in the range of 0.4-0.5. PMID:24277805

  17. Remote life-detection criteria, habitable zone boundaries, and the frequency of Earth-like planets around M and late K stars.

    PubMed

    Kasting, James F; Kopparapu, Ravikumar; Ramirez, Ramses M; Harman, Chester E

    2014-09-01

    The habitable zone (HZ) around a star is typically defined as the region where a rocky planet can maintain liquid water on its surface. That definition is appropriate, because this allows for the possibility that carbon-based, photosynthetic life exists on the planet in sufficient abundance to modify the planet's atmosphere in a way that might be remotely detected. Exactly what conditions are needed, however, to maintain liquid water remains a topic for debate. In the past, modelers have restricted themselves to water-rich planets with CO2 and H2O as the only important greenhouse gases. More recently, some researchers have suggested broadening the definition to include arid, "Dune" planets on the inner edge and planets with captured H2 atmospheres on the outer edge, thereby greatly increasing the HZ width. Such planets could exist, but we demonstrate that an inner edge limit of 0.59 AU or less is physically unrealistic. We further argue that conservative HZ definitions should be used for designing future space-based telescopes, but that optimistic definitions may be useful in interpreting the data from such missions. In terms of effective solar flux, S(eff), the recently recalculated HZ boundaries are: recent Venus--1.78; runaway greenhouse--1.04; moist greenhouse--1.01; maximum greenhouse--0.35; and early Mars--0.32. Based on a combination of different HZ definitions, the frequency of potentially Earth-like planets around late K and M stars observed by Kepler is in the range of 0.4-0.5.

  18. Pulsed Light Stimulation Increases Boundary Preference and Periodicity of Episodic Motor Activity in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Shuang; Xiao, Chengfeng; Robertson, R. Meldrum

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the therapeutic benefits of long-term sensory stimulation for improving cognitive abilities and motor performance of stroke patients. The rationale is that such stimulation would activate mechanisms of neural plasticity to promote enhanced coordination and associated circuit functions. Experimental approaches to characterize such mechanisms are needed. Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most attractive model organisms to investigate neural mechanisms responsible for stimulation-induced behaviors with its powerful accessibility to genetic analysis. In this study, the effect of chronic sensory stimulation (pulsed light stimulation) on motor activity in w1118 flies was investigated. Flies were exposed to a chronic pulsed light stimulation protocol prior to testing their performance in a standard locomotion assay. Flies responded to pulsed light stimulation with increased boundary preference and travel distance in a circular arena. In addition, pulsed light stimulation increased the power of extracellular electrical activity, leading to the enhancement of periodic electrical activity which was associated with a centrally-generated motor pattern (struggling behavior). In contrast, such periodic events were largely missing in w1118 flies without pulsed light treatment. These data suggest that the sensory stimulation induced a response in motor activity associated with the modifications of electrical activity in the central nervous system (CNS). Finally, without pulsed light treatment, the wild-type genetic background was associated with the occurrence of the periodic activity in wild-type Canton S (CS) flies, and w+ modulated the consistency of periodicity. We conclude that pulsed light stimulation modifies behavioral and electrophysiological activities in w1118 flies. These data provide a foundation for future research on the genetic mechanisms of neural plasticity underlying such behavioral modification. PMID:27684063

  19. Functional Dissection of the Blocking and Bypass Activities of the Fab-8 Boundary in the Drosophila Bithorax Complex.

    PubMed

    Kyrchanova, Olga; Mogila, Vladic; Wolle, Daniel; Deshpande, Girish; Parshikov, Alexander; Cléard, Fabienne; Karch, Francois; Schedl, Paul; Georgiev, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    Functionally autonomous regulatory domains direct the parasegment-specific expression of the Drosophila Bithorax complex (BX-C) homeotic genes. Autonomy is conferred by boundary/insulator elements that separate each regulatory domain from its neighbors. For six of the nine parasegment (PS) regulatory domains in the complex, at least one boundary is located between the domain and its target homeotic gene. Consequently, BX-C boundaries must not only block adventitious interactions between neighboring regulatory domains, but also be permissive (bypass) for regulatory interactions between the domains and their gene targets. To elucidate how the BX-C boundaries combine these two contradictory activities, we have used a boundary replacement strategy. We show that a 337 bp fragment spanning the Fab-8 boundary nuclease hypersensitive site and lacking all but 83 bp of the 625 bp Fab-8 PTS (promoter targeting sequence) fully rescues a Fab-7 deletion. It blocks crosstalk between the iab-6 and iab-7 regulatory domains, and has bypass activity that enables the two downstream domains, iab-5 and iab-6, to regulate Abdominal-B (Abd-B) transcription in spite of two intervening boundary elements. Fab-8 has two dCTCF sites and we show that they are necessary both for blocking and bypass activity. However, CTCF sites on their own are not sufficient for bypass. While multimerized dCTCF (or Su(Hw)) sites have blocking activity, they fail to support bypass. Moreover, this bypass defect is not rescued by the full length PTS. Finally, we show that orientation is critical for the proper functioning the Fab-8 replacement. Though the inverted Fab-8 boundary still blocks crosstalk, it disrupts the topology of the Abd-B regulatory domains and does not support bypass. Importantly, altering the orientation of the Fab-8 dCTCF sites is not sufficient to disrupt bypass, indicating that orientation dependence is conferred by other factors.

  20. Functional Dissection of the Blocking and Bypass Activities of the Fab-8 Boundary in the Drosophila Bithorax Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wolle, Daniel; Deshpande, Girish; Parshikov, Alexander; Cléard, Fabienne; Karch, Francois; Schedl, Paul; Georgiev, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Functionally autonomous regulatory domains direct the parasegment-specific expression of the Drosophila Bithorax complex (BX-C) homeotic genes. Autonomy is conferred by boundary/insulator elements that separate each regulatory domain from its neighbors. For six of the nine parasegment (PS) regulatory domains in the complex, at least one boundary is located between the domain and its target homeotic gene. Consequently, BX-C boundaries must not only block adventitious interactions between neighboring regulatory domains, but also be permissive (bypass) for regulatory interactions between the domains and their gene targets. To elucidate how the BX-C boundaries combine these two contradictory activities, we have used a boundary replacement strategy. We show that a 337 bp fragment spanning the Fab-8 boundary nuclease hypersensitive site and lacking all but 83 bp of the 625 bp Fab-8 PTS (promoter targeting sequence) fully rescues a Fab-7 deletion. It blocks crosstalk between the iab-6 and iab-7 regulatory domains, and has bypass activity that enables the two downstream domains, iab-5 and iab-6, to regulate Abdominal-B (Abd-B) transcription in spite of two intervening boundary elements. Fab-8 has two dCTCF sites and we show that they are necessary both for blocking and bypass activity. However, CTCF sites on their own are not sufficient for bypass. While multimerized dCTCF (or Su(Hw)) sites have blocking activity, they fail to support bypass. Moreover, this bypass defect is not rescued by the full length PTS. Finally, we show that orientation is critical for the proper functioning the Fab-8 replacement. Though the inverted Fab-8 boundary still blocks crosstalk, it disrupts the topology of the Abd-B regulatory domains and does not support bypass. Importantly, altering the orientation of the Fab-8 dCTCF sites is not sufficient to disrupt bypass, indicating that orientation dependence is conferred by other factors. PMID:27428541

  1. CAST and ELKS proteins: structural and functional determinants of the presynaptic active zone.

    PubMed

    Hida, Yamato; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa

    2010-08-01

    Cytomatrix at the active zone-associated structural protein (CAST) was first purified from rat brain. It belongs to a protein family with the protein ELKS being its close relative. In nerve terminals, these proteins are specifically localized in the active zone (AZ). They have been shown to directly interact with other AZ proteins, including RIM1, Piccolo and Bassoon, and indirectly with Munc13-1 through RIM1, forming a large molecular complex at AZ. Moreover, the direct interaction of CAST with RIM1 and Bassoon appears to be involved in the release of neurotransmitters. However, it still remains elusive how CAST and ELKS regulate the assembly and function of AZ during synapse maturation. This review focuses on recent findings about the ELKS/CAST family revealed by biochemical strategies and genetic studies, and discusses the potential roles of this protein family in the function and organization of the presynaptic AZ.

  2. Displacement of large-scale open solar magnetic fields from the zone of active longitudes and the heliospheric storm of November 3-10, 2004: 2. "Explosion" of singularity and dynamics of sunspot formation and energy release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, K. G.

    2010-12-01

    A more detailed scenario of one stage (August-November 2004) of the quasibiennial MHD process "Origination ... and dissipation of the four-sector structure of the solar magnetic field" during the decline phase of cycle 23 has been constructed. It has been indicated that the following working hypothesis on the propagation of an MHD disturbance westward (in the direction of solar rotation) and eastward (toward the zone of active longitudes) with the displacement of the large-scale open solar magnetic field (LOSMF) from this zone can be constructed based on LOSMF model representations and data on sunspot formation, flares, active filaments, and coronal ejections as well as on the estimated contribution of sporadic energy release to the flare luminosity and kinetic energy of ejections: (1) The "explosion" of the LOSMF singularity and the formation in the explosion zone of an anemone active region (AR), which produced the satellite sunspot formation that continued west and east of the "anemone," represented a powerful and energy-intensive source of MHD processes at this stage. (2) This resulted in the origination of two "governing" large-scale MHD processes, which regulated various usual manifestations of solar activity: the fast LOSMF along the neutral line in the solar atmosphere, strongly affecting the zone of active longitudes, and the slow LOSMF in the outer layers of the convection zone. The fronts of these processes were identified by powerful (about 1031 erg) coronal ejections. (3) The collision of a wave reflected from the zone of active longitudes with the eastern front of the hydromagnetic impulse of the convection zone resulted in an increase in LOSMF magnetic fluxes, origination of an active sector boundary in the zone of active longitudes, shear-convergent motions, and generation and destabilization of the flare-productive AR 10696 responsible for the heliospheric storm of November 3-10, 2004.

  3. Update on Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) Activities in the PNW Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, K. E.; Fengler, K.; Doelger, S.

    2007-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), which is part of the larger NSF-funded EarthScope project, is nearing the end of year 3 of the installation phase of 852 continuously operating GPS stations in the Western United States. The Pacific Northwest (PNW) region will install 134 continuous GPS stations by the end of September 2008. The sites are distributed along the fore and back-arc of the Cascadia Subduction Zone and at Mt. St. Helens. At the end of September 2007, the PNW region will be several stations short of its installation goal of 110 GPS stations, mostly due to an unusually early and high danger wildfire season. The scientific priority during this past year was to concentrate installations in the Oregon back arc region, the Southwest Oregon fore arc region and the Idaho panhandle. In the last year UNAVCO has added 10 stations to the Pacific Northwest region, raising the number of stations from 124 to 134. The majority of these stations are located within the fore and back arc regions of Southern Oregon. In addition the UNAVCO installed its first building mounted site within a difficult area along the Southwest Oregon coast. UNAVCO will install its remaining 24 new continuous GPS stations in the Pacific Northwest in year 5. The remaining stations are distributed throughout the region, and comprise a mix of standard monuments, and strainmeter collocations. Our goal is to have all stations installed by August 31 2008. Reconnaissance work for all of the GPS sites have been completed, and have had permits submitted.

  4. Verbal transformation effect and the neighborhood activation model: Exploring the boundaries of the neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Peter W.; Warren, Richard M.; Bashford, James A.

    2001-05-01

    A recorded word repeating over and over undergoes a succession of illusory changes to other words and syllables in the listener's lexicon, as well as to nonwords. This verbal transformation effect (VTE) appears to involve successive satiations of a dominant representation and serial replacements by competing representations. Early during the presentation of a VTE stimulus, reported illusory forms are typically lexical and nonlexical neighbors of the veridical stimulus (i.e., forms differing from the stimulus by a single phoneme). Interestingly, presentation of a lexical stimulus initially evokes far more reports of nonlexical neighbors while a nonlexical stimulus evokes predominantly lexical neighbors. After 6 to 7 min, the perceived forms are no longer immediate neighbors of the veridical stimulus, and differ by two phonemes on average. The neighborhood activation model (NAM) considers that identification of spoken words involves the activation of competing, phonetically similar lexical and nonlexical representations. Activation of one of these competitors reaches a critical level and that competitor enters awareness. The VTE polls the population of activated representations, providing a means of defining the functional boundaries of neighborhoods as well as the dynamics of competitor interaction. [Work supported by NIH.

  5. Intrinsic Bayesian Active Contours for Extraction of Object Boundaries in Images

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Anuj

    2010-01-01

    We present a framework for incorporating prior information about high-probability shapes in the process of contour extraction and object recognition in images. Here one studies shapes as elements of an infinite-dimensional, non-linear quotient space, and statistics of shapes are defined and computed intrinsically using differential geometry of this shape space. Prior models on shapes are constructed using probability distributions on tangent bundles of shape spaces. Similar to the past work on active contours, where curves are driven by vector fields based on image gradients and roughness penalties, we incorporate the prior shape knowledge in the form of vector fields on curves. Through experimental results, we demonstrate the use of prior shape models in the estimation of object boundaries, and their success in handling partial obscuration and missing data. Furthermore, we describe the use of this framework in shape-based object recognition or classification. PMID:21076692

  6. A Model of Ischemia-Induced Neuroblast Activation in the Adult Subventricular Zone

    PubMed Central

    Vergni, Davide; Castiglione, Filippo; Briani, Maya; Middei, Silvia; Alberdi, Elena; Reymann, Klaus G.; Natalini, Roberto; Volonté, Cinzia; Matute, Carlos; Cavaliere, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a rat brain organotypic culture model, in which tissue slices contain cortex-subventricular zone-striatum regions, to model neuroblast activity in response to in vitro ischemia. Neuroblast activation has been described in terms of two main parameters, proliferation and migration from the subventricular zone into the injured cortex. We observed distinct phases of neuroblast activation as is known to occur after in vivo ischemia. Thus, immediately after oxygen/glucose deprivation (6–24 hours), neuroblasts reduce their proliferative and migratory activity, whereas, at longer time points after the insult (2 to 5 days), they start to proliferate and migrate into the damaged cortex. Antagonism of ionotropic receptors for extracellular ATP during and after the insult unmasks an early activation of neuroblasts in the subventricular zone, which responded with a rapid and intense migration of neuroblasts into the damaged cortex (within 24 hours). The process is further enhanced by elevating the production of the chemoattractant SDf-1α and may also be boosted by blocking the activation of microglia. This organotypic model which we have developed is an excellent in vitro system to study neurogenesis after ischemia and other neurodegenerative diseases. Its application has revealed a SOS response to oxygen/glucose deprivation, which is inhibited by unfavorable conditions due to the ischemic environment. Finally, experimental quantifications have allowed us to elaborate a mathematical model to describe neuroblast activation and to develop a computer simulation which should have promising applications for the screening of drug candidates for novel therapies of ischemia-related pathologies. PMID:19390597

  7. Micro 3D ERT tomography for data assimilation modelling of active root zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanella, Daniela; Busato, Laura; Boaga, Jacopo; Cassiani, Giorgio; Binley, Andrew; Putti, Mario; Consoli, Simona

    2016-04-01

    Within the soil-plant-atmosphere system, root activity plays a fundamental role, as it connects different domains and allows a large part of the water and nutrient exchanges necessary for plant sustenance. The understanding of these processes is not only useful from an environmental point of view, making a fundamental contribution to the understanding of the critical zone dynamics, but also plays a pivotal role in precision agriculture, where the optimisation of water resources exploitation is mandatory and often carried out through deficit irrigation techniques. In this work, we present the results of non-invasive monitoring of the active root zone of two orange trees (Citrus sinensis, cv Tarocco Ippolito) located in an orange orchard in eastern Sicily (Italy) and drip irrigated with two different techniques: partial root drying and 100% crop evapotranspiration. The main goal of the monitoring activity is to assess possible differences between the developed root systems and the root water uptake between the two irrigation strategies. The monitoring is conducted using 3D micro-electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) based on an apparatus composed of a number of micro-boreholes (about 1.2 m deep) housing 12 electrodes each, plus a number of surface electrodes. Time-lapse measurements conducted both with long-term periodicity and short-term repetition before and after irrigation clearly highlight the presence and distribution of root water uptake zone both at shallow and larger depth, likely to correspond to zones utilized during the irrigation period (shallow) and during the time when the crop is not irrigated (deep). Subsidiary information is available in terms of precipitation, sap flow measurements and micrometeorological evapotranspiration estimates. This data ensemble lends itself to the assimilation into a variably saturated flow model, where both soil hydraulic parameters and root distribution shall be identified. Preliminary results in this directions show

  8. Micro 3D ERT tomography for data assimilation modelling of active root zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, G.; Boaga, J.; Busato, L.; Vanella, D.; Consoli, S.; Binley, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Within the soil-plant-atmosphere system, root activity plays a fundamental role, as it connects different domains and allows a large part of the water and nutrient exchanges necessary for plant sustenance. The understanding of these processes is not only useful from an environmental point of view, making a fundamental contribution to the understanding of the critical zone dynamics, but also plays a pivotal role in precision agriculture, where the optimisation of water resources exploitation is mandatory and often carried out through deficit irrigation techniques. In this work, we present the results of non-invasive monitoring of the active root zone of two orange trees (Citrus sinensis, cv Tarocco Ippolito) located in an orange orchard in eastern Sicily (Italy) and drip irrigated with two different techniques: partial root drying and 100% crop evapotranspiration. The main goal of the monitoring activity is to assess possible differences between the developed root systems and the root water uptake between the two irrigation strategies. The monitoring is conducted using 3D micro-electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) based on an apparatus composed of a number of micro-boreholes (about 1.2 m deep) housing 12 electrodes each, plus a number of surface electrodes. Time-lapse measurements conducted both with long-term periodicity and short-term repetition before and after irrigation clearly highlight the presence and distribution of root water uptake zone both at shallow and larger depth, likely to correspond to zones utilized during the irrigation period (shallow) and during the time when the crop is not irrigated (deep). Subsidiary information is available in terms of precipitation, sap flow measurements and micrometeorological evapotranspiration estimates. This data ensemble lends itself to the assimilation into a variably saturated flow model, where both soil hydraulic parameters and root distribution shall be identified. Preliminary results in this directions show

  9. On interrelation between seismic activity and the Earth crust deformations of Vrancea zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dultsev, A.; Pronyshyn, R.; Siejka, Z.; Serant, O.; Tretyak, K.; Zablotskyj, F.

    2009-04-01

    An investigated territory covers the whole seismically active zone of Vrancea mountains (Romania). It is located between 43° and 47° parallels in latitude and 23° and 29° meridians in longitude. The weekly solutions of coordinates of six permanent stations (BACA, BAIA, BUCU, COST, DEVA, IGEO) allocated on the territories of Romania and Moldova have been used as the initial data for carrying out of the investigations. These initial data were obtained during 2007-2008. The results of determination of the earthquake parameters (coordinates, focal depth, magnitude and energy) have been obtained from a network of seismic stations. An analysis of the temporal earthquake distribution in 2007-2008 showed the alternation of the periods of seismic activity and its absence. The duration of these periods ranges from one to three weeks. The Earth crust deformation parameters between the recurrent periods of seismic activity and its absence have been calculated on basis of weekly solutions for the territory bounded by GPS-permanent stations. The accumulative values of the earthquake energy and magnitude were calculated for the periods of seismic activity. It had been ascertained that the territory of Vrancea zone undergoes the permanent stretching into northeast and southwest directions as well as the compressing into northwest and southeast ones. In fact, the more fast attenuation of the seismic waves occurs in the direction of the contraction axis and the slowest attenuation of ones occurs in the direction of the axis of elongation. The parameters of total amplitude and earthquake energy in the periods of seismic activity have high-degree correlation with difference of the deformations of next periods of seismic activity and its absence. It enables to predict a change of the deformation increment in the zone of earthquake focuses of Vrancea territory by means of the earthquake total force.

  10. Modeling Activity of Very-Low-Frequency Earthquakes in Shallow Subduction Zone Considering Splay Faults and High Pore Pressure Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibazaki, B.; Ito, Y.; Ujiie, K.

    2010-12-01

    Recent observations reveal that very-low-frequency (VLF) earthquakes occur in the shallow subduction zones in the Nankai trough, Hyuganada, and off the coast of Tokachi, Japan (Obara and Ito, 2005; Asano et al., 2008; Obana and Kodaira, 2009). The ongoing super drilling project, Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE), involves sampling the core of seismogenic faults and conducting analyses, experiments, and in-situ borehole measurements at the Nankai trough where VLF earthquakes occur. The data obtained in this project will be used to develop a model of VLF earthquakes that integrates seismological observations, laboratory experimental results, and geological observations. In the present study, first, we perform 2D quasi-dynamic modeling of VLF earthquakes in an elastic half-space on the basis of a rate- and state-dependent friction law. We set a local unstable zone in a shallow stable zone. To explain very low stress drops and short recurrence intervals of VLF earthquakes, the effective stress is assumed to be around 0.2 MPa. The results indicate that VLF earthquakes are unstable slips that occur under high pore pressure conditions. The probable causes for the high pore pressure along the faults of VLF earthquakes are the sediment compaction and dehydration that occur during smectite-to-illite transition in the shallow subduction zone. Then, we model the generation process of VLF earthquakes by considering splay faults and the occurrences of large subduction earthquakes. We set the local unstable zones with high pore pressure in the stable splay fault zones. We assume the long-term average slip velocity of the splay faults, and that the shear stress is accumulated by the delay of the fault slip from the long-term slip motion. Depending on the frictional properties of the shallow splay faults, two types of VLF earthquakes can occur. When the effective stress is low all over the splay faults, the rupture of large earthquakes propagates to the

  11. Microearthquake activity on the Orozco Fracture Zone: Preliminary results from Project ROSE

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-10

    We present preliminary hypocenter determinations for 52 earthquakes recorded by a large multiinstitutional network of ocean bottom seismometers and ocean bottom hydrophones in the Orozco Fracture Zone in the eastern Pacific during late February to mid-March 1979. The network was deployed as part of the Rivera Ocean Seismic Experiment, also known as Project ROSE. The Orozco Fracture Zone is Physiographically complex, and the pattern of microearthquake hypocenters at least partly reflects this complexity. All of the well-located epicenters lie within the active transform fault segment of the fracture zone. About half of the recorded earthquakes were aligned along a narrow trough that extends eastward from the northern rise crest intersection in the approximate direction of the Cocos-Pacific relative plate motion; these events appear to be characterized by strike-slip faulting. The second major group of activity occurred in the central portion of the transform fault; the microearthquakes in this group do not display a preferred alignment parallel to the direction of spreading, and several are not obviously associated with distinct topographic features. Hypocentral depth was well resolved for many of the earthquakes reported here. Nominal depths range from 0 to 17 km below the seafloor.

  12. Microearthquake activity on the Orozco Fracture Zone: Preliminary results from Project ROSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scientists, Project Rose

    1981-05-01

    We present preliminary hypocenter determinations for 52 earthquakes recorded by a large multi-institutional network of ocean bottom seismometers and ocean bottom hydrophones in the Orozco Fracture Zone in the eastern Pacific during late February to mid-March 1979. The network was deployed as part of the Rivera Ocean Seismic Experiment, also known as Project ROSE. The Orozco Fracture Zone is physiographically complex, and the pattern of microearthquake hypocenters at least partly reflects this complexity. All of the well-located epicenters lie within the active transform fault segment of the fracture zone. About half of the recorded earthquakes were aligned along a narrow trough that extends eastward from the northern rise crest intersection in the approximate direction of the Cocos-Pacific relative plate motion; these events appear to be characterized by strike-slip faulting. The second major group of activity occurred in the central portion of the transform fault; the microearthquakes in this group do not display a preferred alignment parallel to the direction of spreading, and several are not obviously associated with distinct topographic features. Hypocentral depth was well resolved for many of the earthquakes reported here. Nominal depths range from 0 to 17 km below the seafloor.

  13. Microearthquake activity on the Orozco Fracture Zone: Preliminary results from Project ROSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-05-01

    We present preliminary hypocenter determinations for 52 earthquakes recorded by a large multiinstitutional network of ocean bottom seismometers and ocean bottom hydrophones in the Orozco Fracture Zone in the eastern Pacific during late February to mid-March 1979. The network was deployed as part of the Rivera Ocean Seismic Experiment, also known as Project ROSE. The Orozco Fracture Zone is Physiographically complex, and the pattern of microearthquake hypocenters at least partly reflects this complexity. All of the well-located epicenters lie within the active transform fault segment of the fracture zone. About half of the recorded earthquakes were aligned along a narrow trough that extends eastward from the northern rise crest intersection in the approximate direction of the Cocos-Pacific relative plate motion; these events appear to be characterized by strike-slip faulting. The second major group of activity occurred in the central portion of the transform fault; the microearthquakes in this group do not display a preferred alignment parallel to the direction of spreading, and several are not obviously associated with distinct topographic features. Hypocentral depth was well resolved for many of the earthquakes reported here. Nominal depths range from 0 to 17 km below the seafloor.

  14. 78 FR 7395 - Foreign-Trade Zone 129-Bellingham, WA; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; T.C. Trading...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 129--Bellingham, WA; Notification of Proposed Production..., grantee of FTZ 129, submitted a notification of proposed production activity on behalf of T.C. Trading... notification (as described below) and subsequently authorized by the FTZ Board. Production under FTZ...

  15. 78 FR 56655 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 203-Moses Lake, Washington; Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 203--Moses Lake, Washington; Notification of Proposed..., grantee of FTZ 203, submitted a notification of proposed production activity to the FTZ Board on behalf of... is located within Site 4 of FTZ 203. The facility is used for the processing of components into...

  16. 78 FR 66330 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 235-Lakewood, New Jersey, Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 235--Lakewood, New Jersey, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Cosmetic Essence Innovations, LLC, (Fragrance Bottling), Holmdel, New Jersey...

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    ... public comment (77 FR 39209, 7/2/2012). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of the... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 74--Baltimore, MD, Authorization of Production Activity, J.D... of J.D. Neuhaus LP, located in Sparks, Maryland. The notification was processed in accordance...

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    2013-12-30

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 265--Conroe, Texas, Notification of Proposed Production... production activity to the FTZ Board on behalf of Bauer Manufacturing Inc. (Bauer), located in Conroe, Texas..., and tools and accessories for pile drivers and boring machinery within Site 1 of FTZ 265. The...

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    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 41--Milwaukee, WI; Notification of Proposed Production... Milwaukee, grantee of FTZ 41, submitted a notification of proposed production activity on behalf of CNH... are used for the production of tractors and tractor/combine components. Pursuant to 15 CFR...

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 26--Atlanta, GA; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Perkins Shibaura Engines LLC, (Diesel Engines), Griffin, GA Perkins Shibaura Engines LLC (Perkins Shibaura), an operator of FTZ 26, submitted...

  1. 78 FR 58995 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 138-Columbus, Ohio; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Rolls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 138--Columbus, Ohio; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Rolls Royce Energy Systems, Inc. (Industrial Gas Turbines, Power Generation Turbines, and Generator Sets); Mount Vernon, Ohio...

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    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 183--Austin, Texas; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Samsung Austin Semiconductor, LLC (Semiconductors); Austin, Texas Samsung Austin Semiconductor... the FTZ Board for its facility in Austin, Texas. The notification conforming to the requirements...

  3. 78 FR 65963 - Foreign-Trade Zone 44-Mt. Olive, New Jersey; Authorization of Production Activity; Givaudan...

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    ... notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (78 FR 39707, 07-02-2013). The FTZ Board has... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 44--Mt. Olive, New Jersey; Authorization of Production Activity; Givaudan Fragrances Corporation (Fragrance and Flavor Products); Mt. Olive, New Jersey On June...

  4. Present-day stress tensors along the southern Caribbean plate boundary zone from inversion of focal mechanism solutions: A successful trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audemard M., Franck A.; Castilla, Raymi

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a compilation of 16 present-day stress tensors along the southern Caribbean plate boundary zone (PBZ), and particularly in western and along northern Venezuela. As a trial, these new stress tensors along PBZ have been calculated from inversion of 125 focal mechanism solutions (FMS) by applying the Angelier & Mechler's dihedral method, which were originally gathered by the first author and published in 2005. These new tensors are compared to those 59 tensors inverted from fault-slip data measured only in Plio-Quaternary sedimentary rocks, compiled in Audemard et al. (2005), which were originally calculated by several researchers through the inversion methods developed by Angelier and Mechler or Etchecopar et al. The two sets of stress tensors, one derived from geological data and the other one from seismological data, compare very well throughout the PBZ in terms of both stress orientation and shape of the stress tensor. This region is characterized by a compressive strike-slip (transpressional senso lato), occasionally compressional, regime from the southern Mérida Andes on the southwest to the gulf of Paria in the east. Significant changes in direction of the maximum horizontal stress (σH = σ1) can be established along it though. The σ1 direction varies progressively from nearly east-west in the southern Andes (SW Venezuela) to between NW-SE and NNW-SSE in northwestern Venezuela; this direction remaining constant across northern Venezuela, from Colombia to Trinidad. In addition, the σV defined by inversion of focal mechanisms or by the shape of the stress ellipsoid derived from the Etchecopar et al.'s method better characterize whether the stress regime is transpressional or compressional, or even very rarely trantensional at local scale. The orientation and space variation of this regional stress field in western Venezuela results from the addition of the two major neighbouring interplate maximum horizontal stress orientations (

  5. Active control of turbulent boundary layer sound transmission into a vehicle interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiazzo, A.; Alujević, N.; Pluymers, B.; Desmet, W.

    2016-09-01

    In high speed automotive, aerospace, and railway transportation, the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) is one of the most important sources of interior noise. The stochastic pressure distribution associated with the turbulence is able to excite significantly structural vibration of vehicle exterior panels. They radiate sound into the vehicle through the interior panels. Therefore, the air flow noise becomes very influential when it comes to the noise vibration and harshness assessment of a vehicle, in particular at low frequencies. Normally, passive solutions, such as sound absorbing materials, are used for reducing the TBL-induced noise transmission into a vehicle interior, which generally improve the structure sound isolation performance. These can achieve excellent isolation performance at higher frequencies, but are unable to deal with the low-frequency interior noise components. In this paper, active control of TBL noise transmission through an acoustically coupled double panel system into a rectangular cavity is examined theoretically. The Corcos model of the TBL pressure distribution is used to model the disturbance. The disturbance is rejected by an active vibration isolation unit reacting between the exterior and the interior panels. Significant reductions of the low-frequency vibrations of the interior panel and the sound pressure in the cavity are observed.

  6. Active Control of Turbulent Boundary Layer Induced Sound Radiation from Multiple Aircraft Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to experimentally investigate active structural acoustic control of turbulent boundary layer (TBL) induced sound radiation from multiple panels on an aircraft sidewall. One possible approach for controlling sound radiation from multiple panels is a multi-input/multi-output scheme which considers dynamic coupling between the panels. Unfortunately, this is difficult for more than a few panels, and is impractical for a typical aircraft which contains several hundred such panels. An alternative is to implement a large number of independent control systems. Results from the current work demonstrate the feasibility of reducing broadband radiation from multiple panels utilizing a single-input/single-output (SISO) controller per bay, and is the first known demonstration of active control of TBL induced sound radiation on more than two bays simultaneously. The paper compares sound reduction for fully coupled control of six panels versus independent control on each panel. An online adaptive control scheme for independent control is also demonstrated. This scheme will adjust for slow time varying dynamic systems such as fuselage response changes due to aircraft pressurization, etc.

  7. A boundary element approach to optimization of active noise control sources on three-dimensional structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunefare, K. A.; Koopmann, G. H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the theoretical development of an approach to active noise control (ANC) applicable to three-dimensional radiators. The active noise control technique, termed ANC Optimization Analysis, is based on minimizing the total radiated power by adding secondary acoustic sources on the primary noise source. ANC Optimization Analysis determines the optimum magnitude and phase at which to drive the secondary control sources in order to achieve the best possible reduction in the total radiated power from the noise source/control source combination. For example, ANC Optimization Analysis predicts a 20 dB reduction in the total power radiated from a sphere of radius at a dimensionless wavenumber ka of 0.125, for a single control source representing 2.5 percent of the total area of the sphere. ANC Optimization Analysis is based on a boundary element formulation of the Helmholtz Integral Equation, and thus, the optimization analysis applies to a single frequency, while multiple frequencies can be treated through repeated analyses.

  8. Regulation of Synaptic Vesicle Docking by Different Classes of Macromolecules in Active Zone Material

    PubMed Central

    Szule, Joseph A.; Harlow, Mark L.; Jung, Jae Hoon; De-Miguel, Francisco F.; Marshall, Robert M.; McMahan, Uel J.

    2012-01-01

    The docking of synaptic vesicles at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of axon terminals is essential for their fusion with the membrane and exocytosis of their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Dense networks of macromolecules, called active zone material, (AZM) are attached to the presynaptic membrane next to docked vesicles. Electron tomography has shown that some AZM macromolecules are connected to docked vesicles, leading to the suggestion that AZM is somehow involved in the docking process. We used electron tomography on the simply arranged active zones at frog neuromuscular junctions to characterize the connections of AZM to docked synaptic vesicles and to search for the establishment of such connections during vesicle docking. We show that each docked vesicle is connected to 10–15 AZM macromolecules, which fall into four classes based on several criteria including their position relative to the presynaptic membrane. In activated axon terminals fixed during replacement of docked vesicles by previously undocked vesicles, undocked vesicles near vacated docking sites on the presynaptic membrane have connections to the same classes of AZM macromolecules that are connected to docked vesicles in resting terminals. The number of classes and the total number of macromolecules to which the undocked vesicles are connected are inversely proportional to the vesicles’ distance from the presynaptic membrane. We conclude that vesicle movement toward and maintenance at docking sites on the presynaptic membrane are directed by an orderly succession of stable interactions between the vesicles and distinct classes of AZM macromolecules positioned at different distances from the membrane. Establishing the number, arrangement and sequence of association of AZM macromolecules involved in vesicle docking provides an anatomical basis for testing and extending concepts of docking mechanisms provided by biochemistry. PMID:22438915

  9. The active zone protein CAST regulates synaptic vesicle recycling and quantal size in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shizuka; Hida, Yamato; Ishizaki, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Eiji; Tanaka-Okamoto, Miki; Yamasaki, Miwako; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Fukaya, Masahiro; Kitajima, Isao; Takai, Yoshimi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Manabe, Toshiya

    2016-09-01

    Synaptic efficacy is determined by various factors, including the quantal size, which is dependent on the amount of neurotransmitters in synaptic vesicles at the presynaptic terminal. It is essential for stable synaptic transmission that the quantal size is kept within a constant range and that synaptic efficacy during and after repetitive synaptic activation is maintained by replenishing release sites with synaptic vesicles. However, the mechanisms for these fundamental properties have still been undetermined. We found that the active zone protein CAST (cytomatrix at the active zone structural protein) played pivotal roles in both presynaptic regulation of quantal size and recycling of endocytosed synaptic vesicles. In the CA1 region of hippocampal slices of the CAST knockout mice, miniature excitatory synaptic responses were increased in size, and synaptic depression after prolonged synaptic activation was larger, which was attributable to selective impairment of synaptic vesicle trafficking via the endosome in the presynaptic terminal likely mediated by Rab6. Therefore, CAST serves as a key molecule that regulates dynamics and neurotransmitter contents of synaptic vesicles in the excitatory presynaptic terminal in the central nervous system.

  10. Groundwater hydrochemistry in the active layer of the proglacial zone, Finsterwalderbreen, Svalbard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, R.J.; Wadham, J.L.; Tranter, M.; Hodgkins, R.; Peters, N.E.

    2002-01-01

    Glacial bulk meltwaters and active-layer groundwaters were sampled from the proglacial zone of Finsterwalderbreen during a single melt season in 1999, in order to determine the geochemical processes that maintain high chemical weathering rates in the proglacial zone of this glacier. Results demonstrate that the principle means of solute acquisition is the weathering of highly reactive moraine and fluvial active-layer sediments by supra-permafrost groundwaters. Active-layer groundwater derives from the thaw of the proglacial snowpack, buried ice and glacial bulk meltwaters. Groundwater evolves by sulphide oxidation and carbonate dissolution. Evaporation- and freeze-concentration of groundwater in summer and winter, respectively produce Mg-Ca-sulphate salts on the proglacial surface. Re-dissolution of these salts in early summer produces groundwaters that are supersaturated with respect to calcite. There is a pronounced spatial pattern to the geochemical evolution of groundwater. Close to the main proglacial channel, active layer sediments are flushed diurnally by bulk meltwaters. Here, Mg-Ca-sulphate deposits become exhausted in the early season and geochemical evolution proceeds by a combination of sulphide oxidation and carbonate dissolution. At greater distances from the channel, the dissolution of Mg-Ca-sulphate salts is a major influence and dilution by the bulk meltwaters is relatively minor. The influence of sulphate salt dissolution decreases during the sampling season, as these salts are exhausted and waters become increasingly routed by subsurface flowpaths. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The active zone protein CAST regulates synaptic vesicle recycling and quantal size in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shizuka; Hida, Yamato; Ishizaki, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Eiji; Tanaka-Okamoto, Miki; Yamasaki, Miwako; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Fukaya, Masahiro; Kitajima, Isao; Takai, Yoshimi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Manabe, Toshiya

    2016-09-01

    Synaptic efficacy is determined by various factors, including the quantal size, which is dependent on the amount of neurotransmitters in synaptic vesicles at the presynaptic terminal. It is essential for stable synaptic transmission that the quantal size is kept within a constant range and that synaptic efficacy during and after repetitive synaptic activation is maintained by replenishing release sites with synaptic vesicles. However, the mechanisms for these fundamental properties have still been undetermined. We found that the active zone protein CAST (cytomatrix at the active zone structural protein) played pivotal roles in both presynaptic regulation of quantal size and recycling of endocytosed synaptic vesicles. In the CA1 region of hippocampal slices of the CAST knockout mice, miniature excitatory synaptic responses were increased in size, and synaptic depression after prolonged synaptic activation was larger, which was attributable to selective impairment of synaptic vesicle trafficking via the endosome in the presynaptic terminal likely mediated by Rab6. Therefore, CAST serves as a key molecule that regulates dynamics and neurotransmitter contents of synaptic vesicles in the excitatory presynaptic terminal in the central nervous system. PMID:27422015

  12. Active Crustal Faults in the Forearc Region, Guerrero Sector of the Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidzik, Krzysztof; Ramírez-Herrera, Maria Teresa; Kostoglodov, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    This work explores the characteristics and the seismogenic potential of crustal faults on the overriding plate in an area of high seismic hazard associated with the occurrence of subduction earthquakes and shallow earthquakes of the overriding plate. We present the results of geomorphic, structural, and fault kinematic analyses conducted on the convergent margin between the Cocos plate and the forearc region of the overriding North American plate, within the Guerrero sector of the Mexican subduction zone. We aim to determine the active tectonic processes in the forearc region of the subduction zone, using the river network pattern, topography, and structural data. We suggest that in the studied forearc region, both strike-slip and normal crustal faults sub-parallel to the subduction zone show evidence of activity. The left-lateral offsets of the main stream courses of the largest river basins, GPS measurements, and obliquity of plate convergence along the Cocos subduction zone in the Guerrero sector suggest the activity of sub-latitudinal left-lateral strike-slip faults. Notably, the regional left-lateral strike-slip fault that offsets the Papagayo River near the town of La Venta named "La Venta Fault" shows evidence of recent activity, corroborated also by GPS measurements (4-5 mm/year of sinistral motion). Assuming that during a probable earthquake the whole mapped length of this fault would rupture, it would produce an event of maximum moment magnitude Mw = 7.7. Even though only a few focal mechanism solutions indicate a stress regime relevant for reactivation of these strike-slip structures, we hypothesize that these faults are active and suggest two probable explanations: (1) these faults are characterized by long recurrence period, i.e., beyond the instrumental record, or (2) they experience slow slip events and/or associated fault creep. The analysis of focal mechanism solutions of small magnitude earthquakes in the upper plate, for the period between 1995

  13. Crustal-scale shear zones recording 400 m.y. of tectonic activity in the North Caribou greenstone belt, western Superior Province of Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalbfleisch, Netasha

    A series of crustal-scale shear zones demarcates the northern and eastern margins of the North Caribou greenstone belt (NCGB), proximal to a Mesoarchean terrane boundary in the core of the western Superior Province of Canada. The dominant deformation produced a pervasive steeply dipping fabric that trends broadly parallel to the doubly arcuate shape of the belt and was responsible for tight folding the banded iron formation host to Goldcorp's prolific gold deposit at Musselwhite mine. The shear zones in the North Caribou greenstone belt are of particular interest because of their ability to channel hydrothermal fluids with the potential to bear ore and cause alteration of the middle to shallow crust. Shear zones are commonly reactivated during subsequent tectonism, but exhibit a consistent and dominant dextral shear sense across the belt; fabric-forming micas and chlorite are generally Mg-rich. Although garnets samples from within the shear zones are dominantly almandine, they possess variable geochemical trends (HREEs of >2 orders of magnitude) and can be syn-, intra-, or post-tectonic in origin. In situ geochronological analysis of zircon (U-Pb) and monazite (total-Pb) in high strain rocks in and around the NCGB, interpreted in light of in situ geochemical analysis of garnet and fabric-forming micas and chlorite, reveals four relatively discrete events that span 400 million years. Metamorphism of the mid-crust was coeval with magmatism during docking of the Island Lake domain at c. 2.86 Ga and subsequent terrane accretion at the north and south margins of the North Caribou Superterrane from c. 2.75 to 2.71 Ga. Transpressive shear at c. 2.60 to 2.56 Ga and late re-activation of shear zones at c. 2.44 Ga produced a steeply-dipping pervasive fabric, and channeled fluids for late crystallization of garnet and monazite recorded in the Markop Lake deformation zone. These observations implicate a horizontal tectonic model similar to the modern eastern Pacific plate

  14. Activating without Inhibiting: Left-Edge Boundary Tones and Syntactic Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roll, Mikael; Horne, Merle; Lindgren, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Right-edge boundary tones have earlier been found to restrict syntactic processing by closing a clause for further integration of incoming words. The role of left-edge intonation, however, has received little attention to date. We show that Swedish left-edge boundary tones selectively facilitate the on-line processing of main clauses, the…

  15. Mutational Analysis of Rab3 Function for Controlling Active Zone Protein Composition at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shirui; Gendelman, Hannah K; Roche, John P; Alsharif, Peter; Graf, Ethan R

    2015-01-01

    At synapses, the release of neurotransmitter is regulated by molecular machinery that aggregates at specialized presynaptic release sites termed active zones. The complement of active zone proteins at each site is a determinant of release efficacy and can be remodeled to alter synapse function. The small GTPase Rab3 was previously identified as playing a novel role that controls the distribution of active zone proteins to individual release sites at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. Rab3 has been extensively studied for its role in the synaptic vesicle cycle; however, the mechanism by which Rab3 controls active zone development remains unknown. To explore this mechanism, we conducted a mutational analysis to determine the molecular and structural requirements of Rab3 function at Drosophila synapses. We find that GTP-binding is required for Rab3 to traffick to synapses and distribute active zone components across release sites. Conversely, the hydrolytic activity of Rab3 is unnecessary for this function. Through a structure-function analysis we identify specific residues within the effector-binding switch regions that are required for Rab3 function and determine that membrane attachment is essential. Our findings suggest that Rab3 controls the distribution of active zone components via a vesicle docking mechanism that is consistent with standard Rab protein function.

  16. Mutational Analysis of Rab3 Function for Controlling Active Zone Protein Composition at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Roche, John P.; Alsharif, Peter; Graf, Ethan R.

    2015-01-01

    At synapses, the release of neurotransmitter is regulated by molecular machinery that aggregates at specialized presynaptic release sites termed active zones. The complement of active zone proteins at each site is a determinant of release efficacy and can be remodeled to alter synapse function. The small GTPase Rab3 was previously identified as playing a novel role that controls the distribution of active zone proteins to individual release sites at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. Rab3 has been extensively studied for its role in the synaptic vesicle cycle; however, the mechanism by which Rab3 controls active zone development remains unknown. To explore this mechanism, we conducted a mutational analysis to determine the molecular and structural requirements of Rab3 function at Drosophila synapses. We find that GTP-binding is required for Rab3 to traffick to synapses and distribute active zone components across release sites. Conversely, the hydrolytic activity of Rab3 is unnecessary for this function. Through a structure-function analysis we identify specific residues within the effector-binding switch regions that are required for Rab3 function and determine that membrane attachment is essential. Our findings suggest that Rab3 controls the distribution of active zone components via a vesicle docking mechanism that is consistent with standard Rab protein function. PMID:26317909

  17. Palaeoseismological evidence for Holocene activity on the Manisa Fault Zone,Western Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özkaymak, Ç.; Sözbilir, H.; Uzel, B.; Akyüz, H. S.

    2009-04-01

    Manisa Fault Zone (MFZ) is an active structural discontinuity that is geomorphologically expressed as a trace of north-facing Quaternary fault scarps bounding the southern margin of the Manisa basin which is subsidiary to the Gediz Graben. We note that the present-day fault trace is over 50 km long from Manisa city in the northwest to the Turgutlu town in the southeast. The MFZ consists of two major sections: (i) eastern section that strikes NW-SE direction in the south and bends into an approximately E-W direction around Manisa to the northwest, (ii) an approximately 10-km-long western section that strikes approximately WNW-ESE direction from Manisa city in the east to the Akgedik town in the west. In this study, we present the geologic, geomorphologic, and palaeoseismologic observations indicating Holocene activity on the western section of the fault zone. We identify that the MFZ, at its western end, consists of three fault segments which are en échelon arranged in left step; the fault segments show evidence for linkage and breaching at the relay ramps. One of them is named as the Manastir Fault. In front of this fault, two Holocene colluvial fans older of which is uncorformity bounded are cut and displaced by the syntethic faults. Palaeoseismologic data show that the syntethic fault segments correspond to the surface ruptures of the historical earthquakes. As a result of detailed stratigraphic, sedimentologic and structural observations on the trench walls, some evidences for at least two earthquakes are recorded which are supported by radio-carbon dating. Besides this, an archaic aqueduct that were used to transport water from Emlakdere town, located on the hanging wall of the Manastir Fault, to the basin is cut and displaced by the syntethic fault egments. It is known that this archaic architecture were in use after 11. century by the Ottomans. On the basis of the mentioned data, fault segments which are belong to the western part of the Manisa Fault Zone

  18. Role of Bassoon and Piccolo in Assembly and Molecular Organization of the Active Zone

    PubMed Central

    Gundelfinger, Eckart D.; Reissner, Carsten; Garner, Craig C.

    2016-01-01

    Bassoon and Piccolo are two very large scaffolding proteins of the cytomatrix assembled at the active zone (CAZ) where neurotransmitter is released. They share regions of high sequence similarity distributed along their entire length and seem to share both overlapping and distinct functions in organizing the CAZ. Here, we survey our present knowledge on protein-protein interactions and recent progress in understanding of molecular functions of these two giant proteins. These include roles in the assembly of active zones (AZ), the localization of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) in the vicinity of release sites, synaptic vesicle (SV) priming and in the case of Piccolo, a role in the dynamic assembly of the actin cytoskeleton. Piccolo and Bassoon are also important for the maintenance of presynaptic structure and function, as well as for the assembly of CAZ specializations such as synaptic ribbons. Recent findings suggest that they are also involved in the regulation activity-dependent communication between presynaptic boutons and the neuronal nucleus. Together these observations suggest that Bassoon and Piccolo use their modular structure to organize super-molecular complexes essential for various aspects of presynaptic function. PMID:26793095

  19. Role of Bassoon and Piccolo in Assembly and Molecular Organization of the Active Zone.

    PubMed

    Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Reissner, Carsten; Garner, Craig C

    2015-01-01

    Bassoon and Piccolo are two very large scaffolding proteins of the cytomatrix assembled at the active zone (CAZ) where neurotransmitter is released. They share regions of high sequence similarity distributed along their entire length and seem to share both overlapping and distinct functions in organizing the CAZ. Here, we survey our present knowledge on protein-protein interactions and recent progress in understanding of molecular functions of these two giant proteins. These include roles in the assembly of active zones (AZ), the localization of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs) in the vicinity of release sites, synaptic vesicle (SV) priming and in the case of Piccolo, a role in the dynamic assembly of the actin cytoskeleton. Piccolo and Bassoon are also important for the maintenance of presynaptic structure and function, as well as for the assembly of CAZ specializations such as synaptic ribbons. Recent findings suggest that they are also involved in the regulation activity-dependent communication between presynaptic boutons and the neuronal nucleus. Together these observations suggest that Bassoon and Piccolo use their modular structure to organize super-molecular complexes essential for various aspects of presynaptic function.

  20. Seismotectonics of the southern boundary of Anatolia, Eastern Mediterranean region: subduction, collision, and arc jumping

    SciTech Connect

    Rotstein, Y.; Kafka, A.L.

    1982-09-10

    The pattern of seismicity and fault plane solutions of earthquakes are used to outline the tectonic features of the southern boundary of Anatolia in the eastern Mediterranean and southeastern Turkey. The results of this study show that this boundary is composed of two distinct parts. One, in southeastern Turkey and Syria, is a wide and complex zone of continental collision. The other, in the Levantine basin of the eastern Mediterranean, is a zone of oceanic subduction. In the region of continental collision three zones of seismicity are observed. Most of the seismic activity in this region follows the Bitlis zone and is associated with a zone of thrusting and mountain building. This appears to be the zone of most active deformation and plate consumption in the plate boundary region between Arabia and Turkey. A less active zone of seismicity to the north of the Bitlis zone is interpreted to have been more active in the past whereas another active zone of seismicity to the south is interpreted to be a zone which may be more active in the future as the main zone of plate consumption jumps to the south. In the subduction zone of the eastern Mediterranean the depth of the subducted slab and the rate of seismicity generally increease from east to west. The zone of present-day convergence between Africa and Turkey in the Levantine basin can be best outlined by the northern edge of the Mediterranean ridge. Deep seismic activity near the Gulf of Antalya is associated with a detached subducted slab north of the Anaximander Mountains that is distinctly different from the seismic trend which is associated with present-day active subduction. Most of the focal mechanisms of the earthquakes along the entire southern boundary of Anatolia indicate that N to NNW thrusting is the dominant mode of seismic deformation.

  1. OUTFLOWS AND DARK BANDS AT ARCADE-LIKE ACTIVE REGION CORE BOUNDARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, J. T.; Martens, P. C. H.; Tarr, L.

    2013-03-10

    Observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode have revealed outflows and non-thermal line broadening in low intensity regions at the edges of active regions (ARs). We use data from Hinode's EIS, Solar Dynamic Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer instrument to investigate the boundaries of arcade-like AR cores for NOAA ARs 11112, 10978, and 9077. A narrow, low intensity region that is observed at the core's periphery as a dark band shows outflows and increased spectral line broadening. This dark band is found to exist for days and appears between the bright coronal loop structures of different coronal topologies. We find a case where the dark band region is formed between the magnetic field from emerging flux and the field of the pre-existing flux. A magnetic field extrapolation indicates that this dark band is coincident with the spine lines or magnetic separatrices in the extrapolated field. This occurs over unipolar regions where the brightened coronal field is separated in connectivity and topology. This separation does not appear to be infinitesimal and an initial estimate of the minimum distance of separation is found to be Almost-Equal-To 1.5-3.5 Mm.

  2. Effects of reconstructed magnetic field from sparse noisy boundary measurements on localization of active neural source.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui-min; Lee, Kok-Meng; Hu, Liang; Foong, Shaohui; Fu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Localization of active neural source (ANS) from measurements on head surface is vital in magnetoencephalography. As neuron-generated magnetic fields are extremely weak, significant uncertainties caused by stochastic measurement interference complicate its localization. This paper presents a novel computational method based on reconstructed magnetic field from sparse noisy measurements for enhanced ANS localization by suppressing effects of unrelated noise. In this approach, the magnetic flux density (MFD) in the nearby current-free space outside the head is reconstructed from measurements through formulating the infinite series solution of the Laplace's equation, where boundary condition (BC) integrals over the entire measurements provide "smooth" reconstructed MFD with the decrease in unrelated noise. Using a gradient-based method, reconstructed MFDs with good fidelity are selected for enhanced ANS localization. The reconstruction model, spatial interpolation of BC, parametric equivalent current dipole-based inverse estimation algorithm using reconstruction, and gradient-based selection are detailed and validated. The influences of various source depths and measurement signal-to-noise ratio levels on the estimated ANS location are analyzed numerically and compared with a traditional method (where measurements are directly used), and it was demonstrated that gradient-selected high-fidelity reconstructed data can effectively improve the accuracy of ANS localization. PMID:26358243

  3. A specialized boundary element algorithm developed to calculate the state of stress in the Anza Gap, San Jacinto Fault Zone, Southern, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Aster, R.; Flores, R.; Fehler, M.

    1995-06-01

    The widely-used algorithm of Crouch and Starfield is unstable when used to solve our mixed boundary equation problem of interest. Altering the boundary conditions and correspondingly rearranging the system of equations to utilize double-sided boundary elements overcomes this drawback. The new algorithm described here is more physically realistic as in that it allows for rotation of the fault segments in the strain field resulting from satisfying the fault static shear strength condition. Preliminary test results indicate that a fault trifurcation gap model may describe the non-strike slip components to some of the seismicity.

  4. Active control of Boundary Layer Separation & Flow Distortion in Adverse Pressure Gradient Flows via Supersonic Microjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvi, Farrukh S.; Gorton, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Inlets to aircraft propulsion systems must supply flow to the compressor with minimal pressure loss, flow distortion or unsteadiness. Flow separation in internal flows such as inlets and ducts in aircraft propulsion systems and external flows such as over aircraft wings, is undesirable as it reduces the overall system performance. The aim of this research has been to understand the nature of separation and more importantly, to explore techniques to actively control this flow separation. In particular, the use of supersonic microjets as a means of controlling boundary layer separation was explored. The geometry used for the early part of this study was a simple diverging Stratford ramp, equipped with arrays of supersonic microjets. Initial results, based on the mean surface pressure distribution, surface flow visualization and Planar Laser Scattering (PLS) indicated a reverse flow region. We implemented supersonic microjets to control this separation and flow visualization results appeared to suggest that microjets have a favorable effect, at least to a certain extent. However, the details of the separated flow field were difficult to determine based on surface pressure distribution, surface flow patterns and PLS alone. It was also difficult to clearly determine the exact influence of the supersonic microjets on this flow. In the latter part of this study, the properties of this flow-field and the effect of supersonic microjets on its behavior were investigated in further detail using 2-component (planar) Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The results clearly show that the activation of microjets eliminated flow separation and resulted in a significant increase in the momentum of the fluid near the ramp surface. Also notable is the fact that the gain in momentum due to the elimination of flow separation is at least an order of magnitude larger (two orders of magnitude larger in most cases) than the momentum injected by the microjets and is accomplished with very

  5. Serpentinite in Active Suprasubduction-Zone Regions and Preserved Terrestrial Sections: Observations; Modeling; and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, P.

    2012-12-01

    Exposures of serpentinized mantle of the overriding plate in the trench-proximal regions of nonaccretionary, intraoceanic forearcs have been extensively studied. Deposits of what were formerly called "sedimentary" serpentinite bodies on land are well documented all over the world. The deposits are variously categorized as mylonitized peridotite that was metamorphosed after obduction of an ophiolite section; olistostromes derived from sections of fault-exposed, serpentinized mantle; diapiric intrusions from point sources or along faults (as ridges); and flows from serpentinite mud volcanoes. The structures and compositions of serpentinite exposures help to differentiate between potential origins and protoliths. Theoretical studies of dehydration reactions, coupled with models of the thermal structure of subduction zones, provide constraints on the nature of fluids liberated from the subducting slab for various convergence angles and rates. These fluids are the source for serpentinization of the suprasubduction-zone mantle. The parameters for degree and distribution of serpentinite in such environments must be, however, constrained in each instance by the forcing functions operating within a given convergent margin. Spatial, i.e., down-dip increases in temperature and pressure vary with convergence angle and rate. Whereas most models assume continuous dehydration of the slab, in reality dehydration events are likely episodic and thus temporal effects must also be considered. We know that suprasubduction-zone serpentinization can begin early in the evolution of a convergent margin and that extensive faulting of a forearc region is necessary for emplacement of serpentinite deposits on the seafloor in active margins. Recent studies of Archean exposures of serpentinized peridotitic deposits suggest that the processes we observe in today's active convergent margins likely also took place during the earliest stages of tectonic cycling of the Earth's lithosphere. The

  6. Comparative study of the antibacterial activity of propolis from different geographical and climatic zones.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Véronique; Peyfoon, Elham; Watson, David G; Fearnley, James

    2008-09-01

    Propolis is a natural substance produced by honeybees upon collection and transformation of resins and exudates from plants. Comparative studies on propolis collected from a wide range of countries are crucial for linking its provenance to antibacterial activity and thus ensuring that the beneficial properties of propolis are used more efficiently by the general public. This study reports the in vitro screening of ethanol extracts of propolis (n = 40), collected from a wide range of countries within the tropical, subtropical and temperate zones, and on the comparison of their activity against a range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using a broth microdilution assay. The results obtained revealed that propolis extracts were mostly active against Gram-positive bacteria. The samples were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) in order to model their activity against Gram-positive microorganisms. Three distinct clusters were distinguished in the PCA mapping based on MIC values, categorizing samples with strong (MIC range 3.9-31.25 mg/L), moderate (MIC range 31.25-> or =500 mg/L) and weak antibacterial activity or inactivity (MIC > or = 500 mg/L only). It is hypothesized that for samples of tropical provenance differences in the activity profiles may depend on the climatic characteristics of the collection sites. High antibacterial activity was observed for samples from locations characterized by a wet-tropical rainforest-type climate.

  7. Crustal structure of the Churchill-Superior boundary zone between 80 and 98 deg W longitude from Magsat anomaly maps and stacked passes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. H.; Millar, T. W.; Noble, I. A.

    1985-01-01

    A modeling technique using spherical shell elements and equivalent dipole sources has been applied to Magsat signatures at the Churchill-Superior boundary in Manitoba, Ontario, and Ungava. A large satellite magnetic anomaly (12 nT amplitude) on POGO and Magsat maps near the Churchill-Superior boundary was found to be related to the Richmond Gulf aulacogen. The averaged crustal magnetization in the source region is 5.2 A/m. Stacking of the magnetic traces from Magsat passes reveals a magnetic signature (10 nT amplitude) at the Churchill-Superior boundary in an area studied between 80 deg W and 98 deg W. Modeling suggests a steplike thickening of the crust on the Churchill side of the boundary in a layer with a magnetization of 5 A/m. Signatures on aeromagnetic maps are also found in the source areas for both of these satellite anomalies.

  8. 16 Years, 16 Cruises, 1.6 Billion Soundings: a Compilation of High-Resolution Multibeam Bathymetry of the Active Plate Boundary Along the Chilean Continental Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinrebe, W.; Flueh, E. R.; Hasert, M.; Behrmann, J. H.; Voelker, D.; Geersen, J.; Ranero, C. R.; Diaz-Naveas, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Chile, a country stranding the active plate boundary between the South-American and the Nazca Plate is afflicted by recurrent earthquakes and hazardous volcanic eruptions. The strongest earthquake ever recorded occurred here, and volcanic hazards are frequent. Consequently, this area has been studied by geoscientists for many years to improve the understanding of subduction zone processes. Swath bathymetry mapping of the ocean floor has proven to bear a large potential for the interpretation of subduction-related processes, such as tectonic deformation of the marine forearc, release and migration of fluids as well as earthquake-triggered mass wasting. Multibeam bathymetry data of 16 major cruises of German, British, and Chilean research vessels recorded between 1995 and December 2010, in total more than 10,000 data files comprising about 1.6 billion soundings, have now been carefully reprocessed, compiled and merged into a unifying set of high-resolution bathymetric maps of the Chilean continental margin from latitude 40°S to 20°S. The imprint of subsurface processes on the surface morphology is well displayed in the case of the Chilean continental margin. The 3,500 km long Chilean convergent margin is not uniform, as various segments with different tectonic characteristics can be distinguished. Major factors that control margin morphology and thus the style of subduction are (1) relief and structure of the incoming oceanic plate, (2) supply of trench sediment, (3) turbidite transport within the trench, and (4) the input of terrigeneous sediments down the continental slope. A major segment boundary occurs at latitude 32°-33° S where the hotspot-related volcanic chain of Juan Fernandez is presently subducting. South of the area of ridge subduction the trench is filled with turbidites, and accretionary ridges develop across the base of the slope along most of the segment, whereas north of this boundary the turbiditic infill is reduced and subduction erosion is

  9. Active zone protein expression changes at the key stages of cerebellar cortex neurogenesis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Juranek, Judyta Karolina; Mukherjee, Konark; Siddiqui, Tabrez J; Kaplan, Benjamin J; Li, Jia Yi; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun; Jahn, Reinhard; Calka, Jaroslaw

    2013-07-01

    Signal transduction and neurotransmitter release in the vertebrate central nervous system are confined to the structurally complex presynaptic electron dense projections called "active zones." Although the nature of these projections remains a mystery, genetic and biochemical work has provided evidence for the active zone (AZ) associated proteins i.e. Piccolo/Aczonin, Bassoon, RIM1/Unc10, Munc13/Unc13, Liprin-α/SYD2/Dliprin and ELKS/CAST/BRP and their specific molecular functions. It still remains unclear, however, what their precise contribution is to the AZ assembly. In our project, we studied in Wistar rats the temporal and spatial distribution of AZ proteins and their colocalization with Synaptophysin in the developing cerebellar cortex at key stages of cerebellum neurogenesis. Our study demonstrated that AZ proteins were already present at the very early stages of cerebellar neurogenesis and exhibited distinct spatial and temporal variations in immunoexpression throughout the course of the study. Colocalization analysis revealed that the colocalization pattern was time-dependent and different for each studied protein. The highest collective mean percentage of colocalization (>85%) was observed at postnatal day (PD) 5, followed by PD10 (>83%) and PD15 (>80%). The findings of our study shed light on AZ protein immunoexpression changes during cerebellar cortex neurogenesis and help frame a hypothetical model of AZ assembly.

  10. 78 FR 60826 - Foreign-Trade Zone 155-Calhoun/Victoria Counties, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... (78 FR 35604, 06/13/2013). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of the activity is... Production Activity; Caterpillar, Inc. (Excavator and Frame Assembly Production); Victoria, Texas On May 29... proposed production activity to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of Caterpillar, Inc.,...

  11. How Large Scale Flows in the Solar Convection Zone may Influence Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, D. H.

    2004-01-01

    Large scale flows within the solar convection zone are the primary drivers of the Sun s magnetic activity cycle. Differential rotation can amplify the magnetic field and convert poloidal fields into toroidal fields. Poleward meridional flow near the surface can carry magnetic flux that reverses the magnetic poles and can convert toroidal fields into poloidal fields. The deeper, equatorward meridional flow can carry magnetic flux toward the equator where it can reconnect with oppositely directed fields in the other hemisphere. These axisymmetric flows are themselves driven by large scale convective motions. The effects of the Sun s rotation on convection produce velocity correlations that can maintain the differential rotation and meridional circulation. These convective motions can influence solar activity themselves by shaping the large-scale magnetic field pattern. While considerable theoretical advances have been made toward understanding these large scale flows, outstanding problems in matching theory to observations still remain.

  12. Border of Notch activity establishes a boundary between the two dorsal appendage tube cell types.

    PubMed

    Ward, Ellen J; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Riddiford, Lynn M; Berg, Celeste A; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2006-09-15

    Boundaries establish and maintain separate populations of cells critical for organ formation. We show that Notch signaling establishes the boundary between two types of post-mitotic epithelial cells, the Rhomboid- and the Broad-positive cells. These cells will undergo morphogenetic movements to generate the two sides of a simple organ, the dorsal appendage tube of the Drosophila egg chamber. The boundary forms due to a difference in Notch levels in adjacent cells. The Notch expression pattern mimics the boundary; Notch levels are high in Rhomboid cells and low in Broad cells. Notch(-) mutant clones generate an ectopic boundary: ectopic Rhomboid cells arise in Notch(+) cells adjacent to the Notch(-) mutant cells but not further away from the clonal border. Pangolin, a component of the Wingless pathway, is required for Broad expression and for rhomboid repression. We further show that Broad represses rhomboid cell autonomously. Our data provide a foundation for understanding how a single row of Rhomboid cells arises adjacent to the Broad cells in the dorsal appendage primordia. Generating a boundary by the Notch pathway might constitute an evolutionarily conserved first step during organ formation in many tissues. PMID:16828735

  13. PLIF Visualization of Active Control of Hypersonic Boundary Layers Using Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Alderfer, David W.; Berry, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging was used to visualize the boundary layer flow on a 1/3-scale Hyper-X forebody model. The boundary layer was perturbed by blowing out of orifices normal to the model surface. Two blowing orifice configurations were used: a spanwise row of 17-holes spaced at 1/8 inch, with diameters of 0.020 inches and a single-hole orifice with a diameter of 0.010 inches. The purpose of the study was to visualize and identify laminar and turbulent structures in the boundary layer and to make comparisons with previous phosphor thermography measurements of surface heating. Jet penetration and its influence on the boundary layer development was also examined as was the effect of a compression corner on downstream boundary layer transition. Based upon the acquired PLIF images, it was determined that global surface heating measurements obtained using the phosphor thermography technique provide an incomplete indicator of transitional and turbulent behavior of the corresponding boundary layer flow. Additionally, the PLIF images show a significant contribution towards transition from instabilities originating from the underexpanded jets. For this experiment, a nitric oxide/nitrogen mixture was seeded through the orifices, with nitric oxide (NO) serving as the fluorescing gas. The experiment was performed in the 31-inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center.

  14. Geophysical signature of hydration-dehydration processes in active subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynard, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    inclusions in arc lavas. High electrical conductivities up to 1 S/m in the hydrated wedge of the hot subductions (Ryukyu, Kyushu, Cascadia) reflect high fluid concentration, while low to moderate (<0.01 S/m) conductivities in the cold subductions (N-E Japan, Bolivia) reflect low fluid flow. This is consistent with the seismic observations of extensive shallow serpentinization in hot subduction zones, while serpentinization is sluggish in cold subduction zones. Bezacier, L., et al. 2010. Elasticity of antigorite, seismic detection of serpentinites, and anisotropy in subduction zones. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 289, 198-208. Reynard, B., 2012. Serpentine in active subduction zones. Lithos, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lithos.2012.10.012. Reynard, B., Mibe, K. & Van de Moortele, B., 2011. Electrical conductivity of the serpentinised mantle and fluid flow in subduction zones. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 307, 387-394. Reynard, B., Nakajima, J. & Kawakatsu, H., 2010. Earthquakes and plastic deformation of anhydrous slab mantle in double Wadati-Benioff zones. Geophysical Research Letters, 37, L24309.

  15. Contact zone permeability at intrusion boundaries: New results from hydraulic testing and geophysical logging in the Newark Rift Basin, New York, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matter, J.M.; Goldberg, D.S.; Morin, R.H.; Stute, M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydraulic tests and geophysical logging performed in the Palisades sill and the underlying sedimentary rocks in the NE part of the Newark Rift Basin, New York, USA, confirm that the particular transmissive zones are localized within the dolerite-sedimentary rock contact zone and within a narrow interval below this contact zone that is characterized by the occurrence of small layers of chilled dolerite. Transmissivity values determined from fluid injection, aquifer testing, and flowmeter measurements generally fall in the range of 8.1E-08 to 9.95E-06 m2/s and correspond to various scales of investigation. The analysis of acoustic and optical BHTV images reveals two primary fracture sets within the dolerite and the sedimentary rocks - subhorizontal fractures, intersected by subvertical ones. Despite being highly fractured either with subhorizontal, subvertical or both fracture populations, the dolerite above and the sedimentary rocks below the contact zone and the zone with the layers of chilled dolerite are significantly less conductive. The distribution of the particular conductive intervals is not a function of the two dominant fracture populations or their density but rather of the intrusion path of the sill. The intrusion caused thermal fracturing and cracking of both formations, resulting in higher permeability along the contact zone. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  16. Active faults in the deformation zone off Noto Peninsula, Japan, revealed by high- resolution seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Okamura, Y.; Murakami, F.; Kimura, H.; Ikehara, K.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, a lot of earthquakes occur in Japan. The deformation zone which many faults and folds have concentrated exists on the Japan Sea side of Japan. The 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake (MJMA 6.9) and 2007 Chuetsu-oki Earthquake (MJMA 6.8) were caused by activity of parts of faults in this deformation zone. The Noto Hanto Earthquake occurred on 25 March, 2007 under the northwestern coast of Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. This earthquake is located in Quaternary deformation zone that is continued from northern margin of Noto Peninsula to southeast direction (Okamura, 2007a). National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) carried out high-resolution seismic survey using Boomer and 12 channels short streamer cable in the northern part off Noto Peninsula, in order to clarify distribution and activities of active faults in the deformation zone. A twelve channels short streamer cable with 2.5 meter channel spacing developed by AIST and private corporation is designed to get high resolution seismic profiles in shallow sea area. The multi-channel system is possible to equip on a small fishing boat, because the data acquisition system is based on PC and the length of the cable is short and easy to handle. Moreover, because the channel spacing is short, this cable is very effective for a high- resolution seismic profiling survey in the shallow sea, and seismic data obtained by multi-channel cable can be improved by velocity analysis and CDP stack. In the northern part off Noto Peninsula, seismic profiles depicting geologic structure up to 100 meters deep under sea floor were obtained. The most remarkable reflection surface recognized in the seismic profiles is erosion surface at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In the western part, sediments about 30 meters (40 msec) thick cover the erosional surface that is distributed under the shelf shallower than 100m in depth and the sediments thin toward offshore and east. Flexures like deformation in

  17. Late Quaternary tectonic activity and paleoseismicity of the Eastern Messinia Fault Zone, SW Peloponessus (Messinia, Greece).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkaniotis, Sotirios; Betzelou, Konstantina; Zygouri, Vassiliki; Koukouvelas, Ioannis; Ganas, Athanassios

    2015-04-01

    The southwestern part of Peloponnesus, Messinia and Laconia, is an area of significant tectonic activity situated near the Hellenic trench. Most of the deformation in this area is accommodated by the Eastern Messinia Fault Zone, bordering the western part of Taygetos Mt range and the west coast of Mani peninsula. The Eastern Messinia Fault Zone (EMFZ) is a complex system of primarily normal faults dipping westwards with a strike of NNW-SSE to N-S direction attaining a total length of more than 100 km from the northern Messinia plain in the north to the southern part of Mani peninsula in the south. The continuity of the EMFZ is disrupted by overlapping faults and relay ramp structures. The central part of the EMFZ, from the town of Oichalia to the city of Kalamata, was investigated by detailed field mapping of fault structures and post-alpine sediment formations together with re-evaluation of historical and modern seismicity. Several fault segments with lengths of 6 to 10 km were mapped, defined and evaluated according to their state of activity and age. Analysis of fault striation measurements along fault planes of the fault zone shows a present regime of WSW-ENE extension, in accordance with focal mechanisms from modern seismicity. Known faults like the Katsareika and Verga faults near the city of Kalamata are interpreted as older-generation faults that are re-activated (e.g. the 1986 Ms 6.0 Kalamata earthquake on Verga Fault) as part of a system of distributed deformation. New fault segments, some of them previously unmapped like the Asprohoma fault to the west of Kalamata, and offshore faults like Kitries and Kourtissa, are being assigned to the EMFZ. Moreover, a paleoseismological trench was excavated in the northern part of Pidima fault segment, one of the most prominent active segments of the central part of the EMFZ, in order to examine the paleoearthquake record of the fault system. A significant number of historical and instrumental earthquakes in the area

  18. Contrasting origins of breached relay zone geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conneally, J.; Childs, C.; Walsh, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Relay zones accommodate transfer of displacement between pairs of adjacent segments of a fault array that become linked to form a through-going fault as displacement increases. 3D geometric and kinematic analysis of two vertically aligned relay zones, that form a complex boundary between two fault segments, generally support this model of relay zone growth but they also highlight some departures from this scheme. The two seismically mapped relay zones, although separated vertically by 100 m, were synchronously active over most of their development history. A causal relationship between them is proposed with the geometric complexity arising from the formation of the lower relay zone triggering the formation of the upper. The lower relay zone is now breached but originally formed a hole within the fault surface up to throws of ca. 50 m. The upper relay zone displays both breached and intact relay zone geometries at different structural levels demonstrating that relay zone breaching is a protracted rather than geologically instantaneous process. Geometrically the lower part of this structure resembles a breached relay zone, but it formed by propagation of a splay fault from a pre-existing bend to enclose an intervening and steepening ramp, a growth scheme which is the opposite of conventional relay zone models.

  19. Deletion of the presynaptic scaffold CAST reduces active zone size in rod photoreceptors and impairs visual processing.

    PubMed

    tom Dieck, Susanne; Specht, Dana; Strenzke, Nicola; Hida, Yamato; Krishnamoorthy, Vidhyasankar; Schmidt, Karl-Friedrich; Inoue, Eiji; Ishizaki, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka-Okamoto, Miki; Miyoshi, Jun; Hagiwara, Akari; Brandstätter, Johann H; Löwel, Siegrid; Gollisch, Tim; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Moser, Tobias

    2012-08-29

    How size and shape of presynaptic active zones are regulated at the molecular level has remained elusive. Here we provide insight from studying rod photoreceptor ribbon-type active zones after disruption of CAST/ERC2, one of the cytomatrix of the active zone (CAZ) proteins. Rod photoreceptors were present in normal numbers, and the a-wave of the electroretinogram (ERG)--reflecting their physiological population response--was unchanged in CAST knock-out (CAST(-/-)) mice. Using immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we found that the size of the rod presynaptic active zones, their Ca(2+) channel complement, and the extension of the outer plexiform layer were diminished. Moreover, we observed sprouting of horizontal and bipolar cells toward the outer nuclear layer indicating impaired rod transmitter release. However, rod synapses of CAST(-/-) mice, unlike in mouse mutants for the CAZ protein Bassoon, displayed anchored ribbons, normal vesicle densities, clustered Ca(2+) channels, and essentially normal molecular organization. The reduction of the rod active zone size went along with diminished amplitudes of the b-wave in scotopic ERGs. Assuming, based on the otherwise intact synaptic structure, an unaltered function of the remaining release apparatus, we take our finding to suggest a scaling of release rate with the size of the active zone. Multielectrode-array recordings of retinal ganglion cells showed decreased contrast sensitivity. This was also observed by optometry, which, moreover, revealed reduced visual acuity. We conclude that CAST supports large active zone size and high rates of transmission at rod ribbon synapses, which are required for normal vision.

  20. In situ comparison of activity in two deep-sea scavenging fishes occupying different depth zones

    PubMed Central

    Collins, M. A.; Priede, I. G.; Bagley, P. M.

    1999-01-01

    The activity of two scavenging deep-sea fishes occupying the same niche in overlapping depth zones were compared by in situ measurements of swimming speeds, tail-beat frequencies and by arrival time at baits. At 4800 m on the Porcupine Abyssal Plain, the grenadier Coryphaenoides (Nematonurus) armatus was the dominant scavenger, arriving at baits after 30 min, and swimming at relatively slow speeds of 0.17 body lengths (BL) sec-1. At 2500 m in the relatively food rich Porcupine Seabight both C. (N.) armatus and the blue-hake, Antimora rostrata, were attracted to bait, but A. rostrata was always the first to arrive and most of the bait was consumed before the C. (N.) armatus arrived. A. rostrata swam at mean speeds of 0.39 BL sec-1, similar to related shallow water species at equivalent temperatures. Observations on tail-beat frequency from video sequences confirmed the greater activity of A. rostrata. The data indicate that, given sufficient food supply, high pressure and low temperature do not limit activity levels of demersal deep-sea fishes. Low activity of C. (N.) armatus is an adaptation to poor food supply in the abyss, where these fishes dominate, but prevents it competing with the more active A. rostrata in shallower depths.

  1. Stellar Activity Mimics a Habitable-zone Planet around Kapteyn's Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Paul; Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, Suvrath

    2015-06-01

    Kapteyn’s star is an old M subdwarf believed to be a member of the Galactic halo population of stars. A recent study has claimed the existence of two super-Earth planets around the star based on radial velocity (RV) observations. The innermost of these candidate planets—Kapteyn b (P = 48 days)—resides within the circumstellar habitable zone (HZ). Given recent progress in understanding the impact of stellar activity in detecting planetary signals, we have analyzed the observed HARPS data for signatures of stellar activity. We find that while Kapteyn’s star is photometrically very stable, a suite of spectral activity indices reveal a large-amplitude rotation signal, and we determine the stellar rotation period to be 143 days. The spectral activity tracers are strongly correlated with the purported RV signal of “planet b,” and the 48-day period is an integer fraction (1/3) of the stellar rotation period. We conclude that Kapteyn b is not a planet in the HZ, but an artifact of stellar activity.

  2. Death effector activation in the subventricular zone subsequent to perinatal hypoxia/ischemia.

    PubMed

    Romanko, Michael J; Zhu, Changlian; Bahr, Ben A; Blomgren, Klas; Levison, Steven W

    2007-11-01

    Perinatal hypoxia/ischemia (H/I) is the leading cause of neurological injury resulting from birth complications and pre-maturity. Our studies have demonstrated that this injury depletes the subventricular zone (SVZ) of progenitors. In this study, we sought to reveal which cell death pathways are activated within these progenitors after H/I. We found that calpain activity is detected as early as 4 h of reperfusion and is sustained for 48 h, while caspase 3 activation does not occur until 8 h and peaks at 24 h post-insult. Activated calpains and caspase 3 co-localized within precursors situated in the lateral aspects of the SVZ (which coincides with progenitor cell death), whereas neither enzyme was activated in the medial SVZ (which harbors the neural stem cells that are resilient to this insult). These studies reveal targets for neuroprotective agents to protect precursors from cell death towards the goal of restoring normal brain development after H/I.

  3. Alignment of Synaptic Vesicle Macromolecules with the Macromolecules in Active Zone Material that Direct Vesicle Docking

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Jung, Jae Hoon; Marshall, Robert M.; McMahan, Uel J.

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles dock at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of a neuron’s axon terminals as a precondition for fusing with the membrane and releasing their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Typically, docked vesicles are next to aggregates of plasma membrane-bound macromolecules called active zone material (AZM). Electron tomography on tissue sections from fixed and stained axon terminals of active and resting frog neuromuscular junctions has led to the conclusion that undocked vesicles are directed to and held at the docking sites by the successive formation of stable connections between vesicle membrane proteins and proteins in different classes of AZM macromolecules. Using the same nanometer scale 3D imaging technology on appropriately stained frog neuromuscular junctions, we found that ∼10% of a vesicle’s luminal volume is occupied by a radial assembly of elongate macromolecules attached by narrow projections, nubs, to the vesicle membrane at ∼25 sites. The assembly’s chiral, bilateral shape is nearly the same vesicle to vesicle, and nubs, at their sites of connection to the vesicle membrane, are linked to macromolecules that span the membrane. For docked vesicles, the orientation of the assembly’s shape relative to the AZM and the presynaptic membrane is the same vesicle to vesicle, whereas for undocked vesicles it is not. The connection sites of most nubs on the membrane of docked vesicles are paired with the connection sites of the different classes of AZM macromolecules that regulate docking, and the membrane spanning macromolecules linked to these nubs are also attached to the AZM macromolecules. We conclude that the luminal assembly of macromolecules anchors in a particular arrangement vesicle membrane macromolecules, which contain the proteins that connect the vesicles to AZM macromolecules during docking. Undocked vesicles must move in a way that aligns this arrangement with the AZM macromolecules for

  4. Alignment of synaptic vesicle macromolecules with the macromolecules in active zone material that direct vesicle docking.

    PubMed

    Harlow, Mark L; Szule, Joseph A; Xu, Jing; Jung, Jae Hoon; Marshall, Robert M; McMahan, Uel J

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles dock at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of a neuron's axon terminals as a precondition for fusing with the membrane and releasing their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Typically, docked vesicles are next to aggregates of plasma membrane-bound macromolecules called active zone material (AZM). Electron tomography on tissue sections from fixed and stained axon terminals of active and resting frog neuromuscular junctions has led to the conclusion that undocked vesicles are directed to and held at the docking sites by the successive formation of stable connections between vesicle membrane proteins and proteins in different classes of AZM macromolecules. Using the same nanometer scale 3D imaging technology on appropriately stained frog neuromuscular junctions, we found that ∼10% of a vesicle's luminal volume is occupied by a radial assembly of elongate macromolecules attached by narrow projections, nubs, to the vesicle membrane at ∼25 sites. The assembly's chiral, bilateral shape is nearly the same vesicle to vesicle, and nubs, at their sites of connection to the vesicle membrane, are linked to macromolecules that span the membrane. For docked vesicles, the orientation of the assembly's shape relative to the AZM and the presynaptic membrane is the same vesicle to vesicle, whereas for undocked vesicles it is not. The connection sites of most nubs on the membrane of docked vesicles are paired with the connection sites of the different classes of AZM macromolecules that regulate docking, and the membrane spanning macromolecules linked to these nubs are also attached to the AZM macromolecules. We conclude that the luminal assembly of macromolecules anchors in a particular arrangement vesicle membrane macromolecules, which contain the proteins that connect the vesicles to AZM macromolecules during docking. Undocked vesicles must move in a way that aligns this arrangement with the AZM macromolecules for docking

  5. Rab3-GEF Controls Active Zone Development at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Haneui; Chen, Shirui; Roche, John P.; Ai, Minrong; Wu, Chunlai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Synaptic signaling involves the release of neurotransmitter from presynaptic active zones (AZs). Proteins that regulate vesicle exocytosis cluster at AZs, composing the cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ). At the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), the small GTPase Rab3 controls the distribution of CAZ proteins across release sites, thereby regulating the efficacy of individual AZs. Here we identify Rab3-GEF as a second protein that acts in conjunction with Rab3 to control AZ protein composition. At rab3-GEF mutant NMJs, Bruchpilot (Brp) and Ca2+ channels are enriched at a subset of AZs, leaving the remaining sites devoid of key CAZ components in a manner that is indistinguishable from rab3 mutant NMJs. As the Drosophila homologue of mammalian DENN/MADD and Caenorhabditis elegans AEX-3, Rab3-GEF is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Rab3 that stimulates GDP to GTP exchange. Mechanistic studies reveal that although Rab3 and Rab3-GEF act within the same mechanism to control AZ development, Rab3-GEF is involved in multiple roles. We show that Rab3-GEF is required for transport of Rab3. However, the synaptic phenotype in the rab3-GEF mutant cannot be fully explained by defective transport and loss of GEF activity. A transgenically expressed GTP-locked variant of Rab3 accumulates at the NMJ at wild-type levels and fully rescues the rab3 mutant but is unable to rescue the rab3-GEF mutant. Our results suggest that although Rab3-GEF acts upstream of Rab3 to control Rab3 localization and likely GTP-binding, it also acts downstream to regulate CAZ development, potentially as a Rab3 effector at the synapse. PMID:27022630

  6. Preliminary study for active monitoring of the plate boundary using ACROSS: Synthetic and observed seismic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruga, K.; Kasahara, J.; Hasada, Y.; Kunitomo, T.; Ikuta, R.; Watanabe, T.; Yamaoka, K.; Fujii, N.; Kumazawa, M.; Nagao, H.; Nakajima, T.; Saiga, A.; Satomura, M.

    2005-12-01

    travel times of reflected waves from the bottom of lower crust Moho (PmP) and from the upper boundary of the Philippine Sea plate (PxP). We believe that these results suggest the potentiality for active monitoring of the subtle changes of geophysical properties in the earth's structure using ACROSS signals in future. Acknowledgements: We appreciate the permission to use the seismic waveform data provided by the Research Group for Seismic Expedition in Central Japan.

  7. 50 CFR Table 8 to Part 679 - Harvest Zone Codes for Use With Vessel Activity Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 8 Table 8 to Part 679—Harvest Zone Codes for Use With Vessel... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Harvest Zone Codes for Use With...

  8. SAD-B Phosphorylation of CAST Controls Active Zone Vesicle Recycling for Synaptic Depression.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Sumiko; Hida, Yamato; Tanifuji, Shota; Hagiwara, Akari; Hamada, Shun; Abe, Manabu; Ma, Huan; Yasumura, Misato; Kitajima, Isao; Sakimura, Kenji; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa

    2016-09-13

    Short-term synaptic depression (STD) is a common form of activity-dependent plasticity observed widely in the nervous system. Few molecular pathways that control STD have been described, but the active zone (AZ) release apparatus provides a possible link between neuronal activity and plasticity. Here, we show that an AZ cytomatrix protein CAST and an AZ-associated protein kinase SAD-B coordinately regulate STD by controlling reloading of the AZ with release-ready synaptic vesicles. SAD-B phosphorylates the N-terminal serine (S45) of CAST, and S45 phosphorylation increases with higher firing rate. A phosphomimetic CAST (S45D) mimics CAST deletion, which enhances STD by delaying reloading of the readily releasable pool (RRP), resulting in a pool size decrease. A phosphonegative CAST (S45A) inhibits STD and accelerates RRP reloading. Our results suggest that the CAST/SAD-B reaction serves as a brake on synaptic transmission by temporal calibration of activity and synaptic depression via RRP size regulation. PMID:27626661

  9. SAD-B Phosphorylation of CAST Controls Active Zone Vesicle Recycling for Synaptic Depression.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Sumiko; Hida, Yamato; Tanifuji, Shota; Hagiwara, Akari; Hamada, Shun; Abe, Manabu; Ma, Huan; Yasumura, Misato; Kitajima, Isao; Sakimura, Kenji; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa

    2016-09-13

    Short-term synaptic depression (STD) is a common form of activity-dependent plasticity observed widely in the nervous system. Few molecular pathways that control STD have been described, but the active zone (AZ) release apparatus provides a possible link between neuronal activity and plasticity. Here, we show that an AZ cytomatrix protein CAST and an AZ-associated protein kinase SAD-B coordinately regulate STD by controlling reloading of the AZ with release-ready synaptic vesicles. SAD-B phosphorylates the N-terminal serine (S45) of CAST, and S45 phosphorylation increases with higher firing rate. A phosphomimetic CAST (S45D) mimics CAST deletion, which enhances STD by delaying reloading of the readily releasable pool (RRP), resulting in a pool size decrease. A phosphonegative CAST (S45A) inhibits STD and accelerates RRP reloading. Our results suggest that the CAST/SAD-B reaction serves as a brake on synaptic transmission by temporal calibration of activity and synaptic depression via RRP size regulation.

  10. Diabatic heating profiles over the continental convergence zone during the monsoon active spells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Rajib; Sur, Sharmila; Joseph, Susmitha; Sahai, A. K.

    2013-07-01

    The present paper aims to bring out the robust common aspects of spatio-temporal evolution of diabatic heating during the monsoon intraseasonal active phases over the continental tropical convergence zone (CTCZ). The robustness of spatio-temporal features is determined by comparing the two state-of-the art reanalyses: NCEP Climate Forecast System reanalysis and Modern ERA Retrospective Analysis. The inter-comparison is based on a study period of 26 years (1984-2009). The study confirms the development of deep heating over the CTCZ region during the active phase and is consistent between the two datasets. However, the detailed temporal evolution of the vertical structure (e.g., vertical tilts) of heating differs at times. The most important common feature from both the datasets is the significant vertical redistribution of heating with the development of shallow (low level) heating and circulation over the CTCZ region 3-7 days after the peak active phase. The shallow circulation is found to be associated with increased vertical shear and relative vorticity over certain regions in the subcontinent. This increased vertical shear and relative vorticity in the lower levels could be crucial in the sustenance of rainfall after the peak active phase. Model experiments with linear dynamics affirm the role of shallow convection in increasing the lower level circulation as observed.

  11. Active Pacific North America Plate boundary tectonics as evidenced by seismicity in the oceanic lithosphere offshore Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauksson, Egill; Kanamori, Hiroo; Stock, Joann; Cormier, Marie-Helene; Legg, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Pacific Ocean crust west of southwest North America was formed by Cenozoic seafloor spreading between the large Pacific Plate and smaller microplates. The eastern limit of this seafloor, the continent-ocean boundary, is the fossil trench along which the microplates subducted and were mostly destroyed in Miocene time. The Pacific-North America Plate boundary motion today is concentrated on continental fault systems well to the east, and this region of oceanic crust is generally thought to be within the rigid Pacific Plate. Yet, the 2012 December 14 Mw 6.3 earthquake that occurred about 275 km west of Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico, is evidence for continued tectonism in this oceanic part of the Pacific Plate. The preferred main shock centroid depth of 20 km was located close to the bottom of the seismogenic thickness of the young oceanic lithosphere. The focal mechanism, derived from both teleseismic P-wave inversion and W-phase analysis of the main shock waveforms, and the 12 aftershocks of M ˜3-4 are consistent with normal faulting on northeast striking nodal planes, which align with surface mapped extensional tectonic trends such as volcanic features in the region. Previous Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements on offshore islands in the California Continental Borderland had detected some distributed Pacific and North America relative plate motion strain that could extend into the epicentral region. The release of this lithospheric strain along existing zones of weakness is a more likely cause of this seismicity than current thermal contraction of the oceanic lithosphere or volcanism. The main shock caused weak to moderate ground shaking in the coastal zones of southern California, USA, and Baja California, Mexico, but the tsunami was negligible.

  12. The number and organization of Ca2+ channels in the active zone shapes neurotransmitter release from Schaffer collateral synapses

    PubMed Central

    Scimemi, Annalisa; Diamond, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Fast synaptic transmission requires tight co-localization of Ca2+ channels and neurotransmitter vesicles. It is generally thought that Ca2+ channels are expressed abundantly in presynaptic active zones, that vesicles within the same active zone have similar release properties and that significant vesicle depletion only occurs at synapses with high release probability. Here we show, at excitatory CA3→CA1 synapses in mouse hippocampus, that release from individual vesicles is generally triggered by only one Ca2+ channel and that only few functional Ca2+ channels may be spread in the active zone at variable distances to neighboring neurotransmitter vesicles. Using morphologically realistic Monte Carlo simulations, we show that this arrangement leads to a widely heterogeneous distribution of release probability across the vesicles docked at the active zone, and that depletion of the vesicles closest to Ca2+ channels can account for the Ca2+-dependence of short term plasticity at these synapses. These findings challenge the prevailing view that efficient synaptic transmission requires numerous presynaptic Ca2+ channels in the active zone, and indicate that the relative arrangement of Ca2+ channels and vesicles contributes to the heterogeneity of release probability within and across synapses and to vesicle depletion at small central synapses with low average release probability. PMID:23238730

  13. Assessment of the biological activity of soils in the subtropical zone of Azerbaijan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaev, M. P.; Orujova, N. I.

    2009-10-01

    The enzymatic activity; the microbial population; and the intensities of the nitrification, ammonification, CO2emission, and cellulose decomposition were studied in gray-brown, meadow-sierozemic, meadow-forest alluvial, and yellow (zheltozem) gley soils in the subtropical zone of Azerbaijan under natural vegetation, crop rotation systems with vegetables, and permanent vegetable crops. On this basis, the biological diagnostics of these soils were suggested and the soil ecological health was evaluated. It was shown that properly chosen crop rotation systems on irrigated lands make it possible to preserve the fertility of the meadow-forest alluvial and zheltozem-gley soils and to improve the fertility of the gray-brown and meadow-sierozemic soils.

  14. Prospecting with ground radar in an active creep-fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibanez Garduno, Dolores; Lorenzo Cimadevila, Henrique; Alvarez Bejar, Roman; Garduno Monroy, Victor H.

    2000-04-01

    In different places of Morelia, Michoacan, Mexico, there are evidences of four active geologic creep-faults system in. These events have damages (cracking and landslides) in the civil building (Garduno M., et. al, 1998; Garduno M., et. al, 1999; Lermo S., et. al., 1999). In order to find these structures in the first 10 m of depth, region where we have the influence in civil building, we carried out a geophysical study with georadar technique. We made 15 sounding in the fault zone to join the results to preliminar geologic studies in order to improve the security rules in the high risk places. In this work we show the results of three sounds with georadar, as well as the final Bidimensional Model effected with the technique of tracing of ray.

  15. Seismic evidence for active underplating below the megathrust earthquake zone in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hisanori; Takeda, Tetsuya; Obara, Kazushige; Kasahara, Keiji

    2010-07-01

    Determining the structure of subduction zones is important for understanding mechanisms for the generation of interplate phenomena such as megathrust earthquakes. The peeling off of the uppermost part of a subducting slab and accretion to the bottom of an overlying plate (underplating) at deep regions has been inferred from exhumed metamorphic rocks and deep seismic imaging, but direct seismic evidence of this process is lacking. By comparing seismic reflection profiles with microearthquake distributions in central Japan, we show that repeating microearthquakes occur along the bottom interface of the layer peeling off from the subducting Philippine Sea plate. This region coincides with the location of slow-slip events that may serve as signals for monitoring active underplating.

  16. Strontium-90 and caesium-137 activity concentrations in bats in the Chernobyl exclusion zone.

    PubMed

    Gashchak, Sergey; Beresford, Nicholas Anthony; Maksimenko, Andrey; Vlaschenko, Anton S

    2010-11-01

    Bats are a protected species and as such may be an object of protection in radiological assessments of the environment. However, there have previously been only few radioecological studies of species of bats. In this paper, results for >140 measurements of (90)Sr and (137)Cs in 10 species of bats collected within the Chernobyl zone are presented. There was some indication of a decreasing transfer of (90)Sr with increasing deposition, although this was inconsistent across species and explained little of the observed variability. There was no difference between male and female bats in the transfer (expressed as the ratio of whole-body activity concentrations to those in soil) of either radionuclide. There was considerable variability in transfer across all species groups. At two sites where there were sufficient data, Eptesicus serotinus was found to have higher transfer than other species.

  17. RIM-binding protein, a central part of the active zone, is essential for neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Liu, Karen S Y; Siebert, Matthias; Mertel, Sara; Knoche, Elena; Wegener, Stephanie; Wichmann, Carolin; Matkovic, Tanja; Muhammad, Karzan; Depner, Harald; Mettke, Christoph; Bückers, Johanna; Hell, Stefan W; Müller, Martin; Davis, Graeme W; Schmitz, Dietmar; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2011-12-16

    The molecular machinery mediating the fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) at presynaptic active zone (AZ) membranes has been studied in detail, and several essential components have been identified. AZ-associated protein scaffolds are viewed as only modulatory for transmission. We discovered that Drosophila Rab3-interacting molecule (RIM)-binding protein (DRBP) is essential not only for the integrity of the AZ scaffold but also for exocytotic neurotransmitter release. Two-color stimulated emission depletion microscopy showed that DRBP surrounds the central Ca(2+) channel field. In drbp mutants, Ca(2+) channel clustering and Ca(2+) influx were impaired, and synaptic release probability was drastically reduced. Our data identify RBP family proteins as prime effectors of the AZ scaffold that are essential for the coupling of SVs, Ca(2+) channels, and the SV fusion machinery. PMID:22174254

  18. Quantitative super-resolution imaging of Bruchpilot distinguishes active zone states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehmann, Nadine; van de Linde, Sebastian; Alon, Amit; Ljaschenko, Dmitrij; Keung, Xi Zhen; Holm, Thorge; Rings, Annika; Diantonio, Aaron; Hallermann, Stefan; Ashery, Uri; Heckmann, Manfred; Sauer, Markus; Kittel, Robert J.

    2014-08-01

    The precise molecular architecture of synaptic active zones (AZs) gives rise to different structural and functional AZ states that fundamentally shape chemical neurotransmission. However, elucidating the nanoscopic protein arrangement at AZs is impeded by the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional light microscopy. Here we introduce new approaches to quantify endogenous protein organization at single-molecule resolution in situ with super-resolution imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). Focusing on the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), we find that the AZ cytomatrix (CAZ) is composed of units containing ~137 Bruchpilot (Brp) proteins, three quarters of which are organized into about 15 heptameric clusters. We test for a quantitative relationship between CAZ ultrastructure and neurotransmitter release properties by engaging Drosophila mutants and electrophysiology. Our results indicate that the precise nanoscopic organization of Brp distinguishes different physiological AZ states and link functional diversification to a heretofore unrecognized neuronal gradient of the CAZ ultrastructure.

  19. Active zone protein CAST is a component of conventional and ribbon synapses in mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Deguchi-Tawarada, Maki; Inoue, Eiji; Takao-Rikitsu, Etsuko; Inoue, Marie; Kitajima, Isao; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Takai, Yoshimi

    2006-04-01

    CAST is a novel cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ)-associated protein. In conventional brain synapses, CAST forms a large molecular complex with other CAZ proteins, including RIM, Munc13-1, Bassoon, and Piccolo. Here we investigated the distribution of CAST and its structurally related protein, ELKS, in mouse retina. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that CAST and ELKS showed punctate signals in the outer and inner plexiform layers of the retina that were well-colocalized with those of Bassoon and RIM. Both proteins were found presynaptically at glutamatergic ribbon synapses, and at conventional GABAergic and glycinergic synapses. Moreover, immunoelectron microscopy revealed that CAST, like Bassoon and RIM, localized at the base of synaptic ribbons, whereas ELKS localized around the ribbons. Both proteins also localized in the vicinity of the presynaptic plasma membrane of conventional synapses in the retina. These results indicated that CAST and ELKS were novel components of the presynaptic apparatus of mouse retina.

  20. Unitary assembly of presynaptic active zones from Piccolo-Bassoon transport vesicles.

    PubMed

    Shapira, Mika; Zhai, R Grace; Dresbach, Thomas; Bresler, Tal; Torres, Viviana I; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Ziv, Noam E; Garner, Craig C

    2003-04-24

    Recent studies indicate that active zones (AZs)-sites of neurotransmitter release-may be assembled from preassembled AZ precursor vesicles inserted into the presynaptic plasma membrane. Here we report that one putative AZ precursor vesicle of CNS synapses-the Piccolo-Bassoon transport vesicle (PTV)-carries a comprehensive set of AZ proteins genetically and functionally coupled to synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Time-lapse imaging reveals that PTVs are highly mobile, consistent with a role in intracellular transport. Quantitative analysis reveals that the Bassoon, Piccolo, and RIM content of individual PTVs is, on average, half of that of individual presynaptic boutons and shows that the synaptic content of these molecules can be quantitatively accounted for by incorporation of integer numbers (typically two to three) of PTVs into presynaptic membranes. These findings suggest that AZs are assembled from unitary amounts of AZ material carried on PTVs.

  1. The presynaptic active zone protein bassoon is essential for photoreceptor ribbon synapse formation in the retina.

    PubMed

    Dick, Oliver; tom Dieck, Susanne; Altrock, Wilko Detlef; Ammermüller, Josef; Weiler, Reto; Garner, Craig Curtis; Gundelfinger, Eckart Dieter; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut

    2003-03-01

    The photoreceptor ribbon synapse is a highly specialized glutamatergic synapse designed for the continuous flow of synaptic vesicles to the neurotransmitter release site. The molecular mechanisms underlying ribbon synapse formation are poorly understood. We have investigated the role of the presynaptic cytomatrix protein Bassoon, a major component of the photoreceptor ribbon, in a mouse retina deficient of functional Bassoon protein. Photoreceptor ribbons lacking Bassoon are not anchored to the presynaptic active zones. This results in an impaired photoreceptor synaptic transmission, an abnormal dendritic branching of neurons postsynaptic to photoreceptors, and the formation of ectopic synapses. These findings suggest a critical role of Bassoon in the formation and the function of photoreceptor ribbon synapses of the mammalian retina.

  2. Quantitative super-resolution imaging of Bruchpilot distinguishes active zone states.

    PubMed

    Ehmann, Nadine; van de Linde, Sebastian; Alon, Amit; Ljaschenko, Dmitrij; Keung, Xi Zhen; Holm, Thorge; Rings, Annika; DiAntonio, Aaron; Hallermann, Stefan; Ashery, Uri; Heckmann, Manfred; Sauer, Markus; Kittel, Robert J

    2014-08-18

    The precise molecular architecture of synaptic active zones (AZs) gives rise to different structural and functional AZ states that fundamentally shape chemical neurotransmission. However, elucidating the nanoscopic protein arrangement at AZs is impeded by the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional light microscopy. Here we introduce new approaches to quantify endogenous protein organization at single-molecule resolution in situ with super-resolution imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). Focusing on the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), we find that the AZ cytomatrix (CAZ) is composed of units containing ~137 Bruchpilot (Brp) proteins, three quarters of which are organized into about 15 heptameric clusters. We test for a quantitative relationship between CAZ ultrastructure and neurotransmitter release properties by engaging Drosophila mutants and electrophysiology. Our results indicate that the precise nanoscopic organization of Brp distinguishes different physiological AZ states and link functional diversification to a heretofore unrecognized neuronal gradient of the CAZ ultrastructure.

  3. Determination of dissociation constants of pharmacologically active xanthones by capillary zone electrophoresis with diode array detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaomu; Gong, Suxuan; Bo, Tao; Liao, Yiping; Liu, Huwei

    2004-12-24

    In this article, the dissociation constants (pKa) of 10 pharmacologically active xanthones isolated from herbal medicine Securidaca inappendiculata were determined by capillary zone electrophoresis with diode array detection. The pKa values determined by the method based on the electrophoretic mobilities (calculated from migration times) have been proved by the method based on UV absorbance calculated from the online spectra corresponding peaks. No conspicuous difference was observed between the two methods with acceptable reproducibility. Two pKa values (pKa1 and pKa2) were found for four xanthones while generally the 10 compounds possess the pKa values ranging from 6.4 to 9.2. PMID:15641365

  4. Quantitative super-resolution imaging of Bruchpilot distinguishes active zone states

    PubMed Central

    Ehmann, Nadine; van de Linde, Sebastian; Alon, Amit; Ljaschenko, Dmitrij; Keung, Xi Zhen; Holm, Thorge; Rings, Annika; DiAntonio, Aaron; Hallermann, Stefan; Ashery, Uri; Heckmann, Manfred; Sauer, Markus; Kittel, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The precise molecular architecture of synaptic active zones (AZs) gives rise to different structural and functional AZ states that fundamentally shape chemical neurotransmission. However, elucidating the nanoscopic protein arrangement at AZs is impeded by the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional light microscopy. Here we introduce new approaches to quantify endogenous protein organization at single-molecule resolution in situ with super-resolution imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). Focusing on the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), we find that the AZ cytomatrix (CAZ) is composed of units containing ~137 Bruchpilot (Brp) proteins, three quarters of which are organized into about 15 heptameric clusters. We test for a quantitative relationship between CAZ ultrastructure and neurotransmitter release properties by engaging Drosophila mutants and electrophysiology. Our results indicate that the precise nanoscopic organization of Brp distinguishes different physiological AZ states and link functional diversification to a heretofore unrecognized neuronal gradient of the CAZ ultrastructure. PMID:25130366

  5. Growth of the active zone in nitride based long wavelength laser structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossow, U.; Jönen, H.; Brendel, M.; Dräger, A.; Langer, T.; Hoffmann, L.; Bremers, H.; Hangleiter, A.

    2011-01-01

    In xGa 1- xN/GaN quantum well (QW) structures grown on c-plane surfaces for long wavelength light emitters have been investigated intended. We reached indium concentrations of xIn≥0.35 with good optical and structural quality. For QW thicknesses dQW≤2 nm a fully strained layer structure is observed. QWs of such high indium concentrations, however, are very sensitive to the growth conditions of the subsequent layers and thermal stability/degradation becomes an important issue. We modified the growth of the QWs to avoid or minimize V-pit formation without temperature ramping in the barriers and showed that their properties were unchanged when used in the active zone of a laser structure.

  6. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone.

    PubMed

    Laßek, Melanie; Weingarten, Jens; Wegner, Martin; Mueller, Benjamin F; Rohmer, Marion; Baeumlisberger, Dominic; Arrey, Tabiwang N; Hick, Meike; Ackermann, Jörg; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Koch, Ina; Müller, Ulrike; Karas, Michael; Volknandt, Walter

    2016-04-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ) highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs) was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network. PMID:27092780

  7. Quaternary grabens in southernmost Illinois: Deformation near an active intraplate seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, W.J.; Denny, F.B.; Follmer, L.R.; Masters, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Narrow grabens displace Quaternary sediments near the northern edge of the Mississippi Embayment in extreme southern Illinois, east-central United States. Grabens are part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC), which has been recurrently active throughout Phanerozoic time. The FAFC strikes directly toward the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), scene of some of the largest intra-plate earthquakes in history. The NMSZ and FAFC share origin in a failed Cambrian rift (Reelfoot Rift). Every major fault zone of the FAFC in Illinois exhibits Quaternary displacement. The structures appear to be strike-slip pull-apart grabens, but the magnitude and direction of horizontal slip and their relationship to the current stress field are unknown. Upper Tertiary strata are vertically displaced more than 100 m, Illinoian and older Pleistocene strata 10 to 30 m, and Wisconsinan deposits 1 m or less. No Holocene deformation has been observed. Average vertical slip rates are estimated at 0.01 to 0.03 mm/year, and recurrence intervals for earthquakes of magnitude 6 to 7 are on the order of 10,000s of years for any given fault. Previous authors remarked that the small amount of surface deformation in the New Madrid area implies that the NMSZ is a young feature. Our findings show that tectonic activity has shifted around throughout the Quaternary in the central Mississippi Valley. In addition to the NMSZ and southern Illinois, the Wabash Valley (Illinois-Indiana), Benton Hills (Missouri), Crowley's Ridge (Arkansas-Missouri), and possibly other sites have experienced Quaternary tectonism. The NMSZ may be only the latest manifestation of seismicity in an intensely fractured intra-plate region.

  8. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Benjamin F.; Rohmer, Marion; Baeumlisberger, Dominic; Arrey, Tabiwang N.; Hick, Meike; Ackermann, Jörg; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Koch, Ina; Müller, Ulrike; Karas, Michael; Volknandt, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ) highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs) was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network. PMID:27092780

  9. The property of fault zone and fault activity of Shionohira Fault, Fukushima, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshimo, K.; Aoki, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Niwa, M.; Kametaka, M.; Sakai, T.; Tanaka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The April 11, 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori Earthquake (hereafter the 4.11 earthquake) formed co-seismic surface ruptures trending in the NNW-SSE direction in Iwaki City, Fukushima Prefecture, which were newly named as the Shionohira Fault by Ishiyama et al. (2011). This earthquake was characterized by a westward dipping normal slip faulting, with a maximum displacement of about 2 m (e.g., Kurosawa et al., 2012). To the south of the area, the same trending lineaments were recognized to exist even though no surface ruptures occurred by the earthquake. In an attempt to elucidate the differences of active and non-active segments of the fault, this report discusses the results of observation of fault outcrops along the Shionohira Fault as well as the Coulomb stress calculations. Only a few outcrops have basement rocks of both the hanging-wall and foot-wall of the fault plane. Three of these outcrops (Kyodo-gawa, Shionohira and Betto) were selected for investigation. In addition, a fault outcrop (Nameishi-minami) located about 300 m south of the southern tip of the surface ruptures was investigated. The authors carried out observations of outcrops, polished slabs and thin sections, and performed X-ray diffraction (XRD) to fault materials. As a result, the fault zones originating from schists were investigated at Kyodo-gawa and Betto. A thick fault gouge was cut by a fault plane of the 4.11 earthquake in each outcrop. The fault materials originating from schists were fault bounded with (possibly Neogene) weakly deformed sandstone at Shionohira. A thin fault gouge was found along the fault plane of 4.11 earthquake. A small-scale fault zone with thin fault gouge was observed in Nameishi-minami. According to XRD analysis, smectite was detected in the gouges from Kyodo-gawa, Shionohira and Betto, while not in the gouge from Nameishi-minami.

  10. Hydrothermal quartz formation during fluctuations of brittle shear-zone activity and fluid flow: grain growth and deformation structures of the Pfahl shear zone (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, T.; Prosser, G.; Liotta, D.; Kruhl, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    The Bavarian Pfahl shear zone is a WNW-ESE trending dextral strike-slip shear zone at the SW margin of the Bohemian Massif (Central Europe). It was discontinuously active during decreasing PT-conditions, i.e. from ductile to brittle, from the late-Carboniferous to the late-Cretaceous - Paleocene times. Triassic hydrothermal activity produced a 150 km long and 30-100 m wide quartz dyke along the main fault, surrounded by sheared basement rocks. Within a zone of >10 m metasomatism transformed the wall rocks to mostly kaolinite, chlorite and phyllosilicates. The quartz dyke exhibits a layered to lenticular and partly symmetric structure with different types of quartz masses, transected by a complex quartz vein network. This already indicates pulses of fluid flux and fragmentation during the lifetime of the shear zone. Analyses by optical microscopy, cathodoluminescence (CL) and SEM-EDX reveal at least four subsequent stages of quartz crystallization and fragmentation. (i) The oldest generation of quartz is represented by a homogeneous dark grey to reddish quartz mass made up by ~10-20 μm-sized crystals. It contains mm- to cm-sized angular wall-rock fragments, completely altered to kaolinite, indicating intense wall-rock alteration prior to the earliest event of silica precipitation. This rules out the possibility that the quartz mass developed from silicification of the wall rocks. This first type of quartz occurs as cm- to dm-large angular fragments in (ii) a light grey to pink quartz mass formed by ~10-50 μm-sized crystals. The different colours result from variable types and amounts of inclusions. Quartz of both generations shows random crystallographic orientations and complex inclusion structures. It probably developed during two fragmentation events and possibly from a silica gel precursor that crystallized after precipitation. (iii) The third quartz generation formed as a set of mm- to dm-wide veins roughly parallel to the trend of the Pfahl zone

  11. 78 FR 45181 - Foreign-Trade Zone 230-Piedmont Triad Area, North Carolina, Authorization of Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... inviting public comment (78 FR 23220, 4-18-2013). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of... Production Activity, Oracle Flexible Packaging, Inc., (Foil-Backed Paperboard), Winston-Salem, North Carolina... proposed production activity to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of Oracle Flexible...

  12. The River Network, Active Tectonics and the Mexican Subduction Zone, Southwest Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidzik, K.; Ramirez-Herrera, M. T.; Kostoglodov, V.; Basili, R.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers, their profiles and network reflect the integration of multiple processes and forces that are part of the fundamental controls on the relief structure of mountain belts. The motivation of this study is to understand active tectonic processes in the forearc region of subduction zones, by distinguishing evidence of active deformation using the river network and topography. To this end, morphotectonic and structural studies have been conducted on fifteen drainage basins on the mountain front, parallel to the Mexican subduction zone, where the Cocos plate underthrusts the North American plate. The southwest - northeast Cocos plate subduction stress regime initiated ca. 20 MA. NE-SW to NNE-SSW normal faults as well as sub-latitudinal to NW-SE strike-slip faults (both dextral and sinistral) constitute the majority of mesofaults recorded in the field within the studied drainage basins. Occasionally dextral N-S strike-slip faults also occur. The stress tensor reconstruction suggests two main evolution stages of these faults: 1) the older is dominated by a NW-SE to WNW-ESE extensional regime and 2) the younger is a transcurrent regime, with NNE-SSW σ1 axis. The drainage pattern is strongly controlled by tectonic features, whereas lithology is only a subordinate factor, with only one exception (Petatlán river). Generally, major rivers flow from north to south mainly through NE-SW and NNE-SSW normal faults, and/or sub-longitudinal dextral (also locally sinistral) strike-slip faults. In the central and eastern part of the studied area, rivers also follow NW-SE structures, which are generally normal or sinistral strike-slip faults (rarely reverse). In most cases, local deflections of the river main courses are related to sub-latitudinal strike-slip faults, both dextral and sinistral. Within the current stress field related to the active Cocos subduction, both normal and strike-slip fault sets could be reactivated. Our analysis suggests that strike-slip faults, mainly

  13. Significant foreshock activities of M>7.5 earthquakes in the Kuril subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, T.; Yokoi, S.; Satake, K.

    2014-12-01

    In the Kuril subduction zone, some M>7.5 earthquakes are accompanied by significant foreshock activities, providing a good opportunity to understand the characteristics of foreshocks for large interplate events such as occur along the Japan Trench and Nankai Trough etc. Some preliminary results from our examination of the foreshock sequences are as follows. Relocated foreshocks tend to migrate with time toward the trench axis. Foreshock distributions of the interplate earthquakes do not overlap with the large coseismic slips (asperities) of the mainshocks. Foreshocks of the 2007 northern Kuril outer-rise event, however, were distributed on the entire rupture area. Foreshock sequences seem to be limited in the regions where the background seismicity rates are relatively high. The foreshock activities were found in the examination of the space-time pattern of M>7 events along the northern Japan to Kuril trench since 1913 (e.g. Harada, Satake, and Ishibashi, 2011:AGU, 2012:AOGS). The large earthquakes preceded by active foreshock sequences are: the 2006 (M8.3), 2007 (M8.1) offshore Simushir earthquakes, the 1963 (M8.5), 1991 (M7.6), 1995 (M7.9) offshore Urup events, the 1978 (M7.8) offshore Iturup events, the 1969 (M8.2) offshore Shikotan event. In contrast, M>7.5 interplate earthquakes offshore Hokkaido (1952 (M8.1), 1973 (M7.8), 2003 (M8.1)) and intraslab earthquakes (1958 (M8.3), 1978 (M7.8), 1993 (M7.6), 1994 (M8.3)) had few or no foreshocks. In the examination of the active foreshocks, we relocated foreshocks by the Modified JHD method (Hurukawa, 1995), compared relocated foreshock areas with mainshock coseismic slip distributions estimated by the teleseismic body-wave inversion (Kikuchi and Kanamori, 2003), and examined the relation between active foreshock sequences and regional background seismicity. This study was supported by the MEXT's "New disaster mitigation research project on Mega thrust earthquakes around Nankai/Ryukyu subduction zones".

  14. 2011 Operations and Maintenance Activities in the East Region of UNAVCO's Plate Boundary Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, T.; Feaux, K.; Kasmer, D.; Jenkins, F.; Mencin, D.

    2011-12-01

    2011 marked Year 3 of Operations and Maintenance of the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). In the East Region of PBO, it was a year characterized by several major projects as well as scheduled ongoing maintenance activities. The most significant major project was a USGS/ARRA funded communications upgrade in Yellowstone National Park. This upgrade consisted of bringing 8 existing PBO stations within the Yellowstone volcanic region to near real-time communications. This work will be completed on time and in collaboration with the National Park Service. The upgrade promises to provide much faster latency for invaluable data being recorded for one of the most geodetically critical regions of the current PBO network. Another significant ongoing project in the East Region has been supporting the community that continues to use PBO data. In particular, support of Kristine Larson (Univ of CO) both in installing webcams at PBO sites for monitoring snow depth as well as supporting vegetative surveys at current PBO sites. Similarly, the East Region responded promptly to the community with requests for data quality issues that are station hardware related, including replacing GPS antennae and receivers. With regards to ongoing operations and maintenance projects, reasons for site visits in 2011 were dominated by two significant situations: battery replacement and CDMA modem swaps. 83 site visits were required as part of the Operations and Maintenance strategic battery plan of 5 year battery replacements. This proved to be a considerable challenge due to the scale and geography of the scheduled replacements- the sites were spread throughout the entire network, east to west and north to south. 20 station visits were required due to a Verizon upgrade of the older Alltel network purchased by Verizon. These stations are predominantly in the Rocky Mountain region, but often times had limited access to due weather. Overall, despite record snowfalls throughout the west, state of health

  15. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John JE; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14530.001 PMID:27115346

  16. The promoter of the Chinese hamster ovary dihydrofolate reductase gene regulates the activity of the local origin and helps define its boundaries.

    PubMed

    Saha, Swati; Shan, Yujie; Mesner, Larry D; Hamlin, Joyce L

    2004-02-15

    The dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and 2BE2121 genes in the Chinese hamster are convergently transcribed in late G1 and ea ly S phase, and bracket an early-firing origin of replication that consists of a 55-kb zone of potential initiation sites. To test whether transcription through the DHFR gene is required to activate this origin in early S phase, we examined the two-dimension (2D) gel patterns of replication intermediates from several variants in which parts or all of the DHFR promote had been deleted. In those variants in which transcription was undetectable, initiation in the intergenic space was markedly suppressed (but not eliminated) in early S phase. Further more, replication of the locus required virtually the entire S period, as opposed to the usual 3-4 h. However, restoration of transcription with either the wild-type Chinese hamster promote or a Drosophila-based construct restored origin activity to the wild-type pattern. Surprisingly, 2D gel analysis of promote less variants revealed that initiation occurs at a low level in ea ly S phase not only in the intergenic region, but also in the body of the DHFR gene. The latter phenomenon has never been observed in the wild-type locus. These studies suggest that transcription through the gene normally increases the efficiency of origin firing in early S phase, but also suppresses initiation in the body of the gene, thus helping to define the boundaries of the downstream origin. PMID:14977920

  17. Probing Microbial Activity in a Perched Water Body Located in a Deep Vadose Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Y.; Taylor, J. L.; Henriksen, J. R.; Delwiche, M.; Gebrehiwet, T.; Hubbard, S. S.; Spycher, N.; Weathers, T. S.; Ginn, T. R.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Smith, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    Waste releases to the vadose zone are a legacy of past activities at a number of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), 90Sr has been detected in perched water bodies underlying the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) facility. Microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) using urea-hydrolyzing microbes is one proposed approach for immobilization of 90Sr in the subsurface. The sequestration mechanism is co-precipitation in calcite, promoted by the production of carbonate alkalinity from ureolysis. In order to assess the potential efficacy of MICP at INTEC a field study was conducted at the INL Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP). The VZRP is located approximately 3 km from INTEC and shares many of the same hydrologic and lithologic features but in a non-contaminated setting. We conducted experiments over two field seasons in a perched water body located approximately 15 meters below land surface, using a 5-spot wellfield design. During the first season amendments (molasses and urea) were injected into the central well and water was extracted from two wells on either side, located along a diagonal. Water samples were characterized for microbial abundance, ureolytic activity and ureC gene numbers, along with solution composition. Before, during and after the injections cross-borehole geophysical imaging was performed, using various combinations of the available wells. During the second field season in situ static experiments were conducted to specifically characterize attached and unattached microbial communities, using surrogate substrates colonized during a 12 week incubation. Based on the field data a first order in situ urea hydrolysis rate constant of 0.034 d-1 was estimated. This was more than an order of magnitude higher than rate constants estimated above-ground using water samples, suggesting that attached microorganisms were responsible for >90% of the observed urea hydrolysis activity. The

  18. Probabilistic secretion of quanta and the synaptosecretosome hypothesis: evoked release at active zones of varicosities, boutons, and endplates.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M R; Gibson, W G; Robinson, J

    1997-01-01

    A quantum of transmitter may be released upon the arrival of a nerve impulse if the influx of calcium ions through a nearby voltage-dependent calcium channel is sufficient to activate the vesicle-associated calcium sensor protein that triggers exocytosis. A synaptic vesicle, together with its calcium sensor protein, is often found complexed with the calcium channel in active zones to form what will be called a "synaptosecretosome." In the present work, a stochastic analysis is given of the conditions under which a quantum is released from the synaptosecretosome by a nerve impulse. The theoretical treatment considers the rise of calcium at the synaptosecretosome after the stochastic opening of a calcium channel at some time during the impulse, followed by the stochastic binding of calcium to the vesicle-associated protein and the probability of this leading to exocytosis. This allows determination of the probabilities that an impulse will release 0, 1, 2,... quanta from an active zone, whether this is in a varicosity, a bouton, or a motor endplate. A number of experimental observations of the release of transmitter at the active zones of sympathetic varicosities and boutons as well as somatic motor endplates are described by this analysis. These include the likelihood of the secretion of only one quantum at an active zone of endplates and of more than one quantum at an active zone of a sympathetic varicosity. The fourth-power relationship between the probability of transmitter release at the active zones of sympathetic varicosities and motor endplates and the external calcium concentration is also explained by this approach. So, too, is the fact that the time course of the increased rate of quantal secretion from a somatic active zone after an impulse is invariant with changes in the amount of calcium that enters through its calcium channel, whether due to changes consequent on the actions of autoreceptor agents such as adenosine or to facilitation. The increased

  19. Observations of Seafloor Deformation and Methane Venting within an Active Fault Zone Offshore Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K.; Lundsten, E. M.; Paull, C. K.; Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H. J.; Brewer, P. G.; Vrijenhoek, R.; Lundsten, L.

    2013-12-01

    Detailed mapping surveys of the floor and flanks of the Santa Monica Basin, San Pedro Basin, and San Diego Trough were conducted during the past seven years using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) built and operated by MBARI specifically for seafloor mapping. The AUV collected data provide up to 1 m resolution multibeam bathymetric grids with a vertical precision of 0.15 m. Along with high-resolution multibeam, the AUV also collects chirp seismic reflection profiles. Structures within the uppermost 10-20 m of the seafloor, which in the surveys presented here is composed of recent sediment drape, can typically be resolved in the sub-bottom reflectors. Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives allowed for ground-truth observations and sampling within the surveyed areas. The objectives of these dives included finding evidence of recent seafloor deformation and locating areas where chemosynthetic biological communities are supported by fluid venting. Distinctive seafloor features within an active fault zone are revealed in unprecedented detail in the AUV generated maps and seismic reflection profiles. Evidence for recent fault displacements include linear scarps which can be as small as 20 cm high but traceable for several km, right lateral offsets within submarine channels and topographic ridges, and abrupt discontinuities in sub-bottom reflectors, which in places appear to displace seafloor sediments. Several topographic highs that occur within the fault zone appear to be anticlines related to step-overs in these faults. These topographic highs are, in places, topped with circular mounds that are up to 15 m high and have ~30° sloping sides. The crests of the topographic highs and the mounds both have distinctive rough morphologies produced by broken pavements of irregular blocks of methane-derived authigenic carbonates, and by topographic depressions, commonly more than 2 m deep. These areas of distinctive rough topography are commonly associated with living

  20. Boundary Creek Thermal areas of Yellowstone National Park I: thermal activity and geologic setting

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, R.A.

    1980-09-01

    Proposed geothermal leasing in the Island Park Geothermal Area (IPGA) in national forest and public lands adjacent to Yellowstone National Park has called attention to the moderate to high temperature springs of the Boundary Creek Thermal Areas. Up until late 1977 no description or geochemical inventory studies had been conducted in these areas. The thermal springs are scattered in four major groups along the Boundary Creek drainage with three to six km. of the IPGA - park border. Observations and analyses of physical and chemical indicators suggest that the source is under the Madison Plateau and that the waters are generally similar in the lower three thermal units. These hot springs should be monitored so as to provide early warning of change in the event that geothermal development in the IPGA causes withdrawal of groundwater from Yellow Stone National Park.

  1. Peculiarities of ULF electromagnetic disturbances before strong earthquakes in seismic active zone of Kamchatka peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopytenko, Y. A.; Ismagilov, V. S.; Schekotov, A.; Molchanov, O.; Chebrov, V.; Raspopov, O. M.

    2006-12-01

    Regular observations of ULF electromagnetic disturbances and acoustic emissions at st. Karymshino in seismic active zone of Kamchatka peninsula were carried out during 2001-2003 years. Five seismic active periods with strong earthquakes (M>5) were displayed during this period. These EQs occurred at the Pacific at 20-60 km depth at 100-140 km distances to the East from the st. Karymshino. Analysis of normalized dynamic power spectra of data of high-sensitive (0.2 pT/sqrt(Hz)) three-component induction magnetometer achieved a significant disorder of daily variation and increasing of the magnetic disturbance intensities (from 0.2 to ~1 pT) in the whole investigated frequency range (0.2-5 Hz). The anomaly intensity increasing was observed during the 12-18 hours before main seismic shocks. Maximum of the increasing occurred during 4-6 hours before the EQs. An increasing of acoustic emissions (F=30 Hz) was observed during the same period. A sharp decreasing of the magnetic disturbance intensities was observed 2-4 hours before the EQs. We suppose that physical processes in a hearth of forthcoming EQ lead to an irreversible avalanche-like formation of cracks and stimulation of the acoustic and ULF electromagnetic disturbances.

  2. Molecular Machines Regulating the Release Probability of Synaptic Vesicles at the Active Zone

    PubMed Central

    Körber, Christoph; Kuner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) with the plasma membrane of the active zone (AZ) upon arrival of an action potential (AP) at the presynaptic compartment is a tightly regulated probabilistic process crucial for information transfer. The probability of a SV to release its transmitter content in response to an AP, termed release probability (Pr), is highly diverse both at the level of entire synapses and individual SVs at a given synapse. Differences in Pr exist between different types of synapses, between synapses of the same type, synapses originating from the same axon and even between different SV subpopulations within the same presynaptic terminal. The Pr of SVs at the AZ is set by a complex interplay of different presynaptic properties including the availability of release-ready SVs, the location of the SVs relative to the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) at the AZ, the magnitude of calcium influx upon arrival of the AP, the buffering of calcium ions as well as the identity and sensitivity of the calcium sensor. These properties are not only interconnected, but can also be regulated dynamically to match the requirements of activity patterns mediated by the synapse. Here, we review recent advances in identifying molecules and molecular machines taking part in the determination of vesicular Pr at the AZ. PMID:26973506

  3. Distribution of dehalogenation activity in subseafloor sediments of the Nankai Trough subduction zone

    PubMed Central

    Futagami, Taiki; Morono, Yuki; Terada, Takeshi; Kaksonen, Anna H.; Inagaki, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    Halogenated organic matter buried in marine subsurface sediment may serve as a source of electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration of subseafloor microbes. Detection of a diverse array of reductive dehalogenase-homologous (rdhA) genes suggests that subseafloor organohalide-respiring microbial communities may play significant ecological roles in the biogeochemical carbon and halogen cycle in the subseafloor biosphere. We report here the spatial distribution of dehalogenation activity in the Nankai Trough plate-subduction zone of the northwest Pacific off the Kii Peninsula of Japan. Incubation experiments with slurries of sediment collected at various depths and locations showed that degradation of several organohalides tested only occurred in the shallow sedimentary basin, down to 4.7 metres below the seafloor, despite detection of rdhA in the deeper sediments. We studied the phylogenetic diversity of the metabolically active microbes in positive enrichment cultures by extracting RNA, and found that Desulfuromonadales bacteria predominate. In addition, for the isolation of genes involved in the dehalogenation reaction, we performed a substrate-induced gene expression screening on DNA extracted from the enrichment cultures. Diverse DNA fragments were obtained and some of them showed best BLAST hit to known organohalide respirers such as Dehalococcoides, whereas no functionally known dehalogenation-related genes such as rdhA were found, indicating the need to improve the molecular approach to assess functional genes for organohalide respiration. PMID:23479745

  4. Molecular Machines Regulating the Release Probability of Synaptic Vesicles at the Active Zone.

    PubMed

    Körber, Christoph; Kuner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) with the plasma membrane of the active zone (AZ) upon arrival of an action potential (AP) at the presynaptic compartment is a tightly regulated probabilistic process crucial for information transfer. The probability of a SV to release its transmitter content in response to an AP, termed release probability (Pr), is highly diverse both at the level of entire synapses and individual SVs at a given synapse. Differences in Pr exist between different types of synapses, between synapses of the same type, synapses originating from the same axon and even between different SV subpopulations within the same presynaptic terminal. The Pr of SVs at the AZ is set by a complex interplay of different presynaptic properties including the availability of release-ready SVs, the location of the SVs relative to the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) at the AZ, the magnitude of calcium influx upon arrival of the AP, the buffering of calcium ions as well as the identity and sensitivity of the calcium sensor. These properties are not only interconnected, but can also be regulated dynamically to match the requirements of activity patterns mediated by the synapse. Here, we review recent advances in identifying molecules and molecular machines taking part in the determination of vesicular Pr at the AZ.

  5. An automatic continuous monitoring station for groundwater geochemistry at an active fault zone in SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chun-Wei; Yang, Tsanyao F.; Fu, Ching-Chou; Hilton, David R.; Liu, Tsung-Kwei; Walia, Vivek; Lai, Tzu-Hua

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have revealed that gas compositions of fluid samples collected from southwestern Taiwan where many hot springs and mud volcanoes are distributed along tectonic sutures show significant variation prior to and after some disaster seismic events. Such variations, including radon activity, CH4/CO2, CO2/3He and 3He/4He ratios of gas compositions, are considered to be precursors of earthquakes in this area. To validate the relationship between fluid compositions and local earthquakes, a continuous monitoring station has been established at Yun-Shui, which is an artesian well located at an active fault zone in SW Taiwan. It is equipped with a radon detector and a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) for in-situ measurement of the dissolved gas composition. Data is telemetered to Taipei so we are able to monitor variations of gas composition in real time. Furthermore, we also installed a syringe pump apparatus for the retrieval and temporal analysis of helium (SPARTAH) at this station. From the SPARTAH samples, we can obtain detailed time series records of H-O isotopic compositions, DIC concentration and δ13C isotopic ratios, and anion concentration of the water samples at this station. After continuous monitoring for about one year, some anomalies occurred prior to some local earthquakes. It demonstrates that this automated system is feasible for long-term continuous seismo-geochemical research in this area. Keywords: monitoring; geochemistry; isotope; dissolved gases; pre-seismic signal.

  6. Exchange and redistribution dynamics of the cytoskeleton of the active zone molecule bassoon.

    PubMed

    Tsuriel, Shlomo; Fisher, Arava; Wittenmayer, Nina; Dresbach, Thomas; Garner, Craig C; Ziv, Noam E

    2009-01-14

    Presynaptic sites typically appear as varicosities (boutons) distributed along axons. Ultrastructurally, presynaptic boutons lack obvious physical barriers that separate them from the axon proper, yet activity-related and constitutive dynamics continuously promote the "reshuffling" of presynaptic components and even their dispersal into flanking axonal segments. How presynaptic sites manage to maintain their organization and individual characteristics over long durations is thus unclear. Conceivably, presynaptic tenacity might depend on the active zone (AZ), an electron-dense specialization of the presynaptic membrane, and particularly on the cytoskeletal matrix associated with the AZ (CAZ) that could act as a relatively stable "core scaffold" that conserves and dictates presynaptic organization. At present, however, little is known on the molecular dynamics of CAZ molecules, and thus, the factual basis for this hypothesis remains unclear. To examine the stability of the CAZ, we studied the molecular dynamics of the major CAZ molecule Bassoon in cultured hippocampal neurons. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and photoactivation experiments revealed that exchange rates of green fluorescent protein and photoactivatable green fluorescent protein-tagged Bassoon at individual presynaptic sites are very low (tau > 8 h). Exchange rates varied between boutons and were only slightly accelerated by stimulation. Interestingly, photoactivation experiments revealed that Bassoon lost from one synapse was occasionally assimilated into neighboring presynaptic sites. Our findings indicate that Bassoon is engaged in relatively stable associations within the CAZ and thus support the notion that the CAZ or some of its components might constitute a relatively stable presynaptic core scaffold.

  7. Slip Rates of Main Active Fault Zones Through Turkey Inferred From GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozener, H.; Aktug, B.; Dogru, A.; Tasci, L.; Acar, M.; Emre, O.; Yilmaz, O.; Turgut, B.; Halicioglu, K.; Sabuncu, A.; Bal, O.; Eraslan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Active Fault Map of Turkey was revised and published by General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration in 2012. This map reveals that there are about 500 faults can generate earthquakes.In order to understand the earthquake potential of these faults, it is needed to determine the slip rates. Although many regional and local studies were performed in the past, the slip rates of the active faults in Turkey have not been determined. In this study, the block modelling, which is the most common method to produce slip rates, will be done. GPS velocities required for block modeling is being compiled from the published studies and the raw data provided then velocity field is combined. To form a homogeneous velocity field, different stochastic models will be used and the optimal velocity field will be achieved. In literature, GPS site velocities, which are computed for different purposes and published, are combined globally and this combined velocity field are used in the analysis of strain accumulation. It is also aimed to develop optimal stochastic models to combine the velocity data. Real time, survey mode and published GPS observations is being combined in this study. We also perform new GPS observations. Furthermore, micro blocks and main fault zones from Active Fault Map Turkey will be determined and homogeneous velocity field will be used to infer slip rates of these active faults. Here, we present the result of first year of the study. This study is being supported by THE SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF TURKEY (TUBITAK)-CAYDAG with grant no. 113Y430.

  8. Electrical stimulation of dorsal root entry zone attenuates wide-dynamic range neuronal activity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fei; Zhang, Chen; Xu, Qian; Tiwari, Vinod; He, Shao-Qiu; Wang, Yun; Dong, Xinzhong; Vera-Portocarrero, Louis P.; Wacnik, Paul W.; Raja, Srinivasa N.; Guan, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Recent clinical studies suggest that neurostimulation at the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ) may alleviate neuropathic pain. However, the mechanisms of action for this therapeutic effect are unclear. Here, we examined whether DREZ stimulation inhibits spinal wide-dynamic-range (WDR) neuronal activity in nerve-injured rats. Materials and Methods We conducted in vivo extracellular single-unit recordings of WDR neurons in rats after an L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) or sham surgery. We set bipolar electrical stimulation (50 Hz, 0.2 ms, 5 min) of the DREZ at the intensity that activated only Aα/β-fibers by measuring the lowest current at which DREZ stimulation evoked a peak antidromic sciatic Aα/β-compound action potential without inducing an Aδ/C-compound action potential (i.e., Ab1). Results The elevated spontaneous activity rate of WDR neurons in SNL rats [n=25; data combined from day 14–16 (n = 15) and day 45–75 post-SNL groups (n=10)] was significantly decreased from the pre-stimulation level (p<0.01) at 0–15 min and 30–45 min post-stimulation. In both sham-operated (n=8) and nerve-injured rats, DREZ stimulation attenuated the C-component, but not A-component, of the WDR neuronal response to graded intracutaneous electrical stimuli (0.1–10 mA, 2 ms) applied to the skin receptive field. Further, DREZ stimulation blocked windup (a short form of neuronal sensitization) to repetitive noxious stimuli (0.5 Hz) at 0–15 min in all groups (p<0.05). Conclusions Attenuation of WDR neuronal activity may contribute to DREZ stimulation-induced analgesia. This finding supports the notion that DREZ may be a useful target for neuromodulatory control of pain. PMID:25308522

  9. [Correlation analysis between meteorological factors, biomass, and active components of Salvia miltiorrhiza in different climatic zones].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen-lu; Liang, Zong-suo; Guo, Hong-bo; Liu, Jing-ling; Liu, Yan; Liu, Feng-hua; Wei, Lang-zhu

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the growth and accumulation of active components of Salvia miltiorrhiza in twenty two experimental sites which crossing through three typical climate zones. The S. miltiorrhiza seedlings with the same genotype were planted in each site in spring, which were cultivated in fields with uniform management during their growing seasons till to harvest. The diterpene ketones (dihydrotanshinone, cryptotanshinone, tanshinone I and tanshinone II(A)) in S. miltiorrhiza root samples were determined by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. The biomass of root (root length, number of root branches, root width and dry weight) was also measured. The results showed that tanshinone II(A) in all samples of each site were higher than the standards required by China Pharmacopoeia. It has been found there is a relationship between root shape and climate change. The correlation analysis between active components and meteorological factors showed that the accumulation of tanshinones were effected by such meteorological factors as average relative humidity from April to October > average vapor pressure from April to October > average temperature difference day and night from April to October > annual average temperature and so on. The correlation analysis between root biomass and meteorological factors exhibited that root shape and accumulation of dry matter were affected by those factors, such as average annual aboveground (0-20 cm) temperature from April to October > annual average temperature > average vapor pressure from April to October > annual active accumulated temperature > annual average temperature > average vapor pressure from April to October. The accumulation of tanshinones and biomass was increased with the decrease of latitude. At the same time, the dry matter and diameter of root decreased if altitude rises. In addition, S. miltiorrhiza required sunlight is not sophisticated, when compared with humid and temperature. To sum up, S

  10. 77 FR 52680 - Foreign-Trade Zone 242-Boundary County, ID, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, AREVA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... AREVA Enrichment Services, LLC (AES), located in Bonneville County, Idaho. The notification conforming.... A separate application for subzone status at the AES facility was submitted and will be processed... ] procedures could allow AES to choose the duty rates during customs entry procedures that apply to...

  11. Active tectonics west of New Zealand's Alpine Fault: South Westland Fault Zone activity shows Australian Plate instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pascale, Gregory P.; Chandler-Yates, Nicholas; Dela Pena, Federico; Wilson, Pam; May, Elijah; Twiss, Amber; Cheng, Che

    2016-04-01

    The 300 km long South Westland Fault Zone (SWFZ) is within the footwall of the Central Alpine Fault (<20 km away) and has 3500 m of dip-slip displacement, but it has been unknown if the fault is active. Here the first evidence for SWFZ thrust faulting in the "stable" Australian Plate is shown with cumulative dip-slip displacements up to 5.9 m (with 3 m throw) on Pleistocene and Holocene sediments and gentle hanging wall anticlinal folding. Cone penetration test (CPT) stratigraphy shows repeated sequences within the fault scarp (consistent with thrusting). Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating constrains the most recent rupture post-12.1 ± 1.7 ka with evidence for three to four events during earthquakes of at least Mw 6.8. This study shows significant deformation is accommodated on poorly characterized Australian Plate structures northwest of the Alpine Fault and demonstrates that major active and seismogenic structures remain uncharacterized in densely forested regions on Earth.

  12. An Active Area Model of Rapid Infiltration Response at Substantial Depth in the Unsaturated Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, L.; Nimmo, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    In a porous medium subject to preferential flow, response to surface water infiltration can occur rapidly even at substantial depth in the unsaturated zone. In a ponding experiment at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) the profile of undisturbed natural soil, seasonally dry at the start, was observed to approach field saturation throughout a 2 meter depth within 6 hours (Nimmo and Perkins, 2007). Traditional use of Richards' equation would require an unrealistically large unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of 40 m/day to capture the observed non-classic wetting behavior. Here we present a model for rapid flow using an active area concept similar to the active fracture model (Liu and others, 1998, WRR 34:2633-2646). The active area concept is incorporated within the preferential flow domain (which allows rapid downward movement) of a dual-domain model that also contains a diffuse-flow domain in which flow can be described by Richards' equation. Development of the active area model is motivated by observation of rapid wetting at substantial depth, as well as a phenomenon in which deep flow is observed before shallow flow. In this model water movement in the preferential domain can be physically conceptualized as laminar flow in free-surface films of constant average thickness. For a given medium, the preferential domain is characterized by an effective areal density (area per unit bulk volume) that describes the free-surface film capacity of the domain as a function of depth. The active area is defined as a portion of the effective areal density that dictates the depth and temporal distribution of domain-exchange and new infiltration within the preferential domain. With the addition of the active area concept, the model is capable of simulating non-diffusive vertical transport patterns. Advantages of the model include simulating rapid response for a variety of infiltration types, including ponding and rain events, as well as modeling relatively rapid aquifer

  13. Dual-color STED microscopy reveals a sandwich structure of Bassoon and Piccolo in active zones of adult and aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Nishimune, Hiroshi; Badawi, Yomna; Mori, Shuuichi; Shigemoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Presynaptic active zones play a pivotal role as synaptic vesicle release sites for synaptic transmission, but the molecular architecture of active zones in mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) at sub-diffraction limited resolution remains unknown. Bassoon and Piccolo are active zone specific cytosolic proteins essential for active zone assembly in NMJs, ribbon synapses, and brain synapses. These proteins are thought to colocalize and share some functions at active zones. Here, we report an unexpected finding of non-overlapping localization of these two proteins in mouse NMJs revealed using dual-color stimulated emission depletion (STED) super resolution microscopy. Piccolo puncta sandwiched Bassoon puncta and aligned in a Piccolo-Bassoon-Piccolo structure in adult NMJs. P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) puncta colocalized with Bassoon puncta. The P/Q-type VGCC and Bassoon protein levels decreased significantly in NMJs from aged mouse. In contrast, the Piccolo levels in NMJs from aged mice were comparable to levels in adult mice. This study revealed the molecular architecture of active zones in mouse NMJs at sub-diffraction limited resolution, and described the selective degeneration mechanism of active zone proteins in NMJs from aged mice. Interestingly, the localization pattern of active zone proteins described herein is similar to active zone structures described using electron microscope tomography. PMID:27321892

  14. Dual-color STED microscopy reveals a sandwich structure of Bassoon and Piccolo in active zones of adult and aged mice.

    PubMed

    Nishimune, Hiroshi; Badawi, Yomna; Mori, Shuuichi; Shigemoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-06-20

    Presynaptic active zones play a pivotal role as synaptic vesicle release sites for synaptic transmission, but the molecular architecture of active zones in mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) at sub-diffraction limited resolution remains unknown. Bassoon and Piccolo are active zone specific cytosolic proteins essential for active zone assembly in NMJs, ribbon synapses, and brain synapses. These proteins are thought to colocalize and share some functions at active zones. Here, we report an unexpected finding of non-overlapping localization of these two proteins in mouse NMJs revealed using dual-color stimulated emission depletion (STED) super resolution microscopy. Piccolo puncta sandwiched Bassoon puncta and aligned in a Piccolo-Bassoon-Piccolo structure in adult NMJs. P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) puncta colocalized with Bassoon puncta. The P/Q-type VGCC and Bassoon protein levels decreased significantly in NMJs from aged mouse. In contrast, the Piccolo levels in NMJs from aged mice were comparable to levels in adult mice. This study revealed the molecular architecture of active zones in mouse NMJs at sub-diffraction limited resolution, and described the selective degeneration mechanism of active zone proteins in NMJs from aged mice. Interestingly, the localization pattern of active zone proteins described herein is similar to active zone structures described using electron microscope tomography.

  15. 78 FR 30269 - Foreign-Trade Zone 129-Bellingham, Washington; Authorization of Production Activity; T.C. Trading...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... 400), including notice in the Federal Register inviting ] public comment (78 FR 7395, 02/01/2013). The... Activity; T.C. Trading Company, Inc. (Eyeglass Assembly and Kitting), Blaine, WA On January 17, 2013, the... Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of T.C. Trading Company, Inc., within Subzone 129B, in...

  16. Group Dynamics in the Language Classroom: Embodied Participation as Active Reception in the Collective Zone of Proximal Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Compernolle, Rémi A.; Williams, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the notion of "active reception" during small-group collaborative interaction in the foreign language classroom, focusing on the embodied participation of a secondary (nonspeaking) interactant, Diane. Drawing on Vygotskian sociocultural theory, we argue that within small-group work, a Zone of Proximal Development…

  17. 78 FR 54234 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity PBR, Inc. d/b/a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... Board (15 CFR part 400), including notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (78 FR 25253... PBR, Inc. d/b/a SKAPS Industries (Polypropylene Geotextiles), Athens, Georgia On April 8, 2013... activity to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of PBR, Inc. d/b/a SKAPS Industries...

  18. 78 FR 11626 - Foreign-Trade Zone 181-Akron/Canton, OH, Authorization of Production Activity, Cimbar Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... FTZ Board (15 CFR part 400), including notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (77 FR..., Cimbar Performance Minerals, (Barium Sulfate Grinding), Wellsville, OH On October 10, 2012, the Northeast... activity to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of Cimbar Performance Minerals, within FTZ...

  19. 77 FR 28569 - Foreign-Trade Zone 92-Gulfport, MS Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Gulf Ship, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ...; Gulf Ship, LLC, (Shipbuilding), Gulfport, MS The Mississippi Coast Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 92, submitted a notification of proposed production activity on behalf of Gulf Ship, LLC (Gulf Ship), located in Gulfport, Mississippi. The Gulf Ship facility is located within Site 3 of FTZ 92....

  20. Liparid and macrourid fishes of the hadal zone: in situ observations of activity and feeding behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, A.J.; Fujii, T.; Solan, M.; Matsumoto, A.K.; Bagley, P.M.; Priede, I.G.

    2008-01-01

    Using baited camera landers, the first images of living fishes were recorded in the hadal zone (6000–11 000 m) in the Pacific Ocean. The widespread abyssal macrourid Coryphaenoides yaquinae was observed at a new depth record of approximately 7000 m in the Japan Trench. Two endemic species of liparid were observed at similar depths: Pseudoliparis amblystomopsis in the Japan Trench and Notoliparis kermadecensis in the Kermadec Trench. From these observations, we have documented swimming and feeding behaviour of these species and derived the first estimates of hadal fish abundance. The liparids intercepted bait within 100–200 min but were observed to preferentially feed on scavenging amphipods. Notoliparis kermadecensis act as top predators in the hadal food web, exhibiting up to nine suction-feeding events per minute. Both species showed distinctive swimming gaits: P. amblystomopsis (mean length 22.5 cm) displayed a mean tail-beat frequency of 0.47 Hz and mean caudal : pectoral frequency ratio of 0.76, whereas N. kermadecensis (mean length 31.5 cm) displayed respective values of 1.04 and 2.08 Hz. Despite living at extreme depths, these endemic liparids exhibit similar activity levels compared with shallow-water liparids. PMID:19129104

  1. Online SERS Detection and Characterization of Eight Biologically-Active Peptides Separated by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Negri, Pierre; Sarver, Scott A.; Schiavone, Nicole M.; Dovichi, Norman J.; Schultz, Zachary D.

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for low cost, sensitive and chemical specific detectors for routine characterization of biomolecules. In this study, we utilize sheath-flow surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) to analyze a mixture of eight biologically-active peptides separated by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). Analysis of the SERS electropherogram resulting from online detection resolves the characteristic Raman bands attributed to the amino acid constituents of each peptide, which enables identification. The detection limit by SERS was found to be 10−8 M. Our results suggest that the structural information obtained from the detected vibrational modes provides complementary characterization to other chemically specific detectors like mass spectrometry and improved chemical identification over other commonly used optical-based post-chromatographic detection methods. In addition, the sheath-flow SERS detection results in band narrowing in the observed electropherogram that enables distinction of closely migrating species. The results presented here indicate that online SERS detection can provide fast, robust, reproducible, and chemical specific detection to facilitate the characterization of peptides. PMID:25599104

  2. Liparid and macrourid fishes of the hadal zone: in situ observations of activity and feeding behaviour.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, A J; Fujii, T; Solan, M; Matsumoto, A K; Bagley, P M; Priede, I G

    2009-03-22

    Using baited camera landers, the first images of living fishes were recorded in the hadal zone (6000-11000 m) in the Pacific Ocean. The widespread abyssal macrourid Coryphaenoides yaquinae was observed at a new depth record of approximately 7000 m in the Japan Trench. Two endemic species of liparid were observed at similar depths: Pseudoliparis amblystomopsis in the Japan Trench and Notoliparis kermadecensis in the Kermadec Trench. From these observations, we have documented swimming and feeding behaviour of these species and derived the first estimates of hadal fish abundance. The liparids intercepted bait within 100-200 min but were observed to preferentially feed on scavenging amphipods. Notoliparis kermadecensis act as top predators in the hadal food web, exhibiting up to nine suction-feeding events per minute. Both species showed distinctive swimming gaits: P. amblystomopsis (mean length 22.5 cm) displayed a mean tail-beat frequency of 0.47 Hz and mean caudal:pectoral frequency ratio of 0.76, whereas N. kermadecensis (mean length 31.5 cm) displayed respective values of 1.04 and 2.08 Hz. Despite living at extreme depths, these endemic liparids exhibit similar activity levels compared with shallow-water liparids. PMID:19129104

  3. Active zone scaffolds differentially accumulate Unc13 isoforms to tune Ca(2+) channel-vesicle coupling.

    PubMed

    Böhme, Mathias A; Beis, Christina; Reddy-Alla, Suneel; Reynolds, Eric; Mampell, Malou M; Grasskamp, Andreas T; Lützkendorf, Janine; Bergeron, Dominique Dufour; Driller, Jan H; Babikir, Husam; Göttfert, Fabian; Robinson, Iain M; O'Kane, Cahir J; Hell, Stefan W; Wahl, Markus C; Stelzl, Ulrich; Loll, Bernhard; Walter, Alexander M; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2016-10-01

    Brain function relies on fast and precisely timed synaptic vesicle (SV) release at active zones (AZs). Efficacy of SV release depends on distance from SV to Ca(2+) channel, but molecular mechanisms controlling this are unknown. Here we found that distances can be defined by targeting two unc-13 (Unc13) isoforms to presynaptic AZ subdomains. Super-resolution and intravital imaging of developing Drosophila melanogaster glutamatergic synapses revealed that the Unc13B isoform was recruited to nascent AZs by the scaffolding proteins Syd-1 and Liprin-α, and Unc13A was positioned by Bruchpilot and Rim-binding protein complexes at maturing AZs. Unc13B localized 120 nm away from Ca(2+) channels, whereas Unc13A localized only 70 nm away and was responsible for docking SVs at this distance. Unc13A(null) mutants suffered from inefficient, delayed and EGTA-supersensitive release. Mathematical modeling suggested that synapses normally operate via two independent release pathways differentially positioned by either isoform. We identified isoform-specific Unc13-AZ scaffold interactions regulating SV-Ca(2+)-channel topology whose developmental tightening optimizes synaptic transmission.

  4. Active zone scaffolds differentially accumulate Unc13 isoforms to tune Ca(2+) channel-vesicle coupling.

    PubMed

    Böhme, Mathias A; Beis, Christina; Reddy-Alla, Suneel; Reynolds, Eric; Mampell, Malou M; Grasskamp, Andreas T; Lützkendorf, Janine; Bergeron, Dominique Dufour; Driller, Jan H; Babikir, Husam; Göttfert, Fabian; Robinson, Iain M; O'Kane, Cahir J; Hell, Stefan W; Wahl, Markus C; Stelzl, Ulrich; Loll, Bernhard; Walter, Alexander M; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2016-10-01

    Brain function relies on fast and precisely timed synaptic vesicle (SV) release at active zones (AZs). Efficacy of SV release depends on distance from SV to Ca(2+) channel, but molecular mechanisms controlling this are unknown. Here we found that distances can be defined by targeting two unc-13 (Unc13) isoforms to presynaptic AZ subdomains. Super-resolution and intravital imaging of developing Drosophila melanogaster glutamatergic synapses revealed that the Unc13B isoform was recruited to nascent AZs by the scaffolding proteins Syd-1 and Liprin-α, and Unc13A was positioned by Bruchpilot and Rim-binding protein complexes at maturing AZs. Unc13B localized 120 nm away from Ca(2+) channels, whereas Unc13A localized only 70 nm away and was responsible for docking SVs at this distance. Unc13A(null) mutants suffered from inefficient, delayed and EGTA-supersensitive release. Mathematical modeling suggested that synapses normally operate via two independent release pathways differentially positioned by either isoform. We identified isoform-specific Unc13-AZ scaffold interactions regulating SV-Ca(2+)-channel topology whose developmental tightening optimizes synaptic transmission. PMID:27526206

  5. A theoretical study of factors influencing calcium-secretion coupling in a presynaptic active zone model.

    PubMed

    Gil, Amparo; González-Vélez, Virginia; Segura, Javier; Gutiérrez, Luis Miguel

    2014-10-01

    A theoretical analysis of some of the relevant factors influencing the calcium time course and the strength and timing of release probabilities of vesicles evoked by an action potential in a calyx-type active zone is presented in this paper. In particular, our study focus on the comparison of cooperative vs non-cooperative calcium binding by the release site and the effect of the number of Ca(2+) binding sites on the calcium sensitivity for release. Regarding the comparison of cooperative and non-cooperative kinetic schemes, our simulations show that quite different results are obtained when considering one or another: a reduction in the release probability of more than a 50% is obtained when considering the cooperative kinetic scheme. Also, a delay in the average time for release appears when using this model for the calcium sensor. Our study also shows that a non-cooperative kinetic binding scheme gives rise to a well defined average calcium level for release assuming that the same kinetic constants are considered for all the sites. Our results also suggest that the central value of the calcium sensitivity for release depends on the number of binding sites N and the dissociation constant KD with a scaling law depending on NKD.

  6. Liparid and macrourid fishes of the hadal zone: in situ observations of activity and feeding behaviour.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, A J; Fujii, T; Solan, M; Matsumoto, A K; Bagley, P M; Priede, I G

    2009-03-22

    Using baited camera landers, the first images of living fishes were recorded in the hadal zone (6000-11000 m) in the Pacific Ocean. The widespread abyssal macrourid Coryphaenoides yaquinae was observed at a new depth record of approximately 7000 m in the Japan Trench. Two endemic species of liparid were observed at similar depths: Pseudoliparis amblystomopsis in the Japan Trench and Notoliparis kermadecensis in the Kermadec Trench. From these observations, we have documented swimming and feeding behaviour of these species and derived the first estimates of hadal fish abundance. The liparids intercepted bait within 100-200 min but were observed to preferentially feed on scavenging amphipods. Notoliparis kermadecensis act as top predators in the hadal food web, exhibiting up to nine suction-feeding events per minute. Both species showed distinctive swimming gaits: P. amblystomopsis (mean length 22.5 cm) displayed a mean tail-beat frequency of 0.47 Hz and mean caudal:pectoral frequency ratio of 0.76, whereas N. kermadecensis (mean length 31.5 cm) displayed respective values of 1.04 and 2.08 Hz. Despite living at extreme depths, these endemic liparids exhibit similar activity levels compared with shallow-water liparids.

  7. Establishment of Active Traces of Lower Tagus Valley Fault Zone through an Integrated Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besana-Ostman, G. M.; Vilanova, S.; Flor, A.; Canora, C.; Heleno, S.; Domingues, A.; Narciso, J.; Pinheiro, P.; Pinto, L.; Fonseca, J. F.

    2013-05-01

    Despite the occurrence of at least two damaging earthquakes in historical times - the M~7 1531 and the M6 1909 earthquakes - the Lower Tagus Valley Fault Zone (LTVFZ) has only recently been mapped (Besana-Ostman et al., 2012). In addition, a new set of active traces has been identified to the east during recent analysis and field inspections. The major challenges to the identification of active traces within Lower Tagus Valley (LTV) are both the presence of the very dynamic Tagus River (LTR) and the extensive urban and agricultural modifications introduced in the landscape. The detailed reports on the geological effects of the 1909 earthquake, while documenting extensively the secondary, shaking-related effects, provide no indication of surface rupture. The active traces of the northeast-southwest trending left-lateral LTVFZ within the LTV were established through integrated approaches as follows: aerial photo analysis, drainage system and satellite images examination, geomorphic feature identification, field mapping, geomorphic index measurements and trenching. The mapped traces extend to about 80 kilometers long and transect Quaternary and Holocene deposits. The mapped length of the western splay is compatible with an M7.2 earthquake. On the other hand, the newly mapped eastern traces plot almost parallel with the western splay, which may extend southwards to a comparable length. Preliminary analysis of satellite data show some evidence of additional splays located further east and south relative to the LTV. The new active traces suggest that the LTVFZ is a left-stepping left-lateral fault system with a regional NNE-SSW trend. Moreover, its extent and kinematics suggest magnitudes higher than previously assessed for the region. The location of the active traces displays a better correlation with the damage distribution of the historical events. Given the significance and implications of these findings for earthquake hazards assessment in Portugal, further studies

  8. Hybrid zone origins, species boundaries, and the evolution of wing-pattern diversity in a polytypic species complex of North American admiral butterflies (Nymphalidae: Limenitis).

    PubMed

    Mullen, Sean P; Dopman, Erik B; Harrison, Richard G

    2008-06-01

    Hybrid zones present opportunities to study the effects of gene flow, selection, and recombination in natural populations and, thus, provide insights into the genetic and phenotypic changes that occur early in speciation. Here we investigate a hybrid zone between mimetic (Limenitis arthemis astyanax) and nonmimetic (Limenitis arthemis arthemis) populations of admiral butterflies using DNA sequence variation from mtDNA and seven nuclear gene loci. We find three distinct mitochondrial clades within this complex, and observe a strong overall concordance between wing-pattern phenotypes and mitochondrial variation. Nuclear gene genealogies, in contrast, revealed no evidence of exclusivity for either wing-pattern phenotype, suggesting incomplete barriers to gene exchange and/or insufficient time for lineage sorting. Coalescent simulations indicate that gene flow between these two subspecies is highly asymmetric, with the majority of migration occurring from mimetic into nonmimetic populations. Selective sweeps of alleles responsible for mimetic phenotypes may have occurred more than once when mimetic and nonmimetic Limenitis occurred together in the presence of the model (Battus philenor).

  9. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP): Active Rift Processes in the Brawley Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, L.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Rymer, M. J.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Harding, A. J.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, A.; Lazaro-Mancilla, O.

    2011-12-01

    The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP), funded by NSF and USGS, acquired seismic data in and across the Salton Trough in southern California and northern Mexico in March 2011. The project addresses both rifting processes at the northern end of the Gulf of California extensional province and earthquake hazards at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault system. Seven lines of onshore refraction and low-fold reflection data were acquired in the Coachella, Imperial, and Mexicali Valleys, two lines and a grid of airgun and OBS data were acquired in the Salton Sea, and onshore-offshore data were recorded. Almost 2800 land seismometers and 50 OBS's were used in almost 5000 deployments at almost 4300 sites, in spacing as dense as 100 m. These instruments received seismic signals from 126 explosive shots up to 1400 kg and over 2300 airgun shots. In the central Salton Trough, North American lithosphere appears to have been rifted completely apart. Based primarily on a 1979 seismic refraction project, the 20-22 km thick crust is apparently composed entirely of new crust added by magmatism from below and sedimentation from above. Active rifting of this new crust is manifested by shallow (<10km depth) seismicity in the oblique Brawley Seismic Zone (BSZ), small Salton Buttes volcanoes aligned perpendicular to the transform faults, very high heat flow (~140 mW/m2), and geothermal energy production. This presentation is focused on an onshore-offshore line of densely sampled refraction and low-fold reflection data that crosses the Brawley Seismic Zone and Salton Buttes in the direction of plate motion. At the time of abstract submission, data analysis was very preliminary, consisting of first-arrival tomography of the onshore half of the line for upper crustal seismic velocity. Crystalline basement (>5 km/s), comprised of late-Pliocene to Quaternary sediment metamorphosed by the high heat flow, occurs at ~2 km depth beneath the Salton Buttes and geothermal field and ~4 km

  10. Characterization of Active Hydrothermal Fluid Discharge and Recharge Zones in the Endeavour Axial Valley, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmi, M.; Hutnak, M.; Hearn, C.; Tivey, M.; Bjorklund, T.; Johnson, H. P.

    2012-12-01

    Sites where warm hydrothermal fluid vents at mid-ocean spreading centers are important for understanding a wide range of critical oceanic processes, but discharge zones represent a very limited portion of crustal fluid circulation pathways. Mapping the distribution of both fluid recharge and discharge sites within the axial valley provides wider insight into the larger scale features of hydrothermal circulation. Our 2011 survey consisted of 180 conductive heat flow stations within the Endeavour axial valley in roughly a 400 m by 1000 m grid, extending across the entire axial valley from the outer flank of the western boundary ridge to the eastern wall. Data acquisition used thermal blankets which measured conductive heat flow without requiring substantial sediment cover. A surprising result from this survey was zones of high heat flow extending across-strike, from the summit of the west valley wall across the entire axial valley floor. This trend was correlated with anomalously low seafloor magnetization from a near-bottom survey with the ROV JASON. Unexpectedly, over half of the axial valley floor was anomalously low at <50 mW m-2, while a small portion of the sites within the 'warm zone' had heat flow values >1 W m-2. The areas of extremely low heat flow values are interpreted as being directly influenced by recharge zones. Based on MCS estimates of partial melt depth below the axial valley and the assumption of no fluid advection, the purely conductive heat flow for this region should be on the order of 1 W m-2.The observation that conductive heat flux is suppressed over large portions of the axial valley floor suggests that heat transfer within the crustal sub-surface fluid reservoir is widespread, and impacts a large portion of our survey area. The largely bi-modal distribution of high and low conductive heat flow, coupled with geophysical and video observations, suggest current Endeavour axial valley crustal fluid circulation models need to be re-evaluated.

  11. Characterization of particle cloud droplet activity and composition in the free troposphere and the boundary layer during INTEX-B

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, G. C.; Day, D. A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Dunlea, E. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Collins, Donald R.; Shinozuka, Y.; Clarke, A. D.

    2010-07-20

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), aerosol size distributions, and submicron aerosol composition were made as part of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) campaign during spring 2006. Measurements were conducted from an aircraft platform over the northeastern Pacific and western North America with a focus on how the transport and evolution of Asian pollution across the Pacific Ocean affected CCN properties. A broad range of air masses were sampled and here we focus on three distinct air mass types defined geographically: the Pacific free troposphere (FT), the marine boundary layer (MBL), and the polluted continental boundary layer in the California Central Valley (CCV). These observations add to the few observations of CCN in the FT. CCN concentrations showed a large range of concentrations between air masses, however CCN activity was similar for the MBL and CCV ({kappa} {approx} 0.2-0.25). FT air masses showed evidence of long-range transport from Asia and CCN activity was consistently higher than for the boundary layer air masses. Bulk chemical measurements predicted CCN activity reasonably well for the CCV and FT air masses. Decreasing trends in {kappa} with organic mass fraction were observed for the combination of the FT and CCV air masses and can be explained by the measured soluble inorganic chemical components. Changes in hygroscopicity associated with differences in the non-refractory organic composition were too small to be distinguished from the simultaneous changes in inorganic ion composition in the FT and MBL, although measurements for the large organic fractions (0.6-0.8) found in the CCV showed values of the organic fraction hygroscopicity consistent with other polluted regions ({kappa}{sub org} {approx} 0.1-0.2). A comparison of CCN-derived {kappa} (for particles at the critical diameter) to H-TDMA-derived {kappa} (for particles at 100 nm diameter) showed similar trends, however the CCN-derived {kappa

  12. Living microbial ecosystems within the active zone of catagenesis: Implications for feeding the deep biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsfield, B.; Schenk, H. J.; Zink, K.; Ondrak, R.; Dieckmann, V.; Kallmeyer, J.; Mangelsdorf, K.; di Primio, R.; Wilkes, H.; Parkes, R. J.; Fry, J.; Cragg, B.

    2006-06-01

    Earth's largest reactive carbon pool, marine sedimentary organic matter, becomes increasingly recalcitrant during burial, making it almost inaccessible as a substrate for microorganisms, and thereby limiting metabolic activity in the deep biosphere. Because elevated temperature acting over geological time leads to the massive thermal breakdown of the organic matter into volatiles, including petroleum, the question arises whether microorganisms can directly utilize these maturation products as a substrate. While migrated thermogenic fluids are known to sustain microbial consortia in shallow sediments, an in situ coupling of abiotic generation and microbial utilization has not been demonstrated. Here we show, using a combination of basin modelling, kinetic modelling, geomicrobiology and biogeochemistry, that microorganisms inhabit the active generation zone in the Nankai Trough, offshore Japan. Three sites from ODP Leg 190 have been evaluated, namely 1173, 1174 and 1177, drilled in nearly undeformed Quaternary and Tertiary sedimentary sequences seaward of the Nankai Trough itself. Paleotemperatures were reconstructed based on subsidence profiles, compaction modelling, present-day heat flow, downhole temperature measurements and organic maturity parameters. Today's heat flow distribution can be considered mainly conductive, and is extremely high in places, reaching 180 mW/m 2. The kinetic parameters describing total hydrocarbon generation, determined by laboratory pyrolysis experiments, were utilized by the model in order to predict the timing of generation in time and space. The model predicts that the onset of present day generation lies between 300 and 500 m below sea floor (5100-5300 m below mean sea level), depending on well location. In the case of Site 1174, 5-10% conversion has taken place by a present day temperature of ca. 85 °C. Predictions were largely validated by on-site hydrocarbon gas measurements. Viable organisms in the same depth range have been

  13. Seismic Activity offshore Martinique and Dominique islands (Lesser Antilles subduction zone)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Fernandez, Mario; Galve, Audrey; Monfret, Tony; Charvis, Philippe; Laigle, Mireille; Flueh, Ernst; Gallart, Josep; Hello, Yann

    2010-05-01

    In the framework of the European project Thales was Right, two seismic surveys (Sismantilles II and Obsantilles) were carried out to better constrain the lithospheric structure of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone, its seismic activity and to evaluate the associated seismic hazards. Sismantilles II experiment was conducted in January, 2007 onboard R/V Atalante (IFREMER). A total of 90 OBS belonging to Géoazur, INSU-CNRS and IFM-Geomar were deployed on a regular grid, offshore Antigua, Guadeloupe, Dominique and Martinique islands. During the active part of the survey, more than 2500 km of multichannel seismic profiles were shot along the grid lines. Then the OBS remained on the seafloor continuously recording for the seismic activity for approximately 4 months. On April 2007 Obsantilles experiment, carried out onboard R/V Antea (IRD), was focused on the recovery of those OBS and the redeployment of 28 instruments (Géoazur OBS) off Martinique and Dominica Islands for 4 additional months of continuous recording of the seismicity. This work focuses on the analysis of the seismological data recorded in the southern sector of the study area, offshore Martinique and Dominique. During the two recording periods, extending from January to the end of August 2007, more than 3300 seismic events were detected in this area. Approximately 1100 earthquakes had enough quality to be correctly located. Station corrections, obtained from multichannel seismic profiles, were introduced to each OBS to take in to account the sedimentary cover and better constrain the hypocentral determinations. Results show events located at shallower depths in the northern sector of the array, close to the Tiburon Ridge, where the seismic activity is mainly located between 20 to 40 km depth. In the southern sector, offshore Martinique, hypocenters become deeper, ranging to 60 km depth and dipping to the west. Focal solutions have also been obtained using the P wave polarities of the best azimuthally

  14. Different synchronization characteristics of distinct types of traveling waves in a model of active medium with periodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepelev, Igor A.; Slepnev, Andrei V.; Vadivasova, Tatiana E.

    2016-09-01

    The model of a one-dimensional active medium, which cells are the FitzHugh-Nagumo oscillators, is studied for periodical boundary conditions. The medium possesses three different regimes in dependence on the parameter values. The regimes correspond to the self-sustained oscillations, excitable dynamics or bistability of the medium cells. Periodic boundary conditions provide the existence of traveling wave modes in all mentioned cases without any deterministic or stochastic excitation. The spatial waveforms and the character of oscillations in time can be similar in the different cases, but the properties of wave modes depend considerably on the medium regime. So, the dispersion characteristics and the synchronization phenomena are essentially different for bistable and excitable media on the one hand, and for the self-sustained oscillatory medium on the other hand. The local and distributed periodic influence on the medium are studied. The phenomenon of the traveling wave frequency locking is observed for all three regimes of the active medium. The comparison of synchronization effects in self-oscillatory, excitable and bistable regimes of the active medium is carried out.

  15. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  16. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  17. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  18. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  19. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  20. Evolution of Surface Motor Activation Zones in Hemiplegic Patients During 20 Sessions of FES Therapy with Multi-pad Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Malešević, Jovana; Štrbac, Matija; Isaković, Milica; Kojić, Vladimir; Konstantinović, Ljubica; Vidaković, Aleksandra; Dedijer, Suzana; Kostić, Miloš; Keller, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine surface motor activation zones for wrist, fingers and thumb extension movements and their temporal change during 20 therapy sessions using advanced multi-pad functional electrical stimulation system. Results from four hemiplegic patients indicate that certain zones have higher probability of eliciting each of the target movements. However, mutual overlap and variations of the zones are present not just between the subjects, but also on the intrasubject level, reflected through these session to session transformations of the selected virtual electrodes. The obtained results could be used as a priori knowledge for semi-automated optimization algorithm and could shorten the time required for calibration of the multi-pad electrode. PMID:27478575

  1. Faults paragenesis and paleostress state in the zone of actively propagating continental strike-slip on the example of North Khangai fault (Northern Mongolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankov, Vladimir; Parfeevets, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Sublatitudinal North Khangai fault extends from Ubsunuur basin to the eastern part of the Selenga corridor trough 800 km. It is the northern boundary of the massive Mongolian block and limits of the Baikal rift system structures propagation in the south (Logatchev, 2003). Late Cenozoic and present-day fault activity are expressed in the left-lateral displacements of a different order of river valleys and high seismicity. We have carried out studies of the kinematics of active faults and palaeostresses reconstruction in the zone of the dynamic influence of North Khangai fault, the width of which varies along the strike and can exceeds 100 km. The result shows that the fault zone has a longitudinal and a transverse zoning. Longitudinal zonation presented gradual change from west to east regions of compression and transpression regimes (Khan-Khukhey ridge) to strike-slip regime (Bolnay ridge) and strike-slip and transtensive regimes (west of Selenga corridor). Strike-slip zones are represented by linearly concentrated rupture deformations. In contrast, near the termination of the fault the cluster fault deformation formed. Here, from north to south, there are radical changes in the palaeostress state. In the north-western sector (east of Selenga corridor) strike-slip faults, strike-slip faults with normal components and normal faults are dominated. For this sector the stress tensors of extensive, transtension and strike-slip regimes are typical. South-western sector is separated from the north-eastern one by massive Buren Nuruu ridge within which the active faults are not identified. In the south-western sector between the Orkhon and Tola rivers the cluster of NW thrusts and N-S strike-slip faults with reverse component are discovered. The faults are perfectly expressed by NW and N-S scarps in the relief. The most structures dip to the east and north-east. Holocene fault activity is demonstrated by the hanging river valleys and horizontal displacements with amplitudes

  2. Multibeam investigation of the active North Atlantic plate boundary reorganization tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, Richard; Martinez, Fernando; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Eason, Deborah E.; Sleeper, Jonathan; Thordarson, Sigvaldi; Benediktsdóttir, Ásdís; Merkuryev, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    The previous orthogonal ridge/transform staircase geometry south of Iceland is being progressively changed to the present continuous oblique Reykjanes Ridge spreading geometry as North America-Eurasia transform faults are successively eliminated from north to south. This reorganization is commonly interpreted as a thermal phenomenon, caused by warmer Iceland plume mantle progressively interacting with the ridge, although other diachronous seafloor spreading reorganizations are thought to result from tectonic rift propagation. New marine geophysical data covering our reinterpretation of the reorganization tip near 57°N show successive transform eliminations at a propagation velocity of ∼110 km/Myr, ten times the spreading half rate, followed by abrupt reorganization slowing at the Modred transform as it was converted to a migrating non-transform offset. Neither the simple thermal model nor the simple propagating rift model appears adequate to explain the complicated plate boundary reorganization process.

  3. [Characteristics of soil denitrifying enzyme activity in riparian zones with different land use types in Chongming Island, Shanghai of China].

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang-Liang; Li, Jian-Hua; Yang, Chang-Ming

    2013-10-01

    By using acetylene inhibition method, this paper studied the soil denitrifying enzyme activity (DEA) and its affecting factors in the riparian zone with different land use types (cropland riparian, forested riparian, and grassy riparian zones) in Chongming Island, Shanghai of China. The riparian soil DEA was (0.69 +/- 0.11)--(134.93 +/- 33.72) microg N x kg(-1) x h(-1), which differed obviously among different land types, with a decreasing trend of forested riparian zone > cropland riparian zone > grassy riparian zone. The soil DEA was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in 0-10 cm in 10-30, 30-50, and 50-70 cm layers. There were significant positive relationships between soil DEA and soil TOC, TN, and NO(3-)-N (P < 0.01). Land use change mainly altered the soil natural structure and soil physical and chemical properties, decreased the accumulation of soil organic carbon, and affected the soil nitrogen transformation, and thus, inhibited the occurrence of riparian soil denitrification.

  4. Geomorphic Assessment of Activity Levels of the Three Strands of North Anatolian Fault Zone in NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürbüz, E.; Gurbuz, A.

    2014-12-01

    The North Anatolian Fault Zone is a narrow zone along a length of ~900 km and width of 10 km between the Karlıova to the east and Dokurcun Valley to the west. The fault zone splays into three strands around the Dokurcun Valley and forms a wide zone with a length of 400 km and width of 100 km. From the Dokurcun Valley, while the northern strand follows a route along the Lake Sapanca, Izmit Gulf, Marmara Sea and Saroz Gulf and connects to the North Aegean Trough, the middle strand tracks Lake Iznik, Gemlik and Bandırma Bays and southern coasts of the Marmara Sea. Although there is not a consensus on where it branches from the main strand, it is generally accepted that it trails a definite route along the Yenişehir, Bursa, Manyas-Karacabey and Yenice basins, and continues towards the Edremit Gulf in the west. Given the slip rates and seismic activities of the last century, the ranking between these three strands show a decrease from north to south. Among these three strands, the northern one offers significant differences with high values compared to the middle and southern strands. The aim of this study is to compare the differences represented by slip rate and seismicity data with morphometric features of the three strands of North Anatolian Fault Zone that controlled by their activities during the Quaternary period. We have calculated the morphometric values for each of the fault strands in the Marmara Region according to geomorphic indices. Our study presents the middle strand, which has represented the lower activity during the instrumental period, has an important sense of activity.

  5. Factors controlling the final depth of active and failed continental rift zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thybo, H.; Elesin, Y.; Artemieva, I. M.

    2012-12-01

    Rift zones are elongated, narrow tectonic depressions in the Earth's surface which with time become filled with sediments and volcanics. Rifting processes may lead to break-up of continental plates to form new oceanic lithosphere. Subsidence of rift basins is caused by thinning of the crust and lithospheric mantle, together with thermal relaxation and isostatic compensation for the extra load of sediments. It is generally believed that the final depth of rift basins is primarily controlled by the amount of stretching. However, we show that the relative rheological strength of faults inside and outside rift zones exerts substantial control on the volume of the final rift basin (by more than a factor of 3) even for the same amount of extension (total or inside the rift zone). This surprising result is mainly caused by irreversible deepening of the rift graben during stretching due to lower crustal flow when the faults in the rift zone are weak, whereas the effect is negligible for strong faults. Relatively strong faults inside the rift zone lead to substantial stretching of adjacent crust, and we find that long term stretching outside the main rift zone may explain the formation of wide continental margins, which are now below sea level. We also demonstrate that fast syn-rift erosion/sedimentation rates can increase the final volume of rift basins by up to a factor of 1.7 for weak crustal faults, whereas this effect is insignificant for strong faults inside the rift zone. These findings have significant implications for estimation of stretching factors, tectonic forces, and geodynamic evolution of sedimentary basins around failed rift zones.

  6. D-amino acid oxidase activity is inhibited by an interaction with bassoon protein at the presynaptic active zone.

    PubMed

    Popiolek, Michael; Ross, John F; Charych, Erik; Chanda, Pranab; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Moss, Stephen J; Brandon, Nicholas J; Pausch, Mark H

    2011-08-19

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable neuropsychiatric disorder affecting ∼1% of the world's population. Linkage and association studies have identified multiple candidate schizophrenia susceptibility genes whose functions converge on the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system. One such susceptibility gene encoding D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), an enzyme that metabolizes the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) co-agonist D-serine, has the potential to modulate NMDAR function in the context of schizophrenia. To further investigate its cellular regulation, we sought to identify DAO-interacting proteins that participate in its functional regulation in rat cerebellum, where DAO expression is especially high. Immunoprecipitation with DAO-specific antibodies and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis of co-precipitated proteins yielded 24 putative DAO-interacting proteins. The most robust interactions occurred with known components of the presynaptic active zone, such as bassoon (BSN) and piccolo (PCLO). The interaction of DAO with BSN was confirmed through co-immunoprecipitation assays using DAO- and BSN-specific antibodies. Moreover, DAO and BSN colocalized with one another in cultured cerebellar granule cells and in synaptic junction membrane protein fractions derived from rat cerebellum. The functional consequences of this interaction were studied through enzyme assay experiments, where DAO enzymatic activity was significantly inhibited as a result of its interaction with BSN. Taking these results together, we hypothesize that synaptic D-serine concentrations may be under tight regulation by a BSN-DAO complex. We therefore predict that this mechanism plays a role in the modulation of glutamatergic signaling through NMDARs. It also furthers our understanding of the biology underlying this potential therapeutic entry point for schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders.

  7. Shoreline changes and its impact on activities in the coastal zone in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, A.; Bendixen, M.; Elberling, B.

    2015-12-01

    shorelines. The shoreline changes were estimated using the digital shoreline analysis system (DSAS) of the USGS. The spatial variability of accumulation and erosion patterns was detected and shows a surprising thread for ancient settlements and present-day activities in the coastal zone. The same patterns are finally discussed in terms of coastal risk assessment.

  8. Faults Activities And Crustal Deformation Along The Arc-Continent Collision Boundary, Eastern Taiwan - Observed From Persistent Scatterer SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Jiun-Yee; Chang, Chung-Pai; Hooper, Andrew; Chang, Yo-Ho; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Chang, Tsui-Yu

    2010-05-01

    Located in the southeastern periphery of the Eurasian plate, eastern Taiwan marks the collional boundary between the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea plate. These two plates converge at about 8 cm/yr near Taiwan and nearly half of the shortening is consumed in eastern Taiwan. There have been many studies in this area about the dynamics of the plate convergence, however, most of the geodetic studies focused on small area (strainmeter), with very few data points (GPS), or only gather data along a specific profile (leveling). We applied the Persistent Scatterer SAR Interferometry in the Longitudinal Valley of eastern Taiwan to observe temporally-variable processes using both ERS and Envisat data. At the same time, leveling and GPS data were measured for the auxiliary tool to verify the deformation rate in this area. Our result indicated that although the area is under active collision, faults do not move in the same fashion along the boundary. In the very northern part of the collided arc, small subsidence has been detected, while in the north-central part very few activity is observed. In the central and southern part of the collisional boundary, patches of faults are moving as rapidly as 15 mm/yr along radar line-of-sight. In addition. between late 2004 and middle 2005 there had been an earthquake swarm consists of shallow earthquakes, which coincided with PSI observation of a large vertical displacement. The comparison between our leveling data and PS results indicated PSI is a reliable tool even in the highly vegetated area in eastern Taiwan.

  9. Exoplanet detection. Stellar activity masquerading as planets in the habitable zone of the M dwarf Gliese 581.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Paul; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Endl, Michael; Roy, Arpita

    2014-07-25

    The M dwarf star Gliese 581 is believed to host four planets, including one (GJ 581d) near the habitable zone that could possibly support liquid water on its surface if it is a rocky planet. The detection of another habitable-zone planet--GJ 581g--is disputed, as its significance depends on the eccentricity assumed for d. Analyzing stellar activity using the Hα line, we measure a stellar rotation period of 130 ± 2 days and a correlation for Hα modulation with radial velocity. Correcting for activity greatly diminishes the signal of GJ 581d (to 1.5 standard deviations) while significantly boosting the signals of the other known super-Earth planets. GJ 581d does not exist, but is an artifact of stellar activity which, when incompletely corrected, causes the false detection of planet g.

  10. Present-day submarine hydrothermal activity in the Taupo-Rotorua Zone (Bay of Plenty, New Zealand)

    SciTech Connect

    Osipenko, A.B.; Egorov, Yu.O.; Fazlullin, S.M.; Gavrilenko, G.M.; Shul`kin, V.I.; Chertkova, L.V.

    1994-09-01

    We made detailed descriptions of the structure and material composition of sedimentary and water columns in the vicinity of active submarine hydrothermal activity in the southern part of the Bay of Plenty (North Island, New Zealand). Geophysical methods revealed that the hydrothermal system is confined to a tectonically distinct zone with a sedimentary cover characterized by complex structure. Chemical and mineralogical investigations confirmed that the activity of underwater vents exerts no substantial regional influence on the composition and features of ore mineralization in these formations. It is shown that essentially hydrothermal formations distinguishable within areas of otherwise monotypic sediments directly coincide with zones of hydrothermal discharge in the ocean floor. The absence of pronounced hydrothermal anomalies, together with the presence of {open_quotes}tongues{close_quotes} of anomalous concentrations of water-soluble gases suggests that the discharges are primarily hydrothermal in character.

  11. Exoplanet detection. Stellar activity masquerading as planets in the habitable zone of the M dwarf Gliese 581.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Paul; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Endl, Michael; Roy, Arpita

    2014-07-25

    The M dwarf star Gliese 581 is believed to host four planets, including one (GJ 581d) near the habitable zone that could possibly support liquid water on its surface if it is a rocky planet. The detection of another habitable-zone planet--GJ 581g--is disputed, as its significance depends on the eccentricity assumed for d. Analyzing stellar activity using the Hα line, we measure a stellar rotation period of 130 ± 2 days and a correlation for Hα modulation with radial velocity. Correcting for activity greatly diminishes the signal of GJ 581d (to 1.5 standard deviations) while significantly boosting the signals of the other known super-Earth planets. GJ 581d does not exist, but is an artifact of stellar activity which, when incompletely corrected, causes the false detection of planet g. PMID:24993348

  12. The morphology of an active zone near Enceladus' south pole and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Bernd; Helfenstein, Paul; Thomas, Peter C.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Perry, Jason; Wagner, Roland; Neukum, Gerhard; Porco, Carolyn C.

    2010-05-01

    On Cassini's 121st orbit, the onboard ISS camera acquired high-resolution (15-30 m/pxl) images in Enceladus' south polar province. The imaging sequence was specifically designed to study one of the source regions of Enceladus' erupting plumes, Baghdad Sulcus. To facilitate the analysis, we derived a digital elevation model in an active section (76°S/323°E) across Baghdad Sulcus. The model reveals that there is a V-shaped trough up to 500 m deep in the center of this section, with flanking slopes of 30° (SW-facing) and > 32° (NE-facing, this slope is in shadow). The slopes do approach angle of repose, but the morphology on the SW slope (blocky terrain with lineation patterns and even benches at angles to the maximum slope) suggests that this is not a slope undergoing angle-of-repose control. The trough, therefore, may owe its shape primarily to faulting, with only some modification by deposition of icy particles by the plume-forming gas. Blocky covering, which includes block sizes of up to 50 m, is not restricted to the trough but also occurs at about the same size and frequency distribution away from it. This suggests that the blocks are not related to the venting process, which concentrates in the trough. Rather, the association of the blocky surfaces with multiple patterns of lineations (presumably fractures and faults) suggests they are outcrops of fault-related ice blocks or lithified detritus undergoing some form of erosion. A potential erosion process may include seismic shaking. The V-shaped trough is partly accompanied by an elevated flanking ridge, which is indicative for rift zones and hints at an extensional origin of Baghdad Sulcus. Alternatively, fault-block rotation at large strains could have led to the elevated ridge.

  13. The Active and Periactive Zone Organization and the Functional Properties of Small and Large Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Raquel; Tabares, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    The arrival of an action potential (AP) at a synaptic terminal elicits highly synchronized quanta release. Repetitive APs produce successive synaptic vesicle (SV) fusions that require management of spent SV components in the presynaptic membrane with minimum disturbance of the secretory apparatus. To this end, the synaptic machinery is structured accordingly to the strength and the range of frequencies at which each particular synapse operates. This results in variations in the number and dimension of Active Zones (AZs), amount and distribution of SVs, and probably, in the primary endocytic mechanisms they use. Understanding better how these structural differences determine the functional response in each case has been a matter of long-term interest. Here we review the structural and functional properties of three distinct types of synapses: the neuromuscular junction (NMJ; a giant, highly reliable synapse that must exocytose a large number of quanta with each stimulus to guarantee excitation of the postsynaptic cell), the hippocampal excitatory small synapse (which most often has a single release site and a relatively small pool of vesicles), and the cerebellar mossy fiber-granule cell synapse (which possesses hundreds of release sites and is able to translocate, dock and prime vesicles at high speed). We will focus on how the release apparatus is organized in each case, the relative amount of vesicular membrane that needs to be accommodated within the periAZ upon stimulation, the different mechanisms for retrieving the excess of membrane and finally, how these factors may influence the functioning of the release sites. PMID:27252645

  14. Strain localization in ultramylonitic marbles by simultaneous activation of dislocation motion and grain boundary sliding (Syros, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, A.; White, J. C.; Grasemann, B.

    2016-03-01

    Extreme strain localization occurred in the centre of the cross-cutting element of a flanking structure in almost pure calcite marbles from Syros, Greece. At the maximum displacement of 120 cm along the cross-cutting element, evidence of grain size sensitive deformation mechanisms can be found in the ultramylonitic marbles, which are characterized by (1) an extremely small grain size ( ˜ 3 µm), (2) grain boundary triple junctions with nearly 120° angles, (3) a weak crystallographic preferred orientation with very low texture index (J = 1.4), (4) a random misorientation angle distribution curve and (5) the presence of small cavities. Using transmission electron microscopy, a deformation sequence is observed comprising recrystallization dominantly by bulging, resulting in the development of the fine-grained ultramylonite followed by the development of a high dislocation density ( ˜ 1013 m-2) with ongoing deformation of the fine-grained ultramylonite. The arrangement of dislocations in the extremely fine-grain-sized calcite differs from microstructures created by classical dislocation creep mediated by combined glide and thermally activated climb. Instead, it exhibits extensive glide and dislocation networks characteristic of recovery accommodated by cross-slip and network-assisted dislocation movement without formation of idealized subgrain walls. The enabling of grain boundary sliding to dislocation activity is deemed central to initiating and sustaining strain softening and is argued to be an important strain localization process in calcite rocks, even at a high strain rate ( ˜ 10-9 s-1) and low temperature (300 °C).

  15. Strain localization in ultramylonitic marbles by simultaneous activation of dislocation motion and grain boundary sliding (Syros, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, A.; White, J. C.; Grasemann, B.

    2015-09-01

    Extreme strain localization occurred in the center of the cross-cutting element of a flanking structure in almost pure calcite marbles from Syros, Greece. At the maximum displacement of 120 cm along the cross-cutting element evidence of grain size sensitive deformation mechanisms can be found in the ultramylonitic marbles, which are characterized by (1) an extremely small grain size (∼3 μm), (2) grain boundary triple junctions with nearly 120° angles, (3) a weak crystallographic preferred orientation with very low texture index (J=1.4), (4) a random misorientation angle distribution curve and (5) the presence of small cavities. Using transmission electron microscopy a deformation sequence is observed comprising, first recrystallization by bulging resulting in the development of the fine-grained ultramylonite followed by the evolution of a high dislocation density (∼1013 m-2) with ongoing deformation of the fine-grained ultramylonite. The arrangement of dislocations in the extremely fine grain sized calcite differs from microstructures created by classical dislocation creep mediated by combined glide and thermally activated climb. Instead, it exhibits extensive glide and dislocation networks characteristic of recovery accommodated by cross-slip and network-assisted dislocation movement without formation of idealized subgrain walls. The enabling of grain boundary sliding to dislocation activity is deemed central to initiating and sustaining strain softening and is argued to be an important strain localization process in calcite rocks, even at high strain rate (10-9 s-1) and low temperature (300 °C).

  16. Microbial abundance and activities in relation to water potential in the vadose zones of arid and semiarid sites.

    PubMed

    Kieft, T L; Amy, P S; Brockman, F J; Fredrickson, J K; Bjornstad, B N; Rosacker, L L

    1993-07-01

    Numbers and activities of microorganisms were measured in the vadose zones of three arid and semiarid areas of the western United States, and the influence of water availability was determined. These low-moisture environments have vadose zones that are commonly hundreds of meters thick. The specific sampling locations chosen were on or near U.S. Department of Energy facilities: the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and the Hanford Site (HS) in southcentral Washington State. Most of the sampling locations were uncontaminated, but geologically representative of nearby locations with storage and/or leakage of waste compounds in the vadose zone. Lithologies of samples included volcanic tuff, basalt, glaciofluvial and fluvial sediments, and paleosols (buried soils). Samples were collected aseptically, either by drilling bore-holes (INEL and HS), or by excavation within tunnels (NTS) and outcrop faces (paleosols near the HS). Total numbers of microorganisms were counted using direct microscopy, and numbers of culturable microorganisms were determined using plate-count methods. Desiccation-tolerant microorganisms were quantified by plate counts performed after 24 h desiccation of the samples. Mineralization of (14)C-labeled glucose and acetate was quantified in samples at their ambient moisture contents, in dried samples, and in moistened samples, to test the hypothesis that water limits microbial activities in vadose zones. Total numbers of microorganisms ranged from log 4.5 to 7.1 cells g(-1) dry wt. Culturable counts ranged from log <2 to 6.7 CFU g(-1) dry wt, with the highest densities occurring in paleosol (buried soil) samples. Culturable cells appeared to be desiccation-tolerant in nearly all samples that had detectable viable heterotrophs. Water limited mineralization in some, but not all samples, suggesting that an inorganic nutrient or other factor may limit microbial activities in some vadose zone environments.

  17. Aftershocks illuninate the 2011 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake causative fault zone and nearby active faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, Jr., J. Wright; Shah, Anjana K.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Snyder, Stephen L.; Carter, Aina M

    2015-01-01

    Deployment of temporary seismic stations after the 2011 Mineral, Virginia (USA), earthquake produced a well-recorded aftershock sequence. The majority of aftershocks are in a tabular cluster that delineates the previously unknown Quail fault zone. Quail fault zone aftershocks range from ~3 to 8 km in depth and are in a 1-km-thick zone striking ~036° and dipping ~50°SE, consistent with a 028°, 50°SE main-shock nodal plane having mostly reverse slip. This cluster extends ~10 km along strike. The Quail fault zone projects to the surface in gneiss of the Ordovician Chopawamsic Formation just southeast of the Ordovician–Silurian Ellisville Granodiorite pluton tail. The following three clusters of shallow (<3 km) aftershocks illuminate other faults. (1) An elongate cluster of early aftershocks, ~10 km east of the Quail fault zone, extends 8 km from Fredericks Hall, strikes ~035°–039°, and appears to be roughly vertical. The Fredericks Hall fault may be a strand or splay of the older Lakeside fault zone, which to the south spans a width of several kilometers. (2) A cluster of later aftershocks ~3 km northeast of Cuckoo delineates a fault near the eastern contact of the Ordovician Quantico Formation. (3) An elongate cluster of late aftershocks ~1 km northwest of the Quail fault zone aftershock cluster delineates the northwest fault (described herein), which is temporally distinct, dips more steeply, and has a more northeastward strike. Some aftershock-illuminated faults coincide with preexisting units or structures evident from radiometric anomalies, suggesting tectonic inheritance or reactivation.

  18. Structural and thermal control of seismic activity and megathrust rupture dynamics in subduction zones: Lessons from the Mw 9.0, 2011 Tohoku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satriano, Claudio; Dionicio, Viviana; Miyake, Hiroe; Uchida, Naoki; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Bernard, Pascal

    2014-10-01

    The 2011 Tohoku megathrust earthquake ruptured a vast region of the northeast Japan Trench subduction zone in a way that had not been enough anticipated by earthquake and tsunami risk scenarios. We analyzed the Tohoku rupture combining high-frequency back-projection analysis with low frequency kinematic inversion of the co-seismic slip. Results support the to-day well-accepted broadband characteristics of this earthquake. Most of the seismic moment is released during the first 100 s, with large co-seismic slip (up to 55 m) offshore Miyagi in a compact region on the landward side of the trench. Coherent high-frequency radiation areas and relatively low co-seismic slip are a distinctive signature of the slab-mantle interface. The broadband characteristics of the Tohoku rupture are interpreted, integrating the seismic activity and structure information on the NE Japan forearc region, as a signature of along-dip segmentation and segment interactions, that result from thermal structure, plate geometry, material composition and fracture heterogeneities along the plate boundary interface. Deep mantle corner flow and low dehydration rates along the cold subduction slab interface lead to an extended seismogenic slab-mantle interface, with strong bi-material contrast controlling larger propagation distance in the downdip preferred rupture direction. Off Miyagi, plate bending below the mantle wedge, ∼142.3°E at ∼25 km depth, is associated with the eastern limit of the deep M7-8-class thrust-earthquakes, and of the strongest coherent high-frequency generation areas. The region of the slab-crust interface between the mantle wedge limit, ∼142.7°E at ∼20 km depth, and a trenchward plate bending, ∼143.2°E at ∼15 km, acted as an effective barrier resisting for many centuries to stress-loading gradient induced by deep stable sliding and large earthquakes along the slab-mantle interface. The 2011 Tohoku earthquake, whose hypocenter is located on the east side of the

  19. Variscan terrane boundaries in the Odenwald-Spessart basement, Mid-German Crystalline Zone: New evidence from ocean ridge, intraplate and arc-derived metabasaltic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, T. M.; Lee, S.-H.; Schmädicke, E.; Frimmel, H. E.; Okrusch, M.

    2015-04-01

    The Mid-German Crystalline Zone is part of a large Variscan suture and consists of various basement complexes that are exposed in central Germany. New lithogeochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data obtained on various amphibolites from the Odenwald-Spessart basement show that their protoliths formed in different tectonic settings and were subsequently incorporated into a subduction zone prior to Variscan continental collision. Metabasic rocks from the northernmost Spessart and the western Odenwald are geochemically almost identical and their protoliths are interpreted to have formed in an extensional, possibly, a back-arc setting. The tholeiitic and calc-alkaline rocks have intermediate TiO2 concentrations and high Th/Nb ratios, typical of volcanic arc-type and/or subduction-fluid modified rocks. The Nd initial ratios are depleted (εNd330 Ma = 5.0-5.8) and Nd model ages range from 660 to 610 Ma, which points at juvenile crustal addition towards the end of the Neoproterozoic. The samples define a linear array in 206Pb/204Pb versus 207Pb/204Pb space. In contrast, the protoliths of the metabasic rocks from the southern and central Spessart formed either in an intraplate oceanic island or a continental arc setting. The alkaline intraplate rocks from the southern Spessart basement are very TiO2-rich and have very low Th/Nb ratios. The rocks have weakly depleted Nd initals (εNd330 Ma = 2.6-3.3) and Nd model ages between 870 and 810 Ma. In contrast, the central Spessart within-plate rocks have considerably lower TiO2 concentrations but higher Th/Nb ratios. In addition, these rocks are isotopically enriched (εNd330 Ma = - 13.1 to - 9.5) and have Palaeoproterozoic Nd model ages. The continental arc rocks from the central and southern Spessart basement have low TiO2 concentrations and variable Th/Nb ratios. Mostly negative Nd initials (εNd330 Ma = - 2.6 to + 0.9) and late Mesoproterozoic Nd model ages indicate that recycling of older crust or mixing of crustal components of

  20. More Active Living–oriented County and Municipal Zoning is Associated with Increased Adult Leisure Time Physical Activity—United States, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Chriqui, Jamie F.; Nicholson, Lisa M.; Thrun, Emily; Leider, Julien; Slater, Sandy J.

    2016-01-01

    Although zoning is recognized for its role in facilitating healthy communities, no study has examined whether active living-oriented zoning codes are associated with adult leisure time physical activity (PA). This study sought to fill this gap and hypothesized that adult leisure time PA would be greater in communities with more progressive zoning code reforms and more active living-oriented zoning. Zoning codes for 1,617 county and municipal jurisdictions located in 30 states (covering ~40% of the U.S. population) were evaluated for code reform zoning and 11 active living markers. County-aggregated zoning measures were created for linking with five adult PA behaviors obtained from the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System controlling for individual and county sociodemographics. Zoning elements most associated with adult PA included requirements for mixed use, active and passive recreation, bike parking/street furniture, and bike-pedestrian trails/paths. This study provides new insights as to the role that zoning can play in facilitating adult PA. PMID:27587898

  1. Active interrogation of plasma-liquid boundary using 2D plasma-in-liquid apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Janis; Foster, John

    2015-09-01

    Plasma medicine and plasma-based water purification technologies rely on the production and transport of plasma-derived (direct or indirect) reactive species into the bulk medium. This interaction takes place at the interface between the gas phase plasma and the liquid medium. The nature of radical production and subsequent radical transport from this region or boundary layer is not well understood due to the difficulty of implementing diagnostics to interrogate this region. We present a 2-D plasma-in-liquid water apparatus that makes the interface region assessable to optical diagnostics. Using colorimetric chemical probes, acidification and oxidation fronts are tracked using high-speed imaging and spectroscopy. Additionally, observed, plasma-induced fluid dynamical effects are also discussed. Forces at the interface can play a key role in the transport of radicals into the bulk solution. The role of plasma-driven interfacial forces as well as that of the applied, local electric field on chemical front propagation velocity and induced circulation are also discussed. Supported by grants NSF CBET 1336375 and DOE DE-SC0001939.

  2. Sounds of marine seeps: a study of bubble activity near a rigid boundary.

    PubMed

    Maksimov, A O; Burov, B A; Salomatin, A S; Chernykh, D V

    2014-09-01

    A passive acoustic method for detecting environmentally dangerous gas leaks from pipelines and methane naturally leaking from the seabed has been investigated. Gas escape involves the formation and release of bubbles of different sizes. Each bubble emits a sound at a specific frequency. Determination of the bubble radius from the frequency of its signature passive acoustic emission by use of so-called Minnaert formula has a restricted area of applicability near the seabed. The point is that the inertial mass and the damping constant of the birthing bubble are markedly different from those of a free bubble. The theoretical model for the bubble volume oscillations near the seabed has been proposed and an analytical solution has been derived. It was shown that the bispherical coordinates provide separation of variables and are more suitable for analysis of the volume oscillations of these constrained bubbles. Explicit formulas have been derived, which describe the dependence of the bubble emission near a rigid wall on its size and the separation distance between the bubble and the boundary. PMID:25190382

  3. [Impacts of root-zone hypoxia stress on muskmelon growth, its root respiratory metabolism, and antioxidative enzyme activities].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Ling; Li, Tian-Lai; Sun, Zhou-Ping; Chen, Ya-Dong

    2010-06-01

    By using aeroponics culture system, this paper studied the impacts of root-zone hypoxia (10% O2 and 5% O2) stress on the plant growth, root respiratory metabolism, and antioxidative enzyme activities of muskmelon at its fruit development stage. Root-zone hypoxia stress inhibited the plant growth of muskmelon, resulting in the decrease of plant height, root length, and fresh and dry biomass. Comparing with the control (21% O2), hypoxia stress reduced the root respiration rate and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity significantly, and the impact of 5% O2 stress was more serious than that of 10% O2 stress. Under hypoxic conditions, the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) activities and the malondialdehyde (MDA) content were significantly higher than the control. The increment of antioxidative enzyme activities under 10% O2 stress was significantly higher than that under 5% O2 stress, while the MDA content was higher under 5% O2 stress than under 10% O2 stress, suggesting that when the root-zone oxygen concentration was below 10%, the aerobic respiration of muskmelon at its fruit development stage was obviously inhibited while the anaerobic respiration was accelerated, and the root antioxidative enzymes induced defense reaction. With the increasing duration of hypoxic stress, the lipid peroxidation would be aggravated, resulting in the damages on muskmelon roots, inhibition of plant growth, and decrease of fruit yield and quality. PMID:20873618

  4. [Impacts of root-zone hypoxia stress on muskmelon growth, its root respiratory metabolism, and antioxidative enzyme activities].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Ling; Li, Tian-Lai; Sun, Zhou-Ping; Chen, Ya-Dong

    2010-06-01

    By using aeroponics culture system, this paper studied the impacts of root-zone hypoxia (10% O2 and 5% O2) stress on the plant growth, root respiratory metabolism, and antioxidative enzyme activities of muskmelon at its fruit development stage. Root-zone hypoxia stress inhibited the plant growth of muskmelon, resulting in the decrease of plant height, root length, and fresh and dry biomass. Comparing with the control (21% O2), hypoxia stress reduced the root respiration rate and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity significantly, and the impact of 5% O2 stress was more serious than that of 10% O2 stress. Under hypoxic conditions, the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) activities and the malondialdehyde (MDA) content were significantly higher than the control. The increment of antioxidative enzyme activities under 10% O2 stress was significantly higher than that under 5% O2 stress, while the MDA content was higher under 5% O2 stress than under 10% O2 stress, suggesting that when the root-zone oxygen concentration was below 10%, the aerobic respiration of muskmelon at its fruit development stage was obviously inhibited while the anaerobic respiration was accelerated, and the root antioxidative enzymes induced defense reaction. With the increasing duration of hypoxic stress, the lipid peroxidation would be aggravated, resulting in the damages on muskmelon roots, inhibition of plant growth, and decrease of fruit yield and quality.

  5. Boundary Crossing and Boundary Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akkerman, Sanne F.; Bakker, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Diversity and mobility in education and work present a paramount challenge that needs better conceptualization in educational theory. This challenge has been addressed by educational scholars with the notion of "boundaries", particularly by the concepts of "boundary crossing" and "boundary objects". Although studies on boundary crossing and…

  6. Boundary issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Alan R.; Porder, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    -centric boundary (Filippelli 2008, Handoh and Lenton 2003). However, human alteration of the P cycle has multiple potential boundaries (figure 1), including P-driven freshwater eutrophication (Smith and Schindler 2009), the potential for world P supply to place an ultimate limit on food production (Smil 2000, Childers et al 2011), and depletion of soil P stocks in some world regions (MacDonald et al 2011). Carpenter and Bennett revisit the P boundary from the freshwater eutrophication perspective. Given the extraordinary variation in freshwater ecosystems across the globe, this is a challenging task, but the authors strengthen their analysis by using three different boundaries with relevance to eutrophication, along with two water quality targets and a range of estimates of P flow to the sea. In doing so, they make a compelling case that if freshwater eutrophication is indeed a Rubicon, we have already crossed it. Importantly, Carpenter and Bennett go beyond the calculation of new boundaries to make broader points about humanity's relationship with the P cycle. Disruptions of both the P and N cycles are mostly about our need for food (Galloway et al 2008, Cordell et al 2009), but unlike N, P supplies are finite and irreplaceable. Environmental concerns aside, we can fix all the N2 from the atmosphere we want—but deplete our economically viable P reserves and we're in trouble. Figure 1 Figure 1. Human alteration of the global P cycle has multiple possible boundaries. These include the environmental risks posed by freshwater eutrophication and marine anoxic events, and the food security risks that come from depletion of soil P stocks in some world regions, as well as finite global supplies of high-value mineral P reserves. Photo credits beyond authors: upper left, Shelby Riskin; upper right, Pedro Sanchez. In effect, Carpenter and Bennett argue that among P's multiple boundaries, the one for freshwaters is less forgiving of our current activities (but no less important) than is

  7. Map showing lava-flow hazard zones, Island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Thomas L.; Chun, Jon Y.F.; Exposo, Jean; Heliker, Christina; Hodge, Jon; Lockwood, John P.; Vogt, Susan M.

    1992-01-01

    This map shows lava-flow hazard zones for the five volcanoes on the Island of Hawaii. Volcano boundaries are shown as heavy, dark bands, reflecting the overlapping of lava flows from adjacent volcanoes along their common boundary. Hazard-zone boundaries are drawn as double lines because of the geologic uncertainty in their placement. Most boundaries are gradational, and the change In the degree of hazard can be found over a distance of a mile or more. The general principles used to place hazard-zone boundaries are discussed by Mullineaux and others (1987) and Heliker (1990). The differences between the boundaries presented here and in Heliker (1990) reflect new data used in the compilation of a geologic map for the Island of Hawaii (E.W. Wolfe and Jean Morris, unpub. data, 1989). The primary source of information for volcano boundaries and generalized ages of lava flows for all five volcanoes on the Island of Hawaii is the geologic map of Hawaii (E.W. Wolfe and Jean Morris, unpub. data, 1989). More detailed information is available for the three active volcanoes. For Hualalai, see Moore and others (1987) and Moore and Clague (1991); for Mauna Loa, see Lockwood and Lipman (1987); and for Kilauea, see Holcomb (1987) and Moore and Trusdell (1991).

  8. Water at Biological Phase Boundaries: Its Role in Interfacial Activation of Enzymes and Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Many life-sustaining activities in living cells occur at the membrane-water interface. The pertinent questions that we need to ask are, what are the evolutionary reasons in biology for choosing the membrane-water interface as the site for performing and/or controlling crucial biological reactions, and what is the key physical principle that is very singular to the membrane-water interface that biology exploits for regulating metabolic processes in cells? In this chapter, a hypothesis is developed, which espouses that cells control activities of membrane-bound enzymes through manipulation of the thermodynamic activity of water in the lipid-water interfacial region. The hypothesis is based on the fact that the surface pressure of a lipid monolayer is a direct measure of the thermodynamic activity of water at the lipid-water interface. Accordingly, the surface pressure-dependent activation or inactivation of interfacial enzymes is directly related to changes in the thermodynamic activity of interfacial water. Extension of this argument suggests that cells may manipulate conformations (and activities) of membrane-bound enzymes by manipulating the (re)activity of interfacial water at various locations in the membrane by localized compression or expansion of the interface. In this respect, cells may use the membrane-bound hormone receptors, lipid phase transition, and local variations in membrane lipid composition as effectors of local compression and/or expansion of membrane, and thereby local water activity. Several experimental data in the literature will be reexamined in the light of this hypothesis.

  9. Cascading ecohydrological transitions: Multiple changes in vegetation and hydrology over the past 500 years for a semiarid forest/woodland boundary zone in New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Craig D.

    2010-05-01

    On decadal and centennial time scales, multiple drivers can cause substantial changes in vegetation cover, which can trigger associated changes in runoff and erosion patterns and processes, with consequent feedbacks to the vegetation - cumulatively this can lead to a cascading series of non-equilibrial ecosystem changes through time. The work reported here provides a relatively detailed 500-year perspective of such changes on the mesas the eastern Jemez Mountains in northern New Mexico (USA), which today exhibit vegetation transitions along an elevational gradient between semiarid ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests, mixed woodlands dominated by piñon (Pinus edulis) and one-seed juniper (Juniperus monosperma), and juniper savannas. Using multiple lines of evidence, a history of major ecosystem changes since ca. 1500 A.D. is reconstructed for a dynamic transition zone on one such mesa (Frijolito Mesa). Evidence includes intensive archaeological surveys, dendrochronological reconstructions of the demographic and spatial patterns of establishment and mortality for these three main tree species, dendrochronological reconstructions of fire regimes and climate patterns, broad-scale mapping of vegetation changes from historic aerial photographs since 1935, monitoring of vegetation from permanent transects since 1991, detailed soil maps and interpretations, intensive ecohydrological studies since 1993 on portions of this mesa, and research on the ecosystem effects of an experimental tree-thinning experiment conducted in 1997. Frijolito Mesa was fully occupied by large numbers of Native American farmers from the A.D. 1200's until the late 1500's, when they left these mesas for settlements in the adjoining Rio Grande Valley. Archaeological evidence and tree ages indicate that the mesa was likely quite deforested when abandoned, followed by episodic tree establishment dominated by ponderosa pine during the Little Ice Age. By the late 1700's Frijolito Mesa included

  10. Noncyclic Notch activity in the presomitic mesoderm demonstrates uncoupling of somite compartmentalization and boundary formation

    PubMed Central

    Feller, Juliane; Schneider, Andre; Schuster-Gossler, Karin; Gossler, Achim

    2008-01-01

    To test the significance of cyclic Notch activity for somite formation in mice, we analyzed embryos expressing activated Notch (NICD) throughout the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Embryos expressing NICD formed up to 18 somites. Expression in the PSM of Hes7, Lfng, and Spry2 was no longer cyclic, whereas Axin2 was expressed dynamically. NICD expression led to caudalization of somites, and loss of Notch activity to their rostralization. Thus, segmentation and anterior–posterior somite patterning can be uncoupled, differential Notch signaling is not required to form segment borders, and Notch is unlikely to be the pacemaker of the segmentation clock. PMID:18708576

  11. Functional inactivation of a fraction of excitatory synapses in mice deficient for the active zone protein bassoon.

    PubMed

    Altrock, Wilko D; tom Dieck, Susanne; Sokolov, Maxim; Meyer, Alexander C; Sigler, Albrecht; Brakebusch, Cord; Fässler, Reinhard; Richter, Karin; Boeckers, Tobias M; Potschka, Heidrun; Brandt, Claudia; Löscher, Wolfgang; Grimberg, Dörte; Dresbach, Thomas; Hempelmann, Anne; Hassan, Hadir; Balschun, Detlef; Frey, Julietta U; Brandstätter, Johann H; Garner, Craig C; Rosenmund, Christian; Gundelfinger, Eckart D

    2003-03-01

    Mutant mice lacking the central region of the presynaptic active zone protein Bassoon were generated to establish the role of this protein in the assembly and function of active zones as sites of synaptic vesicle docking and fusion. Our data show that the loss of Bassoon causes a reduction in normal synaptic transmission, which can be attributed to the inactivation of a significant fraction of glutamatergic synapses. At these synapses, vesicles are clustered and docked in normal numbers but are unable to fuse. Phenotypically, the loss of Bassoon causes spontaneous epileptic seizures. These data show that Bassoon is not essential for synapse formation but plays an essential role in the regulated neurotransmitter release from a subset of glutamatergic synapses.

  12. Optimizing the growth process of the active zone in GaN based laser structures for the long wavelength region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossow, U.; Kruse, A.; Jönen, H.; Hoffmann, L.; Ketzer, F.; Langer, T.; Buss, R.; Bremers, H.; Hangleiter, A.; Mehrtens, T.; Schowalter, M.; Rosenauer, A.

    2013-05-01

    InxGaN/GaN quantum well (QW) structures grown on c-plane surfaces for long wavelength laser structures have been investigated. We found that temperature ramping in the barriers improves the layer structure in avoiding V-pit formation and improves the homogeneity of indium incorporation. In choosing proper temperature profiles degradation of the QWs can be avoided. We demonstrate optical gain for wavelengths larger than 500 nm using structures with an active zone grown in such way.

  13. The active zone protein family ELKS supports Ca2+ influx at nerve terminals of inhibitory hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changliang; Bickford, Lydia S; Held, Richard G; Nyitrai, Hajnalka; Südhof, Thomas C; Kaeser, Pascal S

    2014-09-10

    In a presynaptic nerve terminal, synaptic vesicle exocytosis is restricted to specialized sites called active zones. At these sites, neurotransmitter release is determined by the number of releasable vesicles and their probability of release. Proteins at the active zone set these parameters by controlling the presynaptic Ca(2+) signal, and through docking and priming of synaptic vesicles. Vertebrate ELKS proteins are enriched at presynaptic active zones, but their functions are not well understood. ELKS proteins are produced by two genes in vertebrates, and each gene contributes ∼50% to total brain ELKS. We generated knock-out mice for ELKS1 and found that its constitutive removal causes lethality. To bypass lethality, and to circumvent redundancy between ELKS1 and ELKS2 in synaptic transmission, we used a conditional genetic approach to remove both genes in cultured hippocampal neurons after synapses are established. Simultaneous removal of ELKS1 and ELKS2 resulted in a 50% decrease of neurotransmitter release at inhibitory synapses, paralleled by a reduction in release probability. Removal of ELKS did not affect synapse numbers or their electron microscopic appearance. Using Ca(2+) imaging, we found that loss of ELKS caused a 30% reduction in single action potential-triggered Ca(2+) influx in inhibitory nerve terminals, consistent with the deficits in synaptic transmission and release probability. Unlike deletion of the active zone proteins RIM, RIM-BP, or bruchpilot, ELKS removal did not lead to a measurable reduction in presynaptic Ca(2+) channel levels. Our results reveal that ELKS is required for normal Ca(2+) influx at nerve terminals of inhibitory hippocampal neurons.

  14. The Active Zone Protein Family ELKS Supports Ca2+ Influx at Nerve Terminals of Inhibitory Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changliang; Bickford, Lydia S.; Held, Richard G.; Nyitrai, Hajnalka

    2014-01-01

    In a presynaptic nerve terminal, synaptic vesicle exocytosis is restricted to specialized sites called active zones. At these sites, neurotransmitter release is determined by the number of releasable vesicles and their probability of release. Proteins at the active zone set these parameters by controlling the presynaptic Ca2+ signal, and through docking and priming of synaptic vesicles. Vertebrate ELKS proteins are enriched at presynaptic active zones, but their functions are not well understood. ELKS proteins are produced by two genes in vertebrates, and each gene contributes ∼50% to total brain ELKS. We generated knock-out mice for ELKS1 and found that its constitutive removal causes lethality. To bypass lethality, and to circumvent redundancy between ELKS1 and ELKS2 in synaptic transmission, we used a conditional genetic approach to remove both genes in cultured hippocampal neurons after synapses are established. Simultaneous removal of ELKS1 and ELKS2 resulted in a 50% decrease of neurotransmitter release at inhibitory synapses, paralleled by a reduction in release probability. Removal of ELKS did not affect synapse numbers or their electron microscopic appearance. Using Ca2+ imaging, we found that loss of ELKS caused a 30% reduction in single action potential-triggered Ca2+ influx in inhibitory nerve terminals, consistent with the deficits in synaptic transmission and release probability. Unlike deletion of the active zone proteins RIM, RIM-BP, or bruchpilot, ELKS removal did not lead to a measurable reduction in presynaptic Ca2+ channel levels. Our results reveal that ELKS is required for normal Ca2+ influx at nerve terminals of inhibitory hippocampal neurons. PMID:25209271

  15. EVOLUTION OF WARPED ACCRETION DISKS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. I. ROLES OF FEEDING AT THE OUTER BOUNDARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan-Rong; Wang, Jian-Min; Cheng, Cheng; Qiu, Jie

    2013-02-10

    We investigate the alignment processes of spinning black holes and their surrounding warped accretion disks in a frame of two different types of feeding at the outer boundaries. We consider (1) fixed flows in which gas is continually fed with a preferred angular momentum, and (2) free flows in which there is no gas supply and the disks diffuse freely at their outer edges. As expected, we find that for the cases of fixed flows the black hole disk systems always align on timescales of several 10{sup 6} yr, irrespective of the initial inclinations. If the initial inclination angles are larger than {pi}/2, the black hole accretion transits from retrograde to prograde fashion, and the accreted mass onto the black holes during these two phases is comparable. On the other hand, for the cases of free flows, both alignments and anti-alignments can occur, depending on the initial inclinations and the ratios of the angular momentum of the disks to that of the black holes. In such cases, the disks will be consumed within timescales of 10{sup 6} yr by black holes accreting at the Eddington limit. We propose that there is a close connection between the black hole spin and the lifetime for which the feeding persists, which determines the observable episodic lifetimes of active galactic nuclei. We conclude that careful inclusion of the disk feeding at the outer boundaries is crucial for modeling the evolution of the black hole spin.

  16. Long-time atomistic evolution of grain boundary in nickel using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Sami; Trochet, Mickaël; Restrepo, Oscar; Mousseau, Normand

    The microscopic mechanisms associated with the evolution of metallic materials are still a matter of debate as both experimental and numerical approaches fail to provide a detailed atomic picture of their time evolution. Here, we use the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an unbiased off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building to overcome these limitations and follow the atomistic evolution of a 10.000-atom grain boundary Ni system over macroscopic time scales. We first characterize the kinetic properties of four different empirical potentials, the embedded atom method (EAM), the first and second modified embedded atom method (MEAM1NN and MEAM2NN respectively) and the Reax force field (ReaxFF) potentials. Comparing the energetics, the elastic effects and the diffusion mechanisms for systems with one to three vacancies and one to three self-interstitials in nickel simulated over second time scale, we conclude that ReaxFF and EAM potentials are closest to experimental values. We then proceed to study the long-time evolution of a grain boundary with the Reax forcefield and to offer a detailed description of its energy landscape, including the exact description of short and long-range effects on self-diffusion along the interface

  17. Bruchpilot and Synaptotagmin collaborate to drive rapid glutamate release and active zone differentiation.

    PubMed

    Paul, Mila M; Pauli, Martin; Ehmann, Nadine; Hallermann, Stefan; Sauer, Markus; Kittel, Robert J; Heckmann, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The active zone (AZ) protein Bruchpilot (Brp) is essential for rapid glutamate release at Drosophila melanogaster neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Quantal time course and measurements of action potential-waveform suggest that presynaptic fusion mechanisms are altered in brp null mutants (brp(69) ). This could account for their increased evoked excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) delay and rise time (by about 1 ms). To test the mechanism of release protraction at brp(69) AZs, we performed knock-down of Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt) via RNAi (syt(KD) ) in wildtype (wt), brp(69) and rab3 null mutants (rab3(rup) ), where Brp is concentrated at a small number of AZs. At wt and rab3(rup) synapses, syt(KD) lowered EPSC amplitude while increasing rise time and delay, consistent with the role of Syt as a release sensor. In contrast, syt(KD) did not alter EPSC amplitude at brp(69) synapses, but shortened delay and rise time. In fact, following syt(KD) , these kinetic properties were strikingly similar in wt and brp(69) , which supports the notion that Syt protracts release at brp(69) synapses. To gain insight into this surprising role of Syt at brp(69) AZs, we analyzed the structural and functional differentiation of synaptic boutons at the NMJ. At 'tonic' type Ib motor neurons, distal boutons contain more AZs, more Brp proteins per AZ and show elevated and accelerated glutamate release compared to proximal boutons. The functional differentiation between proximal and distal boutons is Brp-dependent and reduced after syt(KD) . Notably, syt(KD) boutons are smaller, contain fewer Brp positive AZs and these are of similar number in proximal and distal boutons. In addition, super-resolution imaging via dSTORM revealed that syt(KD) increases the number and alters the spatial distribution of Brp molecules at AZs, while the gradient of Brp proteins per AZ is diminished. In summary, these data demonstrate that normal structural and functional differentiation of Drosophila AZs requires

  18. Bruchpilot and Synaptotagmin collaborate to drive rapid glutamate release and active zone differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Mila M.; Pauli, Martin; Ehmann, Nadine; Hallermann, Stefan; Sauer, Markus; Kittel, Robert J.; Heckmann, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The active zone (AZ) protein Bruchpilot (Brp) is essential for rapid glutamate release at Drosophila melanogaster neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Quantal time course and measurements of action potential-waveform suggest that presynaptic fusion mechanisms are altered in brp null mutants (brp69). This could account for their increased evoked excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) delay and rise time (by about 1 ms). To test the mechanism of release protraction at brp69 AZs, we performed knock-down of Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt) via RNAi (sytKD) in wildtype (wt), brp69 and rab3 null mutants (rab3rup), where Brp is concentrated at a small number of AZs. At wt and rab3rup synapses, sytKD lowered EPSC amplitude while increasing rise time and delay, consistent with the role of Syt as a release sensor. In contrast, sytKD did not alter EPSC amplitude at brp69 synapses, but shortened delay and rise time. In fact, following sytKD, these kinetic properties were strikingly similar in wt and brp69, which supports the notion that Syt protracts release at brp69synapses. To gain insight into this surprising role of Syt at brp69 AZs, we analyzed the structural and functional differentiation of synaptic boutons at the NMJ. At ‘tonic’ type Ib motor neurons, distal boutons contain more AZs, more Brp proteins per AZ and show elevated and accelerated glutamate release compared to proximal boutons. The functional differentiation between proximal and distal boutons is Brp-dependent and reduced after sytKD. Notably, sytKD boutons are smaller, contain fewer Brp positive AZs and these are of similar number in proximal and distal boutons. In addition, super-resolution imaging via dSTORM revealed that sytKD increases the number and alters the spatial distribution of Brp molecules at AZs, while the gradient of Brp proteins per AZ is diminished. In summary, these data demonstrate that normal structural and functional differentiation of Drosophila AZs requires concerted action of Brp and Syt. PMID

  19. The fate and transport of nitroglycerin in the unsaturated zone at active and legacy anti-tank firing positions.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Geneviève; Martel, Richard; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia; Poulin, Isabelle

    2012-11-01

    The environmental fate of nitroglycerin (NG) in the unsaturated zone was evaluated in the context of double-base propellant residue deposition at anti-tank training ranges. Fresh propellant residues were collected during live anti-tank training. Surface soils, sub-surface soils and water samples from the unsaturated zone were collected at an active anti-tank range, and at a legacy site where NG-based propellants have been used. Results show that the residues are composed of intact propellant particles, as well as small quantities of NG, dinitroglycerin (DNG) and nitrate which are rapidly dissolved by precipitation, resulting in sporadic pulses of those compounds in water from the unsaturated zone after rain/snow melt events. The dissolved NG and DNG can be progressively degraded in the unsaturated zone, releasing nitrate as an end-product. Over a period of several years, small propellant particles located at the soil surface can be carried downward through the soil pore system by infiltration water, which explains the presence of NG in sub-surface soils at the legacy site, more than 35 years after site closure. NG is no longer leached from these old particles, therefore the detection of NG in sub-surface soils does not signify that groundwater is at risk of contamination by NG.

  20. Magnetic Data Interpretation for the Source-Edge Locations in Parts of the Tectonically Active Transition Zone of the Narmada-Son Lineament in Central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, G. K.

    2016-02-01

    The study has been carried out in the transition zone of the Narmada-Son lineament (NSL) which is seismically active with various geological complexities, upwarp movement of the mantle material into the crust through fault, fractures lamination and upwelling. NSL is one of the most prominent lineaments in central India after the Himalaya in the Indian geology. The area of investigation extends from longitude 80.25°E to 81.50°E and latitude 23.50°N to 24.37°N in the central part of the Indian continent. Different types of subsurface geological formations viz. alluvial, Gondwana, Deccan traps, Vindhyan, Mahakoshal, Granite and Gneisses groups exist in this area with varying geological ages. In this study area tectonic movement and crustal variation have been taken place during the past time and which might be reason for the variation of magnetic field. Magnetic anomaly suggests that the area has been highly disturbed which causes the Narmada-Son lineament trending in the ENE-WSW direction. Magnetic anomaly variation has been taken place due to the lithological variations subject to the changes in the geological contacts like thrusts and faults in this area. Shallow and deeper sources have been distinguished using frequency domain analysis by applying different filters. To enhance the magnetic data, various types of derivatives to identify the source-edge locations of the causative source bodies. The present study carried out the interpretation using total horizontal derivative, tilt angle derivative, horizontal tilt angle derivative and Cos (θ) derivative map to get source-edge locations. The results derived from various derivatives of magnetic data have been compared with the basement depth solutions calculated from 3D Euler deconvolution. It is suggested that total horizontal derivative, tilt angle derivative and Cos (θ) derivative are the most useful tools for identifying the multiple source edge locations of the causative bodies in this tectonically active

  1. Searching for Active Faults in the Western Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, Veronica; Custodio, Susana; Arroucau, Pierre; Carrilho, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The repeated occurrence of large magnitude earthquakes in southwest Iberia in historical and instrumental times suggests the presence of active faults in the region. However, the region undergoes slow deformation, which results in low rates of seismic activity, and the location, dimension and geometry of active structures remains unsettled. We recently developed a new algorithm for earthquake location in 3D complex media with laterally varying interface depths, which allowed us to relocate 2363 events that occurred from 2007 to 2013. The method takes as inputs P- and S-wave catalog arrival times obtained from the Portuguese Meteorological Institute (IPMA, Instituto Portugues do Mar e da Atmosfera), for a study area defined by 8.5°W < lon < 5°W and 36° < lat < 37.5°. After relocation, we obtain a lineation of events in the Guadalquivir bank region, in the northern Gulf of Cadiz. The lineation defines a low-angle northward-dipping plane rooted at the base of the crust, which could indicate the presence of a major fault. We provide seismological evidence for the existence of this seemingly active structure based on earthquake relocations, focal mechanisms and waveform similarity between neighboring events.

  2. Campus Activities and the First Amendment: Defining the Boundaries of Freedom of Expression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smaldone, Karen

    1991-01-01

    Four situations involving freedom of speech that could occur on college campuses are offered to help campus activities administrators consider in advance the implications of controversial events and possible techniques for managing them. The situations include a controversial pro-choice speaker, an X-rated movie, heckling in a public area, and…

  3. Reconsidering the Boundaries of the Cyberloafing Activity: The Case of a University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoghbi-Manrique-de-Lara, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    While many scholars generally conceptualise cyberloafing as just one more type of conventional deviant behaviour at work, others consider this activity to be innocuous or even productive. In either case, cyberloafing is viewed as merely misusing Internet resources, without contemplating its potential online character. The purpose of this study is…

  4. Locating Active Plate Boundaries by Earthquake Data. Crustal Evaluation Education Project. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoever, Edward C., Jr.

    Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) modules were designed to: (1) provide students with the methods and results of continuing investigations into the composition, history, and processes of the earth's crust and the application of this knowledge to man's activities and (2) to be used by teachers with little or no previous background in the…