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Sample records for active brazing filler

  1. Nickel-chromium-silicon brazing filler metal

    DOEpatents

    Martini, Angelo J.; Gourley, Bruce R.

    1976-01-01

    A brazing filler metal containing, by weight percent, 23-35% chromium, 9-12% silicon, a maximum of 0.15% carbon, and the remainder nickel. The maximum amount of elements other than those noted above is 1.00%.

  2. Active Brazing of C/C Composite to Copper by AgCuTi Filler Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kexiang; Xia, Lihong; Zhang, Fuqin; He, Lianlong

    2016-05-01

    Brazing between the carbon-fiber-reinforced carbon composite (C/C composite) and copper has gained increasing interest because of its important application in thermal management systems in nuclear fusion reactors and in the aerospace industry. In order to examine the "interfacial shape effect" on the mechanical properties of the joint, straight and conical interfacial configurations were designed and machined on the surface of C/C composites before joining to copper using an Ag-68.8Cu-4.5Ti (wt pct) alloy. The microstructure and interfacial microchemistry of C/C composite/AgCuTi/Cu brazed joints were comprehensively investigated by using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that the joint region of both straight and conical joints can be described as a bilayer. Reaction products of Cu3Ti3O and γ-TiO were formed near the copper side in a conical interface joint, while no reaction products were found in the straight case. The effect of Ag on the interfacial reaction was discussed, and the formation mechanism of the joints during brazing was proposed. On the basis of the detailed microstructure presented, the mechanical performance of the brazed joints was discussed in terms of reaction and morphology across the joint.

  3. Brazing of copper to stainless steel with a low-silver-content brazing filler metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukikoshi, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Yūki; Miyazawa, Yasuyuki; Kanasaki, Fumio

    2014-08-01

    The brazing of copper to stainless steel (SUS304 JIS) was performed using a low- silver-content brazing filler metal, Ag-50Cu, under an Ar gas atmosphere with a conventional furnace, owing to the potential economic benefits of using low-silver-content filler metals. The brazeability of the low-silver-content brazing filler metal to copper and SUS304 was investigated. A good joint was obtained, and a drastic dissolution reaction occurred at the copper side. Molten BAg8 penetrated along the crystal grain boundary of the copper base metal when BAg8 was used as the filler metal. This was caused by the dissolution of Ni from the stainless steel into the molten filler metal. Ag-50Cu, which was investigated in this work, can be used instead of BAg8 filler metal.

  4. Several braze filler metals for joining an oxide-dispersion-strengthened nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyorgak, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    An evaluation was made of five braze filler metals for joining an aluminum-containing oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy, TD-NiCrAl. All five braze filler metals evaluated are considered suitable for joining TD-NiCrAl in terms of wettability and flow. Also, the braze alloys appear to be tolerant of slight variations in brazing procedures since joints prepared by three sources using three of the braze filler metals exhibited similar brazing characteristics and essentially equivalent 1100 C stress-rupture properties in a brazed butt-joint configuration. Recommendations are provided for brazing the aluminum-containing ODS alloys.

  5. More About Brazing Or Welding NiAl Without Filler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Kalinowski, Joseph M.

    1996-01-01

    Two reports present additional information about two processes for joining, brazing, or welding workpieces made of nickel aluminide alloys, without use of filler metal. Joining processes involve uniform heating in vacuum-controlled furnace. Eliminates internal thermal gradients in workpieces joined and greatly reduces tendency toward cracking.

  6. Wetting and spreading behavior of molten brazing filler metallic alloys on metallic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogi, Satoshi; Kajiura, Tetsurou; Hanada, Yukiakira; Miyazawa, Yasuyuki

    2014-08-01

    Wetting and spreading of molten brazing filler material are important factors that influence the brazing ability of a joint to be brazed. Several investigations into the wetting ability of a brazing filler alloy and its surface tension in molten state, in addition to effects of brazing time and temperature on the contact angle, have been carried out. In general, dissimilar-metals brazing technology and high-performance brazed joint are necessities for the manufacturing field in the near future. Therefore, to address this requirement, more such studies on wetting and spreading of filler material are required for a deeper understanding. Generally, surface roughness and surface conditions affect spreading of molten brazing filler material during brazing. Wetting by and interfacial reactions of the molten brazing filler material with the metallic substrate, especially, affect strongly the spreading of the filler material. In this study, the effects of surface roughness and surface conditions on the spreading of molten brazing filler metallic alloys were investigated. Ag-(40-x)Cu-xIn and Ag- (40-x)Cu-xSn (x=5, 10, 15, 20, 25) alloys were used as brazing filler materials. A mild-steel square plate (S45C (JIS); side: 30 mm; thickness: 3mm) was employed as the substrate. A few surfaces with varying roughness were prepared using emery paper. Brazing filler material and metallic base plate were first washed with acetone, and then a flux was applied to them. The filler, 50 mg, was placed on the center of the metallic base with the flux. A spreading test was performed under Ar gas using an electrically heated furnace, after which, the original spreading area, defined as the sessile drop area, and the apparent spreading area, produced by the capillary grooves, were both evaluated. It was observed that the spreading area decreased with increasing In and Sn content.

  7. Substrate Effects on the High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of a Gold-Based Braze Filler Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Rice, Joseph P.

    2005-06-30

    Oxidation testing was conducted on a commercial gold-based braze alloy, Gold ABA, and on zirconia and stainless steel joining couples prepared using this braze filler metal. Preliminary results reveal that both substrates play a significant role in determining the overall oxidation resistance of the brazed joint.

  8. Brazing Inconel 625 Using Two Ni/(Fe)-Based Amorphous Filler Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Shiang; Shiue, Ren-Kae

    2012-07-01

    For MBF-51 filler, the brazed joint consists of interfacial grain boundary borides, coarse Nb6Ni16Si7, and Ni/Cr-rich matrix. In contrast, the VZ-2106 brazed joint is composed of interfacial Nb6Ni16Si7 precipitates as well as grain boundary borides, coarse Nb6Ni16Si7, and Ni/Cr/Fe-rich matrix. The maximum tensile strength of 443 MPa is obtained from the MBF-51 brazed specimen. The tensile strengths of VZ-2106 brazed joints are approximately 300 MPa. Both amorphous filler foils demonstrate potential in brazing IN-625 substrate.

  9. Substrate Effects on the High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of a Gold-Based Braze Filler Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Rice, Joseph P.

    2005-06-01

    Oxidation testing was conducted on a commercial gold-based braze alloy, Gold ABA®, and on zirconia/stainless steel couples joined using this filler metal. Preliminary results reveal that both substrates play a significant role in determining the overall oxidation behavior of the brazed joint.

  10. Some possible filler alloys with low vapor pressures for refractory-metal brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    A compilation of eutectics and melting-point minima for binary combinations of metals having vapor pressures below 10 to the minus 10th power torr at 1500 degrees K and .00005 torr at 2000 degree K is presented. These compositions and others near them on their phase diagrams are potential special brazing fillers for refractory metals. Some possible problems and advantages for fusion bonds of such mixtures are indicated. Evaluations of brazing fillers containing refractory metals are reported.

  11. Solubility and Dissolution Rate of Ni Base Alloy to Molten Ag-Cu-Pd Brazing Filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeshoji, Toshi-Taka; Watanabe, Yuki; Suzumura, Akio; Yamazaki, Takahisa

    During the brazing process of the rocket engine’s nozzle skirt assembly made from Fe-Ni based super alloy pipes with Pd based brazing filler, the erosion corrosion pits were sometimes engraved on those pipes’ surface. The corrosion is considered to be assisted by the dynamic flow of the molten brazing filler. In order to estimate the amount of erosion corrosion and to prevent it, the solubility and the dissolution rate of Ni to the molten Ag-Cu-Pd brazing filler are measured experimentally. The Ni crucible poured with the Ag-Cu-Pd brazing filler was heated up to 1320K and quenched after the various keeping time. The microstructure of the solidified brazing filler part’s cross sections was observed, and the amount of the dissolved Ni was estimated using the image processing technique. The solubility was about 5.53mass%and the initial dissolution rate was 6.28 × 10-3mass%/s. Using these data, more elaborate dynamic flow simulation will be able to conduct.

  12. Development of brazing process for W-EUROFER joints using Cu-based fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Prado, J.; Sánchez, M.; Ureña, A.

    2016-02-01

    A successful joint between W and EUROFER using high temperature brazing technique has been achieved for structural application in future fusion power plants. Cu-based powder alloy mixed with a polymeric binder has been used as filler. Microstructural analysis of the joints revealed that the joint consisted mainly of primary phases and acicular structures in a Cu matrix. Interaction between EUROFER and filler took place at the interface giving rise to several Cu-Ti-Fe rich layers. A loss of hardness at the EUROFER substrate close to the joint due to a diffusion phenomenon during brazing cycle was measured; however, the joints had an adequate shear strength value.

  13. Copper-silver-titanium filler metal for direct brazing of structural ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1987-01-01

    A method of joining ceramics and metals to themselves and to one another is described using a brazing filler metal consisting essentially of 35 to 50 atomic percent copper, 15 to 50 atomic percent silver and 10 to 45 atomic percent titanium. This method produces strong joints that can withstand high service temperatures and oxidizing environments.

  14. Copper-silver-titanium-tin filler metal for direct brazing of structural ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1988-04-05

    A method of joining ceramics and metals to themselves and to one another at about 800.degree. C. is described using a brazing filler metal consisting essentially of 35 to 50 at. % copper, 40 to 50 at. % silver, 1 to 15 at. % titanium, and 2 to 8 at. % tin. This method produces strong joints that can withstand high service temperatures and oxidizing environments.

  15. Micro-nano filler metal foil on vacuum brazing of SiCp/Al composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Gao, Zeng; Niu, Jitai

    2016-06-01

    Using micro-nano (Al-5.25Si-26.7Cu)- xTi (wt%, x = 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0) foils as filler metal, the research obtained high-performance joints of aluminum matrix composites with high SiC particle content (60 vol%, SiCp/Al-MMCs). The effect of brazing process and Ti content on joint properties was investigated, respectively. The experimental results indicate that void free dense interface between SiC particle and metallic brazed seam with C-Al-Si-Ti product was readily obtained, and the joint shear strength enhanced with increasing brazing temperature from 560 to 580 °C or prolonging soaking time from 10 to 90 min. Sound joints with maximum shear strength of 112.5 MPa was achieved at 580 °C for soaking time of 90 min with (Al-5.25Si-26.7Cu)-2Ti filler, where Ti(AlSi)3 intermetallic is in situ strengthening phase dispersed in the joint and fracture occured in the filler metal layer. In this research, the beneficial effect of Ti addition into filler metal on improving wettability between SiC particle and metallic brazed seam was demonstrated, and capable welding parameters were broadened for SiCp/Al-MMCs with high SiC particle content.

  16. Basic principles of creating a new generation of high- temperature brazing filler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalin, B. A.; Suchkov, A. N.

    2016-04-01

    The development of new materials is based on the formation of a structural-phase state providing the desired properties by selecting the base and the complex of alloying elements. The development of amorphous filler alloys for a high-temperature brazing has its own features that are due to the limited life cycle and the production method of brazing filler alloys. The work presents a cycle of analytical and experimental materials science investigations including justification of the composition of a new amorphous filler alloy for brazing the products from zirconium alloys at the temperature of no more than 800 °C and at the unbrazing temperature of permanent joints of more than 1200 °C. The experimental alloys have been used for manufacture of amorphous ribbons by rapid quenching, of which the certification has been made by X-ray investigations and a differential-thermal analysis. These ribbons were used to obtain permanent joints from the spacer grid cells (made from the alloy Zr-1% Nb) of fuel assemblies of the thermal nuclear reactor VVER-440. The brazed samples in the form of a pair of cells have been exposed to corrosion tests in autoclaves in superheated water at a temperature of 350 °C, a pressure of 160 MPa and duration of up to 6,000 h. They have been also exposed to destructive tests using a tensile machine. The experimental results obtained have made it possible to propose and patent a brazing filler alloy of the following composition: Zr-5.5Fe-(2.5-3.5)Be-1Nb-(5-8)Cu-2Sn-0.4Cr-(0.5-1.0)Ge. Its melting point is 780 °C and the recommended brazing temperature is 800°C.

  17. Improved Wetting of Mixed Ionic/Electronic Conductors Used in Electrochemical Devices with Ternary Reactive Air Braze Filler Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S; Kim, Jin Yong Y; Thomsen, Ed C; Weil, K Scott

    2007-01-19

    This paper reports on the wetting behavior, reactivity, and long-term electrical conductance of a series of ternary filler metals being considered for brazing lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) based oxygen separation membranes. Mixed ionic/electronic conducting perovskite oxides such as LSCF and various doped barium cerates are currently being considered for use in high-temperature electrochemical devices such as oxygen and hydrogen concentrators and solid oxide fuel cells. However to take full advantage of the unique properties of these materials, reliable joining techniques need to be developed. Furthermore, if the proposed joining technique were to yield a hermetic ceramic-to-metal junction that was also electrically conductive, it would additionally benefit the device by allowing current to be drawn from or carried to the electrochemically active mixed conducting oxide component without requiring an separate current collector. A newly developed brazing technique known as air brazing is one such method of joining. In its present form, air brazing uses a silver-copper oxide based filler metal that can be melted directly in air to form a compliant joint that is electrically conductive. Recently, it has been shown that the addition of titania can enhance the wetting behavior of Ag-CuO filler metals on alumina. Here the effect of this wetting agent on the surface wettability, long-term electrical resistance at 750°C, and reactivity with La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3- (LSCF-6428 or LSCF) substrates is discussed.

  18. Brazing ZrO{sub 2} ceramic to Ti–6Al–4V alloy using NiCrSiB amorphous filler foil: Interfacial microstructure and joint properties

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, J.; Song, X.G.; Li, C.; Zhao, L.Y.; Feng, J.C.

    2013-07-15

    Reliable brazing of ZrO{sub 2} ceramic and Ti–6Al–4V alloy was achieved using NiCrSiB amorphous filler foil. The interfacial microstructure of ZrO{sub 2}/Ti–6Al–4V joints was characterized by scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectrometer and micro-focused X-ray diffractometer. The effects of brazing temperature on the interfacial microstructure and joining properties of brazed joints were investigated in detail. Active Ti of Ti–6Al–4V alloy dissolved into molten filler metal and reacted with ZrO{sub 2} ceramic to form a continuous TiO reaction layer, which played an important role in brazing. Various reaction phases including Ti{sub 2}Ni, Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} and β-Ti were formed in brazed joints. With an increasing of brazing temperature, the TiO layer thickened gradually while the Ti{sub 2}Ni amount reduced. Shear test indicated that brazed joints tend to fracture at the interface between ZrO{sub 2} ceramic and brazing seam or Ti{sub 2}Ni intermetallic layer. The maximum average shear strength reached 284.6 MPa when brazed at 1025 °C for 10 min. - Graphical Abstract: Interfacial microstructure of ZrO{sub 2}/TC4 joint brazed using NiCrSiB amorphous filler foil was: ZrO{sub 2}/TiO/Ti{sub 2}Ni + β-Ti + Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}/β-Ti/Widmanstätten structure/TC4. - Highlights: • Brazing of ZrO{sub 2} ceramic and Ti-6Al-4V alloy was achieved. • Interfacial microstructure was TiO/Ti{sub 2}Ni + β + Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}/β/Widmanstätten structure. • The formation of TiO produced the darkening effect of ZrO{sub 2} ceramic. • The highest joining strength of 284.6MPa was obtained.

  19. High temperature silver-palladium-copper oxide air braze filler metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darsell, Jens Tommy

    The Ag-CuO system is currently being investigated as the basis for an air braze filler metal alloy to be used in SOFC components. The system is of interest because unlike most braze alloys, it is capable of wetting a variety of ceramic materials while being applied in an air. This thesis work examined modification of Ag-CuO filler metal system by alloying with palladium to increase the use temperature of the resulting air braze alloy. Thermal analysis was performed to track changes in the solidus and liquidus temperatures for these alloys and determine equilibrium phase present as a function of temperature and composition. Sessile drop experiments were performed to investigate the effect of palladium addition on braze wetability. The influence of copper-oxide and palladium contents on brazed joint strength was characterized by a combination of four-point bend testing and fractography. From combined thermal analysis and quenched data it was found that both the liquidus and solidus increase with increasing palladium content, and the silver-rich miscibility gap boundary could be shifted by the addition of palladium. This was employed as a tool to study the effects of two-liquid phase formation on wetting behavior. In addition, a mass loss likely attributable to silver volatilization is observed in the Pd-modified filler metals when heated over ˜1100°C. As volatilization should be avoided, the ternary alloys should be limited to 15mol% Pd. It was found by sessile drop wetting experiments that there is a definitive change in wetting behavior that corresponds directly to the miscibility gap boundary for the Pd-Ag-CuO system. The first order transition tracks with changes in the miscibility gap boundary that can be induced by increasing palladium content. This is the first experimental evidence of critical point wetting behavior reported for a metal-oxide system and further confirms that critical point wetting theory is universal. Four-point bend testing and

  20. Preparation and Properties of a Novel Al-Si-Ge-Zn Filler Metal for Brazing Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Zhiwei; Huang, Jihua; Yang, Hao; Chen, Shuhai; Zhao, Xingke

    2015-06-01

    The study is concerned with developing a filler metal with low melting temperature and good processability for brazing aluminum and its alloys. For this purpose, a novel Al-Si-Ge-Zn alloy was prepared according to Al-Si-Ge and Al-Si-Zn ternary phase diagrams. The melting characteristics, microstructures, wettability, and processing property of the alloy were investigated. The results showed that the melting temperature range of the novel filler metal was 505.2-545.1 °C, and the temperature interval between the solidus and the liquidus was 39.9 °C. Compared with a common Al-Si-Ge alloy, it had smaller and better dispersed β-GeSi solid solution precipitates, and the Zn-rich phases distributed on the boundary of the β-GeSi precipitates. The novel filler metal has good processability and good wettability with Al. There was one obvious transition layer with a thin α-Al solid solution between the filler metal and base metal, which is favorable to improve the strength of brazing joint.

  1. Theory and modeling of active brazing.

    SciTech Connect

    van Swol, Frank B.; Miller, James Edward; Lechman, Jeremy B.; Givler, Richard C.

    2013-09-01

    Active brazes have been used for many years to produce bonds between metal and ceramic objects. By including a relatively small of a reactive additive to the braze one seeks to improve the wetting and spreading behavior of the braze. The additive modifies the substrate, either by a chemical surface reaction or possibly by alloying. By its nature, the joining process with active brazes is a complex nonequilibrium non-steady state process that couples chemical reaction, reactant and product diffusion to the rheology and wetting behavior of the braze. Most of the these subprocesses are taking place in the interfacial region, most are difficult to access by experiment. To improve the control over the brazing process, one requires a better understanding of the melting of the active braze, rate of the chemical reaction, reactant and product diffusion rates, nonequilibrium composition-dependent surface tension as well as the viscosity. This report identifies ways in which modeling and theory can assist in improving our understanding.

  2. Melting Point Depression and Fast Diffusion in Nanostructured Brazing Fillers Confined Between Barrier Nanolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptay, G.; Janczak-Rusch, J.; Jeurgens, L. P. H.

    2016-05-01

    Successful brazing using Cu-based nanostructured brazing fillers at temperatures much below the bulk melting temperature of Cu was recently demonstrated (Lehmert et al. in, Mater Trans 56:1015-1018, 2015). The Cu-based nano-fillers are composed of alternating nanolayers of Cu and a permeable, non-wetted AlN barrier. In this study, a thermodynamic model is derived to estimate the melting point depression (MPD) in such Cu/AlN nano-multilayers (NMLs) as function of the Cu nanolayer thickness. Depending on the melting route, the model predicts a MPD range of 238-609 K for Cu10nm/AlN10nm NMLs, which suggests a heterogeneous pre-melting temperature range of 750-1147 K (476-874 °C), which is consistent with experimental observations. As suggested by basic kinetic considerations, the observed Cu outflow to the NML surface at the temperatures of 723-1023 K (450-750 °C) can also be partially rationalized by fast solid-state diffusion of Cu along internal interfaces, especially for the higher temperatures.

  3. Development of rapidly quenched nickel-based non-boron filler metals for brazing corrosion resistant steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivannikov, A.; Kalin, B.; Suchkov, A.; Penyaz, M.; Yurlova, M.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion-resistant steels are stably applied in modern rocket and nuclear technology. Creating of permanent joints of these steels is a difficult task that can be solved by means of welding or brazing. Recently, the use rapidly quenched boron-containing filler metals is perspective. However, the use of such alloys leads to the formation of brittle borides in brazing zone, which degrades the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of the compounds. Therefore, the development of non-boron alloys for brazing stainless steels is important task. The study of binary systems Ni-Be and Ni-Si revealed the perspective of replacing boron in Ni-based filler metals by beryllium, so there was the objective of studying of phase equilibrium in the system Ni-Be-Si. The alloys of the Ni-Si-Be with different contents of Si and Be are considered in this paper. The presence of two low-melting components is revealed during of their studying by methods of metallography analysis and DTA. Microhardness is measured and X-ray diffraction analysis is conducted for a number of alloys of Ni-Si-Be. The compositions are developed on the basis of these data. Rapidly quenched brazing alloys can be prepared from these compositions, and they are suitable for high temperature brazing of steels.

  4. Competitive Wetting in Active Brazes

    SciTech Connect

    Chandross, Michael Evan

    2014-05-01

    We found that the wetting and spreading of molten filler materials (pure Al, pure Ag, and AgAl alloys) on a Kovar ™ (001) substrate was studied with molecular dynamics simulations. A suite of different simulations was used to understand the effects on spreading rates due to alloying as well as reactions with the substrate. Moreover, the important conclusion is that the presence of Al in the alloy enhances the spreading of Ag, while the Ag inhibits the spreading of Al.

  5. Two-beam Laser Brazing of Thin Sheet Steel for Automotive Industry Using Cu-base Filler Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelstädt, C.; Seefeld, T.; Reitemeyer, D.; Vollertsen, F.

    This work shows the potential of two-beam laser brazing for joining both Zn-coated steel and 22MnB5. Brazing of Zn-coated steel sheets using Cu-Si filler wire is already state of the art in car manufacturing. New press-hardened steels like 22MnB5 are more and more used in automotive industry, offering high potential to save costs and improve structural properties (reduced weight / higher stiffness). However, for joining of these ultra-high strength steels investigations are mandatory. In this paper, a novel approach using a two-beam laser brazing process and Cu-base filler material is presented. The use of Cu-base filler material leads to a reduced heat input, compared to currently applied welding processes, which may result in benefits concerning distortion, post processing and tensile strength of the joint. Reliable processing at desired high speeds is attained by means of laser-preheating. High feed rates prevent significant diffusion of copper into the base material.

  6. Effect of mechanical milling on Ni-TiH{sub 2} powder alloy filler metal for brazing TiAl intermetallic alloy: The microstructure and joint's properties

    SciTech Connect

    He Peng Liu Duo; Shang Erjing; Wang Ming

    2009-01-15

    A TiH{sub 2}-50 wt.% Ni powder alloy was mechanically milled in an argon gas atmosphere using milling times up to 480 min. A TiAl intermetallic alloy was joined by vacuum furnace brazing using the TiH{sub 2}-50 wt.% Ni powder alloy as the filler metal. The effect of mechanical milling on the microstructure and shear strength of the brazed joints was investigated. The results showed that the grains of TiH{sub 2}-50 wt.% Ni powder alloy were refined and the fusion temperature decreased after milling. A sound brazing seam was obtained when the sample was brazed at 1140 deg. C for 15 min using filler metal powder milled for 120 min. The interfacial zones of the specimens brazed with the milled filler powder were thinner and the shear strength of the joint was increased compared to specimens brazed with non-milled filler powder. A sample brazed at 1180 deg. C for 15 min using TiH{sub 2}-50 wt.% Ni powder alloy milled for 120 min exhibited the highest shear strength at both room and elevated temperatures.

  7. Increasing Ti-6Al-4V brazed joint strength equal to the base metal by Ti and Zr amorphous filler alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ganjeh, E.; Sarkhosh, H.; Bajgholi, M.E.; Khorsand, H.; Ghaffari, M.

    2012-09-15

    Microstructural features developed along with mechanical properties in furnace brazing of Ti-6Al-4V alloy using STEMET 1228 (Ti-26.8Zr-13Ni-13.9Cu, wt.%) and STEMET 1406 (Zr-9.7Ti-12.4Ni-11.2Cu, wt.%) amorphous filler alloys. Brazing temperatures employed were 900-950 Degree-Sign C for the titanium-based filler and 900-990 Degree-Sign C for the zirconium-based filler alloys, respectively. The brazing time durations were 600, 1200 and 1800 s. The brazed joints were evaluated by ultrasonic test, and their microstructures and phase constitutions analyzed by metallography, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. Since microstructural evolution across the furnace brazed joints primarily depends on their alloying elements such as Cu, Ni and Zr along the joint. Accordingly, existence of Zr{sub 2}Cu, Ti{sub 2}Cu and (Ti,Zr){sub 2}Ni intermetallic compounds was identified in the brazed joints. The chemical composition of segregation region in the center of brazed joints was identical to virgin filler alloy content which greatly deteriorated the shear strength of the joints. Adequate brazing time (1800 s) and/or temperature (950 Degree-Sign C for Ti-based and 990 Degree-Sign C for Zr-based) resulted in an acicular Widmanstaetten microstructure throughout the entire joint section due to eutectoid reaction. This microstructure increased the shear strength of the brazed joints up to the Ti-6Al-4V tensile strength level. Consequently, Ti-6Al-4V can be furnace brazed by Ti and Zr base foils produced excellent joint strengths. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature or time was the main factors of controlling braze joint strength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Developing a Widmanstaetten microstructure generates equal strength to base metal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brittle intermetallic compounds like (Ti,Zr){sub 2}Ni/Cu deteriorate shear strength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ti and Zr base filler alloys were the best choice for brazing Ti

  8. Elevated temperature creep properties for selected active metal braze alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    Active metal braze alloys reduce the number of processes required for the joining of metal to ceramic components by eliminating the need for metallization and/or Ni plating of the ceramic surfaces. Titanium (Ti), V, and Zr are examples of active element additions which have been used successfully in such braze alloys. Since the braze alloy is expected to accommodate thermal expansion mismatch strains between the metal and ceramic materials, a knowledge of its elevated temperature mechanical properties is important. In particular, the issue of whether or not the creep strength of an active metal braze alloy is increased or decreased relative to its non-activated counterpart is important when designing new brazing processes and alloy systems. This paper presents a survey of high temperature mechanical properties for two pairs of conventional braze alloys and their active metal counterparts: (a) the conventional 72Ag-28Cu (Cusil) alloy, and the active braze alloy 62.2Ag- 36.2Cu-1.6Ti (Cusil ABA), and (b) the 82Au-18Ni (Nioro) alloy and the active braze alloy Mu-15.5M-0.75Mo-1.75V (Nioro ABA). For the case of the Cusil/Cusil ABA pair, the active metal addition contributes to solid solution strengthening of the braze alloy, resulting in a higher creep strength as compared to the non-active alloy. In the case of the Nioro/Nioro ABA pair, the Mo and V additions cause the active braze alloy to have a two-phase microstructure, which results in a reduced creep strength than the conventional braze alloy. The Garofalo sinh equation has been used to quantitatively describe the stress and temperature dependence of the deformation behavior. It will be observed that the effective stress exponent in the Garofalo sinh equation is a function of the instantaneous value of the stress argument.

  9. Vacuum brazing of alumina ceramic to titanium for biomedical implants using pure gold as the filler metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Mohammad S.

    One of the many promising applications of metal/ceramic joining is in biomedical implantable devices. This work is focused on vacuum brazing of C.P titanium to 96% alumina ceramic using pure gold as the filler metal. A novel method of brazing is developed where resistance heating of C.P titanium is done inside a thermal evaporator using a Ta heating electrode. The design of electrode is optimized using Ansys resistive heating simulations. The materials chosen in this study are biocompatible and have prior history in implantable devices approved by FDA. This research is part of Boston Retinal implant project to make a biocompatible implantable device (www.bostonretina.org). Pure gold braze has been used in the construction of single terminal feedthrough in low density hermetic packages utilizing a single platinum pin brazed to an alumina or sapphire ceramic donut (brazed to a titanium case or ferrule for many years in implantable pacemakers. Pure gold (99.99%) brazing of 96% alumina ceramic with CP titanium has been performed and evaluated in this dissertation. Brazing has been done by using electrical resistance heating. The 96% alumina ceramic disk was manufactured by high temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC) processing while the Ti ferrule and gold performs were purchased from outside. Hermetic joints having leak rate of the order of 1.6 x 10-8 atm-cc/ sec on a helium leak detector were measured. Alumina ceramics made by HTCC processing were centreless grounded utilizing 800 grit diamond wheel to provide a smooth surface for sputtering of a thin film of Nb. Since pure alumina demonstrates no adhesion or wetting to gold, an adhesion layer must be used on the alumina surface. Niobium (Nb), Tantalum (Ta) and Tungsten (W) were chosen for evaluation since all are refractory (less dissolution into molten gold), all form stable oxides (necessary for adhesion to alumina) and all are readily thin film deposited as metals. Wetting studies are also performed to determine the

  10. Microstructure and Performance of Kovar/Alumina Joints Made with Silver-Copper Base Active Metal Braze Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    STEPHENS, JOHN J.; VIANCO,PAUL T.; HLAVA,PAUL F.; WALKER,CHARLES A.

    1999-12-15

    Poor hermeticity performance was observed for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic-ceramic joints having a Kovar{trademark} alloy interlayer. The active Ag-Cu-Ti filler metal was used to braze the substrates together. The Ti active element was scavenged from the filler metal by the formation of a (Fe, Ni, Co){sub x}Ti phase (x= 2-3) that prevented development of a continuous Ti{sub x}O{sub y} layer at the filler metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface. Altering the process parameters did not circumvent the scavenging of Ti. Molybdenum barrier layers 1000, 2500, or 5000 {angstrom} thick on the Kovar{trademark} surfaces successfully allowed Ti{sub x}O{sub y} formation at the filler metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface and hermetic joints. The problems with the Ag-Cu-Ti filler metal for Kovar{trademark}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} braze joints led to the evaluation of a Ag-Cu-Zr filler metal. The Zr (active element) in Ag-Cu-Zr filler metal was not susceptible to the scavenging problem.

  11. Corrosion of Ti-STS dissimilar joints brazed by a Ag interlayer and Ag-Cu-(Pd) alloy fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. K.; Park, J. J.; Lee, G. J.; Lee, J. G.; Kim, D. W.; Lim, C. H.; Rhee, C. K.; Lee, Y. B.; Lee, J. K.; Hong, S. J.

    2011-02-01

    Corrosion behavior of dissimilar brazed joints between titanium Gr. 2 (Ti) and S31254 stainless steel (STS) was investigated. For the study, a Ag interlayer and two Ag-base eutectic alloys, 72Ag-28Cu and 66.2Ag-25.8Cu-8Pd (wt.%), were introduced as a diffusion control layer and fillers, respectively, between the base materials. The joints commonly had a layered structure of Ti(base)/TiAg/Ag solid solution/STS(base), but the one brazed by the Ag-Cu-Pd filler was slightly alloyed with the noble Pd elements over the Ag-rich solid solution region. A series of corrosion test experiments in a sea water revealed that a corrosion of TiAg layer and a stress-induced cracking at the TiAg/Ag solid solution interface were dominant due to a galvanic attack, but notably the Ti-STS dissimilar joint's resistance to corrosion was significantly improved by alloying the Pd in the joint. The corrosion behavior of such dissimilar metal joints was discussed based on galvanic corrosion effect.

  12. Brazed joints of CBN grains and AISI 1045 steel with AgCuTi-TiC mixed powder as filler materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wen-Feng; Xu, Jiu-Hua; Chen, Zhen-Zhen; Su, Hong-Hua; Fu, Yu-Can

    2011-12-01

    The brazing process of cubic boron nitride (CBN) grains and AISI 1045 steel with AgCuTi-TiC mixed powder as a filler material was carried out. The joining strength and the interfacial microstructure were investigated. The experimental results indicate that the spreading of the molten filler material on AISI 1045 steel is decreased with the increase of TiC content. A good interface is formed between the TiC particulates and AgCuTi alloy through the wetting behavior. In the case of AgCuTi+16wt% TiC, the strength of the brazed steel-to-steel joints reached the highest value of 95 MPa dependent upon the reinforcement effect of TiC particles within the filler layer. Brazing resultants of TiB2, TiB, and TiN are produced at the interface of the CBN grains and the AgCuTi-TiC filler layer by virtue of the interdiffusion of B, N, and Ti atoms.

  13. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of Actively Brazed Alumina Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Cadden, C.H.; Stephens, J.J.; Glass, S.J.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Vianco, P.V.; Walker, C.A.

    1999-08-26

    Alumina (94 and 99.8% grade compositions) was brazed directly to itself with gold-based active brazing alloys (ABA's) containing vanadium additions of 1,2 and 3 weight percent. The effects of brazing conditions on the joint properties were investigated. Wetting behavior, interfacial reactions, microstructure, hermeticity and tensile strength were determined. Wetting was fair to good for the ABA and base material combinations. Microanalysis identified a discontinuous Al-V-O spinel reaction product at the alumina-braze interface. Tensile strength results for 94% alumina were uniformly good and generally not sensitive to the vanadium concentration, with tensile values of 85-105 MPa. There was more variability in the 99.8% alumina strength results, with values ranging from 25-95 MPa. The highest vanadium concentration (3 wt. %) yielded the highest joint strength for the brazed 99.8% alumina. Failures in the 99.8% alumina samples occurred at the braze-alumina interface, while the 94% alumina specimens exhibited fracture of the ceramic substrate.

  14. Phase Evolution in the Pd-Ag-CuO Air Braze Filler Metal Alloy System

    SciTech Connect

    Darsell, Jens T.; Weil, K. Scott

    2006-08-01

    Palladium was added as a ternary component to a series of copper oxide-silver alloys in an effort to increase the use temperature of these materials for potential ceramic air brazing applications. Phase equilibria in the ternary Pd-Ag-CuO system were investigated via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and a series of quenching experiments. Presented here are the latest findings on this system and a construction of the corresponding ternary phase diagram for low-to-moderate additions of palladium. The analysis included samples with higher palladium additions than were studied in the past, as well as an analysis of the composition-temperature trends in the Ag-CuO miscibility gap with palladium addition. It was found that the addition of palladium increases the solidus and liquidus and caused three phase zones to appear as expected by the phase rule. Furthermore, the palladium additions cause the miscibility gap boundary extending from the former binary eutectic to shift to lower silver-to-copper ratios.

  15. Oxide film on 5052 aluminium alloy: Its structure and removal mechanism by activated CsF-AlF3 flux in brazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bing; Wang, Dongpo; Cheng, Fangjie; Wang, Ying

    2015-05-01

    The oxide-film structure on the 5052 Al alloy and the film-removal mechanism by activated CsF-AlF3 flux in brazing were studied. Characterisation of the oxide film shows that thermally activated Mg, segregated from the alloy's interior, was significantly enriched and oxidised during medium-temperature brazing. Thus, the outer oxide surface consisted of the amorphous MgO-like phase, and the interior of the oxide film comprised mainly the amorphous MgO-like phase and dispersely distributed and less-ordered MgAl2O4. The MgO-like phase was the main obstacle to oxide removal in brazing. The activated ZnCl2-containing CsF-AlF3 flux effectively removed the oxide film, and the 5052 Al alloy was successfully brazed by the Zn-Al filler metal and activated flux. When Zn2+ in the molten flux permeated the oxide film through cracks, its chemical reaction with the Al substrate loosened the oxide film, which was eventually pushed out as the filler metal spread over the alloy surface.

  16. Active Metal Brazing and Characterization of Brazed Joints in Titanium to Carbon-Carbon Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, T. P.; Morscher, G. N.; Asthana, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Ti-metal/C-C composite joints were formed by reactive brazing with three commercial brazes, namely, Cu-ABA, TiCuNi, and TiCuSiI. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results of the microstructure analysis indicate solute redistribution across the joint and possible metallurgical bond formation via interdiffusion, which led to good wetting and spreading. A tube-on-plate tensile test was used to evaluate joint strength of Ti-tube/ C-C composite joints. The load-carrying ability was greatest for the Cu-ABA braze joint structures. This system appeared to have the best braze spreading which resulted in a larger braze/C-C composite bonded area compared to the other two braze materials. Also, joint loadcarrying ability was found to be higher for joint structures where the fiber tows in the outer ply of the C-C composite were aligned perpendicular to the tube axis when compared to the case where fiber tows were aligned parallel to the tube axis.

  17. The Effect of TiO2 on the Wetting Behavior of Silver-copper Oxide Braze Filler Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Hardy, John S.; Darsell, Jens T.

    2006-03-01

    A series of silver-copper oxide ceramic brazing alloys was compositionally modified by doping with small amounts of titania. Subsequent contact angle measurements indicate that concentrations as low as 0.5 mol% TiO2 can significantly enhance wettability over a wide range of binary Ag-CuOx compositions.

  18. Effect of ZrO2 Nanoparticles on the Microstructure of Al-Si-Cu Filler for Low-Temperature Al Brazing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Roh, Myung-Hwan; Jung, Do-Hyun; Jung, Jae-Pil

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effect of ZrO2 nanoparticles on Al-12Si-20Cu alloy has been studied as a filler metal for aluminum brazing. The microstructural and thermal characterizations are performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The intermetallic compound (IMC) phases are identified by the energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis coupled with the SEM. The filler spreading test is performed according to JIS-Z-3197 standard. XRD and SEM analyses confirm the presence of Si particles, the CuAl2 ( θ) intermetallic, and the eutectic structures of Al-Si, Al-Cu, and Al-Si-Cu in the Al matrix in the monolithic and composite samples. It is observed that when the ZrO2 is added in the alloy, the CuAl2 IMCs and Si particles are found to be dispersed uniformly in the Al matrix up to 0.05 wt pct ZrO2. DTA results show that the liquidus temperature of Al-12Si-20Cu filler metal is dropped from ~806.78 K to 804.6 K (533.78 °C to 531.6 °C) with a lowering of 2 K (2 °C) in liquidus temperature, when the amount of ZrO2 is increased up to 0.05 wt pct. It is also shown that the presence of ZrO2 nanoparticles in the filler metal has no deleterious effect on wettability up to 0.05 wt pct of ZrO2. The ultimate tensile strength and elongation percentage are also found to improve with the addition of ZrO2 nanoparticles in the Al-12Si-20Cu alloy.

  19. Brazing of the Tore Supra actively cooled Phase III Limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, R.E.; Walker, C.A.; Lutz, T.J.; Hosking, F.M.; McGrath, R.T.

    1993-12-31

    The head of the water-cooled Tore Supra Phase 3 Limiter is a bank of 14 round OFHC copper tubes, curved to fit the plasma radius, onto which several hundred pyrolytic graphite (PG) tiles and a lesser number of carbon fiber composite tiles are brazed. The small allowable tolerances for fitting the tiles to the tubes and mating of compound curvatures made the brazing and fabrication extremely challenging. The paper describes the fabrication process with emphasis on the procedure for brazing. In the fixturing for vacuum furnace brazing, the tiles were each independently clamped to the tube with an elaborate set of window frame clamps. Braze quality was evaluated with transient heating tests. Some rebrazing was necessary.

  20. Active Metal Brazing of Carbon-Carbon Composites to Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, T. P.; Morscher, G.; Asthana, R.

    2004-01-01

    The Ti-metal/C-C composite joints were formed by reactive brazing with three commercial brazes, namely, Cu-ABA, TiCuNi, and TiCuSil. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results of the microstructure analysis indicate solute redistribution across the joint which led to good wetting, spreading, and metallurgical bond formation via interdiffusion.

  1. Brazing technique

    DOEpatents

    Harast, Donald G.

    1986-01-01

    A method of brazing comprises sand blasting the surfaces of the components to be brazed with particles of a brazing material to clean the surfaces and to embed brazing material in the surfaces, applying the brazing material to the surfaces, and heating the brazing material to form a brazement between the components.

  2. Fluxless Brazing and Heat Treatment of a Plate-Fin Sandwich Actively Cooled Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1978-01-01

    The processes and techniques used to fabricate plate-fin sandwich actively cooled panels are presented. The materials were 6061 aluminum alloy and brazing sheet having clad brazing alloy. The panels consisted of small scale specimens, fatigue specimens, and a large 0.61 m by 1.22 m test panel. All panels were fluxless brazed in retorts in heated platen presses while exerting external pressure to assure intimate contact of details. Distortion and damage normally associated with that heat treatment were minimized by heat treating without fixtures and solution quenching in an organic polymer solution. The test panel is the largest fluxless brazed and heat treated panel of its configuration known to exist.

  3. Method for controlling brazing

    DOEpatents

    Hosking, F. Michael; Hall, Aaron C.; Givler, Richard C.; Walker, Charles A.

    2006-08-01

    A method for making a braze joint across a discontinuity in a work piece using alternating current. A filler metal is pre-placed at a location sufficiently close to the discontinuity such that, when an alternating current is applied across a work piece to heat the work piece and melt the filler metal, the filler metal is drawn into the discontinuity. The alternating current is maintained for a set residence time, generally less than 10 seconds and more particularly less than 3 seconds. The alternating current is then altered, generally by reducing the current and/or voltage such that the filler metal can solidify to form a braze joint of desired quality and thickness.

  4. Nondestructive test of brazed cooling tubes of prototype bolometer camera housing using active infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Tahiliani, Kumudni; Pandya, Santosh P; Pandya, Shwetang; Jha, Ratneshwar; Govindarajan, J

    2011-01-01

    The active infrared thermography technique is used for assessing the brazing quality of an actively cooled bolometer camera housing developed for steady state superconducting tokamak. The housing is a circular pipe, which has circular tubes vacuum brazed on the periphery. A unique method was adopted to monitor the temperature distribution on the internal surface of the pipe. A stainless steel mirror was placed inside the pipe and the reflected IR radiations were viewed using an IR camera. The heat stimulus was given by passing hot water through the tubes and the temperature distribution was monitored during the transient phase. The thermographs showed a significant nonuniformity in the brazing with a contact area of around 51%. The thermography results were compared with the x-ray radiographs and a good match between the two was observed. Benefits of thermography over x-ray radiography testing are emphasized. PMID:21280850

  5. Development of the activated diffusion brazing process for fabrication of finned shell to strut turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbers, L. G.; Berry, T. F.; Kutchera, R. E.; Edmonson, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    The activated diffusion brazing process was developed for attaching TD-NiCr and U700 finned airfoil shells to matching Rene 80 struts obstructing the finned cooling passageways. Creep forming the finned shells to struts in combination with precise preplacement of brazing alloy resulted in consistently sound joints, free of cooling passageway clogging. Extensive tensile and stress rupture testing of several joint orientation at several temperatures provided a critical assessment of joint integrity of both material combinations. Trial blades of each material combination were fabricated followed by destructive metallographic examination which verified high joint integrity.

  6. Vacuum brazing of high volume fraction SiC particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Dongfeng; Niu, Jitai; Gao, Zeng; Wang, Peng

    2015-03-01

    This experiment chooses A356 aluminum matrix composites containing 55% SiC particle reinforcing phase as the parent metal and Al-Si-Cu-Zn-Ni alloy metal as the filler metal. The brazing process is carried out in vacuum brazing furnace at the temperature of 550°C and 560°C for 3 min, respectively. The interfacial microstructures and fracture surfaces are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy spectrum analysis (EDS). The result shows that adequacy of element diffusion are superior when brazing at 560°C, because of higher activity and liquidity. Dislocations and twins are observed at the interface between filler and composite due to the different expansion coefficient of the aluminum alloy matrix and SiC particles. The fracture analysis shows that the brittle fracture mainly located at interface of filler and composites.

  7. Compound characterization of laser brazed SiC-steel joints using tungsten reinforced SnAgTi-alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Südmeyer, I.; Rohde, M.; Fürst, T.

    2010-02-01

    With the help of a CO2-laser (λ = 10.64 μm) Silicon carbide (Trade name: Ekasic-F, Comp: ESK Ceramics) has been brazed to commercial steel (C45E, Matnr. 1.1191) using SnAgTi-filler alloys. The braze pellets were dry pressed based on commercially available powders and polished to a thickness of 300 μm. The SnAgTi-fractions were varied with the objective of improving the compound strength. Furthermore, tungsten reinforced SnAgTi-fillers were examined with regard to the shear strength of the ceramic/steel joints. Polished microsections of SnAgTi-pellets were investigated before brazing in order to evaluate the particle distribution and to detect potential porosities using optical microscopy. The brazing temperature and the influence of the reinforcing particles on the active braze filler were determined by measurements with a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). After brazing. the ceramic-steel joints were characterized by scanning electron micrographs and EDX-analysis. Finally the mechanical strength of the braze-joints was determined by shear tests.

  8. Mechanical design of ceramic beam tube braze joints for NOvA kicker magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ader, C.R.; Reilly, R.E.; Wilson, J.H.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    The NO?A Experiment will construct a detector optimized for electron neutrino detection in the existing NuMI neutrino beam. The NuMI beam line is capable of operating at 400 kW of primary beam power and the upgrade will allow up to 700 kW. Ceramic beam tubes are utilized in numerous kicker magnets in different accelerator rings at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Kovar flanges are brazed onto each beam tube end, since kovar and high alumina ceramic have similar expansion curves. The tube, kovar flange, end piece, and braze foil alloy brazing material are stacked in the furnace and then brazed. The most challenging aspect of fabricating kicker magnets in recent years have been making hermetic vacuum seals on the braze joints between the ceramic and flange. Numerous process variables can influence the robustness of conventional metal/ceramic brazing processes. The ceramic-filler metal interface is normally the weak layer when failure does not occur within the ceramic. Differences between active brazing filler metal and the moly-manganese process will be discussed along with the applicable results of these techniques used for Fermilab production kicker tubes.

  9. Fluxless Brazing of Large Structural Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    Fluxless brazing is used in fabricating aluminum structural panels that withstand high internal pressure. Aluminum sheet of structural thickness with 4045 aluminum/silicon-braze-alloy cladding is brazed to corrugated "fin stock" having channels 0.001 inch (0.03mm) high by same width. Process is carried out in an inert (argon) atmosphere in a retort furnace. Filler bars are used in some channels to prevent fin stock from collapsing as pressure is applied.

  10. Stabilized sulfur binding using activated fillers

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D.; Vagin, Vyacheslav P.; Vagin, Sergey P.

    2015-07-21

    A method of making a stable, sulfur binding composite comprising impregnating a solid aggregate with an organic modifier comprising unsaturated hydrocarbons with at least one double or triple covalent bond between adjacent carbon atoms to create a modifier-impregnated aggregate; heating and drying the modifier-impregnated aggregate to activate the surface of the modifier-impregnated aggregate for reaction with sulfur.

  11. Vacuum Brazing of Accelerator Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajvir; Pant, K. K.; Lal, Shankar; Yadav, D. P.; Garg, S. R.; Raghuvanshi, V. K.; Mundra, G.

    2012-11-01

    Commonly used materials for accelerator components are those which are vacuum compatible and thermally conductive. Stainless steel, aluminum and copper are common among them. Stainless steel is a poor heat conductor and not very common in use where good thermal conductivity is required. Aluminum and copper and their alloys meet the above requirements and are frequently used for the above purpose. The accelerator components made of aluminum and its alloys using welding process have become a common practice now a days. It is mandatory to use copper and its other grades in RF devices required for accelerators. Beam line and Front End components of the accelerators are fabricated from stainless steel and OFHC copper. Fabrication of components made of copper using welding process is very difficult and in most of the cases it is impossible. Fabrication and joining in such cases is possible using brazing process especially under vacuum and inert gas atmosphere. Several accelerator components have been vacuum brazed for Indus projects at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore using vacuum brazing facility available at RRCAT, Indore. This paper presents details regarding development of the above mentioned high value and strategic components/assemblies. It will include basics required for vacuum brazing, details of vacuum brazing facility, joint design, fixturing of the jobs, selection of filler alloys, optimization of brazing parameters so as to obtain high quality brazed joints, brief description of vacuum brazed accelerator components etc.

  12. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1962-02-20

    A brazing alloy is described which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability and is capable of forming a corrosion-resistant brazed joint. At least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion-resistant refractory metal. The brazing alloy consists essentially of 40 to 90 wt % of gold, 5 to 35 wt% of nickel, and 1 to 45 wt% of tantalum. (AEC)

  13. 46 CFR 56.75-5 - Filler metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Filler metal. 56.75-5 Section 56.75-5 Shipping COAST... Brazing § 56.75-5 Filler metal. (a) The filler metal used in brazing must be a nonferrous metal or alloy having a melting point above 1,000 °F. and below that of the metal being joined. The filler metal...

  14. 46 CFR 56.75-5 - Filler metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Filler metal. 56.75-5 Section 56.75-5 Shipping COAST... Brazing § 56.75-5 Filler metal. (a) The filler metal used in brazing must be a nonferrous metal or alloy having a melting point above 1,000 °F. and below that of the metal being joined. The filler metal...

  15. 46 CFR 56.75-5 - Filler metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Filler metal. 56.75-5 Section 56.75-5 Shipping COAST... Brazing § 56.75-5 Filler metal. (a) The filler metal used in brazing must be a nonferrous metal or alloy having a melting point above 1,000 °F. and below that of the metal being joined. The filler metal...

  16. 46 CFR 56.75-5 - Filler metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Filler metal. 56.75-5 Section 56.75-5 Shipping COAST... Brazing § 56.75-5 Filler metal. (a) The filler metal used in brazing must be a nonferrous metal or alloy having a melting point above 1,000 °F. and below that of the metal being joined. The filler metal...

  17. 46 CFR 56.75-5 - Filler metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Filler metal. 56.75-5 Section 56.75-5 Shipping COAST... Brazing § 56.75-5 Filler metal. (a) The filler metal used in brazing must be a nonferrous metal or alloy having a melting point above 1,000 °F. and below that of the metal being joined. The filler metal...

  18. Active Metal Brazing and Adhesive Bonding of Titanium to C/C Composites for Heat Rejection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, Tarah; Cerny, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Robust assembly and integration technologies are critically needed for the manufacturing of heat rejection system (HRS) components for current and future space exploration missions. Active metal brazing and adhesive bonding technologies are being assessed for the bonding of titanium to high conductivity Carbon-Carbon composite sub components in various shapes and sizes. Currently a number of different silver and copper based active metal brazes and adhesive compositions are being evaluated. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Several mechanical tests have been employed to ascertain the effectiveness of different brazing and adhesive approaches in tension and in shear that are both simple and representative of the actual system and relatively straightforward in analysis. The results of these mechanical tests along with the fractographic analysis will be discussed. In addition, advantages, technical issues and concerns in using different bonding approaches will also be presented.

  19. Vacuum brazing beryllium to Monel

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, T.G.; Grotsky, V.K.; Keller, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    The tensile strength of beryllium to Monel vacuum furnace brazed joints was studied. The filler used was the 72% Ag-28%Cu(BAg-8) alloy. The strength of these joints, which require the use of a titanium hydride powder or physical vapor deposited titanium wetting agent on the beryllium, was found to approach the yield strength of the base metals. Strength was found to be reduced by the interaction of increased titanium hydride quantity and brazing time. Metallographic and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies correlated these effects with microstructure. The formation of the brittle copper-beryllium delta phase was found to require conditions of high brazing temperature and the presence of a reservoir of the copper-containing filler such as found in fillet areas. Two other filler metals: pure silver, and a 60% Ag-30% Cu-10%Sn (BAg-17) alloy were shown to be acceptable alternatives to the BAg-8 alloy in cases where the filler metal can be preplaced between the base metal surfaces.

  20. Laser Brazing of High Temperature Braze Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Y. P.; Seaman, R. F.; McQuillan, T. J.; Martiens, R. F.

    2000-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) consists of 1080 conical tubes, which are furnace brazed themselves, manifolds, and surrounding structural jacket making almost four miles of braze joints. Subsequent furnace braze cycles are performed due to localized braze voids between the coolant tubes. SSME nozzle experiences extremely high heat flux (180 mW/sq m) during hot fire. Braze voids between coolant tubes may result in hot combustion gas escape causing jacket bulges. The nozzle can be disqualified for flight or result in mission failure if the braze voids exceed the limits. Localized braze processes were considered to eliminate braze voids, however, damage to the parent materials often prohibited use of such process. Being the only manned flight reusable rocket engine, it has stringent requirement on the braze process. Poor braze quality or damage to the parent materials limits the nozzle service life. The objective of this study was to develop a laser brazing process to provide quality, localized braze joints without adverse affect on the parent materials. Gold (Au-Cu-Ni-Pd-Mn) based high temperature braze alloys were used in both powder and wire form. Thin section iron base superalloy A286 tube was used as substrate materials. Different Laser Systems including CO2 (10.6 micrometers, 1kW), ND:YAG (1.06 micrometers, 4kW). and direct diode laser (808nm. 150W) were investigated for brazing process. The laser process variables including wavelength. laser power, travel speed and angle of inclination were optimized according to bead geometry and braze alloy wetting at minimum heat input level, The properties of laser brazing were compared to that of furnace brazing. Microhardness profiles were used for braze joint property comparison between laser and furnace brazing. The cooling rate of laser brazing was compared to furnace brazing based on secondary dendritic arm spacing, Both optical and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) were used to evaluate the microstructures of

  1. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1963-02-26

    A brazing alloy which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability, said alloy being capable of forming a corrosion resistant brazed joint wherein at least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion resistant refractory metal, said alloy consisting essentially of 20 to 50 per cent by weight of gold, 20 to 50 per cent by weight of nickel, and 15 to 45 per cent by weight of molybdenum. (AEC)

  2. Surface preparation for high purity alumina ceramics enabling direct brazing in hydrogen atmospheres

    DOEpatents

    Cadden, Charles H.; Yang, Nancy Yuan Chi; Hosking, Floyd M.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for preparing the surface of a high purity alumina ceramic or sapphire specimen that enables direct brazing in a hydrogen atmosphere using an active braze alloy. The present invention also relates to a method for directly brazing a high purity alumina ceramic or sapphire specimen to a ceramic or metal member using this method of surface preparation, and to articles produced by this brazing method. The presence of silicon, in the form of a SiO.sub.2 -containing surface layer, can more than double the tensile bond strength in alumina ceramic joints brazed in a hydrogen atmosphere using an active Au-16Ni-0.75 Mo-1.75V filler metal. A thin silicon coating applied by PVD processing can, after air firing, produce a semi-continuous coverage of the alumina surface with a SiO.sub.2 film. Room temperature tensile strength was found to be proportional to the fraction of air fired surface covered by silicon-containing films. Similarly, the ratio of substrate fracture versus interface separation was also related to the amount of surface silicon present prior to brazing. This process can replace the need to perform a "moly-manganese" metallization step.

  3. Brazing Inconel 625 Using the Copper Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Shiang; Wang, Cheng-Yen; Shiue, Ren-Kae

    2013-12-01

    Brazing Inconel 625 (IN-625) using the copper foil has been investigated in this research. The brazed joint is composed of nanosized CrNi3 precipitates and Cr/Mo/Nb/Ni quaternary compound in the Cu/Ni-rich matrix. The copper filler 50 μm in thickness is enough for the joint filling. However, the application of Cu foil 100 μm in thickness has little effect on the shear strength of the brazed joint. The specimen brazed at 1433 K (1160 °C) for 1800 seconds demonstrates the best shear strength of 470 MPa, and its fractograph is dominated by ductile dimple fracture with sliding marks. Decreasing the brazing temperature slightly decreases the shear strength of the brazed joint due to the presence of a few isolated solidification shrinkage voids smaller than 15 μm. Increasing the brazing temperature, especially for the specimen brazed at 1473 K (1200 °C), significantly deteriorates the shear strength of the joint below 260 MPa because of coalescence of isothermal solidification shrinkage voids in the joint. The Cu foil demonstrates potential in brazing IN-625 for industrial application.

  4. Improved brazing technique

    DOEpatents

    Harast, D.G.

    1984-01-27

    A method of brazing comprises sand blasting the surfaces of the components to be brazed with particles of a brazing material to clean the surfaces and to embed brazing material in the surfaces, applying the brazing material to the surfaces, and heating the brazing material to form a brazement between the components.

  5. Failure Assessment Diagram for Titanium Brazed Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Jones, Justin S.; Powell, Mollie M.; Puckett, David F.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction equation was used to predict failure in Ti-4V-6Al joints brazed with Al 1100 filler metal. The joints used in this study were geometrically similar to the joints in the brazed beryllium metering structure considered for the ATLAS telescope. This study confirmed that the interaction equation R(sub sigma) + R(sub Tau) = 1, where R(sub sigma) and R(sub Tau)are normal and shear stress ratios, can be used as conservative lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in ATLAS brazed joints as well as for construction of the Failure Assessment Diagram (FAD).

  6. Evaluation of Brazed Joints Using Failure Assessment Diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Fitness-for service approach was used to perform structural analysis of the brazed joints consisting of several base metal / filler metal combinations. Failure Assessment Diagrams (FADs) based on tensile and shear stress ratios were constructed and experimentally validated. It was shown that such FADs can provide a conservative estimate of safe combinations of stresses in the brazed joints. Based on this approach, Margins of Safety (MS) of the brazed joints subjected to multi-axial loading conditions can be evaluated..

  7. Failure Assessment Diagram for Brazed 304 Stainless Steel Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yory

    2011-01-01

    Interaction equations were proposed earlier to predict failure in Albemet 162 brazed joints. Present study demonstrates that the same interaction equations can be used for lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in 304 stainless steel joints brazed with silver-based filler metals as well as for construction of the Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD).

  8. Reversible brazing process

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, Jim D.; Stephens, John J.; Walker, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    A method of reversibly brazing surfaces together. An interface is affixed to each surface. The interfaces can be affixed by processes such as mechanical joining, welding, or brazing. The two interfaces are then brazed together using a brazing process that does not defeat the surface to interface joint. Interfaces of materials such as Ni-200 can be affixed to metallic surfaces by welding or by brazing with a first braze alloy. The Ni-200 interfaces can then be brazed together using a second braze alloy. The second braze alloy can be chosen so that it minimally alters the properties of the interfaces to allow multiple braze, heat and disassemble, rebraze cycles.

  9. Microstructural and Mechanical Evaluation of a Cu-Based Active Braze Alloy to Join Silicon Nitride Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Asthana, Rajiv; Varela, F. M.; Martinez-Fernandez, J.

    2010-01-01

    Self-joining of St. Gobain Si3N4 (NT-154) using a ductile Cu-Al-Si-Ti active braze (Cu-ABA) was demonstrated. A reaction zone approx.2.5-3.5 microns thick) developed at the interface after 30 min brazing at 1317 K. The interface was enriched in Ti and Si. The room temperature compressive shear strengths of Si3N4/Si3N4 and Inconel/Inconel joints (the latter created to access baseline data for use with the proposed Si3N4/Inconel joints) were 140+/-49MPa and 207+/-12MPa, respectively. High-temperature shear tests were performed at 1023K and 1073 K, and the strength of the Si3N4/Si3N4 and Inconel/Inconel joints were determined. The joints were metallurgically well-bonded for temperatures above 2/3 of the braze solidus. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies revealed a fine grain microstructure in the reaction layer, and large grains in the inner part of the joint with interfaces being crack-free. The observed formation of Ti5Si3 and AlN at the joint interface during brazing is discussed.

  10. Braze material for joining ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic surfaces and joined ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic article

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, T.K.; Novak, R.F.

    1991-05-07

    An improved active metal braze filler material is provided in which the coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze filler is more closely matched with that of the ceramic and metal, or two ceramics, to provide ceramic to metal, or ceramic to ceramic, sealed joints and articles which can withstand both high temperatures and repeated thermal cycling without failing. The braze filler material comprises a mixture of a material, preferably in the form of a powder, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, tungsten, silicon carbide and mixtures thereof, and an active metal filler material selected from the group consisting of alloys or mixtures of nickel and titanium, alloys or mixtures of nickel and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and copper, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and titanium, alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium, zirconium, and nickel, and alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, zirconium, and nickel. The powder component is selected such that its coefficient of thermal expansion will effect the overall coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze material so that it more closely matches the coefficients of thermal expansion of the ceramic and metal parts to be joined. 3 figures.

  11. Braze material for joining ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic surfaces and joined ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic article

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Thomas K.; Novak, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    An improved active metal braze filler material is provided in which the coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze filler is more closely matched with that of the ceramic and metal, or two ceramics, to provide ceramic to metal, or ceramic to ceramic, sealed joints and articles which can withstand both high temperatures and repeated thermal cycling without failing. The braze filler material comprises a mixture of a material, preferably in the form of a powder, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, tungsten, silicon carbide and mixtures thereof, and an active metal filler material selected from the group consisting of alloys or mixtures of nickel and titanium, alloys or mixtures of nickel and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and copper, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and titanium, alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium, zirconium, and nickel, and alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, zirconium, and nickel. The powder component is selected such that its coefficient of thermal expansion will effect the overall coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze material so that it more closely matches the coefficients of thermal expansion of the ceramic and metal parts to be joined.

  12. Active Metal Brazing and Characterization of Brazed Joints in C-C and C-SiC Composites to Copper-Clad-Molybdenum System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Asthana, R.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon/carbon composites with CVI and resin-derived matrices, and C/SiC composites reinforced with T-300 carbon fibers in a CVI SiC matrix were joined to Cu-clad Mo using two Ag-Cu braze alloys, Cusil-ABA (1.75% Ti) and Ticusil (4.5% Ti). The brazed joints revealed good interfacial bonding, preferential precipitation of Ti at the composite/braze interface, and a tendency toward delamination in resin-derived C/C composite. Extensive braze penetration of the inter-fiber channels in the CVI C/C composites was observed. The Knoop microhardness (HK) distribution across the C/C joints indicated sharp gradients at the interface, and a higher hardness in Ticusil than in Cusil-ABA. For the C/SiC composite to Cu-clad-Mo joints, the effect of composite surface preparation revealed that ground samples did not crack whereas unground samples cracked. Calculated strain energy in brazed joints in both systems is comparable to the strain energy in a number of other ceramic/metal systems. Theoretical predictions of the effective thermal resistance suggest that such joined systems may be promising for thermal management applications.

  13. Braze alloy spreading on steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siewert, T. A.; Heine, R. W.; Lagally, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron microscopy (AEM) were employed to observe elemental surface decomposition resulting from the brazing of a copper-treated steel. Two types of steel were used for the study, stainless steel (treated with a eutectic silver-copper alloy), and low-carbon steel (treated with pure copper). Attention is given to oxygen partial pressure during the processes; a low enough pressure (8 x 10 to the -5th torr) was found to totally inhibit the spreading of the filler material at a fixed heating cycle. With both types of steel, copper treatment enhanced even spreading at a decreased temperature.

  14. BRAZE BONDING OF COLUMBIUM

    DOEpatents

    Heestand, R.L.; Picklesimer, M.L.

    1962-07-31

    A method of brazing niobium parts together is described. The surfaces of the parts to be brazed together are placed in abutting relationship with a brazing alloy disposed adjacent. The alloy consists essentially of, by weight, 12 to 25% niobium, 0.5 to 5% molybdenum, and the balance zirconium, The alloy is heated to at least its melting point to braze the parts together. The brazed joint is then cooled. The heating, melting and cooling take place in an inert atmosphere. (AEC)

  15. Failure Assessment of Stainless Steel and Titanium Brazed Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury A.

    2012-01-01

    Following successful application of Coulomb-Mohr and interaction equations for evaluation of safety margins in Albemet 162 brazed joints, two additional base metal/filler metal systems were investigated. Specimens consisting of stainless steel brazed with silver-base filler metal and titanium brazed with 1100 Al alloy were tested to failure under combined action of tensile, shear, bending and torsion loads. Finite Element Analysis (FEA), hand calculations and digital image comparison (DIC) techniques were used to estimate failure stresses and construct Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD). This study confirms that interaction equation R(sub sigma) + R(sub tau) = 1, where R(sub sigma) and R(sub t u) are normal and shear stress ratios, can be used as conservative lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in stainless steel and titanium brazed joints.

  16. Thermochemical Analysis of Phases Formed at the Interface of a Mg alloy-Ni-plated Steel Joint during Laser Brazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri, Ali M.; Chartrand, Patrice; Weckman, David C.; Zhou, Norman Y.

    2013-04-01

    The thermodynamic stability of precipitated phases at the steel-Ni-Mg alloy interface during laser brazing of Ni-plated steel to AZ31B magnesium sheet using AZ92 magnesium alloy filler wire has been evaluated using FactSage thermochemical software. Assuming local chemical equilibrium at the interface, the chemical activity-temperature-composition relationships of intermetallic compounds that might form in the steel-Ni interlayer-AZ92 magnesium alloy system in the temperature range of 873 K to 1373 K (600 °C to 1100 °C) were estimated using the Equilib module of FactSage. The results provided better understanding of the phases that might form at the interface of the dissimilar metal joints during the laser brazing process. The addition of a Ni interlayer between the steel and the Mg brazing alloy was predicted to result in the formation of the AlNi, Mg2Ni, and Al3Ni2 intermetallic compounds at the interface, depending on the local maximum temperature. This was confirmed experimentally by laser brazing of Ni electro-plated steel to AZ31B-H24 magnesium alloy using AZ92 magnesium alloy filler wire. As predicted, the formation of just AlNi and Mg2Ni from a monotectic and eutectic reaction, respectively, was observed near the interface.

  17. Compressive Strength Evaluation in Brazed ZrO2/Ti6Al4V Joints Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Kee, Se Ho; Jung, Flora; Heo, Yongku; Jung, Jae Pil

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to synthesize and evaluate the compressive strength of the ZrO2/Ti-6Al-4V joint brazed using an active metal filler Ag-Cu-Sn-Ti, and its application to dental implants assuring its reliability to resist the compressive failure in the actual oral environment. The brazing was performed at a temperature of 750 °C for 30 min in a vacuum furnace under 5 × 10-6 Torr atmosphere. The microstructure of the brazed joint showed the presence of an Ag-rich matrix and a Cu-rich phase, and Cu-Ti intermetallic compounds were observed along the Ti-6Al-4V bonded interface. The compressive strength of the brazed ZrO2/Ti-6Al-4V joint was measured by EN ISO 14801 standard test method. The measured compressive strength of the joint was ~1477 MPa—a value almost five times that of existing dental cements. Finite element analysis also confirmed the high von Mises stress values. The compressive strains in the samples were found concentrated near the Ti-6Al-4V position, matching with the position of the real fractured sample. These results suggest extremely significant compressive strength in ZrO2/Ti-6Al-4V joints using the Ag-Cu-Sn-Ti filler. It is believed that a highly reliable dental implant can be processed and designed using the results of this study.

  18. Compressive Strength Evaluation in Brazed ZrO2/Ti6Al4V Joints Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Kee, Se Ho; Jung, Flora; Heo, Yongku; Jung, Jae Pil

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to synthesize and evaluate the compressive strength of the ZrO2/Ti-6Al-4V joint brazed using an active metal filler Ag-Cu-Sn-Ti, and its application to dental implants assuring its reliability to resist the compressive failure in the actual oral environment. The brazing was performed at a temperature of 750 °C for 30 min in a vacuum furnace under 5 × 10-6 Torr atmosphere. The microstructure of the brazed joint showed the presence of an Ag-rich matrix and a Cu-rich phase, and Cu-Ti intermetallic compounds were observed along the Ti-6Al-4V bonded interface. The compressive strength of the brazed ZrO2/Ti-6Al-4V joint was measured by EN ISO 14801 standard test method. The measured compressive strength of the joint was ~1477 MPa—a value almost five times that of existing dental cements. Finite element analysis also confirmed the high von Mises stress values. The compressive strains in the samples were found concentrated near the Ti-6Al-4V position, matching with the position of the real fractured sample. These results suggest extremely significant compressive strength in ZrO2/Ti-6Al-4V joints using the Ag-Cu-Sn-Ti filler. It is believed that a highly reliable dental implant can be processed and designed using the results of this study.

  19. Microstructural and phase evolution in metakaolin geopolymers with different activators and added aluminosilicate fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Madhuchhanda; Dana, Kausik; Das, Sukhen

    2015-10-01

    This work aims to investigate the microstructural and phase evolution of alkali activated metakaolin products with different activators and added aluminosilicate filler phases. The added filler phases have different reactivity to the alkali activated metakaolin system. Microstructural evolution in the alkali activated products has been investigated by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). Variation in strength development in alkali activated metakaolin products was followed by compressive strength measurement test. Microstructural study shows that in case of metakaolin with NaOH activator crystalline sodalite formed in all the product samples irrespective of the added filler phases. The microstructure of these NaOH activated products investigated by FESEM showed crystalline and inhomogeneous morphology. Mixed activator containing both NaOH and sodium silicate in a fixed mass ratio formed predominantly amorphous phase. Microstructure of these samples showed more homogeneity than that of NaOH activated metakaolin products. The study further shows that addition of α-Al2O3 powder, non reactive phase to the alkali activated metakaolin system when used in larger amount increased crystalline phase in the matrix. α-Al2O3 powder addition increased the compressive strength of the product samples for both the activator compositions. Added phase of colloidal silica, reactive to the alkali activated metakaolin system when used in larger amount was found to increase amorphous nature of the matrix. Addition of colloidal silica influenced the compressive strength property differently with different activator compositions.

  20. Mechanical characterization and modeling of brazed EUROFER-tungsten-joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehtov, T.; Aktaa, J.; Kraft, O.

    2007-08-01

    Within the scope of the European fusion power plant study for development of a He-cooled divertor, a tungsten-steel joint has been considered. A preferable joining technique is high temperature brazing. Brazed joints of dissimilar materials suffer from a mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion. The components of the joint are exposed to mechanical and cyclic thermal loads which give rise to development of high stresses and could lead to failure. Brazed joints of tungsten alloy and ferritic-martensitic steel using different brazing filler materials were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Finite element computations have been performed to calculate the stress distribution and to investigate their evolution within the course of the operational thermal load. Sample joint specimen have been brazed, investigated with respect to their microstructure, and mechanically characterized by performing bend and notched bar impact testing at different temperatures. Some plastic deformation and relatively low impact energies were measured.

  1. A New Vacuum Brazing Route for Niobium-316L Stainless Steel Transition Joints for Superconducting RF Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Abhay; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, R.; Bhatnagar, V. K.; Yedle, K.; Ram Sankar, P.; Sindal, B. K.; Kumar, K. V. A. N. P. S.; Singh, M. K.; Rai, S. K.; Bose, A.; Veerbhadraiah, T.; Ramteke, S.; Sridhar, R.; Mundra, G.; Joshi, S. C.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2015-02-01

    The paper describes a new approach for vacuum brazing of niobium-316L stainless steel transition joints for application in superconducting radiofrequency cavities. The study exploited good wettability of titanium-activated silver-base brazing alloy (CuSil-ABA®), along with nickel as a diffusion barrier, to suppress brittle Fe-Nb intermetallic formation, which is well reported during the established vacuum brazing practice using pure copper filler. The brazed specimens displayed no brittle intermetallic layers on any of its interfaces, but instead carried well-distributed intermetallic particles in the ductile matrix. The transition joints displayed room temperature tensile and shear strengths of 122-143 MPa and 80-113 MPa, respectively. The joints not only exhibited required hermeticity (helium leak rate <1.1 × 10-10 mbar l/s) for service in ultra-high vacuum but also withstood twelve hour degassing heat treatment at 873 K (suppresses Q-disease in niobium cavities), without any noticeable degradation in the microstructure and the hermeticity. The joints retained their leak tightness even after undergoing ten thermal cycles between the room temperature and the liquid nitrogen temperature, thereby establishing their ability to withstand service-induced low cycle fatigue conditions. The study proposes a new lower temperature brazing route to form niobium-316L stainless steel transition joints, with improved microstructural characteristics and acceptable hermeticity and mechanical properties.

  2. Soldering and brazing safety guide: A handbook on space practice for those involved in soldering and brazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This manual provides those involved in welding and brazing with effective safety procedures for use in performance of their jobs. Hazards exist in four types of general soldering and brazing processes: (1) cleaning; (2) application of flux; (3) application of heat and filler metal; and (4) residue cleaning. Most hazards during those operations can be avoided by using care, proper ventilation, protective clothing and equipment. Specific process hazards for various methods of brazing and soldering are treated. Methods to check ventilation are presented as well as a check of personal hygiene and good maintenance practices are stressed. Several emergency first aid treatments are described.

  3. Air Brazing: A New Method of Ceramic-Ceramic and Ceramic-Metal Joining

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Darsell, Jens T.; Kim, Jin Yong

    2011-10-01

    A new method of ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal joining has emerged over the past several years. Referred to as air brazing, the technique was originally designed and developed for use in fabricating high-temperature solid-state electrochemical devices such as planar SOFCs and oxygen and hydrogen concentrators. The primary advantage of air brazing is that a predominantly metallic joint can be formed directly in air without need of an inert cover gas or the use of surface reactive fluxes. The resulting bond is hermetic, offers excellent room temperature strength, and is inherently resistant to oxidation at high temperature. The key to developing a successful filler metal composition for air brazing is to identify a metal oxide wetting agent that is mutually soluble in a molten noble metal solvent. One particular oxide-metal combination that appears readily suited for this purpose is CuOx-Ag, a system originally of interest in the development of silver clad cuprate-based superconductors. Studies of the equilibrium phases studies in this system indicate that there are two invariant points in the pseudobinary CuOx-Ag phase diagram around which new braze compositions can be developed: 1) a monotectic reaction at 969±1°C, where CuO and a Ag-rich liquid L1 coexist with a second CuOx-rich liquid phase L2 at a composition of xAg/(xAg + xCu) = 0.10±0.03 Ag and 2) a eutectic reaction at 942±1°C, where CuO and Ag coexist with L1 at a composition of xAg/(xAg + xCu) = 0.99±0.005. Specifically, near-eutectic Ag-CuO filler metal compositions have shown good promise in joining electrochemically active ceramics such as yttria-stabilized zirconia, lanthanum strontium manganite, and barium strontium cobalt ferrite, as well as alumina and magnesia. More recently it has been found that various ternary additions can further improve the wetting characteristics of these filler metals, increase their potential operating temperatures, and/or increase the resulting strength of the

  4. Fluxless aluminum brazing

    DOEpatents

    Werner, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    This invention relates to a fluxless brazing alloy for use in forming brazed composites made from members of aluminum and its alloys. The brazing alloy consists of 35-55% Al, 10--20% Si, 25-60% Ge; 65-88% Al, 2-20% Si, 2--18% In; 65--80% Al, 15-- 25% Si, 5- 15% Y. (0fficial Gazette)

  5. Saturation phenomenon of Ce and Ti in the modification of Al-Zn-Si filler metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin-long; Xue, Song-bai; Dai, Wei; Xue, Peng

    2015-02-01

    Cerium and titanium were added to an Al-42Zn-6.5Si brazing alloy, and the subsequent microstructures of the brazing alloy and the 6061 Al alloy brazing seam were investigated. The microstructures of filler metals and brazed joints were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersion spectrometry. A new Ce-Ti phase formed around the silicon phase in the modified filler metal and this saturation phenomenon was analyzed. Interestingly, following brazing of the 6061 alloy, there is no evidence of the Ce-Ti phase in the brazing seam. Because of the mutual solubility of the brazing alloy and base metal, the quantity of the solvent increases, and the solute Ce and Ti atoms assume an undersaturated state.

  6. Evaluation of Margins of Safety in Brazed Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Wang, Len; Powell, Mollie M.; Soffa, Matthew A.; Rommel, Monica L.

    2009-01-01

    One of the essential steps in assuring reliable performance of high cost critical brazed structures is the assessment of the Margin of Safety (MS) of the brazed joints. In many cases the experimental determination of the failure loads by destructive testing of the brazed assembly is not practical and cost prohibitive. In such cases the evaluation of the MS is performed analytically by comparing the maximum design loads with the allowable ones and incorporating various safety or knock down factors imposed by the customer. Unfortunately, an industry standard methodology for the design and analysis of brazed joints has not been developed. This paper provides an example of an approach that was used to analyze an AlBeMet 162 (38%Be-62%Al) structure brazed with the AWS BAlSi-4 (Al-12%Si) filler metal. A practical and conservative interaction equation combining shear and tensile allowables was developed and validated to evaluate an acceptable (safe) combination of tensile and shear stresses acting in the brazed joint. These allowables are obtained from testing of standard tensile and lap shear brazed specimens. The proposed equation enables the assessment of the load carrying capability of complex brazed joints subjected to multi-axial loading.

  7. Mechanical Property and Corrosion Resistance Evaluations of Ti-6Al-7Nb Alloy Brazed with Bulk Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, E.; Kato, H.; Ogata, Toshiaki; Nishiyama, Nobuyuki; Specht, Eliot D; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Inoue, A.; Hisatsune, K.

    2007-01-01

    Exploitation of metallic glass as new brazing filler for Ti-based biomedical alloy was attempted. Ti-6Al-7Nb was used as a brazed material, and candidates of bulk metallic glass brazing filler were Cu60Hf25Ti15, Mg65Cu25Gd10, Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 and Pd40Cu30P20Ni10. Convergence infrared-ray brazing was conducted for brazing Ti-6Al-7Nb/metallic glass in Ar atmosphere. After brazing, hardness measurement, X-ray tomography, cross-sectional observation, artificial saliva immersion test and tensile test were performed to evaluate brazability, mechanical property and corrosion resistance of the obtained brazing joints. The results of brazing using these metallic glass fillers show that all the metallic glasses were brazable to Ti-6Al-7Nb except for Mg65Cu25Gd10. Mg65Cu25Gd10, Cu60Hf25Ti15 and their joints collapsed rapidly during immersion test. Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 joint was the best in terms of degradation resistance; however, tensile strength was inferior to the conventional one. Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 filler and Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 filler and their joints did not show any collapse or tarnish during the immersion test. Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 joint showed the excellent properties in terms of both corrosion resistance and tensile strength, which were superior to a joint brazed using Ti-15Cu-25Ni conventional filler. X-ray tomograph indicates that fracture tends to occur in the vicinity of the brazing interface after tensile test. The brazed metallic glass fillers were fully crystallized, excluding Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 filler. Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 brazed filler contained mapleleaf like primary dendrite, peritectoid and a few microns interfacial reaction layer in glassy matrix. The results indicated that Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 is promising brazing filler for dental or biomaterial devices.

  8. A new low-melting-point aluminum braze

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, D.M.; Humpston, G.; Sangha, S.P.S.

    1996-08-01

    Most high-strength aluminum engineering alloys cannot be joined by brazing because they either degrade or melt at the temperature at which commercially available aluminum brazes are used. Previous efforts to develop aluminum brazing filler metal alloys with a significantly reduced melting point have tended to be frustrated by poor mechanical properties of the alloys, corrosion of the joints or the high cost, toxicity or volatility of the constituent materials. This paper describes the development and assessment of a new brazing alloy with a composition of 73Al-20Cu-2Ni-55I (wt-%), which has been designed to overcome these limitations. A joining process has been devised for fluxless brazing of aluminum engineering alloys using the new filler metal for use in both inert gas and vacuum furnaces. The production of ductile foil preforms and roll-clad base metals is described together with preliminary results of mechanical property assessments and corrosion resistance trials. These results are highly encouraging and point to promising new applications for aluminum brazing technology.

  9. Development of brazing foils to join monocrystalline tungsten alloys with ODS-EUROFER steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalin, B. A.; Fedotov, V. T.; Sevrjukov, O. N.; Kalashnikov, A. N.; Suchkov, A. N.; Moeslang, A.; Rohde, M.

    2007-08-01

    Results on rapidly solidified filler metals for brazing W with W and monocrystalline W with EUROFER steel (FS) are presented. Rapidly quenched powder-type filler metals based on Ti bal-V-Cr-Be were developed to braze polycrystalline W with monocrystalline W. In addition, Fe bal-Ta-Ge-Si-B-Pd alloys were developed to braze monocrystalline W with FS for helium gas cooled divertors and plasma-facing components. The W to FS brazed joints were fabricated under vacuum at 1150 °C, using a Ta spacer of 0.1 mm in thickness to account for the different thermal expansions. The monocrystalline tungsten as well as the related brazed joints withstood 30 cycles between 750 °C/20 min and air cooling/3-5 min.

  10. Interfacial Microstructure Evolution and Shear Strength of Titanium Sandwich Structures Fabricated by Brazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wentao; Fan, Minyu; Li, Jinlong; Tao, Jie

    2016-03-01

    The corrugated sandwich structure, consisting of a CP Ti (commercially pure titanium) core between two Ti-6Al-4V face sheets, was brazed using pasty Ti-37.5Zr-15Cu-10Ni as filler alloy, at the temperature of 870°C for 5, 10, 20, and 30 min. The effect of brazing time on the microstructure and elemental distribution of the brazed joints was examined by means of SEM, EDS, and XRD analyses. It was found that various intermetallic phases were formed in the brazed joints, following a brazing time of 5 min, and their contents were decreased by the increment of brazing time, while prolonged brazing time resulted in a fine, acicular Widmanstätten microstructure throughout the entire joint. In addition, shear testing was performed in the brazed corrugated specimens in order to indirectly assess the quality of the joints. The debonding between CP Ti and Ti-6Al-4V was observed in the specimen brazed for 5 min and the fracture of the CP Ti corrugated core occurred after 30 min of brazing time. Additionally, when brazed for 10 min or 20 min, brittle intermetallic compounds in the joints and the grain growth of the base metal were controllable. Therefore, the sandwich structures failed without debonding in the joints or fracture within the base metal, demonstrating a good combination of strength and ductility.

  11. Low vapor pressure braze alloys for thermionic energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, V. L.

    1976-01-01

    The evaluation of cesium diode electrode materials called for braze fillers with very low vapor pressures and a wide range of melting points. Binary alloys of low vapor pressure refractory metals were chosen to fill this need. These alloys of Th, Zr, Hf, Ru, Nb, Ir, Mo, Ta, Os, Re, and W have reported melting point minima or eutectics from 1,510 K to above 3,000 K. Preliminary data are compiled on the use of several of these braze alloys. Melting points and surface wetting on a Ta base are given. Results of brazing Ir, LaB6, Nb, Re, W, and Zr-22 wt % ZrO2 materials into Ta and Nb-1% Zr bases are presented. Current braze usage is summarized.

  12. Weld braze technique

    DOEpatents

    Kanne, Jr., William R.; Kelker, Jr., John W.; Alexander, Robert J.

    1982-01-01

    High-strength metal joints are formed by a combined weld-braze technique. A hollow cylindrical metal member is forced into an undersized counterbore in another metal member with a suitable braze metal disposed along the bottom of the counterbore. Force and current applied to the members in an evacuated chamber results in the concurrent formation of the weld along the sides of the counterbore and a braze along the bottom of the counterbore in one continuous operation.

  13. Brazing of Stainless Steels to Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) Using Silver -Base Brazes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Asthana, Rajiv

    2005-01-01

    Three silver-base brazes containing either noble metal palladium (Palcusil-10 and Palcusil-15) or active metal titanium (Ticusil) were evaluated for high-temperature oxidation resistance, and their effectiveness in joining yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to a corrosion-resistant ferritic stainless steel. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and optical- and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) were used to evaluate the braze oxidation behavior and the structure and chemistry of the YSZ/braze/steel joints. The effect of the braze type and processing conditions on the interfacial microstructure and composition of the joint regions is discussed with reference to the chemical changes that occur at the interface. It was found that chemical interdiffusion of the constituents of YSZ, steel and the brazes led to compositional changes and/or interface reconstruction, and metallurgically sound joints.

  14. The story of laser brazing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Peter; Dierken, Roland

    2012-03-01

    This article gives an overview on the development of laser brazing technology as a new joining technique for car body production. The story starts with fundamental research work at German institutes in 1993, continues with the first implementations in automobile production in 1998, gives examples of applications since then and ends with an outlook. Laser brazing adapted design of joints and boundary conditions for a safe processing are discussed. Besides a better understanding for the sensitivity of the process against joint irregularities and misalignment, the key to successful launch was an advanced system technology. Different working heads equipped with wire feeding device, seam tracking system or tactile sensors for an automated teaching are presented in this paper. Novel laser heads providing a two beam technology will allow improved penetration depth of the filler wire and a more ecological processing by means of energy consumption.

  15. Brazing Dissimilar Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotz, Phillip D.; Davis, William M.; Wisner, Daniel L.

    1996-01-01

    Brazing effective technique for joining ordinary structural metals to brittle, low-thermal-expansion refractory metals. Specifically, brazing process established for joining copper or nickel flanges to ends of vacuum-plasma-sprayed tungsten tubes and for joining stainless-steel flanges to ends of tubes made of alloy of molybdenum with 40 percent of rhenium.

  16. Development of optimum process parameters and a study of the effects of surface roughness on brazing of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharinie, Tuan; Huda, Zainul; Izuan, Mohd Faaliq; Hamdi, Mohammed

    2015-03-01

    Brazing experiments on commercially-pure copper plates, using brazing filler metal (MBF-2005), are conducted at temperatures in the range of 650-750 °C for time-durations in the range of 5-15 min. Shear tests for braze-joints involved use of a universal testing machine. Based on the shear-test results, a new brazing cycle has been developed that corresponds to the greatest shear strength of the braze-joint. The brazing cycle has been performed under a controlled dry-argon atmosphere in a tube furnace. Microscopic observations were made by use of both optical and electron microscopes; whereas surface roughness measurements were made by using a TR100 Surface Roughness Tester. It is found that successful brazing and good wetting can be achieved by the least voids by using an average surface roughness (Ra value) for the base material.

  17. Development of Brazing Technology for Use in High- Temperature Gas Separation Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K.S.; Hardy, J.S.; Kim, J.Y.

    2003-04-23

    -to-metal braze and consequently lead to the development of the novel reactive air brazing (RAB) concept. The goal in RAB is to reactively modify one or both oxide faying surfaces with an oxide compound dissolved in a molten noble metal alloy such that the newly formed surface is readily wetted by the remaining liquid filler material. In many respects, this concept is similar to active metal brazing, except that joining can be conducted in air and the final joint will be resistant to oxidation at high temperature. Potentially, there are a number of metal oxide-noble metal systems that can be considered for RAB, including Ag-CuO, Ag-V2O5, and Pt-Nb2O5. Our current interest is in determining whether the Ag-CuO system is suitable for air brazing functional ceramic-to-metal joints such as those needed in practical electrochemical devices. In a series of studies, the wetting behavior of the Ag-CuO braze was investigated with respect to a number of potential hydrogen separation, oxygen separation, and fuel cell electrolyte membrane materials and heat resistant metal systems, including: alumina, (La0.6Sr0.4)(Co0.2Fe0.8)O3, (La0.8Sr0.2)FeO3, YSZ, fecralloy, and Crofer-22APU. Selected findings from these studies as well as from our work on joint strength and durability during high-temperature exposure testing will be discussed.

  18. Brazing Refractory Metals Used In High-Temperature Nuclear Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    A. J. Palmer; C. J. Woolstenhulme

    2009-06-01

    As part of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Next Generation Nuclear Project (NGNP) currently ongoing at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the irradiation performance of candidate high-temperature gas reactor fuels and materials is being evaluated at INL’s Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The design of the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR 1) experiment, currently being irradiated in the ATR, required development of special techniques for brazing niobium and molybdenum. Brazing is one technique used to join refractory metals to each other and to stainless steel alloys. Although brazing processes are well established, it is difficult to braze niobium, molybdenum, and most other refractory metals because they quickly develop adherent oxides when exposed to room-temperature air. Specialized techniques and methods were developed by INL to overcome these obstacles. This paper describes the techniques developed for removing these oxides, as well as the ASME Section IX-qualified braze procedures that were developed as part of the AGR-1 project. All brazes were made using an induction coil with an inert or reducing atmosphere at low pressure. Other parameters, such as filler metals, fluxes used, and general setup procedures, are also discussed.

  19. METHOD OF BRAZING

    DOEpatents

    Patriarca, P.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1962-11-27

    A method of joining metal surfaces is given. Surfaces having nickel or iron as the base metal are joined together with a brazing composition consisting of 80% nickel, 10% phosphorus, and 10% chromium. (AEC)

  20. Joining Ceramics By Brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Sudsina, Michael W.

    1992-01-01

    Certain ceramic materials tightly bond together by brazing with suitable alloys. Enables fabrication of parts of wide variety of shapes from smaller initial pieces of ceramics produced directly in only limited variety of shapes.

  1. Strength testing of Ti-vapor-coated silicon nitride braze joints

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    Sintered silicon nitride was vacuum brazed to itself at 1130{degree}C with a Au-25Ni-25Pd wt % filler metal. Wetting was obtained by coating the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} surfaces with titanium prior to brazing by electron beam evaporation. The brazed joints were virtually free of porosity. Metallographic analysis showed that Ti reacted with the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, to form a TiN reaction layer during brazing. Small amounts of Si and Ti dissolved in the filler metal layers but they did not appear to influence the mechanical properties of the braze layer. Flexure bars were made from the brazed coupons and tested at room temperature, 600C, 700C, and 800C in air. At 700C and below, fracture of the test bars occurred in the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, either near the brazed surfaces or at some distance into the monolithic material. The measured strength of joint specimens decreased slightly with increasing test temperature, and generally exceeded the intrinsic braze filler metal strength in this temperature range. It was also found that lapping the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, prior to Ti coating reduced the number of near-surface flaws and produced joints with higher average strength and lower scatter than those left in a ground condition. Specimens tested at 800C had very low strengths, and this behavior was related to the microstructure at the brazed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} surfaces.

  2. Chemical elements diffusion in the stainless steel components brazed with Cu-Ag alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voiculescu, I.; Geanta, V.; Vasile, I. M.; Binchiciu, E. F.; Winestoock, R.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the study of diffusion of chemical elements through a brazing joint, between two thin components (0.5mm) made of stainless steel 304. An experimental brazing filler material has been used for brazing stainless steel component and then the diffusion phenomenon has been studied, in terms of chemical element displacement from the brazed separation interface. The filler material is in the form of a metal rod coated with ceramic slurry mixture of minerals, containing precursors and metallic powders, which can contribute to the formation of deposit brazed. In determining the distance of diffusion of chemical elements, on both sides of the fusion line, were performed measurements of the chemical composition using electron microscopy SEM and EDX spectrometry. Metallographic analysis of cross sections was performed with the aim of highlight the microstructural characteristics of brazed joints, for estimate the wetting capacity, adherence of filler metal and highlight any imperfections. Analyzes performed showed the penetration of alloying elements from the solder (Ag, Cu, Zn and Sn) towards the base material (stainless steel), over distances up to 60 microns.

  3. Wrinkle Fillers

    MedlinePlus

    ... appear weeks, months or years after injection. Allergy testing is required for particular types of filler materials, such as those taken from animals (e.g., cows, rooster combs). The following risks ...

  4. Dispersed metal-toughened ceramics and ceramic brazing

    SciTech Connect

    Moorhead, A.J.; Tiegs, T.N.; Lauf, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    An alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) based material that contains approximately 1 vol % finely dispersed platinum or chromium was developed for use in high temperature thermal-shock resistant electrical insulators. The work at ORNL is divided into two areas: (1) development of DMT ceramics; and (2) development of brazing filler metals suitable for making ceramic-to-ceramic and ceramic-to-metal brazements. The DMT ceramics and brazements are intended for service at elevated temperatures and at high stress levels in the dirty environments of advanced heat engines. The development and characterization of DMT ceramics includes processing (powder preparation, densification and heat treatment) and detailed measurement of mechanical and physical properties (strength, fracture toughness, and thermal conductivity). The brazing work includes: (1) the formulation and melting of small quantities of experimental brazing filler metals; (2) evaluation of the wetting and bonding behavior of these filler metals on Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, partially stabilized zirconia and ..cap alpha..-SiC in a sessile drop apparatus; and (3) determine the short-term strength and fracture toughness of brazements.

  5. Weld-brazing of titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, which combines resistance spotwelding and brazing has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Resistance spot-welding is employed to position and align the parts and to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing; it contributes to the integrity of the joint. Brazing enhances the properties of the joint and reduces the stress concentrations normally associated with spotwelds. Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints have been fabricated using 3003 aluminum braze both in a vacuum furnace and in a retort containing an inert gas environment.

  6. Coating system to permit direct brazing of ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Cadden, Charles H.; Hosking, F. Michael

    2003-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for preparing the surface of a ceramic component that enables direct brazing using a non-active braze alloy. The present invention also relates to a method for directly brazing a ceramic component to a ceramic or metal member using this method of surface preparation, and to articles produced by using this brazing method. The ceramic can be high purity alumina. The method comprises applying a first coating of a silicon-bearing oxide material (e.g. silicon dioxide or mullite (3Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.2SiO.sub.2) to the ceramic. Next, a thin coating of active metal (e.g. Ti or V) is applied. Finally, a thicker coating of a non-active metal (e.g. Au or Cu) is applied. The coatings can be applied by physical vapor deposition (PVD). Alternatively, the active and non-active metals can be co-deposited (e.g. by sputtering a target made of mullite). After all of the coatings have been applied, the ceramic can be fired at a high temperature in a non-oxidizing environment to promote diffusion, and to enhance bonding of the coatings to the substrate. After firing, the metallized ceramic component can be brazed to other components using a conventional non-active braze alloy. Alternatively, the firing and brazing steps can be combined into a single step. This process can replace the need to perform a "moly-manganese" metallization step.

  7. METHOD OF BRAZING BERYLLIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hanks, G.S.; Keil, R.W.

    1963-05-21

    A process is described for brazing beryllium metal parts by coating the beryllium with silver (65- 75 wt%)-aluminum alloy using a lithium fluoride (50 wt%)-lithium chloride flux, and heating the coated joint to a temperature of about 700 un. Concent 85% C for about 10 minutes. (AEC)

  8. Waste oyster shell as a kind of active filler to treat the combined wastewater at an estuary.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongbing; Huang, Gu; Fu, Xiaoying; Liu, Xiaoling; Zheng, Daocai; Peng, Jian; Zhang, Ke; Huang, Bo; Fan, Liangqian; Chen, Fenghui; Sun, Xiubo

    2013-10-01

    Estuaries have been described as one of the most difficult environments on Earth. It is difficult to know how to treat the combined wastewater in tidal rivers at the estuary, where the situation is very different from ordinary fresh water rivers. Waste oyster shell was used as the active filler in this study in a bio-contact oxidation tank to treat the combined wastewater at the Fengtang Tidal River. With a middle-experimental scale of 360 m3/day, the average removal efficiency of COD, BOD, NH3-N, TP and TSS was 80.05%, 85.02%, 86.59%, 50.58% and 85.32%, respectively, in this bio-contact oxidation process. The living microbes in the biofilms on the waste oyster shell in this bio-contact oxidation tank, which were mainly composed of zoogloea, protozoa and micro-metazoa species, revealed that waste oyster shell as the filler was suitable material for combined wastewater degradation. This treatment method using waste oyster shell as active filler was then applied in a mangrove demonstration area for water quality improvement near the experiment area, with a treatment volume of 5 x 10(3) m3/day. Another project was also successfully applied in a constructed wetland, with a wastewater treatment volume of 1 x 10(3) m3/day. This technology is therefore feasible and can easily be applied on a larger scale. PMID:24494491

  9. Structure of Vacuum Brazed BNi-5 Joint of Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grushko, B.; Weiss, B. Z.

    1984-04-01

    Structural investigations of the brazed joint of Inconel 718 with BNi-5 filler metal were carried out on specimens with geometries simulating a real joint. Three identification methods applied in parallel were used. Fused and solidified filler metal showed the presence of at least four microstructural components: the dominant γ-solid solution, two binary eutectics (G phase + γ) and (θ-phase + γ @#@), and prismatic objects identified as cr-phase. The influence of brazing time and temperature was studied with specimens heated in accordance with three different thermal regimes. The Ni-base γ-phase solidifies in dendritic form and contains Cr, Fe, Nb, and Mo, the concentrations of which are dependent on the thermal regime and on the distance from the former liquid-solid interface. The intermetallics (G, 0) and the matrix form binary and ternary eutectics. In overheated brazed joints the filler metal penetrates into the grain boundaries of the base metal, resulting in the formation of new phases. The dominant phase was identified as a hexagonal Laves phase (λ,). The diffusion zone in the base metal can be divided into two subregions. In subregion I the precipitating phase is a Nb-rich G-phase, while in subregion II, the depth of which can be directly related to the width of the gap, preferentially oriented carbides of Nb and Ti are formed. The phase formation in the BNi-5 brazing of Inconel 718 may be described by a quasi-quarternary diagram on the Ni-Cr-Nb-Si system.

  10. Failure Assessment of Brazed Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    Despite the great advances in analytical methods available to structural engineers, designers of brazed structures have great difficulties in addressing fundamental questions related to the loadcarrying capabilities of brazed assemblies. In this chapter we will review why such common engineering tools as Finite Element Analysis (FEA) as well as many well-established theories (Tresca, von Mises, Highest Principal Stress, etc) don't work well for the brazed joints. This chapter will show how the classic approach of using interaction equations and the less known Coulomb-Mohr failure criterion can be employed to estimate Margins of Safety (MS) in brazed joints.

  11. Corrosion Testing of Brazed Space Station IATCS Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohlman, Matthew J.; Varisik, Jerry; Steele, John W.; Golden, Johnny L.; Boyce, William E.; Pedley, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Increased nickel concentrations in the IATCS coolant prompted a study of the corrosion rates of nickel-brazed heat exchangers in the system. The testing has shown that corrosion is occurring in a silicon-rich intermetallic phase in the braze filler of coldplates and heat exchangers as the result of a decrease in the coolant pH brought about by cabin carbon dioxide permeation through polymeric flexhoses. Similar corrosion is occurring in the EMU de-ionized water loop. Certain heat exchangers and coldplates have more silicon-rich phase because of their manufacturing method, and those units produce more nickel corrosion product. Silver biocide additions did not induce pitting corrosion at silver precipitate sites.

  12. Finding Brazing Voids by Holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galluccio, R.

    1986-01-01

    Vibration-induced interference fringes reveal locations of defects. Holographic apparatus used to view object while vibrated ultrasonically. Interference fringes in hologram reveal brazing defects. Holographic technique locates small voids in large brazed joints. Identifies unbrazed regions 1 in. to second power (6 cm to the second power) or less in area.

  13. Oxidation resistant filler metals for direct brazing of structural ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1986-01-01

    A method of joining ceramics and metals to themselves and to one another is described using essentially pure trinickel aluminide and trinickel aluminide containing small amounts of carbon. This method produces strong joints that can withstand high service temperatures and oxidizing environments.

  14. Brazing graphite to graphite

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, George R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of virtually graphite.

  15. Development of rapidly quenched brazing foils to join tungsten alloys with ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalin, B. A.; Fedotov, V. T.; Sevrjukov, O. N.; Moeslang, A.; Rohde, M.

    2004-08-01

    Results on rapidly solidified filler metals for tungsten brazing are presented. A rapidly quenched foil-type filler metal based on Ni bal-15Cr-4Mo-4Fe-(0.5-1.0)V-7.5Si-1.5B was developed to braze tungsten to ferritic/martensitic Crl3Mo2NbVB steel (FS) for helium gas cooled divertors and plasma facing components. Polycrystalline W-2CeO 2 and monocrystalline pure tungsten were brazed to the steel under vacuum at 1150 °C, using a 0.5 mm thick foil spacer made of a 50Fe-50Ni alloy. As a result of thermocycling tests (100 cycles between 700 °C/20 min and air-water cooling/3-5 min) on brazed joints, tungsten powder metallurgically processed W-2CeO 2 failed due to residual stresses, whereas the brazed joint with zone-melted monocrystalline tungsten withstood the thermocycling tests.

  16. Dissimilar joint characteristics of SiC and WC-Co alloy by laser brazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsuka, K.; Sechi, Y.; Nakata, K.

    2012-08-01

    SiC and WC-Co alloys were joined by laser brazing with an active braze metal. The braze metal based on eutectic Ag-Cu alloy with additional Ti as an active element ranging from 0 to 2.8 mass% was sandwiched by the SiC block and WC-Co alloy plate. The brazing was carried out by selective laser beam irradiation on the WC-Co alloy plate. The content of Ti in the braze metal was required to exceed 0.6 mass% in order to form a brazed joint with a measurable shear strength. The shear strength increased with increasing Ti content up to 2.3 mass%Ti and decreased with a higher content.

  17. Brazing of Stainless Steel to Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Using Gold-Based Brazes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, T. P.; Asthana, R.

    2007-01-01

    Two gold-base active metal brazes (gold-ABA and gold-ABA-V) were evaluated for oxidation resistance to 850 C, and used to join yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to a corrosion-resistant ferritic stainless steel for possible use in solid oxide fuel cells. Thermogravimetric analysis and optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to evaluate the braze oxidation behavior, and microstructure and composition of the YSZ/braze/steel joints. Both gold-ABA and gold-ABA-V exhibited nearly linear oxidation kinetics at 850 C, with gold-ABA-V showing faster oxidation than gold-ABA. Both brazes produced metallurgically sound YSZ/steel joints due to chemical interactions of Ti and V with the YSZ and steel substrates.

  18. Interfacial reaction of intermetallic compounds of ultrasonic-assisted brazed joints between dissimilar alloys of Ti6Al4V and Al4Cu1Mg.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhipeng; Zhao, Weiwei; Yan, Jiuchun; Li, Dacheng

    2011-09-01

    Ultrasonic-assisted brazing of Al4Cu1Mg and Ti6Al4V using Zn-based filler metal (without and with Si) has been investigated. Before brazing, the Ti6Al4V samples were pre-treated by hot-dip aluminizing and ultrasonic dipping in a molten filler metal bath in order to control the formation of intermetallic compounds between the Ti6Al4V samples and the filler metal. The results show that the TiAl(3) phase was formed in the interface between the Ti6Al4V substrate and the aluminized coating. For the Zn-based filler metal without Si, the Ti6Al4V interfacial area of the brazed joint did not change under the effect of the ultrasonic wave, and only consisted of the TiAl(3) phase. For the Zn-based filler metal with Si, the TiAl(3) phase disappeared and a Ti(7)Al(5)Si(12) phase was formed at the interfacial area of the brazed joints under the effect of the ultrasonic wave. Due to the TiAl(3) phase completely changing to a Ti(7)Al(5)Si(12) phase, the morphology of the intermetallic compounds changed from a block-like shape into a lamellar-like structure. The highest shear strength of 138MPa was obtained from the brazed joint free of the block-like TiAl(3) phase. PMID:21489846

  19. High-speed impact of the metal projectile on the barrier containing porous corundum-based ceramics with chemically active filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ischenko, Alexander; Afanas'eva, Svetlana; Belov, Nikolai; Blinov, Vasiliy; Burkin, Vladimir; Korolkov, Leonid; Rogaev, Konstantin; Khabibullin, Marat; Yugov, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a calculation-experimental study on high-speed interaction of the metal projectile with a combined barrier made of porous corundum-based ceramics filled with chemically active composition (sulfur, nitrate of potash) in the wide range of speeds. A mathematical behavior model of porous corundum-based ceramics with chemically active filler is developed within the scope of mechanics of continuous media taking into account the energy embedding from a possible chemical reaction between a projectile metal and filler at high-speed impact. Essential embedding of inlet heat is not observed in the considered range of impact speeds (2.5 … 8 km/s).

  20. Brazeability of a 3003 Aluminum alloy with Al-Si-Cu-based filler metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, L. C.; Weng, W. P.; Cheng, M. D.; Tsao, C. W.; Chuang, T. H.

    2002-08-01

    Al-Si-Cu-based filler metals have been used successfully for brazing 6061 aluminum alloy as reported in the authors’ previous studies. For application in heat exchangers during manufacturing, the brazeability of 3003 aluminum alloy with these filler metals is herein further evaluated. Experimental results show that even at such a low temperature as 550 °C, the 3003 alloys can be brazed with the Al-Si-Cu fillers and display bonding strengths that are higher than 77 MPa as well. An optimized 3003 joint is attained in the brazements with the innovative Al-7Si-20Cu-2Sn-1Mg filler metal at 575 °C for 30 min, which reveals a bonding strength capping the 3003 Al matrix.

  1. Thermally stable diamond brazing

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Robert P.

    2009-02-10

    A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

  2. Welding, brazing, and soldering handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, A. B.; Koehler, M. L.; Metzler, J. W.; Sturges, S. R.

    1969-01-01

    Handbook gives information on the selection and application of welding, brazing, and soldering techniques for joining various metals. Summary descriptions of processes, criteria for process selection, and advantages of different methods are given.

  3. Brazing titanium to stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, R. I.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium and stainless-steel members are usually joined mechanically for lack of any other effective method. New approach using different brazing alloy and plating steel member with nickel resolves problem. Process must be carried out in inert atmosphere.

  4. Poleable nanoparticles as fillers towards non-linear optically active actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Yee Song; Nüesch, Frank A.; Opris, Dorina M.

    2015-04-01

    A new type of poleable dielectric elastomer is introduced herein. The elastomer contains polymer nanoparticles with frozen molecular dipoles, which can be oriented at elevated temperatures in an electric field via poling. The aim is to provide a soft material with high, tunable optical properties suitable for actuator and flexible electronics applications. To that end poleable polymeric nanoparticles with high dipole concentrations and glass transition temperatures well above room temperature will be needed to be used as filler in an elastomer matrix. The synthesis and characterization of such particles is presented in this manuscript. Polyhydroxyethyl methacrylate (PHEMA) nanoparticles were synthesized using miniemulsion polymerization. The particles were loaded with 4-[ethyl (2-hydroxyethyl) amino]-4-nitrobenzene, usually called Disperse Red 1 (DR1), which has a large dipole moment (μ = 7.5 - 9.5 D). The maximum dipole loadings is limited by the solubility of the dipole in the monomer solutions prior to polymerization. All samples show a glass transition temperature around 95 °C. Secondary electron microscopy (SEM) revealed spherical particles, the size of which was confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. A composite was prepared by dispersing the particles in polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS).

  5. Ultrasonic guided wave inspection of Inconel 625 brazed lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comot, Pierre; Bocher, Philippe; Belanger, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The aerospace industry has been investigating the use of brazing for structural joints, as a mean of reducing cost and weight. There therefore is a need for a rapid, robust, and cost-effective non-destructive testing method for evaluating the structural integrity of the joints. The mechanical strength of brazed joints depends mainly on the amount of brittle phases in their microstructure. Ultrasonic guided waves offer the possibility of detecting brittle phases in joints using spatio-temporal measurements. Moreover, they offer the opportunity to inspect complex shape joints. This study focused on the development of a technique based on ultrasonic guided waves for the inspection of Inconel 625 lap joints brazed with BNi-2 filler metal. A finite element model of a lap joint was used to optimize the inspection parameters and assess the feasibility of detecting the amount of brittle phases in the joint. A finite element parametric study simulating the input signal shape, the center frequency, and the excitation direction was performed. The simulations showed that the ultrasonic guided wave energy transmitted through, and reflected from, the joints was proportional to the amount of brittle phases in the joint.

  6. Corrosion Behavior of Aluminum-Steel Weld-Brazing Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu; Li, Jie; Zhang, Gang; Huang, Jiankang; Gu, Yufen

    2016-05-01

    Dissimilar metals of 1060 aluminum and galvanized steel were joined with a lap joint by pulsed double-electrode gas metal arc weld brazing with aluminum-magnesium and aluminum-silicon filler metals. The corrosion behavior of the weld joints was investigated with immersion corrosion and electrochemical corrosion tests, and the corrosion morphology of the joints was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Galvanic corrosion was found to occur when the samples were immersed in corrosive media, and the corrosion rate of joints was increased with increased heat input of the workpiece. Comparison of the corrosion properties of weld joints with different filler wires indicated that the corrosion rate of weld joints with aluminum-silicon filler wire was larger than that of weld joints with aluminum-magnesium filler wire. Results also showed that the zinc-rich zone of weld joints was prone to corrosion. The corrosion behavior of zinc-rich zone was analyzed with SEM equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis system based on the test results.

  7. Numerical Analysis of Residual Stress for Copper Base Brazed Stainless Steel Plate-Fin Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qiaoyun; Ling, Xiang

    2010-07-01

    Copper base stainless steel plate-fin structure has been widely used as a heat exchanger in many fields. The nonlinear thermal reaction on the residual stress in brazing process of the plate-fin structure was studied in this paper. A finite element model (FEM) was proposed to simulate the heat transfer and the sequential residual stress generated in the plate-fin and filler metals based on thermal elastic-plastic theory. By the stress distribution in four paths marked in the structure obtained from FEM results, it is found that the maximum residual tensile stress occurs in the brazed joint next to the plate side and a crack would initiate in this region. Also, the first principle stresses of reference nodes were calculated and the conclusion is consistent with the simulation results. These results would provide some constructive instructions in the practical brazing procedure.

  8. Mechanical and microstructural behavior of brazed aluminum / stainless steel mixed joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V.; Weis, S.; Wagner, G.

    2016-03-01

    There is a requirement to combine different materials such as aluminum and stainless steel in industrial applications like automotive heat exchangers. Brazing offers the possibility to reduce the joining temperature in comparison to welding due to the lower liquidus temperature of the fillers. In the present work, the mechanical and microstructural behavior of aluminum / stainless steel mixed joints is investigated. The specimens are produced by induction brazing using an AlSi10filler and a non-corrosive flux. To evaluate the mechanical properties of the joints, tensile tests at elevated temperatures are carried out. Additionally, long-term thermal exposure experiments are done in order to investigate the changes in the microstructure.

  9. Microstructural evolution and ductile phase toughening in brazed joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philips, Noah Robinson

    In typical brazed joints, melting point depressants degrade the structural robustness by concentrating as brittle phases into continuous seams along the centerline. The objective of this dissertation is to sufficiently understand the mechanisms governing the microstructure of a typical braze that approaches for modifying the fabrication to eliminate brittleness can be identified and demonstrated. A characterization of a quaternary braze (Nicrobraze 31) used for stainless steel bonds, containing P and Si melting point depressants, reveals that the thermochemical interactions governing the microstructure include dissolution/reprecipitation, solid-state diffusion, and solidification. It is shown that the Si can be incorporated into a solid solution gamma-Ni(Fe, Si) phase that forms by reprecipitation. A fracture toughness test for intermediate toughness materials is developed to quantify the performance of brazed joints. The test configuration is a wedge driven DCB (Double Cantilever Beam), with design guided by analytical solutions for the energy release rate and compliance. The fracture resistance of a typical braze joint is found to be significantly greater than that for the intermetallic constituents. Approximately half of the toughening is attributed to plastic stretch of the ductile phase within the eutectic. The remainder is attributed to dissipation within a plastic zone that forms in the primary gamma-Ni(Fe, Si) regions. Heat treatments are presented that use ductile phase toughening to mitigate the effect of brittle intermetallics in a Ni-based braze alloy. The development of this beneficial microstructure is based on an understanding of the transient dissolution and isothermal solidification phenomena. By rapid cooling after a short brazing time, gamma-Ni(Fe, Si) is redistributed to the midline where it disrupts the intermetallics and forms a network of ductile ligaments upon fracture. Reinforcement by the modified ductile phase nearly doubles the toughness

  10. Method for braze-joining spirally wound tapes to inner walls of heat exchanger tubes

    DOEpatents

    Garrison, Melton E.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method of fabricating heat exchanger tubes in which twisted tapes are utilized for promoting turbulence and heat transfer. The method of the present invention provides for the brazing of the tapes to the inner walls of the tubes for enhancing heat transfer between the fluid within the conduit and a fluid medium outside of the conduit by conduction through the tape. The braze joint of the present invention is coextensive with the tape over the entire length thereof within the conduit. The practice of the present invention is achieved by placing a filler wire of brazing metal along the tape at a location removed from the side walls and then heating the conduit and tape sufficiently to effect the displacement of the filler metal by wicking to the contact point between the tape and the conduit wall to form a braze joint coextensive with the length of the tape within the conduit. This arrangement provides maximum heat transfer and assures that the tape is in contact with the conduit over the entire common length thereof.

  11. Method for braze-joining spirally wound tapes to inner walls of heat exchanger tubes

    DOEpatents

    Garrison, M.E.

    1982-09-03

    The present invention is directed to a method of fabricating heat exchanger tubes in which twisted tapes are utilized for promoting turbulence and heat transfer. The method of the present invention provides for the brazing of the tapes to the inner walls of the tubes for enhancing heat transfer between the fluid within the conduit and a fluid medium outside of the conduit by conduction through the tape. The braze joint of the present invention is coextensive with the tape over the entire length thereof within the conduit. The practice of the present invention is achieved by placing a filler wire of brazing metal along the tape at a location removed from the side walls and then heating the conduit and tape sufficiently to effect the displacement of the filler metal by wicking to the contact point between the tape and the conduit wall to form a braze joint coextensive with the length of the tape within the conduit. This arrangement provides maximum heat transfer and assures that the tape is in contact with the conduit over the entire common length thereof.

  12. New concept in brazing metallic honeycomb panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, P. D.; Layton, R. E.; Stratton, F. W.

    1973-01-01

    Aluminum oxide coating provides surface which will not be wetted by brazing alloy and which stops metallic diffusion welding of tooling materials to part being produced. This method eliminates loss of tooling materials and parts from braze wetting and allows fall-apart disassembly of tooling after brazing.

  13. Silver-hafnium braze alloy

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, Jr., John J.; Hosking, F. Michael; Yost, Frederick G.

    2003-12-16

    A binary allow braze composition has been prepared and used in a bonded article of ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal materials. The braze composition comprises greater than approximately 95 wt % silver, greater than approximately 2 wt % hafnium and less than approximately 4.1 wt % hafnium, and less than approximately 0.2 wt % trace elements. The binary braze alloy is used to join a ceramic material to another ceramic material or a ceramic material, such as alumina, quartz, aluminum nitride, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, and mullite, to a metal material, such as iron-based metals, cobalt-based metals, nickel-based metals, molybdenum-based metals, tungsten-based metals, niobium-based metals, and tantalum-based metals. A hermetic bonded article is obtained with a strength greater than 10,000 psi.

  14. The Effect of Braze Interlayer Thickness on the Mechanical Strength of Alumina Brazed with Ag-CuO Braze Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, Kevin M.; Meier, Alan; Joshi, Vineet V.; Pilgrim, Steven M.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of braze interlayer thickness on the strength of alumina brazed with silver-copper oxide reactive air braze (RAB) alloys was evaluated using a four point bend test configuration. The brazed samples had an average fracture strength of 180 MPa or approximately 60 percent of the average monolithic alumina strength. The joint strength values obtained exceeded the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the silver interlayer indicating strong ceramic to metal adhesion and the development of a triaxial stress state in the braze interlayer. The average fracture strength was relatively constant (190 ± 60 MPa) in the thickness range of 0.030 mm to 0.230 mm for all test conditions. The braze fracture strength then decreased down to 100 ± 30 MPa as the braze thickness increased from 0.230 mm to 0.430 mm indicating a loss of triaxial constraint with increasing interlayer thickness. In addition, four different fracture modes were observed.

  15. INVESTIGATION OF A NOVEL AIR BRAZING COMPOSITION FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE, OXIDATION-RESISTANT CERAMIC JOINING

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Hardy, John S.; Darsell, Jens T.

    2004-01-30

    One of the challenges in developing a useful ceramic joining technique is in producing a joint that offers good strength under high temperature and highly oxidizing operating conditions. Unfortunately many of the commercially available active metal ceramic brazing alloys exhibit oxidation behaviors which are unacceptable for use in a high temperature application. We have developed a new approach to ceramic brazing, referred to as air brazing, that employs an oxide wetting agent dissolved in a molten noble metal solvent, in this case CuO in Ag, such that acceptable wetting behavior occurs on a number of ceramic substrates. In an effort to explore how to increase the operating temperature of this type of braze, we have investigated the effect of ternary palladium additions on the wetting characteristics of our standard Ag-CuO air braze composition

  16. Dermal fillers: an update.

    PubMed

    Ballin, Annelyse Cristine; Brandt, Fredric S; Cazzaniga, Alex

    2015-08-01

    Injection of dermal fillers is the second most frequent nonsurgical cosmetic procedure performed in the USA. Dermal fillers are an option in the treatment of volume deficiency, scars, and rhytides; facial sculpting; facial contouring; and augmentation of specific anatomical sites such as the lips. The number of injectable dermal fillers available on the market increases yearly. Dermatologists and cosmetic surgeons should regularly review treatment options to provide patients with safe and effective filler options. This paper extensively reviews the properties of the available fillers, such as their rheology, longevity, and adverse effects, and how these properties affect the choice of filler agent for a particular patient or a particular site. Also, trends in dermal filler injections are discussed. PMID:26081021

  17. Weld-brazing - a new joining process. [combination resistance spot welding and brazing of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A joining process designated weld brazing which combines resistance spot welding and brazing has been developed. Resistance spot welding is used to position and align the parts as well as to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing. Fabrication is then completed by capillary flow of the braze alloy into the joint. The process has been used successfully to fabricate Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints using 3003 aluminum braze alloy. Test results obtained on single overlap and hat-stiffened structural specimens show that weld brazed joints are superior in tensile shear, stress rupture, fatigue, and buckling than joint fabricated by spotwelding or brazing. Another attractive feature of the process is that the brazed joints is hermetically sealed by the braze material.

  18. The Apparent Contact Angle and Wetted Area of Active Alloys on Silicon Carbide as a Function of the Temperature and the Surface Roughness: A Multivariate Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, Wolfgang; Pfeiffer, Jan; Wojarski, Lukas

    2015-08-01

    Despite the broad field of applications for active filler alloys for brazing ceramics, as well as intense research work on the wetting and spreading behavior of these alloys on ceramic surfaces within the last decades, the manufactured joints still exhibit significant variations in their properties due to the high sensitivity of the alloys to changing brazing conditions. This increases the need for investigations of the wetting and spreading behavior of filler alloys with regard to the dominating influences combined with their interdependencies, instead of solely focusing on single parameter investigations. In this regard, measurements of the wetting angle and area were conducted at solidified AgCuTi and CuSnTi alloys on SiC substrates. Based on these measurements, a regression model was generated, illustrating the influence of the brazing temperature, the roughness of the faying surfaces, the furnace atmosphere, and their interdependencies on the wetting and spreading behavior of the filler alloys. It was revealed that the behavior of the melts was significantly influenced by the varied brazing parameters, as well as by their interdependencies. This result was also predicted by the developed model and showed a high accuracy.

  19. Simulation based analysis of laser beam brazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobler, Michael; Wiethop, Philipp; Schmid, Daniel; Schmidt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Laser beam brazing is a well-established joining technology in car body manufacturing with main applications in the joining of divided tailgates and the joining of roof and side panels. A key advantage of laser brazed joints is the seam's visual quality which satisfies highest requirements. However, the laser beam brazing process is very complex and process dynamics are only partially understood. In order to gain deeper knowledge of the laser beam brazing process, to determine optimal process parameters and to test process variants, a transient three-dimensional simulation model of laser beam brazing is developed. This model takes into account energy input, heat transfer as well as fluid and wetting dynamics that lead to the formation of the brazing seam. A validation of the simulation model is performed by metallographic analysis and thermocouple measurements for different parameter sets of the brazing process. These results show that the multi-physical simulation model not only can be used to gain insight into the laser brazing process but also offers the possibility of process optimization in industrial applications. The model's capabilities in determining optimal process parameters are exemplarily shown for the laser power. Small deviations in the energy input can affect the brazing results significantly. Therefore, the simulation model is used to analyze the effect of the lateral laser beam position on the energy input and the resulting brazing seam.

  20. Experimental study of W-Eurofer laser brazing for divertor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munez, C. J.; Garrido, M. A.; Rams, J.; Ureña, A.

    2011-11-01

    This work can be considered as a preliminary evaluation of the potential of laser brazing for joining tungsten based alloys to reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels (Eurofer). Brazing of tungsten and EUROFER alloys using a 55Ni-45Ti alloy as a brazer and a high power diode laser (HPDL) as a power source has been investigated. The brazed joints showed solidified pools with good superficial aspect and a high degree of wettability with the both parent sheets, presumably because of the active effect of titanium. Metallurgical brazeability was investigated and nanoindentation measurements were done to evaluate local hardening and stiffness effects associated to dilution phenomena.

  1. Antimicrobial activity of submicron glass fibres incorporated as a filler to a dental sealer.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Tejeda, L; Cabal, B; Torrecillas, R; Prado, C; Fernandez-Garcia, E; López-Piriz, R; Quintero, F; Pou, J; Penide, J; Moya, J S

    2016-01-01

    Two types of antimicrobial glass fibers containing ZnO and CaO, with diameters ranging from tens of nanometers to 1 µm, were successfully fabricated by a laser spinning technique. The antimicrobial performance was corroborated according to ISO 20743:2013, by using gram-negative (Escherichia coli) and gram-positive (Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus mutans and Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria, and yeast (Candida krusei) (more than 3 logs of reduction). The metabolic activity and endosomal system of eukaryotic cells were not altered by using eluents of CaO glass submicrometric fibers and ZnO fibers at 1 : 10 dilution as cellular media (viability rates over 70%). A dental material was functionalized by embedding ZnO nanofibers above the percolation threshold (20% wt), creating a three-dimensional (3D) fiber network that added an antimicrobial profile. This new ZnO glass fiber composite is proved non-cytotoxic and preserved the antimicrobial effect after immersion in human saliva. This is the first time that a fiber-reinforced liner with strong antimicrobial-activity has been created to prevent secondary caries. The potential of developing new fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) with antimicrobial properties opens up an extensive field of dental applications where most important diseases have an infectious origin. PMID:27509353

  2. Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Kenneth Scott; Hardy, John S; Kim, Jin Yong; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2013-04-23

    A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

  3. Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Kenneth Scott; Hardy, John S.; Kim, Jin Yong; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2010-04-06

    A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

  4. Brazing of beryllium for structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogan, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Progress made in fabricating a beryllium compression tube structure and a stiffened beryllium panel. The compression tube was 7.6cm in diameter and 30.5cm long with titanium end fittings. The panel was 203cm long and stiffened with longitudinal stringers. Both units were assembled by brazing with BAg-18 braze alloy. The detail parts were fabricated by hot forming 0.305cm beryllium sheet and the brazing parameters established.

  5. Thermal resilient multiple jaw braze fixture

    DOEpatents

    Ney, Robert; Perrone, Alex J.

    1995-07-11

    A braze fixture has side walls forming a cavity with an opening to receive a stack of parts to be brazed. Sidewalls of the housing have a plurality of bearing receiving openings into which bearing rods or jaws are inserted to align the stacked elements of the workpiece. The housing can also have view ports to allow a visual check of the alignment. Straps or wires around the fixture are selected to have thermal characteristics similar to the thermal characteristics of the workpiece undergoing brazing. The straps or wires make physical contact with the bearing rods thereby causing bearing rods to maintain the workpiece in proper alignment throughout the entire brazing cycle.

  6. Susceptor heating device for electron beam brazing

    DOEpatents

    Antieau, Susan M.; Johnson, Robert G. R.

    1999-01-01

    A brazing device and method are provided which locally apply a controlled amount of heat to a selected area, within a vacuum. The device brazes two components together with a brazing metal. A susceptor plate is placed in thermal contact with one of the components. A serrated pedestal supports the susceptor plate. When the pedestal and susceptor plate are in place, an electron gun irradiates an electron beam at the susceptor plate such that the susceptor plate is sufficiently heated to transfer heat through the one component and melt the brazing metal.

  7. Residual Stress in Brazing of Submicron Al2O3 to WC-Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunder, T.; Piquerez, A.; Bach, M.; Mille, P.

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the residual stresses induced by brazing and grinding submicron Al2O3, using different methods. Energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry analysis (EDX) of 72Ag-Cu filler and filler/WC-Co interface showed evidence of atomic diffusion and possible formation of titanium oxide layers between the joint and the bonding materials. An analytical model supported by the finite element method (FEM) based on strain determination due to the difference in variation of thermal expansion was used to assess the stress distribution at the coupling interface and in bulk materials. The model took into account the evolution of the Young's modulus and of the thermal expansion with temperature. The model could be used to follow strain and stress evolutions of the bonded materials during the cooling cycle. The maximum stress rose above -300 MPa at the center of the 100 × 100 × 3 mm ceramic plates. The residual stresses on the external surface of ceramic were investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and indentation fracture method (IFM). After brazing and grinding the plate, the principal stresses were 128.1 and 94.9 MPa, and the shear stress was -20.1 MPa. Microscopic examination revealed grain pull-out promoted by the global residual stresses induced by the brazing and grinding processes. The surface stresses evaluated by the different methods were reasonably correlated.

  8. Residual Stress in Brazing of Submicron Al2O3 to WC-Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunder, T.; Piquerez, A.; Bach, M.; Mille, P.

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the residual stresses induced by brazing and grinding submicron Al2O3, using different methods. Energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry analysis (EDX) of 72Ag-Cu filler and filler/WC-Co interface showed evidence of atomic diffusion and possible formation of titanium oxide layers between the joint and the bonding materials. An analytical model supported by the finite element method (FEM) based on strain determination due to the difference in variation of thermal expansion was used to assess the stress distribution at the coupling interface and in bulk materials. The model took into account the evolution of the Young's modulus and of the thermal expansion with temperature. The model could be used to follow strain and stress evolutions of the bonded materials during the cooling cycle. The maximum stress rose above -300 MPa at the center of the 100 × 100 × 3 mm ceramic plates. The residual stresses on the external surface of ceramic were investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and indentation fracture method (IFM). After brazing and grinding the plate, the principal stresses were 128.1 and 94.9 MPa, and the shear stress was -20.1 MPa. Microscopic examination revealed grain pull-out promoted by the global residual stresses induced by the brazing and grinding processes. The surface stresses evaluated by the different methods were reasonably correlated.

  9. Polyurethane Filler for Electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beasley, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Polyurethane foam proves suitable as filler for slots in parts electroplated with copper or nickel. Polyurethane causes less contamination of plating bath and of cleaning and filtering tanks than wax fillers used previously. Direct cost of maintenance and indirect cost of reduced operating time during tank cleaning also reduced.

  10. Weld-brazing of titanium. [resistance spot welding combined with brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, which combines resistance spot-welding and brazing has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Resistance spot-welding is employed to position and aline the parts and to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing and contributes to the integrity of the joint. Brazing enhances the properties of the joint and reduces the stress concentrations normally associated with spotwelds. Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints have been fabricated using 3003 aluminum braze both in a vaccum furnace and in a retort containing an inert gas environment.

  11. Brazed Joints Design and Allowables: Discuss Margins of Safety in Critical Brazed Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    FLom, Yury

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation tutorial discusses margins of safety in critical brazed structures. It reviews: (1) the present situation (2) definition of strength (3) margins of safety (4) design allowables (5) mechanical testing (6) failure criteria (7) design flowchart (8) braze gap (9) residual stresses and (10) delayed failures. This presentation addresses the strength of the brazed joints, the methods of mechanical testing, and our ability to evaluate the margins of safety of the brazed joints as it applies to the design of critical and expensive brazed assemblies.

  12. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Plasma Arc Brazed AISI 304L Stainless Steel and Galvanized Steel Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yajuan; Li, Ruifeng; Yu, Zhishui; Wang, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Plasma arc brazing is used to join the AISI 304L stainless steel and galvanized steel plate butt joints with the CuSi3Mn1 filler wire. The effect of parameters on weld surface appearance, interfacial microstructure, and composition distribution in the joint was studied. The microhardness and mechanical tests were conducted to determine the mechanical properties of the welded specimens. The results indicated that good appearance, bead shape, and sufficient metallurgical bonding could be obtained when the brazing process was performed with a wire feeding speed of 0.8 m/min, plasma gas flow rate of 3.0 l/min, welding current of 100 A, and welding speed of 27 cm/min. During plasma arc brazing process, the top corner of the stainless steel and galvanized steel plate were heated and melted, and the melted quantity of stainless steel was much more than that of the galvanized steel due to the thermal conductivity coefficient difference between the dissimilar materials. The microhardness test results shows that the microhardness value gradually increased from the side of the galvanized steel to the stainless steel in the joint, and it is good for improving the mechanical properties of joint. The tensile strength was a little higher than that of the brazing filler, and the fracture position of weld joint was at the base metal of galvanized steel plate.

  13. Laser beam brazing of car body and aircraft components

    SciTech Connect

    Haferkamp, H.; Kreutzburg, K.

    1994-12-31

    At present, when brazing car body components for the automotive industry, manual flame brazing is mostly used. The advantage of brazing as compared to welding, is the lower hardness of the braze metal, making postmachining easier. But manual flame brazing also shows several main disadvantages, such as pores within the seam and a high thermal influence on the workpiece. Therefore, investigations on laser beam brazing concerning the reduction of the technological and economical disadvantages of the flame brazing process were carried out. Laser beam brazing of aluminum alloys is also a main topic of this presentation. The fundamental research in brazing mild steel was done on lap joints. The investigations about brazing mild steel and aluminum alloys have demonstrated that it is possible to braze these metals using laser beam radiation. Laser beam brazing of 3-dimensional mild steel components requires a special program for the brazing sequence, and new specifications in design and fabrication. But comparing seams made by laser beam brazing to manual flame brazing show that there are advantages to using the automated laser process. Laser beam brazing of aluminum alloys makes it possible to join metals with poor brazeability, although brazing conditions lead to a slight melting of the gap sides.

  14. Dissimilar laser brazing of h-BN and WC-Co alloy in Ar atmosphere without evacuation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sechi, Y.; Nagatsuka, K.; Nakata, K.

    2012-08-01

    Laser brazing with Ti as an active element in Ag-Cu alloy braze metal has been successfully applied to dissimilar joining of h-BN and WC-Co alloy in Ar (99.999% purity) gas flow atmosphere without any evacuation process. Good wettability of the braze metal with h-BN and WC-Co alloy were confirmed by the observation and structural analysis of the interface by electron probe micro-analysis and scanning acoustic microscopy. The oxidation of titanium was not observed and this showed that the laser brazing with titanium as an active element in braze metal could be performed even in an Ar gas flow atmosphere without an evacuation process using a high-vacuum furnace.

  15. Braze alloys for high temperature service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, R. A.; Mckisson, R. L.; Erwin, G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Two groups of refractory metal compositions have been developed that are very useful as high temperature brazing alloys for sealing between ceramic and metal parts. Each group consists of various compositions of three selected refractory metals which, when combined, have characteristics required of good braze alloys.

  16. Automatic-Control System for Safer Brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, J. A.; Vanasse, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    Automatic-control system for radio-frequency (RF) induction brazing of metal tubing reduces probability of operator errors, increases safety, and ensures high-quality brazed joints. Unit combines functions of gas control and electric-power control. Minimizes unnecessary flow of argon gas into work area and prevents electrical shocks from RF terminals. Controller will not allow power to flow from RF generator to brazing head unless work has been firmly attached to head and has actuated micro-switch. Potential shock hazard eliminated. Flow of argon for purging and cooling must be turned on and adjusted before brazing power applied. Provision ensures power not applied prematurely, causing damaged work or poor-quality joints. Controller automatically turns off argon flow at conclusion of brazing so potentially suffocating gas does not accumulate in confined areas.

  17. Method for brazing together planar and nonplanar metal members

    DOEpatents

    Hammersand, Fred G.; Witkowski, Anthony J.

    1985-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and apparatus for brazing two metal members together, at least one of which is nonplanar, in a brazing furnace using a substantially pure brazing material. The method comprises the steps of utilizing a brazing fixture to hold the two metal members in tangential relation to one another along a portion of each member so that a cavity is formed adjacent to the contacting portions. A braze material is then positioned within the cavity. The braze fixture, the metal members, and the braze material are then placed in a brazing furnace. A heat shield is then placed over the braze fixture, the metal members, and the braze material to shield the braze material from direct furnace radiation. The furnace temperature is linearly increased at a rate of about 180.degree. C. per hour until a temperature of 350.degree. C. is achieved. Heat is transferred by conduction from the metal members to the braze material to cause the braze material to melt. Some material from the metal members slowly diffuses into the braze material forming a braze joint. The furnace is rapidly cooled to room temperature using nitrogen gas. The brazed assemblies made according to this method are superior to assemblies formed by heliarc welding.

  18. 46 CFR 56.75-20 - Brazing qualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Brazing qualification. 56.75-20 Section 56.75-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Brazing § 56.75-20 Brazing qualification. (a) The qualification of the performance of brazers and brazing operators shall be in...

  19. Tensile fracture characterization of braze joined copper-to-CFC coupon assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trester, P. W.; Valentine, P. G.; Johnson, W. R.; Chin, E.; Reis, E. E.; Colleraine, A. P.

    1996-10-01

    A vacuum brazing process was used to join a broad spectrum of carbon-fiber reinforced carbon matrix composite (CFC) materials, machined into cylindrical coupons, between coupons of oxygen-free copper, the braze alloy was a copper-base alloy which contained only low activation elements (Al, Si, and Ti) relative to a titanium baseline specification. This demonstration was of particular importance for plasma facing components (PFCs) under design for use in the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX); the braze investigation was conducted by General Atomics for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. A tensile test of each brazed assembly was conducted. The results from the braze processing, testing, and fracture characterization studies of this reporting support the use of CFC's of varied fiber architecture and matrix processing in PFC designs for TPX. Further, the copper braze alloy investigated is now considered to be a viable candidate for a low-activation bond design. The prediction of plasma disruption-induced loads on the PFCs in TPX requires that joint strength between CFC tiles and their copper substrate be considered in design analysis and CFC selection.

  20. Characterization of Brazed Joints of C-C Composite to Cu-clad-Molybdenum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Asthana, R.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites with either pitch+CVI matrix or resin-derived matrix were joined to copper-clad molybdenum using two active braze alloys, Cusil-ABA (1.75% Ti) and Ticusil (4.5% Ti). The brazed joints revealed good interfacial bonding, preferential precipitation of Ti at the composite/braze interface, and a tendency toward de-lamination in resin-derived C-C composite due to its low inter-laminar shear strength. Extensive braze penetration of the inter-fiber channels in the pitch+CVI C-C composites was observed. The relatively low brazing temperatures (<950 C) precluded melting of the clad layer and restricted the redistribution of alloying elements but led to metallurgically sound composite joints. The Knoop microhardness (HK) distribution across the joint interfaces revealed sharp gradients at the Cu-clad-Mo/braze interface and higher hardness in Ticusil (approx.85-250 HK) than in Cusil-ABA (approx.50-150 HK). These C-C/Cu-clad-Mo joints with relatively low thermal resistance may be promising for thermal management applications.

  1. Direct metal brazing to cermet feedthroughs

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-07-29

    An improved method for brazing metallic components to a cermet surface in an alumina substrate eliminates the prior art metallized layer over the cermet via and adjoining alumina surfaces. Instead, a nickel layer is applied over the cermet surface only and metallic components are brazed directly to this nickel coated cermet surface. As a result, heretofore unachievable tensile strength joints are produced. In addition, cermet vias with their brazed metal components can be spaced more closely in the alumina substrate because of the elimination of the prior art metallized alumina surfaces.

  2. Direct metal brazing to cermet feedthroughs

    DOEpatents

    Hopper, Jr., Albert C.

    1984-12-18

    An improved method for brazing metallic components to a cermet surface in an alumina substrate eliminates the prior art metallized layer over the cermet via and adjoining alumina surfaces. Instead, a nickel layer is applied over the cermet surface only and metallic components are brazed directly to this nickel coated cermet surface. As a result, heretofore unachievable tensile strength joints are produced. In addition, cermet vias with their brazed metal components can be spaced more closely in the alumina substrate because of the elimination of the prior art metallized alumina surfaces.

  3. Brazing SiC/SiC Composites to Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffier, Wayne S.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments have shown that active brazing alloys (ABAs) can be used to join SiC/SiC composite materials to metals, with bond strengths sufficient for some structural applications. The SiC/SiC composite coupons used in the experiments were made from polymerbased SiC fiber preforms that were chemical-vapor-infiltrated with SiC to form SiC matrices. Some of the metal coupons used in the experiments were made from 304 stainless steel; others were made from oxygen-free, high-conductivity copper. Three ABAs were chosen for the experiments: two were chosen randomly from among a number of ABAs that were on hand at the time; the third ABA was chosen because its titanium content (1.25 percent) is less than those of the other two ABAs (1.75 and 4.5 percent, respectively) and it was desired to evaluate the effect of reducing the titanium content, as described below. The characteristics of ABAs that are considered to be beneficial for the purpose of joining SiC/SiC to metal include wettability, reactivity, and adhesion to SiC-based ceramics. Prior to further development, it was verified that the three chosen ABAs have these characteristics. For each ABA, suitable vacuum brazing process conditions were established empirically by producing a series of (SiC/SiC)/ABA wetting samples. These samples were then sectioned and subjected to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS) for analysis of their microstructures and compositions. Specimens for destructive mechanical tests were fabricated by brazing of lap joints between SiC/SiC coupons 1/8-in. (.3.2- mm) thick and, variously, stainless steel or copper tabs. The results of destructive mechanical tests and the SEM/EDS analysis were used to guide the development of a viable method of brazing the affected materials.

  4. An Ag based brazing system with a tunable thermal expansion for the use as sealant for solid oxide cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiebach, Ragnar; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Grahl-Madsen, Laila; Sieborg, Bertil; Chen, Ming; Hjelm, Johan; Norrman, Kion; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2016-05-01

    An Ag-Al2TiO5 composite braze was developed and successfully tested as seal for solid oxide cells. The thermo-mechanical properties of the Ag-Al2TiO5 system and the chemical compatibility between this composite braze and relevant materials used in stacks were characterized and the leak rates as a function of the operation temperature were measured. The thermal expansion coefficient in the Ag-Al2TiO5 system can be tailored by varying the amount of the ceramic filler. The brazing process can be carried out in air, the joining partners showed a good chemical stability and sufficient low leak rates were demonstrated. Furthermore, the long-term stability of the Ag-Al2TiO5 composite braze was studied under relevant SOFC and SOEC conditions. The stability of brazed Crofer/Ag-Al2TiO5/NiO-YSZ assemblies in reducing atmosphere and in pure oxygen was investigated over 500 h at 850 °C. Additionally, a cell component test was performed to investigate the durability of the Ag-Al2TiO5 seal when exposed to dual atmosphere. The seals performed well over 900 h under electrolysis operation conditions (-0.5 A cm2, 850 °C), and no cell degradation related to the Ag-Al2TiO5 sealing was found, indicating that the developed braze system is applicable for the use in SOFC/SOEC stacks.

  5. Preliminary results on the development of vacuum-brazed joints for cyrogenic wind tunnel aerofoil models

    SciTech Connect

    Wigley, D.A.; Lawing, P.L.; Sandefur, P.G.

    1982-01-01

    Initial trials carried out at the NASA Langley Research Center in the investigation of cryogenic wind tunnel joint construction demonstrated that diffusion-assisted brazed joints could be formed in 17-4 PH, 15-5 PH, AISI-type 347, and Nitronic 40 stainless steels using electrodeposited copper as the bonding agent. Subsequent work has concentrated on 15-5 PH and Nitronic 40 using thin foils of pure copper and Nicrobraz LM, a commercially available nickel-based alloy containing boron and silicon melting point depressants. This paper summarizes the work carried out to understand and evaluate these bonds and their metallurgical characteristics. The results indicate that a high-strength void-free bond can be formed by the vacuum brazing of stainless steels using copper- and nickel-based filler alloys. The Nitronic 40 brazed joints show strengths in excess of the yield strengths of the parent metal. The poor toughness of 15-5 PH stainless steel at cryogenic temperatures tends to disqualify its use in critical areas of low-temperature aerofoil models.

  6. Collagen and injectable fillers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jacqueline T; Perkins, Stephen W; Hamilton, Mark M

    2002-02-01

    Soft tissue augmentation of facial rhytids, scars, and deformities is a frequently performed office procedure. This article reviews the available biologic (collagen, Dermalogen, Autologen, Isolagen, autologous fat, Fibrel, hyaluronic acid derivatives, particulate fascia lata, micronized Alloderm) and alloplastic (silicone, Bioplastique, and Artecoll) soft tissue injectable fillers. PMID:11781208

  7. Design of a braze alloy for fast epitaxial brazing of superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegert, S.; Laux, B.; Rösier, J.

    2012-07-01

    For the repair of directionally solidified turbine components made of nickel-based superalloys, a new high-temperature brazing method has been developed. Utilising heterogeneous nucleation on the crack surface, the microstructure of the base material can be reproduced, i.e. single crystallinity can be maintained. In contrast to commonly used eutectic braze alloys, such as nickel-boron or nickel-silicon systems, the process is not diffusion controlled but works with a consolute binary base system. The currently applied epitaxial brazing methods rely on isothermal solidification diffusing the melting point depressants into the base material until their concentration is reduced so that the liquid braze solidifies. Contrary, the identified Ni-Mn consolute system enables a temperature driven epitaxial solidification resulting in substantially reduced process duration. The development of the braze alloys was assisted using the CALPHAD software Thermo-Calc. The solidification behaviour was estimated by kinetic calculations with realistic boundary conditions. Finally, the complete system, including braze alloy as well as substrate material, was modelled by means of DICTRA. Subsequently, the thermodynamic properties of the braze alloys were experimentally analysed by DSC measurements. For brazing experiments 300 μm wide parallel gaps were used. Complete epitaxial solidification, i.e. the absence of high-angle grain boundaries, could be achieved within brazing times being up to two orders of magnitude shorter compared to diffusion brazing processes. Theoretically and experimentally evaluated process windows reveal similar shapes. However, a distinct shift has to be stated which can be ascribed to the limited accuracy of the underlying thermodynamic databases.

  8. Manufacturing and High Heat Flux Testing of Brazed Flat-Type W/CuCrZr Plasma Facing Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Youyun; Liu, Xiang; Feng, Fan; Chen, Lei; Cheng, Zhengkui; Wang, Jin; Chen, Jiming

    2016-02-01

    Water-cooled flat-type W/CuCrZr plasma facing components with an interlayer of oxygen-free copper (OFC) have been developed by using vacuum brazing route. The OFC layer for the accommodation of thermal stresses was cast onto the surface of W at a temperature range of 1150 °C-1200 °C in a vacuum furnace. The W/OFC cast tiles were vacuum brazed to a CuCrZr heat sink at 940 °C using the silver-free filler material CuMnSiCr. The microstructure, bonding strength, and high heat flux properties of the brazed W/CuCrZr joint samples were investigated. The W/Cu joint exhibits an average tensile strength of 134 MPa, which is about the same strength as pure annealed copper. High heat flux tests were performed in the electron beam facility EMS-60. Experimental results indicated that the brazed W/CuCrZr mock-up experienced screening tests of up to 15 MW/m2 and cyclic tests of 9 MW/m2 for 1000 cycles without visible damage. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11205049) and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2011GB110004)

  9. Ultrasonics permits brazing complex stainless steel assembly without flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. H.

    1967-01-01

    Ultrasonic vibration of an assembly of stainless steel instrumentation tubes ensures brazing without flux. Vibration with an ultrasonic transducer permits the brazing material to flow down each tube in contact with a seal plug installed in a pressure vessel wall.

  10. Aluminum core structures brazed without use of flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Aluminum alloy face sheets are brazed to aluminum alloy honeycomb cores without using corrosive flux by means of one or three methods. The completed brazed structure has the high-strength characteristics of heat treated aluminum alloys.

  11. Refractory metals welded or brazed with tungsten inert gas equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisner, J. P.

    1965-01-01

    Appropriate brazing metals and temperatures facilitate the welding or brazing of base metals with tungsten inert gas equipment. The highest quality bond is obtained when TIG welding is performed in an inert atmosphere.

  12. Tungsten wire and tubing joined by nickel brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Thin tungsten wire and tungsten tubing are brazed together using a contacting coil of nickel wire heated to its melting point in an inert-gas atmosphere. This method is also effective for brazing tungsten to tungsten-rhenium parts.

  13. Filler Wire Development for 2195 Aluminum-Lithium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cho, Alex; Russell, Carolyn; Zimmerman, Frank

    1998-01-01

    The presentation outline summarizes activities supporting the development of filler wire for 215 aluminum-lithium. The specific objective of the research was to identify an Al-Cu based filler wire chemistry which reduces weld susceptibility in 2195 Aluminum-Lithium welds and repairs welds along with providing adequate mechanical properties. This report is in viewgraph form.

  14. Braze Process Optimization Involving Conventional Metal/Ceramic Brazing with 50Au-50Cu Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    MALIZIA JR.,LOUIS A.; MEREDITH,KEITH W.; APPEL,DANIEL B.; MONROE,SAUNDRA L.; BURCHETT,STEVEN N.; STEPHENS JR.,JOHN J.

    1999-12-15

    Numerous process variables can influence the robustness of conventional metal/ceramic brazing processes. Experience with brazing of hermetic vacuum components has identified the following parameters as influencing the outcome of hydrogen furnace brazed Kovar{trademark} to metallized alumina braze joints: (a) Mo-Mn metallization thickness, sinter fire temperature and porosity (b) Nil plate purity, thickness, and sinter firing conditions (c) peak process temperature, time above liquidus and (d) braze alloy washer thickness. ASTM F19 tensile buttons are being used to investigate the above parameters. The F19 geometry permits determination of both joint hermeticity and tensile strength. This presentation will focus on important lessons learned from the tensile button study: (A) the position of the Kovar{trademark} interlayer can influence the joint tensile strength achieved--namely, off-center interlayers can lead to residual stress development in the ceramic and degrade tensile strength values. Finite element analysis has been used to demonstrate the expected magnitude in strength degradation as a function of misalignment. (B) Time above liquidus (TAL) and peak temperature can influence the strength and alloying level of the resulting braze joint. Excessive TAL or peak temperatures can lead to overbraze conditions where all of the Ni plate is dissolved. (C) Metallize sinter fire processes can influence the morphology and strength obtained from the braze joints.

  15. Union would facilitate joining of tubing, minimize braze contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terril, A. E.

    1966-01-01

    Union assembly provides a fluidtight joint between two lengths of tubing and minimizes introduction of braze contaminants into the tubing. The union contains two brazing preforms separated by a metal ring that serves as a dam for the molten brazing alloy.

  16. Microstructure of arc brazed and diffusion bonded joints of stainless steel and SiC reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elßner, M.; Weis, S.; Grund, T.; Wagner, G.; Habisch, S.; Mayr, P.

    2016-03-01

    Joint interfaces of aluminum and stainless steel often exhibit intermetallics of Al-Fe, which limit the joint strength. In order to reduce these brittle phases in joints of aluminum matrix composites (AMC) and stainless steel, diffusion bonding and arc brazing are used. Due to the absence of a liquid phase, diffusion welding can reduce the formation of these critical in- termetallics. For this joining technique, the influence of surface treatments and adjusted time- temperature-surface-pressure-regimes is investigated. On the other hand, arc brazing offers the advantage to combine a localized heat input with the application of a low melting filler and was conducted using the system Al-Ag-Cu. Results of the joining tests using both approaches are described and discussed with regard to the microstructure of the joints and the interfaces.

  17. What's new in fillers?

    PubMed

    Brown, Lance H; Frank, Paul J

    2003-06-01

    This article is an in-depth review of various materials and products that have been used for the augmentation of soft tissue in the past, and covers several new products, methods, and techniques that may provide new options for dermatologists who use fillers in their practice. Pros and cons of each are discussed, along with mechanisms of action, dosages, approved and off-label uses, as well as a look ahead at some prospective technology. PMID:12848108

  18. Facial Filler Complications.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julie; Khan, Tanya; Martin, John

    2015-11-01

    The use of facial fillers has greatly expanded over the past several years. Along with increased use comes a rise in documented complications, ranging from poor cosmetic result to nodules, granulomas, necrosis, and blindness. Awareness of the potential types of complications and options for management, in addition to the underlying facial anatomy, are imperative to delivering the best patient care. This article defines the complications and how to treat them and provides suggestions to avoid serious adverse outcomes. PMID:26505541

  19. Effects of Thermal Cycling and Thermal Aging on the Hermeticity and Strength of Silver-Copper Oxide Air-Brazed Seals

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Coyle, Christopher A.; Darsell, Jens T.; Xia, Gordon; Hardy, John S.

    2005-12-01

    Thermal cycle and exposure tests were conducted on ceramic-to-metal joints prepared by a new sealing technique. Known as reactive air brazing, this joining method is currently being considered for use in sealing various high-temperature solid-state electrochemical devices, including planar solid oxide fuel cells (pSOFC). In order to simulate a typical pSOFC application, test specimens were prepared by joining ceramic anode/electrolyte bilayers to washers, of the same composition as the common frame materials employed in pSOFC stacks, using a filler metal composed of 4mol% CuO in silver. The brazed samples were exposure tested at 750°C for 200, 400, and 800hrs in both simulated fuel and air environments and thermally cycled at rapid rate (75°C/min) between room temperature and 750°C for as many as fifty cycles. Subsequent joint strength testing and microstructural analysis indicated that the samples exposure tested in air displayed little degradation with respect to strength, hermeticity, or microstructure out to 800hrs of exposure. Those tested in fuel showed no change in rupture strength or loss in hermeticity after 800hrs of high-temperature exposure, but did undergo microstructural change due to the dissolution of hydrogen into the silver-based braze material. Air brazed specimens subjected to rapid thermal cycling exhibited no loss in joint strength or hermeticity, but displayed initial signs of seal delamination along the braze/electrolyte interface after 50 cycles.

  20. Effect of filler content and size on properties of composites.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Swartz, M L; Phillips, R W; Moore, B K; Roberts, T A

    1985-12-01

    Two series of dental composites, along with the unfilled resin matrix, were examined to determine the effects of filler level and size on selected properties. Both series were prepared by incorporating a silanated barium borosilicate filler into a visible-light-activated polyphenylene polymethacrylate resin matrix. One series had a filler particle size of 2 microns, with filler levels of 20, 40, 45, 50, and 53% (vol). The second series contained a 15-microns filler in amounts of 20, 40, 50, 60, and 65% (vol). Tests conducted included: depth of cure as evaluated by hardness, water sorption, compressive strength, stress-strain behavior under slow compression, toothbrush abrasion, and wear by hydroxyapatite. Analysis of the data indicated that increased filler levels resulted in increased hardness, compressive strength and stiffness, and decreased water sorption. Also, there was a slight trend toward improved depth of cure. Incorporation of the 2-microns filler decreased the abrasion resistance of the resins to toothbrushing as compared with the unfilled resin, while addition of the 15-microns filler improved resistance. All filled resins exhibited a significant improvement in resistance to wear by hydroxyapatite as compared with the unfilled resin. There was a trend for increased wear with increased filler level. The particle size of the filler appeared to have a moderate influence on the properties. When compared with 15-microns filled resins of the same filler levels, the 2-micron filled series appeared to have inferior properties in terms of depth of cure, compressive strength, water sorption, and resistance to toothbrush abrasion. Properties which were less affected by particle size were hardness, stiffness, and wear resistance to hydroxyapatite. PMID:3001160

  1. ZIRCONIUM-TITANIUM-BERYLLIUM BRAZING ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Gilliland, R.G.; Patriarca, P.; Slaughter, G.M.; Williams, L.C.

    1962-06-12

    A new and improved ternary alloy is described which is of particular utility in braze-bonding parts made of a refractory metal selected from Group IV, V, and VI of the periodic table and alloys containing said metal as a predominating alloying ingredient. The brazing alloy contains, by weight, 40 to 50 per cent zirconium, 40 to 50 per cent titanium, and the balance beryllium in amounts ranging from 1 to 20 per cent, said alloy having a melting point in the range 950 to 1400 deg C. (AEC)

  2. Effects of Different Braze Materials and Composite Substrates on Composite/Ti Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Asthana, Rajiv; Shpargel, Tarah

    2007-01-01

    An ever increasing number of applications require robust joining technologies of dissimilar materials. In this study, three types of ceramic composites (C-C, C-SiC, and SiC-SiC) were vacuum brazed to commercially pure Ti using the Cusil-ABA (63 Ag - 35.5 Cu - 1.75 Ti) active metal braze alloy. The study also compared composite specimens as-fabricated and after surface grinding/polishing. A butt-strap tensile shear strength test was used to evaluate the joined structures at room temperature, 270 and 500 C. The elevated temperatures represent possible use temperatures for some heat rejection type applications. Joint strength will be discussed in light of braze wetting and spreading properties, composite properties, and test temperature.

  3. One-step brazing process to join CFC composites to copper and copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvo, Milena; Casalegno, Valentina; Rizzo, Stefano; Smeacetto, Federico; Ferraris, Monica; Merola, Mario

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a new single-step brazing technique to join carbon fibre reinforced carbon composite (CFC) to pure copper (Cu) and copper alloy (CuCrZr) for nuclear fusion applications. In order to increase the wettability of CFC by a copper-based brazing alloy containing no active metal, the composite surface was modified by direct reaction with chromium, which forms a carbide layer and allows a large reduction of the contact angle. After the CFC surface modification, the commercial Gemco ® alloy (Cu/Ge) was successfully used to braze CFC to pure copper and pure copper to CuCrZr by the same heat treatment. The shear strength of the CFC/Cu joints measured by single lap shear tests at room temperature was (34 ± 4) MPa, comparable to the values obtained by other joining processes and higher than the intrinsic CFC shear strength.

  4. Effect of Composite Substrates on the Mechanical Behavior of Brazed Joints in Metal-Composite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Shpargel, Tarah; Asthana, Rajiv

    2006-01-01

    Advanced composite components are being considered for a wide variety of demanding applications in aerospace, space exploration, and ground based systems. A number of these applications require robust integration technologies to join dissimilar materials (metalcomposites) into complex structural components. In this study, three types of composites (C-C, C-SiC, and SiC-SiC) were vacuum brazed to commercially pure Ti using the active metal braze alloy Cusil-ABA (63Ag-35.3Cu-1.75Ti). Composite substrates with as fabricated and polished surfaces were used for brazing. The microstructure and composition of the joint, examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), showed sound metallurgical bonding in all systems. The butt strap tensile (BST) test was performed on bonded specimens at room and elevated temperatures. Effect of substrate composition, interlaminar properties, and surface roughness on the mechanical properties and failure behavior of joints will be discussed.

  5. Methods to Predict Stresses in Cutting Inserts Brazed Using Iron-Carbon Brazing Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovodov, V. V.; Valentov, A. V.; Retuynskiy, O. Yu; Esekuev, Sh B.

    2016-04-01

    This work describes a method for predicting residual and operating stresses in a flat-form tool insert made of tungsten free carbides brazed using iron-carbon alloy. According to the studies’ results it is concluded that the recommendations relating to the limitation of a melting point of tool brazing alloys (950-1100°C according to different data) are connected with a negative impact on tools as a composite made of dissimilar materials rather than on hard alloys as a tool material. Due to the cooling process stresses inevitably occur in the brazed joint of dissimilar materials, and these stresses increase with the higher solidification temperature of the brazing alloy.

  6. Semipermanent and permanent injectable fillers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Derek H

    2009-10-01

    Today, an impressive array of injectable dermal fillers for facial soft-tissue augmentation is available in the United States. These agents, most of which were introduced in the last half decade, represent a variety of semipermanent and permanent fillers across several categories. Physicians can choose between semipermanent fillers, such as hyaluronic acid derivatives (HA), calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA), and poly-L-lactic acid (PLA), and longer-lasting, so-called "permanent fillers," such as polymethyl methacrylate microspheres (PMMA), highly purified forms of liquid silicone, and hydrogel polymers. PMID:19850193

  7. Synthetic Fillers for Facial Rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Johnson C; Lorenc, Z Paul

    2016-07-01

    Soft tissue filler procedures have increased dramatically in popularity in the United States. Synthetic fillers such as calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHA), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA), and silicone provide initial volume replacement but have an additional biostimulatory effect to supplement facial volumization. Indications include human immunodeficiency virus lipoatrophy and nasolabial folds for CaHA and PLLA and atrophic acne scars for PMMA. Most clinical use of these synthetic fillers is in an off-label fashion. Beyond the proper choice of a synthetic filler, careful consideration of dilution, injection method, and postprocedural care allows for successful and consistent results. PMID:27363763

  8. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1995-01-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99 gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  9. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1990-07-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99% gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  10. Nondestructive testing of brazed rocket engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, C. J.; Hagemaier, D. J.; Meyer, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    Report details study made of nondestructive radiographic, ultrasonic, thermographic, and leak test methods used to inspect and evaluate the quality of the various brazed joints in liquid-propellant rocket engine components and assemblies. Descriptions of some of the unique equipment and methods developed are included.

  11. Brazed bipolar plates for PEM fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Neutzler, Jay Kevin

    1998-01-01

    A liquid-cooled, bipolar plate separating adjacent cells of a PEM fuel cell comprising corrosion-resistant metal sheets brazed together so as to provide a passage between the sheets through which a dielectric coolant flows. The brazement comprises a metal which is substantially insoluble in the coolant.

  12. Brazed bipolar plates for PEM fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Neutzler, J.K.

    1998-07-07

    A liquid-cooled, bipolar plate separating adjacent cells of a PEM fuel cell comprises corrosion-resistant metal sheets brazed together so as to provide a passage between the sheets through which a dielectric coolant flows. The brazement comprises a metal which is substantially insoluble in the coolant. 6 figs.

  13. Welding/brazing for Space Station repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, David W.; Babel, H. W.; Conaway, H. R.; Hooper, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on welding/brazing for space station repair are presented. Topics covered include: fabrication and repair candidates; debris penetration of module panel; welded repair patch; mechanical assembly of utility fluid line; space station utility systems; Soviet aerospace fabrication - an overview; and processes under consideration.

  14. Thermal and Fluid Flow Brazing Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    HOSKING, FLOYD MICHAEL; GIANOULAKIS,STEVEN E.; GIVLER,RICHARD C.; SCHUNK,P. RANDALL

    1999-12-15

    The thermal response of fixtured parts in a batch-type brazing furnace can require numerous, time-consuming development runs before an acceptable furnace schedule or joint design is established. Powerful computational simulation tools are being developed to minimize the required number of verification experiments, improve furnace throughput, and increase product yields. Typical furnace simulations are based on thermal, fluid flow, and structural codes that incorporate the fundamental physics of the brazing process. The use of massively parallel computing to predict furnace and joint-level responses is presented. Measured and computed data are compared. Temperature values are within 1-270 of the expected peak brazing temperature for different loading conditions. Sensitivity studies reveal that the thermal response is more sensitive to the thermal boundary conditions of the heating enclosure than variability y in the materials data. Braze flow simulations predict fillet geometry and free surface joint defects. Dynamic wetting conditions, interfacial reactions, and solidification structure add a high degree of uncertainty to the flow results.

  15. Brazing of photocathode RF gun structures in Hydrogen atmosphere: Process qualification, effect of brazing on RF properties and vacuum compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kak, Ajay; Kulshreshtha, P.; Lal, Shankar; Kaul, Rakesh; Ganesh, P.; Pant, K. K.; Abhinandan, Lala

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we report on the development of a brazing process for an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible photocathode RF gun structure developed at our Centre. The choice of brazing alloy and its form, brazing clearance between parts to be joined and the brazing cycle adopted have been qualified through metallographic examination of identical joints on an OFE copper prototype that was cut open after brazing. The quality of brazed joint not only affects the UHV compatibility of the gun, but also influences the RF parameters finally achieved. A 2-D electromagnetic code, SUPERFISH, was used to predict the variation in RF parameters before and after brazing considering actual brazing clearances provided between the parts to be joined. Results obtained from low power RF measurements on the brazed gun structure confirm the integrity of the brazed joints and show good agreement with those predicted by electromagnetic simulations. The brazed gun structure has been leak-tested and pumped down to a vacuum level limited by the vacuum compatibility of the flange-fittings employed in the setup.

  16. Nanoparticle-Assisted Diffusion Brazing of Metal Microchannel Arrays: Nanoparticle Synthesis, Deposition, and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eluri, Ravindranadh T.

    Microchannel process technology (MPT) offers several advantages to the field of nanomanufacturing: 1) improved process control over very short time intervals owing to shorter diffusional distances; and 2) reduced reactor size due to high surface area to volume ratios and enhanced heat and mass transfer. The objective of this thesis was to consider how nanomaterials, produced in part using MPT, could be used to solve problems associated with the fabrication of MPT devices. Specifically, many MPT devices are produced using transient liquid-phase brazing involving an electroplated interlayer consisting of a brazing alloy designed for melting temperature suppression. Unfortunately, these alloys can form brittle secondary phases which significantly reduce bond strength. In contrast, prior efforts have shown that it is possible to leverage the size-dependent properties of nanomaterials to suppress brazing temperatures. In this prior work, thin films of off-the-shelf elemental nanoparticles were used as interlayers yielding joints with improved mechanical properties. In the present investigation, efforts have been made to characterize the synthesis and deposition of various elemental nanoparticle suspensions for use in the transient liquid-phase brazing of aluminum and stainless steel. Advances were used to demonstrate the nanoparticle-assisted diffusion brazing of a microchannel array. In the first section, a silver nanoparticle (AgNP) interlayer was produced for the diffusion brazing of heat exchanger aluminum. Efforts are made to examine the effect of braze filler particle size (˜5 nm and ˜50 nm) and processing parameters (heating rate: 5ºC/min and 25ºC/min; brazing temperature: 550ºC and 570ºC) on thin coupons of diffusion-brazed 3003 Al. A tensile strength of 69.7 MPa was achieved for a sample brazed at 570°C for 30 min under 1 MPa with an interlayer thickness of approximately 7 microm. Further suppression of the brazing temperature to 500ºC was achieved by

  17. Development of the weld-braze joining process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, was developed which combines resistance spot welding and brazing. Resistance spot welding is used to position and aline the parts, as well as to establish a suitable faying-surface gap for brazing. Fabrication is then completed at elevated temperature by capillary flow of the braze alloy into the joint. The process was used successfully to fabricate Ti-6Al-4V alloy joints by using 3003 aluminum braze alloy and should be applicable to other metal-braze systems. Test results obtained on single-overlap and hat-stiffened panel specimens show that weld-brazed joints were superior in tensile shear, stress rupture, fatigue, and buckling compared with joints fabricated by conventional means. Another attractive feature of the process is that the brazed joint is hermetically sealed by the braze material, which may eliminate many of the sealing problems encountered with riveted or spot welded structures. The relative ease of fabrication associated with the weld-brazing process may make it cost effective over conventional joining techniques.

  18. Nonlinear thermal and structural analysis of a brazed solar-central-receiver panel

    SciTech Connect

    Napolitano, L.M. Jr.; Kanouff, M.P.

    1981-07-01

    One part of the evaluation program for a molten sodium central receiver was to be a test of a reduced-scale panel at Sandia's Central Receiver Test Facility in Albuquerque. The panel incorporates a new way of joining tubes - brazing to intermediate filler strips - which can affect the panel's lifetime. To calculate the stresses and strains for the worst-case section of the experimental panel, we have done a nonlinear elastic-plastic analysis with the MARC finite element computer code, which takes the temperature dependence of the material properties into account. From the results, tube design lifetimes are predicted. The analysis shows that concerns for cracking and reduction in lifetime are warranted, but a more detailed fracture analysis is necessary to determine whether there is a stable-crack-growth problem.

  19. Applying Taguchi Methods To Brazing Of Rocket-Nozzle Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Bellows, William J.; Deily, David C.; Brennan, Alex; Somerville, John G.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes experimental study in which Taguchi Methods applied with view toward improving brazing of coolant tubes in nozzle of main engine of space shuttle. Dr. Taguchi's parameter design technique used to define proposed modifications of brazing process reducing manufacturing time and cost by reducing number of furnace brazing cycles and number of tube-gap inspections needed to achieve desired small gaps between tubes.

  20. Some properties of low-vapor-pressure braze alloys for thermionic converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, V. L.

    1978-01-01

    Density, dc electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and linear thermal expansion are measured for arc-melted rod-shaped samples of binary eutectics of Zr, Hf, Ru, Nb, Ir, Mo, Ta, Os, Re, and W selected as very-low-pressure braze fillers for thermionic converters. The first two properties are measured at 296 K for Zr-21.7 at% Ru, Zr-13 wt% W, Zr-19 wt% W, Zr-22.3 at% Nb, Nb-66.9 at% Ru, Hf-25.3 wt% Re, Zr-25.7 at% Ta, Hf-22.5 at% W, and Nb-35 wt% Mo. The last property is measured from 293 K to 2/3 melting point for specified alloys of different compositions. Resistivities of 0.000055 to 0.000181 ohm-cm are observed with the alloys having resistivities about ten times that of the less resistive constituent metal and about three times that of the more resistive constituent metal, except for Zr-19 wt% W and Nb-35 wt% Mo (greater resistivities). Thermal expansion coefficients vary from 0.000006 to 0.0000105/K. All brazes exhibit linear thermal expansion near that of their constituent metals.

  1. Dissimilar Laser Welding/Brazing of 5754 Aluminum Alloy to DP 980 Steel: Mechanical Properties and Interfacial Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Li, Yulong; Zhang, Hua; Guo, Wei; Weckman, David; Zhou, Norman

    2015-11-01

    A diode laser welding/brazing technique was used for lap joining of 5754 aluminum alloy to DP 980 steel with Al-Si filler metal. The correlation between joint interfacial microstructure, wettability of filler metal, and mechanical properties was systematically investigated. At low laser power (1.4 kW), a layer of intermetallic compounds, composed of θ-Fe(Al,Si)3 and τ 5 -Al7.2Fe1.8Si, was observed at the interface between fusion zone and steel. Because of the poor wettability of filler metal on the steel substrate, the joint strength was very low and the joint failed at the FZ/steel interface. When medium laser power (2.0 kW) was applied, the wettability of filler metal was enhanced, which improved the joint strength and led to FZ failure. With further increase of laser power to 2.6 kW, apart from θ and τ 5, a new hard and brittle η-Fe2(Al,Si)5 IMC with microcracks was generated at the FZ/steel interface. The formation of η significantly degraded the joint strength. The failure mode changed back to interfacial failure.

  2. Ultrasonic scanning system for inspection of brazed tube joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, J. L.; Maurer, N. A.

    1972-01-01

    An ultrasonic scanning system used to inspect and evaluate in-place brazed tube joints is considered. The system was designed, developed, and built especially for nondestructive testing and was selected because of its known response to brazing defects not associated with material density changes. The scan system is capable of scanning brazed joints in union, tee, elbow and cross configuration of 3/16-inch through 5/8-inch diameters. It is capable of detecting brazed defects as small as 0.008 by 0.010-inch, which exceeds the 0.015-inch diameter defect resolution required by specification.

  3. Composition and method for brazing graphite to graphite

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Albert J.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a brazing material for joining graphite structures that can be used at temperatures up to about 2800.degree. C. The brazing material formed of a paste-like composition of hafnium carbide and uranium oxide with a thermosetting resin. The uranium oxide is converted to uranium dicarbide during the brazing operation and then the hafnium carbide and uranium dicarbide form a liquid phase at a temperature about 2600.degree. C. with the uranium diffusing and vaporizing from the joint area as the temperature is increased to about 2800.degree. C. so as to provide a brazed joint consisting essentially of hafnium carbide. This brazing temperature for hafnium carbide is considerably less than the eutectic temperature of hafnium carbide of about 3150.degree. C. The brazing composition also incorporates the thermosetting resin so that during the brazing operation the graphite structures may be temporarily bonded together by thermosetting the resin so that machining of the structures to final dimensions may be completed prior to the completion of the brazing operation. The resulting brazed joint is chemically and thermally compatible with the graphite structures joined thereby and also provides a joint of sufficient integrity so as to at least correspond with the strength and other properties of the graphite.

  4. Thermal fatigue and oxidation data for alloy/braze combinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, V. L.; Humphreys, V. E.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal fatigue and oxidation data were obtained for 62 brazed specimens of 3 iron-, 3 nickel-, and 1 cobalt-base alloy. Fluidized bed thermal cycling was conducted over the range 740/25 C employing 10 cm long single-edge wedge specimens. Immersion time was always 4 minutes in each bed. Types of test specimens employed in the program include those with brazed overlays on the specimen radius, those butt brazed at midspan and those with a brazed foil overlay on the specimen radius. Of the 18 braze overlay specimens, 5 generated fatigue cracks by 7000 cycles. Thermal cracking of butt brazed specimens occurred exclusively through the butt braze. Of the 23 butt brazed specimens, 7 survived 11,000 thermal cycles without cracking. Only 2 of the 21 foil overlaid specimens exhibiting cracking in 7,000 cycles. Blistering of the foil did occur for 2 alloys by 500 cycles. Oxidation of the alloy/braze combination was limited at the test maximum test temperature of 740 C.

  5. Braze Development of Graphite Fiber for Use in Phase Change Material Heat Sinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Gregory; Gleason, Brian; Beringer, Woody; Stephen, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Hamilton Sundstrand (HS), together with NASA Johnson Space Center, developed methods to metallurgically join graphite fiber to aluminum. The goal of the effort was to demonstrate improved thermal conductance, tensile strength and manufacturability compared to existing epoxy bonded techniques. These improvements have the potential to increase the performance and robustness of phase change material heat sinks that use graphite fibers as an interstitial material. Initial work focused on evaluating joining techniques from 4 suppliers, each consisting of a metallization step followed by brazing or soldering of one inch square blocks of Fibercore graphite fiber material to aluminum end sheets. Results matched the strength and thermal conductance of the epoxy bonded control samples, so two suppliers were down-selected for a second round of braze development. The second round of braze samples had up to a 300% increase in strength and up to a 132% increase in thermal conductance over the bonded samples. However, scalability and repeatability proved to be significant hurdles with the metallization approach. An alternative approach was pursued which used nickel and active braze allows to prepare the carbon fibers for joining with aluminum. This approach was repeatable and scalable with improved strength and thermal conductance when compared with epoxy bonding.

  6. Design, fabrication, and performance of brazed, graphite electrode, multistage depressed collectors with 500-W, continuous wave, 4.8- to 9.6-GHz traveling-wave tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramins, Peter; Ebihara, Ben

    1989-01-01

    A small, isotropic graphite electrode, multistage depressed collector (MDC) was designed, fabricated, and evaluated in conjunction with a 500-W, continuous wave (CW), 4.8- to 9.6-GHz traveling-wave tube (TWT). The carbon electrode surfaces were used to improve the TWT overall efficiency by minimizing the secondary electron emission losses in the MDC. The design and fabrication of the brazed graphite MDC assembly are described. The brazing technique, which used copper braze filler metal, is compatible with both vacuum and the more commonly available hydrogen atmosphere brazing furnaces. The TWT and graphite electrode MCC bakeout, processing, and outgassing characteristics were evaluated and found to be comparable to TWT's equipped with copper electrode MDC's. The TWT and MDC performance was optimized for broadband CW operation at saturation. The average radiofrequency (RF), overall, and MDC efficiencies were 14.9, 46.4, and 83.6 percent, respectively, across the octave operating band. A 1500-hr CW test, conducted without the use of an appendage ion pump, showed no gas buildup and excellent stability of the electrode surfaces.

  7. Midface volumization with injectable fillers.

    PubMed

    Tan, Marietta; Kontis, Theda C

    2015-05-01

    The aging midface has long been overlooked in cosmetic surgery. Our understanding of facial aging in terms of 3 dimensions has placed increased importance on volume restoration. Although an "off-label" indication for most fillers in this facial region, volumization of the midface with injectable fillers is usually a safe and straightforward procedure technically. Injectors, nevertheless, need to have an excellent understanding of facial anatomy and the characteristics of the injected products should problems arise. PMID:25921573

  8. Silver-palladium braze alloy recovered from masking materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cierniak, R.; Colman, G.; De Carlo, F.

    1966-01-01

    Method for recovering powdered silver-palladium braze alloy from an acrylic spray binder and rubber masking adhesive used in spray brazing is devised. The process involves agitation and dissolution of masking materials and recovery of suspended precious metal particles on a filter.

  9. Evaluation of methods for nondestructive testing of brazed joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanno, A.

    1968-01-01

    Evaluation of nondestructive methods of testing brazed joints reveals that ultrasonic testing is effective in the detection of nonbonds in diffusion bonded samples. Radiography provides excellent resolutions of void or inclusion defects, and the neutron radiographic technique shows particular advantage for brazing materials containing cadmium.

  10. Brazing method produces solid-solution bond between refractory metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Brazing two refractory metals by diffusion bonding minimizes distortion and avoids excessive grain growth in the metals. This method requires the selection of an interface metal that forms intermediate low-melting eutectics or solid solutions with the metals to be brazed.

  11. 46 CFR 56.30-30 - Brazed joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) are satisfied at the highest... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Brazed joints. 56.30-30 Section 56.30-30 Shipping COAST... Selection and Limitations of Piping Joints § 56.30-30 Brazed joints. (a) General (refer also to subpart...

  12. 46 CFR 56.30-30 - Brazed joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) are satisfied at the highest... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Brazed joints. 56.30-30 Section 56.30-30 Shipping COAST... Selection and Limitations of Piping Joints § 56.30-30 Brazed joints. (a) General (refer also to subpart...

  13. 46 CFR 56.30-30 - Brazed joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) are satisfied at the highest... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Brazed joints. 56.30-30 Section 56.30-30 Shipping COAST... Selection and Limitations of Piping Joints § 56.30-30 Brazed joints. (a) General (refer also to subpart...

  14. 46 CFR 56.30-30 - Brazed joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) are satisfied at the highest... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Brazed joints. 56.30-30 Section 56.30-30 Shipping COAST... Selection and Limitations of Piping Joints § 56.30-30 Brazed joints. (a) General (refer also to subpart...

  15. 46 CFR 56.30-30 - Brazed joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) are satisfied at the highest... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Brazed joints. 56.30-30 Section 56.30-30 Shipping COAST... Selection and Limitations of Piping Joints § 56.30-30 Brazed joints. (a) General (refer also to subpart...

  16. Tube dimpling tool assures accurate dip-brazed joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Heisman, R. M.

    1968-01-01

    Portable, hand-held dimpling tool assures accurate brazed joints between tubes of different diameters. Prior to brazing, the tool performs precise dimpling and nipple forming and also provides control and accurate measuring of the height of nipples and depth of dimples so formed.

  17. Split glass tube assures quality in electron beam brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kressin, W. J.

    1966-01-01

    Sealed enclosure of heat-resistant glass tubing and silicone rubber molds provide good visibility for electron beam brazing of metal tubes in an inert gas atmosphere. The glass tubing and rubber molds, which are bonded together, are easily applied to and removed from the brazing area by operation of a clamp.

  18. Reactive Boride Brazing on Low-Alloy Automotive Grade Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanisamy, B.; Upadhyaya, A.

    2011-11-01

    Brazing is a widely used process to improve the performance of steels used in automotive applications. The substrate material is often exposed to harsh conditions in these applications and may affect the service life of the component. Reactive boride brazing aims to improve the mechanical properties of the substrate material by forming a ceramic-metal composite coating in a single-step process in situ. In this study, sintered Ancor 4300 low-alloy steel is used as the substrate with chromium-rich braze and chromium-lean braze materials. The mechanical properties of the brazed samples were studied in detail using microindentation hardness measurements and the transverse rupture test. The results indicate that the brazed superlayer has a 10 times higher hardness. There was a significant improvement in the transverse rupture strength of the steel brazed with the chromium-rich boride as compared to the pure substrate material. In an effort to reduce processing time, green compacts of the substrate were also directly brazed and yielded favorable results.

  19. Thin-film diffusion brazing of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikus, E. B.

    1972-01-01

    A thin film diffusion brazing technique for joining titanium alloys by use of a Cu intermediate is described. The method has been characterized in terms of static and dynamic mechanical properties on Ti-6Al-4V alloy. These include tensile, fracture toughness, stress corrosion, shear, corrosion fatigue, mechanical fatigue and acoustic fatigue. Most of the properties of titanium joints formed by thin film diffusion brazing are equal or exceed base metal properties. The advantages of thin film diffusion brazing over solid state diffusion bonding and brazing with conventional braze alloys are discussed. The producibility advantages of this process over others provide the potential for producing high efficiency joints in structural components of titanium alloys for the minimum cost.

  20. Composition and method for brazing graphite to graphite

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, A.J.; Dykes, N.L.

    1982-08-10

    A brazing material is described for joining graphite structures that can be used up to 2800/sup 0/C. The brazing material is formed of a paste-like composition of hafnium carbide and uranium oxide with a thermosetting resin. The uranium oxide is converted to uranium dicarbide during the brazing operation and then the hafnium carbide and uranium dicarbide form a liquid phase at a temperature about 2600/sup 0/C with the uranium diffusing and vaporizing from the joint area as the temperature is increased to about 2800/sup 0/C so as to provide a brazed joint consisting essentially of hafnium carbide. The resulting brazed joint is chemically and thermally compatible with the graphite structures.

  1. Natural Rubber-Filler Interactions: What Are the Parameters?

    PubMed

    Chan, Alan Jenkin; Steenkeste, Karine; Canette, Alexis; Eloy, Marie; Brosson, Damien; Gaboriaud, Fabien; Fontaine-Aupart, Marie-Pierre

    2015-11-17

    Reinforcement of a polymer matrix through the incorporation of nanoparticles (fillers) is a common industrial practice that greatly enhances the mechanical properties of the composite material. The origin of such mechanical reinforcement has been linked to the interaction between the polymer and filler as well as the homogeneous dispersion of the filler within the polymer matrix. In natural rubber (NR) technology, knowledge of the conditions necessary to achieve more efficient NR-filler interactions is improving continuously. This study explores the important physicochemical parameters required to achieve NR-filler interactions under dilute aqueous conditions by varying both the properties of the filler (size, composition, surface activity, concentration) and the aqueous solution (ionic strength, ion valency). By combining fluorescence and electron microscopy methods, we show that NR and silica interact only in the presence of ions and that heteroaggregation is favored more than homoaggregation of silica-silica or NR-NR. The interaction kinetics increases with the ion valence, whereas the morphology of the heteroaggregates depends on the size of silica and the volume percent ratio (dry silica/dry NR). We observe dendritic structures using silica with a diameter (d) of 100 nm at a ∼20-50 vol % ratio, whereas we obtain raspberry-like structures using silica with d = 30 nm particles. We observe that in liquid the interaction is controlled by the hydrophilic bioshell, in contrast to dried conditions, where hydrophobic polymer dominates the interaction of NR with the fillers. A good correlation between the nanoscopic aggregation behavior and the macroscopic aggregation dynamics of the particles was observed. These results provide insight into improving the reinforcement of a polymer matrix using NR-filler films. PMID:26488560

  2. Hyaluronic acid gel fillers in the management of facial aging

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Fredric S; Cazzaniga, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Time affects facial aging by producing cellular and anatomical changes resulting in the consequential loss of soft tissue volume. With the advent of new technologies, the physician has the opportunity of addressing these changes with the utilization of dermal fillers. Hyaluronic acid (HA) dermal fillers are the most popular, non-permanent injectable materials available to physicians today for the correction of soft tissue defects of the face. This material provides an effective, non invasive, non surgical alternative for correction of the contour defects of the face due to its enormous ability to bind water and easiness of implantation. HA dermal fillers are safe and effective. The baby-boomer generation, and their desire of turning back the clock while enjoying an active lifestyle, has expanded the popularity of these fillers. In the US, there are currently eight HA dermal fillers approved for commercialization by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This article reviews the innate properties of FDA-approved HA fillers and provides an insight on future HA products and their utilization for the management of the aging face. PMID:18488885

  3. Flaw Tolerance in Lap Shear Brazed Joints. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Wang, Li-Qin

    2003-01-01

    Furnace brazing is a joining process used in the aerospace and other industries to produce strong permanent and hermetic structural joints. As in any joining process, brazed joints have various imperfections and defects. At the present time, our understanding of the influence of the internal defects on the strength of the brazed joints is not adequate. The goal of this 3-part investigation is to better understand the properties and failure mechanisms of the brazed joints containing defects. This study focuses on the behavior of the brazed lap shear joints because of their importance in manufacturing aerospace structures. In Part 1, an average shear strength capability and failure modes of the single lap joints are explored. Stainless steel specimens brazed with pure silver are tested in accordance with the AWS C3.2 standard. Comparison of the failure loads and the ultimate shear strength with the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of the same specimens as a function of the overlap widths shows excellent correlation between the experimental and calculated values for the defect-free lap joints. A damage zone criterion is shown to work quite well in understanding the failure of the braze joints. In Part 2, the findings of the Part 1 will be verified on the larger test specimens. Also, various flaws will be introduced in the test specimens to simulate lack of braze coverage in the lap joints. Mechanical testing and FEA will be performed on these joints to verify that behavior of the flawed ductile lap joints is similar to joints with a reduced braze area. Finally, in Part 3, the results obtained in Parts 1 and 2 will be applied to the actual brazed structure to evaluate the load-carrying capability of a structural lap joint containing discontinuities. In addition, a simplified engineering procedure will be offered for the laboratory testing of the lap shear specimens.

  4. Rene 95 brazed joint metallurgical program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gay, C.; Givens, J.; Mastrorroco, S.; Sterman, A.

    1972-01-01

    This metallurgical program was specifically conducted for the establishment of material properties required for the design of the LF460 fan. The LF460 lift fan is an advanced 18:1 high thrust to weight single stage design. It has a turbine attached to the outer flowpath of the fan blade tip which minimizes the axial depth of the fan. Advanced lightweight attachment designs are employed in this concept to achieve minimum mass polar moments of inertia which are required for good aircraft flight response control. The design features which are unique to this advanced LF460 lift fan are the 0.010 inch thin Udimet 700 alloy integral tip turbine design, minimum weight braze attachment of the turbine to the fan blade, and the high strength and elevated temperature capability of the Rene'95 alloy for the fan blade. The data presented in this report show that the LF460 fan rotor design is feasible and that the design stresses and margins of safety were more than adequate. Prior to any production application, however, additional stress rupture/shear lap joints should be run in order to establish a firm 1200 F stress rupture curve for the CM50 braze metal.

  5. Cathodic ARC surface cleaning prior to brazing

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, V. R.; Hollis, K. J.; Castro, R. G.; Smith, F. M.; Javernick, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    Surface cleanliness is one the critical process variables in vacuum furnace brazing operations. For a large number of metallic components, cleaning is usually accomplished either by water-based alkali cleaning, but may also involve acid etching or solvent cleaning / rinsing. Nickel plating may also be necessary to ensure proper wetting. All of these cleaning or plating technologies have associated waste disposal issues, and this article explores an alternative cleaning process that generates minimal waste. Cathodic arc, or reserve polarity, is well known for welding of materials with tenacious oxide layers such as aluminum alloys. In this work the reverse polarity effect is used to clean austenitic stainless steel substrates prior to brazing with Ag-28%Cu. This cleaning process is compared to acid pickling and is shown to produce similar wetting behavior as measured by dynamic contact angle experiments. Additionally, dynamic contact angle measurements with water drops are conducted to show that cathodic arc cleaning can remove organic contaminants as well. The process does have its limitations however, and alloys with high titanium and aluminum content such as nickel-based superalloys may still require plating to ensure adequate wetting.

  6. Use of Fillers in Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyoung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Surgical rhinoplasty is the one of the most common cosmetic procedures in Asians. But there are limitations, such as down time, high cost, and a steep learning curve. Most complications are implant related. A safer and less invasive procedure is rhinoplasty using fillers. Good knowledge of the nasal anatomy is essential for rhinoplasty using fillers. Knowledge of nerves, blood supply, and injection plane allows avoiding complications. There are several planes in the nose. The deep fatty layer is recommended for injection, because it is wide and loose and there are less important neurovascular structures. Botulinum toxin also can be used for noninvasive rhinoplasty. PMID:26616716

  7. 7 CFR 58.914 - Fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... evaporated milk fillers having brass parts may be approved if free from corroded surfaces and kept in good... Standards for Plastic, and Rubber and Rubber-Like Materials. Fillers shall be designed so that they in...

  8. Fillers: Contraindications, Side Effects and Precautions

    PubMed Central

    Lafaille, Philippe; Benedetto, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Fillers are generally considered safe. However side effects may happen and hence a practicing dermatologist need to be aware of such side effects, contraindicatons and precaution to be adopted while using fillers. PMID:20606987

  9. Composite weld rod corrects individual filler weaknesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimaldo, S.

    1967-01-01

    Composite filler wire welds together an assembly made from components of Rene 41 nickel base alloy. Using equal parts of Rene 41 and Hastelloy W weld wire in the filler reduces the cracking and weaknesses of the individual parent metals.

  10. Plasma Spray for Difficult-To-Braze Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, A.

    1982-01-01

    Nickel plating on surfaces makes brazing easier for some alloys. Sometimes nickel plating may not be feasible because of manufacturing sequence, size of hardware, or lack of suitable source for nickel plating. Alternative surface preparation in such cases is to grit-blast surface lightly and then plasma-spray 1 1/2 to 2 mils of fine nickel powder or braze-alloy material directly on surface. Powder is sprayed from plasma gun, using argon as carrier gas to prevent oxidation of nickel or braze alloy.

  11. Braze system and method for reducing strain in a braze joint

    SciTech Connect

    Cadden, Charles H.; Goods, Steven H.; Prantil, Vincent C.

    2004-05-11

    A system for joining a pair of structural members having widely differing coefficients of thermal expansion is disclosed. A mechanically "thick" foil is made by dispersing a refractory metal powder, such as molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, or tungsten into a quantity of a liquid, high expansion metal such as copper, silver, or gold, casting an ingot of the mixture, and then cutting sections of the ingot about 1 mm thick to provide the foil member. These foil members are shaped, and assembled between surfaces of structural members for joining, together with a layer of a braze alloy on either side of the foil member capable of wetting both the surfaces of the structural members and the foil. The assembled body is then heated to melt the braze alloy and join the assembled structure. The foil member subsequently absorbs the mechanical strain generated by the differential contraction of the cooling members that results from the difference in the coefficients of thermal expansion of the members.

  12. Silica Fillers for elastomer Reinforement

    SciTech Connect

    Kohls, D.J.; Schaefer, D.W.

    2012-09-10

    This article summarizes recent work on the structure of precipitated silica used in the reinforcement of elastomers. Silica has a unique morphology, consisting of multiple structural levels that can be controlled through processing. The ability to control and characterize the multiple structures of precipitated silica is an example of morphological engineering for reinforcement applications. In this summary of some recent research efforts using precipitated silica, small-angle scattering techniques are described and their usefulness for determining the morphology of silica in terms of primary particles, aggregates, and agglomerates are discussed. The structure of several different precipitated silica powders is shown as well as the mechanical properties of elastomers reinforced with these silica particles. The study of the mechanical properties of filled elastomer systems is a challenging and exciting topic for both fundamental science and industrial application. It is known that the addition of hard particulates to a soft elastomer matrix results in properties that do not follow a straightforward rule of mixtures. Research efforts in this area have shown that the properties of filled elastomers are influenced by the nature of both the filler and the matrix, as well as the interactions between them. Several articles have reviewed the influence of fillers like silica and carbon black on the reinforcement of elastomers. In general, the structure-property relationships developed for filled elastomers have evolved into the following major areas: Filler structure, hydrodynamic reinforcement, and interactions between fillers and elastomers.

  13. Dry bin filler for apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A unique dry bin filler for apples using a sequenced tray was developed to reduce bruising in packing operations. Research and commercial trials in West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Washington State demonstrated the ability to fill bins evenly and with low damage. Cultivars with different bruising su...

  14. Silica Fillers for elastomer Reinforement

    SciTech Connect

    Kohls, D.J.; Schaefer, D.W.

    2009-08-26

    This article summarizes recent work on the structure of precipitated silica used in the reinforcement of elastomers. Silica has a unique morphology, consisting of multiple structural levels that can be controlled through processing. The ability to control and characterize the multiple structures of precipitated silica is an example of morphological engineering for reinforcement applications. In this summary of some recent research efforts using precipitated silica, small-angle scattering techniques are described and their usefulness for determining the morphology of silica in terms of primary particles, aggregates, and agglomerates are discussed. The structure of several different precipitated silica powders is shown as well as the mechanical properties of elastomers reinforced with these silica particles. The study of the mechanical properties of filled elastomer systems is a challenging and exciting topic for both fundamental science and industrial application. It is known that the addition of hard particulates to a soft elastomer matrix results in properties that do not follow a straightforward rule of mixtures. Research efforts in this area have shown that the properties of filled elastomers are influenced by the nature of both the filler and the matrix, as well as the interactions between them. Several articles have reviewed the influence of fillers like silica and carbon black on the reinforcement of elastomers. In general, the structure-property relationships developed for filled elastomers have evolved into the following major areas: Filler structure, hydrodynamic reinforcement, and interactions between fillers and elastomers.

  15. Brazing of Carbon Carbon Composites to Cu-clad Molybdenum for Thermal Management Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Asthana, R.; Shpargel, T> P.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced carbon carbon composites were joined to copper-clad molybdenum (Cu/Mo) using four active metal brazes containing Ti (Cu ABA, Cusin-1 ABA, Ticuni, and Ticusil) for potential use in thermal management applications. The brazed joints were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Knoop microhardness measurements across the joint region. Metallurgically sound C-C/Cu/Mo joints, devoid of interfacial cracks formed in all cases. The joint interfaces were preferentially enriched in Ti, with Cu ABA joints exhibiting the largest interfacial Ti concentrations. The microhardness measurements revealed hardness gradients across the joint region, with a peak hardness of 300-350 KHN in Cusin-1 ABA and Ticusil joints and 200-250 KHN in Cu ABA and Ticuni joints, respectively.

  16. Microstructural Evolution of the Interface Between Pure Titanium and Low Melting Point Zr-Ti-Ni(Cu) Filler Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongmyoung; Sun, Juhyun; Kang, Donghan; Shin, Seungyoung; Hong, Juhwa

    2014-12-01

    Low melting point Zr-based filler metals with melting point depressants (MPDs) such as Cu and Ni elements are used for titanium brazing. However, the phase transition of the filler metals in the titanium joint needs to be explained, since the main element of Zr in the filler metals differs from that of the parent titanium alloys. In addition, since the MPDs easily form brittle intermetallics, that deteriorate joint properties, the phase evolution they cause needs to be studied. Zr-based filler metals having Cu content from 0 to 12 at. pct and Ni content from 12 to 24 at. pct with a melting temperature range of 1062 K to 1082 K (789 °C to 809 °C) were wetting-tested on a titanium plate to investigate the phase transformation and evolution at the interface between the titanium plate and the filler metals. In the interface, the alloys system with Zr, Zr2Ni, and (Ti,Zr)2Ni phases was easily changed to a Ti-based alloy system with Ti, Ti2Ni, and (Ti,Zr)2Ni phases, by the local melting of parent titanium. The dissolution depths of the parent metal were increased with increasing Ni content in the filler metals because Ni has a faster diffusion rate than Cu. Instead, slow diffusion of Cu into titanium substrate leads to the accumulation of Cu at the molten zone of the interface, which could form undesirable Ti x Cu y intermetallics. This study confirmed that Zr-based filler metals are compatible with the parent titanium metal with the minimum content of MPDs.

  17. Fabrication and Characterization of Brazed Joints for SiC-Metallic Systems Utilizing Refractory Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coddington, Bryan; Asthana, Rajiv; Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, M.

    2011-01-01

    Metal to ceramic joining plays a key role for the integration of ceramics into many nuclear, ground and aero based technologies. In order to facilitate these technologies, the active metal brazing of silicon carbide (CVD beta-SiC, 1.1 mm thick, and hot-pressed alpha-SiC, 3 mm thick) to the refractory metals molybdenum and tungsten using active braze alloys was studied. The joint microstructure, composition, and microhardness were evaluated by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and Knoop hardness testing. The braze alloys, Cusil-ABA, Ticusil and Copper-ABA, all formed sound joints with excellent wetting and chemical bonding with the SiC substrate. Despite the close thermal expansion match between the metal substrates and SiC, hairline cracks formed in alpha-SiC while beta-SiC showed no signs of residual stress cracking. The use of ductile interlayers to reduce the effect from residual stresses was investigated and joints formed with copper as an interlayer produced crack free systems utilizing both CVD and hot-pressed SiC.

  18. Fillers in dermatology: from past to present.

    PubMed

    Chacon, Anna H

    2015-11-01

    Injectable fillers were introduced in dermatology as a method for reconstructing facial deformities and restoring the aging face. Although fillers have become a popular option among cosmetic patients, clinical experience has shown that fillers must be used with caution, as complications can occur. This article provides a brief review of the history of filler agents currently available for soft tissue augmentation. Although no single filler is ideal for all patients, indications, and situations, residents should be aware of the properties and characteristics that make each product unique. PMID:26682563

  19. The histological aspects of fillers complications.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Ute S; Clerici, Thierry J

    2004-12-01

    The histological aspects of resorbable heterologous fillers (bovine collagen, acid hyaluronique), autologous fillers (lipofilling, dermis-fat graft), biodegradable fillers (New-Fill), and permanent fillers (silicone, Artecoll, Evolution, Aquamid, DermaLive, DermaDeep, Bioplastique, Paraffin) are described. This article relates the morphological aspect of these materials, the normal tissue reaction after injection, and its chronological evolution as the morphological aspects from the different side effects, more frequently observed for the permanent fillers. They mainly consist of granulomatous reactions which may appear long after injection. PMID:15745233

  20. Reactive Brazing of Carbon-Carbon Composites to Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shpargel, Tarah; Singh, M.; Morscher, Gregory; Asthana, Rajiv

    2004-01-01

    The Ti-metal/C-C composite joints were formed by reactive brazing with three commercial brazes, namely, Cu-ABA, TiCuNi, and TiCuSil. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results of the microstructure analysis indicate solute redistribution across the joint and possible metallurgical bond formation via interdiffusion, which led to good wetting and spreading.

  1. Improved Assembly for Gas Shielding During Welding or Brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul; Baker, Kevin; Weeks, Jack

    2009-01-01

    An improved assembly for inert-gas shielding of a metallic joint is designed to be useable during any of a variety of both laser-based and traditional welding and brazing processes. The basic purpose of this assembly or of a typical prior related assembly is to channel the flow of a chemically inert gas to a joint to prevent environmental contamination of the joint during the welding or brazing process and, if required, to accelerate cooling upon completion of the process.

  2. Ceramic-to-metal stator vane assembly with braze

    DOEpatents

    Chase, Donna J.; Fang, Ho T.; Irwin, Craig W.; Schienle, James L.

    1995-01-01

    A stator vane assembly for a gas turbine engine that includes a plurality of circumferentially spaced ceramic vanes, each of which has an inner and outer ceramic shroud, and a ceramic post extending from one of the shrouds, and a metallic platform having a plurality of circumferentially spaced recesses. The posts are inserted into a metallic sleeve and then brazed. The brazed sleeves are then mounted in the recesses. A method for assembling these components to form the stator assembly is also described.

  3. An investigation of tendon sheathing filler migration into concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1998-03-01

    During some of the inspections at nuclear power plants with prestressed concrete containments, it was observed that the containments has experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler (i.e., streaks). The objective of this activity was to provide an indication of the extent of tendon sheathing filler leakage into the concrete and its affects on concrete properties. Literature was reviewed and concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant and tested. The literature primarily addressed effects of crude or lubricating oils that are known to cause concrete damage. However, these materials have significantly different characteristics relative to the materials used as tendon sheathing fillers. Examination and testing of the concrete cores indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the concrete surface was due to leakage from the conduits and its subsequent migration through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks and there was no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength testing indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased over 40% in 25.4 years relative to the average compressive strength at 28-days age.

  4. Reducing inadvertent alloying of metal/ceramic brazes

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.J.; Hlava, P.F.

    1992-12-31

    Inadvertent alloying of Cu braze metal can compromise metal/ceramic seals. Electron microprobe analyses have quantified alloying of Cu brazes in metal/ceramic feedthroughs. Pin material and processing parameters above 1084C both affect alloying levels. Using either Kovar or Ni-plated 316L stainless steel pins limits alloying compared to Palco pins. Minimizing the time during which the braze is molten also avoids excessive alloying. The original thickness of the Ni plating on the Mo-Mn metallization of the ceramic also influences the alloying content of these brazes. Metal/ceramic brazes made with long brazing cycles, Mo-Mn metallization, and Kovar components grow a layer of Mo{sub 6}(Fe{sub 3.5}CO{sub 3.5}){sub 7} on the metallization. Layer thicknesses observed do not appear to compromise joint integrity. Ni additions of approximately 10 and 20 wt.% to Cu apparently increases the stress required for stress relaxation during cooldown. to maintain creep rates required for stress relaxation during cooldown. Relative to unalloyed Cu, this strengthening effect tends to increase as temperature is decreased.

  5. Electron Beam Welder Used to Braze Sapphire to Platinum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsgren, Roger C.; Vannuyen, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    A new use for electron beam brazing was recently developed by NASA Lewis Research Center's Manufacturing Engineering Division. This work was done to fabricate a fiberoptic probe (developed by Sentec Corporation) that could measure high temperatures less than 600 deg C of vibrating machinery, such as in jet engine combustion research. Under normal circumstances, a sapphire fiber would be attached to platinum by a ceramic epoxy. However, no epoxies can adhere ceramic fibers to platinum under such high temperatures and vibration. Also, since sapphire and platinum have different thermal properties, the epoxy bond is subjected to creep over time. Therefore, a new method had to be developed that would permanently and reliably attach a sapphire fiber to platinum. Brazing a sapphire fiber to a platinum shell. The fiber-optic probe assembly consists of a 0.015-in.-diameter sapphire fiber attached to a 0.25-in.-long, 0.059-in.-diameter platinum shell. Because of the small size of this assembly, electron beam brazing was chosen instead of conventional vacuum brazing. The advantage of the electron beam is that it can generate a localized heat source in a vacuum. Gold reactive braze was used to join the sapphire fiber and the platinum. Consequently, the sapphire fiber was not affected by the total heat needed to braze the components together.

  6. Brazing open cell reticulated copper foam to stainless steel tubing with vacuum furnace brazed gold/indium alloy plating

    DOEpatents

    Howard, Stanley R.; Korinko, Paul S.

    2008-05-27

    A method of fabricating a heat exchanger includes brush electroplating plated layers for a brazing alloy onto a stainless steel tube in thin layers, over a nickel strike having a 1.3 .mu.m thickness. The resultant Au-18 In composition may be applied as a first layer of indium, 1.47 .mu.m thick, and a second layer of gold, 2.54 .mu.m thick. The order of plating helps control brazing erosion. Excessive amounts of brazing material are avoided by controlling the electroplating process. The reticulated copper foam rings are interference fit to the stainless steel tube, and in contact with the plated layers. The copper foam rings, the plated layers for brazing alloy, and the stainless steel tube are heated and cooled in a vacuum furnace at controlled rates, forming a bond of the copper foam rings to the stainless steel tube that improves heat transfer between the tube and the copper foam.

  7. Atomic structure and thermophysical properties of molten silver-copper oxide air braze alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, John Steven

    The Ag-CuOx materials system is the basis for a family of filler alloys used in a recently developed ceramic-metal joining technique referred to as air brazing, which is a brazing process that can be carried out in ambient air rather than under the vacuum or inert to reducing gas conditions required for conventional brazing methods. This research was conducted to elucidate the atomic coordination and selected thermophysical properties of these materials as a function of temperature when they are in the salient liquid state in air, since this is when the critical steps of wetting and spreading occur in the joining process. A series of alloys was selected spanning the entire length of the phase diagram including the pure end members, Ag and CuOx; alloys that form the two constituent single phase liquids; and alloys for which the two liquid phases coexist in the miscibility gap of the phase diagram. The oxygen content of the liquid alloys in air was measured using thermogravimetry. The oxidative weight gain of 99.999% pure metallic precursors was measured while simultaneously accounting for the concurrent silver volatility using a method that was developed in the course of the study. The surface tension and mass density were measured using the maximum bubble pressure method. The number density was calculated based on the information gained from the oxygen content and mass density measurements. For compositions that were amenable to laser heating, containerless high energy x-ray scattering measurements of the liquid atomic coordination were performed using a synchrotron beamline, an aerodynamic levitator, and laser heating. For the remaining compositions x-ray scattering measurements were performed in a beamline-compatible furnace. The two liquid phases that form in this materials system have distinct atomic coordinations characterized by an average of nearly two-fold coordinated ionic metal-oxygen pairs in the CuOx-rich liquid and nearly eight-fold coordinated atomic

  8. Soy-based fillers for thermoset composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Paula

    Considerable work has been done with bio-based fillers in thermoplastics. Wood dust has been used for decades in wood plastic composites in conjunction with recycled high HDPE and PET. In recent years rapidly renewable fillers derived from dried distillery grains and from wood have been introduced commercially for thermoset polymers. These fillers provide bio-content and weight reduction to thermoset molding compounds but issues with moisture absorption and polymerization inhibition have limited their commercial acceptance. The intent of this research was to develop a bio-based filler suitable for thermoset composites. This filler would provide a low density alternative to mined mineral filler, such as CaCO3 or clay. Composites made with these fillers would be lighter in weight, which is desirable for many markets, particularly transportation. Cost parity to the mineral fillers, on a volume basis, was desirable and the use of green chemistry principles was a key objective of the project. This work provides a basis from which further development of modified soy flours as fillers for thermoset composites will continue. Biomass has been evaluated as fillers for thermoset composites since the early 1980s but failed to gain commercial acceptance due to excessive water absorption and inhibition issues with free radical curing. Biomass, with a large percentage of carbohydrates, are very hydrophilic due to their abundance of hydroxyl groups, while biomass, high in lignin, resulted in inhibition of the free radical cure of the unsaturated styrenated polyester matrix systems. Generally protein use as a filler is not desirable due to its food value. Torrefaction has proved to be a good, cost effective, process to reduce hydrophilicity of high cellulose feedstock. Surprising, however, some levels of torrefaction were found to induce the inhibition effect of the filler. Scientific inquiry into this problem proved that aromatics form during the torrefaction process and can

  9. Microstructure and mechanical properties of joints in sintered SiC fiber-bonded ceramics brazed with Ag Cu Ti alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Asthana, Rajiv; Ishikawa, Toshihiro; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Lin, Hua-Tay

    2012-01-01

    Active metal brazing of a new high thermal conductivity sintered SiC-polycrystalline fiber-bonded ceramic (SA-Tyrannohexs) has been carried out using a Ti-containing Ag Cu active braze alloy (Cusil-ABAs). The brazed composite joints were characterized using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM EDS). The results show that this material can be successfully joined using judiciously selected off-the shelf active braze alloys to yield metallurgically sound joints possessing high integrity. Uniform and continuous joints were obtained irrespective of differences in the fiber orientation in the substrate material. Detailed interfacial microanalysis showed that the titanium reacts with C and Si to form TiC layer and a Ti Si compound, respectively. Furthermore, the evaluation of shear strength of the joints was also conducted at ambient and elevated temperatures in air using the single-lap offset (SLO) shear test. The perpendicular-type SA-Tyrannohex joints exhibited apparent shear strengths of about 42 MPa and 25 MPa at 650 1C and 750 1C, respectively. The fracture at the higher temperature occurred at the interface between the reactionformed TiC layer and braze. This might be caused by generation of stress intensity when a shear stress was applied, according to m-FEA simulation results.

  10. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Joints in Sintered SiC Fiber-Bonded Ceramics Brazed with Ag-Cu-Ti Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Lin, Hua-Tay; Asthana, Rajiv; Ishikawa, Toshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Active metal brazing of a new high thermal conductivity sintered SiC-polycrystalline fiber-bonded ceramic (SA-Tyrannohex{reg_sign}) has been carried out using a Ti-containing Ag-Cu active braze alloy (Cusil-ABA{reg_sign}). The brazed composite joints were characterized using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS). The results show that this material can be successfully joined using judiciously selected off-the shelf active braze alloys to yield metallurgically sound joints possessing high integrity. Uniform and continuous joints were obtained irrespective of differences in the fiber orientation in the substrate material. Detailed interfacial microanalysis showed that the titanium reacts with C and Si to form TiC layer and a Ti-Si compound, respectively. Furthermore, the evaluation of shear strength of the joints was also conducted at ambient and elevated temperatures in air using the single-lap offset (SLO) shear test. The perpendicular-type SA-Tyrannohex joints exhibited apparent shear strengths of about 42 MPa and 25 MPa at 650 C and 750 C, respectively. The fracture at the higher temperature occurred at the interface between the reaction-formed TiC layer and braze. This might be caused by generation of stress intensity when a shear stress was applied, according to {mu}-FEA simulation results.

  11. Online monitoring of the laser brazing of titanium overlap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, R.; Vielhaber, K.; Donst, D.; Klocke, F.

    2007-06-01

    Image processing and thermography for its own are very versatile and established measurement techniques for many years. However, the combination of these two measurement technologies opens a new field of applications. The online monitoring of the laser-brazing of titanium overlap joints is such a new application. The laser brazing process for overlap joining of formed titanium sheets for the production of heat exchangers is presently being investigated at the Fraunhofer IPT. In comparison to conventional furnace brazing the laser brazing technology decreases substantially the heat impact and thus reduces the thermal material damage in the parts due to local selective heating in a laser beam focal spot. Even though the process is stable, errors in the brazing seam such as pores or unacceptable material oxidation can occur. To ensure a high quality an online process monitoring or even process control is necessary. But since the surface remains unchanged during this brazing process no geometrical inspection of the surface can be conducted. Therefore today's quality assurance performs x-ray or destructive testing. This paper demonstrates how the use of thermography in combination with image processing allows a machine integrated online monitoring of the laser brazing process. First the basic principals are presented which cover the fields of heat coupling, heat transmission and heat distribution as well as the temperature emission of light and the spectral properties of the laser beam shaping optic and so lead to the optical set-up. Then analysis algorithms are derived which characterize the process, detect process failures and make a seam tracking possible.

  12. In-process oxidation protection in fluxless brazing or diffusion bonding of aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelly, K. P.; Featherston, A. B.

    1974-01-01

    Aluminum is cleaned of its oxide coating and is sealed immediately with polymeric material which makes it suitable for fluxless brazing or diffusion bonding. Time involved between cleaning and brazing is no longer critical factor.

  13. The Hyaluronic Acid Fillers: Current Understanding of the Tissue Device Interface.

    PubMed

    Greene, Jacqueline J; Sidle, Douglas M

    2015-11-01

    The article is a detailed update regarding cosmetic injectable fillers, specifically focusing on hyaluronic acid fillers. Hyaluronic acid-injectable fillers are used extensively for soft tissue volumizing and contouring. Many different hyaluronic acid-injectable fillers are available on the market and differ in terms of hyaluronic acid concentration, particle size, cross-linking density, requisite needle size, duration, stiffness, hydration, presence of lidocaine, type of cross-linking technology, and cost. Hyaluronic acid is a natural component of many soft tissues, is identical across species minimizing immunogenicity has been linked to wound healing and skin regeneration, and is currently actively being studied for tissue engineering purposes. The biomechanical and biochemical effects of HA on the local microenvironment of the injected site are key to its success as a soft tissue filler. Knowledge of the tissue-device interface will help guide the facial practitioner and lead to optimal outcomes for patients. PMID:26505539

  14. Fillers: What's Here and What's Ahead.

    PubMed

    Solish, Nowell

    2016-06-01

    Soft tissue augmentation products (or fillers) are used for the correction of age-related changes in areas of the face. The most common filler material is hyaluronic acid, which is synthetically cross-linked. These materials are generally safe, but some side effects do occur. New fillers are expected to be approved in the United States in the near future. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp6):S117-119. PMID:27537207

  15. Review of non-FDA-approved fillers.

    PubMed

    Ellis, David A F; Segall, Lorne

    2007-05-01

    The number of commercially available injectable soft tissue fillers has increased dramatically worldwide over the past decade. In the United States, a variety of temporary non-collagen-based fillers have been approved. However, no permanent soft tissue injectable fillers are currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. This article discusses some of the more popular soft tissue fillers, such as Restylane Fine Line, Restylane SQ, Perlane, Artecoll, Dermalive, Dermadeep, Bioalcamid, Bioplastique, Evolution, Outline, Argiform, and Aquamid, which are all available outside of the United States. PMID:17544940

  16. Direct use geothermal applications for brazed plate heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Rafferty, K.

    1993-02-01

    Brazed plate heat exchanger were placed in three geothermal fluids (Klamath Falls, OR; Boise, ID; and Pagosa Springs, CO) in order to determine the effect of H{sub 2}S on braze material. Based on subsequent analysis, it appears that the rate of corrosion of the braze material is much slower than corrosion of copper tube materials in the same fluids. Minimum expected life of the heat exchangers based on these corrosion rates is reported to be 12 years in fluids of less than 1 ppm H{sub 2}S and 10 years in fluids of less than 5 ppm. Based on these expected lives, and using a 3% inflation rate and 8% discount rate, brazed plate heat exchangers are a clear economic choice in which the capital cost is 50% or less of the cost of a plate and frame heat exchanger for the same duty. Due to their single pass design, brazed plate heat exchangers are generally limited to approach temperatures of 10{degree} or greater. Size limitations restrict applications to 100 gpm and/or 200 ft{sup 2} heat transfer surface area.

  17. Current Concepts in Filler Injection.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Amir; Watson, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    When evaluating the face in thirds, the upper face, midface, and lower face, one may assume the lateral the temple, midface, and lateral mandible as the pillars of these subdivisions. Many of our facial aesthetic procedures address these regions, including the lateral brow lift, midface lift, and lateral face lift. As the use of facial fillers has advanced, more emphasis is placed on the correction of the temples, midlateral face, and lateral jaw line. This article is dedicated to these facial aesthetic pillars. PMID:26505545

  18. 49 CFR 178.50 - Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.50 Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4B is a welded or brazed steel cylinder with...

  19. 49 CFR 178.50 - Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.50 Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4B is a welded or brazed steel cylinder with...

  20. 49 CFR 178.50 - Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.50 Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4B is a welded or brazed steel cylinder with...

  1. Inert-gas welding and brazing enclosure fabricated from sheet plastic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisner, J. P.

    1965-01-01

    Custom-fabricated plastic bag maintains an inert-gas atmosphere for welding and brazing certain metals. The bag fits over part of the workpieces and the welding and brazing tools. It is also used for metal brazing and fusion plating which require an inert-gas atmosphere.

  2. Process for forming unusually strong joints between metals and ceramics by brazing at temperatures that do not exceed 750/sup 0/C

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, J.P.; David, S.A.; Woodhouse, J.J.

    1984-12-04

    This invention is a process for joining metals to ceramics to form very strong bonds using low brazing temperature, i.e., less than 750/sup 0/C, and particularly for joining nodular cast iron to partially stabilized zirconia. The process provides that the ceramic be coated with an active metal, such as titanium, that can form an intermetallic with a low melting point brazing alloy such as 60Ag-30Cu-10Sn. The nodular cast iron is coated with a noncarbon containing metal, such as copper, to prevent carbon in the nodular cast iron from dissolving in the brazing alloy. These coated surfaces can be brazed together with the brazing alloy between at less than 750/sup 0/C to form a very strong joint. An even stronger bond can be formed if a transition piece is used between the metal and ceramic. It is preferred for the transition piece to have a coefficient of thermal expansion compatible with the coefficient of thermal expansion of the ceramic, such as titanium.

  3. Process for forming unusually strong joints between metals and ceramics by brazing at temperatures that do no exceed 750 degree C.

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Joseph P.; David, Stan A.; Woodhouse, John J.

    1986-01-01

    This invention is a process for joining metals to ceramics to form very strong bonds using low brazing temperature, i.e., less than 750.degree. C., and particularly for joining nodular cast iron to partially stabilized zirconia. The process provides that the ceramic be coated with an active metal, such as titanium, that can form an intermetallic with a low melting point brazing alloy such as 60Ag-30Cu-10Sn. The nodular cast iron is coated with a noncarbon containing metal, such as copper, to prevent carbon in the nodular cast iron from dissolving in the brazing alloy. These coated surfaces can be brazed together with the brazing alloy between at less than 750.degree. C. to form a very strong joint. An even stronger bond can be formed if a transition piece is used between the metal and ceramic. It is preferred for the transition piece to have a coefficient of thermal compatible with the coefficient of thermal expansion of the ceramic, such as titanium.

  4. A review of oxide, silicon nitride, and silicon carbide brazing

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M.L.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    There is growing interest in using ceramics for structural applications, many of which require the fabrication of components with complicated shapes. Normal ceramic processing methods restrict the shapes into which these materials can be produced, but ceramic joining technology can be used to overcome many of these limitations, and also offers the possibility for improving the reliability of ceramic components. One method of joining ceramics is by brazing. The metallic alloys used for bonding must wet and adhere to the ceramic surfaces without excessive reaction. Alumina, partially stabilized zirconia, and silicon nitride have high ionic character to their chemical bonds and are difficult to wet. Alloys for brazing these materials must be formulated to overcome this problem. Silicon carbide, which has some metallic characteristics, reacts excessively with many alloys, and forms joints of low mechanical strength. The brazing characteristics of these three types of ceramics, and residual stresses in ceramic-to-metal joints are briefly discussed.

  5. Computational simulations and experimental validation of a furnace brazing process

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Gianoulakis, S.E.; Malizia, L.A.

    1998-12-31

    Modeling of a furnace brazing process is described. The computational tools predict the thermal response of loaded hardware in a hydrogen brazing furnace to programmed furnace profiles. Experiments were conducted to validate the model and resolve computational uncertainties. Critical boundary conditions that affect materials and processing response to the furnace environment were determined. {open_quotes}Global{close_quotes} and local issues (i.e., at the furnace/hardware and joint levels, respectively) are discussed. The ability to accurately simulate and control furnace conditions is examined.

  6. 7 CFR 58.514 - Container fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container fillers. 58.514 Section 58.514 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....514 Container fillers. Shall comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for Equipment for Packaging...

  7. Filler functionality in edible solid foams.

    PubMed

    van der Sman, R G M

    2016-05-01

    We review the functionality of particulate ingredients in edible brittle foams, such as expanded starchy snacks. In food science and industry there is not a complete awareness of the full functionality of these filler ingredients, which can be fibers, proteins, starch granules and whole grains. But, we show that much can be learned about that from the field of synthetic polymeric foams with (nano)fillers. For edible brittle foams the enhancement of mechanical strength by filler ingredients is less relevant compared to the additional functionalities such as 1) the promotion of bubble nucleation and 2) cell opening-which are much more relevant for the snack texture. The survey of particulate ingredients added to snack formulations shows that they cannot be viewed as inert fillers, because of their strong hygroscopic properties. Hence, these fillers will compete with starch for water, and that will modify the glass transition and boiling point, which are important factors for snack expansion. Filler properties can be modified via extrusion, but it is better if that processing step is decoupled from the subsequent processing steps as mixing and expansion. Several filler ingredients are also added because of their nutritional value, but can have adverse effect on snack expansion. These adverse effects can be reduced if the increase of nutritional value is decoupled from other filler functionality via compartmentalization using micropellets. PMID:27067462

  8. Wind-Resistant Filler for Tile Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellavia, J.; Quigley, I. A.; Callahan, T. S.

    1982-01-01

    Filler developed for gaps between insulating tiles on Space Shuttle finds application in industries that use tiles for thermal or environmental protection. Filler consists of tight-fitting ceramic tubes and fibrous alumina. Combination resists high wind loads while providing requisite heat protection. Quartz-thread stitching holds envelope together.

  9. Dermal Fillers: Tips to Achieve Successful Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Vedamurthy, Maya; Vedamurthy, Amar

    2008-01-01

    Fillers have become a common aesthetic treatment for several cosmetic problems. Several types of fillers are available from different sources and of different longevities. It is important that the treating physician be aware of the different techniques of administration and their possible side effects. This article reviews the available literature on the subject. PMID:20300346

  10. Adverse effects of fillers and their histopathology.

    PubMed

    Haneke, Eckart

    2014-12-01

    Injectable fillers nowadays represent a pillar in facial rejuvenation and make a significant contribution to the success of the treatment. Despite their obvious benefits, a wide range of possible complications such as immediate, late, delayed, temporary, or irreversible adverse effects have to be respected. Differentiating the various filler materials, these effects are assigned to histopathology findings and currently available treatment options. PMID:25536126

  11. Intumescent-ablator coatings using endothermic fillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An intumescent-ablator coating composition which contains the ammonium salt of 1,4-nitroaniline-2-sulfonic acid or 4,4 dinitrosul fanilide, a polymeric binder system and about 5 to 30% weight of an endothermic filler is reported. The filler has a decomposition temperature about or within the exothermic region of the intumescent agent.

  12. Emerging permanent filler technologies: focus on Aquamid.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Paul S

    2014-01-01

    A plethora of soft tissue fillers have been developed within the past decade to correct the cutaneous changes that occur with photoaging. Such fillers, whether nonpermanent, semipermanent, or permanent, are widely used to fill undesired facial rhytides. In addition, fillers are employed to correct atrophy of the face as well as other parts of the body such as the dorsum of the hands through volumization and contouring. The extensive long-term safety outcomes reported with fillers and the ease with which they are administered make them an ideal choice to correct rhytides and to contour the face. However, as with any cosmetic procedure, in order to ensure high patient satisfaction and a safe outcome, proper training in injection techniques, the choice of the proper candidate, and awareness of potential adverse events are essential. This review article focuses on the permanent filler, Aquamid, which is composed of polyacrylamide hydrogel. PMID:25336982

  13. Emerging permanent filler technologies: focus on Aquamid

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Paul S

    2014-01-01

    A plethora of soft tissue fillers have been developed within the past decade to correct the cutaneous changes that occur with photoaging. Such fillers, whether nonpermanent, semipermanent, or permanent, are widely used to fill undesired facial rhytides. In addition, fillers are employed to correct atrophy of the face as well as other parts of the body such as the dorsum of the hands through volumization and contouring. The extensive long-term safety outcomes reported with fillers and the ease with which they are administered make them an ideal choice to correct rhytides and to contour the face. However, as with any cosmetic procedure, in order to ensure high patient satisfaction and a safe outcome, proper training in injection techniques, the choice of the proper candidate, and awareness of potential adverse events are essential. This review article focuses on the permanent filler, Aquamid, which is composed of polyacrylamide hydrogel. PMID:25336982

  14. Influences of Nozzle Material on Laser Droplet Brazing Joints with Cu89Sn11 Preforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Stefan; Heberle, Johannes; Gürtler, Franz Josef; Cvecek, Kristian; Roth, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael

    This paper presents latest results on the influences of nozzle material and geometry on the electromechanical contacting of sensitive piezoceramic actuator modules. Two nozzle types have been investigated,a standard WC/Co nozzle which is used for soldering applications and a novelceramic nozzle. Applications for active piezoceramic components integrated in structural parts are e.g. active damping, energy harvesting, or monitoring of vibrations and material failure. Anup to now unsolved problem is the electrical contacting of such components without damaging the conductor or the metallization of the ceramic substrate. Since piezoelectric components are to be integrated into structures made of casted aluminum, requirements are high mechanical strength and temperature resistance. Within this paper a method forcontacting piezoceramic modules is presented. A spherical braze preform of tin bronze Cu89Sn11 with a diameter of 600 μm is located in a ceramic nozzle and is subsequently melted by a laser pulse. The liquid solder is ejected from the nozzlevia nitrogen overpressure and wets the surface of the metallization pad and the Cu-wire, resulting in a brazing joint after solidification. The process is called laser droplet brazing (LDB). To asses the thermal evolution during one cycle WC/Co and ZTA have been simulated numerically for two different geometries enabling a proposition weather the geometry or the material properties have a significant influence on the thermal load during one cycle. To evaluate the influence of the nozzle on the joint the positioning accuracy, joint height and detachment times have been evaluated. Results obtained with the ZTA nozzle show comparable positioning accuracies to a WC/Co nozzle with a lower standard deviation of solder detachment time.

  15. Field installed brazed thermocouple feedthroughs for high vacuum experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P. M.; Messick, C.

    1983-12-01

    In order to reduce the occurrence of vacuum leaks and to increase the availability of the DIII vacuum vessel for experimental operation, effort was applied to developing a vacuum-tight brazed feedthrough system for sheathed thermocouples, stainless steel sheathed conductor cables and tubes for cooling fluids. This brazed technique is a replacement for elastomer O ring sealed feedthroughs that have proven vulnerable to leaks caused by thermal cycling, etc. To date, about 200 feedthroughs were used. Up to 91 were grouped on a single conflat flange mounted in a bulkhead connector configuration which facilitates installation and removal. Investigation was required to select a suitable braze alloy, flux and installation procedure. Braze alloy selection was challenging since the alloy was required to have: (1) melting temperature in excess of the 250 C (482 F) bakeout temperature; (2) no high vapor pressure elements; (3) good wetting properties when used in air with acceptable flux; and (4) good wettability to 300 series stainless steel and Inconel.

  16. 46 CFR 56.75-20 - Brazing qualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... brazing operators shall be in accordance with the requirements of part C, Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) and part 57 of this... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS...

  17. 46 CFR 56.75-20 - Brazing qualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... brazing operators shall be in accordance with the requirements of part C, section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) and part 57 of this... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS...

  18. 46 CFR 56.75-20 - Brazing qualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... brazing operators shall be in accordance with the requirements of part C, Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) and part 57 of this... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS...

  19. 46 CFR 56.75-20 - Brazing qualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... brazing operators shall be in accordance with the requirements of part C, section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) and part 57 of this... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS...

  20. Low-energy gamma ray inspection of brazed aluminum joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. A.

    1967-01-01

    Americium 241 serves as a suitable radioisotope /gamma ray source/ and exposure probe for radiographic inspection of brazed aluminum joints in areas of limited accessibility. The powdered isotope is contained in a sealed capsule mounted at the end of a spring-loaded pushrod in the probe assembly.

  1. Midfacial rejuvenation by hyaluronic acid fillers and subcutaneous adipose tissue--a new concept.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe

    2015-04-01

    In midface rejuvenation, hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers are commonly used as a versatile tool to improve appearance and to correct V-deformities and loss of volume. The induction of collagen as a major constituent of extracellular matrix (ECM) has been considered to be a basic effect of the rejuvenation procedure. Although commonly described as "dermal" soft fillers, histologic studies localized HA filler in the subcutaneous adipose tissue. Deep injection whenever possible lead to prolonged efficacy. Since volumizing HA filler induce mechanical stress not only to fibroblasts but adipocytes and deep injection itself causes minor trauma in the subcutaneous adipose tissue we suggest that the activation of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSC) is responsible for the observed clinical effects. We present a concept of filler action that discusses interactions of HA with adipocytes, ECM fiber network and ADMSC. Such a concept can explain the prolonged efficacy of deep midfacial filler placement and offers a new understanding to tailor HA fillers in the future. PMID:25665858

  2. An overview of permanent and semipermanent fillers.

    PubMed

    Broder, Kevin W; Cohen, Steven R

    2006-09-01

    The demand for safe, effective, long-lasting, biocompatible dermal filler materials is increasing. Many products that include synthetic polymers and autologous tissue have emerged that attempt to meet these criteria. An overview of injectable permanent fillers, including ArteFill, Aquamid, and silicone, and semipermanent fillers, including Radiesse, Sculptra, and autologous fat, is presented. A discussion of their composition, histologic characteristics, antigenicity, U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval status, indications for use, efficacy, injection technique, and adverse effects is provided. PMID:16936539

  3. Cosmetic Fillers: Perspectives on the Industry.

    PubMed

    Basta, Steven L

    2015-11-01

    The cosmetic filler industry has evolved substantially over the last 30 years. The market is characterized by multiple fillers and a competitive dynamic among major aesthetics companies. Marketing in the United States and Europe has been different owing to regulatory constraints. Differences have led to more rapid growth in the European market. The US market has evolved owing to growth of major companies with multiple product portfolios and leverage in consumer promotion and aesthetics office marketing owing to scale. The evolution of the filler market will include new materials, injection techniques, and facilitation devices, and new areas of injection. PMID:26505538

  4. Laser welding aluminum without filler metal using continuous wave and pulsed Nd:YAG lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bransch, H.N.

    1994-12-31

    A problem with automotive aluminum tubing applications, particularly for air conditioning heat exchanger assemblies, is terminating the tube reliably and inexpensively. An alternative to upsetting and mchining threads to the tube end is welding a nut (made from a stronger, easily machinable alloy such as Al 5456 or Al 6061) to lengths of tubing (made from a softer alloy such as Al 3003). Laser welding was investigated in order to reduce heat input and increase process speeds copared to brazing or gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Nd:YAG lasers were selected as beam source because of better absorptivity of the wavelength compared to CO{sub 2} lasers and simplified tooling with fiber optic beam delivery. It wa determined that a pulsed Nd:YAG laser produced 1.0 mm penetration at 0.3 m/min with 400 W average power, and 1.0 mm penetration at 0.75 m/min with 1000 W average power, however, an Al 4047 filler metal was required to eliminate solidification cracking. A 1900 W CW laser could weld the Al 3003 tube to the Al 5456 nut without filler metal, however, there was insufficient penetration (0.25 mm) to meet the mechanical and hermeticity requirements. To enhance penetration, but still reduce the tendency for hot cracking, the 1900 W average power beam was sine wave modulated from 400 W to 3600 W at 250 Hz and usd to weld the Al 3003 directly to the Al 5456. These parameters produced 1.2 mm penetration at 1.2 m/min without significant cracking and without using a filler metal. In addition, the welds passed all hermeticity and tensile strength tests. This combination of materials, joint design, and laser parameters produced tube assemblies that passed a leak check (300 psi nitrogen in 60{degrees}C water for 1 min) and tensile (tube breakage 100 mm from the joint, 5.2 kN tensile strength).

  5. Epoxy coatings over latex block fillers

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, L.D.

    1997-12-01

    Failures of polymerized epoxy coatings applied over latex/acrylic block fillers continue to plague owners of commercial buildings, particularly those with high architectural content such as condominiums, high rise offices, etc. Water treatment facilities in paper mills are especially prone to this problem. The types of failures include delamination of the topcoats, blisters in both the block fillers and the topcoats and disintegration of the block filler itself. While the problem is well known, the approach to a solution is not. A study of several coatings manufacturer`s Product Data Sheets shows a wide variance in the recommendations for what are purportedly generically equivalent block fillers. While one manufacturer might take an essentially architectural approach, another will take a heavy-duty industrial approach. To the specifying architect or engineer who has little training in the complexities of protective coating systems, this presents a dilemma. Who does he believe? What does he specify? To whom can he turn for independent advice?

  6. Mechanical properties of ethylene-octene copolymer (EOC) - lignocellulosic fillers biocomposites in dependence to filler content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykova, Anna; Pantyukhov, Petr; Popov, Anatoly

    2016-05-01

    The mechanical properties of biocomposites based on ethylene-octene copolymer were studied. The aim of present work was to investigate the mechanical properties of composites based on ethylene-octene copolymer (EOC) in dependence to type of the filler, filler content and trade mark of EOC. Addition of fillers (wood flour or seed flax straw) decreases elongation at break and decreases unsignificantly tensile strenght of examined copolymers. Particles of filler increase the toughness of polymer chain, which leads to decline of elongation at break. Biocomposites with wood flour had higher tensile strength and elongation at break than the composites with flax straw.

  7. The potpourri approach to hyaluronic acid filler injections.

    PubMed

    Lim, Adrian C

    2010-02-01

    There is an ever-expanding range of hyaluronic acid fillers with varying physical characteristics available to cosmetic dermatologists. These fillers are commercially packaged in syringes of approximately 1 mL (range 0.5-2 mL) volume. Filler injectors are currently qualitatively and quantitatively restricted to fillers packaged in ready-to-go syringes. Patients often present for pan-facial rejuvenation requiring varying amounts of fillers as well as more than one type/subtype of filler for optimum correction. The potpourri approach allows access to a range of prepared hyaluronic acid filler subtypes that can be used on the same patient in the one session. The potpourri method centres on the use of multiple 31-gauge insulin syringes prepared with a range of different hyaluronic acid filler products that are ready for use. This increases flexibility with filler selection and has the potential to provide better filler-to-tissue match for patients. PMID:20148852

  8. New Manufacturing Method for Paper filler and Fiber Material

    SciTech Connect

    Doelle, Klaus

    2011-11-22

    The study compares commercial available filler products with a new developed “Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material” and how main structural, optical and strength properties are affected by increasing the filler content of at least 5% over commercial values. The study consists of: (i) an overview of paper filler materials used in the paper production process, (ii) discusses the manufacturing technology of lime based filler materials for paper applications, (iii) gives an overview of new emerging paper filler technologies, (iv) discusses a filler evaluation of commercial available digital printing paper products, (v) reports from a detailed handsheet study and 12” pilot plant paper machine trial runs with the new Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material, and (vi) evaluates and compares commercial filler products and the new Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material with a life cycle analyses that explains manufacturing, economic and environmental benefits as they are applied to uncoated digital printing papers.

  9. Fillers for the improvement in acne scars

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Acne is a common inflammatory disease. Scarring is an unwanted end point of acne. Both atrophic and hypertrophic scar types occur. Soft-tissue augmentation aims to improve atrophic scars. In this review, we will focus on the use of dermal fillers for acne scar improvement. Therefore, various filler types are characterized, and available data on their use in acne scar improvement are analyzed. PMID:26491364

  10. Initial investigation of cryogenic wind tunnel model filler materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, H. F.; Firth, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Various filler materials are being investigated for applicability to cryogenic wind tunnel models. The filler materials will be used to fill surface grooves, holes and flaws. The severe test environment of cryogenic models precludes usage of filler materials used on conventional wind tunnel models. Coefficients of thermal expansion, finishing characteristics, adhesion and stability of several candidate filler materials were examined. Promising filler materials are identified.

  11. Evaluation of Superplastic Forming and Weld-brazing for Fabrication of Titanium Compression Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royster, D. M.; Bales, T. T.; Davis, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The two titanium processing procedures, superplastic forming and weld brazing, are successfully combined to fabricate titanium skin stiffened structural panels. Stiffeners with complex shapes are superplastically formed using simple tooling. These stiffeners are formed to the desired configuration and required no additional sizing or shaping following removal from the mold. The weld brazing process by which the stiffeners are attached to the skins utilize spot welds to maintain alignment and no additional tooling is required for brazing. The superplastic formed/weld brazed panels having complex shaped stiffeners develop up to 60 percent higher buckling strengths than panels with conventional shaped stiffeners. The superplastic forming/weld brazing process is successfully scaled up to fabricate full size panels having multiple stiffeners. The superplastic forming/weld brazing process is also successfully refined to show its potential for fabricating multiple stiffener compression panels employing unique stiffener configurations for improved structural efficiency.

  12. Low vapor pressure braze alloys for thermionic energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, V. L.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary results in the use of some low-vapor-pressure braze alloys are reported; these are binary alloys of refractory metals (Th, Zr, Hf, Ru, Nb, Ir, Mo, Ta, Os, Re, W) with vapor pressures below 0.1 nanotorr at 1500 K or 10 microtorr at 2000 K. The melting point minima or eutectics of the alloys range from 1510 K to above 3000 K. Melting points and surface wetting on a Ta base are given. Results are presented on brazing of Ir, LaB6, Nb, Re, W, and ZrO2 (with 22 wt % Zr) into a Ta base or a Nb-1% Zr base. The results are applicable in electrode screening programs for thermionic cesium diodes.

  13. New hermetic sealing material for vacuum brazing of stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, S.; Wiehl, G.; Silze, F.

    2016-03-01

    For vacuum brazing applications such as in vacuum interrupter industry Hermetic Sealing Materials (HSM) with low partial pressure are widely used. AgCu28 dominates the hermetic sealing market, as it has a very good wetting behavior on copper and metallized ceramics. Within recent decades wetting on stainless steel has become more and more important. However, today the silver content of HSMs is more in focus than in the past decades, because it has the biggest impact on the material prices. Umicore Technical Materials has developed a new copper based HSM, CuAg40Ga10. The wettability on stainless steel is significantly improved compared to AgCu28 and the total silver content is reduced by almost 44%. In this article the physical properties of the alloy and its brazed joints will be presented compared to AgCu28.

  14. Separation and Sealing of a Sample Container Using Brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Rivellini, Tommaso P.; Wincentsen, James E.; Gershman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    A special double-wall container and a process for utilizing the container are being developed to enable (1) acquisition of a sample of material in a dirty environment that may include a biological and/or chemical hazard; (2) sealing a lid onto the inner part of the container to hermetically enclose the sample; (3) separating the resulting hermetic container from the dirty environment; and (4) bringing that hermetic container, without any biological or chemical contamination of its outer surface, into a clean environment. The process is denoted S(exp 3)B (separation, seaming, and sealing using brazing) because sealing of the sample into the hermetic container, separating the container from the dirty environment, and bringing the container with a clean outer surface into the clean environment are all accomplished simultaneously with a brazing operation.

  15. Flight service evaluation of two aluminum-brazed titanium spoilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    The long-term service evaluation of two aluminum-brazed titanium (ABTi) honeycomb flight spoilers was concluded. The two spoilers had about 7.5 years of commercial flight experience on All Nippon Airways Model 737 aircraft. All Nippon Airways was selected because Japan has one of the most severe marine-industrial environments in the world. The results indicated that both flight spoilers still had the same load-carrying capability as when they were originally installed. No direct evidence of any corrosion was observed on either spoiler. Another significant accomplishment of this effort was the development of a braze design for efficiently distributing point loads from the fittings and skin into the honeycomb core.

  16. Effects of service environments on aluminum-brazed titanium (ABTi)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    Aluminum brazed titanium (ABTi) structures were evaluated during prolonged exposure to extreme environments: elevated temperature exposure to airline service fluids, hydraulic fluid, and seawater, followed by laboratory corrosion tests. Solid-face and perforated face honeycomb sandwich panel specimens, stressed panel assemblies, and faying surface brazed joints were tested. The corrosion resistance of ABTi is satisfactory for commercial airline service. Unprotected ABTi proved inherently resistant to attack by all of the extreme service aircraft environments except: seawater at 700 K (800 F) and above, dripping phosphate ester hydraulic fluid at 505 K (450 F), and a marine environment at ambient temperature. The natural oxides and deposits present on titanium surfaces in airline service provide protection against hot salt corrosion pitting. Coatings are required to protect titanium dripping phosphate ester fluid at elevated temperatures and to protect exposed acoustic honeycomb parts against corrosion in a marine environment.

  17. Friction Stir Brazing: a Novel Process for Fabricating Al/Steel Layered Composite and for Dissimilar Joining of Al to Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guifeng; Su, Wei; Zhang, Jianxun; Wei, Zhongxin

    2011-09-01

    A novel process of friction stir brazing (FSB) for fabricating Al/steel layered composite (by multipass) and for joining Al to steel (by single pass) was proposed to avoid the wear of pin by steel, in which a tool without pin was used. FSB of 1.8-mm-thick Al sheet to steel sheet was conducted using a cylindrical tool with 20-mm diameter but without pin and using 0.1-mm-thick zinc foil as filler metal. For the rotational speed of 1500 rpm, sound joints were reliably obtained at the medium range of traverse speed of 75 to 235 mm/min, which fractured within Al parent sheet during tensile shear test. Furthermore, for peel test on the sound joints, Al and steel parent sheets tended to crack and deform, respectively. Metallographic examination showed that most Zn was extruded and the resultant interfacial structure consisted of several Al-Fe intermetallic compounds (IMCs) with a little Zn, less than 3 at. pct. The thickness of IMCs can be controlled to be less than 10 μm by properly increasing traverse speed ( e.g., 150 mm/min). The metallurgical process of FSB was investigated by observing the microstructure of the longitudinal section of a friction stir brazed joint obtained by the suddenly stopping technique.

  18. Mechanistic understanding of aerosol emissions from a brazing operation.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, A T; Biswas, P

    2000-01-01

    Welding operations produce gaseous and aerosol by-products that can have adverse health effects. A laboratory furnace study was conducted to aid understanding of the chemical and aerosol behavior of a widely used, self-fluxing brazing alloy (89% Cu, 6% Ag, 5% P) that is also used with a supplemental fluxing compound to prevent oxidation at the molten metal surface. The results indicate that the aerosols generated by the alloy are transient (produced over a short duration of time) and are associated with mass transfer of phosphorus species from the molten metal surface to the surrounding gas. In contrast, when the alloy was used in conjunction with the supplemental fluxing compound, a relatively nontransient, submicron-size aerosol was generated that was several orders of magnitude higher in concentration. Thermodynamic equilibrium analysis suggests that fluoride (a major constituent in the fluxing compound) played a significant role in reacting with the brazing alloy metals to form gas phase metal fluoride compounds that had high vapor pressures when compared with their elemental or oxide forms. As these metal-fluoride vapors cooled, submicron-size particles were formed mainly through nucleation and condensation growth processes. In addition, the equilibrium results revealed the potential formation of severe pulmonary irritants (HF and BF3) from heating the supplemental fluxing compound. These results demonstrated the importance of fluxing compounds in the formation of brazing fumes, and suggest that fluxing compounds could be selected that serve their metallurgical intention and suppress the formation of aerosols. PMID:10885884

  19. Rheological properties of styrene-butadiene rubber filled with electron beam modified surface treated dual phase fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugharaj, A. M.; Bhowmick, Anil K.

    2004-01-01

    The rheological properties of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) loaded with dual phase filler were measured using Monsanto Processability Tester (MPT) at three different temperatures (100°C, 110°C and 130°C) and four different shear rates (61.3, 306.3, 613, and 1004.5 s -1). The effect of electron beam modification of dual phase filler in absence and presence of trimethylol propane triacrylate (TMPTA) or triethoxysilylpropyltetrasulphide (Si-69) on melt flow properties of SBR was also studied. The viscosity of all the systems decreases with shear rate indicating their pseudoplastic or shear thinning nature. The higher shear viscosity for the SBR loaded with the electron beam modified filler is explained in terms of variation in structure of the filler upon electron beam irradiation. Die swell of the modified filler loaded SBR is slightly higher than that of the unmodified filler loaded rubber, which is explained by calculating normal stress difference for the systems. Activation energy of the modified filler loaded SBR systems is also slightly higher than that of the control filler loaded SBR system.

  20. Filler augmentation, safe or unsafe: A case series of severe complications of fillers

    PubMed Central

    Omranifard, Mahmood; Taheri, Soheila

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The growing interest in filler injection requires a more comprehensive knowledge about the complications of this procedure. METHODS: A total of 5 cases with debilitating chronic complications following filler injection referred to Al-Zahra hospital, Isfahan are presented in this report. RESULTS: The outcome of treatment for two of the cases was satisfactory. In one case the treatment led to failure. A case committed suicide, the remaining case had received vitamin E injection which caused severe necrosis and scaring. CONCLUSIONS: All fillers are considered foreign bodies and may provoke the immune system to varying degrees. Most complications are, however, caused by the technique of injection not the filler itself. Experience of physicians along with adequate knowledge about fillers and their complications can definitely guarantee a better outcome. PMID:22973374

  1. Diffusivity and Transient Localization of Filler Particles in Polymer Melts and Crosslinked Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell, Zachary E.; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2013-03-01

    Building on recent progress in describing the microscopic equilibrium structure of polymer nanocomposites (PRISM theory), as well as the naïve mode coupling and nonlinear Langevin equation approaches for predicting localization and activated barrier hopping, we have initiated the study of dynamical phenomena in nanocomposites at finite filler loading. A colloidal suspension perspective is adopted whereby the polymer dynamics are assumed to remain unperturbed by fillers. Both entangled polymer melts and crosslinked systems are studied. The long time behavior of a tagged nanoparticle (localization and diffusivity) is calculated for various melt (tube diameter, polymer radius of gyration) and nanoparticle (filler size and volume fraction, polymer-filler attraction strength) parameters. For transiently localized particles, a dynamic free energy is constructed and employed to compute the nanoparticle localization length, mean barrier hopping time, and self-diffusion constant. The influence of filler-filler interactions on the Stokes-Einstein violation phenomenon in entangled melts is established. In addition, the influence of nanocomposite statistical structure (e.g., in the depletion, steric stabilization, or bridging regimes) on slow dynamics and localization is investigated.

  2. Plasma-modified graphene nanoplatelets and multiwalled carbon nanotubes as fillers for advanced rubber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicinski, M.; Gozdek, T.; Bielinski, D. M.; Szymanowski, H.; Kleczewska, J.; Piatkowska, A.

    2015-07-01

    In modern rubber industry, there still is a room for new fillers, which can improve the mechanical properties of the composites, or introduce a new function to the material. Modern fillers like carbon nanotubes or graphene nanoplatelets (GnP), are increasingly applied in advanced polymer composites technology. However, it might be hard to obtain a well dispersed system for such systems. The polymer matrix often exhibits higher surface free energy (SFE) level with the filler, which can cause problems with polymer-filler interphase adhesion. Filler particles are not wet properly by the polymer, and thus are easier to agglomerate. As a consequence, improvement in the mechanical properties is lower than expected. In this work, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and GnP surface were modified with low-temperature plasma. Attempts were made to graft some functionalizing species on plasma-activated filler surface. The analysis of virgin and modified fillers’ SFE was carried out. MWCNT and GnP rubber composites were produced, and ultimately, their morphology and mechanical properties were studied.

  3. HIGH TEMPERATURE BRAZING ALLOY FOR JOINT Fe-Cr-Al MATERIALS AND AUSTENITIC AND FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    DOEpatents

    Cost, R.C.

    1958-07-15

    A new high temperature brazing alloy is described that is particularly suitable for brazing iron-chromiumaluminum alloys. It consists of approximately 20% Cr, 6% Al, 10% Si, and from 1.5 to 5% phosphorus, the balance being iron.

  4. Temporal fossa defects: techniques for injecting hyaluronic acid filler and complications after hyaluronic acid filler injection.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Margit Lai Wun; Marmur, Ellen S

    2015-09-01

    Facial changes with aging include thinning of the epidermis, loss of skin elasticity, atrophy of muscle, and subcutaneous fat and bony changes, all which result in a loss of volume. As temporal bones become more concave, and the temporalis atrophies and the temporal fat pad decreases, volume loss leads to an undesirable, gaunt appearance. By altering the temporal fossa and upper face with hyaluronic acid filler, those whose specialty is injecting filler can achieve a balanced and more youthful facial structure. Many techniques have been described to inject filler into the fossa including a "fanned" pattern of injections, highly diluted filler injection, and the method we describe using a three-injection approach. Complications of filler in the temporal fossa include bruising, tenderness, swelling, Tyndall effect, overcorrection, and chewing discomfort. Although rare, more serious complications include infection, foreign body granuloma, intravascular necrosis, and blindness due to embolization into the ophthalmic artery. Using reversible hyaluronic acid fillers, hyaluronidase can be used to relieve any discomfort felt by the patient. Injectors must be aware of the complications that may occur and provide treatment readily to avoid morbidities associated with filler injection into this sensitive area. PMID:26311237

  5. High-Temperature Insulating Gap Filler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toombs, Gordon R.; Oyoung, Kevin K.; Stevens, Everett G.

    1991-01-01

    New inorganic, ceramic filler for gaps between refractory ceramic tiles offers high resistance to heat and erosion. Consists of ceramic-fiber fabric precoated with silica and further coated with silica containing small amount of silicon carbide powder to increase thermal emittance. Developed as replacement for organic filler used on thermal-protection system of Space Shuttle. Promises to serve for many missions and to reduce cost and delay of refurbishing aerospace craft. Used as sealing material in furnaces or as heat shield for sensitive components in automobiles, aircraft, and home appliances.

  6. Understanding, Avoiding, and Managing Severe Filler Complications.

    PubMed

    Rzany, Berthold; DeLorenzi, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Any injectable filler may elicit moderate-to-severe adverse events, ranging from nodules to abscesses to vascular occlusion. Fortunately, severe adverse events are uncommon for the majority of fillers currently on the market. Because these are rare events, it is difficult to identify the relevant risk factors and to design the most efficacious treatment strategies. Poor aesthetic outcomes are far more common than severe adverse events. These in contrast should be easily avoidable by ensuring that colleagues receive proper training and follow best practices. PMID:26441099

  7. Thermal pretreatment of silica composite filler materials

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Quan; Ramsey, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Three different silica filler materials were thermally treated in order to effect dehydration, dehydroxylation, and rehydroxylation. Samples were characterized by thermogravimetry (TG), pycnometry, elemental analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For all fillers, our results indicate incremental removal of silanol groups at higher heating temperatures and irreversible dehydroxylation at over 673 K. To remove the organic content and maintain adequate silanol density for subsequent silanization on Stöber-type silica, we suggest heating at 673 K followed by overnight boiling in water. PMID:20445821

  8. Recent experience in the fabrication and brazing of ceramic beam tubes for kicker magnets at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Ader, C.R.; Jensen, C.; Reilly, R.; Snee, D.; Wilson, J.H.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Ceramic beam tubes are utilized in numerous kicker magnets in different accelerator rings at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Kovar flanges are brazed onto each beam tube end, since kovar and high alumina ceramic have similar expansion curves. The tube, kovar flange, end piece, and braze foil (titanium/incusil) alloy brazing material are stacked in the furnace and then brazed in the furnace at 1000 C. The ceramic specified is 99.8% Alumina, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, a strong recrystallized high-alumina fabricated by slip casting. Recent experience at Fermilab with the fabrication and brazing of these tubes has brought to light numerous problems including tube breakage and cracking and also the difficulty of brazing the tube to produce a leak-tight joint. These problems may be due to the ceramic quality, voids in the ceramic, thinness of the wall, and micro-cracks in the ends which make it difficult to braze because it cannot fill tiny surface cracks which are caused by grain pullout during the cutting process. Solutions which are being investigated include lapping the ends of the tubes before brazing to eliminate the micro-cracks and also metallization of the tubes.

  9. Interfacial metallurgy study of brazed joints between tungsten and fusion related materials for divertor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuxuan; Galloway, Alexander; Wood, James; Robbie, Mikael Brian Olsson; Easton, David; Zhu, Wenzhong

    2014-11-01

    In the developing DEMO divertor, the design of joints between tungsten to other fusion related materials is a significant challenge as a result of the dissimilar physical metallurgy of the materials to be joined. This paper focuses on the design and fabrication of dissimilar brazed joints between tungsten and fusion relevant materials such as EUROFER 97, oxygen-free high thermal conductivity (OFHC) Cu and SS316L using a gold based brazing foil. The main objectives are to develop acceptable brazing procedures for dissimilar joining of tungsten to other fusion compliant materials and to advance the metallurgical understanding within the interfacial region of the brazed joint. Four different butt-type brazed joints were created and characterised, each of which were joined with the aid of a thin brazing foil (Au80Cu19Fe1, in wt.%). Microstructural characterisation and elemental mapping in the transition region of the joint was undertaken and, thereafter, the results were analysed as was the interfacial diffusion characteristics of each material combination produced. Nano-indentation tests are performed at the joint regions and correlated with element composition information in order to understand the effects of diffused elements on mechanical properties. The experimental procedures of specimen fabrication and material characterisation methods are presented. The results of elemental transitions after brazing are reported. Elastic modulus and nano-hardness of each brazed joints are reported.

  10. Effects of two ergonomic improvements in brazing coils of air-handler units.

    PubMed

    Loo, H S; Yeow, Paul H P

    2015-11-01

    The research aims to address the physically loading task and quality and productivity problems in the brazing of coils of air-handler units. Eight operators participated in two intervention studies conducted in a factory in Malaysia to compare the status quo brazing with (1) the use of a new twin-brazing torch that replaced the single-brazing gun and (2) brazing in a sitting position. The outcome measures are related to quality, productivity, monetary costs, body postures and symptoms. After baseline, Interventions I and II were applied for 3 months respectively. The results show a 58.9% quality improvement, 140% productivity increase and 113 times ROI. There was also a reduction in poor work postures e.g. in the raising of the arms and shoulders; bending, twisting and extending of the neck; and bending of left and right wrists, and the back. This research can be replicated in other factories that share similar processes. PMID:26154237

  11. Preparation and Characterization of N-Halamine-based Antimicrobial Fillers

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhuni, Revathi V.; Luo, Jie; Cao, Zhengbing; Sun, Yuyu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that the surface of CaCO3 fillers could be coated with an N-halamine based fatty acid to make the filler surface organophilic and accomplish antibacterial activity simultaneously, rendering the resulting polymer-filler composites antimicrobial. Thus, a new bi-functional compound, 4, 4 -Dimethyl hydantoin-undecanoic acid (DMH-UA), was synthesized by treating the potassium salt of dimethyl hydantoin (DMH) with 11-bromoundecanoic acid (BUA). Upon chlorination treatment with diluted bleach, DMH-UA was transformed into 3-chloro-4, 4-dimethyl hydantoin- undecanoic acid (Cl-DMH-UA). Alternatively, DMH-UA could be coated onto the surface of CaCO3 to obtain the corresponding calcium salt, 4, 4-dimethyl hydantoin-undecanoic acid-calcium carbonate (DMH-UA-CaCO3). In the presence of diluted chlorine bleach, the coated DMH-UA on the surface of CaCO3 was transformed into Cl-DMH-UA, leading to the formation of Cl-DMH-UA-CaCO3. The reactions were characterized with FT-IR, NMR, UV, DSC and SEM analyses. Both Cl-DMH-UA and Cl-DMH-UA-CaCO3 were used as antimicrobial additives for cellulose acetate (CA). The antimicrobial efficacy of the resulting samples was evaluated against both Escherichia coli (Gram-negative bacteria) and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacteria). It was found that with the same additive content, CA samples with Cl-DMH-UA-CaCO3 and Cl-DMH-UA had very similar antimicrobial and biofilm-controlling activity, but the former released less active chlorine into the surrounding environment than the latter. PMID:22942559

  12. 46 CFR 57.02-5 - Filler metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Filler metals. 57.02-5 Section 57.02-5 Shipping COAST... Requirements § 57.02-5 Filler metals. (a) Except as provided for in paragraph (b) of this section, when filler metal is used in a welded fabrication that is required to meet the requirements of this part the...

  13. 46 CFR 57.02-5 - Filler metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Filler metals. 57.02-5 Section 57.02-5 Shipping COAST... Requirements § 57.02-5 Filler metals. (a) Except as provided for in paragraph (b) of this section, when filler metal is used in a welded fabrication that is required to meet the requirements of this part the...

  14. 46 CFR 57.02-5 - Filler metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Filler metals. 57.02-5 Section 57.02-5 Shipping COAST... Requirements § 57.02-5 Filler metals. (a) Except as provided for in paragraph (b) of this section, when filler metal is used in a welded fabrication that is required to meet the requirements of this part the...

  15. 46 CFR 57.02-5 - Filler metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Filler metals. 57.02-5 Section 57.02-5 Shipping COAST... Requirements § 57.02-5 Filler metals. (a) Except as provided for in paragraph (b) of this section, when filler metal is used in a welded fabrication that is required to meet the requirements of this part the...

  16. 14 CFR 23.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 23.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 23.973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must be marked as prescribed...

  17. 14 CFR 27.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 27.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must prevent the entrance of fuel into any part of...

  18. 14 CFR 25.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 25.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.973 Fuel tank filler connection. Each fuel tank filler connection must prevent the entrance of fuel into any part of the...

  19. 7 CFR 29.6129 - Farm Filler (Y Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Farm Filler (Y Group). 29.6129 Section 29.6129... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6129 Farm Filler (Y Group). This group consists of... groups. U.S. grades Grade names, minimum specifications, and tolerances Y1 Fine Quality Farm Filler....

  20. 7 CFR 29.6129 - Farm Filler (Y Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Farm Filler (Y Group). 29.6129 Section 29.6129... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6129 Farm Filler (Y Group). This group consists of... groups. U.S. grades Grade names, minimum specifications, and tolerances Y1 Fine Quality Farm Filler....

  1. 46 CFR 57.02-5 - Filler metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Filler metals. 57.02-5 Section 57.02-5 Shipping COAST... Requirements § 57.02-5 Filler metals. (a) Except as provided for in paragraph (b) of this section, when filler metal is used in a welded fabrication that is required to meet the requirements of this part the...

  2. 14 CFR 23.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 23.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 23.973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must be marked as prescribed...

  3. Update on hyaluronic acid fillers for facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Yasaman; Goldenberg, Gary

    2015-08-01

    Injectable soft tissue filler procedures are becoming increasingly important for rejuvenating the aging face. The variety of available dermal fillers is increasing, and an understanding of their individual characteristics allows optimal outcomes. We provide an overview of the dermal fillers that were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration over the last 5 years. PMID:26367746

  4. 7 CFR 58.914 - Fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fillers. 58.914 Section 58.914 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE...

  5. 7 CFR 58.710 - Fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fillers. 58.710 Section 58.710 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE...

  6. High Temperature Filler for Tile Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Wang, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Gaps between ceramic tiles filled with ceramic-coated fabric that withstands temperatures as high as 2,000 degrees F (1,300 degrees C). Reusable high-temperature gap filler is made of fabric coated with ceramic slurry and bonded in place with room-temperature-vulcanized adhesive. Procedure used in kilns and furnaces.

  7. 7 CFR 58.914 - Fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fillers. 58.914 Section 58.914 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE...

  8. 7 CFR 58.710 - Fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fillers. 58.710 Section 58.710 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE...

  9. Biofilms: Their Role in Dermal Fillers

    PubMed Central

    Sadashivaiah, Anitha B; Mysore, Venkataram

    2010-01-01

    Fillers are commonly used in several aesthetic indications. Though considered safe, several side effects have been reported. The role of biofilms in the causation of some of these side effects has been elucidated only recently and this article presents a short review of the subject. PMID:20606988

  10. 7 CFR 30.14 - Cigar filler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cigar filler. 30.14 Section 30.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO STOCKS AND STANDARDS Classification of...

  11. 7 CFR 30.14 - Cigar filler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cigar filler. 30.14 Section 30.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO STOCKS AND STANDARDS Classification of...

  12. 7 CFR 30.14 - Cigar filler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cigar filler. 30.14 Section 30.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO STOCKS AND STANDARDS Classification of...

  13. Process for recovering filler from polymer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Maurice L.; Smith, Robert M.

    1978-01-01

    This disclosure relates to a process for recovering filler material from a polymeric matrix by reacting the matrix at an elevated temperature in a gas atmosphere with a controlled oxidizing potential and thereafter separating and cleaning the residue from the reaction mixture.

  14. Standard operating procedure: Gas atmosphere MELCO brazing furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Waller, C.R.

    1988-08-01

    A hydrogen and argon gas atmosphere furnace facility using electric furnaces is located at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). This furnace system was acquired to handle smaller jobs with a more rapid response time than was possible with the larger furnaces. Accelerator- and experimental-related components best assembled by atmosphere brazing techniques are routinely processed by this facility in addition to special heat treatment and bakeout heats. The detailed operation sequence and description of the MELCO furnace system are covered by this report. This document is to augment LA-10231-SOP, which describes the operation of the large furnace systems. 6 figs.

  15. Design data for brazed Rene 41 honeycomb sandwich

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, A. K.; Arnquist, J.; Koetje, E. L.; Esposito, J. J.; Lindsay, V. E. J.; Swegle, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    Strength data, creep data and residual strength data after cyclic thermal exposure were obtained at temperatures from 78 K to 1144 K (-320 F to 1600 F). The influences of face thickness, core depth, core gage, cell size and thermal/stress exposure conditions on the mechanical design properties were investigated. A braze alloy and process was developed that is adequate to fully develop the strength of the honeycomb core while simultaneously solution treating and aging the Rene 41 fact sheets. New test procedures and test specimen configurations were developed to avoid excessive thermal stresses during cyclic thermal exposure.

  16. Service evaluation of aluminum-brazed titanium (ABTi). [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, S. D.

    1981-01-01

    Long term creep-rupture, flight service and jet engine exhaust tests on aluminum-brazed titanium (ABTi), originally initiated under the DOT/SST follow-on program, were completed. These tests included exposure to natural airline service environments for up to 6 years. The results showed that ABTi has adequate corrosion resistance for long time commercial airplane structural applications. Special precautions are required for those sandwich structures designed for sound attenuation that utilize perforated skins. ABTi was also shown to have usable creep-rupture strength and to be metallurgically stable at temperatures up to 425 C (800 F).

  17. Thermally conductive polyamide 6/carbon filler composites based on a hybrid filler system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sung Min; Kwon, O. Hwan; Gyeong Oh, Yu; Kim, Yong Seok; Lee, Sung-Goo; Won, Jong Chan; Cho, Kwang Soo; Gak Kim, Byoung; Yoo, Youngjae

    2015-12-01

    We explored the use of a hybrid filler consisting of graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a polyamide 6 (PA 6) matrix. The composites containing PA 6, powdered GNP, and SWCNT were melt-processed and the effect of filler content in the single filler and hybrid filler systems on the thermal conductivity of the composites was examined. The thermal diffusivities of the composites were measured by the standard laser flash method. Composites containing the hybrid filler system showed enhanced thermal conductivity with values as high as 8.8 W (m · K)-1, which is a 35-fold increase compared to the thermal conductivity of pure PA 6. Thermographic images of heat conduction and heat release behaviors were consistent with the thermal conductivity results, and showed rapid temperature jumps and drops, respectively, for the composites. A composite model based on the Lewis-Nielsen theory was developed to treat GNP and SWCNT as two separate types of fillers. Two approaches, the additive and multiplicative approaches, give rather good quantitative agreement between the predicted values of thermal conductivity and those measured experimentally.

  18. Highly reliable field electron emitters produced from reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2014-02-14

    Highly reliable field electron emitters were developed using a formulation for reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube (CNT) composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers and a ball-milling method. We carefully controlled the ball-milling sequence and time to avoid any damage to the CNTs, which incorporated fillers that were fully dispersed as paste constituents. The field electron emitters fabricated by printing the CNT pastes were found to exhibit almost perfect adhesion of the CNT emitters to the cathode, along with good uniformity and reproducibility. A high field enhancement factor of around 10,000 was achieved from the CNT field emitters developed. By selecting nano-sized metal alloys and oxides and using the same formulation sequence, we also developed reliable field emitters that could survive high-temperature post processing. These field emitters had high durability to post vacuum annealing at 950 °C, guaranteeing survival of the brazing process used in the sealing of field emission x-ray tubes. We evaluated the field emitters in a triode configuration in the harsh environment of a tiny vacuum-sealed vessel and observed very reliable operation for 30 h at a high current density of 350 mA cm(-2). The CNT pastes and related field emitters that were developed could be usefully applied in reliable field emission devices. PMID:24434798

  19. Imaging features of midface injectable fillers and associated complications.

    PubMed

    Ginat, D T; Schatz, C J

    2013-08-01

    Injectable fillers are increasingly used for midface augmentation, which can be performed for facial rejuvenation and treatment of HIV facial lipoatrophy. A variety of temporary and permanent filler agents has been developed, including calcium hydroxylapatite, collagen, liquid silicone, polytetrafluoroethylene, hyaluronic acid, poly-l-lactic acid, and polyacrylamide gel. Facial fillers are sometimes encountered on radiologic imaging incidentally and should not be mistaken for pathology. Alternatively, patients with facial fillers may undergo imaging specifically to evaluate associated complications, such as infection, overfilling, migration, foreign-body reaction, and scarring. Therefore, it is important to be familiar with the imaging appearances of the various filler materials and their complications. PMID:22837310

  20. Chemical interaction of polyethylene matrix with vegetable fillers in biocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantyukhov, Petr; Monakhova, Tatiana; Popov, Anatoly; Zykova, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The paper studies the diffusion of low molecular weight components from vegetable fillers into polyethylene matrix during the preparation of biocomposites. In order to identify the diffusible substances a model experiment used where the hexadecane acted as a model of polyethylene. It was determined that polyphenolic compounds and chlorophyll penetrate from vegetable fillers to hexadecane to the maximum extent. There was found a correlation between the amount of polyphenolic compounds diffusible from the fillers to hexadecane and thermal oxidation kinetics of real biocomposites based on polyethylene and vegetable fillers. Thus, it has been assumed the diffusion of polyphenols and chlorophyll from vegetable fillers into polyethylene matrix during the preparation of biocomposites.

  1. A Compendium of Brazed Microstructures For Fission Power Systems Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locci, Ivan E.; Bowman, Cheryl L.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been supporting design studies and technology development for fission-based power systems that could provide power to an outpost on the Moon, Mars, or an asteroid. Technology development efforts have included fabrication and evaluation of components used in a Stirling engine power conversion system. This investigation is part of the development of several braze joints crucial for the heat exchanger transfer path from a hot-side heat exchanger to a Stirling engine heat acceptor. Dissimilar metal joints are required to impart both mechanical strength and thermal path integrity for a heater head of interest. Preliminary design work for the heat exchanger involved joints between low carbon stainless steel to Inconel 718, where the 316L stainless steel would contain flowing liquid metal NaK while Inconel 718, a stronger alloy, would be used as structural reinforcement. This paper addressed the long-term microstructural stability of various braze alloys used to join 316L stainless steel heater head to the high conductivity oxygen-free copper acceptor to ensure the endurance of the critical metallic components of this sophisticated heat exchanger. The bonding of the 316L stainless steel heater head material to a copper heat acceptor is required to increase the heat-transfer surface area in contact with flowing He, which is the Stirling engine working fluid.

  2. Flaw Tolerance In Lap Shear Brazed Joints. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Len; Flom, Yury

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents results of the second part of an on-going effort to gain better understanding of defect tolerance in braze joints. In the first part of this three-part series, we mechanically tested and modeled the strength of the lap joints as a function of the overlap distance. A failure criterion was established based on the zone damage theory, which predicts the dependence of the lap joint shear strength on the overlap distance, based on the critical size of a finite damage zone or an overloaded region in the joint. In this second part of the study, we experimentally verified the applicability of the damage zone criterion on prediction of the shear strength of the lap joint and introduced controlled flaws into the lap joints. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the lap joint strength as a function of flaw size and its location through mechanical testing and nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) employing damage zone criterion for definition of failure. The results obtained from the second part of the investigation confirmed that the failure of the ductile lap shear brazed joints occurs when the damage zone reaches approximately 10% of the overlap width. The same failure criterion was applicable to the lap joints containing flaws.

  3. A systematic review of filler agents for aesthetic treatment of HIV facial lipoatrophy (FLA).

    PubMed

    Jagdeo, Jared; Ho, Derek; Lo, Alex; Carruthers, Alastair

    2015-12-01

    HIV facial lipoatrophy (FLA) is characterized by facial volume loss. HIV FLA affects the facial contours of the cheeks, temples, and orbits, and is associated with social stigma. Although new highly active antiretroviral therapy medications are associated with less severe FLA, the prevalence of HIV FLA among treated individuals exceeds 50%. The goal of our systematic review is to examine published clinical studies involving the use of filler agents for aesthetic treatment of HIV FLA and to provide evidence-based recommendations based on published efficacy and safety data. A systematic review of the published literature was performed on July 1, 2015, on filler agents for aesthetic treatment of HIV FLA. Based on published studies, poly-L-lactic acid is the only filler agent with grade of recommendation: B. Other reviewed filler agents received grade of recommendation: C or D. Poly-L-lactic acid may be best for treatment over temples and cheeks, whereas calcium hydroxylapatite, with a Food and Drug Administration indication of subdermal implantation, may be best used deeply over bone for focal enhancement. Additional long-term randomized controlled trials are necessary to elucidate the advantages and disadvantages of fillers that have different biophysical properties, in conjunction with cost-effectiveness analysis, for treatment of HIV FLA. PMID:26481056

  4. Injectable fillers for facial soft tissue enhancement.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, A P; Romo, T

    2000-01-01

    Soft tissue augmentation materials have been advocated for correction of post-surgical or post-traumatic facial defects, as well as for age-related folds and wrinkles. While autogenous tissues may be the safest option, they require a second operative site. Animal-derived or synthetic materials have been advocated since the late 19th century, and have waxed and waned in popularity. In recent years, we have gained a better understanding of the physical events that occur when material is placed within or below the skin. With this knowledge, we stand at the threshold of a new era, where soft tissue fillers can be designed and customized to suit the individual patient. This article will review the major materials that have been or are now advocated for use as soft tissue fillers, and will detail their relative strengths and weaknesses in order to give the clinician a better perspective when considering a material for soft tissue augmentation. PMID:11802343

  5. Biomechanical characteristics of polymeric UHMWPE composites with hybrid matrix and dispersed fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, Sergey; Kornienko, Lyudmila; Shilko, Sergey; Thuc, Nguyen Xuan; Korchagin, Mikhail; Chaikina, Marina

    2015-11-01

    In order to develop artificial joint implants some biomechanical properties of composites with UHMWPE and hybrid (polymer-polymeric) "UHMWPE+PTFE" matrix with dispersed fillers were studied. A comparative analysis of the effectiveness of adding hydroxyapatite micron- and nanopowders as a biocompatible filler was carried out. It was shown that under dry sliding friction the wear rate of nanocomposites with the hybrid matrix is lower as compared with composites with the non-hybrid one. Mechanical activation of components further enhances the durability of nano- and microcomposites to almost double it without any significant reduction in the strength characteristics.

  6. Vacuum Brazing of Beryllium Copper Components for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tyhurst, C.C.; Cunningham, M.A.

    2002-06-04

    A process for vacuum brazing beryllium copper anode assemblies was required for the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell System, or PEPC, a component for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Initial problems with the joint design and wettability of the beryllium copper drove some minor design changes. Brazing was facilitated by plating the joint surface of the beryllium copper rod with silver 0.0006 inch thick. Individual air sampling during processing and swipe tests of the furnace interior after brazing revealed no traceable levels of beryllium.

  7. Brazing of refractory, superalloy, and composite materials for Space Shuttle applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1972-01-01

    Research work concerning the metallic portion of the shuttle-orbiter heat shield (expected to experience temperatures up to 2500 F) is described. The five metals being evaluated are TD-Ni-Cr, Cb-C129Y, Cb752, Hayes 188, and Inconel 625. Brazing techniques whereby pairs of these materials are joined into thin-membered assemblies for heat shield applications are described. Results obtained with the vacuum-furnace brazing process are examined. In addition, the use of brazed aluminum-boron metal-matrix-contoured composite structures for heat shield applications is evaluated.

  8. Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper for linear collider accelerator structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmer, J. W.; Klingmann, J.; van Bibber, K.

    2001-05-01

    Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper were investigated to develop procedures for joining precision machined copper components for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Diffusion bonds were made over a range of temperatures from 400 °C to 1000 °C, under two different loading conditions [3.45 kPa (0.5 psi) and 3.45 MPa (500 psi)], and on two different diamond machined surface finishes. Brazes were made using pure silver, pure gold, and gold-nickel alloys, and different heating rates produced by both radiation and induction heating. Braze materials were applied by both physical vapor deposition (PVD) and conventional braze alloy shims. Results of the diffusion bonding experiments showed that bond strengths very near that of the copper base metal could be made at bonding temperatures of 700 °C or higher at 3.45 MPa bonding pressure. At lower temperatures, only partial strength diffusion bonds could be made. At low bonding pressures (3.45 kPa), full strength bonds were made at temperatures of 800 °C and higher, while no bonding (zero strength) was observed at temperatures of 700 °C and lower. Observations of the fracture surfaces of the diffusion bonded samples showed the effects of surface finish on the bonding mechanism. These observations clearly indicate that bonding began by point asperity contact, and flatter surfaces resulted in a higher percentage of bonded area under similar bonding conditions. Results of the brazing experiments indicated that pure silver worked very well for brazing under both conventional and high heating rate scenarios. Similarly, pure silver brazed well for both the PVD layers and the braze alloy shims. The gold and gold-containing brazes had problems, mainly due to the high diffusivity of gold in copper. These problems led to the necessity of overdriving the temperature to ensure melting, the presence of porosity in the joint, and very wide braze joints. Based on the overall findings of this study, a two-step joining method

  9. Hyaluronic Acid Fillers: Science and Clinical Uses.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, Karol A

    2016-07-01

    Hyaluronic acid soft tissue fillers include a range of products (Juvederm Ultra, Juvederm Ultra Plus, Voluma, Restylane Silk, Restylane, Restylane Lyft, and Belotero Balance) that are used commonly for facial rejuvenation and enhancement of facial features. Although these products are similar in many ways, they are not interchangeable and have unique characteristics that need to be considered. Injection sites and techniques for facial rejuvenation are discussed. PMID:27363762

  10. Bio-inspired Fillers for Mechanical Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korley, Lashanda

    2012-02-01

    An examination of natural materials has offered a new perspective on the development of multi-functional materials with enhanced mechanical properties. One important lesson from nature is the utilization of composite structures to impart improved mechanical behavior and enhanced functionality using nanofillers. A relatively unexplored expansion of this bio-inspired, nanoscale filler approach to high performance materials is the incorporation of responsive, multi-functional reinforcing elements in polymeric composites with the goal of combining superior mechanical behavior that can be tuned with additional functionality, such as sensing and bioactivity. One approach is the use of self-assembling small molecules that form uniform, one-dimensional nanostructures as an emerging class of filler components. Another pathway toward mechanical enhancement is the incorporation of stimuli-responsive and high-modulus electrospun nanofibers. We have probed the utilization of high-aspect ratio, self-assembled small molecules and responsive electrospun nanofibers as all-organic nanofillers to achieve significant modulus changes within elastomeric matrices. The influence of matrix-filler interactions and the role of hierarchical organization in these nature-inspired composites will be discussed. Potential applications in barrier technology and drug delivery have also been explored.

  11. Ultrasonic inspection of brazed titanium samples with complex shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamberg, J.; Steinhauser, L.

    The ultrasonic technique of inspecting the completeness of brazed titanium joints of complex shape in aircraft engines is examined. The metal dies used for the inspection of titanium parts can be made of aluminum alloy because the longitudinal sound velocity of both materials is nearly the same. The two aluminum dies with an interposed turbine blade dummy are shown. The experiments indicate that a gap of 1.5 mm is sufficient for a broadband 5 MHz pulse. The smallest detected defect with axicon lenses was about 2 mm in diameter. The variation in the transmitted ultrasonic signal through junctions without defects was smaller than 3 dB. A C-scan of a titanium blade dummy with the two cavities inside is shown.

  12. Stress level evaluation of thin films under thermal loading from a brazing process

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1996-06-01

    X-ray front end beamline windows are made of thin beryllium foil that is commonly brazed or diffusion bonded onto a copper frame. In the brazing process, due to differences in the thermal expansion coefficient of the beryllium and copper materials, the beryllium film ends up in a state of very high level compression stress after cooling from 700{degrees}C (the brazing temperature) to room temperature. This makes the thin Be foil deform into a dome-shaped structure due to the usual asymmetrical geometry of the window. This paper studies the brazing process using a finite element method and explains the reason for such phenomena. Recommendations are offered for possible improvement in the bonding process of beryllium to the window block.

  13. Microstructural development of diffusion-brazed austenitic stainless steel to magnesium alloy using a nickel interlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Elthalabawy, Waled M.; Khan, Tahir I.

    2010-07-15

    The differences in physical and metallurgical properties of stainless steels and magnesium alloys make them difficult to join using conventional fusion welding processes. Therefore, the diffusion brazing of 316L steel to magnesium alloy (AZ31) was performed using a double stage bonding process. To join these dissimilar alloys, the solid-state diffusion bonding of 316L steel to a Ni interlayer was carried out at 900 deg. C followed by diffusion brazing to AZ31 at 510 deg. C. Metallographic and compositional analyses show that a metallurgical bond was achieved with a shear strength of 54 MPa. However, during the diffusion brazing stage B{sub 2} intermetallic compounds form within the joint and these intermetallics are pushed ahead of the solid/liquid interface during isothermal solidification of the joint. These intermetallics had a detrimental effect on joint strengths when the joint was held at the diffusion brazing temperature for longer than 20 min.

  14. Copper-phosphorus alloys offer advantages in brazing copper

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, W.D.

    1996-05-01

    Copper-phosphorus brazing alloys are used extensively for joining copper, especially refrigeration and air-conditioning copper tubing and electrical conductors. What is the effect of phosphorus when alloyed with copper? The following are some of the major effects: (1) It lowers the melt temperature of copper (a temperature depressant). (2) It increases the fluidity of the copper when in the liquid state. (3) It acts as a deoxidant or a fluxing agent with copper. (4) It lowers the ductility of copper (embrittles). There is a misconception that silver improves the ductility of the copper-phosphorus alloys. In reality, silver added to copper acts in a similar manner as phosphorus. The addition of silver to copper lowers the melt temperature (temperature depressant) and decreases the ductility. Fortunately, the rate and amount at which silver lowers copper ductility is significantly less than that of phosphorus. Therefore, taking advantage of the temperature depressant property of silver, a Ag-Cu-P alloy can be selected at approximately the same melt temperature as a Cu-P alloy, but at a lower phosphorus content. The lowering of the phosphorus content actually makes the alloy more ductile, not the silver addition. A major advantage of the copper-phosphorus alloys is the self-fluxing characteristic when joining copper to copper. They may also be used with the addition of a paste flux on brass, bronze, and specialized applications on silver, tungsten and molybdenum. Whether it is selection of the proper BCuP alloy or troubleshooting an existing problem, the suggested approach is a review of the desired phosphorus content in the liquid metal and how it is being altered during application. In torch brazing, a slight change in the oxygen-fuel ratio can affect the joint quality or leak tightness.

  15. Initial Investigation of Cryogenic Wind Tunnel Model Filler Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firth, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Filler materials are used for surface flaws, instrumentation grooves, and fastener holes in wind tunnel models. More stringent surface quality requirements and the more demanding test environment encountered by cryogenic wind tunnels eliminate filler materials such as polyester resins, plaster, and waxes used on conventional wind tunnel models. To provide a material data base for cryogenic models, various filler materials are investigated. Surface quality requirements and test temperature extremes require matching of coefficients of thermal expansion or interfacing materials. Microstrain versus temperature curves are generated for several candidate filler materials for comparison with cryogenically acceptable materials. Matches have been achieved for aluminum alloys and austenitic steels. Simulated model surfaces are filled with candidate filler materials to determine finishing characteristics, adhesion and stability when subjected to cryogenic cycling. Filler material systems are identified which meet requirements for usage with aluminum model components.

  16. Method of fluxless brazing and diffusion bonding of aluminum containing components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Featherston, A. B.; Okelly, K. P. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A method of diffusion bonding and fluxless brazing of aluminum containing components is reported. The aluminum surfaces are freed of any aluminum oxide coating and are coated with a polymeric sealer which can be thermally removed leaving essentially no residue. The polymeric sealer is being removed in a substantially oxygen free environment, and the aluminum components are then being brazed or diffusion bonded without the use of a flux to remove oxide coating.

  17. Study of the possibility of using solar radiant energy for welding and brazing metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvernyakov, V. S.; Frantsevich, I. N.; Pasichnyy, V. V.; Shiganov, N. A.; Korunov, Y. I.; Kasich-Pilipenko, I. Y.

    1974-01-01

    The solar spectrum at the surface of the earth is analyzed. A facility for creating concentrated solar radiant energy flux is described, and data on its energetic capabilities are presented. The technology of solar welding by the fusion technique and joining by high-temperature brazing is examined. The use of concentrated solar radiant energy for welding and brazing metals and alloys is shown. The results of mechanical tests and microscopic and macroscopic studies are presented.

  18. Development of plasma MIG brazing process for dissimilar metal joining of aluminum to steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Shinichi; Tanaka, Manabu

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to develop a new brazing process employing plasma MIG. Because the energy density of the plasma produced by the plasma electrode is low, the base metal can be heated extensively without melting of the base metal, consequently improving the wettability of bead. This paper discussed the dissimilar metal joining of aluminum to steel by plasma MIG brazing process. Fracture occurred at the HAZ in the aluminum plate at 80 MPa.

  19. Filler wire for aluminum alloys and method of welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Jr., Gerald W. O. (Inventor); Cho, Alex (Inventor); Russell, Carolyn K. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A weld filler wire chemistry has been developed for fusion welding 2195 aluminum-lithium. The weld filler wire chemistry is an aluminum-copper based alloy containing high additions of titanium and zirconium. The additions of titanium and zirconium reduce the crack susceptibility of aluminum alloy welds while producing good weld mechanical properties. The addition of silver further improves the weld properties of the weld filler wire. The reduced weld crack susceptibility enhances the repair weldability, including when planishing is required.

  20. Advances and Refinement in Hyaluronic Acid Facial Fillers.

    PubMed

    Costa, Christopher R; Kordestani, Reza; Small, Kevin H; Rohrich, Rod J

    2016-08-01

    Fillers temporarily augment deflated or ptotic facial compartments to restore a youthful appearance. Hyaluronic acids predominate the fillers market because of their focal volumization, duration of effect, low incidence of adverse reactions, and reversibility. Being able to properly perform these in-office procedures will ensure safety for patients and provide aesthetically optimal results. This communication provides the senior author's (R.J.R.) stepwise approach to facial aging and deflation with soft-tissue injectable fillers. PMID:27465184

  1. JOINING OF MOLYBDENUM DISILICIDE TO STAINLESS STEEL USING AMORPHOUS METAL BRAZES-RESIDUAL STRESS ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    VAIDYA, RAJENDRA U; KAUTZ, DOUGLAS D.; GALLEGOS, DAVID E.

    2007-01-30

    Molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2})/stainless steel 316 L jOints were produced by high temperature brazing using a cobalt-based metallic-glass (METGLAS{trademark} 2714A). Successful joining was completed in two different ways; either by feeding excess braze into the braze gap upon heating or by constraining the MoSi{sub 2}/stainiess steel assembly with an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) fixture during the heating cycle. These steps were necessary to ensure the production of a high quality void free joint. Residual stress measurements were completed on these joints. Indentation results show higher tensile residual stresses in the stainless steel for the joint with the external constraint, in comparison to the unconstrained state. In contrast, the compressive residual stresses In the MoSi{sub 2} (as measured by X-ray diffraction) were lower in the constrained state relative to the unconstrained state. These results and a lack of residual stress balance indicate that the stress state in the braze is significantly different under the two joining conditions and the volume of the braze plays an important role in the development of the residual stresses. Push-out tests carried out on these joints gave higher joint strengths in the unconstrained as compared to the constrained condition. The results of this study have important implications on the selection of the appropriate joining process (use of constraint versus extra braze).

  2. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  3. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  4. Polyvinyl alcohol battery separator containing inert filler. [alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Hsu, L. C.; Manzo, M. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol battery separator is disclosed. A particulate filler, inert to alkaline electrolyte of an alkaline battery, is incorporated in the separator in an amount of 1-20% by weight, based on the weight of the polyvinyl alcohol, and is dispersed throughout the product. Incorporation of the filler enhances performance and increases cycle life of alkaline batteries when compared with batteries containing a similar separator not containing filler. Suitable fillers include titanates, silicates, zirconates, aluminates, wood floor, lignin, and titania. Particle size is not greater than about 50 microns.

  5. Mechanical properties of Inconel 718 and Nickel 201 alloys after thermal histories simulating brazing and high temperature service

    SciTech Connect

    James, W.F.

    1985-09-01

    An experimental investigation was made to evaluate two nickel base alloys (Nickel-201 and Inconel-718) in three heat treated conditions. These conditions were: (1) annealed; (2) after thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle; and (3) after a thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle plus one operational lifetime of high temperature service. For the Nickel-201, two different braze cycle temperatures were evaluated. A braze cycle utilizing a lower braze temperature resulted in less grain growth for Nickel-201 than the standard braze cycle used for joining Nickel-201 to Inconel-718. It was determined, however, that Nickel-201, was marginal for temperatures investigated due to large grain growth. After the thermal exposures described above, the mechanical properties of Nickel-201 were degraded, whereas similar exposure on Inconel-718 actually strengthened the material compared with the annealed condition. The investigation included tensile tests at both room temperature and elevated temperatures, stress-rupture tests, and metallographic examination.

  6. Mechanical properties of Inconel 718 and Nickel 201 alloys after thermal histories simulating brazing and high temperature service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made to evaluate two nickel base alloys (Nickel-201 and Inconel-718) in three heat treated conditions. These conditions were: (1) annealed; (2) after thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle; and (3) after a thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle plus one operational lifetime of high temperature service. For the Nickel-201, two different braze cycle temperatures were evaluated. A braze cycle utilizing a lower braze temperature resulted in less grain growth for Nickel-201 than the standard braze cycle used for joining Nickel-201 to Inconel-718. It was determined, however, that Nickel-201, was marginal for temperatures investigated due to large grain growth. After the thermal exposures described above, the mechanical properties of Nickel-201 were degraded, whereas similar exposure on Inconel-718 actually strengthened the material compared with the annealed condition. The investigation included tensile tests at both room temperature and elevated temperatures, stress-rupture tests, and metallographic examination.

  7. Braze alloy process and strength characterization studies for 18 nickel grade 200 maraging steel with application to wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, James F.; Sandefur, Paul G., Jr.; Young, Clarence P., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive study of braze alloy selection process and strength characterization with application to wind tunnel models is presented. The applications for this study include the installation of stainless steel pressure tubing in model airfoil sections make of 18 Ni 200 grade maraging steel and the joining of wing structural components by brazing. Acceptable braze alloys for these applications are identified along with process, thermal braze cycle data, and thermal management procedures. Shear specimens are used to evaluate comparative shear strength properties for the various alloys at both room and cryogenic (-300 F) temperatures and include the effects of electroless nickel plating. Nickel plating was found to significantly enhance both the wetability and strength properties for the various braze alloys studied. The data are provided for use in selecting braze alloys for use with 18 Ni grade 200 steel in the design of wind tunnel models to be tested in an ambient or cryogenic environment.

  8. [Injectable fillers: adverse reactions and their management].

    PubMed

    Rzany, B; Bachmann, F; Nast, A

    2013-02-01

    Injectable fillers are one of the corner stones of aesthetic medicine. In general they are safe to use. However, adverse reactions may occur. These reactions may be acute, subacute or delayed, e.g. after decades. It is important to know these reactions and to be prepared so that they can be adequately treated, in view of the clinical symptoms, the injected material and if applicable other diseases/treatments that might trigger these reactions. Last but not least, all reactions should be reported either to specialized registries or regulatory agencies. Only then we are able to learn more about these reactions and their best possible treatment. PMID:23407758

  9. Thermodynamics of copper-nickel alloys containing aluminum, silicon, titanium, and chromium relative to their use in ceramic brazing

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.O.

    1984-11-01

    By varying the copper-to-nickel ratio the activity coefficients of Al, Si, Ti, and Cr can be varied over a wide range. Thus to a degree one can tailor the behavior of such alloys for usefulness in brazing ceramics. Further, considerable amounts of these active elements can be present while the ability of carbon to reduce the surface oxide film in a high-vacuum system is retained. The critical aluminum concentrations required to prevent the formation of SiO/sub 2/, TiO, or Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ by reaction with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ are calculated. The simultaneous presence of the four active additions will presumably promote wetting without making the surface deoxidation more difficult.

  10. Tensile Creep Properties of the 50Au-50Cu Braze Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.J.

    1999-05-28

    The 50Au-50CU (wt.%) alloy is a solid-solution strengthened braze alloy used extensively in conventional, hermetic metal/ceramic brazing applications where low vapor pressure is a requirement. Typical metal/ceramic base materials would be KovarTM alloy and metallized and Ni-plated 94% alumina ceramic. The elevated temperature mechanical properties are important for permitting FEA evaluation of residual stresses in metal/ceramic brazes given specific geometries and braze cooldown profiles. For material with an atomic composition of 76.084 at.% CL 23.916 Au (i.e., on the Cu-rich side of Cu3Au) that was annealed for 2 hr. at 750°C and water quenched a Garofalo sinh equation was found to adequately characterize the minimum strain rate data over the temperature mnge 450-850°C. At lower temperatures (250 arid 350°C), a conventional power law equation was found to characterize the data. For samples held long periods of time at 375°C (96 hrs.) and slowly cooled to room temperature, a slight strengthening reaction was observed: with the stress necessary to reach the same strain rate increasing by about 15% above the baseline annealed and quenched data. X-ray diffiction indicates that the 96 hr at 375°C + slow cool condition does indeed order. The microhardness of the ordered samples indicates a value of 94.5 VHN, compared to 93.7 VHN for the baseline annealed and quenched (disordered FCC) samples. From a brazing perspective, the relative sluggishness of this ordering reaction does not appear to pose a problem for braze joints cooled at reasonable rates following brazing.

  11. Evaluating Waste Charcoal as Potential Rubber Composite Filler

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon black, a byproduct of the petroleum industry, is the world's most predominant filler for rubber composites. In this study, charcoal in the form of pyrolyzed agricultural products was evaluated as potential carbon-based filler for rubber composites made with carboxylated styrene-butadiene lat...

  12. 7 CFR 29.6129 - Farm Filler (Y Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Farm Filler (Y Group). 29.6129 Section 29.6129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6129 Farm Filler (Y Group). This group consists...

  13. 7 CFR 29.6129 - Farm Filler (Y Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Farm Filler (Y Group). 29.6129 Section 29.6129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6129 Farm Filler (Y Group). This group consists...

  14. 7 CFR 29.6129 - Farm Filler (Y Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Farm Filler (Y Group). 29.6129 Section 29.6129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6129 Farm Filler (Y Group). This group consists...

  15. Charcoal byproducts as potential styrene-butadiene rubber composte filler

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon black, a byproduct of the petroleum industry, is the world's most predominant filler for rubber composites. In this study, various renewable charcoals in the form of pyrolyzed agricultural byproducts were evaluted as potential carbon-based filler for rubber composites made with carboxylated s...

  16. Fillers as Signals: Evidence from a Question-Answering Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Esther J.; Risko, Evan F.; Kingstone, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of a human or computer "partner" on the production of fillers ("um" and "uh") during a question and answer task. Experiment 1 investigated whether or not responding to a human partner as opposed to a computer partner results in a higher rate of filler production. Participants…

  17. Use of nut shells as fillers in polymer composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The three nutshell fillers including walnut, almond and pistachio nutshell were added to PLA. All the physical properties of samples deteriorated relative to PLA. When subjected to heat pre-treatment, although the physical properties of PLA-filler samples still deteriorated, the extent of deteriorat...

  18. 7 CFR 58.229 - Filler and packaging equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Filler and packaging equipment. 58.229 Section 58.229....229 Filler and packaging equipment. All filling and packaging equipment shall be of sanitary... equipment should comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for equipment for Packaging Dry Milk and Dry...

  19. 7 CFR 58.229 - Filler and packaging equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Filler and packaging equipment. 58.229 Section 58.229....229 Filler and packaging equipment. All filling and packaging equipment shall be of sanitary... equipment should comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for equipment for Packaging Dry Milk and Dry...

  20. 7 CFR 58.229 - Filler and packaging equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Filler and packaging equipment. 58.229 Section 58.229....229 Filler and packaging equipment. All filling and packaging equipment shall be of sanitary... equipment should comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for equipment for Packaging Dry Milk and Dry...

  1. 7 CFR 58.229 - Filler and packaging equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Filler and packaging equipment. 58.229 Section 58.229....229 Filler and packaging equipment. All filling and packaging equipment shall be of sanitary... equipment should comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for equipment for Packaging Dry Milk and Dry...

  2. 7 CFR 58.229 - Filler and packaging equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filler and packaging equipment. 58.229 Section 58.229....229 Filler and packaging equipment. All filling and packaging equipment shall be of sanitary... equipment should comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for equipment for Packaging Dry Milk and Dry...

  3. Aluminum oxide filler prevents obstructions in tubing during welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelly, K. P.

    1966-01-01

    Granular aluminum oxide is used as filler in serpentine tubing while welding the tubing to a flat surface. The filler eliminates obstructions in the tubes formed by molten weld nuggets and is porous enough to allow gases to escape from the welding area.

  4. Slot-Filler Categories as Memory Organizers for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucariello, Joan; Nelson, Katherine

    1985-01-01

    Two experiments tested the hypothesis that scripts (event schemas) provide a basis for categorical structures in semantic memory. Significantly better memory and organization were achieved on slot-filler lists than on either taxonomic or complementary lists, suggesting that slot-filler categories are more available in preschoolers' semantic…

  5. Managing Complications of Fillers: Rare and Not-So-Rare.

    PubMed

    Haneke, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Fillers belong to the most frequently used beautifying products. They are generally well tolerated, but any one of them may occasionally produce adverse side effects. Adverse effects usually last as long as the filler is in the skin, which means that short-lived fillers have short-term side effects and permanent fillers may induce life-long adverse effects. The main goal is to prevent them, however, this is not always possible. Utmost care has to be given to the prevention of infections and the injection technique has to be perfect. Treatment of adverse effects is often with hyaluronidase or steroid injections and in some cases together with 5-fluorouracil plus allopurinol orally. Histological examination of biopsy specimens often helps to identify the responsible filler allowing a specific treatment to be adapted. PMID:26865784

  6. Managing Complications of Fillers: Rare and Not-So-Rare

    PubMed Central

    Haneke, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Fillers belong to the most frequently used beautifying products. They are generally well tolerated, but any one of them may occasionally produce adverse side effects. Adverse effects usually last as long as the filler is in the skin, which means that short-lived fillers have short-term side effects and permanent fillers may induce life-long adverse effects. The main goal is to prevent them, however, this is not always possible. Utmost care has to be given to the prevention of infections and the injection technique has to be perfect. Treatment of adverse effects is often with hyaluronidase or steroid injections and in some cases together with 5-fluorouracil plus allopurinol orally. Histological examination of biopsy specimens often helps to identify the responsible filler allowing a specific treatment to be adapted. PMID:26865784

  7. Microvascular complications associated with injection of cosmetic facelift dermal fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Siavash; Prendes, Mark; Chang, Shu-Hong; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-02-01

    Minimally-invasive cosmetic surgeries such as injection of subdermal fillers have become very popular in the past decade. Although rare, some complications may follow injections such as tissue necrosis and even blindness. There exist two hypothesis regarding source of these complications both of which include microvasculature. The first hypothesis is that fillers in between the tissue structures and compress microvasculature that causes blockage of tissue neutrition and oxygen exchange in the tissue. In another theory, it is hypothesized that fillers move inside major arteries and block the arteries/veins. In this paper, we study these hypotheses using optical coherence tomography and optical microangiography technologies with different hyaluronic-acid fillers in a mouse ear model. Based on our observations, the fillers eventually block arteries/veins if injected directly into them that eventually causes tissue necrosis.

  8. Cryogenic performance of slotted brazed Rene 41 honeycomb panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, A. K.; Swegle, A. R.

    1982-01-01

    Two brazed Rene 41 honeycomb panels that would incorporate a frame element were designed, fabricated and tested. The panels were representative of the lower surface of an advanced space transportation vehicle. The first panel was a two span panel supported by a center frame and on edges parallel to it. The second panel was a two span panel supported by a center frame and on edges parallel to it. The second panel was a three span panel supported on two frames and on edges parallel to the frames. Each panel had its outer skin slotted to reduce the thermal stresses of the panel skins. The first panel was tested under simulated boost conditions that included liquid hydrogen exposure of the frame and inner skin and radiant heat to 478K on the outer skins. The first panel was tested to investigate the effect of thermal stresses in skins and core caused by the panel being restrained by a cold integral frame and to observe the effects of frost formation and possible liquid air development in and around outer skin slots.

  9. ``Long-life`` aluminium brazing alloys for automotive radiators -- a ten-year retrospective

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.C.; Woods, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    A class of corrosion-resistant brazing sheet materials, generally referred to as ``long-life alloys,`` has been in widespread use in brazed aluminum automobile radiators for over ten years. K319 tube material was initially introduced in 1986 to address the problem of road-salt-induced, outside-in corrosion of tubes in vacuum-brazed aluminum radiators, The development history, metallurgy, and field performance of long-life radiator brazing sheet are reviewed. This material utilizes the familiar sacrificial layer concept to improve corrosion resistance; however, it is unusual in that the layer is not introduced by conventional cladding means during sheet manufacture, but rather develops in situ by metallurgical transformations which occur during the brazing cycle. The sacrificial layer, about 25 mV anodic to the core alloy, increases by an order of magnitude the time-to-perforation of radiator tube sheet tested in cyclic acidified salt spray (SWAAT), which mimics the corrosion morphology observed in the field. Radiators examined after ten years of field service show excellent corrosion resistance, as predicted by SWAAT.

  10. Microwave induced plasma (MIP) brazing of silicon nitride to stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Samandi, M.; Bate, M.; Donnan, R.; Miyake, S.

    1996-12-31

    In an attempt to accelerate the process of joining of metals to ceramics, a new rapid brazing technology has been developed. In this process, referred to as Microwave Induced Plasma (MIP) brazing, a microwave plasma is used to rapidly heat the ceramic and metal to the melting temperature of the reactive braze material. The heating rate obtained by MIP could be many times faster than those achieved by conventional resistive heating in a tube furnace. The fast heating rate has no detrimental effect on the joint quality and in fact results in the formation of a thick interfacial film suggesting significant interdiffusion between the braze and ceramic, possibly stimulated by the microwave radiation. In this paper the experimental arrangement of the MIP system is described. The unique capability of the MIP heating is demonstrated by successful joining of hot pressed nitride to stainless steel using reactive metal brazing. The results of microstructural characterization of the joints carried out by SEM and EDS will also be presented.

  11. Brazing of Stainless Steels to Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shpargel, Tarah P.; Needham, Robert J.; Singh, M.; Kung, Steven C.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, there has been a great deal of interest in research, development, and commercialization of solid oxide fuel cells. Joining and sealing are critical issues that will need to be addressed before SOFC's can truly perform as expected. Ceramics and metals can be difficult to join together, especially when the joint must withstand up to 900 C operating temperature of the SOFC's. The goal of the present study is to find the most suitable braze material for joining of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to stainless steels. A number of commercially available braze materials TiCuSil, TiCuNi, Copper-ABA, Gold-ABA, and Gold-ABA-V have been evaluated. The oxidation behavior of the braze materials and steel substrates in air was also examined through thermogravimetric analysis. The microstructure and composition of the brazed regions have been examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and EDS analysis. Effect of braze composition and processing conditions on the interfacial microstructure and composition of the joint regions will be presented.

  12. Filler/ Polycarbosilane Systems as CMC Matrix Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1998-01-01

    Pyrolytic conversion of polymeric precursors to ceramics is accompanied by loss of volatiles and large volume changes. Infiltration of a low viscosity polymer into a fiber preform will fill small spaces within fiber tows by capillary forces, but create large matrix cracks within large, intertow areas. One approach to minimizing shrinkage and reducing the number of required infiltration cycles is to use particulate fillers. In this study, Starfire allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS) was blended with a silicon carbide powder, with and without dispersant, using shear mixing. The polymer and polymer/particle interactions were characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis and rheometry. Polymer/particulate slurries and suspensions were used to infiltrate a figidized preform of an eight ply five harness satin CG Nicalon fiber having a dual layer BN/SiC interface coating, and the resulting composites characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  13. Critical Issues for Producing UHTC-Brazed Joints: Wetting and Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passerone, A.; Muolo, M. L.; Valenza, F.

    2016-03-01

    A brief survey is presented of the most important interaction phenomena occurring at the solid-liquid interfaces in metal-ceramic systems at high temperatures, with special attention to the most recent developments concerning wetting and joining transition metals diborides. These phenomena are described and discussed from both the experimental and theoretical points of view in relation to joining ceramic and metal-ceramic systems by means of processes in the presence of a liquid phase (brazing, TLPB etc.). It is shown that wetting and the formation of interfacial dissolution regions are the results of the competition between different phenomena: dissolution of the ceramic in the liquid phase, reaction and formation of new phases at the solid-liquid interface, and drop spreading along the substrate surface. We emphasize the role of phase diagrams to support both the design of the experiments and the choice of active alloying elements, and to interpret the evolution of the system in relation to temperature and composition. In this respect, the sessile-drop technique has been shown to be helpful in assessing critical points of newly calculated phase diagrams. These studies are essential for the design of joining processes, for the creation of composite materials, and are of a particular relevance when applied to UHTC materials.

  14. 75 FR 52037 - Welding, Cutting and Brazing Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... Order No. 5-2007 (67 FR 31160). Signed at Washington, DC, on August 16, 2010. David Michaels, Assistant... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Welding, Cutting and Brazing Standard; Extension of the Office of... the information collection requirements contained in the Welding, Cutting and Brazing Standard (29...

  15. Orbiter Gap Filler Bending Model for Re-entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.

    2007-01-01

    Pressure loads on a protruding gap filler during an Orbiter reentry are investigated to evaluate the likelihood of extraction due to pressure loads, and to ascertain how much bending will be induced by re-entry pressure loads. Oblique shock wave theory is utilized to develop a representation of the pressure loads induced on a gap filler for the ISSHVFW trajectory, representative of a heavy weight ISS return. A free body diagram is utilized to react the forces induced by the pressure forces. Preliminary results developed using these methods demonstrate that pressure loads, alone, are not likely causes of gap filler extraction during reentry. Assessment of the amount a gap filler will bend over is presented. Implications of gap filler bending during re-entry include possible mitigation of early boundary layer transition concerns, uncertainty in ground based measurement of protruding gap fillers from historical Orbiter flight history, and uncertainty in the use of Orbiter gap fillers for boundary layer prediction calibration. Authors will be added to the author list as appropriate.

  16. Wear of nanofilled dental composites at varying filler concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of nanofiller concentration on the mechanisms of wear of a dental composite. Nanofilled composites were fabricated with a bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate polymer and 40 nm SiO2 filler particles at three filler loads (25, 50, and 65 wt %). The elastic modulus, flexural strength, and hardness of the composites and the unfilled resin were measured. The materials (n = 8) were tested in the modified wear testing device at 50,000, 100,000, and 200,000 cycles with 20N force at 1 Hz. A 33% glycerine lubricant and stainless steel antagonist were used. The worn composite and antagonist surfaces were analyzed with noncontact profilometry and SEM. The volumetric wear data indicated that there are significant differences between filler concentrations and cycles (p < 0.05). A trend was noted that increasing filler content beyond 25% decreased the wear resistance of the composites. Increasing filler content increased hardness and modulus and increased flexural strength up to 50% fill. SEM evaluation of the worn specimens indicated that the resin and 25% filled materials exhibited cracking and failed by fatigue and the 50 and 65% filled materials exhibited microcutting and failed by abrasive wear. Based on the results of this study, composite manufacturers are recommended to use a filler concentration between 25 and 50% when using nanosized filler particles. PMID:24909664

  17. Properties of microfilled composite resins as influenced by filler content.

    PubMed

    St Germain, H; Swartz, M L; Phillips, R W; Moore, B K; Roberts, T A

    1985-02-01

    Two series of composite resins were prepared with a light-cured urethane dimethacrylate matrix to which varying amounts of two types of silanated silica particles were added. One series contained volume fractions ranging from 15.8 to 28.8% silica particles of 20 nm in diameter (Type I filler) and the other series volume fractions of from 24 to 49.4% of an agglomerated silica particle of 40 nm in diameter (Type II filler). Tests were conducted to determine the effect of filler level on: depth of cure as determined by hardness measurements; color stability in both UV light and water; water sorption with time; hardness; compressive strength; strain behavior in slow compression; and resistance to toothbrush abrasion and wear by hydroxyapatite. Analysis of the data obtained for these two microfilled series indicate that increased filler levels result in trends for increased depth of cure, color stability, hardness, compressive strength, and stiffness, while water sorption and resistance to both toothbrush abrasion and wear by hydroxyapatite were reduced. These trends were more pronounced for the Type II filler series than for the Type I filler series. However, there was a greater differential in filler levels within the Type II series than within the Type I series. PMID:2982935

  18. In vitro wear of composite with varied cure, filler level, and filler treatment.

    PubMed

    Condon, J R; Ferracane, J L

    1997-07-01

    For the clinical wear of composite filing materials to be reduced, compositional factors such as degree of cure, filler level, and silanation level should be optimized. An oral-wear-stimulating machine was used to explore the effects of these factors on abrasion and attrition wear as well as on opposing enamel wear. The composites were made from Sr glass (1-2 micron avg) and a 50/50 Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin. Series I (A-D, E) were light-cured (Triad II) for 9, 12, 25, and 40 sec/side to produce degree of cure (DC) as measured by FTIR of 56, 60, 61, and 63%, respectively. E received an additional heat cure (120 degrees C for 10 min) to reach a DC of 66%. Series II (D, F-I) were filled to 62, 53, 48, 37, and 28 vol%, respectively. In series III (D, J-M), the portion of fillers treated with a silane coupler (MPS) was 100, 80, 60, 40, and 20%, respectively. Samples were cycled 50,000 times against an enamel antagonist in a poppy seed/PMMA slurry in the oral wear simulator to produce abrasion (load = 20 N) and attrition (load = 70 N) simultaneously. Wear depth (micron: n = 5) was measured by profilometry. Results for each series were analysed by ANOVA/Turkey's (p < or = 0.05). The wear depths did reflect cure values, though only the abrasion difference for E < A was significant. Greater wear was correlated with lower filler levels (r2 = 0.88; p < 0.05), significantly increasing below 48 vol% (G). Wear increased linearly as the percent of silane-treated fillers was reduced (r2 = 0.99; p < 0.05). Abrasion and attrition did not differ significantly for any composite. Wear of the opposing enamel was largely unchanged by these factors. Compositional factors including degree of cure, filler level, and silanation directly affected the wear resistance of dental composites evaluated in an oral wear simulator. PMID:9207774

  19. The filler powders laser welding of ODS ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shenyong; Lei, Yucheng; Zhu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Laser welding was performed on Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with the self-designed filler powders. The filler powders were added to weld metal to produce nano-particles (Y-M-O and TiC), submicron particles (Y-M-O) and dislocation rings. The generated particles were evenly distributed in the weld metal and their forming mechanism and behavior were analyzed. The results of the tests showed that the nano-particles, submicron particles and dislocation rings were able to improve the micro-hardness and tensile strength of welded joint, and the filler powders laser welding was an effective welding method of ODS ferritic steel.

  20. 21 CFR 888.3045 - Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device... salt bone void filler device. (a) Identification. A resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device is... entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance: Resorbable Calcium Salt Bone Void Filler Device; Guidance...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3045 - Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device... salt bone void filler device. (a) Identification. A resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device is... entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance: Resorbable Calcium Salt Bone Void Filler Device; Guidance...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3045 - Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device... salt bone void filler device. (a) Identification. A resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device is... entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance: Resorbable Calcium Salt Bone Void Filler Device; Guidance...

  3. BRAZING OF POROUS ALUMINA TO MONOLITHIC ALUMINA WITH Ag-CuO and Ag-V2O5 ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, M. C.; Camardello, Sam J.; Meier, Alan; Weil, K. Scott; Hardy, John S.

    2005-01-31

    The feasibility of joining porous alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) bodies to monolithic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using Ag-CuO and Ag-V{sub 2}O{sub 5} alloys via reactive air brazing (RAB) was examined for a nanoporous filter application. Brazing for these systems is complicated by the conflicting requirements of satisfactory wetting to fill the braze gap, while minimizing the infiltration of the porous body. By varying the firing time, temperature, and initial powder size, porous bodies with a range of pore microstructures were fabricated. The wettability was evaluated via sessile drop testing on monolithic substrates and porous body infiltration. Porous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/monolithic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} brazed samples were fabricated, and the microstructures were evaluated. Both systems exhibited satisfactory wetting for brazing, but two unique types of brazing behavior were observed. In the Ag-CuO system, the braze alloy infiltrated a short distance into the porous body. For these systems, the microstructures indicated satisfactory filling of the brazed gap and a sound joint regardless of the processing conditions. The Ag-V{sub 2}O{sub 5} alloys brazed joints exhibited a strong dependence on the amount of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} available. For Ag-V{sub 2}O{sub 5} alloys with large V{sub 2}O{sub 5} additions, the braze alloy aggressively infiltrated the porous body and significantly depleted the Ag from the braze region resulting in poor bonding and large gaps within the joint. With small additions of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, the Ag infiltrated the porous body until the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} was exhausted and the Ag remaining at the braze interlayer bonded with the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Based on these results, the Ag-CuO alloys have the best potential for brazing porous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to monolithic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  4. Dielectric properties of inorganic fillers filled epoxy thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Norshamira, A. Mariatti, M.

    2015-07-22

    The demand on the small size and high performance electronics has driven changes in the electronic packaging requirements from discrete capacitor to embedded capacitor. Embedded capacitor can improve electrical performance compared with discrete capacitor. This study aimed to achieve high dielectric of epoxy thin film composite that were targeted for application as embedded capacitor. In this study, inorganic fillers such as Calcium Copper Titanate (CCTO), Iron(III) Oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and Titanium Dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) were loaded in epoxy system at 5 and 20vol%. Morphology and dielectric properties were investigated to identify the effect of fillers loading and types of fillers on the properties of epoxy thin film composite. Based on the study, CCTO with 20vol% loading was found to have good dielectric properties compared to other type of fillers.

  5. Hyaluronic acid filler injections with a 31-gauge insulin syringe.

    PubMed

    Lim, Adrian C

    2010-02-01

    Hyaluronic acid gel is a commonly used skin/soft tissue filler in cosmetic dermatology. Hyaluronic acid fillers are packaged in proprietary luer-lock syringes that can be injected via a 30-gauge, 27-gauge or larger diameter needle depending on the consistency of the gel. A method of decanting proprietary hyaluronic acid fillers into multiple 31-gauge insulin syringes for injection is described. The use of a 31-gauge insulin syringe for filler injections can potentially enhance the injection process through more accurate product delivery and placement. This has the potential to produce a more balanced and symmetrical outcome for patients. Additional benefits include less injection pain, less bleeding/bruising and higher levels of patient satisfaction. PMID:20148851

  6. Polyacrylamide soft tissue filler nodule mimicking a mucoepidermoid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Karagozoglu, K H; van der Waal, I

    2008-06-01

    A 39-year-old woman is described in whom histopathologic examination of a nodule of the cheek mucosa was suggestive of a mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Only after the availability of a wider surgical specimen was a distinct foreign body reaction to polyacrylamide soft tissue filler observed. On inquiry, the patient admitted to having this filler injected into her nasolabial folds 3 years previously. PMID:18313268

  7. Legal ramifications of off-label filler use.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, David J

    2006-01-01

    Dermal fillers are often used in an off-label manner. Most off-label use is not only legal, but represents an appropriate physician standard of care. This chapter will first explore what is and what is not considered off-label. Then the chapter will explore manufacturer promotion of off-label use of both drugs and devices. Finally, the legal ramifications of off-label dermal filler use will be discussed. PMID:16784518

  8. Identification and Complications of Cosmetic Fillers: Sonography First.

    PubMed

    Wortsman, Ximena

    2015-07-01

    Cosmetic fillers are frequently used these days for enhancing beauty and to treat wrinkles or sagging skin. However, information on the history of injections may be difficult to obtain, and there is a growing number of reports on complications with these agents. In contrast to other imaging techniques, sonography has been successfully used for detecting and identifying common types of cosmetic fillers and has become the first-line imaging modality to deal with these exogenous components. PMID:26112618

  9. Fillers for improved graphite fiber retention by polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, E. E.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a program designed to determine the extent to which elemental boron and boron containing fillers added to the matrix resin of graphite/epoxy composites prevent the release of graphite fibers when the composites are exposed to fire and impact conditions are described. The fillers evaluated were boron, boron carbide and aluminum boride. The conditions evaluated were laboratory simulations of those that could exist in the event of an aircraft crash and burn situation. The baseline (i.e., unfilled) laminates evaluated were prepared from commercially available graphite/epoxy. The baseline and filled laminates' mechanical properties, before and after isothermal and humidity aging, also were compared. It was found that a small amount of graphite fiber was released from the baseline graphite/epoxy laminates during the burn and impact conditions used in this program. However, the extent to which the fibers were released is not considered a severe enough problem to preclude the use of graphite reinforced composites in civil aircraft structure. It also was found that the addition of boron and boron containing fillers to the resin matrix eliminated this fiber release. Mechanical properties of laminates containing the boron and boron containing fillers were lower than those of the baseline laminates. These property degradations for two systems: boron (5 micron) at 2.5 percent filler loading, and boron (5 micron) at 5.0 percent filler loading do not appear severe enough to preclude their use in structural composite applications.

  10. Microstructural Development and Mechanical Properties for Reactive Air Brazing of ZTA to Ni Alloys using Ag-CuO Braze Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Prevost, Erica; DeMarco, A.Joseph; MacMichael, Beth; Joshi, Vineet V.; Meier, Alan; Hoffman, John W.; Walker, William J.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive air brazing (RAB) is a potential joining technique to join metal alloys to ceramics for a variety of applications. In the current study, nickel (Ni) alloys were heat treated to form an oxide layer prior to RAB joining to zirconia toughened alumina (ZTA). The Ni alloys evaluated were Nicrofer 6025 HT, Inconel 600, Inconel 693, Haynes 214 and Inconel 601. The ZTA studied had compositions of 0 to 15 wt% zirconia and 0 to 14 wt% glass. Four point-bend tests were performed to evaluate the joint strength of ZTA/ZTA and ZTA/nickel alloys brazed with Ag-2wt% CuO braze alloys. It was determined that the joint strength is not a function of the ZTA composition, but that the strength is a strong function of the chemistry and microstructure of the oxide layer formed on the nickel alloy. It was determined that an increase in the aluminum content of the Ni alloy resulted in an increase of the thickness of alumina in the oxide layer and was directly proportional to the bond strength with the exception of Inconel 601 which exhibited relatively high joint strengths even though it had a relatively low aluminum content.

  11. Neutron Spectrometry for Identification of filler material in UXO - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, Mary

    2007-09-12

    Unexploded ordnance (UXO)-contaminated sites often include ordnance filled with inert substances that were used in dummy rounds. During UXO surveys, it is difficult to determine whether ordnance is filled with explosives or inert material (e.g., concrete, plaster-of-paris, wax, etc.) or is empty. Without verification of the filler material, handling procedures often necessitate that the object be blown in place, which has potential impacts to the environment, personnel, communities and survey costs. The Department of Defense (DoD) needs a reliable, timely, non-intrusive and cost-effective way to identify filler material before a removal action. A new technology that serves this purpose would minimize environmental impacts, personnel safety risks and removal costs; and, thus, would be especially beneficial to remediation activities.

  12. Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture of the Femoral Head treated with Core Decompression and Bone Void Filler Support

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hiren; Kamath, Atul F.

    2016-01-01

    Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head (SIFFH) is characterized by acute onset hip pain without overt trauma. It appears as a low intensity band with bone marrow edema on T1-weighted MRI. The most common course of treatment is protected weight bearing for a period of several weeks. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been commonly used if the patient does not respond to the initial protected weight bearing treatment. We present a case of a 48-year-old male with SIFFH who was treated with core hip decompression and bone void filler as a hip-preserving alternative to THA. The patient has an excellent clinical and radiographic result at final follow up. Core hip decompression with bone void filler is a less invasive alternative to THA, and may be a preferred initial treatment strategy for SIFFH in the young and active patient who has failed conservative measures. PMID:27517074

  13. Stability Enhancement of Polymeric Sensing Films Using Fillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Brian; Shevade, Abhijit; Ryan, Margaret Amy; Kisor, Adam; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Manatt, Kenneth; Homer, Margie; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Experiments have shown the stability enhancement of polymeric sensing films on mixing the polymer with colloidal filler particles (submicron-sized) of carbon black, silver, titanium dioxide, and fumed silicon dioxide. The polymer films are candidates for potential use as sensing media in micro/nano chemical sensor devices. The need for stability enhancement of polymer sensing films arises because such films have been found to exhibit unpredictable changes in sensing activity over time, which could result in a possible failure of the sensor device. The changes in the physical properties of a polymer sensing film caused by the sorption of a target molecule can be measured by any of several established transduction techniques: electrochemical, optical, calorimetric, or piezoelectric, for example. The transduction technique used in the current polymer stability experiments is based on piezoelectric principles using a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM). The surface of the QCM is coated with the polymer, and the mass uptake by the polymer film causes a change in the oscillating frequency of the quartz crystal. The polymer used for the current study is ethyl cellulose. The polymer/ polymer composite solutions were prepared in 1,3 dioxolane solvent. The filler concentration was fixed at 10 weight percent for the composites. The polymer or polymer composite solutions were cast on the quartz crystal having a fundamental frequency of about 6 MHz. The coated crystal was subjected to a multistage drying process to remove all measurable traces of the solvent. In each experiment, the frequency of oscillation was measured while the QCM was exposed to clean, dry, flowing air for about 30 minutes, then to air containing a known concentration of isopropanol for about 30 minutes, then again to clean dry air for about 30 minutes, and so forth. This cycle of measurements for varying isopropanol concentrations was repeated at intervals for several months. The figure depicts some of the

  14. Correlation established between heat transfer and ultrasonic transmission properties of copper braze bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinovi, R. A.

    1967-01-01

    Measuring and correlating the thermal conductivity and ultrasonic transmission of seven hot-brazed-bonded copper plates established a relationship between heat transfer and ultrasonic transmission properties of the bonds. This relationship permits the prediction of heat transfer characteristics from ultrasonic transmission tests.

  15. Ultrasonics used for high-precision nondestructive inspection of brazed joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. M.

    1971-01-01

    Technique detects voids greater than or equal to 0.1016 cm in braze depths of 0.254 cm, detecting voids of smaller dimensions is possible. Internal design ensures control of beam's water path length to within 0.635 cm, this length is critical to system's accuracy.

  16. Braze Development of Graphite Fiber for Use in Phase Change Material Heat Sinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Gregory; Beringer, Woody; Gleason, Brian; Stephan, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Hamilton Sundstrand (HS), together with NASA Johnson Space Center, developed methods to metallurgically join graphite fiber to aluminum. The goal of the effort was to demonstrate improved thermal conductance, tensile strength and manufacturability compared to existing epoxy bonded techniques. These improvements have the potential to increase the performance and robustness of phase change material heat sinks that use graphite fibers as an interstitial material. Initial work focused on evaluating joining techniques from four suppliers, each consisting of a metallization step followed by brazing or soldering of one inch square blocks of Fibercore graphite fiber material to aluminum end sheets. Results matched the strength and thermal conductance of the epoxy bonded control samples, so two suppliers were down-selected for a second round of braze development. The second round of braze samples had up to a 300% increase in strength and up to a 132% increase in thermal conductance over the bonded samples. However, scalability and repeatability proved to be significant hurdles with the metallization approach. An alternative approach was pursued which used a nickel braze allow to prepare the carbon fibers for joining with aluminum. Initial results on sample blocks indicate that this approach should be repeatable and scalable with good strength and thermal conductance when compared with epoxy bonding.

  17. Nondestructive testing for braze voids in thin panels by use of special coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Application of commercial coating to exterior of sandwich panel structures for determining presence of voids in brazed plates is discussed. Procedure for applying coating material and method of conducting nondestructive tests are explained. Illustrations are included to show appearance of voids.

  18. Brazing retort manifold design concept may minimize air contamination and enhance uniform gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruppe, E. P.

    1966-01-01

    Brazing retort manifold minimizes air contamination, prevents gas entrapment during purging, and provides uniform gas flow into the retort bell. The manifold is easily cleaned and turbulence within the bell is minimized because all manifold construction lies outside the main enclosure.

  19. 49 CFR 178.51 - Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel cylinders. 178.51 Section 178.51 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications...

  20. 49 CFR 178.55 - Specification 4B240ET welded or brazed cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4B240ET welded or brazed cylinders. 178.55 Section 178.55 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for...

  1. Training Materials Sourcebook. Welding, Brazing, and Flame-Cutting. Voc./Tec. Resources Series Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Commission of Employment and Immigration, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Second in a resource series (see note), this annotated bibliography provides detailed information on training curriculum and instructional materials for welding, brazing, and flame-cutting. The materials are divided into thirty-fie sections by topic and type. Specific topic areas include gas and arc welding; arc welding; oxyacetylene welding and…

  2. Skylab experiment performance evaluation manual. Appendix G: Experiment M552 exothermic brazing (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, O. H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Analyses for Experiment M552, Exothermic Brazing (MSFC), to be used for evaluating the performance of the Skylab corollary experiments under preflight, inflight, and post-flight conditions are presented. Experiment contingency plan workaround procedure and malfunction analyses are presented in order to assist in making the experiment operationally successful.

  3. The effect of filler addition and oven temperature to the antioxidant quality in the drying of Physalis angulata fruit extract obtained by subcritical water extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanti, R. F.; Christianto, G.

    2016-01-01

    Physalis angulata or ceplukan is medicinal herb, which grows naturally in Indonesia. It has been used in traditional medicine to treat several diseases. It is also reported to have antimycobacterial, antileukemic, antipyretic. In this research, Pysalis angulata fruit was investigated for its antioxidant capacity. In order to avoid the toxic organic solvent commonly used in conventional extraction, subcritical water extraction method was used. During drying, filler which is inert was added to the extract. It can absorb water and change the oily and sticky form of extract to powder form. The effects of filler types, concentrations and drying temperatures were investigated to the antioxidant quality covering total phenol, flavonoid and antioxidant activity. The results showed that total phenol, flavonoid and antioxidant activity were improved by addition of filler because the drying time was shorter compared to extract without filler. Filler absorbs water and protects extract from exposure to heat during drying. The combination between high temperature and shorter drying time are beneficial to protect the antioxidant in extract. The type of fillers investigation showed that aerosil gave better performance compared to Microcrystalline Celullose (MCC).

  4. Coaggregation of mineral filler particles and starch granules as a basis for improving filler-fiber interaction in paper production.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Fan, Jun; Chen, Wensen; Shu, Jiayan; Qian, Xueren; Wei, Haifeng; Wang, Qingwen; Shen, Jing

    2016-09-20

    The sustainable, efficient use of renewable bio-based additives in the production of various materials fits well into the concept of sustainability. Here, the concept of coaggregation of mineral filler particles and starch granules for improving filler-fiber interaction in paper-based cellulosic networks is presented. Coaggregation of precipitated calcium carbonate filler particles and uncooked, unmodified corn starch granules by cationic polyacrylamide (a cationic high molecular weight polymer flocculant) in combination with bentonite (an anionic microparticle) prior to addition to cellulosic fiber slurry delivered enhanced filler bondability with cellulosic fibers. For instance, under the conditions studied, preaggregation resulted in an increase in filler bondability factor from 9.24 to 15.21 at starch dosage of 1% (on the basis of the dry weight of papermaking stock). The swelling and gelatinization of the starch granules in starch-filler preaggregates or hybrids enabled the "bridging" of the gaps in cellulosic networks, leading to structural consolidation and strength enhancement. PMID:27261726

  5. Does filler surface chemistry impact filler dispersion, polymer dynamics and conductivity in nanofilled solid polymer electrolytes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapatibhotla, Lalitha; Maranas, Janna

    2012-02-01

    We study the impact of nanofiller surface chemistry on filler dispersion, polymer dynamics and ionic conductivity in acidic α-Al2O3 filled PEO+LiClO4 solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs).SPEs are the key to light-weight and high energy density rechargeable Li ion batteries but suffer from low room temperature ionic conductivity. Addition of ceramic nanofillers improves conductivity of SPEs and their surface chemistry influences extent of conductivity enhancement. The ionic conductivity of acidic α-Al2O3 filled SPE is enhanced for salt concentrations at and below eutectic, while neutral γ-Al2O3 filler enhances conductivity only at eutectic composition. Li ion motion is coupled to segmental mobility of polymer and we study how this is affected by addition of α-Al2O3 using quasi-elastic neutron scattering. Aggregation extent of nanoparticles in SPE matrix, a less explored factor in filled SPEs, can affect segmental mobility of polymer. This can vary with surface chemistry of particles and we quantify this using small angle neutron scattering. All measurements are performed as a function of Li concentration, nanoparticle loading and temperature.

  6. Effect of fillers on the dielectric properties of polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, N.E.; McGrath, P.B.; Burns, C.W.

    1996-12-31

    The effect on the permittivity of two different base materials was investigated with two types of fillers. Several theories were investigated to determine which most closely predicted the permittivity of the composites. The fillers utilized were a low permittivity material, alumina, and a high permittivity compound, barium titanate. The base materials investigated were epoxy and silicon rubber. It was found that the permittivity of the alumina filled composite was most closely predicted by the formulae which considered the permittivity of the filler in the calculation, i.e., the Log Law, Rayleigh`s formula, and Effective Medium Theory. The permittivity of the barium titanate filled materials were most closely predicted by the percolative theories, i.e., Bruggeman`s formula and the Effective Medium Theory, as these materials were demonstrating percolative tendencies. The effect of the base material selection on the loss tangent of the filled material was also investigated. It was found that the epoxy samples exhibited little change in the loss tangent over the range of filler levels tested, whereas the silicon rubber samples showed increasing loss tangent with increasing filler level for both the alumina and barium titanate filled samples.

  7. Solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel filler metals

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Braski, D.N.

    1980-02-01

    Thermal analysis and interrupted solidification experiments on selected austenitic stainless steel filler metals provided an understanding of the solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel welds. The sequences of phase separations found were for type 308 stainless steel filler metal, L + L + delta + L + delta + ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. + delta, and for type 310 stainless steel filler metal, L ..-->.. L + ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..gamma... In type 308 stainless steel filler metal, ferrite at room temperature was identified as either the untransformed primary delta-ferrite formed during the initial stages of solidification or the residual ferrite after Widmanstaetten austenite precipitation. Microprobe and scanning transmission electron microscope microanalyses revealed that solute extensively redistributes during the transformation of primary delta-ferrite to austenite, leading to enrichment and stabilization of ferrite by chromium. The type 310 stainless steel filler metal investigated solidifies by the primary crystallization of austenite, with the transformation going to completion at the solidus temperature. In our samples residual ferrite resulting from solute segregation was absent at the intercellular or interdendritic regions.

  8. Nanocarbon filler particles in polymer matrix - Nanosized dielectric probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Vitaliy G.; Polschikov, Sergey V.; Nedorezova, Polina M.; Klyamkina, Alla N.; Aladyshev, Alexander M.

    2014-05-01

    Composite materials of polypropylene, graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) or fullerene C60 were synthesized by in situ polymerization. GNP particles consist of 3 - 5 graphene layers and have aspect ratio 40. In composites with pristine GNP particles their aspect ratio is 110, whereas ultrasonic processing reduces it to 40 - 50. This change of aspect ratio of filler particles and their aggregates results in different properties of composites with pristine and sonicated GNP. Percolation threshold for composites with pristine GNP is 0.25% vol. In composites with sonicated GNP it is 2-3% vol. This is due to reduction in the size of filler particles aggregates and more uniform distribution of particles in polymer matrix after ultrasonic treatment. The presence of nanocarbon filler (GNP or fullerene) makes α-transition, associated with the glass transition of the amorphous phase of polypropylene, clearly resolved. Its intensity increases with the concentration of nanofiller, which acts as a dielectric probe.

  9. Facial volume augmentation in 2014: overview of different filler options.

    PubMed

    Luebberding, Stefanie; Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene

    2013-12-01

    Volume loss is considered to be one of the major contributors to facial aging. Therefore, the restoration of facial volume and contour changes has become an important treatment approach in aesthetic dermatology in recent years. In October 2013 the FDA approved for the first time ever an injectable dermal filler for the augmentation of age-related volume loss. This low-molecular-weight (LMW) 20 mg/ml hyaluronic acid (HA) filler competes on the market with poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) and calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA), that have been used off-label for many years to restore age-related volume loss. The safety profile and efficacy of all three injectables has been intensively evaluated in innumerous clinical studies. However, each volume filler has its benefits and disadvantages, including usage, method of action and duration of effect that are reviewed in this article. PMID:24301234

  10. Mycobacterium chelonae Facial Infections Following Injection of Dermal Filler

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jan M.; Xie, Yingda L.; Winthrop, Kevin L.; Schafer, Sean; Sehdev, Paul; Solomon, Joel; Jensen, Bette; Toney, Nadege C.; Lewis, Paul F.

    2015-01-01

    A cluster of 3 facial Mycobacterium chelonae infections occurred after cosmetic dermal filler injections at a plastic surgery clinic. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that M chelonae isolated from the clinic tap water were identical to the patient wound isolates. Review of injection procedures identified application of nonsterile ice to the skin prior to injection as a possible source of M chelonae. Surveys of regional laboratories and a national plastic surgery listserv identified no other cases related to the injection of this brand of dermal filler. This is the first report of cutaneous M chelonae infections following the injection of dermal fillers. It adds to a growing body of literature on postinjection M chelonae infections and reinforces the importance of optimal skin disinfection steps prior to percutaneous procedures. PMID:23335647

  11. Wetting and Mechanical Performance of Zirconia Brazed with Silver/Copper Oxide and Silver/Vanadium Oxide Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnamon, Kathleen E.; Meier, Alan; Joshi, Vineet V.

    2014-12-01

    The wetting behavior and mechanical strength of silver/copper oxide and silver/vanadium oxide braze alloys were investigated for both magnesia-stabilized and yttria-stabilized (Mg-PSZ and Y-TZP) transformation toughened zirconia substrates. The temperatures investigated were 1000 to 1100°C, with oxide additions of 1 to 10 weight percent V2O5 or CuO, and hold times of 0.9 to 3.6 ks. Increasing either the isothermal hold temperature or time had a distinctly negative effect on the joint strength. The maximum strengths for both braze alloys were obtained for 5 wt. % oxide additions at 1050°C with a hold time of 0.9 ks. The Mg-PSZ/Ag-CuO system exhibited a average fracture strength of 255 MPa (45% of the reported monolithic strength), and the Y-TZP/Ag-CuO system had an average fracture strength of 540 MPa (30% of the reported monolithic strength). The fracture strengths were lower for the Ag-V2O5 braze alloys, with fracture strengths of approximately 180 MPa (30% of the monolithic strength) for Mg-PSZ versus approximately 160 MPa (10% of the monolithic strength) for Y-TZP. No interfacial products were observed in low magnification SEM analysis for the brazing alloys containing V2O5 additions, while there were interfacial products present for brazes prepared with CuO additions in the braze alloy.

  12. Effect of filler size on wear resistance of resin cement.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, K; Suzuki, S; Katoh, Y

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of filler size on the wear of resin cements. Materials tested included four experimental dual-cure resin cements (Kuraray) consisting of different-sized filler particles. A rectangular box cavity was prepared on the flattened occlusal surface of extracted human molars. Ceramic inlays for the cavities were fabricated using the Cerec 2 system. The Cerec inlays were cemented with the respective cements and adhesive systems according to the manufacturer's directions. The restored surface was finished by wet-grinding with an 800-grit silicon carbide paper. Six specimens were prepared for each resin cement. Half of the specimens were subjected to a three-body wear test for 200,000 cycles, and the others were subjected to a toothbrush abrasion test for 30,000 cycles. The worn surface of each restoration was scanned by a profilometer (Surfcom 475 A) at eight different points for each restoration. The wear value was determined by measuring the vertical gap depth on the profilometric tracings. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe's test. The results showed that, with increase of filler size, the wear value decreased in the toothbrush test and increased in the three-body wear test. The cement with 0.04-microm filler exhibited the lowest wear value among the materials in the three-body wear test, and the same wear value as the cement with 0.97-microm filler in the toothbrush test. Based upon the results of this study, it is concluded that the wear of resin cements was affected by the filler size as well as the mode of wear test. PMID:14530920

  13. Dermal Filler Injection: A Novel Approach for Limiting Infarct Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Liam P.; Matsuzaki, Kanji; Noma, Mio; Jackson, Benjamin M.; Eperjesi, Thomas J.; Plappert, Theodore J.; St. John-Sutton, Martin G.; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Early infarct expansion after coronary occlusion compromises contractile function in perfused myocardial regions and promotes adverse long-term left ventricular (LV) remodeling. We hypothesized that injection of a tissue-expanding dermal filler material into a myocardial infarction (MI) would attenuate infarct expansion and limit LV remodeling. Methods Fifteen sheep were subjected to an anteroapical MI involving approximately 20% of the LV followed by the injection of 1.3 mL of a calcium hydroxyapatite–based dermal filler into the infarct. Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography was performed at baseline, 30 minutes after MI, and 15 minutes after injection to assess infarct expansion. Sixteen additional sheep were subjected to the same infarction and followed echocardiographically and hemodynamically for 4 weeks after MI to assess chronic remodeling. Eight animals had injection with dermal filler as described above immediately after MI, and 8 animals were injected with an equal amount of saline solution. Results All animals exhibited infarct expansion soon after coronary occlusion. The regional ejection fraction of the apex became negative after infarction, consistent with systolic dyskinesia. Injection of the dermal filler converted the apical wall motion from dyskinetic to akinetic and resulted immediately in significant decreases in global, regional, and segmental LV volumes. Chronically, relative to saline control, dermal filler injection significantly reduced LV end-systolic volume (62.2 ± 3.6 mL versus 44.5 ± 3.9 mL; p < 0.05) and improved global ejection fraction (0.295 ± 0.016 versus 0.373 ± 0.017; p < 0.05) at 4 weeks after infarction. Conclusions Injection of an acellular dermal filler into an MI immediately after coronary occlusion reduces early infarct expansion and limits chronic LV remodeling. PMID:19101288

  14. Lower Face: Clinical Anatomy and Regional Approaches with Injectable Fillers.

    PubMed

    Braz, André; Humphrey, Shannon; Weinkle, Susan; Yee, G Jackie; Remington, B Kent; Lorenc, Z Paul; Yoelin, Steve; Waldorf, Heidi A; Azizzadeh, Babak; Butterwick, Kimberly J; de Maio, Mauricio; Sadick, Neil; Trevidic, Patrick; Criollo-Lamilla, Gisella; Garcia, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    The use of injectable fillers enables facial sculpting through treatment of volume depletion and modeling of facial contours. Injectable fillers are among the most frequently performed minimally invasive cosmetic procedures.However, treatment of the lower third of the face can be challenging and requires expertise in facial anatomy. In this article, the authors provide a comprehensive review of the anatomy of the lower third of the face, highlighting danger zones. In addition, the authors describe their preferred approach and detailed technique used in the treatment of each specific area, namely the jawline, prejowl sulcus, melomental folds, and lips. PMID:26441104

  15. Volume correction in the aging hand: role of dermal fillers.

    PubMed

    Rivkin, Alexander Z

    2016-01-01

    The hands, just like the face, are highly visible parts of the body. They age at a similar rate and demonstrate comparable changes with time, sun damage, and smoking. Loss of volume in the hands exposes underlying tendons, veins, and bony prominences. Rejuvenation of the hands with dermal fillers is a procedure with high patient satisfaction and relatively low risk for complications. This study will review relevant anatomy, injection technique, clinical safety, and efficacy of dermal filler volumization of the aging hand. PMID:27621659

  16. Injectable Filler Techniques for Facial Rejuvenation, Volumization, and Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Bass, Lawrence S

    2015-11-01

    Multiple fillers are available: various hyaluronic acid products, calcium hydroxylapatite, and a few others that are biocompatible with good duration and a variety of mechanical properties allowing intradermal, subdermal, and supraperiosteal injection. Facial features can be reshaped with great control using these fillers. Aging changes, including facial volume loss, can be well-corrected. These treatments have become a mainstay of rejuvenation in the early facial aging patient. Injection technique is critical to obtaining excellent results. Threading, fanning, cross-hatching, bleb, and pillar techniques must be mastered. Technical execution can only measure up to, but not exceed, the quality of the aesthetic analysis. PMID:26505544

  17. Volume correction in the aging hand: role of dermal fillers

    PubMed Central

    Rivkin, Alexander Z

    2016-01-01

    The hands, just like the face, are highly visible parts of the body. They age at a similar rate and demonstrate comparable changes with time, sun damage, and smoking. Loss of volume in the hands exposes underlying tendons, veins, and bony prominences. Rejuvenation of the hands with dermal fillers is a procedure with high patient satisfaction and relatively low risk for complications. This study will review relevant anatomy, injection technique, clinical safety, and efficacy of dermal filler volumization of the aging hand. PMID:27621659

  18. Brazing as a Means of Sealing Ceramic Membranes for use in Advanced Coal Gasification Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Hardy, John S.; Rice, Joseph P.; Kim, Jin Yong Y.

    2006-01-02

    Coal is potentially a very inexpensive source of clean hydrogen fuel for use in fuel cells, turbines, and various process applications. To realize its potential however, efficient, low-cost gas separation systems are needed to provide high purity oxygen to enhance the coal gasification reaction and to extract hydrogen from the resulting gas product stream. Several types of inorganic membranes are being developed for hydrogen or oxygen separation, including porous alumina, transition metal oxide perovskites, and zirconia. One of the key challenges in developing solid-state membrane based gas separation systems is in hermetically joining the membrane to the metallic body of the separation device. In an effort to begin addressing this issue, a new brazing concept has been developed, referred to as reactive air brazing. This paper discusses the details of this joining technique and illustrates its use in bonding a wide variety of materials, including alumina, lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite, and yttria stabilized zirconia.

  19. Brazing as a Means of Sealing Ceramic Membranes for Use in Advanced Coal Gasification Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Hardy, John S.; Rice, Joseph P.; Kim, Jin Yong

    2006-01-31

    Coal is a potentially a very inexpensive source of clean hydrogen fuel for use in fuel cells, turbines, and various process applications. To realize its potential however, efficient, low-cost gas separation systems are needed to provide high purity oxygen to enhance the coal gasification reaction and to extract hydrogen from the resulting gas product stream. Several types of inorganic membranes are being developed for hydrogen or oxygen separation, including porous alumina, transition metal oxide perovskites, and zirconia. One of the key challenges in developing solid-state membrane based gas separation systems is in hermetically joining the membrane to the metallic body of the separation device. In an effort to begin addressing this issue, a new brazing concept has been developed, referred to as reactive air brazing. This paper discusses the details of this joining technique and illustrates its use in bonding a wide variety of materials, including alumina, lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite, and yttria stabilized zirconia.

  20. Ultrasonic scanning system for in-place inspection of brazed tube joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, J. L.; Wages, C. G.; Haralson, H. S. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A miniaturized ultrasonic scanning system for nondestructive in-place, non-immersion testing of brazed joints in stainless-steel tubing is described. The system is capable of scanning brazed tube joints, with limited clearance access, in 1/4 through 5/8 inch union, tee, elbow and cross configurations. The system has the capability to detect defective conditions now associated with material density changes in addition to those which are depended upon density variations. The system includes a miniaturized scanning head assembly that fits around a tube joint and rotates the transducer around and down the joint in a continuous spiral motion. The C-scan recorder is similar in principle to conventional models except that it was specially designed to track the continuous spiral scan of the tube joint. The scanner and recorder can be operated with most commercially available ultrasonic flaw detectors.

  1. Filler modification for papermaking with starch/oleic acid complexes with the aid of calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiujie; Shen, Jing; Qian, Xueren

    2013-10-15

    To mitigate the negative effect of filler addition on paper strength and improve filler retention, filler modification with hydrogen bonding polymers (e.g., starch) or their composites is an interesting research topic. Differing from previous reports, the concept related to the deposition of starch/oleic acid complexes on precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) with the aid of calcium ions was demonstrated. The introduction of calcium ions resulted in effective starch deposition. As a result of filler modification, filler retention and the tensile strength of the filled paper were simultaneously improved essentially due to the aggregation of PCC particles in filler modification process as well as improved filler bondability. The concept demonstrated in this brief study may provide an alternative approach to filler bondability enhancement for improved papermaking performances. PMID:23987430

  2. Effect of precipitated calcium carbonate--Cellulose nanofibrils composite filler on paper properties.

    PubMed

    He, Ming; Cho, Byoung-Uk; Won, Jong Myoung

    2016-01-20

    A new concept of composite filler was developed by using cellulose nanofibrils (CNF), precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) and cationic starch (C-starch). In this study, cellulose nanofibrils were utilized in two different ways: a PCC-CNF composite filler and a papermaking additive in sheet forming. The aim was to elucidate their effects on flocculation, filler retention and the strength and optical properties of handsheets. The highest filler retention was obtained by using the PCC-CNF composite filler in paper sheets. The paper filled with the composite fillers had much higher bursting and tensile strengths than conventional PCC loading. It was also found that the paper prepared with PCC-CNF composite fillers became denser with increasing the filler content of paper. PMID:26572417

  3. Influence of the concentration and disperity of the filler on the creep of polymer composite

    SciTech Connect

    Aniskevich, K.; Khristova, Yu.

    1995-09-01

    The aim of this work is to study the effect of the concentration and dispersity of particles of filler on the creep of polymer composite. As an example, we study a polyester resin with a cement filler.

  4. High-Power Comparison Among Brazed, Clamped and Electroformed X-Band Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Spataro, B.; Alesini, D.; Chimenti, V.; Dolgashev, V.; Higashi, Y.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Parodi, R.; Tantawi, S.G.; Yeremian, A.D.; /SLAC

    2012-04-25

    We report the building procedure of X-band copper structures using the electroforming and electroplating techniques. These techniques allow the deposition of copper layers on a suitable die and they can be used to build RF structures avoiding the high temperature brazing step in the standard technique. We show the constructed prototypes and low power RF measurements and discuss the results of the high power tests at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

  5. Fillers used in papermaking. (Latest citations from the Paper and Board, Printing, and Packaging Industries Research Associations database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning organic and inorganic fillers used in paper products and their effect on the properties and manufacture of paper. The citations examine a variety of fillers, including natural calcium carbonate, bentonite, polymeric fillers, titanium dioxide, calcium carbonate, calcium silicate, barium sulphate, agalite, talc, clay, kaolin, limestone, mica, and ash. Filler effects on thermal strength, coloring, acidity, surface coatings, porosity, production efficiency, absorption, opacity, printability, and deposit control are presented. Also discussed are the microanalysis of fillers, recovery of fillers from wastes, availability of filler and pigment raw materials, and the determination of filler content in paper products. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. Improved fiber retention by the use of fillers in graphite fiber/resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gluyas, R. E.; Bowles, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    A variety of matrix fillers were tested for their ability to prevent loss of fiber from graphite fiber/PMR polyimide and graphite fiber/epoxy composites in a fire. The fillers tested included powders of boron, boron carbide lime glass, lead glass, and aluminum. Boron was the most effective and prevented any loss of graphite fiber during burning. Mechanical properties of composites containing boron filler were measured and compared to those of composites containing no filler.

  7. Use of hyaluronic acid fillers for the treatment of the aging face

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Michael H

    2007-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid fillers have become popular soft tissue filler augmentation agents over the past several years. They have helped revolutionize the filler market with a number of new products available for use for our patients. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the characteristics of the HA fillers and to review each of the current products currently available for use in the US. PMID:18044187

  8. Control of Interfacial Reactivity Between ZrB2 and Ni-Based Brazing Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, F.; Muolo, M. L.; Passerone, A.; Cacciamani, G.; Artini, C.

    2012-05-01

    Transition metals diborides (Ti,Zr,Hf)B2 play a key role in applications where stability at extremely high temperatures and damage tolerance are required; however, much research has still to be done to optimize the joining of these materials to themselves or to other high-temperature materials. In this study, the reactivity at the solid-liquid interface between ZrB2 ceramics and Ni-based brazing alloys has been addressed; it is shown how the reactivity and the dissolution of the solid phase can be controlled and even suppressed by adjusting the brazing alloy composition on the basis of thermodynamic calculations. Wetting experiments on ZrB2 ceramics by Ni, Ni-B 17 at.%, and Ni-B 50 at.% were performed at 1500 and 1200 °C by the sessile drop technique. The obtained interfaces were characterized by optical microscopy and SEM-EDS, and interpreted by means of the ad hoc-calculated B-Ni-Zr ternary diagram. A correlation among microstructures, substrate dissolution, shape of the drops, spreading kinetics, and the phase diagram was found. The effect on the interfacial reactivity of Si3Ni4 used as a sintering aid and issues related to Si diffusion into the brazing alloy are discussed as well.

  9. Mechanical Characterization of Reactively Brazed Metal-Composite Joints for Heat Rejection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Asthana, Rajiv; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah

    2005-01-01

    The joining of metal tubes to composite plates is required for heat-rejection components in several space applications. Currently a number of different braze compositions are being evaluated as to their effectiveness. Such tube-plate configurations cannot be represented by traditional methods of testing, e.g., lap joints. The joined region is not between two flat surfaces, but rather between a flat surface and a curved surface. Therefore, several tests have been employed to ascertain the effectiveness of the different braze approaches in tension and in shear that are both simple and representative of the actual system and relatively straightforward in analysis. The results of these "tube tests" will be discussed for the three different braze compositions, Cu-ABA, Ti-Cu-Sil, and Ti-Cu-Ni. In addition, fracture analysis of the failed joints was performed and offers insights into the cause of joint failure and the distinctions which need to be made between the "strength" of a joint versus the "load carrying ability" of a joint.

  10. Fabrication and evaluation of superplastically formed/weld-brazed corrugated compression panels with beaded webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royster, D. M.; Davis, R. C.; Shinn, J. M., Jr.; Bales, T. T.; Wiant, H. R.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made to investigate the feasibility of superplastically forming corrugated panels with beaded webs and to demonstrate the structural integrity of these panels by testing. The test panels in the study consist of superplastically formed titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V half-hat elements that are joined by weld-brazing to titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V caps to form either single-corrugation compression panels or multiple-corrugation compression panels. Stretching and subsequent thinning of the titanium sheet during superplastic forming is reduced by approximately 35 percent with a shallow half-hat die concept instead of a deep die concept and results in a more uniform thickness across the beaded webs. The complete panels are tested in end compression at room temperature and the results compared with analysis. The heavily loaded panels failed at loads approaching the yield strength of the titanium material. At maximum load, the caps wrinkled locally accompanied with separation of the weld-braze joint in the wrinkle. None of the panels tested, however, failed catastrophically in the weld-braze joint. Experimental test results are in good agreement with structural analysis of the panels.

  11. OPTIMIZING THE FRACTIONATION OF SOY PROTEIN ISOLATE FOR USE AS A BIOMATERIAL FILLER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nearly all rubber used today utilizes filler materials for strength and various other application-specific properties. The most common filler on the market today is carbon black, which is produced by the burning of petroleum. Using renewable biomaterials as fillers would reduce dependence on petro...

  12. Slot-Filler and Conventional Category Organisation in Young Korean Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Younoak; Nelson, Katherine

    1993-01-01

    In two experiments, five year olds produced more instances in slot-filler categories than taxonomic categories, and eight year olds produced more instances in taxonomic categories than slot-filler categories; for five year olds, slot-filler categories led to superior recall and shorter response latencies than did taxonomic categories. (BB)

  13. Fibrous Fillers to Manufacture Ultra High Ash/Performance Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. VIjay K. Mathur

    2009-04-30

    The paper industry is one of the largest users of energy and emitters of CO2 in the US manufacturing industry. In addition to that, it is facing tremendous financial pressure due to lower cost imports. The fine paper industry has shrunk from 15 million tons per year production to 10 million tons per year in the last 5 years. This has resulted in mill closures and job loses. The AF&PA and the DOE formed a program called Agenda 2020 to help in funding to develop breakthrough technologies to provide help in meeting these challenges. The objectives of this project were to optimize and scale-up Fibrous Fillers technology, ready for commercial deployment and to develop ultra high ash/high performance paper using Fibrous Fillers. The goal was to reduce energy consumption, carbon footprint, and cost of manufacturing paper and related industries. GRI International (GRI) has been able to demonstrate the techno - economic feasibility and economic advantages of using its various products in both handsheets as well as in commercial paper mills. GRI has also been able to develop sophisticated models that demonstrate the effect of combinations of GRI's fillers at multiple filler levels. GRI has also been able to develop, optimize, and successfully scale-up new products for use in commercial paper mills.

  14. Internal Filler-Wire Feed For Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.; Dyer, Gerald E.

    1990-01-01

    Tungsten electrode for gas/tungsten arc welding contains lengthwise channel for feeding filler wire to weld joint. Channel makes it unnecessary to feed wire through guides outside electrode, conserving valuable space near weld and protects wire from deformation by contact with other parts in vicinity of weld. Helpful in robotic or automatic welding.

  15. Photosensitive filler minimizes internal stresses in epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, J. N.

    1967-01-01

    Photosensitive filler is added to curable epoxy resins to minimize stress from internal shrinkage during curing or polymerization. Cinnamic acid resins and cinnamal ketones may be added in the amount of 1 to 3 percent by weight of the resin mixture.

  16. Gap Filler Induced Transition on the Mars Science Laboratory Heatshield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Barnhardt, Michael D.; Tang, Chun Y.; Sozer, Emre; Candler, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Detached Eddy Simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of high-fidelity turbulence modeling on roughness-induced transition to turbulence during Mars entry. Chemically reacting flow solutions will be obtained for a gap filler of Mars Science Laboratory at the peak heating condition.

  17. Automatic reel controls filler wire in welding machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millett, A. V.

    1966-01-01

    Automatic reel on automatic welding equipment takes up slack in the reel-fed filler wire when welding operation is terminated. The reel maintains constant, adjustable tension on the wire during the welding operation and rewinds the wire from the wire feed unit when the welding is completed.

  18. Impact of fillers on dissolution kinetic of fenofibrate dry foams.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Elisabeth; Sprunk, Angela; Kleinebudde, Peter; Page, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Dry foam technology reveals the opportunity to improve the dissolution behavior of poorly soluble drugs tending to agglomeration due to micronization. In this study, the impact of fillers on the manufacturability, the properties of dry foams and granules as well as the dissolution kinetics of dry foam tablets was investigated using fenofibrate as a model compound. Different maltodextrins and dried glucose syrups, a maltodextrin-phosphatidylcholine complex, isomalt and a 1:1 mixture of mannitol/glucose syrup were used as filler. Within the group of maltodextrins and glucose syrups, the influences of dextrose equivalent (DE), particle morphology and botanical source of starch were investigated. Comparable macroscopic foam structures were obtained with maltodextrins and glucose syrups whereas different foam morphologies were obtained for the other fillers tested. Regarding the maltodextrins and glucose syrups, different physicochemical and particle properties had a minor impact on granule characteristics and tablet dissolution. Using the maltodextrin-phosphatidylcholine complex resulted in a low specific surface area of the granules and a slow tablet dissolution caused by a slow disintegration. In contrast, a high specific surface area and a fast release were obtained with isomalt and glucose syrup/mannitol mixture indicating that high soluble low molecular weight fillers enable the development of fast dissolving dry foam tablets. PMID:24901031

  19. Inflammatory granuloma caused by injectable soft tissue filler (Artecoll)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Chang; Kim, Jong-Bae; Chin, Byung-Rho; Kim, Jin-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Artecoll (Artes Medical Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) has recently been developed as a permanent synthetic cosmetic filler. We experienced an inflammatory granuloma resulting from a previous injection of Artecoll at the upper lip, which was regarded as a rare side effect of this filler. A 50-year-old female patient complained of swelling, dull pain, and heat in the right upper nasolabial fold area, which had started one week before her visit to Kyungpook National University Hospital. The patient received topical steroid therapy at a local clinic, which was not effective. At the injection site, a hard nodule was palpated and erythema was observed with mild tenderness. Antibiotic treatment and subsequent incision and drainage did not result in complete cure of the facial swelling, and the facial swelling and pain persisted. Computed tomography showed a lesion approximately 1-cm in size without clear boundaries and relatively increased nodular thickening. Finally, a subdermal lesion was removed via an intraoral vestibular approach. The lesion was diagnosed as inflammatory granuloma by a permanent biopsy. The patient had healed at two months after the filler injection. Although the soft tissue filler is widely used for cosmetic purposes, there is potential for complication, such as the inflammatory granuloma should be considered before treatment. PMID:24471042

  20. New Manufacturing Method for Paper Filler and Fiber Material

    SciTech Connect

    Doelle, Klaus

    2013-08-25

    The use of fillers in printing and writing papers has become a prerequisite for competing in a global market to reduce the cost of materials. Use of calcium carbonates (ranging from 18% to 30%) as filler is a common practice in the paper industry but the choices of fillers for each type of papers vary widely according to its use. The market for uncoated digital printing paper is one that continues to introduce exciting growth projections. and it is important to understand the effect that new manufacturing methods of calcium carbonates have on the energy efficiency and paper production. Research conducted under this award showed that the new fiber filler composite material has the potential to increase the paper filler content by up to 5% without losing mechanical properties. Benefits of the technology can be summarized as follows for a 1% filler increase per metric ton of paper produced: (i) production cost savings over $12, (ii) Energy savings of 100,900 btu, (iii) CO{sub 2} emission savings of 33 lbs, and additional savings for wood preparation, pulping, recovery of 203593 btu with a 46lbs of CO{sub 2} emission savings per 1% filler increase. In addition the technology has the potential to save: (i) additional $3 per ton of bleached pulp produced, (ii) bleaching energy savings of 170,000 btu, (iii) bleaching CO{sub 2} emission savings of 39 lbs, and (iv) additional savings for replacing conventional bleaching chemicals with a sustainable bleaching chemical is estimated to be 900,000 btu with a 205 lbs of CO{sub 2} emission savings per ton of bleached pulp produced. All the above translates to a estimated annual savings for a 12% filler increase of 296 trillion buts or 51 million barrel of oil equivalent (BOE) or 13.7% of the industries energy demand. This can lead to a increase of renewable energy usage from 56% to close to 70% for the industry sector. CO{sub 2} emission of the industry at a 12% filler increase could be lowered by over 39 million tons annually

  1. Market opportunities for fly ash fillers in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C.; Harris, T.; Gledhill, J. )

    1990-11-01

    Direct Acid Leaching (DAL) processed fly ash is derived from treating raw and beneficiated coal fly ash with hydrochloric acid. The DAL process allows for the production of fly ash with greater chemical purity and consistency than raw fly ash alone. In addition, DAL fly ash is similar to various minerals used in a wide range of applications that require filler minerals. This project investigates the feasibility of using three grades of DAL fly ash ranging from 10 microns to 30 microns in diameter as an alternative filler material to mineral fillers. Six major applications in North America, requiring large volumes of filler minerals were investigated by region including: (1) asphalt roofing shingles (2) carpet backing (3) joint compound and wallboard (4) industrial coatings (5) plastics (6) vinyl flooring. It is determined that calcium carbonate was the primary mineral filler DAL fly ash would be competing with in the applications investigated. Calcium carbonate is used in all applications investigated. The application which demonstrated the greatest potential for using DAL fly ash is asphalt shingles. Asphalt shingles were the largest calcium carbonate consuming application identified, consuming 4.8 million tons in 1988, and is the least sensitive to the dark color of the DAL fly ash. Although the DAL fly ash typically has a smaller particle size, in comparison to calcium carbonate, the asphalt shingle manufacturers felt it would be a good substitute. Other promising applications for DAL fly ash were industrial coatings and plastics where the calcium carbonate particle size requirements of 3 to 6 microns very closely matches the particle size of the DAL fly ash considered in this project. 17 figs., 36 tabs.

  2. New Manufacturing Method for Paper Filler and Fiber Material

    SciTech Connect

    Doelle, Klaus

    2011-06-26

    The use of fillers in printing and writing papers has become a prerequisite for competing in a global market to reduce the cost of materials. Use of calcium carbonates (ranging from 18% to 30%) as filler is a common practice in the paper industry but the choices of fillers for each type of papers vary widely according to its use. The market for uncoated digital printing paper is one that continues to introduce exciting growth projections and it is important to understand the effect that different types of calcium carbonates have on the paper properties made of 100% eucalyptus pulp. The current study is focused on selecting the most suitable market available calcium carbonate for the production of uncoated Eucalyptus digital printing paper, targeting a potential filler increase of 5% above the currently used filler content. We made hand sheets using 13 different varieties of widely used calcium carbonates [Nine samples of PCC (two rhombic and seven scalenohedral, covering a wide particle size range from 1.2 {micro}m to 2.9 {micro}m), and four samples of GCC (three anionic and one cationic, with a particle size range from 0.7 {micro}m to 1.5 {micro}m)] available in the market followed by a 12” pilot plant paper machine run. The detailed analysis on the main structural, optical and strength properties of the hand sheets found that the most suitable calcium carbonate for uncoated Eucalyptus digital printing paper production is scalenohedral PCC, with a particle size of 1.9 {micro}m for its positive effects on thickness, stiffness, brightness and opacity of paper.

  3. Detached Melt Nucleation during Diffusion Brazing of a Technical Ni-based Superalloy: A Phase-Field Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Laux, B.; Piegert, S.

    2015-06-01

    Advanced solidification processes like welding, soldering, and brazing are often characterized by their specific solidification conditions. But they also may include different types of melting processes which themselves are strongly influenced by the initial microstructures and compositions of the applied materials and therefore are decisive for the final quality and mechanical properties of the joint. Such melting processes are often not well- understood because - compared to other fields of solidification science - relatively little research has been done on melting by now. Also, regarding microstructure simulation, melting has been strongly neglected in the past, although this process is substantially different from solidification due to the reversed diffusivities of the involved phases. In this paper we present phase-field simulations showing melting, solidification and precipitation of intermetallic phases during diffusion brazing of directionally solidified and heat-treated high-alloyed Ni- based gas turbine blade material using different boron containing braze alloys. Contrary to the common belief, melting of the base material is not always planar and can be further accompanied by detached nucleation and growth of a second liquid phase inside the base material leading to polycrystalline morphologies of the joint after solidification. These findings are consistent with results from brazed laboratory samples, which were characterized by EDX and optical microscopy, and can be explained in terms of specific alloy thermodynamics and inter-diffusion kinetics. Consequences of the gained new understanding for brazing of high- alloyed materials are discussed.

  4. Autonomous Slat-Cove-Filler Device for Reduction of Aeroacoustic Noise Associated with Aircraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Kidd, Reggie T. (Inventor); Lockard, David P (Inventor); Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Streett, Craig L. (Inventor); Weber, Douglas Leo (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A slat cove filler is utilized to reduce airframe noise resulting from deployment of a leading edge slat of an aircraft wing. The slat cove filler is preferably made of a super elastic shape memory alloy, and the slat cove filler shifts between stowed and deployed shapes as the slat is deployed. The slat cove filler may be configured such that a separate powered actuator is not required to change the shape of the slat cove filler from its deployed shape to its stowed shape and vice-versa. The outer contour of the slat cove filler preferably follows a profile designed to maintain accelerating flow in the gap between the slat cove filler and wing leading edge to provide for noise reduction.

  5. Ductility dip cracking susceptibility of Inconel Filler Metal 52 and Inconel Alloy 690

    SciTech Connect

    Kikel, J.M.; Parker, D.M.

    1998-06-01

    Alloy 690 and Filler Metal 52 have become the materials of choice for commercial nuclear steam generator applications in recent years. Filler Metal 52 exhibits improved resistance to weld solidification and weld-metal liquation cracking as compared to other nickel-based filler metals. However, recently published work indicates that Filler Metal 52 is susceptible to ductility dip cracking (DDC) in highly restrained applications. Susceptibility to fusion zone DDC was evaluated using the transverse varestraint test method, while heat affected zone (HAZ) DDC susceptibility was evaluated using a newly developed spot-on-spot varestraint test method. Alloy 690 and Filler Metal 52 cracking susceptibility was compared to the DDC susceptibility of Alloy 600, Filler Metal 52, and Filler Metal 625. In addition, the effect of grain size and orientation on cracking susceptibility was also included in this study. Alloy 690, Filler Metal 82, Filler Metal 52, and Filler Metal 625 were found more susceptible to fusion zone DDC than Alloy 600. Filler Metal 52 and Alloy 690 were found more susceptible to HAZ DDC when compared to wrought Alloy 600, Filler Metal 82 and Filler Metal 625. Filler Metal 52 exhibited the greatest susceptibility to HAZ DDC of all the weld metals evaluated. The base materials were found much more resistant to HAZ DDC in the wrought condition than when autogenously welded. A smaller grain size was found to offer greater resistance to DDC. For weld metal where grain size is difficult to control, a change in grain orientation was found to improve resistance to DDC.

  6. Perpendicular Strut Injection of Hyaluronic Acid Filler for Deep Wrinkles

    PubMed Central

    Mashiko, Takanobu; Kinoshita, Kahori; Kanayama, Koji; Feng, Jingwei

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Although various injection techniques of hyaluronic acid (HA) filler for facial rejuvenation have been developed, correction of deep wrinkles/grooves, such as the nasolabial fold (NLF), with intradermal or subdermal injections remains difficult. We tested the intradermal HA injection method to place multiple HA struts by (1) inserting a small needle perpendicularly to the wrinkle and (2) injecting HA as intradermal struts with the skin fully stretched by the practitioner’s fingers. The results of both NLFs in 10 patients suggest that this technique improves NLFs and maintain the effects more consistently than conventional techniques, although the effects of both methods were almost lost after 6 months. Selective and/or combined application of this technique may enhance the current approach to facial rejuvenation with dermal fillers. PMID:26893992

  7. Perpendicular Strut Injection of Hyaluronic Acid Filler for Deep Wrinkles.

    PubMed

    Mashiko, Takanobu; Kinoshita, Kahori; Kanayama, Koji; Feng, Jingwei; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2015-11-01

    Although various injection techniques of hyaluronic acid (HA) filler for facial rejuvenation have been developed, correction of deep wrinkles/grooves, such as the nasolabial fold (NLF), with intradermal or subdermal injections remains difficult. We tested the intradermal HA injection method to place multiple HA struts by (1) inserting a small needle perpendicularly to the wrinkle and (2) injecting HA as intradermal struts with the skin fully stretched by the practitioner's fingers. The results of both NLFs in 10 patients suggest that this technique improves NLFs and maintain the effects more consistently than conventional techniques, although the effects of both methods were almost lost after 6 months. Selective and/or combined application of this technique may enhance the current approach to facial rejuvenation with dermal fillers. PMID:26893992

  8. Complications of facial fillers: resource implications for NHS hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hachach-Haram, Nadine; Gregori, Marco; Kirkpatrick, Niall; Young, Richard; Collier, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Facial rejuvenation seeks to reverse the negative sequelae of multiple factors but most importantly of genetic predisposition, sun damage and smoking. With the advent of the so-called ‘non-surgical’ techniques, and perhaps fuelled by these austere times, volumetric facial augmentation using dermal fillers has soared in popularity among both patients and practitioners. However, legislation has yet to keep pace with the change in clinical practices leaving patients poorly informed and with no protection against unscrupulous suppliers and unregulated practitioners. When things go wrong, patients often turn to the National Health Service (NHS) to rectify both the acute and chronic sequelae resulting in potentially difficult ethical and resource implications. Here, we report one of an increasing number of cases presenting to our NHS craniofacial service with acute filler-related complications. PMID:23362071

  9. Filler segmentation of SEM paper images based on mathematical morphology.

    PubMed

    Ait Kbir, M; Benslimane, Rachid; Princi, Elisabetta; Vicini, Silvia; Pedemonte, Enrico

    2007-07-01

    Recent developments in microscopy and image processing have made digital measurements on high-resolution images of fibrous materials possible. This helps to gain a better understanding of the structure and other properties of the material at micro level. In this paper SEM image segmentation based on mathematical morphology is proposed. In fact, paper models images (Whatman, Murillo, Watercolor, Newsprint paper) selected in the context of the Euro Mediterranean PaperTech Project have different distributions of fibers and fillers, caused by the presence of SiAl and CaCO3 particles. It is a microscopy challenge to make filler particles in the sheet distinguishable from the other components of the paper surface. This objectif is reached here by using switable strutural elements and mathematical morphology operators. PMID:17867540

  10. Laser Transmission Welding of CFRTP Using Filler Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Stefan; Schmidt, Michael

    In the automotive industry the increasing environmental awareness is reflected through consistent lightweight construction. Especially the use of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastics (CFRTP) plays an increasingly important role. Accordingto the material substitution, the demand for adequate joining technologies is growing. Therefore, laser transmission welding with filler material provides a way to combine two opaque joining partners by using process specific advantages of the laser transmission welding process. After introducing the new processing variant and the used experimental setup, this paper investigates the process itselfand conditions for a stable process. The influence of the used process parameters on weld quality and process stability is characterized by tensile shear tests. The successfully performed joining of PA 6 CF 42 organic sheets using natural PA 6 as filler material underlines the potential of the described joining method for lightweight design and other industrial applications.

  11. Mechanical performance of reactive-air-brazed (RAB) ceramic/metal joints for solid oxide fuel cells at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, B.; Wetzel, F. J.; Malzbender, J.; Steinbrech, R. W.; Singheiser, L.

    Mechanical integrity of the sealants in planar SOFC stacks is a key prerequisite for reliable operation. In this respect joining with metals rather than brittle glass-ceramics is considered to have advantages. Hence, as one of the joining solutions for SOFCs of planar design, reactive air brazing of ceramic cells into metallic frames gains increasing interest. Fracture experiments are carried out to characterize fracture energy and failure mechanisms of silver-based reactive-air-brazes, used for joining the zirconia electrolytes of anode supported planar cells with metallic Crofer22APU frames. The specimens are mechanically tested in notched beam bending geometry. In-situ observation in optical and SEM resolution reveals specific failure mechanisms. The influence of braze formulation and associated interfacial reactions on the crack path location is addressed. Discussion of the results focuses in particular on the role of oxide scale formation.

  12. Polymer Filler Aging and Failure Studied by Lateral Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ratto, T; Saab, A P

    2009-05-27

    In the present work, we study, via force microscopy, the basic physical interactions of a single bead of silica filler with a PDMS matrix both before and after exposure to gamma radiation. Our goal was to confirm our results from last year, and to explore force microscopy as a means of obtaining particle-scale polymer/filler interactions suitable for use as empirical inputs to a computational model consisting of an ensemble of silica beads embedded in a PDMS matrix. Through careful calibration of a conventional atomic force microscope, we obtained both normal and lateral force data that was fitted to yield adhesion, surface shear modulus, and friction of a 1 {micro}m silica bead in contact with PDMS layers of various thickness. Comparison of these terms before and after gamma exposure indicated that initially, radiation exposure lead to softening of the PDMS, but eventually resulted in stiffening. Simultaneously, adhesion between the polymer and silica decreased. This could indicate a serious failure path for filled PDMS exposed to radiation, whereby stiffening of the bulk polymer leads to loss of compressive elastic behavior, while a decrease in polymer filler adhesion results in an increased likelihood of stress failure under load. In addition to further testing of radiation damaged polymers, we also performed FEA modeling of silica beads in a silicone matrix using the shear modulus and adhesion values isolated from the force microscopy experiments as model inputs. The resulting simulation indicated that as a polymer stiffens due to impinging radiation, it also undergoes weakening of adhesion to the filler. The implication is that radiation induces a compound failure mode in filled polymer systems.

  13. Injectable carboxymethylcellulose hydrogels for soft tissue filler applications.

    PubMed

    Varma, Devika M; Gold, Gittel T; Taub, Peter J; Nicoll, Steven B

    2014-12-01

    Disease, trauma and aging all lead to deficits in soft tissue. As a result, there is a need to develop materials that safely and effectively restore areas of deficiency. While autogenous fat is the current gold standard, hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers are commonly used. However, the animal and bacterial origin of HA-based materials can induce adverse reactions in patients. With the aim of developing a safer and more affordable alternative, this study characterized the properties of a plant-derived, injectable carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) soft tissue filler. Specifically, methacrylated CMC was synthesized and crosslinked to form stable hydrogels at varying macromer concentrations (2-4% w/v) using an ammonium persulfate and ascorbic acid redox initiation system. The equilibrium Young's modulus was shown to vary with macromer concentration (ranging from ∼2 to 9.25kPa), comparable to values of native soft tissue and current surgical fillers. The swelling properties were similarly affected by macromer concentration, with 4% gels exhibiting the lowest swelling ratio and mesh size, and highest crosslinking density. Rheological analysis was performed to determine gelation onset and completion, and was measured to be within the ISO standard for injectable materials. In addition, hydrolytic degradation of these gels was sensitive to macromer concentration, while selective removal using enzymatic treatment was also demonstrated. Moreover, favorable cytocompatibility of the CMC hydrogels was exhibited by co-culture with human dermal fibroblasts. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the tunability of redox-crosslinked CMC hydrogels by varying fabrication parameters, making them a versatile platform for soft tissue filler applications. PMID:25152355

  14. Long-term complications associated with permanent dermal fillers.

    PubMed

    Kunjur, Jayanth; Witherow, Helen

    2013-12-01

    We report a case series of patients with serious long-term complications associated with the injection of permanent dermal fillers. Although such complications are relatively rare, the consequences are potentially life-long, and the psychological and medical effects can often have a profound impact on the patient. The continued routine offering of these treatments will require doctors to communicate effectively with patients about the nature of the complications and the probability of risk compared with alternative treatments. PMID:23962591

  15. The Aging Face: Global Approach With Fillers and Neuromodulators.

    PubMed

    Solish, Nowell

    2016-06-01

    The goal of treating the aging face is to restore facial balance and modify shadows. A facial evaluation should focus on areas of volume loss and opportunities to use neuromodulators (eg, botulinum toxin A) and the use of fillers. A thorough understanding of facial anatomy, including muscles, nerves, bone, and fat pads, is essential for effective and safe treatment. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp6):S120-S121. PMID:27537350

  16. A concept for improved fire-safety through coated fillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K.

    1977-01-01

    A possible method is examined for obtaining a high value of thermal conductivity before ignition and a low value after ignition in standard composite materials. The idea is to coat fiberglass, alumina trihydrate, and similar fillers with specially selected chemicals prior to using polymer resins. The amount of the coat constitutes typically less than 5% of the material's total weight. The experimental results obtained are consistent with the basic concept.

  17. Nanostructures and dynamics of macromolecules bound to attractive filler surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Tad; Barkley, Deborah; Jiang, Naisheng; Endoh, Maya; Masui, Tomomi; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Nagao, Michihiro; Satija, Sushil; Taniguchi, Takashi

    We report in-situ nanostructures and dynamics of polybutadiene (PB) chains bound to carbon black (CB) fillers (the so-called ``bound polymer layer (BPL)'') in a good solvent. The BPL on the CB fillers were extracted by solvent leaching of a CB-filled PB compound and subsequently dispersed in deuterated toluene to label the BPL for small-angle neutron scattering and neutron spin echo techniques. Intriguingly, the results demonstrate that the BPL is composed of two regions regardless of molecular weights of PB: the inner unswollen region of ~ 0.5 nm thick and outer swollen region where the polymer chains display a parabolic profile with a diffuse tail. This two-layer formation on the filler surface is similar to that reported for polymer chains adsorbed on planar substrates from melts. In addition, the results show that the dynamics of the swollen bound chains can be explained by the so-called ``breathing mode'' and is generalized with the thickness of the swollen BPL. Furthermore, we will discuss how the breathing collective dynamics is affected by the presence of polymer chains in a matrix solution. We acknowledge the financial support from NSF Grant No. CMMI-1332499.

  18. NANOSCALE BOEHMITE FILLER FOR CORROSION AND WEAR RESISTANT POLYPHENYLENESULFIDE COATINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.

    2003-06-26

    The authors evaluated the usefulness of nanoscale boehmite crystals as a filler for anti-wear and anti-corrosion polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) coatings exposed to a very harsh, 300 C corrosive geothermal environment. The boehmite fillers dispersed uniformly into the PPS coating, conferring two advanced properties: First, they reduced markedly the rate of blasting wear; second, they increased the PPS's glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature. The wear rate of PPS surfaces was reduced three times when 5wt% boehmite was incorporated into the PPS. During exposure for 15 days at 300 C, the PPS underwent hydrothermal oxidation, leading to the substitution of sulfide linkages by the sulfite linkages. However, such molecular alteration did not significantly diminish the ability of the coating to protect carbon steel against corrosion. In fact, PPS coating filled with boehmite of {le} 5wt% adequately mitigated its corrosion in brine at 300 C. One concern in using this filler was that it absorbs brine. Thus, adding an excess amount of boehmite was detrimental to achieving the maximum protection afforded by the coatings.

  19. Evaluation of rice husk ash as filler in tread compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, M. R. S.; Furtado, C. R. G. E-mail: ana.furtado.sousa@gmail.com; Sousa, A. M. F. de E-mail: ana.furtado.sousa@gmail.com

    2014-05-15

    Rice which is one of the largest agriculture crops produces around 22% of rice rusk during its milling process. This material is mainly used as fuel for energy generation, which results in an ash, which disposal represents an environmental issue. The rice husk ash (RHA) contains over than 70% of silica in an amorphous form and a lot of applications is being developed for it all over the world. The use of silica as a filler in the tire industry is growing since it contributes significantly to the reduction of fuel consumption of the automobiles, allowing at the same time better traction (safety). This paper presents an evaluation of the use of RHA as filler in rubber tread compounds prepared in lab scale and compares its performance with compounds prepared with commercial silica and carbon black, the fillers normally used in tire industry. Mechanical and rheological properties are evaluated, with emphasis for tan delta as an indicator of tread performance related with rolling resistance (fuel consumption) and wet grip/traction (safety)

  20. Evaluation of rice husk ash as filler in tread compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, M. R. S.; Furtado, C. R. G.; de Sousa, A. M. F.

    2014-05-01

    Rice which is one of the largest agriculture crops produces around 22% of rice rusk during its milling process. This material is mainly used as fuel for energy generation, which results in an ash, which disposal represents an environmental issue. The rice husk ash (RHA) contains over than 70% of silica in an amorphous form and a lot of applications is being developed for it all over the world. The use of silica as a filler in the tire industry is growing since it contributes significantly to the reduction of fuel consumption of the automobiles, allowing at the same time better traction (safety). This paper presents an evaluation of the use of RHA as filler in rubber tread compounds prepared in lab scale and compares its performance with compounds prepared with commercial silica and carbon black, the fillers normally used in tire industry. Mechanical and rheological properties are evaluated, with emphasis for tan delta as an indicator of tread performance related with rolling resistance (fuel consumption) and wet grip/traction (safety).

  1. Electrically insulating thermal nano-oils using 2D fillers.

    PubMed

    Taha-Tijerina, Jaime; Narayanan, Tharangattu N; Gao, Guanhui; Rohde, Matthew; Tsentalovich, Dmitri A; Pasquali, Matteo; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2012-02-28

    Different nanoscale fillers have been used to create composite fluids for applications such as thermal management. The ever increasing thermal loads in applications now require advanced operational fluids, for example, high thermal conductivity dielectric oils in transformers. These oils require excellent filler dispersion, high thermal conduction, but also electrical insulation. Such thermal oils that conform to this thermal/electrical requirement, and yet remain in highly suspended stable state, have not yet been synthesized. We report here the synthesis and characterization of stable high thermal conductivity Newtonian nanofluids using exfoliated layers of hexagonal boron nitride in oil without compromising its electrically insulating property. Two-dimensional nanosheets of hexagonal boron nitride are liquid exfoliated in isopropyl alcohol and redispersed in mineral oil, used as standard transformer oil, forming stable nanosuspensions with high shelf life. A high electrical resistivity, even higher than that of the base oil, is maintained for the nano-oil containing small weight fraction of the filler (0.01 wt %), whereas the thermal conductivity was enhanced. The low dissipation factor and high pour point for this nano-oil suggests several applications in thermal management. PMID:22268368

  2. Lymphedema fat graft: an ideal filler for facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Nicoli, Fabio; Chilgar, Ram M; Sapountzis, Stamatis; Lazzeri, Davide; Sze Wei, Matthew Yeo; Ciudad, Pedro; Nicoli, Marzia; Lim, Seong Yoon; Chen, Pei-Yu; Constantinides, Joannis; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2014-09-01

    Lymphedema is a chronic disorder characterized by lymph stasis in the subcutaneous tissue. Lymphatic fluid contains several components including hyaluronic acid and has many important properties. Over the past few years, significant research has been performed to identify an ideal tissue to implant as a filler. Because of its unique composition, fat harvested from the lymphedema tissue is an interesting topic for investigation and has significant potential for application as a filler, particularly in facial rejuvenation. Over a 36-month period, we treated and assessed 8 patients with lymphedematous limbs who concurrently underwent facial rejuvenation with lymphedema fat (LF). We conducted a pre- and post-operative satisfaction questionnaire survey and a histological assessment of the harvested LF fat. The overall mean general appearance score at an average of 6 months after the procedure was 7.2±0.5, demonstrating great improvement. Patients reported significant improvement in their skin texture with a reading of 8.5±0.7 and an improvement in their self-esteem. This study demonstrates that LF as an ideal autologous injectable filler is clinically applicable and easily available in patients with lymphedema. We recommend the further study and clinical use of this tissue as it exhibits important properties and qualities for future applications and research. PMID:25276654

  3. Erosion of tungsten and its brazed joints with bronze irradiated by pulsed deuterium plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushin, V.; Polsky, V.; Kalin, B.; Dzhumaev, P.; Polyansky, A.; Sevryukov, O.; Suchkov, A.; Fedotov, V.

    2013-11-01

    This work presents results on erosion of mono- and polycrystalline tungsten and its brazed joints with bronze substrates under irradiation by high-temperature pulsed (τp ˜ 20 μs) deuterium plasma flows, with a power density q = 19-66 GW/m2 and pulses numbering from 2 to 10, simulating the expected plasma disruptions and ELMs in fusion reactors. The surface erosion and heat resistance of tungsten and brazed joints were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, and erosion coefficients were determined by target mass loss. It is found that for both types of tungsten the surface starts to significantly crack even under relatively weak irradiation regimes (q = 19 GW/m2, N = 2), at which point surface melting is not observed. Local melting becomes visible with an increase of q up to 25 GW/m2. In addition, there is formation of blisters with a typical size of 1-2 μm on the surface of monocrystalline samples and craters up to 2 μm in diameter on polycrystalline samples. In addition, craters ˜10-30 μm in diameter are formed on defects similar to those observed under unipolar arcs. At that point, the erosion coefficients change to within ranges of 0.2-0.7 × 10-5 kg/J m2. It is found that at q = 50 GW/m2, the brazed joints of monocrystalline tungsten with bronze of Cu-0.6% Cr-0.08% Zr have the highest heat resistance.

  4. Potential and limitations of microanalysis SEM techniques to characterize borides in brazed Ni-based superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Vargas, J.; Siredey-Schwaller, N.; Noyrez, P.; Mathieu, S.; Bocher, P.; and others

    2014-08-15

    Brazed Ni-based superalloys containing complex phases of different Boron contents remain difficult to characterize at the micrometer scale. Indeed Boron is a light element difficult to measure precisely. The state-of-the-art microanalysis systems have been tested on a single crystal MC2 based metal brazed with BNi-2 alloy to identify boride precipitates. Effort has been made to evaluate the accuracy in Boron quantitation. Energy-dispersive and wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy attached to a Scanning Electron Microscope have first been used to determine the elemental composition of Boron-free phases, and then applied to various types of borides. Results have been compared to the ones obtained using a dedicated electron probe microanalysis, considered here as the reference technique. The most accurate method to quantify Boron using EDS is definitely by composition difference. A precision of 5 at.% could be achieved with optimized data acquisition and post-processing schemes. Attempts that aimed at directly quantifying Boron with various standards using EDS or coupled EDS/WDS gave less accurate results. Ultimately, Electron Backscatter Diffraction combined with localized EDS analysis has proved invaluable in conclusively identifying micrometer sized boride precipitates; thus further improving the characterization of brazed Ni-based superalloys. - Highlights: • We attempt to accurately identify Boron-rich phases in Ni-based superalloys. • EDS, WDS, EBSD systems are tested for accurate identification of these borides. • Results are compared with those obtained by electron probe microanalysis. • Boron was measured with EDS by composition difference with a precision of 5 at. %. • Additional EBSD in phase identification mode conclusively identifies the borides.

  5. Adhesive bonding and brazing of nanocrystalline diamond foil onto different substrate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodes, Matthias A.; Sailer, Stefan; Rosiwal, Stefan M.; Singer, Robert F.

    2013-10-01

    Diamond coatings are used in heavily stressed industrial applications to reduce friction and wear. Hot-filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) is the favourable coating method, as it allows a coating of large surface areas with high homogeneity. Due to the high temperatures occurring in this CVD-process, the selection of substrate materials is limited. With the desire to coat light materials, steels and polymers a new approach has been developed. First, by using temperature-stable templates in the HFCVD and stripping off the diamond layer afterwards, a flexible, up to 150 μm thick and free standing nanocrystalline diamond foil (NCDF) can be produced. Afterwards, these NCDF can be applied on technical components through bonding and brazing, allowing any material as substrate. This two-step process offers the possibility to join a diamond layer on any desired surface. With a modified scratch test and Rockwell indentation testing the adhesion strength of NCDF on aluminium and steel is analysed. The results show that sufficient adhesion strength is reached both on steel and aluminium. The thermal stress in the substrates is very low and if failure occurs, cracks grow undercritically. Adhesion strength is even higher for the brazed samples, but here crack growth is critical, delaminating the diamond layer to some extent. In comparison to a sample directly coated with diamond, using a high-temperature CVD interlayer, the brazed as well as the adhesively bonded samples show very good performance, proving their competitiveness. A high support of the bonding layer could be identified as crucial, though in some cases a lower stiffness of the latter might be acceptable considering the possibility to completely avoid thermal stresses which occur during joining at higher temperatures.

  6. Tensile properties of thin Au-Ni brazes between strong base materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tolle, M.C.; Kassner, M.E. )

    1991-12-01

    It has long been known that when relatively strong base materials are joined by thin, soft, interlayer metals such as with brazing or various solid state joining processes, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the bond may be several factors higher than the UTS of the bulk, or unconstrained, interlayer metals. However, earlier work reported by the authors confirmed that delayed or creep'' failure of the bond may occur at stresses much less than the UTS. It was found that for thin silver interlayers, prepared by brazing and physical vapor deposition (PVD), joining elastically deforming base materials (i.e. no measurable plastic deformation occurs in the base metal at the applied stresses), the ambient (and near-ambient) temperature time to failure is controlled by the creep rate of the silver interlayer which is determined by the effective stress within the interlayer. The plastic deformation within the interlayer causes cavity nucleation which continues until the concentration of nuclei is sufficiently high to lead to instability and eventual failure. The delayed failure may be accelerated by base material creep resulting from the effective stress in the base material. Plastic deformation in the base metal causes corresponding deformation in the interlayer, and cavities nucleate as with elastic base metal case. The delayed failure phenomenon was confirmed by the authors only for silver interlayers; other compositions were not tested. In this study, maraging steel was joined with an Au-Ni braze alloy with 57.5 at. % Au and 42.5 at. % Ni. The microstructure is expected to be a refined two-phase (spinodal) alloy with higher strength than the PVD silver of our previous investigation.

  7. Tensile properties of thin Au-Ni brazes between strong base materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tolle, M.C.; Kassner, M.E.

    1991-12-01

    It has long been known that when relatively strong base materials are joined by thin, soft, interlayer metals such as with brazing or various solid state joining processes, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the bond may be several factors higher than the UTS of the bulk, or unconstrained, interlayer metals. However, earlier work reported by the authors confirmed that delayed or ``creep`` failure of the bond may occur at stresses much less than the UTS. It was found that for thin silver interlayers, prepared by brazing and physical vapor deposition (PVD), joining elastically deforming base materials (i.e. no measurable plastic deformation occurs in the base metal at the applied stresses), the ambient (and near-ambient) temperature time to failure is controlled by the creep rate of the silver interlayer which is determined by the effective stress within the interlayer. The plastic deformation within the interlayer causes cavity nucleation which continues until the concentration of nuclei is sufficiently high to lead to instability and eventual failure. The delayed failure may be accelerated by base material creep resulting from the effective stress in the base material. Plastic deformation in the base metal causes corresponding deformation in the interlayer, and cavities nucleate as with elastic base metal case. The delayed failure phenomenon was confirmed by the authors only for silver interlayers; other compositions were not tested. In this study, maraging steel was joined with an Au-Ni braze alloy with 57.5 at. % Au and 42.5 at. % Ni. The microstructure is expected to be a refined two-phase (spinodal) alloy with higher strength than the PVD silver of our previous investigation.

  8. Note: Magnification of a polarization angle with a Littrow layout brazed grating

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, H. Kubo, H.; Kawano, Y.; Itami, K.; Arakawa, H.

    2014-08-15

    A new method to magnify a small polarization angle with brazed gratings has been developed. In the method, difference in diffraction efficiency for S and P polarization components is used. The magnification dependence on the incident angle can be small by arranging the grating in Littrow layout. A magnification with a factor ∼2.7 has been demonstrated for a 10.6 μm CO{sub 2} laser beam as expected from a calculation. The method is applicable in many polarimetry fields.

  9. Simulation and experiment of packaging of the fibre Bragg grating sensors using brazing/soldering methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Changjin; Li, Yulong; Hu, Ronghua; Xu, Jianning

    2016-08-01

    To manufacture fibre Bragg grating (FBG) transducer, finite element model simulation and experimental verification of packaging of the FBG by brazing/soldering were investigated. The packaging processes and their impacts on the wavelength change of FBG were analysed. Simulation results showed that the Bragg wavelength of packaged FBG shifted down a level of ~10 nm. For experimental verification, temperature sensitivity of the packaged FBG was enhanced about twice of the bare FBG, while its spectrum was well preserved. The Bragg wavelength was shifted down a level of ~10 nm which was in accordance with the simulation.

  10. Investigation of welding and brazing of molybdenum and TZM alloy tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundblad, Wayne E.

    1991-01-01

    This effort involved investigating the welding and brazing techniques of molybdenum tubes to be used as cartridges in the crystal growth cartridge. Information is given in the form of charts and photomicrographs. It was found that the recrystallization temperature of molybdenum can be increased by alloying it with 0.5 percent titanium and 0.1 percent zirconium. Recrystallization temperatures for this alloy, known as TZM, become significant around 2500 F. A series of microhardness tests were run on samples of virgin and heat soaked TZM. The test results are given in tabular form. It was concluded that powder metallurgy TZM may be an acceptable cartridge material.

  11. Automating a precision braze paste dispensing operation using non- contact sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, D; Novak, J; Maslakowski, J; Thiele, A

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a collaborative effort between Sandia National Laboratories and the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation to develop an automated braze paste dispensing system for rocket engine nozzle manufacturing. The motivation for automating this manufacturing process is to reduce the amount of labor and excess material required. A critical requirement for this system is the automatic location of key nozzle features using non-contact sensors. Sandia has demonstrated that the low-cost Multi-Axis Seam Tracking (MAST) capacitive sensor can be used to accurately locate the nozzle surface and tube gaps.

  12. Molded polymer-coated composite bone void filler improves tobramycin controlled release kinetics.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Benjamin D; Sinclair, Kristofer D; Davidoff, Sherry N; Lawson, Scott; Williams, Alex G; Coats, Brittany; Grainger, David W; Brooks, Amanda E

    2014-07-01

    Infection remains a significant problem associated with biomedical implants and orthopedic surgeries, especially in revision total joint replacements. Recent advances in antibiotic-releasing bone void fillers (BVF) provide new opportunities to address these types of device-related orthopedic infections that often lead to substantial economic burdens and reduced quality of life. We report improvements made in fabrication and scalability of an antibiotic-releasing polycaprolactone-calcium carbonate/phosphate ceramic composite BVF using a new solvent-free, molten-cast fabrication process. This strategy provides the ability to tailor drug release kinetics from the BVF composite based on modifications of the inorganic substrate and/or the polymeric component, allowing extended tobramycin release at bactericidal concentrations. The mechanical properties of the new BVF composite are comparable to many reported BVFs and validate the relative homogeneity of fabrication. Most importantly, fabrication quality controls are correlated with favorable drug release kinetics, providing bactericidal activity to 10 weeks in vitro when the polycaprolactone component exceeds 98% w/w of the total polymer fraction. Furthermore, in a time kill study, tobramycin-releasing composite fragments inhibited S. aureus growth over 48 h at inoculums as high as 10(9) CFU/mL. This customizable antibiotic-releasing BVF polymer-inorganic biomaterial should provide osseointegrative and osteoconductive properties while contributing antimicrobial protection to orthopedic sites requiring the use of bone void fillers. PMID:24376164

  13. Battery plate containing filler with conductive coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The plate (10) comprises a matrix or binder resin phase (12) in which is dispersed particulate, conductive tin oxide such as tin oxide coated glass fibers (14). A monopolar plate (11) is prepared by coating a layer (18) of electrolytically active material onto a surface of the plate (10). Tin oxide is prevented from reduction by coating a surface of the plate (10) with a conductive, impervious layer resistant to reduction such as a thin film (22) of lead adhered to the plate with a layer (21) of conductive adhesive. The plate (10) can be formed by casting a molten dispersion from mixer (36) onto a sheet (30) of lead foil or by passing an assembly of a sheet (41) of resin, a sheet (43) of fiberglass and a sheet (45) of lead between the nip of heated rollers (48, 50).

  14. Battery plate containing filler with conductive coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The plate (10) comprises a matrix or binder resin phase (12) in which is dispersed particulate, conductive tin oxide such as tin oxide coated glass fibers (14). A monopolar plate (11) is prepared by coating a layer (18) of electrolytically active material onto a surface of the plate (10). Tin oxide is prevented from reduction by coating a surface of the plate (10) with a conductive, impervious layer resistant to reduction such as a thin film (22) of lead adhered to the plate with a layer (21) of conductive adhesive. The plate (10) can be formed by casting a molten dispersion from mixer (36) onto a sheet (30) of lead foil or by passing an assembly of a sheet (41) of resin, a sheet (43) of fiberglass and a sheet (45) of lead between the nip of heated rollers (48, 50).

  15. Reactive hydroxyapatite fillers for pectin biocomposites.

    PubMed

    Munarin, Fabiola; Petrini, Paola; Barcellona, Giulia; Roversi, Tommaso; Piazza, Laura; Visai, Livia; Tanzi, Maria Cristina

    2014-12-01

    In this work, a novel injectable biocomposite hydrogel is produced by internal gelation, using pectin as organic matrix and hydroxyapatite either as crosslinking agent and inorganic reinforcement. Tunable gelling kinetics and rheological properties are obtained varying the hydrogels' composition, with the final aim of developing systems for cell immobilization. The reversibility by dissolution of pectin-hydroxyapatite hydrogels is achieved with saline solutions, to possibly accelerate the release of the cells or active agents immobilized. Texture analysis confirms the possibility of extruding the biocomposites from needles with diameters from 20 G to 30 G, indicating that they can be implanted with minimally-invasive approaches, minimizing the pain during injection and the side effects of the open surgery. L929 fibroblasts entrapped in the hydrogels survive to the immobilization procedure and exhibit high cell viability. On the overall, these systems result to be suitable supports for the immobilization of cells for tissue regeneration applications. PMID:25491814

  16. Effect of presilanization filler decontamination on aesthetics and degradation resistance of resin composites.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Shirai, Kenichi; Shintani, Hideaki; Okazaki, Masayuki; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2002-12-01

    Filler-matrix coupling determines, to a large extent, the mechanical strength and clinical longevity of dental composites. The aim of this study was to examine how far a methodology to decontaminate filler prior to silanization may improve aesthetic performance in addition to physico-mechanical properties such as degradation resistance. It was reported that filler particles are surrounded and wrapped by a film that consists of multiple layers of silane molecules. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, however, revealed that silanization of filler particles largely depended upon siloxane bridge (Si-O-Si) formation between the silica surface and the silane molecule rather than on intermolecular bonding between adjacent silane molecules. In this study, we showed that filler decontamination resulted in a higher translucency, thereby providing a better aesthetic potential. In addition, experimental composites produced following presilanization decontamination of filler revealed a higher Vickers hardness value and a diametral tensile strength that was resistant to degradation by thermo-cycling. PMID:12608427

  17. New fillers under consideration: what is the future of injectable aesthetics?

    PubMed

    Rivkin, Alexander

    2009-05-01

    The past 5 years in the United States have seen an explosion in the popularity of noninvasive aesthetic procedures. Not only have fillers and Botox turned out to be fantastically reliable and effective aesthetic tools, but also they have vastly expanded the accessibility of cosmetic procedures. Our cosmetic filler options are growing quickly as more and more fillers are coming before the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), seeking entry into the lucrative U.S. market. This article outlines the approval process that foreign fillers go through in their home countries and gives an idea of the fillers that are currently under consideration by the FDA. As our armamentarium of injectable fillers grows, it will be essential to know each product's strengths and weaknesses so that we can provide our patients with the best possible aesthetic results. PMID:19415580

  18. The Effect of Post-grinding Heat Treatment of Alumina and Ag-Cu-Ti Braze Preform Thickness on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Alumina-to-Alumina-Brazed Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassam, Tahsin Ali; Nadendla, Hari Babu; Ludford, Nicholas; Buisman, Iris

    2016-05-01

    Alumina-to-alumina-brazed joints were formed using 96.0 and 99.7 wt.% Al2O3 and TICUSIL® (68.8Ag-26.7Cu-4.5Ti wt.%) preforms of different thicknesses. Brazing was conducted in a vacuum of 1 × 10-5 mbar at 850 °C for 10 minutes. Joint strengths were evaluated using four-point bend testing and were compared to flexural strengths of standard test bars. Post-grinding heat treatment, performed at 1550 °C for 1 hour, did not affect the average surface roughness or grain size of either grades of alumina but affected their average flexural strengths with a small increase for 96.0 wt.% Al2O3 and a small decrease for 99.7 wt.% Al2O3. As the TICUSIL® preform thickness was increased from 50 to 100 µm, the average strengths of both 96.0 and 99.7 wt.% Al2O3 brazed joints improved. Joints made using 100-µm-thick TICUSIL® preforms predominantly consisted of Cu-Ti phases which formed due to excess Ti in the interlayers and non-uniform Ag-rich outflow. Brazed joints of 96.0 wt.% Al2O3 made using 100-µm-thick TICUSIL® preforms achieved an average joint strength of 238 MPa with consistent failure in the ceramic.

  19. Phase constitution in the interfacial region of laser penetration brazed magnesium–steel joints

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yugang; Han, Duanfeng Xu, Xiangfang; Wu, Bintao

    2014-07-01

    The phase constitution in the interfacial region of laser penetration brazed magnesium–steel joints was investigated using electron microscopy. From the distribution of elements, the transition zone was mainly composed of elements Mg and Fe along with some Al and O. Furthermore, the transition layer consisted mainly of intermetallic compounds and metal oxides. The compounds were identified as Al-rich phases, such as Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12}, Mg{sub 2}Al{sub 3}, FeAl and Fe{sub 4}Al{sub 13}. More noteworthy was that the thickness of the transition layer was determined by Fe–Al compounds. The presence of FeAl and Fe{sub 4}Al{sub 13} was a result of the complex processes that were associated with the interfacial reaction of solid steel and liquid Mg–Al alloy. - Highlights: • A technology of laser penetration brazed Mg alloy and steel has been developed. • The interface of Mg/Fe dissimilar joints was investigated using electron microscopy. • The transition layer consisted of intermetallic compounds and metal oxides. • Moreover, the thickness of transition layer was determined by Fe/Al compounds. • The presence of FeAl and Fe{sub 4}Al{sub 13} was associated with the interfacial reaction.

  20. Elevated temperature behavior of superplastically formed/weld-brazed titanium compression panels having advanced shaped stiffeners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royster, D. M.; Bales, T. T.

    1983-01-01

    The 316 C (600 F) buckling behavior of superplastically formed/weld-brazed titanium compression panels having advanced shaped stiffeners was investigated. Fabrication of the advanced shaped stiffeners was made possible by the increased formability afforded by the superplasticity characteristics of the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. Stiffeners having the configurations of a conventional hat, a beaded web, a modified beaded web, a ribbed web, and a stepped web were investigated. The data from the panel tests include load-shortening curves, local buckling strengths, and failure loads. The superplastic formed/weld-brazed panels with the ribbed web and stepped web stiffeners developed 25 and 27 percent higher buckling strengths at 316 C (600 F) than panels with conventionally shaped stiffeners. The buckling load reductions for panels tested at 316 C (600 F), compared with panels tested at room temperature, were in agreement with predictions based on titanium material property data. The advantage that higher buckling loads can be readily achieved by superplastically forming of advanced stiffener shapes was demonstrated. Application of these advanced stiffener shapes offers the potential to achieve substantial weight savings in aerospace vehicles.